Sample records for genetically modified potato

  1. Zeaxanthin is bioavailable from genetically modified zeaxanthin-rich potatoes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Achim Bub; Jutta Möseneder; Gerhard Wenzel; Gerhard Rechkemmer; Karlis Briviba

    2008-01-01

    The carotenoid zeaxanthin accumulates in the human macula lutea and protects retinal cells from blue light damage. However,\\u000a zeaxanthin intake from food sources is low. Increasing zeaxanthin in common foods such as potatoes by traditional plant breeding\\u000a or by genetic engineering could contribute to an increased intake of this carotenoid and, consequently, to a decreased risk\\u000a of age-related macular degeneration.

  2. Evaluation of the sensitization rates and identification of IgE-binding components in wild and genetically modified potatoes in patients with allergic disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Soo-Keol Lee; Young-Min Ye; Sung-Ho Yoon; Bou-Oung Lee; Seung-Hyun Kim; Hae-Sim Park

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The potato is one of the most common types of genetically modified (GM) food. However, there are no published data evaluating the impact of genetic manipulations on the allergenicity of GM potatoes. To compare the allergenicity of GM potatoes with that of wild-type potatoes using in vivo and in vitro methods in adult allergy patients sensitized to potatoes. METHODS:

  3. Structural characteristics and plant-beneficial effects of bacteria colonizing the shoots of field grown conventional and genetically modified T4-lysozyme producing potatoes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Rasche; Ester Marco-Noales; Henk Velvis; Leo S. van Overbeek; María M. López; Jan D. van Elsas; Angela Sessitsch

    2006-01-01

    Genetically modified potatoes expressing antibacterial protein T4 lysozyme may offer effective control strategies for bacterial pathogens causing severe potato diseases. Apart from this beneficial effect, it is very important to investigate such engineered potatoes carefully for potential adverse effects on potato-associated bacteria which frequently exhibit plant beneficial functions such as plant growth promotion and antagonism towards pathogens invading the plant.

  4. Development of a certified reference material for genetically modified potato with altered starch composition.

    PubMed

    Broothaerts, Wim; Corbisier, Philippe; Emons, Hendrik; Emteborg, Håkan; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Trapmann, Stefanie

    2007-06-13

    The presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food and feed products is subject to regulation in the European Union (EU) and elsewhere. As part of the EU authorization procedure for GMOs intended for food and feed use, reference materials must be produced for the quality control of measurements to quantify the GMOs. Certified reference materials (CRMs) are available for a range of herbicide- and insect-resistant genetically modified crops such as corn, soybean, and cotton. Here the development of the first CRM for a GMO that differs from its non-GMO counterpart in a major compositional constituent, that is, starch, is described. It is shown that the modification of the starch composition of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, together with other characteristics of the delivered materials, have important consequences for the certification strategy. Moreover, the processing and characterization of the EH92-527-1 potato material required both new and modified procedures, different from those used routinely for CRMs produced from genetically modified seeds. PMID:17508757

  5. Different Selective Effects on Rhizosphere Bacteria Exerted by Genetically Modified versus Conventional Potato Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hannula, Silja Emilia; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Pereira e Silva, Michele de Cássia; Salles, Joana Falcão; de Boer, Wietse; van Veen, Johannes; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study, we assessed the actively metabolizing bacteria in the rhizosphere of potato using two potato cultivars, i.e. the genetically-modified (GM) cultivar Modena (having tubers with altered starch content) and the near-isogenic non-GM cultivar Karnico. To achieve our aims, we pulse-labelled plants at EC90 stage with 13C-CO2 and analysed their rhizosphere microbial communities 24 h, 5 and 12 days following the pulse. In the analyses, phospholipid fatty acid/stable isotope probing (PLFA-SIP) as well as RNA-SIP followed by reverse transcription and PCR-DGGE and clone library analysis, were used to determine the bacterial groups that actively respond to the root-released 13C labelled carbonaceous compounds. Methodology/Principal findings The PLFA-SIP data revealed major roles of bacteria in the uptake of root-released 13C carbon, which grossly increased with time. Gram-negative bacteria, including members of the genera Pseudomonas and Burkholderia, were strong accumulators of the 13C-labeled compounds at the two cultivars, whereas Gram-positive bacteria were lesser responders. PCR-DGGE analysis of cDNA produced from the two cultivar types showed that these had selected different bacterial, alpha- and betaproteobacterial communities at all time points. Moreover, an effect of time was observed, indicating dynamism in the structure of the active bacterial communities. PCR-DGGE as well as clone library analyses revealed that the main bacterial responders at cultivar Karnico were taxonomically affiliated with the genus Pseudomonas, next to Gluconacetobacter and Paracoccus. Cultivar Modena mainly attracted Burkholderia, next to Moraxella-like (Moraxellaceae family) and Sphingomonas types. Conclusions/Significance Based on the use of Pseudomonas and Burkholderia as proxies for differentially-selected bacterial genera, we conclude that the selective forces exerted by potato cultivar Modena on the active bacterial populations differed from those exerted by cultivar Karnico. PMID:23844136

  6. Effects of genetically modified potatoes with increased zeaxanthin content on the abundance and diversity of rhizobacteria with in vitro antagonistic activity do not exceed natural variability among cultivars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicole Weinert; Remo Meincke; Christine Gottwald; Viviane Radl; Xia Dong; Michael Schloter; Gabriele Berg; Kornelia Smalla

    2010-01-01

    To assess potential effects of genetically modified (GM) potatoes on the abundance and diversity of rhizobacteria with in\\u000a vitro antagonistic activity in relation to natural variability among cultivars, two GM potato lines accumulating the carotenoid\\u000a zeaxanthin in their tubers, the parental cultivar and four additional commercial cultivars were planted at two field sites\\u000a in Germany. Rhizosphere samples were taken at

  7. Potato genetics, genomics, and applications

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Potato has a variety of reproductive uniquenesses besides its clonal propagation by tubers. These traits are controlled by a different kind of genetic control. The reproductive information has been applied to enable interspecific hybridization to enhance valuable traits, such as disease and pest resistances, from the tuber-bearing Solanum gene pool. While progress has been made in potato breeding, many resources have been invested due to the requirements of large populations and long time frame. This is not only due to the general pitfalls in plant breeding, but also due to the complexity of polyploid genetics. Tetraploid genetics is the most prominent aspect associated with potato breeding. Genetic maps and markers have contributed to potato breeding, and genome information further elucidates questions in potato evolution and supports comprehensive potato breeding. Challenges yet remain on recognizing intellectual property rights to breeding and germplasm, and also on regulatory aspects to incorporate modern biotechnology for increasing genetic variation in potato breeding. PMID:25931980

  8. Assessing the potential for unintended effects in genetically modified potatoes perturbed in metabolic and developmental processes. Targeted analysis of key nutrients and anti-nutrients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louise V. T. Shepherd; James W. McNicol; Ruth Razzo; Mark A. Taylor; Howard V. Davies

    2006-01-01

    Targeted compositional analysis was carried out on transgenic potato tubers of either cultivar (cv.) Record or cv. Desirée\\u000a to assess the potential for unintended effects caused by the genetic modification process. The range of transgenic lines analysed\\u000a included those modified in primary carbohydrate metabolism, polyamine biosynthesis and glycoprotein processing. Controls included\\u000a wildtype tubers, tubers produced from plants regenerated through tissue

  9. Effects of genetically modified starch metabolism in potato plants on photosynthate fluxes into the rhizosphere and on microbial degraders of root exudates.

    PubMed

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Esperschütz, Jürgen; Buegger, Franz; Reichmann, Michael; Müller, Martin; Munch, Jean Charles; Schloter, Michael

    2011-06-01

    A high percentage of photosynthetically assimilated carbon is released into soil via root exudates, which are acknowledged as the most important factor for the development of microbial rhizosphere communities. As quality and quantity of root exudates are dependent on plant genotype, the genetic engineering of plants might also influence carbon partitioning within the plant and thus microbial rhizosphere community structure. In this study, the carbon allocation patterns within the plant-rhizosphere system of a genetically modified amylopectin-accumulating potato line (Solanum tuberosum L.) were linked to microbial degraders of root exudates under greenhouse conditions, using (13)C-CO(2) pulse-chase labelling in combination with phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. In addition, GM plants were compared with the parental cultivar as well as a second potato cultivar obtained by classical breeding. Rhizosphere samples were obtained during young leaf developmental and flowering stages. (13)C allocation in aboveground plant biomass, water-extractable organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon and PLFA as well as the microbial community structure in the rhizosphere varied significantly between the natural potato cultivars. However, no differences between the GM line and its parental cultivar were observed. Besides the considerable impact of plant cultivar, the plant developmental stage affected carbon partitioning via the plant into the rhizosphere and, subsequently, microbial communities involved in the transformation of root exudates. PMID:21348886

  10. Genetically modified.

    PubMed

    Cheek, Dennis J; Brazeau, Dan

    2015-05-01

    SINCE THE 1990s, and certainly since the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, the need for nurses to understand genetic information has become increasingly evident. Knowledge of genetics, genomics, pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics, the study of heredity, gene function and how medication targets genes, continues to increase and is important in the nursing care of patients. PMID:26014775

  11. Improved material properties of solution-cast starch films: Effect of varying amylopectin structure and amylose content of starch from genetically modified potatoes.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Carolin; Andersson, Mariette; Andersson, Roger; Vázquez-Gutiérrez, José L; Daniel, Geoffrey; Langton, Maud; Gällstedt, Mikael; Koch, Kristine

    2015-10-01

    High-amylose potato starches were produced through genetic modification resulting in changed granule morphology and composition, with higher amylose content and increased chain length of amylopectin. The increased amylose content and structural changes in amylopectin enhanced film-forming behavior and improved barrier and tensile properties in starch films. The molecular structure in these starches was related to film-forming properties. Solution-cast films of high-amylose starch revealed a homogeneous structure with increasing surface roughness at higher amylose content, possibly due to amylose aggregation. Films exhibited significantly higher stress and strain at break compared with films of wild-type starch, which could be attributable to the longer chains of amylopectin being involved in the interconnected network and more interaction between chains, as shown using transmission electron microscopy. The oxygen permeability of high-amylose starch films was significantly decreased compared with wild-type starch. The nature of the modified starches makes them an interesting candidate for replacement of non-renewable oxygen and grease barrier polymers used today. PMID:26076640

  12. Diversity of potato genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Machida-Hirano, Ryoko

    2015-03-01

    A considerable number of highly diverse species exist in genus Solanum. Because they can adapt to a broad range of habitats, potato wild relatives are promising sources of desirable agricultural traits. Potato taxonomy is quite complex because of introgression, interspecific hybridization, auto- and allopolyploidy, sexual compatibility among many species, a mixture of sexual and asexual reproduction, possible recent species divergence, phenotypic plasticity, and the consequent high morphological similarity among species. Recent researchers using molecular tools have contributed to the identification of genes controlling several types of resistance as well as to the revision of taxonomical relationships among potato species. Historically, primitive forms of cultivated potato and its wild relatives have been used in breeding programs and there is still an enormous and unimaginable potential for discovering desirable characteristics, particularly in wild species Different methods have been developed to incorporate useful alleles from these wild species into the improved cultivars. Potato germplasm comprising of useful alleles for different breeding objectives is preserved in various gene banks worldwide. These materials, with their invaluable information, are accessible for research and breeding purposes. Precise identification of species base on the new taxonomy is essential for effective use of the germplasm collection. PMID:25931978

  13. The Canon of Potato Science: 6. Genetic Modification and Cis and Transgenesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Jacobsen

    2007-01-01

    What is it? Genetic modification is the act of inserting one or more agriculturally important genes into the genome of a potato plant by in vitro techniques and by using modified Agrobacterium tumefaciens as a natural gene transfer tool. The end product is a genetically modified (GM) plant. Important preconditions for transformation are in vitro regeneration and transformation ability of

  14. Genetic comparisons of gibberellin mutants in potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gibberellin deficient mutants in potato have been published as ga1 (from S. tuberosum ssp. tuberosum and andigena), pito (from the tuberosum cultivar Pito), and ga2 (from the phureja haploid inducing clone “phu-1.22”). We conducted crossing experiments to investigate genetic similarities. When the...

  15. Cryopreservation for preservation of potato genetic resources

    PubMed Central

    Niino, Takao; Arizaga, Miriam Valle

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation is becoming a very important tool for the long-term storage of plant genetic resources and efficient cryopreservation protocols have been developed for a large number of plant species. Practical procedures, developed using in vitro tissue culture, can be a simple and reliable preservation option of potato genetic resources rather than maintaining by vegetative propagation in genebanks due their allogamous nature. Cryopreserved materials insure a long-term backup of field collections against loss of plant germplasm. Occurrence of genetic variation, in tissue culture cells during prolonged subcultures, can be avoided with suitable cryopreservation protocols that provide high regrowth, leading and facilitating a systematic and strategic cryo-banking of plant genetic resources. Cryopreservation protocols for potato reviewed here, can efficiently complement field and in vitro conservation, providing for preservation of genotypes difficult to preserve by other methods, wild types and other species decided as priority collections. PMID:25931979

  16. Potato

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jens Lübeck

    \\u000a \\u000a During the past 20 years, since potato\\u000a became transformable, potato transgenic research mainly focused on fundamental aspects of plant molecular physiology or molecular\\u000a genetics using the potato as a model system. But there are also striking achievements with regard to commercially relevant\\u000a and useful traits. This chapter highlights some examples of how genetic engineering has been used to address the

  17. Genetic diversity among late blight resistant and susceptible potato genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Taleb, Eid M.; Aboshosha, Sayed M.; El-Sherif, Ebtsam M.; El-Komy, Mahmoud H.

    2010-01-01

    RAPD polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to study the genetic diversity among a wild potato variety Solanum demissum (very resistant to late blight) and six potato cultivars (Hanna, Lady-Olympia, Lady-Rosetta, Spunta, Diamant and Cara) varied in their resistance to Phytophthora infestans. Cluster analysis of six potato genotypes showed that, all tested genotypes were separated into two clusters (1 and 2). Cluster 1, included only the wild potato variety (S. demissum), whereas cluster 2 divided into two groups (G1 and G2). Late blight high resistant cultivars Hanna and Cara were grouped in G1. Group 2 included the moderate resistant cultivar Spunta and the susceptible cultivars Diamant, Lady-Rosetta and Lady-Olympia. The potato cultivars that showed highest genetic similarity to the wild potato variety were the resistant cultivars Hanna and Cara. Lowest genetic similarity was obtained with the susceptible cultivars Lady-Rosetta, Diamant and Lady-Olympia. RAPD primer K17 yielded a band with molecular weight of 936 bp found in all susceptible potato cultivars (Lady-Rosetta, Lady-Olympia and Diamant). On the other hand, band with molecular weight of 765 bp were detected in the wild potato and the resistant cultivars Hanna and Cara. Results of this study suggested that, the RAPD marker technique could be beneficial for revealing the genetic variability of different genotypes of potato varied in their resistibility to late blight. PMID:23961069

  18. Genetically Modified Foods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert R. Nelson; Ali A. Poorani; Justin E. Crews

    2004-01-01

    This study outlines the controversy surrounding genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and how it impacts North American based food service companies' marketing policies. Recent developments have made foods derived from GMOs a strategic marketing challenge for food service franchise and chain operations. Headlines such as “Why McDonalds Pulled Frankenfries from Menus” have unwittingly put restaurants on the frontline of the battle

  19. GENETIC MANIPULATION FOR ENHANCING CALCIUM CONTENT IN POTATO TUBER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased calcium (Ca) in potatoes may increase the production rate by enhancing tuber quality and storability. Additionally, increased Ca levels in important agricultural crops may help ameliorate the incidence of osteoporosis. However, the capacity to alter Ca levels in potato tubers through genet...

  20. MOLECULAR GENETIC ANALYSIS OF A LARGE POTATO GENEBANK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We performed a comprehensive molecular genetic analysis of the Commonwealth Potato Collection (CPC), as well as material from a USDA potato collection. This analysis, one of the first to include an entire germplasm collection, has involved the deployment of six AFLP primer combinations (four PstI/Ms...

  1. COMBINING ABILITY AND GENETIC VARIABILITY STUDIES IN POTATO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. HAYDAR; M. K. ALAM; E. H. KHOKAN; T. ARA; K. M. KHALEQUZZAMAN

    Haydar, A., Alam, M. K., Khokan, E. H., Ara, T., and Khalequzzaman, K. M. 2009. Combining ability and genetic variability studies in potato. J.Soil.Nature. 3 (2):01-03. Seventeen potato genotypes comprising seven parents and their ten crosses were evaluated during to November 2005 to March 2006 to study their combining ability and genetic variability. Mean squares due to GCA and SCA

  2. Modifying glycoalkaloid content in transgenic potato - Metabolome impacts.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Louise Vida Traill; Hackett, Christine Anne; Alexander, Colin James; McNicol, James William; Sungurtas, Julia Anne; Stewart, Derek; McCue, Kent Frank; Belknap, William Richardson; Davies, Howard Vivian

    2015-11-15

    Metabolite profiling has been used to assess the potential for unintended composition changes in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Desirée) tubers, which have been genetically modified (GM) to reduce glycoalkaloid content, via the independent down-regulation of three genes SGT1, SGT2 and SGT3 known to be involved in glycoalkaloid biosynthesis. Differences between the three groups of antisense lines and control lines were assessed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography (GC)-MS, and data analysed using principal component analysis and analysis of variance. Compared with the wild-type (WT) control, LC-MS revealed not only the expected changes in specific glycoalkaloid levels in the GM lines, but also significant changes in several other metabolites, some of which were explicable in terms of known pathways. Analysis of polar and non-polar metabolites by GC-MS revealed other significant (unintended) differences between SGT lines and the WT, but also between the WT control and other control lines used. PMID:25977048

  3. Assessment of Genetic Diversity of Sweet Potato in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Bonilla, Lorraine; Cuevas, Hugo E.; Montero-Rojas, Milly; Bird-Pico, Fernando; Luciano-Rosario, Dianiris; Siritunga, Dimuth

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is the seventh most important food crop due to its distinct advantages, such as adaptability to different environmental conditions and high nutritional value. Assessing the genetic diversity of this important crop is necessary due to the constant increase of demand for food and the need for conservation of agricultural and genetic resources. In Puerto Rico (PR), the genetic diversity of sweet potato has been poorly understood, although it has been part of the diet since Pre-Columbus time. Thus, 137 landraces from different localities around PR were collected and subjected to a genetic diversity analysis using 23 SSR-markers. In addition, 8 accessions from a collection grown in Gurabo, PR at the Agricultural Experimental Station (GAES), 10 US commercial cultivars and 12 Puerto Rican accessions from the USDA repository collection were included in this assessment. The results of the analysis of the 23 loci showed 255 alleles in the 167 samples. Observed heterozygosity was high across populations (0.71) while measurements of total heterozygosity revealed a large genetic diversity throughout the population and within populations. UPGMA clustering method revealed two main clusters. Cluster 1 contained 12 PR accessions from the USDA repository collection, while cluster 2 consisted of PR landraces, US commercial cultivars and the PR accessions from GAES. Population structure analysis grouped PR landraces in five groups including four US commercial cultivars. Our study shows the presence of a high level of genetic diversity of sweet potato across PR which can be related to the genetic makeup of sweet potato, human intervention and out-crossing nature of the plant. The history of domestication and dispersal of sweet potato in the Caribbean and the high levels of genetic diversity found through this study makes sweet potato an invaluable resource that needs to be protected and further studied. PMID:25551388

  4. Why genetically modified crops?

    PubMed

    Jones, Jonathan D G

    2011-05-13

    This paper is intended to convey the message of the talk I gave at the Theo Murphy meeting at the Kavli Centre in July 2010. It, like the talk, is polemical, and conveys the exasperation felt by a practitioner of genetically modified (GM) plant science at its widespread misrepresentation. I argue that sustainable intensification of agriculture, using GM as well as other technologies, reduces its environmental impact by reducing pesticide applications and conserving soil carbon by enabling low till methods. Current technologies (primarily insect resistance and herbicide tolerance) have been beneficial. Moreover, the near-term pipeline of new GM methods and traits to enhance our diet, increase crop yields and reduce losses to disease is substantial. It would be perverse to spurn this approach at a time when we need every tool in the toolbox to ensure adequate food production in the short, medium and long term. PMID:21464072

  5. Genetic structure and molecular variability of potato virus M populations.

    PubMed

    Tabasinejad, Fatemeh; Jafarpour, Behrooz; Zakiaghl, Mohammad; Siampour, Majid; Rouhani, Hamid; Mehrvar, Mohsen

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the genetic diversity of potato virus M (PVM; genus Carlavirus, family Betaflexiviridae), the complete nucleotide sequence of the coat protein gene of 30 PVM isolates from a major potato-growing region in Iran were determined. Phylogenetic analysis of these Iranian PVM isolates together with those available in the GenBank database suggested two divergent evolutionary lineages that did not reflect the origin of the isolates, and these were designated as PVM-o and PVM-d. Examination of the genetic variability of the coat protein of Iranian isolates and their counterparts whose sequences are available in the Genbank database revealed 16 genotype groups in the PVM population. Analysis of the synonymous-tononsynonymous ratio showed strong purifying selection in the CP gene in the genotype groups of divergent clades. PMID:24658780

  6. Analysis of genetic and pathogenic variation among Alternaria solani in a potato production region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-year survey was conducted in a potato production region to investigate the genetic variability within naturally infecting populations of Alternaria solani, the cause of early blight in potato, and between species A. solani and A. dauci. Genetic diversity among 151 isolates was assessed using s...

  7. Construction of reference chromosome-scale pseudomolecules for potato: integrating the potato genome with genetic and physical maps.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bolser, Daniel; de Boer, Jan; Sønderkær, Mads; Amoros, Walter; Carboni, Martin Federico; D'Ambrosio, Juan Martín; de la Cruz, German; Di Genova, Alex; Douches, David S; Eguiluz, Maria; Guo, Xiao; Guzman, Frank; Hackett, Christine A; Hamilton, John P; Li, Guangcun; Li, Ying; Lozano, Roberto; Maass, Alejandro; Marshall, David; Martinez, Diana; McLean, Karen; Mejía, Nilo; Milne, Linda; Munive, Susan; Nagy, Istvan; Ponce, Olga; Ramirez, Manuel; Simon, Reinhard; Thomson, Susan J; Torres, Yerisf; Waugh, Robbie; Zhang, Zhonghua; Huang, Sanwen; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B; Sagredo, Boris; Feingold, Sergio E; Orjeda, Gisella; Veilleux, Richard E; Bonierbale, Merideth; Jacobs, Jeanne M E; Milbourne, Dan; Martin, David Michael Alan; Bryan, Glenn J

    2013-11-01

    The genome of potato, a major global food crop, was recently sequenced. The work presented here details the integration of the potato reference genome (DM) with a new sequence-tagged site marker-based linkage map and other physical and genetic maps of potato and the closely related species tomato. Primary anchoring of the DM genome assembly was accomplished by the use of a diploid segregating population, which was genotyped with several types of molecular genetic markers to construct a new ~936 cM linkage map comprising 2469 marker loci. In silico anchoring approaches used genetic and physical maps from the diploid potato genotype RH89-039-16 (RH) and tomato. This combined approach has allowed 951 superscaffolds to be ordered into pseudomolecules corresponding to the 12 potato chromosomes. These pseudomolecules represent 674 Mb (~93%) of the 723 Mb genome assembly and 37,482 (~96%) of the 39,031 predicted genes. The superscaffold order and orientation within the pseudomolecules are closely collinear with independently constructed high density linkage maps. Comparisons between marker distribution and physical location reveal regions of greater and lesser recombination, as well as regions exhibiting significant segregation distortion. The work presented here has led to a greatly improved ordering of the potato reference genome superscaffolds into chromosomal "pseudomolecules". PMID:24062527

  8. The effect of consumer risk perceptions on the propensity to purchase genetically modified foods in Romania

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kynda R. Curtis; Klaus Moeltner

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates consumer purchase propensity for genetically modified (GM) food products in Romania, shedding light on consumer preferences in developing Eastern European nations. Results based on a bivariate probit model of purchase propensity for GM sunflower oil and table potatoes show that consumers in Romania are generally opposed to GM food consumption, similar to consumers in Western Europe, but

  9. Quality of shrimp analogue product as affected by addition of modified potato starch.

    PubMed

    Remya, S; Basu, S; Venkateshwarlu, G; Mohan, C O

    2015-07-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of addition of modified potato starch on the biochemical and textural properties of shrimp analogue/imitation shrimp, a popular value-added product prepared from surimi. Three batches of shrimp analogues were prepared with 0 % (NPS), 50 % (CPS) and 100 % (MPS) of modified starch incorporation and various quality attributes were monitored at regular intervals during frozen storage (-20 °C). Loss of myofibrillar protein was least for the shrimp analogue sample added with 100 % modified potato starch. The expressible moisture content of MPS (2.48 %) was less affected by long term storage compared to CPS (3.38 %) and NPS (3.99 %). During extended low temperature storage, the textural quality of sea food analogue was highly influenced by the type of starch added to it. The percentage of modified potato starch added to shrimp analogue significantly (p???0.05) affected its hardness and fracturability. MPS samples did not show significant changes in hardness during storage as compared to other two samples. Springiness of shrimp analogue increased 2.57, 1.5 and 1.77 times with the storage period for samples with NPS, CPS and MPS, respectively. Addition of modified potato starch improved the sensory quality and textural properties of shrimp analogue and reduced the quality degradation during frozen storage as compared to NPS which contained only native potato starch. PMID:26139909

  10. Potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is the most important vegetable crop in the U.S. It is produced throughout the country and across all seasons, although production is concentrated on the fall crop in the Pacific Northwest. In 2012, 21 million metric tons of potatoes were produced on 1.14 million acres, with an average yield ...

  11. agronomie: plant genetics and breeding Transgenic potato plants can be used to evaluate

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    agronomie: plant genetics and breeding Transgenic potato plants can be used to evaluate stability of transgenic potato plants and in subsequent vegetative generations. Transgenics carrying one or two copies-rolC transgenic plants harboring four and five copies of the rolC gene showed a strong phenoty- pic rol

  12. Genetic Consequences of Tuber Versus Seed Sampling in Two Wild Potato Species Indigenous to the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild potatoes reproduce in the wild (in situ) clonally by tubers or sexually by seeds. This study used model populations to assess the genetic consequences of sampling in situ tubers or in situ seeds for two indigenous potato species of the USA, Solanum stoloniferum PI 564039 (sto) and Solanum james...

  13. Attitudes towards genetically modified and organic foods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marieke Saher; Marjaana Lindeman; Ulla-Kaisa Koivisto Hursti

    2006-01-01

    Finnish students (N=3261) filled out a questionnaire on attitudes towards genetically modified and organic food, plus the rational-experiential inventory, the magical thinking about food and health scale, Schwartz's value survey and the behavioural inhibition scale. In addition, they reported their eating of meat. Structural equation modelling of these measures had greater explanatory power for attitudes towards genetically modified (GM) foods

  14. Ottawa asked to approve genetically modified salmon

    E-print Network

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    Ottawa asked to approve genetically modified salmon Last Updated: Wednesday, December 8, 2004 | 9 Canadian diners with genetically modified salmon that grow twice as fast as normal fish. Aqua Bounty Bounty will ask for permission to sell GM salmon for humans to eat. Both salmon are one year old

  15. Genetically Modified Animals and Pharmacological Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dominic J. Wells

    \\u000a This chapter reviews the use of genetically modified animals and the increasingly detailed knowledge of the genomes of the\\u000a domestic species. The different approaches to genetic modification are outlined as are the advantages and disadvantages of\\u000a the techniques in different species. Genetically modified mice have been fundamental in understanding gene function and in\\u000a generating affordable models of human disease although

  16. Traceability of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Henk J M; van Rie, Jean-Paul P F; Kok, Esther J

    2002-01-01

    EU regulations stipulate the labeling of food products containing genetically modified organisms (GMOs) unless the GMO content is due to adventitious and unintended 'contamination' and not exceeding the 1% level at ingredient basis. In addition, member states have to ensure full traceability at all stages of the placing on the market of GMOs. Both requirements ensure consumers 'right to know', facilitate enforcement of regulatory requirements and are of importance for environmental monitoring and postmarket surveillance. Besides administrative procedures, such as used in quality certification systems, the significance of adequate molecular methods becomes more and more apparent. During the last decade a considerable number of molecular methods have been developed and validated that enable the detection, identification and quantification of GMO impurities. Most of them rely on the PCR technology and can only detect one specific stretch of DNA. It can, however, be anticipated that in the near future the situation will become more complex. The number of GMO varieties, including 'stacked-gene' varieties, which will enter the European Market will increase and it is likely that these varieties will harbor more variable constructs. New tools will be necessary to keep up with these developments. One of the most promising techniques is microarray analysis. This technique enables the screening for a large number of different GMOs within a single experiment. PMID:11963810

  17. Genetic diversity of wild potato of the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato of commerce has two wild relatives in the USA, Solanum jamesii (jam) and S. fendleri (fen). The authors have collected samples at the natural habitats since 1992 (new), greatly increasing the geographic coverage and number of populations compared to what was in the US Potato Genebank avai...

  18. Genetic diversity of potato landraces from northwestern Argentina assessed with simple sequence repeats (SSRs)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Verónica Nilda Ispizúa; Irma Rosana Guma; Sergio Feingold; Andrea Martina Clausen

    2007-01-01

    Andean potato varieties are cultivated in the northwest of Argentina and constitute the most important staple food for the\\u000a local farmers. The genetic diversity of 155 accessions conserved at the Genebank of Balcarce (INTA) was tested using four\\u000a microsatellites. Three commercial potato varieties of Tuberosum group and one accession of Curtilobum group were used as outgroups.\\u000a The presence of bands

  19. Genetic diversity of thiamine and folate in primitive cultivated and wild potato (Solanum) species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofortification of staple crops like potato via breeding is an attractive strategy to reduce human micronutrient deficiencies. A prerequisite is metabolic phenotyping of genetically diverse material which can be used as parents in breeding programs. Thus, the natural genetic diversity of thiamine a...

  20. Genetically Modified Pigs for Medicine and Agriculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RANDALL S. PRATHER; MIAODA SHEN; YIFAN DAI

    2008-01-01

    The ability to genetically modify pigs has enabled scientists to create pigs that are beneficial to humans in ways that were previously unimaginable. Improvements in the methods to make genetic modifications have opened up the possibilities of introducing transgenes, knock-outs and knock-ins with precision. The benefits to medicine include the production of pharmaceuticals, the provision of organs for xenotransplantation into

  1. Genetic stability in potato germplasm for resistance to root galling caused by the powdery scab pathogen spongospora subterranea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spongospora subteranea, the causal agent of potato powdery scab is becoming increasingly important worldwide. Little is known about the genetic basis of resistance to this disease. The present study tested the hypothesis that potato genotypes with stable genetic resistance to "Spongospora root galli...

  2. Characteristics of oxidative stress in potato plants with modified carbohydrate metabolism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. Sin’kevich; A. N. Deryabin; T. I. Trunova

    2009-01-01

    Effects of sugars on the development of hypothermia-induced oxidative stress were studied in leaves of two potato genotypes\\u000a (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Désirée): with normal carbohydrate metabolism and a genotype with increased sugar content modified by insertion of\\u000a yeast-derived invertase gene. It was found that generation of proceeds more actively in transformed plants than in control\\u000a plants. On the contrary

  3. [Genetically modified food--unnecessary controversy?].

    PubMed

    Tchórz, Micha?; Radoniewicz-Chagowska, Anna; Lewandowska-Stanek, Hanna; Szponar, Elzbieta; Szponar, Jaros?aw

    2012-01-01

    Fast development of genetic engineering and biotechnology allows use of genetically modified organisms (GMO) more and more in different branches of science and economy. Every year we can see an increase of food amount produced with the use of modification of genetic material. In our supermarkets we can find brand new types of plants, products including genetically modified ingredients or meat from animals fed with food containing GMO. This article presents general information about genetically modified organisms, it also explains the range of genetic manipulation, use of newly developed products and current field area for GMO in the world. Based on scientific data the article presents benefits from development of biotechnology in reference to modified food. It also presents the voice of skeptics who are extremely concerned about the impact of those organisms on human health and natural environment. Problems that appear or can appear as a result of an increase of GMO are very important not only from a toxicologist's or a doctor's point of view but first of all from the point of view of ordinary consumers--all of us. PMID:23243917

  4. Frankenfoods? The Debate Over Genetically Modified Crops

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bill Rhodes

    2001-01-01

    This discussion case, in which a university research laboratory is vandalized by environmental activists opposed to genetic engineering, focuses on the science and ethics of genetically modified crops. Students consider both the risks and benefits of biotechnology and explore the positions of various stakeholders, including environmentalists, conservationists, agricultural businesses, research scientists, and farmers. Originally written for a vegetable crops course, the case would be appropriate for a wide variety of courses in which biotechnology is discussed.

  5. Introduction to Potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is an introductory chapter on potatoes which gives a brief history of the potato, potato morphology, taxonomy, production statistics, nutritional content, and future prospects for potato research and production. It will appear in a new book entitled Genetics, Genomics, and Breeding of Potato ...

  6. Genetic Improvement of Potato for Tuber Calcium Uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuber internal quality is a major limiting factor for the U.S. potato industry. Breeders invest time and money in producing advanced selections which, in the end, often fail because of tuber internal defects, tuber bruising, or storage quality issues. In-season fertilization with calcium is known to...

  7. Genetic and cultural management solutions to improve potato storage quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato storage quality is most easily described in terms of tuber attributes that maintain the value of the harvested crop. Among these attributes are attractive appearance, low shrink, low incidence of bruising and, for chip and fry processing varieties, specific gravity and reducing sugars appropr...

  8. Genetic Characterization of Early Blight Resistance in Interspecific Potato Hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early blight, caused by the fungal pathogen Alternaria solani Sorauer, is a serious foliar disease of potato and tomato worldwide. It is characterized by substantial yield loss resulting from severe defoliation, especially under hot, humid conditions. Fungicides are the main method of control, how...

  9. Genetically Modified (GM) Foods: A Brief Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Farrukh Jamal; Q. S. Haque; Tabish Qidwai; U. P. India

    Due to ever-increasing population burden, genetically modified (GM) foods promised great potential, to solve many of the world's hunger and malnutrition problems, and also to preserve the environment. The authentic GM foods may not only have better nutritional and pharmaceutical values but are also resistant to pest and diseases, tolerant to extreme temperatures and herbicides. Yet they pose many challenges

  10. Genetically modified foods: the effect of information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthimia M. Batrinou; Evangelia Dimitriou; Dionisios Liatsos; Vassiliki Pletsa

    2005-01-01

    Purpose – This paper examines the attitudes of young Greek University students towards genetically modified (GM) foods and studies the effect of appropriate information in shaping this attitude. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A questionnaire was distributed to 433 Greek students of the Technological Educational Institute of Athens during the academic year 2003-2004. Results were processed by SPSS 11.0. Findings – The survey

  11. Strategic environmental assessments for genetically modified organisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas A. Linacre; Joanne Gaskell; Mark W. Rosegrant; Jose Falck-Zepeda; Hector Quemada; Mark Halsey; Regina Birner

    2006-01-01

    Genetically modified crops appear to provide a promising option in finding sustainable solutions to end global hunger and poverty, but strategic decisions need to be made on how to spend limited agricultural research funds. Potentially, strategic environmental assessment (SEA) may be used as part of an environmental management system to introduce mainstreaming of environmental considerations in the policy research and

  12. Genetically modified plants: public and scientific perceptions.

    PubMed

    Rastogi Verma, Smita

    2013-01-01

    The potential of genetically modified plants to meet the requirements of growing population is not being recognized at present. This is a consequence of concerns raised by the public and the critics about their applications and release into the environment. These include effect on human health and environment, biosafety, world trade monopolies, trustworthiness of public institutions, integrity of regulatory agencies, loss of individual choice, and ethics as well as skepticism about the real potential of the genetically modified plants, and so on. Such concerns are enormous and prevalent even today. However, it should be acknowledged that most of them are not specific for genetically modified plants, and the public should not forget that the conventionally bred plants consumed by them are also associated with similar risks where no information about the gene(s) transfer is available. Moreover, most of the concerns are hypothetical and lack scientific background. Though a few concerns are still to be disproved, it is viewed that, with proper management, these genetically modified plants have immense potential for the betterment of mankind. In the present paper, an overview of the raised concerns and wherever possible reasons assigned to explain their intensity or unsuitability are reviewed. PMID:25937981

  13. ROMANIAN APPROACH TO GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anghel Gabriel; Popovici Veronica

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) - an extreme controversed issue in the entire world, raise numerous questions concerning the impact on the human health, biodiversity, farmers, legislation, etc. In Romania, country that is dealing now with lots of difficulties on agriculture and environmental protection, especially due to the recent European Union's accession , the population is poorly informed on the risks,

  14. Genetic diversity of the ordinary strain of potato virus Y (PVY) and origin of recombinant PVY strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ordinary strain of Potato virus Y (PVY), PVYO, causes mild mosaic in tobacco and induces necrosis and severe stunting in potato cultivars carrying the Ny gene. There is, however, a growing body of evidence that PVYO strain group is not uniform both genetically and biologically. A novel sub-strai...

  15. Overcoming crossing barriers between nontuber-bearing and tuber-bearing Solanum species: towards potato germplasm enhancement with a broad spectrum of solanaceous genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K N; Orrillo, M; Vega, S; Valkonen, J P; Pehu, E; Hurtado, A; Tanksley, S D

    1995-02-01

    The first direct sexual hybrids between diploid nontuber-bearing species and diploid potato breeding lines are reported here. Three nontuberous species of Solanum, S. brevidens, S. etuberosum, and S. fernandezianum, were used for sexual crosses, achieved by a combination of rescue pollinations and embryo rescue. Initial hybrid selection was made using an embryo spot marker, followed by the evaluation of morphological and reproductive traits. Putative hybrids were first tested for resistance to potato leaf roll virus derived from the wild species, and then were tested with molecular markers using species-specific DNA probes. Finally, the tuberization of several 2x hybrids was tested for actual potato germplasm enhancement. These hybrids are unique in terms of their potential to enhance recombination between chromosomes of wild species and those of cultivated potatoes in germplasm utilization, and to exploit the genetic nature of tuber formation. The finding that nontuber-bearing Solanum spp. can be directly crossed with tuber-bearing species also has important implications for the regulatory aspects of the use of genetically modified organisms. PMID:18470149

  16. Are genetically modified plants useful and safe?

    PubMed

    Weil, Jacques-Henry

    2005-01-01

    So far, plants have been genetically modified essentially to achieve resistance to herbicides, or to pathogens (mainly insects, or viruses), but resistance to abiotic stresses (such as cold, heat, drought, or salt) is also being studied. Genetically modified (GM) plants with improved nutritional qualities have more recently been developed, such as plants containing higher proportions of unsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6) in their oil (to prevent cardio-vascular diseases), or containing beta-carotene as in the golden rice (to prevent vitamin A deficiency). Possible risks for human health (such as the production of allergenic proteins), or for the environment (such as the appearance of superweeds as a result from gene flow), should be carefully studied, and a science-based assessment of benefits vs. risks should be made on a case by case basis, both for GM plants and for plants obtained by conventional breeding methods. PMID:16036615

  17. GMEnzy: A Genetically Modified Enzybiotic Database

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hairong; Li, Guodong; Huang, Qingshan

    2014-01-01

    GMEs are genetically modified enzybiotics created through molecular engineering approaches to deal with the increasing problem of antibiotic resistance prevalence. We present a fully manually curated database, GMEnzy, which focuses on GMEs and their design strategies, production and purification methods, and biological activity data. GMEnzy collects and integrates all available GMEs and their related information into one web based database. Currently GMEnzy holds 186 GMEs from published literature. The GMEnzy interface is easy to use, and allows users to rapidly retrieve data according to desired search criteria. GMEnzy’s construction will increase the efficiency and convenience of improving these bioactive proteins for specific requirements, and will expand the arsenal available for researches to control drug-resistant pathogens. This database will prove valuable for researchers interested in genetically modified enzybiotics studies. GMEnzy is freely available on the Web at http://biotechlab.fudan.edu.cn/database/gmenzy/. PMID:25084271

  18. Genetically modified foods and social concerns.

    PubMed

    Maghari, Behrokh Mohajer; Ardekani, Ali M

    2011-07-01

    Biotechnology is providing us with a wide range of options for how we can use agricultural and commercial forestry lands. The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops on millions of hectares of lands and their injection into our food chain is a huge global genetic experiment involving all living beings. Considering the fast pace of new advances in production of genetically modified crops, consumers, farmers and policymakers worldwide are challenged to reach a consensus on a clear vision for the future of world food supply. The current food biotechnology debate illustrates the serious conflict between two groups: 1) Agri-biotech investors and their affiliated scientists who consider agricultural biotechnology as a solution to food shortage, the scarcity of environmental resources and weeds and pests infestations; and 2) independent scientists, environmentalists, farmers and consumers who warn that genetically modified food introduces new risks to food security, the environment and human health such as loss of biodiversity; the emergence of superweeds and superpests; the increase of antibiotic resistance, food allergies and other unintended effects. This article reviews major viewpoints which are currently debated in the food biotechnology sector in the world. It also lays the ground-work for deep debate on benefits and risks of Biotech-crops for human health, ecosystems and biodiversity. In this context, although some regulations exist, there is a need for continuous vigilance for all countries involved in producing genetically engineered food to follow the international scientific bio-safety testing guidelines containing reliable pre-release experiments and post-release track of transgenic plants to protect public health and avoid future environmental harm. PMID:23408723

  19. Genetically Modified Foods and Social Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Maghari, Behrokh Mohajer; Ardekani, Ali M.

    2011-01-01

    Biotechnology is providing us with a wide range of options for how we can use agricultural and commercial forestry lands. The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops on millions of hectares of lands and their injection into our food chain is a huge global genetic experiment involving all living beings. Considering the fast pace of new advances in production of genetically modified crops, consumers, farmers and policymakers worldwide are challenged to reach a consensus on a clear vision for the future of world food supply. The current food biotechnology debate illustrates the serious conflict between two groups: 1) Agri-biotech investors and their affiliated scientists who consider agricultural biotechnology as a solution to food shortage, the scarcity of environmental resources and weeds and pests infestations; and 2) independent scientists, environmentalists, farmers and consumers who warn that genetically modified food introduces new risks to food security, the environment and human health such as loss of biodiversity; the emergence of superweeds and superpests; the increase of antibiotic resistance, food allergies and other unintended effects. This article reviews major viewpoints which are currently debated in the food biotechnology sector in the world. It also lays the ground-work for deep debate on benefits and risks of Biotech-crops for human health, ecosystems and biodiversity. In this context, although some regulations exist, there is a need for continuous vigilance for all countries involved in producing genetically engineered food to follow the international scientific bio-safety testing guidelines containing reliable pre-release experiments and post-release track of transgenic plants to protect public health and avoid future environmental harm. PMID:23408723

  20. Genetic Resistances to Potato Leafroll Virus, Potato Virus Y, and Green Peach Aphid in Progeny of Solanum etuberosum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. G. Novy; A. Nasruddin; D. W. Ragsdale; E. B. Radcliffe

    2002-01-01

    Increasing prevalence of potato leafroll virus (PLRV) and potato virus Y (PVY) has been reported in seed and commercial potato\\u000a production, resulting in the rejection of potatoes for certification and processing. Host plant resistance to PLRV and PVY\\u000a and their primary vector, green peach aphid,Myzus persicae, could limit the spread of these viruses. Host plant resistance to PLRV, PVY, and

  1. Association genetics in Solanum tuberosum provides new insights into potato tuber bruising and enzymatic tissue discoloration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most agronomic plant traits result from complex molecular networks involving multiple genes and from environmental factors. One such trait is the enzymatic discoloration of fruit and tuber tissues initiated by mechanical impact (bruising). Tuber susceptibility to bruising is a complex trait of the cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum) that is crucial for crop quality. As phenotypic evaluation of bruising is cumbersome, the application of diagnostic molecular markers would empower the selection of low bruising potato varieties. The genetic factors and molecular networks underlying enzymatic tissue discoloration are sparsely known. Hitherto there is no association study dealing with tuber bruising and diagnostic markers for enzymatic discoloration are rare. Results The natural genetic diversity for bruising susceptibility was evaluated in elite middle European potato germplasm in order to elucidate its molecular basis. Association genetics using a candidate gene approach identified allelic variants in genes that function in tuber bruising and enzymatic browning. Two hundred and five tetraploid potato varieties and breeding clones related by descent were evaluated for two years in six environments for tuber bruising susceptibility, specific gravity, yield, shape and plant maturity. Correlations were found between different traits. In total 362 polymorphic DNA fragments, derived from 33 candidate genes and 29 SSR loci, were scored in the population and tested for association with the traits using a mixed model approach, which takes into account population structure and kinship. Twenty one highly significant (p < 0.001) and robust marker-trait associations were identified. Conclusions The observed trait correlations and associated marker fragments provide new insight in the molecular basis of bruising susceptibility and its natural variation. The markers diagnostic for increased or decreased bruising susceptibility will facilitate the combination of superior alleles in breeding programs. In addition, this study presents novel candidates that might control enzymatic tissue discoloration and tuber bruising. Their validation and characterization will increase the knowledge about the underlying biological processes. PMID:21208436

  2. Genetically Modified T Cells to Target Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Simone; Rodríguez-Cruz, Tania G.; DeRenzo, Christopher; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical procedures, radiation, and chemotherapy the outcome for patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains poor. While GBM cells express antigens that are potentially recognized by?T cells, GBMs prevent the induction of GBM-specific immune responses by creating an immunosuppressive microenvironment. The advent of gene transfer has allowed the rapid generation of antigen-specific?T cells as well as?T cells with enhanced effector function. Here we review recent advances in the field of cell therapy with genetically modified?T cells and how these advances might improve outcomes for patients with GBM in the future. PMID:24427741

  3. MATERNAL EFFECTS IN ADVANCED HYBRIDS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED AND NON-GENETICALLY MODIFIED BRASSICA SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of fitness traits potentially impacted by gene flow from genetically modified (GM) crops to compatible relatives is of interest in risk assessments for GM crops. Reciprocal crosses were made between GM canola, Brassica napus cv. RaideRR that expresses CP4 EPSPS fo...

  4. The voyage of an invasive species across continents: genetic diversity of North American and European Colorado potato beetle populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALESSANDRO GRAPPUTO; SANNA BOMAN; LEENA LINDSTRÖM; ANNE LYYTINEN; JOHANNA MAPPES

    2005-01-01

    The paradox of successful invading species is that they are likely to be genetically depau- perate compared to their source population. This study on Colorado potato beetles is one of the few studies of the genetic consequences of continent-scale invasion in an insect pest. Understanding gene flow, population structure and the potential for rapid evolution in native and invasive populations

  5. Hierarchical and factorial mating designs for quantitative genetic analysis in tetrasomic potato.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, R.; Golmirzaie, A.

    2002-03-01

    Plant breeders need to quantify additive and non-additive components of genetic variance in order to determine appropriate selection methods to improve quantitative characteristics. Hierarchical and factorial mating designs (also known as North Carolina mating designs I and II, respectively) allow one to determine these variance components. The relative advantages of these two designs in the quantitative genetics of tuber yield in tetrasomic potato were investigated. Likewise, the number of female parents to include in design I was also investigated. Data were collected from two independent experiments at two contrasting Peruvian locations: La Molina in the dry coast and San Ramon in the humid mid-altitude. In the first experiment, although design I gave a negative digenic variance (sigma(2)(D)), this design provided almost the same estimate of narrow-sense heritability (h(2)) for tuber yield as that obtained in design II (0.291 and 0.260, respectively). Therefore, design I appears to be appropriate for quantitative genetics research in tetrasomic potato, a crop in which some clones are male sterile. The easy handling of crosses (distinct random females included in the crossing scheme) is another advantage of design I relative to design II. In the second experiment, 12 males were crossed with either two or four females following a design-I mating scheme. The additive genetic variance (sigma(2)(A)) was zero (or negative) when two females per male were included but was positive with four females. These results suggest that two females per male may not be enough for design I in tetrasomic potato. Four females per male are preferable to determine sigma(2)(A) in design I for this tetrasomic crop. PMID:12582673

  6. Promise and issues of genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Lin, Yongjun

    2013-05-01

    The growing area of genetically modified (GM) crops has substantially expanded since they were first commercialized in 1996. Correspondingly, the adoption of GM crops has brought huge economic and environmental benefits. All these achievements have been primarily supported by two simple traits of herbicide tolerance and insect resistance in the past 17 years. However, this situation will change soon. Recently, the advance of new products, technologies and safety assessment approaches has provided new opportunities for development of GM crops. In this review, we focus on the developmental trend in various aspects of GM crops including new products, technical innovation and risk assessment approaches, as well as potential challenges that GM crops are currently encountering. PMID:23571013

  7. Beliefs About Genetically Modified Foods: A Qualitative and Quantitative Exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emma Lea

    2005-01-01

    This study is aimed to examine consumers’ beliefs about genetically modified foods. Ten focus group interviews of community members and a random questionnaire-based mail survey of 500 Australian (Victorian) adults were conducted (58% response). Participants were generally negative about genetically modified foods, with concerns being raised about them being unnatural, difficult to identify, and having unknown long-term health and environmental

  8. Genetic variation for potato tuber micronutrient content and implications for biofortification of potatoes to reduce micronutrient malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronutrients are crucial to healthy growth and development, yet a large proportion of the world’s population suffers from micronutrient deficiencies. Biofortification of staple foods has tremendous potential to alleviate these deficiencies. Potato production in developing countries is increasing...

  9. Food from genetically modified organisms and potential for food allergy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. L Taylor

    1997-01-01

    Crops produced through genetic modification are beginning to reach the market and many genetically-modified crops are under development. Since genetic modification results in the introduction of new proteins into the food plant the safety of the newly introduced proteins must be assessed. The potential allergenicity of the newly introduced protein is a major consideration in that safety assessment. All allergens

  10. Detection of sweet potato viruses in Yunnan and genetic diversity analysis of the common viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two hundred seventy-nine samples with virus-like symptoms collected from 16 regions in Yunnan Province were tested by RT-PCR/PCR using virus-specific primers for 8 sweet potato viruses. Six viruses, Sweet potato chlorotic fleck virus (SPCFV), Sweet Potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), Sweet potato ...

  11. Genetically modified mouse models addressing gonadotropin function.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Laura D; Rulli, Susana B; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2014-03-01

    The development of genetically modified animals has been useful to understand the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the gonadotropin function. It is well known that alterations in the secretion of a single hormone is capable of producing profound reproductive abnormalities. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone normally secreted by the human placenta, and structurally and functionally it is related to pituitary LH. LH and hCG bind to the same LH/hCG receptor, and hCG is often used as an analog of LH to boost gonadotropin action. There are many physiological and pathological conditions where LH/hCG levels and actions are elevated. In order to understand how elevated LH/hCG levels may impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis we have developed a transgenic mouse model with chronic hCG hypersecretion. Female mice develop many gonadal and extragonadal phenotypes including obesity, infertility, hyperprolactinemia, and pituitary and mammary gland tumors. This article summarizes recent findings on the mechanisms involved in pituitary gland tumorigenesis and hyperprolactinemia in the female mice hypersecreting hCG, in particular the relationship of progesterone with the hyperprolactinemic condition of the model. In addition, we describe the role of hyperprolactinemia as the main cause of infertility and the phenotypic abnormalities in these mice, and the use of dopamine agonists bromocriptine and cabergoline to normalize these conditions. PMID:24607250

  12. Genetically Modified Organisms and Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Chhajer, Rudra; Ali, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing infectious diseases. Since the eradication of small pox in 1976, many other potentially life compromising if not threatening diseases have been dealt with subsequently. This event was a major leap not only in the scientific world already burdened with many diseases but also in the mindset of the common man who became more receptive to novel treatment options. Among the many protozoan diseases, the leishmaniases have emerged as one of the largest parasite killers of the world, second only to malaria. There are three types of leishmaniasis namely cutaneous (CL), mucocutaneous (ML), and visceral (VL), caused by a group of more than 20 species of Leishmania parasites. Visceral leishmaniasis, also known as kala-azar is the most severe form and almost fatal if untreated. Since the first attempts at leishmanization, we have killed parasite vaccines, subunit protein, or DNA vaccines, and now we have live recombinant carrier vaccines and live attenuated parasite vaccines under various stages of development. Although some research has shown promising results, many more potential genes need to be evaluated as live attenuated vaccine candidates. This mini-review attempts to summarize the success and failures of genetically modified organisms used in vaccination against some of major parasitic diseases for their application in leishmaniasis. PMID:24860575

  13. Genetically modified crops and food security.

    PubMed

    Qaim, Matin; Kouser, Shahzad

    2013-01-01

    The role of genetically modified (GM) crops for food security is the subject of public controversy. GM crops could contribute to food production increases and higher food availability. There may also be impacts on food quality and nutrient composition. Finally, growing GM crops may influence farmers' income and thus their economic access to food. Smallholder farmers make up a large proportion of the undernourished people worldwide. Our study focuses on this latter aspect and provides the first ex post analysis of food security impacts of GM crops at the micro level. We use comprehensive panel data collected over several years from farm households in India, where insect-resistant GM cotton has been widely adopted. Controlling for other factors, the adoption of GM cotton has significantly improved calorie consumption and dietary quality, resulting from increased family incomes. This technology has reduced food insecurity by 15-20% among cotton-producing households. GM crops alone will not solve the hunger problem, but they can be an important component in a broader food security strategy. PMID:23755155

  14. [Assessment of allergenicity of genetically modified food crops].

    PubMed

    Schauzu, M; Pöting, A; Rubin, D; Lampen, A

    2012-03-01

    The placing on the European Union's market of genetically modified crops requires authorization by the European Commission which is based on the proof that the derived foods are as safe as their conventional counterparts. The assessment of potential allergenicity is part of the necessary investigations recommended in the updated Guidance Document of the Scientific Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which is based on internationally agreed recommendations. All genetically modified crops which so far have been authorized in the European Union were evaluated by the EFSA GMO Panel which considered it unlikely that their overall allergenicity has been altered. PMID:22373855

  15. GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS: HEALTH AND SAFETY ISSUES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Javed Akhter; Mohammed Qutub; Norman Burnham

    2001-01-01

    For thousands of years, humans have taken advantage of naturally occurring genetic variation within species to selectively breed organisms with desirable traits. Many of the characteristics of domestic animals and agricultural crops have been developed through selective breeding. What is revolutionary about genetic engineering is that it involves the transfer of genetic material between organisms that would never be able

  16. Creation of a Metabolic Sink for Tryptophan Alters the Phenylpropanoid Pathway and the Susceptibility of Potato

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kening Yao; Vincenzo De Luca; Normand Brisson

    The creation of artificial metabolic sinks in plants by genetic engineering of key branch points may have serious conse- quences for the metabolic pathways being modified. The introduction into potato of a gene encoding tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) isolated from Catharanthus roseus drastically altered the balance of key substrate and product pools involved in the shikimate and phenylpropanoid pathways. Transgenic potato

  17. Genetically modified crops: Brazilian law and overview.

    PubMed

    Marinho, C D; Martins, F J O; Amaral Júnior, A T; Gonçalves, L S A; dos Santos, O J A P; Alves, D P; Brasileiro, B P; Peternelli, L A

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the first genetically modified (GM) crop was released in 1998, and it is estimated that 84, 78, and 50% of crop areas containing soybean, corn, and cotton, respectively, were transgenic in 2012. This intense and rapid adoption rate confirms that the choice to use technology has been the main factor in developing national agriculture. Thus, this review focuses on understanding these dynamics in the context of farmers, trade relations, and legislation. To accomplish this goal, a survey was conducted using the database of the National Cultivar Registry and the National Service for Plant Variety Protection of the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply [Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento (MAPA)] between 1998 and October 13, 2013. To date, 36 events have been released: five for soybeans, 18 for corn, 12 for cotton, and one for beans. From these events, 1395 cultivars have been developed and registered: 582 for soybean, 783 for corn and 30 for cotton. Monsanto owns 73.05% of the technologies used to develop these cultivars, while the Dow AgroScience - DuPont partnership and Syngenta have 16.34 and 4.37% ownership, respectively. Thus, the provision of transgenic seeds by these companies is an oligopoly supported by legislation. Moreover, there has been a rapid replacement of conventional crops by GM crops, whose technologies belong almost exclusively to four multinational companies, with the major ownership by Monsanto. These results reflect a warning to the government of the increased dependence on multinational corporations for key agricultural commodities. PMID:25061747

  18. 2007 POTATO BREEDING AND GENETICS RESEARCH REPORT David S. Douches, J. Coombs, K. Zarka, D. Berry, D. Kells, and E. Estelle

    E-print Network

    Douches, David S.

    2007 POTATO BREEDING AND GENETICS RESEARCH REPORT David S. Douches, J. Coombs, K. Zarka, D. Berry INTRODUCTION At Michigan State University we are breeding potatoes for the chip-processing and tablestock markets. The program is one of four integrated breeding program in the North Central region. At MSU, we

  19. Assessment of genetic diversity among Indian potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) collection using microsatellite and retrotransposon based marker systems.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishakha; Nandineni, Madhusudan R

    2014-04-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is an important non-cereal crop throughout the world and is highly recommended for ensuring global food security. Owing to the complexities in genetics and inheritance pattern of potato, the conventional method of cross breeding for developing improved varieties has been difficult. Identification and tagging of desirable traits with informative molecular markers would aid in the development of improved varieties. Insertional polymorphism of copia-like and gypsy-like long terminal repeat retrotransposons (RTN) were investigated among 47 potato varieties from India using Inter-Retrotransposon Amplified Polymorphism (IRAP) and Retrotransposon Microsatellite Amplified Polymorphism (REMAP) marker techniques and were compared with the DNA profiles obtained with simple sequence repeats (SSRs). The genetic polymorphism, efficiency of polymorphism and effectiveness of marker systems were evaluated to assess the extent of genetic diversity among Indian potato varieties. A total of 139 polymorphic SSR alleles, 270 IRAP and 98 REMAP polymorphic bands, showing polymorphism of 100%, 87.9% and 68.5%, respectively, were used for detailed characterization of the genetic relationships among potato varieties by using cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). IRAP analysis resulted in the highest number of polymorphic bands with an average of 15 polymorphic bands per assay unit when compared to the other two marker systems. Based on pair-wise comparison, the genetic similarity was calculated using Dice similarity coefficient. The SSRs showed a wide range in genetic similarity values (0.485-0.971) as compared to IRAP (0.69-0.911) and REMAP (0.713-0.947). A Mantel's matrix correspondence test showed a high positive correlation (r=0.6) between IRAP and REMAP, an intermediate value (r=0.58) for IRAP and SSR and the lowest value (r=0.17) for SSR and REMAP. Statistically significant cophenetic correlation coefficient values, of 0.961, 0.941 and 0.905 were observed for REMAP, IRAP and SSR, respectively. The widespread presence and distinct DNA profiles for copia-like and gypsy-like RTNs in the examined genotypes indicate that these elements are active in the genome and may have even contributed to the potato genome organization. Although the three marker systems were capable of distinguishing all the 47 varieties; high reproducibility, low cost and ease of DNA profiling data collection make IRAP and REMAP markers highly efficient whole-genome scanning molecular probes for population genetic studies. Information obtained from the present study regarding the genetic association and distinctiveness provides an useful guide for selection of germplasm for plant breeding and conservation efforts. PMID:24440815

  20. Global Genetics and Invasion History of the Potato Powdery Scab Pathogen, Spongospora subterranea f.sp. subterranea

    PubMed Central

    Gau, Rebecca D.; Merz, Ueli; Falloon, Richard E.; Brunner, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Spongospora subterranea f. sp. subterranea (Sss) causes two diseases on potato (Solanum tuberosum), lesions on tubers and galls on roots, which are economically important worldwide. Knowledge of global genetic diversity and population structure of pathogens is essential for disease management including resistance breeding. A combination of microsatellite and DNA sequence data was used to investigate the structure and invasion history of Sss. South American populations (four countries, 132 samples) were consistently more diverse than those from all other regions (15 countries, 566 samples), in agreement with the hypothesis that Sss originated in South America where potato was domesticated. A substantial genetic differenciation was found between root and tuber-derived samples from South America. Estimates of past and recent gene flow suggested that Sss was probably introduced from South America into Europe. Subsequently, Europe is likely to have been the recent source of migrants of the pathogen, acting as a “bridgehead” for further global dissemination. Quarantine measures must continue to be focussed on maintaining low global genetic diversity and avoiding exchange of genetic material between the native and introduced regions. Nevertheless, the current low global genetic diversity of Sss allows potato breeders to select for resistance, which is likely to be durable. PMID:23840791

  1. Gene Flow in Genetically Modified Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Rieben, Silvan; Kalinina, Olena; Schmid, Bernhard; Zeller, Simon L.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding gene flow in genetically modified (GM) crops is critical to answering questions regarding risk-assessment and the coexistence of GM and non-GM crops. In two field experiments, we tested whether rates of cross-pollination differed between GM and non-GM lines of the predominantly self-pollinating wheat Triticum aestivum. In the first experiment, outcrossing was studied within the field by planting “phytometers” of one line into stands of another line. In the second experiment, outcrossing was studied over distances of 0.5–2.5 m from a central patch of pollen donors to adjacent patches of pollen recipients. Cross-pollination and outcrossing was detected when offspring of a pollen recipient without a particular transgene contained this transgene in heterozygous condition. The GM lines had been produced from the varieties Bobwhite or Frisal and contained Pm3b or chitinase/glucanase transgenes, respectively, in homozygous condition. These transgenes increase plant resistance against pathogenic fungi. Although the overall outcrossing rate in the first experiment was only 3.4%, Bobwhite GM lines containing the Pm3b transgene were six times more likely than non-GM control lines to produce outcrossed offspring. There was additional variation in outcrossing rate among the four GM-lines, presumably due to the different transgene insertion events. Among the pollen donors, the Frisal GM line expressing a chitinase transgene caused more outcrossing than the GM line expressing both a chitinase and a glucanase transgene. In the second experiment, outcrossing after cross-pollination declined from 0.7–0.03% over the test distances of 0.5–2.5 m. Our results suggest that pollen-mediated gene flow between GM and non-GM wheat might only be a concern if it occurs within fields, e.g. due to seed contamination. Methodologically our study demonstrates that outcrossing rates between transgenic and other lines within crops can be assessed using a phytometer approach and that gene-flow distances can be efficiently estimated with population-level PCR analyses. PMID:22216349

  2. Review: genetically modified plants for the promotion of human health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keiko Yonekura-Sakakibara; Kazuki Saito

    2006-01-01

    Plants are attractive biological resources because of their ability to produce a huge variety of chemical compounds, and the familiarity of production in even the most rural settings. Genetic engineering gives plants additional characteristics and value for cultivation and post-harvest. Genetically modified (GM) plants of the “first generation” were conferred with traits beneficial to producers, whereas GM plants in subsequent

  3. Genetically modified ingredients in animal nutrition: Their safety and future

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Chesson; H. J. Flint

    SUMMARY -The immense potential of genetic manipulation techniques is now being realized with a dramatic increase in the agricultural and industrial use of modified plants and microorganisms. Many animal feeds now include material from crop plants that have been modified for characteristics such as disease or pest resistance that are unlikely to affect their nutritional value. In addition crop plants

  4. Genetic, Physiological, and Environmental Factors Affecting Acrylamide Concentration in Fried Potato Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The discovery of acrylamide in processed potato products has brought increased interest in the controlling Maillard reaction precursors (reducing sugars and amino acids) in potato tubers. Because of their effects on nonenzymatic browning of fried potato products, reducing sugars and amino acids have...

  5. Genetically modified foods: safety, risks and public concerns-a review.

    PubMed

    Bawa, A S; Anilakumar, K R

    2013-12-01

    Genetic modification is a special set of gene technology that alters the genetic machinery of such living organisms as animals, plants or microorganisms. Combining genes from different organisms is known as recombinant DNA technology and the resulting organism is said to be 'Genetically modified (GM)', 'Genetically engineered' or 'Transgenic'. The principal transgenic crops grown commercially in field are herbicide and insecticide resistant soybeans, corn, cotton and canola. Other crops grown commercially and/or field-tested are sweet potato resistant to a virus that could destroy most of the African harvest, rice with increased iron and vitamins that may alleviate chronic malnutrition in Asian countries and a variety of plants that are able to survive weather extremes. There are bananas that produce human vaccines against infectious diseases such as hepatitis B, fish that mature more quickly, fruit and nut trees that yield years earlier and plants that produce new plastics with unique properties. Technologies for genetically modifying foods offer dramatic promise for meeting some areas of greatest challenge for the 21st century. Like all new technologies, they also pose some risks, both known and unknown. Controversies and public concern surrounding GM foods and crops commonly focus on human and environmental safety, labelling and consumer choice, intellectual property rights, ethics, food security, poverty reduction and environmental conservation. With this new technology on gene manipulation what are the risks of "tampering with Mother Nature"?, what effects will this have on the environment?, what are the health concerns that consumers should be aware of? and is recombinant technology really beneficial? This review will also address some major concerns about the safety, environmental and ecological risks and health hazards involved with GM foods and recombinant technology. PMID:24426015

  6. [Genetic variability and differentiation of three Russian populations of yellow potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis as revealed by nuclear markers].

    PubMed

    Khrisanfova, G G; Kharchevnikov, D A; Popov, I O; Zinov'eva, S V; Semenova, S K

    2008-05-01

    Genetic variability of yellow potato cyst nematode G. rostochiensis from three Russian populations (Karelia, Vladimir oblast, and Moscow oblast) was investigated using two types of nuclear markers. Using RAPD markers identified with the help of six random primers (P-29, OPA-10, OPT-14, OPA-11, OPB-11, and OPH-20), it was possible to distinguish Karelian population from the group consisting of the populations from two adjacent regions (Moscow oblast and Vladimir oblast). Based on the combined matrix, containing 294 RAPD fragments, dendrogram of genetic differences was constructed, and the indices of genetic divergence and partition (P, H, and G(st)), as well as the gene flow indices N(m) between the nematode samples examined, were calculated. The dendrogram structure, genetic diversity indices, and variations of genetic distances between single individuals in each population from Karelia and Central Russia pointed to genetic isolation and higher genetic diversity of the nematodes from Karelia. Based on polymorphism of rDNA first intergenic spacer ITS1, attribution of all populations examined to the species G. rostochiensis was proved. Small variations of the ITS1 sequence in different geographic populations of nematodes from different regions of the species world range did not allow isolation of separate groups within the species. Possible factors (including interregional transportations of seed potato) affecting nematode population structure in Russia are discussed. PMID:18672794

  7. Potential allergenicity research of Cry1C protein from genetically modified rice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Sishuo; He, Xiaoyun; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Ran, Wenjun; Liang, Lixing; Dai, Yunqing; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-07-01

    With the development of genetically modified crops, there has been a growing interest in available approaches to assess the potential allergenicity of novel gene products. We were not sure whether Cry1C could induce allergy. We examined the protein with three other proteins to determine the potential allergenicity of Cry1C protein from genetically modified rice. Female Brown Norway (BN) rats received 0.1 mg peanut agglutinin (PNA), 1mg potato acid phosphatase (PAP), 1mg ovalbumin (OVA) or 5 mg purified Cry1C protein dissolved in 1 mL water by daily gavage for 42 days to test potential allergenicity. Ten days after the last gavage, rats were orally challenged with antigens, and physiologic and immunologic responses were studied. In contrast to sensitization with PNA, PAP and OVA Cry1C protein did not induce antigen-specific IgG2a in BN rats. Cytokine expression, serum IgE and histamine levels and the number of eosinophils and mast cells in the blood of Cry1C group rats were comparable to the control group rats, which were treated with water alone. As Cry1C did not show any allergenicity, we make the following conclusion that the protein could be safety used in rice or other plants. PMID:22504668

  8. Genetic variation in potato virus M isolates infecting pepino (Solanum muricatum) in China.

    PubMed

    Ge, Beibei; He, Zhen; Zhang, Zhixiang; Wang, Hongqing; Li, Shifang

    2014-12-01

    Potato virus M (PVM, genus Carlavirus, family Betaflexviridae) is considered to be one of most economically important pathogens of pepino in China. However, the details and the mechanisms underlying PVM evolution are unknown. In this study, we determined and analyzed 40 TGB 1 gene sequences, 67 TGB 2 and TGB 3 gene sequences, and 88 CP and NABP gene sequences from viruses isolated from 19 samples of pepino (Solanum muricatum) and one sample of tomato (S. lycopersicum) collected from different areas of China. Recombination analysis identified only one clear recombinant in the TGB2-TGB3-CP region, but no recombinants were detected for each of the five individual genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all PVM isolates could be divided into at least two lineages in trees derived from the TGB 2, CP, and NABP gene sequences, and the lineages seemed to reflect geographical origin. The five PVM genes in this study were found to be under strong negative selection pressure. The PVM isolates examined showed frequent gene flow between the Chinese and European populations, and also within the Chinese population. Clear star phylogenies and the neutral equilibrium model test showed that pepino isolates of PVM appear to be experiencing a new expansion after a recent introduction into China, and these isolates display low levels of genetic diversity. To our knowledge, this study is the first report describing genetic structure, recombination, and gene flow in PVM populations, and it provides strong evolutionary evidence for the virus populations from different geographic regions of China. PMID:25233939

  9. Genetically modified plants for law enforcement applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Neal Stewart

    2002-01-01

    Plants are ubiquitous in the environment and have the unique ability to respond to their environment physiologically and through altered gene expression profiles (they cannot walk away). In addition, plant genetic transformation techniques and genomic information in plants are becoming increasingly advanced. We have been performing research to express the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) in plants. GFP emits green

  10. Implantation of Vascular Grafts Lined with Genetically Modified Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, James M.; Birinyi, Louis K.; Salomon, Robert N.; Libby, Peter; Callow, Allan D.; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1989-06-01

    The possibility of using the vascular endothelial cell as a target for gene replacement therapy was explored. Recombinant retroviruses were used to transduce the lacZ gene into endothelial cells harvested from mongrel dogs. Prosthetic vascular grafts seeded with the genetically modified cells were implanted as carotid interposition grafts into the dogs from which the original cells were harvested. Analysis of the graft 5 weeks after implantation revealed genetically modified endothelial cells lining the luminal surface of the graft. This technology could be used in the treatment of atherosclerosis disease and the design of new drug delivery systems.

  11. Genetically biodiverse potato cultivars grown on a suitable agricultural soil under compost amendment or mineral fertilization: yield, quality, genetic and epigenetic variations, soil properties.

    PubMed

    Cicatelli, Angela; Baldantoni, Daniela; Iovieno, Paola; Carotenuto, Maurizio; Alfani, Anna; De Feis, Italia; Castiglione, Stefano

    2014-09-15

    The use of compost for soil amendment is a promising agricultural practice environmentally and economically viable. In the framework of a wide research project designed to evaluate the effects of soil amendment with municipal solid waste compost in comparison with traditional mineral fertilization practices, 54 different cultivars (Cvs) of potatoes were AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) molecularly fingerprinted. The seven most genetically biodiverse potato Cvs were used to establish an experimental field in southern Italy. The field area was divided into two portions fertilized with compost (20 Mg ha(-1)) or with ammonium sulphate (200 kg ha(-1)). No significant differences in productivity, organoleptic characteristics and element concentrations were observed between the potato tubers obtained with both kinds of soil fertilization, while the tubers grown on compost amended soil showed, on average, higher K concentrations with respect to those grown on mineral fertilised soil. cDNA-AFLP (complementary DNA-AFLP) and MSAP (methylation sensitive amplified polymorphism) analyses were carried out on both leaves and tubers of one selected Cv to estimate if any transcriptome alterations or epigenetic modifications were induced by the two kinds of fertilization, however no variations were detected. Chemical and biological soil qualities (i.e., microbial respiration, FDA hydrolysis, alkaline and acid phosphatase) were assessed on soil samples at the start of the experiment and at the end of potato crop cycle. No significant differences in soil pH and limited ones, in the available fraction of some trace elements, were observed; while conductivity was much higher for the compost amended portion of the experimental field. Microbial respiration, FDA hydrolysis and acid phosphatase activities were significantly increased by compost amendment, in comparison with mineral fertilization. Finally, a sensory panel of potato Cvs detected no significant differences among qualitative descriptors and among potatoes coming from the two differently fertilized soils. PMID:25016108

  12. Huntingtin Interacting Proteins Are Genetic Modifiers of Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Becklin, Robert R; Chettier, Rakesh; Bell, Russell; Phansalkar, Amit; Strand, Andrew; Torcassi, Cameron; Savage, Justin; Hurlburt, Anthony; Cha, Guang-Ho; Ukani, Lubna; Chepanoske, Cindy Lou; Zhen, Yuejun; Sahasrabudhe, Sudhir; Olson, James; Kurschner, Cornelia; Ellerby, Lisa M; Peltier, John M; Botas, Juan; Hughes, Robert E

    2007-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by expansion of the polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. Neuronal toxicity in HD is thought to be, at least in part, a consequence of protein interactions involving mutant Htt. We therefore hypothesized that genetic modifiers of HD neurodegeneration should be enriched among Htt protein interactors. To test this idea, we identified a comprehensive set of Htt interactors using two complementary approaches: high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screening and affinity pull down followed by mass spectrometry. This effort led to the identification of 234 high-confidence Htt-associated proteins, 104 of which were found with the yeast method and 130 with the pull downs. We then tested an arbitrary set of 60 genes encoding interacting proteins for their ability to behave as genetic modifiers of neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of HD. This high-content validation assay showed that 27 of 60 orthologs tested were high-confidence genetic modifiers, as modification was observed with more than one allele. The 45% hit rate for genetic modifiers seen among the interactors is an order of magnitude higher than the 1%–4% typically observed in unbiased genetic screens. Genetic modifiers were similarly represented among proteins discovered using yeast two-hybrid and pull-down/mass spectrometry methods, supporting the notion that these complementary technologies are equally useful in identifying biologically relevant proteins. Interacting proteins confirmed as modifiers of the neurodegeneration phenotype represent a diverse array of biological functions, including synaptic transmission, cytoskeletal organization, signal transduction, and transcription. Among the modifiers were 17 loss-of-function suppressors of neurodegeneration, which can be considered potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Finally, we show that seven interacting proteins from among 11 tested were able to co-immunoprecipitate with full-length Htt from mouse brain. These studies demonstrate that high-throughput screening for protein interactions combined with genetic validation in a model organism is a powerful approach for identifying novel candidate modifiers of polyglutamine toxicity. PMID:17500595

  13. Genetic diversity and origin of cultivated potatoes based on plastid microsatellite polymorphism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined, with 15 plastid microsatellite loci and with the 241 bp deletion marker characteristic of Chilean S. tuberosum, 392 accessions of cultivated and wild potato species, mostly from the experimental subset of the Russian National potato collection, recently characterized by nuclear microsat...

  14. Genetically modified plants for tactical systems applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.

    2002-08-01

    Plants are ubiquitous in the environment and have the ability to respond to their environment physiologically and through altered gene expression profiles (they cannot walk away). In addition, plant genetic transformation techniques and genomic information in plants are becoming increasingly advanced. We have been performing research to express the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) in plants. GFP emits green light when excited by blue or UV light. In addition, my group and collaborators have developed methods to detect GFP in plants by contact instruments and at a standoff. There are several tactical uses for this technology. Some obvious applications are using plants as sentinels for detecting biological and chemical warfare agents or their derivatives from a remote platform, as well as detecting explosives. Another tactical application is covert monitoring using individual plants. Different methods to detect GFP in transgenic plants will be discussed.

  15. Genetic Modifiers of Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Joshua W.; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex, multifactorial disease with both genetic and environmental determinants. Experimental investigation of the effects of these determinants on the development and progression of atherosclerosis has been greatly facilitated by the use of targeted mouse models of the disease, particularly those resulting from the absence of functional genes for apolipoprotein E or the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). This review focuses on the influence on atherosclerosis of combining apoE or LDLR deficiencies with factors affecting atherogenesis, including (1) inflammatory processes, (2) glucose metabolism, (3) blood pressure, and (4) coagulation and fibrinolysis. We also discuss the general problem of using the mouse to test the effects on atherogenesis of human polymorphic variations and future ways of enhancing the usefulness of these mouse models. PMID:11073835

  16. Japanese Consumers’ Valuation of Genetically Modified Functional Foods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renee B Kim

    2009-01-01

    Recent food safety scares have increased Japanese consumers’ concerns for food safety and Genetically Modified (GM) foods as they perceive the uncertainty associated with GM foods as potential risk. However, this risk perception can be considerably reduced as the consumers observe or experience the benefits of GM foods directly. Technical advancement in GM food development and manufacturing has led to

  17. GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS: CONSUMERS' ATTITUDES AND LABELING ISSUES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michele M. Veeman; Wiktor L. Adamowicz

    2004-01-01

    Consumers' attitudes to genetically modified (GM) food ingredients and their reactions to and preferences for labeling of GM food are topical issues for Canadian food policy and are the subjects of this study. This project included several components. The first of these was an assessment of public attitudes to biotechnology and to GM food based on evidence from polls and

  18. Response Dimensions Towards Genetically Modified Foods: A Consumer Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Quazi; Gamini Herath

    2002-01-01

    Increasing public awareness of genetically modified (GM) foods and their availability on retail store shelves has resulted in profound cleavages of opinions amongst various interest groups regarding the possible risks they pose to consumers and their ethical implications. This paper proposes that response patterns of consumers may depend upon their moral and ethical orientations. This paper suggests that clearer groupings

  19. On consumers’ willingness to purchase nutritionally enhanced genetically modified food

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maurizio Canavari; Rodolfo M. Nayga Jr

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses consumers' willingness to purchase genetically modified (GM) food products with two different types of benefits: an input (i.e., reduced pesticides) and an output trait benefit (i.e., nutritionally enhanced). Data were collected using a telephone survey of an Italian households sample. Discrete choice approach is used to elicit the purchase intentions of the respondents. Four separate probit models

  20. Regulatory control of genetically modified (GM) foods: likely developments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Constable

    2002-01-01

    The placing of genetically modified (GM) crops on the European market requires a regulatory approval supported by a thorough safety evaluation. This approach has been applied to all GM crops presently on the market. Despite this stringent process there has been an increasing public concern about the impact of GM foods on human health and the environment. In this context,

  1. Consumer demands for organic and genetically modified foods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Donaghy; John Rolfe; Jeffrey W. Bennett

    2003-01-01

    Issues concerning consumer demands for genetically modified and organic food remain topical. It is unclear how consumers perceive issues associated with food production such as food safety, environmental impacts or animal welfare. It is also unclear how consumers might value potential changes in those issues in regional and metropolitan centres. This paper reports on research using the choice modelling technique

  2. Changing Consumer Perceptions About Genetically Modified Food Products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheryl J. Wachenheim

    2006-01-01

    Perceptions of college students about genetically modified (GM) food products and the role of agriculture and biotechnology in the environment were elicited. Perceptions were influenced bias in selection of information provided about environmental impacts of growing GM crop varieties. Information increased self-perceived level of knowledge among students and had unintended effects on perceptions of other crop production practices. Perceived risk

  3. Coexistence costs for genetically modified crops for Switzerland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregor Albisser Vögeli; Daniel Wolf; Markus Lips

    2010-01-01

    The ban on the commercial cultivation of genetically modified (GM) wheat and maize in Switzerland is expected to remain in force until 2013. Coexistence regulations in Switzerland and their resulting impacts on profitability will then require examination. In this paper we present time and cost calculations for what we consider to be the most critical of these coexistence measures. Coexistence

  4. CONSENSUS CONFERENCES ON GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD IN NORWAY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alf J. Mørkrid

    2001-01-01

    The report goes on to review the introduction and evolution of the use of consensus conferences in Norway, as well as their evaluation. The specific case of the 1996 consensus conference on genetically modified food is described in terms of its organisation, process and results. The key findings of the independent evaluation report on the consensus conference, issued in 1997,

  5. Perceptions of genetically modified crops among Danish farmers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lartey G. Lawson; Anders S. Larsen; Søren Marcus Pedersen; Morten Gylling

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate what factors have an impact on farmers' attitude toward accepting genetically modified (GM) crops. For this purpose, a farm survey was conducted and data were subjected to a multinomial logit regression analysis. The main results indicate that approximately 45%, 28%, and 27% of the farmers are positive, negative, and neutral, respectively, toward

  6. Huntingtin Interacting Proteins Are Genetic Modifiers of Neurodegeneration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda S Kaltenbach; Eliana Romero; Robert R Becklin; Rakesh Chettier; Russell Bell; Amit Phansalkar; Andrew Strand; Cameron Torcassi; Justin Savage; Anthony Hurlburt; Guang-Ho Cha; Lubna Ukani; Cindy Lou Chepanoske; Yuejun Zhen; Sudhir Sahasrabudhe; James Olson; Cornelia Kurschner; Lisa M Ellerby; John M Peltier; Juan Botas; Robert E Hughes

    2007-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by expansion of the polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. Neuronal toxicity in HD is thought to be, at least in part, a consequence of protein interactions involving mutant Htt. We therefore hypothesized that genetic modifiers of HD neurodegeneration should be enriched among Htt protein interactors. To test this idea,

  7. Genetically modified crops and country image of food exporting countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John G. Knight; Damien W. Mather; David K. Holdsworth

    2005-01-01

    Purpose – Many countries have held back from planting genetically modified (GM) food crops due to perceived negative reaction in export and domestic markets. Three lines of research have tested the reality of this fear. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – In-depth interviews were conducted in European countries with key companies and organisations in the European food sector. Supermarket intercepts were used to ascertain

  8. LABELING, TRADE AND GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS (GMOS): A PROPOSED SOLUTION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Ford Runge; Lee Ann Jackson

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this brief article is to assess the current controversy over Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) in agriculture and its potential implications for the global trading system. More importantly, it offers a solution to the serious potential for injury to this system, to be developed below. The remainder of this article is divided into three sections. The next section

  9. RESEARCH ARTICLE Seed bank persistence of genetically modified canola

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Seed bank persistence of genetically modified canola in California Douglas J of glyphosate. Methods Volunteer from dormant canola seeds produced thousands of plants per hectare in the fourth year (2011) following a 2007 crop harvest. This occurred with no addi- tional canola seed

  10. Attitudes of agricultural scientists in Indonesia towards genetically modified foods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judhiastuty Februhartanty; Tri Nisa Widyastuti; Dwi Nastiti Iswarawanti

    Conflicting arguments and partial truths on genetically modified (GM) foods have left confusion. Although studies of consumer acceptance of GM foods are numerous, the study of scientists is limited. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to assess the attitudes of scientists towards GM foods. The study was a cross sectional study. A total of 400 scientists (involved in

  11. Detection of genetically modified soybean by monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2004-01-01

    RationaleThe safety of Genetically modified (GM) soy still remains controversial despite its advantages in cultivation. Since soy has been consumed commonly in Korea, it is necessary to investigate for developing detection methods of GM soy which carries the added gene and express 5-enol-pyruvyl-shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) in foods.

  12. Use of Genetically Modified Viruses and Genetically Engineered Virus-vector Vaccines: Environmental Effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vivian S. W. Chan

    2006-01-01

    Despite major therapeutic advances, infectious diseases remain highly problematic. Recent advancements in technology in producing DNA-based vaccines, together with the growing knowledge of the immune system, have provided new insights into the identification of the epitopes needed to target the development of highly targeted vaccines. Genetically modified (GM) viruses and genetically engineered virus-vector vaccines possess significant unpredictability and a number

  13. [Genetics and modifier genes, atypical and rare forms].

    PubMed

    Férec, C; Scotet, V; Beucher, J; Corvol, H

    2012-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is defined as the most common life shortening genetic disorder in the Caucasian populations. The cloning of the gene responsible for the disease - the CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator) gene - twenty years ago has greatly improved our knowledge of the pathophysiology of CF. That disease is characterized by a highly phenotypic variability and the CFTR mutations cannot explain all the variability observed in the disease severity. The possible influence of the environment and modifier genes has therefore been evocated. Several genetic variants coding for genes involved in the physiopathology of the disease have been studied, like genes involve in the immunity and the inflammatory response. Some of these genes have indeed been shown to influence the disease severity. A new approach has also been developed, analyzing the whole genome. This review summarizes the genetic basis of CF in its classical and atypical forms, as well as the work performed in the field of modifier genes. PMID:22682487

  14. Early Institutionalization: Neurobiological Consequences and Genetic Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Drury, Stacy; McLaughlin, Kate; Almas, Alisa

    2011-01-01

    Children raised in the profound deprivation associated with institutionalization are at elevated risk for negative outcomes across a host of social and cognitive domains. This risk appears to be mitigated by early foster care or adoption into a family setting. Although pervasive developmental problems have been noted in a substantial proportion of previously institutionalized children, marked variation exists in the nature and severity of these deficits. Increasing evidence suggests that institutional deprivation impacts the developing brain, potentially underlying the wide range of outcomes with which it is associated. In the current review we examine the neural consequences of institutionalization and genetic factors associated with differences in outcome in an effort to characterize the consequences of early deprivation at a neurobiological level. Although the effects of institutional deprivation have been studied for more than 50 years much remains unanswered regarding the pathways through which institutionalization impacts child development. Through a more complete and nuanced assessment of the neural correlates of exposure and recovery as well as a better understanding of the individual factors involved we will be better able to delineate the impact of early adversity in the setting of severe social deprivation. PMID:21042937

  15. Methodological scheme for designing the monitoring of genetically modified crops at the regional scale.

    PubMed

    Graef, F; Züghart, W; Hommel, B; Heinrich, U; Stachow, U; Werner, A

    2005-12-01

    According to EC regulations the deliberate release of genetically modified (GM) crops into the agro-environment needs to be accompanied by environmental monitoring to detect potential adverse effects, e.g. unacceptable levels of gene flow from GM to non-GM crops, or adverse effects on single species or species groups thus reducing biodiversity. There is, however, considerable scientific and public debate on how GM crops should be monitored with sufficient accuracy, discussing questions of potential adverse effects, agro-environmental variables or indicators to be monitored and respective detection methods; Another basic component, the appropriate number and location of monitoring sites, is hardly considered. Currently, no consistent GM crop monitoring approach combines these components systematically. This study focuses on and integrates spatial agro-environmental aspects at a landscape level in order to design monitoring networks. Based on examples of environmental variables associated with the cropping of Bt-Maize (Zea maize L.), herbicide-tolerant (HT) winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), HT sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), and starch-modified potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), we develop a transferable framework and assessment scheme that comprises anticipated adverse environmental effects, variables to be measured and monitoring methods. These we integrate with a rule-based GIS (geographic information system) analysis, applying widely available spatial area and point information from existing environmental networks. This is used to develop scenarios with optimised regional GM crop monitoring networks. PMID:16311819

  16. GenAnneal: Genetically modified Simulated Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoulos, Ioannis G.; Lagaris, Isaac E.

    2006-05-01

    A modification of the standard Simulated Annealing (SA) algorithm is presented for finding the global minimum of a continuous multidimensional, multimodal function. We report results of computational experiments with a set of test functions and we compare to methods of similar structure. The accompanying software accepts objective functions coded both in Fortran 77 and C++. Program summaryTitle of program:GenAnneal Catalogue identifier:ADXI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXI_v1_0 Program available from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: The tool is designed to be portable in all systems running the GNU C++ compiler Installation: University of Ioannina, Greece on Linux based machines Programming language used:GNU-C++, GNU-C, GNU Fortran 77 Memory required to execute with typical data: 200 KB No. of bits in a word: 32 No. of processors used: 1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: No No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:84 885 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:14 896 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: A multitude of problems in science and engineering are often reduced to minimizing a function of many variables. There are instances that a local optimum does not correspond to the desired physical solution and hence the search for a better solution is required. Local optimization techniques are frequently trapped in local minima. Global optimization is hence the appropriate tool. For example, solving a non-linear system of equations via optimization, employing a "least squares" type of objective, one may encounter many local minima that do not correspond to solutions (i.e. they are far from zero). Typical running time: Depending on the objective function. Method of solution: We modified the process of step selection that the traditional Simulated Annealing employs and instead we used a global technique based on grammatical evolution.

  17. The Case of the "Tainted" Taco Shells: A Case Study on Genetically Modified Foods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ann T. S.

    2004-01-01

    This case study introduces students to the use of genetically modified foods. Students learn how genetically modified plants are made, and then they read primary literature papers to evaluate the environmental, economic, and health issues. (Contains 2 figures.)

  18. Resistance of potato germplasm to the potato tuberworm (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evaluation of potato accessions for resistance to potato tuberworm Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) is a valuable component of integrated pest management; however, few attempts have been made to identify natural genetic tuber resistance to tuberworm on potato germplasm. The objective of this stu...

  19. Genetic variation modifies risk for neurodegeneration based on biomarker status

    PubMed Central

    Hohman, Timothy J.; Koran, Mary Ellen I.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: While a great deal of work has gone into understanding the relationship between Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, brain atrophy, and disease progression, less work has attempted to investigate how genetic variation modifies these relationships. The goal of this study was two-fold. First, we sought to identify high-risk vs. low-risk individuals based on their CSF tau and A? load and characterize these individuals with regard to brain atrophy in an AD-relevant region of interest. Next, we sought to identify genetic variants that modified the relationship between biomarker classification and neurodegeneration. Methods: Participants were categorized based on established cut-points for biomarker positivity. Mixed model regression was used to quantify longitudinal change in the left inferior lateral ventricle. Interaction analyses between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and biomarker group status were performed using a genome wide association study (GWAS) approach. Correction for multiple comparisons was performed using the Bonferroni procedure. Results: One intergenic SNP (rs4866650) and one SNP within the SPTLC1 gene (rs7849530) modified the association between amyloid positivity and neurodegeneration. A transcript variant of WDR11-AS1 gene (rs12261764) modified the association between tau positivity and neurodegeneration. These effects were consistent across the two sub-datasets and explained approximately 3% of variance in ventricular dilation. One additional SNP (rs6887649) modified the association between amyloid positivity and baseline ventricular volume, but was not observed consistently across the sub-datasets. Conclusions: Genetic variation modifies the association between AD biomarkers and neurodegeneration. Genes that regulate the molecular response in the brain to oxidative stress may be particularly relevant to neural vulnerability to the damaging effects of amyloid-?. PMID:25140149

  20. A community genetics approach to understanding tri-trophic interactions in potato crops

    E-print Network

    Reece, Sarah

    feeding damage and plant virus transmission. Control of aphid infestations by non-chemical means can of the aphid parasitoid Aphidius ervi attacking the potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae when feeding on Solanum

  1. On the origin of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) genetic diversity in New Guinea, a secondary centre of diversity

    PubMed Central

    Roullier, C; Kambouo, R; Paofa, J; McKey, D; Lebot, V

    2013-01-01

    New Guinea is considered the most important secondary centre of diversity for sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). We analysed nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity of 417 New Guinea sweet potato landraces, representing agro-morphological diversity collected throughout the island, and compared this diversity with that in tropical America. The molecular data reveal moderate diversity across all accessions analysed, lower than that found in tropical America. Nuclear data confirm previous results, suggesting that New Guinea landraces are principally derived from the Northern neotropical genepool (Camote and Batata lines, from the Caribbean and Central America). However, chloroplast data suggest that South American clones (early Kumara line clones or, more probably, later reintroductions) were also introduced into New Guinea and then recombined with existing genotypes. The frequency distribution of pairwise distances between New Guinea landraces suggests that sexual reproduction, rather than somaclonal variation, has played a predominant role in the diversification of sweet potato. The frequent incorporation of plants issued from true seed by farmers, and the geographical and cultural barriers constraining crop diffusion in this topographically and linguistically heterogeneous island, has led to the accumulation of an impressive number of variants. As the diversification of sweet potato in New Guinea is primarily the result of farmers' management of the reproductive biology of their crop, we argue that on-farm conservation programmes that implement distribution of core samples (clones representing the useful diversity of the species) and promote on-farm selection of locally adapted variants may allow local communities to fashion relatively autonomous strategies for coping with ongoing global change. PMID:23531982

  2. Genetically modified organisms in agriculture: can regulations work?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Kothamasi; Saskia Vermeylen

    2011-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been recognised to be economically beneficial to subsistence farmers and have been projected\\u000a as essential tools for addressing challenges in hunger, environmental sustainability and international development. Yet the\\u000a uncertainty of their effects on human health and the undesirable ecological consequences of these organisms have raised concerns\\u000a on the rapid pace of their production. Regulating the

  3. The Detection of Genetically Modified Organisms: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovesná, Jaroslava; Demnerová, Kate?ina; Pouchová, Vladimíra

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are those whose genetic material has been altered by the insertion of a new gene or by the deletion of an existing one(s). Modern biotechnology, in particular, the rise of genetic engineering, has supported the development of GMOs suitable for research purposes and practical applications (Gepts, 2002; Novoselova,Meuwissen, & Huirne, 2007; Sakakibara & Saito, 2006). For over 20 years GM bacteria and other GM organisms have been used in laboratories for the study of gene functions (Maliga & Small, 2007; Ratledge & Kristiansen, 2006). Agricultural plants were the first GMOs to be released into the environment and placed on the market. Farmers around the world use GMsoybeans, GMcorn and GM cotton that are herbicide tolerant, or insect resistant, or combine several traits that reduce the costs associated with crop production (Corinne, Fernandez-Cornejo, & Goodhue, 2004).

  4. Genetically modified yeast species and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    DOEpatents

    Rajgarhia, Vineet (Kingsport, TN); Koivuranta, Kari (Helsinki, FI); Penttila, Merja (Helsinki, FI); Ilmen, Marja (Helsinki, FI); Suominen, Pirkko (Maple Grove, MN); Aristidou, Aristos (Maple Grove, MN); Miller, Christopher Kenneth (Cottage Grove, MN); Olson, Stacey (St. Bonifacius, MN); Ruohonen, Laura (Helsinki, FI)

    2011-05-17

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications', include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  5. Barriers to application of genetically modified lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Verrips, C T; van den Berg, D J

    1996-10-01

    To increase the acceptability of food products containing genetically modified microorganisms it is necessary to provide in an early stage to the consumers that the product is safe and that the product provide a clear benefit to the consumer. To comply with the first requirement a systematic approach to analyze the probability that genetically modified lactic acid bacteria will transform other inhabitants of the gastro- intestinal (G/I) tract or that these lactic acid bacteria will pick up genetic information of these inhabitants has been proposed and worked out to some degree. From this analysis it is clear that reliable data are still missing to carry out complete risk assessment. However, on the basis of present knowledge, lactic acid bacteria containing conjugative plasmids should be avoided. Various studies show that consumers in developed countries will accept these products when they offer to them health or taste benefits or a better keepability. For the developing countries the biggest challenge for scientists is most likely to make indigenous fermented food products with strongly improved microbiological stability due to broad spectra bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria. Moreover, these lactic acid bacteria may contribute to health. PMID:8879412

  6. [Genetically modified organisms: a new threat to food safety].

    PubMed

    Spendeler, Liliane

    2005-01-01

    This article analyzes all of the food safety-related aspects related to the use of genetically modified organisms into agriculture and food. A discussion is provided as to the uncertainties related to the insertion of foreign genes into organisms, providing examples of unforeseen, undesirable effects and of instabilities of the organisms thus artificially fabricated. Data is then provided from both official agencies as well as existing literature questioning the accuracy and reliability of the risk analyses as to these organisms being harmless to health and discusses the almost total lack of scientific studies analyzing the health safety/dangerousness of transgenic foods. Given all these unknowns, other factors must be taken into account, particularly genetic contamination of the non-genetically modified crops, which is now starting to become widespread in some parts of the world. Not being able of reversing the situation in the even of problems is irresponsible. Other major aspects are the impacts on the environment (such as insects building up resistances, the loss of biodiversity, the increase in chemical products employed) with indirect repercussions on health and/or future food production. Lastly, thoughts for discussion are added concerning food safety in terms of food availability and food sovereignty, given that the transgenic seed and related agrochemicals market is currently cornered by five large-scale transnational companies. The conclusion entails an analysis of biotechnological agriculture's contribution to sustainability. PMID:15913060

  7. Sequence-modified primers for the differential RT-PCR detection of Andean potato latent and Andean potato mild mosaic viruses in quarantine tests.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Renate; Ziebell, Heiko

    2014-05-01

    To enable the differential PCR detection of Andean potato latent virus (APLV) and Andean potato mild mosaic virus (APMMV) strains, sense primers were designed that correspond to regions directly upstream of the coat protein genes. Their differentiating power was increased by A->C or T->C replacements in their 3'-terminal parts. Together with the broad-specificity antisense primer EM3, primer AL-a-mod3C detected all APLV strains tested, but none of the APMMV strains. Primer AM-a-mod4C yielded PCR products with all APMMV preparations, but also with some APLV preparations. Sequence analysis revealed that this was not due to a lack of primer specificity, but to the sensitive detection of contaminating APMMV in some of our APLV preparations. PMID:24221248

  8. Predicting genetic richness at wild potato collection sites in southeastern Arizona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It takes a lot of time and money to collect even a fraction of the potential geographic range of wild potato species, so there is efficiency to gain if one could predict diversity “hot spots” for collecting. A previous experiment that used AFLPs to compare “remote” versus “easy” collection sites wit...

  9. Successful prediction of genetic richness at wild potato collection sites in southeastern Arizona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much time, money, and effort is needed to collect even a fraction of the potential geographic range of wild potato species, so there is efficiency to gain if one could predict and prioritize spots particularly rich in unique alleles for collecting. A previous experiment that used AFLP markers to com...

  10. Association genetics in Solanum tuberosum provides new insights into potato tuber bruising and enzymatic tissue discoloration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claude Urbany; Benjamin Stich; Lysann Schmidt; Ludwig Simon; Hergen Berding; Holger Junghans; Karl-Heinz Niehoff; Alexander Braun; Eckhard Tacke; Hans-Rheinhardt Hofferbert; Jens Lübeck; Josef Strahwald; Christiane Gebhardt

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most agronomic plant traits result from complex molecular networks involving multiple genes and from environmental factors. One such trait is the enzymatic discoloration of fruit and tuber tissues initiated by mechanical impact (bruising). Tuber susceptibility to bruising is a complex trait of the cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum) that is crucial for crop quality. As phenotypic evaluation of bruising is

  11. Benefits and risks associated with genetically modified food products.

    PubMed

    Kramkowska, Marta; Grzelak, Teresa; Czy?ewska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Scientists employing methods of genetic engineering have developed a new group of living organisms, termed 'modified organisms', which found application in, among others, medicine, the pharmaceutical industry and food distribution. The introduction of transgenic products to the food market resulted in them becoming a controversial topic, with their proponents and contestants. The presented study aims to systematize objective data on the potential benefits and risks resulting from the consumption of transgenic food. Genetic modifications of plants and animals are justified by the potential for improvement of the food situation worldwide, an increase in yield crops, an increase in the nutritional value of food, and the development of pharmaceutical preparations of proven clinical significance. In the opinions of critics, however, transgenic food may unfavourably affect the health of consumers. Therefore, particular attention was devoted to the short- and long-lasting undesirable effects, such as alimentary allergies, synthesis of toxic agents or resistance to antibiotics. Examples arguing for the justified character of genetic modifications and cases proving that their use can be dangerous are innumerable. In view of the presented facts, however, complex studies are indispensable which, in a reliable way, evaluate effects linked to the consumption of food produced with the application of genetic engineering techniques. Whether one backs up or negates transgenic products, the choice between traditional and non-conventional food remains to be decided exclusively by the consumers. PMID:24069841

  12. Information system for monitoring environmental impacts of genetically modified organisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hauke Reuter; Ulrike Middelhoff; Frieder Graef; Richard Verhoeven; Thomas Batz; Martin Weis; Gunther Schmidt; Winfried Schröder; Broder Breckling

    2010-01-01

    Background, aim and scope  European legislation stipulates that genetically modified organisms (GMO) have to be monitored to identify potential adverse\\u000a environmental effects. A wealth of different types of monitoring data from various sources including existing environmental\\u000a monitoring programmes is expected to accumulate. This requires an information system to efficiently structure, process and\\u000a evaluate the monitoring data.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A structure for an Information

  13. [The lack of information on genetically modified organisms in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Isabelle Geoffroy; Marin, Victor Augustus

    2012-02-01

    This article presents a review about the labeling of products that have Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO), also called transgenic elements in their composition. It addresses the conventions, laws and regulations relating to such products currently governing the market, the adequacy of these existing standards and their acceptance by society. It also examines the importance of the cautionary principle when assessing the application of new technologies or technologies where little is known or where there is no relevant scientific knowledge about the potential risks to the environment, human health and society. PMID:22267031

  14. [Unintended effects assessment of genetically modified crops using omics techniques].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Li, Yan-Yan

    2013-12-01

    Safety assessment is the essential process for commercial application of genetically modified (GM) crops. Omics techniques can be used to evaluate the safety of GM crops unbiasedly at different biological levels, such as transcripts, proteins and metabolites. In the present review, the researches on unintended effects assessment of GM crops using transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques in recent ten years have been summarized. The facts show that the environmental factors (growing area and season) and genotype difference play greater roles than gene insertion does for most unintended variations in GM crops. PMID:24645345

  15. Safety assessment of genetically modified plants with deliberately altered composition.

    PubMed

    Halford, Nigel G; Hudson, Elizabeth; Gimson, Amy; Weightman, Richard; Shewry, Peter R; Tompkins, Steven

    2014-08-01

    The development and marketing of 'novel' genetically modified (GM) crops in which composition has been deliberately altered poses a challenge to the European Union (EU)'s risk assessment processes, which are based on the concept of substantial equivalence with a non-GM comparator. This article gives some examples of these novel GM crops and summarizes the conclusions of a report that was commissioned by the European Food Safety Authority on how the EU's risk assessment processes could be adapted to enable their safety to be assessed. PMID:24735114

  16. Safety assessment of genetically modified plants with deliberately altered composition

    PubMed Central

    Halford, Nigel G; Hudson, Elizabeth; Gimson, Amy; Weightman, Richard; Shewry, Peter R; Tompkins, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The development and marketing of ‘novel’ genetically modified (GM) crops in which composition has been deliberately altered poses a challenge to the European Union (EU)'s risk assessment processes, which are based on the concept of substantial equivalence with a non-GM comparator. This article gives some examples of these novel GM crops and summarizes the conclusions of a report that was commissioned by the European Food Safety Authority on how the EU's risk assessment processes could be adapted to enable their safety to be assessed. PMID:24735114

  17. Considerations for the assessment of the safety of genetically modified animals used for human food or animal feed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gijs A Kleter; Harry A Kuiper

    2002-01-01

    Genetically modified food and feed crops have entered the Western market, and genetically modified animals may follow in the near future. The issues that are commonly addressed in the assessment of the safety of genetically modified crops are discussed, as well as the analogous issues that may arise for genetically modified animals. For safety assessment, the degree of substantial equivalence

  18. Communicating about the risks and benefits of genetically modified foods. Effects of different information strategies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn Frewer; Joachim Scholderer; Clive Downs; Lone Bredahl

    2000-01-01

    The research reported here aimed to investigate the effects of different types of information about genetically modified foods on both consumer attitudes towards genetic modification and their tendency to choose genetically modified products (compared to more traditionally manufactured alternatives). The impact of information strategy (balanced, or product specific), attributed information source (The “European Association of Consumers”, the “European Association of

  19. Reforming the WTO to Defuse Potential Trade Conflicts in Genetically Modified Goods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas Perdikis; William A. Kerr Shelburne; Jill E. Hobbs

    2001-01-01

    Arguably genetic modification is one of the most important technological change seen to date. Its effects on both human health and the environment are both profound and controversial. In particular consumers, mainly in the EU, have concerns regarding the long term effects of consuming genetically modified foods on their health. They are also concerned regarding the effect that genetically modified

  20. A risk-based classification scheme for genetically modified foods I: Conceptual development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eunice Chao; Daniel Krewski

    2008-01-01

    The predominant paradigm for the premarket assessment of genetically modified (GM) foods reflects heightened public concern by focusing on foods modified by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) techniques, while foods modified by other methods of genetic modification are generally not assessed for safety. To determine whether a GM product requires less or more regulatory oversight and testing, we developed and evaluated

  1. Mucosal vaccination and therapy with genetically modified lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vehicles that overcome the problem of delivering functional proteins to the mucosal tissues. By the intranasal route, both live and killed LAB vaccine strains have been shown to elicit mucosal and systemic immune responses that afford protection against infectious challenges. To be effective via oral administration, frequent dosing over several weeks is required but new targeting and adjuvant strategies have clearly demonstrated the potential to increase the immunogenicity and protective immunity of LAB vaccines. Oral administration of Lactococcus lactis has been shown to induce antigen-specific oral tolerance (OT) to secreted recombinant antigens. LAB delivery is more efficient at inducing OT than the purified antigen, thus avoiding the need for purification of large quantities of antigen. This approach holds promise for new therapeutic interventions in allergies and antigen-induced autoimmune diseases. Several clinical and research reports demonstrate considerable progress in the application of genetically modified L. lactis for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). New medical targets are on the horizon, and the approval by several health authorities and biosafety committees of a containment system for a genetically modified L. lactis that secretes Il-10 should pave the way for new LAB delivery applications in the future. PMID:22129390

  2. [The genetic base and phenotypic manifestations of Colorado potato beetle resistance to organophosphorus insecticides].

    PubMed

    Ben'kovskaia, G V; Udalov, M B; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2008-05-01

    A high level of resistance to organophosphorus insecticides was recorded in a local population of the Colorado potato beetle (Ufa raion, Bashkortostan). Toxicological analysis demonstrated that the fraction of susceptible individuals did not exceed 0.025. DNA analysis of the polymorphism of acetylcholinesterase gene (AChE) according to the presence of mutation 989>AG in the sample of Colorado potato beetle imagoes demonstrated the absence of wild-type (sensitive, SS) homozygotes and prevalence (0.79) of the homozygotes with mutant resistant type (RR). The phenetic analysis of the variation of the integument pattern phenes demonstrated statistically significant differences between the imago phenotypes in the ratio of SS and RR genotypes. PMID:18672797

  3. Molecular scissors and their application in genetically modified farm animals.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Bjoern; Niemann, Heiner

    2015-06-01

    Molecular scissors (MS), incl. Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFN), Transcription-activator like endoncleases (TALENS) and meganucleases possess long recognition sites and are thus capable of cutting DNA in a very specific manner. These molecular scissors mediate targeted genetic alterations by enhancing the DNA mutation rate via induction of double-strand breaks at a predetermined genomic site. Compared to conventional homologous recombination based gene targeting, MS can increase the targeting rate 10,000-fold, and gene disruption via mutagenic DNA repair is stimulated at a similar frequency. The successful application of different MS has been shown in different organisms, including insects, amphibians, plants, nematodes, and mammals, including humans. Recently, another novel class of molecular scissors was described that uses RNAs to target a specific genomic site. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is capable of targeting even multiple genomic sites in one shot and thus could be superior to ZFNs or TALEN, especially by its easy design. MS can be successfully employed for improving the understanding of complex physiological systems, producing transgenic animals, incl. creating large animal models for human diseases, creating specific cell lines, and plants, and even for treating human genetic diseases. This review provides an update on molecular scissors, their underlying mechanism and focuses on new opportunities for generating genetically modified farm animals. PMID:25603988

  4. Genetic characterisation of Pectobacterium wasabiae causing soft rot disease of potato in New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew R. Pitman; Sally A. Harrow; Sandra B. Visnovsky

    2010-01-01

    Pectobacterium wasabiae has a narrow host range, having previously only been associated with Japanese horseradish. However, recent characterisation\\u000a of Pectobacterium causing soft rotting in New Zealand has identified putative P. wasabiae isolates pathogenic to potato. In this study, phylogenetic reconstruction of acnA and mdh DNA sequences and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphisms (fAFLP) were used to confirm the identity of

  5. Detection of genetically modified maize and soybean in feed samples.

    PubMed

    Meriç, S; Cak?r, O; Turgut-Kara, N; Ar?, S

    2014-01-01

    Despite the controversy about genetically modified (GM) plants, they are still incrementally cultivated. In recent years, many food and feed products produced by genetic engineering technology have appeared on store shelves. Controlling the production and legal presentation of GM crops are very important for the environment and human health, especially in terms of long-term consumption. In this study, 11 kinds of feed obtained from different regions of Turkey were used for genetic analysis based on foreign gene determination. All samples were screened by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique for widely used genetic elements; cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (CaMV35S promoter), and nopaline synthase terminator (T-NOS) sequences for GM plants. After determination of GM plant-containing samples, nested PCR and conventional PCR analysis were performed to find out whether the samples contained Bt176 or GTS-40-3-2 for maize and soy, respectively. As a result of PCR-based GM plant analysis, all samples were found to be transgenic. Both 35S- and NOS-containing feed samples or potentially Bt176-containing samples, in other words, were analyzed with Bt176 insect resistant cryIAb gene-specific primers via nested PCR. Eventually, none of them were found Bt176-positive. On the other hand, when we applied conventional PCR to the same samples with the herbicide resistance CTP4-EPSPS construct-specific primers for transgenic soy variety GTS-40-3-2, we found that all samples were positive for GTS-40-3-2. PMID:24634172

  6. The state of genetically modified crop regulation in Canada.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Stuart J

    2014-07-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops were first commercialized in Canada in 1995 and the 2014 crop represents the 20th year of successful production. Prior to the first commercialization of GM crops, Canada reviewed its existing science-based regulatory framework and adapted the existing framework to allow for risk assessments on the new technology to be undertaken in a timely and efficient manner. The result has been the rapid and widespread adoption of GM varieties of canola, corn and soybeans. The first decade of GM crop production precipitated 2 landmark legal cases relating to patent infringement and economic liability, while the second decade witnessed increased political efforts to have GM crops labeled in Canada as well as significant challenges from the low level comingling of GM crops with non-GM commodities. This article reviews the 20 y of GM crop production in Canada from a social science perspective that includes intellectual property, consumer acceptance and low level presence. PMID:25437238

  7. Proteomic evaluation of genetically modified crops: current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chun Yan; Wang, Tai

    2013-01-01

    Hectares of genetically modified (GM) crops have increased exponentially since 1996, when such crops began to be commercialized. GM biotechnology, together with conventional breeding, has become the main approach to improving agronomic traits of crops. However, people are concerned about the safety of GM crops, especially GM-derived food and feed. Many efforts have been made to evaluate the unintended effects caused by the introduction of exogenous genes. "Omics" techniques have advantages over targeted analysis in evaluating such crops because of their use of high-throughput screening. Proteins are key players in gene function and are directly involved in metabolism and cellular development or have roles as toxins, antinutrients, or allergens, which are essential for human health. Thus, proteomics can be expected to become one of the most useful tools in safety assessment. This review assesses the potential of proteomics in evaluating various GM crops. We further describe the challenges in ensuring homogeneity and sensitivity in detection techniques. PMID:23471542

  8. Environmental risk assessment for medicinal products containing genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Anliker, B; Longhurst, S; Buchholz, C J

    2010-01-01

    Many gene therapy medicinal products and also some vaccines consist of, or contain, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), which require specific consideration in the environmental risk assessment (ERA) before marketing authorisation or clinical trial applications. The ERA is performed in order to identify the potential risks for public health and the environment, which may arise due to the clinical use of these medicinal products. If such environmental risks are identified and considered as not acceptable, the ERA should go on to propose appropriate risk management strategies capable to reduce these risks. This article will provide an overview of the legal basis and requirements for the ERA of GMO-containing medicinal products in the context of marketing authorisation in the EU and clinical trials in Germany. Furthermore, the scientific principles and methodology that generally need to be followed when preparing an ERA for GMOs are discussed. PMID:19940966

  9. A literature review on the safety assessment of genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L; Giné Bordonaba, Jordi

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a notable concern on the safety of genetically modified (GM) foods/plants, an important and complex area of research, which demands rigorous standards. Diverse groups including consumers and environmental Non Governmental Organizations (NGO) have suggested that all GM foods/plants should be subjected to long-term animal feeding studies before approval for human consumption. In 2000 and 2006, we reviewed the information published in international scientific journals, noting that the number of references concerning human and animal toxicological/health risks studies on GM foods/plants was very limited. The main goal of the present review was to assess the current state-of-the-art regarding the potential adverse effects/safety assessment of GM plants for human consumption. The number of citations found in databases (PubMed and Scopus) has dramatically increased since 2006. However, new information on products such as potatoes, cucumber, peas or tomatoes, among others was not available. Corn/maize, rice, and soybeans were included in the present review. An equilibrium in the number research groups suggesting, on the basis of their studies, that a number of varieties of GM products (mainly maize and soybeans) are as safe and nutritious as the respective conventional non-GM plant, and those raising still serious concerns, was currently observed. Nevertheless, it should be noted that most of these studies have been conducted by biotechnology companies responsible of commercializing these GM plants. These findings suggest a notable advance in comparison with the lack of studies published in recent years in scientific journals by those companies. All this recent information is herein critically reviewed. PMID:21296423

  10. Passenger Mutations Confound Interpretation of All Genetically Modified Congenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Vanden Berghe, Tom; Hulpiau, Paco; Martens, Liesbet; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E; Van Wonterghem, Elien; Perry, Seth W; Bruggeman, Inge; Divert, Tatyana; Choi, Sze Men; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Shestopalov, Valery I; Libert, Claude; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2015-07-21

    Targeted mutagenesis in mice is a powerful tool for functional analysis of genes. However, genetic variation between embryonic stem cells (ESCs) used for targeting (previously almost exclusively 129-derived) and recipient strains (often C57BL/6J) typically results in congenic mice in which the targeted gene is flanked by ESC-derived passenger DNA potentially containing mutations. Comparative genomic analysis of 129 and C57BL/6J mouse strains revealed indels and single nucleotide polymorphisms resulting in alternative or aberrant amino acid sequences in 1,084 genes in the 129-strain genome. Annotating these passenger mutations to the reported genetically modified congenic mice that were generated using 129-strain ESCs revealed that nearly all these mice possess multiple passenger mutations potentially influencing the phenotypic outcome. We illustrated this phenotypic interference of 129-derived passenger mutations with several case studies and developed a Me-PaMuFind-It web tool to estimate the number and possible effect of passenger mutations in transgenic mice of interest. PMID:26163370

  11. Genetic modifiers of cognitive maintenance among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Jennifer S; Evans, Daniel S; Coppola, Giovanni; Kramer, Joel H; Tranah, Gregory J; Yaffe, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Objective Identify genetic factors associated with cognitive maintenance in late life and assess their association with gray matter (GM) volume in brain networks affected in aging. Methods We conducted a genome-wide association study of ?2.4 M markers to identify modifiers of cognitive trajectories in Caucasian participants (N?=?7,328) from two population-based cohorts of non-demented elderly. Standardized measures of global cognitive function (z-scores) over 10 and 6 years were calculated among participants and mixed model regression was used to determine subject-specific cognitive slopes. “Cognitive maintenance” was defined as a change in slope of???0 and was compared with all cognitive decliners (slope?genetic scores to assess whether carrying more cognitive maintenance alleles was associated with greater GM volume in specific brain networks using voxel-based morphometry. Results The most significant association was on chromosome 11 (rs7109806, P?=?7.8 × 10?8) near RIC3. RIC3 modulates activity of ?7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which have been implicated in synaptic plasticity and beta-amyloid binding. In the neuroimaging cohort, carrying more cognitive maintenance alleles was associated with greater volume in the right executive control network (RECN; PFWE?=?0.01). Conclusions These findings suggest that there may be genetic loci that promote healthy cognitive aging and that they may do so by conferring robustness to GM in the RECN. Future work is required to validate top candidate genes such as RIC3 for involvement in cognitive maintenance. PMID:24616004

  12. Multielemental analysis of genetically modified food using ANAA and PIXE techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ilca Marli; Moitinho Amaral; Cibele Bugno Zamboni Medeiros; Jos ´ e; Agostinho Goncalves de Medeiros; Marcia de Almeida Rizzutto

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application of two techniques, ANAA and PIXE, used in the analyses of some availa- ble commercial food containing regular and genetically modified ingredients, as well as soybens cultivated with regular and genetically modified seeds (GMS). The aim of this work is determine their elemental composition to perform a comparative analysis. The elemental composition results of both

  13. Quasi-option values for enhanced information regarding genetically modified foods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Donaghy; John Rolfe; Jeffrey W. Bennett

    2004-01-01

    Issues concerning the long-term environmental and health risks associated with the production of genetically modified foods remain highly topical in Australia. It is unclear how consumers values for a precautionary approach to the release of genetically modified crops compares to the opportunity costs of forgoing economic growth associated with the use of these technologies. In this paper, an application of

  14. Evaluating the Behavioural Impact of the Australian and New Zealand Genetically Modified Food Labelling Provisions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Terry Macpherson; Zane Kearns; Duncan Hedderley; Simon Sharland

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a choice experiment that encompassed the labelling options outlined in the Australian and New Zealand government's recently finalized mandatory labelling system for genetically modified foods (GMF's) and foods that contain genetically modified ingredients. The labelling scheme is to be implemented across both countries from December 2001 onwards. Results suggest difficulties ahead for manufacturers and

  15. Agricultural Deskilling and the Spread of Genetically Modified Cotton in Warangal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2007-01-01

    Warangal District, Andhra Pradesh, India, is a key cotton-growing area in one of the most closely watched arenas of the global struggle over genetically modified crops. In 2005 farmers adopted India's first genetically modified crop, Bt cotton, in numbers that resemble a fad. Various parties, including the biotechnology firm behind the new technology, interpret the spread as the result of

  16. Genetic basis and detection of unintended effects in genetically modified crop plants.

    PubMed

    Ladics, Gregory S; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Bregitzer, Phil; Doerrer, Nancy G; Gray, Alan; Holzhauser, Thomas; Jordan, Mark; Keese, Paul; Kok, Esther; Macdonald, Phil; Parrott, Wayne; Privalle, Laura; Raybould, Alan; Rhee, Seung Yon; Rice, Elena; Romeis, Jörg; Vaughn, Justin; Wal, Jean-Michel; Glenn, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    In January 2014, an international meeting sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute/Health and Environmental Sciences Institute and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency titled "Genetic Basis of Unintended Effects in Modified Plants" was held in Ottawa, Canada, bringing together over 75 scientists from academia, government, and the agro-biotech industry. The objectives of the meeting were to explore current knowledge and identify areas requiring further study on unintended effects in plants and to discuss how this information can inform and improve genetically modified (GM) crop risk assessments. The meeting featured presentations on the molecular basis of plant genome variability in general, unintended changes at the molecular and phenotypic levels, and the development and use of hypothesis-driven evaluations of unintended effects in assessing conventional and GM crops. The development and role of emerging "omics" technologies in the assessment of unintended effects was also discussed. Several themes recurred in a number of talks; for example, a common observation was that no system for genetic modification, including conventional methods of plant breeding, is without unintended effects. Another common observation was that "unintended" does not necessarily mean "harmful". This paper summarizes key points from the information presented at the meeting to provide readers with current viewpoints on these topics. PMID:25716164

  17. Maximizing the Phytonutrient Content of Potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are exploring to what extent the rich genetic diversity of potatoes can be used to maximize the nutritional potential of potatoes. Metabolic profiling is being used to screen potatoes for genotypes with elevated amounts of vitamins and phytonutrients. Substantial differences in phytonutrients am...

  18. Genetic Modifiers of Cardiorespiratory Fitness Response to Lifestyle Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Inga; Papandonatos, George D.; Belalcazar, L. Maria; Yang, Yao; Erar, Bahar; Jakicic, John M.; Unick, Jessica L.; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Lipkin, Edward W.; Delahanty, Linda M.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Wing, Rena R.; McCaffery, Jeanne M.; Huggins, Gordon S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Numerous prospective studies indicate that improved cardiorespiratory fitness reduces type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk and delays disease progression. We hypothesized that genetic variants modify fitness response to an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) in the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) randomized clinical trial, aimed to detect whether ILI will reduce cardiovascular events in overweight/obese subjects with T2D compared to a standard of care. Methods Polymorphisms in established fitness genes and in all loci assayed on the Illumina CARe iSelect chip were examined as predictors of change in metabolic equivalent (MET) level, estimated using a treadmill test, in response to a one-year intervention in 3,899 participants. Results We identified a significant signal in previously reported fitness-related gene RUNX1 that was associated with one-year METs response in ILI (0.19±0.04 MET less improvement per minor allele copy; P=1.9×10?5) and genotype-intervention interaction (P=4.8×10?3). In the chip-wide analysis, FKBP7 rs17225700 showed a significant association with ILI response among subjects not receiving beta-blocker medications (0.47±0.09 METs less improvement; P=5.3×10?7), and genotype-treatment interaction (P=5.3×10?5). GRAIL pathway-based analysis identified connections between associated genes, including those influencing vascular tone, muscle contraction, cardiac energy substrate dynamics, and muscle protein synthesis. Conclusions This is the first study to identify genetic variants associated with fitness responses to a randomized lifestyle intervention in overweight/obese diabetic individuals. RUNX1 and FKBP7, involved in erythropoesis and muscle protein synthesis, respectively, are related to change in cardiorespiratory fitness in response to exercise. PMID:23899896

  19. NeuroGeM, a knowledgebase of genetic modifiers in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are characterized by the progressive loss of neurons in the human brain. Although the majority of NDs are sporadic, evidence is accumulating that they have a strong genetic component. Therefore, significant efforts have been made in recent years to not only identify disease-causing genes but also genes that modify the severity of NDs, so-called genetic modifiers. To date there exists no compendium that lists and cross-links genetic modifiers of different NDs. Description In order to address this need, we present NeuroGeM, the first comprehensive knowledgebase providing integrated information on genetic modifiers of nine different NDs in the model organisms D. melanogaster, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae. NeuroGeM cross-links curated genetic modifier information from the different NDs and provides details on experimental conditions used for modifier identification, functional annotations, links to homologous proteins and color-coded protein-protein interaction networks to visualize modifier interactions. We demonstrate how this database can be used to generate new understanding through meta-analysis. For instance, we reveal that the Drosophila genes DnaJ-1, thread, Atx2, and mub are generic modifiers that affect multiple if not all NDs. Conclusion As the first compendium of genetic modifiers, NeuroGeM will assist experimental and computational scientists in their search for the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying NDs. http://chibi.ubc.ca/neurogem. PMID:24229347

  20. Potato Phytonutrient Analysis and Engineering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes have the highest per capita consumption of any vegetable, a fact which emphasizes their potential to be a key dietary source of health-promoting compounds. Only a fraction of the genetic diversity available in potato wild-species has been incorporated into modern cultivars. LCMS analysis of...

  1. Genetically modified cotton in India and detection strategies.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Gurinder Jit; Chhabra, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    India is one of the largest cotton-growing countries. Cotton is a fiber crop with varied applications from making tiny threads to fashionable clothing in the textile sector. In the near future, cotton crop will gain popularity as a multipurpose crop in India. The commercialization of Bt cotton in 2002 and consequently the fast adoption of Bt cotton hybrids by cotton farmers have enhanced the cotton production in India. Presently, genetically modified (GM) cotton has occupied 21.0 million hectares (mha) that comprise 14% of the global area under GM cultivation. In the coming years, improved cotton hybrids, with stacked and multiple gene events for improved fiber quality, insect resistance, drought tolerance, and herbicide tolerance, would further significantly improve the cotton production in India. With the dramatic increase in commercialization of GM crops, there is an urgent need to develop cost-effective and robust GM detection methods for effective risk assessment and management, post release monitoring, and to solve the legal disputes. DNA-based GM diagnostics are most robust assays due to their high sensitivity, specificity, and stability of DNA molecule. PMID:23143480

  2. Aphid-parasitoid community structure on genetically modified wheat.

    PubMed

    von Burg, Simone; van Veen, Frank J F; Álvarez-Alfageme, Fernando; Romeis, Jörg

    2011-06-23

    Since the introduction of genetically modified (GM) plants, one of the main concerns has been their potential effect on non-target insects. Many studies have looked at GM plant effects on single non-target herbivore species or on simple herbivore-natural enemy food chains. Agro-ecosystems, however, are characterized by numerous insect species which are involved in complex interactions, forming food webs. In this study, we looked at transgenic disease-resistant wheat (Triticum aestivum) and its effect on aphid-parasitoid food webs. We hypothesized that the GM of the wheat lines directly or indirectly affect aphids and that these effects cascade up to change the structure of the associated food webs. Over 2 years, we studied different experimental wheat lines under semi-field conditions. We constructed quantitative food webs to compare their properties on GM lines with the properties on corresponding non-transgenic controls. We found significant effects of the different wheat lines on insect community structure up to the fourth trophic level. However, the observed effects were inconsistent between study years and the variation between wheat varieties was as big as between GM plants and their controls. This suggests that the impact of our powdery mildew-resistant GM wheat plants on food web structure may be negligible and potential ecological effects on non-target insects limited. PMID:21247941

  3. Detection methods and performance criteria for genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Bertheau, Yves; Diolez, Annick; Kobilinsky, André; Magin, Kimberly

    2002-01-01

    Detection methods for genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are necessary for many applications, from seed purity assessment to compliance of food labeling in several countries. Numerous analytical methods are currently used or under development to support these needs. The currently used methods are bioassays and protein- and DNA-based detection protocols. To avoid discrepancy of results between such largely different methods and, for instance, the potential resulting legal actions, compatibility of the methods is urgently needed. Performance criteria of methods allow evaluation against a common standard. The more-common performance criteria for detection methods are precision, accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, which together specifically address other terms used to describe the performance of a method, such as applicability, selectivity, calibration, trueness, precision, recovery, operating range, limit of quantitation, limit of detection, and ruggedness. Performance criteria should provide objective tools to accept or reject specific methods, to validate them, to ensure compatibility between validated methods, and be used on a routine basis to reject data outside an acceptable range of variability. When selecting a method of detection, it is also important to consider its applicability, its field of applications, and its limitations, by including factors such as its ability to detect the target analyte in a given matrix, the duration of the analyses, its cost effectiveness, and the necessary sample sizes for testing. Thus, the current GMO detection methods should be evaluated against a common set of performance criteria. PMID:12083279

  4. Gene Flow from Genetically Modified Rice and Its Environmental Consequences

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    BAO-RONG LU and ALLISON A. SNOW (; )

    2005-08-01

    This peer-reviewed article from BioScience journal is about the environmental consequences of genetically modified rice. Within the next few years, many types of transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) will be ready for commercialization, including varieties with higher yields, greater tolerance of biotic and abiotic stresses, resistance to herbicides, improved nutritional quality, and novel pharmaceutical proteins. Although rice is primarily self-pollinating, its transgenes are expected to disperse to nearby weedy and wild relatives through pollen-mediated gene flow. Sexually compatible Oryza species often co-occur with the crop, especially in tropical countries, but little is known about how quickly fitness-enhancing transgenes will accumulate in these populations and whether this process will have any unwanted environmental consequences. For example, weedy rice could become much more difficult to manage if it acquires herbicide resistance, produces more seeds, or occurs in a wider range of habitats because of the spread of certain transgenes. Rice-growing countries urgently need publicly available ecological assessments of the risks and benefits of transgenic rice before new varieties are released.

  5. Method of detecting genetically modified chicken containing human erythropoietin gene.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Osamu; Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) chickens carrying the human erythropoietin (hEpo) gene have been developed to produce recombinant hEpo protein in eggs. However, such animals have not been approved as food sources in Japan. We developed a method for detecting the hEpo gene in chicken meat using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR). The hEpo gene was clearly detected in genomic DNA extracted from magnum and heart of a chimeric chicken containing the hEpo gene. A plasmid containing the hEpo gene was used as a standard reference molecule as well. The results clearly showed that our method was capable of detecting the hEpo gene contained in the plasmid in the presence of genomic DNA extracted from a raw chicken meat sample. We successfully used this method to test six samples of raw chicken meat and six samples of chicken meat in processed foods. This method will be useful for monitoring chicken meat that might have originated from GM chickens carrying the hEpo gene to assure food safety. PMID:23995657

  6. Examining consumer behavior toward genetically modified (GM) food in Britain.

    PubMed

    Spence, Alexa; Townsend, Ellen

    2006-06-01

    This study examined behavior toward genetically modified (GM) food in a British community-based sample. We used an equivalent gain task in which participants actually received the options they chose to encourage truthful responding. In conjunction with this, theory of planned behavior (TPB) components were evaluated so as to examine the relative importance of behavioral influences in this domain. Here, the TPB was extended to include additional components to measure self-identity, moral norms, and emotional involvement. Results indicated that the monetary amounts participants accepted in preference to GM food were significantly lower than those accepted in preference to non-GM food. However, the vast majority of participants were indifferent between GM and non-GM food options. All TPB components significantly predicted behavioral intentions to try GM food, with attitudes toward GM being the strongest predictor. Self-identity and emotional involvement were also found to be significant predictors of behavioral intentions but moral norms were not. In addition, behavioral intentions significantly predicted behavior; however, PBC did not. An additional measure of participants' propensity to respond in a socially desirable manner indicated that our results were not influenced by self-presentation issues, giving confidence to our findings. Overall, it appears that the majority of participants (74.5%) would purchase GM food at some price. PMID:16834625

  7. Effects of Hydrated Potato Starch on the Quality of Low-fat Ttoekgalbi (Korean Traditional Patty) Packaged in Modified Atmosphere Conditions during Storage

    PubMed Central

    Muhlisin, S. M. Kang; Choi, W. H.; Lee, K. T.; Cheong, S. H.; Lee, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of hydrated potato starch on the quality of low-fat ttoekgalbi (Korean traditional patty) packaged in modified atmosphere conditions during storage. The ttoekgalbi was prepared from 53.2% lean beef, 13.9% lean pork, 9.3% pork fat, and 23.6% other ingredients. Two low-fat ttoekgalbi treatments were prepared by substituting pork fat with hydrated potato starch; either by 50% fat replacement (50% FR) or 100% fat replacement (100% FR). Both 50% and 100% FR increased the moisture, crude protein, and decreased fat content, cooking loss, and hardness. For MAP studies, 200 g of ttoekgalbi were placed on the tray and filled with gas composed of 70% O2: 30% CO2 (70% O2-MAP) and 30% CO2: 70% N2 (70% N2-MAP), and were stored at 5°C for 12 d. During the storage time, both 50% and 100% FR showed higher protein deterioration, while no differences were found in CIE a*, CIE L*, lipid oxidation, and bacterial counts in comparison to control. The ttoekgalbi with 70% O2-MAP was more red, lighter in color, and showed higher TBARS values compared with 70% N2-MAP. The meat with 70% N2-MAP showed lower aerobic bacterial counts in control than those with 70% O2-MAP. The lower anaerobic bacterial counts were observed only in 50% FR and 100% FR packed with 70% N2-MAP in comparison with 70% O2-MAP. In conclusion, the fat replacement with hydrated potato starch showed no negative effects on the quality of low fat ttoekgalbi during storage and 70% N2-MAP was better than 70% O2-MAP for low-fat ttoekgalbi packaging. PMID:25049619

  8. Origin and genetic diversity of Western European populations of the potato cyst nematode (Globodera pallida) inferred from mitochondrial sequences and microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Plantard, O; Picard, D; Valette, S; Scurrah, M; Grenier, E; Mugniéry, D

    2008-05-01

    Native to South America, the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida is one of the principal pests of Andean potato crops and is also an important global pest following its introduction to Europe, Africa, North America, Asia and Oceania. Building on earlier work showing a clear south to north phylogeographic pattern in Peruvian populations, we have been able to identify the origin of Western European populations with high accuracy. They are all derived from a single restricted area in the extreme south of Peru, located between the north shore of the Lake Titicaca and Cusco. Only four cytochrome b haplotypes are found in Western Europe, one of them being also found in some populations of this area of southern Peru. The allelic richness at seven microsatellite loci observed in the Western European populations, although only one-third of that observed in this part of southern Peru, is comparable to the allelic richness observed in the northern region of Peru. This result could be explained by the fact that most of the genetic variability observed at the scale of a field or even of a region is already observed at the scale of a single plant within a field. Thus, even introduction via a single infected potato plant could result in the relatively high genetic variability observed in Western Europe. This finding has important consequences for the control of this pest and the development of quarantine measures. PMID:18410291

  9. Optimising ketocarotenoid production in potato tubers: effect of genetic background, transgene combinations and environment.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Raymond; Morris, Wayne L; Mortimer, Cara L; Misawa, Norihiko; Ducreux, Laurence J M; Morris, Jenny A; Hedley, Pete E; Fraser, Paul D; Taylor, Mark A

    2015-05-01

    Astaxanthin is a high value carotenoid produced by some bacteria, a few green algae, several fungi but only a limited number of plants from the genus Adonis. Astaxanthin has been industrially exploited as a feed supplement in poultry farming and aquaculture. Consumption of ketocarotenoids, most notably astaxanthin, is also increasingly associated with a wide range of health benefits, as demonstrated in numerous clinical studies. Currently astaxanthin is produced commercially by chemical synthesis or from algal production systems. Several studies have used a metabolic engineering approach to produce astaxanthin in transgenic plants. Previous attempts to produce transgenic potato tubers biofortified with astaxanthin have met with limited success. In this study we have investigated approaches to optimising tuber astaxanthin content. It is demonstrated that the selection of appropriate parental genotype for transgenic approaches and stacking carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes with the cauliflower Or gene result in enhanced astaxanthin content, to give six-fold higher tuber astaxanthin content than has been achieved previously. Additionally we demonstrate the effects of growth environment on tuber carotenoid content in both wild type and astaxanthin-producing transgenic lines and describe the associated transcriptome and metabolome restructuring. PMID:25804807

  10. 75 FR 1269 - Vegetable Import Regulations; Modification of Potato Import Regulations; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ...Vegetable Import Regulations; Modification of Potato Import Regulations; Correction AGENCY...modified the import regulations for Irish potatoes and made minor administrative changes to the potato, onion, and tomato import regulations...

  11. Factors influencing stakeholders attitudes toward genetically modified aedes mosquito.

    PubMed

    Amin, Latifah; Hashim, Hasrizul

    2015-06-01

    Dengue fever is a debilitating and infectious disease that could be life-threatening. It is caused by the dengue virus which affects millions of people in the tropical area. Currently, there is no cure for the disease as there is no vaccine available. Thus, prevention of the vector population using conventional methods is by far the main strategy but has been found ineffective. A genetically modified (GM) mosquito is among the favoured alternatives to curb dengue fever in Malaysia. Past studies have shown that development and diffusion of gene technology products depends heavily upon public acceptance. The purpose of this study is to identify the relevant factors influencing stakeholders' attitudes toward the GM Aedes mosquito and to analyse the relationships between all the factors using the structural equation model. A survey was carried out on 509 respondents from various stakeholder groups in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia. Results of the survey have confirmed that public perception towards complex issues such as gene technology should be seen as a multi-faceted process. The perceived benefit-perceived risk balance is very important in determining the most predominant predictor of attitudes toward a GM mosquito. In this study the stakeholders perceived the benefit of the GM mosquito as outweighing its risk, translating perceived benefit as the most important direct predictor of attitudes toward the GM mosquito. Trust in key players has a direct influence on attitudes toward the GM mosquito while moral concern exhibited an indirect influence through perceived benefits. Other factors such as attitudes toward technology and nature were also indirect predictors of attitudes toward the GM mosquito while religiosity and engagement did not exhibited any significant roles. The research findings serve as a useful database to understand public acceptance and the social construct of public attitudes towards the GM mosquito to combat dengue. PMID:24906652

  12. 1074 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Genetics and Resistance

    E-print Network

    Spooner, David

    1074 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Genetics and Resistance A Test of Taxonomic and Biogeographic Predictivity predictivity: Resistance to Potato virus Y in wild relatives of the cultivated potato. Phytopathology 101

  13. Effects of rice cystatin I expression in transgenic potato on Colorado potato beetle larvae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Lecardonnel; Laura Chauvin; Lise Jouanin; Antony Beaujean; Geneviève Prévost; Brigitte Sangwan-Norreel

    1999-01-01

    The impact of OCI (Oryzacystatin I) expressing transgenic potato on Colorado potato beetle (CPB) larvae development was investigated. Transgenic potatoes, resistant to kanamycin and expressing the OCI cysteine protease inhibitor (PI), were obtained via Agrobacterium tumefaciens genetic transformation. Four independent transgenic lines were shown by molecular analysis to exhibit a high level of OCI expression. Larvae of CPB were independently

  14. [Progress on biosafety assessment of marker genes in genetically modified foods].

    PubMed

    Yang, Lichen; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2003-05-01

    Marker genes are useful in facilitating the detection of genetically modified organisms(GMO). These genes play an important role during the early identification stage of GMO development, but they exist in the mature genetically modified crops. So the safety assessment of these genes could not be neglected. In this paper, all the study on the biosafety assessment of marker genes were reviewed, their possible hazards and risks were appraised, and the marker genes proved safe were list too. GMO Labeling the is one important regulations for the development of genetically modified foods in the market. The accurate detecting techniques for GMO are the basis for setting up labeling regulation. In addition, some methods used to remove marker genes in genetically modified foods were introduced in the paper, which can eliminate their biosafety concern thoroughly. PMID:12914289

  15. USE OF MODELING APPROACHES TO UNDERSTAND POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED PLANTS ON PLANT COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Model development is of interest to ecologists, regulators and developers, since it may assist theoretical understanding, decision making in experimental design, product development and risk assessment. In order to predict the potential impacts of genetically modified (GM) plants...

  16. Development of a chemiluminometric immunosensor array for on-site monitoring of genetically modified organisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hye-Jee Jang; Il-Hoon Cho; Hee-Soo Kim; Jin-Woo Jeon; Se-Young Hwang; Se-Hwan Paek

    2011-01-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been mainly developed for mass production of agricultural plants; however, there are concerns that transgenic crops might cause side effects on ecosystems and human beings. Therefore, to quantitatively trace the genetically modified products, we constructed a chemiluminometric immunosensor array for the detection of recombinant marker proteins expressed in GMOs, i.e., 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), neomycin phosphotransferase

  17. A Modified Genetic Algorithm Applied to Horizontal Well Placement Optimization in Gas Condensate Reservoirs

    E-print Network

    Morales, Adrian

    2011-02-22

    A MODIFIED GENETIC ALGORITHM APPLIED TO HORIZONTAL WELL PLACEMENT OPTIMIZATION IN GAS CONDENSATE RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ADRIAN NICOLAS MORALES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... Condensate Reservoirs Copyright 2010 Adrian Nicolas Morales A MODIFIED GENETIC ALGORITHM APPLIED TO HORIZONTAL WELL PLACEMENT OPTIMIZATION IN GAS CONDENSATE RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ADRIAN NICOLAS MORALES Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  18. Environmental Effects of Genetically Modified Crops: Differentiated Risk Assessment and Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David E. Ervinand; Rick Welsh

    The environmental risks and benefits of genetically modified crops have varying degrees of certainty. The U.S. regulatory\\u000a system evaluates a suite of hazards for the crops primarily by minimizing type I error. However, genetically modified crops\\u000a vary widely in their potential for environmental harm. We develop a differentiated risk assessment process using three models\\u000a that shift from primary emphasis on

  19. A Modified Genetic Algorithm Applied to Horizontal Well Placement Optimization in Gas Condensate Reservoirs 

    E-print Network

    Morales, Adrian

    2011-02-22

    A MODIFIED GENETIC ALGORITHM APPLIED TO HORIZONTAL WELL PLACEMENT OPTIMIZATION IN GAS CONDENSATE RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ADRIAN NICOLAS MORALES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... Condensate Reservoirs Copyright 2010 Adrian Nicolas Morales A MODIFIED GENETIC ALGORITHM APPLIED TO HORIZONTAL WELL PLACEMENT OPTIMIZATION IN GAS CONDENSATE RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ADRIAN NICOLAS MORALES Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  20. Attitudes to genetically modified food over time: How trust in organizations and the media cycle predict support.

    PubMed

    Marques, Mathew D; Critchley, Christine R; Walshe, Jarrod

    2015-07-01

    This research examined public opinion toward genetically modified plants and animals for food, and how trust in organizations and media coverage explained attitudes toward these organisms. Nationally representative samples (N = 8821) over 10 years showed Australians were less positive toward genetically modified animals compared to genetically modified plants for food, especially in years where media coverage was high. Structural equation modeling found that positive attitudes toward different genetically modified organisms for food were significantly associated with higher trust in scientists and regulators (e.g. governments), and with lower trust in watchdogs (e.g. environmental movement). Public trust in scientists and watchdogs was a stronger predictor of attitudes toward the use of genetically modified plants for food than animals, but only when media coverage was low. Results are discussed regarding the moral acceptability of genetically modified organisms for food, the media's role in shaping public opinion, and the role public trust in organizations has on attitudes toward genetically modified organisms. PMID:25063421

  1. Improvement of Aroma in Transgenic Potato As a Consequence of Impairing Tuber Browning

    PubMed Central

    Llorente, Briardo; Rodríguez, Vanina; Alonso, Guillermo D.; Torres, Héctor N.; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando F.

    2010-01-01

    Sensory analysis studies are critical in the development of quality enhanced crops, and may be an important component in the public acceptance of genetically modified foods. It has recently been established that odor preferences are shared between humans and mice, suggesting that odor exploration behavior in mice may be used to predict the effect of odors in humans. We have previously found that mice fed diets supplemented with engineered nonbrowning potatoes (-PPO) consumed more potato than mice fed diets supplemented with wild-type potatoes (WT). This prompted us to explore a possible role of potato odor in mice preference for nonbrowning potatoes. Taking advantage of two well established neuroscience paradigms, the “open field test” and the “nose-poking preference test”, we performed experiments where mice exploration behavior was monitored in preference assays on the basis of olfaction alone. No obvious preference was observed towards -PPO or WT lines when fresh potato samples were tested. However, when oxidized samples were tested, mice consistently investigated -PPO potatoes more times and for longer periods than WT potatoes. Congruently, humans discriminated WT from -PPO samples with a considerably better performance when oxidized samples were tested than when fresh samples were tested in blind olfactory experiments. Notably, even though participants ranked all samples with an intermediate level of pleasantness, there was a general consensus that the -PPO samples had a more intense odor and also evoked the sense-impression of a familiar vegetable more often than the WT samples. Taken together, these findings suggest that our previous observations might be influenced, at least in part, by differential odors that are accentuated among the lines once oxidative deterioration takes place. Additionally, our results suggest that nonbrowning potatoes, in addition to their extended shelf life, maintain their odor quality for longer periods of time than WT potatoes. To our knowledge this is the first report on the use of an animal model applied to the sensory analysis of a transgenic crop. PMID:21103333

  2. The role of cell wall-modifying proteins in plant penetration and feeding site proliferation by the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. Kudla

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to investigate two distinct groups of proteins involved in plant cell walls modifications in the parasitism of the potato cyst nematode, Globodera rostochiensis , namely pectate lyases and expansins. Plant parasitism of potato cyst nematode proceeds through two main stages i.e. mobile and sessile. During the migratory phase, potato cyst nematode uses cell

  3. In vivo characterization of skeletal phenotype of genetically modified mice.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hua Zhu

    2005-01-01

    Genetically modified mouse models provide an important tool for understanding of the roles of specific gene in skeletal growth, development, and aging. Appropriate study design is essential for characterization of skeletal phenotype of these mice. It is important to characterize the bone status of the different phases of skeletal development including the early rapid growth, attainment of peak bone mass, and age-related bone loss phases. In C57BL/6 strain mice, cancellous and cortical bone mass rapidly increases with age before 3 months of age, and reaches the peak cancellous bone mass at approximately 6-8 months of age, while cortical bone mass continuously increases until 12 months of age. Thereafter, age-related decrease in bone mass occurs. According to these observations, at least three different age groups need to be evaluated for bone status to cover the different phases of the life span: 1-3 months of age for rapid growth, 6-9 months for peak bone mass, and >12 months for aged phases. Furthermore, bone resorption and formation activities on all bone surfaces (periosteal, endocortical, intracortical, and cancellous) need to be evaluated. In this article, we briefly summarize our findings in the estrogen receptor-beta knockout (BERKO) and the P2X7 receptor (an ATP-gated ion channel) knockout mice. In BERKO female mice, bone status at 6, 13, and 21 months of ages was evaluated as compared with the wild-type littermate controls. We found that estrogen receptor-beta plays an inhibitory role in periosteal bone formation and longitudinal and radial growth during the growth period, whereas it plays a role in stimulation of bone resorption, bone turnover, and bone loss on cancellous and endocortical bone surfaces during the aging process. We also found that ER-beta knockout improves the survival rate between 6 and 21 months of age. In P2X7R knockout mice, bone status at 2, 5, 9, and 15 months of age was evaluated for both sexes as compared with their wild-type littermate controls. We found that P2X7R plays a role in stimulating periosteal and cancellous bone formation and inhibiting cancellous bone resorption during the growth period. PMID:15984421

  4. Molecular toolbox for the identification of unknown genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Ruttink, Tom; Demeyer, Rolinde; Van Gulck, Elke; Van Droogenbroeck, Bart; Querci, Maddalena; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc

    2010-03-01

    Competent laboratories monitor genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and products derived thereof in the food and feed chain in the framework of labeling and traceability legislation. In addition, screening is performed to detect the unauthorized presence of GMOs including asynchronously authorized GMOs or GMOs that are not officially registered for commercialization (unknown GMOs). Currently, unauthorized or unknown events are detected by screening blind samples for commonly used transgenic elements, such as p35S or t-nos. If (1) positive detection of such screening elements shows the presence of transgenic material and (2) all known GMOs are tested by event-specific methods but are not detected, then the presence of an unknown GMO is inferred. However, such evidence is indirect because it is based on negative observations and inconclusive because the procedure does not identify the causative event per se. In addition, detection of unknown events is hampered in products that also contain known authorized events. Here, we outline alternative approaches for analytical detection and GMO identification and develop new methods to complement the existing routine screening procedure. We developed a fluorescent anchor-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for the identification of the sequences flanking the p35S and t-nos screening elements. Thus, anchor-PCR fingerprinting allows the detection of unique discriminative signals per event. In addition, we established a collection of in silico calculated fingerprints of known events to support interpretation of experimentally generated anchor-PCR GM fingerprints of blind samples. Here, we first describe the molecular characterization of a novel GMO, which expresses recombinant human intrinsic factor in Arabidopsis thaliana. Next, we purposefully treated the novel GMO as a blind sample to simulate how the new methods lead to the molecular identification of a novel unknown event without prior knowledge of its transgene sequence. The results demonstrate that the new methods complement routine screening procedures by providing direct conclusive evidence and may also be useful to resolve masking of unknown events by known events. PMID:19937431

  5. Implications of Genetically Modified Food Technology Policies for Sub-Saharan Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kym Anderson; Lee Ann Jackson

    2004-01-01

    The first generation of genetically modified (GM) crop varieties sought to increase farmer profitability through cost reductions or higher yields. The next generation of GM food research is focusing also on breeding for attributes of interest to consumers, beginning with ?golden rice,? which has been genetically engineered to contain a higher level of vitamin A and thereby boost the health

  6. PERCEPTIONS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED AND ORGANIC FOODS AND PROCESSES: NORTH DAKOTA COLLEGE STUDENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon C. Anderson; Cheryl J. Wachenheim; William C. Lesch

    2005-01-01

    Perceptions of genetically modified (GM) and organic food among North Dakota college students were elicited and compared. Participants responded to one of two survey instruments containing identical wording except for reference to genetic modification or organic, after reading a primer defining the term used in their instrument. Participants' indicated their level of agreement with statements in the construct areas of

  7. Construction of a 10,000-marker ultradense genetic recombination map of potato: providing a framework for accelerated gene isolation and a genomewide physical map.

    PubMed

    van Os, Hans; Andrzejewski, Sandra; Bakker, Erin; Barrena, Imanol; Bryan, Glenn J; Caromel, Bernard; Ghareeb, Bilal; Isidore, Edwige; de Jong, Walter; van Koert, Paul; Lefebvre, Véronique; Milbourne, Dan; Ritter, Enrique; van der Voort, Jeroen N A M Rouppe; Rousselle-Bourgeois, Françoise; van Vliet, Joke; Waugh, Robbie; Visser, Richard G F; Bakker, Jaap; van Eck, Herman J

    2006-06-01

    An ultradense genetic linkage map with >10,000 AFLP loci was constructed from a heterozygous diploid potato population. To our knowledge, this is the densest meiotic recombination map ever constructed. A fast marker-ordering algorithm was used, based on the minimization of the total number of recombination events within a given marker order in combination with genotyping error-detection software. This resulted in "skeleton bin maps," which can be viewed as the most parsimonious marker order. The unit of distance is not expressed in centimorgans but in "bins." A bin is a position on the genetic map with a unique segregation pattern that is separated from adjacent bins by a single recombination event. Putative centromeres were identified by a strong clustering of markers, probably due to cold spots for recombination. Conversely, recombination hot spots resulted in large intervals of up to 15 cM without markers. The current level of marker saturation suggests that marker density is proportional to physical distance and independent of recombination frequency. Most chromatids (92%) recombined once or never, suggesting strong chiasma interference. Absolute chiasma interference within a chromosome arm could not be demonstrated. Two examples of contig construction and map-based cloning have demonstrated that the marker spacing was in accordance with the expected physical distance: approximately one marker per BAC length. Currently, the markers are used for genetic anchoring of a physical map of potato to deliver a sequence-ready minimal tiling path of BAC contigs of specific chromosomal regions for the potato genome sequencing consortium (http://www.potatogenome.net). PMID:16582432

  8. The Spiroplasma Motility Inhibition Test, a New Method for Determining Intraspecific Variation among Colorado Potato Beetle Spiroplasmas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KEVIN J. HACKETT; J. J. LIPA; G. E. GASPARICH; D. E. LYNN; M. KONAI; M. CAMP

    1997-01-01

    The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, is a major holarctic pest of solanaceous crops. Presumably, this insect spread from Solanurn species in central America to the Mexican plateau, and this was followed by multiple invasions of North America and Europe. Attempts are being made to control this beetle by using a genetically modified spiroplasma that occurs naturally in its gut.

  9. Controlling Potato Blight: Past, Present, and Future

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ethel D. Stanley (Beloit College; Biology)

    2006-05-20

    Potato late blight, Phytophthora infestans, has an infamous past, yet it continues to present a challenge to modern day farmers. Historical scenarios in the LateBlight simulation help us define the impact of this disease before the interactions between this microbe and the potato were understood. Modern scenarios enable us to investigate current strategies to control this pathogen from the management of cull piles to the use of genetically engineered potatoes. A life cycle model, Potato Late Blight, provides an additional method for exploring microbial interactions. * make a profit or lose the farm as you investigate the economic consequences of using chemical control approaches to managing late blight in potatoes

  10. Potato with growth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Peggy Greb (USDA; ARS)

    2006-05-23

    Potatoes are grown in the ground. Potatoes can be eaten by humans and animals and they can also grow more potatoes. Potatoes sprout things called eyes. The eyes are from where both the roots and potatoes develop.

  11. Do You Really Know What You're Eating? A Case Study on Genetically Modified Foods

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wayne Shew

    2007-01-01

    Starting from a fictional “news” report about an apparent allergic reaction to a taco tainted by genetically modified corn, students consider some of the techniques and procedures used in modern molecular genetics and microbiology as well as some of the issues associated with genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Originally designed for role-play and PowerPoint assignments, suggestions for a shortened version are also provided. Suitable for a general microbiology course, the case could also be used in an introductory molecular biology course with appropriate modifications. Various levels of coverage of the topic of recombinant DNA are possible.

  12. Genetically Modified Food: Knowledge and Attitude of Teachers and Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Animesh K. Mohapatra; Deepika Priyadarshini; Antara Biswas

    2010-01-01

    The concepts behind the technology of genetic modification of organisms and its applications are complex. A diverse range\\u000a of opinions, public concern and considerable media interest accompanies the subject. This study explores the knowledge and\\u000a attitudes of science teachers and senior secondary biology students about the application of a rapidly expanding technology,\\u000a genetic engineering, to food production. The results indicated

  13. Estimating the Market Effect of a Food Scare: The Case of Genetically Modified StarLink Corn

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colin A. Carter; Aaron D. Smith

    2006-01-01

    Genetic modification of crops has revolutionized food production, but it remains controversial due to food safety and environmental concerns. A recent food safety scare provides a natural experiment on the corn market's willingness to accept unapproved genetically modified organisms. In 2000, a genetically modified corn variety called StarLink was discovered in the food-corn supply, even though it was not approved

  14. Three vitrification-based cryopreservation procedures cause different cryo-injuries to potato shoot tips while all maintain genetic integrity in regenerants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biao; Li, Jing-Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Bo; Wang, Ren-Rui; Ma, Yan-Li; Blystad, Dag-Ragnar; Keller, E R Joachim; Wang, Qiao-Chun

    2014-08-20

    We previously reported successful cryopreservation of shoot tips of potato 'Zihuabai' by three vitrification-based protocols. In the present study, cryo-injury to shoot tips and genetic stability in regenerants recovered from cryopreserved shoot tips by the three vitrification-based protocols were further investigated. The results showed that sucrose preculture caused no obviously different injuries, while dehydration with plant vitrification solution 2 (PVS2) was the step causing major damage to cells of shoot tips, regardless of the cryogenic procedures. Compared with droplet-vitrification and encapsulation-vitrification, vitrification caused the most severe injury to cells of the shoot tips, thus resulting in much longer time duration for shoot recovery and much lower shoot regrowth rate. Cells in apical dome and the youngest leaf primordia were able to survive and subsequently some of them regrew into shoots following all three vitrification-based cryopreservation procedures. Analyses using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers in shoots regrown from all three vitrification-based protocols did not find any polymorphic bands. The results reported here suggest that vitrification-based cryo-procedures can be considered promising methods for long-term preservation of potato genetic resources. PMID:24858678

  15. Reasonable Foreseeability and Liability in Relation to Genetically Modified Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoury, Lara; Smyth, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    This article examines problems that may arise when addressing liability resulting from the genetic modification of microbes, animals, and plants. More specifically, it evaluates how uncertainties relating to the outcomes of these biotechnological innovations affect--or may affect--the courts' application of the reasonable foreseeability…

  16. Genetically Modified Food: Knowledge and Attitude of Teachers and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohapatra, Animesh K.; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Biswas, Antara

    2010-01-01

    The concepts behind the technology of genetic modification of organisms and its applications are complex. A diverse range of opinions, public concern and considerable media interest accompanies the subject. This study explores the knowledge and attitudes of science teachers and senior secondary biology students about the application of a rapidly…

  17. Creating genetically modified pigs by using nuclear transfer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liangxue Lai; Randall S Prather

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear transfer (NT) is a procedure by which genetically identical individuals can be created. The technology of pig somatic NT, including in vitro maturation of oocytes, isolation and treatment of donor cells, artificial activation of reconstructed oocytes, embryo culture and embryo transfer, has been intensively studied in recent years, resulting in birth of cloned pigs in many labs. While it

  18. Environmental and genetic modifiers of squint penetrance during zebrafish embryogenesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wuhong Pei; P. Huw Williams; Matthew D. Clark; Derek L. Stemple; Benjamin Feldman

    2007-01-01

    The Nodal-related subgroup of the TGF? superfamily of secreted cytokines regulates the specification of the mesodermal and endodermal germ layers during gastrulation. Two Nodal-related proteins – Squint (Sqt) and Cyclops (Cyc) – are expressed during germ-layer specification in zebrafish. Genetic sqt mutant phenotypes have defined a variable requirement for zygotic Sqt, but not for maternal Sqt, in midline mesendoderm development.

  19. Chemical and flavor profiles of genetically modified peanut varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an economically important crop throughout the world. It is susceptible to many types of fungal pathogens. Genetic engineering offers great potential for developing peanut cultivars resistant to a broad spectrum of pathogens that pose a recurring threat to peanut hea...

  20. Improved bioavailability of calcium in genetically-modified carrots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteoporosis is one of the world's most prevalent nutritional disorders, and inadequate absorbed calcium is a known contributor to the pathophysiology of this condition. In a cross-over study of 15 male and 15 female young adults, we used a dual stable isotope method with 42Ca-labeled genetically-mo...

  1. Effect of Genetically Modified Pseudomonas putida WCS358r on the Fungal Rhizosphere Microflora of Field-Grown Wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DEBORA C. M. GLANDORF; Patrick Verheggen; Timo Jansen; JAN-WILLEM JORRITSMA; Eric Smit; Paula Leeflang; Karel Wernars; LINDA S. THOMASHOW; Eric Laureijs; JANE E. THOMAS-OATES; PETER A. H. M. BAKKER; L. C. van Loon

    2001-01-01

    We released genetically modified Pseudomonas putida WCS358r into the rhizospheres of wheat plants. The\\u000atwo genetically modified derivatives, genetically modified microorganism (GMM) 2 and GMM 8, carried the\\u000aphz biosynthetic gene locus of strain P. fluorescens 2-79 and constitutively produced the antifungal compound\\u000aphenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). In the springs of 1997 and 1998 we sowed wheat seeds treated with either

  2. Potato Flavor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato is one of the most popular vegetables worldwide and is the most important vegetable crop in the United States, accounting for nearly one-third of per-capita vegetable consumption. Potatoes can be prepared in many ways, including baking, boiling, roasting, frying, and microwaving, allowin...

  3. Suppression of NGB and NAB/ERabp1 in tomato modifies root responses to potato cyst nematode infestation.

    PubMed

    D?browska-Bronk, Joanna; Czarny, Magdalena; Wi?niewska, Anita; Fudali, Sylwia; Baranowski, ?ukasz; Sobczak, Miros?aw; ?wi?cicka, Magdalena; Matuszkiewicz, Mateusz; Brzy?ek, Grzegorz; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Dobosz, Renata; Bartoszewski, Grzegorz; Filipecki, Marcin

    2015-05-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes cause significant damage to major crops throughout the world. The small number of genes conferring natural plant resistance and the limitations of chemical control require the development of new protective strategies. RNA interference or the inducible over-expression of nematicidal genes provides an environment-friendly approach to this problem. Candidate genes include NGB, which encodes a small GTP-binding protein, and NAB/ERabp1, which encodes an auxin-binding protein, which were identified as being up-regulated in tomato roots in a transcriptome screen of potato cyst nematode (Globodera rostochiensis) feeding sites. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in?situ hybridization confirmed the localized up-regulation of these genes in syncytia and surrounding cells following nematode infection. Gene-silencing constructs were introduced into tomato, resulting in a 20%-98% decrease in transcription levels. Nematode infection tests conducted on transgenic plants showed 57%-82% reduction in the number of G.?rostochiensis females in?vitro and 30%-46% reduction in pot trials. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a deterioration of cytoplasm, and degraded mitochondria and plastids, in syncytia induced in plants with reduced NAB/ERabp1 expression. Cytoplasm in syncytia induced in plants with low NGB expression was strongly electron translucent and contained very few ribosomes; however, mitochondria and plastids remained intact. Functional impairments in syncytial cytoplasm of silenced plants may result from NGB's role in ribosome biogenesis; this was confirmed by localization of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-labelled NGB protein in nucleoli and co-repression of NGB in plants with reduced NAB/ERabp1 expression. These results demonstrate that NGB and NAB/ERabp1 play important roles in the development of nematode-induced syncytia. PMID:25131407

  4. The Association between Carbohydrate-Rich Foods and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Is Not Modified by Genetic Susceptibility to Dyslipidemia as Determined by 80 Validated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Sonestedt, Emily; Hellstrand, Sophie; Schulz, Christina-Alexandra; Wallström, Peter; Drake, Isabel; Ericson, Ulrika; Gullberg, Bo; Hedblad, Bo; Orho-Melander, Marju

    2015-01-01

    Background It is still unclear whether carbohydrate consumption is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Genetic susceptibility might modify the associations between dietary intakes and disease risk. Objectives The aim was to examine the association between the consumption of carbohydrate-rich foods (vegetables, fruits and berries, juice, potatoes, whole grains, refined grains, cookies and cakes, sugar and sweets, and sugar-sweetened beverages) and the risk of incident ischemic CVD (iCVD; coronary events and ischemic stroke), and whether these associations differ depending on genetic susceptibility to dyslipidemia. Methods Among 26,445 individuals (44–74 years; 62% females) from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study cohort, 2,921 experienced an iCVD event during a mean follow-up time of 14 years. At baseline, dietary data were collected using a modified diet history method, and clinical risk factors were measured in 4,535 subjects. We combined 80 validated genetic variants associated with triglycerides and HDL-C or LDL-C, into genetic risk scores and examined the interactions between dietary intakes and genetic risk scores on the incidence of iCVD. Results Subjects in the highest intake quintile for whole grains had a 13% (95% CI: 3–23%; p-trend: 0.002) lower risk for iCVD compared to the lowest quintile. A higher consumption of foods rich in added sugar (sugar and sweets, and sugar-sweetened beverages) had a significant cross-sectional association with higher triglyceride concentrations and lower HDL-C concentrations. A stronger positive association between a high consumption of sugar and sweets on iCVD risk was observed among those with low genetic risk score for triglycerides (p-interaction=0.05). Conclusion In this prospective cohort study that examined food sources of carbohydrates, individuals with a high consumption of whole grains had a decreased risk of iCVD. No convincing evidence of an interaction between genetic susceptibility for dyslipidemia, measured as genetic risk scores of dyslipidemia-associated variants, and the consumption of carbohydrate-rich foods on iCVD risk was observed. PMID:25898210

  5. Genetically Modified Plants: What’s the Fuss? (402nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, Ben (Senior Geneticist, BNL Biology Dept) [Senior Geneticist, BNL Biology Dept

    2006-03-16

    Genetic transformation is a relatively new and powerful tool used by plant breeders and for basic research. Benefits of gene transformation include resistance to pests and herbicides, which has led to a reduction in pesticide application and soil erosion. Genetically modified plants are used on a massive scale in agriculture in the U.S. and other countries, in part because they are less expensive and more convenient to work with. Yet, despite the benefits, genetic transformation remains a controversial subject and groups in the U.S. and abroad contest its practice.

  6. Mapping of resistance to the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis from the wild potato species Solanum vernei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeanne M. E. Jacobs; Herman J. Eck; Karin Horsman; Paul F. P. Arens; Brigitte Verkerk-Bakker; Evert Jacobsen; Andy Pereira; Willem J. Stiekema

    1996-01-01

    A population of diploid potato (Solanum tuberosum) was used for the genetic analysis and mapping of a locus for resistance to the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis, introgressed from the wild potato species Solanum vernei. Resistance tests of 108 genotypes of a F1 population revealed the presence of a single locus with a dominant allele for resistance to G. rostochiensis

  7. Transplants of Fibroblasts Genetically Modified to Express BDNF Promote Regeneration of Adult Rat Rubrospinal Axons and

    E-print Network

    Fischer, Itzhak

    CNS neurons do not normally regenerate their severed axons. This failure has been attributed to scar tracing with fluorogold showed that 7% of RST neurons regenerated axons at least three to four segmentsTransplants of Fibroblasts Genetically Modified to Express BDNF Promote Regeneration of Adult Rat

  8. Transplants of Fibroblasts Genetically Modified to Express BDNF Promote Axonal Regeneration from Supraspinal Neurons

    E-print Network

    Fischer, Itzhak

    promote axon regeneration from supraspinal neurons in the chronically injured spinal cord with accompaTransplants of Fibroblasts Genetically Modified to Express BDNF Promote Axonal Regeneration from Supraspinal Neurons Following Chronic Spinal Cord Injury Ying Jin,*,1 Itzhak Fischer, Alan Tessler,, and John

  9. Perceptions and attitudes of geography teachers to biotechnology: A study focusing on genetically modified (GM) foods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Demirci

    2008-01-01

    This study reports the perceptions and attitudes of geography teachers towards biotechnology and genetically-modified (GM) foods in Turkey. A survey was conducted with secondary school geography teachers attending teacher workshops in various parts of the country in 2008 and was responded to by 78 teachers from 31 different provinces. The study not only revealed important results about the perceptions of

  10. Labelling genetically modified food products: consumers’ concern in the United Kingdom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arbindra Rimal; Wanki Moon; Siva Balasubramanian

    2007-01-01

    AbstractAn online survey method was used to collect data regarding the concern and attitude of UK consumers towards genetically modified (GM) food labelling. Questionnaires were sent to 9000 participants of the online panel via emails, and 2568 consumers completed the online survey. The response rate was 29%. This study found that more than 75% of the consumers questioned were concerned

  11. Measuring The Attitudes Of Australian Food Manufacturers Towards Genetically Modified (GM) Foods - A Pilot Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frances Woodside; Gabriel Ogunmokun; Leslie R. Brown

    Consumer acceptance of Genetically Modified (GM) foods varies amongst countries, Europeans generally show low levels of acceptance and US consumers are seen as divided in attitudes. As acceptance is essential for the adoption of new technologies in food production and the ultimate market success of new food products, this study, unlike prior Australian research, which has focused on consumer attitudes

  12. CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE OF FOOD BIOTECHNOLOGY: WILLINGNESS TO BUY GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD PRODUCTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ferdaus Hossain; Benjamin M. Onyango; Adesoji O. Adelaja; Brian J. Schilling; William K. Hallman

    2002-01-01

    Biotechnology is often viewed as the defining technology for the future of food and agriculture with the potential to deliver a wide range of economic and health benefits. Public acceptance of genetically modified food products is a critical factor for this emerging technology. Using data from a national survey, this study examines public acceptance of food biotechnology by modeling consumers?'

  13. An integrated research framework to understand consumer attitudes and purchase intentions toward genetically modified foods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mei-Fang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – Given that the increased marketing of genetically modified (GM) food products and the attitudes of the public have a strong impact on the progress of this emerging gene technology, this study aims to shed light on the antecedents relating to the extent of both the adoption and the purchase intention of GM foods. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This work is

  14. Analysis of consumer responses to health threat of genetically modified foods: A pilot study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ayla ÖZHAN DEDEO?LU; Keti VENTURA

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims to analyze the perception of threat of Genetically Modified Foods (GMFs), consequent emotions and coping responses of Turkish consumers. A survey methodology that enables analysis of consumer fear in a naturalistic setting is embraced, so that the call of Hastings, Stead and Webb (2004) for a literature also focusing on generalizability of findings to external settings

  15. Acceptance of Genetically Modified Foods with Health Benefits: A Study in Germany

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José I. Rojas-Méndez; Sadrudin A. Ahmed; Rodrigo Claro-Riethmüller; Achim Spiller

    2012-01-01

    A study was carried out in Germany in order to assess consumers' acceptance of genetically modified (GM) foods with health benefits (bread, yohurt and eggs). Acceptability of GM foods increases when its source does not involve animal products such as eggs. Three factors have been identified as direct antecedents of the acceptance of GM foods: respondents' attitude towards biotechnology, health

  16. GENETICALLY MODIFIED PLANTS: A NORTH\\/SOUTH PERSPECTIVE IN THE MEDITERRANEAN REGION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Berndt H. Brikell

    The use of Genetically Modified Plants (GMPs) is considered a controversial issue. On the one hand GMPs seem to promise a way to increase planetary food production, while on the other it seems to open Pandora's box with no hope to erase the impact of un-controlled GMP spread. Those who advocate Research & Demonstration (R&D) of GMPs argue that these

  17. Studies on feeds from genetically modified plants (GMP) – Contributions to nutritional and safety assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Flachowsky; K. Aulrich; H. Böhme; I. Halle

    2007-01-01

    Since 1997, 18 studies with feeds from genetically modified plants (GMP) in the nutrition of dairy cows, growing bulls, growing and finishing pigs, laying hens, chicken for finishing as well as growing and laying quails were conducted at the Federal Agricultural Research Centre (FAL) in Braunschweig (Germany).The majority of the experiments (16) were undertaken with GMP of the so-called first

  18. The environmental feature in consumer purchasing preferences: The case of Genetically Modified foods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Macario Rodriguez-Entrena; Samir Sayadi

    2008-01-01

    Progress in Biotechnology (Gene Revolution) tends to be compared with that of the Green Revolution in the sixties and seventies. This process is developing in a context of increasing concern by the consumers for food safety and environmental conservation, stirring controversy in the scientific community and society about the potential benefits and possible risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In

  19. Disaggregating consumer demands for organic and genetically modified foods using the Choice Modelling technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Donaghy; John Rolfe; Jeffrey W. Bennett

    2002-01-01

    Issues concerning consumer demands for genetically modified and organic food remain highly topical in Australia. It is unclear how consumers perceive issues associated with food production such as food safety, environmental impacts or animal welfare. It is also unclear how consumers might value potential changes in those issues. This paper reports on research using the choice modelling technique to estimate

  20. Weed and arthropod populations in conventional and genetically modified herbicide tolerant fodder beet fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beate Strandberg; Marianne Bruus Pedersen; Niels Elmegaard

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of genetically modified herbicide tolerant (GMHT) crops has raised concerns from both scientists and non-governmental organisations about possible effects on arable flora and fauna due to the changes in herbicide application and management that such crops involve. Three consecutive studies were performed, covering flora and fauna in fields of GMHT and conventional fodder beets over the season, at

  1. Monitoring of MON810 genetically modified maize in foods in Brazil from 2005 to 2007

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andréia Zilio Dinon; Jaqueline Elis de Melo; Ana Carolina Maisonnave Arisi

    2008-01-01

    Regulations for the use and labeling of genetically modified (GM) products and derived ingredients were implemented in Brazil in 2003. In 2008, GM maize line MON810 was approved for commercialization in Brazil; nevertheless, maize Bt11, Bt176 and MON810 were found in Brazilian market products sold in 2000 and 2001. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was employed to monitor the

  2. Evidence for the establishment and persistence of genetically modified canola populations in the U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Questions/Methods Concerns surrounding the commercial release of genetically modified crops include the risks of escape from cultivation, naturalization, and the transfer of beneficial traits to native and weedy species. Among the crops commonly grown in the U.S., a l...

  3. TRACKING GENE FLOW FROM A GENETICALLY MODIFIED CREEPING BENTGRASS -- METHODS, MEASURES AND LESSONS LEARNED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Creeping bentgrass (CBG) expressing an engineered gene for resistance to glyphosate herbicide is one of the first genetically modified (GM) perennial crops to undergo regulatory review for commercial release by the US Department of Agriculture Animal Plant Health and Inspection S...

  4. Opinion Building on a Socio-Scientific Issue: The Case of Genetically Modified Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekborg, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results from a study with the following research questions: (a) are pupils' opinions on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) influenced by biology teaching; and (b) what is important for the opinion pupils hold and how does knowledge work together with other parameters such as values? 64 pupils in an upper secondary school…

  5. Genetically Modified Foods: Are They a Risk to Human/Animal Health?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Arpad Pusztai (Rowett Research Institute; )

    2001-06-01

    The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article posits that genetically modified (GM) crops and food are being grown and consumed by the public, even though: there is little scientific study about their health risks, safety test technology is inadequate to assess potential harm, they can carry unpredictable toxins, and they may increase the risk of allergenic reactions.

  6. Assessing Genetically Modified Crops to Minimize the Risk of Increased Food Allergy: A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard E. Goodman; Susan L. Hefle; Steven L. Taylor; Ronald van Ree

    2005-01-01

    The first genetically modified (GM) crops approved for food use (tomato and soybean) were evaluated for safety by the United States Food and Drug Administration prior to commercial production. Among other factors, those products and all additional GM crops that have been grown commercially have been evaluated for potential increases in allergenic properties using methods that are consistent with the

  7. Protection of the Neostriatum against Excitotoxic Damage by Neurotrophin-Producing, Genetically Modified Neural Stem Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alberto Martinez-Serrano; Anders Bjorklund

    1996-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative dis- ease that affects the striatum, above all, the GABAergic striatal projection neurons. In the present study, we have explored the use of genetically modified neural stem cell lines producing nerve growth factor (NGF) or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as a means to protect the striatal neurons against excitotoxic damage after transplantation to the

  8. Modeling and optimization of viscosity in enzyme-modified cheese by fuzzy logic and genetic algorithm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Mohebbi; J. Barouei; M. R. Akbarzadeh-T; A. R. Rowhanimanesh; M. B. Habibi-Najafi; M. Yavarmanesh

    2008-01-01

    In the food industry, there is an increasing emphasis on the need for an economic and an additional cheese flavor to prepared food. In this paper a Genetic Fuzzy Rule Base System (GFRS) for modeling of viscosity in enzyme-modified cheese (EMC) is described based on experimental data. Using data obtained via measurement of viscosity in EMC prepared with different dosage

  9. Assessing the Transfer of Genetically Modified DNA from Feed to Animal Tissues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raffaele Mazza; Mirko Soave; Mauro Morlacchini; Gianfranco Piva; Adriano Marocco

    2005-01-01

    In Europe, public and scientific concerns about the environmental and food safety of GM (Genetically Modified) crops overshadow the potential benefits offered by crop biotechnology to improve food quality. One of the concerns regarding the use of GM food in human and animal nutrition is the effect that newly introduced sequences may have on the organism. In this paper, we

  10. Competitors co-operating: establishing a supply chain to manage genetically modified canola

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stuart J. Smyth; Peter W. B. Phillips

    2001-01-01

    Identity preserving production and marketing (IPPM) systems are used extensively in the Canadian canola industry to segregate varieties with different traits from the commodity stream. This paper examines one use of identify preserved production and marketing systems for genetically modified (GM) canola. A number of transgenic herbicide tolerant (HT) varieties have been approved for release in Canada since 1995 but

  11. Awareness and Support of Release of Genetically Modified “Sterile” Mosquitoes, Key West, Florida, USA

    PubMed Central

    Haenchen, Steven; Dickinson, Katherine; Doyle, Michael S.; Walker, Kathleen; Monaghan, Andrew J.; Hayden, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    After a dengue outbreak in Key West, Florida, during 2009–2010, authorities, considered conducting the first US release of male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes genetically modified to prevent reproduction. Despite outreach and media attention, only half of the community was aware of the proposal; half of those were supportive. Novel public health strategies require community engagement. PMID:25625795

  12. Genetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens into the

    E-print Network

    Lieberman, Judy

    , 2000 (received for review January 24, 2000) Bacillus anthrax lethal toxin can be engineered to deliverGenetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens compartment of mammalian cells. The engineered anthrax toxin vaccine appears unlikely to induce an antibody

  13. Approaches to Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Novel Proteins in Food from Genetically Modified Crops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian Kimber; Rebecca J. Dearman

    2002-01-01

    The safety assessment of food derived from genetically modified plants continues to attract considerable attention. Among the important issues that need to be considered is whether the prod- ucts of novel genes introduced into crop plants will have the potential to induce allergic sensitization or to elicit allergic disease. Hierarchical approaches to allergenicity testing have been pro- posed, and these

  14. Attitudes, perceptions, and trust. Insights from a consumer survey regarding genetically modified banana in Uganda

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Enoch M. Kikulwe; Justus Wesseler; Jose Falck-Zepeda

    2011-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops and food are still controversial. This paper analyzes consumers’ perceptions and institutional awareness and trust toward GM banana regulation in Uganda. Results are based on a study conducted among 421 banana-consuming households between July and August 2007. Results show a high willingness to purchase GM banana among consumers. An explanatory factor analysis is conducted to identify

  15. Assessing reproduction of potato psyllid haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae), is a serious pest of solanaceous crops in North and Central America and New Zealand. This insect vectors the bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” that causes zebra chip disease of potato. So far, four distinct genetic ...

  16. A Survey of Genetically Modified Foods Consumed, Health Implications and Recommendations for Public Health Food Safety in Trinidad

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deryck Damian Pattron

    Genetically modified foods provide one of the major challenges facing the food industry in the twenty-first century worldwide. The safety of genetically modified foods are being questioned by scientists, researchers and doctors as it is believed that these foods may pose a serious public health risk, especially for the young, aged, pregnant and immunocompromised persons. The present study investigated the

  17. Information Based Regulation and International Trade in Genetically Modified Agricultural Products: An Evaluation of The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael P. Healy

    2002-01-01

    This Essay considers the regulation of international trade in genetically modified agricultural products. Specifically, it addresses both products released into the environment as seeds and products intended for consumption as food. The first part of the Essay describes the significance of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in modern agriculture, especially agriculture in the United States. This discussion summarizes the risks and

  18. Spatio-temporal urban landscape change analysis using the Markov chain model and a modified genetic algorithm

    E-print Network

    Wang, Le

    from a modified genetic algorithm (GA). Model performance was evaluated between the empirical landscapeSpatio-temporal urban landscape change analysis using the Markov chain model and a modified genetic algorithm J. TANG, L. WANG* and Z. YAO Texas Center for Geographic Information Science, Department

  19. Pre-invasion history and demography shape the genetic variation in the insecticide resistance-related acetylcholinesterase 2 gene in the invasive Colorado potato beetle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Invasive pest species offers a unique opportunity to study the effects of genetic architecture, demography and selection on patterns of genetic variability. Invasive Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) populations have experienced a rapid range expansion and intense selection by insecticides. By comparing native and invasive beetle populations, we studied the origins of organophosphate (OP) resistance-associated mutations in the acetylcholinesterase 2 (AChE2) gene, and the role of selection and demography on its genetic variability. Results Analysis of three Mexican, two US and five European populations yielded a total of 49 haplotypes. Contrary to the expectations all genetic variability was associated with a point mutation linked to insecticide resistance (S291G), this mutation was found in 100% of Mexican, 95% of US and 71% of European beetle sequences analysed. Only two susceptible haplotypes, genetically very differentiated, were found, one in US and one in Europe. The genetic variability at the AChE2 gene was compared with two other genes not directly affected by insecticide selection, diapause protein 1 and juvenile hormone esterase. All three genes showed reduction in genetic variability indicative of a population bottleneck associated with the invasion. Conclusions Stochastic effects during invasion explain most of the observed patterns of genetic variability at the three genes investigated. The high frequency of the S291G mutation in the AChE2 gene among native populations suggests this mutation is the ancestral state and thus, either a pre-adaptation of the beetle for OP resistance or the AChE2 is not the major gene conferring OP resistance. The long historical association with host plant alkaloids together with recombination may have contributed to the high genetic variation at this locus. The genetic diversity in the AChE2 locus of the European beetles, in turn, strongly reflects founder effects followed by rapid invasion. Our results suggest that despite the long history of insecticide use in this species, demographic events together with pre-invasion history have been strongly influential in shaping the genetic diversity of the AChE2 gene in the invasive beetle populations. PMID:23331855

  20. Genetic modificationTransgene introgression from genetically modified crops to their wild relatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew D. Halfhill; Suzanne I. Warwick; C. Neal Stewart

    2003-01-01

    Transgenes engineered into annual crops could be unintentionally introduced into the genomes of their free-living wild relatives. The fear is that these transgenes might persist in the environment and have negative ecological consequences. Are some crops or transgenic traits of more concern than others? Are there natural genetic barriers to minimize gene escape? Can the genetic transformation process be exploited

  1. Identification of susceptibility genes and genetic modifiers of human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Kenneth; Kammerer, Stefan; Hoyal, Carolyn; Reneland, Rikard; Marnellos, George; Nelson, Matthew R.; Braun, Andreas

    2005-03-01

    The completion of the human genome sequence enables the discovery of genes involved in common human disorders. The successful identification of these genes is dependent on the availability of informative sample sets, validated marker panels, a high-throughput scoring technology, and a strategy for combining these resources. We have developed a universal platform technology based on mass spectrometry (MassARRAY) for analyzing nucleic acids with high precision and accuracy. To fuel this technology, we generated more than 100,000 validated assays for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering virtually all known and predicted human genes. We also established a large DNA sample bank comprised of more than 50,000 consented healthy and diseased individuals. This combination of reagents and technology allows the execution of large-scale genome-wide association studies. Taking advantage of MassARRAY"s capability for quantitative analysis of nucleic acids, allele frequencies are estimated in sample pools containing large numbers of individual DNAs. To compare pools as a first-pass "filtering" step is a tremendous advantage in throughput and cost over individual genotyping. We employed this approach in numerous genome-wide, hypothesis-free searches to identify genes associated with common complex diseases, such as breast cancer, osteoporosis, and osteoarthritis, and genes involved in quantitative traits like high density lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-c) levels and central fat. Access to additional well-characterized patient samples through collaborations allows us to conduct replication studies that validate true disease genes. These discoveries will expand our understanding of genetic disease predisposition, and our ability for early diagnosis and determination of specific disease subtype or progression stage.

  2. Solving ethanol production problems with genetically modified yeast strains

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Cavalheiro, A.; Monteiro, G.

    2013-01-01

    The current world demand for bioethanol is increasing as a consequence of low fossil fuel availability and a growing number of ethanol/gasoline flex-fuel cars. In addition, countries in several parts of the world have agreed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and the use of ethanol as a fuel (which produces fewer pollutants than petroleum products) has been considered to be a good alternative to petroleum products. The ethanol that is produced in Brazil from the first-generation process is optimized and can be accomplished at low cost. However, because of the large volume of ethanol that is produced and traded each year, any small improvement in the process could represent a savings of billions dollars. Several Brazilian research programs are investing in sugarcane improvement, but little attention has been given to the improvement of yeast strains that participate in the first-generation process at present. The Brazilian ethanol production process uses sugarcane as a carbon source for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast is then grown at a high cellular density and high temperatures in large-capacity open tanks with cells recycle. All of these culture conditions compel the yeast to cope with several types of stress. Among the main stressors are high temperatures and high ethanol concentrations inside the fermentation tanks during alcohol production. Moreover, the competition between the desired yeast strains, which are inoculated at the beginning of the process, with contaminants such as wild type yeasts and bacteria, requires acid treatment to successfully recycle the cells. This review is focused on describing the problems and stressors within the Brazilian ethanol production system. It also highlights some genetic modifications that can help to circumvent these difficulties in yeast. PMID:24516432

  3. The Search for Genetic Modifiers of Disease Severity in the ?-Hemoglobinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Lettre, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) and ?-thalassemia, two monogenic diseases caused by mutations in the ?-globin gene, affect millions of individuals worldwide. These hemoglobin disorders are characterized by extreme clinical heterogeneity, complicating patient management and treatment. A better understanding of this patient-to-patient clinical variability would dramatically improve care and might also guide the development of novel therapies. Studies of the natural history of these ?-hemoglobinopathies have identified fetal hemoglobin levels and concomitant ?-thalassemia as important modifiers of disease severity. Several small-scale studies have attempted to identify additional genetic modifiers of SCD and ?-thalassemia, without much success. Fortunately, improved knowledge of the human genome and the development of new genomic tools, such as genome-wide genotyping arrays and next-generation DNA sequencers, offer new opportunities to use genetics to better understand the causes of the many complications observed in ?-hemoglobinopathy patients. Here I discuss the most important factors to consider when planning an experiment to find associations between ?-hemoglobinopathy-related complications and DNA sequence variants, with a focus on how to successfully perform a genome-wide association study. I also review the literature and explain why most published findings in the field of SCD modifier genetics are likely to be false-positive reports, with the goal to draw lessons allowing investigators to design better genetic experiments. PMID:23028136

  4. Detection of genetically modified maize in processed foods sold commercially in iran by qualitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Rabiei, Maryam; Mehdizadeh, Mehrangiz; Rastegar, Hossein; Vahidi, Hossein; Alebouyeh, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food is an important issue for all the subjects involved in food control and customer's right. Due to the increasing number of GMOs imported to Iran during the past few years, it has become necessary to screen the products in order to determine the identity of the consumed daily foodstuffs. In this study, following the extraction of genomic DNA from processed foods sold commercially in Iran, qualitative PCR was performed to detect genetically modified maize. The recombinant DNA target sequences were detected with primers highly specific for each investigated transgene such as CaMV35s gene, Bt-11, MON810 and Bt-176 separately. Based on the gel electrophoresis results, Bt- 11 and MON810 events were detected in some maize samples, while, in none of them Bt- 176 modified gene was detected. For the first time, the results demonstrate the presence of genetically modified maize in Iranian food products, reinforcing the need for the development of labeling system and valid quantitative methods in routine analyses. PMID:24250568

  5. Genetic Diversity of the Ordinary Strain of Potato virus Y (PVY) and Origin of Recombinant PVY Strains

    PubMed Central

    Karasev, Alexander V.; Hu, Xiaojun; Brown, Celeste J.; Kerlan, Camille; Nikolaeva, Olga V.; Crosslin, James M.; Gray, Stewart M.

    2011-01-01

    The ordinary strain of Potato virus Y (PVY), PVYO, causes mild mosaic in tobacco and induces necrosis and severe stunting in potato cultivars carrying the Ny gene. A novel substrain of PVYO was recently reported, PVYO-O5, which is spreading in the United States and is distinguished from other PVYO isolates serologically (i.e., reacting to the otherwise PVYN-specific monoclonal antibody 1F5). To characterize this new PVYO-O5 subgroup and address possible reasons for its continued spread, we conducted a molecular study of PVYO and PVYO-O5 isolates from a North American collection of PVY through whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. In all, 44 PVYO isolates were sequenced, including 31 from the previously defined PVYO-O5 group, and subjected to whole-genome analysis. PVYO-O5 isolates formed a separate lineage within the PVYO genome cluster in the whole-genome phylogenetic tree and represented a novel evolutionary lineage of PVY from potato. On the other hand, the PVYO sequences separated into at least two distinct lineages on the whole-genome phylogenetic tree. To shed light on the origin of the three most common PVY recombinants, a more detailed phylogenetic analysis of a sequence fragment, nucleotides 2,406 to 5,821, that is present in all recombinant and nonrecombinant PVYO genomes was conducted. The analysis revealed that PVYN:O and PVYN-Wi recombinants acquired their PVYO segments from two separate PVYO lineages, whereas the PVYNTN recombinant acquired its PVYO segment from the same lineage as PVYN:O. These data suggest that PVYN:O and PVYN-Wi recombinants originated from two separate recombination events involving two different PVYO parental genomes, whereas the PVYNTN recombinants likely originated from the PVYN:O genome via additional recombination events. PMID:21675922

  6. Association of financial or professional conflict of interest to research outcomes on health risks or nutritional assessment studies of genetically modified products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johan Diels; Mario Cunha; Célia Manaia; Bernardo Sabugosa-Madeira; Margarida Silva

    2011-01-01

    Since the first commercial cultivation of genetically modified crops in 1994, the rapidly expanding market of genetically modified seeds has given rise to a multibillion dollar industry. This fast growth, fueled by high expectations towards this new commercial technology and shareholder trust in the involved industry, has provided strong incentives for further research and development of new genetically modified plant

  7. Key issues for the assessment of the allergenic potential of genetically modified foods: breakout group reports.

    PubMed Central

    Germolec, Dori R; Kimber, Ian; Goldman, Lynn; Selgrade, MaryJane

    2003-01-01

    On the final afternoon of the workshop "Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Genetically Modified Foods," held 10-12 December 2001 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, speakers and participants met in breakout groups to discuss specific questions in the areas of use of human clinical data, animal models to assess food allergy, biomarkers of exposure and effect, sensitive populations, dose-response assessment, and postmarket surveillance. Each group addressed general questions regarding allergenicity of genetically modified foods and specific questions for each subject area. This article is a brief summary of the discussions of each of the six breakout groups regarding our current state of knowledge and what information is needed to advance the field. PMID:12826486

  8. Use of seedling progeny tests for genetical studies as part of a potato (Solanum tuberosum subsp. tuberosum) breeding programme.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, J E; Stewart, H E; Wastie, R L; Dale, M F; Phillips, M S

    1995-05-01

    A diallel set of crosses, including selfs and some reciprocal crosses, was made between 15 parents chosen for their male fertility from those included in a tetraploid potato (Solanum tuberosum subsp. tuberosum) breeding programme at the Scottish Crop Research Institute. Seedling progeny tests were used to evaluate the progenies for non-race-specific resistance to late blight (Phytophthora infestans) in both foliage and tubers, quantitative resistance to the white potato cystnematode (PCN) (Globodera pallida) and the commercial worth of their tubers as judged by breeders' visual preference. No reciprocal differences were found. Comparisons of the selfs and crosses revealed inbreeding depression for breeders' preference, which varied among the parents from negligible to severe, whilst there were also statistically significant differences for foliage and tuber blight, but not for PCN. When the selfs were omitted from the combining ability analyses, large differences in general combining ability (GCA) were found for all four traits, and smaller differences in specific combining ability for tuber blight and breeders' preference. The only statistically significant correlation between GCAs for different traits was a favourable one of r = 0.56 between foliage and tuber resistance to late blight. It was concluded that prospects were good for simultaneously improving all four traits by multitrait genotypic recurrent selection. PMID:24172936

  9. Genetic Diversity and Ecological Evaluation of Fluorescent Pseudomonads Isolated from the Leaves and Roots of Potato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Someya, Nobutaka; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Tsuchiya, Kenichi; Ikeda, Seishi

    2012-01-01

    A total of 828 isolates of fluorescent pseudomonads (FPs) were obtained from the leaves (305 isolates) and roots (523 isolates) of potato plants grown in different geographical locations in Japan, and 16S rRNA gene sequences of 776 isolates were successfully determined by direct PCR sequencing. Clustering analysis (?99% identity) identified 13 and 26 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) for leaf- and root-associated FPs, respectively, and 29 OTUs were identified in the phytosphere of potato plants. Among them, 7 and 9 OTUs showed a significantly biased distribution to the leaves and roots, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 3 dominant OTUs for leaf-associated FPs were grouped in a cluster of leaf-associated pathogens, such as Pseudomonas cichorii and Pseudomonas viridiflava. In contrast, 4 OTUs were located in a cluster of saprophytic pseudomonads. Among them, 3 OTUs showed high similarity to Pseudomonas koreensis and Pseudomonas vancouverensis, both of which have been reported to be beneficial for biological control or plant growth promotion. These data provide key information for efficient surveying and utilization of beneficial FPs in agricultural practices. PMID:22791043

  10. Genetic diversity and ecological evaluation of fluorescent pseudomonads isolated from the leaves and roots of potato plants.

    PubMed

    Someya, Nobutaka; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Tsuchiya, Kenichi; Ikeda, Seishi

    2012-01-01

    A total of 828 isolates of fluorescent pseudomonads (FPs) were obtained from the leaves (305 isolates) and roots (523 isolates) of potato plants grown in different geographical locations in Japan, and 16S rRNA gene sequences of 776 isolates were successfully determined by direct PCR sequencing. Clustering analysis (?99% identity) identified 13 and 26 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) for leaf- and root-associated FPs, respectively, and 29 OTUs were identified in the phytosphere of potato plants. Among them, 7 and 9 OTUs showed a significantly biased distribution to the leaves and roots, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 3 dominant OTUs for leaf-associated FPs were grouped in a cluster of leaf-associated pathogens, such as Pseudomonas cichorii and Pseudomonas viridiflava. In contrast, 4 OTUs were located in a cluster of saprophytic pseudomonads. Among them, 3 OTUs showed high similarity to Pseudomonas koreensis and Pseudomonas vancouverensis, both of which have been reported to be beneficial for biological control or plant growth promotion. These data provide key information for efficient surveying and utilization of beneficial FPs in agricultural practices. PMID:22791043

  11. Bringing policy relevance and scientific discipline to environmental risk assessment for genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Herman, Rod A; Garcia-Alonso, Monica; Layton, Raymond; Raybould, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Although public opinion is important in deciding what is valued by society, governments have determined that scientific expertise is required to evaluate potential environmental effects of genetically modified (GM) crops. We suggest how to evaluate rigorously the environmental effects of GM crops in the context of a scientific investigation. Following a disciplined scientific approach to environmental risk assessment (ERA) for GM crops should help resolve controversy in identifying and addressing risk. PMID:23973171

  12. Temporal Dynamics of Bacterial and Fungal Communities in a Genetically Modified (GM) Rice Ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seung-Hoon Lee; Chang-Gi Kim; Hojeong Kang

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the temporal dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities in a soil ecosystem supporting genetically modified\\u000a (GM) rice (Oryza sativa L., ABC-TPSP; fusion of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase and phosphatase). Using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism\\u000a analysis and real-time quantitative PCR, we compared bacterial and fungal communities in the soils underlying GM rice (ABC-TPSP),\\u000a and its host cultivar (Nakdong) during growing

  13. A Microarray-based Detection System for Genetically Modified (GM) Food Ingredients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Serge Leimanis; Marta Hernández; Sophie Fernández; Francine Boyer; Malcolm Burns; Shirin Bruderer; Thomas Glouden; Neil Harris; Othmar Kaeppeli; Patrick Philipp; Maria Pla; Pere Puigdomènech; Marc Vaitilingom; Yves Bertheau; José Remacle

    2006-01-01

    A multiplex DNA microarray chip was developed for simultaneous identification of nine genetically modified organisms (GMOs),\\u000a five plant species and three GMO screening elements, i.e. the 35S promoter, the nos terminator and the nptII gene. The chips also include several controls, such as that for the possible presence of CaMV. The on-chip detection was\\u000a performed directly with PCR amplified products.

  14. Consumer Acceptance of Genetically Modified Foods: Traits, Labels and Diverse Information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wallace E. Huffman

    2010-01-01

    New experimental economic methods are described and used to assess consumers' willingness to pay for food products that might be made from new transgenic and intragenic genetically modified (GM) traits. Participants in auctions are randomly chosen adult consumers in major US metropolitan areas and not college students. Food labels are kept simple and focus on key attributes of experimental goods. Diverse private information from

  15. Suggested Improvements for the Allergenicity Assessment of Genetically Modified Plants Used in Foods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard E. Goodman; Afua O. Tetteh

    2011-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) plants are increasingly used for food production and industrial applications. As the global population\\u000a has surpassed 7 billion and per capita consumption rises, food production is challenged by loss of arable land, changing weather\\u000a patterns, and evolving plant pests and disease. Previous gains in quantity and quality relied on natural or artificial breeding,\\u000a random mutagenesis, increased pesticide

  16. Environmental impact of herbicide regimes used with genetically modified herbicide-resistant maize

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yann Devos; Mathias Cougnon; Sofie Vergucht; Robert Bulcke; Geert Haesaert; Walter Steurbaut; Dirk Reheul

    2008-01-01

    With the potential advent of genetically modified herbicide-resistant (GMHR) crops in the European Union, changes in patterns\\u000a of herbicide use are predicted. Broad-spectrum, non-selective herbicides used with GMHR crops are expected to substitute for\\u000a a set of currently used herbicides, which might alter the agro-environmental footprint from crop production. To test this\\u000a hypothesis, the environmental impact of various herbicide regimes

  17. An overview of general features of risk assessments of genetically modified crops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy Craig; Mark Tepfer; Giuliano Degrassi; Decio Ripandelli

    2008-01-01

    The intentional introduction into the environment or market of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is nearly always governed\\u000a by a framework of science-based risk assessment and risk management measures. This is usually implemented through the integration\\u000a of hazard identification and characterisation of all of the elements of risk associated with a new GM crop or derived product.\\u000a Typical categories of hazards

  18. Report of the Questionnaire Survey for Consumers' Recognition to Genetically Modified Food in Beijing, China 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dayuan XUE; Yuqing WANG

    Summary: Based on the questionnaire surveys to 1000 consumers from 12 supermarkets in Beijing, China, 2004, this paper revealed consumers' attitudes on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and GM foods. The results show that 64.9% interviewees are not acquaintance to GMOs and GM products, while only 2.3% of respondents have a good understanding. With respect to GMOs labeling, 45.3% of interviewees

  19. Intraspinal Delivery of Neurotrophin3 Using Neural Stem Cells Genetically Modified by Recombinant Retrovirus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Liu; B. T. Himes; J. Solowska; J. Moul; S. Y. Chow; K. I. Park; A. Tessler; M. Murray; E. Y. Snyder; I. Fischer

    1999-01-01

    Neural stem cells have been shown to participate in the repair of experimental CNS disorders. To examine their potential in spinal cord repair, we used retroviral vectors to genetically modify a clone of neural stem cells, C17, to overproduce neurotrophin-3 (NT-3). The cells were infected with a retrovirus construct containing the NT-3.IRES.lacZ\\/neo sequence and cloned by limiting dilution and selection

  20. General surveillance of genetically modified plants in the EC and the need for controls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom J. de Jong

    2010-01-01

    Post market environmental monitoring of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) after their deliberate release is a legal obligation in the European Union (Directive 2001\\/18\\/EC and EC-Regulation 1829\\/2003). It has been introduced in order to identify direct or indirect, immediate and\\/or delayed adverse effects of GMOs after their release on the market. The monitoring of environmental effects is subdivided in two parts:

  1. Identifying indicator species for post-release monitoring of genetically modified, herbicide resistant crops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angelika Hilbeck; Matthias Meier; Armin Benzler

    2008-01-01

    In Europe, regulations for release and placing-on-the-market of genetically modified (GM) crops require post-release monitoring\\u000a of their impact on the environment. Monitoring potential adverse effects of GM crops includes direct effects as well as indirect\\u000a effects, e.g. GM crop specific changes in land and pest management. Currently, there is a gap in the pre-release risk assessments\\u000a conducted for regulatory approval

  2. Landscape-scale distribution and persistence of genetically modified oilseed rape ( Brassica napus ) in Manitoba, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexis L. Knispel; Stéphane M. McLachlan

    2010-01-01

    Background, aim and scope  Genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) oilseed rape (OSR; Brassica napus L.) was approved for commercial cultivation in Canada in 1995 and currently represents over 95% of the OSR grown in western\\u000a Canada. After a decade of widespread cultivation, GMHT volunteers represent an increasing management problem in cultivated\\u000a fields and are ubiquitous in adjacent ruderal habitats, where they contribute

  3. Empirical Modeling of Genetically Modified Maize Grain Production Practices to Achieve European Union Labeling Thresholds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David I Gustafson; Ivo O. Brants; Michael J. Horak; Kirk M. Remund; Eric W. Rosenbaum; John K. Soteres

    2006-01-01

    An empirical approach is given for specifying co-existence requirements for genetically-modified (GM) maize production, in order to ensure compliance with the 0.9% labeling threshold for food and feed in the Eur opean Union. Field data were considered in which pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) was measured within maize receptor fields at a series of distances from source fi elds having a

  4. Approaches for the Identification of Genetic Modifiers of Nutrient Dependent Phenotypes: Examples from Folate

    PubMed Central

    Zinck, John W. R.; MacFarlane, Amanda J.

    2014-01-01

    By combining the sciences of nutrition, bioinformatics, genomics, population genetics, and epidemiology, nutrigenomics is improving our understanding of how diet and nutrient intake can interact with or modify gene expression and disease risk. In this review, we explore various approaches to examine gene–nutrient interactions and the modifying role of nutrient consumption, as they relate to nutrient status and disease risk in human populations. Two common approaches include the use of SNPs in candidate genes to identify their association with nutritional status or disease outcomes, or genome-wide association studies to identify genetic polymorphisms associated with a given phenotype. Here, we examine the results of various gene–nutrient interaction studies, the association of genetic polymorphisms with disease expression, and the identification of nutritional factors that modify gene-dependent disease phenotypes. We have focused on specific examples from investigations of the interactions of folate, B-vitamin consumption, and polymorphisms in the genes of B-vitamin dependent enzymes and their association with disease risk, followed by an examination of the strengths and limitations of the methods employed. We also present suggestions for future studies, including an approach from an on-going large scale study, to examine the interaction of nutrient intake and genotypic variation and their impact on nutritional status. PMID:25988111

  5. Prevalence of genetically modified rice, maize, and soy in Saudi food products.

    PubMed

    Elsanhoty, Rafaat M; Al-Turki, A I; Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy

    2013-10-01

    Qualitative and quantitative DNA-based methods were applied to detect genetically modified foods in samples from markets in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Two hundred samples were collected from Al-Qassim, Riyadh, and Mahdina in 2009 and 2010. GMOScreen 35S and NOS test kits for the detection of genetically modified organism varieties in samples were used. The positive results obtained from GMOScreen 35S and NOS were identified using specific primer pairs. The results indicated that all rice samples gave negative results for the presence of 35S and NOS terminator. About 26 % of samples containing soybean were positive for 35S and NOS terminator and 44 % of samples containing maize were positive for the presence of 35S and/or NOS terminator. The results showed that 20.4 % of samples was positive for maize line Bt176, 8.8 % was positive for maize line Bt11, 8.8 % was positive for maize line T25, 5.9 % was positive for maize line MON 810, and 5.9 % was positive for StarLink maize. Twelve samples were shown to contain <3 % of genetically modified (GM) soy and 6 samples >10 % of GM soy. Four samples containing GM maize were shown to contain >5 % of GM maize MON 810. Four samples containing GM maize were shown to contain >1 % of StarLink maize. Establishing strong regulations and certified laboratories to monitor GM foods or crops in Saudi market is recommended. PMID:23904260

  6. Unintended compositional changes in genetically modified (GM) crops: 20 years of research.

    PubMed

    Herman, Rod A; Price, William D

    2013-12-01

    The compositional equivalency between genetically modified (GM) crops and nontransgenic comparators has been a fundamental component of human health safety assessment for 20 years. During this time, a large amount of information has been amassed on the compositional changes that accompany both the transgenesis process and traditional breeding methods; additionally, the genetic mechanisms behind these changes have been elucidated. After two decades, scientists are encouraged to objectively assess this body of literature and determine if sufficient scientific uncertainty still exists to continue the general requirement for these studies to support the safety assessment of transgenic crops. It is concluded that suspect unintended compositional effects that could be caused by genetic modification have not materialized on the basis of this substantial literature. Hence, compositional equivalence studies uniquely required for GM crops may no longer be justified on the basis of scientific uncertainty. PMID:23414177

  7. Ghrelin and eating behavior: evidence and insights from genetically-modified mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Aki; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Perelló, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin is an octanoylated peptide hormone, produced by endocrine cells of the stomach, which acts in the brain to increase food intake and body weight. Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying ghrelin's effects on eating behaviors has been greatly improved by the generation and study of several genetically manipulated mouse models. These models include mice overexpressing ghrelin and also mice with genetic deletion of ghrelin, the ghrelin receptor [the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)] or the enzyme that post-translationally modifies ghrelin [ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT)]. In addition, a GHSR-null mouse model in which GHSR transcription is globally blocked but can be cell-specifically reactivated in a Cre recombinase-mediated fashion has been generated. Here, we summarize findings obtained with these genetically manipulated mice, with the aim to highlight the significance of the ghrelin system in the regulation of both homeostatic and hedonic eating, including that occurring in the setting of chronic psychosocial stress. PMID:23882175

  8. Potato Float

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL)

    2004-01-01

    How can a potato wedge be made to hover in the center of a glass of liquid? This material is part of a series of hands-on science activities designed to arouse student interest. Here students investigate density using potato wedges and water and sugar water solutions. The activity includes a description, a list of science process skills and complex reasoning strategies being used, and a compilation of applicable national science standards for grades K-12. Also provided are content topics, a list of necessary supplies, instructions to perform the activity, and presentation techniques. The activity's content is explained, and assessment suggestions are provided.

  9. METHODS FOR DETERMINING EXPOSURE TO AND POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF GENE FLOW FROM GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS TO COMPATIBLE RELATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SCIENCE QUESTIONS: -Does gene flow occur from genetically modified (GM) crop plants to compatible plants? -How can it be measured? -Are there ecological consequences of GM crop gene flow to plant communities? RESEARCH: The objectives ...

  10. Genetic Variability and Evolutionary Implications of RNA Silencing Suppressor Genes in RNA1 of Sweet Potato Chlorotic Stunt Virus Isolates Infecting Sweetpotato and Related Wild Species

    PubMed Central

    Tugume, Arthur K.; Amayo, Robert; Weinheimer, Isabel; Mukasa, Settumba B.; Rubaihayo, Patrick R.; Valkonen, Jari P. T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The bipartite single-stranded RNA genome of Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV, genus Crinivirus; Closteroviridae) encodes a Class 1 RNase III (RNase3), a putative hydrophobic protein (p7) and a 22-kDa protein (p22) from genes located in RNA1. RNase3 and p22 suppress RNA silencing, the basal antiviral defence mechanism in plants. RNase3 is sufficient to render sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) virus-susceptible and predisposes it to development of severe diseases following infection with unrelated virus. The incidence, strains and gene content of SPCSV infecting wild plant species have not been studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty SPCSV isolates were characterized from 10 wild Ipomoea species, Hewittia sublobata or Lepistemon owariensis (family Convolvulaceae) in Uganda and compared with 34 local SPCSV isolates infecting sweetpotatoes. All isolates belonged to the East African (EA) strain of SPCSV and contained RNase3 and p7, but p22 was not detected in six isolates. The three genes showed only limited genetic variability and the proteins were under purifying selection. SPCSV isolates lacking p22 synergized with Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus potyvirus; Potyviridae) and caused severe symptoms in co-infected sweetpotato plants. One SPCSV isolate enhanced accumulation of SPFMV, but no severe symptoms developed. A new whitefly-transmitted virus (KML33b) encoding an RNase3 homolog (<56% identity to SPCSV RNase3) able to suppresses sense-mediated RNA silencing was detected in I. sinensis. Conclusions/Significance SPCSV isolates infecting wild species and sweetpotato in Uganda were genetically undifferentiated, suggesting inter-species transmission of SPCSV. Most isolates in Uganda contained p22, unlike SPCSV isolates characterized from other countries and continents. Enhanced accumulation of SPFMV and increased disease severity were found to be uncoupled phenotypic outcomes of RNase3-mediated viral synergism in sweetpotato. A second virus encoding an RNase3-like RNA silencing suppressor was detected. Overall, results provided many novel and important insights into evolutionary biology of SPCSV. PMID:24278443

  11. Applications of biotechnology and genomics in potato improvement.

    PubMed

    Barrell, Philippa J; Meiyalaghan, Sathiyamoorthy; Jacobs, Jeanne M E; Conner, Anthony J

    2013-10-01

    Potato is the third most important global food crop and the most widely grown noncereal crop. As a species highly amenable to cell culture, it has a long history of biotechnology applications for crop improvement. This review begins with a historical perspective on potato improvement using biotechnology encompassing pathogen elimination, wide hybridization, ploidy manipulation and applications of cell culture. We describe the past developments and new approaches for gene transfer to potato. Transformation is highly effective for adding single genes to existing elite potato clones with no, or minimal, disturbances to their genetic background and represents the only effective way to produce isogenic lines of specific genotypes/cultivars. This is virtually impossible via traditional breeding as, due to the high heterozygosity in the tetraploid potato genome, the genetic integrity of potato clones is lost upon sexual reproduction as a result of allele segregation. These genetic attributes have also provided challenges for the development of genetic maps and applications of molecular markers and genomics in potato breeding. Various molecular approaches used to characterize loci, (candidate) genes and alleles in potato, and associating phenotype with genotype are also described. The recent determination of the potato genome sequence has presented new opportunities for genomewide assays to provide tools for gene discovery and enabling the development of robustly unique marker haplotypes spanning QTL regions. The latter will be useful in introgression breeding and whole-genome approaches such as genomic selection to improve the efficiency of selecting elite clones and enhancing genetic gain over time. PMID:23924159

  12. Use of Genetically Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Treat Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wyse, Robert D.; Dunbar, Gary L.; Rossignol, Julien

    2014-01-01

    The transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for treating neurodegenerative disorders has received growing attention recently because these cells are readily available, easily expanded in culture, and when transplanted, survive for relatively long periods of time. Given that such transplants have been shown to be safe in a variety of applications, in addition to recent findings that MSCs have useful immunomodulatory and chemotactic properties, the use of these cells as vehicles for delivering or producing beneficial proteins for therapeutic purposes has been the focus of several labs. In our lab, the use of genetic modified MSCs to release neurotrophic factors for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases is of particular interest. Specifically, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been recognized as therapeutic trophic factors for Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases, respectively. The aim of this literature review is to provide insights into: (1) the inherent properties of MSCs as a platform for neurotrophic factor delivery; (2) the molecular tools available for genetic manipulation of MSCs; (3) the rationale for utilizing various neurotrophic factors for particular neurodegenerative diseases; and (4) the clinical challenges of utilizing genetically modified MSCs. PMID:24463293

  13. Determinants of consumer attitudes and purchase intentions with regard to genetically modified foods - Results of a cross-national survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lone Bredahl

    2000-01-01

    1. Previous research has shown consumers to be highly sceptical towards genetic modification in food production. So far, however, little research has tried to explain how consumers form attitudes and make decisions with regard to genetically modified foods. 2. The paper presents the results of a survey which was carried out in Denmark, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom to

  14. Evaluation of Detection Methods for Genetically Modified Traits in Genotypes Resistant to European Corn Borer and Herbicides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. L. MA; K. SUBEDI; L. EVENSON; G. STEWART

    2005-01-01

    Detection of genetically modified (GM) traits in corn (Zea mays L.) is urgently needed for preservation of genetic identity and marketing GM products. A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency, accuracy, and reliability of different analytical methods to detect GM traits in corn. Samples with known fractions of GM concentrations (Bacillus thuringiensis [Bt], Liberty Link [LL] and stacked

  15. Agro-environmental effects due to altered cultivation practices with genetically modified herbicide-tolerant oilseed rape and implications for monitoring. A review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Graef

    2009-01-01

    Genetically modified herbicide-tolerant oilseed rape or canola (Brassica napus L.) is at the forefront of being introduced into European agriculture. Concerns have been raised about how genetically modified\\u000a oilseed rape cultivation and the modified cropping practices might impair the agro-environment. The present review compiles\\u000a and categorises evidenced and potential agro-environmental effects of cultivating genetically modified oilseed rape and assesses\\u000a the

  16. Piezoelectric Sensor for Determination of Genetically Modified Soybean Roundup Ready® in Samples not Amplified by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Stobiecka, Magdalena; Cie?la, Jaros?aw M.; Janowska, Beata; Tudek, Barbara; Radecka, Hanna

    2007-01-01

    The chemically modified piezoelectrodes were utilized to develop relatively cheap and easy to use biosensor for determination of genetically modified Roundup Ready soybean (RR soybean). The biosensor relies on the immobilization onto gold piezoelectrodes of the 21-mer single stranded oligonucleotide (probes) related to 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene, which is an active component of an insert integrated into RR soybean genome. The hybridization reaction between the probe and the target complementary sequence in solution was monitored. The system was optimized using synthetic oligonucleotides, which were applied for EPSPS gene detection in DNA samples extracted from animal feed containing 30% RR soybean amplified by the PCR and nonamplified by PCR. The detection limit for genomic DNA was in the range of 4.7·105 numbers of genom copies contained EPSPS gene in the QCM cell. The properties such as sensitivity and selectivity of piezoelectric senor presented here indicated that it could be applied for the direct determination of genetically modified RR soybean in the samples non-amplified by PCR.

  17. CHEMICALLY FORCED DORMANCY TERMINATION MIMICS NATURAL DORMANCY PROGRESSION IN POTATO TUBER MERISTEMS BY REDUCING ABA LEVELS AND MODIFYING EXPRESSION OF GENES INVOLVED IN REGULATING ABA CONTENT.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The length of potato tuber dormancy depends on both the genotype and environmental conditions during growth and storage. Abscisic acid (ABA) has been shown to play a critical role in tuber dormancy control but the mechanisms regulating ABA content during dormancy as well as the sites of ABA synthesi...

  18. Analysis of genetic relationships between potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli) populations in the United States, Mexico and Guatemala using ITS2 and inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc), is an important factor in Zebra Complex (ZC), a disease that causes economic losses on potato crops. Although the exact cause of ZC is not yet known, it may be related to the toxicity of psyllid saliva, pathogens transmitted by this insect, or a com...

  19. Using multiple genetic variants as instrumental variables for modifiable risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Tom M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Harbord, Roger M; Sheehan, Nuala A; Tobias, Jon H; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Sterne, Jonathan AC

    2012-01-01

    Mendelian randomisation analyses use genetic variants as instrumental variables (IVs) to estimate causal effects of modifiable risk factors on disease outcomes. Genetic variants typically explain a small proportion of the variability in risk factors; hence Mendelian randomisation analyses can require large sample sizes. However, an increasing number of genetic variants have been found to be robustly associated with disease-related outcomes in genome-wide association studies. Use of multiple instruments can improve the precision of IV estimates, and also permit examination of underlying IV assumptions. We discuss the use of multiple genetic variants in Mendelian randomisation analyses with continuous outcome variables where all relationships are assumed to be linear. We describe possible violations of IV assumptions, and how multiple instrument analyses can be used to identify them. We present an example using four adiposity-associated genetic variants as IVs for the causal effect of fat mass on bone density, using data on 5509 children enrolled in the ALSPAC birth cohort study. We also use simulation studies to examine the effect of different sets of IVs on precision and bias. When each instrument independently explains variability in the risk factor, use of multiple instruments increases the precision of IV estimates. However, inclusion of weak instruments could increase finite sample bias. Missing data on multiple genetic variants can diminish the available sample size, compared with single instrument analyses. In simulations with additive genotype-risk factor effects, IV estimates using a weighted allele score had similar properties to estimates using multiple instruments. Under the correct conditions, multiple instrument analyses are a promising approach for Mendelian randomisation studies. Further research is required into multiple imputation methods to address missing data issues in IV estimation. PMID:21216802

  20. Attitudes, perceptions, and trust. Insights from a consumer survey regarding genetically modified banana in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kikulwe, Enoch M; Wesseler, Justus; Falck-Zepeda, Jose

    2011-10-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops and food are still controversial. This paper analyzes consumers' perceptions and institutional awareness and trust toward GM banana regulation in Uganda. Results are based on a study conducted among 421 banana-consuming households between July and August 2007. Results show a high willingness to purchase GM banana among consumers. An explanatory factor analysis is conducted to identify the perceptions toward genetic modification. The identified factors are used in a cluster analysis that grouped consumers into segments of GM skepticism, government trust, health safety concern, and food and environmental safety concern. Socioeconomic characteristics differed significantly across segments. Consumer characteristics and perception factors influence consumers' willingness to purchase GM banana. The institutional awareness and trust varied significantly across segments as well. The findings would be essential to policy makers when designing risk-communication strategies targeting different consumer segments to ensure proper discussion and addressing potential concerns about GM technology. PMID:21704665

  1. Modifying Behavioral Phenotypes in Fmr1 KO Mice: Genetic Background Differences Reveal Autistic-Like Responses

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Corinne M.; Alekseyenko, Olga; Hamilton, Shannon M.; Thomas, Alexia M.; Serysheva, Ekaterina; Yuva-Paylor, Lisa A.; Paylor, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Scientific Abstract Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability in humans. In addition to cognitive impairment, patients may exhibit hyperactivity, attention deficits, social difficulties and anxiety, and autistic-like behaviors. The degree to which patients display these behaviors varies considerably and is influenced by family history, suggesting that genetic modifiers play a role in the expression of behaviors in FXS. Several studies have examined behavior in a mouse model of FXS in which the Fmr1 gene has been ablated. Most of those studies were done in Fmr1 knockout mice on a pure C57BL/6 or FVB strain background. To gain a better understanding of the effects of genetic background on behaviors resulting from the loss of Fmr1 gene expression, we generated F1 hybrid lines from female Fmr1 heterozygous mice on a pure C57BL/6J background bred with male Fmr1 wild-type mice of various background strains (A/J, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, 129S1/SvImJ and CD-1). Male Fmr1 knockout and wild-type littermates from each line were examined in an extensive behavioral test battery. Results clearly indicate that multiple behavioral responses are dependent on genetic background, including autistic-like traits that are present on limited genetic backgrounds. This approach has allowed us to identify improved models for different behavioral symptoms present in FXS including autistic-like traits. PMID:21268289

  2. A look at product development with genetically modified crops: examples from maize.

    PubMed

    Mumm, Rita H

    2013-09-01

    Plant breeding for crop genetic improvement involves the cycle of creating genetic diversity and exploiting that diversity to derive an improved cultivar with outstanding performance for specific traits of interest. Genetic modification through transformation essentially expands the genepool to facilitate access to genes otherwise not available through crossing. Transgenic events are defined by the DNA sequence that has been incorporated into the target genome and the specific point(s) of insertion. In the development of a new transgenic trait, typically many events are generated and evaluated with the aim of identifying one exhibiting consistent trait expression at or above specified thresholds, stable inheritance, and the absence of any negative effects. With transgenic traits for maize, once commercial candidates have been identified, these events are introgressed into elite lines, often through the use of molecular markers that can accelerate the breeding process and aid in producing a quality conversion. Converted elite lines are yield-tested to ensure performance equivalency with their unconverted counterparts. Finally, before commercial sale of seed, quality control monitoring is conducted to ensure event identity and purity and the absence of any unintended events. This monitoring complements other quality control measures to confirm seed viability and line/hybrid purity and uniformity in seed treatments, all in an effort to ensure customer satisfaction and to comply with governmental regulations. Thus, genetically modified (GM) cultivars are subject to significant testing and auditing prior to seed sale and distribution to farmers, more testing and auditing than with non-GM cultivars. PMID:23668783

  3. Evaluation of genetically modified sugarcane lines carrying Cry 1AC gene using molecular marker techniques.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Roba M

    2013-01-01

    Five genetically modified insect resistant sugarcane lines harboring the Bt Cry 1AC gene to produce insecticidal proteins were compared with non-transgenic control by using three types of molecular marker techniques namely, RAPD, ISSR and AFLP. These techniques were applied on transgenic and non-transgenic plants to investigate the genetic variations, which may appear in sugarcane clones. This variation might demonstrate the genomic changes associated with the transformation process, which could change important molecular basis of various biological phenomena. Genetic variations were screened using 22 different RAPD primers, 10 ISSR primers and 13 AFLP primer combinations. Analysis of RAPD and ISSR banding patterns gave no exclusive evidence for genetic variations. Meanwhile, the percentage of polymorphic bands was 0.45% in each of RAPD and ISSR, while the polymorphism generated by AFLP analysis was 1.8%. The maximum percentage of polymorphic bands was 1.4%, 1.1% and 5.5% in RAPD, ISSR and AFLP, respectively. These results demonstrate that most transgenic lines showed genomic homogeneity and verified minor genomic changes. Dendrograms revealing the relationships among the transgenic and control plants were developed from the data of each of the three marker types. PMID:23549345

  4. The development and standardization of testing methods for genetically modified organisms and their derived products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dabing; Guo, Jinchao

    2011-07-01

    As the worldwide commercialization of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) increases and consumers concern the safety of GMOs, many countries and regions are issuing labeling regulations on GMOs and their products. Analytical methods and their standardization for GM ingredients in foods and feed are essential for the implementation of labeling regulations. To date, the GMO testing methods are mainly based on the inserted DNA sequences and newly produced proteins in GMOs. This paper presents an overview of GMO testing methods as well as their standardization. PMID:21651724

  5. Multiple Genetic Modifiers of Bilirubin Metabolism Involvement in Significant Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia in Patients of Chinese Descent

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Zheng, Lei; Lin, Min; Zheng, Xiang-bin; Lin, Fen

    2015-01-01

    The potential for genetic variation to modulate neonatal hyperbilirubinemia risk is increasingly being recognized. A case-control study was designed to assess comprehensive contributions of the multiple genetic modifiers of bilirubin metabolism on significant neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in Chinese descendents. Eleven common mutations and polymorphisms across five bilirubin metabolism genes, namely those encoding UGT1A1, HMOX1, BLVRA, SLCO1B1 and SLCO1B3, were determined using the high resolution melt (HRM) assay or PCR-capillary electrophoresis analysis. A total of 129 hyperbilirubinemic infants and 108 control subjects were evaluated. Breastfeeding and the presence of the minor A allele of rs4148323 (UGTA*6) were correlated with an increased risk of hyperbilirubinemia (OR=2.17, P=0.02 for breastfeeding; OR=9.776, P=0.000 for UGTA*6 homozygote; OR=3.151, P=0.000 for UGTA*6 heterozygote); whereas, increasing gestational age and the presence of –TA7 repeat variant of UGT1A1 decreased the risk (OR=0.721, P=0.003 for gestational age; OR=0.313, P=0.002 for heterozygote TA6/TA7). In addition, the SLCO1B1 and SLCO1B3 polymorphisms also contributed to an increased risk of hyperbilirubinemia. This detailed analysis revealed the impact of multiple genetic modifiers on neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. This may support the use of genetic tests for clinical risk assessment. Furthermore, the established HRM assay can serve as an effective method for large-scale investigation. PMID:26146841

  6. Production of genetically and developmentally modified seaweeds: exploiting the potential of artificial selection techniques.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Bénédicte; Rolland, Elodie; Gupta, Vishal; Reddy, C R K

    2015-01-01

    Plant feedstock with specific, modified developmental features has been a quest for centuries. Since the development and spread of agriculture, there has been a desire for plants producing disproportionate-or more abundant and more nutritional-biomass that meet human needs better than their native counterparts. Seaweed aquaculture, targeted for human consumption and the production of various raw materials, is a rapidly expanding field and its stakeholders have increasing vested interest for cost-effective and lucrative seaweed cultivation processes. Thus, scientific research on seaweed development is particularly timely: the potential for expansion of seaweed cultivation depends on the sector's capacity to produce seaweeds with modified morphological features (e.g., thicker blades), higher growth rates or delayed (or even no) fertility. Here, we review the various technical approaches used to modify development in macroalgae, which have attracted little attention from developmental biologists to date. Because seaweed (or marine macroalgae) anatomy is much less complex than that of land plants and because seaweeds belong to three different eukaryotic phyla, the mechanisms controlling their morphogenesis are key to understanding their development. Here, we present efficient sources of developmentally and genetically modified seaweeds-somatic variants, artificial hybrids and mutants-as well as the future potential of these techniques. PMID:25852700

  7. Precision breeding for novel starch variants in potato.

    PubMed

    Muth, Jost; Hartje, Stefanie; Twyman, Richard M; Hofferbert, Hans-Reinhard; Tacke, Eckhard; Prüfer, Dirk

    2008-08-01

    Potato can be used as a source of modified starches for culinary and industrial processes, but its allelic diversity and tetraploid genome make the identification of novel alleles a challenge, and breeding such alleles into elite lines is a slow and difficult process. An efficient and reliable strategy has been developed for the rapid introduction and identification of new alleles in elite potato breeding lines, based on the ethylmethanesulphonate mutagenesis of dihaploid seeds. Using the granule-bound starch synthase I gene (waxy) as a model, a series of point mutations that potentially affect gene expression or enzyme function was identified. The most promising loss-of-function allele (waxy(E1100)) carried a mutation in the 5'-splice donor site of intron 1 that caused mis-splicing and protein truncation. This was used to establish elite breeding lineages lacking granule-bound starch synthase I protein activity and producing high-amylopectin starch. This is the first report of rapid and efficient mutation analysis in potato, a genetically complex and vegetatively propagated crop. PMID:18422889

  8. Potato Straw

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-07-12

    In this physics demonstration, learners are challenged to insert a straw the furthest into a potato. After learners explore different techniques, the demonstrator can show them how to hold the straw firmly about 2/3 of the way up and use a sharp thrusting movement. Use this activity to explore force and surface area. This activity guide includes a helpful video that demonstrates each step of the demonstration.

  9. Potato Shoot Tip Cryopreservation. A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anja Kaczmarczyk; Veli-Matti Rokka; E. R. Joachim Keller

    2011-01-01

    Potato is one of the most important crops worldwide. Genetic resources of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. ssp. tuberosum) and related cultivated species are conserved through storage of tubers, in vitro plants and in cryopreservation. Cryopreservation,\\u000a storage in or above liquid nitrogen, is the best option to maintain vegetatively propagated plants in the long term. The present\\u000a review gives comprehensive information

  10. Covering chemical diversity of genetically-modified tomatoes using metabolomics for objective substantial equivalence assessment.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Miyako; Redestig, Henning; Hirai, Tadayoshi; Oikawa, Akira; Matsuda, Fumio; Fukushima, Atsushi; Arita, Masanori; Watanabe, Shin; Yano, Megumu; Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Ezura, Hiroshi; Saito, Kazuki

    2011-01-01

    As metabolomics can provide a biochemical snapshot of an organism's phenotype it is a promising approach for charting the unintended effects of genetic modification. A critical obstacle for this application is the inherently limited metabolomic coverage of any single analytical platform. We propose using multiple analytical platforms for the direct acquisition of an interpretable data set of estimable chemical diversity. As an example, we report an application of our multi-platform approach that assesses the substantial equivalence of tomatoes over-expressing the taste-modifying protein miraculin. In combination, the chosen platforms detected compounds that represent 86% of the estimated chemical diversity of the metabolites listed in the LycoCyc database. Following a proof-of-safety approach, we show that % had an acceptable range of variation while simultaneously indicating a reproducible transformation-related metabolic signature. We conclude that multi-platform metabolomics is an approach that is both sensitive and robust and that it constitutes a good starting point for characterizing genetically modified organisms. PMID:21359231

  11. Covering Chemical Diversity of Genetically-Modified Tomatoes Using Metabolomics for Objective Substantial Equivalence Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Tadayoshi; Oikawa, Akira; Matsuda, Fumio; Fukushima, Atsushi; Arita, Masanori; Watanabe, Shin; Yano, Megumu; Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Ezura, Hiroshi; Saito, Kazuki

    2011-01-01

    As metabolomics can provide a biochemical snapshot of an organism's phenotype it is a promising approach for charting the unintended effects of genetic modification. A critical obstacle for this application is the inherently limited metabolomic coverage of any single analytical platform. We propose using multiple analytical platforms for the direct acquisition of an interpretable data set of estimable chemical diversity. As an example, we report an application of our multi-platform approach that assesses the substantial equivalence of tomatoes over-expressing the taste-modifying protein miraculin. In combination, the chosen platforms detected compounds that represent 86% of the estimated chemical diversity of the metabolites listed in the LycoCyc database. Following a proof-of-safety approach, we show that % had an acceptable range of variation while simultaneously indicating a reproducible transformation-related metabolic signature. We conclude that multi-platform metabolomics is an approach that is both sensitive and robust and that it constitutes a good starting point for characterizing genetically modified organisms. PMID:21359231

  12. What risk assessments of genetically modified organisms can learn from institutional analyses of public health risks.

    PubMed

    Rajan, S Ravi; Letourneau, Deborah K

    2012-01-01

    The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT) as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large. PMID:23193357

  13. Unveiling the roles of the glutathione redox system in vivo by analyzing genetically modified mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Junichi; Ito, Jun-itsu; Zhang, Xuhong; Kurahashi, Toshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Redox status affects various cellular activities, such as proliferation, differentiation, and death. Recent studies suggest pivotal roles of reactive oxygen species not only in pathogenesis under oxidative insult but also in intracellular signal transduction. Glutathione is present in several millimolar concentrations in the cytoplasm and has multiple roles in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Two enzymes, ?-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione synthetase, constitute the de novo synthesis machinery, while glutathione reductase is involved in the recycling of oxidized glutathione. Multidrug resistant proteins and some other transporters are responsible for exporting oxidized glutathione, glutathione conjugates, and S-nitrosoglutathione. In addition to antioxidation, glutathione is more positively involved in cellular activity via its sulfhydryl moiety of a molecule. Animals in which genes responsible for glutathione metabolism are genetically modified can be used as beneficial and reliable models to elucidate roles of glutathione in vivo. This review article overviews recent progress in works related to genetically modified rodents and advances in the elucidation of glutathione-mediated reactions. PMID:21980221

  14. Endpoint Visual Detection of Three Genetically Modified Rice Events by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Wang, Xiaofu; Jin, Nuo; Zhou, Yu; Huang, Sainan; Miao, Qingmei; Zhu, Qing; Xu, Junfeng

    2012-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) rice KMD1, TT51-1, and KF6 are three of the most well known transgenic Bt rice lines in China. A rapid and sensitive molecular assay for risk assessment of GM rice is needed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), currently the most common method for detecting genetically modified organisms, requires temperature cycling and relatively complex procedures. Here we developed a visual and rapid loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to amplify three GM rice event-specific junction sequences. Target DNA was amplified and visualized by two indicators (SYBR green or hydroxy naphthol blue [HNB]) within 60 min at an isothermal temperature of 63 °C. Different kinds of plants were selected to ensure the specificity of detection and the results of the non-target samples were negative, indicating that the primer sets for the three GM rice varieties had good levels of specificity. The sensitivity of LAMP, with detection limits at low concentration levels (0.01%–0.005% GM), was 10- to 100-fold greater than that of conventional PCR. Additionally, the LAMP assay coupled with an indicator (SYBR green or HNB) facilitated analysis. These findings revealed that the rapid detection method was suitable as a simple field-based test to determine the status of GM crops. PMID:23203072

  15. What Risk Assessments of Genetically Modified Organisms Can Learn from Institutional Analyses of Public Health Risks

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, S. Ravi; Letourneau, Deborah K.

    2012-01-01

    The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT) as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large. PMID:23193357

  16. Rapid detection of genetically modified organisms on a continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuyuan; Xing, Da; Zhang, Chunsun

    2009-02-01

    The ability to perform DNA amplification on a microfluidic device is very appealing. In this study, a compact continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction (PCR) microfluidics was developed for rapid analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in genetically modified soybeans. The device consists of three pieces of copper and a transparent polytetrafluoroethylene capillary tube embedded in the spiral channel fabricated on the copper. On this device, the P35S and Tnos sequences were successfully amplified within 9min, and the limit of detection of the DNA sample was estimated to be 0.005 ng microl(-1). Furthermore, a duplex continuous-flow PCR was also reported for the detection of the P35S and Tnos sequences in GMOs simultaneously. This method was coupled with the intercalating dye SYBR Green I and the melting curve analysis of the amplified products. Using this method, temperature differences were identified by the specific melting temperature values of two sequences, and the limit of detection of the DNA sample was assessed to be 0.01 ng microl(-1). Therefore, our results demonstrated that the continuous-flow PCR assay could discriminate the GMOs in a cost-saving and less time-consuming way. PMID:19010299

  17. Chemometric discrimination of genetically modified Coffea arabica cultivars using spectroscopic and chromatographic fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ivanira; Scarminio, Ieda Spacino

    2013-03-30

    Multivariate statistical design and principal component analysis (PCA) applied to RP-HPLC-DAD and FTIR spectroscopic data were performed to investigate the fingerprints of four coffee cultivars, traditional red bourbon and three genetically modified cultivars. The design and response surface results showed that extraction dependence on solvent composition of one of the genetically modified cultivars, IAPAR 59, was very similar to that found for the red bourbon standard. PCA of the FTIR spectra obtained from all the simplex centroid design mixtures indicated that the 1:1 binary ethanol-dichloromethane solution resulted in the best separation of the four cultivars. The IPR 108 cultivar has more intense vibrational bands in the 3200-3,600 cm(-1) and 1100-1,600 cm(-1) regions indicating higher acid and fat levels than those of the other cultivars. The UV absorptions close to 275 nm of the RP-HPLC-DAD spectra are correlated with the strengths of the infrared absorptions between 3400 and 3,460 cm(-1) and can be explained by varying caffeine concentrations in the four cultivars. PMID:23598243

  18. Lymphocytes genetically modified to express tumor antigens target DCs in vivo and induce antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Vincenzo; Cipponi, Arcadi; Raccosta, Laura; Rainelli, Cristina; Fontana, Raffaella; Maggioni, Daniela; Lunghi, Francesca; Mukenge, Sylvain; Ciceri, Fabio; Bregni, Marco; Bordignon, Claudio; Traversari, Catia

    2007-01-01

    The exploitation of the physiologic processing and presenting machinery of DCs by in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens may improve the immunogenic potential and clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. Here we show that lymphocytes genetically modified to express self/tumor antigens, acting as antigen carriers, efficiently target DCs in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. The infusion of tyrosinase-related protein 2–transduced (TRP-2–transduced) lymphocytes induced the establishment of protective immunity and long-term memory in tumor-bearing mice. Analysis of the mechanism responsible for the induction of such an immune response allowed us to demonstrate that cross-presentation of the antigen mediated by the CD11c+CD8?+ DC subset had occurred. Furthermore, we demonstrated in vivo and in vitro that DCs had undergone activation upon phagocytosis of genetically modified lymphocytes, a process mediated by a cell-to-cell contact mechanism independent of CD40 triggering. Targeting and activation of secondary lymphoid organ–resident DCs endowed antigen-specific T cells with full effector functions, which ultimately increased tumor growth control and animal survival in a therapeutic tumor setting. We conclude that the use of transduced lymphocytes represents an efficient method for the in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens on DCs. PMID:17885685

  19. Is genetically modified crop the answer for the next green revolution?

    PubMed

    Basu, Saikat Kumar; Dutta, Madhuleema; Goyal, Aakash; Bhowmik, Pankaj Kumar; Kumar, Jitendra; Nandy, Sanjib; Scagliusi, Sandra Mansun; Prasad, Rajib

    2010-01-01

    Post-green revolution advances made in biotechnology paved the way of cultivating the high-yielding, stress and disease resistant genetically modified (GM) varieties of wheat, rice, maize cotton and several other crops. The recent rapid commercialization of the genetically modified crops in Asia, Americas and Australia indicates the potentiality of this new technology. GM crops give higher yields and are rich in nutritional values containing vitamins and minerals and can thus can help to alleviate hunger and malnutrition of the growing population in the under developed and developing countries. It could also be possible to develop more biotic and abiotic stress resistant genotypes in these crops where it was difficult to develop due to the unavailability of genes of resistance in the crossing germplasms. However, further research and investigations are needed to popularize the cultivation of these crops in different parts of the world. This review provides an insight of the impact of GM crops on contemporary agriculture across the past few decades, traces its' history across time, highlights new achievements and breakthroughs and discusses the future implication of this powerful technology in the coming few decades. PMID:21865874

  20. The Calcium Solution: Developing Potato Cultivars With Enhanced Tuber Storage and Internal Quality by Genetic Improvement of Tuber Calcium Accumulation Ability Enetic Improvement of Potato for Tuber Calcium Uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuber internal quality is a major limiting factor for the U.S. potato industry. Breeders invest time and money in producing advanced selections which, in the end, often fail because of tuber internal defects, tuber bruising, or storage quality issues. In-season fertilization with calcium is known to...

  1. BOTANY OF THE POTATO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter, published in a revision of the Potato Association of America's Handbook entitled "Commercial Potato Production in North America, describes the taxonomy of cultivated potato in the genus Solanum. It describes the differences between wild and cultivated potatoes and the number of sp...

  2. Potatoes and Human Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Ellen Camire; Stan Kubow; Danielle J. Donnelly

    2009-01-01

    The potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber follows only rice and wheat in world importance as a food crop for human consumption. Cultivated potatoes have spread from the Andes of South America where they originated to 160 countries around the world. Consumption of fresh potatoes has declined while processed products have increased in popularity. As the potato becomes a staple in

  3. Breeding potato at the diploid level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In most regions of the world, potato cultivars are tetraploid. However, complexities due to tetraploid genetics have slowed breeding progress and limited the implementation of breeding strategies commonly used in other major crops. We are developing diploid genetics resources, including partially in...

  4. Comparative proteomic analysis of genetically modified maize grown under different agroecosystems conditions in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Profiling technologies allow the simultaneous measurement and comparison of thousands of cell components without prior knowledge of their identity. In the present study, we used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry to evaluate protein expression of Brazilian genetically modified maize hybrid grown under different agroecosystems conditions. To this effect, leaf samples were subjected to comparative analysis using the near-isogenic non-GM hybrid as the comparator. Results In the first stage of the analysis, the main sources of variation in the dataset were identified by using Principal Components Analysis which correlated most of the variation to the different agroecosystems conditions. Comparative analysis within each field revealed a total of thirty two differentially expressed proteins between GM and non-GM samples that were identified and their molecular functions were mainly assigned to carbohydrate and energy metabolism, genetic information processing and stress response. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge this study represents the first evidence of protein identities with differentially expressed isoforms in Brazilian MON810 genetic background hybrid grown under field conditions. As global databases on outputs from “omics” analysis become available, these could provide a highly desirable benchmark for safety assessments. PMID:24304660

  5. Detection of genetically modified DNA in fresh and processed foods sold in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al-Salameen, Fadila; Kumar, Vinod; Al-Aqeel, Hamed; Al-Hashash, Hanadi; Hejji, Ahmed Bin

    2012-01-01

    Developments in genetic engineering technology have led to an increase in number of food products that contain genetically engineered crops in the global market. However, due to lack of scientific studies, the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in the Kuwaiti food market is currently ambiguous. Foods both for human and animal consumption are being imported from countries that are known to produce GM food. Therefore, an attempt has been made to screen foods sold in the Kuwaiti market to detect GMOs in the food. For this purpose, samples collected from various markets in Kuwait have been screened by SYBR green-based real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Further confirmation and GMO quantification was performed by TaqMan-based RT-PCR. Results indicated that a significant number of food commodities sold in Kuwait were tested positive for the presence of GMO. Interestingly, certain processed foods were tested positive for more than one transgenic events showing complex nature of GMOs in food samples. Results of this study clearly indicate the need for well-defined legislations and regulations on the marketing of approved GM food and its labeling to protect consumer's rights. PMID:22892687

  6. Molecular genetics of aminoglycoside resistance genes and familial relationships of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, K J; Rather, P N; Hare, R S; Miller, G H

    1993-01-01

    The three classes of enzymes which inactivate aminoglycosides and lead to bacterial resistance are reviewed. DNA hybridization studies have shown that different genes can encode aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes with identical resistance profiles. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of 49 aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes have revealed new insights into the evolution and relatedness of these proteins. A preliminary assessment of the amino acids which may be important in binding aminoglycosides was obtained from these data and from the results of mutational analysis of several of the genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Recent studies have demonstrated that aminoglycoside resistance can emerge as a result of alterations in the regulation of normally quiescent cellular genes or as a result of acquiring genes which may have originated from aminoglycoside-producing organisms or from other resistant organisms. Dissemination of these genes is aided by a variety of genetic elements including integrons, transposons, and broad-host-range plasmids. As knowledge of the molecular structure of these enzymes increases, progress can be made in our understanding of how resistance to new aminoglycosides emerges. Images PMID:8385262

  7. Genetic diversity of the golden potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis and determination of the origin of populations in Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Annie Christine; Mimee, Benjamin; Montarry, Josselin; Bardou-Valette, Sylvie; Bélair, Guy; Moffett, Peter; Grenier, Eric

    2013-10-01

    The golden cyst nematode (Globodera rostochiensis), native to South America, has been introduced in many parts of the world, including Europe and North America. Recently, it was found for the first time in the province of Quebec, Canada in the locality of St. Amable near Montreal. To date, very few studies have examined the population genetics of this pest. Consequently, there is a lack of knowledge about the genetic structure and evolution of this nematode. In this study, twelve new microsatellite markers were developed in order to explore these questions. These markers were used to genotype fifteen populations originating from different regions of the world, including five from Canada. Within populations, the highest genetic diversity was consistently observed in the populations from Bolivia, the postulated region of origin of the golden nematode, and the lowest in populations from British Columbia (Canada) and New York (USA). The two Quebec populations were very similar to each other and to the population found in Newfoundland, but surprisingly, they were significantly different from three other North American populations including those from New York and British Columbia. Based on our results, we conclude that the golden cyst nematode has been introduced in North America at least twice from distinct regions of the world. PMID:23742887

  8. Tracking historic migrations of the Irish potato famine pathogen, Phytophthora infestans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean Beagle Ristaino

    2002-01-01

    The plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans causes late blight, a devastating disease on potato that led to the Irish potato famine during 1845–1847. The disease is considered a reemerging problem and still causes major epidemics on both potato and tomato crops worldwide. Theories on the origin of the disease based on an examination of the genetic diversity and structure of P.

  9. The GMOseek matrix: a decision support tool for optimizing the detection of genetically modified plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since their first commercialization, the diversity of taxa and the genetic composition of transgene sequences in genetically modified plants (GMOs) are constantly increasing. To date, the detection of GMOs and derived products is commonly performed by PCR-based methods targeting specific DNA sequences introduced into the host genome. Information available regarding the GMOs’ molecular characterization is dispersed and not appropriately organized. For this reason, GMO testing is very challenging and requires more complex screening strategies and decision making schemes, demanding in return the use of efficient bioinformatics tools relying on reliable information. Description The GMOseek matrix was built as a comprehensive, online open-access tabulated database which provides a reliable, comprehensive and user-friendly overview of 328 GMO events and 247 different genetic elements (status: 18/07/2013). The GMOseek matrix is aiming to facilitate GMO detection from plant origin at different phases of the analysis. It assists in selecting the targets for a screening analysis, interpreting the screening results, checking the occurrence of a screening element in a group of selected GMOs, identifying gaps in the available pool of GMO detection methods, and designing a decision tree. The GMOseek matrix is an independent database with effective functionalities in a format facilitating transferability to other platforms. Data were collected from all available sources and experimentally tested where detection methods and certified reference materials (CRMs) were available. Conclusions The GMOseek matrix is currently a unique and very valuable tool with reliable information on GMOs from plant origin and their present genetic elements that enables further development of appropriate strategies for GMO detection. It is flexible enough to be further updated with new information and integrated in different applications and platforms. PMID:23965170

  10. Insertional mutagenesis using Tnt1 retrotransposon in potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is the third most important food crop in the world. However, genetics and genomics research of potato has lagged behind many major crop species due to its autotetraploidy and a highly heterogeneous genome. Insertional mutagenesis using T-DNA or transposable elements, which is available in sev...

  11. Problem formulation in the environmental risk assessment for genetically modified plants

    PubMed Central

    Wolt, Jeffrey D.; Keese, Paul; Raybould, Alan; Burachik, Moisés; Gray, Alan; Olin, Stephen S.; Schiemann, Joachim; Sears, Mark; Wu, Felicia

    2009-01-01

    Problem formulation is the first step in environmental risk assessment (ERA) where policy goals, scope, assessment endpoints, and methodology are distilled to an explicitly stated problem and approach for analysis. The consistency and utility of ERAs for genetically modified (GM) plants can be improved through rigorous problem formulation (PF), producing an analysis plan that describes relevant exposure scenarios and the potential consequences of these scenarios. A properly executed PF assures the relevance of ERA outcomes for decision-making. Adopting a harmonized approach to problem formulation should bring about greater uniformity in the ERA process for GM plants among regulatory regimes globally. This paper is the product of an international expert group convened by the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Research Foundation. PMID:19757133

  12. A novel approach to the use of genetically modified herbicide tolerant crops for environmental benefit.

    PubMed Central

    Dewar, Alan M; May, Mike J; Woiwod, Ian P; Haylock, Lisa A; Champion, Gillian T; Garner, Beulah H; Sands, Richard J N; Qi, Aiming; Pidgeon, John D

    2003-01-01

    The proposed introduction of genetically modified herbicide tolerant (GMHT) crops, with claims of improved weed control, has prompted fears about possible environmental impacts of their widespread adoption, particularly on arable weeds, insects and associated farmland birds. In response to this, we have developed a novel weed-management system for GMHT sugar beet, based on band spraying, which exploits the flexibility offered by the broad-spectrum partner herbicides. Here, we show the results from two series of field experiments which, taken together, demonstrate that, by using this system, crops can be managed for enhanced weed and insect biomass without compromising yield, thus potentially offering food and shelter to farmland birds and other wildlife. These results could be applicable widely to other row crops, and indicate that creative use of GMHT technology could be a powerful tool for developing more sustainable farming systems in the future. PMID:12639311

  13. Blood-testis barrier and spermatogenesis: lessons from genetically-modified mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiao-Hua; Bukhari, Ihtisham; Zheng, Wei; Yin, Shi; Wang, Zheng; Cooke, Howard J; Shi, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is found between adjacent Sertoli cells in the testis where it creates a unique microenvironment for the development and maturation of meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells in seminiferous tubes. It is a compound proteinous structure, composed of several types of cell junctions including tight junctions (TJs), adhesion junctions and gap junctions (GJs). Some of the junctional proteins function as structural proteins of BTB and some have regulatory roles. The deletion or functional silencing of genes encoding these proteins may disrupt the BTB, which may cause immunological or other damages to meiotic and postmeiotic cells and ultimately lead to spermatogenic arrest and infertility. In this review, we will summarize the findings on the BTB structure and function from genetically-modified mouse models and discuss the future perspectives. PMID:24713828

  14. Evaluating the 2008 consensus conference on genetically modified foods in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mei-Fang

    2015-07-01

    Genetically modified foods have become one of the most popular topics for deliberative exercises involving ordinary citizens worldwide. This paper examines the Taiwanese consensus conference on GM foods held in June 2008, and the implications and limitations of the public deliberations. The consensus conference facilitated multiparty dialogues and enhanced citizens' knowledge, and affected their attitudes. This study demonstrates the ways contextual factors have influenced the outcome of the citizens' deliberative practices, including the government's conventional technocratic decision-making style, the strong influence of the U.S. government, the political and technological culture, the government's framing of economic development concerns, and a lack of pressure from civil society to compel the government to formally respond to their concerns. The consensus conference had a limited effect on policy decision-making, and seemed to serve as a socio-political experiment. PMID:24068183

  15. [Examination of processed vegetable foods for the presence of common DNA sequences of genetically modified tomatoes].

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Mamiko; Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Ubukata, Shoji; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The contamination of processed vegetable foods with genetically modified tomatoes was investigated by the use of qualitative PCR methods to detect the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (P35S) and the kanamycin resistance gene (NPTII). DNA fragments of P35S and NPTII were detected in vegetable juice samples, possibly due to contamination with the genomes of cauliflower mosaic virus infecting juice ingredients of Brassica species and soil bacteria, respectively. Therefore, to detect the transformation construct sequences of GM tomatoes, primer pairs were designed for qualitative PCR to specifically detect the border region between P35S and NPTII, and the border region between nopaline synthase gene promoter and NPTII. No amplification of the targeted sequences was observed using genomic DNA purified from the juice ingredients. The developed qualitative PCR method is considered to be a reliable tool to check contamination of products with GM tomatoes. PMID:25743587

  16. A novel approach to the use of genetically modified herbicide tolerant crops for environmental benefit.

    PubMed

    Dewar, Alan M; May, Mike J; Woiwod, Ian P; Haylock, Lisa A; Champion, Gillian T; Garner, Beulah H; Sands, Richard J N; Qi, Aiming; Pidgeon, John D

    2003-02-22

    The proposed introduction of genetically modified herbicide tolerant (GMHT) crops, with claims of improved weed control, has prompted fears about possible environmental impacts of their widespread adoption, particularly on arable weeds, insects and associated farmland birds. In response to this, we have developed a novel weed-management system for GMHT sugar beet, based on band spraying, which exploits the flexibility offered by the broad-spectrum partner herbicides. Here, we show the results from two series of field experiments which, taken together, demonstrate that, by using this system, crops can be managed for enhanced weed and insect biomass without compromising yield, thus potentially offering food and shelter to farmland birds and other wildlife. These results could be applicable widely to other row crops, and indicate that creative use of GMHT technology could be a powerful tool for developing more sustainable farming systems in the future. PMID:12639311

  17. Imaging physiologic dysfunction of individual hippocampal subregions in humans and genetically modified mice.

    PubMed

    Small, S A; Wu, E X; Bartsch, D; Perera, G M; Lacefield, C O; DeLaPaz, R; Mayeux, R; Stern, Y; Kandel, E R

    2000-12-01

    We have developed a variant of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) designed to be sensitive to static neuronal function. This method is based on resting instead of dynamic changes in oxygen-dependent signal and therefore allows for a spatial resolution that can detect signal from different hippocampal subregions in human subjects as well as in mice. We found that hippocampal signal was significantly diminished in elderly subjects with memory decline compared to age-matched controls, and different subjects showed dysfunction in different subregions. Among healthy elders, signal intensity from the subiculum was correlated selectively with memory performance. This method does not require an activation task; it can be used in anesthetized normal and in genetically modified and cognitively impaired mice. In mice the signal was found to be sufficiently sensitive to detect functional changes in the absence of underlying anatomical changes. PMID:11163257

  18. Suggested improvements for the allergenicity assessment of genetically modified plants used in foods.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Richard E; Tetteh, Afua O

    2011-08-01

    Genetically modified (GM) plants are increasingly used for food production and industrial applications. As the global population has surpassed 7 billion and per capita consumption rises, food production is challenged by loss of arable land, changing weather patterns, and evolving plant pests and disease. Previous gains in quantity and quality relied on natural or artificial breeding, random mutagenesis, increased pesticide and fertilizer use, and improved farming techniques, all without a formal safety evaluation. However, the direct introduction of novel genes raised questions regarding safety that are being addressed by an evaluation process that considers potential increases in the allergenicity, toxicity, and nutrient availability of foods derived from the GM plants. Opinions vary regarding the adequacy of the assessment, but there is no documented proof of an adverse effect resulting from foods produced from GM plants. This review and opinion discusses current practices and new regulatory demands related to food safety. PMID:21487714

  19. Genetic?Genomic Replication to Identify Candidate Mouse Atherosclerosis Modifier Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jeffrey; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Genetics plays a large role in atherosclerosis susceptibility in humans and mice. We attempted to confirm previously determined mouse atherosclerosis?associated loci and use bioinformatics and transcriptomics to create a catalog of candidate atherosclerosis modifier genes at these loci. Methods and Results A strain intercross was performed between AKR and DBA/2 mice on the apoE?/? background generating 166 F2 progeny. Using the phenotype log10 of the aortic root lesion area, we identified 3 suggestive atherosclerosis quantitative trait loci (Ath QTLs). When combined with our prior strain intercross, we confirmed 3 significant Ath QTLs on chromosomes 2, 15, and 17, with combined logarithm of odds scores of 5.9, 5.3, and 5.6, respectively, which each met the genome?wide 5% false discovery rate threshold. We identified all of the protein coding differences between these 2 mouse strains within the Ath QTL intervals. Microarray gene expression profiling was performed on macrophages and endothelial cells from this intercross to identify expression QTLs (eQTLs), the loci that are associated with variation in the expression levels of specific transcripts. Cross tissue eQTLs and macrophage eQTLs that replicated from a prior strain intercross were identified. These bioinformatic and eQTL analyses produced a comprehensive list of candidate genes that may be responsible for the Ath QTLs. Conclusions Replication studies for clinical traits as well as gene expression traits are worthwhile in identifying true versus false genetic associations. We have replicated 3 loci on mouse chromosomes 2, 15, and 17 that are associated with atherosclerosis. We have also identified protein coding differences and multiple replicated eQTLs, which may be useful in the identification of atherosclerosis modifier genes. PMID:23525445

  20. ETHICAL ISSUES IN FIELD TRIALS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED DISEASE-RESISTANT MOSQUITOES

    PubMed Central

    RESNIK, DAVID B.

    2012-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases take a tremendous toll on human populations, especially in developing nations. In the last decade, scientists have developed mosquitoes that have been genetically modified to prevent transmission of mosquito-borne diseases, and field trials have been conducted. Some mosquitoes have been rendered infertile, some have been equipped with a vaccine they transmit to humans, and some have been designed to resist diseases. This article focuses on ethical issues raised by field trials of disease-resistant, genetically modified mosquitoes. Some of these issues include: protecting the public and the environment from harm, balancing benefits and risks, collaborating with the local community, avoiding exploitation, and safeguarding the rights and welfare of research subjects. One of the most difficult problems involves protecting the welfare of community members who will be impacted by the release of mosquitoes but who are not enrolled in the study as research subjects. To address this concern, field trials should take place only when the targeted disease is a significant public health problem in an isolated area, the benefits of the trial for the community are likely to outweigh the risks, community leaders approve of the trial, and there are measures in place to protect the welfare of un-enrolled community members, such as informing the community about the study and offering free treatment to people who contract mosquito-borne diseases. Since the justification of any field trial depends on a careful examination of the scientific and ethical issues, proposed studies should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. PMID:23279283

  1. Allergenicity assessment of genetically-modified tobacco expressing salt tolerance cbl gene.

    PubMed

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Tuteja, Narendra; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2014-09-01

    It is mandatory to assess the allergenic potential of genetically modified (GM) crops before their commercialization. Recently, a transgene [Calcineurin B-like (CBL) protein] has been introduced into tobacco plant to make the crop salt resistance. Therefore, it was felt necessary to assess the allergenic potential of the cbl gene product, which was introduced and expressed in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plant and compared the allergenic effects with the wild-type (WT) counterpart. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that there was no significant sequence homology with known allergens. Also, no difference between the protein digestibility profiles of GM and WT tobacco was found. Rapid digestion of CBL protein (Mol Wt 35 kDa) by simulated gastric fluid (SGF) indicated reduced chances of this protein to induce allergenicity. In addition, BALB/c mice sensitized by intraperitoneal administration of WT and GM tobacco protein showed comparable levels of clinical score, specific IgE, IgG1, histamine level, similar effect on different organs as well as IgE binding proteins. These findings indicate that insertion of cbl gene in tobacco did not cause any additional allergic risk to consumer and the GM and native tobacco proteins behave similarly in both in vitro and in vivo situations even after genetic modification. PMID:25106468

  2. Risk assessment of genetically modified lactic acid bacteria using the concept of substantial equivalence.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Jean Guy; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Piard, Jean-Christophe; Sesma, Fernando; de Giori, Graciela Savoy

    2010-12-01

    The use of food-grade microorganisms such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is one of the most promising methods for delivering health promoting compounds. Since it is not always possible to obtain strains that have the ability to produce specific compounds naturally or that produce them in sufficient quantities to obtain physiological responses, genetic modifications can be performed to improve their output. The objective of this study was to evaluate if previously studied genetically modified LAB (GM-LAB), with proven in vivo beneficial effects, are just as safe as the progenitor strain from which they were derived. Mice received an elevated concentration of different GM-LAB or the native parental strain from which they were derived during a prolonged period of time, and different health parameters were evaluated. Similar growth rates, hematological values, and other physiological parameters were obtained in the animals that received the GM-LAB compared to those that were fed with the native strain. These results demonstrate that the GM-LAB used in this study are just as safe as the native strains from which they were derived and thus merit further studies to include them into the food chain. PMID:20449592

  3. Genetic modifiers of EGFR dependence in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharifnia, Tanaz; Rusu, Victor; Piccioni, Federica; Bagul, Mukta; Imielinski, Marcin; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Wong, Bang; Wilson, Frederick H.; Garraway, Levi A.; Altshuler, David; Golub, Todd R.; Root, David E.; Subramanian, Aravind; Meyerson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinomas harboring activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) represent a common molecular subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. EGFR mutations predict sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and thus represent a dependency in NSCLCs harboring these alterations, but the genetic basis of EGFR dependence is not fully understood. Here, we applied an unbiased, ORF-based screen to identify genetic modifiers of EGFR dependence in EGFR-mutant NSCLC cells. This approach identified 18 kinase and kinase-related genes whose overexpression can substitute for EGFR in EGFR-dependent PC9 cells, and these genes include seven of nine Src family kinase genes, FGFR1, FGFR2, ITK, NTRK1, NTRK2, MOS, MST1R, and RAF1. A subset of these genes can complement loss of EGFR activity across multiple EGFR-dependent models. Unbiased gene-expression profiling of cells overexpressing EGFR bypass genes, together with targeted validation studies, reveals EGFR-independent activation of the MEK-ERK and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathways. Combined inhibition of PI3K-mTOR and MEK restores EGFR dependence in cells expressing each of the 18 EGFR bypass genes. Together, these data uncover a broad spectrum of kinases capable of overcoming dependence on EGFR and underscore their convergence on the PI3K-AKT and MEK-ERK signaling axes in sustaining EGFR-independent survival. PMID:25512530

  4. Genetic modifiers of EGFR dependence in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharifnia, Tanaz; Rusu, Victor; Piccioni, Federica; Bagul, Mukta; Imielinski, Marcin; Cherniack, Andrew D; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Wong, Bang; Wilson, Frederick H; Garraway, Levi A; Altshuler, David; Golub, Todd R; Root, David E; Subramanian, Aravind; Meyerson, Matthew

    2014-12-30

    Lung adenocarcinomas harboring activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) represent a common molecular subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. EGFR mutations predict sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and thus represent a dependency in NSCLCs harboring these alterations, but the genetic basis of EGFR dependence is not fully understood. Here, we applied an unbiased, ORF-based screen to identify genetic modifiers of EGFR dependence in EGFR-mutant NSCLC cells. This approach identified 18 kinase and kinase-related genes whose overexpression can substitute for EGFR in EGFR-dependent PC9 cells, and these genes include seven of nine Src family kinase genes, FGFR1, FGFR2, ITK, NTRK1, NTRK2, MOS, MST1R, and RAF1. A subset of these genes can complement loss of EGFR activity across multiple EGFR-dependent models. Unbiased gene-expression profiling of cells overexpressing EGFR bypass genes, together with targeted validation studies, reveals EGFR-independent activation of the MEK-ERK and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathways. Combined inhibition of PI3K-mTOR and MEK restores EGFR dependence in cells expressing each of the 18 EGFR bypass genes. Together, these data uncover a broad spectrum of kinases capable of overcoming dependence on EGFR and underscore their convergence on the PI3K-AKT and MEK-ERK signaling axes in sustaining EGFR-independent survival. PMID:25512530

  5. The genetic landscape of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: inheritance, mutations, modifier genes, and diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wiesinger, Christoph; Eichler, Florian S; Berger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene encoding a peroxisomal ABC transporter. In this review, we compare estimates of incidence derived from different populations in order to provide an overview of the worldwide incidence of X-ALD. X-ALD presents with heterogeneous phenotypes ranging from adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) to inflammatory demyelinating cerebral ALD (CALD). A large number of different mutations has been described, providing a unique opportunity for analysis of functional domains within ABC transporters. Yet the molecular basis for the heterogeneity of clinical symptoms is still largely unresolved, as no correlation between genotype and phenotype exists in X-ALD. Beyond ABCD1, environmental triggers and other genetic factors have been suggested as modifiers of the disease course. Here, we summarize the findings of numerous reports that aimed at identifying modifier genes in X-ALD and discuss potential problems and future approaches to address this issue. Different options for prenatal diagnosis are summarized, and potential pitfalls when applying next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Recently, the measurement of very long-chain fatty acids in lysophosphatidylcholine for the identification of peroxisomal disorders was included in newborn screening programs. PMID:25999754

  6. The influence of biocomposites containing genetically modified flax fibers on gene expression in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gredes, Tomasz; Kunert-Keil, Christiane; Dominiak, Marzena; Gedrange, Tomasz; Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan

    2010-12-01

    In many studies, natural flax fibers have been proven to be resistant and surgically suitable. Genetically modified flax fibers, derived from transgenic flax expressing three bacterial genes for the synthesis of poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB), have better mechanical properties than unmodified flax fibers. The aim of this study was to examine the biocompatibility of composites containing flax fibers from transgenic polyhydroxybutyrate producing (M50) and control (wt-NIKE) plants in a polylactide (PLA) matrix in rat Musculus latissimus dorsi. For this purpose, effects of biocomposites on the expression of growth factors and osteogenic differentiation, in particular the mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, insulin like growth factor 1, insulin like growth factor 2, collagen-1, collagen-2 and myostatin, were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR. The biocomposites did not show any inflammation response after subcutaneous insertion. The results following subcutaneous insertion of PLA alone and PLA-M50 showed no significant changes on the gene expression of all tested genes, whereas PLA-wt-NIKE reduced the mRNA amount of myostatin, VEGFA and IGF2, respectively. It can be asserted that modified flax membranes with PHB and other organic substances have a good biocompatibility to the muscle and they do not disrupt the muscle function. Furthermore, composites from transgenic flax plants producing PHB did not differ from composites of non-transgenic flax plants. PMID:20973615

  7. Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.

    PubMed

    Panda, R; Ariyarathna, H; Amnuaycheewa, P; Tetteh, A; Pramod, S N; Taylor, S L; Ballmer-Weber, B K; Goodman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. The potential that a newly expressed protein might become an allergen is evaluated based on resistance to digestion in pepsin and abundance in food fractions. If the modified plant is a common allergenic source (e.g. soybean), regulatory guidelines suggest testing for increases in the expression of endogenous allergens. Some regulators request evaluating endogenous allergens for rarely allergenic plants (e.g. maize and rice). Since allergic individuals must avoid foods containing their allergen (e.g. peanut, soybean, maize, or rice), the relevance of the tests is unclear. Furthermore, no acceptance criteria are established and little is known about the natural variation in allergen concentrations in these crops. Our results demonstrate a 15-fold difference in the major maize allergen, lipid transfer protein between nine varieties, and complex variation in IgE binding to various soybean varieties. We question the value of evaluating endogenous allergens in GM plants unless the intent of the modification was production of a hypoallergenic crop. PMID:23205714

  8. Genetic Polymorphisms of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Modify the Neurobehavioral Effects of Mercury in Children

    PubMed Central

    Woods, James S.; Heyer, Nicholas J.; Russo, Joan E.; Martin, Michael D.; Pillai, Pradeep B.; Bammler, Theodor K.; Farin, Federico M.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is neurotoxic and children may be particularly susceptible to this effect. A current major challenge is identification of children who may be uniquely susceptible to Hg toxicity because of genetic disposition. This study examined the hypothesis that genetic variants of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) that are reported to alter neurobehavioral functions that are also affected by Hg in adults might modify the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg exposure in children. Five hundred and seven children, 8–12 yr of age at baseline, participated in a clinical trial to evaluate the neurobehavioral effects of Hg from dental amalgam tooth fillings. Subjects were evaluated at baseline and at seven subsequent annual intervals for neurobehavioral performance and urinary Hg levels. Following the clinical trial, genotyping assays were performed for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of COMT rs4680, rs4633, rs4818, and rs6269 on biological samples provided by 330 of the trial participants. Regression-modeling strategies were employed to evaluate associations between allelic status, Hg exposure, and neurobehavioral test outcomes. Similar analysis was performed using haplotypes of COMT SNPs. Among girls, few interactions for Hg exposure and COMT variants were found. In contrast, among boys, numerous gene–Hg interactions were observed between individual COMT SNPs, as well as with a common COMT haplotype affecting multiple domains of neurobehavioral function. These findings suggest increased susceptibility to the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg among children with common genetic variants of COMT, and may have important implications for strategies aimed at protecting children from the potential health risks associated with Hg exposure. PMID:24593143

  9. Why does Monsanto introduce genetically modified seeds in every country differently? An inquiry into the worldwide commercialization of Bt Cotton

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SAMIRA CHAKLATTI; UMR GAEL INRA; SHYAMA V. RAMANI; Bd de Brandebourg

    Monsanto, a leading firm in agrobiotechnology has commercialized its genetically modified varieties in many countries of the world, including developing countries. This paper tries to identify the different commercialization strategies pursued by Monsanto. Then it proposes a simple sequential model of technology transfer between an upstream agbiotech firm and a downstream seed firm. The agbiotech chooses between a license, a

  10. Genetically modified foods: What are they, and are they good or bad for consumers and the environment?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda Tabe

    Plant gene technology is a new technique in plant breeding. It involves the introduction of a pure gene, from any source, into a plant in order to achieve a particular improvement in agricultural performance or product quality. Farmers in many countries have embraced genetically modified (GM) crops enthusiastically because they offer advantages for agricultural production. However, concerns about the implications

  11. A risk-based classification scheme for genetically modified foods III: Evaluation using a panel of reference foods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eunice Chao; Daniel Krewski

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory evaluation of four functional components of a proposed risk-based classification scheme (RBCS) for crop-derived genetically modified (GM) foods in a concordance study. Two independent raters assigned concern levels to 20 reference GM foods using a rating form based on the proposed RBCS. The four components of evaluation were: (1) degree of concordance, (2) distribution across

  12. In search of a depressed mouse: utility of models for studying depression-related behavior in genetically modified mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J F Cryan; C Mombereau

    2004-01-01

    The ability to modify mice genetically has been one of the major breakthroughs in modern medical science affecting every discipline including psychiatry. It is hoped that the application of such technologies will result in the identification of novel targets for the treatment of diseases such as depression and to gain a better understanding of the molecular pathophysiological mechanisms that are

  13. Crop management and agronomic context of the Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. T. Champion; M. J. May; S. Bennett; D. R. Brooks; S. J. Clark; R. E. Daniels; L. G. Firbank; A. J. Haughton; C. Hawes; M. S. Heard; J. N. Perry; Z. Randle; M. J. Rossall; P. Rothery; M. P. Skellern; R. J. Scott; G. R. Squire; M. R. Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops (GMHT) were conducted in the UK from 2000 to 2002 on beet (sugar and fodder), spring oilseed rape and forage maize. The management of the crops studied is described and compared with current conventional commercial prac- tice. The distribution of field sites adequately represented the areas currently growing these crops, and

  14. Minimizing use of fish meal in sunshine bass diets using standard and new varieties of non-genetically modified soybeans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved plant ingredients are needed to support sustainable culture of carnivorous fish, such as hybrid striped bass (HSB). We are evaluating meals made from new strains of non-genetically-modified soybeans (non-GMO) with high protein and reduced anti-nutritional factors (ANFs) on HSB nutrient dige...

  15. Quantitative analysis of cefalexin based on artificial neural networks combined with modified genetic algorithm using short near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Yanfu; Feng, Guodong; Wang, Bin; Ren, Yulin; Fei, Qiang

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a novel chemometric method was developed for rapid, accurate, and quantitative analysis of cefalexin in samples. The experiments were carried out by using the short near-infrared spectroscopy coupled with artificial neural networks. In order to enhancing the predictive ability of artificial neural networks model, a modified genetic algorithm was used to select fixed number of wavelength.

  16. A 90-day safety study in Wistar rats fed genetically modified rice expressing snowdrop lectin Galanthus nivalis (GNA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Morten Poulsen; Stine Kroghsbo; Malene Schrøder; Andrea Wilcks; Helene Jacobsen; Andreas Miller; Thomas Frenzel; Jürgen Danier; Michael Rychlik; Qingyao Shu; Kaveh Emami; Duraialagraja Sudhakar; Angharad Gatehouse; Karl-Heinz Engel; Ib Knudsen

    2007-01-01

    Genetically modified plants expressing insecticidal traits offer a new strategy for crop protection, but at the same time present a challenge in terms of food safety assessment. The present 90-day feeding study was designed to assess the safety of a rice variety expressing the snowdrop Galanthus nivalis lectin (GNA lectin), and forms part of a EU-funded project where the objective

  17. Use of genetically modified mouse models to assess pathways of benzene-induced bone marrow cytotoxicity and genotoxicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leslie Recio; Alison Bauer; Brenda Faiola

    2005-01-01

    Benzene induces bone marrow cytotoxicity and chromosomal breaks as a primary mode of action for the induction of bone marrow toxicity. Our research group has used genetically modified mouse models to examine metabolic and genomic response pathways involved in benzene induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in bone marrow and in hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). We review our studies using NQO1?\\/? mice

  18. Environmental and human health impacts of growing genetically modified herbicide-tolerant sugar beet: a life-cycle assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Bennett; Richard Phipps; Alison Strange; Peter Grey

    Summary There is ongoing debate concerning the possible environmental and human health impacts of growing genetically modified (GM) crops. Here, we report the results of a life-cycle assessment (LCA) comparing the environmental and human health impacts of conventional sugar beet growing regimes in the UK and Germany with those that might be expected if GM herbicide-tolerant (to glyphosate) sugar beet

  19. Potent Vaccine Therapy with Dendritic Cells Genetically Modified by the Gene-Silencing-Resistant Retroviral Vector GCDNsap

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tsukasa Nabekura; Makoto Otsu; Toshiro Nagasawa; Hiromitsu Nakauchi; Masafumi Onodera

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) genetically modified to express tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) would be promising tools in cancer immunotherapy. However, the use of retroviral vectors for such modifications is still a challenge because of low transduction efficiency and gene silencing in DCs. We have established an efficient method to prepare such DCs by in vitro differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells transduced with

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL-IMPACT INFORMATION ON CONSUMER WILLINGNESS TO PAY FOR PRODUCTS LABELED AS FREE OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED INGREDIENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheryl J. Wachenheim; Tamara Vanwechel

    2004-01-01

    Limited information is available about consumer willingness to pay for genetically modified food products. This information is of immediate interest to the food industry. An experimental auction was conducted to assess willingness to pay for food items labeled as free of genetically modified ingredients and to evaluate the influence of positive and negative information about the impact of biotechnology on

  1. Texas Crop Profile: Potatoes 

    E-print Network

    Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

    2000-04-12

    decemlin- eata), potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae), leafhopper (E. fabae and E . abrupta), grasshop- pers, spider mite, potato psyllid (Paratrioza cockerelli), false cinch bug (Nysius raphanus), cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni), and tomato hornworm...

  2. Texas Crop Profile: Potatoes

    E-print Network

    Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

    2000-04-12

    in the Winter Garden; and July through October in the High Plains. Pest Information Pests of potatoes include numerous foliar feed- ing insects, several soil insects, diseases, nema- todes and weeds. Foliar feeding insects Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa... (Manduca quinquemaculata) Frequency of occurrence: Every year these insects will appear in some part of the state and cause problems in potatoes. In the High Plains, psyllids and grasshoppers are a problem every year. Damage caused: Colorado potato beetle...

  3. Colorado potato beetle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Colorado potato beetle (CPB) shifted to the potato crop from native solanaceous weeds in the American West in 1859, and has been a serious pest ever since. CPB is a highly fecund leaf-feeder on potato and eggplant, and often tomatoes, with one to several generations per year. It is the most importa...

  4. POTATO DISEASE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential to use systemic acquired resistance for disease control in potato is discussed. The mechanism of how SAR works in plants is described. Potato was found to have high salicylic acid levels in all tissues examined. The defense gene PR-1 was constitutively expressed in potato, in contrast ...

  5. Effect on soil chemistry of genetically modified (GM) vs. non-GM maize.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Zhu, Ping; Peng, Chang; Kang, Lingsheng; Gao, Hongjun; Clarke, Nicholas J; Clarke, Jihong Liu

    2010-01-01

    The effects of genetically modified (GM) maize (Zea mays L.) expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner Cry1Fa2 protein (Bt) and phosphinothricin or glyphosate herbicide tolerance on soil chemistry (organic matter, N, P, K and pH), compared with non-GM controls, were assessed in field and pot experiments. In the field experiment, NH(4)(+) was significantly higher in soil under the crop modified for herbicide tolerance compared to the control (mean values of 11 and 9.6 mg N/kg respectively) while P was significantly higher in soil under the control compared to under the GM crop (mean values of 6.9 and 6.4 dg P/kg, respectively). No significant differences were found as a result of growing Bt/herbicide tolerant maize. In the pot experiment, using soils from three sites (Gongzhuling, Dehui and Huadian), significant effects of using Bt maize instead of conventional maize were found for all three soils. In the Gongzhuling soil, P was significantly higher in soil under the control compared to under the GM crop (mean values of 4.8 and 4.0 dg P/kg, respectively). For the Dehui soil, the pH was significantly higher in soil under the control compared to under the GM crop (mean values for {H(+)} of 1.1 and 2.4 ?M for the control and the GM crop respectively). In the Huadian soil, organic matter and total N were both higher in soil under the GM crop than under the control. For organic matter, the mean values were 3.0 and 2.9% for the GM crop and the control, respectively, while for total nitrogen the mean values were 2.02 and 1.96% for the GM crop and the control respectively. Our results indicate that growing GM crops instead of conventional crops may alter soil chemistry, but not greatly, and that effects will vary with both the specific genetic modification and the soil. PMID:21844670

  6. The use of genetically modified mice in cancer risk assessment: Challenges and limitations*

    PubMed Central

    Eastmond, David A.; Vulimiri, Suryanarayana V.; French, John E.; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2015-01-01

    The use of genetically modified (GM) mice to assess carcinogenicity is playing an increasingly important role in the safety evaluation of chemicals. While progress has been made in developing and evaluating mouse models such as the Trp53+/?, Tg.AC and the rasH2, the suitability of these models as replacements for the conventional rodent cancer bioassay and for assessing human health risks remains uncertain. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of accelerated cancer bioassays with GM mice for assessing the potential health risks associated with exposure to carcinogenic agents. We compared the published results from the GM bioassays to those obtained in the National Toxicology Program’s conventional chronic mouse bioassay for their potential use in risk assessment. Our analysis indicates that the GM models are less efficient in detecting carcinogenic agents but more consistent in identifying non-carcinogenic agents. We identified several issues of concern related to the design of the accelerated bioassays (e.g., sample size, study duration, genetic stability and reproducibility) as well as pathway-dependency of effects, and different carcinogenic mechanisms operable in GM and non-GM mice. The use of the GM models for dose-response assessment is particularly problematic as these models are, at times, much more or less sensitive than the conventional rodent cancer bioassays. Thus, the existing GM mouse models may be useful for hazard identification, but will be of limited use for dose-response assessment. Hence, caution should be exercised when using GM mouse models to assess the carcinogenic risks of chemicals. PMID:23985072

  7. The use of genetically modified mice in cancer risk assessment: challenges and limitations.

    PubMed

    Eastmond, David A; Vulimiri, Suryanarayana V; French, John E; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2013-09-01

    The use of genetically modified (GM) mice to assess carcinogenicity is playing an increasingly important role in the safety evaluation of chemicals. While progress has been made in developing and evaluating mouse models such as the Trp53?/?, Tg.AC and the rasH2, the suitability of these models as replacements for the conventional rodent cancer bioassay and for assessing human health risks remains uncertain. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of accelerated cancer bioassays with GM mice for assessing the potential health risks associated with exposure to carcinogenic agents. We compared the published results from the GM bioassays to those obtained in the National Toxicology Program's conventional chronic mouse bioassay for their potential use in risk assessment. Our analysis indicates that the GM models are less efficient in detecting carcinogenic agents but more consistent in identifying non-carcinogenic agents. We identified several issues of concern related to the design of the accelerated bioassays (e.g., sample size, study duration, genetic stability and reproducibility) as well as pathway-dependency of effects, and different carcinogenic mechanisms operable in GM and non-GM mice. The use of the GM models for dose-response assessment is particularly problematic as these models are, at times, much more or less sensitive than the conventional rodent cancer bioassays. Thus, the existing GM mouse models may be useful for hazard identification, but will be of limited use for dose-response assessment. Hence, caution should be exercised when using GM mouse models to assess the carcinogenic risks of chemicals. PMID:23985072

  8. Identification of genetic modifiers of CagA-induced epithelial disruption in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Reid, David W.; Muyskens, Jonathan B.; Neal, James T.; Gaddini, Gino W.; Cho, Lucy Y.; Wandler, Anica M.; Botham, Crystal M.; Guillemin, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains containing the CagA protein are associated with high risk of gastric diseases including atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. CagA is injected into host cells via a Type IV secretion system where it activates growth factor-like signaling, disrupts cell-cell junctions, and perturbs host cell polarity. Using a transgenic Drosophila model, we have shown that CagA expression disrupts the morphogenesis of epithelial tissues such as the adult eye. Here we describe a genetic screen to identify modifiers of CagA-induced eye defects. We determined that reducing the copy number of genes encoding components of signaling pathways known to be targeted by CagA, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), modified the CagA-induced eye phenotypes. In our screen of just over half the Drosophila genome, we discovered 12 genes that either suppressed or enhanced CagA's disruption of the eye epithelium. Included in this list are genes involved in epithelial integrity, intracellular trafficking, and signal transduction. We investigated the mechanism of one suppressor, encoding the epithelial polarity determinant and junction protein Coracle, which is homologous to the mammalian Protein 4.1. We found that loss of a single copy of coracle improved the organization and integrity of larval retinal epithelia expressing CagA, but did not alter CagA's localization to cell junctions. Loss of a single copy of the coracle antagonist crumbs enhanced CagA-associated disruption of the larval retinal epithelium, whereas overexpression of crumbs suppressed this phenotype. Collectively, these results point to new cellular pathways whose disruption by CagA are likely to contribute to H. pylori-associated disease pathology. PMID:22919616

  9. Comparison of Life History Characteristics of the Genetically Modified OX513A Line and a Wild Type Strain of Aedes aegypti

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Irka Bargielowski; Derric Nimmo; Luke Alphey; Jacob C. Koella

    2011-01-01

    The idea of implementing genetics-based insect control strategies modelled on the traditional SIT (Sterile Insect Technique), such as RIDL (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal), is becoming increasingly popular. In this paper, we compare a genetically modified line of Aedes aegypti carrying a tetracycline repressible, lethal positive feedback system (OX513A) with a genetically similar, unmodified counterpart and their respective

  10. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  11. Multiple-Site Identification of Potato Parent Clones Conferring High Levels of Late Blight Resistance with a Corresponding Genetic Model for Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1996, the progeny of late blight resistant potato clones have been grown in Toluca Valley, Mexico. This location is the putative center of origin and is the center of diversity for Phytophthora infestans (Mont) de Bary, the oomycete pathogen responsible for late blight, making it an ideal loc...

  12. Genetically modified flax expressing NAP-SsGT1 transgene: examination of anti-inflammatory action.

    PubMed

    Matusiewicz, Magdalena; Kosieradzka, Iwona; Zuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the work was to define the influence of dietary supplementation with GM (genetically modified) GT#4 flaxseed cake enriched in polyphenols on inflammation development in mice liver. Mice were given ad libitum isoprotein diets: (1) standard diet; (2) high-fat diet rich in lard, high-fat diet enriched with 30% of (3) isogenic flax Linola seed cake; and (4) GM GT#4 flaxseed cake; for 96 days. Administration of transgenic and isogenic seed cake lowered body weight gain, of transgenic to the standard diet level. Serum total antioxidant status was statistically significantly improved in GT#4 flaxseed cake group and did not differ from Linola. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid profile and the liver concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-? were ameliorated by GM and isogenic flaxseed cake consumption. The level of pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-? did not differ between mice obtaining GM GT#4 and non-GM flaxseed cakes. The C-reactive protein concentration was reduced in animals fed GT#4 flaxseed cake and did not differ from those fed non-GM flaxseed cake-based diet. Similarly, the liver structure of mice consuming diets enriched in flaxseed cake was improved. Dietetic enrichment with GM GT#4 and non-GM flaxseed cakes may be a promising solution for health problems resulting from improper diet. PMID:25247574

  13. Benefits of genetically modified crops for the poor: household income, nutrition, and health.

    PubMed

    Qaim, Matin

    2010-11-30

    The potential impacts of genetically modified (GM) crops on income, poverty and nutrition in developing countries continue to be the subject of public controversy. Here, a review of the evidence is given. As an example of a first-generation GM technology, the effects of insect-resistant Bt cotton are analysed. Bt cotton has already been adopted by millions of small-scale farmers, in India, China, and South Africa among others. On average, farmers benefit from insecticide savings, higher effective yields and sizeable income gains. Insights from India suggest that Bt cotton is employment generating and poverty reducing. As an example of a second-generation technology, the likely impacts of beta-carotene-rich Golden Rice are analysed from an ex ante perspective. Vitamin A deficiency is a serious nutritional problem, causing multiple adverse health outcomes. Simulations for India show that Golden Rice could reduce related health problems significantly, preventing up to 40,000 child deaths every year. These examples clearly demonstrate that GM crops can contribute to poverty reduction and food security in developing countries. To realise such social benefits on a larger scale requires more public support for research targeted to the poor, as well as more efficient regulatory and technology delivery systems. PMID:20643233

  14. Spectroscopic detection of fluorescent protein marker gene activity in genetically modified plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, O. W.; Chong, Jenny P. C.; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This work focuses on developing a portable fibre optic fluorescence analyser for rapid identification of genetically modified plants tagged with a fluorescent marker gene. Independent transgenic tobacco plant lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene were regenerated following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Molecular characterisation of these plant lines was carried out at the DNA level by PCR screening to confirm their transgenic status. Conventional transgene expression analysis was then carried out at the RNA level by RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting using anti-GFP rabbit antiserum. The amount of plant-expressed EGFP on a Western blot was quantified against known amounts of purified EGFP by scanning densitometry. The expression level of EGFP in transformed plants was found to range from 0.1 - 0.6% of total extractable protein. A comparison between conventional western analysis of transformants and direct spectroscopic quantification using the fibre optic fluorescence analyser was made. The results showed that spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence emission from strong EGFP expressors correlated positively with Western blot data. However, the fluorescence analyser was also able to identify weakly expressing plant transformants below the detection limit of colorimetric Western blotting.

  15. The global income and production effects of genetically modified (GM) crops 1996-2011.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Graham; Barfoot, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A key part of any assessment of the global value of crop biotechnology in agriculture is an examination of its economic impact at the farm level. This paper follows earlier annual studies which examined economic impacts on yields, key costs of production, direct farm income and effects and impacts on the production base of the four main crops of soybeans, corn, cotton and canola. The commercialization of genetically modified (GM) crops has continued to occur at a rapid rate, with important changes in both the overall level of adoption and impact occurring in 2011. This annual updated analysis shows that there have been very significant net economic benefits at the farm level amounting to $19.8 billion in 2011 and $98.2 billion for the 16 year period (in nominal terms). The majority (51.2%) of these gains went to farmers in developing countries. GM technology have also made important contributions to increasing global production levels of the four main crops, having added 110 million tonnes and 195 million tonnes respectively, to the global production of soybeans and maize since the introduction of the technology in the mid-1990s. PMID:23549349

  16. A Built-In Strategy to Mitigate Transgene Spreading from Genetically Modified Corn

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Fengzhen; Lin, Chaoyang; Gao, Jianhua; Fang, Jun; Ding, Xiahui; Shen, Zhicheng; Xu, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    Transgene spreading is a major concern in cultivating genetically modified (GM) corn. Cross-pollination may cause the spread of transgenes from GM cornfields to conventional fields. Occasionally, seed lot contamination, volunteers, mixing during sowing, harvest, and trade can also lead to transgene escape. Obviously, new biological confinement technologies are highly desired to mitigate transgene spreading in addition to physical separation and isolation methods. In this study, we report the development of a built-in containment method to mitigate transgene spreading in corn. In this method, an RNAi cassette for suppressing the expression of the nicosulfuron detoxifying enzyme CYP81A9 and an expression cassette for the glyphosate tolerant 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene G10 were constructed and transformed into corn via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The GM corn plants that were generated were found to be sensitive to nicosulfuron but resistant to glyphosate, which is exactly the opposite of conventional corn. Field tests demonstrated that GM corn plants with silenced CYP81A9 could be killed by applying nicosulfuron at 40 g/ha, which is the recommended dose for weed control in cornfields. This study suggests that this built-in containment method for controlling the spread of corn transgenes is effective and easy to implement. PMID:24324711

  17. Qualitative and Quantitative PCR-Based Detection Methods for Authorized Genetically Modified Cotton Events in India.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Rashmi; Randhawa, Gurinder Jit; Bhoge, Rajesh K; Singh, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative diagnostics for all five commercialized genetically modified (GM) cotton events for insect resistance in India is being reported for the first time in this paper. The cost-effective and robust multiplex PCR (MPCR)-based detection assay, distinguishing the insect resistant transgenic Bt cotton events, viz., MON531, MON15985, Event 1, GFM-cry1A, and MLS-9124, has been developed. This decaplex PCR assay targets nine transgenic elements, viz., sequences of four transgenes, three transgene constructs, and two event-specific sequences along with one endogenous reference gene. The LOD of the qualitative MPCR assay was up to 0.1%. A quantitative detection method for four widely commercially cultivated GM cotton events, namely, MON531, MON15985, Event 1, and GFM-cry1A, covering 99.5% of the total area under GM cultivation in the country, is also reported. A construct-specific real-time PCR assay has been developed for quantification of these GM cotton events with LOQ <0.05% and LOD <0.025%. The developed assays will be of great use to screen for the presence/absence of authorized GM cotton events in unknown samples and to check the authenticity of GM cotton seed samples. PMID:25902979

  18. Genetically Modified Flax Expressing NAP-SsGT1 Transgene: Examination of Anti-Inflammatory Action

    PubMed Central

    Matusiewicz, Magdalena; Kosieradzka, Iwona; Zuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the work was to define the influence of dietary supplementation with GM (genetically modified) GT#4 flaxseed cake enriched in polyphenols on inflammation development in mice liver. Mice were given ad libitum isoprotein diets: (1) standard diet; (2) high-fat diet rich in lard, high-fat diet enriched with 30% of (3) isogenic flax Linola seed cake; and (4) GM GT#4 flaxseed cake; for 96 days. Administration of transgenic and isogenic seed cake lowered body weight gain, of transgenic to the standard diet level. Serum total antioxidant status was statistically significantly improved in GT#4 flaxseed cake group and did not differ from Linola. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid profile and the liver concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-? were ameliorated by GM and isogenic flaxseed cake consumption. The level of pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-? did not differ between mice obtaining GM GT#4 and non-GM flaxseed cakes. The C-reactive protein concentration was reduced in animals fed GT#4 flaxseed cake and did not differ from those fed non-GM flaxseed cake-based diet. Similarly, the liver structure of mice consuming diets enriched in flaxseed cake was improved. Dietetic enrichment with GM GT#4 and non-GM flaxseed cakes may be a promising solution for health problems resulting from improper diet. PMID:25247574

  19. Effects of Knowledge on Attitude Formation and Change Toward Genetically Modified Foods.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xie, Xiaofei

    2015-05-01

    In three waves, this study investigates the impact of risk and benefit knowledge on attitude formation toward genetically modified (GM) foods as well as the moderating effect of knowledge level on attitude change caused by receiving information. The data in Wave 1 (N = 561) demonstrate that both benefit and risk knowledge either directly contribute to attitude formation or indirectly affect attitudes through the mediating roles of benefit and risk perceptions. Overall, benefit and risk knowledge affect consumer attitudes positively and negatively, respectively. In Wave 2, 486 participants from Wave 1 were provided with information about GM foods, and their attitudes were assessed. Three weeks later, 433 of these participants again reported their attitudes. The results indicate that compared with the benefit and mixed information, risk information has a greater and longer lasting impact on attitude change, which results in lower acceptance of GM foods. Furthermore, risk information more strongly influences participants with a higher knowledge level. The moderating effect of knowledge on attitude change may result from these participants' better understanding of and greater trust in the information. These findings highlight the important role of knowledge in attitude formation and attitude change toward GM foods as well as the necessity of considering the determinants of attitude formation in attitude change studies. PMID:25693867

  20. Detection limits of the strip test and PCR for genetically modified corn in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, V E; Von Pinho, É V R; Von Pinho, R G; do Nascimento, A D

    2012-01-01

    Brazilian legislation establishes a labeling limit for products that contain more than 1% material from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). We assessed the sensitivity of the lateral flow strip test in detection of the GMO corn varieties Bt11 and MON810 and the specificity and sensitivity of PCR techniques for their detection. For the strip test, the GMO seeds were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8% for Bt11, and 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6% for MON810. Three different methodologies were assessed and whole seeds, their endosperm and embryonic axis were used. For the PCR technique, the GMO seeds of each of the two varieties were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 20, 10, 5, 2, 1, and 0.5%. The seeds were ground and the DNA extracted. For detection of the GMO material, specific primers were used for MON810 and Bt11 and maize zein as an endogenous control. The sensitivity of the strip test varied for both maize varieties and methodologies. The test was positive for Bt11 only at 0.8%, in contrast with the detection limit of 0.4% indicated by the manufacturer. In the multiplex PCR, the primers proved to be specific for the different varieties. These varieties were detected in samples with one GMO seed in 100. Thus, this technique proved to be efficient in detecting contaminations equal to or greater than 1%. PMID:22843069

  1. A multiplex PCR method of detecting recombinant DNAs from five lines of genetically modified maize.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, T; Kuribara, H; Akiyama, H; Miura, H; Goda, Y; Kusakabe, Y; Isshiki, K; Toyoda, M; Hino, A

    2001-02-01

    Seven lines of genetically modified (GM) maize have been authorized in Japan as foods and feeds imported from the USA. We improved a multiplex PCR method described in the previous report in order to distinguish the five lines of GM maize. Genomic DNA was extracted from GM maize with a silica spin column kit, which could reduce experimental time and improve safety in the laboratory and potentially in the environment. We sequenced recombinant DNA (r-DNA) introduced into GM maize, and re-designed new primer pairs to increase the specificity of PCR to distinguish five lines of GM maize by multiplex PCR. A primer pair for the maize intrinsic zein gene (Ze1) was also designed to confirm the presence of amplifiable maize DNA. The lengths of PCR products using these six primer pairs were different. The Ze1 and the r-DNAs from the five lines of GM maize were qualitatively detected in one tube. The specific PCR bands were distinguishable from each other on the basis of the expected length. The r-DNA could be detected from maize samples containing 0.5% of each of the five lines of GM maize. The sensitivity would be acceptable to secure the verification of non-GMO materials and to monitor the reliability of the labeling system. PMID:11383153

  2. Opisthorchis felineus liver fluke invasion is an environmental factor modifying genetic risk of atopic bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Saltykova, Irina V; Ogorodova, Ludmila M; Bragina, Elena Yu; Puzyrev, Valery P; Freidin, Maxim B

    2014-11-01

    According to epidemiological observations, Opisthorchis felineus liver fluke invasion is negatively associated with the development and severity of allergic diseases in endemic regions of Russia. We hypothesized that the invasion is an important factor in gene-environmental interactions (GEI) underlying allergy. To prove this, we tested 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms of immune response modifying genes in 428 individuals stratified by atopic bronchial asthma presence and O. felineus invasion. Using regression models, a statistically significant interaction between the rs6737848 polymorphism of SOCS5 gene and O. felineus invasion was observed (pint=0.001, OR=5.66, 95% CI 1.96-16.31 for dominant model; pint=0.003; OR=4.38, 95% CI 1.68-11.45 for additive model). The interaction is based on the statistically significant association between the SOCS5 gene and atopic bronchial asthma in patients without O. felineus infection, while no such association is seen in patients infected by the helminth. These data confirm for the first time the importance of the helminth invasion as an environmental factor influencing the association between genetic factors and atopic bronchial asthma. In particular, O. felineus diminishes the risk of atopic bronchial asthma associated with the SOCS5 gene polymorphism. PMID:25017311

  3. Mate competition and evolutionary outcomes in genetically modified zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Howard, Richard D; Rohrer, Karl; Liu, Yiyang; Muir, William M

    2015-05-01

    Demonstrating relationships between sexual selection mechanisms and trait evolution is central to testing evolutionary theory. Using zebrafish, we found that wild-type males possessed a significant advantage in mate competition over transgenic RFP Glofish® males. In mating trials, wild-type males were aggressively superior to transgenic males in male-male chases and male-female chases; as a result, wild-type males sired 2.5× as many young as did transgenic males. In contrast, an earlier study demonstrated that female zebrafish preferred transgenic males as mates when mate competition was excluded experimentally. We tested the evolutionary consequence of this conflict between sexual selection mechanisms in a long-term study. The predicted loss of the transgenic phenotype was confirmed. More than 18,500 adults collected from 18 populations across 15 generations revealed that the frequency of the transgenic phenotype declined rapidly and was eliminated entirely in all but one population. Fitness component data for both sexes indicated that only male mating success differed between wild-type and transgenic individuals. Our predictive demographic model based on fitness components closely matched the rate of transgenic phenotype loss observed in the long-term study, thereby supporting its utility for studies assessing evolutionary outcomes of escaped or released genetically modified animals. PMID:25873489

  4. Improved Lower Bounds of DNA Tags Based on a Modified Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Wei, Xiaopeng; Dong, Jing; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The well-known massively parallel sequencing method is efficient and it can obtain sequence data from multiple individual samples. In order to ensure that sequencing, replication, and oligonucleotide synthesis errors do not result in tags (or barcodes) that are unrecoverable or confused, the tag sequences should be abundant and sufficiently different. Recently, many design methods have been proposed for correcting errors in data using error-correcting codes. The existing tag sets contain small tag sequences, so we used a modified genetic algorithm to improve the lower bound of the tag sets in this study. Compared with previous research, our algorithm is effective for designing sets of DNA tags. Moreover, the GC content determined by existing methods includes an imprecise range. Thus, we improved the GC content determination method to obtain tag sets that control the GC content in a more precise range. Finally, previous studies have only considered perfect self-complementarity. Thus, we considered the crossover between different tags and introduced an improved constraint into the design of tag sets. PMID:25693135

  5. Degradation of transgene DNA in genetically modified herbicide-tolerant rice during food processing.

    PubMed

    Song, Shangxin; Zhou, Guanghong; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Liangyan; Dai, Sifa; Xu, Xinglian; Xiao, Hongmei

    2011-12-01

    In order to assess the effect of food processing on the degradation of exogenous DNA components in sweet rice wine and rice crackers made from genetically modified (GM) rice (Oryza sativa L.), we developed genomic DNA extraction methods and compared the effect of different food processing procedures on DNA degradation. It was found that the purity, quantity and quality of DNA by alkaline lysis method were higher than by CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) method. For sweet rice wine, CAMV35S (cauliflower mosaic virus 35S) promoter and NOS (nopaline synthase) terminator were degraded by the third day, whereas the exogenous gene Bar (bialaphos resistance) remained unaffected. For rice crackers, boiling, drying and microwaving contributed to the initial degradations of DNA. Baking resulted in further degradations, and frying led to the most severe changes. These results indicated that the stability of DNA in GM rice was different under different processing conditions. For sweet rice wine, Bar was most stable, followed by NOS, CAMV35S, and SPS. For rice crackers, CAMV35S was most stable, followed by SPS, NOS, and Bar. PMID:21871942

  6. Co-occurrence of Distinct Ciliopathy Diseases in Single Families Suggests Genetic Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Maha S; Sattar, Shifteh; Massoudi, Rustin A; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2011-01-01

    Disorders within the “ciliopathy” spectrum include Joubert (JS), Bardet–Biedl syndromes (BBS), and nephronophthisis (NPHP). Although mutations in single ciliopathy genes can lead to these different syndromes between families, there have been no reports of phenotypic discordance within a single family. We report on two consanguineous families with discordant ciliopathies in sibling. In Ciliopathy-672, the older child displayed dialysis-dependent NPHP whereas the younger displayed the pathognomonic molar tooth MRI sign (MTS) of JS. A second branch displayed two additional children with NPHP. In Ciliopathy-1491, the oldest child displayed classical features of BBS whereas the two younger children displayed the MTS. Importantly, the children with BBS and NPHP lacked MTS, whereas children with JS lacked obesity or NPHP, and the child with BBS lacked MTS and NPHP. Features common to all three disorders included intellectual disability, postaxial polydactyly, and visual reduction. The variable phenotypic expressivity in this family suggests that genetic modifiers may determine specific clinical features within the ciliopathy spectrum. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22002901

  7. A Meta-Analysis of the Impacts of Genetically Modified Crops

    PubMed Central

    Klümper, Wilhelm; Qaim, Matin

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the rapid adoption of genetically modified (GM) crops by farmers in many countries, controversies about this technology continue. Uncertainty about GM crop impacts is one reason for widespread public suspicion. Objective We carry out a meta-analysis of the agronomic and economic impacts of GM crops to consolidate the evidence. Data Sources Original studies for inclusion were identified through keyword searches in ISI Web of Knowledge, Google Scholar, EconLit, and AgEcon Search. Study Eligibility Criteria Studies were included when they build on primary data from farm surveys or field trials anywhere in the world, and when they report impacts of GM soybean, maize, or cotton on crop yields, pesticide use, and/or farmer profits. In total, 147 original studies were included. Synthesis Methods Analysis of mean impacts and meta-regressions to examine factors that influence outcomes. Results On average, GM technology adoption has reduced chemical pesticide use by 37%, increased crop yields by 22%, and increased farmer profits by 68%. Yield gains and pesticide reductions are larger for insect-resistant crops than for herbicide-tolerant crops. Yield and profit gains are higher in developing countries than in developed countries. Limitations Several of the original studies did not report sample sizes and measures of variance. Conclusion The meta-analysis reveals robust evidence of GM crop benefits for farmers in developed and developing countries. Such evidence may help to gradually increase public trust in this technology. PMID:25365303

  8. A built-in strategy to mitigate transgene spreading from genetically modified corn.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Fengzhen; Lin, Chaoyang; Gao, Jianhua; Fang, Jun; Ding, Xiahui; Shen, Zhicheng; Xu, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    Transgene spreading is a major concern in cultivating genetically modified (GM) corn. Cross-pollination may cause the spread of transgenes from GM cornfields to conventional fields. Occasionally, seed lot contamination, volunteers, mixing during sowing, harvest, and trade can also lead to transgene escape. Obviously, new biological confinement technologies are highly desired to mitigate transgene spreading in addition to physical separation and isolation methods. In this study, we report the development of a built-in containment method to mitigate transgene spreading in corn. In this method, an RNAi cassette for suppressing the expression of the nicosulfuron detoxifying enzyme CYP81A9 and an expression cassette for the glyphosate tolerant 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene G10 were constructed and transformed into corn via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The GM corn plants that were generated were found to be sensitive to nicosulfuron but resistant to glyphosate, which is exactly the opposite of conventional corn. Field tests demonstrated that GM corn plants with silenced CYP81A9 could be killed by applying nicosulfuron at 40 g/ha, which is the recommended dose for weed control in cornfields. This study suggests that this built-in containment method for controlling the spread of corn transgenes is effective and easy to implement. PMID:24324711

  9. Severe presentation of WDR62 mutation: is there a role for modifying genetic factors?

    PubMed

    Poulton, Cathryn J; Schot, Rachel; Seufert, Katja; Lequin, Maarten H; Accogli, Andrea; Annunzio, Giuseppe D'; Villard, Laurent; Philip, Nicole; de Coo, René; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene; Grasshoff, Ute; Kattentidt-Mouravieva, Anja; Calf, Hans; de Vreugt-Gronloh, Erika; van Unen, Leontine; Verheijen, Frans W; Galjart, Niels; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J; Mancini, Grazia M S

    2014-09-01

    Mutations in WDR62 are associated with primary microcephaly; however, they have been reported with wide phenotypic variability. We report on six individuals with novel WDR62 mutations who illustrate this variability and describe three in greater detail. Of the three, one lacks neuromotor development and has severe pachygyria on MRI, another has only delayed speech and motor development and moderate polymicrogyria, and the third has an intermediate phenotype. We observed a rare copy number change of unknown significance, a 17q25qter duplication, in the first severely affected individual. The 17q25 duplication included an interesting candidate gene, tubulin cofactor D (TBCD), crucial in microtubule assembly and disassembly. Sequencing of the non-duplicated allele showed a TBCD missense mutation, predicted to cause a deleterious p.Phe1121Val substitution. Sequencing of a cohort of five patients with WDR62 mutations, including one with an identical mutation and different phenotype, plus 12 individuals with diagnosis of microlissencephaly and another individual with mild intellectual disability (ID) and a 17q25 duplication, did not reveal TBCD mutations. However, immunostaining with tubulin antibodies of cells from patients with both WDR62 and TBCD mutation showed abnormal tubulin network when compared to controls and cells with only the WDR62 mutation. Therefore, we propose that genetic factors contribute to modify the severity of the WDR62 phenotype and, although based on suggestive evidence, TBCD could function as one of such factors. PMID:24842779

  10. Proteomic analysis of endosomes from genetically modified p14/MP1 mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Stasyk, Taras; Holzmann, Johann; Stumberger, Sonja; Ebner, Hannes L; Hess, Michael W; Bonn, Guenther K; Mechtler, Karl; Huber, Lukas A

    2010-11-01

    The p14/MP1 scaffold complex binds MEK1 and ERK1/2 on late endosomes, thus regulating the strength, duration and intracellular location of MAPK signaling. By organelle proteomics we have compared the protein composition of endosomes purified from genetically modified p14?/?, p14+/? and p14(rev) mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The latter ones were reconstituted retrovirally from p14?/? mouse embryonic fibroblasts by reexpression of pEGFP-p14 at equimolar ratios with its physiological binding partner MP1, as shown here by absolute quantification of MP1 and p14 proteins on endosomes by quantitative MS using the Equimolarity through Equalizer Peptide strategy. A combination of subcellular fractionation, 2-D DIGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS revealed 31 proteins differentially regulated in p14?/? organelles, which were rescued by reexpression of pEGFP-p14 in p14?/? endosomes. Regulated proteins are known to be involved in actin remodeling, endosomal signal transduction and trafficking. Identified proteins and their in silico interaction networks suggested that endosomal signaling might regulate such major cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival. PMID:21080497

  11. Computational allergenicity prediction of transgenic proteins expressed in genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Misra, Amita; Subash, Swarna; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2011-09-01

    Development of genetically modified (GM) crops is on increase to improve food quality, increase harvest yields, and reduce the dependency on chemical pesticides. Before their release in marketplace, they should be scrutinized for their safety. Several guidelines of different regulatory agencies like ILSI, WHO Codex, OECD, and so on for allergenicity evaluation of transgenics are available and sequence homology analysis is the first test to determine the allergenic potential of inserted proteins. Therefore, to test and validate, 312 allergenic, 100 non-allergenic, and 48 inserted proteins were assessed for sequence similarity using 8-mer, 80-mer, and full FASTA search. On performing sequence homology studies, ~94% the allergenic proteins gave exact matches for 8-mer and 80-mer homology. However, 20 allergenic proteins showed non-allergenic behavior. Out of 100 non-allergenic proteins, seven qualified as allergens. None of the inserted proteins demonstrated allergenic behavior. In order to improve the predictability, proteins showing anomalous behavior were tested by Algpred and ADFS separately. Use of Algpred and ADFS softwares reduced the tendency of false prediction to a great extent (74-78%). In conclusion, routine sequence homology needs to be coupled with some other bioinformatic method like ADFS/Algpred to reduce false allergenicity prediction of novel proteins. PMID:20964517

  12. Genetic Modifier Screens Reveal New Components that Interact with the Drosophila Dystroglycan-Dystrophin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Yatsenko, Andriy S.; Shcherbata, Halyna R.; Fischer, Karin A.; Maksymiv, Dariya V.; Chernyk, Yaroslava I.; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2008-01-01

    The Dystroglycan-Dystrophin (Dg-Dys) complex has a capacity to transmit information from the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton inside the cell. It is proposed that this interaction is under tight regulation; however the signaling/regulatory components of Dg-Dys complex remain elusive. Understanding the regulation of the complex is critical since defects in this complex cause muscular dystrophy in humans. To reveal new regulators of the Dg-Dys complex, we used a model organism Drosophila melanogaster and performed genetic interaction screens to identify modifiers of Dg and Dys mutants in Drosophila wing veins. These mutant screens revealed that the Dg-Dys complex interacts with genes involved in muscle function and components of Notch, TGF-? and EGFR signaling pathways. In addition, components of pathways that are required for cellular and/or axonal migration through cytoskeletal regulation, such as Semaphorin-Plexin, Frazzled-Netrin and Slit-Robo pathways show interactions with Dys and/or Dg. These data suggest that the Dg-Dys complex and the other pathways regulating extracellular information transfer to the cytoskeletal dynamics are more intercalated than previously thought. PMID:18545683

  13. Novel reference molecules for quantitation of genetically modified maize and soybean.

    PubMed

    Kuribara, Hideo; Shindo, Yoichiro; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Takubo, Ken; Futo, Satoshi; Aoki, Nobutaro; Hirao, Takashi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Goda, Yukihiro; Toyoda, Masatake; Hino, Akihiro

    2002-01-01

    New quantitation methods based on a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique were developed for 5 lines of genetically modified (GM) maize, including MON810, Event176, Bt11, T25, and GA21, and a GM soy, Roundup Ready. Oligonucleotide DNA, including specific primers and fluorescent dye-labeled probes, were designed for PCRs. Two plasmids were constructed as reference molecules (RMs) for the detection of GM maize and GM soy. The molecules contain the DNA sequences of a specific region found in each GM line, universal sequences used in various GM lines, such as cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and nopaline synthase terminator, and the endogenous DNA sequences of maize or soy. By using these plasmids, no GM maize and GM soy were required as reference materials for the qualitative and quantitative PCR technique. Test samples containing 0, 0.10, 0.50, 1.0, 5.0, and 10% GM maize or GM soy were quantitated. At the 5.0% level, the bias (mean-true value) ranged from 2.8 to 19.4% and the relative standard deviation was <5.2%. These results show that our method involving the use of these plasmids as RMs is reliable and practical for quantitation of GM maize and GM soy. PMID:12374407

  14. Inferences from genetically modified mouse models on the skeletal actions of vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Goltzman, D

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin D has pleiotropic extra-skeletal effects which have been noted in mouse models of deletion of either the 25-hydroxy vitamin D 1?-hydroxylase enzyme, cyp27b1 (1OHase(-/-) mice) or of the vitamin D receptor (Vdr(-/-) mice); these may be preventable or reversible by either restoring normal signaling of the 1,25(OH)2D/VDR system, or in some cases by restoring normal mineral homeostasis. However, effects on skeletal and mineral homeostasis are clearly the major phenotype observed in humans with loss-of-function mutations in either CYP27B1 or VDR. In mouse phenocopies of these human disorders, correction of hypocalcemia and hypophosphatemia reduce elevated circulating parathyroid hormone concentrations and normalize impaired bone mineralization, but restoration of normal 1,25(OH)2D/VDR signaling may be required for optimal bone formation. Induction of high endogenous 1,25(OH)2D concentrations in genetically modified mouse models may cause increased bone resorption and decreased mineralization. Transgenic Vdr overexpression and conditional Vdr deletion in cells of the osteoblastic lineage have also provided insights into the stages of osteoblast differentiation which may mediate these actions. These anabolic and catabolic effects of the 1,25(OH)2D system on bone may therefore be a function of both the ambient concentration of circulating 1,25(OH)2D and the stage of differentiation of the osteoblast. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'. PMID:25237033

  15. Comparative safety testing of genetically modified foods in a 90-day rat feeding study design allowing the distinction between primary and secondary effects of the new genetic event

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ib Knudsen; Morten Poulsen

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the wider experiences regarding the usefulness of the 90-day rat feeding study for the testing of whole foods from genetically modified (GM) plant based on data from a recent EU-project [Poulsen, M., Schrøder, M., Wilcks, A., Kroghsbo, S., Lindecrona, R.H., Miller, A., Frenzel, T., Danier, J., Rychlik, M., Shu, Q., Emami, K., Taylor, M., Gatehouse, A., Engel,

  16. Binding of the Trace Elements: Cu(II) and Fe(III) to the Native and Modified Nutritive Potato Starches Studied by EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ?migielska, H.; Lewandowicz, G.; Goslar, J.; Hoffmann, S. K.

    2006-08-01

    The Cu(II) and Fe(III) ions have been adsorbed by four potato starches of different degrees of oxidation (different numbers of COOH groups replacing host CH2OH groups): native (no oxidized), white (pudding) with oxidation degree of 0.04%, gelating (0.1%), and LUBOX starch (0.5%). Concentration of the ions in starches was determined from atomic absorption and EPR spectrum intensity. For small concentration of the adsorbed ions (below 4 mg/g) nearly all ions are adsorbed from the solution. EPR shows that adsorbed copper(II) ions are chemically bonded to the starch molecules (preferably) at COOH sites and uniformly dispersed in the starch structure. The complexes are typical of octahedral or square-quadratic coordination with spin-Hamiltonian parameters g?=2.373, g?= 2.080, A?=12.1 mT, A?=1.0 mT. For higher concentrations the Cu(II) displays a tendency to clustering. Iron(III) ions are introduced into starch in a form of clusters mainly, even for the smallest concentration. The highest concentrations of both Cu(II) and Fe(III) were observed in LUBOX starch having the highest degree of oxidation.

  17. LOW WASTEWATER POTATO STARCH/PROTEIN PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    While potato starch has been an item of commerce for many years, traditional processing methods have incurred large volumes of high BOD effluents. The research summarized by this report has lead to a modified process which upgrades the soluble components formerly discarded in the...

  18. 78 FR 35743 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Modification of the General Cull and Handling Regulation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ...AMS-FV-13-0001; FV13-948-1 IR] Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Modification of the General...interim rule modifies the size requirements for potatoes handled under the Colorado potato marketing order, Area No. 2 (order)....

  19. 78 FR 70191 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Modification of the General Cull and Handling Regulation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ...AMS-FV-13-0001; FV13-948-1 FIR] Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Modification of the General...rule that modified the size requirements for potatoes handled under the Colorado potato marketing order, Area No. 2 (order)....

  20. 78 FR 3 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Modification of the Handling Regulation for Area No. 2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ...AMS-FV-12-0043; FV12-948-1 IR] Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Modification of the Handling...This rule modifies the grade requirements for potatoes handled under the Colorado potato marketing order, Area No. 2 (order)....

  1. 78 FR 23829 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Modification of the Handling Regulation for Area No. 2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ...AMS-FV-12-0043; FV12-948-1 FIR] Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Modification of the Handling...rule that modified the grade requirements for potatoes handled under the Colorado potato marketing order, Area No. 2. The interim...

  2. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods for four genetically modified maize varieties and maize DNA content in food.

    PubMed

    Brodmann, Peter D; Ilg, Evelyn C; Berthoud, Hélène; Herrmann, Andre

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative detection methods are needed for enforcement of the recently introduced labeling threshold for genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food ingredients. This labeling threshold, which is set to 1% in the European Union and Switzerland, must be applied to all approved GMOs. Four different varieties of maize are approved in the European Union: the insect-resistant Bt176 maize (Maximizer), Btl 1 maize, Mon810 (YieldGard) maize, and the herbicide-tolerant T25 (Liberty Link) maize. Because the labeling must be considered individually for each ingredient, a quantitation system for the endogenous maize content is needed in addition to the GMO-specific detection systems. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction detection methods were developed for the 4 approved genetically modified maize varieties and for an endogenous maize (invertase) gene system. PMID:12083257

  3. Approaches in the risk assessment of genetically modified foods by the Hellenic Food Safety Authority.

    PubMed

    Varzakas, Theodoros H; Chryssochoidis, G; Argyropoulos, D

    2007-04-01

    Risk analysis has become important to assess conditions and take decisions on control procedures. In this context it is considered a prerequisite in the evaluation of GM food. Many consumers worldwide worry that food derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) may be unhealthy and hence regulations on GMO authorisations and labelling have become more stringent. Nowadays there is a higher demand for non-GM products and these products could be differentiated from GM products using the identity preservation system (IP) that could apply throughout the grain processing system. IP is the creation of a transparent communication system that encompasses HACCP, traceability and related systems in the supply chain. This process guarantees that certain characteristics of the lots of food (non-GM origin) are maintained "from farm to fork". This article examines the steps taken by the Hellenic Food Safety Authority to examine the presence of GMOs in foods. The whole integrated European legislation framework currently in place still needs to be implemented in Greece. Penalties should be enforced to those who import, process GMOs without special licence and do not label those products. Similar penalties should be enforced to those companies that issue false certificates beyond the liabilities taken by the food enterprises for farmers' compensation. We argue that Greece has no serious reasons to choose the use of GMOs due to the fact that the structural and pedologic characteristics of the Greek agriculture favour the biological and integrated cultivation more. Greece is not in favour of the politics behind coexistence of conventional and GM plants and objects to the use of GMOs in the food and the environment because the processor has a big burden in terms of money, time and will suffer a great deal in order to prove that their products are GMO free or that any contamination is adventitious or technically unavoidable. Moreover, Greece owns a large variety of genetic material that should try to protect from patenting and commercialisation. Finally, we should be aware of the requirements of movement of GMOs within borders, i.e. GMOs grown or used in other countries but which are not intended to cross into Greece, since Greece is very close to countries that are non-EU. This is where the development of a new, integrated, trustworthy and transparent food quality control system will help to satisfy the societal demands for safe and quality products. On the other hand, Greece should not be isolated from any recent scientific technological development and should assess the possible advantages for some cultivation using a case by case approach. Finally, the safety assessment of GM foods and feed has been discussed according to the risk assessment methodology applied by EFSA. PMID:17275157

  4. Transplants of Fibroblasts Genetically Modified to Express BDNF Promote Axonal Regeneration from Supraspinal Neurons Following Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ying Jin; Itzhak Fischer; Alan Tessler; John D. Houle

    2002-01-01

    Transplants of fibroblasts genetically modified to express BDNF (Fb\\/BDNF) have been shown to promote regeneration of rubrospinal axons and recovery of forelimb function when placed acutely into the injured cervical spinal cord of adult rats. Here we investigated whether Fb\\/BDNF cells could stimulate supraspinal axon regeneration and recovery after chronic (4 week) injury. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats received a complete

  5. A MULTI-COUNTRY ASSESSMENT OF CONSUMER ATTITUDES OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR NEW LABELING SYSTEM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hyun-Seok Kim; Kwansoo Kim

    2004-01-01

    This paper estimates the willingness to pay (WTP) for non-genetically modified (GM) vegetable oil and tofu in Korea by using contingent valuation (CV) method and compares this WTP with Japan, Norway, Taiwan and the U.S. It also recovers the distribution of WTP by using a bootstrapping approach to provide a better measure of consumer's WTP on non-GM foods. Especially, we

  6. Development of a qualitative, multiplex real-time PCR kit for screening of genetically modified organisms (GMOs)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans-Henno Dörries; Ivonne Remus; Astrid Grönewald; Cordt Grönewald; Kornelia Berghof-Jäger

    2010-01-01

    The number of commercially available genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and therefore the diversity of possible target\\u000a sequences for molecular detection techniques are constantly increasing. As a result, GMO laboratories and the food production\\u000a industry currently are forced to apply many different methods to reliably test raw material and complex processed food products.\\u000a Screening methods have become more and more relevant

  7. Establishment and evaluation of event-specific qualitative and quantitative PCR method for genetically modified soybean DP356043-5

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen Tao Xu; Nan Zhang; Yun Bo Luo; Zhi Fang Zhai; Ying Shang; Xing Hua Yan; Juan Juan Zheng; Kun Lun Huang

    With the increasing development of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), labeling regulations have been introduced, which\\u000a require appropriate detection methods. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been the mainstay for GMO detection,\\u000a especially for event-specific qualitative and quantitative PCR detection methods, which have become the internationally agreed\\u000a state-of-art. This paper describes the character and event-specific quantitative detection method of DP-356043-5

  8. DNA Biosensor Prepared by Electrodeposited Pt-nanoparticles for the Detection of Specific Deoxyribonucleic Acid Sequence in Genetically Modified Soybean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mao-Qing WANG; Xiao-Yan DU; li-Yan LIU; Qian SUN; Xian-Chen JIANG

    2008-01-01

    DNA biosensors were prepared by electrodepositing platinum nanoparticles (Pt-nano) on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). A 19-mer ssDNA of promoter 35S, which was specific to most inserted sequences in genetically modified food, was immobilized on the Pt nanoparticle-deposited GC electrode. The morphology of the surface of Pt nanoparticle-deposited GC electrodes (Pt-nano\\/GCE) was investigated under a scanning electron

  9. Qualitative and Quantitative PCR Methods for Event-specific Detection of Genetically Modified Cotton Mon1445 and Mon531

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Litao Yang; Aihu Pan; Kewei Zhang; Changsong Yin; Bingjun Qian; Jianxiu Chen; Cheng Huang; Dabing Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Based on the DNA sequences of the junctions between recombinant and cotton genomic DNA of the two genetically modified (GM)\\u000a cotton varieties, herbicide-tolerance Mon1445 and insect-resistant Mon531, event-specific primers and probes for qualitative\\u000a and quantitative PCR detection for both GM cotton varieties were designed, and corresponding detection methods were developed.\\u000a In qualitative PCR detection, the simplex and multiplex PCR detection

  10. New Analysis of a Rat Feeding Study with a Genetically Modified Maize Reveals Signs of Hepatorenal Toxicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilles-Eric Séralini; Dominique Cellier; Joël Spiroux de Vendomois

    2007-01-01

    Health risk assessment of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) cultivated for food or feed is under debate throughout the\\u000a world, and very little data have been published on mid- or long-term toxicological studies with mammals. One of these studies\\u000a performed under the responsibility of Monsanto Company with a transgenic corn MON863 has been subjected to questions from\\u000a regulatory reviewers in Europe,

  11. ELISA method for monitoring human serum IgE specific for Cry1Ab introduced into genetically modified corn

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osamu Nakajima; Reiko Teshima; Kayoko Takagi; Haruyo Okunuki; Jun-ichi Sawada

    2007-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the most convenient method of monitoring the occurrence of IgE antibodies specific for novel proteins in genetically modified (GM) foods. The levels of IgE specific for a recombinant protein, Cry1Ab, were determined using an ELISA method. A soluble form of the Cry1Ab protein purified from pCold1 vector-transformed Escherichia coli pTf16\\/BL21 was used as the ELISA

  12. The biomedical potential of genetically modified flax seeds overexpressing the glucosyltransferase gene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Flax (Linum usitatissimum) is a potential source of many bioactive components that can be found in its oil and fibers, but also in the seedcake, which is rich in antioxidants. To increase the levels of medically beneficial compounds, a genetically modified flax type (named GT) with an elevated level of phenylopropanoids and their glycoside derivatives was generated. In this study, we investigated the influence of GT seedcake extract preparations on human fibroblast proliferation and migration, and looked at the effect on a human skin model. Moreover, we verified its activity against bacteria of clinical relevance. Methods The GT flax used in this study is characterized by overexpression of the glucosyltransferase gene derived from Solanum sogarandinum. Five GT seedcake preparations were generated. Their composition was assessed using ultra pressure liquid chromatography and confirmed using the UPLC-QTOF method. For the in vitro evaluation, the influence of the GT seedcake preparations on normal human dermal fibroblast proliferation was assessed using the MTT test and the wound scratch assay. A human skin model was used to evaluate the potential for skin irritation. To assess the antimicrobial properties of GT preparations, the percentage of inhibition of bacterial growth was calculated. Results The GT seedcake extract had elevated levels of phenylopropanoid compounds in comparison to the control, non-transformed plants. Significant increases in the content of ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid, and their glucoside derivatives, kaempferol, quercitin and secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) were observed in the seeds of the modified plants. The GT seedcake preparations were shown to promote the proliferation of normal human dermal fibroblasts and the migration of fibroblasts in the wound scratch assay. The superior effect of GT seedcake extract on fibroblast migration was observed after a 24-hour treatment. The skin irritation test indicated that GT seedcake preparations have no harmful effect on human skin. Moreover, GT seedcake preparations exhibited inhibitory properties toward two bacterial strains: Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Conclusions We suggest that preparations derived from the new GT flax are an effective source of phenylopropanoids and that their glycoside derivatives and might be promising natural products with both healing and bacteriostatic effects. This flax-derived product is a good candidate for application in the repair and regeneration of human skin and might also be an alternative to antibiotic therapy for infected wounds. PMID:23228136

  13. A novel, sensitive method to evaluate potato germplasm for bacterial wilt resistance using a luminescent Ralstonia solanacearum reporter strain.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andrea Paola Zuluaga; Ferreira, Virginia; Pianzzola, María Julia; Siri, María Inés; Coll, Núria S; Valls, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Several breeding programs are under way to introduce resistance to bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum in solanaceous crops. The lack of screening methods allowing easy measurement of pathogen colonization and the inability to detect latent (i.e., symptomless) infections are major limitations when evaluating resistance to this disease in plant germplasm. We describe a new method to study the interaction between R. solanacearum and potato germplasm that overcomes these restrictions. The R. solanacearum UY031 was genetically modified to constitutively generate light from a synthetic luxCDABE operon stably inserted in its chromosome. Colonization of this reporter strain on different potato accessions was followed using life imaging. Bacterial detection in planta by this nondisruptive system correlated with the development of wilting symptoms. In addition, we demonstrated that quantitative detection of the recombinant strain using a luminometer can identify latent infections on symptomless potato plants. We have developed a novel, unsophisticated, and accurate method for high-throughput evaluation of pathogen colonization in plant populations. We applied this method to compare the behavior of potato accessions with contrasting resistance to R. solanacearum. This new system will be especially useful to detect latency in symptomless parental lines before their inclusion in long-term breeding programs for disease resistance. PMID:24283938

  14. Composition of sulfited potatoes: comparison with fresh and frozen potatoes.

    PubMed

    Chalom, S; Elrezzi, E; Peña, P; Astiarsarán, I; Bello, J

    1995-02-01

    The content in moisture, fat, protein, carbohydrate, fibre and vitamin C was analyzed in three commercial types of potatoes: sulfited (treated with E223), frozen potatoes (pre-fried) and fresh potatoes (not processed). The composition of sulfited potatoes does not usually appear in food composition tables. Our results showed significant differences in the content of carbohydrates and fibre between sulfited and fresh potatoes. The content of vitamin C in sulfited potatoes, which is similar to that of frozen potatoes, was shown to be approximately half of that found in fresh potatoes. PMID:7792261

  15. Systematic mapping of genetic interactions in Caenorhabditis elegans identifies common modifiers of diverse signaling pathways

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ben Lehner; Catriona Crombie; Julia Tischler; Angelo Fortunato; Andrew G Fraser

    2006-01-01

    Most heritable traits, including disease susceptibility, are affected by interactions between multiple genes. However, we understand little about how genes interact because very few possible genetic interactions have been explored experimentally. We have used RNA interference in Caenorhabditis elegans to systematically test ?65,000 pairs of genes for their ability to interact genetically. We identify ?350 genetic interactions between genes functioning

  16. Construction of a reference plasmid containing ten targets for the detection of genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiumin; Teng, Da; Xi, Di; Guan, Qingfeng; Wang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Standard reference molecules play a significant role for the detection of genetically modified (GM) crops and products. The newest reference molecules should catch up with the rapid development of GM crops in the world. In this work, a reference plasmid containing ten targets from GM soybean, maize and cotton was constructed on the basis of the pTLE8 harboring eight targets only from GM soybean and cotton. Three target segments of the Bt176 event-specific 3'-junction (Bt176G3'), MON810 event-specific 3'-junction (MON810G3') and the endogenous maize Hmg genes, were fused into the 890 bp fragment by overlap extension PCR. The CP4 EPSPS gene in the plasmid pTLE8 previously constructed in our laboratory was replaced with above fusion fragment, thus generating a new plasmid pTLH10 containing ten target genes from GM soybean, maize and cotton. The PCR efficiencies with pTLH10 as a calibrator ranged from 93.3% to 99.9% for the standard curves of the Bt176G3', MON810G3' and Hmg genes. The standard deviation (SD) values of repeatability were from 0.04 to 0.8 for three different days and from 0.12 to 1.14 for one day, respectively. These results indicated that the reference plasmid constructed in this work is also suitable for the identification of GM maize, and would be an important tool to establish a feasible identification management for various GM crops components. PMID:23085154

  17. Does wheat genetically modified for disease resistance affect root-colonizing pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi?

    PubMed

    Meyer, Joana Beatrice; Song-Wilson, Yi; Foetzki, Andrea; Luginbühl, Carolin; Winzeler, Michael; Kneubühler, Yvan; Matasci, Caterina; Mascher-Frutschi, Fabio; Kalinina, Olena; Boller, Thomas; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetically modified (GM) wheat with introduced pm3b mildew resistance transgene, on two types of root-colonizing microorganisms, namely pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Our investigations were carried out in field trials over three field seasons and at two locations. Serial dilution in selective King's B medium and microscopy were used to assess the abundance of cultivable pseudomonads and AMF, respectively. We developed a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method to characterize the diversity of the pqqC gene, which is involved in Pseudomonas phosphate solubilization. A major result was that in the first field season Pseudomonas abundances and diversity on roots of GM pm3b lines, but also on non-GM sister lines were different from those of the parental lines and conventional wheat cultivars. This indicates a strong effect of the procedures by which these plants were created, as GM and sister lines were generated via tissue cultures and propagated in the greenhouse. Moreover, Pseudomonas population sizes and DGGE profiles varied considerably between individual GM lines with different genomic locations of the pm3b transgene. At individual time points, differences in Pseudomonas and AMF accumulation between GM and control lines were detected, but they were not consistent and much less pronounced than differences detected between young and old plants, different conventional wheat cultivars or at different locations and field seasons. Thus, we conclude that impacts of GM wheat on plant-beneficial root-colonizing microorganisms are minor and not of ecological importance. The cultivation-independent pqqC-DGGE approach proved to be a useful tool for monitoring the dynamics of Pseudomonas populations in a wheat field and even sensitive enough for detecting population responses to altered plant physiology. PMID:23372672

  18. Validation of PCR methods for quantitation of genetically modified plants in food.

    PubMed

    Hübner, P; Waiblinger, H U; Pietsch, K; Brodmann, P

    2001-01-01

    For enforcement of the recently introduced labeling threshold for genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food ingredients, quantitative detection methods such as quantitative competitive (QC-PCR) and real-time PCR are applied by official food control laboratories. The experiences of 3 European food control laboratories in validating such methods were compared to describe realistic performance characteristics of quantitative PCR detection methods. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) of GMO-specific, real-time PCR was experimentally determined to reach 30-50 target molecules, which is close to theoretical prediction. Starting PCR with 200 ng genomic plant DNA, the LOQ depends primarily on the genome size of the target plant and ranges from 0.02% for rice to 0.7% for wheat. The precision of quantitative PCR detection methods, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), varied from 10 to 30%. Using Bt176 corn containing test samples and applying Bt176 specific QC-PCR, mean values deviated from true values by -7to 18%, with an average of 2+/-10%. Ruggedness of real-time PCR detection methods was assessed in an interlaboratory study analyzing commercial, homogeneous food samples. Roundup Ready soybean DNA contents were determined in the range of 0.3 to 36%, relative to soybean DNA, with RSDs of about 25%. Taking the precision of quantitative PCR detection methods into account, suitable sample plans and sample sizes for GMO analysis are suggested. Because quantitative GMO detection methods measure GMO contents of samples in relation to reference material (calibrants), high priority must be given to international agreements and standardization on certified reference materials. PMID:11767156

  19. Public health issues related with the consumption of food obtained from genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Paparini, Andrea; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) are a fact of modern agriculture and a major field of discussion in biotechnology. As science incessantly achieves innovative and unexpected breakthroughs, new medical, political, ethical and religious debates arise over the production and consumption of transgenic organisms. Despite no described medical condition being directly associated with a diet including approved GM crops in large exposed populations such as 300,000,000 Americans and a billion Chinese, public opinion seems to look at this new technology with either growing concern or even disapproval. It is generally recognized that a high level of vigilance is necessary and highly desirable, but it should also be considered that GMOs are a promising new challenge for the III Millennium societies, with remarkable impact on many disciplines and fields related to biotechnology. To acquire a basic knowledge on GMO production, GM-food consumption, GMO interaction with humans and environment is of primary importance for risk assessment. It requires availability of clear data and results from rigorous experiments. This review will focus on public health risks related with a GMO-containing diet. The objective is to summarize state of the art research, provide fundamental technical information, point out problems and perspectives, and make available essential tools for further research. Are GMO based industries and GMO-derived foods safe to human health? Can we consider both social, ethical and public health issues by means of a constant and effective monitoring of the food chain and by a clear, informative labeling of the products? Which are the so far characterized or alleged hazards of GMOs? And, most importantly, are these hazards actual, potential or merely contrived? Several questions remain open; answers and solutions belong to science, to politics and to the personal opinion of each social subject. PMID:15504704

  20. Nanoparticle-based DNA biosensor for visual detection of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Kalogianni, Despina P; Koraki, Theodora; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Ioannou, Penelope C

    2006-01-15

    Although screening of raw ingredients and food products for genetically modified organisms (GMO) may be accomplished by detecting either the exogenous DNA or the novel protein, DNA is the preferred analyte because of its superior stability during food processing. The development of DNA biosensors is of increasing importance due to the growing demand for rapid and reliable methods for GMO detection. We report the first DNA biosensor in a dry-reagent dipstick configuration for visual detection and confirmation of GMO-related sequences by hybridization within minutes. The sensor is disposable and does not require special instrumentation. It detects the 35S promoter and nopaline synthase (NOS) terminator sequences that are present in the majority of transgenic plants. The target sequences are amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and hybridized (7min) with probes bearing oligo(dA) tail. The biotinylated product is applied to the sensor followed by immersion in the appropriate buffer. Migration of the buffer rehydrates gold nanoparticles conjugated to oligo(dT), which hybridize with the oligo(dA) tails. The hybrids are captured by immobilized streptavidin at the test zone of the sensor giving a characteristic red line due to the accumulation of the nanoparticles. The excess of nanoparticle conjugates are captured at the control zone by immobilized oligo(dA) strands. Amplified 35S or NOS DNA is detectable at 0.16nM. Soybean powder certified reference material with 0.1% GMO content is clearly detectable after 35 and 40 amplification cycles for 35S and NOS sequence, respectively. The sensor was also applied to real samples from various sources. PMID:15935636

  1. What determines the acceptability of genetically modified food that can improve human nutrition?

    SciTech Connect

    Purchase, Iain F.H. [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ifhp@chadzombe.u-net.com

    2005-09-01

    It has been predicted that by 2025 there will be an annual shortfall of cereals for feeding the human population of 68.5 million tonnes. One possible solution is the use of genetically modified (GM) crops, which are already grown extensively (59 million ha of GM crops were planted in 2002) in the USA, South America, Africa and China. Nevertheless, there is considerable disagreement about the advisability of using such crops, particularly in Europe. Obviously, the safety of the food derived from the GM crops is a primary consideration. Safety assessment relies on establishing that the food is substantially equivalent to its non-GM counterpart and specific testing for allergenicity of proteins and toxicity of metabolites and the whole food. There appears to be international agreement on the principles of safety assessment. Safety to the environment is equally important, but will not be covered in this presentation. The public's perception of the risk of new technology is critical to its acceptance. Perception of risk, in turn, depends on the credibility of the source of the information and trust in the regulatory process. In many countries, the public appears to have lost its trust in the scientists and government dealing with GM food, making the acceptability of GM crops uncertain. Of equal importance are the socio-economic factors that impinge on the viability of GM produce. These include intellectual property protection, trade liberalisation (through subsidy and tariff barriers in developed countries) and the intensity of bio safety regulations. The socio-economic interests of developed and developing countries may diverge and may even be contradictory in any one country. Acceptance of GM crops will thus depend on detailed issues surrounding particular crops and economies.

  2. Genetically modified hairy roots of Withania somnifera Dunal: a potent source of rejuvenating principles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Murthy, Kotamballi N Chidambara; Bhamid, Suresh; Sudha, C G; Ravishankar, Gokare A

    2005-01-01

    Transgenic hairy roots were induced from Withania somnifera Dunal, by infecting leaf explants with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Polymerase chain reaction for rol A gene and Southern blot confirmed the integration of T-DNA in the genome. Cultures were grown in Murashige and Skoog solid as well as in liquid medium. The antioxidant activity was assayed in roots grown in solid media and liquid media. Hairy roots grown in liquid media found to possess highly significant activity in 1,1-diphenyl-2-pecryl-hydrazyl radical, beta-carotene linoleic acid model system. The activity was 57.34%, 75.64%, and 93.41% in case DPPH model and 55.3%, 76.3%, and 90.5% in case of b-CLAMS in 25, 50, and 100 mg L(-1) concentration, respectively. In case of hydroxyl radical trapping and brain lipid peroxidation assay, the activity was more significant in hairy roots grown on solid medium in comparison with commercial formulation prepared using normal roots and standard withanaloids. Root extract grown in solid medium has shown 93.2% hydroxyl radical trapping activity at 100 mg L(-1) concentration, and 500 mg L(-1) has shown 83.6% in case of brain lipid peroxidation assay. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated the presence of withanaloids in the hairy root extracts. The results of the study clearly indicate that there is enhancement of secondary metabolites in hairy roots, which is indicated through significant enhancement of the antioxidant activity, since these are the major constituents responsible for the activity. This is the first report on the presence of antioxidant principles in genetically modified roots of W. somnifera. These results of the present study may aid in utilization of the W. somnifera hairy roots for its rejuvenating principles. PMID:15798373

  3. Evaluation of plasmid and genomic DNA calibrants used for the quantification of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Caprioara-Buda, M; Meyer, W; Jeynov, B; Corbisier, P; Trapmann, S; Emons, H

    2012-07-01

    The reliable quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) by real-time PCR requires, besides thoroughly validated quantitative detection methods, sustainable calibration systems. The latter establishes the anchor points for the measured value and the measurement unit, respectively. In this paper, the suitability of two types of DNA calibrants, i.e. plasmid DNA and genomic DNA extracted from plant leaves, for the certification of the GMO content in reference materials as copy number ratio between two targeted DNA sequences was investigated. The PCR efficiencies and coefficients of determination of the calibration curves as well as the measured copy number ratios for three powder certified reference materials (CRMs), namely ERM-BF415e (NK603 maize), ERM-BF425c (356043 soya), and ERM-BF427c (98140 maize), originally certified for their mass fraction of GMO, were compared for both types of calibrants. In all three systems investigated, the PCR efficiencies of plasmid DNA were slightly closer to the PCR efficiencies observed for the genomic DNA extracted from seed powders rather than those of the genomic DNA extracted from leaves. Although the mean DNA copy number ratios for each CRM overlapped within their uncertainties, the DNA copy number ratios were significantly different using the two types of calibrants. Based on these observations, both plasmid and leaf genomic DNA calibrants would be technically suitable as anchor points for the calibration of the real-time PCR methods applied in this study. However, the most suitable approach to establish a sustainable traceability chain is to fix a reference system based on plasmid DNA. PMID:22638881

  4. DNA Barcoding Simplifies Environmental Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Crops in Biodiverse Regions

    PubMed Central

    Nzeduru, Chinyere V.; Ronca, Sandra; Wilkinson, Mike J.

    2012-01-01

    Transgenes encoding for insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from the soil-dwelling bacterium Bacillus Thuringiensis have been widely introduced into Genetically Modified (GM) crops to confer protection against insect pests. Concern that these transgenes may also harm beneficial or otherwise valued insects (so-called Non Target Organisms, NTOs) represents a major element of the Environmental Risk Assessments (ERAs) used by all countries prior to commercial release. Compiling a comprehensive list of potentially susceptible NTOs is therefore a necessary part of an ERA for any Cry toxin-containing GM crop. In partly-characterised and biodiverse countries, NTO identification is slowed by the need for taxonomic expertise and time to enable morphological identifications. This limitation represents a potentially serious barrier to timely adoption of GM technology in some developing countries. We consider Bt Cry1A cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) in Nigeria as an exemplar to demonstrate how COI barcoding can provide a simple and cost-effective means of addressing this problem. Over a period of eight weeks, we collected 163 insects from cowpea flowers across the agroecological and geographic range of the crop in Nigeria. These individuals included 32 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) spanning four Orders and that could mostly be assigned to genus or species level. They included 12 Lepidopterans and two Coleopterans (both potentially sensitive to different groups of Cry proteins). Thus, barcode-assisted diagnoses were highly harmonised across groups (typically to genus or species level) and so were insensitive to expertise or knowledge gaps. Decisively, the entire study was completed within four months at a cost of less than 10,000 US$. The broader implications of the findings for food security and the capacity for safe adoption of GM technology are briefly explored. PMID:22567120

  5. Does Wheat Genetically Modified for Disease Resistance Affect Root-Colonizing Pseudomonads and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi?

    PubMed Central

    Foetzki, Andrea; Luginbühl, Carolin; Winzeler, Michael; Kneubühler, Yvan; Matasci, Caterina; Mascher-Frutschi, Fabio; Kalinina, Olena; Boller, Thomas; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetically modified (GM) wheat with introduced pm3b mildew resistance transgene, on two types of root-colonizing microorganisms, namely pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Our investigations were carried out in field trials over three field seasons and at two locations. Serial dilution in selective King's B medium and microscopy were used to assess the abundance of cultivable pseudomonads and AMF, respectively. We developed a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method to characterize the diversity of the pqqC gene, which is involved in Pseudomonas phosphate solubilization. A major result was that in the first field season Pseudomonas abundances and diversity on roots of GM pm3b lines, but also on non-GM sister lines were different from those of the parental lines and conventional wheat cultivars. This indicates a strong effect of the procedures by which these plants were created, as GM and sister lines were generated via tissue cultures and propagated in the greenhouse. Moreover, Pseudomonas population sizes and DGGE profiles varied considerably between individual GM lines with different genomic locations of the pm3b transgene. At individual time points, differences in Pseudomonas and AMF accumulation between GM and control lines were detected, but they were not consistent and much less pronounced than differences detected between young and old plants, different conventional wheat cultivars or at different locations and field seasons. Thus, we conclude that impacts of GM wheat on plant-beneficial root-colonizing microorganisms are minor and not of ecological importance. The cultivation-independent pqqC-DGGE approach proved to be a useful tool for monitoring the dynamics of Pseudomonas populations in a wheat field and even sensitive enough for detecting population responses to altered plant physiology. PMID:23372672

  6. New insights into the pathogenesis of pseudoxanthoma elasticum and related soft tissue calcification disorders by identifying genetic interactions and modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Hendig, Doris; Knabbe, Cornelius; Götting, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Screening of the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter protein subfamily C member 6 gene (ABCC6) in pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) revealed a mutation detection rate of approximately 87%. Although 25% of the unidentified disease alleles underlie deletions/insertions, there remain several PXE patients with no clear genotype. The recent identification of PXE-related diseases and the high intra-familiar and inter-individual clinical variability of PXE led to the assumption that secondary genetic co-factors exist. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the genetics underlying PXE and PXE-related disorders based on human and animal studies. Furthermore, we discuss the role of genetic interactions and modifier genes in PXE and PXE-related diseases characterized by soft tissue calcification. PMID:23802012

  7. Autonomous cell death, temperature sensitivity and the genetic control associated with resistance to cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in diploid potatoes (Solanum spp.)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. T. Valkonen; K. N. Watanabe

    1999-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is a commonly occurring plant virus that causes severe damage in many crops, including the diploid\\u000a crop species tomato and pepper (Lycopersicon spp. and Capsicum spp., respectively) of the family Solanaceae, but it is neither common nor economically important in cultivated potatoes\\u000a (Solanum tuberosum; Solanaceae). Resistance to CMV was examined in two diploid (2n=2x=24), highly heterozygous

  8. Modified H5 promoter improves stability of insert genes while maintaining immunogenicity during extended passage of genetically engineered MVA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongde; Martinez, Joy; Zhou, Wendi; La Rosa, Corinna; Srivastava, Tumul; Dasgupta, Anindya; Rawal, Ravindra; Li, Zhongqui; Britt, William J; Diamond, Don

    2010-02-10

    We have engineered recombinant (r) Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) to express multiple antigens under the control of either of two related vaccinia synthetic promoters (pSyn) with early and late transcriptional activity or the modified H5 (mH5) promoter which has predominant early activity. We sequentially passaged these constructs and analyzed their genetic stability by qPCR, and concluded that rMVA expressing multiple antigens using the mH5 promoter exhibit remarkable genetic stability and maintain potent immunogenicity after serial passage. In contrast, rMVA expressing antigens using engineered vaccinia synthetic E/L (pSyn I or II) promoters are genetically unstable. Progressive accumulation of antigen loss variants resulted in a viral preparation with lower immunogenicity after serial passage. Metabolic labeling, followed by cold chase revealed little difference in stability of proteins expressed from mH5 or pSyn promoter constructs. We conclude that maintenance of genetic stability which is achieved using mH5, though not with pSyn promoters, is linked to timing, not the magnitude of expression levels of foreign antigen, which is more closely associated with immunogenicity of the vaccine. PMID:19969118

  9. To see China in a grain of genetically modified rice : a case study on the governance of agricultural biotechnology in China 

    E-print Network

    Li, Moxuan

    2010-07-01

    This thesis examines the development and changing practices of governance in China by example of the evolution of policy development in agricultural biotechnology (especially in the case of genetically modified rice). In particular, the process...

  10. TMEM106B is a genetic modifier of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Michael D.; Suh, Eunran; Grossman, Murray; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Van Swieten, John C.; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Neumann, Manuela; Gelpi, Ellen; Ghetti, Bernardino; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Halliday, Glenda; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Seilhean, Danielle; Shaw, Pamela J.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S.

    2014-01-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) have recently been linked to frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and may be the most common genetic cause of both neurodegenerative diseases. Genetic variants at TMEM106B influence risk for the most common neuropathological subtype of FTLD, characterized by inclusions of TAR DNA binding protein of 43kDa (FTLD-TDP). Previous reports have shown that TMEM106B is a genetic modifier of FTLD-TDP caused by progranulin (GRN) mutations, with the major (risk) allele of rs1990622 associating with earlier age at onset of disease. Here we report that rs1990622 genotype affects age at death in a single-site discovery cohort of FTLD patients with C9orf72 expansions (n=14), with the major allele correlated with later age at death (p=0.024). We replicate this modifier effect in a 30-site international neuropathological cohort of FTLD-TDP patients with C9orf72 expansions (n=75), again finding that the major allele associates with later age at death (p=0.016), as well as later age at onset (p=0.019). In contrast, TMEM106B genotype does not affect age at onset or death in 241 FTLD-TDP cases negative for GRN mutations or C9orf72 expansions. Thus, TMEM106B is a genetic modifier of FTLD with C9orf72 expansions. Intriguingly, the genotype that confers increased risk for developing FTLD-TDP (major, or T, allele of rs1990622) is associated with later age at onset and death in C9orf72 expansion carriers, providing an example of sign epistasis in human neurodegenerative disease. PMID:24442578

  11. Safety assessment and detection method of genetically modified Chinese Kale (Brassica oleracea cv. alboglabra ).

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Hui; Lu, Chien-Te; Lin, Hsin-Tang; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2009-03-11

    Sporamins are tuberous storage proteins and account for 80% of soluble protein in sweet potato tubers with trypsin-inhibitory activity. The expression of sporamin protein in transgenic Chinese kale (line BoA 3-1) conferred insecticidal activity toward corn earworm [ Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner)] in a previous report. In this study, we present a preliminary safety assessment of transgenic Chinese kale BoA 3-1. Bioinformatic and simulated gastric fluid (SGF) analyses were performed to evaluate the allergenicity of sporamin protein. The substantial equivalence between transgenic Chinese kale and its wild-type host has been demonstrated by the comparison of important constituents. A reliable real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection method was also developed to control sample quality. Despite the results of most evaluations in this study being negative, the safety of sporamin in transgenic Chinese kale BoA 3-1 was uncluded because of the allergenic risk revealed by bioinformatic analysis. PMID:19216530

  12. Weed control changes and genetically modified herbicide tolerant crops in the USA 1996-2012.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Crops that have been genetically modified (GM) to be tolerant to herbicides have been widely grown in the USA since 1996. The rapid and widespread adoption of this technology reflects the important economic and environmental benefits that farmers have derived from its use (equal to $21.7 billion additional farm income and a 225 million kg reduction in herbicide active ingredient use 1996-2012). During this time, weed control practices in these crops relative to the 'conventional alternative' have evolved to reflect experience of using the technology, the challenges that have arisen and the increasing focus in recent years on developing sustainable production systems. This paper examines the evidence on the changing nature of herbicides used with these crops and in particular how farmers addressed the challenge of weed resistance. The evidence shows that use of the technology has resulted in a net reduction in both the amount of herbicide used and the associated environmental impact, as measured by the EIQ indicator when compared to what can reasonably be expected if the area planted to GM HT crops reverted to conventional production methods. It also facilitated many farmers being able to derive the economic and environmental benefits associated with switching from a plough-based to a no tillage or conservation tillage production system. In terms of herbicide use, the technology has also contributed to a change the profile of herbicides used. A broad range of, mostly selective herbicides has been replaced by one or 2 broad-spectrum herbicides (mostly glyphosate) used in conjunction with one or 2 other (complementary) herbicides. Since the mid-2000s, the average amount of herbicide applied and the associated environmental load, as measured by the EIQ indicator, have increased on both GM HT and conventional crops. A primary reason for these changes has been increasing incidence of weed species developing populations resistant to herbicides and increased awareness of the consequences of relying on a single or very limited number of herbicides for weed control. As a result, growers of GM HT crops have become much more proactive and diversified in their weed management programs in line with weed scientist recommendations and now include other herbicides (with different and complementary modes of action) in combination with glyphosate, even where instances of weed resistance to glyphosate have not been found. The willingness to proactively diversity weed management systems in the GM HT crops is also influenced by a desire to maintain effective weed control and hence continue to enjoy the benefits of no tillage and conservation tillage. Nevertheless, despite the increase in herbicide use in recent years, the use of GM HT technology continues to deliver significant economic and environmental gains to US farmers. PMID:25523177

  13. Environmental impact of herbicide regimes used with genetically modified herbicide-resistant maize.

    PubMed

    Devos, Yann; Cougnon, Mathias; Vergucht, Sofie; Bulcke, Robert; Haesaert, Geert; Steurbaut, Walter; Reheul, Dirk

    2008-12-01

    With the potential advent of genetically modified herbicide-resistant (GMHR) crops in the European Union, changes in patterns of herbicide use are predicted. Broad-spectrum, non-selective herbicides used with GMHR crops are expected to substitute for a set of currently used herbicides, which might alter the agro-environmental footprint from crop production. To test this hypothesis, the environmental impact of various herbicide regimes currently used with non-GMHR maize in Belgium was calculated and compared with that of possible herbicide regimes applied in GMHR maize. Impacts on human health and the environment were calculated through the pesticide occupational and environmental risk (POCER) indicator. Results showed that the environmental impact of herbicide regimes solely relying on the active ingredients glyphosate (GLY) or glufosinate-ammonium (GLU) is lower than that of herbicide regimes applied in non-GMHR maize. Due to the lower potential of GLY and GLU to contaminate ground water and their lower acute toxicity to aquatic organisms, the POCER exceedence factor values for the environment were reduced approximately by a sixth when GLY or GLU is used alone. However, the environmental impact of novel herbicide regimes tested may be underestimated due to the assumption that active ingredients used with GMHR maize would be used alone. Data retrieved from literature suggest that weed control efficacy is increased and resistance development delayed when GLY or GLU is used together with other herbicides in the GMHR system. Due to the partial instead of complete replacement of currently used herbicide regimes, the beneficial environmental impact of novel herbicide regimes might sometimes be reduced or counterbalanced. Despite the high weed control efficacy provided by the biotechnology-based weed management strategy, neither indirect harmful effects on farmland biodiversity through losses in food resources and shelter, nor shifts in weed communities have been demonstrated in GMHR maize yet. However, with the increasing adoption rate of GMHR maize and their associated novel herbicide regimes, this situation is expected to change in the short-term. PMID:18404410

  14. The Conditional Nature of Genetic Interactions: The Consequences of Wild-Type Backgrounds on Mutational Interactions in a Genome-Wide Modifier Screen

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2013-01-01

    The phenotypic outcome of a mutation cannot be simply mapped onto the underlying DNA variant. Instead, the phenotype is a function of the allele, the genetic background in which it occurs and the environment where the mutational effects are expressed. While the influence of genetic background on the expressivity of individual mutations is recognized, its consequences on the interactions between genes, or the genetic network they form, is largely unknown. The description of genetic networks is essential for much of biology; yet if, and how, the topologies of such networks are influenced by background is unknown. Furthermore, a comprehensive examination of the background dependent nature of genetic interactions may lead to identification of novel modifiers of biological processes. Previous work in Drosophila melanogaster demonstrated that wild-type genetic background influences the effects of an allele of scalloped (sd), with respect to both its principal consequence on wing development and its interactions with a mutation in optomotor blind. In this study we address whether the background dependence of mutational interactions is a general property of genetic systems by performing a genome wide dominant modifier screen of the sdE3 allele in two wild-type genetic backgrounds using molecularly defined deletions. We demonstrate that ?74% of all modifiers of the sdE3 phenotype are background-dependent due in part to differential sensitivity to genetic perturbation. These background dependent interactions include some with qualitative differences in the phenotypic outcome, as well as instances of sign epistasis. This suggests that genetic interactions are often contingent on genetic background, with flexibility in genetic networks due to segregating variation in populations. Such background dependent effects can substantially alter conclusions about how genes influence biological processes, the potential for genetic screens in alternative wild-type backgrounds identifying new loci that contribute to trait expression, and the inferences of the topology of genetic networks. PMID:23935530

  15. The Sweet Potato Borer.

    E-print Network

    Conradi, Albert F. (Albert Frederick)

    1907-01-01

    ," however, are exceptional in the climate of Texa~. HISTORICAL. This insect was described as early. as 1798 by Fabricius. We have no record of it as a sweet potato enemy until IS57 when Nietner recorded it as attacking sweet potatoes in the island...

  16. Sweet Potato Pie Ingredients

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    , save rest for other uses. Set aside. 4. Tap egg on side on a hard surface to crack. Pull apartSweet Potato Pie Ingredients: 3 cups sweet potatoes, cooked, skin removed and mashed 3 large eggs and empty into a small bowl. Check for freshness. if it is OK, add to bowl. Repeat for remaining eggs. Beat

  17. Solanum tuberosum (Potato)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is the fourth most important food crop worldwide, with high value as a balanced and nutritious food. It is one of the world’s most productive crops. Wild potatoes are native from the southwestern United States to south-central Chile, with centers of species diversity in central Mexico and in ...

  18. Effect of Genetically Modified Pseudomonas putida WCS358r on the Fungal Rhizosphere Microflora of Field-Grown Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Glandorf, Debora C. M.; Verheggen, Patrick; Jansen, Timo; Jorritsma, Jan-Willem; Smit, Eric; Leeflang, Paula; Wernars, Karel; Thomashow, Linda S.; Laureijs, Eric; Thomas-Oates, Jane E.; Bakker, Peter A. H. M.; van Loon, Leendert C.

    2001-01-01

    We released genetically modified Pseudomonas putida WCS358r into the rhizospheres of wheat plants. The two genetically modified derivatives, genetically modified microorganism (GMM) 2 and GMM 8, carried the phz biosynthetic gene locus of strain P. fluorescens 2-79 and constitutively produced the antifungal compound phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). In the springs of 1997 and 1998 we sowed wheat seeds treated with either GMM 2, GMM 8, or WCS358r (approximately 107 CFU per seed), and measured the numbers, composition, and activities of the rhizosphere microbial populations. During both growing seasons, all three bacterial strains decreased from 107 CFU per g of rhizosphere sample to below the limit of detection (102 CFU per g) 1 month after harvest of the wheat plants. The phz genes were stably maintained, and PCA was detected in rhizosphere extracts of GMM-treated plants. In 1997, but not in 1998, fungal numbers in the rhizosphere, quantified on 2% malt extract agar (total filamentous fungi) and on Komada's medium (mainly Fusarium spp.), were transiently suppressed in GMM 8-treated plants. We also analyzed the effects of the GMMs on the rhizosphere fungi by using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. Introduction of any of the three bacterial strains transiently changed the composition of the rhizosphere fungal microflora. However, in both 1997 and 1998, GMM-induced effects were distinct from those of WCS358r and lasted for 40 days in 1997 and for 89 days after sowing in 1998, whereas effects induced by WCS358r were detectable for 12 (1997) or 40 (1998) days. None of the strains affected the metabolic activity of the soil microbial population (substrate-induced respiration), soil nitrification potential, cellulose decomposition, plant height, or plant yield. The results indicate that application of GMMs engineered to have improved antifungal activity can exert nontarget effects on the natural fungal microflora. PMID:11472906

  19. Detection of a major gene for heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin after accounting for genetic modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Thein, S.L.; Weatherall, D.J. (Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Sampietro, M.; Rohde, K.; Rochette, J.; Lathrop, G.M.; Demenais, F.

    1994-02-01

    [open quotes]Heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin[close quotes] (HPFH) is the term used to describe the genetically determined persistence of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production into adult life, in the absence of any related hematological disorder. Whereas some forms are caused by mutations in the [beta]-globin gene cluster on chromosome 11, others segregate independently. While the latter are of particular interest with respect to the regulation of globin gene switching, it has not been possible to determine their chromosomal location, mainly because their mode of inheritance is not clear, but also because several other factors are known to modify Hb F production. The authors have examined a large Asian Indian pedigree which includes individuals with heterocellular HPFH associated with [beta]-thalassemia and/or [alpha]-thalassemia. Segregation analysis was conducted on the HPFH trait FC, defined to be the percentage of Hb F-containing cells (F-cells), using the class D regressive model. The results provide evidence for the presence of a major gene, dominant or codominant, which controls the FC values with residual familial correlations. The major gene was detected when the effects of genetic modifiers, notably [beta]-thalassemia and the XmnI-[sup G][gamma] polymorphism, are accounted for in this analysis. Linkage with the [beta]-globin gene cluster is excluded. The transmission of the FC values in this pedigree is informative enough to allow detection of linkage with an appropriate marker(s). The analytical approach outlined in this study, using simple regression to allow for genetic modifiers and thus allowing the mode of inheritance of a trait to be dissected out, may be useful as a model for segregation and linkage analyses of other complex phenotypes. 39 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. A 90-day safety study in Wistar rats fed genetically modified rice expressing snowdrop lectin Galanthus nivalis (GNA).

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Morten; Kroghsbo, Stine; Schrøder, Malene; Wilcks, Andrea; Jacobsen, Helene; Miller, Andreas; Frenzel, Thomas; Danier, Jürgen; Rychlik, Michael; Shu, Qingyao; Emami, Kaveh; Sudhakar, Duraialagraja; Gatehouse, Angharad; Engel, Karl-Heinz; Knudsen, Ib

    2007-03-01

    Genetically modified plants expressing insecticidal traits offer a new strategy for crop protection, but at the same time present a challenge in terms of food safety assessment. The present 90-day feeding study was designed to assess the safety of a rice variety expressing the snowdrop Galanthus nivalis lectin (GNA lectin), and forms part of a EU-funded project where the objective has been to develop and validate sensitive and specific methods to assess the safety of genetically modified foods. Male and female Wistar rats were given a purified diet containing either 60% genetically modified or parental rice for 90 days. This corresponds to a mean daily GNA lectin intake of approximately 58 and 67mg/kg body weight for males and females, respectively. Prior to the animal study comprehensive analytical characterization of both rice materials was performed. The chemical analyses showed a number of statistically significant differences, with the majority being within the ranges reported in the literature. In the animal study a range of clinical, biological, immunological, microbiological and pathological parameters were examined. A number of significant differences were seen between groups fed the two diets, but none of them were considered to be adverse. In conclusion, the design of the present animal study did not enable us to conclude on the safety of the GM food. Additional group(s) where the expressed gene products have been spiked to the diet should be included in order to be able to distinguish whether the observed effects were due to the GNA lectin per se or to secondary changes in the GM rice. PMID:17052828

  1. Principles for the risk assessment of genetically modified microorganisms and their food products in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Jaime; Gomes, Ana R; Olaru, Irina

    2013-10-01

    Genetically modified microorganisms (GMMs) are involved in the production of a variety of food and feed. The release and consumption of these products can raise questions about health and environmental safety. Therefore, the European Union has different legislative instruments in place in order to ensure the safety of such products. A key requirement is to conduct a scientific risk assessment as a prerequisite for the product to be placed on the market. This risk assessment is performed by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), through its Scientific Panels. The EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms has published complete and comprehensive guidance for the risk assessment of GMMs and their products for food and/or feed use, in which the strategy and the criteria to conduct the assessment are explained, as well as the scientific data to be provided in applications for regulated products. This Guidance follows the main risk assessment principles developed by various international organisations (Codex Alimentarius, 2003; OECD, 2010). The assessment considers two aspects: the characterisation of the GMM and the possible effects of its modification with respect to safety, and the safety of the product itself. Due to the existing diversity of GMMs and their products, a categorisation is recommended to optimise the assessment and to determine the extent of the required data. The assessment starts with a comprehensive characterisation of the GMM, covering the recipient/parental organism, the donor(s) of the genetic material, the genetic modification, and the final GMM and its phenotype. Evaluation of the composition, potential toxicity and/or allergenicity, nutritional value and environmental impact of the product constitute further cornerstones of the process. The outcome of the assessment is reflected in a scientific opinion which indicates whether the product raises any safety issues. This opinion is taken into account by the different European regulatory authorities prior to a decision regarding authorisation to commercialise the product. PMID:23632210

  2. Enhanced matrix synthesis and in vitro formation of cartilage-like tissue by genetically modified chondrocytes expressing BMP-7.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, C; Quitoriano, M; Warren, R F; Crystal, R G

    2001-09-01

    Bone morphogenic protein-7 (BMP-7) supports ectopic cartilage and bone formation, is expressed in normal articular cartilage, and increases matrix synthesis in chondrocytes. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that an adenovirus (Ad) vector encoding human BMP-7 could be used to modify chondrocytes genetically to improve their capacity for cartilage repair. An adenovirus vector encoding BMP-7 (AdBMP-7) was constructed and its bioactivity confirmed by ectopic bone formation assay. AdBMP-7 modification of bovine chondrocytes induced expression of BMP-7 mRNA and bioactive protein, resulting in an increase in incorporation of 35SO4- into proteoglycan, 3H-proline uptake into protein, and the expression of the cartilage-specific matrix genes, aggrecan and type II collagen. An in vitro model of chondrocyte transplantation was used to demonstrate the feasibility of using genetically modified chondrocytes to enhance formation of cartilage-like tissue. When transplanted onto cartilage explants and maintained in vitro for 3 weeks, chondrocytes modified with AdBMP-7 formed 1.9-fold thicker tissue than chondrocytes modified with a control vector (P < 0.001). This tissue was positive for type II collagen and proteoglycan but negative for type X collagen and demonstrated a cartilage-like morphology. These observations suggest that Ad-mediated transfer of BMP-7 gene to chondrocytes enhances the chondrocyte-specific matrix synthesis and their capacity to form cartilage-like tissue, thus representing a strategy that may improve cell-based cartilage repair. PMID:11562118

  3. In Search of the DFNA11 Myosin VIIA (MYO7A) Low and Mid-Frequency Auditory Genetic Modifier

    PubMed Central

    Kallman, Jeremy C.; Phillips, James O.; Bramhall, Naomi F.; Kelly, John P.; Street, Valerie A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the auditory, vestibular, and retinal characteristics of a large American DFNA11 pedigree with autosomal dominant progressive sensorineural hearing loss that first impacts the low and mid-frequency auditory range. The pedigree (referred to as the HL2 family) segregates a myosinVIIA (MYO7A) mutation in exon 17 at DNA residue G2164C (MYO7AG2164C) that appears to be influenced by a genetic modifier that either rescues or exacerbates the MYO7AG2164C alteration. DNA analysis to examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two candidate modifier genes (ATP2B2 and WFS1) is summarized in this report. Study Design Family study. Results The degree of low and mid-frequency hearing loss in HL2 family members segregating the MYO7AG2164C mutation varies from mild to more severe with approximately the same number of HL2 family members falling at each end of the severity spectrum. The extent of hearing loss in HL2 individuals can vary between family generations. Differences in the degree of hearing loss in MYO7AG2164C HL2 family members may be mirrored by vestibular function in at least two of these same individuals. The SNPs examined within ATP2B2 and WFS1 did not segregate with the mild versus more severe auditory phenotype. Conclusions The severity of the auditory and vestibular phenotypes in MYO7AG2164C HL2 family members may run in parallel suggesting a common modifier gene within the inner ear. The putative MYO7AG2164C genetic modifier is likely to represent a common polymorphism that is not linked tightly to the MYO7A mutation on the MYO7A2164C allele. PMID:18667942

  4. Genetic engineering of flavonoid pigments to modify flower color in floricultural plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masahiro NishiharaTakashi Nakatsuka; Takashi Nakatsuka

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in genetic transformation techniques enable the production of desirable and novel flower colors in some important\\u000a floricultural plants. Genetic engineering of novel flower colors is now a practical technology as typified by commercialization\\u000a of a transgenic blue rose and blue carnation. Many researchers exploit knowledge of flavonoid biosynthesis effectively to\\u000a obtain unique flower colors. So far, the main

  5. 7 CFR 946.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Potatoes. 946.5 Section 946.5 ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating...Handling Definitions § 946.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all...

  6. 7 CFR 945.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Potatoes. 945.5 Section 945.5 Agriculture...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN DESIGNATED COUNTIES...Handling Definitions § 945.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties...

  7. 7 CFR 953.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Potatoes. 953.5 Section 953.5 Agriculture...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN SOUTHEASTERN STATES Order...Handling Definitions § 953.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties...

  8. 7 CFR 945.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Potatoes. 945.5 Section 945.5 Agriculture...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN DESIGNATED COUNTIES...Handling Definitions § 945.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties...

  9. 7 CFR 953.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Potatoes. 953.5 Section 953.5 Agriculture...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN SOUTHEASTERN STATES Order...Handling Definitions § 953.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties...

  10. 7 CFR 948.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Potatoes. 948.5 Section 948.5 Agriculture...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means and...

  11. 7 CFR 946.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Potatoes. 946.5 Section 946.5 ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating...Handling Definitions § 946.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all...

  12. 7 CFR 948.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Potatoes. 948.5 Section 948.5 Agriculture...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means and...

  13. 7 CFR 948.6 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 948.6 Section 948.6 Agriculture...Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.6 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes or seed means any potatoes which...

  14. 7 CFR 948.6 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 948.6 Section 948.6 Agriculture...Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.6 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes or seed means any potatoes which...

  15. 7 CFR 946.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 946.12 Section 946.12 Agriculture...Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes...

  16. 7 CFR 947.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 947.12 Section 947.12 Agriculture...Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 947.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes...

  17. 7 CFR 947.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 947.12 Section 947.12 Agriculture...Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 947.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes...

  18. 7 CFR 946.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 946.12 Section 946.12 Agriculture...Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes...

  19. 7 CFR 948.6 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 948.6 Section 948.6 Agriculture...Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.6 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes or seed means any potatoes which...

  20. 7 CFR 947.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 947.12 Section 947.12 Agriculture...Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 947.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes...

  1. 7 CFR 946.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 946.12 Section 946.12 Agriculture...Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes...

  2. Comparative safety testing of genetically modified foods in a 90-day rat feeding study design allowing the distinction between primary and secondary effects of the new genetic event.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Ib; Poulsen, Morten

    2007-10-01

    This article discusses the wider experiences regarding the usefulness of the 90-day rat feeding study for the testing of whole foods from genetically modified (GM) plant based on data from a recent EU-project [Poulsen, M., Schrøder, M., Wilcks, A., Kroghsbo, S., Lindecrona, R.H., Miller, A., Frenzel, T., Danier, J., Rychlik, M., Shu, Q., Emami, K., Taylor, M., Gatehouse, A., Engel, K.-H., Knudsen, I., 2007a. Safety testing of GM-rice expressing PHA-E lectin using a new animal test design. Food Chem. Toxicol. 45, 364-377; Poulsen, M., Kroghsbo, S., Schrøder, M., Wilcks, A., Jacobsen, H., Miller, A., Frenzel, T., Danier, J., Rychlik, M., Shu, Q., Emami, K., Sudhakar, D., Gatehouse, A., Engel, K.-H., Knudsen, I., 2007b. A 90-day safety in Wistar rats fed genetically modified rice expressing snowdrop lectin Galanthus nivalis (GNA). Food Chem. Toxicol. 45, 350-363; Schrøder, M., Poulsen, M., Wilcks, A., Kroghsbo, S., Miller, A., Frenzel, T., Danier, J., Rychlik, M., Emami, K., Gatehouse, A., Shu, Q., Engel, K.-H., Knudsen, I., 2007. A 90-day safety study of genetically modified rice expressing Cry1Ab protein (Bacillus thuringiensis toxin) in Wistar rats. Food Chem. Toxicol. 45, 339-349]. The overall objective of the project has been to develop and validate the scientific methodology necessary for assessing the safety of foods from genetically modified plants in accordance with the present EU regulation. The safety assessment in the project is combining the results of the 90-day rat feeding study on the GM food with and without spiking with the pure novel gene product, with the knowledge about the identity of the genetic change, the compositional data of the GM food, the results from in-vitro/ex-vivo studies as well as the results from the preceding 28-day toxicity study with the novel gene product, before the hazard characterisation is concluded. The results demonstrated the ability of the 90-day rat feeding study to detect the biological/toxicological effects of the new gene product in the GM food. The authors consider on this basis that the 90-day, rodent feeding study with one high dose level and a dietary design based upon compositional data on the GM food and toxicity data on the gene product is sensitive and specific enough to verify the presence/absence of the biological/nutritional/toxicological effects of the novel gene insert and further by the use of spiking able to separate potentially unintended effects of the novel gene product from other unintended effects at the level of intake defined in the test and within the remit of the test. Recommendations for further work necessary in the field are given. PMID:17719159

  3. The effect of photoperiod on tuberization in cultivated x wild potato species hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild Solanum species offer a valuable source of genetic diversity for potato improvement. Most of these species are found in equatorial South and Central America and they do not tuberize under long day photoperiods typical of those in the major potato production areas of North America, Europe and As...

  4. The perfect host: a mouse host embryo facilitating more efficient germ line transmission of genetically modified embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Taft, Robert A; Low, Benjamin E; Byers, Shannon L; Murray, Stephen A; Kutny, Peter; Wiles, Michael V

    2013-01-01

    There is a continual need to improve efficiency in creating precise genetic modifications in mice using embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We describe a novel approach resulting in 100% germline transmission from competent injected ESCs. We developed an F1 mouse host embryo (Perfect Host, PH) that selectively ablates its own germ cells via tissue-specific induction of diphtheria toxin. This approach allows competent microinjected ESCs to fully dominate the germline, eliminating competition for this critical niche in the developing and adult animal. This is in contrast to conventional methods, where competition from host germ cells results in offspring derived from host cells and ESCs, necessitating extensive breeding of chimeras and genotyping to identify germline. The germline transmission process is also complicated by variability in the actual number of ESCs that colonize the germline niche and the proportion that are germline competent. To validate the PH approach we used ESC lines derived from 129 F1, BALB/cByJ, and BTBR backgrounds as well as an iPS line. Resulting chimeric males produced 194 offspring, all paternally derived from the introduced stem cells, with no offspring being derived from the host genome. We further tested this approach using eleven genetically modified C57BL/6N ESC lines (International Knockout Mouse Consortium). ESC germline transmission was observed in 9/11 (82%) lines using PH blastocysts, compared to 6/11 (55%) when conventional host blastocysts were used. Furthermore, less than 35% (83/240) of mice born in the first litters from conventional chimeras were confirmed to be of ESC-origin. By comparison, 100% (137/137) of the first litter offspring of PH chimeras were confirmed as ESC-derived. Together, these data demonstrate that the PH approach increases the probability of germline transmission and speeds the generation of ESC derived animals from chimeras. Collectively, this approach reduces the time and costs inherent in the production of genetically modified animals. PMID:23844102

  5. The Perfect Host: A Mouse Host Embryo Facilitating More Efficient Germ Line Transmission of Genetically Modified Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Taft, Robert A.; Low, Benjamin E.; Byers, Shannon L.; Murray, Stephen A.; Kutny, Peter; Wiles, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    There is a continual need to improve efficiency in creating precise genetic modifications in mice using embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We describe a novel approach resulting in 100% germline transmission from competent injected ESCs. We developed an F1 mouse host embryo (Perfect Host, PH) that selectively ablates its own germ cells via tissue-specific induction of diphtheria toxin. This approach allows competent microinjected ESCs to fully dominate the germline, eliminating competition for this critical niche in the developing and adult animal. This is in contrast to conventional methods, where competition from host germ cells results in offspring derived from host cells and ESCs, necessitating extensive breeding of chimeras and genotyping to identify germline. The germline transmission process is also complicated by variability in the actual number of ESCs that colonize the germline niche and the proportion that are germline competent. To validate the PH approach we used ESC lines derived from 129 F1, BALB/cByJ, and BTBR backgrounds as well as an iPS line. Resulting chimeric males produced 194 offspring, all paternally derived from the introduced stem cells, with no offspring being derived from the host genome. We further tested this approach using eleven genetically modified C57BL/6N ESC lines (International Knockout Mouse Consortium). ESC germline transmission was observed in 9/11 (82%) lines using PH blastocysts, compared to 6/11 (55%) when conventional host blastocysts were used. Furthermore, less than 35% (83/240) of mice born in the first litters from conventional chimeras were confirmed to be of ESC-origin. By comparison, 100% (137/137) of the first litter offspring of PH chimeras were confirmed as ESC-derived. Together, these data demonstrate that the PH approach increases the probability of germline transmission and speeds the generation of ESC derived animals from chimeras. Collectively, this approach reduces the time and costs inherent in the production of genetically modified animals. PMID:23844102

  6. Creation of a Metabolic Sink for Tryptophan Alters the Phenylpropanoid Pathway and the Susceptibility of Potato to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed Central

    Yao, K.; De Luca, V.; Brisson, N.

    1995-01-01

    The creation of artificial metabolic sinks in plants by genetic engineering of key branch points may have serious consequences for the metabolic pathways being modified. The introduction into potato of a gene encoding tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) isolated from Catharanthus roseus drastically altered the balance of key substrate and product pools involved in the shikimate and phenylpropanoid pathways. Transgenic potato tubers expressing the TDC gene accumulated tryptamine, the immediate decarboxylation product of the TDC reaction. The redirection of tryptophan into tryptamine also resulted in a dramatic decrease in the levels of tryptophan, phenylalanine, and phenylalanine-derived phenolic compounds in transgenic tubers compared with nontransformed controls. In particular, wound-induced accumulation of chlorogenic acid, the major soluble phenolic ester in potato tubers, was found to be two- to threefold lower in transgenic tubers. Thus, the synthesis of polyphenolic compounds, such as lignin, was reduced due to the limited availability of phenolic monomers. Treatment of tuber discs with arachidonic acid, an elicitor of the defense response, led to a dramatic accumulation of soluble and cell wall-bound phenolics in tubers of untransformed potato plants but not in transgenic tubers. The transgenic tubers were also more susceptible to infection after inoculation with zoospores of Phytophthora infestans, which could be attributed to the modified cell wall of these plants. This study provides strong evidence that the synthesis and accumulation of phenolic compounds, including lignin, could be regulated by altering substrate availability through the introduction of a single gene outside the pathway involved in substrate supply. This study also indicates that phenolics, such as chlorogenic acid, play a critical role in defense responses of plants to fungal attack. PMID:12242360

  7. Growing Potatoes in Your Home Garden

    E-print Network

    Douches, David S.

    Growing Potatoes in Your Home Garden A Guide to Growing Potatoes In Your Home Garden Yes potatoes immigrants brought the potato with them to the New World. Have you ever grown potatoes in your garden? Growing potatoes is fun and not that hard! Home gardeners can grow unique varieties that are not sold

  8. HOW DO THE RUSSIAN CITIZENS OF DMITROV HILLS CONCEPTUALIZE GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Curtis R. Friedel; Courtney A. Meyers; Nadezhda N. Mamontova; Tracy A. Irani

    The purpose of agricultural biotechnology is to address challenges producers face in the production of food. Through genetic modification, crops have been developed that are resistant to drought, heat, insects, and diseases. Despite varying opinions toward GM foods in and among different countries, the production of GM crops continues to increase. Russia's official stance on agricultural biotechnology has been inconsistent.

  9. A Modified Compact Genetic Algorithm For The Intrinsic Evolution Of Continuous Time Recurrent Neural Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John C. Gallagher; Saranyan Vigraham

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Inthe past, we have extrinsically evolved continuous time recurrent neural networks ,(CTRNNs) to control physical processes. Currently, we are seeking to create intrinsic CTRNN devices that combine ,a hardware ge- netic algorithm ,engine ,on the ,same ,chip ,with reconfigurable analog VLSI neurons. A necessary step in this process is to identify a genetic algorithm that is both amenable,to hardware

  10. Covering Chemical Diversity of Genetically-Modified Tomatoes Using Metabolomics for Objective Substantial Equivalence Assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miyako Kusano; Henning Redestig; Tadayoshi Hirai; Akira Oikawa; Fumio Matsuda; Atsushi Fukushima; Masanori Arita; Shin Watanabe; Megumu Yano; Kyoko Hiwasa-Tanase; Hiroshi Ezura; Kazuki Saito; Alfredo Herrera-Estrella

    2011-01-01

    As metabolomics can provide a biochemical snapshot of an organism's phenotype it is a promising approach for charting the unintended effects of genetic modification. A critical obstacle for this application is the inherently limited metabolomic coverage of any single analytical platform. We propose using multiple analytical platforms for the direct acquisition of an interpretable data set of estimable chemical diversity.

  11. Genetics and Breeding for Modified Fatty Acid Profile in Soybean Seed Oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] oil is versatile and used in many products. Modifying the fatty acid profile would make soy oil more functional in food and other products. The ideal oil with the most end uses would have saturates (palmitic + stearic acids) reduced from 15 to < 7%, oleic acid increa...

  12. Genetic Variation for Shelf-life of Salad-cut Lettuce in Modified-atmosphere Environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Minimally processed lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is an important component of the lettuce industry. The product is highly perishable; cold storage and modified atmosphere (MA) packaging are used to extend its shelf-life. Given the importance of this market, lettuce cultivars, breeding lines, and pop...

  13. Recent progress on environmental biosafety assessment of genetically modified trees and floricultural plants in Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akira Kikuchi; Kazuo Watanabe; Yoshikazu Tanaka; Hiroshi Kamada

    A broad spectrum of living modified organisms (LMOs) have been developed and commercial production of them have already been started. It is the global requirement to conduct environmental biosafety after the implementation of Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety. Environmental biosafety assessment is of cardinal importance even in confined field trials and at the deliberate release to an environment for practical uses.

  14. Antioxidants in potato

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R. Brown

    2005-01-01

    The content of compounds in potato that may act as antioxidants in the human diet is not widely appreciated. Carotenoids are\\u000a present in the flesh of all potatoes. The contents mentioned in the literature range from 50 to 100 ?g per 100 g fresh weight\\u000a (FW) in white-fleshed varieties to 2000 ?g per 100 g FW in deeply yellow to

  15. Effect of Dose and Administration Period of Seed Cake of Genetically Modified and Non-Modified Flax on Selected Antioxidative Activities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matusiewicz, Magdalena; Kosieradzka, Iwona; Zuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Flaxseed cake containing antioxidants is a valuable dietary component. Its nutritional effect may be diminished by the presence of anti-nutrients. The work was aimed at determining the effect of different contents of flaxseed cake in diets and their administration period on the development of rats and selected parameters of their health status. Diets with 15% and 30% addition of genetically modified (GM) flax seed cake with enhanced synthesis of polyphenols, as well as Linola non-GM flax were administered in short-term (33 days) and long-term (90 days) experiments. The 30% addition of flaxseed cake reduced digestibility of dietary nutrients, GM flaxseed cake lowered body weight gains. The relative weight of selected organs, hematological blood markers and serum activities of aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST, ALT) were not affected. Flaxseed cake consumption reduced serum concentration of albumins and increased globulins. Administration of 30% flaxseed cake improved plasma total antioxidant status and 30% GM flaxseed cake lowered liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. The activities of superoxide dismutase in erythrocytes, glutathione peroxidase in plasma and the liver concentration of 8-oxo-2?-deoxyguanosine were not changed. Most morphometric parameters of the small intestine did not differ between feeding groups. The administration of diets with 30% addition of flaxseed cake for 90 days improved the antioxidant status in rats. PMID:26110393

  16. Effect of Dose and Administration Period of Seed Cake of Genetically Modified and Non-Modified Flax on Selected Antioxidative Activities in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matusiewicz, Magdalena; Kosieradzka, Iwona; Zuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Flaxseed cake containing antioxidants is a valuable dietary component. Its nutritional effect may be diminished by the presence of anti-nutrients. The work was aimed at determining the effect of different contents of flaxseed cake in diets and their administration period on the development of rats and selected parameters of their health status. Diets with 15% and 30% addition of genetically modified (GM) flax seed cake with enhanced synthesis of polyphenols, as well as Linola non-GM flax were administered in short-term (33 days) and long-term (90 days) experiments. The 30% addition of flaxseed cake reduced digestibility of dietary nutrients, GM flaxseed cake lowered body weight gains. The relative weight of selected organs, hematological blood markers and serum activities of aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST, ALT) were not affected. Flaxseed cake consumption reduced serum concentration of albumins and increased globulins. Administration of 30% flaxseed cake improved plasma total antioxidant status and 30% GM flaxseed cake lowered liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. The activities of superoxide dismutase in erythrocytes, glutathione peroxidase in plasma and the liver concentration of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine were not changed. Most morphometric parameters of the small intestine did not differ between feeding groups. The administration of diets with 30% addition of flaxseed cake for 90 days improved the antioxidant status in rats. PMID:26110393

  17. Chromosome 4q25 variants are genetic modifiers of rare ion channel mutations associated with familial atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rowan, Shane; Kucera, Gayle; Stubblefield, Tanya; Blair, Marcia; Roden, Dan M; Darbar, Dawood

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study tested the hypothesis that two common polymorphisms in the chromosome 4q25 region that have been associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) contribute to the variable penetrance of familial AF. Background Although mutations in ion channels, gap junction proteins, and signaling molecules have been described for Mendelian forms of AF, penetrance is highly variable. Recent studies have consistently identified 2 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the chromosome 4q25 region as independent AF susceptibility alleles. Methods We studied 11 families in which AF was present in ?2 individuals who also shared a candidate gene mutation. These mutations were identified in all subjects with familial lone AF (n=33) as well as apparently unaffected family members (age >50 yrs with no AF; n=17). Results Mutations were identified in SCN5A (n=6); NPPA (n=2); KCNQ1 (n=1); KCNA5 (n=1) and NKX2.5 (n=1). In genetic association analyses, un-stratified and stratified according to age of onset of AF and unaffected age > 50 yrs, there was a highly statistically significant association between the presence of both common (rs2200733, rs10033464) as well as rare variants and AF (un-stratified P=1×10?8; stratified [age of onset <50 yrs and unaffected age >50 yrs], P=7.6×10?5) (un-stratified P<0.0001; stratified [age of onset <50 yrs and unaffected age >50 yrs], P<0.0001). Genetic association analyses showed that the presence of common 4q25 risk alleles predicted whether carriers of rare mutations developed AF (P = 2.2×10?4). Conclusions Common AF-associated 4q25 polymorphisms modify the clinical expression of latent cardiac ion channel and signaling molecule gene mutations associated with familial AF. These findings support the idea that the genetic architecture of AF is complex and includes both rare and common genetic variants. PMID:22818067

  18. Exploring Genetic Factors Involved in Huntington Disease Age of Onset: E2F2 as a New Potential Modifier Gene

    PubMed Central

    Valcárcel-Ocete, Leire; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Iriondo, Mikel; Fullaondo, Asier; García-Barcina, María; Fernández-García, José Manuel; Lezcano-García, Elena; Losada-Domingo, José María; Ruiz-Ojeda, Javier; Álvarez de Arcaya, Amaia; Pérez-Ramos, José María; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Nielsen, Jørgen E.; Saft, Carsten; Zubiaga, Ana M.; Aguirre, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Age of onset (AO) of Huntington disease (HD) is mainly determined by the length of the CAG repeat expansion (CAGexp) in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Additional genetic variation has been suggested to contribute to AO, although the mechanism by which it could affect AO is presently unknown. The aim of this study is to explore the contribution of candidate genetic factors to HD AO in order to gain insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disorder. For that purpose, two AO definitions were used: the earliest age with unequivocal signs of HD (earliest AO or eAO), and the first motor symptoms age (motor AO or mAO). Multiple linear regression analyses were performed between genetic variation within 20 candidate genes and eAO or mAO, using DNA and clinical information of 253 HD patients from REGISTRY project. Gene expression analyses were carried out by RT-qPCR with an independent sample of 35 HD patients from Basque Country Hospitals. We found suggestive association signals between HD eAO and/or mAO and genetic variation within the E2F2, ATF7IP, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, LINC01559, HIP1 and GRIK2 genes. Among them, the most significant was the association between eAO and rs2742976, mapping to the promoter region of E2F2 transcription factor. Furthermore, rs2742976 T allele patient carriers exhibited significantly lower lymphocyte E2F2 gene expression, suggesting a possible implication of E2F2-dependent transcriptional activity in HD pathogenesis. Thus, E2F2 emerges as a new potential HD AO modifier factor. PMID:26148071

  19. International Potato Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    With headquarters in La Molina, Peru, the International Potato Center seeks to reduce poverty and achieve food security through research activities on not only the potato, but also on the sweet potato, and other root and tuber crops. The Center has a staff of scientists from 25 countries working on these pressing topics, and visitors with like-minded interests will appreciate the diversity of materials offered on the site. The site has a number of sections, and those dedicated to the potato and the sweet potato are most deserving of a visit. Within each of these sections, visitors can learn about each crop, its conservation, the pests and diseases that threaten each one, and a wide array of related statistics. It should be noted that the homepage itself is a great source of updated news reports on these plants, and recent items have included information on new growing techniques for potatoes (such as aeroponics, which involves suspending tubers) and the nutritional benefits of these plants.

  20. Genotypic and Environmental Impact on Natural Variation of Nutrient Composition in 50 Non Genetically Modified Commercial Maize Hybrids in North America.

    PubMed

    Cong, Bin; Maxwell, Carl; Luck, Stanley; Vespestad, Deanne; Richard, Keith; Mickelson, James; Zhong, Cathy

    2015-06-10

    This study was designed to assess natural variation in composition and metabolites in 50 genetically diverse non genetically modified maize hybrids grown at six locations in North America. Results showed that levels of compositional components in maize forage were affected by environment more than genotype. Crude protein, all amino acids except lysine, manganese, and ?-carotene in maize grain were affected by environment more than genotype; however, most proximates and fibers, all fatty acids, lysine, most minerals, vitamins, and secondary metabolites in maize grain were affected by genotype more than environment. A strong interaction between genotype and environment was seen for some analytes. The results could be used as reference values for future nutrient composition studies of genetically modified crops and to expand conventional compositional data sets. These results may be further used as a genetic basis for improvement of the nutritional value of maize grain by molecular breeding and biotechnology approaches. PMID:25971869

  1. Biodiversity and Optimal Policies Towards R&D and the Growth of Genetically Modified Crops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alistair Ulph; Lucy O'Shea

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we provide a simple model illustrating the possible nature ofgovernment policy with regards to genetic modification,\\u000a taking into accountits impact on the environment. We show that it is necessary not only tointervene in the growing of crops,\\u000a but also to intervene in R&D througha tax on the adoption of new GM technology. Without intervention at bothlevels, both

  2. A novel 16p locus associated with BSCL2 hereditary motor neuronopathy: a genetic modifier?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esther Brusse; Danielle Majoor-Krakauer; Bianca M. de Graaf; Gerhard H. Visser; Sigrid Swagemakers; Agnita J. W. Boon; Ben A. Oostra; Aida M. Bertoli-Avella

    2009-01-01

    We describe the neurological, electrophysiological, and genetic features of autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuronopathy\\u000a (HMN) in a three-generation Dutch family, including 12 patients with distal muscle weakness and atrophy. The severity of disease\\u000a ranged from disabling muscle weakness to a subclinical phenotype. Neurologic exams of nine patients and nerve conduction studies\\u000a (NCS) and myography in five endorsed the variable

  3. Integration of Insect-Resistant Genetically Modified Crops within IPM Programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George G. Kennedy

    Although host plant resistance has long been an important insect management tactic, its wide-spread use has been constrained\\u000a by the limited availability of elite cultivars possessing high levels of resistance to key pest species. The application of\\u000a recombinant DNA technology to genetically engineer insect-resistant crop plants has provided a way to eliminate this constraint\\u000a and make host plant resistance a

  4. Genetically modified lactic acid bacteria: applications to food or health and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Renault, Pierre

    2002-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have a long history of use in fermented food products. Progress in gene technology allows their modification by introducing new genes or by modifying their metabolic functions. These modifications may lead to improvements in food technology (bacteria better fitted to technological processes, leading to improved organoleptic properties em leader ), or to new applications including bacteria producing therapeutic molecules that could be delivered by mouth. Examples in these two fields will be discussed, at the same time evaluating their potential benefit to society and the possible risks associated with their use. Risk assessment and expected benefits will determine the future use of modified bacteria in the domains of food technology and health. PMID:12595135

  5. Colorado potato beetle resistance management strategies for transgenic potatoes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Casey W. Hoy

    1999-01-01

    NewLeaf potatoes could provide substantial ecological and economic benefits to potato growers. A concern with NewLeaf potatoes,\\u000a however, is that Colorado potato beetle may develop resistance to the Bt endotoxin because of the intense selection pressure\\u000a imposed by its constant presence in the transgenic crop. Before these cultivars were released, however, entomologists throughout\\u000a North America conducted biological research needed for

  6. Immunotherapy targeting HER2 with genetically modified T cells eliminates tumor-initiating cells in osteosarcoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N Rainusso; V S Brawley; A Ghazi; M J Hicks; S Gottschalk; J M Rosen; N Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Despite radical surgery and multi-agent chemotherapy, less than one third of patients with recurrent or metastatic osteosarcoma (OS) survive. The limited efficacy of current therapeutic approaches to target tumor-initiating cells (TICs) may explain this dismal outcome. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of modified T cells expressing a human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-specific chimeric antigen

  7. Plant-mediated RNA interference of effector gene Mc16D10L confers resistance against Meloidogyne chitwoodi in diverse genetic backgrounds of potato and reduces pathogenicity of nematode offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meloidogyne chitwoodi is a major problem for potato production in the Pacific Northwest of the USA. In spite of long-term breeding efforts no commercial potato cultivars with resistance to M. chitwoodi exist to date. The RMc1 resistance gene against M. chitwoodi has been introgressed from Solanum bu...

  8. Organic potato production – seed potato production and participatory variety trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes are vegetatively propagated, thus many pathogens can be transmitted in seed potatoes and affect the subsequent crop. Certified seed potatoes, which are inspected to ensure that pathogen levels are below a specified threshold, provide effective control of most tuber-borne diseases. Organic g...

  9. Easy Gardening.....Irish Potatoes

    E-print Network

    McGraw, Dean; Masabni, Joseph

    2009-05-17

    Easy Gardening Joseph Masabni, Assistant Professor and Extension Horticulturist, The Texas A&M University System IRISH POTATOES ? IRISH POTATOES ? IRISH POTA - -1- I rishpotatoesareoneofAmerica?smost popularvegetables?theaverageAmeri- caneatsabout...

  10. Rapeseed species and environmental concerns related to loss of seeds of genetically modified oilseed rape in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Toru; Tamaoki, Masanori; Aono, Mitsuko; Kubo, Akihiro; Saji, Hikaru; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Feral rapeseed in Japan consists of Brassica rapa, B. juncea and B. napus, mostly produced by escape from crops. Brassica rapa and B. juncea were introduced from abroad long ago as leaf and root vegetables and as an oil crop and breeders have developed various cultivars. Brassica napus was introduced in the late 1800s, mainly as an oil crop. Rapeseed production in Japan is low, and most demand is met by imports from Canada (94.4% of the 2009 trade volume). Recently, spontaneous B. napus, including genetically modified (GM) herbicide-resistant individuals, has been detected along Japanese roads, probably originating from seeds lost during transportation of imports. As GM oilseed production increases abroad, the probability of escape of GM oilseed rape in Japan will increase, raising environmental biosafety concerns related to the impact of feral rapeseed on heirloom brassicaceous crops. In this paper, we review the history of rapeseed introduction in Japan and future concerns. PMID:21844669

  11. Maternal and fetal exposure to pesticides associated to genetically modified foods in Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Aris, Aziz; Leblanc, Samuel

    2011-05-01

    Pesticides associated to genetically modified foods (PAGMF), are engineered to tolerate herbicides such as glyphosate (GLYP) and gluphosinate (GLUF) or insecticides such as the bacterial toxin bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between maternal and fetal exposure, and to determine exposure levels of GLYP and its metabolite aminomethyl phosphoric acid (AMPA), GLUF and its metabolite 3-methylphosphinicopropionic acid (3-MPPA) and Cry1Ab protein (a Bt toxin) in Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada. Blood of thirty pregnant women (PW) and thirty-nine nonpregnant women (NPW) were studied. Serum GLYP and GLUF were detected in NPW and not detected in PW. Serum 3-MPPA and CryAb1 toxin were detected in PW, their fetuses and NPW. This is the first study to reveal the presence of circulating PAGMF in women with and without pregnancy, paving the way for a new field in reproductive toxicology including nutrition and utero-placental toxicities. PMID:21338670

  12. Deconstructing a Plant Macromolecular Assembly: Chemical Architecture, Molecular Flexibility, And Mechanical Performance of Natural and Engineered Potato Suberins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Periderms present in plant barks are essential protective barriers to water diffusion, mechanical breakdown, and pathogenic invasion. They consist of densely packed layers of dead cells with cell walls that are embedded with suberin. Understanding the interplay of molecular structure, dynamics, and biomechanics in these cell wall-associated insoluble amorphous polymeric assemblies presents substantial investigative challenges. We report solid-state NMR coordinated with FT-IR and tensile strength measurements for periderms from native and wound-healing potatoes and from potatoes with genetically modified suberins. The analyses include the intact suberin aromatic–aliphatic polymer and cell-wall polysaccharides, previously reported soluble depolymerized transmethylation products, and undegraded residues including suberan. Wound-healing suberized potato cell walls, which are 2 orders of magnitude more permeable to water than native periderms, display a strikingly enhanced hydrophilic–hydrophobic balance, a degradation-resistant aromatic domain, and flexibility suggestive of an altered supramolecular organization in the periderm. Suppression of ferulate ester formation in suberin and associated wax remodels the periderm with more flexible aliphatic chains and abundant aromatic constituents that can resist transesterification, attenuates cooperative hydroxyfatty acid motions, and produces a mechanically compromised and highly water-permeable periderm. PMID:24502663

  13. A new PCR-CGE (size and color) method for simultaneous detection of genetically modified maize events.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Anna; Coll, Anna; La Paz, Jose-Luis; Esteve, Teresa; Pla, Maria

    2006-10-01

    We present a novel multiplex PCR assay for simultaneous detection of multiple transgenic events in maize. Initially, five PCR primers pairs specific to events Bt11, GA21, MON810, and NK603, and Zea mays L. (alcohol dehydrogenase) were included. The event specificity was based on amplification of transgene/plant genome flanking regions, i.e., the same targets as for validated real-time PCR assays. These short and similarly sized amplicons were selected to achieve high and similar amplification efficiency for all targets; however, its unambiguous identification was a technical challenge. We achieved a clear distinction by a novel CGE approach that combined the identification by size and color (CGE-SC). In one single step, all five targets were amplified and specifically labeled with three different fluorescent dyes. The assay was specific and displayed an LOD of 0.1% of each genetically modified organism (GMO). Therefore, it was adequate to fulfill legal thresholds established, e.g., in the European Union. Our CGE-SC based strategy in combination with an adequate labeling design has the potential to simultaneously detect higher numbers of targets. As an example, we present the detection of up to eight targets in a single run. Multiplex PCR-CGE-SC only requires a conventional sequencer device and enables automation and high throughput. In addition, it proved to be transferable to a different laboratory. The number of authorized GMO events is rapidly growing; and the acreage of genetically modified (GM) varieties cultivated and commercialized worldwide is rapidly increasing. In this context, our multiplex PCR-CGE-SC can be suitable for screening GM contents in food. PMID:16972302

  14. Ubiquitin promoter-terminator cassette promotes genetically stable expression of the taste-modifying protein miraculin in transgenic lettuce.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Tadayoshi; Shohael, Abdullah Mohammad; Kim, You-Wang; Yano, Megumu; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    Lettuce is a commercially important leafy vegetable that is cultivated worldwide, and it is also a target crop for plant factories. In this study, lettuce was selected as an alternative platform for recombinant miraculin production because of its fast growth, agronomic value, and wide availability. The taste-modifying protein miraculin is a glycoprotein extracted from the red berries of the West African native shrub Richadella dulcifica. Because of its limited natural availability, many attempts have been made to produce this protein in suitable alternative hosts. We produced transgenic lettuce with miraculin gene driven either by the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette from lettuce or a 35S promoter/nos terminator cassette. Miraculin gene expression and miraculin accumulation in both cassettes were compared by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression level of the miraculin gene and protein in transgenic lettuce was higher and more genetically stable in the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette than in the 35S promoter/nos terminator cassette. These results demonstrated that the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette is an efficient platform for the genetically stable expression of the miraculin protein in lettuce and hence this platform is of benefit for recombinant miraculin production on a commercial scale. PMID:21830129

  15. Current Review of Genetically Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria for the Prevention and Treatment of Colitis Using Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Miyoshi, Anderson; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) are disorders of the gastrointestinal tract characterized by recurrent inflammation that requires lifelong treatments. Probiotic microorganisms appear as an alternative for these patients; however, probiotic characteristics are strain dependent and each probiotic needs to be tested to understand the underlining mechanisms involved in their beneficial properties. Genetic modification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was also described as a tool for new IBD treatments. The first part of this review shows different genetically modified LAB (GM-LAB) described for IBD treatment since 2000. Then, the two principally studied strategies are discussed (i) GM-LAB producing antioxidant enzymes and (ii) GM-LAB producing the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Different delivery systems, including protein delivery and DNA delivery, will also be discussed. Studies show the efficacy of GM-LAB (using different expression systems) for the prevention and treatment of IBD, highlighting the importance of the bacterial strain selection (with anti-inflammatory innate properties) as a promising alternative. These microorganisms could be used in the near future for the development of therapeutic products with anti-inflammatory properties that can improve the quality of life of IBD patients.

  16. Engineering of vascular grafts with genetically modified bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on poly (propylene carbonate) graft.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Qi, Hongxu; Wang, Hongjun; Hu, Ping; Ou, Lailiang; Guo, Shuhua; Li, Jing; Che, Yongzhe; Yu, Yaoting; Kong, Deling

    2006-12-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have demonstrated their pluripotency to differentiate into different cell lineages and may be an alternative cell source for vascular tissue engineering. The objective of this study is to create small diameter vessels by seeding and culture of genetically modified MSCs onto a synthetic polymer scaffold produced by an electrospinning technique. A tubular scaffold (2 mm in diameter) with a microstructure of nonwoven fibers was produced by electrospinning of poly (propylene carbonate) (PPC). Rat MSCs obtained from bone marrow were expanded in culture and modified with vasculoprotective gene endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) or marker gene green fluorescent protein (GFP). These MSCs were seeded onto the electrospun fibrous grafts (internal diameter = 2 mm), and cultured in 5% CO(2) at 37 degrees C. The growth of MSCs in the scaffold was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The gene transfer and transgenic gene expression were examined with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), immunochemical staining, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and western blot. The production of nitric oxide (NO) by the engineered vessels was measured with an NO detection kit. Our data showed that the seeded cells integrated with the microfibers of the scaffold to form a three-dimensional cellular network, indicating a favorable interaction between this synthetic PPC scaffold with MSCs. High transduction efficiency was obtained with the use of concentrated retrovirus in the gene transfection of MSCs. The eNOS gene transcripts and protein were detected in the grafts seeded with eNOS-modified MSCs by RT-PCR and immunochemical staining. The amount of NO produced by grafts seeded with eNOS-modified MSCs was comparable to that produced by native blood vessels, and it was significantly higher than that in the grafts seeded with nonmodified MSCs. In summary, the vascular graft produced by culture of eNOS gene-modified MSCs onto the electrospun tubular scaffolds shows promising results in terms of function. The use of MSCs and therapeutic genes in tissue engineering of blood vessels could be helpful in improving vessel regeneration and patency. PMID:17181830

  17. Biosafety testing of genetically modified ryegrass (Lolium perenne) using a model for the optimum selection of test invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Barratt, B I P; Todd, J H; Ferguson, C M; Crook, K; Burgess, E P J; Barraclough, E I; Malone, L A

    2013-08-01

    Selection of test species for use in biosafety evaluation of genetically modified plants is challenging but important, as regulators in many jurisdictions require tests to determine the potential for adverse environmental impacts before the release of plants into the environment. This contribution provides an example of an evidence-based process whereby species from the receiving environment can be ranked in order of susceptibility to potential impact, and guide test species selection. The case study used for this example was ryegrass, a forage plant, which had been modified to produce elevated levels of the lipid triacylglyceride. The previously described priority ranking of nontarget invertebrates model (PRONTI), designed to rank invertebrates for biosafety testing, has been adapted for use with these plants, which could, potentially, be beneficial to invertebrate populations, and applied to data on 246 known pasture invertebrate species. The output from the model for the top 20 ranked pasture invertebrate species is discussed, the attributes of these are considered along with the level of uncertainty in the information used. Consideration is given to how the model output can be interpreted and used in a biosafety risk assessment. While some subjectivity is involved in establishing the scores, all invertebrate species are subjected to the same analysis, and treated equally. In this way, regulators have a method of a risk assessment that is evidence-based, and transparent in its assumptions thereby avoiding potential for bias. PMID:23905747

  18. Intake levels of dietary long-chain PUFAs modify the association between genetic variation in FADS and LDL-C.

    PubMed

    Hellstrand, S; Sonestedt, E; Ericson, U; Gullberg, B; Wirfält, E; Hedblad, B; Orho-Melander, M

    2012-06-01

    Polymorphisms of the FA desaturase (FADS) gene cluster have been associated with LDL, HDL, and triglyceride concentrations. Because FADS converts ?-linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid into PUFAs, we investigated the interaction between different PUFA intakes and the FADS polymorphism rs174547 (T>C) on fasting blood lipid and lipoprotein concentrations. We included 4,635 individuals (60% females, 45-68 years) from the Swedish population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort. Dietary intakes were assessed by a modified diet history method including 7-day registration of cooked meals. The C-allele of rs174547 was associated with lower LDL concentration (P = 0.03). We observed significant interaction between rs174547 and long-chain ?-3 PUFA intakes on LDL (P = 0.01); the C-allele was only associated with lower LDL among individuals in the lowest tertile of long-chain ?-3 PUFA intakes (P < 0.001). In addition, significant interaction was observed between rs174547 and the ratio of ALA and linoleic FA intakes on HDL (P = 0.03). However, no significant associations between the C-allele and HDL were detected within the intake tertiles of the ratio. Our findings suggest that dietary intake levels of different PUFAs modify the associated effect of genetic variation in FADS on LDL and HDL. PMID:22451038

  19. A Novel Hybrid Classification Model of Genetic Algorithms, Modified k-Nearest Neighbor and Developed Backpropagation Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Nader; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Najafi, Farid; Nallappan, Meenakshii; Karishnarajah, Isthrinayagy

    2014-01-01

    Among numerous artificial intelligence approaches, k-Nearest Neighbor algorithms, genetic algorithms, and artificial neural networks are considered as the most common and effective methods in classification problems in numerous studies. In the present study, the results of the implementation of a novel hybrid feature selection-classification model using the above mentioned methods are presented. The purpose is benefitting from the synergies obtained from combining these technologies for the development of classification models. Such a combination creates an opportunity to invest in the strength of each algorithm, and is an approach to make up for their deficiencies. To develop proposed model, with the aim of obtaining the best array of features, first, feature ranking techniques such as the Fisher's discriminant ratio and class separability criteria were used to prioritize features. Second, the obtained results that included arrays of the top-ranked features were used as the initial population of a genetic algorithm to produce optimum arrays of features. Third, using a modified k-Nearest Neighbor method as well as an improved method of backpropagation neural networks, the classification process was advanced based on optimum arrays of the features selected by genetic algorithms. The performance of the proposed model was compared with thirteen well-known classification models based on seven datasets. Furthermore, the statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman test followed by post-hoc tests. The experimental findings indicated that the novel proposed hybrid model resulted in significantly better classification performance compared with all 13 classification methods. Finally, the performance results of the proposed model was benchmarked against the best ones reported as the state-of-the-art classifiers in terms of classification accuracy for the same data sets. The substantial findings of the comprehensive comparative study revealed that performance of the proposed model in terms of classification accuracy is desirable, promising, and competitive to the existing state-of-the-art classification models. PMID:25419659

  20. Innate and Introduced Resistance Traits in Genetically Modified Aspen Trees and Their Effect on Leaf Beetle Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Hjältén, Joakim; Axelsson, E. Petter; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Wennström, Anders; Pilate, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Genetic modifications of trees may provide many benefits, e.g. increase production, and mitigate climate change and herbivore impacts on forests. However, genetic modifications sometimes result in unintended effects on innate traits involved in plant-herbivore interactions. The importance of intentional changes in plant defence relative to unintentional changes and the natural variation among clones used in forestry has not been evaluated. By a combination of biochemical measurements and bioassays we investigated if insect feeding on GM aspens is more affected by intentional (induction Bt toxins) than of unintentional, non-target changes or clonal differences in innate plant defence. We used two hybrid wildtype clones (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides and Populus tremula x P. alba) of aspen that have been genetically modified for 1) insect resistance (two Bt lines) or 2) reduced lignin properties (two lines COMT and CAD), respectively. Our measurements of biochemical properties suggest that unintended changes by GM modifications (occurring due to events in the transformation process) in innate plant defence (phenolic compounds) were generally smaller but fundamentally different than differences seen among different wildtype clones (e.g. quantitative and qualitative, respectively). However, neither clonal differences between the two wildtype clones nor unintended changes in phytochemistry influenced consumption by the leaf beetle (Phratora vitellinae). By contrast, Bt induction had a strong direct intended effect as well as a post experiment effect on leaf beetle consumption. The latter suggested lasting reduction of beetle fitness following Bt exposure that is likely due to intestinal damage suffered by the initial Bt exposure. We conclude that Bt induction clearly have intended effects on a target species. Furthermore, the effect of unintended changes in innate plant defence traits, when they occur, are context dependent and have in comparison to Bt induction probably less pronounced effect on targeted herbivores. PMID:24040084

  1. Genetic modifiers of menopausal hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk: A genome-wide interaction study

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Anja; Hein, Rebecca; Lindström, Sara; Beckmann, Lars; Behrens, Sabine; Liu, Jianjun; Aschard, Hugues; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Jean; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Brüning, Thomas; Harth, Volker; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Southey, Melissa; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Eriksson, Mikael; Humpreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Olson, Janet E.; Stevens, Kristen N.; Vachon, Celine M.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Webb, Penny M.; Guénel, Pascal; Brauch, Hiltrud; Giles, Graham; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Hunter, David J.; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Easton, Douglas F.; Hall, Per; Nevanlinna, Heli; Kraft, Peter; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are at increased risk to develop breast cancer (BC). To detect genetic modifiers of the association between current use of MHT and BC risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide case-only studies followed by replication in eleven case-control studies. We used a case-only design to assess interactions between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and current MHT use on risk of overall and lobular BC. The discovery stage included 2,920 cases (541 lobular) from four genome-wide association studies. The top 1,391 SNPs showing P-values for interaction (Pint) <3.0×10?03 were selected for replication using pooled case-control data from eleven studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, including 7,689 cases (676 lobular) and 9,266 controls. Fixed effects meta-analysis was used to derive combined Pint. No SNP reached genome-wide significance in either the discovery or combined stage. We observed effect modification of current MHT use on overall BC risk by two SNPs on chr13 near POMP (combined Pint?8.9×10?06), two SNPs in SLC25A21 (combined Pint?4.8×10?05), and three SNPs in PLCG2 (combined Pint?4.5×10?05). The association between lobular BC risk was potentially modified by one SNP in TMEFF2 (combined Pint?2.7×10?05), one SNP in CD80 (combined Pint?8.2×10?06), three SNPs on chr17 near TMEM132E (combined Pint?2.2×10?06), and two SNPs on chr18 near SLC25A52 (combined Pint?4.6×10?05). In conclusion, polymorphisms in genes related to solute transportation in mitochondria, transmembrane signaling and immune cell activation are potentially modifying BC risk associated with current use of MHT. These findings warrant replication in independent studies. PMID:24080446

  2. Genetics

    MedlinePLUS

    Homozygous; Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  3. Microbiology of potatoes and potato products: a review.

    PubMed

    Doan, C H; Davidson, P M

    2000-05-01

    Many types of spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms exist on fresh, minimally processed, and fully processed potato products. Potatoes are processed into many products including frozen, dried, ready-to-eat, and minimally processed. The microbiological quality of finished potato products is influenced by the natural microflora, processing, handling, and human contact. The natural microflora of potatoes are influenced by soil and airborne inocula, agricultural practices, harvesting methods, and storage conditions. The microflora of processed products are influenced by all of the factors and conditions affecting the natural microflora as well as the processes applied to the product. Increased consumer demand for new and existing potato products highlights the importance of ensuring their microbiological safety. This review considers the sources of microorganisms, microflora, foodborne disease pathogens, and outbreaks associated with, and selected microbiological research involving, potatoes and potato products. PMID:10826729

  4. Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance by Combining Genetically Modified Switchgrass and Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bingyu; Zhang, Y.-H. Percival

    2013-01-01

    Decreasing lignin content of plant biomass by genetic engineering is believed to mitigate biomass recalcitrance and improve saccharification efficiency of plant biomass. In this study, we compared two different pretreatment methods (i.e., dilute acid and cellulose solvent) on transgenic plant biomass samples having different lignin contents and investigated biomass saccharification efficiency. Without pretreatment, no correlation was observed between lignin contents of plant biomass and saccharification efficiency. After dilute acid pretreatment, a strong negative correlation between lignin content of plant samples and overall glucose release was observed, wherein the highest overall enzymatic glucan digestibility was 70% for the low-lignin sample. After cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation pretreatment, there was no strong correlation between lignin contents and high saccharification efficiencies obtained (i.e., 80–90%). These results suggest that the importance of decreasing lignin content in plant biomass to saccharification was largely dependent on pretreatment choice and conditions. PMID:24086283

  5. Enhanced characteristics of genetically modified switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) for high biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lignocellulosic biomass is one of the most promising renewable and clean energy resources to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on fossil fuels. However, the resistance to accessibility of sugars embedded in plant cell walls (so-called recalcitrance) is a major barrier to economically viable cellulosic ethanol production. A recent report from the US National Academy of Sciences indicated that, “absent technological breakthroughs”, it was unlikely that the US would meet the congressionally mandated renewable fuel standard of 35 billion gallons of ethanol-equivalent biofuels plus 1 billion gallons of biodiesel by 2022. We here describe the properties of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) biomass that has been genetically engineered to increase the cellulosic ethanol yield by more than 2-fold. Results We have increased the cellulosic ethanol yield from switchgrass by 2.6-fold through overexpression of the transcription factor PvMYB4. This strategy reduces carbon deposition into lignin and phenolic fermentation inhibitors while maintaining the availability of potentially fermentable soluble sugars and pectic polysaccharides. Detailed biomass characterization analyses revealed that the levels and nature of phenolic acids embedded in the cell-wall, the lignin content and polymer size, lignin internal linkage levels, linkages between lignin and xylans/pectins, and levels of wall-bound fucose are all altered in PvMYB4-OX lines. Genetically engineered PvMYB4-OX switchgrass therefore provides a novel system for further understanding cell wall recalcitrance. Conclusions Our results have demonstrated that overexpression of PvMYB4, a general transcriptional repressor of the phenylpropanoid/lignin biosynthesis pathway, can lead to very high yield ethanol production through dramatic reduction of recalcitrance. MYB4-OX switchgrass is an excellent model system for understanding recalcitrance, and provides new germplasm for developing switchgrass cultivars as biomass feedstocks for biofuel production. PMID:23651942

  6. Genetic polymorphisms in metabolizing enzymes modify the association between Smoking and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Nguyen, Deanna D; Sauk, Jenny; Yajnik, Vijay; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cigarette smoking is a well established environmental risk factor for Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The exact mechanism of its effect remains unexplained. Genetic polymorphisms in metabolizing enzymes may influence susceptibility to the effect of smoking and shed light on its mechanism of action. Methods We utilized a prospective cohort of patients with CD, UC, and healthy controls. Smoking status was defined as current, former, or never smoking. Patients were genotyped for polymorphisms in CYP2A6, glutathione transferase enzymes (GSTP1 and GSTM1), NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO), and Heme Oxygenase 1 using a Sequenom platform. Multivariate logistic regression models with CD or UC as the outcome, stratified by genotype were developed and interaction p-values calculated. Results Our study included 634 patients with CD, 401 with UC, and 337 healthy controls. Ever smokers had an increased risk of CD (OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.35 – 6.39) compared to non-smokers among patients with AG/AA genotypes at CYP2A6. However, ever smoking was not associated with CD among patients with the AA genotype (pinteraction 0.001). Former smoking was associated with an increased risk for UC only in the presence of GG/AG genotypes for GSTP1, but not in those with the AA genotype (Pinteraction 0.012). Polymorphisms at the NQO and HMOX loci did not demonstrate a statistically significant interaction with smoking and risk of CD or UC. Conclusion Genetic polymorphisms in metabolizing enzymes may influence the association between smoking and CD and UC. Further studies of gene-environment interaction in IBD are warranted. PMID:24651583

  7. Potato transformation and potato cyst nematode infection on potato plantlets in tissue culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    These two protocols describe the methods for generating transgenic potato plants and for evaluating potato cyst nematode (Globodera rostochiensis and G. pallida) infection on potato plantlets in tissue culture. These methods are useful tools that can be used in the study of the interactions between ...

  8. Can genetically modified foods be considered as a dominant design? : An actor-network theory investigation of gene technology in agribusiness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JoAnne Labrecque; Sylvain Charlebois; Emeric Spiers

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – Technology influences market growth and productivity, and the food industry has seen major technological and productivity method changes in recent years. The debate on genetically modified (GM) food, in particular, has been led on multiple levels in both Europe and North America. Studies to date have described the structural differences between the North American and European regulatory agencies

  9. The Impact of Biotechnology, in Particular Genetically Modified Crops on International Agricultural Research, Production and Marketing and How this will Affect Agriculture in Western Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandy Forbes

    2003-01-01

    In 2000 I was awarded a Nuffield Farming Scholarship to study the impact of biotechnology, in particular genetically modified crops, on international agricultural research, production and marketing. I studied this topic in 2001 in Canada, USA and United Kingdom in an attempt to gain an insight into the issues with GM crops and how this may impact on our decision

  10. Invertebrates and vegetation of field margins adjacent to crops subject to contrasting herbicide regimes in the Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. B. Roy; D. A. Bohan; A. J. Haughton; M. O. Hill; J. L. Osborne; S. J. Clark; J. N. Perry; P. Rothery; R. J. Scott; D. R. Brooks; G. T. Champion; C. Hawes; M. S. Heard; L. G. Firbank

    2003-01-01

    The effects of management of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) crops on adjacent field margins were assessed for 59 maize, 66 beet and 67 spring oilseed rape sites. Fields were split into halves, one being sown with a GMHT crop and the other with the equivalent conventional non-GMHT crop. Margin vegetation was recorded in three components of the field margins. Most

  11. Effects on weed and invertebrate abundance and diversity of herbicide management in genetically modified herbicide-tolerant winter-sown oilseed rape

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Bohan; Caroline W. H. Boffey; David R. Brooks; Suzanne J. Clark; Alan M. Dewar; Les G. Firbank; Alison J. Haughton; Cathy Hawes; Matthew S. Heard; Mike J. May; Juliet L. Osborne; Joe N. Perry; Peter Rothery; David B. Roy; Rod J. Scott; Geoff R. Squire; Ian P. Woiwod; Gillian T. Champion

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of the herbicide management associated with genetically modified herbicide- tolerant (GMHT) winter oilseed rape (WOSR) on weed and invertebrate abundance and diversity by testing the null hypothesis that there is no difference between the effects of herbicide management of GMHT WOSR and that of comparable conventional varieties. For total weeds there were few treatment differences between

  12. Market Risks of Genetically Modified Wheat The potential short-term impacts of GMO Spring Wheat introduction on U.S. wheat export markets and prices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Wisner

    This report examines potential impacts on export markets and prices from commercializing Genetically Modified (GMO) hard red spring wheat in the U.S. within the next two to six years. GMO crop technology offers possible large benefits to consumers in the future, if plant-breeding concepts in the development stage materialize. For the short run, however, there is much evidence suggesting that

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-TIERED INSECT RESISTANCE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM FOR GENETICALLY MODIFIED CORN HYBRIDS EXPRESSING THE PLANT INCORPORATED PROTECTANT, BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A significant increase in genetically modified corn planting driven by biofuel demand is expected for the 2007 growing season with future planted acreages approaching 80% of total corn plantings anticipated by 2009. As demand increases, incidence of farmer non-compliance with ma...

  14. Knowledge of, Attitudes toward, and Acceptance of Genetically Modified Organisms among Prospective Teachers of Biology, Home Economics, and Grade School in Slovenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorgo, Andrej; Ambrozic-Dolinsek, Jana

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate knowledge, opinions, and attitudes toward, as well as readiness to accept genetically modified organisms (GMOs) among prospective primary and secondary Slovene teachers. Our findings are that prospective teachers want to take an active role in rejecting or supporting individual GMOs and are aware of…

  15. Resistance evolution to the first generation of genetically modified Diabrotica-active Bt-maize events by western corn rootworm: management and monitoring considerations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera; WCR) is a major coleopteran maize pest in North America and the EU, and has traditionally been managed through crop rotation and broad-spectrum soil insecticides. Genetically modified (GM) Bt-maize offers an additional means of control against W...

  16. Nested Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction for the Determination of DNA From Genetically Modified Corn and Soy Beans Using the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer Application

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Jensen

    This application note describes how the Agilent Technologies 2100 bioanalyzer and the DNA 500 LabChip can be used to detect polymerase chain reaction products corresponding to genetically modified elements and endogenous sequences in corn and soy beans. The DNA extraction protocol used in the preparation of polymerase chain reaction samples was characterized using the Protein 200 Plus LabChip.

  17. The Use of Genetically Modified Crops in Agriculture and Food Production, and Their Impacts on the Environment – A Developing World Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tewolde B. Gebre Egziabher

    2003-01-01

    The scientific basis for predicting substantially higher yields from genetically modified (GM) than non-GM crops is not strong. They may yield specialized products, but they are also likely to create problems for human health and to the environment unless they are rigorously tested before use. Even assuming that they will give higher yields, they may not solve the problem of

  18. Are genetic determinants of weight gain modified by leisure-time physical activity? A prospective study of Finnish twins1'2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bent Lilienthal Heitmann; Jaakko Kaprio; Jennifer R Harris; Aila Rissanen; Maarit Korkeila; Markku Koskenvuo

    A large number of studies have shown that obesity is both under genetic control and influenced by several environmental factors, including energy expenditure and intake. Several studies in animals and humans have furthermore suggested that certain environmental factors, such as a high fat intake, may modify the expression of the genes responsible for weight gain. The present study examined whether

  19. 476. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Genetically Modified To Express High Levels of Erythropoietin Through Transfer of an Artificial Chromosome Engineered Using the ACE System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra Vanderbyl; Neil MacDonald; Tom Stodola; Adele Telenius; Sandra Stewart; Harry C. Ledebur; Carl F. Perez

    2004-01-01

    The ACE System is a versatile, reliable system for genetically modifying cell therapies, generating transgenic animals, and engineering mammalian cells for high expression of a recombinant protein. Key components of the ACE System include an artificial chromosome (Platform ACE) encoding multiple (>50) DNA site-specific integration sites (acceptor sites); a targeting vector (ACE Targeting Vector) encoding both a Platform ACE-specific DNA

  20. The role of culture in risk regulations: a comparative case study of genetically modified corn in the United States of America and European Union

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas P. Guehlstorf; Lars K. Hallstrom

    2005-01-01

    According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and USA Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), herbicide tolerant (Roundup Ready or RR) and insect resistant (Bacillus thuringiensis or Bt) corn has “no significant impact” on human health and environmental integrity. In Europe, genetically modified (GM) maize strains – the identical Bt and RR biotech crops used in the USA – are