Science.gov

Sample records for genital hpv types

  1. Pathogenesis of genital HPV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, A

    1993-01-01

    Clinical, subclinical, and latent human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are distinguished from HPV-associated neoplasia. Besides HPV additional cofactors are necessary to transform HPV infected tissue to intraepithelial or invasive neoplasia. Risk factors for the presence of HPV are high number of sexual partners, early cohabitarche, young age at first delivery, suppression and alteration of immune status, young age and hormonal influences. While the fact of a high number of sexual partners exclusively increases the risk of HPV infection, it is not known whether the other factors lead to either an increased risk for HPV infection and/or to HPV-associated neoplasia. Subclinical and latent genital HPV infections are highly prevalent. The prevalence rate depends on the sensitivity of the HPV detection system used, on age and sexual activity of the population screened, and on the number of subsequent examinations performed for each subject. Sexual transmission is the main pathway for genital HPV's, however, vertical, peripartal, and oral transmission are also possible. Seroreactivity against genital HPV may be due to an active infection or the result of contact with HPV earlier in life. Antibodies against the HPV 16 E7 protein indicate an increased risk for cervical cancer. Compared with humoral response cellular immune response is probably more important for regression of genital HPV infection: impaired cellular response is characterized by depletion of T helper/inducer cells and/or Langerhans cells and impaired function of natural killer cells and/or the infected keratinocyte. In condylomata replication and transcription of viral nucleic acids and antigen production coincide with cellular differentiation. However, the interaction between HPV and the keratinocyte on a molecular level in subclinical and latent disease is not well understood. Regression or persistence of subclinical and latent genital HPV infections as observed in longitudinal investigations show a constant come-and-go of HPV presence. Subclinical or latent cervical infections with high-risk HPV types (such as HPV 16 and 18) have an increased risk for the development of HPV-associated neoplasia. PMID:8392965

  2. Genital Warts (HPV)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a group of viruses called HPV (short for human papillomavirus ). There are more than 100 types of HPV. ... is no cure that gets rid of the human papillomavirus completely. But treatments can reduce the number of ...

  3. Cutaneous human papillomavirus types detected on the surface of male external genital lesions: A case series within the HPV Infection in Men Study

    PubMed Central

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Messina, Jane L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Jukic, Drazen M.; Tommasino, Massimo; Gheit, Tarik; Rollison, Dana E.; Sichero, Laura; Sirak, Bradley A.; Ingles, Donna J.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Lu, Beibei; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs) may be associated with cutaneous epithelial lesions and non-melanoma skin cancers. No study has systematically evaluated the presence of genus beta [?]-HPV in male genital skin or external genital lesions (EGLs). Objectives To examine cutaneous ?-HPV types detected on the surface of EGLs in men and describe their presence prior to EGL development. Study design A retrospective case series was conducted among 69 men with pathologically confirmed EGLs (n=72) who participated in the HPV Infection in Men Study. Archived exfoliated cells collected from the surface of each EGL and normal genital skin specimens 6–12 months preceding EGL development were tested for ?-HPV DNA using a type-specific multiplex genotyping assay. Results ?-HPV DNA was detected on 61.1% of all EGLs, with types 38 (16.7%), 5 (15.3%), and 12 (12.5%) most commonly identified. HPV prevalence differed across pathological diagnoses, with the largest number of ?-HPV types detected on condylomas. Most ?-HPV types were detected on normal genital skin prior to EGL development, though the prevalence was lower on EGLs compared to preceding normal genital skin. Conclusions EGLs and the normal genital skin of men harbor a large number of ?-HPV types; however, it appears that ?-HPVs are unrelated to EGL development in men. Despite evidence to support a causal role in skin carcinogenesis at UVR-exposed sites, cutaneous HPV appears unlikely to cause disease at the UVR-unexposed genitals. PMID:24210970

  4. GENITAL HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS (HPV) Dartmouth COOP

    E-print Network

    identified; 30 of them affect the genital tract. 3. All types of HPV are spread by SKIN TO SKIN contact, and vice versa. Adapted from: 1. American Social Health Association . Sponsored by the Department of Community and Family Medicine Rural Health Programs July 06 #12;

  5. Genital Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Native Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... emotionally hard for a person to deal with; • Cervical cancer in women; • Other less common cancers in men ... of HPV will not develop genital warts or cervical cancer. ? Genital warts will not turn into cancer, even ...

  6. Gardasil 9 Protects against Additional HPV Types

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a large randomized clinical trial that shows a new human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectively prevented infection and disease caused seven HPV types that cause cancer and two HPV types that cause genital warts.

  7. Genital HPV infection and related lesions in men

    PubMed Central

    Anic, Gabriella M.; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is highly prevalent in men and there is an interest in further understanding the relationship between HPV infection and disease in men, including the development of genital warts, penile intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive penile carcinomas. Genital warts are caused by HPV 6/11 and are the most common clinical manifestation of HPV in men. Though they are benign and not associated with mortality, they are a source of psychosocial distress and physical discomfort. HPV infection can also develop into invasive penile carcinoma which is associated with morbidity and mortality. Approximately 40% of invasive penile carcinomas are attributable to HPV with HPV 16, 18, and 6/11 being the genotypes most commonly detected in penile tumors. Penile carcinomas of the basaloid and warty histologic subtypes are most likely to test positive for HPV. In addition to HPV infection, the risk factors most strongly associated with penile cancer are lack of neonatal circumcision, phimosis (the inability of uncircumcised men to fully retract the foreskin), and anogenital warts. Male vaccination with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine that protects against HPV 6/11/16/18 has been shown to significantly reduce HPV-associated anogenital infection and disease in men. If the quadrivalent vaccine is successfully disseminated to large segments of the young male population, there is the potential for substantial reduction in genital HPV infection and related lesions in men. PMID:21962470

  8. Prevalence of low-risk HPV types and genital warts in women born 1988/89 or 1983/84 -results of WOLVES, a population-based epidemiological study in Wolfsburg, Germany

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Wolfsburg HPV Epidemiological Study (WOLVES) is a population-based cohort study on HPV infections and associated diseases in the pre-vaccination era in young women in Wolfsburg, Germany. Methods Women born 1983/84 or 1988/89 were invited to participate. Participants were recruited in gynecology practices, and completed a questionnaire with socioeconomic, sexual and medical data including vaccination status. Pelvic examination with Pap smear and HPV testing (HC2?=?Hybrid Capture 2) was obligatory. HC2-positive and 10% of HC2-negative samples were tested for specific HPV types with SPF-10-PCR, and in inconclusive cases with DNA sequencing. Women with genital warts (GW) and those with atypical Pap smears were transferred for colposcopy. GWs were classified as typical condylomata acuminata (TCA), flat condyloma (FC) and seborrheic wart-like (SWL). Results In total, 1258 subjects were recruited from the target population of 2850 (44.1%). Overall the prevalence of HC2 low-risk (LR) types was 8.5%. HPV6 was the most frequent LR type (2.1%), followed by HPV42 (1.1%), HPV11 and HPV44 (each 0.4%). LiPA showed a low sensitivity for HPV types 42, 90 and 91, which were detected only by HC2 and HPV sequencing. Nine women (0.7%) were transferred with incident GW: five TCA, two FC and two SWL. All TCA were associated with HPV6 in corresponding cervical swabs and warts. Tissues of SWL contained HPV6 (n?=?1) and HPV16 (n?=?1). The cumulative life-risk for GW was 1.4% in the 1988/89 and 4.8% in the 1983/84 cohort. Eight of 107 HC2-LR?+?and five of nine cases of GW had concomitant abnormal Pap smears. All CIN lesions could be linked to high-risk HPV types but borderline and low-grade abnormal smears were explained by vaginal and cervical TCA in four cases. Conclusions HC2 was a specific test for the detection of established and potential LR types. In this first WOLVES analysis, HPV6 was the most frequent HPV type and the single LR type linked to disease. The observed GW incidence of 715 per 100,000 fits well with estimates of healthcare providers. Although life risks for GW were lower than in Scandinavian analyses, the societal burden within the WOLVES populations was considerable. PMID:23259726

  9. Developing an HPV vaccine to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Janine T

    2007-04-20

    The challenges of the journey from target identification through development of a prophylactic quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine have been met in Gardasil. Cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Approximately 70% of cervical cancer is caused by infection with HPV types 16 and 18 and approximately 90% of genital warts are caused by HPV types 6 and 11. The quadrivalent HPV vaccine was generated by expression of the major capsid protein (L1) of HPV types 16, 18, 6 and 11 in yeast. L1 proteins self assemble into pentamer structures and these pentamer structures come together to form virus-like particles (VLPs). The VLPs are antigenically indistinguishable from HPV virions. The VLPs contain no viral DNA and therefore the vaccine is non-infectious. Gardasil is composed of VLPs of HPV types 16, 18, 6 and 11 conjugated to a proprietary amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate adjuvant. The results of a rigorous clinical program have demonstrated that the vaccine is safe and highly efficacious in preventing dysplasias, cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN 1-3) the precursors of cervical cancer and external genital lesions caused by vaccine-HPV types. In conclusion, Gardasil addresses a major medical need, that is, reduction of HPV-related disease including cervical cancer as a safe, immunogenic, and highly efficacious vaccine. PMID:17289220

  10. Prevalence of high-risk HPV types and associated genital diseases in women born in 1988/89 or 1983/84 – results of WOLVES, a population-based epidemiological study in Wolfsburg, Germany

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) infection is associated with the development of cervical cancer. HPV vaccination reduces the risk of developing malignant lesions and is expected to change the dynamics of HPV transmission. Data from non-vaccinated women may provide an important benchmark to allow the impact of HPV vaccination programs to be assessed. This study was designed to prospectively determine the changing dynamics of HR-HPV infection and associated genital diseases in young women, most of whom were non-vaccinated. Methods Data from a population-based cohort study, comprising women of two predefined birth cohorts (women born in 1983/84 or 1988/89), were analyzed between 19 October 2009 and 31 December 2010 to determine risk factors for high-risk HPV infection and the association between specific HR-HPV types and atypical Pap smear test results. HPV status was determined by Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) assay and genotyping. Results The prevalence of HR-HPV was 22.8% in the 1983/84 cohort (150/659) and 23.7% in the 1988/99 cohort (142/599). Only the number of sexual partners was a significant risk factor for HPV infection (odds ratios 22.687 and 6.124 for more than five versus one partner 84 cohort,/84 and 1988/89 cohorts, respectively) in multivariate analysis. HPV16 positive-women were significantly more likely to have abnormal Pap smears of any degree than HPV16-negative women (22.0% versus 3.61%, p?HPV16. In the 1988/89 cohort, the rate of HPV16 infection was significantly lower in vaccinated than non-vaccinated women (1.59% versus 8.88%; p?=?0.003). Conclusions HR-HPV infection was highly prevalent in both cohorts and associated with an increased risk of abnormal Pap smears and biopsy proven CIN2+. HPV16 infection was associated with a high risk of clinically relevant lesions. HPV vaccination significantly decreased the risk of HPV16 infection. PMID:23497108

  11. Male circumcision and the incidence and clearance of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men: the HPV Infection in men (HIM) cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reported associations of male circumcision (MC) with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men have been inconsistent. Methods 4,033 healthy men were examined every six months for a median of 17.5 months. In each study visit, exfoliated cell specimens from the coronal sulcus/glans penis, penile shaft, and scrotum were collected and combined into one sample per person for HPV DNA detection. Samples were tested for 37 HPV types. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between MC and the incidence and clearance of HPV infections and specific genotypes. Results The overall incidence of new HPV infections did not differ by MC status (for any HPV, adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91-1.27). However, incidence was significantly lower among circumcised versus uncircumcised men for HPV types 58 (p?=?0.01), 68 (p?HPV types 39 (p?=?0.01) and 51 (p?=?0.02). Despite the lack of an overall association in the risk of HPV clearance by MC (for any HPV, aHR 0.95, 95% CI 0.88-1.02), median times to clearance were significantly shorter among circumcised than uncircumcised men for HPV types 33 (p?=?0.02) and 64 (p?=?0.04), and longer for HPV types 6 (p?genital HPV detection, except for certain HPV types. The use of a single combined sample from the penis and scrotum for HPV DNA detection likely limited our ability to identify a true effect of MC at the distal penis. PMID:24517172

  12. 9-Valent HPV vaccine for cancers, pre-cancers and genital warts related to HPV.

    PubMed

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Velicer, Christine; Luxembourg, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of nearly all cervical cancer cases as well as a substantial proportion of anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal cancers, making it responsible for approximately 5% of the global cancer burden. The first-generation HPV vaccines that is, quadrivalent HPV type 6/11/16/18 vaccine and bivalent HPV type 16/18 vaccine were licensed in 2006 and 2007, respectively. A second-generation 9-valent HPV type 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine with broader cancer coverage was initiated even before the first vaccines were approved. By preventing HPV infection and disease due to HPV31/33/45/52/58, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to increase prevention of cervical cancer from 70 to 90%. In addition, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to prevent 85-95% of HPV-related vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers. Overall, the 9vHPV vaccine addresses a significant unmet medical need, although further health economics and implementation research is needed. PMID:26366475

  13. Recent Developments in Non-HPV-related Adenocarcinomas of the Lower Female Genital Tract and Their Precursors.

    PubMed

    McCluggage, W Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Most adenocarcinomas in the lower female genital tract (cervix, vagina, vulva) arise in the cervix and are associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, there is an emerging spectrum of non-HPV-related cervical adenocarcinomas, the most common of which is so-called gastric type. In this review, the concept of gastric-type cervical adenocarcinomas and their possible precursor lesions is covered, the precursor lesions still being poorly understood. Other non-HPV-related cervical adenocarcinomas are also discussed, including new information regarding molecular events in mesonephric adenocarcinoma. A variety of primary vaginal adenocarcinomas, including clear cell, endometrioid, intestinal and gastric types are also discussed. The spectrum of benign and malignant glandular lesions involving the lower female genital tract and probably derived from misplaced Skene's (periurethral) glands is also covered. PMID:26645463

  14. Prevalence and genotype distribution of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) in male genital samples of Osijek-Baranja County.

    PubMed

    Bosnjak, Zinka; Peri?, Magdalena; Krizan, Ivana Roksandi?; Dzijan, Snjezana; Ruzman, Natasa; Pastuovi?, Tajana; Sarkanj, Bojan; Berti?, Vedran; Burian, Sven; Vukovi?, Dubravka

    2013-12-01

    This is a first cross-sectional study on the prevalence and distribution of HPV infection in asymptomatic, heterosexual men from Osijek-Baranja County, Croatia. Between 2009 and 2011, 330 men tested for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were recruited. Their genital swabs were tested for high-risk HPV (HR HPV) infection by the AMPLICOR HPV test and further genotyped by the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (both by Roche). Infection with a single HR HPV was detected in almost one third of men (39%) whereas multiple HPV types, in more than a half of HR HPV-positive men (61%). The highest HR HPV prevalence was detected in those younger than 20 (37.5%) and lowest in 31-35 year old men (27.8%). The most common genotypes were HPV 6 (24%), 16 (17.8%), 51 (9%), 52 (6%), 35, 55, 66, 84 (each 5%), 31, 62 (each 4%), 39, 58, 59, 83 (each 2.5%), and finally 56, 18, 53, and 54 (each 1.3%). Having more than one sexual partner per year was significantly associated with HR HPV infection in age group between 26 and 30 years (p = 0.001). Due to the high prevalence of HR HPV infection in men of this County and its risk of transmission to women, we recommend more public awareness about this particular STD and initiating vaccination programs of young men and women. PMID:24611336

  15. Identification of multiple HPV types on spermatozoa from human sperm donors.

    PubMed

    Kaspersen, Maja D; Larsen, Peter B; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob; Fedder, Jens; Petersen, Gert Bruun; Bonde, Jesper; Höllsberg, Per

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) may cause sexually transmitted disease. High-risk types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cell dysplasia, whereas low-risk types may cause genital condyloma. Despite the association between HPV and cancer, donor sperm need not be tested for HPV according to European regulations. Consequently, the potential health risk of HPV transmission by donor bank sperm has not been elucidated, nor is it known how HPV is associated with sperm. The presence of 35 types of HPV was examined on DNA from semen samples of 188 Danish sperm donors using a sensitive HPV array. To examine whether HPV was associated with the sperm, in situ hybridization were performed with HPV-6, HPV-16 and -18, and HPV-31-specific probes. The prevalence of HPV-positive sperm donors was 16.0% and in 66.7% of these individuals high-risk types of HPV were detected. In 5.3% of sperm donors, two or more HPV types were detected. Among all identified HPV types, 61.9% were high-risk types. In situ hybridization experiments identified HPV genomes particularly protruding from the equatorial segment and the tail of the sperm. Semen samples from more than one in seven healthy Danish donors contain HPV, most of them of high-risk types binding to the equatorial segment of the sperm cell. Most HPV-positive sperm showed decreased staining with DAPI, indicative of reduced content of DNA. Our data demonstrate that oncogenic HPV types are frequent in men. PMID:21479232

  16. A case of HPV and acquired genital lymphangioma: over-lapping clinical features.

    PubMed

    Cestaro, Giovanni; De Rosa, Michele; Gentile, Maurizio; Massaron, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic malformation or lymphangioma is a benign proliferation of the lymphatics accounting for 4% of all vascular malformations and 26% of all benign vascular tumors. There are several reports about genital lymphangiomas mimicking venereal lesions, such as genital warts. Hereby we described a case of a 24 year old man affected by multiple vesicles and warts in genital area. All hematological and biochemical parameters, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Treponema Pallidum tests, C1-Inhibitor and C1-Q values were within limits. An accurate fulguration and wide excision of bigger lesions were performed. Histological examination showed numerous dilated lymphatic vessels in the superficial dermis with infiltration of inflammatory cells, that is a histopathological picture compatible with genital lymphangioma. Considering our clinical suspicion of condylomatosis, HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) Polimerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Genotyping, named INNOLiPA test, was performed, that revealed a genital infection by HPV - genotype 6. We think that our case can be considered an example of HPV infection and acquired genital lymphangioma overlap clinical syndrome. The patient presented any lesions one year after the procedure at follow-up examination. PMID:25818349

  17. Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and types among Turkish women at a gynecology outpatient unit

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-known pathogen for lower genital tract neoplasias, yet little is known regarding HPV prevalence in Turkey. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV DNA and to determine HPV types distribution among women with normal and abnormal cytology. Methods A total of five hundred seven (n = 507) women were retrospectively evaluated between 2004-2008. Conventional polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the presence of HPV types in cervicovaginal samples obtained from patients during gynecologic examination. Results One hundred four (n = 104) of the women were excluded from the study because of the incomplete data and a total of 403 women were used for the final analysis. There were, 93 (23%) women with cytologic abnormality and 310 (77%) women with normal cytology. Overall, 23% of the women was HPV positive. The overall prevalence of HPV in women with abnormal Pap smears was 36% (93/403), of which in ASCUS 22%, LSIL 51% and HSIL 60%. Also, HPV DNA was positive in 20% of the women with normal cervical cytology. The most common HPV types in cytologically normal women were as follows; HPV 16 (36%), HPV 6 (22%) and HPV 18 (13%). The rate of other HPV types were as follows; HPV11 4.4%, HPV45 4.4%, HPV90 4.4%, HPV35 2.2%, HPV67 2.2%, HPV81 2.2%, and multiple type HPVs 8.9%. The most common HPV types in cytologically abnormal women were HPV 16 (35%), HPV6 (19%) and HPV18 (8%). The rate of multiple HPV infections in women with normal Pap test was 2.2%. Conclusion HPV prevalence and type distribution in this study were similar to that reported worldwide at least in our study population. Hovewer, HPV prevalence was more common compared with previous studies reported from Turkey. This might be related with methodology and hospital based patient accrual and high rate of women with abnormal cytology. Further population based prospective studies are needed to eliminate the drawbacks of our study and to determine nonhospital based HPV prevalence in Turkish women. PMID:19948015

  18. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA on the fingers of patients with genital warts

    PubMed Central

    Sonnex, C.; Strauss, S.; Gray, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether patients with genital warts carry human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA on their fingers. METHODS: 14 men and eight women with genital warts had cytobrush samples taken from genital lesions, finger tips, and tips of finger nails. Samples were examined for the presence of HPV DNA by the polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: HPV DNA was detected in all female genital samples and in 13/14 male genital samples. HPV DNA was detected in the finger brush samples of three women and nine men. The same HPV type was identified in genital and hand samples in one woman and five men. CONCLUSION: This study has identified hand carriage of genital HPV types in patients with genital warts. Although sexual intercourse is considered the usual mode of transmitting genital HPV infection, our findings raise the possibility of transmission by finger-genital contact. ??? PMID:10616355

  19. Integrative approach to diagnosis of genital human papillomaviruses (HPV) infection of female.

    PubMed

    Dunjic, Momir; Stanisic, Slavisa; Krstic, Dejan; Stanisic, Miodrag; Ignjatic, Z Jovanovic; Dunjic, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus from the papillomavirus family that is capable of infecting humans. Some types of HPVs cause warts, while others can lead to cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, oropharynx and anus. High-risk human papillomavirus (hr HPV) has been detected in almost all cervical squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas. All patients examined by colposcopy. Cervical swab is routinely done and patients are screened with both HPV DNA by Real Time Polimerase Chain Reaction (RT PCR) testing and Pap testing. Pictures obtained by colposcopy were examined by indirect Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT) by using reference control substance (RCS): HPV 16, HPV 18, and Integrin ?5 ?1. BDORT was developed by Prof. Omura Y. of New York and received U.S. patent in 1993. For detection of HPV DNA we used RT PCR and standard Qiagen method which detect 18 types (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 68, 6, 11, 42, 43, 44) of HPV from smear. From 63 patients where is BDORT indicated presence of HPV, in 49 patients (77.8%) RT PCR confirmed presence of HPV. From 63 patients in 54 patients (85.7%), we detected, by colposcopic exam, some kind of lesions associated with HPV infection. Results obtained by RT PCR: one type (1/18) of DNA HPV in 25 patients (51.02%), 2 types (2/18) in 15 patients (30.61%) and 3 types (3/18) in 9 patients (18.37%). Although BDORT results usually have higher sensitivity and detection rate is much higher, it can be used together with RT PCR in detection of HPV and cervical lesions associated with HPV infection. PMID:25693306

  20. Concordance of human papillomavirus types detected on the surface and in the tissue of genital lesions in men.

    PubMed

    Anic, Gabriella M; Messina, Jane L; Stoler, Mark H; Rollison, Dana E; Stockwell, Heather; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Gage, Christine; Silva, Roberto Jose C; Baggio, Maria L; Salmerón, Jorge; Giuliano, Anna R

    2013-09-01

    Swabbing the surface of a genital lesion to obtain a sample for HPV DNA testing is less invasive than a biopsy, but may not represent HPV types present in the lesion tissue. The objective of this study was to examine the concordance of HPV types detected in swab and biopsy samples from 165 genital lesions from men ages 18-70. Lesions included 90 condyloma, 10 penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PeIN), 23 non-condyloma with a known histology, and 42 lesions with an undetermined histology. All lesions were sampled by swabbing the surface of the lesion with a pre-wetted Dacron swab and taking a shave biopsy. HPV genotyping was performed using Linear Array for swab samples and INNO-LiPA for biopsy samples. The kappa and McNemar statistics were used to compare the concordance of detecting HPV types in swab and biopsy samples. Both sampling methods had high agreement for detection of HPV DNA in condyloma (87.8% agreement) and PeIN (100% agreement). There was also high concordance for detection of HPV16 (kappa?=?1.00) and HPV18 (kappa?=?1.00) in PeIN, however, agreement was low to moderate for detecting HPV6 (kappa?=?0.31) and HPV11 (kappa?=?0.56) in condyloma. Low to moderate agreement was also observed between sampling methods for detecting individual HPV types in the non-condyloma and lesions with an indefinite histology. The results suggest that obtaining a biopsy in addition to swabbing the surface of a lesion may provide additional information about specific HVP types associated with male genital lesions. PMID:23852680

  1. Concordance of human papillomavirus types detected on the surface and in the tissue of genital lesions in men

    PubMed Central

    Anic, Gabriella M.; Messina, Jane L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Rollison, Dana E.; Stockwell, Heather; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Gage, Christine; Silva, Roberto Jose C.; Baggio, Maria L.; Salmerón, Jorge; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Swabbing the surface of a genital lesion to obtain a sample for HPV DNA testing is less invasive than a biopsy, but may not represent HPV types present in the lesion tissue. The objective of this study was to examine the concordance of HPV types detected in swab and biopsy samples from 165 genital lesions from men ages 18-70. Lesions included 90 condyloma, 10 penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PeIN), 23 non-condyloma with a known histology, and 42 lesions with an undetermined histology. All lesions were sampled by swabbing the surface of the lesion with a pre-wetted Dacron swab and taking a shave biopsy. HPV genotyping was performed using Linear Array for swab samples and INNO-LiPA for biopsy samples. The kappa and McNemar statistics were used to compare the concordance of detecting HPV types in swab and biopsy samples. Both sampling methods had high agreement for detection of HPV DNA in condyloma (87.8% agreement) and PeIN (100% agreement). There was also high concordance for detection of HPV16 (kappa = 1.00) and HPV18 (kappa = 1.00) in PeIN, however, agreement was low to moderate for detecting HPV6 (kappa = 0.31) and HPV11 (kappa = 0.56) in condyloma. Low to moderate agreement was also observed between sampling methods for detecting individual HPV types in the non-condyloma and lesions with an indefinite histology. The results suggest that obtaining a biopsy in addition to swabbing the surface of a lesion may provide additional information about specific HVP types associated with male genital lesions. PMID:23852680

  2. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause serious health problems, including genital ... Commercial Print Version What is genital HPV? Genital human papillomavirus (also called HPV) is the most common sexually ...

  3. Comparison of real-time multiplex human papillomavirus (HPV) PCR assays with the linear array HPV genotyping PCR assay and influence of DNA extraction method on HPV detection.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christine C; Swoyer, Ryan; Bryan, Janine T; Taddeo, Frank J

    2011-05-01

    Real-time human papillomavirus (HPV) type-specific multiplex PCR assays were developed to detect HPV DNA in specimens collected for the efficacy determination of the quadrivalent HPV (type 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine (Gardasil). We evaluated the concordance between type-specific multiplex HPV PCR and the widely used, commercially available Roche Linear Array genotyping PCR assay. Female genital swab specimens were tested for the presence of L1, E6, and E7 sequences of HPV type 6 (HPV6), HPV11, HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV45, HPV52, and HPV58 and E6 and E7 sequences of HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV51, HPV56, and HPV59 in type- and gene-specific real-time multiplex PCR assays. Specimens were also tested for the presence of L1 sequences using two versions of the Roche Linear Array genotyping assay. Measures of concordance of a modified version of the Linear Array and the standard Linear Array PCR assay were evaluated. With specimen DNA extraction using the Qiagen Spin blood kit held as the constant, multiplex PCR assays detect more HPV-positive specimens for the 14 HPV types common to both than either version of the Linear Array HPV genotyping assay. Type-specific agreements between the assays were good, at least 0.838, but were often driven by negative agreement in HPV types with low prevalence, as evidenced by reduced proportions of positive agreement. Overall HPV status agreements ranged from 0.615 for multiplex PCR and standard Linear Array to 0.881 for multiplex PCR and modified Linear Array. An alternate DNA extraction technique, that used by the Qiagen MinElute kit, impacted subsequent HPV detection in both the multiplex PCR and Linear Array assays. PMID:21346041

  4. Variability of human immunodeficiency virus-1 in the female genital reservoir during genital reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    LeGoff, J; Roques, P; Jenabian, M-A; Charpentier, C; Brochier, C; Bouhlal, H; Gresenguet, G; Frost, E; Pepin, J; Mayaud, P; Belec, L

    2015-09-01

    Clinical and subclinical genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactivations have been associated with increases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 genital shedding. Whether HSV-2 shedding contributes to the selection of specific genital HIV-1 variants remains unknown. We evaluated the genetic diversity of genital and blood HIV-1 RNA and DNA in 14 HIV-1/HSV-2-co-infected women, including seven with HSV-2 genital reactivation, and seven without as controls. HIV-1 DNA and HIV-1 RNA env V1-V3 sequences in paired blood and genital samples were compared. The HSV-2 selection pressure on HIV was estimated according to the number of synonymous substitutions (dS), the number of non-synonymous substitutions (dN) and the dS/dN ratio within HIV quasi-species. HIV-1 RNA levels in cervicovaginal secretions were higher in women with HSV-2 replication than in controls (p0.02). Plasma HIV-1 RNA and genital HIV-1 RNA and DNA were genetically compartmentalized. No differences in dS, dN and the dS/dN ratio were observed between the study groups for either genital HIV-1 RNA or plasma HIV-1 RNA. In contrast, dS and dN in genital HIV-1 DNA were significantly higher in patients with HSV-2 genital reactivation (p <0.01 and p <0.05, respectively). The mean of the dS/dN ratio in genital HIV-1 DNA was slightly higher in patients with HSV-2 genital replication, indicating a trend for purifying selection (p 0.056). HSV-2 increased the genetic diversity of genital HIV-1 DNA. These observations confirm molecular interactions between HSV-2 and HIV-1 at the genital tract level. PMID:26003280

  5. HPV Vaccine: Access and Use in the U.S.

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2011). Genital HPV infection- Fact sheet. ? Return to text CDC. (2014). Genital HPV infection- Fact sheet. ? Return to text CDC. (2014). Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: Recommendations of the ...

  6. [HPV vaccination: principles, results and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Rouzier, R; Uzan, C; Collinet, P

    2007-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) are responsible of an important morbidity and mortality. HPV is a significant source of morbidity and mortality. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection: adolescents are at high-risk for HPV acquisition. Biologic and epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that HPV infection is a necessary but non-sufficient cause of cervical cancer and genital warts. The vast majority of cervical cancers contain high-risk HPV type and approximately 70% contain HPV types 16 or 18. HPV types 6 or 11 are responsible for approximately 90% of genital warts. Thus, a vaccine that could prevent. Prophylactic vaccines based on the use of virus-like particles (VLPs) obtained by auto-assembly of L1 are under clinical trials. Two vaccines are currently evaluated: Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologics), a bivalent vaccine against HPV 16 and 18, and Gardasil (Merck & Co) a quadrivalent vaccine against HPV 16, 18, 6, and 11. Phase I, II and III studies have demonstrated that both vaccines are well tolerated and provide an excellent immunogenicity. With approximately 5-year follow-up, both vaccines have been effective in preventing persistent infection with targeted HPV types and in preventing cervical intraepithelial lesions. The optimal target for vaccination is probably 12-year-old girls. PMID:17293248

  7. Introduction and sustained high coverage of the HPV bivalent vaccine leads to a reduction in prevalence of HPV 16/18 and closely related HPV types

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, K; Pollock, K G J; Potts, A; Love, J; Cuschieri, K; Cubie, H; Robertson, C; Donaghy, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2008, a national human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation programme began in Scotland for 12–13 year old females with a three-year catch-up campaign for those under the age of 18. Since 2008, three-dose uptake of bivalent vaccine in the routine cohort aged 12–13 has exceeded 90% annually, while in the catch-up cohort overall uptake is 66%. Methods: To monitor the impact of HPV immunisation, a programme of national surveillance was established (pre and post introduction) which included yearly sampling and HPV genotyping of women attending for cervical screening at age 20. By linking individual vaccination, screening and HPV testing records, we aim to determine the impact of the immunisation programme on circulating type-specific HPV infection particularly for four outcomes: (i) the vaccine types HPV 16 or 18 (ii) types considered to be associated with cross-protection: HPV 31, 33 or 45; (iii) all other high-risk types and (iv) any HPV. Results: From a total of 4679 samples tested, we demonstrate that three doses (n=1100) of bivalent vaccine are associated with a significant reduction in prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 from 29.8% (95% confidence interval 28.3, 31.3%) to 13.6% (95% confidence interval 11.7, 15.8%). The data also suggest cross-protection against HPV 31, 33 and 45. HPV 51 and 56 emerged as the most prevalent (10.5% and 9.6%, respectively) non-vaccine high-risk types in those vaccinated, but at lower rates than HPV 16 (25.9%) in those unvaccinated. Conclusions: This data demonstrate the positive impact of bivalent vaccination on the prevalence of HPV 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 in the target population and is encouraging for countries which have achieved high-vaccine uptake. PMID:24736582

  8. More men than women make mucosal IgA antibodies to Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18: a study of oral HPV and oral HPV antibodies in a normal healthy population

    PubMed Central

    Marais, Dianne J; Sampson, Candice; Jeftha, Anthea; Dhaya, Dherendra; Passmore, Jo-Ann S; Denny, Lynette; Rybicki, Edward P; Van Der Walt, Eric; Stephen, Lawrence XG; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2006-01-01

    Background We have previously shown the high prevalence of oral anti-human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) antibodies in women with HPV-associated cervical neoplasia. It was postulated that the HPV antibodies were initiated after HPV antigenic stimulation at the cervix via the common mucosal immune system. The present study aimed to further evaluate the effectiveness of oral fluid testing for detecting the mucosal humoral response to HPV infection and to advance our limited understanding of the immune response to HPV. Methods The prevalence of oral HPV infection and oral antibodies to HPV types 16, 18 and 11 was determined in a normal, healthy population of children, adolescents and adults, both male and female, attending a dental clinic. HPV types in buccal cells were determined by DNA sequencing. Oral fluid was collected from the gingival crevice of the mouth by the OraSure method. HPV-16, HPV-18 and HPV-11 antibodies in oral fluid were detected by virus-like particle-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. As a reference group 44 women with cervical neoplasia were included in the study. Results Oral HPV infection was highest in children (9/114, 7.9%), followed by adolescents (4/78, 5.1%), and lowest in normal adults (4/116, 3.5%). The predominant HPV type found was HPV-13 (7/22, 31.8%) followed by HPV-32 (5/22, 22.7%). The prevalence of oral antibodies to HPV-16, HPV-18 and HPV-11 was low in children and increased substantially in adolescents and normal adults. Oral HPV-16 IgA was significantly more prevalent in women with cervical neoplasia (30/44, 68.2%) than the women from the dental clinic (18/69, 26.1% P = 0.0001). Significantly more adult men than women displayed oral HPV-16 IgA (30/47 compared with 18/69, OR 5.0, 95% CI 2.09–12.1, P < 0.001) and HPV-18 IgA (17/47 compared with 13/69, OR 2.4, 95% CI 0.97–6.2, P = 0.04). Conclusion The increased prevalence of oral HPV antibodies in adolescent individuals compared with children was attributed to the onset of sexual activity. The increased prevalence of oral anti-HPV IgA in men compared with women was noteworthy considering reportedly fewer men than women make serum antibodies, and warrants further investigation. PMID:16762074

  9. Pap and HPV Testing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... test that looks specifically for HPV-16 and HPV-18, the two HPV types that cause most cervical ... is having HPV-alone testing tests positive for HPV types 16 or 18 , she should, according to guidance from the FDA, ...

  10. Male circumcision and prevalence of genital human papillomavirus infection in men: a multinational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulated evidence from epidemiological studies and more recently from randomized controlled trials suggests that male circumcision (MC) may substantially protect against genital HPV infection in men. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between MC and genital HPV infection in men in a large multinational study. Methods A total of 4072 healthy men ages 18–70?years were enrolled in a study conducted in Brazil, Mexico, and the United States. Enrollment samples combining exfoliated cells from the coronal sulcus, glans penis, shaft, and scrotum were analyzed for the presence and genotyping of HPV DNA by PCR and linear array methods. Prevalence ratios (PR) were used to estimate associations between MC and HPV detection adjusting for potential confounders. Results MC was not associated with overall prevalence of any HPV, oncogenic HPV types or unclassified HPV types. However, MC was negatively associated with non-oncogenic HPV infections (PR 0.85, 95% confident interval: 0.76-0.95), in particular for HPV types 11, 40, 61, 71, and 81. HPV 16, 51, 62, and 84 were the most frequently identified genotypes regardless of MC status. Conclusions This study shows no overall association between MC and genital HPV infections in men, except for certain non-oncogenic HPV types for which a weak association was found. However, the lack of association with MC might be due to the lack of anatomic site specific HPV data, for example the glans penis, the area expected to be most likely protected by MC. PMID:23327450

  11. Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type distribution, and HPV-associated cytological abnormalities in anal specimens from men infected with HIV who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Damay, Audrey; Fabre, Jaqueline; Costes, Valérie; Didelot, Jean-Michel; Didelot, Marie-Noëlle; Boulle, Nathalie; Segondy, Michel

    2010-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) detection and typing using the PapilloCheck test and cytological examination were carried out in anal samples collected from 67 men seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who have sex with men. Fifty (74.6%) patients had anal HPV infection, 46 (68.7%) had high-risk (HR) HPV infection, and 38 (56.7%) had multiple infection involving 2-9 (median, 3) HPV types. The HPV types identified most frequently were HPV 44/55 (19.4%), HPV 53 (19.4%), HPV 16 (16.4%), HPV 39 (16.4%), and HPV 42 (14.9%). Thirty-two of the 66 interpretable smears (48.5%) revealed cytological abnormalities: 9 (13.4%) atypical cells of undetermined significance, 20 (30.3%) low-grade intraepithelial lesions, and 3 (4.5%) high-grade intraepithelial lesions. Cytological abnormalities were associated significantly with HPV detection (P < 0.001), multiple HPV infection (P < 0.001), and increased number of HPV types (P < 0.001). The HPV types associated most frequently with cytological abnormalities were HPV 39 (28.1%), HPV 42 (28.1%), HPV 53 (28.1%), HPV 16 (25.0%), HPV 44/55 (25.0%), and HPV 59 (21.9%). HPV DNA detection as well as cytological abnormalities were associated neither with HIV RNA detection in plasma nor with CD4+ T-cell count. Differences in age or in time since HIV acquisition were not observed in patients with or without cytological abnormalities. The present study confirms the high prevalence of anal HR-HPV infection and cytological abnormalities in men infected with HIV who have sex with men. HPV testing and/or cytological analysis may be helpful in selecting the patients to be referred to proctological examination. PMID:20166175

  12. The HPV Vaccine: Framing the Arguments "for" and "against" Mandatory Vaccination of All Middle School Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vamos, Cheryl A.; McDermott, Robert J.; Daley, Ellen M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus responsible for cervical cancer, is the most common viral sexually transmitted infection in the United States. A vaccine was approved in 2006 that is effective in preventing the types of HPV responsible for 70% of cervical cancers and 90% of genital warts. Proposals for routine and mandatory HPV

  13. Hand-genital transmission of genital warts? An analysis of prevalence data.

    PubMed Central

    Fairley, C. K.; Gay, N. J.; Forbes, A.; Abramson, M.; Garland, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    The role of hand-genital transmission in the aetiology of genital warts is unclear. However this route is suggested by a number of observations including the relatively high proportion of genital warts in children which contain HPV types 1-4 (15% for children and 2% for adults). We compared two transmission models; one which assumes that hand-genital transmission occurs and one that it does not, and determined the conditions in which each model can reflect the available prevalence data. Hand-genital transmission provides a simple explanation of the observed differences in the proportions of genital warts containing HPV types 1-4 and 6/11 in children and adults. If hand-genital transmission does not occur, the observed difference could only be explained by an eightfold greater probability of transmission to children of types 1-4 than types 6/11, or by an eightfold greater duration of infection with types 1-4. Our findings provide support for the view that genital warts may be transmitted by hand-genital contact. PMID:7641831

  14. HPV Immunization | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common virus that is spread through sexual contact. Some types of HPVs can cause genital warts, and other types, called high-risk or oncogenic HPVs, can cause cancer. High-risk HPVs cause virtually all cervical cancers, most anal cancers, and some vaginal, vulvar, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers. Many HPV infections go away on their own within 1 to 2 years. However, infections that last for many years increase a person’s risk of developing cancer.

  15. Mining the Risk Types of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) by AdaCost

    E-print Network

    Mining the Risk Types of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) by AdaCost S.-B. Park, S. Hwang, and B,shhwang,btzhang}@bi.snu.ac.kr Abstract. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is known as the main factor for cervical cancer, where the accuracy, which implies that most high-risk HPVs are found. 1 Introduction Human papillomavirus (HPV

  16. Vulvar Epidermoid Cyst and Type 2 Radical Genital Mutilation

    PubMed Central

    Birge, Ozer; Ozbey, Ertugrul Gazi; Arslan, Deniz; Erkan, Mustafa Melih; Demir, Feyza; Akgor, Utku

    2015-01-01

    About 100 million women are estimated to be circumcised globally. Various rates of complications have been encountered, especially after circumcision, such as bleeding, infection, shock, menstrual irregularity, difficulty in urination or common urinary tract infections, inguinal pain, difficulty in sexual intercourse, and genital circumcision scar especially at the vulvar region, and cystic or solid character mass in short and long term. Furthermore, the maternal-fetal morbidity and mortality increase due to bleeding and fistula, which develop after prolonged labor, travail, and difficult labors. Our aim in this paper was to discuss a 42-year-old multiparous female case who had undergone type 2 radical genital mutilation (circumcision) when she was 7 years of age, along with the literature, which has been evaluated for the gradually growing mass at the left inguinal canal region in the last 10 years and diagnosed as epidermoid inclusion cyst developing secondary to postcircumcision surgical ground trauma, since there was no other case found in the literature search that had been circumcised at such an early age and developing after circumcision at such advanced age, and, therefore, this is suggested to be the first case on this subject. PMID:26682078

  17. Evaluation of human papillomavirus type replacement postvaccination must account for diagnostic artifacts: masking of HPV52 by HPV16 in anogenital specimens.

    PubMed

    Tota, Joseph E; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; Villa, Luisa L; Richardson, Harriet; Burchell, Ann N; Koushik, Anita; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Coutlée, François; Franco, Eduardo L

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that, following a reduction in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine-targeted genotypes, an increase in prevalence of other HPV types may occur due to reduced competition during natural infection. Any apparent postvaccination increase must be distinguished from diagnostic artifacts consequent to consensus PCR assays failing to detect HPV types present in low copy numbers in coinfected specimens (under the assumption that with a drop in vaccine-preventable types there may be increased detection of previously "masked" types). We reanalyzed anogenital specimens to evaluate unmasking of HPV52 that may be caused by elimination of HPV16. Using highly sensitive type-specific real-time HPV52 PCR, we retested 1,200 anogenital specimens (all HPV52 negative according to consensus PCR assays) from six epidemiologic studies (200 specimens/study; 100 HPV16(+)/study). Multivariate logistic regression, with adjustment for age and number of sexual partners, was used to evaluate the association between HPV16 positivity and detection of HPV52. In our pooled analysis (n = 1,196), the presence of HPV16 was positively associated with HPV52 detection [adjusted OR, 1.47; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.76-2.82]. In our separate (study specific) analyses, a statistically significant association was observed in one study that included HIV-infected males (HIPVIRG study; adjusted OR, 3.82; 95% CI, 1.19-12.26). We observed a positive association between HPV16 viral load (tertiles) and detection of HPV52 (P for trend = 0.003). These results indicate that diagnostic artifacts, resulting from unmasking of HPV52, may occur in some settings in the evaluation of HPV type replacement. Additional studies exploring the extent and severity of unmasking are needed. PMID:25277793

  18. New generic primer system targeting mucosal/genital and cutaneous human papillomaviruses leads to the characterization of HPV 115, a novel Beta-papillomavirus species 3.

    PubMed

    Chouhy, Diego; Gorosito, Mario; Sánchez, Adriana; Serra, Esteban C; Bergero, Adriana; Fernandez Bussy, Ramón; Giri, Adriana A

    2010-02-01

    We explored the cutaneotropic HPV genetic diversity in 71 subjects from Argentina. New generic primers (CUT) targeting 88 mucosal/cutaneous HPV were designed and compared to FAP primers. Overall, 69 different HPV types/putative types were identified, being 17 of them novel putative types. Phylogenetic analysis of partial L1 sequences grouped 2 novel putative types in the Beta-PV, 14 in the Gamma-PV and 1 in the Mu-PV genera. CUT primers showed broader capacity than FAP primers in detecting different genera/species and novel putative types (p<0.01). Using overlapping PCR, the full-length genome of a Beta-PV putative type was amplified and cloned. The new virus, designated HPV 115, encodes five early genes and two late genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated HPV 115 as the most divergent type within the genus Beta-PV species 3. This report is the first providing data on cutaneous HPVs circulating in South America and expands our knowledge of the Papillomaviridae family. PMID:19948351

  19. Differential Dependence on Host Cell Glycosaminoglycans for Infection of Epithelial Cells by High-Risk HPV Types

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Linda; Meyers, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the leading cause of cervical cancer world-wide. Here, we show that native HPV particles produced in a differentiated epithelium have developed different strategies to infect the host. Using biochemical inhibition assays and glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-negative cells, we show that of the four most common cancer-causing HPV types, HPV18, HPV31, and HPV45 are largely dependent on GAGs to initiate infection. In contrast, HPV16 can bind and enter through a GAG-independent mechanism. Infections of primary human keratinocytes, natural host cells for HPV infections, support our conclusions. Further, this renders the different virus types differentially susceptible to carrageenan, a microbicide targeting virus entry. Our data demonstrates that ordered maturation of papillomavirus particles in a differentiating epithelium may alter the virus entry mechanism. This study should facilitate a better understanding of the attachment and infection by the main oncogenic HPV types, and development of inhibitors of HPV infection. PMID:23861898

  20. Concurrence of oral and genital human papillomavirus infection in healthy men: a population-based cross-sectional study in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangfang; Hang, Dong; Deng, Qiuju; Liu, Mengfei; Xi, Longfu; He, Zhonghu; Zhang, Chaoting; Sun, Min; Liu, Ying; Li, Jingjing; Pan, Yaqi; Ning, Tao; Guo, Chuanhai; Liang, Yongmei; Xu, Ruiping; Zhang, Lixin; Cai, Hong; Ke, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, a primary cause of genital cancer, is also related to the increasing incidence of oropharyngeal cancer among young men. Relatively little is known about the concurrence of oral and genital infection among healthy individuals. Oral and genital swab exfoliated cells were collected simultaneously from 2566 men in rural China. Using general primer-mediated (SPF1/GP6+) PCR and sequencing, HPV testing results were obtained from 2228 men with both valid oral and genital specimens (?-globin-positive). The prevalence of HPV infection was 6.7% in the oral cavity and 16.9% for the external genitalia. Among 43 men (1.9%, 43/2228) with oral-genital coinfection, 60.5% (26/43) harbored an identical HPV type at both sites. The risk of oral HPV infection was higher among men with genital infection than among uninfected men (11.4% vs. 5.7%, Adjusted OR?=?2.3, 95% CI: 1.6–3.4). In addition, having multiple lifetime sexual partners was a significant risk for oral-genital HPV coinfection (Adjusted OR?=?2.6, 95% CI: 1.0–7.0; 2 partners vs. 1 partner). These findings provide a basis for further understanding the natural history and transmission dynamics of oral HPV infection. PMID:26503510

  1. Concurrence of oral and genital human papillomavirus infection in healthy men: a population-based cross-sectional study in rural China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangfang; Hang, Dong; Deng, Qiuju; Liu, Mengfei; Xi, Longfu; He, Zhonghu; Zhang, Chaoting; Sun, Min; Liu, Ying; Li, Jingjing; Pan, Yaqi; Ning, Tao; Guo, Chuanhai; Liang, Yongmei; Xu, Ruiping; Zhang, Lixin; Cai, Hong; Ke, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, a primary cause of genital cancer, is also related to the increasing incidence of oropharyngeal cancer among young men. Relatively little is known about the concurrence of oral and genital infection among healthy individuals. Oral and genital swab exfoliated cells were collected simultaneously from 2566 men in rural China. Using general primer-mediated (SPF1/GP6+) PCR and sequencing, HPV testing results were obtained from 2228 men with both valid oral and genital specimens (?-globin-positive). The prevalence of HPV infection was 6.7% in the oral cavity and 16.9% for the external genitalia. Among 43 men (1.9%, 43/2228) with oral-genital coinfection, 60.5% (26/43) harbored an identical HPV type at both sites. The risk of oral HPV infection was higher among men with genital infection than among uninfected men (11.4% vs. 5.7%, Adjusted OR?=?2.3, 95% CI: 1.6-3.4). In addition, having multiple lifetime sexual partners was a significant risk for oral-genital HPV coinfection (Adjusted OR?=?2.6, 95% CI: 1.0-7.0; 2 partners vs. 1 partner). These findings provide a basis for further understanding the natural history and transmission dynamics of oral HPV infection. PMID:26503510

  2. HPV types and variants among cervical cancer tumors in three regions of Tunisia.

    PubMed

    KrennHrubec, Keris; Mrad, Karima; Sriha, Badreddine; Ben Ayed, Farhat; Bottalico, Danielle M; Ostolaza, Janae; Smith, Benjamin; Tchaikovska, Tatyana; Soliman, Amr S; Burk, Robert D

    2011-04-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among Tunisian women, and the incidence rates vary by region. Three Tunisian registries report age-standardized rates of 6.3/10(5) in the central region, 5.4/10(5) in the north, and 2.7/10(5) in the south. High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types and their variants differ in carcinogenic potential and geographic distribution. The HPV type and variant distribution could be a factor in the differing rates between regions of Tunisia. Tumor tissue was collected from 142 Tunisian cervical cancer patients. Demographic and reproductive characteristics of the patients were abstracted from cancer registry and hospital records. HPV type and variant analyses were performed using PCR-based Luminex and dot-blot hybridization assays. Eighty-three percent of tumors were infected with at least one HPV type. European variants of HPV16/18 were the most prevalent in tumors from all three regions, with all HPV18 infections and 64% of HPV16 infections being of European lineage. A higher frequency of HPV16 was present in Northern Tunisia (80%) than in Central (68%) or Southern Tunisia (50%) (P=0.02). HPV18/45 was significantly more common in adenocarcinomas (50%) than in squamous cell carcinomas (11%) (P=0.004). Frequent infection with European HPV variants most likely reflects the history of European migration to Tunisia. In addition to the importance of understanding the variants of HPV in Tunisia, behavioral and cultural attitudes towards screening and age-specific infection rates should be investigated to aid the development of future vaccination and HPV screening programs and policies. PMID:21328380

  3. Oncogenic and nononcogenic human genital papillomaviruses generate the E7 mRNA by different mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Smotkin, D; Prokoph, H; Wettstein, F O

    1989-01-01

    A new promoter located within E6 was mapped in human papillomavirus type 6b (HPV6b)- and HPV11-containing benign genital condylomata (genital warts). The RNA transcribed from this promoter represented the major RNA species colinear with open reading frames E6 and E7 and can encode the E7 protein. No equivalent promoter was active in HPV16-containing cancers and cancer-derived cell lines. In those, the major transcripts contained one of two different introns within E6 and the RNAs could encode two different E6 proteins and E7. Images PMID:2536845

  4. HPV and Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... HPV types have been identified. Two of these, HPV types 16 and 18, are responsible for most HPV-caused cancers ( 2 , ... cancer are caused by HPV, and just two HPV types, 16 and 18, are responsible for about 70 percent of all ...

  5. HPV DNA test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... during sex. Some types of HPV can cause cervical cancer and other cancers. These are called high-risk ... High-risk types of HPV can lead to cervical cancer or anal cancer. The HPV-DNA test is ...

  6. Clinical features of external genital warts.

    PubMed

    Lynde, Charles; Vender, Ronald; Bourcier, Marc; Bhatia, Neal

    2013-12-01

    External genital warts (EGWs) are a common sexually transmitted infection caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although over 100 HPV types have been identified, some of which are associated with cancer, EGWs are caused by noncancerous HPV subtypes 6 and 11. This cutaneous manifestation of HPV infection can be asymptomatic or produce warty lesions that may assume a cauliflower-like, flat, papular, or keratotic appearance. Physical symptoms may also accompany warts, such as pruritus, burning, pain, and obstruction. EGWs typically appear in anogenital areas, such as the vulva, penis, groin, perineum, perianal skin, or mucosal surfaces. EGWs are typically a transient type of infection that often spontaneously regresses without treatment, but long-term remission rates are currently unknown. Treatment is determined according to the size and number of lesions, which can cluster or develop at multiple sites. Because of the individual variability in disease, treatment should be determined on a case-by-case basis. Further investigation, such as a biopsy, may be advisable in cases of atypical lesions, lesions that are unresponsive to therapies, and immunocompromised individuals, who are essentially more susceptible to HPV infections and less responsive to treatment. Although HPV testing is available, it is not currently recommended for detection and HPV typing. Differential diagnoses may include normal skin variations, other infectious or inflammatory diseases, and cancerous growths. PMID:24388559

  7. Sensitive HPV detection in oropharyngeal cancers

    E-print Network

    Winder, David M.; Ball, Siolian L. R.; Vaughan, Katie; Hanna, Nashat; Woo, Yin Ling; Franzer, Jurgen-Theodor; Sterling, Jane C.; Stanley, Margaret A.; Sudhoff, Holger H.; Goon, Peter K. C.

    2009-12-15

    Abstract Background Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the aetiological agents of certain benign and malignant tumours of skin and mucosae; the most important of which is cervical cancer. Also, the incidence of ano-genital warts, HPV-anal cancer...

  8. Comparison of the immunogenicity of the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 vaccine and the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine for oncogenic non-vaccine types HPV-31 and HPV-45 in healthy women aged 18–45 years

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Mira; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Fox, Bradley; Scholar, Sofia; Rosen, Jeffrey; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Lebacq, Marie; van der Most, Robbert; Moris, Philippe; Giannini, Sandra L; Schuind, Anne; Datta, Sanjoy K; Descamps, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Protection against oncogenic non-vaccine types (cross-protection) offered by human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines may provide a significant medical benefit. Available clinical efficacy data suggest the two licensed vaccines [HPV-16/18 vaccine, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals (GSK), and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine, Merck and Co., Inc.,] differ in terms of protection against oncogenic non-vaccine HPV types -31/45. The immune responses induced by the two vaccines against these two non-vaccine HPV types (cross-reactivity) was compared in an observer-blind study up to Month 24 (18 mo postvaccination), in women HPV DNA-negative and seronegative prior to vaccination for the HPV type analyzed [HPV-010 (NCT00423046)]. Geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) measured by pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (PBNA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA ) were similar between vaccines for HPV-31/45. Seropositivity rates for HPV-31 were also similar between vaccines; however, there was a trend for higher seropositivity with the HPV-16/18 vaccine (13.0–16.7%) vs. the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (0.0–5.0%) for HPV-45 with PBNA, but not ELISA . HPV-31/45 cross-reactive memory B-cell responses were comparable between vaccines. Circulating antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell frequencies were higher for the HPV-16/18 vaccine than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine {HPV-31 [geometric mean ratio (GMR) = 2.0; p = 0.0002] and HPV-45 [GMR = 2.6; p = 0.0092]}, as were the proportion of T-cell responders (HPV-31, p = 0.0009; HPV-45, p = 0.0793). In conclusion, immune response to oncogenic non-vaccine HPV types -31/45 was generally similar for both vaccines with the exception of T-cell response which was higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine. Considering the differences in cross-protective efficacy between the two vaccines, the results might provide insights into the underlying mechanism(s) of protection. PMID:22048172

  9. Comparison of the immunogenicity of the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 vaccine and the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine for oncogenic non-vaccine types HPV-31 and HPV-45 in healthy women aged 18-45 years.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H; Baron, Mira; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Fox, Bradley; Scholar, Sofia; Rosen, Jeffrey; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Lebacq, Marie; van der Most, Robbert; Moris, Philippe; Giannini, Sandra L; Schuind, Anne; Datta, Sanjoy K; Descamps, Dominique

    2011-12-01

    Protection against oncogenic non-vaccine types (cross-protection) offered by human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines may provide a significant medical benefit. Available clinical efficacy data suggest the two licensed vaccines (HPV-16/18 vaccine, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals (GSK), and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine, Merck & Co., Inc.) differ in terms of protection against oncogenic non-vaccine HPV types -31/45. The immune responses induced by the two vaccines against these two non-vaccine HPV types (cross-reactivity) was compared in an observer-blind study up to Month 24 (18 mo post-vaccination), in women HPV DNA-negative and seronegative prior to vaccination for the HPV type analyzed (HPV-010 [NCT00423046]). Geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) measured by pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (PBNA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were similar between vaccines for HPV-31/45. Seropositivity rates for HPV-31 were also similar between vaccines; however, there was a trend for higher seropositivity with the HPV-16/18 vaccine (13.0-16.7%) versus the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (0.0-5.0%) for HPV-45 with PBNA, but not ELISA. HPV-31/45 cross-reactive memory B-cell responses were comparable between vaccines. Circulating antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell frequencies were higher for the HPV-16/18 vaccine than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (HPV-31 [geometric mean ratio [GMR] =2.0; p=0.0002] and HPV-45 [GMR=2.6; p=0.0092]), as were the proportion of T-cell responders (HPV-31, p=0.0009; HPV-45, p=0.0793). In conclusion, immune response to oncogenic non-vaccine HPV types -31/45 was generally similar for both vaccines with the exception of T-cell response which was higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine. Considering the differences in cross-protective efficacy between the two vaccines, the results might provide insights into the underlying mechanism(s) of protection. PMID:22048172

  10. Comparison of real-time multiplex human papillomavirus (HPV) PCR assays with INNO-LiPA HPV genotyping extra assay.

    PubMed

    Else, Elizabeth A; Swoyer, Ryan; Zhang, Yuhua; Taddeo, Frank J; Bryan, Janine T; Lawson, John; Van Hyfte, Inez; Roberts, Christine C

    2011-05-01

    Real-time type-specific multiplex human papillomavirus (HPV) PCR assays were developed to detect HPV DNA in samples collected for the efficacy determination of the quadrivalent HPV (type 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine (Gardasil). Additional multiplex (L1, E6, and E7 open reading frame [ORF]) or duplex (E6 and E7 ORF) HPV PCR assays were developed to detect high-risk HPV types, including HPV type 31 (HPV31), HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58, and HPV59. Here, we evaluated clinical specimen concordance and compared the limits of detection (LODs) between multiplex HPV PCR assays and the INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra assay, which detects 28 types, for the 14 HPV types common to both of these methods. Overall HPV detection agreement rates were >90% for swabs and >95% for thin sections. Statistically significant differences in detection were observed for HPV6, HPV16, HPV18, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV56, HPV58, and HPV59 in swabs and for HPV45, HPV58, and HPV59 in thin sections. Where P was <0.05, discordance was due to detection of more HPV-positive samples by the multiplex HPV PCR assays. LODs were similar for eight HPV types, significantly lower in multiplex assays for five HPV types, and lower in INNO-LiPA for HPV6 only. LODs were under 50 copies for all HPV types, with the exception of HPV39, HPV58, and HPV59 in the INNO-LiPA assay. The overall percent agreement for detection of 14 HPV types between the type-specific multiplex HPV PCR and INNO-LiPA genotyping assays was good. The differences in positive sample detection favored multiplex HPV PCR, suggesting increased sensitivity of HPV DNA detection by type-specific multiplex HPV PCR assays. PMID:21068278

  11. Chlamydia trachomatis infection: implications for HPV status and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jani; Cerqueira, Fátima; Medeiros, Rui

    2014-04-01

    Genital Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infections have been identified as a major health problem concern. CT is associated with adverse effect on women reproduction and also associated with cervical hypertrophy and induction of squamous metaplasia, providing a possible relationship with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Infection by high-risk HPV types is crucial to the pathogenesis of invasive cervical cancer (ICC), but other co-variants/cofactors must be present for the development of malignancy. CT biological effect may damage the mucosal barrier, improving HPV infection, or may interfere in immune response and viral clearance supporting the persistence of HPV infection. Moreover, CT-related chronic cervical inflammation, decrease of lower genital tract antigen-presenting cells, inhibition of cell-mediated immunity, and anti-apoptotic capacity may influence the natural history of HPV infection, namely persistence progression or resolution. Although several epidemiological studies have stated a positive association involving CT and HPV-related cervical neoplastic lesions and/or cervical cancer (CC), the specific role of this bacterium in the pathogenesis of cervical neoplasia has not been completely clarified. The present review summarizes several studies on CT role in cervical cancer and suggests future research directions on HPV and CT interaction. PMID:24346121

  12. PDZRN3/LNX3 Is a Novel Target of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18 E6

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 proteins have a C-terminal PDZ binding motif through which they bind, and target for proteasome-mediated degradation, a number of PDZ-containing cellular targets. Recent studies have suggested that the RING-containing ubiquitin-protein ligase PDZRN3 might also be an HPV E6 target. In this analysis, we show that HPV-16 and HPV-18 E6 can target PDZRN3 in a PDZ- and proteasome-dependent manner and provide a connection between the HPV life cycle and differentiation-related STAT signaling. PMID:25355882

  13. A cross-sectional, multicentre, epidemiological study on human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in adult women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Tjalma, W.A.A.; Trinh, X.B.; Rosenlund, M.; Makar, A.P.; Kridelka, F.; Rosillon, D.; Van Dam, P.A.; Collas De Souza, S.; Holl, K.; Simon, P.; Jenkins, D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Despite an advanced national cervical cancer screening and vaccination programme cervical cancer is still the third most frequent diagnosed gynaecological tumour in Belgium. The goal of this study is to present the Belgian data of a cross-sectional, multicentre, epidemiological study on human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in adult women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer (ICC) conducted in 12 European countries. Material and Methods: Centres in four major Belgian cities (Antwerp, Brussels, Ghent and Liège) participated in this study. Tissue samples from women with ICC were collected from the period 2001 - 2008. All slides were centrally reviewed and analysed for HPV. The total enrolled cohort included 278 subjects. Results: The histologically eligible cohort comprised of 255 patients (mean age 51.3 ± 15.1 years) and 237 were confirmed HPV positive (mean age 50.6 ± 14.9 years). A single HPV infection was present in 95.8%. The five most frequent HPV types were HPV 16 (68.7%), HPV18 (12.3%), HPV 31 (6.2%), HPV 33 (5.3%) and HPV 45 (1.8%). Multiple HPV types were present in 3.4%, with two HPV types in 2.5% and three HPV types in 0.8%. In the various HPV type combinations observed in multiple infected women, HPV 31 (62.5%) and HPV 33 (50.0%) were the most frequent. The ratio of adenocarcinoma (ADC) versus squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases in the histologically eligible cohort was 1:8. Compared to the pooled European data the Belgium HPV 16 is 1.1, HPV 33 is 1.2 and HPV 31 is 1.7 higher and the HPV 18 is 0.8 and HPV 45 is 0.34 lower. Conclusion: The 5 most frequent HPV types in Belgium are the same as in the rest of Europe, but the distribution is different. Cervical cancer screening should therefore be HPV type specific and HPV prophylactic vaccination should also focus on other types then HPV 16 and HPV 18. A national registry is needed in order to follow the trends of HPV types in the society and to measure the impact of prevention, for which the data presented in this study can be an important basis. PMID:26175888

  14. Genital warts

    MedlinePLUS

    Condylomata acuminata; Penile warts; Human papillomavirus (HPV); Venereal warts; Condyloma; HPV DNA test; Sexually transmitted disease (STD) - warts; Sexually transmitted infection (STI) - warts; LSIL-HPV; Low- ...

  15. The epidemiology of oral HPV infection among a multinational sample of healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimee R.; Villa, Alessandro; Nyitray, Alan G.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Papenfuss, Mary; Smith, Danelle; Hildesheim, Allan; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Oral human papillomavirus type-16 (HPV16) infection is a risk factor for oropharyngeal cancer. We examined oral HPV infection among healthy men. Methods Oral rinse/gargle specimens and questionnaire data were collected from 1,688 healthy men aged 18 to 74 (median 31 years), from the United States, Mexico, and Brazil. HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, and 59 and non-carcinogenic HPV types were detected using Roche Linear Array. Results Oral HPV DNA was detected in 67 of 1680 (4.0%, 95%CI 3.1% to 5.0%) ß-globin positive specimens; carcinogenic HPVs were detected in 1.3% (95%CI 0.8% to 2.0%; n=22) and HPV16 was the most commonly detected carcinogenic HPV type (0.6%, 95%CI 0.2% to 1.1%; n=10). The prevalence of oral HPV infection was similar by country except for HPV55, which had notably higher prevalence in Mexico (3.0%) than Brazil (0%) or the US (0.2%). Oral HPV prevalence non-significantly increased over increasing age categories (p for trend 0.096). The strongest predictor of oral HPV was current tobacco use, which increased the odds 2.5-fold (95%CI 1.4–4.4). Oral sexual behaviors were not associated with oral HPV infection. Conclusions Oral HPV16 infection was rare in healthy men, especially at younger ages, and was positively associated with current tobacco use. Impact Oral HPV appears to be ~10 fold less prevalent than infection at genital sites in men (4% vs. ~40%, respectively). It remains unclear whether this reflects reduced exposure or if the oral region is more resistant to HPV infection compared to anogenital sites. PMID:21148755

  16. FDA licensure of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4, Gardasil) for use in males and guidance from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

    PubMed

    2010-05-28

    On October 16, 2009, the Food and Drug Administration licensed quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4; Gardasil, Merck & Co. Inc.) for use in males aged 9 through 26 years for prevention of genital warts caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 11. HPV4 had been licensed previously for use in females aged 9 through 26 years for prevention of HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18-related outcomes (i.e., vaginal, vulvar, and cervical precancers and cancers and genital warts). The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends routine vaccination of females at age 11 or 12 years and catch-up vaccination for females aged 13 through 26 years. On October 21, 2009, ACIP provided guidance that HPV4 may be given to males aged 9 through 26 years to reduce their likelihood of acquiring genital warts; ACIP does not recommend HPV4 for routine use among males. This report presents the ACIP policy statement and summarizes background data. Issues reviewed by ACIP included efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of the HPV4 vaccine in males, epidemiology of HPV and burden of HPV-associated diseases and cancers in males, cost-effectiveness of male vaccination, and programmatic considerations. PMID:20508594

  17. Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E7 protein bodies cause tumour regression in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the causative agents of cervical cancer in women, which results in over 250 000 deaths per year. Presently there are two prophylactic vaccines on the market, protecting against the two most common high-risk HPV types 16 and 18. These vaccines remain very expensive and are not generally affordable in developing countries where they are needed most. Additionally, there remains a need to treat women that are already infected with HPV, and who have high-grade lesions or cervical cancer. Methods In this paper, we characterize the immunogenicity of a therapeutic vaccine that targets the E7 protein of the most prevalent high-risk HPV - type 16 – the gene which has previously been shown to be effective in DNA vaccine trials in mice. The synthetic shuffled HPV-16 E7 (16E7SH) has lost its transforming properties but retains all naturally-occurring CTL epitopes. This was genetically fused to Zera®, a self-assembly domain of the maize ?-zein able to induce the accumulation of recombinant proteins into protein bodies (PBs), within the endoplasmic reticulum in a number of expression systems. Results High-level expression of the HPV 16E7SH protein fused to Zera® in plants was achieved, and the protein bodies could be easily and cost-effectively purified. Immune responses comparable to the 16E7SH DNA vaccine were demonstrated in the murine model, with the protein vaccine successfully inducing a specific humoral as well as cell mediated immune response, and mediating tumour regression. Conclusions The fusion of 16E7SH to the Zera® peptide was found to enhance the immune responses, presumably by means of a more efficient antigen presentation via the protein bodies. Interestingly, simply mixing the free PBs and 16E7SH also enhanced immune responses, indicating an adjuvant activity for the Zera® PBs. PMID:24885328

  18. Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 101 and 103 isolated from cervicovaginal cells lack an E6 open reading frame (ORF)

    E-print Network

    DeSalle, Rob

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 101 and 103 isolated from cervicovaginal cells lack an E6 open reading frame (ORF) and are related to gamma-papillomaviruses Zigui Chen a , Mark Schiffman b , Rolando with the gamma- and pi-PV groups. These data demonstrated that HPV genomes closely related to papillomaviruses

  19. Epidemiology of oral HPV in the oral mucosa in women without signs of oral disease from Yucatan, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Losa, María del Refugio; Barrera, Ernesto Soria; Herrera-Pech, Verónica; Conde-Ferráez, Laura; Puerto-Solís, Marylin; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are considered necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, there is no doubt that some types of oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with HR-HPV. The epidemiology of oral HPV infections in healthy subjects remains unclear due to a lack of knowledge. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections of the oral mucosa without pathology. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 390 women seeking prenatal care, Pap smears, family planning or gynecological diseases were studied. Oral cells were collected by direct swab sampling. Information regarding sociodemographic status, sexual behavior, infectious diseases, contraceptive history and tobacco and alcohol consumption were obtained through direct interviews. HPV and genotypes were detected by type-specific polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 14% of the women studied had an oral HPV infection. Women ? 20 years of age had the highest HPV prevalence (24.5%). In total, seven genotypes were identified, including the high-risk genotypes 16, 18, 58 and 59 and the low-risk genotypes 6, 81 and 13, the latter of which is a type exclusive to oral mucosa. Sexual behavior was not associated with the presence of genital HPV types in the oral mucosa. Genital HPV types were present in the oral mucosa of women without associated clinical manifestations; however, sexual behavior was not associated with infection, and therefore others routes of transmission should be explored. PMID:26221121

  20. Decreasing risk: impact of HPV vaccination on outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hymel, Pamela Ann

    2006-12-01

    Cervical cancer, caused by oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV), remains a major health problem worldwide. The recent introduction of a quadrivalent vaccine (Gardasil), which targets HPV strains responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases and 90% of genital warts, has ushered in new hope of substantially reducing global prevalence of HPV disease. A further bivalent HPV vaccine (Cervarix) is in the offing. However, many issues still need to be addressed, including actual vaccine efficacy in preventing cervical cancer, public acceptance, use of the vaccine in men, vaccine access, costs, and impact of the vaccine on cervical cancer screening programs. This review analyzes some of these issues, and emphasizes the need for a coordinated effort of patients, parents, health professionals, hospitals, and policymakers to ensure successful implementation of vaccination programs in the United States. PMID:17203991

  1. Minor Cytological Abnormalities and up to 7-Year Risk for Subsequent High-Grade Lesions by HPV Type

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Sven-Erik; Dillner, Joakim; Andersson, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diagnoses of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) are common, but the corresponding risk of disease varies by human papillomavirus (HPV) status, complicating management strategies. Our aim was to estimate the longer-term risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+) among women with ASCUS/LSIL by age, HPV status, and genotype(s). Methods A total of 314 women with ASCUS/ LSIL were followed for a median of 3.8 years. Baseline HPV status was determined by reflex testing and women with histologically confirmed CIN2+ were identified through linkage to the Swedish National Quality Register for Cervical Cancer Prevention. Cumulative incidence and hazard ratios were estimated to explore differences between index data and associations with CIN2+. Results In total, 89 women (28.3%) developed CIN2+. High-risk (HR) HPV-positive women developed significantly more CIN2+ than HR-HPV-negative women (cumulative incidence 3.5 years after the index test: 42.2%, 95% CI: 32.5–53.5 for HPV16/18; 36.2%, 95% CI: 28.3–45.4 for other HR-HPV types; and 2.0%, 95% CI: 0.5–7.8 for HR-HPV-negative women; p<0.0001). Conclusion HPV status was of greatest importance in determining the risk of CIN2+. The risk was low among HPV-negative women during the first years of follow-up, suggesting these women could be followed less intensively. HPV16/18-positive women may need intensified follow-up as they showed the highest risk of CIN2+. PMID:26083247

  2. The HPV infection in males: an update.

    PubMed

    Giraldi, G; De Luca d'Alessandro, E

    2012-01-01

    The role of Human papillomavirus (HPV) in malignant and non-malignant genital diseases in females is well known and the corresponding epidemiological burden has been widely described, in males instead, less is known about the role of the virus in anal, penile and head and neck cancer, and the burden of malignant and non-malignant HPV-related diseases. There are many types of HPV that can infect the epithelium: some types can cause genital warts (low risk genotype), other types (high risk genotypes) can cause cancers of the penis, anus or oropharynx. Relative to females, males tend to be less knowledgeable about the infection: some may view its consequences as less likely and severe for themselves than for females, and thus could perceive vaccination as unnecessary. Including boys in the vaccination program generally exceeded conventional thresholds of good value for money, even under favorable conditions of vaccine protection and health benefits; however, uncertainty still exists in many areas that can either strengthen or attenuate the findings achieved. PMID:23234187

  3. Pathogenic role of the eight probably/possibly carcinogenic HPV types 26, 53, 66, 67, 68, 70, 73 and 82 in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Halec, Gordana; Alemany, Laia; Lloveras, Belen; Schmitt, Markus; Alejo, Maria; Bosch, Franz X; Tous, Sara; Klaustermeier, Jo Ellen; Guimerà, Nuria; Grabe, Niels; Lahrmann, Bernd; Gissmann, Lutz; Quint, Wim; Bosch, Francesc X; de Sanjose, Silvia; Pawlita, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Eight HPV types (HPV26, 53, 66, 67, 68, 70, 73 and 82) that are phylogenetically closely related to 12 WHO-defined high-risk (HR) HPV have been rarely but consistently identified as single HPV infections in about 3% of cervical cancer (CxCa) tissues. Due to lack of biological data, these types are referred to as probable/possible (p) HR-HPV. To analyse their biological activity in direct comparison to HR-HPV types, we selected 55 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) CxCa tissues harbouring single pHR-HPV infections (2-13 cases per type) and 266 tissues harbouring single HR-HPV (7-40 cases per type) from a worldwide, retrospective, cross-sectional study. Single HPV infection was verified by two genotyping methods. Presence of type-specific spliced E6*I mRNA transcripts and expression of cellular proteins indicative of HPV transformation were assessed in all cases. In 55 CxCa tissues with pHR-HPV, E6*I mRNA expression was 100%; high p16(INK4a) , 98%; low pRb, 96%; low CyD1, 93%; and low p53, 84%. Compared to HPV16 tissues as a reference, individual frequencies of these five markers did not differ significantly, either for any of the eight pHR-HPV and the 11 other HR types individually or for the groups of pHR and HR types without HPV16. We conclude that the eight pHR-HPV types, when present as a single infection in CxCa, are biologically active and affect the same cellular pathways as any of the fully recognized carcinogenic HR-HPV types. Therefore we have provided molecular evidence of carcinogenicity for types currently classified as probably/possibly carcinogenic. Although this evidence is crucial for HPV-type carcinogenicity classification, per se it is not sufficient for inclusion of these HPV types into population-wide primary and secondary prevention programmes. Such decisions have to include careful estimation of effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses. PMID:25043390

  4. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer ... of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Committee Opinion No. 588: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination. Obstet Gynecol . 2014;123:712-8. American ...

  5. A comparative analysis of the epidemiological impact and disease cost-savings of HPV vaccines in France

    PubMed Central

    Bresse, Xavier; Adam, Marjorie; Largeron, Nathalie; Roze, Stephane; Marty, Remi

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to compare the epidemiological and economic impact of 16/18 bivalent and 6/11/16/18 quadrivalent HPV vaccination in France, considering differences in licensed outcomes, protection against non-vaccine HPV types and prevention of HPV-6/11-related diseases. The differential impact of the two vaccines was evaluated using a published model adapted to the French setting. The target population was females aged 14–23 y and the time horizon was 100 y. A total of eight different scenarios compared vaccination impact in terms of reduction in HPV-16/18-associated carcinomas (cervical, vulvar, vaginal, anal, penile and head and neck), HPV-6/11-related genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and incremental reduction in cervical cancer due to potential cross-protection. Quadrivalent vaccine was associated with total discounted cost savings ranging from EUR 544–1,020 million vs. EUR 177–538 million with the bivalent vaccination (100-y time horizon). Genital wart prevention thanks to quadrivalent HPV vaccination accounted for EUR 306–380 million savings (37–56% of costs saved). In contrast, the maximal assumed cross-protection against cervical cancer resulted in EUR 13–33 million savings (4%). Prevention of vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers accounted for additional EUR 71–89 million savings (13%). In France, the quadrivalent HPV vaccination would result in significant incremental epidemiological and economic benefits vs. the bivalent vaccination, driven primarily by prevention of genital. The present analysis is the first in the French setting to consider the impact of HPV vaccination on all HPV diseases and non-vaccine types. PMID:23563511

  6. Determinants of human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 infections in the lower female genital tract in an Italian population.

    PubMed

    Venuti, A; Badaracco, G; Sedati, A; Carbini, R; Marcante, M L

    1994-01-01

    The prevalences of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 infection were determined by a non isotopic molecular hybridization assay on cervical scrapes from 738 women affected by gynaecological lesions different from malignancies. The correlation with known epidemiological risk factors for cervical neoplasia, such as sexual habits, smoking and pill use, was investigated. The overall HPV prevalence rate was 29.8% (220/738). Viral DNA sequences were detected in 26.9% (122/452) of morphologically normal cervices, in 75 of 224 HPV lesions (32.5%), in 1 case of 3 HSV2 lesions and in 22 of 59 dysplastic lesions (37.3%), and the frequency was increasing with the severity of CIN from 22.7% of CIN I to 57.1% of CIN III. The most relevant factor as relative risk for the presence of HPV 16/18 was the multiple lifetime sexual partners, whereas the other investigated factors were mainly associated with the clinically manifested HPV infection. PMID:7957325

  7. Association Study between Cervical Lesions and Single or Multiple Vaccine-Target and Non-Vaccine Target Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in Women from Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Chagas, Bárbara Simas; Comar, Manola; Gurgel, Ana Pavla Almeida Diniz; Paiva, Sérgio; Seraceni, Silva; de Freitas, Antonio Carlos; Crovella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    We performed an association between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and single or multiple vaccine-target as well as non-vaccine target Human papillomavirus (HPV) types. Using bead-based HPV genotyping, 594 gynecological samples were genotyped. An association between squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) and presence of HPV16, 18, 31, 58 and 56 types were calculated. The risk was estimated by using odds ratio (OR) and 95% of confidence intervals (CI). A total of 370 (62.3%) women were HPV positive. Among these, 157 (42.7%) presented a single HPV infection, and 212 (57.3%) were infected by more than one HPV type. HPV31 was the most prevalent genotype, regardless single and multiple HPV infections. Single infection with HPV31 was associated with LSIL (OR=2.32; 95%CI: 1.01 to 5.32; p=0.04); HPV31 was also associated with LSIL (OR=3.28; 95%CI: 1.74 to 6.19; p= 0.0002) and HSIL (OR=3.82; 95%CI: 2.10 to 6.97; p<0.001) in multiple HPV infections. Risk to harbor cervical lesions was observed in multiple HPV infections with regard to the HPV56 (OR=5.39; 95%CI: 2.44 to 11.90; p<0.001for LSIL; OR=5.37; 95%CI: 2.71 to 10.69; p<0.001) and HPV58 (OR=3.29; 95%CI: 1.34 to 8.09; p=0.0091 for LSIL; OR=3.55; 95%CI: 1.56 to 8.11; p=0.0026) genotypes. In addition, women coinfected with HPV16/31/56 types had 6 and 5-fold increased risk of HSIL (OR=6.46; 95%CI: 1.89 to 22.09; p=0.002) and LSIL (OR=5.22; 95%CI: 1.10 to 24.70; p=0.03), respectively. Multiple HPV infections without HPV16/18 has 2-fold increased risk of HSIL (OR=2.57; 95%CI: 1.41 to 4.70; p=0.002) and LSIL OR=2.03; 95%CI: 1.08 to 3.79; p=0.02). The results of this study suggest that single and multiple vaccine target as well as non-vaccine target HPV types are associated with LSIL and HSIL. These finding should be taken into consideration in the design of HPV vaccination strategies. PMID:26176537

  8. Cervicovaginal human papillomavirus (HPV)-infection before and after hysterectomy: evidence of different tissue tropism for oncogenic and nononcogenic HPV types in a cohort of HIV-positive and HIV-negative women.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Burk, Robert D; Zhong, Ye; Minkoff, Howard; Massad, L Stewart; Xue, Xiaonan; Watts, D Heather; Anastos, Kathryn; Palefsky, Joel M; Levine, Alexandra M; Colie, Christine; Castle, Philip E; Strickler, Howard D

    2012-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is detected in nearly all cervical cancers and approximately half of vaginal cancers. However, vaginal cancer is an order of magnitude less common than cervical cancer, not only in the general population but also among women with HIV/AIDS. It is interesting therefore that recent studies found that HPV was common in both normal vaginal and cervical tissue, with higher prevalence of nononcogenic HPV types in the vagina. In our investigation, we prospectively examined HPV infection in 86 HIV-positive and 17 HIV-negative women who underwent hysterectomy during follow-up in a longitudinal cohort. Cervicovaginal lavage specimens were obtained semi-annually and tested for HPV DNA by polymerase chain reaction. To address possible selection biases associated with having a hysterectomy, subjects acted as their own comparison group--before versus after hysterectomy. The average HPV prevalence was higher in HIV-positive than HIV-negative women both before (59% vs. 12%; p < 0.001) and after hysterectomy (56% vs. 6%; p < 0.001). Multivariate random effects models (within-individual comparisons) demonstrated significantly lower HPV prevalence [odds ratio (OR) = 0.71; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.59-0.85) after hysterectomy. The association of HPV prevalence with hysterectomy was similar among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women. However, hysterectomy had greater effects on oncogenic (OR = 0.48; 95% CI = 0.35-0.66) than nononcogenic HPV types (OR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.71-1.11; P(interaction) = 0.002). Overall, we observed greater reductions in oncogenic than nononcogenic HPV prevalence after hysterectomy. If correct, these data could suggest that oncogenic HPV have greater tropism for cervical compared to vaginal epithelium, consistent with the lower incidence of vaginal than cervical cancer. PMID:22120980

  9. HPV vaccine (human papillomavirus) Cervarix - what you need to know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Cervarix® Vaccine Information Statement: http://www.cdc.gov/ ... What is HPV? Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most ... in the United States. More than half of sexually active men and ...

  10. Incidence and clearance of genital human papillomavirus infection in men (HIM): a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Anna R; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Fulp, William; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano, Eduardo; Papenfuss, Mary R; Abrahamsen, Martha; Salmeron, Jorge; Anic, Gabriella M; Rollison, Dana E; Smith, Danelle

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause genital warts and cancers in men. The natural history of HPV infection in men is largely unknown, and that information is needed to inform prevention strategies. The goal in this study was to estimate incidence and clearance of type-specific genital HPV infection in men, and to assess the associated factors. Methods Men (aged 18–70 years), residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the USA, who were HIV negative and reported no history of cancer were recruited from the general population, universities, and organised health-care systems. They were assessed every 6 months for a median follow-up of 27·5 months (18·0–31·2). Specimens from the coronal sulcus, glans penis, shaft, and scrotum were obtained for the assessment of the status of HPV genotypes. Findings In 1159 men, the incidence of a new genital HPV infection was 38·4 per 1000 person months (95% CI 34·3–43·0). Oncogenic HPV infection was significantly associated with having a high number of lifetime female sexual partners (hazard ratio 2·40, 1·38–4·18, for at least 50 partners vs not more than one partner), and number of male anal-sexual partners (2·57, 1·46–4·49, for at least three male partners vs no recent partners). Median duration of HPV infection was 7·52 months (6·80–8·61) for any HPV and 12·19 months (7·16–18·17) for HPV 16. Clearance of oncogenic HPV infection decreased in men with a high number of lifetime female partners (0·49, 0·31–0·76, for at least 50 female partners vs not more than one partner), and in men in Brazil (0·71, 0·56–0·91) and Mexico (0·73, 0·57–0·94) compared with the USA. Clearance of oncogenic HPV was more rapid with increasing age (1·02, 1·01–1·03). Interpretation The data from this study are useful for the development of realistic cost-effectiveness models for male HPV vaccination internationally. Funding National Cancer Institute. PMID:21367446

  11. High prevalence of HPV in non-cervical sites of women with abnormal cervical cytology

    E-print Network

    Crawford, Robin; Grignon, Anne-Laure; Kitson, Sarah; Winder, David M.; Ball, Siolian L. R.; Vaughan, Katie; Stanley, Margaret A.; Sterling, Jane C.; Goon, Peter K. C.

    2011-11-02

    Abstract Background Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are causally associated with ano-genital and a subset of head and neck cancers. Rising incidence of HPV+ anal cancers and head and neck cancers have now been demonstrated in the developed world over...

  12. HPV Type 16 Infection Switches Keratinocytes from Apoptotic to Proliferative Fate under TWEAK/Fn14 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong; Zhan, Na; Ding, Dong; Liu, Xiaoming; Zou, Xiaoyan; Li, Ke; Xia, Yumin

    2015-10-01

    Previously, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) had been known to be an inducer of apoptosis of keratinocytes by engaging the Fn14 receptor. However, the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection confers a proliferation advantage on keratinocytes that may consequently harbor tumorigenicity. This study was designed to investigate the cross-talk in keratinocytes between TWEAK/Fn14 signaling and HPV type 16 infection, which may cooperate in regulating cell-cycle progression. TWEAK and Fn14 expression was determined in anogenital warts and normal skin. Both primary keratinocytes and HaCaT cells were transfected with HPV16 E6/E7 genes. The results showed that Fn14 is highly expressed upon HPV16 transfection and accompanied by an increase in Ras GTPase activity and TNF-receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) expression. Moreover, the E6/E7-transfected keratinocytes exhibit a shift of TNF receptor profile from type 1 to type 2 and weakened apoptotic response to TNF-? stimuli, when compared with the normal control. Surprisingly, significant increase in proliferation but not apoptosis was seen in E6/E7-positive keratinocytes, as TWEAK was additionally supplemented. In conclusion, the HPV16 infection in keratinocytes causes a switch of apoptotic to proliferative fate under TWEAK/Fn14 interaction, possibly by favoring Ras and TRAF2 activation and modulating TNF receptor expression. PMID:26016896

  13. HPV vaccines: their pathology-based discovery, benefits, and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Alcina F; de Andrade, Cecilia V; Russomano, Fabio B; Rodrigues, Luana S L; Oliveira, Nathalia S; Provance, David William; Nuovo, Gerard J

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine illustrates the power of in situ-based pathologic analysis in better understanding and curing diseases. The 2 available HPV vaccines have markedly reduced the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, genital warts, and cervical cancer throughout the world. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, health care officials, and parents to refuse providing the recommended vaccination to the target population. The aims of the study were to discuss the discovery of HPV vaccine and review scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines. The strong type-specific immunity against HPV in humans has been known for more than 25 years. Multiple studies confirm the positive risk benefit of HPV vaccination with minimal documented adverse effects. The most common adverse effect, injection site pain, occurred in about 10% of girls and was less than the rate reported for other vaccines. Use of HPV vaccine should be expanded into more diverse populations, mainly in low-resource settings. PMID:26321154

  14. Genital Warts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... anal, or oral). Genital contact (people's genitals touch). Childbirth (from infected mother to baby). Warts may not appear until weeks or months after sex with an infected person. All content solely developed by the American Academy of Dermatology. ...

  15. Identification of a Novel Human Papillomavirus, Type HPV199, Isolated from a Nasopharynx and Anal Canal, and Complete Genomic Characterization of Papillomavirus Species Gamma-12

    PubMed Central

    Oštrbenk, Anja; Kocjan, Boštjan J.; Hošnjak, Lea; Li, Jingjing; Deng, Qiuju; Šterbenc, Anja; Poljak, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The novel human papillomavirus type 199 (HPV199) was initially identified in a nasopharyngeal swab sample obtained from a 25 year-old immunocompetent male. The complete genome of HPV199 is 7,184 bp in length with a GC content of 36.5%. Comparative genomic characterization of HPV199 and its closest relatives showed the classical genomic organization of Gammapapillomaviruses (Gamma-PVs). HPV199 has seven major open reading frames (ORFs), encoding five early (E1, E2, E4, E6, and E7) and two late (L1 and L2) proteins, while lacking the E5 ORF. The long control region (LCR) of 513 bp is located between the L1 and E6 ORFs. Phylogenetic analysis additionally confirmed that HPV-199 clusters into the Gamma-PV genus, species Gamma-12, additionally containing HPV127, HV132, HPV148, HPV165, and three putative HPV types: KC5, CG2 and CG3. HPV199 is most closely related to HPV127 (nucleotide identity 77%). The complete viral genome sequence of additional HPV199 isolate was determined from anal canal swab sample. Two HPV199 complete viral sequences exhibit 99.4% nucleotide identity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first member of Gamma-PV with complete nucleotide sequences determined from two independent clinical samples. To evaluate the tissue tropism of the novel HPV type, 916 clinical samples were tested using HPV199 type-specific real-time PCR: HPV199 was detected in 2/76 tissue samples of histologically confirmed common warts, 2/108 samples of eyebrow hair follicles, 2/137 anal canal swabs obtained from individuals with clinically evident anal pathology, 4/184 nasopharyngeal swabs and 3/411 cervical swabs obtained from women with normal cervical cytology. Although HPV199 was found in 1.4% of cutaneous and mucosal samples only, it exhibits dual tissue tropism. According to the results of our study and literature data, dual tropism of all Gamma-12 members is highly possible. PMID:26375679

  16. Differential effects of human papillomavirus type 6, 16, and 18 DNAs on immortalization and transformation of human cervical epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pecoraro, G.; Morgan, D.; Defendi, V. )

    1989-01-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with specific benign and malignant lesions of the skin and mucosal epithelia. Cloned viral DNAs from HPV types 6b, 16, and 18 associated with different pathological manifestations of genital neoplasia in vivo were introduced into primary human cervical epithelial cells by electroporation. Cells transfected with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA acquired indefinite lifespans, distinct morphological alterations, and anchorage-independent growth (HPV18), and contain integrated transcriptionally active viral genomes. HPV6b or plasmid electroporated cells senesced at low passage. The alterations in growth and differentiation of the cells appear to reflect the progressive oncogenic processes that result in cervical carcinoma in vivo.

  17. HPV Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Is HPV and Why Is It a Problem? Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually ... 15 minutes after each shot. Protecting Yourself Against HPV For people who are having sex, condoms offer ...

  18. HPV Vaccine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 11, 16, and 18. Cervarix® provides protection against HPV types 16 and 18. Neither of these vaccines contains a live virus. ... of miscarriage with bivalent vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18: pooled analysis of two randomized clinical trials. BMJ ...

  19. Potential coverage of circulating HPV types by current and developing vaccines in a group of women in Bosnia and Herzegovina with abnormal Pap smears.

    PubMed

    Salimovi?-Beši?, I; Huki?, M

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in a group of Bosnian-Herzegovinian women with abnormal cytology and to assess their potential coverage by vaccines. HPVs were identified by multiplex real-time PCR test (HPV High Risk Typing Real-TM; Sacace Biotechnologies, Italy) of 105 women with an abnormal cervical Pap smear and positive high-risk (HR) HPV DNA screening test. The most common genotypes in the study were HPV-16 (32·6%, 48/147), HPV-31 (14·3%, 21/147), HPV-51 (9·5%, 14/147) and HPV-18 (7·5%, 11/147). The overall frequency of HR HPV-16 and/or HPV-18, covered by currently available vaccines [Gardasil® (Merck & Co., USA) and Cervarix®; (GlaxoSmithKline, UK)] was lower than the overall frequency of other HPVs detected in the study (40·1%, 59/174, P = 0·017). Group prevalence of HR HPVs targeted by a nine-valent vaccine in development (code-named V503) was higher than total frequency of other HPVs detected (68·0%, 100/147, P < 0·001). Development of cervical cytological abnormalities was independent of the presence of multiple infections (? 2 = 0·598, P = 0·741). Compared to other HPVs, dependence of cervical diagnosis and HPV-16, -18 (P = 0·008) and HPV-16, -18, -31 (P = 0·008) infections were observed. Vaccines targeting HR HPV-16, -18 and -31 might be an important tool in the prevention of cervical disease in Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:25578155

  20. Herpes simplex virus type 2 and other genital ulcerative infections as a risk factor for HIV-1 acquisition.

    PubMed Central

    Keet, I P; Lee, F K; van Griensven, G J; Lange, J M; Nahmias, A; Coutinho, R A

    1990-01-01

    We studied the role of genital ulcerative infections for acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in a cohort of 989 homosexual men in Amsterdam between October 1984 and December 1988. Among 53 HIV-1 seroconverters serological and anamnestic data were gathered regarding herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and syphilis in the 6 months before seroconversion. For statistical analysis a control who remained seronegative during the same interval was selected at random for each HIV-1 seroconverter. A significant difference between the prevalence of HSV-2 antibodies among HIV-1 seroconverters and controls was found (72% vs 38%). HSV-2 seroconversions among men initially seronegative for HSV-2 were found among three of 18 HIV-1 seroconverters and among three of 36 controls. (O.R. = 2.2, 95% C.I. 0.4-12.1). Self-reported cases of anogenital herpes were found more frequently among HIV-1 seroconverters (8) than among controls (4). One case of syphilis was diagnosed among HIV-1 seroconverters, and one among controls. Summing up these cases we assessed the total number of genital ulcerative infections: 12 among HIV-1 seroconverters and eight among controls (23 vs 15%, O.R. 1.7, C.I. 0.6-4.62). These data suggest little evidence for genital ulcerative infections being an important independent risk factor for HIV-1 acquisition among homosexual men in Amsterdam during the time period studied. PMID:2245979

  1. HPV Infections among MSM in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong-Yan; Yin, Yue-Ping; Feng, Tie-Jian; Hong, Fu-Chang; Jiang, Ning; Wang, Bao-Xi; Chen, Xiang-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background An increasing incidence of anal cancer among men, especially men who have sex with men (MSM) suggests a need to better understand anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among this group. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among MSM in Shenzhen, China. Blood was collected for HIV serological testing and syphilis serological screening, and anal swabs were collected for HPV genotyping. Difference of HPV prevalence between HIV seropositive and HIV seronegative MSM was assessed by chi-square test. Factors associated with anal canal HPV infection were assessed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results A total of 408 MSM were recruited. HIV and HPV prevalence were 6.9% and 36.4%, respectively. HPV was detected in the anal canal in 71.4% of the HIV-positive MSM and in 33.8% of the HIV-negative MSM (P<0.001). Oncogenic types were seen more often in anal specimens of HIV-positive MSM than in specimens of HIV-negative MSM (P?=?0.001). The HPV genotypes detected most frequently were HPV06 (8.2%), HPV16 (7.2%), HPV11 (6.4%), HPV18 (4.7%), HPV58 (4.7%), and HPV52 (4.2%). Conclusions In this study, HIV positive MSM had a higher burden of HPV infection, especially oncogenic HPV infection. HPV types 52 and 58 were as popular as those types designed for the currently available vaccine (HPV6, 11, 16, 18). PMID:24801331

  2. Genetically modified cellular vaccines for therapy of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV 16)-associated tumours.

    PubMed

    Bubenik, J

    2008-05-01

    Therapeutic strategies based on the insertion of cytokine or other immunostimulatory genes into the genome of tumour cells followed by vaccination with the resulting, genetically modified, cytokine-producing vaccines represent a new potential prospect for the treatment of cancer patients. HPV 16 is the aetiological agent of more than 60 percent human cervical carcinomas (CC). At present, two prophylactic vaccines against HPV 16 are available (GlaxoSmithKline "Cervarix" and Merck "Gardasil"). These vaccines can almost completely protect the immunized individuals against both, persistent HPV 16 infection and HPV 16-related pathological findings in cervical cytology. In contrast, no clinically utilizable therapeutic vaccines against CC are available. During the last decade animal models have substantially contributed to the development of the therapeutic vaccines against HPV 16-associated tumours. It has been demonstrated that the HPV 16 E6/E7 oncoproteins can serve as tumour rejection antigens (TRA) and that the HPV 16-associated tumour cells can be genetically modified with DNA encoding immunostimulatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-12, GM-CSF) or other immunostimulatory molecules, used for vaccination, and inhibit tumour growth. To improve the HPV 16 antigen presentation in tumour-bearing individuals, dendritic cell-based vaccines loaded with HPV 16 E6/E7 DNA or hybrids of the dendritic and tumour cells have also been successfully employed. Unfortunately, when these encouraging approaches used in animal models were translated into clinical trials, the results were less optimistic. The problems that are still to be faced before the therapeutic vaccines against high-risk HPV-associated tumours can be approved for clinical purposes are discussed. PMID:18473731

  3. [Condylomata acuminata: an indication for prophylactic HPV vaccination?].

    PubMed

    Schneede, P; Schlenker, B; Hungerhuber, E

    2006-12-01

    HPV infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Although most infections are transient, persistent ones can lead to condylomata acuminata, genital intraepithelial neoplasia and genital cancer. The recent approval of vaccines against HPV has raised great hopes. Since 1990, 5,392 urological investigations for HPV were carried out in 1,792 men in special HPV centres. We report on the epidemiology and natural course of condylomata, techniques for HPV detection, treatment surveillance and long-term sequelae. Condylomata acuminata proved to be pathognomonic; partner infections were diagnosed in 50% and more. Systematic HPV DNA analyses in partner investigations or as screening investigations cannot be recommended. Ultimately, within the spectrum of therapeutic options for condylomata, no method is really superior to others; recurrences occurred in 30-70% of cases. We definitely need the HPV vaccination programme to get rid of one of the oldest and up to now unsolved problems of mankind. PMID:17096125

  4. Prevalence and type distribution of human papillomavirus infection in women from North Sardinia, Italy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with several disorders of the genital tract, skin and oropharynx. The aims of our study were to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection in women between 15 and 54 years of age in North Sardinia, Italy, to identify the prevalence of High Risk - Human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) genotypes and to establish a correlation between molecular and cytological results. Methods From 2007 to 2009 we consecutively enrolled women aged 15-54 years admitted to public and private outpatient settings. All the participants filled in a questionnaire about the socio-cultural state, sexual activity and awareness about HPV. 323 cervical specimens were tested for HPV-DNA and HPV genotypes with INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping CE Amp kit. Samples showing positivity to some HPV genotypes were re-tested using "in house" quantitative Real-Time PCR assays. Results Overall HPV-DNA positivity was detected in 35.9% of the women. The prevalence of HR-HPV infection among HPV positive samples was 93.1% with a specific prevalence of HPV 16, 51, 31, 53 and 18 of 54.3%, 37.9%, 10.3%, 6.9% and 5.2%, respectively. Co-infection with any HPV, HR-HPV, LR-HPV and HR/LR-HPV type was 18.3%, 14.9%, 0.9% and 2.5%, respectively; HPV 16/51 co-infection was detected in 64.6% of the HR-HPV co-infection group. The most frequent HPV-genotypes detected were 16 (32.5%) and 51 (22.7%). Among the 57 patients harboring mono-infection the most prevalent HPV genotypes were 16 (38.6%) and 31(10.5%). A multivariate analysis identified a statistical significant association between HPV infection and age and between HPV infection and previous sexual transmitted diseases. A statistically significant association between cytological cervical lesions and generic HPV exposure was identified. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first survey evaluating the prevalence of HPV infection in Northern Sardinia and drawing attention to the unusual high proportion of genotype HPV 51. Given the recent implementation of a widespread immunization program with vaccines not containing HPV 51, it has been relevant to prove the high prevalence of this HPV genotype from the start of the vaccination campaign, in order to avoid in the future attributing to the vaccination program a possible selection effect (HPV replacement). PMID:21989375

  5. Accelerating HPV Vaccine Uptake: Urgency for Action to Prevent Cancer: Home

    Cancer.gov

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) cause most cases of cervical cancer and large proportions of vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers. HPV also causes genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. HPV vaccines could dramatically reduce the incidence of HPV-associated cancers and other conditions among both females and males, but uptake of the vaccines has fallen short of target levels. The President's Cancer Panel finds underuse of HPV vaccines a serious but correctable threat to progress against cancer.

  6. Men's Perceptions and Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and Cervical Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPartland, Tara S.; Weaver, Bethany A.; Lee, Shu-Kuang; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2005-01-01

    The authors assessed young men's knowledge and perceptions of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to identify factors that predict intention to make positive behavioral changes. Male university students aged 18 to 25 years completed a self-report instrument to assess knowledge and perceptions of genital HPV infection. If diagnosed with…

  7. A prospective analysis of smoking and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among men in The HPV in Men (HIM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Schabath, Matthew B.; Villa, Luisa L.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmerón, Jorge; Abrahamsen, Martha E.; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Quiterio, Manuel; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    At present it is unknown whether the higher prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among smokers in men is attributed to a higher probability of acquiring an infection or because of longer infection persistence. Thus, we investigated the role of smoking on the (acquisition) and clearance (persistence) of genital HPV infections among 4,026 men in The HPV in Men (HIM) Study, a multinational prospective study of the natural history of genital HPV infection in men. Genital HPV infections were grouped any-, oncogenic-, and non-oncogenic HPV infections and smoking status was categorized as current-, former, and never smokers. The incidence of any-, oncogenic-, and non-oncogenic HPV infections was significantly higher among current smokers compared to former- and never smokers (P < 0.01). In multivariable analyses adjusting for sexual behavior and potential confounders, when compared to never smokers, current smokers exhibited significantly higher probability of acquiring any- (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02 – 1.50) and non-oncogenic (HR = 1.21; 95% CI 1.00 – 1.45) infections and a borderline significant probability for oncogenic infections (HR = 1.18; 95% CI 0.98 – 1.41). Although the median duration of HPV infection was generally longer among current smokers, we found no statistically significant associations in the multivariable analyses. Overall, these results demonstrated that current smoking exhibited the highest incidence and highest probability of acquiring genital HPV infections. PMID:24222514

  8. Numerical simulation of a two-sex human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryani, I.; Adi-Kusumo, F.

    2014-02-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer, precancerous lesions, cancer and other disease. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection. Although HPV virus primarily affects woman but it can also affects man because it cause of cancer of the anus, vulva, vagina, penis and some other cancers. HPV vaccines now used to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts because the vaccine protect against four types of HPV that most commonly cause disease are types 6, 11, 16, and 18. This paper is sequel work of Elbasha (2008). Difference with Elbasha (2008) are give alternative proof global stability, numerical simulation and interpretation. Global stability of the equilibrium on the model of a two-sex HPV vaccination were explored by using Lyapunov. Although we use the same lyapunov function, we use the largest invariant set to proof the global stability. The result show that the global stability of the equilibrium depends on the effective reproduction number (R). If R < 1 then the infection-free equilibrium is asymptotically stable globally. If R > 1 then endemic equilibrium have globally asymptotically stable properties. Then equilibrium proceed with the interpretation of numerical simulation.

  9. HPV Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... has had the HPV vaccine. Do I need cervical cancer screening? Yes. Because currently available HPV vaccines do ... ve had a hysterectomy. Do I still need cervical cancer screening? Women who have had a total hysterectomy ( ...

  10. Genital Warts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can get genital warts during oral, vaginal, or anal sex with an infected partner. Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not completely eliminate, the risk of ... back. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  11. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... surefire way to prevent genital herpes is abstinence . Teens who do have sex must properly use a latex condom every time they have any form of sexual intercourse (vaginal, oral, or anal sex). Girls receiving oral sex should have their ...

  12. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tested and has negative STD test results; • Using latex condoms the right way every time you have ... female genital areas that are covered by a latex condom. However, outbreaks can also occur in areas ...

  13. Novel genital alphapapillomaviruses in baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis) with cervical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Bergin, I L; Bell, J D; Chen, Z; Zochowski, M K; Chai, D; Schmidt, K; Culmer, D L; Aronoff, D M; Patton, D L; Mwenda, J M; Wood, C E; Burk, R D

    2013-01-01

    Genital Alphapapillomavirus (?PV) infections are one of the most common sexually transmitted human infections worldwide. Women infected with the highly oncogenic genital human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are at high risk for development of cervical cancer. Related oncogenic ?PVs exist in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques. Here the authors identified 3 novel genital ?PV types (PhPV1, PhPV2, PhPV3) by PCR in cervical samples from 6 of 15 (40%) wild-caught female Kenyan olive baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis). Eleven baboons had koilocytes in the cervix and vagina. Three baboons had dysplastic proliferative changes consistent with cervical squamous intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). In 2 baboons with PCR-confirmed PhPV1, 1 had moderate (CIN2, n = 1) and 1 had low-grade (CIN1, n = 1) dysplasia. In 2 baboons with PCR-confirmed PhPV2, 1 had low-grade (CIN1, n = 1) dysplasia and the other had only koilocytes. Two baboons with PCR-confirmed PhPV3 had koilocytes only. PhPV1 and PhPV2 were closely related to oncogenic macaque and human ?PVs. These findings suggest that ?PV-infected baboons may be useful animal models for the pathogenesis, treatment, and prophylaxis of genital ?PV neoplasia. Additionally, this discovery suggests that genital ?PVs with oncogenic potential may infect a wider spectrum of non-human primate species than previously thought. PMID:22446324

  14. Male Genital Lichen Sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    Bunker, Christopher Barry; Shim, Tang Ngee

    2015-01-01

    Male genital lichen sclerosus (MGLSc) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease responsible for male sexual dyspareunia and urological morbidity. An afeared complication is squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis. The precise etiopathogenesis of MGLSc remains controversial although genetic, autoimmune and infective (such as human papillomavirus (HPV) hepatitis C (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Borrelia) factors have been implicated: Consideration of all the evidence suggests that chronic exposure of susceptible epithelium to urinary occlusion by the foreskin seems the most likely pathomechanism. The mainstay of treatment is topical ultrapotent corticosteroid therapy. Surgery is indicated for cases unresponsive to topical corticosteroid therapy, phimosis, meatal stenosis, urethral stricture, carcinoma in situ (CIS) and squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25814697

  15. Primary Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Type I in Preterm Prelabour Rupture of Membranes at 30 Weeks' Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Anna; Grivell, Rosalie

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disseminated herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the neonate is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines recommend caesarean in third-trimester maternal primary genital HSV outbreaks to prevent transmission from mother to fetus. In the premature fetus, however, expectant management is often necessary to reduce morbidity of prematurity. The benefit of performing caesarean after 6?hrs of rupture of membranes (ROM) to reduce maternal-fetal transmission is unclear. Case. A female patient with primary genital HSV type 1 outbreak coinciding with preterm, prelabour rupture of membranes (PPROM) at 30 + 3 weeks' gestation. An immediate caesarean section was not performed after multidisciplinary team discussion due to the benefits of glucocorticoids on immune complications of prematurity. The patient had expectant management for 5 days with intravenous (IV) aciclovir and then delivered an infant vaginally with disseminated neonatal HSV. Conclusion. We address the rare presentation of primary HSV infection associated with PPROM and the dilemma of how to manage these patients given the limited literature. We discuss the role of intrauterine compartment monitoring with amniocentesis, the mode of delivery when ROM has occurred for 120 hours, expectant management to reduce prematurity, and the effectiveness of aciclovir to reduce viral shedding in the prevention of neonatal HSV. PMID:26649212

  16. Wild-type p53 reactivation by small-molecule Minnelide™ in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Caicedo-Granados, Emiro; Lin, Rui; Clements-Green, Caitlin; Yueh, Bevan; Sangwan, Veena; Saluja, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The incidence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) continues to increase, particularly oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) cases. The inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene promotes a chain of molecular events, including cell cycle progression and apoptosis resistance. Reactivation of wild-type p53 function is an intriguing therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a novel compound derived from diterpene triepoxide (Minnelide™) can reactivate wild-type p53 function in HPV-positive HNSCC. Materials and Methods For all of our in vitro experiments, we used 2 HPV-positive HNSCC cell lines, University of Michigan squamous cell carcinoma (UM-SCC) 47 and 93-VU-147, and 2 HPV-positive human cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and CaSki. Cells were treated with different concentrations of triptolide and analyzed for p53 activation. Mice bearing UM-SCC 47 subcutaneous xenografts and HPV-positive patient-derived tumor xenografts were treated with Minnelide and evaluated for tumor growth and p53 activation. Results In HPV-positive HNSCC, Minnelide reactivated p53 by suppressing E6 oncoprotein. Activation of apoptosis followed, both in vitro and in vivo. In 2 preclinical HNSCC animal models (a subcutaneous xenograft model and a patient-derived tumor xenograft model), Minnelide reactivated p53 function and significantly decreased tumor progression and tumor volume. Conclusion Triptolide and Minnelide caused cell death in vitro and in vivo in HPV-positive HNSCC by reactivating wild-type p53 and thus inducing apoptosis. In addition, in 2 HPV-positive HNSCC animal models, Minnelide decreased tumor progression and induced apoptosis. PMID:25311433

  17. Genital Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection in Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gone. Using condoms during sexual intercourse and dental dams during oral sex may also help to reduce the spread of infection. However, condoms or dams may not always completely prevent the spread of ...

  18. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Genital Warts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload ... Marketing Share this: JavaScript is disabled in your browser. To view this content, please enable JavaScript and ...

  19. Human papillomaviruses: are we ready to type?

    PubMed Central

    Roman, A; Fife, K H

    1989-01-01

    The issue of determining which human papillomavirus (HPV) is present in a clinical specimen (typing specimens for HPVs) is receiving attention because HPVs cause condyloma acuminata and are associated with the continuum of disease which ranges from dysplasia to invasive genital cancer. Morphological inspection of precancerous lesions is not sufficient to determine which lesions will progress and which will not. A number of research tools based primarily on deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization have been developed. These permit identification and typing of HPV in genital tract scrapings or biopsies. Some HPV types (e.g., HPV-16 and HPV-18) have been identified in high-grade dysplasias and carcinomas more commonly than other types (e.g., HPV-6) and have been designated "high risk" types for cervical cancer. Thus, the question arises whether HPV typing would improve patient management by providing increased sensitivity for detection of patients at risk or by providing a prognostic indicator. In this review, the available typing methods are reviewed from the standpoint of their sensitivity, specificity, and ease of application to large-scale screening programs. Data implicating HPVs in the genesis of genital tract cancers are reviewed, as is the association of specific HPV types with specific outcomes. We conclude that there is currently no simple, inexpensive assay for HPV types, although such assays may be developed in the future. Analysis of the typing data indicates that, while HPV types can be designated high risk and low risk, these designations are not absolute and thus the low-risk group should not be ignored. In addition, interpretation of the data is complicated by finding high-risk types in individuals with no indication of disease. Insufficient data exist to indicate whether knowledge of the presence of a given HPV type is a better prognostic indicator than cytological or histological results. Thus, more research is needed before it can be determined whether typing information will augment the method currently in use for deciding treatment regimen and whether it warrants widespread use. Images PMID:2539898

  20. Racial differences in the incidence and clearance of human papillomavirus (HPV): The HPV in Men (HIM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Schabath, Matthew B.; Villa, Luisa L.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J.; Akogbe, Gabriel O.; Abrahamsen, Martha E.; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmerón, Jorge; Quiterio, Manuel; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background This analysis assessed the acquisition (incidence) and persistence (clearance) of HPV infection by self-reported race among men in The HPV in Men (HIM) Study, a multinational prospective study of the natural history of genital HPV infections. Methods Self-reported race was categorized as White, Black, Asian/Pacific Islander (PI), or multiple and mixed race. Genital samples were combined for HPV DNA testing and categorized by any-, oncogenic-, and non-oncogenic HPV infections. Results Asian/PI race had significantly the lowest incidence of any-, oncogenic-, and non-oncogenic HPV infection (P < 0.001). In multivariable analyses Asian/PI race was associated with a lower probability of acquiring any- (HR=0.63; 95% CI 0.42–0.95) and non-oncogenic HPV infection (HR=0.61; 95% CI 0.40–0.93) when compared to Whites. No significant associations were evident for Asian/PI race for clearance. Multiple and mixed race was significantly associated with lower probability of acquiring non-oncogenic HPV infection (HR=0.83; 95% CI 0.69–0.99) and borderline significant associations were observed for any HPV (HR=0.91) and oncogenic infections (HR=0.92). Multiple and mixed race was associated with a lower probability of clearing any- (HR=0.92; 95% CI 0.84–1.00) and oncogenic HPV infections (HR=0.85; 95% CI 0.75–0.95). Conclusion Asian/PI race had the lowest incidence of HPV and exhibited a lower probability of acquiring new HPV infections. Multiple and mixed race had the second lowest incidence of infection and was associated with a lower probability of acquiring and clearing a HPV infection. Impact Race-specific differences in HPV infection could be due to behavior, innate genetic differences, or circulating intratypic HPV variants. PMID:23872745

  1. A novel vaccine for cervical cancer: quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16 and 18) recombinant vaccine (Gardasil).

    PubMed

    Govan, Vandana A

    2008-02-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and remains a public health problem worldwide. There is strong evidence that HPV causes cervical, vulva and vaginal cancers, genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. The current treatments for HPV-induced infections are ineffective and recurrence is common-place. Therefore, to reduce the burden of HPV-induced infections, several studies have investigated the effi cacy of different prophylactic vaccines in clinical human trials directed against HPV types 6, 11, 16, or 18. Notably, these HPV types contribute to a signifi cant proportion of disease worldwide. This review will focus on the published results of Merck & Co's prophylactic quadrivalent recombinant vaccine targeting HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18 (referred to as Gardasil((R))). Data from the Phase III trial demonstrated that Gardasil was 100% effi cacious in preventing precancerous lesions of the cervix, vulva, and vagina and effective against genital warts. Due to the success of these human clinical trials, the FDA approved the registration of Gardasil on the 8 June 2006. In addition, since Gardasil has been effi cacious for 5 years post vaccination, the longest evaluation of an HPV vaccine, it is expected to reduce the incidence of these type specifi c HPV-induced diseases in the future. PMID:18728721

  2. Adverse Psychosexual Impact Related to the Treatment of Genital Warts and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Campaner, Adriana Bittencourt; Vespa Junior, Nelson; Giraldo, Paulo César; Leal Passos, Mauro Romero

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare the psychosexual impact related to the treatment of genital warts and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in women. Methods. 75 patients presenting with HPV-induced genital lesions, belonging to one of two patient groups, were included in the study: 29 individuals with genital warts (GWs) and 46 individuals with CIN grades 2 or 3 (CIN 2/3). Initially, medical charts of each woman were examined for extraction of data on the type of HPV-induced infection and treatment administered. Subjects were interviewed to collect sociodemographic data as well as personal, gynecologic, obstetric, and sexual history. After this initial anamnesis, the Sexual Quotient-Female Version (SQ-F) questionnaire was applied to assess sexual function. After application of the questionnaire, patients answered specific questions produced by the researchers, aimed at assessing the impact of the disease and its treatment on their sexual lives. Results. It is noteworthy that patients with CIN 2/3 had statistically similar classification of sexual quotient to patients with GWs (P = 0.115). However, patients with GWs more frequently gave positive answers to the specific questions compared to patients with CIN 2/3. Conclusion. Based on these findings, it is clear that GWs have a greater impact on sexual behavior compared to CIN 2/3. PMID:26316956

  3. HPV vaccine shown to also protect against oral HPV infection

    Cancer.gov

    Women who received a vaccine targeting two types of the human papilloma virus (HPV) that cause 70 percent of cervical cancers had the added benefit of protection against oral HPV infection, which can lead to cancer of the tonsils and throat (oropharyngeal cancer). The results were published July 17, 2013, in PLOS ONE.

  4. Influence of Physiologic Folate Deficiency on Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV16)-harboring Human Keratinocytes in Vitro and in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Suhong; Tang, Ying-Sheng; Khan, Rehana A.; Zhang, Yonghua; Kusumanchi, Praveen; Stabler, Sally P.; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N.; Antony, A?ok C.

    2012-01-01

    Although HPV16 transforms infected epithelial tissues to cancer in the presence of several co-factors, there is insufficient molecular evidence that poor nutrition has any such role. Because physiological folate deficiency led to the intracellular homocysteinylation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 (hnRNP-E1) and activated a nutrition-sensitive (homocysteine-responsive) posttranscriptional RNA operon that included interaction with HPV16 L2 mRNA, we investigated the functional consequences of folate deficiency on HPV16 in immortalized HPV16-harboring human (BC-1-Ep/SL) keratinocytes and HPV16-organotypic rafts. Although homocysteinylated hnRNP-E1 interacted with HPV16 L2 mRNA cis-element, it also specifically bound another HPV16 57-nucleotide poly(U)-rich cis-element in the early polyadenylation element (upstream of L2?L1 genes) with greater affinity. Together, these interactions led to a profound reduction of both L1 and L2 mRNA and proteins without effects on HPV16 E6 and E7 in vitro, and in cultured keratinocyte monolayers and HPV16-low folate-organotypic rafts developed in physiological low folate medium. In addition, HPV16-low folate-organotypic rafts contained fewer HPV16 viral particles, a similar HPV16 DNA viral load, and a much greater extent of integration of HPV16 DNA into genomic DNA when compared with HPV16-high folate-organotypic rafts. Subcutaneous implantation of 18-day old HPV16-low folate-organotypic rafts into folate-replete immunodeficient mice transformed this benign keratinocyte-derived raft tissue into an aggressive HPV16-induced cancer within 12 weeks. Collectively, these studies establish a likely molecular linkage between poor folate nutrition and HPV16 and predict that nutritional folate and/or vitamin-B12 deficiency, which are both common worldwide, will alter the natural history of HPV16 infections and also warrant serious consideration as reversible co-factors in oncogenic transformation of HPV16-infected tissues to cancer. PMID:22351779

  5. Relationship between Humoral Immune Responses against HPV16, HPV18, HPV31 and HPV45 in 12-15 Year Old Girls Receiving Cervarix® or Gardasil® Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Godi, Anna; Bissett, Sara L.; Miller, Elizabeth; Beddows, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines confer protection against the oncogenic genotypes HPV16 and HPV18 through the generation of type-specific neutralizing antibodies raised against virus-like particles (VLP) representing these genotypes. The vaccines also confer a degree of cross-protection against HPV31 and HPV45, which are genetically-related to the vaccine types HPV16 and HPV18, respectively, although the mechanism is less certain. There are a number of humoral immune measures that have been examined in relation to the HPV vaccines, including VLP binding, pseudovirus neutralization and the enumeration of memory B cells. While the specificity of responses generated against the vaccine genotypes are fairly well studied, the relationship between these measures in relation to non-vaccine genotypes is less certain. Methods We carried out a comparative study of these immune measures against vaccine and non-vaccine genotypes using samples collected from 12–15 year old girls following immunization with three doses of either Cervarix® or Gardasil® HPV vaccine. Results The relationship between neutralizing and binding antibody titers and HPV-specific memory B cell levels for the vaccine genotypes, HPV16 and HPV18, were very good. The proportion of responders approached 100% for both vaccines while the magnitude of these responses induced by Cervarix® were generally higher than those following Gardasil® immunization. A similar pattern was found for the non-vaccine genotype HPV31, albeit at a lower magnitude compared to its genetically-related vaccine genotype, HPV16. However, both the enumeration of memory B cells and VLP binding responses against HPV45 were poorly related to its neutralizing antibody responses. Purified IgG derived from memory B cells demonstrated specificities similar to those found in the serum, including the capacity to neutralize HPV pseudoviruses. Conclusions These data suggest that pseudovirus neutralization should be used as the preferred humoral immune measure for studying HPV vaccine responses, particularly for non-vaccine genotypes. PMID:26495976

  6. High HPV Infection Prevalence in Men from Infertile Couples and Lack of Relationship between Seminal HPV Infection and Sperm Quality

    PubMed Central

    Golob, Barbara; Verdenik, Ivan; Kolbezen Simoniti, Mojca; Vrta?nik Bokal, Eda; Zorn, Branko

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the most frequently sexually transmitted viruses and etiological agents of several human cancers. Controversial results of the role of HPV in infertile population on sperm parameters have been published. The aim of this study was to estimate the type-specific prevalence of HPV DNA infection of the external genitalia and semen in 340 Slovenian men from infertile couples and to establish the relationship between seminal HPV DNA infection and abnormal sperm parameters. Self-taken swabs of the entire penile surface and semen samples were collected, and HPV detection and genotyping were performed. HPV DNA was detected in 37.12% of external genitalia and in 13.61% of semen samples with high HPV type concordance of both sampling sites. The most prevalent HPV types in the male external genitalia were HPV-CP6108 and HPV-84. The most prevalent HPV types in semen were HPV-53 and HPV-CP6108. The prevalence of HPV infection between normozoospermic men and men with abnormal sperm parameters did not differ significantly. Sperm quality did not differ significantly between men with seminal HPV infection and uninfected men. In conclusion, the men from infertile couples are equally susceptible to HPV infection regardless of their fertile potential; seminal HPV infection does not impair sperm quality. PMID:24809062

  7. HPV Vaccine Effective at Multiple Anatomic Sites

    Cancer.gov

    A new study from NCI researchers finds that the HPV vaccine protects young women from infection with high-risk HPV types at the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed at l

  8. Presence of human papillomavirus type 18 DNA in vulvar carcinomas and its integration into the cell genome.

    PubMed

    Venuti, A; Marcante, M L

    1989-06-01

    We have screened 78 genital tract tumours from Italian female patients for the presence of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18 DNA. Dot and Southern blot hybridization experiments revealed that DNA sequences of HPV-16 and/or HPV-18 are present in 66% of tumour samples. HPV-18 was detected in 80% of vulvar carcinomas. In these tumours the integration of HPV-18 DNA seems to occur in the E1/E2 region of the virus genome with long deletions in almost all samples. The invariable retention of the non-coding region and the E6/E7 open reading frames suggests that the integration event and the possible expression of these sequences could play a role in some stages of cellular transformation. PMID:2543791

  9. HPV-type-specific response of cervical cancer cells to cisplatin after silencing replication licensing factor MCM4.

    PubMed

    Das, Mitali; Prasad, Shyam Babu; Yadav, Suresh Singh; Modi, Arusha; Singh, Sunita; Pradhan, Satyajit; Narayan, Gopeshwar

    2015-12-01

    Minichoromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins play key role in cell cycle progression by licensing DNA replication only once per cell cycle. These proteins are found to be overexpressed in cervical cancer cells. In this study, we depleted MCM4, one of the MCM 2-7 complex components by RNA interference (RNAi) in four cervical cancer cell lines. The four cell lines were selected on the basis of their human papillomavirus (HPV) infection: HPV16-positive SiHa, HPV18-positive ME-180, HPV16- and HPV18-positive CaSki, and HPV-negative C-33A. The MCM4-deficient cells irrespective of their HPV status grow for several generations and maintain regular cell cycle. We did not find any evidence of augmented response to a short-term (48 h) cisplatin treatment in these MCM4-deficient cells. However, MCM4-/HPV16+ SiHa cells cannot withstand a prolonged treatment (up to 5 days) of even a sublethal dosage of cisplatin. They show increased chromosomal instability compared to their control counterparts. On the other hand, MCM4-deficient CaSki cells (both HPV16+ and 18+) remain resistant to a prolonged exposure to cisplatin. Our study indicates that cervical cancer cells may be using excess MCMs as a backup for replicative stress; however, its regulatory mechanism is dependent on the HPV status of the cells. PMID:26188903

  10. Exploring the Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Communication Preferences of the General Public regarding HPV: Findings from CDC Focus Group Research and Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Allison L.; Shepeard, Hilda

    2007-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States, causing genital warts, cervical cell abnormalities, and cervical cancer in women. To inform HPV education efforts, 35 focus groups were conducted with members of the general public, stratified by gender, race/ethnicity, and urban/rural…

  11. Robust In Vitro and In Vivo Neutralization against Multiple High-Risk HPV Types Induced by a Thermostable Thioredoxin-L2 Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Hanna; Ribeiro-Müller, Lis; Canali, Elena; Bolchi, Angelo; Tommasino, Massimo; Ottonello, Simone; Müller, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Current prophylactic virus-like particle (VLP) human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are based on the L1 major capsid protein and provide robust but virus type-restricted protection. Moreover, VLP vaccines have a high production cost, require cold-chain storage, and are thus not readily implementable in developing countries, which endure 85% of the cervical cancer-related death burden worldwide. In contrast with L1, immunization with minor capsid protein L2 elicits broad cross-neutralization, and we previously showed that insertion of a peptide spanning amino acids 20-38 of L2 into bacterial thioredoxin (Trx) greatly enhances its immunogenicity. Building on this finding, we use, here, four different neutralization assays to demonstrate that low doses of a trivalent Trx-L2 vaccine, incorporating L2(20-38) epitopes from HPV16, HPV31 and HPV51, and formulated in a human-compatible adjuvant, induce broadly protective responses. Specifically, we show that this vaccine, which uses a far-divergent archaebacterial thioredoxin as scaffold and is amenable to an easy one-step thermal purification, induces robust cross-neutralization against 12 of the 13 known oncogenic HPV types. Immune performance measured with two different in vitro neutralization assays was corroborated by the results of mouse cervico-vaginal challenge and passive transfer experiments indicating robust cross-protection also in vivo. Altogether, our results attest to the potential of Trx-L2 as a thermostable second-generation HPV vaccine particularly well suited for low-resource countries. Cancer Prev Res; 8(10); 932-41. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26170394

  12. Long-term persistence of oral human papillomavirus type 16: the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) study.

    PubMed

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Kreimer, Aimée R; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; O'Keefe, Michael T; Ingles, Donna J; Abrahamsen, Martha; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-03-01

    Persistent infection with oral HPV16 is believed to drive the development of most oropharyngeal cancers. However, patterns of oral HPV16 persistence remain understudied, particularly among HIV-negative individuals. Oral HPV16 persistence was evaluated among 1,626 participants of the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Twenty-three oral HPV16-positive men who provided an oral gargle sample on ?2 study visits were included in the analysis. Archived oral samples from all follow-up visits were tested for HPV16 using Linear Array and INNO-LiPA detection methods. Persistence was evaluated using consecutive HPV16-positive visits held approximately 6 months apart and using the Kaplan-Meier method. Oral HPV16-positive men were aged 18 to 64 years [median, 36 years; interquartile range (IQR), 25-42] and were followed for a median of 44.4 months (IQR, 29.9-49.5). Of 13 incident infections, 4 (30.8%) persisted ?12 months, 1 (10.0%) persisted ?24 months, and none persisted ?36 months [median infection duration, 7.3 months; 95% confidence interval (CI), 6.4-NA)]. Of 10 prevalent infections, 9 (90.0%) persisted ?12 months, 8 (80.0%) persisted ?24 months, 4 (57.1%) persisted ?36 months, and 2 (40.0%) persisted ?48 months (median infection duration, NA). Twelve-month persistence of incident infections increased significantly with age (Ptrend = 0.028). Prevalent oral HPV16 infections in men persisted longer than newly acquired infections, and persistence appeared to increase with age. These findings may explain the high prevalence of oral HPV observed at older ages. Understanding oral HPV16 persistence will aid in the identification of men at high-risk of developing HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:25575501

  13. Antigenic specificities of human CD4+ T-cell clones recovered from recurrent genital herpes simplex virus type 2 lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, D M; Corey, L; Burke, R L; Eisenberg, R J; Cohen, G H; Pichyangkura, R; Triezenberg, S J

    1994-01-01

    Lesions resulting from recurrent genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection are characterized by infiltration of CD4+ lymphocytes. We have investigated the antigenic specificity of 47 HSV-specific CD4+ T-cell clones recovered from the HSV-2 buttock and thigh lesions of five patients. Clones with proliferative responses to recombinant truncated glycoprotein B (gB) or gD of HSV-2 or purified natural gC of HSV-2 comprised a minority of the total number of HSV-specific clones isolated from lesions. The gC2- and gD2-specific CD4+ clones had cytotoxic activity. The approximate locations of the HSV-2 genes encoding HSV-2 type-specific CD4+ antigens have been determined by using HSV-1 x HSV-2 intertypic recombinant virus and include the approximate map regions 0.30 to 0.46, 0.59 to 0.67, 0.67 to 0.73, and 0.82 to 1.0 units. The antigenic specificity of an HLA DQ2-restricted, HSV-2 type-specific T-cell clone was mapped to amino acids 425 to 444 of VP16 of HSV-2 by sequential use of an intertypic recombinant virus containing VP16 of HSV-2 in an HSV-1 background, recombinant VP16 fusion proteins, and synthetic peptides. Each of the remaining four patients also yielded at least one type-specific T-cell clone reactive with an HSV-2 epitope mapping to approximately 0.67 to 0.73 map units. The antigenic specificities of lesion-derived CD4+ T-cell clones are quite diverse and include at least 10 epitopes. Human T-cell clones reactive with gC and VP16 are reported here for the first time. PMID:7512152

  14. HPV Carcinomas in Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reusser, Nicole M.; Downing, Christopher; Guidry, Jacqueline; Tyring, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide and can result in pre-malignancies or overt malignancies of the skin and mucosal surfaces. HPV-related illnesses are an important personal and public health problem causing physical, mental, sexual and financial detriments. Moreover, this set of malignancies severely affects the immunosuppressed population, particularly HIV-positive patients and organ-transplant recipients. There is growing incidence of HPV-associated anogenital malignancies as well as a decrease in the average age of affected patients, likely related to the rising number of high-risk individuals. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of HPV-related malignancy. Current treatment options for HPV infection and subsequent disease manifestations include imiquimod, retinoids, intralesional bleomycin, and cidofovir; however, primary prevention with HPV vaccination remains the most effective strategy. This review will discuss anogenital lesions in immunocompromised patients, cutaneous warts at nongenital sites, the association of HPV with skin cancer in immunocompromised patients, warts and carcinomas in organ-transplant patients, HIV-positive patients with HPV infections, and the management of cutaneous disease in the immunocompromised patient. PMID:26239127

  15. HPV Prevalence in Multiple Anatomical Sites among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Blas, Magaly M.; Brown, Brandon; Menacho, Luis; Alva, Isaac E.; Silva-Santisteban, Alfonso; Carcamo, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Background Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted viral infection worldwide. HPV is highly prevalent in sexually active men who have sex with men (MSM) and has been associated with anal cancer, penile cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods From March to September 2011, we conducted a cross-sectional study of HPV prevalence among MSM above age 18 years. Participants were recruited using respondent driven sampling at Clinica Cayetano Heredia. All participants provided anal, genital, and oral samples for HPV DNA testing, and blood for HIV and HPV antibody testing. Results A total of 200 MSM were recruited in the study. The mean age was 34 years (range 18–59 years, SD = 9.4) and101 participants were HIV negative (99 HIV positive). HPV 6/11/16/18 or quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV4) genotype seroprevalence among HIV negative and positive MSM was 64.3% (55%-75.9%) and 93.8% (87.6%-99.2%) respectively (p<0.001). HIV positivity was associated with a higher prevalence of HPV4 and HPV 16/18 DNA at external genital sites and the anal canal. HPV4 DNA prevalence at external genital sites among HIV negative and positive MSM was 14.9% and 28.7% (p = 0.02) respectively, at anal canal was 50.9% and 79.0% (p = 0.001), and at the oral cavity was 9.9% and 8.5% (p = 0.6). Conclusions HPV4 seroprevalence was high in our study among both HIV positives and negatives, with HPV DNA prevalence much lower, and the anal canal being the anatomical site with the highest HPV DNA prevalence. HPV prevention interventions are needed among MSM at high-risk for HIV infection. PMID:26437318

  16. Reducing HPV-associated Cancer Globally

    PubMed Central

    Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers are a major worldwide public health concern. Virtually all cervical cancer is HPV-related, with 70% caused by HPV16 and -18. Variable proportions of certain non-cervical cancers (e.g., anal, vulvar, oropharyngeal) are HPV-related; over 90% of the HPV-related ones are related to HPV16, -18. The HPV-related cancers are dominated by cervical cancer in the developing world, where cervical cancer screening is limited. In this setting, widespread uptake of current HPV vaccines by adolescent girls could reduce this cancer's incidence and mortality by approximately two-thirds, with cost-effective screening programs of adult women having the potential to reduce mortality more rapidly. In the industrialized world, non-cervical HPV-related cancers, especially oropharyngeal, are rapidly increasing, and now rival the incidence of cervical cancer, whose rates continue to decline thanks to established cervical screening programs. Therefore, reducing HPV-associated non-cervical cancers with HPV vaccination has greater importance in the industrialized world, especially since there are no approved screening programs for these cancers. Preventing the substantial number of non-cervical HPV cancers in men will require either “herd” immunity through high vaccination rates in females or male vaccination. Current HPV vaccination can complement cervical screening in protecting against cervical cancer and may permit the safe reduction of screening intensity in industrialized countries. Second-generation HPV vaccines (active against a broader array of cervical cancer–related HPV types) could prevent an even higher proportion of cervical precancer and cancer and might permit further reductions in screening intensity. PMID:22219162

  17. HPV and Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Transmitted Diseases HPV-Associated Cancers Gynecologic Cancers Redirect HPV and Cancer Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  18. HPV and Men

    MedlinePLUS

    ... time in their life. Although most HPV infections go away on their own without causing problems, HPV ... me? Most of the time HPV infections completely go away and don’t cause any health problems. ...

  19. HPV testing as a screen for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Annekathryn

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as a necessary factor in the development of pre-invasive and invasive cancers of the lower genital tract, of which cervical cancer is the most prevalent. A molecular understanding of malignant transformation and epidemiologic information has led to the development of many strategies for detection and early intervention. Newer tests for oncogenic subtypes of HPV have made it possible to predict the risk of future development of cervical cancer. This review summarizes the current understanding of HPV related disease and examines the role of HPV testing as a screening tool for cervical cancer. It summarizes the data from prospective and randomized controlled trials on HPV screening from Europe and North America and includes smaller studies from low and middle income countries where cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women. PMID:26126623

  20. HPV vaccination's second act: promotion, competition, and compulsion.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jason L

    2010-10-01

    Developments regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines will transform HPV vaccination in the United States while simultaneously raising several new policy and ethical concerns. Policymakers, vaccine manufacturers, and the public health community must now respond to the presence of competing vaccines that are similar but distinct, particularly with respect to genital wart prevention and the benefits of vaccinating males. This work arises in the shadow of the contentious introduction of the HPV vaccine Gardasil (Merck & Co, Inc, Whitehouse Station, NJ) in 2006, particularly the opposition to efforts in many states to require the vaccine for school attendance. I review the current status of HPV vaccine policy in the United States and examine issues of public health ethics and policy central to ongoing and future HPV vaccination programs. PMID:20724671

  1. Effects of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Glycoprotein Vaccines and CLDC Adjuvant on Genital Herpes Infection in the Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, David I; Earwood, Julie D.; Bravo, Fernando J.; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Clark, Jennifer R.; Fairman, Jeffrey; Cardin, Rhonda D.

    2011-01-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are common but results from vaccine trials with HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) have been disappointing. We therefore compared a similar HSV gD2 vaccine, to a further truncated gD2 vaccine, to a vaccine with gD2 plus gB2 and gH2/gL2 and to a vaccine with only gB2 and gH2/gL2 in a guinea pig model of genital herpes. All vaccines were administered with cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) as an adjuvant. All vaccines significantly decreased the severity of acute genital disease and vaginal virus replication compared to the placebo group. The majority of animals in all groups developed at least one episode of recurrent disease but the frequency of recurrent disease was significantly reduced by each vaccine compared to placebo. No vaccine was significantly more protective than gD2 alone for any of the parameters described above. No vaccine decreased recurrent virus shedding. When protection against acute infection of dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord was evaluated all vaccines decreased the per cent of animal with detectable virus and the quantity of virus but again no vaccine was significantly more protective than another. Improvements in HSV-2 vaccines may require inclusion of more T cell targets, more potent adjuvants or live virus vaccines. PMID:21238569

  2. Effects of herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein vaccines and CLDC adjuvant on genital herpes infection in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, David I; Earwood, Julie D; Bravo, Fernando J; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Clark, Jennifer R; Fairman, Jeffrey; Cardin, Rhonda D

    2011-03-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are common but results from vaccine trials with HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) have been disappointing. We therefore compared a similar HSV gD2 vaccine, to a further truncated gD2 vaccine, to a vaccine with gD2 plus gB2 and gH2/gL2 and to a vaccine with only gB2 and gH2/gL2 in a guinea pig model of genital herpes. All vaccines were administered with cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) as an adjuvant. All vaccines significantly decreased the severity of acute genital disease and vaginal virus replication compared to the placebo group. The majority of animals in all groups developed at least one episode of recurrent disease but the frequency of recurrent disease was significantly reduced by each vaccine compared to placebo. No vaccine was significantly more protective than gD2 alone for any of the parameters described above. No vaccine decreased recurrent virus shedding. When protection against acute infection of dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord was evaluated all vaccines decreased the per cent of animal with detectable virus and the quantity of virus but again no vaccine was significantly more protective than another. Improvements in HSV-2 vaccines may require inclusion of more T cell targets, more potent adjuvants or live virus vaccines. PMID:21238569

  3. HPV vaccine effective against infection at multiple sites

    Cancer.gov

    Vaccination against high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) protected young women from infection with these HPV types at the cervix, anus, and oropharynx—the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed, though at lower levels, in women previously exposed to the virus.

  4. Management of external genital warts.

    PubMed

    Karnes, Jonathan B; Usatine, Richard P

    2014-09-01

    Genital warts affect 1% of the sexually active U.S. population and are commonly seen in primary care. Human papillomavirus types 6 and 11 are responsible for most genital warts. Warts vary from small, flat-topped papules to large, cauliflower-like lesions on the anogenital mucosa and surrounding skin. Diagnosis is clinical, but atypical lesions should be confirmed by histology. Treatments may be applied by patients, or by a clinician in the office. Patient-applied treatments include topical imiquimod, podofilox, and sinecatechins, whereas clinician-applied treatments include podophyllin, bichloroacetic acid, and trichloroacetic acid. Surgical treatments include excision, cryotherapy, and electrosurgery. The quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine is active against virus subtypes that cause genital warts in men and women. Additionally, male circumcision may be effective in decreasing the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus, human papillomavirus, and herpes simplex virus. PMID:25251091

  5. Comparison of the Cobas 4800 HPV and HPV 9G DNA Chip Tests for Detection of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Specimens of Women with Consecutive Positive HPV Tests But Negative Pap Smears

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sun-Young; Park, Eun Su; Kim, Jiyoung; Kang, Jun; Lee, Jae Jun; Bae, Yoonjin; Kim, Sang-Il; Maeng, Lee-So

    2015-01-01

    Detecting high-risk (HR) HPV is important for clinical management of women with persistent HPV-positive and Pap-negative results. The Cobas 4800 HPV test is the first FDA-approved HPV DNA test that can be used alone as a first-line screening tool. The HPV 9G DNA chip test is a PCR-based DNA microarray assay. We evaluated the patients of consecutive HPV-positivity on HPV 9G DNA chip test without cytologic abnormalities. We then compared the performances of HPV 9G DNA chip and the Cobas 4800 HPV tests for detecting HR HPV with each other and confirmed HPV genotyping using direct sequencing. All 214 liquid-based cytology specimens were collected from 100 women with consecutive HPV-positive and Pap-negative results on the HPV 9G DNA chip test between May 2012 and Dec 2013, but only 180 specimens were available for comparing HPV test results. The HPV 9G DNA chip and the Cobas 4800 HPV tests agreed with each other in 81.7% of the samples, and the concordance rate was greater than 97.2% for detecting HPV-16 or -18. For HR genotypes other than HPV types 16 and 18, the two tests agreed for 81.1% of the samples. The sensitivity of both assays for detecting HR HPV was 100%, regardless of HR genotypes. The HPV 9G DNA chip test may be as effective as the Cobas 4800 HPV test in detecting HR HPV, and has a similar ability to identify HPV-16 and -18. PMID:26469982

  6. Genital herpes: a review.

    PubMed

    Beauman, John G

    2005-10-15

    Genital herpes simplex virus infection is a recurrent, lifelong disease with no cure. The strongest predictor for infection is a person's number of lifetime sex partners. The natural history includes first-episode mucocutaneous infection, establishment of latency in the dorsal root ganglion, and subsequent reactivation. Most infections are transmitted via asymptomatic viral shedding. Classic outbreaks consist of a skin prodrome and possible constitutional symptoms such as headache, fever, and inguinal lymphadenopathy. As the infection progresses, papules, vesicles on an erythematous base, and erosions appear over hours to days. These lesions usually crust, re-epithelialize, and heal without scarring. First-episode infections are more extensive: primary lesions last two to six weeks versus approximately one week for lesions in recurrent disease. Atypical manifestations are common. Infected persons experience a median of four recurrences per year after their first episode, but rates vary greatly. Genital herpes simplex virus type 2 recurs six times more frequently than type 1. Viral culture is preferred over polymerase chain reaction testing for diagnosis. Serologic testing can be useful in persons with a questionable history. Effective oral antiviral medications are available for initial, episodic, and suppressive therapy but are not a cure. There is some evidence that alternative therapies such as L-lysine, zinc, and some herbal preparations may offer some benefit. Counseling patients about the risk of transmission is crucial and helps prevent the spread of disease and neonatal complications. PMID:16273819

  7. Evaluation of the polyclonal ELISA HPV serology assay as a biomarker for HPV exposure

    PubMed Central

    Coseo, Sarah E.; Porras, Carolina; Dodd, Lori E.; Hildesheim, Allan; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Gonzalez, Paula; Sherman, Mark E.; Jimenez, Silvia; Solomon, Diane; Bougelet, Catherine; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Quint, Wim; Safaeian, Mahboobeh

    2011-01-01

    Background Seropositivity to HPV16 and 18 antibodies is used as a measure of cumulative HPV exposure and as a stratifier of HPV exposure for vaccine efficacy analyses. Overall performance of these assays, as a measure of HPV exposure, has not been evaluated. Methods Using data from the enrollment phase of the HPV16/18 vaccine trial in Costa Rica, we evaluated the performance of the polyclonal ELISA HPV16 and 18 serological assays as a measure of HPV exposure. Biological (for eg. HPV infection at the cervix) and behavioral characteristics (for eg. lifetime number of sexual partners) with known associations with current and past HPV infection were used to define cases and controls (HPV exposed vs. not exposed). Pre-vaccination serum was measured for antibodies against HPV16 and HPV18 by ELISA; cervical samples were tested for HPV DNA using PCR SPF10/LiPA25. ELISA results were analyzed using receiver-operator-characteristic curves (ROC); performance was evaluated at the manufacturer set cutpoint (HPV16 =8, HPV18 =7) and at cutpoints chosen to optimize sensitivity and specificity (HPV16 =34, HPV18 =60). Results Defining cases as type-specific HPV DNA positive with high-grade abnormal cytolzogy (i.e. combined molecular and microscopic markers of infection), HPV16-ELISA gave sensitivity that was lower at the optimal cutpoint than the manufacturer cutpoint (62.2 compared with 75.7, respectively; p=0.44). However, specificity was higher (85.3 compared with 70.4, respectively; p<0.0001). Similarly, HPV18-ELISA gave sensitivity that was lower at the optimal cutpoint than the manufacturer cutpoint (34.5 compared with 51.7, respectively; p=0.40), with higher specificities (94.9 compared with 72.6, respectively; p<0.0001). Conclusions Modifying cutpoints did not improve the low sensitivity. The low sensitivity of this assay does not support its use for risk stratification or clinical settings. PMID:21934576

  8. Awareness of Diagnosis and Knowledge of HPV in Women Patients: Data from a Multi-Site Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCree, Donna Hubbard; Daley, Ellen M.; Gorbach, Pamina; Hamm, Robert M.; Sharpe, Patricia A.; Brandt, Heather M.; McFarlane, Mary; Kerndt, Peter; McDermott, Robert J.; Perrin, Karen M.; St. Lawrence, Janet S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Persistent infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with cervical and other anogenital cancers. Purpose: This paper reports results of awareness of an HPV diagnosis and HPV knowledge from a multi-site study of HPV knowledge, attitudes and behavior, and the impact of an HPV diagnosis on women and their…

  9. Persistence of mucosal T cell responses to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in the female genital tract

    PubMed Central

    Posavad, Christine M.; Zhao, Lin; Mueller, Dawn E.; Stevens, Claire E.; Huang, Meei Li; Wald, Anna; Corey, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the human T cell response to HSV-2 in the female genital tract, a major site of heterosexual HSV-2 acquisition, transmission and reactivation. In order to understand the role of local mucosal immunity in HSV-2 infection, T cell lines were expanded from serial cervical cytobrush samples from 30 HSV-2 infected women and examined for reactivity to HSV-2. Approximately 3% of the CD3+ T cells isolated from the cervix were HSV-2 specific and of these, a median of 91.3% were CD4+ while a median of 3.9% were CD8+. HSV-2 specific CD4+ T cells expanded from the cervix were not only more frequent than CD8+ T cells but also exhibited greater breadth in terms of antigenic reactivity. T cells directed at the same HSV-2 protein were often detected in serial cervical cytobrush samples and in blood. Thus, broad and persistent mucosal T cell responses to HSV-2 were detected in the female genital tract of HSV-2+ women suggesting that these cells are resident at the site of HSV-2 infection. Understanding the role of these T cells at this biologically relevant site will be central to the elucidation of adaptive immune mechanisms involved in controlling HSV-2 disease. PMID:24917455

  10. Strategies for Developing Oral Vaccines for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Induced Cancer using Nanoparticle mediated Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Kouzi, Samir A; Hussain, Muhammad Delwar

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) are a diverse group of small non-enveloped DNA viruses. Some HPVs are classified as low-risk as they are very rarely associated with neoplasia or cancer in the general population, and cause lenient warts. Other HPVs are considered as high-risk types because they are responsible for several important human cancers, including cervical cancer, a large proportion of other anogenital cancers, and a growing number of head and neck cancers. Transmission of HPV occurs primarily by skin-to-skin contact. The risk of contracting genital HPV infection and cervical cancer is influenced by sexual activity. Currently two prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil® (Merck, USA) and Cervarix® (GlaxoSmithKline, UK), are available and recommended for mass immunization of adolescents. However, these vaccines have limitations as they are expensive and require cold chain storage and trained personnel to administer them by injection. The use of nano or micro particulate vaccines could address most of these limitations as they are stable at room temperature, inexpensive to produce and distribute to resource poor regions, and can be administered orally without the need for adjuvants in the formulation. Also it is possible to increase the efficiency of these particulate vaccines by decorating the surface of the nano or micro particulates with suitable ligands for targeted delivery. Oral vaccines, which can be delivered using particulate formulations, have the added potential to stimulate mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue located in the digestive tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, both of which are important for the induction of effective mucosal response against many viruses. In addition, oral vaccines provide the opportunity to reduce production and administration costs and are very patient compliant. This review elaborately discusses different strategies that can be pursued to develop a nano or micro particulate oral vaccine for HPV induced cancers and other diseases. PMID:26158287

  11. Understanding HPV Disease and Prevention: A Guide for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood-Rayermann, Suzy; McIntyre, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) causes 99.7% of all cervical cancers. HPV Types 16 and 18 are responsible for approximately 77% of cases, and peak prevalence occurs in females younger than 25 years of age. The recent implementation of HPV vaccination provides females with the opportunity to prevent infection. School nurses are advocates of…

  12. Genital Tract HIV RNA Levels and Their Associations with Human Papillomavirus Infection and Risk of Cervical Pre-Cancer

    PubMed Central

    GHARTEY, Jeny; KOVACS, Andrea; BURK, Robert D.; MASSAD, L. Stewart; MINKOFF, Howard; XIE, Xianhong; D’SOUZA, Gypsyamber; XUE, Xiaonan; WATTS, D. Heather; LEVINE, Alexandra M.; EINSTEIN, Mark H.; COLIE, Christine; ANASTOS, Kathryn; ELTOUM, Isam-Eldin; HEROLD, Betsy C.; PALEFSKY, Joel M.; STRICKLER, Howard D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Plasma HIV RNA levels have been associated with risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical neoplasia in HIV-seropositive women. However, little is known regarding local genital tract HIV RNA levels and their relation with cervical HPV and neoplasia. Design/Methods In an HIV-seropositive women’s cohort with semi-annual follow-up, we conducted a nested case-control study of genital tract HIV RNA levels and their relation with incident high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions sub-classified as severe (severe HSIL), as provided for under the Bethesda 2001 classification system. Specifically, 66 incident severe HSIL were matched to 130 controls by age, CD4+ count, HAART use, and other factors. We also studied HPV prevalence, incident detection, and persistence in a random sample of 250 subjects. Results Risk of severe HSIL was associated with genital tract HIV RNA levels (odds ratio comparing HIV RNA ? the median among women with detectable levels versus undetectable [ORVL] 2.96; 95% CI: 0.99–8.84; Ptrend=0.03). However, this association became non-significant (Ptrend=0.51) following adjustment for plasma HIV RNA levels. There was also no association between genital tract HIV RNA levels and the prevalence of any HPV or oncogenic HPV. However, the incident detection of any HPV (Ptrend=0.02) and persistence of oncogenic HPV (Ptrend=0.04) were associated with genital tract HIV RNA levels, after controlling plasma HIV RNA levels. Conclusion These prospective data suggest that genital tract HIV RNA levels are not a significant independent risk factor for cervical pre-cancer in HIV-seropositive women, but leave open the possibility that they may modestly influence HPV infection, an early stage of cervical tumoriogenesis. PMID:24694931

  13. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution, cervical cancer screening practices and current status of vaccination implementation in Central and Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Poljak, Mario; Seme, Katja; Maver, Polona J; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Cuschieri, Kate S; Rogovskaya, Svetlana I; Arbyn, Marc; Syrjänen, Stina

    2013-12-31

    We present a review of current cervical cancer screening practices, the implementation status of vaccination against human papillomaviruses (HPV) and available data concerning the burden of HPV infection and HPV type-specific distribution in 16 Central and Eastern European countries: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Montenegro, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia and the Former Yugoslav Republic (FYR) of Macedonia. Since published data were relatively scarce, two detailed surveys were conducted during August-October 2011 and in January 2013 to obtain relevant and updated information. The mean prevalence of HPV infection in 8610 women with normal cervical cytology from the region was 12.6%, with HPV16 being the most frequent HPV type. The overall HPV DNA prevalence in women with high-grade cervical lesions was 78.1%. HPV DNA was found in 86.6% of cervical cancers; the combined prevalence of HPV16/18 among HPV positive cases was 87.5%. The overall HPV DNA prevalence in genital warts and laryngeal papillomas was 94.8% and 95.2%, respectively, with HPV6 and HPV11 being the most frequent types. Opportunistic and organized cervical screening, mainly based on conventional cytology, is performed in nine and seven countries in the region, respectively, with the proposed age of the start of screening ranging from 20 to 30 years and the estimated coverage ranging from a few percent to over 70%. At least one of the current HPV prophylactic vaccines is registered in all Central and Eastern European countries except Montenegro. Only Bulgaria, Czech Republic, FYR Macedonia, Latvia, Romania and Slovenia have actually integrated HPV vaccination into their national immunization programme and currently provide routine vaccination free of charge to the primary target population. The key reasons for lack of implementation of HPV vaccination into the national immunization programme are high vaccine cost and negative public perception. This article forms part of a regional report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases in the Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia Region" Vaccine Volume 31, Supplement 7, 2013. Updates of the progress in the field are presented in a separate monograph entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012. PMID:24332298

  14. Association of Cervical Biopsy with HIV Type 1 Genital Shedding Among Women on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Victoria G.; Liegler, Teri; Cohen, Craig R.; Sawaya, George F.; Smith-McCune, Karen; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 genital shedding is associated with increased HIV-1 transmission risk. Inflammation and ulceration are associated with increased shedding, while highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been shown to have a protective effect. We sought to examine the impact of cervical biopsies, a routine component of cervical cancer screening, on HIV-1 genital RNA levels in HIV-infected women on HAART. We enrolled HIV-1-infected women undergoing cervical biopsy for diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2/3 in this prospective cohort study. All were stable on HAART for at least 3 months. Clinical and demographic information as well as plasma HIV-1 viral load were collected at the baseline visit. Specimens for cervical HIV-1 RNA were collected immediately prior to biopsy, and 2 and 7 days afterward. Quantitative PCR determined HIV-1 concentration in cervical specimens at each time point to a lower limit of detection of 40 copies/specimen. Among the 30 participants, five (16.6%) women had detectable cervical HIV-1 RNA at baseline, of whom four (80%) had detectable HIV-1 RNA after cervical biopsy, with no significant increase in viral load in the follow-up specimens. Only one woman (3.3%) with undetectable baseline cervical HIV-1 RNA had detection postbiopsy. Detectable plasma HIV-1 RNA was the only factor associated with baseline cervical HIV-1 RNA. In women on HAART, an increase in cervical HIV-1 RNA detection or concentration was not associated with cervical biopsy. These findings help provide safety data regarding cervical cancer screening and diagnosis in HIV-infected women and inform postprocedure counseling. PMID:23594240

  15. Biological evidence for a causal role of HPV16 in a small fraction of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Halec, G; Holzinger, D; Schmitt, M; Flechtenmacher, C; Dyckhoff, G; Lloveras, B; Höfler, D; Bosch, F X; Pawlita, M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a causal factor in virtually all cervical and a subset of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP-SCC), whereas its role in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (L-SCC) is unclear. Methods: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (N=154) and deep-frozen tissues (N=55) of 102 L-SCC patients were analysed for the presence of 51 mucosal HPV types. HPV DNA-positive (HPV DNA+) cases were analysed for E6*I mRNA transcripts of all high risk (HR)/probably/possibly (p)HR-HPV identified, and for HPV type 16 (HPV16) viral load. Expression of p16INK4a, pRb, cyclin D1 and p53 was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Ninety-two patients were valid in DNA analysis, of which 32 (35%) had at least one HPV DNA+ sample. Among the 29 single infections, 22 (76%) were HPV16, 2 (7%) HPV56 and 1 each (4%) HPV45, HPV53, HPV70, HPV11 and HPV42. Three cases harboured HPV16 with HPV33 (twice) or HPV45. Only 32% of HPV DNA+ findings were reproducible. Among HPV16 DNA+ L-SCC, 2 out of 23 (9%) had high viral loads, 5 out of 25 (21%) expressed E6*I mRNA and 3 out of 21 (14%) showed high p16INK4a and low pRb expression (all three HPV16 RNA-positive), immunohistochemical marker combination not identified in any other HPV DNA+ or HPV DNA-negative (HPV DNA?) L-SCC, respectively. Conclusion: HPV type 16 has a causative role in a small subgroup of L-SCC (<5% in this German hospital series). PMID:23778529

  16. Role of bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) in diseases of cattle. Recent findings on BoHV-5 association with genital disease

    PubMed Central

    Favier, P.A.; Marin, M.S.; Pérez, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) belongs to the family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, genus Varicellovirus. This virus is a major causative agent of non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in young cattle. It was first isolated in 1962 from a neurological disease outbreak in Australia. BoHV-5 is genetically and antigenically related to bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1), a highly prevalent virus responsible for respiratory and genital disease in cattle. Initially, BoHV-5 was considered a subtype of BoHV-1 (BoHV-1.3). However, the exclusive presentation of outbreaks of neurological disease suggested that the virus was a new agent with characteristics of neuropathogenicity. Even though both are neurotropic viruses, only BoHV-5 is capable of replicating extensively in the central nervous system and inducing neurological disease. Occasionally, encephalitis caused by BoHV-1 has been reported. Like other alpha-herpesviruses, BoHV-5 can establish latency in nervous ganglia and, by stress factors or glucocorticoid treatment, latent virus can be reactivated. During episodes of reactivation, the virus is excreted in nasal, ocular and genital secretions and transmitted to other susceptible hosts. Recently, BoHV-5 has been associated with infection of the reproductive tract. The virus has been isolated and the presence of viral DNA has been demonstrated in semen samples from Brazil and Australia and natural transmission of the virus through contaminated semen has also been described. Embryos and oocytes are permissive for BoHV-5 infection and BoHV-5 DNA has been detected in the central nervous system of aborted fetuses. The objective of this review is to compile the limited information on the recent association between BoHV-5 and reproductive disorders in cattle.

  17. Comparative immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Mira; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Fox, Bradley; Scholar, Sofia; Rosen, Jeffrey; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Meric, Dorothée; Dessy, Francis J; Datta, Sanjoy K; Descamps, Dominique; Dubin, Gary

    2011-01-01

    In this observer-blind study (NCT00423046), women (N = 1,106), stratified by age (18–26, 27–35, 36–45 y), were randomized (1:1) to receive the HPV-16/18 vaccine (Cervarix®, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Months 0, 1, 6) or the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (Gardasil® Merck and Co., Inc., Months 0, 2, 6). Month 7 results were previously reported; we now report Month 24 results. In the according-to-protocol cohort for immunogenicity (seronegative and DNA-negative at baseline for HPV type analyzed), seropositivity rates of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) [pseudovirion-based neutralization assay] were, across all age strata, 100% (HPV-16/18 vaccine) and 97.5–100% (HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine) for HPV-16, and 99.0–100% (HPV-16/18 vaccine) and 72.3–84.4% (HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine) for HPV-18. Corresponding geometric mean titers (GMTs) were 2.4–5.8-fold higher for HPV-16 and 7.7–9.4-fold higher for HPV-18 with the HPV-16/18 vaccine vs. the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine; HPV-16 and HPV-18 GMTs were significantly higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (p < 0.0001) in the total vaccinated cohort (received ?1 vaccine dose, irrespective of baseline sero/DNA-status). Similar results were obtained using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA ). Positivity rates and GMTs of antigen-specific IgG antibodies in cervicovaginal secretions (ELISA) were not significantly different between vaccines. At Month 24, CD4+ T-cell responses for HPV-16 and HPV-18 were higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine; memory B-cell response was higher for HPV-18 with the HPV-16/18 vaccine and similar between vaccines for HPV-16. Both vaccines were generally well tolerated. Although an immunological correlate of protection has not been defined, differences in the magnitude of immune response between vaccines may represent determinants of duration of protection. PMID:22048173

  18. The quality of life of patients with genital warts: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genital warts, which are caused by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), are one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in Europe. Although genital warts are commonly perceived as a non-serious condition, treatment is often long, of varying effectiveness and the recurrence rate is high. Very few studies have been performed on the personal consequences of genital warts. The aim of this qualitative study, set in Denmark, was to examine the ways in which genital warts may affect patients' quality of life. Methods To obtain an in-depth understanding of patients' perceptions of genital warts, we used qualitative focus-group interviews with five men and five women aged between 18 and 30 years who had genital warts. The interview guide was based on a literature review that identified important issues and questions. The data were analysed using a medical anthropological approach. Results Patients' experiences were related to cultural conceptions of venereal diseases and the respective identities and sexuality of the sexes. The disease had negative psychological and social effects both for men and for women and it affected their sex and love lives, in particular. The psychological burden of the disease was increased by the uncertain timeline and the varying effectiveness of treatment. We identified a need for more patient information about the disease and its psycho-sexual aspects. Conclusions The men and women participating in this study considered their quality of life to be significantly lowered because of genital warts. The experiences described by the participants give insights that may be valuable in treatment and counselling. The quadrivalent HPV vaccine that has now been added to the childhood vaccination programme for girls in Denmark for the prevention of cervical cancer can also prevent 90% of cases of genital warts. Our results suggest that HPV vaccination could considerably reduce the largely unacknowledged psychological and social burden associated with genital warts, in men as well as women. PMID:20205944

  19. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Share Compartir You are being redirected to the HPV Cancer Screening page. Please update your bookmarks to ...

  20. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... and Share (PDF 1105 KB ) En Español HPV (human papillomavirus) is a sexually transmitted virus. It is passed ...

  1. Comparison of the immunogenicity of Cervarix® and Gardasil® human papillomavirus vaccines for oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Toft, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Müller, Martin; Sehr, Peter; Bonde, Jesper; Storgaard, Merete; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S

    2014-01-01

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have excess risk of developing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease. A substantial fraction of HPV-associated cancers is caused by HPV serotypes not included in the currently available vaccines. Among healthy women, both Cervarix(®) (HPV-16/18, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, GSK) and Gardasil(®) (HPV-6/11/16/18, Merck) have demonstrated partial cross-protection against certain oncogenic non-vaccine HPV-types. Currently, there are no available data on vaccine-induced cross-protection in men and little is known about cross-reactive immunity after HPV-vaccination of HIV-infected individuals. In an investigator-initiated trial, we randomized 91 HIV-positive men and women to receive vaccination with Cervarix(®) or Gardasil(®). The HPV-DNA status of the participants was determined with pcr before and after immunization. Cross-reactive antibody responses against HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 were evaluated for up to 12 months using a pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (PBNA). Geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) were compared among vaccine groups and genders at 7 and 12 months.: Both vaccines induced anti-HPV-31, -33, and -45 neutralizing antibodies in participants who were seronegative and HPV-DNA negative for those types at study entry. Geometric mean antibody titers were comparable between vaccine groups. Interestingly, anti-HPV-31 and -33 antibody titers were higher among women compared with men at 7 and 12 months.: In conclusion, both licensed HPV-vaccines induced cross-neutralizing antibodies against frequent oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults, and women had greater serological responses against HPV-31 and -33 compared with men. PMID:24553190

  2. HPV Vaccine Information for Young Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the human papillomavirus (HPV) types that cause most cervical cancers as well as some cancers of the anus, ... Cervarix]. Should girls and women be screened for cervical cancer before getting vaccinated? Girls and women do not ...

  3. Cost of Preventing, Managing, and Treating Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-Related Diseases in Sweden before the Introduction of Quadrivalent HPV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Östensson, Ellinor; Fröberg, Maria; Leval, Amy; Hellström, Ann-Cathrin; Bäcklund, Magnus; Zethraeus, Niklas; Andersson, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Costs associated with HPV-related diseases such as cervical dysplasia, cervical cancer, and genital warts have not been evaluated in Sweden. These costs must be estimated in order to determine the potential savings if these diseases were eradicated and to assess the combined cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening. The present study aimed to estimate prevention, management, and treatment costs associated with cervical dysplasia, cervical cancer, and genital warts from a societal perspective in Sweden in 2009, 1 year before the quadrivalent HPV vaccination program was implemented. Methods and Materials Data from the Swedish cervical cancer screening program was used to calculate the costs associated with prevention (cytological cervical cancer screening), management (colposcopy and biopsy following inadequate/abnormal cytological results), and treatment of CIN. Swedish official statistics were used to estimate treatment costs associated with cervical cancer. Published epidemiological data were used to estimate the number of incident, recurrent, and persistent cases of genital warts; a clinical expert panel assessed management and treatment procedures. Estimated visits, procedures, and use of medications were used to calculate the annual cost associated with genital warts. Results From a societal perspective, total estimated costs associated with cervical cancer and genital warts in 2009 were €106.6 million, of which €81.4 million (76%) were direct medical costs. Costs associated with prevention, management, and treatment of CIN were €74 million; screening and management costs for women with normal and inadequate cytology alone accounted for 76% of this sum. The treatment costs associated with incident and prevalent cervical cancer and palliative care were €23 million. Estimated costs for incident, recurrent and persistent cases of genital warts were €9.8 million. Conclusion Prevention, management, and treatment costs associated with cervical dysplasia, cervical cancer, and genital warts are substantial. Defining these costs is important for future cost-effectiveness analyses of the quadrivalent HPV vaccination program in Sweden. PMID:26398189

  4. Parents' Knowledge, Risk Perception and Willingness to Allow Young Males to Receive Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Muhwezi, Wilson Winstons; Banura, Cecily; Turiho, Andrew Kampikaho; Mirembe, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The Ministry of Health in Uganda in collaboration with the Program for Appropriate Technology for Health (PATH) supported by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in 2008–2009 vaccinated approximately 10,000 girls with the bivalent humanpapilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. We assessed parent's knowledge, risk perception and willingness to allow son(s) to receive HPV vaccines in future through a cross-sectional survey of secondary school boys aged 10–23 years in 4 districts. 377 questionnaires were distributed per district and 870 were used in analysis. Parents that had ever heard about cervical cancer and HPV vaccines; those who would allow daughter(s) to be given the vaccine and those who thought that HPV infection was associated with genital warts were more willing to allow son(s) to receive the HPV vaccine. Unwilling parents considered HPV vaccination of boys unimportant (p?=?0.003), believed that only females should receive the vaccine (p?=?0.006), thought their son(s) couldn't contract HPV (p?=?0.010), didn't know about HPV sexual transmissibility (p?=?0.002), knew that males could not acquire HPV (p?=?0.000) and never believed that the HPV vaccines could protect against HPV (p?=?0.000). Acceptance of HPV vaccination of daughters and likelihood of recommending HPV vaccines to son(s) of friends and relatives predicted parental willingness to allow sons to receive HPV vaccines. Probable HPV vaccination of boys is a viable complement to that of girls. Successfulness of HPV vaccination relies on parental acceptability and sustained sensitization about usefulness of HPV vaccines even for boys is vital. PMID:25203053

  5. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the noncoding region of human papillomavirus type 6

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tzyy-Choou.

    1989-01-01

    The structure and function of the transcriptional regulatory region of human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV-6) has been investigated. To investigate tissue specific gene expression, a sensitive method to detect and localize HPV-6 viral DNA, mRNA and protein in plastic-embedded tissue sections of genital and respiratory tract papillomata by using in situ hybridization and immunoperoxidase assays has been developed. This method, using ultrathin sections and strand-specific {sup 3}H labeled riboprobes, offers the advantages of superior morphological preservation and detection of viral genomes at low copy number with good resolution, and the modified immunocytochemistry provides better sensitivity. The results suggest that genital tract epithelium is more permissive for HPV-6 replication than respiratory tract epithelium. To study the tissue tropism of HPV-6 at the level of regulation of viral gene expression, the polymerase chain reaction was used to isolate the noncoding region (NCR) of HPV-6 in independent isolates. Nucleotide sequence analysis of molecularly cloned DNA identified base substitutions, deletions/insertions and tandem duplications. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the NCR were assayed in recombinant plasmids containing the bacterial gene for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase.

  6. Cellular immune responses to HPV-18, -31, and -53 in healthy volunteers immunized with recombinant HPV-16 L1 virus-like particles

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Ligia A.; Harro, Clayton D.; Kemp, Troy J.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Hildesheim, Allan

    2006-09-30

    Human papillomavirus-like particles (HPV VLP) are candidate vaccines that have shown to be efficacious in reducing infection and inducing robust antiviral immunity. Neutralizing antibodies generated by vaccination are largely type-specific, but little is known about the type-specificity of cellular immune responses to VLP vaccination. To determine whether vaccination with HPV-16 L1VLP induces cellular immunity to heterologous HPV types (HPV-18, HPV-31, and HPV-53), we examined proliferative and cytokine responses in vaccine (n = 11) and placebo (n = 5) recipients. Increased proliferative and cytokine responses to heterologous types were observed postvaccination in some individuals. The proportion of women responding to heterologous types postvaccination (36%-55%) was lower than that observed in response to HPV-16 (73%). Response to HPV-16 VLP predicted response to other types. The strongest correlations in response were observed between HPV-16 and HPV-31, consistent with their phylogenetic relatedness. In summary, PBMC from HPV-16 VLP vaccine recipients can respond to L1VLP from heterologous HPV types, suggesting the presence of conserved T cell epitopes.

  7. A Population-based Study of HPV Genotype Prevalence in the United States: Baseline Measures Prior to Mass HPV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Cosette M.; Hunt, William C.; Cuzick, Jack; Langsfeld, Erika; Pearse, Amanda; Robertson, Michael; Shearman, Catherine A.; Castle, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, two prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines targeting HPV 16 and 18 have been shown to be highly efficacious for preventing precursor lesions, although the effectiveness of these vaccines in real world clinical settings must still be determined. Toward this end, an ongoing statewide surveillance program was established in New Mexico to assess all aspects of cervical cancer preventive care. Given that the reduction in cervical cancer incidence is expected to take several decades to manifest, a systematic population-based measurement of HPV type-specific prevalence employing an age- and cytology-stratified sample of 47,617 women attending for cervical screening was conducted prior to widespread HPV vaccination. A well-validated PCR method for 37 HPV genotypes was used to test liquid-based cytology specimens. The prevalence for any of the 37 HPV types was 27.3% overall with a maximum of 52% at age 20 years followed by a rapid decline at older ages. The HPV 16 prevalence in women aged ? 20 years, 21-29 years, or ? 30 years was 9.6%, 6.5%, and 1.8%, respectively. The combined prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 in these age groups was 12.0%, 8.3% and 2.4%, respectively. HPV 16 and/or HPV 18 were detected in 54.5% of high-grade squamous intraepithelial (cytologic) lesions (HSIL) and in 25.0% of those with low-grade SIL (LSIL). These baseline data enable estimates of maximum HPV vaccine impact across time and provide critical reference measurements important to assessing clinical benefits and potential harms of HPV vaccination including increases in non-vaccine HPV types (i.e., type replacement). PMID:22532127

  8. Characterization of Two Novel Gammapapillomaviruses, HPV179 and HPV184, Isolated from Common Warts of a Renal-Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Hošnjak, Lea; Kocjan, Boštjan J.; Pirš, Branko; Seme, Katja; Poljak, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Gammapapillomavirus (Gamma-PV) is a diverse and rapidly expanding PV-genus, currently consisting of 76 fully characterized human papillomavirus (HPV) types. In this study, DNA genomes of two novel HPV types, HPV179 and HPV184, obtained from two distinct facial verrucae vulgares specimens of a 64 year-old renal-transplant recipient, were fully cloned, sequenced and characterized. HPV179 and HPV184 genomes comprise 7,228-bp and 7,324-bp, respectively, and contain four early (E1, E2, E6 and E7) and two late genes (L1 and L2); the non-coding region is typically positioned between L1 and E6 genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the L1 nucleotide sequence placed both novel types within the Gamma-PV genus: HPV179 was classified as a novel member of species Gamma-15, additionally containing HPV135 and HPV146, while HPV184 was classified as a single member of a novel species Gamma-25. HPV179 and HPV184 type-specific quantitative real-time PCRs were further developed and used in combination with human beta-globin gene quantitative real-time PCR to determine the prevalence and viral load of the novel types in the patient’s facial warts and several follow-up skin specimens, and in a representative collection, a total of 569 samples, of HPV-associated benign and malignant neoplasms, hair follicles and anal and oral mucosa specimens obtained from immunocompetent individuals. HPV179 and HPV184 viral loads in patients’ facial warts were estimated to be 2,463 and 3,200 genome copies per single cell, respectively, suggesting their active role in the development of common warts in organ-transplant recipients. In addition, in this particular patient, both novel types had established a persistent infection of the skin for more than four years. Among immunocompetent individuals, HPV179 was further detected in low-copy numbers in a few skin specimens, indicating its cutaneous tissue tropism, while HPV184 was further detected in low-copy numbers in one mucosal and a few skin specimens, suggesting its dual tissue tropism. PMID:25748516

  9. Acceptability of HPV Vaccine for Males and Preferences for Future Education Programs Among Appalachian Residents

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Paul L.; Oldach, Benjamin R.; Randle, Katherine E.; Katz, Mira L.

    2014-01-01

    Appalachia is a geographic region with several disparities related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, yet little is known about acceptability of HPV vaccine for males among Appalachian residents. HPV vaccine acceptability and preferences for future HPV vaccine education programs were examined among residents of Appalachian Ohio. Focus groups and in-depth interviews were conducted with Appalachian Ohio residents between July and October 2011. Participants (n = 102 from 24 focus groups and 5 in-depth interviews) included four key stakeholder groups: health care providers, community leaders, parents with adolescent sons, and young adult men ages 18 to 26 years. Support for vaccinating males against HPV was high among participants, despite low awareness and knowledge about HPV vaccine for males. Participants reported three categories of potential barriers to vaccinating males against HPV: concerns about vaccine safety and side effects, access to care and vaccination logistics, and gender and cultural issues. Participants reported that HPV vaccine was viewed as being only for females in their communities and that receiving the vaccine may be emasculating or embarrassing to males. Participants suggested that future HPV vaccine education programs mainly target parents, include basic information about HPV-related diseases and HPV vaccine (e.g., number of doses, cost), and present the vaccine as having the potential to prevent cancer (as opposed to preventing genital warts). Acceptability of HPV vaccine for males was high among residents of Appalachian Ohio. Future HPV vaccine education programs in Appalachia should address common potential barriers to vaccination and help destigmatize vaccination among males. PMID:24085197

  10. HPV Vaccination: An Investigation of Physician Reminders and Recommendation Scripts

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-15

    Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 11; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 16; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 18; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 6; Cervical Cancer; Genital Warts; Oropharyngeal Cancer

  11. Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose regimen

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody levels against two of the most carcinogenic types of HPV (16 and 18), compared to a standard three dose regimen.

  12. Transmission heterogeneity and autoinoculation in a multisite infection model of HPV.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Andrew F; Meza, Rafael; Eisenberg, Marisa C

    2015-12-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is sexually transmitted and can infect oral, genital, and anal sites in the human epithelium. Here, we develop a multisite transmission model that includes autoinoculation to study HPV and other multisite diseases. Under a homogeneous-contacts assumption, we analyze the basic reproduction number R0, as well as type and target reproduction numbers, for a two-site model. In particular, we find that R0 occupies a space between taking the maximum of next generation matrix terms for same site transmission and taking the geometric average of cross-site transmission terms in such a way that heterogeneity in the same-site transmission rates increases R0 while heterogeneity in the cross-site transmission decreases it. Additionally, autoinoculation adds considerable complexity to the form of R0. We extend this analysis to a heterosexual population, which additionally yields dynamics analogous to those of vector-host models. We also examine how these issues of heterogeneity may affect disease control, using type and target reproduction numbers. PMID:26518265

  13. Importance of HPV Genotyping for the Screening, Therapy and Management of Cervical Neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Jentschke, M.; Soergel, P.; Hillemanns, P.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the detection of human papillomaviruses (HPV) has become increasingly important in cervical cancer screening and the treatment of cancer precursors. HPV screening is recommended for the further evaluation of abnormal Pap tests or during follow-up after treating precancerous lesions. Several randomised controlled studies have shown that screening for cervical cancer using HPV detection can be more effective than cytology alone. Genotyping of different high-risk HPV (hrHPV) types obtained from smear tests has not yet gained widespread acceptance in clinical practice. However, significant differences have been noted in the oncogenicity of hrHPV genotypes. HPV 16 is by far the most common and oncogenic genotype. Genotyping of hrHPV could be helpful for the risk stratification of HPV-positive women. PMID:25374431

  14. HPV in HIV-Infected Women: Implications for Primary Prevention

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Nathalie Dauphin; Kobetz, Erin N.; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Rosa-Cunha, Isabella; Potter, JoNell E.; Morishita, Atsushi; Lucci, Joseph A.; Guettouche, Toumy; Hnatyszyn, James H.; Koru-Sengul, Tulay

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women might have a different human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in cervical dysplasia specimens as compared to the general population. This has implications for primary prevention. Objective: We aimed to obtain preliminary data on the HPV genotypes prevalent in histological samples of HIV-infected women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 3/CIS of the cervix in Miami, FL, USA. Methods: Retrospective data were collected on HIV-infected women referred to the University of Miami-Jackson Memorial Hospital colposcopy clinic between years 2000 and 2008. The histology slides of CIN 3/CIS biopsies underwent pathological review and sections were cut from these archived specimens for HPV DNA extraction. HPV genotyping was then performed using the GeneSquare™ HPV genotyping assay. We report on our first set of 23 samples. Results: Eight high-risk HPV types were detected. Types in decreasing order of frequency were 16, 35, 45, 52, 59, 31, 58, and 56. Most cases had multiple infections. HPV type 16 was the most common (45%) followed by HPV-35 and -45 with equal frequency (40%). No samples contained HPV-18. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that cervical dysplasia specimens of HIV-infected women more likely (55%) contain non-16 and -18 high-risk HPV types. We show that this held true for histologically confirmed severe dysplasia and carcinoma-in situ. Epidemiological studies guide vaccine development, therefore HPV type prevalence in CIS and invasive cervical cancer among HIV-infected women should be more rigorously explored to ensure that this highly vulnerable population receives appropriate primary prevention. PMID:25161956

  15. HPV Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... YEARS Preteens have a higher immune response to HPV vaccine than older teens. 3 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 26 ? While there is very little risk of exposure to HPV before age 13, the risk of exposure increases ...

  16. Self-assembly of in vitro-translated human papillomavirus type 16 L1 capsid protein into virus-like particles and antigenic reactivity of the protein.

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, S; Shah, K V; Kotloff, K L; Ghim, S J; Viscidi, R P

    1996-01-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) L1 capsid protein is the major component of the HPV virion. We prepared L1 protein of HPV-16 in a cell-free system. The L1 gene was cloned in an expression plasmid and transcribed and translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate. The expressed protein had the molecular mass (55 kDa) expected for the L1 protein, and it assembled into virus-like particles that closely resembled papillomavirus virions. The protein retained conformational epitopes, as evidenced by its reactivity with monoclonal antibodies which recognize only intact viral particles. In radioimmunoprecipitation assays with sera from college women grouped by their genital tract HPV DNA status, high reactivity was found in 68% of HPV-16 DNA-positive women, in 23% of women with other HPVs, and in 19% of HPV-negative women. In comparison, none of the sera of children were reactive. The results of the radioimmunoprecipitation assays showed a significant correlation with results obtained with the same sera in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with virus-like particles produced in baculovirus (chi-square test for linear trend, P = 0.0023). Although the amounts of L1 protein obtained are small, the ability to produce virus-like particles by in vitro translation may be useful in the study of virus assembly, virus binding, and the immunological response to HPV infection. PMID:8914767

  17. Healing of Genital Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Carol D.

    2011-01-01

    Child sexual abuse as well as accidental trauma may cause acute injuries in the anogenital area. Most data on residual findings following genital trauma come from longitudinal studies of children who have been sexually assaulted, undergone surgical procedures, or experienced accidental trauma. Like injuries in other part parts of the body, such…

  18. HPV Vaccine Acceptance in a Clinic-Based Sample of Women in the Rural South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Heather M.; Sharpe, Patricia A.; McCree, Donna H.; Wright, Marcie S.; Davis, Jennifer; Hutto, Brent E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a very common sexually transmitted infection linked to cervical disease. Vaccines for some types of HPV were in development at the time of the study. Purpose: The study examined HPV vaccine acceptability among underserved women in a rural region of the southeastern U.S. with high rates of cervical cancer…

  19. Activation of Src, Fyn and Yes non-receptor tyrosine kinases in keratinocytes expressing human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E7 oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Src family tyrosine kinases (SFK) are cellular regulatory proteins that influence cell adhesion, proliferation, invasion and survival during tumor development. Elevated activity of Src was associated with increased cell proliferation and invasivity in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated malignancies; therefore, transduced human foreskin keratinocytes (HFK) were used to investigate whether SFK activation is a downstream effect of papillomaviral oncoproteins. Activation of ubiquitously expressed SFKs, namely Src, Yes and Fyn, was investigated in both proliferating and differentiating keratinocytes. Results In proliferating keratinocytes, Src, Yes and Fyn mRNA levels were not affected by HPV 16 E6 or E7 oncoproteins, while at the protein level as detected by western blot, the presence of both E6 and E7 resulted in substantial increase in Src and Yes expression, but did not alter the high constitutive level of Fyn. Phospo-kinase array revealed that all ubiquitously expressed SFKs are activated by phosphorylation in the presence of HPV 16 E7 oncoprotein. Keratinocyte differentiation led to increased Yes mRNA and protein levels in all transduced cell lines, while it did not influence the Src transcription but resulted in elevated Src protein level in HPV16 E7 expressing lines. Conclusions This study revealed that HPV 16 oncoproteins upregulate Src family kinases Src and Yes via posttranscriptional mechanisms. A further effect of HPV 16 E7 oncoprotein is to enhance the activating phosphorylation of SFKs expressed in keratinocytes. PMID:23497302

  20. Genome-wide gene expression profiles of HPV-positive and HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancer: potential implications for treatment choices

    PubMed Central

    Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Houck, John; Fan, Wenhong; Yueh, Bevan; Mendez, Eduardo; Futran, Neal; Doody, David R.; Upton, Melissa P.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Zhao, Lue Ping; Chen, Chu

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the difference in gene expression between human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Design We used Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 arrays to examine gene expression profiles of OSCC and normal oral tissue. HPV DNA was detected using PCR followed by the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test, and the differentially expressed genes were analyzed to examine their potential biological roles using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Software (IPA 5.0). Subjects Tumor tissue from 119 primary OSCC patients and normal oral tissue from 35 patients without cancer, all of whom were treated at three University of Washington-affiliated medical centers. Results HPV DNA was found in 41 of 119 (34.5%) tumors and 2 of 35 (5.7%) normal tissue samples, with 39 of 43 HPV being HPV type 16; there was a higher prevalence of HPV DNA in oropharyngeal cancer (23 of 31) than in oral cavity cancer (18 of 88). We found no significant difference in gene expression between HPV-positive and HPV-negative oral cavity cancer but found 446 probe sets (347 known genes) differentially expressed between HPV-positive and HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancer. The most prominent functions of these genes are DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle. Some genes differentially expressed between HPV-positive and HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancer (e.g., TYMS, STMN1, CCND1 and RBBP4) are involved in chemotherapy or radiation sensitivity. Conclusion These results suggest that differences in the biology of HPV-positive and HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancer may have implications for the management of patients with these different tumors. PMID:19221247

  1. Evaluation of a Radionovela to Promote HPV Vaccine Awareness and Knowledge Among Hispanic Parents

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Gloria D.; Rodriguez, Hector P.; Thompson, Beti

    2014-01-01

    Hispanic women have more than a 1.5-fold increased cervical cancer incidence and mortality compared to non-Hispanic white women in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control recommends the HPV vaccine for females at ages 11 and 12 years, though it is approved for females aged 9–26 to protect against the primary types of high-risk HPV (HPV-16 and HPV-18) that cause approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases. Few culturally-tailored Spanish HPV vaccine awareness programs have been developed. This study evaluates the efficacy of a Spanish radionovela as an educational tool. Rural Hispanic parents of daughters aged 9–17 (n = 88; 78 mothers and 10 fathers) were randomized to listen to the HPV vaccine radionovela or to another public service announcement. Participants completed a 30 min pretest posttest questionnaire. Parents who listened to the HPV radionovela (intervention group) scored higher on six knowledge and belief items. They were more likely to confirm that HPV is a common infection (70% vs. 48%, P = .002), to deny that women are able to detect HPV (53% vs. 31%, P = .003), to know vaccine age recommendations (87% vs. 68%, P = .003), and to confirm multiple doses (48% vs. 26%, P = .03) than control group parents. The HPV vaccine radionovela improved HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge and attitudes. Radionovela health education may be an efficacious strategy to increase HPV vaccine awareness among Hispanic parents. PMID:21452030

  2. Comparison of Hybribio GenoArray and Roche Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Linear Array for HPV Genotyping in Anal Swab Samples

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Michelle I.; Brown, Brandon J.; Leng, Chan Yoon; Blas, Magaly M.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Woo, Yin Ling

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with anal cancer, as HPV DNA is detected in up to 90% of anal intraepithelial neoplasias and anal cancers. With the gradual increase of anal cancer rates, there is a growing need to establish reliable and clinically relevant methods to detect anal cancer precursors. In resource-limited settings, HPV DNA detection is a potentially relevant tool for anal cancer screening. Here, we evaluated the performance of the Hybribio GenoArray (GA) for genotyping HPV in anal samples, against the reference standard Roche Linear Array (LA). Anal swab samples were obtained from sexually active men who have sex with men. Following DNA extraction, each sample was genotyped using GA and LA. The overall interassay agreement, type-specific, and single and multiple genotype agreements were evaluated by kappa statistics and McNemar's ?2 tests. Using GA and LA, 68% and 76% of samples were HPV DNA positive, respectively. There was substantial interassay agreements for the detection of all HPV genotypes (? = 0.70, 86% agreement). Although LA was able to detect more genotypes per sample, the interassay agreement was acceptable (? = 0.53, 63% agreement). GA had poorer specific detection of HPV genotypes 35, 42, and 51 (? < 0.60). In conclusion, GA and LA showed good interassay agreement for the detection of most HPV genotypes in anal samples. However, the detection of HPV DNA in up to 76% of anal samples warrants further evaluation of its clinical significance. PMID:25502520

  3. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... when deciding about circumcision. Other Ways to Prevent Cervical Cancer: Regular Pap tests Regular Pap tests (also called ... smears) are still an important way to prevent cervical cancer, including for females who have had the HPV ...

  4. Genital Human Papillomavirus Infection among Women in Bangladesh: Findings from a Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Quamrun; Sultana, Farhana; Alam, Anadil; Islam, Jessica Yasmine; Rahman, Mustafizur; Khatun, Fatema; Alam, Nazmul; Dasgupta, Sushil Kanta; Marions, Lena; Ashrafunnessa; Kamal, Mohammed; Cravioto, Alejandro; Reichenbach, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Background There has been no population-based study on human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence or its genotypes in Bangladesh; a country eligible for GAVI funding for HPV vaccine. Methods We used baseline survey data of a prospective cohort study that was conducted in one urban and one rural area of Bangladesh. A total of 997 urban and 905 rural married women, aged 13 to 64 years, were enrolled in the baseline during July-December, 2011. Information was collected on socio-demographic characteristics and potential risk factors for HPV infection followed by gynecological examination and collection of endocervical samples using the cervical cytobrush (Digene cervical sampler). HPV DNA testing was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) using a consensus primer set. Results Prevalence of any HPV infection was 7.7% with no significant difference between urban and rural women. Most common high-risk genotypes were HPV16, HPV66, HPV18, HPV45, HPV31 and HPV53. Urban women working as housemaids or garment workers were at higher risk of any HPV infection (OR?=?2.15, 95% CI: 1.13–4.11) compared to housewives. Rural women whose husband lived overseas were almost two times more likely to have any HPV infection (OR?=?1.93; 95% CI 1.05–3.55) compared to women whose husbands lived with them. Conclusion The prevalence of HPV infection among Bangladeshi women is similar to other regions of Asia. However, type-specific patterns are different. The study findings will inform the formulation of HPV vaccination policies in Bangladesh, monitoring the impact of vaccination programmes, and the identification of target populations for screening. PMID:25271836

  5. Incidence and persistence of carcinogenic genital human papillomavirus infections in young women with or without Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Vriend, Henrike J; Bogaards, Johannes A; van Bergen, Jan E A M; Brink, Antoinette A T P; van den Broek, Ingrid V F; Hoebe, Christian J P A; King, Audrey J; van der Sande, Marianne A B; Wolffs, Petra F G; de Melker, Hester E

    2015-10-01

    We assessed whether infection with chlamydia increases the incidence of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and if HPV persistence is affected by chlamydia co-infection. For 1982 women (16-29 years-old) participating in two consecutive rounds of a chlamydia screening implementation trial, swabs were polymerase chain reaction tested to detect chlamydia and 14 carcinogenic HPV genotypes. HPV type-specific incidence and persistence rates were stratified for chlamydia positivity at follow-up. Associations were assessed by multilevel logistic regression analyses with correction for sexual risk factors. HPV type-specific incidence ranged from 1.4% to 8.9% and persistence from 22.7% to 59.4% after a median follow-up of 11 months (interquartile range: 11-12). Differences in 1-year HPV persistence rates between chlamydia -infected and noninfected women were less distinct than differences in HPV incidence rates (pooled adjusted odds ratios of 1.17 [95% CI: 0.69-1.96] and 1.84 [95% CI: 1.36-2.47], respectively). The effect of chlamydia co-infection on HPV-infection risk did not significantly differ by HPV genotype. In conclusion, infection with chlamydia increases the risk of infection by carcinogenic HPV types and may enhance persistence of some HPV types. Although these findings could reflect residual confounding through unobserved risk factors, our results do give reason to explore more fully the association between chlamydia and HPV type-specific acquisition and persistence. PMID:26194784

  6. Incidence and persistence of carcinogenic genital human papillomavirus infections in young women with or without Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Vriend, Henrike J; Bogaards, Johannes A; van Bergen, Jan E A M; Brink, Antoinette A T P; van den Broek, Ingrid V F; Hoebe, Christian J P A; King, Audrey J; van der Sande, Marianne A B; Wolffs, Petra F G; de Melker, Hester E

    2015-01-01

    We assessed whether infection with chlamydia increases the incidence of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and if HPV persistence is affected by chlamydia co-infection. For 1982 women (16–29 years-old) participating in two consecutive rounds of a chlamydia screening implementation trial, swabs were polymerase chain reaction tested to detect chlamydia and 14 carcinogenic HPV genotypes. HPV type-specific incidence and persistence rates were stratified for chlamydia positivity at follow-up. Associations were assessed by multilevel logistic regression analyses with correction for sexual risk factors. HPV type-specific incidence ranged from 1.4% to 8.9% and persistence from 22.7% to 59.4% after a median follow-up of 11 months (interquartile range: 11–12). Differences in 1-year HPV persistence rates between chlamydia -infected and noninfected women were less distinct than differences in HPV incidence rates (pooled adjusted odds ratios of 1.17 [95% CI: 0.69–1.96] and 1.84 [95% CI: 1.36–2.47], respectively). The effect of chlamydia co-infection on HPV-infection risk did not significantly differ by HPV genotype. In conclusion, infection with chlamydia increases the risk of infection by carcinogenic HPV types and may enhance persistence of some HPV types. Although these findings could reflect residual confounding through unobserved risk factors, our results do give reason to explore more fully the association between chlamydia and HPV type-specific acquisition and persistence. PMID:26194784

  7. Type-specific detection of 30 oncogenic human papillomaviruses by genotyping both E6 and L1 genes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Junping; Gao, Lei; Guo, Junhua; Wang, Ting; Wang, Ling; Yao, Qing; Zhu, Haijun; Jin, Qi

    2013-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the principal cause of invasive cervical cancer and benign genital lesions. There are currently 30 HPV types linked to cervical cancer. HPV infection also leads to other types of cancer. We developed a 61-plex analysis of these 30 HPV types by examining two genes, E6 and L1, using MassARRAY matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) (PCR-MS). Two hundred samples from homosexual males (HM) were screened by PCR-MS and MY09/MY11 primer set-mediated PCR (MY-PCR) followed by sequencing. One hundred thirty-five formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cervical cancer samples were also analyzed by PCR-MS, and results were compared to those of the commercially available GenoArray (GA) assay. One or more HPV types were identified in 64.5% (129/200) of the samples from HM. Comprising all 30 HPV types, PCR-MS detected 51.9% (67/129) of samples with multiple HPV types, whereas MY-PCR detected only one single HPV type in these samples. All PCR-MS results were confirmed by MY-PCR. In the cervical cancer samples, PCR-MS and GA detected 97% (131/135) and 90.4% (122/135) of HPV-positive samples, respectively. PCR-MS and GA results were fully concordant for 122 positive and 4 negative samples. The sequencing results for the 9 samples that tested negative by GA were completely concordant with the positive PCR-MS results. Multiple HPV types were identified in 25.2% (34/135) and 55.6% (75/135) of the cervical cancer samples by GA and PCR-MS, respectively, and results were confirmed by sequencing. The new assay allows the genotyping of >1,000 samples per day. It provides a good alternative to current methods, especially for large-scale investigations of multiple HPV infections and degraded FFPE samples. PMID:23152557

  8. Reduced Prevalence of Oral Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 4 Years after Bivalent HPV Vaccination in a Randomized Clinical Trial in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Rolando; Quint, Wim; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula; Struijk, Linda; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Wacholder, Sholom; Kreimer, Aimée R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particularly with type 16, causes a growing fraction of oropharyngeal cancers, whose incidence is increasing, mainly in developed countries. In a double-blind controlled trial conducted to investigate vaccine efficacy (VE) of the bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against cervical infections and lesions, we estimated VE against prevalent oral HPV infections 4 years after vaccination. Methods and Findings A total of 7,466 women 18–25 years old were randomized (1?1) to receive the HPV16/18 vaccine or hepatitis A vaccine as control. At the final blinded 4-year study visit, 5,840 participants provided oral specimens (91·9% of eligible women) to evaluate VE against oral infections. Our primary analysis evaluated prevalent oral HPV infection among all vaccinated women with oral and cervical HPV results. Corresponding VE against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection was calculated for comparison. Oral prevalence of identifiable mucosal HPV was relatively low (1·7%). Approximately four years after vaccination, there were 15 prevalent HPV16/18 infections in the control group and one in the vaccine group, for an estimated VE of 93·3% (95% CI?=?63% to 100%). Corresponding efficacy against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection for the same cohort at the same visit was 72·0% (95% CI?=?63% to 79%) (p versus oral VE?=?0·04). There was no statistically significant protection against other oral HPV infections, though power was limited for these analyses. Conclusions HPV prevalence four years after vaccination with the ASO4-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccine was much lower among women in the vaccine arm compared to the control arm, suggesting that the vaccine affords strong protection against oral HPV16/18 infection, with potentially important implications for prevention of increasingly common HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. ClinicalTrials.gov, Registry number NCT00128661 PMID:23873171

  9. Status of HPV Vaccine in the ICSN Countries

    Cancer.gov

    Australia has approved the HPV vaccine. Brazil has approved the HPV vaccine. Canada has approved the HPV vaccine. Denmark has approved the HPV vaccine. Finland has not approved the HPV vaccine. France has approved the HPV vaccine. Germany has approved the HPV vaccine. Hungary has the HPV vaccine under review. Iceland has approved the HPV vaccine. Italy has approved the HPV vaccine. Ireland has not approved the HPV vaccine. Japan has the HPV vaccine under review.

  10. Global Improvement in Genotyping of Human Papillomavirus DNA: the 2011 HPV LabNet International Proficiency Study

    PubMed Central

    Eklund, Carina; Forslund, Ola; Wallin, Keng-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and internationally comparable human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA genotyping is essential for HPV vaccine research and for HPV surveillance. The HPV Laboratory Network (LabNet) has designed international proficiency studies that can be issued regularly and in a reproducible manner. The 2011 HPV genotyping proficiency panel contained 43 coded samples composed of purified plasmids of 16 HPV types (HPV6, -11, -16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, -45, -51, -52, -56, -58, -59, -66, -68a, and -68b) and 3 extraction controls. Tests that detected 50 IU of HPV16 and HPV18 and 500 genome equivalents for the other 14 HPV types in both single and multiple infections were considered proficient. Ninety-six laboratories worldwide submitted 134 data sets. Twenty-five different HPV genotyping assay methods were used, including the Linear Array, line blot/INNO-LiPA, PapilloCheck, and PCR Luminex assays. The major oncogenic HPV types, HPV16 and HPV18, were proficiently detected in 97.0% (113/116) and 87.0% (103/118) of the data sets, respectively. In 2011, 51 data sets (39%) were 100% proficient for the detection of at least one HPV type, and 37 data sets (28%) were proficient for all 16 HPV types; this was an improvement over the panel results from the 2008 and 2010 studies, when <25 data sets (23% and 19% for 2008 and 2010, respectively) were fully proficient. The improvement was also evident for the 54 laboratories that had also participated in the previous proficiency studies. In conclusion, a continuing global proficiency program has documented worldwide improvement in the comparability and reliability of HPV genotyping assay performances. PMID:24478473

  11. HPV prevalence at enrollment and baseline results from the Carolina Women’s Care Study, a longitudinal study of HPV persistence in women of college age

    PubMed Central

    Banister, Carolyn E; Messersmith, Amy R; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Wang, Yinding; Spiryda, Lisa B; Glover, Saundra H; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer, a rare outcome of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, disproportionately affects African American women, who are about twice more likely than European American women to die of the disease. Most cervical HPV infections clear in about one year. However, in some women HPV persists, posing a greater risk for cervical dysplasia and cancer. The Carolina Women’s Care Study (CWCS) was conducted to explore the biological, genetic, and lifestyle determinants of persistent HPV infection in college-aged European American and African American women. This paper presents the initial results of the CWCS, based upon data obtained at enrollment. Methods Freshman female students attending the University of South Carolina were enrolled in the CWCS and followed until graduation with biannual visits, including two Papanicolaou tests, cervical mucus collection, and a questionnaire assessing lifestyle factors. We recruited 467 women, 293 of whom completed four or more visits for a total of 2274 visits. Results and conclusion CWCS participants were 70% European American, 24% African American, 3% Latina/Hispanic, and 3% Asian. At enrollment, 32% tested positive for any HPV. HPV16 infection was the most common (18% of infections). Together, HPV16, 66, 51, 52, and 18 accounted for 58% of all HPV infections. Sixty-four percent of all HPV-positive samples contained more than one HPV type, with an average of 2.2 HPV types per HPV-positive participant. We found differences between African American and European American women in the prevalence of HPV infection (38.1% African American, 30.7% European American) and abnormal Papanicolaou test results (9.8% African-American, 5.8% European American). While these differences did not reach statistical significance at enrollment, as the longitudinal data of this cohort are analyzed, the sample size will allow us to confirm these results and compare the natural history of HPV infection in college-aged African American and European American women. PMID:23861602

  12. HPV-Associated Cancers Statistics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Women Ages 30 and Older Cervical cancer Human papillomavirus (HPV) Cervical cancer screening tests What your Pap ... Prostate Skin Uterine Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer Home HPV-Associated Cancers Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  13. HPV Vaccine - Questions and Answers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Redirect for HPV Vaccine FAQ This page has moved. Please update ... to the address below. http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/questions-answers.html Print page Share Compartir ...

  14. [Age for HPV vaccination: recommandations from the French high council of public health].

    PubMed

    Heard, Isabelle; Floret, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    The French high council of public health has recently amended age for HPV vaccination. The paper will describe reasons that have contributed to the development of these new guidelines. Parental and adolescent acceptance of HPV vaccination is reported as well as potential barriers among medical practices. First results of immunogenicity of vaccines using alternative dosing schedules are presented. Finally, preliminary data on clinical efficacy of the quadrivalent vaccine on genital warts and cervical precancerous lesions are presented. A decrease in the prevalence of infection with genotypes included in the vaccine has now been reported in several studies. This decrease may be partly attributable to herd immunity. PMID:24356148

  15. Genital Cancers in Women: Vulvar Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hill-Daniel, Jamie; Roett, Michelle A

    2015-11-01

    Vulvar cancer is uncommon, accounting for 0.3% of all new US cancer diagnoses. The majority of cases are squamous cell carcinoma. Malignant melanoma is the second most common type. Other cases are related to chronic inflammatory skin disorders such as lichen sclerosus. Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) is a precursor to squamous cell vulvar cancer. It may be the usual type associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, or the differentiated type often associated with chronic skin disorders. Risk factors for VIN are HPV infection, cigarette smoking, chronic skin disorders, and immunosuppression. Symptoms of vulvar cancer include pruritus, bleeding, skin color change, skin lesions, and dysuria. VIN and vulvar cancer are diagnosed by skin biopsy. Treatment of VIN includes wide local excision, via surgical removal or with laser or ultrasonic surgical aspiration procedures. Medical therapy with imiquimod also may be used. Prognosis is good with early detection; the 5-year survival rate for stage I cancer is greater than 85%. Advanced disease has a poor prognosis, with a 5-year survival rate in stage IV disease as low as 5%. Although screening for vulvar cancer is not recommended, clinicians should evaluate and biopsy any suspicious vulvar lesions. Current efforts at prevention are aimed at HPV vaccination. PMID:26569049

  16. Dermoscopic and Clinical Features of Pigmented Skin Lesions of the Genital Area*

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Emiroglu, Nazan; Wellenhof, Rainer Hofmann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The dermoscopic features of vulvar melanosis lesions are well known. To our knowledge, there are only a few case reports about dermoscopic features of pigmented genital lesions in male patients. OBJECTIVE To evaluate dermoscopic and clinical characteristics of benign lesions of the genital area in both males and females, and to assess the distinguishing dermoscopic criteria of vulvar melanosis and atypical melanocytic nevi of the genital type. METHODS 68 patients with pigmented genital lesions were included in this observational study (28 male and 40 female). A punch biopsy was taken from all pigmented lesions and histopathological examination was performed on all specimens. RESULTS We histopathologically diagnosed: genital melanosis in 40 lesions, atypical melanocytic nevi of the genital type in 15 lesions, melanocytic nevi in 9 lesions, seborrheic keratosis in 4 lesions. The most frequent locations were the glans penis (19 patients, 67.9%) in males and the labia minora (19 patients, 47.5%) in females. The mean age of patients with atypical nevi (28,6 ± 11,36) was significantly lower than the mean age of patients with genital melanosis (47,07 ± 15,33). CONCLUSIONS Parallel pattern is prominent in genital melanosis, ring-like pattern is only observed in genital melanosis. Most pigmented lesions on the genital area are solitary. Blue-white veil and irregular dots are only observed in AMNGT. According to these results, we propose that histopathological examination is performed, especially if blue-white veil and irregular dots are found by dermoscopy. PMID:25830986

  17. Serum antibody response to Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections detected by a novel ELISA technique based on denatured recombinant HPV16 L1, L2, E4, E6 and E7 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Di Bonito, Paola; Grasso, Felicia; Mochi, Stefania; Accardi, Luisa; Donà, Maria Gabriella; Branca, Margherita; Costa, Silvano; Mariani, Luciano; Agarossi, Alberto; Ciotti, Marco; Syrjänen, Kari; Giorgi, Colomba

    2006-01-01

    Background Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the primary etiological agents of cervical cancer and are also involved in the development of other tumours (skin, head and neck). Serological survey of the HPV infections is important to better elucidate their natural history and to disclose antigen determinants useful for vaccine development. At present, the analysis of the HPV-specific antibodies has not diagnostic value for the viral infections, and new approaches are needed to correlate the antibody response to the disease outcome. The aim of this study is to develop a novel ELISA, based on five denatured recombinant HPV16 proteins, to be used for detection HPV-specific antibodies. Methods The HPV16 L1, L2, E4, E6 and E7 genes were cloned in a prokaryotic expression vector and expressed as histidine-tagged proteins. These proteins, in a denatured form, were used in ELISA as coating antigens. Human sera were collected from women with abnormal PAP smear enrolled during an ongoing multicenter HPV-PathogenISS study in Italy, assessing the HPV-related pathogenetic mechanisms of progression of cervical cancer precursor lesions. Negative human sera were collected from patients affected by other infectious agents. All the HPV-positive sera were also subjected to an avidity test to assess the binding strength in the antigen-antibody complexes. Results Most of the sera showed a positive reactivity to the denatured HPV16 proteins: 82% of the sera from HPV16 infected women and 89% of the sera from women infected by other HPV genotypes recognised at least one of the HPV16 proteins. The percentages of samples showing reactivity to L1, L2 and E7 were similar, but only a few serum samples reacted to E6 and E4. Most sera bound the antigens with medium and high avidity index, suggesting specific antigen-antibody reactions. Conclusion This novel ELISA, based on multiple denatured HPV16 antigens, is able to detect antibodies in women infected by HPV16 and it is not genotype-specific, as it detects antibodies also in women infected by other genital HPVs. The assay is easy to perform and has low cost, making it suitable for monitoring the natural history of HPV infections as well as for detecting pre-existing HPV antibodies in women who receive VLP-based HPV vaccination. PMID:17150135

  18. A retrospective analysis of the costs and management of genital warts in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Italy the prevalence of genital warts in women (15–64 years) is approximately 0.6% with an incidence of 0.4% per year. Treatments for GW are usually long, with moderate success and high costs. The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic-therapeutic pathway, duration and setting of treatment, costs of episodes of condyloma in a population attending a regional STI clinic in Piedmont. Methods This was a retrospective observational study conducted using medical records of outpatients who first visited the STI Clinic of San Lazzaro Dermatological Hospital in 2008. The patients’ medical histories were analysed for episodes that occurred and were cleared in 18 months following the initial visit. Data on screening methods for STIs, type of diagnosis for condyloma, treatment type, treatment setting, and anatomic lesion site were obtained from medical records. The costs were calculated for each episode. Results A total of 450 episodes were analysed (297 men,153 women). The most frequently affected anatomic site was the genital area (74%) in both genders. With regard to treatment setting, 78.44% of patients received outpatient treatment at the STI clinic, 4% were treated at home, and 0.22% were hospitalised; 11.11% were treated in multiple settings. The mean number of treatments per episode was 2.03; although many patients received only 1 treatment (n?=?207, 46%), exspecially cryotherapy or diathermy coagulation (64.73% versus 28.02% of episodes, respectively). The mean episode duration was 80.74 days. The mean cost (in 2011 euros) for an episode was €158.46?±?257.77; the mean costswere €79.13?±?57.40 for diagnosis and €79.33?±?233.60 for treatment. The mean cost for treatment in a STI-Clinic setting was €111.39?±?76.72, that for home treatment was €160.88?±?95.69, and that for hospital care was €2825.94. Conclusions The treatment of and associated costs for genital warts are significant. Several factors affect the cost, and internal STI clinic protocols, such as the 6 month window used to consider a recurrence or new diagnosis, create bias. Nonetheless, our findings how costs similar to those reported in the international literature and should be considered when deciding on which HPV vaccination programs should be provided by the public health system. PMID:24106891

  19. DNA ploidy of cervical epithelial cells should be a cure criterion of high-risk HPV infection in Xinjiang Uygur women

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yang-Chun; Yang, Jia; Liu, Cheng-Ming; Cheng, Zhen-Zhen; Huang, Yan-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Background The Uygur women have the highest incidence of cervical cancer in all Chinese ethnic groups. The research was conducted to explore whether DNA ploidy could be the prognostic indicator of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Xinjiang Uygur women. Methods Case data and cervical exfoliated cell samples from 326 Uygur women. The DNA ploidy was analyzed by flow cytometry. The flow-through hybridization and gene chip (FHGC) for HPV type test then divided the cases into negative HPV group, non high-risk HPV infection group, single high-risk HPV infection group, and multiple high-risk HPV infection group. Lastly, 113 cases from 273 HPV infection cases were followed up. Results The 16-type HPV had the highest rate in all genotypes infection; 16/18-type HPV mixed infection was the most common type in multiple high-risk HPV infection group. Abnormal DNA ploidy happened along with the seriousness of HPV infection. Compared with the HPV negative group, DNA heteroploid appeared 12.750 times and 22.705 times, respectively, in single high-risk HPV and multiple high-risk HPV infection groups. Followed up 1 year later, the DNA index, S-phase cells’ peak percentage and heteroploid of cervical exfoliated cells significantly reduced in single and multiple high-risk HPV infection patients, but in nine patients negative HPV infection and DNA heteroploid still existed. Conclusion The finally cure criterion of high-risk HPV infection should include the negative HPV test and normal DNA ploidy analysis. It was useful to prevent and cure cervical lesions in Xinjiang Uygur women through high-risk HPV test and DNA ploidy analysis. The transient infection and persistent infection in Xinjiang Uygur women should be taken as further research. PMID:25926744

  20. HPV and Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to yeast or latex shouldn’t get certain HPV vaccines. Be sure to tell the doctor or nurse if your child has any severe allergies. Help paying for vaccines The Vaccines for Children (VFC) program provides vaccines for children ages 18 years and younger who are uninsured, Medicaid-eligible, ...

  1. Acute genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  2. Gaps in detailed knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) and the HPV vaccine among medical students in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A vaccination programme targeted against human papillomavirus (HPV) types16 and 18 was introduced in the UK in 2008, with the aim of decreasing incidence of cervical disease. Vaccine roll out to 12–13 year old girls with a catch-up programme for girls aged up to 17 years and 364 days was accompanied by a very comprehensive public health information (PHI) campaign which described the role of HPV in the development of cervical cancer. Methods A brief questionnaire, designed to assess acquisition of knowledge of HPV infection and its association to cervical cancer, was administered to two different cohorts of male and female 1st year medical students (school leavers: 83% in age range 17–20) at a UK university. The study was timed so that the first survey in 2008 immediately followed a summer's intensive PHI campaign and very shortly after vaccine roll-out (150 students). The second survey was exactly one year later over which time there was a sustained PHI campaign (213 students). Results We addressed three research questions: knowledge about three specific details of HPV infection that could be acquired from PHI, whether length of the PHI campaign and/or vaccination of females had any bearing on HPV knowledge, and knowledge differences between men and women regarding HPV. No female student in the 2008 cohort had completed the three-dose vaccine schedule compared to 58.4% of female students in 2009. Overall, participants’ knowledge regarding the sexually transmitted nature of HPV and its association with cervical cancer was high in both year groups. However, in both years, less than 50% of students correctly identified that HPV causes over 90% of cases of cervical cancer. Males gave fewer correct answers for these two details in 2009. In 2008 only around 50% of students recognised that the current vaccine protects against a limited subset of cervical cancer-causing HPV sub-types, although there was a significant increase in correct response among female students in the 2009 cohort compared to the 2008 cohort. Conclusions This study highlights a lack of understanding regarding the extent of protection against cervical cancer conferred by the HPV vaccine, even among an educated population in the UK who could have a vested interest in acquiring such knowledge. The intensive PHI campaign accompanying the first year of HPV vaccination seemed to have little effect on knowledge over time. This is one of the first studies to assess detailed knowledge of HPV in both males and females. There is scope for continued improvements to PHI regarding the link between HPV infection and cervical cancer. PMID:23521847

  3. Pairwise antibody footprinting using surface plasmon resonance technology to characterize human papillomavirus type 16 virus-like particles with direct anti-HPV antibody immobilization.

    PubMed

    Towne, Victoria; Zhao, Qinjian; Brown, Martha; Finnefrock, Adam C

    2013-02-28

    This paper describes an approach to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based epitope mapping, also referred to as pairwise antibody footprinting, involving the direct immobilization of an antigen-specific primary mAb to the surface of an SPR interface. This technique offers a more straightforward approach than indirect capture (e.g., via rabbit anti-mouse Fc) as it does not require additional steps to block the unoccupied immobilized anti-Fc to prevent non-specific antibody binding. This is also an alternative to the direct immobilization of an antigen of interest, which may cause conformational changes in the antigen or epitope degradation upon chemical immobilization, particularly in successive regeneration cycles. It is particularly suitable for highly multivalent targets such as virus-like particles (VLPs). Using this technique, we assessed a panel of eight monoclonal antibodies against HPV (human papilloma virus) L1 protein VLPs expressed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the antibody epitope screening studies, HPV16 L1-directed conformational mAbs were clearly distinguished from the linear mAbs and consistent with known epitope information. Additional studies using a linear mAb and a conformational mAb demonstrate the practical application of this technique for characterizing the result of process changes and the consistency of recombinant HPV16 VLPs. The method is readily extensible to other VLPs and VLP-based vaccines. PMID:23159495

  4. Cost-effectiveness of vaccination with a quadrivalent HPV vaccine in Germany using a dynamic transmission model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Persistent infections with human papillomavirus (HPV) are a necessary cause of cervical cancer and are responsible for important morbidity in men and women. Since 2007, HPV vaccination has been recommended and funded for all girls aged 12 to 17 in Germany. A previously published cost-effectiveness analysis, using a static model, showed that a quadrivalent HPV vaccination programme for 12-year-old girls in Germany would be cost effective. Here we present the results from a dynamic transmission model that can be used to evaluate the impact and cost-effectiveness of different vaccination schemas. Methods We adapted a HPV dynamic transmission model, which has been used in other countries, to the German context. The model was used to compare a cervical cancer screening only strategy with a strategy of combining vaccination of females aged 12–17 years old and cervical cancer screening, based on the current recommendations in Germany. In addition, the impact of increasing vaccination coverage in this cohort of females aged 12–17 years old was evaluated in sensitivity analysis. Results The results from this analysis show that the current quadrivalent HPV vaccination programme of females ages 12 to 17 in Germany is cost-effective with an ICER of 5,525€/QALY (quality adjusted life year). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) increased to 10,293€/QALY when the vaccine effects on HPV6/11 diseases were excluded. At steady state, the model predicted that vaccinating girls aged 12 to 17 could reduce the number of HPV 6/11/16/18-related cervical cancers by 65% and genital warts among women and men by 70% and 48%, respectively. The impact on HPV-related disease incidence and costs avoided would occur relatively soon after initiating the vaccine programme, with much of the early impact being due to the prevention of HPV6/11-related genital warts. Conclusions These results show that the current quadrivalent HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening programmes in Germany will substantially reduce the incidence of cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and genital warts. The evaluated vaccination strategies were all found to be cost-effective. Future analyses should include more HPV-related diseases. PMID:23009387

  5. Prevalence of anal human papillomavirus infection and anal HPV-related disorders in women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stier, Elizabeth A; Sebring, Meagan C; Mendez, Audrey E; Ba, Fatimata S; Trimble, Debra D; Chiao, Elizabeth Y

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the findings of publications addressing the epidemiology of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, and anal cancer in women. We conducted a systematic review among publications published from Jan. 1, 1997, to Sept. 30, 2013, to limit to publications from the combined antiretroviral therapy era. Three searches were performed of the National Library of Medicine PubMed database using the following search terms: women and anal HPV, women anal intraepithelial neoplasia, and women and anal cancer. Publications were included in the review if they addressed any of the following outcomes: (1) prevalence, incidence, or clearance of anal HPV infection, (2) prevalence of anal cytological or histological neoplastic abnormalities, or (3) incidence or risk of anal cancer. Thirty-seven publications addressing anal HPV infection and anal cytology remained after applying selection criteria, and 23 anal cancer publications met the selection criteria. Among HIV-positive women, the prevalence of high-risk (HR)-HPV in the anus was 16-85%. Among HIV-negative women, the prevalence of anal HR-HPV infection ranged from 4% to 86%. The prevalence of anal HR-HPV in HIV-negative women with HPV-related pathology of the vulva, vagina, and cervix compared with women with no known HPV-related pathology, varied from 23% to 86% and from 5% to 22%, respectively. Histological anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (anal intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or greater) was found in 3-26% of the women living with HIV, 0-9% among women with lower genital tract pathology, and 0-3% for women who are HIV negative without known lower genital tract pathology. The incidence of anal cancer among HIV-infected women ranged from 3.9 to 30 per 100,000. Among women with a history of cervical cancer or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3, the incidence rates of anal cancer ranged from 0.8 to 63.8 per 100,000 person-years, and in the general population, the incidence rates ranged from 0.55 to 2.4 per 100,000 person-years. This review provides evidence that anal HPV infection and dysplasia are common in women, especially in those who are HIV positive or have a history of HPV-related lower genital tract pathology. The incidence of anal cancer continues to grow in all women, especially those living with HIV, despite the widespread use of combined antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25797230

  6. Bogarting that joint might decrease oral HPV among cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Zwenger, S R

    2009-12-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) has many known strains, two of the most well studied perhaps being the high-risk types 16 and 18. These strains have attracted more interest because they are known to disrupt tumour-suppressor genes that control the cell cycle, rendering those genes less effective at keeping cell division in check.Within the last decade, an increase in oral hpv-linked cancers of the throat and tongue has been attributed to exposure and contraction of hpv through oral sex, most notably in younger people. An understudied and arguably equal contributor to oral hpv infection might be indirect contact with an infected person. Presented here is a brief but important perspective on the relationship between cannabis use and oral cancer. The development of oral cancer is not a result of smoking cannabis per se; rather, it is hypothesized to be a result of contracting hpv through various forms of sharing and passing joints and other smoking apparatuses. Therefore, it is hypothesized that bogarting (and not passing) joints might decrease oral hpv among cannabis smokers. Future research should therefore investigate the prevalence of oral hpv in cannabis smokers to better understand its epidemiology. PMID:20016740

  7. Peritonitis due to genital tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, J H; Mikkelsen, A L; Siemssen, O J

    1985-01-01

    A case of genital tuberculosis is presented. The diagnosis was made by laparotomy and histological examination of biopsies from peritoneum and the Fallopian tube. The literature is reviewed and the diagnostic approach and treatment discussed. PMID:4083779

  8. Biological and clinical relevance of transcriptionally active human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jung, Alain C; Briolat, Jenny; Millon, Régine; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Rickman, David; Thomas, Emilie; Abecassis, Joseph; Clavel, Christine; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2010-04-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are associated with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), particularly HPV16. This study analyzed the presence and genotype of high risk HPVs, viral DNA load and transcription of the E6/E7 mRNAs, in 231 consecutive HNSCC. Twelve out of 30 HPV16 DNA-positive tumors displayed high E6/E7 mRNAs levels and were localized in the oropharyngeal region. While HPV-free and non-transcriptionally active HPV-related patients showed similar 5-years survival rates, E6/E7 expression was associated with a better prognosis. This emphasizes the importance of considering the transcriptional status of HPV-positive tumors for patient stratification. A gene expression profiling analysis of these different types of tumors was carried out. The most significant differentially expressed gene was CDKN2A, a known biomarker for HPV-related cancer. Assessing both the expression level of the E6/E7 mRNAs and of CDKN2A in HNSCC is required to detect active HPV infection. Chromosomic alterations were investigated by Comparative Genomic Hybridation (CGH) analysis of tumors with transcriptionally active HPV and HPV-negative tumors. The loss of the chromosomal region 16q was found to be a major genetic event in HPV-positive lesions. A cluster of genes located in 16q21-24 displayed decreased expression levels, notably APP-BP1 that is involved in the modulation of the transcriptional activity of p53. In conclusion, this study highlights important criteria required to predict clinically active HPV infection, identifies new biological pathways implicated in HPV tumorigenesis and increases the understanding of HPV-HNSCC physiopathology that is required to develop new targets for therapy. PMID:19795456

  9. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a significant factor in the development of most cervical and vulvar cancers, large population-based studies have implied an inherited predisposition to these cancers. Cell-mediated immune mechanisms, including human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type 1 and 2 cytokines, determine an individual's response to HPV infection. Investigators propose to analyze associations of HLA class I and II alleles with the risk of cervical and vulvar cancers.

  10. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Signs and Symptoms

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  11. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  12. HPV E6/E7 mRNA versus HPV DNA biomarker in cervical cancer screening of a group of Macedonian women.

    PubMed

    Duvlis, Sotirija; Popovska-Jankovic, Katerina; Arsova, Zorica Sarafinovska; Memeti, Shaban; Popeska, Zaneta; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2015-09-01

    High risk types of human papillomaviruses E6/E7 oncogenes and their association with tumor suppressor genes products are the key factors of cervical carcinogenesis. This study proposed them as specific markers for cervical dysplasia screening. The aim of the study is to compare the clinical and prognostic significance of HPV E6/E7 mRNA as an early biomarker versus HPV DNA detection and cytology in triage of woman for cervical cancer. The study group consists of 413 women: 258 NILM, 26 ASC-US, 81 LSIL, 41 HSIL, and 7 unsatisfactory cytology. HPV4AACE screening, real-time multiplex PCR and MY09/11 consensus PCR primers methods were used for the HPV DNA detection. The real-time multiplex nucleic acid sequence-based assay (NucliSENS EasyQ HPV assay) was used for HPV E6/E7 mRNA detection of the five most common high risk HPV types in cervical cancer (16, 18, 31, 33, and 45). The results show that HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing had a higher specificity 50% (95% CI 32-67) and positive predictive value (PPV) 62% (95% CI 46-76) for CIN2+ compared to HPV DNA testing that had specificity of 18% (95% CI 7-37) and PPV 52% (95% CI 39-76) respectively. The higher specificity and PPV of HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing are valuable in predicting insignificant HPV DNA infection among cases with borderline cytological finding. It can help in avoiding aggressive procedures (biopsies and over-referral of transient HPV infections) as well as lowering patient's anxiety and follow up period. PMID:25880030

  13. Efficacy of the HPV-16/18 Vaccine: Final according to protocol results from the blinded phase of the randomized Costa Rica HPV-16/18 Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hildesheim, Allan; Wacholder, Sholom; Catteau, Gregory; Struyf, Frank; Dubin, Gary; Herrero, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    Background A community-based randomized trial was conducted in Costa Rica to evaluate the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (NCT00128661). The primary objective was to evaluate efficacy of the vaccine to prevent cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or more severe disease (CIN2+) associated with incident HPV-16/18 cervical infections. Secondary objectives were to evaluate efficacy against CIN2+ associated with incident cervical infection by any oncogenic HPVs and to evaluate duration of protection against incident cervical infection with HPV-16/18. Vaccine safety and immunogenicity over the 4-year follow-up were also evaluated. Methods We randomized (3,727 HPV arm; 3,739 Control arm), vaccinated (HPV-16/18 or Hepatitis A) and followed (median 53.8 months) 7,466 healthy women aged 18-25 years. 5,312 women (2,635 HPV arm; 2,677 Control arm) were included in the according to protocol analysis for efficacy. The full cohort was evaluated for safety. Immunogenicity was considered on a subset of 354 (HPV-16) and 379 (HPV-18) women. HPV type was assessed by PCR on cytology specimens. Immunogenicity was assessed using ELISA and inhibition enzyme immunoassays. Disease outcomes were histologically confirmed. Vaccine efficacy and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were computed. Results Vaccine efficacy was 89.8% (95% CI: 39.5 - 99.5; N=11 events total) against HPV-16/18 associated CIN2+, 59.9% (95% CI: 20.7 - 80.8; N=39 events total) against CIN2+ associated with non-HPV-16/18 oncogenic HPVs and 61.4% (95% CI: 29.5-79.8; N=51 events total) against CIN2+ irrespective of HPV type. The vaccine had an acceptable safety profile and induced robust and long-lasting antibody responses. Conclusions Our findings confirm the high efficacy and immunogenicity of the HPV-16/18 vaccine against incident HPV infections and cervical disease associated with HPV-16/18 and other oncogenic HPV types. These results will serve as a benchmark to which we can compare future findings from ongoing extended follow-up of participants in the Costa Rica trial. Trial Registration Registered with clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00128661 PMID:25018097

  14. Association between human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA and micronuclei in normal cervical cytology

    PubMed Central

    Cassel, Ana Paula Rebelo; Barcellos, Regina Bones; da Silva, Cláudia Maria Dornelles; de Matos Almeida, Sabrina Esteves; Rossetti, Maria Lucia Rosa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between HPV-DNA and micronucleus (MN) frequency in women with normal cervical cytology. A total of 158 normal cervical smears were analyzed cytologically. The HPV genome was amplified using the GP5+/bioGP6+ consensus primers. HPV-DNA of high-risk types 16, 18, 31, 33, 39, 45 and 59 were also investigated. Of the 158 samples, 20 (12.7%) and 47 (29.7%) were positive for HPV-DNA and MN, respectively. Evidence for MN was found in 11 out of 20 (55%) HPV-DNA positive samples and in 36 out of 138 (26.1%) HPV-DNA negative ones. MN presence was significantly higher in HPV-DNA positive samples (p = 0.016). On the other hand, the absence of MN observed in a considerable number of HPV-DNA negative samples (102) may be of great value in predicting the absence of HPV. The mean age of HPV-DNA positive women (34.2 ± 12.6) was significantly lower than the mean age of HPV-DNA negative women (43.9 ± 13.7) (p = 0.003). Infection by one or multiple HPV types was found in 11 out of 20 (55.0%) and 9 out of 20 (45.0%) samples, respectively. The evaluation of MN using cervical smears collected for cytology tests could, thus, be used as additional information to monitor a population’s exposure to HPV. PMID:25071400

  15. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Prevalence in Nasal and Antrochoanal Polyps and Association with Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Knör, Mareike; Tziridis, Konstantin; Agaimy, Abbas; Zenk, Johannes; Wendler, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The pathogenesis of sinonasal polyposis remains unclear, in spite of several investigative approaches. Antrochoanal polyps, a subgroup of sinonasal polyposis along with allergic- and chronic-inflammatory nasal polyps, mostly originate from the maxillary sinus and develop as a unilateral, pedunculated mass towards the nasopharynx. The human papillomavirus (HPV) is discussed as a possible causative and influencing factor in development and progression of sinonasal polyposis. This study aims to elucidate HPV frequency in nasal polyps and antrochoanal polyps. Materials and Methods Genomic DNA from 257 tissue specimens (166 nasal polyps, 39 antrochoanal polyps and 52 nasal turbinates) was subjected to three different established HPV- polymerase chain reaction assays, testing for 37 low- and high-risk HPV. In addition, immunohistochemical analyses for HPV16 were carried out, as well as immunohistochemistry and western blots of p16, a biomarker for HPV induced cancer. Results HPV-DNA was detected in 53.8% of antrochoanal polyps, 15.1% of nasal polyps, and 5.8% of nasal turbinates. HPV16 was the predominant type with a detection rate of 76% in nasal polyps and 62% in antrochoanal polyps. Immunohistochemically, HPV positive tissues stained positive for HPV16 antigens and p16 in epithelial cell layers. No significant p16 overexpression was traceable in antrochoanal polyps, nasal polyps and nasal turbinates by western blot. There was no correlation of HPV-status with sex, age, smoking, alcohol consumption or allergic background. Conclusion The present study shows a significant frequency of high-risk type HPV16 in antrochoanal polyps. Absence of oncogenic transformation or correlation of the HPV-status with clinical data suggests a latent superinfection, possibly because of anatomical proximity to the oropharynx. PMID:26509801

  16. Immune responses against human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and evasion of host defense in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Toshiyuki; Takagi, Hiroaki; Makinoda, Satoru

    2012-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important etiological factor for cervical cancer. A recent study demonstrated that more than 20 HPV types were thought to be oncogenic for uterine cervical cancer. Notably, more than one-half of women show cervical HPV infections soon after their sexual debut, and about 90 % of such infections are cleared within 3 years. Immunity against HPV might be important for elimination of the virus. The innate immune responses involving macrophages, natural killer cells, and natural killer T cells may play a role in the first line of defense against HPV infection. In the second line of defense, adaptive immunity via cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) targeting HPV16 E2 and E6 proteins appears to eliminate cells infected with HPV16. However, HPV can evade host immune responses. First, HPV does not kill host cells during viral replication and therefore neither presents viral antigen nor induces inflammation. HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins downregulate the expression of type-1 interferons (IFNs) in host cells. The lack of co-stimulatory signals by inflammatory cytokines including IFNs during antigen recognition may induce immune tolerance rather than the appropriate responses. Moreover, HPV16 E5 protein downregulates the expression of HLA-class 1, and it facilitates evasion of CTL attack. These mechanisms of immune evasion may eventually support the establishment of persistent HPV infection, leading to the induction of cervical cancer. Considering such immunological events, prophylactic HPV16 and 18 vaccine appears to be the best way to prevent cervical cancer in women who are immunized in adolescence. PMID:23117294

  17. Male genital trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G.H.; Gilbert, D.A.

    1988-07-01

    We have attempted to discuss genital trauma in relatively broad terms. In most cases, patients present with relatively minimal trauma. However, because of the complexity of the structures involved, minimal trauma can lead to significant disability later on. The process of erection requires correct functioning of the arterial, neurologic, and venous systems coupled with intact erectile bodies. The penis is composed of structures that are compliant and distensible to the limits of their compliance. These structures therefore tumesce in equal proportion to each other, allowing for straight erection. Relatively minimal trauma can upset this balance of elasticity, leading to disabling chordee. Likewise, relatively minimal injuries to the vascular erectile structures can lead to significantly disabling spongiofibrosis. The urethra is a conduit of paramount importance. Whereas the development of stricture is generally related to the nature of the trauma, the extent of stricture and of attendant complications is clearly a function of the immediate management. Overzealous debridement can greatly complicate subsequent reconstruction. A delicate balance between aggressive initial management and maximal preservation of viable structures must be achieved. 38 references.

  18. High Prevalence and Genotype Diversity of Anal HPV Infection among MSM in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Supindham, Taweewat; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Utaipat, Utaiwan; Miura, Toshiyuki; Ruanpeng, Darin; Chotirosniramit, Nuntisa; Kosashunhanan, Natthapol; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Saokhieo, Pongpun; Songsupa, Radchanok; Siriaunkgul, Sumalee; Wongthanee, Antika

    2015-01-01

    Background HPV infection is common and may cause cancer among men who have sex with men (MSM). Anal HPV infection (HPV+) was found in 85% of HIV-positive (HIV+) and 59% of HIV-negative (HIV-) MSM in Bangkok, central Thailand. As little is known about HPV in this group in northern Thailand, we studied MSM subgroups comprised of gay men (GM), bisexual men (BM), and transgender women (TGW). Methods From July 2012 through January 2013, 85 (42.5% of 200) GM, 30 (15%) BM, and 85 (42.5%) TGW who practiced receptive anal intercourse were recruited after informed consent, followed by self-assisted computer interview, HIV testing, and anal swabs for HPV genotyping. Results Of 197 adequate specimens, the overall prevalence of any HPV was 157 (80%). Prevalence was 89% (76/85) in GM, 48% (14/29) in BM, and 81% (67/83) in TGW. The most common high-risk types were HPV16 (27% of 197), HPV58 (23%), and HPV51 (18%). Prevalence of high-risk types was 74% in 85 GM, 35% in 29 BM, and 71% in 83 TGW. Prevalence of any HPV type, or high-risk type, was 100% and 94%, respectively, among 48 HIV+ MSM, 70% and 54% among 120 HIV- MSM. Of the 197 specimens, 36% (70) had HPV types 16 and/or 18 in the bivalent vaccine, compared to 48% (95) with ?1 of types 16/18/06/11 in the quadrivalent, 56% (111) for 16/18/31/33/45/52/58 in the 7-valent, and 64% (126) for 16/18/31/33/45/52/58/06/11 in the 9-valent. HIV+, GM, and TGW were independently associated with HPV infection. Conclusions We found higher rates of both any HPV and high-risk types than previous studies. Among the heretofore unstudied TGW, their equivalent HPV rates were comparable to GM. Current and investigational HPV vaccines could substantially protect GM, BM, and TGW from the serious consequences of HPV infection especially among HIV + MSM. PMID:25932915

  19. Epidemiological Aspects of Genital Warts in Romania – a 2012 Retrospective Survey

    PubMed Central

    SALAVASTRU, Carmen Maria; NICULESCU, Mihaela Cristina; ZOTA, Alexandra; NICOLA, Gheorghe; MORARIU, Horia Silviu; SOLOVAN, Caius; PATRASCU, Virgil; POPOVICI, Georgeta; VLADUTA, Raluca; PANDURU, Mihaela; TIPLICA, George-Sorin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Genital infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) has become one of the most frequently viral sexually transmitted diseases. The infection may remain asymptomatic, may take the form of external genital warts and may give raise to cervical cancers. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of the patients with genital warts addressing to five tertiary referral dermato-venereological units in Romania (where patients from several counties are referred) and to compare the results with the out-patient data reported by all Romanian hospitals. Material and methods: Data regarding patients with external genital warts who addressed to the hospital emergency rooms, in five tertiary referral dermato-venerological units in Romania (Bucharest, Timisoara, Craiova, Constanta, Târgu-Mures) were collected for the year 2012. For comparison there have been used data collected by the National School of Public Health, Management and Professional Development, during the same year. Outcomes: Data reported at national level in 2012 included 952 patients (731 women and 221 men) with 26 males under 20 years of age and 251 female patients in the age group 0-20 years. In the overall population (males and females combined) the total number of genital warts cases registered at the hospital emergency rooms in the five centers, in the year 2012, was 266 patients (119 men and 147 women) with 4 girls under 14 years of age and 6 male patients in the age group 0-14 years. Conclusions: The high prevalence of the infection with HPV, the costs of treatment and the psychological impact prove that prevention of the disease is the most important step for decreasing the incidence of this disease. General measures for patients awareness regarding the disease and its complications need to be completed with the recommendation for vaccination. A closer monitoring of patients would provide information for a strategic national approach leading to a better outcome. PMID:25705269

  20. Detection of systemic and mucosal HPV-specific IgG and IgA antibodies in adolescent girls one and two years after HPV vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Scherpenisse, Mirte; Mollers, Madelief; Schepp, Rutger M.; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; de Melker, Hester E.; Berbers, Guy A.M.; van der Klis, Fiona R.M.

    2013-01-01

    The bivalent HPV16/18 vaccine induces high antibody concentrations in serum while data about antibody responses in the cervix are limited. In this study, we investigated pre- and post-vaccination antibody responses against seven high-risk HPV types by detection of IgG and IgA HPV-specific antibodies in cervical secretion samples (CVS) and serum. From an HPV vaccine monitoring study CVS and serum samples were available (pre-vaccination (n = 297), one year (n = 211) and two years (n = 141) post-dose-one vaccination) from girls aged 14–16 y. The girls were vaccinated with the bivalent HPV vaccine at months 0, 1 and 6. CVS was self-sampled using a tampon. Samples were tested for HPV-specific antibodies (HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58) by a VLP-based multiplex immunoassay. Post-vaccination, IgG and IgA antibody levels for HPV16/18 were detectable in CVS and amounted to 2% and 1% of the IgG and IgA antibody levels observed in serum, respectively. The antibody levels remained constant between one and two years after vaccination. The correlation between CVS and serum was similar for IgG and IgA vaccine-derived antibody levels for HPV16 (rs = 0.58, rs = 0.54) and HPV18 (rs = 0.50, rs = 0.55). Vaccine-derived IgG antibody levels against cross-reactive HPV types in CVS and in serum were highest for HPV45. No IgA cross-reactive antibody responses could be detected in CVS. Post-vaccination, HPV16/18 IgG and IgA antibodies are not only detectable in serum but also in CVS. The correlation of HPV16/18 IgG antibody levels between serum and CVS suggests that vaccine induced HPV antibodies transudate and/or exudate from the systemic circulation to the cervical mucosa to provide protection against HPV infections. PMID:23149693

  1. HPV genotypes and associated cervical cytological abnormalities in women from the Pearl River Delta region of Guangdong province, China: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is important to understand the specific HPV genotype distribution in screen-detected lesions. HPV Genotype is helpful for separating HPV-positive women at greater risk of cancer from those who can regress spontaneously and for preventing cervical cancer at early stage. The aim of this study was to investigate the high-risk HPV genotype distribution among cervical cytology abnormality in Pearl River Delta Region, Southern China Methods 5585 HPV-infected women were screened from 77069 women in Pearl River Delta Region. Information was obtained from 3226 screened subjects through questionnaires and personal interviews. Exfoliated cervical cells were collected by doctors for HPV test with MassARRAY (Sequenom, Sandiego, CA) technique based on the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The ThinPrep cytology test was performed to screen for cervical cancer. Unconditional logistic was used to determine the most common HPV carcinogenic types. Results Of the 3226 HPV-positive samples tested, 1744 (54.1%) with normal cervical cytology, 1482 (45.9%) with abnormal cytology. The five most common HPV types in this study were HPV16 (20.2%), HPV52 (17.1%), HPV58 (13.2%), HPV18 (9.5%), HPV6 (7.6%). Overall, HPV16 (OR?=?10.5, 95% CI: 3.7?~?29.6), HPV33 (OR?=?9.1, 95% CI: 2.8?~?29.2), HPV58 (OR?=?6.3, 95% CI: 2.1?~?18.6), HPV31 (OR?=?4.5, 95% CI: 1.3?~?15.5), multiple genotype infection (OR?=?3.0, 95% CI: 1.7?~?14.7), especially HPV16 and HPV33, increased the risk of cytology abnormalities. Conclusions HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV58, and multiple HPV genotype infection increased the risk of cytology abnormalities in Pearl River Delta Region and might be useful for the screening, preventing, treating, and monitoring of pre-cancer lesions in southern China. PMID:25016305

  2. HPV infection in women with and without cervical cancer in Conakry, Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Keita, N; Clifford, G M; Koulibaly, M; Douno, K; Kabba, I; Haba, M; Sylla, B S; van Kemenade, F J; Snijders, P J F; Meijer, C J L M; Franceschi, S

    2009-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer incidence in western Africa is among the highest in the world. Methods: To investigate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Guinea, we obtained cervical specimens from 831 women aged 18–64 years from the general population of the capital Conakry and from 77 locally diagnosed invasive cervical cancers (ICC). Human papillomavirus was detected using a GP5+/6+ PCR-based assay. Results: Among the general population, the prevalence of cervical abnormalities was 2.6% by visual inspection and 9.5% by liquid-based cytology. Fourteen of 15 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions were visual inspection-negative. Human papillomavirus prevalence was 50.8% (32.1% for high-risk types) and relatively constant across all age groups. Being single or reporting ?3 sexual partners was significantly associated with HPV positivity. HPV16 was the most common type, both among the general population (7.3%) and, notably in ICC (48.6%). HPV45 (18.6%) and HPV18 (14.3%), the next most common types in ICC, were also more common in ICC than in HPV-positive women with normal cytology from the general population. Conclusion: The heavy burden of HPV infection and severe cervical lesions in Guinean women calls for new effective interventions. Sixty-three per cent of cervical cancers are theoretically preventable by HPV16/18 vaccines in Guinea; perhaps more if some cross-protection exists with HPV45. PMID:19536089

  3. Analytic and clinical performance of cobas HPV testing in anal specimens from HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Tokugawa, Diane; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; Chen, Jie; Lorey, Thomas S; Gage, Julia C; Fetterman, Barbara; Boyle, Sean; Sadorra, Mark; Tang, Scott Dahai; Darragh, Teresa M; Castle, Philip E

    2014-08-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common, and the incidence of anal cancer is high in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). To evaluate the performance of HPV assays in anal samples, we compared the cobas HPV test (cobas) to the Roche Linear Array HPV genotyping assay (LA) and cytology in HIV-infected MSM. Cytology and cobas and LA HPV testing were conducted for 342 subjects. We calculated agreement between the HPV assays and the clinical performance of HPV testing and HPV genotyping alone and in combination with anal cytology. We observed high agreement between cobas and LA, with cobas more likely than LA to show positive results for HPV16, HPV18, and other carcinogenic types. Specimens testing positive in cobas but not in LA were more likely to be positive for other markers of HPV-related disease compared to those testing negative in both assays, suggesting that at least some of these were true positives for HPV. cobas and LA showed high sensitivities but low specificities for the detection of anal intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 (AIN2/3) in this population (100% sensitivity and 26% specificity for cobas versus 98.4% sensitivity and 28.9% specificity for LA). A combination of anal cytology and HPV genotyping provided the highest accuracy for detecting anal precancer. A higher HPV load was associated with a higher risk of AIN2/3 with HPV16 (P(trend) < 0.001), HPV18 (P(trend) = 0.07), and other carcinogenic types (P(trend) < 0.001). We demonstrate that cobas can be used for HPV detection in anal cytology specimens. Additional tests are necessary to identify men at the highest risk of anal cancer among those infected with high-risk HPV. PMID:24899025

  4. Analytic and Clinical Performance of cobas HPV Testing in Anal Specimens from HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Tokugawa, Diane; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Chen, Jie; Lorey, Thomas S.; Gage, Julia C.; Fetterman, Barbara; Boyle, Sean; Sadorra, Mark; Tang, Scott Dahai; Darragh, Teresa M.; Castle, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common, and the incidence of anal cancer is high in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). To evaluate the performance of HPV assays in anal samples, we compared the cobas HPV test (cobas) to the Roche Linear Array HPV genotyping assay (LA) and cytology in HIV-infected MSM. Cytology and cobas and LA HPV testing were conducted for 342 subjects. We calculated agreement between the HPV assays and the clinical performance of HPV testing and HPV genotyping alone and in combination with anal cytology. We observed high agreement between cobas and LA, with cobas more likely than LA to show positive results for HPV16, HPV18, and other carcinogenic types. Specimens testing positive in cobas but not in LA were more likely to be positive for other markers of HPV-related disease compared to those testing negative in both assays, suggesting that at least some of these were true positives for HPV. cobas and LA showed high sensitivities but low specificities for the detection of anal intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 (AIN2/3) in this population (100% sensitivity and 26% specificity for cobas versus 98.4% sensitivity and 28.9% specificity for LA). A combination of anal cytology and HPV genotyping provided the highest accuracy for detecting anal precancer. A higher HPV load was associated with a higher risk of AIN2/3 with HPV16 (Ptrend < 0.001), HPV18 (Ptrend = 0.07), and other carcinogenic types (Ptrend < 0.001). We demonstrate that cobas can be used for HPV detection in anal cytology specimens. Additional tests are necessary to identify men at the highest risk of anal cancer among those infected with high-risk HPV. PMID:24899025

  5. Female genital cutting: a persisting practice.

    PubMed

    Nour, Nawal M

    2008-01-01

    More than 130 million women worldwide have undergone female genital cutting (FGC). FGC occurs in parts of Africa and Asia, in societies with various cultures and religions. Reasons for the continuing practice of FGC include rite of passage, preserving chastity, ensuring marriageability, religion, hygiene, improving fertility, and enhancing sexual pleasure for men. The World Health Organization has classified FGC into 4 types depending on the extent of tissue removed. Immediate complications include hemorrhage, infection, sepsis, and death. Long-term complications include pain, scarring, urinary issues, and poor obstetric and neonatal outcomes. Efforts are being made nationally and internationally to eradicate this practice. PMID:19015765

  6. Gene expression profiling in male genital lichen sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Emma; Barton, Geraint; Buisson, Sandrine; Francis, Nick; Gotch, Frances; Game, Laurence; Haddad, Munther; Dinneen, Michael; Bunker, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Male genital lichen sclerosus (MGLSc) has a bimodal distribution in boys and men. It is associated with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The pathogenesis of MGLSc is unknown. HPV and autoimmune mechanisms have been mooted. Anti extracellular matrix protein (ECM)1 antibodies have been identified in women with GLSc. The gene expression pattern of LSc is unknown. Using DNA microarrays we studied differences in gene expression in healthy and diseased prepuces obtained at circumcision in adult males with MGLSc (n = 4), paediatric LSc (n = 2) and normal healthy paediatric foreskin (n = 4). In adult samples 51 genes with significantly increased expression and 87 genes with significantly reduced expression were identified; paediatric samples revealed 190 genes with significantly increased expression and 148 genes with significantly reduced expression. Concordance of expression profiles between adult and paediatric samples indicates the same disease process. Functional analysis revealed increased expression in the adult and child MGSLc samples in the immune response/cellular defence gene ontology (GO) category and reduced expression in other categories including genes related to squamous cancer. No specific HPV, autoimmune or squamous carcinogenesis-associated gene expression patterns were found. ECM1 and CABLES1 expression were significantly reduced in paediatric and adult samples respectively. PMID:21718371

  7. HPV16 early gene E5 specifically reduces miRNA-196a in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chanzhen; Lin, Jianfei; Li, Lianqin; Zhang, Yonggang; Chen, Weiling; Cao, Zeyi; Zuo, Huancong; Chen, Chunling; Kee, Kehkooi

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16, which is responsible for greater than 50% of cervical cancer cases, is the most prevalent and lethal HPV type. However, the molecular mechanisms of cervical carcinogenesis remain elusive, particularly the early steps of HPV infection that may transform normal cervical epithelium into a pre-neoplastic state. Here, we report that a group of microRNAs (microRNAs) were aberrantly decreased in HPV16-positive normal cervical tissues, and these groups of microRNAs are further reduced in cervical carcinoma. Among these miRNAs, miR196a expression is the most reduced in HPV16-infected tissues. Interestingly, miR196a expression is low in HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell lines but high in HPV16-negative cervical cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we found that only HPV16 early gene E5 specifically down-regulated miRNA196a in the cervical cancer cell lines. In addition, HoxB8, a known miR196a target gene, is up-regulated in the HPV16 cervical carcinoma cell line but not in HPV18 cervical cancer cell lines. Various doses of miR196a affected cervical cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. Altogether, these results suggested that HPV16 E5 specifically down-regulates miR196a upon infection of the human cervix and initiates the transformation of normal cervix cells to cervical carcinoma. PMID:25563170

  8. Antibodies from women immunized with Gardasil cross-neutralize HPV 45 pseudovirions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Judith F; Brownlow, Michelle; Brown, Martha; Kowalski, Rose; Esser, Mark T; Ruiz, Wanda; Barr, Eliav; Brown, Darron R; Bryan, Janine T

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16 and 18 L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) have been used to generate the prophylactic quadrivalent vaccine, Gardasil. There is a high degree of L1 homology between HPV types and it is likely that there is a substantial degree of surface exposed viral epitope similarity. An investigation of vaccine-induced antibody binding and neutralization was undertaken focusing on A7 species members, HPV 18 and 45. Polyclonal sera from Gardasil recipients and from HPV 18 L1 VLP recipients were evaluated. Vaccine-induced antibodies were found to cross-neutralize HPV 45 pseudovirions (PsV) in vitro. Examination of a panel of monoclonal antibodies made against L1 VLPs revealed the presence of conformational, neutralizing epitopes on the surface of VLPs that may be shared between HPV 18 and HPV 45. These data demonstrate that Gardasil(r) immunization induces antibodies capable of neutralizing HPV 18 PsV and HPV 45 PsV in vitro. PMID:17611417

  9. A Role for MicroRNA-155 Expression in Microenvironment Associated to HPV-Induced Carcinogenesis in K14-HPV16 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Isabel; Gil da Costa, Rui M.; Ribeiro, Joana; Sousa, Hugo; Bastos, Margarida; Rocha, Ana Faustino Carlos; Oliveira, Paula A; Medeiros, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus cause a number of diseases most notably cervical cancer. K14-HPV16 transgenic mice expressing the HPV16 early genes in squamous epithelial cells provide a suitable experimental model for studying these diseases. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play an important role in regulating gene expression and have been suggested to play an important role in cancer development. The role of miR-155 in cancer remains controversial and there is limited evidence linking this miRNA to HPV- associated diseases. We hypothesized that miR-155 expression modulates each tissue’s susceptibility to develop HPV-associated carcinogenesis. In this study, we analyzed miR-155 expression in ear and chest skin samples from 22-26 weeks old, female K14-HPV16 transgenic (HPV16+/-) and wild-type (HPV-/-) mice. Among wild-type mice the expression of miR-155 was lower in ear skin compared with chest skin (p = 0.028). In transgenic animals, in situ carcinoma was present in all ear samples whereas chest tissues only showed epidermal hyperplasia. Furthermore, in hyperplastic chest skin samples, miR-155 expression was lower than in normal chest skin (p = 0,026). These results suggest that miR-155 expression may modulate the microenvironmental susceptibility to cancer development and that high miR155 levels may be protective against the carcinogenesis induced by HPV16. PMID:25625305

  10. Quantifying the broader economic consequences of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in Germany applying a government perspective framework.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulos, Nikolaos; Connolly, Mark P; Remy, Vanessa

    2015-12-01

    HPV infections can cause substantial burden in females and males as it is associated with several genital cancers, in addition to genital warts. Traditional economic evaluations often focus on quantifying cost-effectiveness, however, it is increasingly recognized that vaccinations may generate broader benefits not captured in cost-effectiveness analysis. ?he aim of this study was to evaluate the broader economic consequences associated with HPV vaccination in males and females and to conduct a lifetime cost-benefit analysis of investing in universal vaccination in Germany from the perspective of government. Methodologies from generational accounting, human capital and health economics were combined to estimate the broader economic consequences of HPV vaccination including the fiscal impact for the government. A cohort model was developed simulating the medical costs and average lifetime fiscal transfers between the government and 12-year-old immunized and non-immunized males and females. To estimate tax revenue attributed to vaccination-related changes in morbidity and mortality, direct and indirect tax rates were linked to differences in age- and gender-specific earnings. Based on HPV vaccination costs, the base case cost-benefit analysis demonstrated that investing 1 in universal HPV vaccination could yield 1.7 in gross tax revenue over the lifetime of the cohorts. After taking into consideration the governmental transfers, universal HPV vaccination in Germany could result in incremental positive net discounted taxes (i.e. tax revenue-transfers) from 62 million for the German government. The vaccination of males and females with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine is likely to have positive effects on public finances. PMID:26198884

  11. HPV16L1-attenuated Shigella recombinant vaccine induced strong vaginal and systemic immune responses in guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaofei; Wang, Depu; Liang, Fengli; Fu, Ling; Guo, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Though human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines based on L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) have excellent protective effect against HPV-induced cervical cancer, they are too expensive to be afforded by the developing countries, where most cases of cervical cancer occur. A live bacterial-based vaccine could be an inexpensive alternative. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of live attenuated Shigella. flexneri 2a sc602 strain-based HPV16L1 as a high-efficiency, low-cost HPV16L1 mucosal vaccine. Recombinant sc602/L1 vaccine induced high L1-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses as well as cell-mediated Th1 and Th2 immune responses in guinea pig model. Sc602/L1 vaccine induced higher L1-specific IgG and IgA antibodies as well as HPV16-neutralizing antibodies in genital region in sc602/L1 mucosal immunized animals than in L1 intramuscular immunized animals. Though both are via mucosal delivery, immunized sc602/L1 vaccine by rectum route induced higher L1-specific IgA and IgG titers in genital region than by conjunctiva route. In addition, sc602/L1 also strongly increased L1-specific IFN-? and IL-4 expression, implying its effect on cell-mediated immune response. HPV16L1 was expressed in sc602 bacteria and their biologic characteristics were detected by immunoblot, electron microscope and HeLa cell invasion assay. Guinea pigs were immunized with sc602L1 through conjunctiva (i.c.) or rectum (i.r.). Mucosal and systemic immune responses were detected by ELISA, ELISPOT and Neutralization activity assays. Strong mucosal and systemic immune responses were induced by sc602/L1 vaccine. This study provides evidence that sc602/L1 vaccine may have protective effect on HPV infection. PMID:25483698

  12. HPV16L1-attenuated Shigella recombinant vaccine induced strong vaginal and systemic immune responses in guinea pig model

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaofei; Wang, Depu; Liang, Fengli; Fu, Ling; Guo, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Though human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines based on L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) have excellent protective effect against HPV-induced cervical cancer, they are too expensive to be afforded by the developing countries, where most cases of cervical cancer occur. A live bacterial-based vaccine could be an inexpensive alternative. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of live attenuated Shigella. flexneri 2a sc602 strain-based HPV16L1 as a high-efficiency, low-cost HPV16L1 mucosal vaccine. Recombinant sc602/L1 vaccine induced high L1-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses as well as cell-mediated Th1 and Th2 immune responses in guinea pig model. Sc602/L1 vaccine induced higher L1-specific IgG and IgA antibodies as well as HPV16-neutralizing antibodies in genital region in sc602/L1 mucosal immunized animals than in L1 intramuscular immunized animals. Though both are via mucosal delivery, immunized sc602/L1 vaccine by rectum route induced higher L1-specific IgA and IgG titers in genital region than by conjunctiva route. In addition, sc602/L1 also strongly increased L1-specific IFN-? and IL-4 expression, implying its effect on cell-mediated immune response. HPV16L1 was expressed in sc602 bacteria and their biologic characteristics were detected by immunoblot, electron microscope and HeLa cell invasion assay. Guinea pigs were immunized with sc602L1 through conjunctiva (i.c.) or rectum (i.r.). Mucosal and systemic immune responses were detected by ELISA, ELISPOT and Neutralization activity assays. Strong mucosal and systemic immune responses were induced by sc602/L1 vaccine. This study provides evidence that sc602/L1 vaccine may have protective effect on HPV infection. PMID:25483698

  13. Warts and All: HPV in Primary Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Leiding, Jennifer W.; Holland, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) is almost universal and eventually asymptomatic, but pathologic infection with HPV is severe, recurrent, and recalcitrant to therapy. It is also an underappreciated manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Mutations in EVER1, EVER2, GATA2, CXCR4, and DOCK8 are typically associated with extensive HPV infections, whereas several other primary immune defects have severe HPV much less frequently. We review immunodeficiencies with severe HPV infections and the mechanisms underlying them. PMID:23036745

  14. Evaluation of the Long-Term Anti-Human Papillomavirus 6 (HPV6), 11, 16, and 18 Immune Responses Generated by the Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nygård, Mari; Saah, Alfred; Munk, Christian; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Enerly, Espen; Hortlund, Maria; Sigurdardottir, Lara G; Vuocolo, Scott; Kjaer, Susanne K; Dillner, Joakim

    2015-08-01

    This quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) (HPV6, -11, -16, and -18) vaccine long-term follow-up (LTFU) study is an ongoing extension of a pivotal clinical study (FUTURE II) taking place in the Nordic region. The LTFU study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness, immunogenicity, and safety of the qHPV vaccine (Gardasil) for at least 10 years following completion of the base study. The current report presents immunogenicity data from testing samples of the year 5 LTFU visit (approximately 9 years after vaccination). FUTURE II vaccination arm subjects, who consented to being followed in the LTFU, donated serum at regular intervals and in 2012. Anti-HPV6, -11, -16, and -18 antibodies were detected by the competitive Luminex immunoassay (cLIA), and in addition, serum samples from 2012 were analyzed by the total IgG Luminex immunoassay (LIA) (n = 1,598). cLIA geometric mean titers (GMTs) remained between 70% and 93% of their month 48 value depending on HPV type. For all HPV types, the lower bound of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for the year 9 GMTs remained above the serostatus cutoff value. The proportion of subjects who remained seropositive based on the IgG LIA was higher than the proportion based on cLIA, especially for anti-HPV18. As expected, the anti-HPV serum IgG and cLIA responses were strongly correlated for all HPV types. Anti-HPV GMTs and the proportion of vaccinated individuals who are seropositive remain high for up to 9 years of follow-up after vaccination. PMID:26084514

  15. SHORT COMMUNICATION Star-PAP controls HPV E6 regulation of p53 and sensitizes cells

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    papillomaviruses (HPV type 16, 18 and 31, and so on) are major agents for its cause. A key switch for the onset of E6/E6-associated protein (E6AP)-mediated degradation.3 The high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E

  16. Papillomavirus Capsid Protein Expression in Escherichia coli: Purification and Assembly of HPV11

    E-print Network

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    Papillomavirus Capsid Protein Expression in Escherichia coli: Purification and Assembly of HPV11 proteins of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 11 and 16 were puri®ed and analyzed for structural integrity for vaccine design. # 2001 Academic Press Keywords: human papillomavirus; virus assembly; virus capsids

  17. Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose regimen

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody levels against two of the most carcinogenic types of HPV (16 and 18), compared to a standard three dose regimen. The results appeared in the November 2013 issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

  18. What School Nurses Need to Know about Cervical Cancer, HPV, and the New Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrhardt, Jeanie

    2007-01-01

    At least 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in the United States, accounting for at least 4,000 deaths. Worldwide, cervical cancer is the second most common type of cancer among women. The human papilloma virus (HPV) has been linked to at least 70% of all cervical cancer. HPV can be divided into 2 categories: (a) low risk,…

  19. [HPV-associated head and neck cancer : Mutational signature and genomic aberrations].

    PubMed

    Wagner, S; Würdemann, N; Hübbers, C; Reuschenbach, M; Prigge, E-S; Wichmann, G; Hess, J; Dietz, A; Dürst, M; Tinhofer, I; von Knebel-Döberitz, M; Wittekindt, C; Klussmann, J P

    2015-11-01

    A significantly increasing proportion of oropharyngeal head and neck carcinomas (OSCC) in North America and Europe are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. HPV-related OSCC is regarded as a distinct tumor type with regard to its cellular, biologic, and clinical characteristics. Patients with HPV-related OSCC have significantly better local control, but higher rates of regional lymph node and distant metastases as compared to patients with HPV-negative OSCC. Classical molecular genetic investigations demonstrated specific chromosomal aberration signatures in HPV-related OSCC, and recent developments in next generation sequencing (NGS) technology have rendered possible the sequencing of entire genomes, and thus detection of specific mutations, in just a few days. Initial data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project obtained by using genome-wide high throughput methods have confirmed that HPV-related OSCC contain fewer, albeit more specific mutations than HPV-negative tumors. Additionally, these data revealed the presence of specific-potentially therapeutically targetable-activating driver mutations in subgroups of HPV-positive OSCC, some of which have a prognostic impact. Specific targeted NGS technologies provide new possibilities for identification of diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers and the development of personalized cancer treatment. Patients with HPV-positive tumors are likely to profit from these developments in the future, since the genetic alterations are relatively homogenous and frequently lead to signal pathway activation. There is an urgent need for network research activities to carry out the necessary basic research in prospective cohort studies. PMID:26507715

  20. Current trends in the etiology and diagnosis of HPV-related head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ryan C; Lambie, Duncan; Verma, Mukesh; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is a major risk factor for a distinct subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The current review summarizes the epidemiology of HNSCC and the disease burden, the infectious cycle of HPV, the roles of viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, and the downstream cellular events that lead to malignant transformation. Current techniques for the clinical diagnosis of HPV-associated HNSCC will also be discussed, that is, the detection of HPV DNA, RNA, and the HPV surrogate marker, p16 in tumor tissues, as well as HPV-specific antibodies in serum. Such methods do not allow for the early detection of HPV-associated HNSCC and most cases are at an advanced stage upon diagnosis. Novel noninvasive approaches using oral fluid, a clinically relevant biological fluid, allow for the detection of HPV and cellular alterations in infected cells, which may aid in the early detection and HPV-typing of HNSCC tumors. Noninvasive diagnostic methods will enable early detection and intervention, leading to a significant reduction in mortality and morbidity associated with HNSCC. PMID:25644715

  1. Alcohol and Tobacco Increases Risk of High Risk HPV Infection in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: Study from North-East Region of India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rupesh; Rai, Avdhesh Kumar; Das, Debabrata; Das, Rajjyoti; Kumar, R. Suresh; Sarma, Anupam; Sharma, Shashi; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Ramteke, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papilloma virus (HPV) associated Head and Neck Cancers (HNCs) have generated significant amount of research interest in recent times. Due to high incidence of HNCs and lack of sufficient data on high-risk HPV (hr-HPV) infection from North -East region of India, this study was conceived to investigate hr-HPV infection, its types and its association with life style habits such as tobacco, alcohol consumption etc. Methods A total of one hundred and six primary HNC tumor biopsy specimens were collected. These samples were analyzed for hr-HPV DNA (13 HPV types) using hybrid capture 2 (HC2) assay and genotyping was done by E6 nested multiplex PCR (NMPCR). Results The presence of hr-HPV was confirmed in 31.13% (n = 33) and 24.52% (n = 26) of the HNC patients by nested multiplex PCR (NMPCR) and HC2 assay respectively. Among hr-HPV positive cases, out of thirteen hr- HPV types analyzed, only two prevalent genotypes, HPV-16 (81.81%) followed by HPV-18 (18.18%) were found. Significant association was observed between hr-HPV infection with alcohol consumption (p <0.001) and tobacco chewing (p = 0.02) in HNC cases. Compared to HPV-18 infection the HPV-16 was found to be significantly associated with tobacco chewing (p = 0.02) habit. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that tobacco chewing and alcohol consumption may act as risk factors for hr-HPV infection in HNCs from the North-East region of India. This was the first study from North-East India which also assessed the clinical applicability of HC2 assay in HNC patient specimens. We suggest that alcohol, tobacco and hr- HPV infection act synergistically or complement each other in the process of HNC development and progression in the present study population. PMID:26473489

  2. An Examination of Health Providers' HPV Vaccination Behaviors, Perceived Barriers, and Supports: A Four State Analysis.

    E-print Network

    McCave, Emily

    2009-12-08

    This study's main research asked which combination of predictors, including type of health provider, type of state policy initiative, overall barriers scores, and overall supports scores, is most predictive of HPV vaccination ...

  3. Prevention of HPV-Related Cancers in Norway: Cost-Effectiveness of Expanding the HPV Vaccination Program to Include Pre-Adolescent Boys

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Emily A.; Sy, Stephen; Nygård, Mari; Kristiansen, Ivar S.; Kim, Jane J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasingly, countries have introduced female vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV), causally linked to several cancers and genital warts, but few have recommended vaccination of boys. Declining vaccine prices and strong evidence of vaccine impact on reducing HPV-related conditions in both women and men prompt countries to reevaluate whether HPV vaccination of boys is warranted. Methods A previously-published dynamic model of HPV transmission was empirically calibrated to Norway. Reductions in the incidence of HPV, including both direct and indirect benefits, were applied to a natural history model of cervical cancer, and to incidence-based models for other non-cervical HPV-related diseases. We calculated the health outcomes and costs of the different HPV-related conditions under a gender-neutral vaccination program compared to a female-only program. Results Vaccine price had a decisive impact on results. For example, assuming 71% coverage, high vaccine efficacy and a reasonable vaccine tender price of $75 per dose, we found vaccinating both girls and boys fell below a commonly cited cost-effectiveness threshold in Norway ($83,000/quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained) when including vaccine benefit for all HPV-related diseases. However, at the current market price, including boys would not be considered ‘good value for money.’ For settings with a lower cost-effectiveness threshold ($30,000/QALY), it would not be considered cost-effective to expand the current program to include boys, unless the vaccine price was less than $36/dose. Increasing vaccination coverage to 90% among girls was more effective and less costly than the benefits achieved by vaccinating both genders with 71% coverage. Conclusions At the anticipated tender price, expanding the HPV vaccination program to boys may be cost-effective and may warrant a change in the current female-only vaccination policy in Norway. However, increasing coverage in girls is uniformly more effective and cost-effective than expanding vaccination coverage to boys and should be considered a priority. PMID:24651645

  4. High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences in metaplastic breast carcinomas of Mexican women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metaplastic carcinoma, an uncommon subtype of breast cancer, is part of the spectrum of basal-like, triple receptor-negative breast carcinomas. The present study examined 20 surgical specimens of metaplastic breast carcinomas, for the presence of high-risk Human papillomavirus (HPV), which is suspected to be a potential carcinogenic agent for breast carcinoma. Methods Mastectomy specimens from patients harboring metaplastic breast carcinoma, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), and who attended the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia in Mexico City, were retrieved from the files of the Department of Pathology accumulated during a 16-year period (1995–2008). Demographic and clinical information was obtained from patients’ medical records. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors and HPV type-specific amplification was performed by means of Polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Quantitative Real-time (RT) PCR was conducted in HPV positive cases. Statistically, the association of continuous or categorical variables with HPV status was tested by the Student t, the Chi square, or Fisher’s exact tests, as appropriate. Results High-risk HPV DNA was detected in eight (40%) of 20 metaplastic breast carcinomas: seven (87.5%) HPV-16 and one (12.5%) HPV-18. Mean age of patients with HPV-positive cases was 49 years (range 24–72 years), the same as for HPV-negative cases (range, 30–73 years). There were not striking differences between HPV?+?and HPV– metaplastic carcinomas regarding clinical findings. Nearly all cases were negative for estrogen, progesterone and Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), but positive for Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Conclusions High-risk HPV has been strongly associated with conventional breast carcinomas, although the subtle mechanism of neoplastic transformation is poorly understood. In Mexican patients, the prevalence of HPV infection among metaplastic breast carcinomas is higher than in non-metaplastic ones, as so the HPV viral loads; notwithstanding, HPV viral loads show wide variation and remain even lower than cervical and other non-cervical carcinomas, making it difficult to assume that HPV could play a key role in breast carcinogenesis. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the meaning of the presence of high-risk HPVDNA in breast carcinomas. PMID:24083491

  5. Examining HPV threat-to-efficacy ratios in the Extended Parallel Process Model.

    PubMed

    Carcioppolo, Nick; Jensen, Jakob D; Wilson, Steven R; Collins, W Bart; Carrion, Melissa; Linnemeier, Georgiann

    2013-01-01

    The Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) posits that an effective fear appeal includes both threat and efficacy components; however, research has not addressed whether there is an optimal threat-to-efficacy ratio. It is possible that varying levels of threat and efficacy in a persuasive message could yield different effects on attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. In a laboratory experiment, women (n?=?442) were exposed to human papilloma virus (HPV) prevention messages containing one of six threat-to-efficacy ratios and one of two message frames (messages emphasizing the connection between HPV and cervical cancer or HPV and genital warts). Multiple mediation analysis revealed that a 1-to-1 ratio of threat to efficacy was most effective at increasing prevention intentions, primarily because it caused more fear and risk susceptibility than other message ratios. Response efficacy significantly mediated the relationship between message framing and intentions, such that participants exposed to a genital warts message reported significantly higher intentions, and this association can be explained in part through response efficacy. Implications for future theoretical research as well as campaigns and intervention research are discussed. PMID:23330855

  6. HPV Infection and Cervical Screening in Socially Isolated Indigenous Women Inhabitants of the Amazonian Rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Allex Jardim; Taeko, Daniela; Chaves, Thiciane Araújo; Amorim, Lucia Dayanny da Costa; Murari, Raisa Saron Wanderley; Miranda, Angélica Espinosa; Chen, Zigui; Burk, Robert David; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos Lima

    2015-01-01

    Objective Indigenous women from the Amazon regions have some of the highest rates of cervical cancer in the world. This study evaluated cervical cytology and human papillomavirus (HPV) in native women that differ by lifestyle and interaction with western society. Yanomami women are isolated deep in the Amazon with a hunter/gatherer lifestyle. Macuxi and Wapishana women live in proximity to western society. Methods To select a representative group of women from each district, random cluster sampling was used, considering each registered village as a cluster. Cervical samples were collected for cytology and HPV detection and typing by PCR amplification and next generation sequencing. The study was approved by the National IRB and by tribal leaders. Results 664 native women were enrolled from 13 indigenous villages (76% participation rate). Yanomami women had higher rates of abnormal cytology (5.1% vs. 1.8%, p = 0.04) and prevalent HR-HPV (34.1% vs. 19.2%, p<0.001). Yanomami women >35y of age were significantly more likely to have HR-HPV, whereas women ?35y did not significantly differ between groups. Prevalence of HPV was significantly different amongst geographically clustered Yanomami women (p<0.004). The most prevalent HPV types in the entire group were HPV31 (8.7%), HPV16 (5.9%) and HPV18 (4.4%). Conclusion Isolated endogenous Yanomami women were more likely to be HPV+ and rates increased with age. Study of HPV in isolated hunter-gather peoples suggests that long-term persistence is a characteristic of prehistoric humans and patterns reflecting decreased prevalence with age in western society represents recent change. These studies have implications for cervical cancer prevention and viral-host relationships. PMID:26207895

  7. Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Radiotherapy or Radiochemotherapy: Prognostic Role of TP53 and HPV Status

    SciTech Connect

    Fallai, Carlo; Perrone, Federica; Licitra, Lisa; Pilotti, Silvana; Locati, Laura; Bossi, Paolo; Orlandi, Ester; Palazzi, Mauro; Olmi, Patrizia

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the TP53 mutation and human papilloma virus (HPV) status in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Methods and materials: The TP53 mutation and HPV status were analyzed in 78 cases of locoregionally advanced OPSCC. The possible correlation of these factors with locoregiownal control, relapse-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival (OS) was also investigated. Results: Of these 78 cases, 22 had disruptive and 22 had non-disruptive (silent) TP53 mutations; the remaining 34 cases had wild-type (WT) TP53. HPV 16 DNA was found in 9 cases (11%), but all HPV-positive (HPV+) cases carried a functional p53 protein, except for 1 case that had a silent mutation. HPV+ patients fared better than HPV-negative (HPV-) patients in terms of all survival parameters, with highly statistically significant differences between the groups. Specifically, no distant metastases were observed in the HPV+ patients, whereas they occurred in 17% of the HPV- patients. However, no difference was observed between the WT TP53 and mutation group, even when this was analyzed in terms of disruptive and non-disruptive mutations. Regardless, treatment with chemotherapy nearly doubled the 5-year OS rates, both in the mutation (42% vs. 22%) and WT (30 vs. 16%) group, but only the mutation group showed improvement in all survival parameters. In addition, the second tumor-free 5-year survival rate was 72% in HPV- cases, but no second tumors were observed in HPV+ and WT p53 cases. Conclusions: Patients with HPV+ OPSCC have an excellent prognosis after radiochemotherapy, but cisplatin-based chemotherapy may not confer a satisfactory outcome, especially in WT cases, thereby justifying the additional or alternative use of taxanes and epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors. Uncommon distant metastases and second tumors in the HPV+ group may be cause for clinicians to review the follow-up policies in these patients.

  8. Genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) in histological sections of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical carcinoma in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution and co-infection occurrence was studied in cervical specimens from the city of Madrid (Spain), as a contribution to the knowledge of Human Papillomavirus genotype distribution and prevalence of carcinogenic HPV types in cervical lesions in Spain. Methods A total of 533 abnormal specimens, from the Hospital General Universitario “Gregorio Marañón” of Madrid, were studied. These included 19 benign lesions, 349 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias 1 (CIN1), 158 CIN2-3 and 7 invasive cervical carcinomas (ICC). HPV genotyping was performed using PCR and tube array hybridization. Results We detected 20 different HPV types: 13 carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (HR-HPVs), 2 probably carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (PHR-HPVs) and 5 carcinogenic low-risk HPV types (LR-HPVs). The most frequent HPV genotypes found in all specimens were HPV16 (26.0%), 31 (10.7%) and 58 (8.0%). HPV 18 was only detected in 5.0%. Co-infections were found in 30.7% of CIN 1 and 18.4% cases of CIN2-3. The highest percentage of HR HPVs was found in those specimens with a CIN2-3 lesion (93.7%). Conclusion As our study shows the current tetravalent vaccine could be effective in our geographical area for preventing all the invasive cervical carcinomas. In addition, upon the estimates of the important presence of other HR-HPV types – such as 31, 58, 33 and 52 – in different preneoplasic lesions the effectiveness of HPV vaccination in our geographical area, and others with similar genotype distribution, should be limited. PMID:23167826

  9. Characterization of the plasma membrane localization and orientation of HPV16 E5 for cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-10-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a non-enveloped DNA virus with an approx 8000 base pair genome. Infection with certain types of HPV is associated with cervical cancer, although the molecular mechanism by which HPV induces carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Three genes encoded by HPV16 are regarded as oncogenic - E5, E6, and E7. The role of E5 has been controversial. Expression of HPV16 E5 causes cell-cell fusion, an event that can lead to increased chromosomal instability, particularly in the presence of cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors like HPV16 E6 and E7. Using biochemical and cell biological assays to better understand HPV16 E5, we find that HPV16 E5 localizes to the plasma membrane with an intracellular amino terminus and an extracellular carboxyl-terminus. Further, HPV16 E5 must be expressed on both cells for cell fusion to occur. When the extracellular epitope of HPV16 E5 is targeted with an antibody, the number of bi-nucleated cells decreases.

  10. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Genotyping: Automation and Application in Routine Laboratory Testing

    PubMed Central

    Torres, M; Fraile, L; Echevarria, JM; Hernandez Novoa, B; Ortiz, M

    2012-01-01

    A large number of assays designed for genotyping human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been developed in the last years. They perform within a wide range of analytical sensitivity and specificity values for the different viral types, and are used either for diagnosis, epidemiological studies, evaluation of vaccines and implementing and monitoring of vaccination programs. Methods for specific genotyping of HPV-16 and HPV-18 are also useful for the prevention of cervical cancer in screening programs. Some commercial tests are, in addition, fully or partially automated. Automation of HPV genotyping presents advantages such as the simplicity of the testing procedure for the operator, the ability to process a large number of samples in a short time, and the reduction of human errors from manual operations, allowing a better quality assurance and a reduction of cost. The present review collects information about the current HPV genotyping tests, with special attention to practical aspects influencing their use in clinical laboratories. PMID:23248734

  11. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Gardasil-9)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... vaccinated?Gardasil-9 prevents many cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, including:cervical cancer in females vaginal and ... Gardasil-9 can prevent most of these cancers. HPV infection usually comes from sexual contact, and most ...

  12. Prevalent high-risk HPV infection and vaginal microbiota in Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Dareng, E O; Ma, B; Famooto, A O; Akarolo-Anthony, S N; Offiong, R A; Olaniyan, O; Dakum, P S; Wheeler, C M; Fadrosh, D; Yang, H; Gajer, P; Brotman, R M; Ravel, J; Adebamowo, C A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the association between high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) and the vaginal microbiome. Participants were recruited in Nigeria between April and August 2012. Vaginal bacterial composition was characterized by deep sequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA gene fragments (V4) on Illumina MiSeq and HPV was identified using the Roche Linear Array® HPV genotyping test. We used exact logistic regression models to evaluate the association between community state types (CSTs) of vaginal microbiota and hrHPV infection, weighted UniFrac distances to compare the vaginal microbiota of individuals with prevalent hrHPV to those without prevalent hrHPV infection, and the Linear Discriminant Analysis effect size (LEfSe) algorithm to characterize bacteria associated with prevalent hrHPV infection. We observed four CSTs: CST IV-B with a low relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. in 50% of participants; CST III (dominated by L. iners) in 39·2%; CST I (dominated by L. crispatus) in 7·9%; and CST VI (dominated by proteobacteria) in 2·9% of participants. LEfSe analysis suggested an association between prevalent hrHPV infection and a decreased abundance of Lactobacillus sp. with increased abundance of anaerobes particularly of the genera Prevotella and Leptotrichia in HIV-negative women (P < 0·05). These results are hypothesis generating and further studies are required. PMID:26062721

  13. From Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection to Cervical Cancer Prevention in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S.; Vigliotti, Veronica S.; Jones, William

    2014-01-01

    The newly gained knowledge of the viral etiology in cervical carcinogenesis has prompted industrial interests in developing virology-based tools for cervical cancer prevention. Due to the long incubation period from viral infection to developing an invasive cancer, a process whose outcome is influenced by numerous life-style and genetic factors, the true efficacy of the genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in cervical cancer prevention cannot be determined for another 30 years. Most HPV DNA test kits designed to replace the traditional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for precancer detection lack the analytical sensitivity and specificity to comprehensively detect all potentially carcinogenic HPVs and to perform reliable genotyping. The authors implemented the classic nested PCR and Sanger DNA-sequencing technology for routine HPV testing. The results showed a true negative HPV PCR invariably indicates the absence of precancerous cells in the cytology samples. However, 80.5% of single positive HPV-16 tests and 97.3% of single positive HPV-18 tests were associated with a negative or a largely self-reversible Pap cytology. Routine sensitive and reliable HPV type-specific or perhaps even variant-specific methods are needed to address the issues of persistence of HPV infection if a virology-based primary cervical screen is used to replace the Pap cytology screening paradigm. PMID:25279452

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Hand-foot-genital syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hand-foot-genital syndrome On this page: Description Genetic changes ... Glossary definitions Reviewed April 2008 What is hand-foot-genital syndrome? Hand-foot-genital syndrome is a ...

  15. HPV Genotypes Predict Survival Benefits From Concurrent Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, School of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan ; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Huang, Yi-Ting; Chao, Angel; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hong, Ji-Hong; Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, School of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone or concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: Between August 1993 and May 2000, 327 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage III/IVA or stage IIB with positive lymph nodes) were eligible for this study. HPV genotypes were determined using the Easychip Registered-Sign HPV genechip. Outcomes were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: We detected 22 HPV genotypes in 323 (98.8%) patients. The leading 4 types were HPV16, 58, 18, and 33. The 5-year overall and disease-specific survival estimates for the entire cohort were 41.9% and 51.4%, respectively. CCRT improved the 5-year disease-specific survival by an absolute 9.8%, but this was not statistically significant (P=.089). There was a significant improvement in disease-specific survival in the CCRT group for HPV18-positive (60.9% vs 30.4%, P=.019) and HPV58-positive (69.3% vs 48.9%, P=.026) patients compared with the RT alone group. In contrast, the differences in survival with CCRT compared with RT alone in the HPV16-positive and HPV-33 positive subgroups were not statistically significant (P=.86 and P=.53, respectively). An improved disease-specific survival was observed for CCRT treated patients infected with both HPV16 and HPV18, but these differenced also were not statistically significant. Conclusions: The HPV genotype may be a useful predictive factor for the effect of CCRT in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Verifying these results in prospective trials could have an impact on tailoring future treatment based on HPV genotype.

  16. Comparative immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine: follow-up from months 12-24 in a Phase III randomized study of healthy women aged 18-45 years.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H; Baron, Mira; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Fox, Bradley; Scholar, Sofia; Rosen, Jeffrey; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Meric, Dorothée; Dessy, Francis J; Datta, Sanjoy K; Descamps, Dominique; Dubin, Gary

    2011-12-01

    In this observer-blind study (NCT00423046), women (N=1,106), stratified by age (18-26, 27-35, 36-45 y), were randomized (1:1) to receive the HPV-16/18 vaccine (Cervarix®, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Months 0, 1, 6) or the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (Gardasil® Merck & Co., Inc., Months 0, 2, 6). Month 7 results were previously reported; we now report Month 24 results. In the according-to-protocol cohort for immunogenicity (seronegative and DNA-negative at baseline for HPV type analyzed), seropositivity rates of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) [pseudovirion-based neutralization assay] were, across all age strata, 100% (HPV-16/18 vaccine) and 97.5-100% (HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine) for HPV-16, and 99.0-100% (HPV-16/18 vaccine) and 72.3-84.4% (HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine) for HPV-18. Corresponding geometric mean titers (GMTs) were 2.4-5.8-fold higher for HPV-16 and 7.7-9.4-fold higher for HPV-18 with the HPV-16/18 vaccine versus the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine; HPV-16 and HPV-18 GMTs were significantly higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (p< 0.0001) in the total vaccinated cohort (received ?1 vaccine dose, irrespective of baseline sero/DNA-status). Similar results were obtained using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Positivity rates and GMTs of antigen-specific IgG antibodies in cervicovaginal secretions (ELISA) were not significantly different between vaccines. At Month 24, CD4? T-cell responses for HPV-16 and HPV-18 were higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine; memory B-cell response was higher for HPV-18 with the HPV-16/18 vaccine and similar between vaccines for HPV-16. Both vaccines were generally well tolerated. Although an immunological correlate of protection has not been defined, differences in the magnitude of immune response between vaccines may represent determinants of duration of protection. PMID:22048173

  17. Female genital mutilation/cutting: an update.

    PubMed

    Rouzi, A A; Alturki, F

    2015-01-01

    Female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is a cultural practice involving several types of external female genitalia cutting. FGM/C is known to occur in all parts of the world but is most prevalent in 28 countries in Africa and the Middle East and among immigrant communities in Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States. Studies of FGM/C suffer from many methodological problems including inadequate analysis and an unclear reporting of results. The evidence to link FGM/C to infertility is weak. The management of epidermal clitoral inclusion cysts includes expensive investigations like comprehensive endocrinology tests and MRI resulting in unnecessary anxiety due to delay in surgical treatment. Similarly, unnecessary cesarean sections or rupture of the infibulation scar continue to occur because of the inadequate use of intrapartum defibulation. A significant amount of efforts is required to improve and correct the inadequate care of FGM/C women and girls. PMID:26151997

  18. Uncovering category specificity of genital sexual arousal in women: The critical role of analytic technique.

    PubMed

    Pulverman, Carey S; Hixon, J Gregory; Meston, Cindy M

    2015-10-01

    Based on analytic techniques that collapse data into a single average value, it has been reported that women lack category specificity and show genital sexual arousal to a large range of sexual stimuli including those that both match and do not match their self-reported sexual interests. These findings may be a methodological artifact of the way in which data are analyzed. This study examined whether using an analytic technique that models data over time would yield different results. Across two studies, heterosexual (N?=?19) and lesbian (N?=?14) women viewed erotic films featuring heterosexual, lesbian, and gay male couples, respectively, as their physiological sexual arousal was assessed with vaginal photoplethysmography. Data analysis with traditional methods comparing average genital arousal between films failed to detect specificity of genital arousal for either group. When data were analyzed with smoothing regression splines and a within-subjects approach, both heterosexual and lesbian women demonstrated different patterns of genital sexual arousal to the different types of erotic films, suggesting that sophisticated statistical techniques may be necessary to more fully understand women's genital sexual arousal response. Heterosexual women showed category-specific genital sexual arousal. Lesbian women showed higher arousal to the heterosexual film than the other films. However, within subjects, lesbian women showed significantly different arousal responses suggesting that lesbian women's genital arousal discriminates between different categories of stimuli at the individual level. Implications for the future use of vaginal photoplethysmography as a diagnostic tool of sexual preferences in clinical and forensic settings are discussed. PMID:26118962

  19. VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT HPV Vaccine Cervarix

    E-print Network

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT HPV Vaccine Cervarix® What You Need to Know (Human Papillomavirus) Many Vaccine Information Statements are available in Spanish and other languages. See www, but some of the problems it causes can be treated. 2 HPV vaccine: Why get vaccinated? HPV vaccine

  20. HPV infection, anal intra-epithelial neoplasia (AIN) and anal cancer: current issues

    E-print Network

    Stanley, Margaret A.; Winder, David M.; Sterling, Jane C.; Goon, Peter K. C.

    2012-09-08

    -genital mucosae (cervix, vagina, vulva, anus and penis) are oncogenic viruses causing ~ 5.2% of total human cancers [1]. Like cervical cancer, squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (anal SCC) is thought to be preceded by a spectrum of intra- epithelial changes, anal... , not sexual preference; increases in incidence were shown before the advent of the HIV epidemic [3]. The majority of studies of prevalence of anal HPV infection and AIN have been in the MSM cohort, especially HIV-positive MSM, as this is the highest risk group...

  1. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes invasive cervical cancer in women and also causes penile cancer in men. Because men transmit HPV to their female partners, reducing HPV infection in men could be an important next step HPV prevention strategy that benefits both men and women. By decreasing the viral load of HPV infection in men this could reduce male-to-female HPV transmission, and thus ultimately reduce HPV prevalence and associated neoplasia in women.

  2. Experiential Interventions for Clients with Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Anne L.

    1999-01-01

    Explores potential benefits of incorporating concepts and interventions from experimental therapy to help clients with psychosocial difficulties in learning to live with genital herpes. Recommends experimental counseling of two-chair dialog, empty chair, and metaphor for helping clients with emotional sequelae of genital herpes. Presents case…

  3. Predictors of Genital Pain in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Melissa A.; Meston, Cindy M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of genital pain in healthy young adult women, limited research has addressed genital pain during intercourse using contemporary models of multidimensional sexual function. The objectives of this study were threefold: (1) to identify differences in sexual functioning in women who experience genital pain compared to pain free women; (2) to identify predictors of sexual functioning in women with and without genital pain; and (3) to identify predictors of sexual satisfaction in women with and without genital pain. Sexually active female undergraduates (n = 651) were administered the Female Sexual Function Index and the Derogatis Sexual Functioning Inventory. We evaluated the sexual factors that impact the sexual function of women with any pain (including high and low pain groups) versus women with no history of pain. Women with genital pain reported greater rates of sexual dysfunction as compared to pain-free women; however, sexual functioning in the high versus low pain groups was distinguished primarily by vaginal lubrication. Women in the high pain group showed negative correlations between domains of sexual satisfaction and genital pain frequency and intensity that were not found in the low pain group. For pain-free women, intercourse played a strong role in sexual satisfaction, whereas non-intercourse sexual behavior was central to sexual satisfaction in women who reported pain. The evaluation of levels of genital pain may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the impairment of sexual function, sexual behavior, and sexual satisfaction. PMID:17674182

  4. Prevalence of sexually transmitted pathogens associated with HPV infection in cervical samples in a Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Magaña-Contreras, Mariana; Contreras-Paredes, Adriana; Chavez-Blanco, Alma; Lizano, Marcela; De la Cruz-Hernandez, Yanira; De la Cruz-Hernandez, Erick

    2015-12-01

    Cervical cancer development has been mainly associated with persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. However, HPV infection is unlikely to be sufficient to cause cervical cancer, and the contribution of other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) could be the determining factor for cervical lesion-progression. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of STIs associated with HPV-positivity in 201 cervical samples from patients who underwent annual routine gynecological exams. The overall prevalence of STIs was 57.7%, and the most frequent infection was Ureaplasma spp (UP) (39.8%), followed by Gardnerella vaginalis (GV) (25.9%), ?-HPV (18.4%), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) (1.5%), and Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) (0.5%). The highest prevalence rate of multiple non-HPV infections was observed for the age-range 31-40; for papillomavirus infection, the age-range was 21-30. In normal cervical samples, HPV16 was the most prevalent genotype (24.3%), followed by genotypes 58 (13.5%) and 52 (10.8%). Intriguingly, HPV18 was not detected in the study population, and genotypes 52 and 58 were found exclusively in samples with abnormal cytology. Papillomavirus infection with oncogenic types was significantly associated with GV (P?=?0.025) and strongly associated with multiple non-HPV pathogens (P?=?0.002). The following variables correlated significantly with cytological diagnosis of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL): GV (P?=?0.028), multiple non-HPV infections (P?=?0.001), and high-risk HPV positivity (P?=?0.001). Epidemiological data from this study will contribute to the molecular detection of sexually transmitted pathogens from screening programs to identify those women who are at risk for developing cervical lesions. PMID:26010580

  5. Female genital mutilation among Iraqi Kurdish women: a cross-sectional study from Erbil city

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Iraqi Kurdistan region is one of the areas where female genital mutilation is reportedly widely practiced but inadequately studied. The aim of this study was to determine (i) the prevalence of female genital mutilation among Muslim Kurdish women in Erbil city, (ii) the patterns and types of female genital mutilation, (iii) the factors associated with this practice and (iv) women’s knowledge and attitudes towards this practice. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in the primary health care centers and the Maternity Teaching Hospital in Erbil city, involving 1987 women aged 15–49 years. Data were obtained about female genital mutilation status and knowledge and perception towards this practice. The participants were clinically examined to verify the self-reported female genital mutilation status. Results The self-reported prevalence of female genital mutilation was 70.3%, while it was 58.6% according to clinical examination of the women’s genitalia. The most common type of female genital mutilation was type I (99.6%) and the most common age at which mutilation was performed was 4–7 years (60.2%). This practice was mostly performed by traditional birth attendants (72.5%). Only 6.4% of mutilated women reported having complications after mutilation, most commonly bleeding (3.6%). The practice was more reported among housewives (OR?=?3.3), those women whose mothers were mutilated (OR?=?15.1) or with unknown mutilation status (OR?=?7.3) and those women whose fathers were illiterate (OR?=?1.4) or could only read and write (OR?=?1.6). The common reasons for practicing female genital mutilation were cultural tradition (46.7%) and dictate of religion (38.9%). Only 30% of the participants were aware about the health consequences of female genital mutilation. More than one third (36.6%) of the women support the practice and 34.5% have intention to mutilate their daughters. Conclusions Prevalence of female genital mutilation among Muslim Kurdish women in Erbil city is very high; although, most cases are of type I. There is clear lack of knowledge about the health consequences of female genital mutilation and a relatively important segment of women support this practice. Custom or tradition and dictate of religion are the main reasons for this practice that need further in-depth exploration. PMID:24010850

  6. Overcoming barriers to HPV vaccination: A randomized clinical trial of a culturally-tailored, media intervention among African American girls.

    PubMed

    DiClemente, Ralph J; Murray, Colleen Crittenden; Graham, Tracie; Still, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Although genital HPV is the most prevalent STI in the US, rates of vaccination uptake among high-risk subgroups remain low. Investigations of vaccine compliance have mainly targeted mother-daughter dyads, which in some settings may prove difficult. This study examines an innovative culturally tailored, computer-delivered media-based strategy to promote HPV vaccine uptake. Data, inclusive of sociodemographics, sexual behaviors, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about HPV and vaccination were collected via ACASI from 216 African American adolescent females (ages 14-18 years) seeking services in family planning and STI public health clinics in metropolitan Atlanta. Data were obtained prior to randomization and participation in an interactive media-based intervention designed to increase HPV vaccination uptake. Medical record abstraction was conducted 7 month post-randomization to assess initial vaccine uptake and compliance. Participants in the intervention were more compliant to vaccination relative to a placebo comparison condition (26 doses vs. Seventeen doses; p=0.12). However, vaccination series initiation and completion were lower than the national average. Thorough evaluation is needed to better understand factors facilitating HPV vaccine uptake and compliance, particularly perceived susceptibility and the influence of the patient-provider encounter in a clinical setting. PMID:26378650

  7. Distribution of HPV genotypes in Shanghai women

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Suman; Zhou, Qian; Yu, Yunyun; Xu, Xianghong; Huang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Junwei; Han, Lingfei; Wang, Kai; Sun, Jing; Li, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the Distribution of HPV genotypes in Shanghai women. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital affiliated with Tongji University. Population: Patients those attended in the cervical disease diagnosis and treatment center of Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital between January 2011 and December 2014. Methods: HPV GenoArray test kit (HybriBio Ltd) was used to perform HPV genotyping and was also used in DNA amplification and HybriBio’s proprietary flow-through hybridization technique. Results: In this study, total patients analyzed were 4585. Among 4585 sample the HPV positive patients were 1460 i.e. 31.84% in total. On the basis of pathological report normal were 1358, with inflammation 2441, with low grade lesion were 399, high grade lesion were 353, CIN were 19 and cervical carcinoma were 15. Among normal HPV positive were 215 (15.8%), among inflammation HPV positive were 735 (30.11%). HPV positive in low grade lesion were 353 i.e. 59.77%. In high grade lesion 211 were HPV positive among 272 (68.17%). The percentage of HPV positive was 73.68% i.e. 14 out of 19 patient in cervical carcinoma in situ. 13 patient out of 15 i.e. 86.67% of Cervical carcinoma were HPV positive. Among all percentage of HPV positive was high among cervical carcinoma then cervical carcinoma in situ then high grade lesion in decreasing fashion to low grade lesion and in normal. Highest prevalence i.e. 22.67% is of HPV 52 subtype and HPV 16 has second highest prevalence with 17.67% among HPV positive cases. Sensitivity of TCT detection is 71.6%. Specificity of TCT detection is 79.6%. Sensitivity of HPV-DNA detection is 65.2%. Specificity of HPV-DNA detection is 78.2%. Conclusion: HPV is one of major health concern in shanghai having high prevalence rate in comparison to other part of china and other part of world. This has implications for the future cervical cancer burden and the priority to be given to prevent cervical cancer in Shanghai, especially, given the promising efficacy of prophylactic vaccines against HPV52, 16 and 58. This study also shows high sensitivity and specificity of TCT and HPV-DNA detection. PMID:26617946

  8. Higher Risk Perception of HIV than of Chlamydia and HPV among Secondary School Students in Two German Cities

    PubMed Central

    Samkange-Zeeb, Florence; Pöttgen, Saskia; Zeeb, Hajo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chlamydia and genital human papillomavirus (HPV) are the two most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among teens and young adults in industrialised countries. The majority of adolescents, however, have limited or no knowledge of these infections. Within the context of a cross-sectional survey on awareness and knowledge of sexually transmitted infections, secondary school students attending the 8th grade and above in Bremen and Bremerhaven, two cities in northern Germany, were asked to rate the risk of peers to get infected with HIV, HPV or chlamydia. Methods Between October and December 2011, students aged 12–20 years completed an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire at their school. In addition to answering questions on awareness and knowledge of sexually transmitted infections, all students were also asked to rate the risk of peers to get infected with HIV, HPV or chlamydia. Furthermore, those reporting ever having sexual intercourse were asked to rate their own risk of getting infected with each of the three infections. Results 1,148 students, 55% female, completed the questionnaire. 27% of the students reported having had sexual intercourse. 68% of all students rated the risk of same-aged students to get infected with HIV/AIDS as high/medium. The corresponding proportions for HPV and chlamydia were 19 and 25% respectively. Those reporting ever having sexual intercourse generally perceived their own risk of getting infected with HIV, chlamydia or HPV as lower than that of their peers. Conclusion Generally, the risk of getting infected with HIV was perceived as being higher than that of getting infected with HPV or chlamydia, most likely due to the fact that the students were more aware of HIV than of the other two infections. Efforts should be made to improve awareness and knowledge of HPV and chlamydia among school going adolescents, and to make them realize that these are common infections that are preventable. PMID:23637872

  9. Identification of Broad-Genotype HPV L2 Neutralization Site for Pan-HPV Vaccine Development by a Cross-Neutralizing Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daning; Li, Zhihai; Xiao, Jieqiong; Wang, Junqi; Zhang, Li; Liu, Yajing; Fan, Fei; Xin, Lu; Wei, Minxi; Kong, Zhibo; Yu, Hai; Gu, Ying; Zhang, Jun; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV), a non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA virus, is responsible for 5% of human cancers. The HPV capsid consists of major and minor structural proteins, L1 and L2. L1 proteins form an icosahedral shell with building blocks of the pentameric capsomere, and one L2 molecule extends outward from the central hole of the capsid. Thus, L2 is concealed within L1 and only becomes exposed when the capsid interacts with host cells. The low antigenic variation of L2 means that this protein could offer a target for the development of a pan-HPV vaccine. Toward this goal, here we describe an anti-L2 monoclonal antibody, 14H6, which broadly neutralizes at least 11 types of HPV, covering types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58 and 59, in pseudovirion—based cell neutralization assay. The mAb 14H6 recognizes a minimal linear epitope located on amino acids 21 to 30 of the L2 protein. Alanine scanning mutagenesis and sequence alignment identified several conserved residues (Cys22, Lys23, Thr27, Cys28 and Pro29) that are involved in the 14H6 binding with L2. The epitope was grafted to several scaffolding proteins, including HPV16 L1 virus-like particles, HBV 149 core antigen and CRM197. The resultant chimeric constructs were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified with high efficiency. Immunization with these pan-HPV vaccine candidates elicited high titers of the L2-specific antibody in mice and conferred robust (3-log) titers of cross-genotype neutralization, including against HPV11, 16, 18, 45, 52, 58 and 59. These findings will help in the development of an L2-based, pan-HPV vaccine. PMID:25905781

  10. A longitudinal study of HPV detection and cervical pathology in HIV infected women

    PubMed Central

    Cubie, H; Seagar, A; Beattie, G; Monaghan, S; Williams, A

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To monitor the presence and persistence of high risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical brushings from HIV infected women. Methods: Prospective observational cohort study of HIV infected women. Women were enrolled from the cohort of 164 HIV infected women who attend the colposcopy clinic at the Edinburgh Regional Infectious Diseases Unit. A single cervical brush scrape was obtained from 39 women and two or more samples from 63 women who attended regularly at approximately 6 monthly intervals. HPV typing was carried out using a commercial hybrid capture assay (HCA). Details of antiretroviral therapy, cytological assessment, and histological evaluation were made available and the interrelation with HR-HPV detection analysed. Results: Abnormal cervical cytology, particularly of low grade, was common in these HIV infected women. HR-HPV types were detected in 25% of the women with normal cytology, while over 80% of those with abnormal cytology of any grade were HR-HPV positive. Persistent HR-HPV, as defined by two or more consecutive HPV positive results, was common and found in 27/63 women from whom multiple samples were obtained. HR-HPV was detected at high levels whether or not patients were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Profound immunosuppression was not necessarily associated with progression of cervical disease and no cases of invasive cervical disease were seen. Conclusion: While mild dyskaryosis (low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL)) and persistence of HR-HPV are common in HIV infected women in Edinburgh, regular cytological and colposcopic evaluation with appropriate intervention and treatment appears to limit the progression of cervical disease. Key Words: human papillomavirus; HIV; cervical disease PMID:11026879

  11. Comparative humoral and cellular immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in healthy women aged 18–45 years: Follow-up through Month 48 in a Phase III randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Mark H; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Takacs, Peter; Catteau, Grégory; Dessy, Francis J; Moris, Philippe; Lin, Lan; Struyf, Frank; Dubin, Gary

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported higher anti-HPV-16 and -18 immune responses induced by HPV-16/18 vaccine compared with HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine at Month 7 (one month after completion of full vaccination series) in women aged 18–45 y in an observer-blind study NCT00423046; the differences of immune response magnitudes were maintained up to Month 24. Here we report follow-up data through Month 48. At Month 48, in according-to-protocol cohort for immunogenicity (seronegative and DNA-negative for HPV type analyzed at baseline), geometric mean titers of serum neutralizing antibodies were 2.0- to 5.2-fold higher (HPV-16) and 8.6- to 12.8-fold higher (HPV-18) in HPV-16/18 vaccine group than in HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine group. The majority of women in both vaccine groups remained seropositive for HPV-16. The same trend was observed for HPV-18 in HPV-16/18 vaccine group; however, seropositivity rates in HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine group decreased considerably, particularly in the older age groups. In the total vaccinated cohort (regardless of baseline serological and HPV-DNA status), anti-HPV-16 and -18 neutralizing antibody levels induced by HPV-16/18 vaccine were higher than those induced by HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine. CD4+ T-cell response for HPV-16 and HPV-18 was higher in HPV-16/18 vaccine group than in HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine group. Memory B-cell responses appeared similar between vaccine groups. Both vaccines were generally well tolerated. Overall, the higher immune response observed with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was maintained up to Month 48. A head-to-head study incorporating clinical endpoints would be required to confirm whether the observed differences in immune response between the vaccines influence the duration of protection they provided. PMID:25483700

  12. Deconstructing Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Knowledge: Objective and Perceived Knowledge in Males' Intentions to Receive the HPV Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krawczyk, Andrea; Stephenson, Ellen; Perez, Samara; Lau, Elsa; Rosberger, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Background: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was recently approved for men. To effectively tailor HPV education efforts toward men, it is important to understand what men know about HPV and how this knowledge relates to their decision to receive the vaccine. This study examines how objective HPV knowledge, objective HPV vaccine knowledge,…

  13. Characterization of HPV and host genome interactions in primary head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Parfenov, Michael; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Gehlenborg, Nils; Freeman, Samuel S.; Danilova, Ludmila; Bristow, Christopher A.; Lee, Semin; Hadjipanayis, Angela G.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Protopopov, Alexei; Yang, Lixing; Seth, Sahil; Song, Xingzhi; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Zhang, Jianhua; Pantazi, Angeliki; Santoso, Netty; Xu, Andrew W.; Mahadeshwar, Harshad; Wheeler, David A.; Haddad, Robert I.; Jung, Joonil; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Issaeva, Natalia; Yarbrough, Wendell G.; Hayes, D. Neil; Grandis, Jennifer R.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Meyerson, Matthew; Park, Peter J.; Chin, Lynda; Seidman, J. G.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Birol, Inanc; Bowlby, Reanne; Butterfield, Yaron S.N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Cheng, Dean; Chu, Andy; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Wong, Tina; Protopopov, Alexei; Santoso, Netty; Lee, Semin; Parfenov, Michael; Zhang, Jianhua; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S.; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Seth, Sahil; Haseley, Psalm; Zeng, Dong; Yang, Lixing; Xu, Andrew W.; Song, Xingzhi; Pantazi, Angeliki; Bristow, Christopher; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Seidman, Jonathan; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Akbani, Rehan; Casasent, Tod; Liu, Wenbin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Motter, Thomas; Weinstein, John; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Fan, You Hong; Liu, Jinze; Wang, Kai; Auman, J. Todd; Balu, Saianand; Bodenheimer, Tom; Buda, Elizabeth; Hayes, D. Neil; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Corbin D.; Kimes, Patrick K.; Marron, J.S.; Meng, Shaowu; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Mose, Lisle E.; Parker, Joel S.; Perou, Charles M.; Prins, Jan F.; Roach, Jeffrey; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V.; Singh, Darshan; Soloway, Mathew G.; Tan, Donghui; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Walter, Vonn; Waring, Scot; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wu, Junyuan; Zhao, Ni; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Tward, Aaron D.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Saksena, Gordon; Jung, Joonil; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Carter, Scott L.; Zack, Travis I.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Freeman, Samuel S.; Meyerson, Matthew; Cho, Juok; Chin, Lynda; Getz, Gad; Noble, Michael S.; DiCara, Daniel; Zhang, Hailei; Heiman, David I.; Gehlenborg, Nils; Voet, Doug; Lin, Pei; Frazer, Scott; Stojanov, Petar; Liu, Yingchun; Zou, Lihua; Kim, Jaegil; Lawrence, Michael S.; Sougnez, Carrie; Lichtenstein, Lee; Cibulskis, Kristian; Lander, Eric; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Muzny, Donna; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Kovar, Christie; Reid, Jeff; Morton, Donna; Han, Yi; Hale, Walker; Chao, Hsu; Chang, Kyle; Drummond, Jennifer A.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Kakkar, Nipun; Wheeler, David; Xi, Liu; Ciriello, Giovanni; Ladanyi, Marc; Lee, William; Ramirez, Ricardo; Sander, Chris; Shen, Ronglai; Sinha, Rileen; Weinhold, Nils; Taylor, Barry S.; Aksoy, B. Arman; Dresdner, Gideon; Gao, Jianjiong; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Reva, Boris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sumer, S. Onur; Sun, Yichao; Chan, Timothy; Morris, Luc; Stuart, Joshua; Benz, Stephen; Ng, Sam; Benz, Christopher; Yau, Christina; Baylin, Stephen B.; Cope, Leslie; Danilova, Ludmila; Herman, James G.; Bootwalla, Moiz; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Laird, Peter W.; Triche, Timothy; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Agrawal, Nishant; Bishop, Justin; Boutros, Paul C.; Bruce, Jeff P; Byers, Lauren Averett; Califano, Joseph; Carey, Thomas E.; Chen, Zhong; Cheng, Hui; Chiosea, Simion I.; Cohen, Ezra; Diergaarde, Brenda; Egloff, Ann Marie; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ferris, Robert L.; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Guo, Yan; Haddad, Robert I.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Harris, Thomas; Hayes, D. Neil; Hui, Angela BY; Lee, J. Jack; Lippman, Scott M.; Liu, Fei-Fei; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Myers, Jeff; Ng, Patrick Kwok Shing; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Pickering, Curtis R.; Prystowsky, Michael; Romkes, Marjorie; Saleh, Anthony D.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Seethala, Raja; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Si, Han; Tward, Aaron D.; Van Waes, Carter; Waggott, Daryl M.; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Yarbrough, Wendell; Zhang, Jiexin; Zuo, Zhixiang; Burnett, Ken; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Candance; Shelton, Troy; Sherman, Mark; Yena, Peggy; Black, Aaron D.; Bowen, Jay; Frick, Jessica; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Harper, Hollie A.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Baboud, Julien; Jensen, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have established that a subset of head and neck tumors contains human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences and that HPV-driven head and neck cancers display distinct biological and clinical features. HPV is known to drive cancer by the actions of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, but the molecular architecture of HPV infection and its interaction with the host genome in head and neck cancers have not been comprehensively described. We profiled a cohort of 279 head and neck cancers with next generation RNA and DNA sequencing and show that 35 (12.5%) tumors displayed evidence of high-risk HPV types 16, 33, or 35. Twenty-five cases had integration of the viral genome into one or more locations in the human genome with statistical enrichment for genic regions. Integrations had a marked impact on the human genome and were associated with alterations in DNA copy number, mRNA transcript abundance and splicing, and both inter- and intrachromosomal rearrangements. Many of these events involved genes with documented roles in cancer. Cancers with integrated vs. nonintegrated HPV displayed different patterns of DNA methylation and both human and viral gene expressions. Together, these data provide insight into the mechanisms by which HPV interacts with the human genome beyond expression of viral oncoproteins and suggest that specific integration events are an integral component of viral oncogenesis. PMID:25313082

  14. Characterization of HPV and host genome interactions in primary head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Parfenov, Michael; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Gehlenborg, Nils; Freeman, Samuel S; Danilova, Ludmila; Bristow, Christopher A; Lee, Semin; Hadjipanayis, Angela G; Ivanova, Elena V; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Protopopov, Alexei; Yang, Lixing; Seth, Sahil; Song, Xingzhi; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Zhang, Jianhua; Pantazi, Angeliki; Santoso, Netty; Xu, Andrew W; Mahadeshwar, Harshad; Wheeler, David A; Haddad, Robert I; Jung, Joonil; Ojesina, Akinyemi I; Issaeva, Natalia; Yarbrough, Wendell G; Hayes, D Neil; Grandis, Jennifer R; El-Naggar, Adel K; Meyerson, Matthew; Park, Peter J; Chin, Lynda; Seidman, J G; Hammerman, Peter S; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2014-10-28

    Previous studies have established that a subset of head and neck tumors contains human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences and that HPV-driven head and neck cancers display distinct biological and clinical features. HPV is known to drive cancer by the actions of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, but the molecular architecture of HPV infection and its interaction with the host genome in head and neck cancers have not been comprehensively described. We profiled a cohort of 279 head and neck cancers with next generation RNA and DNA sequencing and show that 35 (12.5%) tumors displayed evidence of high-risk HPV types 16, 33, or 35. Twenty-five cases had integration of the viral genome into one or more locations in the human genome with statistical enrichment for genic regions. Integrations had a marked impact on the human genome and were associated with alterations in DNA copy number, mRNA transcript abundance and splicing, and both inter- and intrachromosomal rearrangements. Many of these events involved genes with documented roles in cancer. Cancers with integrated vs. nonintegrated HPV displayed different patterns of DNA methylation and both human and viral gene expressions. Together, these data provide insight into the mechanisms by which HPV interacts with the human genome beyond expression of viral oncoproteins and suggest that specific integration events are an integral component of viral oncogenesis. PMID:25313082

  15. Prevalence of HPV infection in head and neck carcinomas shows geographical variability: a comparative study from Brazil and Germany.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Franziska; Oliveira-Silva, Michelle; Dreyer, Johannes H; Perrusi, Victor José Ferreira; Arcuri, Roberto Alfonso; Hassan, Rocio; Bonvicino, Cibele Rodrigues; Barros, Mario Henrique M; Niedobitek, Gerald

    2015-06-01

    Rising prevalence rates of high-risk human papillomaviruses (hrHPV) infection in oropharyngeal carcinoma (up to 80 %) have been reported in North America and Scandinavia. We have analysed 424 German and 163 Brazilian head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) from the oral cavity (OSCC), oropharynx (OPSCC) and hypopharynx (HPSCC) using p16 immunohistochemistry, HPV DNA PCR and sequencing, hrHPV DNA in situ hybridisation (ISH) and hrHPV E6/E7 RNA ISH. In the German series, 52/424 cases (12.3 %) were p16-positive/hrHPV-positive (OSCC 3.8 % [10/265], OPSCC 34.4 % [42/122], HPSCC 0 % [0/37]). In addition, there were 9 cases that were p16-positive/hrHPV-negative (5 OPSCC and 4 OSCC). In the Brazilian series, the overall hrHPV DNA prevalence by PCR was 11.0 % ([18/163]; OSCC 6 % [5/83], OPSCC 15.5 % [11/71], HPSCC 22.2 % [2/9]). Ten of these cases were hrHPV-positive/p16-positive. The remaining 8 hrHPV-positive/p16-negative cases were also negative in both ISH assays. Furthermore, 5 p16-positive/hrHPV-negative cases (2 OPSCC and 3 OSCC) were identified. In both series, HPV16 was by far the most common HPV type detected. We confirm that regardless of geographical origin, the highest hrHPV prevalence in HNSCC is observed in oropharyngeal carcinomas. The proportion of HPV-associated OPSCC was substantially higher in the German cohort than in the Brazilian series (34.4 vs. 15.5 %), and in both groups, the prevalence of hrHPV in OPSCC was much lower than in recent reports from North America and Scandinavia. We suggest, therefore, that it may be possible to define areas with high (e.g. USA, Canada, Scandinavia), intermediate (e.g. Germany) and low (e.g. Brazil) prevalences of HPV infection in OPSCC. PMID:25820374

  16. Sociodemographic and clinical factors of women with HPV and their association with HIV 1

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Joice; Quintana, Silvana Maria; Reis, Renata Karina; Gir, Elucir

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the association between HIV-seropositive or HIV-seronegative status and the sociodemographic and clinical variables of women with genital HPV infection. METHOD: cross-sectional, retrospective study in a reference service in Ribeirão Preto. A total of 824 women undergoing HIV testing who had high or low grade cervical intraepithelial lesions or condylomatous genital lesions caused by HPV were studied. The chi-square test and logistic regression analysis with the calculation of the odds ratio and a confidence interval of 95% were conducted to verify the association. RESULTS: a higher probability of seropositivity was identified for non-white women; with low education; widowed; who consumed alcohol, tobacco or illicit drugs; with hepatitis C; who had multiple partners; and that worked as prostitutes. CONCLUSION: the increasing impairment of women due to sexually transmitted infections, considering the influence of the socioeconomic and behavioral context on the course of these infections, highlights the importance of public policies that establish intervention strategies involving the prevention, early diagnosis and timely treatment of these diseases, so that there is the promotion of quality of life in this population. PMID:25806634

  17. Effects of HPV-16 infection on hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma and FaDu cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wuhao; Feng, Long; Li, Ping; Wang, Yuanyuan; Du, Yuwen; Chen, Xiaonan; Wu, Shujun; Zhao, Guoqiang; Lou, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    Hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is a common type of malignant tumor among head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Heavy smoking and/or drinking is associated with the development of HNSCC. However, HNSCC also occurs in individuals that do not drink or smoke, possibly due to infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV). HPV-16 has been shown to be closely associated with the occurrence of several types of cancers. However, its role in hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of HPV-16 on hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma and FaDu cells. Lentiviral vectors were used to establish FaDu cells that expressed the E6 and E7 proteins of HPV-16. We used quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays and western blotting to detect and determine the levels of expression for E6-E7 mRNAs and proteins. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), Transwell assays, and flow cytometry were used to assess the effects of HPV-16 E6-E7 on the proliferation, invasion, metastasis and apoptosis of FaDu cells. Expression of microRNAs was analyzed by qRT-PCR. We found that the expression levels of HPV-16 E6-E7 were increased in FaDu cells transfected with the lentiviral vector compared with that observed in the control cells. In addition, the rates of apoptosis were decreased in the transfected cells, while proliferation was increased. The average numbers of cells penetrating the Matrigel were significantly higher than those for the controls. We detected miR-363 and miR-15a, and their expression levels were significantly increased in the HPV-16-positive patients and in FaDu cells expressing HPV-16 E6-E7. We found that HPV-16 E6-E7 appeared to inhibit apoptosis, and to increase cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Furthermore, miR-363 and miR-15a were overexpressed in the hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma samples infected with HPV-16, and in FaDu cells stably expressing HPV-16 E6-E7. These findings may provide a new clue of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of HPV-16-positive hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26497405

  18. How Many Cancers Are Linked with HPV Each Year?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Women Ages 30 and Older Cervical cancer Human papillomavirus (HPV) Cervical cancer screening tests What your Pap ... are found in parts of the body where human papillomavirus (HPV) is often found. HPV causes about 26, ...

  19. Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men who have sex with men: prevalence and lack of anogenital concordance

    PubMed Central

    King, Eleanor M; Gilson, Richard; Beddows, Simon; Soldan, Kate; Panwar, Kavita; Young, Carmel; Jit, Mark; Edmunds, W John; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of oral detectable human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) attending a sexual health clinic in London and concordance with anogenital HPV infection. Such data are important to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of oral HPV and the potential use of vaccines to prevent oropharyngeal cancers. Methods Paired oral rinse samples and anogenital samples were available from 151 HIV-negative MSM within a larger cross-sectional survey. All samples were tested in parallel for 21 types of HPV DNA using an in-house assay. Results The median age of participants was 30 (IQR 25–35). The prevalence of any oral HPV and of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) was 13.7% (n=21; 95% CI 8.7 to 20.2) and 5.9% (n=9; 95% CI 2.7 to 10.9) compared with 64.9% (n=98; 95% CI 56.7 to 72.5) and 34.4% (n=52; 95% CI 26.9 to 42.6) in any anogenital sample, respectively. The prevalence of types prevented by the bivalent (HPV16/18), quadrivalent (HPV6/11/16/18) and nonavalent (HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) vaccines was 1.3% (95% CI 0.2 to 4.7), 2.6% (95% CI 0.7 to 6.6) and 4.6% (95% CI 1.9 to 9.3), respectively. There was no concordance between HPV genotypes detected in oral and anogenital sites. Conclusions HR-HPV DNA, including HPV 16/18, was detected in oral specimens from HIV-negative MSM attending sexual health clinics, suggesting a potential role for vaccination, but is far less common than anogenital infection. How this relates to the risk and natural history of HPV-related head and neck cancers warrants further study. Lack of concordance with anogenital infection also suggests that oral HPV infection should be considered separately when estimating potential vaccine impact. PMID:25887283

  20. DEK promotes HPV positive and negative head and neck cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Allie K.; Hallenbeck, Grace E.; Casper, Keith A.; Patil, Yash J.; Wilson, Keith M.; Kimple, Randall J.; Lambert, Paul F.; Witte, David P.; Xiao, Weihong; Gillison, Maura L.; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide, and patient outcomes using current treatments remains poor. Tumor development is etiologically associated with tobacco or alcohol use and/or HPV infection. HPV positive HNSCCs, which frequently harbor wild-type p53, carry a more favorable prognosis and are a biologically distinct subgroup when compared to their HPV negative counterparts. HPV E7 induces expression of the human DEK gene, both in vitro and in vivo. In keratinocytes, DEK overexpression is sufficient for causing oncogenic phenotypes in the absence of E7. Conversely, DEK loss results in cell death in HPV positive cervical cancer cells at least in part through p53 activation, and Dek knockout mice are relatively resistant to the development of chemically induced skin papillomas. Despite the established oncogenic role of DEK in HPV associated cervical cancer cell lines and keratinocytes, a functional role of DEK has not yet been explored in HNSCC. Using an established transgenic mouse model of HPV16 E7 induced HNSCC, we demonstrate that Dek is required for optimal proliferation of E7-transgenic epidermal cells and for the growth of HNSCC tumors. Importantly, these studies also demonstrate that DEK protein is universally up-regulated in both HPV positive and negative human HNSCC tumors relative to adjacent normal tissue. Furthermore, DEK knockdown inhibited the proliferation of HPV positive and negative HNSCC cells, establishing a functional role for DEK in human disease. Mechanistic studies reveal that attenuated HNSCC cell growth in response to DEK loss was associated with reduced expression of the oncogenic p53 family member, ?Np63. Exogenous ?Np63 expression rescued the proliferative defect in the absence of DEK, thereby establishing a functional DEK-?Np63 oncogenic pathway that promotes HNSCC. Taken together, our data demonstrate that DEK stimulates HNSCC cellular growth and identify ?Np63 as a novel DEK effector. PMID:24608431

  1. High prevalence of hpv multiple genotypes in women with persistent chlamydia trachomatis infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlamydia trachomatis interaction with HR-HPV types has highlighted a central role in cervical cancer development. The aim of this study was to investigate HPV prevalence and genotypes distribution in women at risk for C. trachomatis infection and negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy. Methods 1071 cervical swabs were tested for C. trachomatis by Real Time PCR and genotyping by ompA gene sequencing. Additionally, a quantitative Real time-PCR was performed to assess the expression of the C. trachomatis Hsp60–encoding gene (Ct604 portion), linked to a persistent status of infection. HPV infection and genotypes was investigated in C. trachomatis positive women using Luminex technology. Results C. trachomatis infection was detected in 53 out of 1071 (4.5%) samples, of which the 53% resulted positive for Hsp60 gene expression. The overall prevalence of HPV infection in C. trachomatis positive samples was of 60.4% (32/53): in 37.5% of samples was present a single genotype, while multiple genotypes infections were found in the 62.5% of them. Among women with a C. trachomatis chronic infection, 68% were HPV co-infected and the 79% showed multiple genotypes. Should be noted that levels of C. trachomatis Hsp60 expression in HPV co-infected women were significantly lower compared to women infected only with C. trachomatis. The C. trachomatis serotype F was found in the majority of samples, independently of HPV infection. Conclusions A high prevalence of HPV multiple infections have been found in young women affected with a C. trachomatis chronic infection. These observations suggested that the expression of CHSP60-1, interfering with both apoptotic and cellular senescence pathways, may promote a favourable local microenvironment for HPV infection. PMID:25621003

  2. A Humanized Mouse Model of HPV-Associated Pathology Driven by E7 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Pérez, Águeda; Hachimi, Mariam; Dueñas, Marta; Lloveras, Belén; Santos, Almudena; Holguín, Almudena; Duarte, Blanca; Santiago, Juan Luis; Akgül, Baki; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L.; Storey, Alan; Ribas, Catalina; Larcher, Fernando; del Rio, Marcela; Paramio, Jesús M.; García-Escudero, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of human cervical cancer and has been associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma development. Although prophylactic vaccines have been developed, there is a need to develop new targeted therapies for individuals affected with malignant infected lesions in these locations, which must be tested in appropriate models. Cutaneous beta HPV types appear to be involved in skin carcinogenesis. Virus oncogenicity is partly achieved by inactivation of retinoblastoma protein family members by the viral E7 gene. Here we show that the E7 protein of cutaneous beta HPV5 binds pRb and promotes its degradation. In addition, we described an in vivo model of HPV-associated disease in which artificial human skin prepared using primary keratinocytes engineered to express the E7 protein is engrafted onto nude mice. Expression of E7 in the transplants was stably maintained for up to 6 months, inducing the appearance of lesions that, in the case of HPV16 E7, histologically resembled human anogenital lesions caused by oncogenic HPVs. Moreover, it was confirmed through biomarker expression analysis via immunodetection and/or quantitative PCR from mRNA and miRNA that the 16E7-modified engrafted skin shares molecular features with human HPV-associated pretumoral and tumoral lesions. Finally, our findings indicate a decrease of the in vitro capacity of HPV5 E7 to reduce pRb levels in vivo, possibly explaining the phenotypical differences when compared with 16E7-grafts. Our model seems to be a valuable platform for basic research into HPV oncogenesis and preclinical testing of HPV-associated antitumor therapies. PMID:22911850

  3. On reduced relatives with genitive subjects

    E-print Network

    Krause, Cornelia (Cornelia Ann), 1972-

    2001-01-01

    What is the place of relatives with genitive subjects in a typology of relative clauses? Are they full or reduced, headed or free relatives? Can they appear pre- and postnominally? Can they be head-internal relatives? Are ...

  4. Human papillomavirus typing and the reduction of cervical cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Jin, X W; Cash, J; Kennedy, A W

    1999-10-01

    Minor cervical cytologic abnormalities are common, but knowing which low-grade lesions will progress to cervical cancer--and therefore deserve biopsy and excision--is difficult. Since some human papillomavirus (HPV) types are strongly associated with cervical cancer, HPV typing may be a means of determining which patients with minor abnormalities require biopsy and treatment and which need only follow-up smears. This paper reviews the association between cervical cancer and HPV infection, the pathogenesis of HPV infection, the utility of HPV typing in training patients with a diagnosis of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, and the prospects for the development of an HPV vaccine. PMID:10535179

  5. Racial Differences in HPV Knowledge, HPV Vaccine Acceptability, and Related Beliefs among Rural, Southern Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Joan R.; Brewer, Noel T.; Fazekas, Karah I.; Mitchell, Cicely E.; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Because cervical cancer mortality in the United States is twice as high among black women as white women and higher in rural areas, providing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to rural black adolescents is a high priority. Purpose: To identify racial differences in knowledge and attitudes about HPV, cervical cancer, and the HPV vaccine…

  6. Toll like receptor agonist imiquimod facilitates antigen-specific CD8+ T cell accumulation in the genital tract leading to tumor control through interferon-?

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Song, Liwen; Trieu, Janson; Knoff, Jayne; He, Liangmei; Tsai, Ya-Chea; Huh, Warner; Chang, Yung-Nien; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Roden, Richard B.S.; Wu, T.-C.; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Imiquimod is a toll-like receptor 7 agonist utilized topically to manage genital warts and basal cell carcinoma. We examine the combination of topical imiquimod with intramuscular administration of CRT/E7, a therapeutic HPV vaccination that comprises a naked DNA vector expressing calreticulin fused to HPV16 E7. Experimental Design Using an orthotopic HPV16 E6/E7+ syngeneic tumor, TC-1, as a model of high-grade cervical/vaginal/vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia, we show that combining CRT/E7 vaccination with cervicovaginal deposition of imiquimod results in synergistic immune-mediated tumor clearance. Results Imiquimod induces cervicovaginal accumulation of activated E7-specific CD8+ T cells elicited by CRT/E7 vaccination. Recruitment was not dependent upon the specificity of the activated CD8+ T cells, but was significantly reduced in mice lacking the IFN? receptor. Intravaginal imiquimod deposition induced upregulation of CXCL9 and CXCL10 mRNA expression in the genital tract. These chemokines are expressed upon IFN? receptor activation and attract cells expressing their receptor, CXCR3. In this study, T cells attracted by imiquimod to the cervicovaginal tract expressed CXCR3 as well as the tissue resident memory T cell (Trm) marker CD49a, a mucosal homing integrin. Our results indicate that intramuscular CRT/E7 vaccination in conjunction with intravaginal imiquimod deposition recruits antigen-specific CXCR3+CD8+ T cells to the genital tract. Conclusions Our study has potential clinical relevance because imiquimod is FDA approved for condyloma accuminata and basal cell carcinoma and intramuscular vaccination with pNGVL4a-CRT/E7(detox) is currently undergoing clinical testing, suggesting potential for their synergistic action to induce strong antigen-specific Trm-mediated immune responses and antitumor effects in genital mucosa. PMID:24893628

  7. HPV vaccine: immersed in controversy.

    PubMed

    Ohri, Linda K

    2007-11-01

    There has been substantial media coverage of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine since the Food and Drug Administration approved Gardasil (Merck & Co., Inc.) on June 8, 2006. The most vocal complaints maintain that its use will promote promiscuity among teenagers, and condemn proposed mandated use for school entry. Some also question evidence for the vaccine's safety. There have been concerns raised by both providers and patients regarding financial barriers to access. Still others argue that additional populations could benefit who have not been included in current recommendations. Clarification of these issues is essential to advance optimal use of this important new vaccine. There is strong evidence to support HPV vaccine as an effective, safe, and efficient public health measure. School mandates are valuable tools to reduce disparities in availability of immunizations. The time has come to consider universal funding as a means to improve access to all recommended vaccines. PMID:17848419

  8. Angiokeratoma of vulva mimicking genital warts.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Amit Kumar; Pandhi, Deepika; Goyal, Surbhi; Bisherwal, Kavita

    2014-12-01

    Angiokeratoma of vulva is a relatively rare lesion which is occasionally misdiagnosed as melanoma, pyogenic granuloma, seborrheic keratosis, or genital warts. We report a case of vulvar angiokeratomas which were diagnosed and managed as genital warts. All asymptomatic dull red-colored papules over vulva should be subjected to astute clinical and histological examination to diagnose angiokeratoma and differentiate it from other lesions. PMID:25404845

  9. Dermatologic therapy of chronic genital disease.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Libby

    2004-01-01

    The adaptation of dermatology for the genital area requires several modifications of standard therapy. This unique area produces issues of both psychological sensitivity and unique environmental factors of constant moisture, warmth, and friction. These issues become far more important when symptoms are chronic. Recognition of normal variants, the multifactorial nature of many genital symptoms, and the avoidance of creating secondary iatrogenic disease are all important. PMID:14756885

  10. Comparison of long-term immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in healthy women aged 18-45 years: End-of-study analysis of a Phase III randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Mark H; Takacs, Peter; Chatterjee, Archana; Sperling, Rhoda S; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Blatter, Mark M; Lalezari, Jacob; David, Marie-Pierre; Lin, Lan; Struyf, Frank; Dubin, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The observer-blind, randomized, age-stratified, head-to-head study (NCT00423046) comparing immunogenicity and safety of HPV-16/18 and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccines in healthy women aged 18-45 y was completed. Five y after vaccination, in subjects from the Month 60 according-to-protocol cohort (seronegative and DNA negative for HPV type analyzed at baseline), serum neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses induced by HPV-16/18 vaccine remained 7.8-fold (18-26-y stratum), 5.6-fold (27-35-y stratum) and 2.3-fold (36-45-y stratum) higher than those induced by HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine for HPV-16. For HPV-18, the fold differences were 12.1, 13.0 and 7.8, respectively. At Month 60, all (100%) subjects in HPV-16/18 vaccine group and the majority (95.7%-97.5%) in HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine group were seropositive for HPV-16. For HPV-18, the majority (98.1%-100%) of subjects in HPV-16/18 vaccine group were seropositive; however, seropositivity rates in HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine group decreased considerably (61.1%-76.9%) across the 3 age strata. In the total vaccinated cohort (received ? 1 dose regardless of baseline HPV serostatus and DNA status), geometric mean titers for anti-HPV-16 and anti-HPV-18 nAb were higher in HPV-16/18 vaccine group than in HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine group. Based on the 5-y data, piece-wise and modified power-law models predicted a longer durability of nAb response for HPV-16/18 vaccine compared to HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine. Beyond the differences apparent between the vaccines in terms of immunogenicity and modeled persistence of antibody responses, comparative studies including clinical endpoints would be needed to determine whether differences exist in duration of vaccine-induced protection. PMID:25483701

  11. [Ethics and reproductive health: the issue of HPV vaccination].

    PubMed

    Mateji?, Bojana; Kesi?, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    The ethics of reproductive health covers a wide field of different issues, from the ethical dimensions of assisted reproduction, life of newborns with disabilities to the never-ending debate on the ethical aspects of abortion. Furthermore, increasing attention is paid to the ethical dimensions of using stem cells taken from human embryos, the creation of cloned embryos of patients for possible self-healing, and the increasingly present issue of reproductive cloning. Development of vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) has introduced new ethical aspects related to reproductive health and the need for a consensus of clinical and public-healthcare population. Today immunization with HPV vaccine is a measure for the primary prevention of cervical cancer and it provides effective protection against certain types of viruses included in the vaccine. The most often mentioned issues of discussions on ethical concerns about HPV vaccination are the recommended age of girls who should be informed and vaccinated (12-14 years), attitudes and fears of parents concerning discussion with their preadolescent daughters on issues important for their future sexual behavior, dilemma on the vaccination of boys and the role of the chosen pediatrician in providing information on the vaccination. In Serbia, two HPV vaccines have been registered but the vaccination is not compulsory. Up-till-now there has been no researches on the attitudes of physicians and parents about HPV vaccination. Nevertheless, it is very important to initiate education of general and medical public about the fact that the availability of vaccine, even if we disregard all aforementioned dilemmas, does not lead to the neglect of other preventive strategies against cervical cancer, primarily screening. The National Program for Cervical Cancer Prevention involves organized screening, i.e. regular cytological examinations of the cervical smear of all women aged 25-69 years, every three years, regardless of the vaccination status. PMID:23539924

  12. Age-specific occurrence of HPV16- and HPV18-related cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Quint, Wim G. V.; Hunt, William C.; Joste, Nancy E.; Alemany, Laia; Bosch, F. Xavier; Myers, Evan R.; Castle, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    The age-specific of occurrence of cervical cancer related to human papillomavirus genotypes HPV16 and HPV18, the two targeted by current HPV vaccines, is not well described. We therefore used data from two large, tissue-based HPV genotyping studies of cervical cancer, one conducted in New Mexico (USA) (n = 744) and an international study restricted to cancers (n = 1,729) from Europe, North America, and Australia to represent those regions with widely available cervical cancer screening facilities. HPV results were categorized as HPV16 or HPV18 positive (HPV16/18) versus other HPV genotype. We observed a decreasing proportion of HPV16/18-positive cancers with increasing age in the international study (ptrend < 0.001) and New Mexico study (ptrend < 0.001). There was no heterogeneity in the relationship between age of diagnosis and the proportion of HPV16/18-positive cancers between studies (p = 0.8). Combining results from the two studies (n = 2,473), the percentages of HPV16/18-positive cases were 77.0% (95%CI: 75.1%-78.9%) for women less than 65 years old and 62.7% (95%CI: 58.4%-66.9%) for women aged 65 and older (p < 0.001). In women who are under the age of 25 and have been vaccinated before becoming sexually active, the cervical cancer incidence is expected to be approximately 3.5 per million by 2020. HPV vaccination against HPV16/18 may have a greater impact on cervical cancers in women under 65 than in women aged 65 and older. These data will inform the age-specific impact of HPV vaccination and its integration with cervical cancer screening activities. PMID:23632816

  13. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... been vaccinated still need to be screened for cervical cancer? How much do these vaccines cost, and will ... High-risk HPVs cause several types of cancer. Cervical cancer : Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused ...

  14. Oncogenic potential of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and its relation with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Faridi, Rabia; Zahra, Amreen; Khan, Khalida; Idrees, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the second most common cancer after lung cancer, affecting women of different age groups; has a prevalence of about 20% in young sexually active women. Among different types of HPV, HPV16 the major strain causing this cancer and is sexually transmitted had been unnoticed for decades. Keeping in mind the multiple risk factors related with cervical cancer such as early age sexual activities, teenage pregnancies, smoking, use of oral contraceptives, having multiple sex partners, hormone replacement therapies and various other unknown factors lead to the onset of the disease. Awareness for various diagnostic procedures such as Pap smears screening prove to be an effective way in eradicating the oncogenic potential of HPV. PMID:21635792

  15. Impact of vaccinating boys and men against HPV in the United States.

    PubMed

    Elbasha, Elamin H; Dasbach, Erik J

    2010-10-01

    We assessed the public health impact and value of vaccinating boys and men with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in the United States. We used mathematical population models, accounting for both the direct and indirect protective effects of vaccination. Inputs for the models were obtained from public data sources, published literature, and analyses of clinical trial data. Compared with a program of vaccinating girls and women only, including boys and men 9-26 years of age would further decrease the cumulative mean number of genital wart cases, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2/3 cases, cancer cases, and cancer deaths by 5,146,000, 708,000, 116,000, and 40,000, respectively, within 100 years. The mean cost-effectiveness ratio (2008 US $) of this strategy was $25,700 (range: 13,600-48,800) per QALY gained if vaccination protects against all HPV 6/11/16/18-associated diseases, and $69,000 (range: 37,700-152,300)/QALY if it only protects against diseases currently in the vaccine indication. Vaccinating boys and men age 9-26 against all HPV 6/11/16/18-associated diseases provides substantial public health benefits and is cost-effective at commonly cited thresholds. PMID:20713101

  16. [Development of an HPV vaccine--remaining issues and perspective].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Kazunari

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer, the second most frequent gynecological malignancy in the world, is caused by infection with one of the 15 types of high-risk HPVs. Vaccines protecting women from infection with high-risk HPVs can reduce prevalence of cervical cancer. At present, two prophylactic vaccines (GlaxoSmithKline "Cervarix" and Merck "Gardasil") have been approved by several countries. These vaccines can almost completely protect HPV16 and 18 infections which account for approximately 50% and 20% of cervical cancer, respectively. However, cervical cancer screening should continue in all vaccinated women due to exposure of the other oncogenic HPV types. There are also unanswered remaining questions about overall vaccine effectiveness, duration of protection, and adverse effect. PMID:19177753

  17. Histological diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related dysplasia: quality control by in situ hybridization (ISH) analysis.

    PubMed

    Cadorin, L; Sopracordevole, F; Iuzzolino, C; Tonetto, G; Nenzi, F

    1992-01-01

    The Authors studied 54 cervical biopsies using in situ hybridization (ISH) to identify HPV related lesions. 26 biopsies lacked clear cut koilocytotic atypia on histological examination and 28 had a diagnosis of grades 1 and 2 intraepithelial neoplasia. Histological diagnosis of HPV-related dysplasia were studied using ISH with biotinylated probes (Phatogene DNA probe assay Enzo Diagnostics). Probes included HPV types 6/11, 16/18 and 31/35/51. HPV DNA were detected in 18 of 28 (64.3%) cervical biopsies with diagnosis of grade 1 and grade 2 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with koilocytotic atypia. None of the 26 cervical biopsies equivocal for koilocytotic atypia had detectable HPV DNA with ISH. These results suggest that ISH can be used for the quality control in the histological diagnosis of koilocytotic atypia. PMID:1283127

  18. Human papillomavirus infection in Bhutan at the moment of implementation of a national HPV vaccination programme

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is the most common female cancer in Bhutan, the first low/middle-income country to implement a national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme. Methods To provide a robust baseline for future evaluations of vaccine effectiveness, cervical cell specimens were obtained from 2,505 women aged 18–69 years from the general population, and biopsies from 211 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3) and 112 invasive cervical cancer (ICC) cases. Samples were tested for HPV using GP5+/6+ PCR. Results Among the general population, HPV prevalence was 26%, being highest (33%) in women ?24 years, but remaining above 15% in all age-groups. Determinants of HPV included age, marital status, and number of sexual partners. Among the eight percent with cytological abnormalities, 24 CIN3 and 4 ICC were histologically confirmed. Even after additional testing with a sensitive E7 PCR, no infections with vaccine-targeted HPV types were detected in the few vaccinated women (n?=?34) compared to 6% prevalence in unvaccinated women of similar age (p?=?0?·?215). Conclusion Based upon type-specific prevalence among biopsies, at least 70% of ICC in Bhutan are theoretically preventable by HPV16/18 vaccination, but screening programmes should be expanded among older women, who have an important underlying burden of CIN3 and ICC. PMID:25047665

  19. Female genital cutting: impact on women's health.

    PubMed

    Nour, Nawal M

    2015-01-01

    More than 130 million women worldwide have undergone female genital cutting (FGC). FGC is practiced in parts of Africa and Asia, in societies with various cultures and religions. Reasons for the continuing practice of FGC include rite of passage, preserving chastity, ensuring marriageability, religion, hygiene, improving fertility, and enhancing sexual pleasure for men. The World Health Organization has classified FGC into four types depending on the extent of tissue removed. Immediate complications include hemorrhage, infection, sepsis, and death. Long-term complications include pain, scarring, urinary issues, and poor obstetric and neonatal outcomes. Efforts are being made nationally and internationally to eradicate this practice. In December 2012, the UN General Assembly accepted a resolution on the elimination of FGC. Although it is illegal to perform FGC in the United States, women from countries where the practice occurs have been and are still immigrating here. Many enter as refugees from war-torn, famine-stricken, or politically unstable countries. They bring along with them their cultural pride, health complications, and fears of being judged when visiting a health provider. A deeper understanding of the history, cultural beliefs, medical complications, and methods of surgical reconstruction is necessary to provide culturally and linguistically competent care to this unique group of women. PMID:25565511

  20. Genital Cancers in Women: Uterine Cancer.

    PubMed

    Roett, Michelle A

    2015-11-01

    There are two main types of uterine cancer. Endometrial carcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed genital cancer in women, accounts for most cases (more than 95%) and sarcoma comprises the remainder. Endometrial cancer primarily occurs in postmenopausal women. Risk factors include exposure to high levels of endogenous estrogen (eg, obesity, nulliparity, late menopause) or exogenous estrogen (eg, hormone replacement therapy, tamoxifen) and pelvic radiation. Genetics are involved in a small percentage of cases, notably among women in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). More than 80% of patients with endometrial cancers present with abnormal uterine bleeding. Endometrial biopsy and transvaginal ultrasound are the first-line tests to evaluate bleeding. If the endometrial lining is thickened on ultrasound, endometrial biopsy is indicated. If symptoms persist after negative biopsy results, or if biopsy results are inadequate, hysteroscopy is performed for tissue sampling. Most patients with endometrial cancer are diagnosed early, when cancer is confined to the uterus. Hysterectomy is the treatment of choice in such cases. Treatment of advanced disease involves radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Perimenopausal women should be informed that abnormal bleeding could be a sign of cancer and should be evaluated. However, no routine screening is recommended except for women with HNPCC. PMID:26569046

  1. Genital Chlamydia trachomatis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Meenakshi; Sood, Seema; Mukherjee, Anjan; Muralidhar, Sumathi; Bala, Manju

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of curable bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) worldwide. It manifests primarily as urethritis in males and endocervicitis in females. Untreated chlamydial infection in man can cause epididymitis and proctitis. Though most women with Chlamydia infection are asymptomatic or have minimal symptoms, some develop salpingitis, endometritis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy and tubal factor infertility. It is associated with an increased risk for the transmission or acquisition of HIV and is also attributed to be a risk factor for the development of cervical carcinoma. Early diagnosis and treatment of infected individuals is required to prevent the spread of the disease and severe sequelae. Traditionally, tissue culture was considered the gold standard for the diagnosis. However, with the availability of newer diagnostic techniques particularly molecular methods which are not only highly sensitive and specific but are cost-effective also, the diagnosis has became fast and easy. The purpose of this review is to study the various aspects of genital C. trachomatis infection. Also the advances related to the clinical picture, various diagnostic modalities, prevention, treatment, drug resistance and control measures will be dealt with. PMID:24135174

  2. Lactobacillus-dominated cervicovaginal microbiota associated with reduced HIV/STI prevalence and genital HIV viral load in African women

    PubMed Central

    Borgdorff, Hanneke; Tsivtsivadze, Evgeni; Verhelst, Rita; Marzorati, Massimo; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Ndayisaba, Gilles F; Schuren, Frank H; van de Wijgert, Janneke HHM

    2014-01-01

    Cervicovaginal microbiota not dominated by lactobacilli may facilitate transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), as well as miscarriages, preterm births and sepsis in pregnant women. However, little is known about the exact nature of the microbiological changes that cause these adverse outcomes. In this study, cervical samples of 174 Rwandan female sex workers were analyzed cross-sectionally using a phylogenetic microarray. Furthermore, HIV-1 RNA concentrations were measured in cervicovaginal lavages of 58 HIV-positive women among them. We identified six microbiome clusters, representing a gradient from low semi-quantitative abundance and diversity dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus (cluster R-I, with R denoting ‘Rwanda') and L. iners (R-II) to intermediate (R-V) and high abundance and diversity (R-III, R-IV and R-VI) dominated by a mixture of anaerobes, including Gardnerella, Atopobium and Prevotella species. Women in cluster R-I were less likely to have HIV (P=0.03), herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2; P<0.01), and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV; P<0.01) and had no bacterial STIs (P=0.15). Statistically significant trends in prevalence of viral STIs were found from low prevalence in cluster R-I, to higher prevalence in clusters R-II and R-V, and highest prevalence in clusters R-III/R-IV/R-VI. Furthermore, only 10% of HIV-positive women in clusters R-I/R-II, compared with 40% in cluster R-V, and 42% in clusters R-III/R-IV/R-VI had detectable cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA (Ptrend=0.03). We conclude that L. crispatus-dominated, and to a lesser extent L. iners-dominated, cervicovaginal microbiota are associated with a lower prevalence of HIV/STIs and a lower likelihood of genital HIV-1 RNA shedding. PMID:24599071

  3. Comparative study of HPV16 integration in cervical lesions between ethnicities with high and low rates of infection with high-risk HPV and the correlation between integration rate and cervical neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    HAN, LILI; MAIMAITIMING, TUERXUNAYI; HUSAIYIN, SULAIYA; WANG, LIN; WUSAINAHONG, KUNDUOZI; MA, CHUNHUA; NIYAZI, MAYINUER

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of a high incidence of cervical cancer in populations with a low human papillomavirus (HPV) infection rate is unclear. The current study aimed to investigate the role of HPV16 DNA integration in cervical lesions in women of Han and Uygur ethnicity and to explore the association between viral integration and a high cervical cancer morbidity with a low HPV infection rate. DNA was extracted from the biopsy specimens of cervical lesions of 379 patients of Uygur ethnicity and 464 patients of Han ethnicity, and multiple quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were performed to determine the copy numbers of the HPV16 E2 and E6 genes. The copy number of the HPV16 DNA was evaluated according to the E2/E6 ratio. Among these cases, 122 Uygur and 121 Han specimens were found to be HPV16 positive. In the two populations, the percentage of cases with HPV16 integration (the sum of integrated-type infection only or a mixture of free-and integrated-type infection) increased with the grade of the cervical lesions (P<0.001). Within groups with the same cervical lesion grade, no significant differences in HPV16 integration were found between women of Uygur and Han ethnicity (rank sum test, P>0.05). No significant differences in the distribution of the HPV16 integration rate according to lesion grade were found in either population (P>0.05). When the two subpopulations were considered as one sample population, the integration rate significantly increased with lesion grade (P=0.02). These results indicate that the integration rate of HPV16 E2 may serve as a molecular biological marker for the development of cervical lesions. PMID:26668611

  4. Mapping of HPV transcripts in four human cervical lesions using RNAseq suggests quantitative rearrangements during carcinogenic progression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinmiao; Xue, Yuezhen; Poidinger, Michael; Lim, Thimothy; Chew, Sung Hock; Pang, Chai Ling; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Thierry, Françoise

    2014-08-01

    Two classes of Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect the anogenital track: high risk viruses that are associated with risk of cervical cancer and low risk types that drive development of benign lesions, such as condylomas. In the present study, we established quantitative transcriptional maps of the viral genome in clinical lesions associated with high risk HPV16 or low risk HPV6b. Marked qualitative and quantitative changes in the HPV16 transcriptome were associated with progression from low to high grade lesions. Specific transcripts encoding essential regulatory proteins such as E7, E2, E1^E4 and E5 were identified. We also identified intrinsic differences between the HPV6b-associated condyloma transcript map and that of the HPV16-associated low grade CIN specifically regarding promoter usage. Characterization and quantification of HPV transcripts in patient samples thus establish the impact of viral transcriptional regulation on the status of HPV-associated lesions and may therefore help in defining new biologically-relevant prognosis markers. PMID:25092457

  5. Order of HPV/Chlamydia infections and cervical high-grade precancer risk: a case-cohort study.

    PubMed

    Luostarinen, Tapio; Namujju, Proscovia B; Merikukka, Marko; Dillner, Joakim; Hakulinen, Timo; Koskela, Pentti; Paavonen, Jorma; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Lehtinen, Matti

    2013-10-01

    Interactions of carcinogenic human papillomaviruses (most notably HPV types 16/18/31/33/45), and HPV6 or Chlamydia trachomatis are not well understood. We have used seroconversions to study effects the order of these infections has on the risk of high-grade cervical precancer. In a cohort of 94,349 Finnish women with paired sera from consecutive pregnancies within an average of 2.4 years, 490 were diagnosed with cervical CIN3/AIS. Serum antibodies to HPV6/16/18/31/33/45 and C. trachomatis were measured in paired sera of the cases and a subcohort of 2,796 women with a minimum of two pregnancies. HPV16-adjusted rate ratios (RR) and confidence intervals were estimated by stratified Cox model. Compared to dual seropositivity already at the first serum sampling, RRs related to HPV6 seropositivity before and after HPV31 seroconversion were 0.4 (95% CI 0.0, 4.4) and 10 (95% CI 1.8, 57). Furthermore, RR related to seroconversions of both HPV18/45 and C.trachomatis between the consecutive pregnancies was 28 (95% CI 4.3, 190). Virtually concomitant HPV18/45 and C.trachomatis infections are associated with very high CIN3 risk. PMID:23526412

  6. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The overall goal of this study is to determine the association between serum biomarkers of oxidant load and cervical carcinogenesis among women from the Ludwig-McGill Cohort Study. The Ludgwig-McGill Cohort Study is a large prospective study which collected multiple measurements of relevant risk factors (e.g., smoking, presence of cervical inflammatory cells, dietary and circulatory concentrations of antioxidant nutrients) and endpoints (e.g., type-specific HPV persistence, viral load, and development of SIL).

  7. Benefit of fewer than three doses of HPV vaccine reported

    Cancer.gov

    Further, investigators observed that participants who received two doses six months apart showed evidence of partial protection against other HPV types not included in the vaccine formulation; experts refer to this as cross-protection. But women who received one dose, or who received two doses just one month apart, showed no evidence of cross-protection. The study was a collaborative effort by Aimée R.

  8. Risk messages about HPV, cervical cancer, and the HPV vaccine gardasil in North American news magazines.

    PubMed

    Abdelmutti, Nazek; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2010-09-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine (Gardasil) is a significant advancement in reducing women's risk for cervical cancer. Public opinion of the vaccine can be influenced by the mass media. We used content analysis to assess the discussion of risks, fear-inducing messages about HPV, cervical cancer, and the HPV vaccine in four high circulating North American news magazines from January 2006 to December 2007. Risk messages about HPV and cervical cancer focused on threatening illness or injury. Reporting on the HPV vaccine emphasized it being poorly understood by science. News magazine articles on the HPV vaccine and cervical cancer included fear-inducing messages. Cancer educators need to be aware of media reporting in order to alleviate fears that the public may experience about the HPV vaccine. PMID:20232189

  9. The costs of managing genital warts in the UK by devolved nation: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Coles, Vah; Chapman, R; Lanitis, T; Carroll, S M

    2016-01-01

    Genital warts, 90% of which are caused by human papillomavirus types 6 and 11, are a significant problem in the UK. The cost of managing genital warts was previously estimated at £52.4 million for 2010. The objective of this study was to estimate the cost of genital warts management up to 2012 in the UK and by jurisdiction. Population statistics and the number of reported genital warts cases in genito-urinary medicine clinics were obtained and extrapolated to 2012. Cases of genital warts treated in primary care were estimated from The Health Improvement Network database. The number of visits and therapy required were estimated by genito-urinary medicine experts. Costs were obtained from the appropriate national tariffs. The model estimated there were 220,875 genital warts cases in the UK in 2012, costing £58.44 million (£265/patient). It estimated 157,793 cases in England costing £41.74 million; 7468 cases in Scotland costing £1.90 million; 7095 cases in Wales costing £1.87 million; and 3621 cases in Northern Ireland costing £948,000. The full National Health Service costs for the management of genital warts have never previously been estimated separately for each jurisdiction. Findings reveal a significant economic burden, which is important to quantify when understanding the value of quadrivalent human papilloma virus vaccination. PMID:25681263

  10. Hysterosalpingographic findings in women with genital tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Farrokh, Donya; Layegh, Parvaneh; Afzalaghaee, Monavvar; Mohammadi, Mohaddeseh; Fallah Rastegar, Yalda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genital tuberculosis (TB) is an important cause of infertility in the developing countries, where hysterosalpingography (HSG) remains an initial diagnostic procedure in the evaluation of tubal and peritoneal factors leading to infertility. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the HSG findings of genital TB in infertile women. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed HSG findings in 20 women with genital tuberculosis. HSG was performed in these women as part of infertility work up over 5 years. The other diagnostic procedures used included endometrial curettage and biopsy, histological examination, culture, laparoscopy, hysteroscopy and polymerase chain reaction. Results: The mean age of the participants was 30.5±8 years. All women had clinical history of infertility for at least 4 years. Women presented with pelvic abdominal pain (30-35%) and menstrual disturbances (20-25%). Reviewing 20 cases of female genital TB were encountered various presentations on HSG. Conclusion: HSG is an invaluable procedure in suggesting the diagnosis of genital TB in patients being investigated for infertility. PMID:26221129

  11. Understanding HPV tests and their appropriate applications.

    PubMed

    Cubie, H A; Cuschieri, K

    2013-10-01

    Greater understanding of the role played by human papillomavirus (HPV) in the causation of disease has led to the development of an increasing number of HPV tests with different characteristics. The bewildering choice facing healthcare professionals and providers is daunting. Clearly, HPV testing is no longer simply of research interest, but can provide information that can be used for individual patient management and at the population level for cervical screening and vaccine surveillance. This review aims to provide the background to the development of HPV tests, to explain the different technologies and to discuss the challenges of the application of these optimally in the varied contexts of disease management. Few HPV tests are approved for clinical use and it is important that clinicians understand which test can be utilized, in what circumstances, with what specimens and the meaning of the report issued. HPV testing is no longer applicable only to cervical disease, and we have suggested additional areas, such as the oropharynx, in which HPV testing services might be implemented in the near future. New tests will continue to emerge and we have identified some of the indirect measures of HPV activity, or biomarkers, that could help in the risk stratification of HPV infection and associated disease. The challenges relating to the optimal application of the various HPV technologies are compounded by the lack of evidence regarding their performance in vaccinated populations. Currently published work, including modelling studies, has been undertaken in non-immunized populations. We therefore end by addressing the issues regarding appropriate strategies and tests for immunized populations. PMID:23998275

  12. Prevalence of human papillomavirus types in cervical cancerous and precancerous lesions of Ecuadorian women.

    PubMed

    Mejía, Lorena; Muñoz, Diana; Trueba, Gabriel; Tinoco, Leopoldo; Zapata, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection worldwide and it is responsible for most cases of uterine cancer. In Ecuador there is limited information about HPV types (and variants) in cancerous lesions; however, identifying the type-specific HPV prevalence in cervical lesions of women living in Ecuador is important to better predict the impact of HPV prophylactic vaccination in this country. We studied the prevalence of HPV types in cervical cancerous or precancerous lesions from 164 Ecuadorian women and found that 86.0% were HPV positive. The most common types were HPV16 (41.8%) and HPV58 (30.5%). Interestingly, HPV18 was detected only in 2.8% of the HPV-positive samples. Fifteen DNA sequences (genes E6 and L1) from 16 samples positive for HPV16 belonged to the European lineage, considered one of the least carcinogenic lineages, and 1 (6.25%) to the Asian-American lineage. Similar analysis in 12 HPV58 positive samples showed that 10 (83.3%) sequences grouped in sublineage A2, which belongs to the oldest HPV58 lineage, 1 belonged to A3 and 1 to lineage C. This study suggests that the currently used HPV vaccines (bivalent and tetravalent) may have lower effectiveness in Ecuador than in other geographic locations where HPV18 is more prevalent. J. Med. Virol. 88:144-152, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26113443

  13. Bridging Links between Long Noncoding RNA HOTAIR and HPV Oncoprotein E7 in Cervical Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sweta; Mandal, Paramita; Sadhukhan, Tamal; Roy Chowdhury, Rahul; Ranjan Mondal, Nidhu; Chakravarty, Biman; Chatterjee, Tanmay; Roy, Sudipta; Sengupta, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 oncoprotein E7 plays a major role in cervical carcinogenesis by interacting with and functionally inactivating various host regulatory molecules. Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOTAIR is one such regulator that recruits chromatin remodelling complex PRC2, creating gene silencing H3K27?me3 marks. Hence, we hypothesized that HOTAIR could be a potential target of E7, in HPV16 related cervical cancers (CaCx). We identified significant linear trend of progressive HOTAIR down-regulation through HPV negative controls, HPV16 positive non-malignants and CaCx samples. Majority of CaCx cases portrayed HOTAIR down-regulation in comparison to HPV negative controls, with corresponding up-regulation of HOTAIR target, HOXD10, and enrichment of cancer related pathways. However, a small subset had significantly higher HOTAIR expression, concomitant with high E7 expression and enrichment of metastatic pathways. Expression of HOTAIR and PRC2-complex members (EZH2 and SUZ12), showed significant positive correlation with E7 expression in CaCx cases and E7 transfected C33A cell line, suggestive of interplay between E7 and HOTAIR. Functional inactivation of HOTAIR by direct interaction with E7 could also be predicted by in silico analysis and confirmed by RNA-Immunoprecipitation. Our study depicts one of the causal mechanisms of cervical carcinogenesis by HPV16 E7, through modulation of HOTAIR expression and function. PMID:26152361

  14. Cross-sectional study of HPV-16 infection in a population-based subsample of Hispanic adults

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, A P; Unger, E R; Muñoz, C; Panicker, G; Tortolero-Luna, G; Soto-Salgado, M; Otero, Y; Suárez, E; Pérez, C M

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to estimate the prevalence and correlates of seropositivity to human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 in a subsample of adults who participated in the parent study Epidemiology of Hepatitis C in the adult population of Puerto Rico (PR). Setting The parent study was a population-based household survey aimed to estimate the seroprevalence of hepatitis C and other viral infections (hepatitis A, hepatitis B, HIV, and herpes simplex type 2) in PR (n=1654) between 2005 and 2008. Participants A subsample of the last 450 consecutive adults aged 21–64?years, recruited between February 2007 and January 2008, who participated in the parent study and agreed to participate in HPV testing. Primary and secondary outcome measures The samples were tested by ELISA for HPV-16 viral-like particle-specific immunoglobulin G. Information on sociodemographic, health, and lifestyle characteristics was collected. Logistic regression modelling was used to estimate the prevalence odds ratio (POR) to assess factors associated to HPV-16 seropositivity. Results Prevalence of seropositivity to HPV-16 was 11.3%. Seroprevalence was higher in women (15.8%) than men (5.6%; p=0.001). After adjusting for age and sex, ever smokers (POR 2.06, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.92) and participants with at least five lifetime sexual partners (POR 2.91, 95% CI 1.24 to 6.81) were more likely to be HPV-16 seropositive. Conclusions HPV-16 seropositivity is similar to that reported in the USA (10.4%) for NHANES 2003–2004 participants, although different assays were used in these studies. While future studies should evaluate HPV seroprevalence using a larger population-based sample, our results highlight the need to further understand the burden of HPV infection and HPV-related malignancies in PR, population with a low vaccine uptake. PMID:24496698

  15. Human Papillomavirus Risk Type Classification from Protein Sequences Using

    E-print Network

    Human Papillomavirus Risk Type Classification from Protein Sequences Using Support Vector Machines by the human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with the development of cervical cancer. HPV can be classified

  16. Current Concepts for Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection: Diagnostics and Pathogenesis of Genital Tract Shedding.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christine; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYHerpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is a DNA virus that is efficiently transmitted through intimate genital tract contact and causes persistent infection that cannot be eliminated. HSV-2 may cause frequent, symptomatic self-limited genital ulcers, but in most persons infection is subclinical. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the virus is frequently shed from genital surfaces even in the absence of signs or symptoms of clinical disease and that the virus can be transmitted during these periods of shedding. Furthermore, HSV-2 shedding is detected throughout the genital tract and may be associated with genital tract inflammation, which likely contributes to increased risk of HIV acquisition. This review focuses on HSV diagnostics, as well as what we have learned about the importance of frequent genital HSV shedding for (i) HSV transmission and (ii) genital tract inflammation, as well as (iii) the impact of HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition and transmission. We conclude with discussion of future areas of research to push the field forward. PMID:26561565

  17. Female Genital Mutilation: A Capabilities Approach

    E-print Network

    Alavi, Roksana

    Genital Mutilation: A Capabilities Approach* Roksana Alavi University of Kansas In many African countries female genital mutilation (FGM) is quite common in spite of the fact that most of those countries have laws against it.1 FGM is a painful... excision, the female takes the first step towards womanhood. Although some of this is done to girls as young infancy the majority are in their teens and a few are adults. 3 The fundamental societal motive for FGM is simple: It is widely agreed...

  18. Performance of the HPV-16 L1 methylation assay and HPV E6/E7 mRNA test for the detection of squamous intraepithelial lesions in cervical cytological samples.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Cui; Zhi, Yanfang; Shen, Yong; Gong, Jiaomei; Li, Ya; Rong, Shouhua; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lulu; Li, Xiaofu

    2015-11-01

    HPV-16 L1 methylation and E6/E7 mRNA have suggested that they had close relationship with cervical neoplastic progression. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical performance of the HPV-16 L1 methylation assay and E6/E7 mRNA test for detecting high-grade cervical lesions (CIN2+). A total of 81 women with liquid-based cytology (LBC) samples, histological results, and positive HPV-DNA test for HPV type 16 only were included in this study. HPV-16 L1 methylation and E6/E7 mRNA levels were measured using methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis and Quantivirus®HPV E6/E7 RNA 3.0 assay (bDNA), respectively, in the same residue of LBC samples. The current date showed a positive correlation between the HPV-16 L1 methylation and the E6/E7 mRNA levels. The L1 methylation and mRNA levels both increased with disease severity. The mRNA test method showed higher sensitivity and NPV (98.0 and 91.7% vs. 89.8 and 80.8%), while lower specificity and PPV (34.4 and 69.6% vs. 65.6 and 80.0%), than the L1 methylation assay for detecting histology-confirmed CIN2+. When using the detection method of mRNA test combined with L1 methylation assay, we obtained a sensitivity of 89.8% and a specificity of 71.9%. These findings suggest that assessment of HPV-16 L1 methylation testing combined with E6/E7 mRNA testing may be a promising method for the triage of women with HPV type 16 only. PMID:26297960

  19. Anti-HPV16 E2 Protein T-Cell Responses and Viral Control in Women with Usual Vulvar Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Their Healthy Partners

    PubMed Central

    Jacobelli, Simon; Sanaa, Fedoua; Moyal-Barracco, Micheline; Pelisse, Monique; Berville, Sophie; Villefroy, Pascale; North, Marie Odile; Figueiredo, Suzanne; Charmeteau, Bénédicte; Clerici, Thierry; Plantier, Françoise; Arnold, Françoise; Touzé, Antoine; Dupin, Nicolas; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Cheynier, Rémi; Bourgault-Villada, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    T-cell responses (proliferation, intracellular cytokine synthesis and IFN? ELISPOT) against human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E2 peptides were tested during 18 months in a longitudinal study in eight women presenting with HPV16-related usual vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) and their healthy male partners. In six women, anti-E2 proliferative responses and cytokine production (single IFN? and/or dual IFN?/IL2 and/or single IL2) by CD4+ T lymphocytes became detectable after treating and healing of the usual VIN. In the women presenting with persistent lesions despite therapy, no proliferation was observed. Anti-E2 proliferative responses were also observed with dual IFN?/IL2 production by CD4+ T-cells in six male partners who did not exhibit any genital HPV-related diseases. Ex vivo IFN? ELISPOT showed numerous effector T-cells producing IFN? after stimulation by a dominant E2 peptide in all men and women. Since the E2 protein is absent from the viral particles but is required for viral DNA replication, these results suggest a recent infection with replicative HPV16 in male partners. The presence of polyfunctional anti-E2 T-cell responses in the blood of asymptomatic men unambiguously establishes HPV infection even without detectable lesions. These results, despite the small size of the studied group, provide an argument in favor of prophylactic HPV vaccination of young men in order to prevent HPV16 infection and viral transmission from men to women. PMID:22590583

  20. "The first cut is the deepest": a psychological, sexological and gynecological perspective on female genital cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Giussy; Facchin, Federica; Meschia, Michele; Vercellini, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    In recent years increased numbers of healthy women and girls have been seeking female genital cosmetic surgery for esthetic reasons and/or to enhance sexual functioning. This phenomenon is associated with the development of a new vulvovaginal standard due to Internet pornography and the increased exposure of female genitalia. This strict standard may negatively affect women's psychological health and cause increased insecurity, which may drive even teenagers to seek female genital cosmetic surgery. Psychological counseling is recommended to inform women that surgery is not a definitive solution to treat psychologically based pain or dysfunction. Moreover, there is no robust evidence supporting the effectiveness of female genital cosmetic surgery, especially regarding sexual enhancement, as underlined by major scientific societies. The importance of a definite regulation of female genital cosmetic surgery should be emphasized and be based on an ethically oriented, multidisciplinary model aimed at providing exhaustive information on all gynecological, sexological, and psychological concerns raised by this type of surgery. PMID:25891185

  1. HPV Infection, but Not EBV or HHV-8 Infection, Is Associated with Salivary Gland Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Hühns, Maja; Simm, Georg; Erbersdobler, Andreas; Zimpfer, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Benign and malignant salivary gland tumours are clinically heterogeneous and show different histology. Little is known about the role of human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in salivary gland neoplasms. We investigated the presence of the three viruses in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples in a cohort of 200 different salivary gland tumours. We performed EBV-LMP-1 and HHV-8 and p16 immunohistochemistry, a specific chip based hybridization assay for detection and typing of HPV and a chromogenic in situ hybridization for EBV analysis. Only one case, a polymorphic low-grade carcinoma, showed HHV-8 expression and one lymphoepithelial carcinoma was infected by EBV. In 17 cases (9%) moderate or strong nuclear and cytoplasmic p16 expression was detected. The HPV type was investigated in all of these cases and additionally in 8 Warthin's tumours. In 19 cases HPV type 16 was detected, mostly in Warthin's tumour, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma NOS. We concluded that HHV-8 infection and EBV infection are not associated with salivary gland cancer, but HPV infection may play a role in these tumour entities. PMID:26618178

  2. Use of 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine: updated HPV vaccination recommendations of the advisory committee on immunization practices.

    PubMed

    Petrosky, Emiko; Bocchini, Joseph A; Hariri, Susan; Chesson, Harrell; Curtis, C Robinette; Saraiya, Mona; Unger, Elizabeth R; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2015-03-27

    During its February 2015 meeting, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine (9vHPV) (Gardasil 9, Merck and Co., Inc.) as one of three HPV vaccines that can be used for routine vaccination. HPV vaccine is recommended for routine vaccination at age 11 or 12 years. ACIP also recommends vaccination for females aged 13 through 26 years and males aged 13 through 21 years not vaccinated previously. Vaccination is also recommended through age 26 years for men who have sex with men and for immunocompromised persons (including those with HIV infection) if not vaccinated previously. 9vHPV is a noninfectious, virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine. Similar to quadrivalent HPV vaccine (4vHPV), 9vHPV contains HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 VLPs. In addition, 9vHPV contains HPV 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 VLPs. 9vHPV was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on December 10, 2014, for use in females aged 9 through 26 years and males aged 9 through 15 years. For these recommendations, ACIP reviewed additional data on 9vHPV in males aged 16 through 26 years. 9vHPV and 4vHPV are licensed for use in females and males. Bivalent HPV vaccine (2vHPV), which contains HPV 16, 18 VLPs, is licensed for use in females. This report summarizes evidence considered by ACIP in recommending 9vHPV as one of three HPV vaccines that can be used for vaccination and provides recommendations for vaccine use. PMID:25811679

  3. Genital Anxiety and the Quest for the Perfect Vulva: A Feminist Analysis of Female Genital Cosmetic Surgery

    E-print Network

    Chen, Zhongping

    Cosmetic Surgery Ariana Keil 95863710 Women and the Body- Professor Susan Greenhalgh UCI March, 2010 #12;2 Genital Anxiety and the Quest for the Perfect Vulva: A Feminist Analysis of Female Genital Cosmetic Surgery Female genital cosmetic surgery procedures are relatively new, but they are swiftly growing

  4. [Medical and legal aspects of genital mutilation and circumcision part I: female genital mutilation (FGM)].

    PubMed

    Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Laux, Johannes; Friedl, Hannah; Zedler, Barbara; Bratzke, Hansjürgen; Parzeller, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is considered to be against the law and against morality not only in Western countries, although a woman of age and able to consent may sometimes think differently. The procedure may have serious physical and emotional consequences for the girl or woman. Nevertheless there are attempts to justify the procedure with medical and hygienic pseudoarguments, ideology, freedom of religion, cultural identity and social adequacy. Outside the Western world, some people claim that religion and culture alone justify the practice. In Germany, parents can lose the right to determine the residence of their daughter, if she is faced with the risk of genital mutilation in order to prevent that the child or girl is taken to her home country. Genital mutilation as a gender-specific threat is recognized as a reason to grant asylum or prevent deportation. Proposals to make genital mutilation a separate punishable offence are presently discussed by the legislator. PMID:21404547

  5. Acetylation of intragenic histones on HPV16 correlates with enhanced HPV16 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Cecilia; Jamal Fattah, Tavan; Yu, Haoran; Nygren, Jakob; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Schwartz, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    We report that many histone modifications are unevenly distributed over the HPV16 genome in cervical cancer cells as well as in HPV16-immortalized keratinocytes. For example, H3K36me3 and H3K9Ac that are common in highly expressed cellular genes and over exons, were more common in the early than in the late region of the HPV16 genome. In contrast, H3K9me3, H4K20me3, H2BK5me1 and H4K16Ac were more frequent in the HPV16 late region. Furthermore, a region encompassing the HPV16 early polyadenylation signal pAE displayed high levels of histone H3 acetylation. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors caused a 2- to 8-fold induction of HPV16 early and late mRNAs in cervical cancer cells and in immortalized keratinocytes, while at the same time increasing the levels of acetylated histones in the cells and on the HPV16 genome specifically. We concluded that increased histone acetylation on the HPV16 genome correlates with increased HPV16 gene expression. PMID:25900886

  6. The knowledge levels and opinions of biomedical students regarding the human papillomavirus quadrivalent (types 6, 11, 16, and 18) recombinant vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tsau, Kristy; Reutzel, Thomas J; Wang, Sheila; Quiñones, Ana; Nguyen, Patrick; Hasan, Shehrbano; Workman, Gloria

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the knowledge levels and attitudes of all students enrolled in 1 biomedical university regarding the human papillomavirus quadrivalent (types 6, 11, 16, and 18) recombinant vaccine (Gardasil-Merck; the HPV vaccine). A survey of students from all 7 programs at the University was conducted in January 2009. A total of 1120 useable questionnaires were obtained. These programs included pharmacy, osteopathic medicine, physician assistant, physical therapy, occupational therapy, doctor of psychology, and master of biomedical sciences. Mean percentage correct on the HPV vaccine knowledge test was 73. Subjects scored highest on the question that asks whether the vaccine helps prevent cervical cancer (97% correct) and lowest on the one asking whether it helps prevent genital warts (41% correct). Eighty-eight percent thought that patients 18 years and older should be able to receive the HPV vaccine without parental consent. Only about 5% think that the vaccine would cause patients to become sexually active, or that it would cause patients to have unprotected sex. The results suggest that these students have reasonable but limited knowledge of the vaccine. Their positive attitudes suggest that they will likely recommend or provide the vaccine to their patients. PMID:21712218

  7. A Minimalist analysis of Uyghur genitives

    E-print Network

    Politzer-Ahles, Stephen

    2011-10-03

    on the multiplicity of semantic roles that the “possessing” object may bear, and the observation that it may be dropped from the DP, an analogy is made between genitive-possessive DPs and finite TPs. It is proposed that “possessors” behave in a manner parallel...

  8. Herpes Simplex (Cold Sores and Genital Herpes)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... defenses and make it easier to get HIV infection. A recent study found that people with HSV had three times ... significant reduction in HIV viral load. However, another study found that treating genital herpes did not prevent new HIV infections. People with both HIV and HSV also need ...

  9. Genital Evolution: Why Are Females Still Understudied?

    PubMed Central

    Ah-King, Malin; Barron, Andrew B.; Herberstein, Marie E.

    2014-01-01

    The diversity, variability, and apparent rapid evolution of animal genitalia are a vivid focus of research in evolutionary biology, and studies exploring genitalia have dramatically increased over the past decade. These studies, however, exhibit a strong male bias, which has worsened since 2000, despite the fact that this bias has been explicitly pointed out in the past. Early critics argued that previous investigators too often considered only males and their genitalia, while overlooking female genitalia or physiology. Our analysis of the literature shows that overall this male bias has worsened with time. The degree of bias is not consistent between subdisciplines: studies of the lock-and-key hypothesis have been the most male focused, while studies of cryptic female choice usually consider both sexes. The degree of bias also differed across taxonomic groups, but did not associate with the ease of study of male and female genital characteristics. We argue that the persisting male bias in this field cannot solely be explained by anatomical sex differences influencing accessibility. Rather the bias reflects enduring assumptions about the dominant role of males in sex, and invariant female genitalia. New research highlights how rapidly female genital traits can evolve, and how complex coevolutionary dynamics between males and females can shape genital structures. We argue that understanding genital evolution is hampered by an outdated single-sex bias. PMID:24802812

  10. Psychosocial Treatment for Recurrent Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, David J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Assigned 21 individuals with recurrent genital herpes to psychosocial intervention, social support, or waiting-list control conditions. Those receiving psychosocial intervention (herpes simplex virus information, relaxation training, stress management instructions, and an imagery technique) reported significantly greater reductions in herpes…

  11. Diagnosis of genital Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma infections.

    PubMed

    Friberg, J

    1985-03-01

    Genital Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma have been implicated in pelvic inflammatory disease, puerperal infections, septic abortions, low birth weight, nongonococcal urethritis and prostatitis as well as spontaneous abortion and infertility. An unequivocal diagnosis of infection with these organisms can be made only after properly obtained specimens have been evaluated with the use of selective cultures. PMID:4020782

  12. Genital Ulcers: Their Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Stephen L.

    1987-01-01

    This article offers some background information on diagnosis and treatment of three major causes of genital ulcers: syphilis, herpes simplex virus (HSV), and chancroid. The author also discusses differential diagnoses and suggests an approach to treatment. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:21263799

  13. Genital injuries following sexual assault of women with and without prior sexual intercourse experience

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M; Stermac, L E; Divinsky, M

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The literature on sexual assault has not directly addressed the question of genital injuries in women without prior sexual intercourse experience. Given the paucity of research and the current importance of physical evidence in the criminal justice system, this study was designed to document the type and site of genital injuries from sexual assault in women without and with prior sexual intercourse experience. METHODS: The charts were reviewed of 132 women who had been sexually assaulted and had sought medical treatment at the Sexual Assault Care Centre (SACC), Women's College Hospital, Toronto, within 10 days after the assault. Half (66) of the women reported that, at the time of the assault, they had no prior sexual intercourse experience. The Sexual Assault Evidence Kit in each patient's file was reviewed to ascertain the type and location of genital injuries. Types of injuries were classified into 3 categories (nonperforating soft-tissue injuries, lacerations or current bleeding) and locations into 6 categories (labia majora and minora, posterior fourchette and introitus, hymen, vagina, cervix, and anus). RESULTS: Significantly more women without than with prior sexual intercourse experience had visible genital injuries (65.2% v. 25.8%, p < 0.01). However, of the women without prior experience, only 9.1% had hymenal perforation. Analyses of the data for only women with genital injuries indicated no difference between those without and those with prior sexual intercourse experience in the overall mean number of injured sites (1.65 and 1.47 respectively) or in the mean number of sites with nonperforating soft-tissue injuries (0.349 and 0.706), lacerations (0.953 and 0.471) and bleeding (0.279 and 0.294). INTERPRETATION: The results suggest that genital injuries are more common in women without prior sexual intercourse experience but that substantial proportions of all women, regardless of their prior sexual experience at the time of assault, will not have visible genital injuries. Emergency department staff and members of the criminal justice system need to be aware of the variable presentation of genital trauma related to sexual assault in women with and without prior sexual intercourse experience. PMID:9679484

  14. Psychophysical properties of female genital sensation.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Melissa A; Maykut, Caroline A; Huberman, Jackie S; Huang, Lejian; Khalifé, Samir; Binik, Yitzchak M; Apkarian, A Vania; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2013-11-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is characterized by the presence of vulvar touch and pain hypersensitivity. Pain with vaginal distension, which motivates treatment seeking and perpetuates distress, is frequently reported with PVD. However, the concordance between the perception of vulvar and vaginal sensation (ie, somatic and visceral genital sensations, respectively) remains unstudied in healthy women, as well as in clinical populations such as PVD. To evaluate the static and dynamic (time-varying) properties of somatic and visceral genital sensation, women with PVD (n=14) and age- and contraceptive-matched healthy controls (n=10) rated varying degrees of nonpainful and painful genital stimulation. Somatic (vulvar) mechanical sensitivity to nonpainul and painful degrees of force were compared to visceral (vaginal) sensitivity to nonpainful and painful distension volumes. Results indicated that healthy women showed substantial individual variation in and high discrimination of vulvar and vaginal sensation. In contrast, PVD was associated with vulvar allodynia and hyperalgesia, as well as vaginal allodynia. Modeling of dynamic perception revealed novel properties of abnormal PVD genital sensation, including temporal delays in vulvar touch perception and reduced perceptual thresholds for vaginal distension. The temporal properties and magnitude of PVD distension pain were indistinguishable from vaginal fullness in healthy controls. These results constitute the first empirical comparison of somatic and visceral genital sensation in healthy women. Findings provide novel insights into the sensory abnormalities that characterize PVD, including an experimental demonstration of visceral allodynia. This investigation challenges the prevailing diagnostic assessment of PVD and reconceptualizes PVD as a chronic somatic and visceral pain condition. PMID:23707679

  15. HPV - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ???????) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Tagalog (Tagalog) Thai (???????) Vietnamese (Tiê?ng Viê?t) Armenian (???????) Human Papillomavirus ... Action Coalition; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Thai (???????) Human Papillomavirus HPV (Cervarix) VIS English ??????? ( ...

  16. HPV: immune response to infection and vaccination

    E-print Network

    Stanley, Margaret A

    2010-10-20

    coat protein L1 is protective suggesting that this would be an effective prophylactic vaccine strategy. The current prophylactic HPV VLP vaccines are delivered i.m. circumventing the intra-epithelial immune evasion strategies. These vaccines generate...

  17. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  18. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  19. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  20. Vaccine Reduces HPV Infections in Young Men

    Cancer.gov

    An international randomized clinical trial has shown that the vaccine Gardasil can reduce the incidence of anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in young men 16 to 26 years of age at the time of vaccination.

  1. Differential in vitro immortalization capacity of eleven (probable) [corrected] high-risk human papillomavirus types.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Denise M; Snijders, Peter J F; Bosch, Leontien; Kramer, Duco; Meijer, Chris J L M; Steenbergen, Renske D M

    2014-02-01

    Epidemiological studies identified 12 high-risk HPV (hrHPV) types and 8 probable/possible hrHPV types that display different cancer risks. Functional studies on transforming properties of hrHPV are mainly limited to HPV16 and -18, which induce immortalization of human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) by successive bypass of two proliferative life span barriers, senescence and crisis. Here, we systematically compared the in vitro immortalization capacities, as well as influences on p53, pRb, hTERT, growth behavior, and differentiation capacity, of nine hrHPV types (HPV16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -45, -51, -52, and -59), and two probable hrHPV types (HPV66 and -70). By retroviral transduction, the respective E6/E7 coding sequences were expressed in HFKs from two or three independent donors. Reduced p53 levels and low-level hTERT expression in early-passage cells, as seen in HPV16-, -31-, -33-, and -35-, and to a lesser extent HPV18-transduced HFKs, was associated with continuous growth and an increased immortalization capacity. Less frequent immortalization by HPV45 and -51 and immortalization by HPV66 and -70 was preceded by an intervening period of strongly reduced growth (crisis) without prior increase in hTERT expression. Immortalization by HPV59 was also preceded by a period crisis, despite the onset of low hTERT expression at early passage. HPV52 triggered an extended life span but failed to induce immortality. Variations in p53 and pRb levels were not correlated with differences in alternative E6/E7 mRNA splicing in all hrHPV-transduced HFKs. On collagen rafts, transductants showed disturbed differentiation reminiscent of precancerous lesions. In conclusion, in vitro oncogenic capacities differ between the established hrHPV types, and both some established and probable hrHPV types display weak or moderate immortalization potential. PMID:24257607

  2. Distribution of HPV Genotype in Invasive Cervical Carcinoma and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia in Zhejiang Province, Southeast China: Establishing the Baseline for Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Xian; Zhou, Jian-Song; Yuan, Shu-Hui; Yu, Hua; Lou, Han-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) are firmly established as the principal causative agent for cervical carcinoma. Current vaccines may provide some protection for women from cervical carcinoma linked to HPV genotype 16 and 18. This may be the best vaccine for Western women, but the geographical variation in HPV distributions may not make it the most appropriate vaccine for China or Asia. This study provided an observational, retrospective, hospital-based cross-sectional study on the distribution of HPV genotypes among 5410 women with invasive cervical cancer (ICC) or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Overall, the positive rates of the four HPV types included in current prophylactic vaccines were counted, the two high-risk types (HPV-16 and -18) covered by current vaccines represented 66.9% of women with squamous cancer, 55.0% with adenocarcinoma, 64.9% with adenosquamous carcinoma and 77.4% of other type ICC, as well as 59.5% of CIN III, 45.0% of CIN II and 38.1% of CIN I cases. As expected, two low-risk types (HPV-6 and -11) included in the quadrivalent vaccine did not show good coverage data. Particularly worth mentioning is the fact that the addition of HPV-52 and -58 to the vaccine cocktail would increase cancer protection in our population, potentially preventing up to beyond 16% of squamous/adenosquamous carcinoma and other type of cervical cancers, and 7.75% of adenocarcinomas. It might also potentially reduce the rate of CIN III by a further 28.6% and CIN II and I by a third. This study established the baseline for surveillance in Zhejiang Province, and provides data for further vaccine designs: a quadrivalent HPV vaccine covering HPV-16/-58/-18/-52, would be more welcome in our region in the forthcoming year compared to the currently available vaccine. PMID:26404339

  3. Female genital structures in several families of Centropagoidea (Copepoda: Calanoida)

    PubMed Central

    Barthélémy, R.-M.

    1998-01-01

    The female genital structures of 21 calanoid species belonging to the families Candaciidae, Centropagidae, Pontellidae, Sulcanidae, Temoridae and Tortanidae were studied using light and electron microscopy (scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy). Except the monotypic Sulcanidae, their organization conforms to a common pattern characterized by egg-laying ducts opening through paired adjacent gonopores into a small cavity, the genital atrium, covered by a genital operculum and opening to the outside through a distal atrial slit. No seminal receptacle is present and the seminal products must be stored for a brief period in the genital atrium.The genital structures occupy a well delimited genital area, the main changes in which concern their position on the ventral face of the genital double-somite, and operculum morphology. Their organization and possible mode of operation are compared with those of other calanoid families. A possible correlation between absence of seminal receptacles and mating behaviour is discussed.

  4. Longitudinal Assessment of Pigtailed Macaque Lower Genital Tract Microbiota by Pyrosequencing Reveals Dissimilarity to the Genital Microbiota of Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kersh, Ellen; Guenthner, Patricia; Vishwanathan, Sundaram Ajay; Gilbert, Douglas; Zariffard, M. Reza; Mirmonsef, Paria; Landay, Alan; Zheng, Luyang; Gillevet, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vaginal bacterial communities play an important role in human health and have been shown to influence HIV infection. Pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) are used as an animal model of HIV vaginal infection of women. Since the bacterial microbiota could influence retrovirus infection of pigtailed macaques, the genital microbiota in 10 cycling macaques was determined by pyrosequencing. The microbiota of all macaques was polymicrobial with a median of 13 distinct genera. Strikingly, the genera Sneathia and Fusobacterium, both in the phylum Fusobacteria, accounted for 18.9% and 13.3% of sequences while the next most frequent were Prevotella (5.6%), Porphyromonas (4.1%), Atopobium (3.6%), and Parvimonas (2.6%). Sequences corresponding to Lactobacillus comprised only 2.2% of sequences on average and were essentially all L. amylovorus. Longitudinal sampling of the 10 macaques over an 8-week period, which spanned at least one full ovulatory cycle, showed a generally stable presence of the major types of bacteria with some exceptions. These studies show that the microbiota of the pigtailed macaques is substantially dissimilar to that found in most healthy humans, where the genital microbiota is usually dominated by Lactobacillus sp. The polymicrobial makeup of the macaque bacterial populations, the paucity of lactobacilli, and the specific types of bacteria present suggest that the pigtailed macaque microbiota could influence vaginal retrovirus infection. PMID:22264029

  5. Type distribution of human papillomavirus among adult women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer (stage 1b or higher) in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the necessary cause of cervical cancer. Published data on the epidemiology of HPV in women with invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in New Zealand (NZ) are limited. This cross-sectional study investigated the distribution of high-risk and low-risk HPV types in cervical specimens collected from women throughout NZ who had been diagnosed with ICC between 2004 and 2010. Methods Women aged ?18 years, with ICC International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib or greater were identified from the five tertiary public hospitals in NZ regularly treating women with ICC. Women were enrolled in the study only after obtaining informed consent. Stored, formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical specimens were retrieved and histopathologically reviewed to confirm the diagnosis of ICC. Cervical specimens were tested for HPV using polymerase chain reaction-short fragment10; HPV DNA was detected using DNA enzyme immunoassay and typed by reverse hybridization line probe assay. Results 242 women were enrolled and ICC was histologically confirmed in 227 samples. HPV infection was detected in 88.5% (n?=?201; 95% CI: 83.7–92.4) of women with ICC; high-risk HPV types were detected in 87.2% of women. The most commonly detected HPV types were HPV-16 (51.1%) and HPV-18 (20.7%), followed by HPV-31 (4.0%), HPV-45 and HPV-52 (3.1% each). Overall, HPV distribution was highest (94.3%) in women aged 30–39 years at diagnosis and a higher distribution of HPV-16 (68.8%) was observed in women younger than 30 years. The overall distribution of HPV types between Maori and non-Maori women were similar. HPV-positive women with ICC stage II or greater were less likely to be infected with HPV-16/18 (P?=?0.002) or HPV-18 (P?=?0.029) compared with the other high-risk types. Single type infection and multiple infections were detected in 93.5% and 5.5% of women, respectively. Conclusions HPV-16, HPV-18, HPV-31, HPV-45 and HPV-52 were the most commonly detected high-risk HPV types. Findings from the study fill an important data gap on HPV type distribution from NZ which will help facilitate better understanding of the epidemiology of HPV in NZ women. Clinical trial registration NCT01328028. PMID:25000939

  6. Anal cytological abnormalities and anal HPV infection in men with Centers for Disease Control group IV HIV disease.

    PubMed Central

    Palefsky, J M; Holly, E A; Ralston, M L; Arthur, S P; Hogeboom, C J; Darragh, T M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterise risk factors for abnormal and cytology and anal human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in homosexual/bisexual men with advanced HIV related immunosuppression. DESIGN: Cross sectional study of men with Centers for Disease Control group IV HIV disease. SETTING: The University of California San Francisco, AIDS Clinic. PATIENTS: 129 homosexual or bisexual men with group IV HIV disease. METHODS: A questionnaire was administered detailing tobacco, alcohol and recreational drug use, medical history, and sexual practices. Anal swabs for cytology and HPV studies were obtained, as was blood for CD4 levels. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Abnormal anal cytology and anal HPV infection. RESULTS: Abnormal anal cytology was detected in 39% of subjects and anal HPV infection in 93% as measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Risk factors for abnormal cytology in multivariate analysis included HPV 16/18 infection (measured by PCR, RR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2-3.5) and intravenous drug use (RR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.7). Infection with HPV 6/11 also had significantly elevated RRs in a separate model. Cigarette smoking, alcohol use, recreational drug use, and low CD4 level were associated with abnormal anal cytology in univariate analysis, as was infection with multiple HPV types and high levels of hybrid capture group B viral DNA. CONCLUSIONS: Anal cytological abnormalities and HPV infection are common among homosexual/bisexual men with group IV HIV disease. In this study population, the main risk factors for abnormal cytology were HPV infection and intravenous drug use. Images PMID:9306896

  7. Nip the HPV encoded evil in the cancer bud: HPV reshapes TRAILs and signaling landscapes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    HPV encoded proteins can elicit ectopic protein–protein interactions that re-wire signaling pathways, in a mode that promotes malignancy. Moreover, accumulating data related to HPV is now providing compelling substantiation of a central role played by HPV in escaping immunosurveillance and impairment of apoptotic response. What emerges is an intricate network of Wnt, TGF, Notch signaling cascades that forms higher-order ligand–receptor complexes routing downstream signaling in HPV infected cells. These HPV infected cells are regulated both extracellularly by ligand receptor axis and intracellularly by HPV encoded proteins and impair TRAIL mediated apoptosis. We divide this review into different sections addressing how linear signaling pathways integrate to facilitate carcinogenesis and compounds that directly or indirectly reverse these aberrant interactions offer new possibilities for therapy in cancer. Although HPV encoded proteins mediated misrepresentation of pathways is difficult to target, improved drug-discovery platforms and new technologies have facilitated the discovery of agents that can target dysregulated pathways in HPV infected cervical cancer cells, thus setting the stage for preclinical models and clinical trials. PMID:23773282

  8. Knowledge of HPV, Perception of Risk, and Intent to Obtain HPV Vaccination among Male University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted virus in the world, is associated with almost all cases of cervical cancer. It is also related to vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal, and oropharyngeal cancer. HPV vaccination is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for both boys and girls. Unfortunately,…

  9. Evolution and Taxonomic Classification of Human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV16)-Related Variant Genomes

    E-print Network

    DeSalle, Rob

    Evolution and Taxonomic Classification of Human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV16)-Related Variant Genomes of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America Abstract Background: Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16 and Taxonomic Classification of Human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV16)-Related Variant Genomes: HPV31, HPV33, HPV35

  10. Honeybee venom possesses anticancer and antiviral effects by differential inhibition of HPV E6 and E7 expression on cervical cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Wan; Chaturvedi, Pankaj Kumar; Chun, Sung Nam; Lee, Yang Gu; Ahn, Woong Shick

    2015-04-01

    Bee venom (BV) therapy is a type of alternative medical treatment used to treat various diseases in oriental medicine. The mechanisms underlying the effects of BV remain poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the antiviral effect of BV on cervical carcinoma cell lines (CaSki, HeLa, C33A and TC-1). BV treatments resulted in a more significant suppression of cell growth in HPV 16-infected cells (CaSki) and a lesser suppression in HPV 18-infected cells (HeLa). However, less suppression was observed in HPV-negative C33A cells. In 10 µg/ml BV-treated CaSki cells, the mRNA expression and protein levels of HPV16 E6 and E7 were significantly decreased by BV, while HPV18 E6 and E7 mRNA expression levels were not significantly altered by 10 µg/ml BV-treated HeLa cells. The antitumor effects of BV were in accordance with in vitro data, in restricting tumor growth in vivo and were much more effective on the suppression of tumor growth. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression levels of HPV16 E6 and E7 were decreased by BV in TC-1 tumors. These findings demonstrated the antiviral effects of BV in HPV-infected cervical cancer cells and the anticancer effects of BV in HPV16 E6/E7-expressed TC-1 tumors. Collectively, BV plays a differential role in suppressing HPV16-infected cells (CaSki cells) and HPV18-infected cells (HeLa cells) by the downregulation of E6/E7 protein of HPV16/18. PMID:25633640

  11. Newsprint media representations of the introduction of the HPV vaccination programme for cervical cancer prevention in the UK (2005–2008)

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Shona; Hunt, Kate; Langan, Mairi; Bedford, Helen; Petticrew, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In September 2008, the human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation programme was introduced in the UK for schoolgirls aged between 12 and 18 years of age. The vaccine shows high efficacy in preventing infection against HPV types 16 and 18 responsible for 70% of cervical cancer. However, to be most effective, the vaccine needs to be administered before exposure to the viruses and therefore, ideally, before young people become sexually active. The introduction of any new vaccine, and perhaps particularly one given to young teenage girls to prevent a sexually transmitted cancer-causing virus, has the potential to attract a great deal of media attention. This paper reports on content analysis of 344 articles published between January 2005 and December 2008 in 15 UK newspapers. It includes both manifest and latent analysis to examine newsprint media coverage of the introduction of the HPV vaccination programme and its role in HPV advocacy. We concluded that the newspapers were generally positive towards the new HPV vaccination and that over the 4 years period the newsworthiness of the HPV vaccination programme increased. In 2008 two events dominated coverage, firstly, the introduction of the HPV programme in September 2008 and secondly, in August 2008 the diagnosis on camera of cervical cancer given to Jade Goody, a 27 year old mother of two, who gained fame and notoriety in the UK through her participation in several reality television shows. There are two conclusions from this study. Firstly, the positive media coverage surrounding the introduction of the HPV vaccination programme is to be welcomed as it is likely to contribute towards influencing public perceptions about the acceptability and need for HPV vaccination. Secondly, the focus on prevalence rates of HPV infection among women and on women's sexual behaviours, in relation to HPV vaccination ‘encouraging’ promiscuity, is an unhelpful aspect of media coverage. PMID:20064682

  12. Bortezomib sensitises TRAIL-resistant HPV-positive head and neck cancer cells to TRAIL through a caspase-dependent, E6-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bullenkamp, J; Raulf, N; Ayaz, B; Walczak, H; Kulms, D; Odell, E; Thavaraj, S; Tavassoli, M

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causative for a new and increasing form of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Although localised HPV-positive cancers have a favourable response to radio-chemotherapy (RT/CT), the impact of HPV in advanced or metastatic HNSCC remains to be defined and targeted therapeutics need to be tested for cancers resistant to RT/CT. To this end, we investigated the sensitivity of HPV-positive and -negative HNSCC cell lines to TRAIL (tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), which induces tumour cell-specific apoptosis in various cancer types. A clear correlation was observed between HPV positivity and resistance to TRAIL compared with HPV-negative head and neck cancer cell lines. All TRAIL-resistant HPV-positive cell lines tested were sensitised to TRAIL-induced cell death by treatment with bortezomib, a clinically approved proteasome inhibitor. Bortezomib-mediated sensitisation to TRAIL was associated with enhanced activation of caspase-8, -9 and -3, elevated membrane expression levels of TRAIL-R2, cytochrome c release and G2/M arrest. Knockdown of caspase-8 significantly blocked cell death induced by the combination therapy, whereas the BH3-only protein Bid was not required for induction of apoptosis. XIAP depletion increased the sensitivity of both HPV-positive and -negative cells to TRAIL alone or in combination with bortezomib. In contrast, restoration of p53 following E6 knockdown in HPV-positive cells had no effect on their sensitivity to either single or combination therapy, suggesting a p53-independent pathway for the observed response. In summary, bortezomib-mediated proteasome inhibition sensitises previously resistant HPV-positive HNSCC cells to TRAIL-induced cell death through a mechanism involving both the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis. The cooperative effect of these two targeted anticancer agents therefore represents a promising treatment strategy for RT/CT-resistant HPV-associated head and neck cancers. PMID:25341043

  13. Improving immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccines for genital herpes containing herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Shaw, Carolyn; Friedman, Harvey

    2014-12-01

    No vaccines are approved for prevention or treatment of genital herpes. The focus of genital herpes vaccine trials has been on prevention using herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD2) alone or combined with glycoprotein B. These prevention trials did not achieve their primary end points. However, subset analyses reported some positive outcomes in each study. The most recent trial was the Herpevac Trial for Women that used gD2 with monophosphoryl lipid A and alum as adjuvants in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 seronegative women. Unexpectedly, the vaccine prevented genital disease by HSV-1 but not HSV-2. Currently, HSV-1 causes more first episodes of genital herpes than HSV-2, highlighting the importance of protecting against HSV-1. The scientific community is conflicted between abandoning vaccine efforts that include gD2 and building upon the partial successes of previous trials. We favor building upon success and present approaches to improve outcomes of gD2-based subunit antigen vaccines. PMID:25138572

  14. HPV16 E6 Controls the Gap Junction Protein Cx43 in Cervical Tumour Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Dong, Li; MacDonald, Alasdair I; Akbari, Shahrzad; Edward, Michael; Hodgins, Malcolm B; Johnstone, Scott R; Graham, Sheila V

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) causes a range of cancers including cervical and head and neck cancers. HPV E6 oncoprotein binds the cell polarity regulator hDlg (human homologue of Drosophila Discs Large). Previously we showed in vitro, and now in vivo, that hDlg also binds Connexin 43 (Cx43), a major component of gap junctions that mediate intercellular transfer of small molecules. In HPV16-positive non-tumour cervical epithelial cells (W12G) Cx43 localised to the plasma membrane, while in W12T tumour cells derived from these, it relocated with hDlg into the cytoplasm. We now provide evidence that E6 regulates this cytoplasmic pool of Cx43. E6 siRNA depletion in W12T cells resulted in restoration of Cx43 and hDlg trafficking to the cell membrane. In C33a HPV-negative cervical tumour cells expressing HPV16 or 18 E6, Cx43 was located primarily in the cytoplasm, but mutation of the 18E6 C-terminal hDlg binding motif resulted in redistribution of Cx43 to the membrane. The data indicate for the first time that increased cytoplasmic E6 levels associated with malignant progression alter Cx43 trafficking and recycling to the membrane and the E6/hDlg interaction may be involved. This suggests a novel E6-associated mechanism for changes in Cx43 trafficking in cervical tumour cells. PMID:26445057

  15. Expression of P16 in NUT carcinomas with no association with human papillomavirus (HPV).

    PubMed

    Salles, Paulo Guilherme de Oliveira; Moura, Rafael de Deus; Menezes, Letícia M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2014-04-01

    NUT carcinoma (NC) is a rare malignant neoplasm usually located in the midline, including the upper aerodigestive tract. NC is an aggressive and highly lethal type of carcinoma. It is defined by the rearrangement of the nuclear protein in the testis (NUT) gene on chromosome 15q14. In most cases, the NUT is involved in a balanced translocation with the BRD4 gene on chromosome 19p13.1, an event that creates a BRD4-NUT fusion gene. The relationship between the human papillomavirus (HPV), p16, and upper aerodigestive tract cancer has been long postulated. In this study, we evaluated the relationship of the p16 expression in 4 cases of NCs and its eventual association with HPV. All 4 cases presented typical histopathologic findings with nuclear positivity of the NUT protein and strong expression for p16. None of these cases, however, showed an association with HPV evaluated by polymerase chain reaction. Despite the expression of p16, this negative result for HPV indicates that HPV infection probably does not play a role in the pathogenesis of NC. PMID:24185123

  16. HPV16 E6 Controls the Gap Junction Protein Cx43 in Cervical Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Dong, Li; MacDonald, Alasdair I.; Akbari, Shahrzad; Edward, Michael; Hodgins, Malcolm B.; Johnstone, Scott R.; Graham, Sheila V.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) causes a range of cancers including cervical and head and neck cancers. HPV E6 oncoprotein binds the cell polarity regulator hDlg (human homologue of Drosophila Discs Large). Previously we showed in vitro, and now in vivo, that hDlg also binds Connexin 43 (Cx43), a major component of gap junctions that mediate intercellular transfer of small molecules. In HPV16-positive non-tumour cervical epithelial cells (W12G) Cx43 localised to the plasma membrane, while in W12T tumour cells derived from these, it relocated with hDlg into the cytoplasm. We now provide evidence that E6 regulates this cytoplasmic pool of Cx43. E6 siRNA depletion in W12T cells resulted in restoration of Cx43 and hDlg trafficking to the cell membrane. In C33a HPV-negative cervical tumour cells expressing HPV16 or 18 E6, Cx43 was located primarily in the cytoplasm, but mutation of the 18E6 C-terminal hDlg binding motif resulted in redistribution of Cx43 to the membrane. The data indicate for the first time that increased cytoplasmic E6 levels associated with malignant progression alter Cx43 trafficking and recycling to the membrane and the E6/hDlg interaction may be involved. This suggests a novel E6-associated mechanism for changes in Cx43 trafficking in cervical tumour cells. PMID:26445057

  17. Genital and sexual pain in women.

    PubMed

    Graziottin, Alessandra; Gambini, Dania; Bertolasi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the all too common problem of sex-related pain in women. Pain is a complex perceptive experience, involving biologic as well as psychologic and relational meanings. They become increasingly important with the chronicity of pain. Neurologists are quite aware of the painful aspect of many neurologic disorders, but lifelong and acquired genital and sexual pain is still neglected in a consistent percentage of women. One reason is the view - still held by many - that psychologic factors play the most important role in sex-related pain complaints. The consequences of diagnostic delay can be dramatic. Persisting tissue inflammation induces pain to change from acute and "nociceptive," which indicates a "friendly signal," alerting one to ongoing tissue damage, to chronic and "neuropathic," a disease per se. Whilst the primary disease is progressing and neuroinflammation becomes a prominent feature, affected women have to bear years of pain and distress, huge quantifiable and non-quantifiable costs, and a progressive deterioration of personal and relational health and happiness. The scenario is even more dramatic when pain complicates an already disabling disease. The main aspects considered in this chapter include neuroinflammation as a key feature of pain; genital and sexual pain as part of neurologic diseases; and genital and sexual pain syndrome (dyspareunia and vaginismus) as primary problems, and their pelvic comorbidities (bladder pain syndrome, endometriosis, irritable bowel syndrome, provoked vestibulodynia/vulvodynia). Finally, we discuss iatrogenic pain, i.e., genital and sexual pain caused by ill-conceived medical, surgical, pharmacologic or radiologic therapeutic interventions. PMID:26003257

  18. Mothers' acceptance of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for daughters in a country with a high prevalence of HPV.

    PubMed

    Alder, Susanna; Gustafsson, Sofia; Perinetti, Claudia; Mints, Miriam; Sundström, Karin; Andersson, Sonia

    2015-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Argentina and the mortality rate is not declining despite opportunistic screening. Free-of-charge human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of 11-year-old girls was introduced in 2011. Parental acceptance of HPV vaccination is considered to be of great importance for HPV vaccine uptake. However, little is known regarding this factor in Argentina. The aim of the present study was to explore maternal HPV vaccination acceptance, willingness to pay for HPV vaccination and correlates of this willingness, awareness of HPV and HPV-associated disease and behaviors and attitudes associated with HPV vaccination acceptance. A total of 180 mothers of girls aged 9-15 years comprised this quantitative, cross-sectional, survey-based study, conducted at two hospitals in the Mendoza Province. Correlates of willingness to pay for HPV vaccination were obtained using multivariable logistic regression models. Maternal HPV vaccination acceptance was 90%, and 60% of mothers were willing to pay for HPV vaccination. Mothers who were gainfully employed and had a higher disposable household income were significantly more willing to pay for HPV vaccination [odds ratio (OR)=2.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-6.38; OR=3.28, 95% CI 1.36-7.94, respectively], as were mothers who were aware of cervical cancer prior to the study (OR=3.22, 95% CI 1.02-10.14). Only one in 10 mothers were informed that HPV vaccination does not offer complete protection against cervical cancer. In conclusion, the present study showed high maternal HPV vaccination acceptance, although acceptance decreased when vaccination was not free-of-charge. Continuous public education campaigns are needed to improve knowledge of HPV, HPV vaccines and HPV-associated disease. PMID:25738832

  19. Too Few Preteen Girls Get HPV Vaccine, CDC Says

    MedlinePLUS

    ... vaccine protects against infection with the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), which can cause cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina and anus. "Increasing delivery of HPV vaccination at the recommended ages of 11 or ...

  20. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Process of Care Research Branch Process of Care Research Branch (PCRB) Key Initiatives HPV and Cervical Cancer HPV

  1. HIV-1 Genital Shedding is Suppressed in the Setting of High Genital Antiretroviral Drug Concentrations Throughout the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Anandi N.; Evans-Strickfaden, Tammy; Haaland, Richard; Martin, Amy; Gatcliffe, Chelsea; Adesoye, Adebola; Omondi, Michael W.; Lupo, L. Davis; Danavall, Damien; Easley, Kirk; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Pau, Chou-Pong; Hart, Clyde; Ofotokun, Igho

    2014-01-01

    Background.?It is not known if fluctuations in genital tract antiretroviral drug concentrations correlate with genital virus shedding in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected women on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods.?Among 20 HIV-infected women on ART (tenofovir [TFV], emtricitabine [FTC], and ritonavir-boosted atazanavir [ATV]) with suppressed plasma virus loads, blood and cervicovaginal samples collected twice weekly for 3 weeks were tested for antiretroviral concentrations, HIV-1 RNA, and proviral DNA. Results.?Cervicovaginal:plasma antiretroviral concentration ratios were highest for FTC (11.9, 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.66–16.3), then TFV (3.52, 95% CI, 2.27–5.48), and ATV (2.39, 95% CI, 1.69–3.38). Within- and between-person variations in plasma and genital antiretroviral concentrations were observed. Low amounts of genital HIV-1 RNA (<50 copies/mL) were detected in 45% of women at 16% of visits. Genital HIV-1 DNA was detected in 70% of women at 35% of visits. Genital virus detection was associated with higher concentrations of mucosal leukocytes but not with genital antiretroviral concentrations, menstrual cycle phase, bacterial vaginosis, genital bleeding, or plasma virus detection. Conclusions.?Standard doses of ART achieved higher genital than plasma concentrations across the menstrual cycle. Therapeutic ART suppresses genital virus shedding throughout the menstrual cycle, even in the presence of factors reported to increase virus shedding. PMID:24643223

  2. Baseline prevalence and type distribution of human papillomavirus in healthy Chinese women aged 18–25 years enrolled in a clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fang-Hui; Zhu, Feng-Cai; Chen, Wen; Li, Juan; Hu, Yue-Mei; Hong, Ying; Zhang, Yi-Ju; Pan, Qin-Jing; Zhu, Jia-Hong; Zhang, Xun; Chen, Yong; Tang, Haiwen; Zhang, Helen; Durand, Christelle; Datta, Sanjoy K; Struyf, Frank; Bi, Dan; HPV-039 study group

    2014-01-01

    Baseline human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type distribution were evaluated in young Chinese women enrolled in a clinical trial of an HPV vaccine (ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT00779766). Cervical specimens and blood samples were collected at baseline from women aged 18–25 years (n?=?6,051) from four sites across Jiangsu province. Cervical specimens were tested for HPV DNA by SPF10 PCR-DEIA-LiPA25 version 1, and HPV-16/18 type-specific polymerase chain reaction. Anti-HPV-16 and anti-HPV-18 antibody titres were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. At baseline, 15.3% of women were DNA positive for any of 14 HPV high-risk (hr) types (HPV-16/18/31/33/35/39/45/51/52/56/58/59/66/68). The most commonly detected hrHPV types in cervical specimens were HPV-52 (4.0%) and HPV-16 (3.7%). High-risk HPV DNA-positivity increased with severity of cytological abnormalities: 39.3% in atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, 85.0% in low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and 97.8% in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). The hrHPV types most frequently detected in HSIL were HPV-16 (63.0%), HPV-18 (17.4%), HPV-52 (17.4%), HPV-58 (15.2%) and HPV-33 (15.2%). The hrHPV types most frequently detected in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2+ were HPV-16 (66.1%), HPV-33 (16.1%), HPV-52 (16.1%), HPV-58 (14.5%) and HPV-51 (11.3%). Multiple hrHPV infections were reported for 24.4% of hrHPV DNA positive women. Regardless of baseline HPV DNA status, 30.5% and 16.0% of subjects were initially seropositive for anti-HPV-16 and anti-HPV-18, respectively. In conclusion, the high baseline seropositivity rate and intermediate prevalence of cervical hrHPV types in Chinese women aged 18–25 years underlines the importance of early HPV vaccination in this population. What's new? In China, cervical cancer is the second most frequent cancer among women aged 15–44 years. The authors collected baseline data on prevalence and type distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) from more than 6,000 healthy Chinese women aged 18–25 years participating in a large vaccine efficacy trial. Regardless of cytology, 15.3% of women were positive for high-risk HPV types, with HPV-52 (4.0%), HPV-16 (3.7%), HPV-51 (1.7%) and HPV-58 (1.5%) being the most frequently detected. This high baseline prevalence of high-risk HPV types underscores the importance of early vaccination among Chinese women. PMID:24740547

  3. Attributing oncogenic human papillomavirus genotypes to high-grade cervical neoplasia: which type causes the lesion?

    PubMed

    van der Marel, Jacolien; Berkhof, Johannes; Ordi, Jaume; Torné, Aureli; Del Pino, Marta; van Baars, Romy; Schiffman, Mark; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Jenkins, David; Quint, Wim G V

    2015-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in most women with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2/3 in cervical cytology and biopsies. Multiple high-risk HPV (hrHPV) genotypes are present in 15% to 50% of cytology samples. We have shown by laser-capture microscopy (LCM)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that each lesion is associated with a single hrHPV type. Attribution of hrHPV types to CIN2/3 is important to understand the oncogenic role of different types and the limitations of cytologic typing. We studied hrHPV genotypes in 257 women with histologic CIN2/3 referred on the basis of abnormal cytology. HPV typing was done on cytology and CIN2/3 biopsies. If the whole-tissue section of the biopsy was positive for multiple hrHPV types, LCM-PCR was performed. We found 181 (70%) single and 71 (28%) multiple hrHPV infections in cytology, with 5 (2%) cases HPV-positive only on whole-tissue section PCR. Of cases with multiple cytologic hrHPV infections, 47/71 (66%) showed a single type in CIN2/3 lesions. In total, in 232 of 257 (90%) women with CIN2/3, a single hrHPV type caused CIN2/3. One was nonattributable on the LCM level. The remaining 24 women had 2 or more contiguous or separated lesions, each associated with a single hrHPV infection. The probability of HPV16 being present in CIN2/3, if detected in cytology, was 0.96 (95% confidence interval=0.90-0.98). LCM-PCR confirms that only 9% of histologic CIN2/3 is associated with multiple hrHPV types, much less than cytology would indicate, and each lesion was associated with a single hrHPV infection. PMID:25353286

  4. A nontoxic derivative of lipopolysaccharide increases immune responses to Gardasil HPV vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji Eun; Kim, Hye Kyeong; Park, Shin Ae; Lee, Seung Jae; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Son, Ga Hyun; Kim, Young Tae; Cho, Yang Je; Kim, Hong-Jin; Lee, Na Gyong

    2010-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of cervical cancer, the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. The licensed HPV vaccine Gardasil((R)) from Merck & Co. is a quadrivalent vaccine containing virus-like particles (VLPs) of the L1 proteins from HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18 adsorbed on aluminum salts (alum). CIA07 is an immunostimulatory agent comprised of bacterial DNA fragments (CIA02) and a nontoxic derivative of lipopolysaccharide (CIA05) that has been shown to have antitumor activity and adjuvant activity for viral and bacterial vaccine antigens. We investigated whether these CIAs are capable of promoting the immune response to Gardasil. Balb/c mice were immunized intramuscularly twice three weeks apart with 1/20 human dose of Gardasil alone or in combination with CIA02, CIA05 or both, and immune responses were assessed. The serum anti-HPV16 L1 VLP IgG antibody titer was significantly higher in mice administered CIA05 or CIA05 plus CIA02, but not in those given CIA02, compared with mice given Gardasil alone. A secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP)-based pseudovirus neutralization assay showed increased neutralizing antibody titers in both CIA05 and CIA05 plus CIA02 groups. Coadministration of CIA05 with Gardasil led to a marked increase in serum IgG2a antibody titer and the percentage of interferon (IFN)-gamma(+) cells in the spleen, indicating that CIA05 effectively promotes Th1-type immune responses. These data indicate that CIA05, in synergy with alum, enhances the immune response to HPV L1 VLPs and suggest its potential as an adjuvant for the development of a potent prophylactic HPV vaccine. PMID:19874917

  5. Measurement of Neutralizing Serum Antibodies of Patients Vaccinated with Human Papillomavirus L1 or L2-Based Immunogens Using Furin-Cleaved HPV Pseudovirions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joshua W.; Jagu, Subhashini; Wang, Chenguang; Kitchener, Henry C.; Daayana, Sai; Stern, Peter L.; Pang, Susana; Day, Patricia M.; Huh, Warner K.; Roden, Richard B. S.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies specific for neutralizing epitopes in either Human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid protein L1 or L2 can mediate protection from viral challenge and thus their accurate and sensitive measurement at high throughput is likely informative for monitoring response to prophylactic vaccination. Here we compare measurement of L1 and L2-specific neutralizing antibodies in human sera using the standard Pseudovirion-Based Neutralization Assay (L1-PBNA) with the newer Furin-Cleaved Pseudovirion-Based Neutralization Assay (FC-PBNA), a modification of the L1-PBNA intended to improve sensitivity towards L2-specific neutralizing antibodies without compromising assay of L1-specific responses. For detection of L1-specific neutralizing antibodies in human sera, the FC- PBNA and L1-PBNA assays showed similar sensitivity and a high level of correlation using WHO standard sera (n?=?2), and sera from patients vaccinated with Gardasil (n?=?30) or an experimental human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L1 VLP vaccine (n?=?70). The detection of L1-specific cross-neutralizing antibodies in these sera using pseudovirions of types phylogenetically-related to those targeted by the L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines was also consistent between the two assays. However, for sera from patients (n?=?17) vaccinated with an L2-based immunogen (TA-CIN), the FC-PBNA was more sensitive than the L1-PBNA in detecting L2-specific neutralizing antibodies. Further, the neutralizing antibody titers measured with the FC-PBNA correlated with those determined with the L2-PBNA, another modification of the L1-PBNA that spacio-temporally separates primary and secondary receptor engagement, as well as the protective titers measured using passive transfer studies in the murine genital-challenge model. In sum, the FC-PBNA provided sensitive measurement for both L1 VLP and L2-specific neutralizing antibody in human sera. Vaccination with TA-CIN elicits weak cross-protective antibody in a subset of patients, suggesting the need for an adjuvant. PMID:24999962

  6. HLA-DRB1 Class II antigen level alleles are associated with persistent HPV infection in Mexican women; a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major risk factor for malignant lesions and cervical cancer. A widely studied element in the search for genetic factors influencing risk HPV infection diseases is allelic variation of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus. The study was designed to search for HLA susceptibility alleles contributing to the persistence of HPV infection in Mexican women. Methods A total of 172 subjects were divided into three groups: 1) HPV–persistent patients; 2) HPV–cleared; and 3) HPV–reinfected patients. They were screened for HPV types using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR-sequence specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP) was used for HLA DRB1 and DQB1 typing. Results We observed that HLA-DQB1*0501 allele might be associated with susceptibility of reinfection with HPV (p?=?0.01, OR?=?4.9, CI 95%?=?1.3 -18.7). Allele frequency of HLA-DRB1*14 was particularly reduced in patients with cancer when compared with the HPV–persistent group (p?=?0.04), suggesting that this allele is a possible protective factor for the development of cervical cancer (OR?=?2.98). HLA-DRB1*07 might be associated with viral clearance (p?=?0.04). Conclusions Genetic markers for HPV infection susceptibility are different in each population, in Mexicans several HLA-DQB1 alleles might be associated with an enhanced risk for viral persistence. In contrast, DRB1*14, seems to confer protection against cervical cancer. PMID:24000898

  7. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Sexual behavior of the male partner may be as or more important than a woman's personal sexual behavior in predicting the women's risk of HPV infection and cervical disease. Little is known about the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men largely because of inadequate sample collection for HPV DNA testing and the inconsistencies in where the appropriate site is to sample.

  8. Expressions of E2 and E7-HPV16 proteins in pre-malignant and malignant lesions of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, N; Guerra, F; Camporeale, G; Quintana, S; Diaz, L B; Cuneo, N; Villacorta Hidalgo, J; Tatti, S A; Alonso, L G; Borkosky, S S; Prat Gay, G; Palaoro, L

    2015-12-01

    Continuous production of the E7 protein from different types of high risk human papilloma virus (HPV) is required for progression of malignancy. We developed antibodies against HPV type 16 E7 and E2 proteins to evaluate their utility as markers for diagnosis during early stages of cervical cancer. Forty biopsies from uterine cervices were diagnosed as low grade intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), high grade intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), squamous carcinoma (SC), in situ adenocarcinoma (ISA) and invasive adenocarcinoma (AC), all of which were infected with HPV 16. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expressions of E7 and E2 (both from HPV 16) and p16. P16 was expressed in eight of 12 LSILs, in all HSILs, in 16 of 18 SC and in all ACs. E2 was expressed in six of 12 LSILs. E7 was positive in eight of 12 LSILs and in all HSIL and carcinomas. The expressions of E2 and E7 of HPV16 related to p16 expression confirmed the value of the viral oncogenic proteins as complementary to histology and support the carcinogenic model of the uterine cervix, because HPVDNA integration into cellular DNA implies the destruction of the gene encoding E2, which suppresses the expression of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins. E2 from HPV16 could be marker for LSILs, while E7 could be a marker for progression of LSILs to HSILs in patients infected by HPV16, because viral typing has little positive predictive value. PMID:26052817

  9. Stratification of HPV-Induced Cervical Pathology using the Virally-Encoded Molecular Marker E4 in Combination with p16 or MCM

    E-print Network

    Griffin, Heather; Soneji, Yasmina; Baars, Romy Van; Arora, Rupali; Jenkins, David; van de Sandt, Miekel; Wu, Zhonglin; Quint, Wim; Jach, Robert; Okon, Krzysztof; Huras, Hubert; Singers, Albert; Doorbar, John

    2015-05-08

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types cause cervical lesions of varying severity, ranging from transient productive infections to high-grade neoplasia. Disease stratification requires the examination of lesional pathology, and possibly also...

  10. Simultaneous Characterization of Somatic Events and HPV-18 Integration in a Metastatic Cervical Carcinoma Patient Using DNA and RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Winnie S.; Aldrich, Jessica; Nasser, Sara; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Phillips, Lori; Reiman, Rebecca; McDonald, Jacquelyn; Izatt, Tyler; Christoforides, Alexis; Baker, Angela; Craig, Christine; Egan, Jan B.; Chase, Dana M.; Farley, John H.; Bryce, Alan H.; Stewart, A. Keith; Borad, Mitesh J.; Carpten, John D.; Craig, David W.; Monk, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Integration of carcinogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) into the host genome is a significant tumorigenic factor in specific cancers including cervical carcinoma. Although major strides have been made with respect to HPV diagnosis and prevention, identification and development of efficacious treatments for cervical cancer patients remains a goal and thus requires additional detailed characterization of both somatic events and HPV integration. Given this need, the goal of this study was to use the next generation sequencing to simultaneously evaluate somatic alterations and expression changes in a patient’s cervical squamous carcinoma lesion metastatic to the lung and to detect and analyze HPV infection in the same sample. Materials and Methods We performed tumor and normal exome, tumor and normal shallow whole-genome sequencing, and RNA sequencing of the patient’s lung metastasis. Results We generated over 1.2 billion mapped reads and identified 130 somatic point mutations and indels, 21 genic translocations, 16 coding regions demonstrating copy number changes, and over 36 genes demonstrating altered expression in the tumor (corrected P < 0.05). Sequencing also revealed the HPV type 18 (HPV-18) integration in the metastasis. Using both DNA and RNA reads, we pinpointed 3 major events indicating HPV-18 integration into an intronic region of chromosome 6p25.1 in the patient’s tumor and validated these events with Sanger sequencing. This integration site has not been reported for HPV-18. Conclusions We demonstrate that DNA and RNA sequencing can be used to concurrently characterize somatic alterations and expression changes in a biopsy and delineate HPV integration at base resolution in cervical cancer. Further sequencing will allow us to better understand the molecular basis of cervical cancer pathogenesis. PMID:24418928

  11. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of high risk HPV16 E2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Klucevsek, Kristin; Wertz, Mary; Lucchi, John; Leszczynski, Anna; Moroianu, Junona . E-mail: moroianu@bc.edu

    2007-03-30

    The E2 protein of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) contains an amino-terminal (N) domain, a hinge (H) region and a carboxyl-terminal (C) DNA-binding domain. Using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusions with full length E2 and E2 domains in transfection assays in HeLa cells, we found that the C domain is responsible for the nuclear localization of E2 in vivo, whereas the N and H domains do not contain additional nuclear localization signals (NLSs). Deletion analysis of EGFP-E2 and EGFP-cE2 determined that the C domain contains an {alpha} helix cNLS that overlaps with the DNA-binding region. Mutational analysis revealed that the arginine and lysine residues in this cNLS are essential for nuclear localization of HPV16 E2. Interestingly, these basic amino acid residues are well conserved among the E2 proteins of BPV-1 and some high risk HPV types but not in the low risk HPV types, suggesting that there are differences between the NLSs and corresponding nuclear import pathways between these E2 proteins.

  12. Diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus infection in the clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since the type of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection affects prognosis and subsequent counseling, type-specific testing to distinguish HSV-1 from HSV-2 is always recommended. Although PCR has been the diagnostic standard method for HSV infections of the central nervous system, until now viral culture has been the test of choice for HSV genital infection. However, HSV PCR, with its consistently and substantially higher rate of HSV detection, could replace viral culture as the gold standard for the diagnosis of genital herpes in people with active mucocutaneous lesions, regardless of anatomic location or viral type. Alternatively, antigen detection—an immunofluorescence test or enzyme immunoassay from samples from symptomatic patients--could be employed, but HSV type determination is of importance. Type-specific serology based on glycoprotein G should be used for detecting asymptomatic individuals but widespread screening for HSV antibodies is not recommended. In conclusion, rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis of HSV is now become a necessity, given the difficulty in making the clinical diagnosis of HSV, the growing worldwide prevalence of genital herpes and the availability of effective antiviral therapy. PMID:24885431

  13. Six-Month Incidence and Persistence of Oral HPV Infection in HIV-Negative and HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Mooij, Sofie H.; Speksnijder, Arjen G. C. L.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; King, Audrey J.; Verhagen, Dominique W. M.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Quint, Wim G. V.; Molijn, Anco; de Koning, Maurits N. C.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; van der Loeff, Maarten F. Schim

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to assess incidence and persistence of oral HPV infection in HIV-negative and HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods MSM aged ?18 years were included in Amsterdam (the Netherlands) in 2010–2011, and followed up 6 months later. Participants completed risk factor questionnaires. HPV DNA was analyzed in oral-rinse and gargle specimens using the SPF10-PCR DEIA/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of oral samples was subjected to SPF10 sequencing to identify additional HPV types. Multivariable logistic regression analyses using generalized estimating equations (GEE) were performed to assess determinants for oral high-risk HPV incidence and persistence. Results 689/795 participant MSM provided both baseline and 6-month data. Baseline prevalence of high-risk HPV was 9.4% in HIV-negative and 23.9% in HIV-infected MSM (P<0.001). 56/689 MSM acquired ?1 high-risk HPV infection (6-month incidence 8.1%; 95%CI 6.2–10.4%); incidence was 4.1% in HIV-negative and 14.1% in HIV-infected MSM (P<0.001). HIV infection and recent use of cannabis were both independently associated with high-risk HPV incidence. Persistent high-risk HPV was observed in 48/130 (36.9%) infections. Conclusion Incidence of oral high-risk HPV infection in MSM is substantial, and is associated with HIV infection. Over a third of HPV infections persisted over a 6-month period. PMID:24896848

  14. From HPV-positive towards HPV-driven oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Pawlita, Michael; Holzinger, Dana

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), which is both biologically and clinically distinct from tobacco- and alcohol-related OPSCC, is dramatically increasing. The finding that individuals with HPV-positive local/regionally advanced OPSCC have a significantly better prognosis than their negative counterparts have led to efforts to de-escalate treatment in those patients to avoid serious side effects and to improve their long-term quality of life, while maintaining treatment efficacy. Identifying diagnostic tests that are able to distinguish cancers etiologically associated with HPV is thus becoming a pressing challenge for researchers. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the diagnostic tools presently available to evaluate HPV status in patients with OPSCC and, in particular, to discuss their strengths and weaknesses in identifying those infections that are the real driving force in the oropharyngeal carcinogenesis process. PMID:26547133

  15. Detection of Salivary Human Papilloma Viruses 16 and 18 (HPV) in Smoker Men in an Iranian Population by PCR: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Arbabi-Kalati, Fateme; Nosratzehi, Tahereh; Bameri, Zakaria; Rigi, Fiz Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection of the oropharynx is acquired through a variety of sexual and social forms of transmission. Recent epidemiologic evidence has suggested that HPV may be an independent risk factor for oropharyngeal cancers, but risk factors for persistent HPV infection in the oropharynx are unknown. More evidence is needed regarding the prevalence of oral high-risk HPV among healthy smoker and nonsmoker adults. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare salivary infection with human papilloma virus types 16 and 18 between smokers and nonsmokers. Patients and Methods: A hundred healthy adult subjects were selected from Zahedan dental school for this pilot study. DNA was isolated from saliva samples and screened for high-risk HPV strains of HPV 16 and 18. Then, further processed using Real Time PCR for quantification and confirmation of sensitivity and specificity of the test. Data was analyzed by t-test. Results: There were no high-risk types of virus in patients and no significant differences between the groups (P = 1). Conclusions: It seems that smoking cannot increase the prevalence of high risk HPV 16, 18 in saliva samples. PMID:25632381

  16. Multiple tumors of the female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini, A; Becagli, L; Scrimin, F; Cecchetto, A; Domini, D; Resta, P; De Salvia, D

    1982-01-01

    The increased incidence of multiple primary tumors of genital-breast district has been evaluated, with the possibility of early diagnosis which consent greater survival in cancer patients. We found a particular high incidence of second neoplasia associated with vulval tumors (7.4%). With regard to pathogenetic factors, the oncogenic role of certain treatments is undoubtedly important, especially if they are protracted in time. It is necessary that these patients undergo complete gynecological screening for a time period that is much longer than that held sufficient to consider a patient cured. PMID:7169066

  17. Medicalization of female genital cutting in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Refaat, A

    2009-01-01

    The medicalization of female genital cutting (FGC) has been increasing. This cross-sectional study estimated the determinants of the practice of FGC among Egyptian physicians. Responses from 193 physicians showed that while 88% of them knew at least one adverse physical or sexual consequence, 18% approved of it, mostly as a religious observation (82%). Almost one-fifth (19%) of physicians practised FGC, mostly due to conviction (51%) or for profit (30%). A negative correlation was found between knowledge of the adverse consequences of FGC and both approval and practice. Cultural influences were the highest determinant (81%) followed by lack of knowledge (35%). PMID:20218128

  18. The Emergence of the "s"-Genitive in Danish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perridon, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The -"s" genitives of English and Swedish play an important role in grammaticalization theory, as they are often used as counterexamples to the main tenet of that theory, viz. that grammatical change is unidirectional. In this paper I look at the emergence of the -"s" genitive in Danish, hoping that it may shed some new light on the evolution of…

  19. Can You Get Genital Herpes from a Cold Sore?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this tool to play your goals. Hot Topics Stress & Coping Center Writing a Paper Abusive Relationships Dynamic Stretching A Guy's Guide to Body Image Can You Get Genital Herpes From a Cold Sore? KidsHealth > Teens > Q&A > Birth Control, Pregnancy & STDs > Can You Get Genital Herpes ...

  20. Characterization of human antibody-reactive epitopes encoded by human papillomavirus types 16 and 18.

    PubMed Central

    Jenison, S A; Yu, X P; Valentine, J M; Galloway, D A

    1991-01-01

    We have previously reported that the most common human serum immunoglobulin G antibody reactivities to human papillomavirus type 16 and type 18 (HPV16 and HPV18)-encoded proteins are directed against the minor capsid proteins (HPV16 L2 and HPV18 L2) and to the E7 protein of HPV16 (S. A. Jenison, X.-P. Yu, J. M. Valentine, L. A. Koutsky, A. E. Christiansen, A. M. Beckmann, and D. A. Galloway, J. Infect. Dis. 162:60-69, 1990). In this study, the antibody-reactive segments of the HPV16 E7, HPV16 L2, and HPV18 L2 polypeptides were mapped by using nested sets of deleted recombinant proteins. A single major immunoreactive region was identified in the HPV16 E7 polypeptide between amino acids (aa) 21 and 34 (DLYCYE-QLNDSSEE). In contrast, three distinct immunoreactive regions of the HPV16 L2 polypeptide were present in the segment between aa149 and aa204, and three distinct immunoreactive regions of the HPV18 L2 polypeptide were present in the segment between aa110 and aa211. With the exception of one serum sample, serum immunoglobulin G antibodies which reacted with HPV16 L2 polypeptides or with HPV18 L2 polypeptides were not cross-reactive. Images PMID:1704924

  1. Invited Commentary: Multiple Human Papillomavirus Infections and Type Replacement—Anticipating the Future After Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination with 3 doses of either of 2 commercially available vaccines is highly efficacious in preventing infections with the most carcinogenic types of HPV (HPV 16 and HPV 18) at the cervix and other anatomical sites at which HPV-related cancers develop. Concern has been raised that eradicating the most virulent HPV types, 16 and 18, could result in 1 or more of the types that are not targeted by the vaccine occupying the ecological niche created by the elimination of these types, referred to as type replacement. In this issue of the Journal, Yang et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2014;180(11):1066–1075) report on concurrent infections with multiple HPV types in unvaccinated women who underwent cervical screening in New Mexico (December 2007–April 2009) to identify possible interactions between HPV types, which if present could suggest the possibility of type replacement. Consistent with previous reports, they show minimal type-specific interactions among women with normal cytology, which they consider an indication that type replacement of HPV 16/18 is unlikely to be an issue in the general population postvaccination. Type replacement may be of less concern with the introduction of multivalent vaccines that include most of the carcinogenic HPV types; continued surveillance postvaccination should improve our understanding of the impact of HPV vaccination on type distribution and screening performance. PMID:25355444

  2. Primary Screening for Cervical Cancer Based on High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection and HPV 16 and HPV 18 Genotyping, in Comparison to Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Constantinidis, Theocharis; Constantinidis, Theodoros C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the present study is to assess the performance of a high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) DNA test with individual HPV-16/HPV-18 genotyping as a method for primary cervical cancer screening compared with liquid-based cytology (LBC) in a population of Greek women taking part in routine cervical cancer screening. Methods The study, conducted by the “HEllenic Real life Multicentric cErvical Screening” (HERMES) study group, involved the recruitment of 4,009 women, aged 25–55, who took part in routine cervical screening at nine Gynecology Departments in Greece. At first visit cervical specimens were collected for LBC and HPV testing using the Roche Cobas 4800 system. Women found positive for either cytology or HPV were referred for colposcopy, whereas women negative for both tests will be retested after three years. The study is ongoing and the results of the first screening round are reported herein. Results Valid results for cytology and HPV testing were obtained for 3,993 women. The overall prevalence of HR-HPV was 12.7%, of HPV-16 2.7% and of HPV-18 1.4%. Of those referred for colposcopy, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+) was detected in 41 women (1.07%). At the threshold of CIN2+, cytology [atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) or worse] and HPV testing showed a sensitivity of 53.7% and 100% respectively, without change between age groups. Cytology and HPV testing showed specificity of 96.8% and 90.3% respectively, which was increased in older women (?30) in comparison to younger ones (25–29). Genotyping for HPV16/18 had similar accuracy to cytology for the detection of CIN2+ (sensitivity: 58.5%; specificity 97.5%) as well as for triage to colposcopy (sensitivity: 58.5% vs 53.7% for cytology). Conclusion HPV testing has much better sensitivity than cytology to identify high-grade cervical lesions with slightly lower specificity. HPV testing with individual HPV-16/HPV-18 genotyping could represent a more accurate methodology for primary cervical cancer screening in comparison to liquid-based cytology, especially in older women. PMID:25793281

  3. Copulatory courtship by bushcricket genital titillators revealed by functional morphology, ?CT scanning for 3D reconstruction and female sense structures.

    PubMed

    Wulff, Nadja C; Lehmann, Arne W; Hipsley, Christy A; Lehmann, Gerlind U C

    2015-07-01

    Genitalia are rapidly evolving morphological structures most likely under sexual selection. Due to their internal nature they are often hidden inside the body, thus morpho-functional studies of animal genitalia are broadly lacking. Males of some bushcricket taxa bear paired genital appendices called titillators, the exact function of which is unknown since they are obscured inside the female body during pairing. To investigate titillator morphology and possible function during copulation, we studied the bushcricket Metrioptera roeselii (Hagenbach, 1822) using a novel combination of independent, yet complementary, techniques. Copulating pairs were snap-frozen and scanned by X-ray micro-computed tomography (?CT) to visualize the coupling of male and female genitalia in situ. Video recordings of copulating pairs also showed rhythmical insertion of male titillators into the female's genital chamber, where they percuss a softened structure on the female's subgenital plate. Movements did not induce damage to the female's structure, which lacks any sclerotized genital counterparts. Instead, scanning electron microscopy and histological sections show the female subgenital plate to be covered with two different types of sensory receptors at the contact zone between the male's titillator and the female genital chamber. We interpret the non-harmful function of the titillator processes, the lack of a genital counter-structure and the presence of sensory cells on the female's subgenital plate as indicators of a copulatory courtship function of titillators, subject to sexual selection by female choice. PMID:26014975

  4. Labial hair tourniquet: unusual complication of an unrepaired genital laceration.

    PubMed

    Dua, Anahita; Jamshidi, Ramin; Lal, Dave R

    2013-07-01

    Hair tourniquet syndrome has been recognized as a medical entity since the 1600 s. Appendages develop acute ischemia from tightening of hair strands circumferentially wrapped around them. Most commonly affected sites are fingers, toes, and penis, but limited reports have described involvement of the female genitalia. Although hair strangulation involving the labia minora or clitoris has been described, it typically occurs in young children. We present a case of an adolescent girl with a labial appendage hair tourniquet resulting from a previous unrepaired genital laceration. This is one of the oldest patients in whom a genital hair tourniquet has been reported, as well as description of a posttraumatic genital appendage. Genital hair tourniquets are medical emergencies that require prompt diagnosis and treatment to avoid tissue necrosis and possible amputation. Genital trauma in general requires surgical evaluation. PMID:23823263

  5. Attenuated Recombinant Influenza A Virus Expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 as a Novel Therapeutic Vaccine Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jindra, Christoph; Huber, Bettina; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Wolschek, Markus; Ferko, Boris; Muster, Thomas; Brandt, Sabine; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types, most often HPV16 and HPV18, causes all cervical and most anal cancers, and a subset of vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Two prophylactic virus-like particle (VLPs)-based vaccines, are available that protect against vaccine type-associated persistent infection and associated disease, yet have no therapeutic effect on existing lesions or infections. We have generated recombinant live-attenuated influenza A viruses expressing the HPV16 oncogenes E6 and E7 as experimental immunotherapeutic vaccine candidates. The influenza A virus life cycle lacks DNA intermediates as important safety feature. Different serotypes were generated to ensure efficient prime and boost immunizations. The immune response to vaccination in C57BL/6 mice was characterized by peptide ELISA and IFN-? ELISpot, demonstrating induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine efficacy was analyzed in the murine HPV16-positive TC-1 tumor challenge model. Subcutaneous (s.c.) prime and boost vaccinations of mice with recombinant influenza A serotypes H1N1 and H3N2, followed by challenge with TC-1 cells resulted in complete protection or significantly reduced tumor growth as compared to control animals. In a therapeutic setting, s.c. vaccination of mice with established TC-1 tumors decelerated tumor growth and significantly prolonged survival. Importantly, intralesional vaccine administration induced complete tumor regression in 25% of animals, and significantly reduced tumor growth in 50% of mice. These results suggest recombinant E6E7 influenza viruses as a promising new approach for the development of a therapeutic vaccine against HPV-induced disease. PMID:26381401

  6. Attenuated Recombinant Influenza A Virus Expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 as a Novel Therapeutic Vaccine Approach.

    PubMed

    Jindra, Christoph; Huber, Bettina; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Wolschek, Markus; Ferko, Boris; Muster, Thomas; Brandt, Sabine; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types, most often HPV16 and HPV18, causes all cervical and most anal cancers, and a subset of vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Two prophylactic virus-like particle (VLPs)-based vaccines, are available that protect against vaccine type-associated persistent infection and associated disease, yet have no therapeutic effect on existing lesions or infections. We have generated recombinant live-attenuated influenza A viruses expressing the HPV16 oncogenes E6 and E7 as experimental immunotherapeutic vaccine candidates. The influenza A virus life cycle lacks DNA intermediates as important safety feature. Different serotypes were generated to ensure efficient prime and boost immunizations. The immune response to vaccination in C57BL/6 mice was characterized by peptide ELISA and IFN-? ELISpot, demonstrating induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine efficacy was analyzed in the murine HPV16-positive TC-1 tumor challenge model. Subcutaneous (s.c.) prime and boost vaccinations of mice with recombinant influenza A serotypes H1N1 and H3N2, followed by challenge with TC-1 cells resulted in complete protection or significantly reduced tumor growth as compared to control animals. In a therapeutic setting, s.c. vaccination of mice with established TC-1 tumors decelerated tumor growth and significantly prolonged survival. Importantly, intralesional vaccine administration induced complete tumor regression in 25% of animals, and significantly reduced tumor growth in 50% of mice. These results suggest recombinant E6E7 influenza viruses as a promising new approach for the development of a therapeutic vaccine against HPV-induced disease. PMID:26381401

  7. NGS-based approach to determine the presence of HPV and their sites of integration in human cancer genome

    PubMed Central

    Chandrani, P; Kulkarni, V; Iyer, P; Upadhyay, P; Chaubal, R; Das, P; Mulherkar, R; Singh, R; Dutt, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) accounts for the most common cause of all virus-associated human cancers. Here, we describe the first graphic user interface (GUI)-based automated tool ‘HPVDetector', for non-computational biologists, exclusively for detection and annotation of the HPV genome based on next-generation sequencing data sets. Methods: We developed a custom-made reference genome that comprises of human chromosomes along with annotated genome of 143 HPV types as pseudochromosomes. The tool runs on a dual mode as defined by the user: a ‘quick mode' to identify presence of HPV types and an ‘integration mode' to determine genomic location for the site of integration. The input data can be a paired-end whole-exome, whole-genome or whole-transcriptome data set. The HPVDetector is available in public domain for download: http://www.actrec.gov.in/pi-webpages/AmitDutt/HPVdetector/HPVDetector.html. Results: On the basis of our evaluation of 116 whole-exome, 23 whole-transcriptome and 2 whole-genome data, we were able to identify presence of HPV in 20 exomes and 4 transcriptomes of cervical and head and neck cancer tumour samples. Using the inbuilt annotation module of HPVDetector, we found predominant integration of viral gene E7, a known oncogene, at known 17q21, 3q27, 7q35, Xq28 and novel sites of integration in the human genome. Furthermore, co-infection with high-risk HPVs such as 16 and 31 were found to be mutually exclusive compared with low-risk HPV71. Conclusions: HPVDetector is a simple yet precise and robust tool for detecting HPV from tumour samples using variety of next-generation sequencing platforms including whole genome, whole exome and transcriptome. Two different modes (quick detection and integration mode) along with a GUI widen the usability of HPVDetector for biologists and clinicians with minimal computational knowledge. PMID:25973533

  8. Investigating Diagnostic Problems of CIN 1 and 2 Associated with High-Risk HPV by Combining the Novel Molecular Biomarker PanHPV E4 with P16ink4a

    E-print Network

    van Baars, Romy; Griffin, Heather; Wu, Zhonglin; Soneji, Yasmina Jay; van de Sandt, Miekel; Arora, Rupali; van der Marel, Jacolien; ter Harmsel, Bram; Jach, Robert; Okon, Krzysztof; Huras, Hubert; Jenkins, David; Quint, Wim; Doorbar, John

    2015-06-23

    -affinity synthetic Fabs to E4. Virology 1997; 238: 40-52. 15. Durst M, Glitz D, Schneider A, et al. Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16) gene expression and DNA replication in cervical neoplasia: analysis by in situ hybridization. Virology 1992; 189: 132-140. 16... , function and patterns of expression. Virology 2013; 445: 80-98. 38. Griffin H, Wu Z, Marnane R, et al. E4 antibodies facilitate detection and type-assignment of active HPV infection in cervical disease. PLoS One 2012; 7: e49974. 39. van der Marel J, van...

  9. HPV knowledge, vaccine acceptance, and vaccine series completion among female entertainment and sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia: the Young Women's Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Wadhera, Priya; Evans, Jennifer L; Stein, Ellen; Gandhi, Monica; Couture, Marie-Claude; Sansothy, Neth; Sichan, Keo; Maher, Lisa; Kaldor, John; Page, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) and the causative agent for cervical cancer, a frequently occurring malignant disease among women in developing countries. We assessed HPV awareness prior to the delivery of a brief information and education intervention, and HPV vaccine provision to female entertainment and sex workers (N=220). At baseline, only 23.6% of women had heard of HPV. Following the educational intervention, 90% answered all the HPV knowledge questions correctly. Of 192 participants attending the first quarterly cohort visit where vaccine was offered, 149 (78%) were eligible for vaccination; HIV-positive (n=32) and pregnant (n=11) women were excluded. Acceptance of vaccine among eligible women was universal, and 79.2% completed the three-dose vaccination series. Women who reported use of amphetamine type stimulants (ATS) had significantly and independently lower odds of vaccine completion (Adjusted OR 0.24; 95% CI 0.08, 0.69). New pregnancies also had an impact on vaccine completion: 5.4% (8/149 5.4%) who started the series had to stop due to new pregnancy. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of a simple education intervention designed to increase HPV knowledge and the feasibility of successful HPV vaccine in a population that is often difficult to engage in preventive health care. PMID:25505042

  10. Safety and immunogenicity of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in female Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients aged 12 to 26 years

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Women with SLE have higher rates of persistent human papilloma virus (HPV) infections and precancerous lesions than healthy women. HPV vaccine is safe and effective in healthy females aged 9–26 years. There are limited data on the safety and immunogenicity of HPV vaccine in females with SLE, and none in adolescents with SLE. Our study evaluates the safety and immunogenicity of recombinant quadrivalent HPV vaccine, Gardasil, in adolescents and young women with SLE. Methods This is a prospective, open-label study. Exclusion criteria included disease exacerbation within past 30 days; rituximab or cyclophosphamide within 6 months; pregnancy. Vaccine was administered at months 0, 2, and 6. Physical examination, SLEDAI scores and laboratory studies were performed at months 0, 2, 4, 6 and 7. Each patient’s SLEDAI scores and laboratory profile in the year prior to vaccine administration were used as controls for that patient. Primary outcome measures were change in SLEDAI and mean HPV antibody titers. Results 27 patients, 12 to 26 years, were enrolled; 20 completed the study. Nine had mild/moderate lupus flares. Mean SLEDAI scores decreased from 6.14 pre-vaccination to 4.49 post-vaccination (p?=?0.01). Of 12 patients with lupus nephritis, two experienced worsening renal function during/after the study and progressed to renal failure within 18 months of the study. Both had Class IV lupus nephritis with high chronicity scores (? 8) on renal biopsies performed within one year prior to study entry. Seropositivity post-vaccine was >94% for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18. Conclusions Quadrivalent HPV vaccine seems generally safe and well tolerated in this series of adolescents and young women with SLE, with no increase in mean SLEDAI scores. Progression to renal failure in two patients was most likely secondary to pre-existing severe renal chronicity and not secondary to HPV vaccination. Immunogenicity to the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was excellent, with the seropositivity rate >94% in all four HPV types. PMID:23924237

  11. Systematic review of the cost-effectiveness of the vaccination against HPV in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Allex Jardim; de Lima Ferreira, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, almost 16,000 new cases of cervical cancer (CC), the type of neoplasia that claims the more lives of young women than any other, are expected in 2014. Although the vaccine against HPV has been developed, the application of this strategies to large populations is costly, and its use in Brazil is limited. Studies of the economic implications of new preventive technologies for CC may support rational and evidence-based decisions in public health. A systematic search of articles published between 2000 and 2014 was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Collaboration of Systematic Reviews, and LILACS. The aim of this search was the identification of original articles that evaluated the cost-effectiveness of vaccination against HPV in Brazil. A total of 6 articles are included in this review, evaluating the addition of a vaccine against HPV in comparison to population screening. Although the vaccine against HPV increases the cost of preventing cervical cancer, this new preventive technology presents favorable cost-effectiveness profiles in the case of Brazil. Failure to utilize the newly available preventative technologies against CC can lead to misguided and perverse consequences in a country in which programs based on the Papanicolaou test have been only partially successful. PMID:25483692

  12. Antitumor effect of therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines with chitosan-based nanodelivery systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is the second-most-common cause of malignancies in women worldwide, and the oncogenic activity of the human papilloma virus types (HPV) E7 protein has a crucial role in anogenital tumors. In this study, we have designed a therapeutic vaccine based on chitosan nanodelivery systems to deliver HPV-16 E7 DNA vaccine, considered as a tumor specific antigen for immunotherapy of HPV-associated cervical cancer. We have developed a Nano-chitosan (NCS) as a carrier system for intramuscular administration using a recombinant DNA vaccine expressing HPV-16 E7 (NCS-DNA E7 vaccine). NCS were characterized in vitro for their gene transfection ability. Results The transfection of CS-pEGFP NPs was efficient in CHO cells and the expression of green fluorescent proteins was well observed. In addition, NCS-DNA E7 vaccine induced the strongest E7-specific CD8+ T cell and interferon ? responses in C57BL/6 mice. Mice vaccinated with NCS-DNA E7 vaccine were able to generate potent protective and therapeutic antitumor effects against challenge with E7-expressing tumor cell line, TC-1. Conclusions The strong therapeutic effect induced by the Chitosan-based nanodelivery suggest that nanoparticles may be an efficient carrier to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccination upon intramuscular administration and the platform could be further exploited as a potential cancer vaccine candidate in humans. PMID:25077570

  13. The Need for Cervical Cancer Control in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Women from Romania by Primary Prevention and by Early Detection Using Clinically Validated HPV/DNA Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ursu, Ramona Gabriela; Onofriescu, Mircea; Luca, Alexandru; Prisecariu, Liviu Jany; S?lceanu, Silvia Olivia; Nemescu, Drago?; Iancu, Lumini?a Smaranda

    2015-01-01

    Background In Romania, a country with no organized national surveillance program regarding cervical cancer, the early diagnosis of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) infections is a major requirement, especially in HIV-infected women. The objective of this study was to determine the HPV prevalence and type distribution in young HIV-positive women and to assess the difference in the risk factors for developing cervical cancer compared to those of HIV-negative women. Method We conducted one cross-sectional cohort study from June 2013–September 2014, including 1,032 women: 992 HIV- women who were 36.5 years old (limits: 17 ÷ 84) and 40 HIV + women who were 22.9 years old (limits: 17 ÷ 30) with iatrogenic HIV infected. We detected HPV types with the Linear Array HPV Genotyping test (Roche, Romania). Results DNA/HPV was detected in 18/40 (45%) of the HIV+ patients and in 350/992 (35.2%) of the HIV- patients (OR = 1.5, 95%CI 0.76÷2.96). After age adjustment, the overall HPV prevalence was 51.6% in HIV+ versus 63.2% in HIV- women aged under 25, and 22.2% in HPV+ versus 47.2% in HIV- women aged 25–34. We detect HIV being a risk factor for acquiring multiple HPV type infections (OR = 2.30, 95% CI 0.88÷5.97). The eight most common HPV types (high-risk, and low-risk) for women below age 30, HIV+ / - were: HPV 16, 18, 31, 51, 58, 68, and 6 and 82 respectively. To assess the risk factors of HIV-positive women for acquiring HPV infection, we analyzed the CD4/?L, ARN/HIV copies/?L, the age group, the number of sexual partners, smoking, and the type of HPV infection (single versus multiple infections). We found that the number of sexual partners and smoking are statistically significant risk factors. Conclusion Even though there are no significant differences regarding the prevalence of HPV infection in HIV + versus HIV – patients, multiple infections were more frequent in the first group. In our study group young HIV-infected patients under HAART therapy, high number of sexual partners (more than 3) and smoking were detected to be risk factors. Future organized screening for HPV infection using sensitive and specific methods are necessary at the national level in Romania. PMID:26186361

  14. Female genital mutilations: genito-urinary complications and ethical-legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Vella, Marco; Argo, Antonina; Costanzo, Angela; Tarantino, Lucia; Milone, Livio; Pavone, Carlo

    2015-09-18

    Many women in the world are still undergoing female genital mutilations (FGMs) even if in almost all the countries, the practice of FGM is illegal. The increase of immigration, particularly from African Countries, to Europe, and Italy too, led to consider this phenomenon with particular attention and skill. All the operators in health services need to know the different types of FGMs and the related complications and the psychological and sexual sequels. Urological complications, in particular, are not rare and the changing anatomy of the external genital apparatus can also make the catheter insertion sometimes difficult. This review analyzes the epidemiology of FGMs, the reasons why the practice is still made, the complications, the ethical, and the principal legal aspects of this practise that must be hopefully early banned. PMID:25744709

  15. Genital and urinary tract infections in diabetes: impact of pharmacologically-induced glucosuria.

    PubMed

    Geerlings, Suzanne; Fonseca, Vivian; Castro-Diaz, David; List, James; Parikh, Shamik

    2014-03-01

    Predisposition to genital infections and urinary tract infections (UTIs) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) results from several factors such as glucosuria, adherence of bacteria to the uroepithelium and immune dysfunction. The tendency to develop these infections could be even higher in patients with T2DM treated with the emerging class of sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Studies have shown that pharmacologically-induced glucosuria with SGLT2 inhibitors raises the risk of developing genital infections and, to a relatively lesser extent, UTIs. However, a definitive dose relationship of the incidence of these infections with the SGLT2 doses is not evident in the existing data. Therefore, the precise role of glucosuria as a causative factor for these infections is yet to be fully elucidated. PMID:24529566

  16. Long-term persistence of systemic and mucosal immune response to HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine in preteen/adolescent girls and young women.

    PubMed

    Petäjä, Tiina; Pedersen, Court; Poder, Airi; Strauss, Gitte; Catteau, Gregory; Thomas, Florence; Lehtinen, Matti; Descamps, Dominique

    2011-11-01

    Vaccination against oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types is one key intervention for cervical cancer prevention. This follow-up study assessed the persistence of the systemic and mucosal immune responses together with the safety profile of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered to young women aged 10-25 years. Serum and cervicovaginal secretion (CVS) samples were collected at prespecified time-points during the 48-month follow-up period. Anti-HPV-16/18 antibody levels in serum and CVS were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). At Month 48, all subjects remained seropositive for serum anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies. As previously observed, anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies levels (ELISA Units/mL) were higher in subjects vaccinated at the age of 10-14 years (2862.2 and 940.8) compared to subjects vaccinated at the age of 15-25 years (1186.2 and 469.8). Moreover, anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies in CVS were still detectable for subjects aged 15-25 years (84.1% and 69.7%, respectively). There was a strong correlation between serum and CVS anti-HPV-16 and -18 antibodies levels (correlation coefficients = 0.84 and 0.90 at Month 48, respectively) supporting the hypothesis of transudation or exudation of serum immunoglobulin G antibodies through the cervical epithelium. The HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine had a clinically acceptable safety profile. In conclusion, this follow-up study shows that the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered to preteen/adolescents girls and young women induces long-term systemic and mucosal immune response and has a clinically acceptable safety profile up to 4 years after the first vaccine dose. PMID:21190190

  17. A Review of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and HPV Vaccine-Related Attitudes and Sexual Behaviors among College-Aged Women in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasiripong, Nop T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccine-related attitudes among college-aged women and the relationship between HPV vaccine uptake and subsequent sexual behaviors. Methods: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar searches were performed from 2006, the date after the first HPV vaccine became available, to…

  18. HPV vaccines for circumpolar health: summary of plenary session, “Opportunities for Prevention: Global HPV Vaccine” and “Human Papillomavirus Prevention: The Nordic Experience”

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Eileen F.; Koch, Anders

    2013-01-01

    In this publication, we provide an overview of the presentations, “Opportunities for Prevention: Global HPV Vaccine” and “Human Papillomavirus Prevention: The Nordic Experience” as a part of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, held at Anchorage, Alaska, on August 8, 2012. We provide an overview of HPV, HPV vaccines and policy as well as the Nordic experience with HPV vaccine introduction.

  19. [Symptomatology and treatment of persistent genital arousal disorder. Case report].

    PubMed

    Er?s, Erika; Brockhauser, Ildikó; Pólyán, Edina

    2015-04-01

    Persistent genital arousal disorder is a rare condition among women characterized by unwanted and intrusive sexual arousal that can persist for an extended period of time and unrelated to sexual desire or sexual stimuli. Since its first documentation in 2001, numerous studies have been dedicated to investigate its specifics. The persistent genital arousal occurs in the absence of sexual interest and fantasies and it causes excessive psychological suffering. Masturbation, spontaneous orgasm or sexual intercourse can offer only a temporary relief. Researches provide a limited insight into the characteristics of persistent genital arousal disorder. This paper presents a case and summarizes the scientific findings on prevalence, etiology and treatment perspectives. PMID:25845321

  20. Antiviral immune responses in the genital tract: clues for vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are often exploited as a portal of entry by a wide variety of microorganisms. An advanced understanding has been gained over the past decade of the immune system of the gastrointestinal and the respiratory mucosae. However, despite the fact that many viruses are transmitted sexually through the genital tract, the immune system of the male and female genital mucosae has received much less attention. Here, I describe and highlight differences of the innate and adaptive immune systems of the genital and intestinal mucosae, and discuss the challenges we face in the development of successful vaccines against sexually transmitted viral pathogens. PMID:20829886

  1. Female Genital Mutilation (FGM): Australian Midwives' Knowledge and Attitudes.

    PubMed

    Ogunsiji, Olayide

    2015-11-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a women's health and human rights issue attracting global interest. My purpose in this qualitative study was to report the knowledge and attitudes of Australian midwives toward FGM. Verbatim transcription and thematic analysis of semistructured interviews with 11 midwives resulted in these themes: knowledge of female genital mutilation and attitude toward female genital mutilation. Significant gaps in knowledge about FGM featured prominently. The midwives expressed anger toward FGM and empathy for affected women. Recommendations include increased information on FGM and associated legislation among midwives and other health providers in countries where FGM may be encountered. PMID:25558808

  2. New cervical cancer screening strategy: combined Pap and HPV testing.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xian Wen; Zanotti, Kristine; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda

    2005-02-01

    Our strategy for cervical cancer screeing is being revolutionized by our new understanding of how human papillomavirus (HPV) contributes to carcinogenesis and the natural history of cervical cancer. The American Cancer Society and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists now recommend combined HPV and Papanicolaou (Pap) testing for cervical cancer screening in women age 30 or older. However, although incorporation of HPV DNA testing into primary screening provides clear benefits, it also raises new questions. PMID:15757169

  3. HPV-Associated Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vokes, Everett E; Agrawal, Nishant; Seiwert, Tanguy Y

    2015-12-01

    Over the last two decades, it has been recognized that head and neck cancers, primarily in the oropharynx, can be a distinct entity that is causally related to human papilloma virus (HPV). Fakhry et al. (1) established in 2008 that such tumors have a strikingly better prognosis with improved responsiveness to chemotherapy as well as chemoradiotherapy and favorable survival rates. Since then, new studies have contributed to our increased understanding of this new entity, ranging from a detailed understanding of the genetic fingerprint and risk modifiers such as smoking to successful early attempts to personalize therapy with de-escalation in the definitive intent treatment setting and specific evaluation of targeted therapies in this patient population. This Commentary seeks to summarize the state of the art of our understanding of HPV-associated head and neck cancers that has emerged since the publication of seminal findings by Fakhry et al. PMID:26656751

  4. Oral precancer and the HPV connection.

    PubMed

    DiGangi, Patti

    2014-01-01

    All dental care professionals need to educate themselves and their patients about the relationship between oropharyngeal cancers, HPV, and risk factor management. A risk factor manager is an early interventionist whose tasks are performing diagnostic testing, gathering data, and putting it into a meaningful report for the care providers. Risk factor managers practice on all three levels of prevention, including proactively identifying risks for oral precancer with the hope of changing our dread predictions. PMID:25211989

  5. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    This study seeks to develop sensitive, specific, and inexpensive approaches to cervical cancer screening as alternatives to the traditional Pap test and cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing.

  6. Advancements in Pharmacotherapy for Noncancerous Manifestations of HPV

    PubMed Central

    Kollipara, Ramya; Ekhlassi, Erfon; Downing, Christopher; Guidry, Jacqueline; Lee, Michael; Tyring, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted disease. Via infection of the basal epithelial cells, HPV causes numerous malignancies and noncancerous cutaneous manifestations. Noncancerous cutaneous manifestations of HPV, including common, plantar, plane, and anogenital warts, are among the most common reasons for an office visit. Although there are various therapies available, they are notoriously difficult to treat. HPV treatments can be grouped into destructive (cantharidin, salicylic acid), virucidal (cidofovir, interferon-?), antimitotic (bleomycin, podophyllotoxin, 5-fluorouracil), immunotherapy (Candida antigen, contact allergen immunotherapy, imiquimod) or miscellaneous (trichloroacetic acid, polyphenon E). The mechanism of action, recent efficacy data, safety profile and recommended regimen for each of these treatment modalities is discussed. PMID:26239450

  7. HPV-p53-miR-34a axis in HPV-associated cancers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are known to cause many cancers by altering multiple signalling pathways through their oncogene integration into host genome and expression. Studies have shown that many microRNAs (miRs) may function as oncogenes (called as oncomiRs) to promote an oncogenic effect. MiR-34a among the reported oncomiRs is a key player in the carcinogenesis caused by infection with HPVs. In this mini-review, we summarise the roles of miR-34a in HPV-caused cancers. MiR-34a is transcriptionally regulated by tumour suppressor p53. HPV oncogene E6 inhibits expression of p53 to decrease the levels of miR-34a, leading to the increased expression of multiple genes which are targeted by miR-34a. The upregulation of these genes increases cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration in HPV-associated cancers.

  8. Gavi HPV Programs: Application to Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Celina M.; Eckert, Linda; Bloem, Paul; Cernuschi, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Developing countries disproportionately suffer from the burden of cervical cancer yet lack the resources to establish systematic screening programs that have resulted in significant reductions in morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination provides an opportunity for primary prevention of cervical cancer in low-resource settings through vaccine provision by Gavi The Vaccine Alliance. In addition to the traditional national introduction, countries can apply for a demonstration program to help them make informed decisions for subsequent national introduction. This article summarizes information from approved Gavi HPV demonstration program proposals and preliminary implementation findings. After two rounds of applications, 23 countries have been approved targeting approximately 400,000 girls for vaccination. All countries are proposing primarily school-based strategies with mixed strategies to locate and vaccinate girls not enrolled in school. Experiences to date include: Reaching marginalized girls has been challenging; Strong coordination with the education sector is key and overall acceptance has been high. Initial coverage reports are encouraging but will have to be confirmed in population based coverage surveys that will take place later this year. Experiences from these countries are consistent with existing literature describing other HPV vaccine pilots in low-income settings. PMID:26343194

  9. Unique potential of 4-1BB agonist antibody to promote durable regression of HPV+ tumors when combined with an E6/E7 peptide vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Bartkowiak, Todd; Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Galvan, Gloria; Haria, Dhwani; Ai, Midan; Allison, James P.; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Curran, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody modulation of T-cell coinhibitory (e.g., CTLA-4) or costimulatory (e.g., 4-1BB) receptors promotes clinical responses to a variety of cancers. Therapeutic cancer vaccination, in contrast, has produced limited clinical benefit and no curative therapies. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of human papilloma virus (HPV) drive the majority of genital cancers, and many oropharyngeal tumors. We discovered 15–19 amino acid peptides from HPV-16 E6/E7 for which induction of T-cell immunity correlates with disease-free survival in patients treated for high-grade cervical neoplasia. We report here that intranasal vaccination with these peptides and the adjuvant alpha-galactosylceramide elicits systemic and mucosal T-cell responses leading to reduced HPV+ TC-1 tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice. We hypothesized that the inability of these T cells to fully reject established tumors resulted from suppression in the tumor microenvironment which could be ameliorated through checkpoint modulation. Combining this E6/E7 peptide vaccine with checkpoint blockade produced only modest benefit; however, coadministration with a 4-1BB agonist antibody promoted durable regression of established genital TC-1 tumors. Relative to other therapies tested, this combination of vaccine and ?4-1BB promoted the highest CD8+ versus regulatory FoxP3+ T-cell ratios, elicited 2- to 5-fold higher infiltration by E7-specific CTL, and evoked higher densities of highly cytotoxic TcEO (T cytotoxic Eomesodermin) CD8 (>70-fold) and ThEO (T helper Eomesodermin) CD4 (>17-fold) T cells. These findings have immediate clinical relevance both in terms of the direct clinical utility of the vaccine studied and in illustrating the potential of 4-1BB antibody to convert therapeutic E6/E7 vaccines already in clinical trials into curative therapies. PMID:26351680

  10. Generating HPV specific T helper cells for the treatment of HPV induced malignancies using TCR gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection with high risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is associated with cancer of the cervix, vagina, penis, vulva, anus and some cases of head and neck carcinomas. The HPV derived oncoproteins E6 and E7 are constitutively expressed in tumor cells and therefore potential targets for T cell mediated adoptive immunotherapy. Effective immunotherapy is dependent on the presence of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. However, low precursor frequencies of HPV16 specific T cells in patients and healthy donors hampers routine isolation of these cells for adoptive transfer purposes. An alternative to generate HPV specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells is TCR gene transfer. Methods HPV specific CD4+ T cells were generated using either a MHC class I or MHC class II restricted TCR (from clones A9 and 24.101 respectively) directed against HPV16 antigens. Functional analysis was performed by interferon-? secretion, proliferation and cytokine production assays. Results Introduction of HPV16 specific TCRs into blood derived CD4+ recipient T cells resulted in recognition of the relevant HPV16 epitope as determined by IFN-? secretion. Importantly, we also show recognition of the endogenously processed and HLA-DP1 presented HPV16E6 epitope by 24.101 TCR transgenic CD4+ T cells and recognition of the HLA-A2 presented HPV16E7 epitope by A9 TCR transgenic CD4+ T cells. Conclusion Our data indicate that TCR transfer is feasible as an alternative strategy to generate human HPV16 specific CD4+ T helper cells for the treatment of patients suffering from cervical cancer and other HPV16 induced malignancies. PMID:21892941

  11. HPV-18 E2circumflexE4 chimera: 2 new spliced transcripts and proteins induced by keratinocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Chye Ling; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Lai, Deborah; Carthagena, Laetitia; Wang, Qian; Xue, Yue Zhen; Quek, Ling Shih; Doorbar, John; Bachelerie, Francoise; Thierry, Francoise; Bellanger, Sophie

    2012-07-20

    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E4 is known to be synthesized as an E1circumflexE4 fusion resulting from splice donor and acceptor sites conserved across HPV types. Here we demonstrate the existence of 2 HPV-18 E2circumflexE4 transcripts resulting from 2 splice donor sites in the 5 Prime part of E2, while the splice acceptor site is the one used for E1circumflexE4. Both E2circumflexE4 transcripts are up-regulated by keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and can be detected in clinical samples containing low-grade HPV-18-positive cells from Pap smears. They give rise to two fusion proteins in vitro, E2circumflexE4-S and E2circumflexE4-L. Whereas we could not differentiate E2circumflexE4-S from E1circumflexE4 in vivo, E2circumflexE4-L could be formally identified as a 23 kDa protein in raft cultures in which the corresponding transcript was also found, and in a biopsy from a patient with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia stage I-II (CINI-II) associated with HPV-18, demonstrating the physiological relevance of E2circumflexE4 products.

  12. In silico mechanistic analysis of IRF3 inactivation and high-risk HPV E6 species-dependent drug response

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Masaud; Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Park, Seolhee; Jafri, Syyada Samra; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    The high-risk human papillomavirus E6 (hrHPV E6) protein has been widely studied due to its implication in cervical cancer. In response to viral threat, activated kinases phosphorylate the IRF3 autoinhibitory domain, inducing type1 interferon production. HPV circumvents the antiviral response through the possible E6 interaction with IRF3 and abrogates p53’s apoptotic activity by recruiting E6-associated protein. However, the molecular mechanism of IRF3 inactivation by hrHPV E6 has not yet been delineated. Therefore, we explored this mechanism through in silico examination of protein-protein and protein-ligand docking, binding energy differences, and computational alanine mutagenesis. Our results suggested that the LxxLL motifs of IRF3 binds within the hydrophobic pocket of E6, precluding Ser-patch phosphorylation, necessary for IRF3 activation and interferon induction. This model was further supported by molecular dynamics simulation. Furthermore, protein-ligand docking and drug resistance modeling revealed that the polar patches in the pocket of E6, which are crucial for complex stability and ligand binding, are inconsistent among hrHPV species. Such variabilities pose a risk of treatment failure owing to point mutations that might render drugs ineffective, and allude to multi-drug therapy. Overall, this study reveals a novel perspective of innate immune suppression in HPV infections and suggests a plausible therapeutic intervention. PMID:26289783

  13. Monitoring the T cell response to genital tract infection

    E-print Network

    Starnbach, Michael

    and proliferated in the lymph nodes draining the genital tract after primary intrauterine infection. Activated they migrate into infected tissues. It is also unknown when effector cytokines are produced by Chlamydia

  14. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 protein antagonises an Imiquimod-induced inflammatory pathway in primary human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Richards, Kathryn H; Wasson, Christopher W; Watherston, Oliver; Doble, Rosella; Eric Blair, G; Wittmann, Miriam; Macdonald, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the etiological pathogen of cervical and a number of ano-genital cancers. How HPVs overcome the significant barriers of the skin immune system has been the topic of intensive research. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins have emerged as key players in the deregulation of host innate immune pathways that are required for the recruitment of effector cells of the immune response. Here we demonstrate that E7, and to a lesser extend E6, strongly reduce NF?B activation in response to the inflammatory mediator imiquimod. Moreover, we establish that undifferentiated keratinocytes do not express the putative receptor for imiquimod, TLR7, and as such are stimulated by imiquimod through a novel pathway. Inhibition of imiquimod induced cytokine production required residues in the CR1 and CR3 regions of E7 and resulted in reduced nuclear translocation and acetylation of the p65 sub-unit of NF?B. The results provide further evidence for a TLR7-independent role of imiquimod in the epithelial immune response and reinforce the ability of the HPV oncoproteins to disrupt the innate immune response, which may have important consequences for establishment of a chronic infection. PMID:26268216

  15. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 protein antagonises an Imiquimod-induced inflammatory pathway in primary human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Kathryn H.; Wasson, Christopher W.; Watherston, Oliver; Doble, Rosella; Eric Blair, G.; Wittmann, Miriam; Macdonald, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the etiological pathogen of cervical and a number of ano-genital cancers. How HPVs overcome the significant barriers of the skin immune system has been the topic of intensive research. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins have emerged as key players in the deregulation of host innate immune pathways that are required for the recruitment of effector cells of the immune response. Here we demonstrate that E7, and to a lesser extend E6, strongly reduce NF?B activation in response to the inflammatory mediator imiquimod. Moreover, we establish that undifferentiated keratinocytes do not express the putative receptor for imiquimod, TLR7, and as such are stimulated by imiquimod through a novel pathway. Inhibition of imiquimod induced cytokine production required residues in the CR1 and CR3 regions of E7 and resulted in reduced nuclear translocation and acetylation of the p65 sub-unit of NF?B. The results provide further evidence for a TLR7-independent role of imiquimod in the epithelial immune response and reinforce the ability of the HPV oncoproteins to disrupt the innate immune response, which may have important consequences for establishment of a chronic infection. PMID:26268216

  16. E7 properties of mucosal human papillomavirus types 26, 53 and 66 correlate with their intermediate risk for cervical cancer development

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, Mariam; Touka, Majid; Hasan, Uzma; Bellopede, Angelica; Smet, Anouk; Accardi, Rosita; Gabet, Anne-Sophie; Sylla, Bakary S.; Tommasino, Massimo

    2007-10-10

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that 15 different mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) types of the genus alpha of the HPV phylogetic tree are classified as high risk for cervical cancer development. Three additional HPV types of the same genus, HPV26, 53 and 66, are classified as probable high-risk types. In this study, we have characterized the biological properties of the E7 oncoproteins from these three HPV types. All of the corresponding E7 proteins were able to associate with retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and up-regulated the expression of several positive cell cycle regulators, i.e. CDK2, cyclin A and cylin E. However, HPV26 E7 appears to be more efficient than HPV53 and 66 E7 in up-regulating the transcription of cyclin A. Unlike E7 from the high-risk type HPV16 protein, HPV26, 53 and 66 did not efficiently promote pRb degradation. In addition, E7 from these viruses was able to promote proliferation of primary human keratinocytes and circumvent G1 arrest imposed by overexpression of p16{sup INK4a}, but with less efficiency than the high-risk HPV16 E7. Together, our data show that in vitro properties of these E7 proteins correlate with the epidemiological classification of HPV26, 53 and 66 as HPV types with an intermediate risk for cervical cancer development.

  17. Various hysterosalpingography findings of female genital tuberculosis: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Afzali, Nargess; Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Akhbari, Farnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background: Genital tuberculosis is a chorionic disease and mostly occurs by haematogenous spread from extra genital source like lungs, peritoneum, lymph nodes and bones. Transmission through a sexual intercourse is also possible. Since the majority of patients are in reproductive ages, involvement of fallopian tubes and endometrium cause infertility in patients. Cases: Reviewing 4 cases of female genital tuberculosis, which referred to an infertility treatment center with various symptoms, we encountered various appearances on hysterosalpingography (HSG). Conclusion: The genitourinary tract is the most common site of extra pulmonary TB. The primary focus of genital tuberculosis is fallopian tubes, which are almost always affected bilaterally but not symmetrically. Because of common involvement of fallopian tubes and endometrial cavity, disease causes infertility. Diagnosis is not easy because genital tuberculosis has a wide range of clinical and radiological manifestations with slow growing symptoms. Detailed hysterosalpingography finding may be helpful in better diagnosis of the disease. This case series aims to depict the various hystrosalpingographic appearances and pathology produced by tuberculosis and related literatures are reviewed in order to establish a better diagnostic evaluation of genital tuberculosis. PMID:24639787

  18. The genetic events of HPV-immortalized esophageal epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z Y; Xu, L Y; Chen, X H; Cai, W J; Shen, J; Chen, J Y; Huang, T H; Zeng, Y

    2001-11-01

    We studied cytogenesis, telomere and telomerase, and c-myc, ras, bcl-2, and p53 genes of cells in the progressive process of immortal epithelial cells from embryonic esophagus induced by human papillomavirus (HPV). The SHEE cell line, established by us, consist of immortalized epithelial cells from the embryonic esophagus induced by genes E6E7 of HPV type 18. It was in initial malignant transformation when cultivated over 60 passages without co-carcinogens. Cells of the 10th, 31st, and 60th passages were represented in the progressive process within the immortal period. In these three stages of the cell line, the modal number of chromosome and karyotypes were analyzed. The telomere length was assayed by Southern blot methods, and the telomerase activity was analyzed by hTR and hTERT assay. C-myc, p53, bcl-2, ras genes were assayed by the multi-PCR method. The morphology of the 10th passage cells exhibited good differentiation, the 60th passage cells were relatively poorly differentiated, and the 31st passage cells differentiated in two distinct ways. The growth characteristics of the 31st and 60th passage cells were weakened at contact-inhibition and anchorage-dependent growth. Karyotypes of three cell passages belonged to hyperdiploid and hypotriploid with abnormal chromosomes +1, +3, +7, +9, +17, +18; del(1)(p32); der(4), t(4;?)(q31;?); der(5),t(5;?)(q31;?); der(13),t(13;13)(p11;q11) and others. Bimodal distribution of chromosomes with more aberrant chromosomes appeared in the 31st and 60th passage cells. Telomere length sharply shortened from normal fetal esophagus to the 10th and 31st passage step by step, but was stable from the 31st to the 60th passage and the telomerase activities measured were expressed at late two passages. p53 mutant was positive in three passages, c-myc was positive in the 31st and the 60th passage K-ras only in the last. The results reveal that changes of chromosomes, telomere length, telomerase activity and certain gene expressions are important events of HPV-immortalized esophageal epithelium cells. All of these changes occurred in dynamic progressive process. This cell line may be useful for the elucidation of the genetic mechanism of cellular immortalization. PMID:11605024

  19. Lack of efficacy of AMP against recrudescent genital herpes infections in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser-Smith, E B; Smee, D F; Matthews, T R

    1983-01-01

    AMP was evaluated for its efficacy against herpes simplex virus type 2 genital infections in guinea pigs. Vaginally infected animals were treated twice a day with AMP at 50 mg/kg per dose for 2 weeks. Subcutaneous doses were started 10 weeks postinfection. AMP treatment did not reduce the number of animals with recrudescent episodes when compared with saline-treated controls. In addition, AMP treatment did not reduce either the number of lesions or the duration of the recrudescent episodes which did develop. These results suggest that AMP has no effect on recrudescent herpes simplex virus type 2 vaginal infections. PMID:6685993

  20. Influence of Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide as an adjuvant on the immunogenicity of HPV-16 L1VLP vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Ardestani, Susan Kaboudanian; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Abdoli, Asghar

    2015-04-01

    Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has less toxicity and no pyrogenic properties in comparison with other bacterial LPS. It is a toll-like receptor 4 agonist and has been shown to have the potential use as a vaccine adjuvant. In this study, the immunostimulatory properties of LPS from smooth and rough strains of B. abortus (S19 and RB51) as adjuvants were investigated for the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L1 virus-like particles (L1VLPs) vaccines. C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously three times either with HPV-16 L1VLPs alone, or in combination with smooth LPS (S-LPS), rough LPS (R-LPS), aluminum hydroxide or a mixture of them as adjuvant. The humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring the specific and total IgG levels, and also the T-cell immune response of mice was evaluated by measuring different cytokines such as IFN-?, TNF-?, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17. Results showed that serum anti-HPV16 L1VLP IgG antibody titers was significantly higher in mice immunized with a combination of VLPs and R-LPS or S-LPS compared with other immunized groups. Co-administration of HPV-16 L1VLPs with R-LPS elicited the highest levels of splenocytes cytokines (IFN-?, IL-4, IL-17 and TNF-?) and also effectively induced improvement of a Th1-type cytokine response characterized with a high ratio of IFN-?/IL-10. The data indicate that B. abortus LPS particularly RB51-LPS enhances the immune responses to HPV-16 L1VLPs and suggests its potential as an adjuvant for the development of a potent prophylactic HPV vaccine and other candidate vaccines. PMID:25187406

  1. Preclinical refinements of a broadly protective VLP-based HPV vaccine targeting the minor capsid protein, L2.

    PubMed

    Tumban, Ebenezer; Muttil, Pavan; Escobar, Carolina Andrea A; Peabody, Julianne; Wafula, Denis; Peabody, David S; Chackerian, Bryce

    2015-06-26

    An ideal prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine would provide broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses against all high-risk HPV types, would be effective after a single dose, and would be formulated in such a manner to allow for long-term storage without the necessity for refrigeration. We have developed candidate HPV vaccines consisting of bacteriophage virus-like particles (VLPs) that display a broadly neutralizing epitope derived from the HPV16 minor capsid protein, L2. Immunization with 16L2 VLPs elicited high titer and broadly cross-reactive and cross-neutralizing antibodies against diverse HPV types. In this study we introduce two refinements for our candidate vaccines, with an eye towards enhancing efficacy and clinical applicability in the developing world. First, we assessed the role of antigen dose and boosting on immunogenicity. Mice immunized with 16L2-MS2 VLPs at doses ranging from 2 to 25 ?g with or without alum were highly immunogenic at all doses; alum appeared to have an adjuvant effect at the lowest dose. Although boosting enhanced antibody titers, even a single immunization could elicit strong and long-lasting antibody responses. We also developed a method to enhance vaccine stability. Using a spray dry apparatus and a combination of sugars & an amino acid as protein stabilizers, we generated dry powder vaccine formulations of our L2 VLPs. Spray drying of our L2 VLPs did not affect the integrity or immunogenicity of VLPs upon reconstitution. Spray dried VLPs were stable at room temperature and at 37 °C for over one month and the VLPs were highly immunogenic. Taken together, these enhancements are designed to facilitate implementation of a next-generation VLP-based HPV vaccine which addresses U.S. and global disparities in vaccine affordability and access in rural/remote populations. PMID:26003490

  2. Female genital mutilation: knowledge, attitude and practice among nurses.

    PubMed Central

    Onuh, Sunday O.; Igberase, Gabriel O.; Umeora, Joaness O. U.; Okogbenin, Sylvanus A.; Otoide, Valentine O.; Gharoro, Etedafe P.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female genital mutilation (FGM) and cutting is a subject of global interest, with many countries of the world still practicing it despite efforts by the WHO and other agencies to discourage the practice. The highest known prevalence is in Africa. OBJECTIVES: To determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of FGM among nurses in the ancient metropolis of Benin in a Nigerian state where FGM is illegal. RESULTS: One-hundred-ninety-three nurses in the study hospital were recruited in the study out of which 182 (94.3%) appropriately filled and returned the questionnaires. The average age of respondents was 37 years, and the average duration of postgraduation experience was 14.5 years. Most respondents are of Bini (36.8%) and Esan (34.1%) ethnic origin. All respondents identified at least one form of FGM, but only 12 respondents (6.6%) could correctly identify the four types of FGM. The harmful effects of FGM identified by the majority of respondents include hemorrhage, difficult labor/childbirth, genital tears, infections and scar/keloid formation. Forty-four (24.2%) of respondents were of the opinion that some forms of FGM are harmless. Eighty nurses admitted to having undergone FGM, for a prevalence of 44%. Five respondents (2.8%) view FGM as a good practice and will encourage the practice. Twelve respondents (6.6%) routinely perform FGM out of which seven (58.3%) viewed FGM as a bad practice. Nurses performing FGM routinely were those who had spent >20 years (59%) and 11-20 years (41%) in the profession. Another 26 (14.3%) had performed FGM before, though not on a routine basis. Of this latter group, 15 will perform FGM in the future when faced with certain circumstances. Reasons for FGM practice were mainly cultural. Eight of the respondents would have their daughters circumcised. CONCLUSION: Nurses perceive FGM in Benin as cultural. Almost half have had FGM themselves, and a small percentage recommend it to their daughters. Discouraging FGM practice will require culturally sensitive education of the healthcare providers and the population at large on the ill effects of FGM, including the risk to health and violations of human rights. PMID:16573307

  3. Lineages of Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Types Other Than Type 16 and 18 and Risk for Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Mark; Koutsky, Laura A.; Hughes, James P.; Winer, Rachel L.; Mao, Constance; Hulbert, Ayaka; Lee, Shu-Kuang; Shen, Zhenping; Kiviat, Nancy B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Data on clinical outcomes of infection with variants of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types other than HPV16 and HPV18 are rare. We investigated intratypic variations in non-HPV16/18 oncogenic types and their corresponding relationships with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2–3 (CIN2/3). Methods Study subjects were women who were positive for one or more of 11 non-HPV16/18 oncogenic types. Subjects were followed every six months for two years for detection of HPV and cervical lesions. Variant lineages were defined by sequencing the 3’ part of the long control region and the entire E6/E7 region of HPV genome. Lineage-associated risk of CIN2/3 was assessed using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. Results A total of 4591 type-specific HPV infections among 2667 women were included in the analysis. The increase in risk of CIN2/3 was statistically significant for women with HPV31 A or B compared with C variants, HPV33 A1 compared with B variants, HPV45 A3 or B2 compared with B1 variants, HPV56 B compared with A2 variants, and HPV58 A1 or A3 compared with C variants. For these five types, the adjusted odds ratio associated with CIN2/3 was 2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5 to 2.6) for infections with single-type high-risk (HR) variants, 1.7 (95% CI = 1.0 to 2.7) for infections with two or more types but only one HR variant, and 5.3 (95% CI = 3.1 to 8.4) for infections with HR variants of two or more types as compared with those with single-type non-HR variants. The likelihood of CIN2/3 was similar for women with HPV16 infection and for those with HPV58 A1 variant infection. Conclusions These findings suggest that for a given HPV type, intratypic nucleotide changes may alter phenotypic traits that affect the probability of neoplasia. PMID:25217779

  4. RESEARCH ARTICLE HPV Clearance and the Neglected Role of

    E-print Network

    Durrett, Richard

    of basal stem cells--plays a critical role in the elimination of HPV-infected cell clones. In particular division dynamics of stem cells in the infected tissues. Combining mechanistic mathematical modelsRESEARCH ARTICLE HPV Clearance and the Neglected Role of Stochasticity Marc D. Ryser1 *, Evan R

  5. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Risk for cervical cancer may depend on human papillomavirus (HPV) subtype, viral load in cervical tissue, and the persistence of infection. The risk of cervical cancer due to HPV infection may be modified by an individual's genetics, specifically, a group of alleles that code for the human leukocyte antigen (HLA).

  6. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    This study examines human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and reactivation among older women (born between 1945 and 1964) and the persistence and progression of this infection to cervical cancer. Specifically, investigators propose to assemble a prospective cohort of 1500 racially and socioeconomically diverse women for HPV infection and squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL).

  7. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    In the United States, Hispanic women have significantly higher rates of cervical cancer than non-Hispanic White women. Human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection, is the central cause of invasive cervical and other anogenital cancers, including anal, penile, vaginal and vulvar cancers. Little is known, however, about the prevalence, incidence, and clearance of HPV infection in men.

  8. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Most cases of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection do not progress to cervical cancer. Epidemiologic studies suggest that the variation in progression can be attributed to inherited genetic factors. However, because the genes responsible for this process have not been determined, it is not yet possible to identify which women with HPV infection or preinvasive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) will need treatment.

  9. HPV vaccines and screening: NCI Science Writers' Seminar

    Cancer.gov

    An Oct. 19, 2010, science writers' seminar to discuss new research findings and future directions in HPV-related cancer research.  Among the topics discussed will be the natural history of HPV and related cancers, advances in screening techniques and tool

  10. Perceptions of HPV Vaccine amongst UK University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ellen; Senior, Naomi; Abdullah, Ammar; Brown, Janine; Collings, Suzanne; Racktoo, Sophie; Walpole, Sarah; Zeiton, Moez; Heffernan, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this small-scale focus group study is to explore the impact the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine has on attitudes towards HPV, cervical cancer and sexual risk taking amongst university students in the UK. Design/methodology/approach: Participants were recruited through advertisements placed on notice boards throughout the…

  11. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The progression of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to cervical neoplasia is likely influenced by the immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) induce secretion of cytokines and activation of T cells that may play an important role in cervical immunity to HPV infection.

  12. Oral human papillomavirus type-specific infection in HIV-infected men: a prospective cohort study among men who have sex with men and heterosexual men.

    PubMed

    Darwich, L; Cañadas, M P; Videla, S; Coll, J; Molina-López, R A; Cobarsi, P; Sirera, G; Clotet, B

    2014-09-01

    The natural history of type-specific oral infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) was assessed in a cohort of HIV-infected men (538 men who have sex with men (MSM); 195 heterosexuals). Risk factors associated with oral HPV infections were examined. The overall prevalence of HPV was 16%: HPV-16 was the most prevalent type (3.7% MSM; 7.8% heterosexuals). The prevalence of HPV-16 in heterosexuals was associated with CD4 nadir counts <200 cells/?L (ORadjusted = 3.0, 95% CI, 1.4-6.3). The overall incidence of HPV was similar between groups (11%), but the incidence of HPV-16 was higher in heterosexuals (ORadjusted = 3.2, 95% CI, 1.1-9.5). Not only MSM but also HIV-infected heterosexual men are at risk of HPV infection. Regular and careful oral inspection is needed. PMID:24382308

  13. Egyptian court overturns ban on genital mutilation.

    PubMed

    1997-07-01

    The ban on female genital mutilation (FGM) performed by health professionals in Egypt was overturned by a June 24 [1997] ruling of Judge Abdul Aziz Hamade of a mid-level administrative court in Cairo. The judge determined that the ministerial decree, which had been implemented last July by Health Minister Ismail Sallam, inappropriately restricted the practice of doctors. According to news reports, the court cited research purporting to show that failure to perform FGM harmed children, as well as quotes from Mohammed, which FGM advocates said endorsed the procedure under Islamic law. Although the court overturned the ministerial decree, it did acknowledge that Parliament could outlaw the practice; however, human rights groups believe the practice is too popular for Parliament to do so. The suit against the ban had been filed by Sheik Youssef al-Badry, a conservative Islamic cleric, and Munir Fawzi, a Cairo gynecologist. In May, Egypt's highest court had recommended to the mid-level court that FGM should be legal. The decision does not effect a ban on the performance of surgery by those without a medical license, including barbers and midwives. It is estimated that 80% of girls in Egypt undergo FGM. Egypt's highest Sunni Moslem authority contests the endorsement of FGM under Islamic law. PMID:12292628

  14. Evaluation of an Intervention Providing HPV Vaccine in Schools

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Brenda W.; Panozzo, Catherine A.; Moss, Jennifer L.; Reiter, Paul L.; Whitesell, Dianne H.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To conduct outcome and process evaluations of school-located HPV vaccination clinics in partnership with a local health department. Methods Temporary clinics provided the HPV vaccine to middle school girls in Guilford County, North Carolina, in 2009–2010. Results HPV vaccine initiation was higher among girls attending host schools than satellite schools (6% vs. 1%, OR = 6.56, CI = 3.99–10.78). Of the girls who initiated HPV vaccine, 80% received all 3 doses. Private insurance or federal programs paid for most vaccine doses. Conclusions Lessons learned for creating more effective school-health department partnerships include focusing on host schools and delivering several vaccines to adolescents, not just HPV vaccine alone. PMID:24034684

  15. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution in cervical glandular neoplasias: Results from a European multinational epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Holl, Katsiaryna; Nowakowski, Andrzej M; Powell, Ned; McCluggage, W Glenn; Pirog, Edyta C; Collas De Souza, Sabrina; Tjalma, Wiebren A; Rosenlund, Mats; Fiander, Alison; Castro Sánchez, Maria; Damaskou, Vasileia; Joura, Elmar A; Kirschner, Benny; Koiss, Robert; O'Leary, John; Quint, Wim; Reich, Olaf; Torné, Aureli; Wells, Michael; Rob, Lukas; Kolomiets, Larisa; Molijn, Anco; Savicheva, Alevtina; Shipitsyna, Elena; Rosillon, Dominique; Jenkins, David

    2015-12-15

    Cervical glandular neoplasias (CGN) present a challenge for cervical cancer prevention due to their complex histopathology and difficulties in detecting preinvasive stages with current screening practices. Reports of human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type-distribution in CGN vary, providing uncertain evidence to support prophylactic vaccination and HPV screening. This study [108288/108290] assessed HPV prevalence and type-distribution in women diagnosed with cervical adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS, N = 49), adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC, N = 104), and various adenocarcinoma subtypes (ADC, N = 461) from 17 European countries, using centralised pathology review and sensitive HPV testing. The highest HPV-positivity rates were observed in AIS (93.9%), ASC (85.6%), and usual-type ADC (90.4%), with much lower rates in rarer ADC subtypes (clear-cell: 27.6%; serous: 30.4%; endometrioid: 12.9%; gastric-type: 0%). The most common HPV types were restricted to HPV16/18/45, accounting for 98.3% of all HPV-positive ADC. There were variations in HPV prevalence and ADC type-distribution by country. Age at diagnosis differed by ADC subtype, with usual-type diagnosed in younger women (median: 43 years) compared to rarer subtypes (medians between 57 and 66 years). Moreover, HPV-positive ADC cases were younger than HPV-negative ADC. The six years difference in median age for women with AIS compared to those with usual-type ADC suggests that cytological screening for AIS may be suboptimal. Since the great majority of CGN are HPV16/18/45-positive, the incorporation of prophylactic vaccination and HPV testing in cervical cancer screening are important prevention strategies. Our results suggest that special attention should be given to certain rarer ADC subtypes as most appear to be unrelated to HPV. PMID:26096203

  16. HPV-associated lung cancers: an international pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ragin, Camille; Obikoya-Malomo, Monisola

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the etiologic risk factor for cervical cancer. Some studies have suggested an association with a subset of lung tumors, but the etiologic link has not been firmly established. We performed an international pooled analysis of cross-sectional studies (27 datasets, n = 3249 patients) to evaluate HPV DNA prevalence in lung cancer and to investigate viral presence according to clinical and demographic characteristics. HPV16/18 were the most commonly detected, but with substantial variation in viral prevalence between geographic regions. The highest prevalence of HPV16/18 was observed in South and Central America, followed by Asia, North America and Europe (adjusted prevalence rates = 22, 5, 4 and 3%, respectively). Higher HPV16 prevalence was noted in each geographic region compared with HPV18, except in North America. HPV16/18-positive lung cancer was less likely observed among White race (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.12–0.90), whereas no associations were observed with gender, smoking history, age, histology or stage. Comparisons between tumor and normal lung tissue show that HPV was more likely to be present in lung cancer rather than normal lung tissues (OR = 3.86, 95% CI = 2.87–5.19). Among a subset of patients with HPV16-positive tumors, integration was primarily among female patients (93%, 13/14), while the physical status in male cases (N = 14) was inconsistent. Our findings confirm that HPV DNA is present in a small fraction of lung tumors, with large geographic variations. Further comprehensive analysis is needed to assess whether this association reflects a causal relationship. PMID:24523449

  17. Rationale and design of a community-based double-blind randomized clinical trial of an HPV 16 and 18 vaccine in Guanacaste, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Rodríguez, Ana C; Wacholder, Sholom; Bratti, Concepción; Solomon, Diane; González, Paula; Porras, Carolina; Jiménez, Silvia; Guillen, Diego; Morales, Jorge; Alfaro, Mario; Cyr, Jean; Morrisey, Kerrygrace; Estrada, Yenory; Cortés, Bernal; Morera, Lidia Ana; Freer, Enrique; Schussler, John; Schiller, John; Lowy, Douglas; Schiffman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    We report the rationale, design, methods and details of participation of a community-based, double blind, randomized clinical trial of an HPV 16 and 18 vaccine conducted in two provinces of Costa Rica to investigate the efficacy and population impact of the vaccine in the prevention of cervical cancer precursors. More than 24,000 women between 18 and 25 years of age were invited to participate and pre-screened for eligibility, with recruitment of 7,466 women (30% of those prescreened, 59% of those eligible) who were randomized to receive 3 doses of the HPV vaccine or hepatitis A vaccine as control. A complex protocol of data and specimen collection was applied, including an interview, pelvic exam for sexually active women, blood for serology and cell-mediated immunity, cervical secretions for local immunity and cells for HPV, Chlamydia trachomatis and Gonorrhea testing. Eighty percent of the women received 3 doses, 12.4% two doses and 7.4% one dose. At visits, compliance with data and specimen collection was close to 100%. Baseline characteristics and age-specific prevalence of HPV and cervical neoplasia are reported. Overall prevalence of HPV was high (50%), with 8.3% of women having HPV 16 and 3.2% HPV 18. LSIL was detected in 12.7% of women at baseline and HSIL in 1.9%. Prevalence of Chlamydia was 14.2%. There was very good agreement in HPV detection between clinician-collected and self-collected specimens (89.4% agreement for all types, kappa 0.59). Follow up will continue with yearly or more frequent examinations for at least 4 years for each participant. PMID:18640170

  18. Transnodal Lymphangiography in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Genital Lymphedema

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, F. M. Martinez-Rodrigo, J.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Santos, E.; Forner, I.; Lloret, M.; Perez-Enguix, D.; Garcia-Marcos, R.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To report the success of groin nodal lymphography in the diagnosis and treatment of genital lymphedema. Methods and Materials: We present one female (8 years old [patient no. 1]) and two male (69 and [patient no. 2] 31 years old [patient no. 3], respectively) patients with genital lymphedema in whom conservative treatment failed. The girl also had lymphorrhagia. Genital lymphedema was caused by radical cystectomy (patient no. 2), lymphatic hyperplasia (patient no. 1), and idiopathic lymphangitis (patient no. 3). All of them underwent ultrasound-guided bilateral groin lymph node puncture. Afterward, 4-8 ml Lipiodol Ultra-Fluide (Guerbet) were injected at a rate of 0.2 ml/s. Lipiodol progression was assessed by fluoroscopy. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis was performed immediately after and again at 24 h after the procedure to confirm the leak. The follow-up period was 15, 13, and 9 months, respectively. Technical success was considered as bilateral pelvic and abdominal filling of lymphatic vessels. Therapeutic success was considered as improvement or disappearance of genital lymphedema and/or lymphorrhagia. Results: Lipiodol leak to the scrotum was observed in patients no. 2 and 3. Lymphaticopelvic fistula and genital lymphatic hyperplasia were seen in patient no. 1. Genital lymphedema diminished within 1 week and almost disappeared in two cases (patients no. 1 and 3) or significantly improved (patient no. 2). lymphorrhagia also resolved in patient no. 1. No recurrence or worsening was detected during follow-up. Conclusion: Therapeutic lymphangiography by lymph node injection seems to be effective to treat genital lymphedema. Lymph node puncture lymphangiography is feasible and less cumbersome than pedal lymphangiography.

  19. Lack of effects on fertility and developmental toxicity of a quadrivalent HPV vaccine in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Wise, L David; Wolf, Jayanthi J; Kaplanski, Catherine V; Pauley, Cindy J; Ledwith, Brian J

    2008-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, with approximately half of the HPV-infected people being adolescents and young adults. A recently developed quadrivalent HPV vaccine, GARDASIL((R)), has been shown to be highly effective in the prevention of a number of HPV-mediated diseases. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential effects of the vaccine on female fertility and F1 development, growth, behavior, and reproductive performance. In addition, anti-HPV antibodies in the F0 females and F1 offspring were measured during the study. Two groups of 65 virgin Sprague-Dawley rats were administered two or four intramuscular injections of the vaccine (full human dose of 0.5 mL at 5 and 2 weeks prior to mating, on Gestation Day [GD] 6, and Lactation Day [LD] 7; or GD 6 and LD 7 only). Additional groups of rats were administered phosphate-buffered saline or Merck Aluminum Adjuvant (MAA) at the same four times. All females were mated to males of the same stock. Cesarean sections were performed on 22/group on GD 21, 22/group were allowed to deliver, and remaining females used for blood collections or replacements. F0 female fertility parameters were evaluated. An extensive number of prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal parameters were evaluated in the F1 generation. There were no unscheduled deaths during the study. There was no evidence of toxicity in the F0 females given either MAA or vaccine. There were no effects on the fertility or reproductive performance of the F0 females. There was no evidence of developmental toxicity to the F1 generation, including fetal body weight and morphology, postnatal growth and development, behavior, and reproductive performance. The quadrivalent vaccine induced a specific antibody response to the four HPV types in the F0 female rats following one or multiple injections. Antibodies against all four HPV types were transferred to the F1 generation during gestation and/or lactation, likely via the placenta and milk, respectively. The passively transferred antibodies persisted up to Postnatal Day 77 when they were last measured. These results demonstrate that this quadrivalent HPV vaccine had no detectable adverse effects in either the treated F0 female rats or the F1 generation. PMID:19025783

  20. College Students' Knowledge of the Connection between HPV and Cervical Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applegate, Trent E.; Jones, Iesha K.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated college students' knowledge of the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Few students knew what HPV was. Most of the females who had been screened knew that a Pap smear could detect HPV and cervical cancer. Over half of the students did not realize the link between HPV and cervical cancer. Students…

  1. A Multicountry Evaluation of careHPV Testing, Visual Inspection With Acetic Acid, and Papanicolaou Testing for the Detection of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jeronimo, Jose; Bansil, Pooja; Lim, Jeanette; Peck, Roger; Paul, Proma; Amador, Juan Jose; Mirembe, Florence; Byamugisha, Josaphat; Poli, Usha Rani; Satyanarayana, Labani; Asthana, Smita

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study evaluates the feasibility and performance of careHPV, a novel human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test, when used for screening women for cervical cancer in low-resource settings. Methods and Materials Clinician-collected (cervical) and self-collected (vaginal) careHPV specimens, visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA), and Papanicolaou test were evaluated among 16,951 eligible women in India, Nicaragua, and Uganda. Women with positive screening results received colposcopy and histologic follow-up as indicated. The positivity of each screening method was calculated overall, by site, and age. In addition, the clinical performance of each screening test was determined for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 (CIN2+) and CIN grade 3. Results Moderate or severe dysplasia or cancer (taken together as CIN2+) was diagnosed in 286 women. The positivity rate ranged between 2.4% to 19.6% for vaginal careHPV, 2.9% to 20.2% for cervical careHPV, 5.5% to 34.4% for VIA, and 2.8% to 51.8% for Papanicolaou test. Cervical careHPV was the most sensitive for CIN2+ (81.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 76.5–85.8) and CIN grade 3 (85.3%; 95% CI, 78.6–90.6) at all sites, followed by vaginal careHPV (69.6% and 71.3%, respectively). The sensitivity of VIA ranged from 21.9% to 73.6% and Papanicolaou test from 40.7% to 73.7%. The pooled specificities of cervical careHPV, vaginal careHPV, VIA, and Papanicolaou test were 91.6%, 90.6%, 84.2%, and 87.7%, respectively. Conclusions careHPV performed well in large multicountry demonstration studies conducted in resource-limited settings that have not previously been conducted this type of testing; its sensitivity using cervical samples or vaginal self-collected samples was better than VIA or Papanicolaou test. The feasibility of using careHPV in self-collected vaginal samples opens the possibility of increasing coverage and early detection in resource-constrained areas. PMID:24557438

  2. Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) and HPV 18 antibody responses measured by pseudovirus neutralization and competitive Luminex assays in a two- versus three-dose HPV vaccine trial.

    PubMed

    Krajden, Mel; Cook, Darrel; Yu, Amanda; Chow, Ron; Mei, Wendy; McNeil, Shelly; Money, Deborah; Dionne, Marc; Karunakaran, Karuna P; Palefsky, Joel M; Dobson, Simon; Ogilvie, Gina; Petric, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) and HPV 18 antibody responses in a 2- versus 3-dose HPV vaccine (Gardasil) trial were measured by a pseudovirus neutralizing antibody (PsV NAb) assay and by the Merck competitive Luminex immunoassay (cLIA). Eight hundred twenty-four female subjects assigned to three dosing regimens (group 1, 9 to 13 years old; 2 doses, months 0 and 6 [n = 259]; group 2, 9 to 13 years old; 3 doses, months 0, 2, and 6 [n = 260]; group 3, 16 to 26 years old; 3 doses, months 0, 2, and 6 [n = 305]) had postvaccine responses assessed 1 month after the last dose. Of 791 subjects with baseline and 7-month sera, 15 (1.9%) and 9 (1.1%) were baseline seropositive for HPV 16 and HPV 18, respectively. All baseline-seronegative vaccinees seroconverted to both HPV 16 and HPV 18. Mean anti-HPV 16 levels were similar for groups 1 and 2 (for PsV NAb, P = 0.675; for cLIA, P = 0.874), and levels for both groups 1 and 2 were approximately 2-fold higher than that for group 3 (for PsV NAb and cLIA, P < 0.001). Mean anti-HPV 18 levels were approximately 1.4-fold lower in group 1 than in group 2 (for PsV, NAb P = 0.013; for cLIA, P = 0.001), and levels for both groups 1 and 2 were approximately 2.0- to 2.5-fold higher than that for group 3 (for PsV NAb and cLIA, P < 0.001). Pearson correlation coefficients for the assays were 0.672 for HPV 16 and 0.905 for HPV 18. Most of the discordant results were observed at lower cLIA signals. These results suggest that the PsV NAb assay could be a suitable alternative to cLIA for the measurement of postvaccine antibody responses. PMID:21248158

  3. Detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 gene DNA possibly bound to particulate aluminum adjuvant in the HPV vaccine Gardasil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sin Hang

    2012-12-01

    Medical practitioners in nine countries submitted samples of Gardasil (Merck & Co.) to be tested for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA because they suspected that residual recombinant HPV DNA left in the vaccine might have been a contributing factor leading to some of the unexplained post-vaccination side effects. A total of 16 packages of Gardasil were received from Australia, Bulgaria, France, India, New Zealand, Poland, Russia, Spain and the United States. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method using the MY09/MY11 degenerate primers for initial amplification and the GP5/GP6-based nested PCR primers for the second amplification were used to prepare the template for direct automated cycle DNA sequencing of a hypervariable segment of the HPV L1 gene which is used for manufacturing of the HPV L1 capsid protein by a DNA recombinant technology in vaccine production. Detection of HPV DNA and HPV genotyping of all positive samples were finally validated by BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) analysis of a 45-60 bases sequence of the computer-generated electropherogram. The results showed that all 16 Gardasil samples, each with a different lot number, contained fragments of HPV-11 DNA, or HPV-18 DNA, or a DNA fragment mixture from both genotypes. The detected HPV DNA was found to be firmly bound to the insoluble, proteinase-resistant fraction, presumably of amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate (AAHS) nanoparticles used as adjuvant. The clinical significance of these residual HPV DNA fragments bound to a particulate mineral-based adjuvant is uncertain after intramuscular injection, and requires further investigation for vaccination safety. PMID:23078778

  4. The clinical impact of HPV tumor status upon head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Eleni; Li, Ryan; Eisele, David; Fakhry, Carole

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human papillomavirus (HPV) is etiologically responsible for a distinct subset of head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCCs). HPV-positive HNSCCs (HPV-HNSCCs) most commonly arise from the oropharynx and are responsible for the increasing incidence of oropharyngeal SCC (OSCC) in the United States (US) and abroad. HPV-positive OSCC (HPV-OSCC) has a unique demographic and risk factor profile and tumor biology. HPV-OSCC patients tend to be white, younger, and have a higher cumulative exposure to sexual behaviors as compared with HPV-negative OSCC patients. HPV-positive tumor status also significantly improves survival, and is indeed the single strongest prognostic factor for OSCC. The mechanisms that underlie the improved prognosis conferred by HPV-positive disease are unknown. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical impact of HPV status in HNSCC, particularly in OSCC, both in terms of the unique clinic-demographic profile and prognostic implications. PMID:24134947

  5. Female Genital Mutilation in Sierra Leone: Forms, Reliability of Reported Status, and Accuracy of Related Demographic and Health Survey Questions

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Donald S.; Berggren, Vanja

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine forms of female genital mutilation (FGM), assess consistency between self-reported and observed FGM status, and assess the accuracy of Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) FGM questions in Sierra Leone. Methods. This cross-sectional study, conducted between October 2010 and April 2012, enrolled 558 females aged 12–47 from eleven antenatal clinics in northeast Sierra Leone. Data on demography, FGM status, and self-reported anatomical descriptions were collected. Genital inspection confirmed the occurrence and extent of cutting. Results. All participants reported FGM status; 4 refused genital inspection. Using the WHO classification of FGM, 31.7% had type Ib; 64.1% type IIb; and 4.2% type IIc. There was a high level of agreement between reported and observed FGM prevalence (81.2% and 81.4%, resp.). There was no correlation between DHS FGM responses and anatomic extent of cutting, as 2.7% reported pricking; 87.1% flesh removal; and 1.1% that genitalia was sewn closed. Conclusion. Types I and II are the main forms of FGM, with labia majora alterations in almost 5% of cases. Self-reports on FGM status could serve as a proxy measurement for FGM prevalence but not for FGM type. The DHS FGM questions are inaccurate for determining cutting extent. PMID:24204384

  6. Stopping female genital mutilation. An update.

    PubMed

    Gamble, A

    1995-01-01

    There is widespread consensus among many individuals, countries, and organizations that female genital mutilation (FGM) is a human rights abuse. France, Britain, Sweden, and Switzerland have passed legislation forbidding medical personnel from performing FGM, eighteen African countries have made official statements against FGM, and FGM was an issue in the 1993 World Health Assembly, the 1993 World Human Rights Conference, and the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. True change, however, depends upon a transformation in the informal economic, social, and political structures which perpetuate women's dependency upon marriage and men. The Research Action Information Network for the Bodily Integrity of Women (RAINBOW) and the Development Law and Policy Unit of the Columbia University School of Public Health introduced the Global Action Against FGM (GAAFGM) Project in June 1994. The project is designed to integrate action against FGM into existing health and human rights programs and to pool available resources against FGM. GAAFGM has also coordinated an interagency working group comprised of international agencies, in-country grassroots organizations, and women's groups, which met for the first time in November 1994. The project should provide considerable information and leadership on the issue. On another front, participants in the most recent preparatory meeting for the upcoming Beijing Conference noted the existence of a strong recognition that FGM is a problem upon which the international community should act. The author notes recent litigation brought by the Egyptian Organization for Human Rights against the grand sheik of Al-Azhar University for issuing a fatwa declaring female circumcision an Islamic duty. In addition, a Ghanaian may be granted refugee status in Canada on the basis of her efforts to avoid mutilation if deported to her country of origin. PMID:12346850

  7. Hysterosalpingographic Appearances of Female Genital Tract Tuberculosis: Part II: Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Zafarani, Fatemeh; Shahrzad, Gholam Shahrzad

    2014-01-01

    Female genital tuberculosis remains as a major cause of tubal obstruction leading to infertility, especially in developing countries. The global prevalence of genital tuberculosis has increased during the past two decades due to increasing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Genital tuberculosis (TB) is commonly asymptomatic and it is diagnosed during infertility investigations. Despite of recent advances in imaging tools such as computed tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasongraphy, hysterosalpinography has been considered as the standard screening test for evaluation of tubal infertility and as a valuable tool for diagnosis of female genital tuberculosis. Tuberculosis gives rise to various appearances on hysterosalpingography (HSG) from non-specific changes to specific findings. The present pictorial review illustrates and describes specific and non-specific radiographic features of female genital tuberculosis in two parts. Part I presents specific findings of tuberculosis related to tubes such as "beaded tube", "golf club tube", "pipestem tube", "cobble stone tube" and the "leopard skin tube". Part II will describe adverse effects of tuberculosis on structure of endometrium and radiological specific findings, such as "T-shaped" tuberculosis uterus, "pseudo-unicornuate "uterus, "collar-stud abscess" and "dwarfed" uterus with lymphatic intravasation and occluded tubes which have not been encountered in the majority of non-tuberculosis cases. PMID:24696765

  8. TMEM16A/ANO1 is differentially expressed in HPV-negative versus HPV-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma through promoter methylation.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Ronak; Kemp, Carolyn; Kulich, Scott; Seethala, Raja; Chiosea, Simion; Ling, Shizhang; Ha, Patrick K; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has a variety of causes. Recently, the human papilloma virus (HPV) has been implicated in the rising incidence of oropharyngeal cancer and has led to variety of studies exploring the differences between HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC. The calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A is overexpressed in a variety of cancers, including HNSCC, but whether or not it plays different roles in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that TMEM16A is preferentially overexpressed in HPV-negative HNSCC and that this overexpression of TMEM16A is associated with decreased patient survival. We also show that TMEM16A expression is decreased in HPV-positive HNSCC at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels in patient samples as well as cell lines. We demonstrate that the lower levels of TMEM16A expression in HPV-positive tumors can be attributed to both a combination of copy number alteration and promoter methylation at the DNA level. Additionally, our cellular data show that HPV-negative cell lines are more dependent on TMEM16A for survival than HPV-positive cell lines. Therefore, we suspect that the down-regulation of TMEM16A in HPV-positive HNSCC makes TMEM16A a poor therapeutic target in HPV-positive HNSCC, but a potentially useful target in HPV-negative HNSCC. PMID:26563938

  9. TMEM16A/ANO1 is differentially expressed in HPV-negative versus HPV-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma through promoter methylation

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Ronak; Kemp, Carolyn; Kulich, Scott; Seethala, Raja; Chiosea, Simion; Ling, Shizhang; Ha, Patrick K.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has a variety of causes. Recently, the human papilloma virus (HPV) has been implicated in the rising incidence of oropharyngeal cancer and has led to variety of studies exploring the differences between HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC. The calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A is overexpressed in a variety of cancers, including HNSCC, but whether or not it plays different roles in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that TMEM16A is preferentially overexpressed in HPV-negative HNSCC and that this overexpression of TMEM16A is associated with decreased patient survival. We also show that TMEM16A expression is decreased in HPV-positive HNSCC at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels in patient samples as well as cell lines. We demonstrate that the lower levels of TMEM16A expression in HPV-positive tumors can be attributed to both a combination of copy number alteration and promoter methylation at the DNA level. Additionally, our cellular data show that HPV-negative cell lines are more dependent on TMEM16A for survival than HPV-positive cell lines. Therefore, we suspect that the down-regulation of TMEM16A in HPV-positive HNSCC makes TMEM16A a poor therapeutic target in HPV-positive HNSCC, but a potentially useful target in HPV-negative HNSCC. PMID:26563938

  10. Barriers and Facilitators to HPV Vaccination: Perspectives from Malawian Women

    PubMed Central

    Ports, Katie A.; Reddy, Diane M.; Rameshbabu, Anjali

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to elucidate potential barriers and facilitators to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in Malawi, a sub-Saharan country. In Malawi, approximately 31 out of every 100,000 women develop cervical cancer annually, and 80% of those affected die from this malignancy. HPV vaccination may provide a feasible strategy for cervical cancer prevention in Malawi. However, important questions and concerns regarding cervical cancer and HPV vaccination acceptance among individuals and their communities must be considered prior to vaccine delivery. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 Malawian mothers aged 18–49 years from Chiradzulu District. Women’s knowledge and beliefs about HPV, cervical cancer, and vaccination, and their social-ecological contexts were explored in-depth. Thematic analyses revealed that despite women’s limited knowledge, cervical cancer was perceived to be a serious disease. Participants believed that as women, they were responsible for their children’s health. Women unanimously reported that they would vaccinate their children against HPV, especially if a health professional recommended it. Malawi’s health care infrastructure could present challenges to HPV vaccine programs; however, participants did not typically report this to be a barrier to vaccination. These data shed light on factors that may influence HPV vaccination acceptance and uptake in Malawi. PMID:23937733

  11. Factors associated with HPV vaccination among adult women in Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Kiely, Marilou; Sauvageau, Chantal; Dubé, Ève; Deceuninck, Geneviève; De Wals, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are the most common sexually transmitted infections in North America and are associated with cervical cancer. A publicly-funded HPV immunization program was launched in the province of Quebec, Canada, in the fall of 2008. The aim of this study was to explore factors associated with HPV immunization among young adult women not targeted by this program. Methods: A questionnaire was mailed to 2400 24-y-old women randomly selected from the Quebec provincial health insurance database and 56% responded. Factors associated with vaccination status were analyzed using a multivariate logistic regression model. Results: Few women had received at least one dose of HPV vaccine among the 1347 respondents. Age at first sexual intercourse ? 20 y, participating in cervical cancer screening, higher education level, being born in Quebec and some positive beliefs about HPV were associated with vaccination. Conclusions: The rate of immunization in women who had to pay for the HPV vaccine was very low and was associated with characteristics that are generally associated with a lower risk for HPV infection and cervical cancer. Efforts are needed to reach at-risk adult women. PMID:23571165

  12. Public knowledge and attitudes towards Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Charlotte Devereaux; Gera, Aradhana; Shah, Meeraj; Sharma, Amit; Powell, Judy E; Wilson, Sue

    2008-01-01

    Background Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine has undergone successful trials and has recently been approved for use for the primary prevention of cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to determine knowledge and attitudes towards HPV vaccination. Methods Semi-structured interview and questionnaire delivered in a street survey. Standardised HPV-related statements used to measure HPV knowledge and attitudes to vaccination. The setting was three different areas of Birmingham, to target a mix of social class and ethnicity. The sample population was composed of 16–54 year olds. Results A total of 420 participants were recruited. Poor knowledge of HPV and its links with cervical cancer were observed. 81% had a knowledge score of zero. Knowledge about HPV was associated with different ethnic group and socio-economic group. The majority (88%) of participants were in favour of vaccination, with 83.6% indicating that they would allow a child under their care to be vaccinated. Conclusion Initial responses to the proposed HPV vaccination within the UK public are favourable. However, knowledge levels are poor and media and health professional promotion are required to raise awareness. PMID:18947430

  13. Early Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Oncogenic Influences in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, Christopher; Lawson, James S.; Clay, Rosemary; Delprado, Warick; Whitaker, Noel J.; Glenn, Wendy K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may act early in breast oncogenesis (“hit-and-run” phenomena). METHODS The authors used immunohistochemistry for the identification of HPV E7 oncogenic protein expression in 32 sets of benign and subsequent breast cancer specimens from the same Australian patients. RESULTS HPV E7 oncoprotein was clearly expressed in the nuclei of 23 (72%) of the 32 benign specimens and 20 (62.5%) of the subsequent 32 breast cancer specimens in the same patients. There was no HPV E7 protein expression in seven (30%) of the 23 breast cancer specimens that had prior HPV E7 protein-positive benign breast biopsies in the same patients. CONCLUSIONS This observation suggests that HPV oncogenic influences occur early in some breast cancers. This finding confirms the previous observations. This early influence of HPVs may be the reason why there is no increase in the prevalence of HPV-associated breast cancer in immunocompromised patients as compared to HPV-associated cervical cancer. PMID:26691275

  14. Nasal and skin delivery of IC31(®)-adjuvanted recombinant HSV-2 gD protein confers protection against genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Wizel, Benjamin; Persson, Josefine; Thörn, Karolina; Nagy, Eszter; Harandi, Ali M

    2012-06-19

    Genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) remains the leading cause of genital ulcers worldwide. Given the disappointing results of the recent genital herpes vaccine trials in humans, development of novel vaccine strategies capable of eliciting protective mucosal and systemic immune responses to HSV-2 is urgently required. Here we tested the ability of the adjuvant IC31(®) in combination with HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) used through intranasal (i.n.), intradermal (i.d.), or subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization routes for induction of protective immunity against genital herpes infection in C57BL/6 mice. Immunization with gD plus IC31(®) through all three routes of immunization developed elevated gD-specific serum antibody responses with HSV-2 neutralizing activity. Whereas the skin routes promoted the induction of a mixed IgG2c/IgG1 isotype profile, the i.n. route only elicited IgG1 antibodies. All immunization routes were able to induce gD-specific IgG antibody responses in the vaginas of mice immunized with IC31(®)-adjuvanted gD. Although specific lymphoproliferative responses were observed in splenocytes from mice of most groups vaccinated with IC31(®)-adjuvanted gD, only i.d. immunization resulted in a significant splenic IFN-? response. Further, immunization with gD plus IC31(®) conferred 80-100% protection against an otherwise lethal vaginal HSV-2 challenge with amelioration of viral replication and disease severity in the vagina. These results warrant further exploration of IC31(®) for induction of protective immunity against genital herpes and other sexually transmitted infections. PMID:22682292

  15. GATA3 Is a Sensitive and Specific Marker of Benign and Malignant Mesonephric Lesions in the Lower Female Genital Tract.

    PubMed

    Howitt, Brooke E; Emori, Megan M; Drapkin, Ronny; Gaspar, Cynthia; Barletta, Justine A; Nucci, Marisa R; McCluggage, W Glenn; Oliva, Esther; Hirsch, Michelle S

    2015-10-01

    GATA3 is a transcription factor critical for embryogenesis, development, and cell differentiation. Recent studies have suggested that GATA3 is a sensitive and relatively specific biomarker for urothelial and breast carcinomas, with most Müllerian carcinomas being negative. We investigated GATA3 expression in mesonephric/Wolffian remnants and tumors in the female genital tract. A western blot was performed to assess specificity for the GATA3 antibody. GATA3 immunohistochemistry was performed on 59 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded mesonephric samples, including 17 mesonephric remnants (MR; 11 cervical and 6 fallopian tube), 15 mesonephric hyperplasias, 21 mesonephric carcinomas, and 6 female adnexal tumors of probable Wolffian origin. Thirty conventional endocervical adenocarcinomas (ENDO-CA), 9 gastric-type cervical adenocarcinomas, and 165 endometrial adenocarcinomas (EM-CA) were also evaluated. GATA3 nuclear intensity and extent of staining was evaluated. The western blot revealed GATA3 expression in seminal vesicle and cell lines derived from breast and urothelial carcinomas, but not in other cell lines including ovarian, cervical, and endometrial cancers. All cervical MRs and mesonephric hyperplasias, 5/6 (83%) fallopian tube MRs, and 20/21 (95%) mesonephric carcinomas were GATA3 positive, although with great variability in both intensity (weak to strong) and extent (1+ to 3+) of staining. Only 1/6 (17%) female adnexal tumors of probable Wolffian origin showed weak multifocal staining. One of 30 (3%) usual-type ENDO-CAs and 3/165 EM-CAs exhibited weak-moderate GATA3 immunoreactivity; all gastric-type cervical adenocarcinomas were negative. GATA3 is a highly sensitive and specific marker for mesonephric lesions in the lower genital tract; however, its utility in the upper genital tract may be more limited. In addition, GATA3 can aid in distinguishing lower genital mesonephric lesions from usual-type and gastric-type ENDO-CAs and uterine EM-CAs. PMID:26135559

  16. Cervicovaginal bacteria are a major modulator of host inflammatory responses in the female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Anahtar, Melis N; Byrne, Elizabeth H; Doherty, Kathleen E; Bowman, Brittany A; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Soumillon, Magali; Padavattan, Nikita; Ismail, Nasreen; Moodley, Amber; Sabatini, Mary E; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Nusbaum, Chad; Huttenhower, Curtis; Virgin, Herbert W; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Dong, Krista L; Walker, Bruce D; Fichorova, Raina N; Kwon, Douglas S

    2015-05-19

    Colonization by Lactobacillus in the female genital tract is thought to be critical for maintaining genital health. However, little is known about how genital microbiota influence host immune function and modulate disease susceptibility. We studied a cohort of asymptomatic young South African women and found that the majority of participants had genital communities with low Lactobacillus abundance and high ecological diversity. High-diversity communities strongly correlated with genital pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Transcriptional profiling suggested that genital antigen-presenting cells sense gram-negative bacterial products in situ via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling, contributing to genital inflammation through activation of the NF-?B signaling pathway and recruitment of lymphocytes by chemokine production. Our study proposes a mechanism by which cervicovaginal microbiota impact genital inflammation and thereby might affect a woman's reproductive health, including her risk of acquiring HIV. PMID:25992865

  17. Antigen-Specific CD8 T Cells Respond to Chlamydia trachomatis in the Genital Mucosa1

    E-print Network

    Starnbach, Michael

    T cells proliferated in lymph nodes draining the genital tract in response to genital infection with C. trachomatis. Furthermore, we found that these cells acquired the ability to produce IFN- and migrated

  18. Genital Appearance Dissatisfaction: Implications for Women’s Genital Image Self-Consciousness, Sexual Esteem, Sexual Satisfaction, and Sexual Risk

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Vanessa R.; Calabrese, Sarah K.; Rima, Brandi N.; Zucker, Alyssa N.

    2010-01-01

    Findings regarding the link between body image and sexuality have been equivocal, possibly because of the insensitivity of many of body image measures to potential variability across sensory aspects of the body (e.g., appearance versus odor), individual body parts (e.g., genitalia versus thighs), and social settings (e.g., public versus intimate). The current study refined existing methods of evaluating women’s body image in the context of sexuality by focusing upon two highly specified dimensions: satisfaction with the visual appearance of the genitalia and self-consciousness about the genitalia during a sexual encounter. Genital appearance dissatisfaction, genital image self-consciousness, and multiple facets of sexuality were examined with a sample of 217 undergraduate women using an online survey. Path analysis revealed that greater dissatisfaction with genital appearance was associated with higher genital image self-consciousness during physical intimacy, which, in turn, was associated with lower sexual esteem, sexual satisfaction, and motivation to avoid risky sexual behavior. These findings underscore the detrimental impact of negative genital perceptions on young women’s sexual wellbeing, which is of particular concern given their vulnerability at this stage of sexual development as well as the high rates of sexually transmitted infections within this age group. Interventions that enhance satisfaction with the natural appearance of their genitalia could facilitate the development of a healthy sexual self-concept and provide long-term benefits in terms of sexual safety and satisfaction. PMID:20824180

  19. Xenobiotic Transporter Expression along the Male Genital Tract1

    PubMed Central

    Klein, David M.; Wright, Stephen H.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2015-01-01

    The male genital tract plays an important role in protecting sperm by forming a distinct compartment separate from the body which limits exposure to potentially toxic substrates. Transporters along this tract can influence the distribution of xenobiotics into the male genital tract through efflux back into the blood or facilitating the accumulation of toxicants. The aim of this study was to quantitatively determine the constitutive mRNA expression of 30 xenobiotic transporters in caput and cauda regions of the epididymis, vas deferens, prostate, and seminal vesicles from adult Sprague-Dawley rats. The epididymis was found to express at least moderate levels of 18 transporters, vas deferens 15, seminal vesicles 23, and prostate 18. Constitutive expression of these xenobiotic transporters in the male genital tract may provide insight into the xenobiotics that can potentially be transported into these tissues and may provide the molecular mechanism for site specific toxicity of select agents. PMID:24814985

  20. Mucosal Immunity in the Female Genital Tract, HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Reis Machado, Juliana; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; Antônia dos Reis, Marlene; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes; Rosa Miranda Corrêa, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal immunity consists of innate and adaptive immune responses which can be influenced by systemic immunity. Despite having been the subject of intensive studies, it is not fully elucidated what exactly occurs after HIV contact with the female genital tract mucosa. The sexual route is the main route of HIV transmission, with an increased risk of infection in women compared to men. Several characteristics of the female genital tract make it suitable for inoculation, establishment of infection, and systemic spread of the virus, which causes local changes that may favor the development of infections by other pathogens, often called sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The relationship of these STDs with HIV infection has been widely studied. Here we review the characteristics of mucosal immunity of the female genital tract, its alterations due to HIV/AIDS, and the characteristics of coinfections between HIV/AIDS and the most prevalent STDs. PMID:25313360

  1. Microbial diseases of the genital system of rams or bucks.

    PubMed

    Gouletsou, P G; Fthenakis, G C

    2015-12-14

    Objective of the present paper is to review microbial diseases of the genital system of male small ruminants. The paper reviews the infections and the diseases by taking an organ approach within the genital system, whilst relevant health management actions are also discussed. Diseases of the genital organs of male small ruminants include orchitis, of bacterial or viral aetiology, epididymitis, primarily caused by Brucella ovis, by other bacteria as well (e.g., Actinobacillus seminis, Haemophilus somni), infections of the accessory glands, orf, other infections of the penis or prepuce and infections of the scrotum. The health management of rams/bucks include the appropriate diagnostic investigations, the relevant therapeutic approaches and, finally, the preventive measures. PMID:26209019

  2. [Female genital mutilations, forced marriages, and early pregnancies].

    PubMed

    Henrion, Roger

    2003-01-01

    Female genital mutilations, as well as forcible childhood marriage and their correlate adolescent pregnancies are traditional practices which, not only violate the dignity, but also jeopardize the health, and even the life, of women and their children. The complications of genital mutilations are frequent for a number of reasons: the fact that the clitoris is highly vascularized, the nature of the mutilations, excision or infibulation, and the poor conditions of hygiene. The short term complications are pain, hemorrhage, shock, and urinary retention. Medium term complications include gangrene, septicemia, tetanus, pelvic inflammatory disease, HIV/AIDS, and hepatitis B or C infections. Serious sequelae may occur, including infertility and gynecologic disorders, and sexual life is invariably altered. The main obstetrical complications of genital mutilations are genital lacerations involving the labia minor and the perineum, which can lead to hemorrhage and sequelae such as urinary or anal incontinence, recto-vaginal and vesico-vaginal fistulas. The role of doctors, which is delicate because these customs are entrenched, is to detect genital mutilations, repair them and prevent them, by participating in health education programs. The consequences of forcible childhood marriage are serious, besides the fact that this is a disguised form of rape. The obstetrical risks favored by the underdevelopment of the uterus and the pelvis, include uterine rupture, preeclampsia and eclampsia, and obstetrical hemorrhage. The fetus/neonate are jeopardized by these complications, which can result in perinatal asphyxia and death, as well as the high rates of intrauterine growth retardation and preterm delivery. The impact of genital mutilations on delivery are compounded in childhood pregnancies for anatomical reasons, but also because these adolescents or children are extremely vulnerable and have poor access to perinatal care. In France, as well as in Africa, non-governmental and women's rights organizations are active in preventing these practices. We strongly recommend that these groups should receive aid and encouragement. PMID:14978867

  3. Epidemiology of genital Chlamydia trachomatis in England and Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Simms, I; Catchpole, M; Brugha, R; Rogers, P; Mallinson, H; Nicoll, A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the recent epidemiology of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection in England and Wales. DESIGN: Retrospective study of routinely available surveillance datasets and ad hoc prevalence studies. METHODS: Numbers of new cases of genital C trachomatis infection, obtained from the Department of Health and Welsh Office, were combined with the estimated mid-year resident population of England and Wales. Rates were analysed for trend over time using a log linear age period model in GLIM4. Ad hoc prevalence and case finding studies carried out over the past 20 years were critically assessed in terms of study design and testing methodologies. RESULTS: Attendance rates at genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics were higher for women than men over the period 1989 to 1994 as were the number of laboratory reports. The highest rate of attendance (GUM clinic data) was for women aged 16 to 19 years. There was an overall significant linear decrease in the attendance rates over time for both men (p = 0.0172) and women (p = 0.0000) between 1989 and 1994. There was considerable variation in the prevalence of genital C trachomatis infection detected within different clinical settings, together with a substantial level of asymptomatic infection. CONCLUSIONS: Genital C trachomatis infection is broadly distributed throughout the sexually active population, with a substantial reservoir of asymptomatic infection among those generally perceived to be at low risk of a sexually transmitted infection. Young people, particularly women aged 16 to 19 years, are at highest risk of genital C trachomatis infection. This is of concern since younger women are more susceptible than older women to developing complications of chlamydial infection, such as pelvic inflammatory disease. The broad distribution of infection across all sexually active health service attenders and the high level of asymptomatic infection suggest that a new, screening based, approach to the control of genital C trachomatis infection is required. Recommendations are made as to the epidemiological research required to guide such work. PMID:9215095

  4. Asking mom: formative research for an HPV vaccine campaign targeting mothers of adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Autumn; Cates, Joan R; Diehl, Sandra J; Hartmann, Miriam

    2011-10-01

    Vaccination against the types of human papillomavirus (HPV) that cause about 70% of cervical cancers is approved for use in girls and women between 9 and 26 years of age and recommended routinely in 11-12-year-old girls. This article reports on the systematic theory-based formative research conducted to develop HPV vaccine messages for a campaign targeting racially diverse mothers of nonvaccinated 11-12-year-old girls in rural Southeastern United States. A consortium of 13 county health departments concerned about high rates of cervical cancer in their region relative to state and national averages initiated the campaign. The research examined behavioral determinants for vaccination decisions as well as mothers' reactions to message frames and emotional appeals. On the basis of focus groups and intercept interviews (n = 79), the authors demonstrated how preproduction message research and production message testing were used to develop messages that would motivate mothers of preteen girls. Core emotional truths that emerged were a mother's instinct to protect her daughter from harm and to embrace aspirations for her daughter's future. Mothers also reacted more positively to text about preventing cervical cancer than about preventing HPV, a sexually transmitted disease. Mothers preferred message concepts with photos of minorities and Caucasian mothers and daughters. PMID:21728780

  5. The current and future role of screening in the era of HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Myers, Evan; Huh, Warner K; Wright, Jason D; Smith, Jennifer S

    2008-05-01

    With the introduction of cervical screening programs, the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer has been drastically reduced. Techniques such as the traditional Papanicolaou test and the newer liquid-based cytology allow for the early detection of cervical abnormalities prior to the development of invasive cervical cancer. As oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is necessary for cervical cancer, HPV-DNA testing has also been proposed as a routine screening method for the general population. Screening limitations, such as adherence, test sensitivity and specificity, access, and cost-effectiveness are reflected in current screening guidelines. The development of prophylactic cervical cancer vaccines is a major milestone in cervical cancer prevention. These vaccines protect against the initial infection of certain oncogenic HPV types, and therefore prevent the development of cervical dysplasia, precancerous lesions, and cervical cancer. Considering routine cervical cancer vaccination in adolescent girls, screening guidelines must adapt in order to retain efficient and cost-effective prevention measures. Although the true epidemiological and economic impact of cervical cancer vaccines cannot be immediately realized, mathematical models predict various scenarios in which vaccination, in addition to cervical screening, will be cost-effective and further reduce cervical cancer disease. PMID:18482556

  6. Relationship of sexual dysfunction and its associated factors in women with genital and breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Fahami, Fariba; Savabi, Mitra; Mohamadirizi, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sexuality is a basic and important factor in human experiences, which varies among different types of cancers. This study was carried out with the aim of defining the relationship between sexual dysfunction and related factors in genital and breast cancers. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 150 women with genital and breast cancers admitted to two specialized hospitals in Isfahan and by using a two-stage sampling method. Participants completed demographic/disease questionnaire and sexual function questionnaire. Collected data were analyzed by using SPSS software version 14 and statistical tests of correlation coefficient, Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: The obtained results showed that 47% of women had sexual dysfunction with the mean (SD) age of 47 (7.7) years (with the range of 25–65 years). There was a significant correlation between sexual functioning and age, occupation, educational level, and treatment duration (P < 0.05). There was also a significant correlation between the stage of disease, primary disorder (0.003), and recent disorder (0.028). Meanwhile, Chi-square test showed no significant relationship between cancer type and primary disorder (0.403) and recent disorder (0.416). Conclusions: Breast and genital cancers may result in significant difficulties with sexual functioning and sexual life. Addressing these problems is essential to improve the quality of life in women with cancer and further investigations should be conducted for prevention and treatment of disorders by the health authorities. PMID:26257810

  7. Post-coital genital injury in healthy women: A review.

    PubMed

    Schmidt Astrup, Birgitte; Lykkebo, Annemette Wildfang

    2015-04-01

    Female genital injury following penile sexual intercourse in healthy women is a matter of importance and debate in many parts of society. However, the literature on the subject is sparse. There are a few studies regarding minor injury that does not require treatment in adult, pre-menopausal women, a single study of adolescent women, and none regarding post-menopausal women. Larger lesions requiring treatment are described casuistically. The purpose of this article is to provide a short, easy-to-read review of the literature regarding the prevalence and nature of female genital injury following consensual sexual intercourse in otherwise healthy women. PMID:25346095

  8. Children's Memories of a Physical Examination Involving Genital Touch: Implications for Reports of Child Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saywitz, Karen J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Conducted medical checkups on five- and seven-year-old girls (n=72), one-half of whom also received genital examinations. Later solicited girls' memories. Most girls in genital condition revealed vaginal and anal contact only when asked directly about it. Children who had nongenital examination never falsely reported genital touch in free recall…

  9. Comparison of the immunogenicity and safety of Cervarix and Gardasil human papillomavirus (HPV) cervical cancer vaccines in healthy women aged 18-45 years.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H; Baron, Mira; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Edwards, Robert P; Zepp, Fred; Carletti, Isabelle; Dessy, Francis J; Trofa, Andrew F; Schuind, Anne; Dubin, Gary

    2009-10-01

    This observer-blind study compared the prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline) and Gardasil (Merck), by assessing immunogenicity and safety through one month after completion of the three-dose vaccination course. Women (n = 1106) were stratified by age (18-26, 27-35, 36-45 years) and randomized (1:1) to receive Cervarix (Months 0, 1, 6) or Gardasil (Months 0, 2, 6). At Month 7 after first vaccination, all women in the according-to-protocol cohort who were seronegative/DNA negative before vaccination for the HPV type analyzed had seroconverted for HPV-16 and HPV-18 serum neutralizing antibodies, as measured by pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (PBNA), except for two women aged 27-35 years in the Gardasil group who did not seroconvert for HPV-18 (98%). Geometric mean titers of serum neutralizing antibodies ranged from 2.3-4.8-fold higher for HPV-16 and 6.8-9.1-fold higher for HPV-18 after vaccination with Cervarix compared with Gardasil, across all age strata. In the total vaccinated cohort (all women who received at least one vaccine dose, regardless of their serological and DNA status prior to vaccination), Cervarix induced significantly higher serum neutralizing antibody titers in all age strata (p < 0.0001). Positivity rates for anti-HPV-16 and -18 neutralizing antibodies in cervicovaginal secretions and circulating HPV-16 and -18 specific memory B-cell frequencies were also higher after vaccination with Cervarix compared with Gardasil. Both vaccines were generally well tolerated. The incidence of unsolicited adverse events was comparable between vaccinated groups. The incidence of solicited symptoms was generally higher after Cervarix, injection site reactions being most common. However, compliance rates with the three-dose schedules were similarly high (>or= 84%) for both vaccines. Although the importance of differences in magnitude of immune response between these vaccines is unknown, they may represent determinants of duration of protection against HPV-16/18. Long-term studies evaluating duration of efficacy after vaccination are needed for both vaccines. PMID:19684472

  10. Alternative dosage schedules with HPV VLP vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Margaret A.; Sudenga, Staci L.; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines can prevent multiple cancers in women and men. Difficulties in the cost and completion of the three-dose vaccine series have led to considerations of alternative dose schedules. In clinical trials, three doses given within a 12-month period versus the standard six-month period yielded comparable results, and immunogenicity appears comparable with two doses in adolescent females compared to the three-dose series in adult females. While the data are generally supportive of moving to a two-dose vaccine schedule among young female adolescents, the adoption of a two-dose vaccine schedule still poses a potential risk to the strength and longevity of the immune response. Public health authorities implementing a two-dose vaccine schedule should devise risk management strategies to minimize the potential impact on cancer prevention. PMID:25001893

  11. All Adventurous Women Do: HPV, Narrative, and HBO's Girls.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Brian

    2016-01-01

    This study looks at media portrayals of sexual health through the popular HBO television show Girls. This rhetorical criticism of Girls delineates two emergent narrative themes. First, the show repeatedly discusses human papillomavirus (HPV) in terms of its severity, but it oscillates in terms of representing the degree of significance. Second, the show frames the source of infection as more important than other concerns related to HPV. Ultimately, this analysis demonstrates that Girls perpetuates a problematic narrative plot structure related to issues of HPV transmission; it also provides a largely scientifically accurate portrayal of HPV and promotes open and frank discussions of sexual health. It is argued that mediated narratives, such as Girls, might have the potential to transform social attitudes and actions and should thereby garner attention from health communication scholars and public health advocates. PMID:26075310

  12. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Process of Care Research Branch Key Initiatives Behavioral Studies Regarding HPV and Cervical Cancer Enhanced

  13. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Process of Care Research Branch Process of Care Research Branch (PCRB) Key Initiatives HPV and Cervical Cancer

  14. HPV vaccine (human papillomavirus) Gardasil - what you need to know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any component of HPV vaccine, or to ... a serious problem, such as a severe allergic reaction. The risk of any vaccine causing a serious ...

  15. HPV Vaccine - Cervarix: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT HPV Vaccine Cervarix ® (Human Papillomavirus) What You Need to Know Many Vaccine Information Statements are available in Spanish and other languages. See www. immunize. org/ vis Hojas ...

  16. HPV Vaccine - Gardasil: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT HPV Vaccine Gardasil ® (Human Papillomavirus) What You Need to Know Many Vaccine Information Statements are available in Spanish and other languages. See www. immunize. org/ vis Hojas ...

  17. HPV Vaccine Gardasil®-9: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT HPV Vaccine Gardasil ® -9 (Human Papillomavirus) What You Need to Know Many Vaccine Information Statements are available in Spanish and other languages. See www. immunize. org/ vis Hojas de ...

  18. HPV-Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Women Ages 30 and Older Cervical cancer Human papillomavirus (HPV) Cervical cancer screening tests What your Pap ... from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Human papillomavirus–associated cancers—United States, 2004–2008. MMWR 2012; ...

  19. HPV-Associated Vulvar Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Women Ages 30 and Older Cervical cancer Human papillomavirus (HPV) Cervical cancer screening tests What your Pap ... from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Human papillomavirus–associated cancers—United States, 2004–2008. MMWR 2012; ...

  20. HPV Clearance and the Neglected Role of Stochasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ryser, Marc D.; Myers, Evan R.; Durrett, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Clearance of anogenital and oropharyngeal HPV infections is attributed primarily to a successful adaptive immune response. To date, little attention has been paid to the potential role of stochastic cell dynamics in the time it takes to clear an HPV infection. In this study, we combine mechanistic mathematical models at the cellular level with epidemiological data at the population level to disentangle the respective roles of immune capacity and cell dynamics in the clearing mechanism. Our results suggest that chance—in form of the stochastic dynamics of basal stem cells—plays a critical role in the elimination of HPV-infected cell clones. In particular, we find that in immunocompetent adolescents with cervical HPV infections, the immune response may contribute less than 20% to virus clearance—the rest is taken care of by the stochastic proliferation dynamics in the basal layer. In HIV-negative individuals, the contribution of the immune response may be negligible. PMID:25769112

  1. Protect Yourself Against HPV | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... reproductive-health/stis/hpv/ Human Papillomavirus Block this cervical-cancer causing virus More than half of all sexually ... a cancer researcher there. "The most prominent is cervical cancer." Cervical cancer is the fourth-deadliest cancer among ...

  2. HPV-Linked Throat Cancer Responds to Reduced Chemo, Radiation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... HPV-Linked Throat Cancer Responds to Reduced Chemo, Radiation: Study Lower doses also lower unwanted side effects, ... THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lower-level radiation and chemotherapy may be as effective as standard ...

  3. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection plays a significant role in the development of cervical cancer. However, most infections regress spontaneously and few progress to cervical cancer. Therefore, factors other than HPV infection likely are involved in cervical carcinogenesis. Methylation of CpG islands in the promoter regions of host and viral genes can lead to loss of gene function and has been observed in a number of cancers, including cervical.

  4. Making Sense of Your Pap and HPV Test Results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Click hyperlinked words for more information. What is cervical cancer? Cancer that starts to grow on a womanâ??s ... part of a woman's reproductive system. What causes cervical cancer? A virus , called genital human papillomavirus (pap-ah- ...

  5. Genital myiasis (Wohlfahrtiosis) in camel herds of Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Valentin, A; Baumann, M P; Schein, E; Bajanbileg, S

    1997-12-31

    Genital infestations caused by Wohlfahrtia magnifica (Schiner, 1862) has been reported as being a common problem encountered in female camels in the Gobi desert. Thus, a field investigation to establish the prevalence of wohlfarthiosis in camel herds in the eastern Gobi district was carried out between May and July 1994. The objectives of the study were to establish the relevance of genital myiasis, and to describe the disease patterns, clinical course and pathomorphological changes associated with it. The field study was designed to suit the specific ecological, infrastructural and logistic conditions. Two cross-sectional samples were taken from 45 selected herds in six different areas of the Chatanbulag Sumon to obtain data on herd structure, age distribution, and the breeding history of infested female animals. Post partum events and previous occurrence of genital myiasis were recorded by use of a standardised questionnaire. Clinically infested animals were first detected visually. All camels to be investigated further were subsequently immobilised using ropes and the genitals were examined for tissue lesions and the presence of larvae. Examination of 1676 Bactrian camels from 45 selected herds in six different areas of the Chatanbulag Sumon in the Eastern Gobi district, Mongolia, led to an estimate of Wohlfahrtia magnifica infestation rates between 8-10%. Most myiasis cases were found in older females (> 4 yr), younger animals were infested at a lower rate. Highest prevalence rates were discovered during June and July, highest levels of infestation occurred in the Aman Us Chudak region with infestation rates up to 15%. PMID:9477520

  6. Mothers' Perceptions of Female Genital Mutilation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahanonu, E. L.; Victor, O.

    2014-01-01

    The practice of female genital mutilation (FGM) is widespread in Nigeria. This study was conducted to assess the perceptions of FGM among mothers at a primary healthcare centre in Lagos, Nigeria. A convenience sample of 95 mothers completed the pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaires. Data analysis was carried out using descriptive statistics…

  7. [Prevalence of genital anomalies in young football players].

    PubMed

    Mónaco, M; Verdugo, F; Bodell, M; Avendaño, E; Til, L; Drobnic, F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of genital examination (GE) during the Pre-participation Physical Examination (PPE) is to identify the state of maturity, and rule out any genital pathology. To describe genital anomalies (GA) and estimate the awareness of GE in young football players. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 280 elite football players from the results of PPE over two seasons. There was a detection rate of 5.4% GA, with varicocele being 3.2%, and of which only 13% were aware of their condition. Although this study shows a low incidence of genital abnormality in the study population, only 13% were aware of the GE prior to assessment. These findings demonstrate a low incidence of GA in this population. While GE is recommended during PPE, it is not a routine practice performed by family doctors or sports medicine specialists. This article attempts to raise awareness of the importance of GE in PPE as a preventive health strategy. PMID:25434530

  8. 21 CFR 884.5960 - Genital vibrator for therapeutic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Genital vibrator for therapeutic use. 884.5960 Section 884.5960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... of sexual dysfunction or as an adjunct to Kegel's exercise (tightening of the muscles of the...

  9. 21 CFR 884.5960 - Genital vibrator for therapeutic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Genital vibrator for therapeutic use. 884.5960 Section 884.5960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... of sexual dysfunction or as an adjunct to Kegel's exercise (tightening of the muscles of the...

  10. 21 CFR 884.5960 - Genital vibrator for therapeutic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Genital vibrator for therapeutic use. 884.5960 Section 884.5960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... of sexual dysfunction or as an adjunct to Kegel's exercise (tightening of the muscles of the...

  11. 21 CFR 884.5960 - Genital vibrator for therapeutic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Genital vibrator for therapeutic use. 884.5960 Section 884.5960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... of sexual dysfunction or as an adjunct to Kegel's exercise (tightening of the muscles of the...

  12. 21 CFR 884.5960 - Genital vibrator for therapeutic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Genital vibrator for therapeutic use. 884.5960 Section 884.5960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... of sexual dysfunction or as an adjunct to Kegel's exercise (tightening of the muscles of the...

  13. No Evidence of Human Papillomaviruses in Non-genital Seborrheic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Meibodi, Naser Tayyebi; Nahidi, Yalda; Meshkat, Zahra; Esmaili, Habibollah; Gharib, Masoumeh; Gholoobi, Aida

    2013-01-01

    Background: Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a benign epidermal tumor of unknown etiology. Because of its wart-like morphology, Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been suggested as a possible causative agent. Viral involvement, however, has not been confirmed yet despite research and the association between HPVs and seborrheic keratosis has not been studied among Iranian population by PCR. Objectives: The aim of this case-control study was to evaluate the presence of HPVs DNA in non-genital SK by PCR. Materials and Methods: Fifty biopsy specimens obtained from patients with non-genital SK and 50 controls were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: No HPVs DNA was detected by PCR within the tissue extracts from paraffin-embedded SK samples, while one of the controls was HPVs DNA positive. The age range of the patients was 20 to 82 yrs (mean = 52). Twenty-eight patients (56%) were males and 22 patients (44%) were females. The most common anatomic site was the face. Histopathologic changes due to viral infection such as koilocytosis (10%), dyskeratosis (66%), mitosis (28%), and parakeratosis (88%) were evident within the lesions. The most common histologic type was acanthotic type. Conclusion: Our results showed that there is no association between HPVs and seborrheic keratosis in investigated subjects. PMID:23919020

  14. Knowledge and Perceptions of HPV and the HPV Vaccine among Pre-adolescent Girls and Their Guardians in Georgetown, Guyana

    PubMed Central

    Tyrell, E; Ramsammy-Boyce, K

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To examine the knowledge and perceptions of 11-year old girls and their guardians toward the human papillomavirus (HPV), HPV (mandatory) vaccination and cervical cancer and to determine their main sources of health information. Methods: A cross-sectional study was done by interviewing two separate study populations ie 11-year old girls from five primary schools in Georgetown and their guardians. Questions were designed to assess level of knowledge as well as perceptions about mandatory vaccination and sources of health information. Results: A total of 87 girls participated, of whom 10 (11%) had already received the HPV vaccine. Overall, when asked whether they knew of HPV, the HPV vaccine, cervical cancer or the Pap smear, more than half of the girls, in every instance, did not know. Seventy-four guardians took part and most (> 80%) of them claimed that they knew about these parameters except for HPV transmission (40%) and the cause of cervical cancer (30%). Both girls and guardians responded poorly to questions about the detection of cervical cancer. Furthermore, only two of the 14 girls who stated that they knew how HPV was transmitted, actually answered correctly that it was sexual transmission. Girls were almost twice as likely to be in favour of mandatory vaccination as guardians (OR 1.8, 95% CI: 0.9, 3.6) but the difference was not significant (p > 0.05). The girls indicated health centres/clinics (58%), whilst TV/radio (66%) was the preference for the guardians as their most popular health information sources. Conclusions: These findings point to a necessity for educational programmes and activities in which children and their guardians can meaningfully participate and be informed about the different aspects of HPV vaccination. PMID:26035815

  15. Human Papillomavirus Type 8 E6 Oncoprotein Inhibits Transcription of the PDZ Protein Syntenin-2

    PubMed Central

    Lazi?, Daliborka; Hufbauer, Martin; Zigrino, Paola; Buchholz, Stephanie; Kazem, Siamaque; Feltkamp, Mariet C. W.; Mauch, Cornelia; Steger, Gertrud; Pfister, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    The E6 proteins from high-risk alpha human papillomavirus (HPV) types (e.g., HPV16) are characterized by the presence of a PDZ-binding motif through which they interact with a number of cellular PDZ domain-containing substrates and cooperate in their degradation. The ability of these E6 proteins to bind to PDZ domain proteins correlates with the oncogenic potential of the virus. The E6 proteins of oncogenic HPV from the genus Betapapillomavirus (betaPV, e.g., HPV8) do not encode a PDZ-binding motif. We found that the PDZ domain protein syntenin-2 is transcriptionally downregulated in primary human epidermal keratinocytes (PHEK) by HPV8 E6. The mRNA levels of the known HPV16 E6 PDZ protein targets Dlg, Scribble, Magi-1, Magi-3, PSD95, and Mupp1 were not changed by HPV8 E6. Decreased protein levels of syntenin-2 were observed in cell extracts from PHEK expressing HPV5, -8, -16, -20, and -38 E6 but not in HPV1 and -4 E6-positive keratinocytes. Surprisingly, HPV16 E6 also repressed transcription of syntenin-2 but with a much lower efficiency than HPV8 E6. In healthy human skin, syntenin-2 expression is localized in suprabasal epidermal layers. In organotypic skin cultures, the differentiation-dependent expression of syntenin-2 was absent in HPV8 E6- and E6E7-expressing cells. In basal cell carcinomas of the skin, syntenin-2 was not detectable, whereas in squamous cell carcinomas, expression was located in differentiated areas. Short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of syntenin-2 led to an inhibition of differentiation and an increase in the proliferation capacity in PHEK. These results identified syntenin-2 as the first PDZ domain protein controlled by HPV8 and HPV16 at the mRNA level. PMID:22623796

  16. Treatment of male genital lymphedema: an integrated concept.

    PubMed

    Torio-Padron, Nestor; Stark, G Björn; Földi, Etelka; Simunovic, Filip

    2015-02-01

    Genital lymphedema is a debilitating condition. Currently, therapeutic concepts include conservative and surgical measures of genital volume reduction, but no therapy standards exist. The aim of this study was to analyze our experience with the treatment of male genital lymphedema and to describe our integrated concept, which combines perioperative complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP) with surgical reduction. We conducted a retrospective study of 51 male patients who were treated in our clinic between 1998 and 2013, acquiring data on etiology, performed therapy, and complication rates. Forty-three (84%) of our patients suffered from primary and eight (16%) from secondary lymphedema. Two patients (4%) exhibited isolated penile affection and 22 (43%) isolated scrotal affection, while the majority (27 or 53%) exhibited penoscrotal lymphedema. All patients underwent inpatient CDP preceding and following surgery. Surgical therapy involved debulking the scrotum in 25 patients (49%), isolated penile reduction in two (4%), and penoscrotal reduction in 24 (47%). Hydrocoelectomy was performed in 22 (43%) patients. Following resection of the diseased tissue, the defects were closed primarily using adjacent healthy skin. There was no need for local flaps or skin grafts. Three patients suffered from complications requiring revision surgery: hematoma in two patients (4%) and wound dehiscence in one (2%). We measured the change in quality of life that was achieved by these procedures using the Glasgow Benefit Inventory questionnaire. The patients reported improvement in general functioning and physical health, whereas the social support score was largely unaffected by the procedure. Our results show that genital lymphedema patients can be reliably treated by combining conservative and surgical therapy. Prior conservative reduction of the genitals facilitates surgery and allows consistent results at a low complication rate, whereas surgical reduction serves to enhance and stabilize the results of conservative treatment. PMID:25456280

  17. Cross-neutralizing antibodies elicited by the Cervarix® human papillomavirus vaccine display a range of Alpha-9 inter-type specificities?

    PubMed Central

    Bissett, Sara L.; Draper, Eve; Myers, Richard E.; Godi, Anna; Beddows, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The highly efficacious human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLP) representing genotypes HPV16 and HPV18, which together account for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases. Vaccine-type protection is thought to be mediated by high titer, type-specific neutralizing antibodies. The vaccines also confer a degree of cross-protection against some genetically-related types from the Alpha-9 (HPV16-like: HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58) and Alpha-7 (HPV18-like: HPV39, HPV45, HPV59, HPV68) species groups. Cross-protection is coincident with the detection of low titer serum responses against non-vaccine types by vaccinees. Such antibodies may be the effectors of cross-protection or their detection may be useful as a correlate or surrogate. This study evaluated whether cross-neutralization of HPV types from the Alpha-9 species group is mediated by antibodies with a predominantly type-restricted specificity for HPV16 that nevertheless exhibit low affinity interactions with non-vaccine types, or by antibody specificities that demonstrate similar recognition of vaccine and non-vaccine types but are present at very low levels. Antibodies generated following Cervarix® vaccination of 13–14 year old girls were evaluated by pseudovirus neutralization, VLP ELISA and by enrichment of target antigen specificity using VLP-immobilized beads. Two-dimensional hierarchical clustering of serology data demonstrated that the antibody specificity profile generated by VLP ELISA was both quantitatively and qualitatively different from the neutralizing antibody specificity profile. Target-specific antibody enrichment demonstrated that cross-neutralization of non-vaccine types was due to a minority of antibodies rather than by the weak interactions of a predominantly type-restricted HPV16 antibody specificity. Furthermore, cross-neutralization of non-vaccine types appeared to be mediated by multiple antibody specificities, recognizing single and multiple non-vaccine types, and whose specificities were not predictable from examination of the serum neutralizing antibody profile. These data contribute to our understanding of the antibody specificities elicited following HPV vaccination and have potential implications for vaccine-induced cross-protection. PMID:24440205

  18. Molecular Characterization of Human-Colonizing Streptococcus agalactiae Strains Isolated from Throat, Skin, Anal Margin, and Genital Body Sites?

    PubMed Central

    van der Mee-Marquet, Nathalie; Fourny, Laure; Arnault, Laurence; Domelier, Anne-Sophie; Salloum, Mazen; Lartigue, Marie-Frédérique; Quentin, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae carriage was evaluated by sampling four body sites in a group of 249 healthy individuals including both sexes and a wide range of ages; the aims were to study the population structure of colonizing strains by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and to evaluate their diversity by serotyping, SmaI macrorestriction analysis, and PCR screening for genetic markers of highly virulent clones for neonates. The prevalences of carriage were 27% in women and 32% in men. The major positive body site was the genital tract (23% in women and 21% in men); skin, throats, and anal margins were also positive in 2%, 4%, and 14%, respectively. These human-colonizing strains belonged mostly to serotypes III (24%), Ia (21%), V (18%), and Ib (17%). Twenty-three sequence types (STs) were identified. The MLST characteristics of the strains isolated from a single anatomic site—genital (vagina [women] or from a sample of the first urination after arising from a night's sleep [men]), throat, skin, or anal margin—suggest a body site colonization specificity for particular STs: strains of STs 2, 10, 19, and 196 were isolated only from genital sites; strains of STs 1, 8, and 23 were isolated more frequently from throat florae; and strains recovered only from anal margin samples were more closely related to strains isolated from throats than to those from genital sites. Most strains of STs 1, 8, and 23—STs that are increasingly described as being responsible for adult infections—did not carry any markers of strains virulent for neonates, suggesting that the virulence of these strains is probably associated with other genetic determinants. In addition, the genetic diversities of the strains varied between STs: STs 2, 8, 10, 23, and 196 were the most diverse; STs 1 and 19 were more homogeneous; and ST 17 strains formed three distant groups. PMID:18632904

  19. FDA licensure of bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV2, Cervarix) for use in females and updated HPV vaccination recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

    PubMed

    2010-05-28

    On October 16, 2009, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) licensed bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV2; Cervarix, GlaxoSmithKline) for use in females aged 10 through 25 years. Cervarix is the second human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine licensed for use in females in the United States. Quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV4; Gardasil, Merck & Co, Inc.) was licensed in 2006 for use in females aged 9 through 26 years, and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended routine HPV4 vaccination of females aged 11 or 12 years, and catch-up vaccination for females aged 13 through 26 years. This report provides updated recommendations for routine and catch-up vaccination of females with either HPV2 or HPV4. PMID:20508593

  20. Activation of human papillomavirus type 18 gene expression by herpes simplex virus type 1 viral transactivators and a phorbol ester

    SciTech Connect

    Gius, D.; Laimins, L.A.

    1989-02-01

    Several viral trans-activators and a tumor promoter were examined for the ability to activate human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) gene expression. A plasmid containing the HPV-18 noncoding region placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene was cotransfected with different herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) genes into several cell lines. Both HSV-1 TIF and ICPO activated HPV-18 expression; however, activation by TIF was observed only in epithelial cells, while ICPO stimulated expression in a wide variety of cells. The element activated by both TIF and ICOP was mapped to a 229-base-pair fragment which also contains an HPV-18 epithelial cell-preferred enhancer. The inclusion of a papillomavirus E2 trans-activator with TIF and ICOP further increased HPV-18 expression. In contrast, the HSV-1 ICP4 and ICP27 genes, as well as the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tat genes, were found to have no effect on HPV-18 expression. In transient assays, the addition of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) also activated HPV-18 expression. The region of HPV-18 activated by TPA was localized to a sequence which is homologous to other TPA-responsive elements.