Science.gov

Sample records for genital hpv types

  1. Genital Warts (HPV)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Genital Warts (HPV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Genital Warts (HPV) Print A ... HPV infection. How Do People Know They Have HPV? Most HPV infections have no signs or symptoms. ...

  2. Genital Warts (HPV)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... touching someone's genitals or having vaginal, oral, or anal sex). In some rare cases, genital warts are transmitted ... abstinence ). That means not having vaginal, oral, or anal sex. Preventing HPV infection also means not touching the ...

  3. Pathogenesis of genital HPV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, A

    1993-01-01

    Clinical, subclinical, and latent human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are distinguished from HPV-associated neoplasia. Besides HPV additional cofactors are necessary to transform HPV infected tissue to intraepithelial or invasive neoplasia. Risk factors for the presence of HPV are high number of sexual partners, early cohabitarche, young age at first delivery, suppression and alteration of immune status, young age and hormonal influences. While the fact of a high number of sexual partners exclusively increases the risk of HPV infection, it is not known whether the other factors lead to either an increased risk for HPV infection and/or to HPV-associated neoplasia. Subclinical and latent genital HPV infections are highly prevalent. The prevalence rate depends on the sensitivity of the HPV detection system used, on age and sexual activity of the population screened, and on the number of subsequent examinations performed for each subject. Sexual transmission is the main pathway for genital HPV's, however, vertical, peripartal, and oral transmission are also possible. Seroreactivity against genital HPV may be due to an active infection or the result of contact with HPV earlier in life. Antibodies against the HPV 16 E7 protein indicate an increased risk for cervical cancer. Compared with humoral response cellular immune response is probably more important for regression of genital HPV infection: impaired cellular response is characterized by depletion of T helper/inducer cells and/or Langerhans cells and impaired function of natural killer cells and/or the infected keratinocyte. In condylomata replication and transcription of viral nucleic acids and antigen production coincide with cellular differentiation. However, the interaction between HPV and the keratinocyte on a molecular level in subclinical and latent disease is not well understood. Regression or persistence of subclinical and latent genital HPV infections as observed in longitudinal investigations show a constant come-and-go of HPV presence. Subclinical or latent cervical infections with high-risk HPV types (such as HPV 16 and 18) have an increased risk for the development of HPV-associated neoplasia. PMID:8392965

  4. Genital Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Native Women

    MedlinePLUS

    Genital Human Papillomavirus (HPV) At least 50% of sexually active women and men will get it. Most will not ... possible effects of HPV. W hat is genital human papillomavirus (HPV)? HPV is a common virus. There ...

  5. Cutaneous human papillomavirus types detected on the surface of male external genital lesions: A case series within the HPV Infection in Men Study

    PubMed Central

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Messina, Jane L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Jukic, Drazen M.; Tommasino, Massimo; Gheit, Tarik; Rollison, Dana E.; Sichero, Laura; Sirak, Bradley A.; Ingles, Donna J.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Lu, Beibei; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs) may be associated with cutaneous epithelial lesions and non-melanoma skin cancers. No study has systematically evaluated the presence of genus beta [?]-HPV in male genital skin or external genital lesions (EGLs). Objectives To examine cutaneous ?-HPV types detected on the surface of EGLs in men and describe their presence prior to EGL development. Study design A retrospective case series was conducted among 69 men with pathologically confirmed EGLs (n=72) who participated in the HPV Infection in Men Study. Archived exfoliated cells collected from the surface of each EGL and normal genital skin specimens 612 months preceding EGL development were tested for ?-HPV DNA using a type-specific multiplex genotyping assay. Results ?-HPV DNA was detected on 61.1% of all EGLs, with types 38 (16.7%), 5 (15.3%), and 12 (12.5%) most commonly identified. HPV prevalence differed across pathological diagnoses, with the largest number of ?-HPV types detected on condylomas. Most ?-HPV types were detected on normal genital skin prior to EGL development, though the prevalence was lower on EGLs compared to preceding normal genital skin. Conclusions EGLs and the normal genital skin of men harbor a large number of ?-HPV types; however, it appears that ?-HPVs are unrelated to EGL development in men. Despite evidence to support a causal role in skin carcinogenesis at UVR-exposed sites, cutaneous HPV appears unlikely to cause disease at the UVR-unexposed genitals. PMID:24210970

  6. Incidence and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Type Distribution of Genital Warts in a Multinational Cohort of Men: The HPV in Men Study

    PubMed Central

    Anic, Gabriella M.; Lee, JiHyun; Stockwell, Heather; Rollison, Dana E.; Wu, Yougui; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Gage, Christine; Silva, Roberto Jos C.; Baggio, Maria L.; Quiterio, Manuel; Salmern, Jorge; Abrahamsen, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Background.?Data on the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV)related genital warts (GWs) in men are sparse. We described the distribution of HPV types in incident GWs and estimated GW incidence and time from type-specific incident HPV infections to GW detection in a multinational cohort of men aged 1870 years. Methods.?Participants included 2487 men examined for GWs and tested for HPV every 6 months and followed up for a median of 17.9 months. Samples were taken from 112 men with incident GWs to test for HPV DNA by polymerase chain reaction. Results.?Incidence of GWs was 2.35 cases per 1000 person-years, with highest incidence among men aged 1830 years (3.43 cases per 1000 person-years). HPV 6 (43.8%), HPV 11 (10.7%), and HPV 16 (9.8%) were the genotypes most commonly detected in GWs. The 24-month cumulative incidence of GWs among men with incident HPV 6/11 infections was 14.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5%21.1%). Median time to GW detection was 17.1 months (95% CI, 12.419.3 months), with shortest time to detection among men with incident infections with HPV 6/11 only (6.2 months; 95% CI, 5.624.2 months). Conclusions.?HPV 6/11 plays an important role in GW development, with the highest incidence and shortest time to detection among men with incident HPV 6/11 infection. PMID:22013227

  7. Gardasil 9 Protects against Additional HPV Types

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a large randomized clinical trial that shows a new human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectively prevented infection and disease caused seven HPV types that cause cancer and two HPV types that cause genital warts.

  8. HPV

    MedlinePLUS

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are common viruses that can cause warts. There are more than 100 types of HPV. Most are harmless, but about 30 types put ... either low-risk or high-risk. Low-risk HPV can cause genital warts. High-risk HPV can ...

  9. [The specifities of the HPV-genital infections in males].

    PubMed

    Skerlev, Mihael; Ljubojevic, Suzana

    2010-08-01

    Anogenital infections caused by Human papillomavirus (HPV) are the most frequently diagnosed sexually transmitted infections of viral origin and up to 150 HPV DNA types have been recognized so far. Anogenital warts (condylomata acuminata) are the most common lesions presented in men, however, during the last decade the other HPV-associated exaggerated lesions such as condylomata plana, penile, scrotal, and anal intraepithelial neoplasias, as well as the penile, urine bladder and prostate cancer have been studied somewhat more extensively. The clinical variations might range from clinically invisible, asymptomatic lesions to the bizarre forms of giant condyloma of Buschke-Lwenstein type, including Bowenoid papulosis, Mb. Bowen, different kinds of eryhtroplasia both in men and women and a large spectrum of HPV-induced dermatovenereological entities in genital region including high-grade intraepithelial genital neoplasias, such as penile, anal, scrotal, vulvar, vaginal etc. (thus not only cervical), and, last but not least - the anogenital warts. A prophylactic vaccine that targets these types should thus substantially reduce the burden of HPV-associated clinical diseases. Ultimately, within the spectrum of therapeutic options for condylomata, no method is really superior to others; recurrences occurred in 30-70% of cases. We definitely need the HPV vaccination programme to eliminate one of the oldest and up to now unsolved problems of the mankind. Since HPV is transmitted by sexual intercourse, treatment of both partners is necessary in order to eliminate the virus from the population. Approaches to this include prophylactic vaccines such as quadrivalent HPV vaccine for both men and women. PMID:21258302

  10. Concordant Oral-Genital HPV Infection in South Africa Couples: Evidence for Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Samantha L.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Martinson, Neil A.; Hoffmann, Jennifer; DSouza, Gypsyamber

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality in South Africa. However, little is known about oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence settings. Method: Thirty-four adult heterosexual couples attending an HIV testing center in Soweto, South Africa were enrolled. Each participant provided an oral rinse sample and genital swab, which were tested for 37 types of HPV DNA, and completed a risk behavior survey. Results: Median age was 31?years and 9% (3/34) of men and 29% (10/34) of women enrolled tested HIV-positive; median CD4 count was 437?cells/mm3. Oral HPV prevalence was similar in women and men (12 vs. 18%, p?=?0.48), and was non-significantly higher in HIV-infected vs. HIV-uninfected (23 vs. 13%, p?=?0.34) subjects. Most men (82%) and women (84%) reported ever performing oral sex. Median number of lifetime sexual partners was 25 while median number of lifetime oral sex partners was 1. Oncogenic HPV subtypes were detected in 4% of oral, 26% of penile, and 74% of vaginal samples, including HPV16 in 1, 12, and 21% of these samples respectively. Genital HPV prevalence was significantly higher than oral HPV prevalence (75 vs. 15%, p???0.001). Thirty-five percent of couples (12/34) had at least one type-specific concordant vaginal-penile HPV infection but only one of nine couples with oral HPV had concordant oraloral infection. However, 67% (4/6) of men and 25% (1/4) of women with oral HPV infection had partners with concordant genital HPV infection. Implications and Impact: Oraloral HPV concordance between couples is low, but oral-genital and genitalgenital HPV concordance is higher, including concordance of male oral HPV infection with their partners vaginal HPV infection. This data is consistent with possible transmission of vaginal HPV infection to the oral cavity of sexual partners performing oral sex. PMID:24377087

  11. Prevalence of low-risk HPV types and genital warts in women born 1988/89 or 1983/84 -results of WOLVES, a population-based epidemiological study in Wolfsburg, Germany

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Wolfsburg HPV Epidemiological Study (WOLVES) is a population-based cohort study on HPV infections and associated diseases in the pre-vaccination era in young women in Wolfsburg, Germany. Methods Women born 1983/84 or 1988/89 were invited to participate. Participants were recruited in gynecology practices, and completed a questionnaire with socioeconomic, sexual and medical data including vaccination status. Pelvic examination with Pap smear and HPV testing (HC2?=?Hybrid Capture 2) was obligatory. HC2-positive and 10% of HC2-negative samples were tested for specific HPV types with SPF-10-PCR, and in inconclusive cases with DNA sequencing. Women with genital warts (GW) and those with atypical Pap smears were transferred for colposcopy. GWs were classified as typical condylomata acuminata (TCA), flat condyloma (FC) and seborrheic wart-like (SWL). Results In total, 1258 subjects were recruited from the target population of 2850 (44.1%). Overall the prevalence of HC2 low-risk (LR) types was 8.5%. HPV6 was the most frequent LR type (2.1%), followed by HPV42 (1.1%), HPV11 and HPV44 (each 0.4%). LiPA showed a low sensitivity for HPV types 42, 90 and 91, which were detected only by HC2 and HPV sequencing. Nine women (0.7%) were transferred with incident GW: five TCA, two FC and two SWL. All TCA were associated with HPV6 in corresponding cervical swabs and warts. Tissues of SWL contained HPV6 (n?=?1) and HPV16 (n?=?1). The cumulative life-risk for GW was 1.4% in the 1988/89 and 4.8% in the 1983/84 cohort. Eight of 107 HC2-LR?+?and five of nine cases of GW had concomitant abnormal Pap smears. All CIN lesions could be linked to high-risk HPV types but borderline and low-grade abnormal smears were explained by vaginal and cervical TCA in four cases. Conclusions HC2 was a specific test for the detection of established and potential LR types. In this first WOLVES analysis, HPV6 was the most frequent HPV type and the single LR type linked to disease. The observed GW incidence of 715 per 100,000 fits well with estimates of healthcare providers. Although life risks for GW were lower than in Scandinavian analyses, the societal burden within the WOLVES populations was considerable. PMID:23259726

  12. Prevalence of high-risk HPV types and associated genital diseases in women born in 1988/89 or 1983/84 – results of WOLVES, a population-based epidemiological study in Wolfsburg, Germany

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) infection is associated with the development of cervical cancer. HPV vaccination reduces the risk of developing malignant lesions and is expected to change the dynamics of HPV transmission. Data from non-vaccinated women may provide an important benchmark to allow the impact of HPV vaccination programs to be assessed. This study was designed to prospectively determine the changing dynamics of HR-HPV infection and associated genital diseases in young women, most of whom were non-vaccinated. Methods Data from a population-based cohort study, comprising women of two predefined birth cohorts (women born in 1983/84 or 1988/89), were analyzed between 19 October 2009 and 31 December 2010 to determine risk factors for high-risk HPV infection and the association between specific HR-HPV types and atypical Pap smear test results. HPV status was determined by Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) assay and genotyping. Results The prevalence of HR-HPV was 22.8% in the 1983/84 cohort (150/659) and 23.7% in the 1988/99 cohort (142/599). Only the number of sexual partners was a significant risk factor for HPV infection (odds ratios 22.687 and 6.124 for more than five versus one partner 84 cohort,/84 and 1988/89 cohorts, respectively) in multivariate analysis. HPV16 positive-women were significantly more likely to have abnormal Pap smears of any degree than HPV16-negative women (22.0% versus 3.61%, p < 0.0001 for the 1983/84 cohort and 9.09% versus 2.52%, p = 0.0482 for the 1988/89 cohort). CIN3 was diagnosed in six women 84 cohort,/84 cohort and two in the 1988/89 cohort. All women with CIN3 tested positive for HC2-HR and all six CIN3 cases 84 cohort,/84 cohort tested positive for HPV16. In the 1988/89 cohort, the rate of HPV16 infection was significantly lower in vaccinated than non-vaccinated women (1.59% versus 8.88%; p = 0.003). Conclusions HR-HPV infection was highly prevalent in both cohorts and associated with an increased risk of abnormal Pap smears and biopsy proven CIN2+. HPV16 infection was associated with a high risk of clinically relevant lesions. HPV vaccination significantly decreased the risk of HPV16 infection. PMID:23497108

  13. Developing an HPV vaccine to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Janine T

    2007-04-20

    The challenges of the journey from target identification through development of a prophylactic quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine have been met in Gardasil. Cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Approximately 70% of cervical cancer is caused by infection with HPV types 16 and 18 and approximately 90% of genital warts are caused by HPV types 6 and 11. The quadrivalent HPV vaccine was generated by expression of the major capsid protein (L1) of HPV types 16, 18, 6 and 11 in yeast. L1 proteins self assemble into pentamer structures and these pentamer structures come together to form virus-like particles (VLPs). The VLPs are antigenically indistinguishable from HPV virions. The VLPs contain no viral DNA and therefore the vaccine is non-infectious. Gardasil is composed of VLPs of HPV types 16, 18, 6 and 11 conjugated to a proprietary amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate adjuvant. The results of a rigorous clinical program have demonstrated that the vaccine is safe and highly efficacious in preventing dysplasias, cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN 1-3) the precursors of cervical cancer and external genital lesions caused by vaccine-HPV types. In conclusion, Gardasil addresses a major medical need, that is, reduction of HPV-related disease including cervical cancer as a safe, immunogenic, and highly efficacious vaccine. PMID:17289220

  14. Male circumcision and the incidence and clearance of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men: the HPV Infection in men (HIM) cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reported associations of male circumcision (MC) with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men have been inconsistent. Methods 4,033 healthy men were examined every six months for a median of 17.5months. In each study visit, exfoliated cell specimens from the coronal sulcus/glans penis, penile shaft, and scrotum were collected and combined into one sample per person for HPV DNA detection. Samples were tested for 37 HPV types. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between MC and the incidence and clearance of HPV infections and specific genotypes. Results The overall incidence of new HPV infections did not differ by MC status (for any HPV, adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91-1.27). However, incidence was significantly lower among circumcised versus uncircumcised men for HPV types 58 (p?=?0.01), 68 (p?HPV types 39 (p?=?0.01) and 51 (p?=?0.02). Despite the lack of an overall association in the risk of HPV clearance by MC (for any HPV, aHR 0.95, 95% CI 0.88-1.02), median times to clearance were significantly shorter among circumcised than uncircumcised men for HPV types 33 (p?=?0.02) and 64 (p?=?0.04), and longer for HPV types 6 (p?genital HPV detection, except for certain HPV types. The use of a single combined sample from the penis and scrotum for HPV DNA detection likely limited our ability to identify a true effect of MC at the distal penis. PMID:24517172

  15. 9-Valent HPV vaccine for cancers, pre-cancers and genital warts related to HPV.

    PubMed

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Velicer, Christine; Luxembourg, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of nearly all cervical cancer cases as well as a substantial proportion of anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal cancers, making it responsible for approximately 5% of the global cancer burden. The first-generation HPV vaccines that is, quadrivalent HPV type 6/11/16/18 vaccine and bivalent HPV type 16/18 vaccine were licensed in 2006 and 2007, respectively. A second-generation 9-valent HPV type 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine with broader cancer coverage was initiated even before the first vaccines were approved. By preventing HPV infection and disease due to HPV31/33/45/52/58, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to increase prevention of cervical cancer from 70 to 90%. In addition, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to prevent 85-95% of HPV-related vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers. Overall, the 9vHPV vaccine addresses a significant unmet medical need, although further health economics and implementation research is needed. PMID:26366475

  16. Recent Developments in Non-HPV-related Adenocarcinomas of the Lower Female Genital Tract and Their Precursors.

    PubMed

    McCluggage, W Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Most adenocarcinomas in the lower female genital tract (cervix, vagina, vulva) arise in the cervix and are associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, there is an emerging spectrum of non-HPV-related cervical adenocarcinomas, the most common of which is so-called gastric type. In this review, the concept of gastric-type cervical adenocarcinomas and their possible precursor lesions is covered, the precursor lesions still being poorly understood. Other non-HPV-related cervical adenocarcinomas are also discussed, including new information regarding molecular events in mesonephric adenocarcinoma. A variety of primary vaginal adenocarcinomas, including clear cell, endometrioid, intestinal and gastric types are also discussed. The spectrum of benign and malignant glandular lesions involving the lower female genital tract and probably derived from misplaced Skene's (periurethral) glands is also covered. PMID:26645463

  17. Lower Female Genital Tract Tumors With Adenoid Cystic Differentiation: P16 Expression and High-risk HPV Detection.

    PubMed

    Xing, Deyin; Schoolmeester, J Kenneth; Ren, Zhiyong; Isacson, Christina; Ronnett, Brigitte M

    2016-04-01

    Lower female genital tract tumors with adenoid cystic differentiation are rare, and data on their relationship with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) are limited. Here we report the clinicopathologic features from a case series. Tumors with adenoid cystic differentiation, either pure or as part of a carcinoma with mixed differentiation, arising in the lower female genital tract were evaluated by means of immunohistochemical analysis for p16 expression and in situ hybridization using 1 or more probes for high-risk HPV (a high-risk probe covering multiple types, a wide-spectrum probe, and separate type-specific probes for HPV16 and HPV18) and when possible by polymerase chain reaction for high-risk HPV. Six cervical carcinomas with adenoid cystic differentiation admixed with various combinations of at least 1 other pattern of differentiation, including adenoid basal tumor (epithelioma and/or carcinoma), squamous cell carcinoma (basaloid or keratinizing), and small cell carcinoma were identified in patients ranging in age from 50 to 86 years (mean, 73 y; median, 76 y). All of these tumors were characterized by diffuse p16 expression. High-risk HPV was detected in 5 of 6 tested cases: 4 cases by in situ hybridization (all positive for HPV-wide-spectrum and HPV16) and 1 by polymerase chain reaction (HPV45). Seven pure adenoid cystic carcinomas (6 vulvar and 1 cervical) were identified in patients ranging in age from 27 to 74 years (mean, 48 y; median, 48 y). All of these tumors were characterized by variable p16 expression ranging from very limited to more extensive but never diffuse. No high-risk HPV was detected in any of these pure tumors. Lower female genital tract carcinomas with adenoid cystic differentiation appear to comprise 2 pathogenetically distinct groups. Cervical carcinomas with mixed differentiation, including adenoid cystic, adenoid basal, squamous, and small cell components, are etiologically related to high-risk HPV and can be identified by diffuse p16 expression. Pure vulvar and cervical adenoid cystic carcinomas appear to be unrelated to high-risk HPV and are distinguished from the mixed carcinomas by nondiffuse p16 expression. PMID:26645728

  18. HPV knowledge and impact of genital warts on self esteem and sexual life in Colombian patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Information on HPV knowledge in patients with genital warts is scarse as is the information on factors related to the impact on self-esteem and sex life among them. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in adult patients with a clinical diagnosis of genital warts (GW) attending a major private out-patient clinic in Bogot, Colombia. Patients underwent biopsy for pathological diagnosis, HPV-DNA testing and completed a questionnaire assessing HPV knowledge, and the consequences of GW on self-esteem and sexual life. Differences in proportions were assessed with a chi2 test. Results 106 men and 155 women had pathologic confirmation of GW. 51% of subjects had heard of HPV before consultation coming mainly from the media (82%). Less than half of the participants knew that HPV could be transmitted through non-penetrant sexual intercourse and only two thirds acknowledged HPV vaccine as a preventive measure against HPV infection. Impact on self-esteem was higher among women than men (90.3% vs 60.4%, [p?HPV awareness and age; in women they were higher education and anatomic location; external GW had a higher impact on sexual life in women (83% vs. 66%; [p?=?0.05]). Conclusions We found a low awareness of HPV and low knowledge on the vaccine as a preventive measure for associated diseases even in patients suffering from genital warts, highlighting the need for communication and education on HPV. Greater impact on self-esteem in women might reflect higher health consciousness among Latin American women. PMID:23530591

  19. A case of HPV and acquired genital lymphangioma: over-lapping clinical features.

    PubMed

    Cestaro, Giovanni; De Rosa, Michele; Gentile, Maurizio; Massaron, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic malformation or lymphangioma is a benign proliferation of the lymphatics accounting for 4% of all vascular malformations and 26% of all benign vascular tumors. There are several reports about genital lymphangiomas mimicking venereal lesions, such as genital warts. Hereby we described a case of a 24 year old man affected by multiple vesicles and warts in genital area. All hematological and biochemical parameters, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Treponema Pallidum tests, C1-Inhibitor and C1-Q values were within limits. An accurate fulguration and wide excision of bigger lesions were performed. Histological examination showed numerous dilated lymphatic vessels in the superficial dermis with infiltration of inflammatory cells, that is a histopathological picture compatible with genital lymphangioma. Considering our clinical suspicion of condylomatosis, HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) Polimerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Genotyping, named INNOLiPA test, was performed, that revealed a genital infection by HPV - genotype 6. We think that our case can be considered an example of HPV infection and acquired genital lymphangioma overlap clinical syndrome. The patient presented any lesions one year after the procedure at follow-up examination. PMID:25818349

  20. Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and types among Turkish women at a gynecology outpatient unit

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-known pathogen for lower genital tract neoplasias, yet little is known regarding HPV prevalence in Turkey. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV DNA and to determine HPV types distribution among women with normal and abnormal cytology. Methods A total of five hundred seven (n = 507) women were retrospectively evaluated between 2004-2008. Conventional polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the presence of HPV types in cervicovaginal samples obtained from patients during gynecologic examination. Results One hundred four (n = 104) of the women were excluded from the study because of the incomplete data and a total of 403 women were used for the final analysis. There were, 93 (23%) women with cytologic abnormality and 310 (77%) women with normal cytology. Overall, 23% of the women was HPV positive. The overall prevalence of HPV in women with abnormal Pap smears was 36% (93/403), of which in ASCUS 22%, LSIL 51% and HSIL 60%. Also, HPV DNA was positive in 20% of the women with normal cervical cytology. The most common HPV types in cytologically normal women were as follows; HPV 16 (36%), HPV 6 (22%) and HPV 18 (13%). The rate of other HPV types were as follows; HPV11 4.4%, HPV45 4.4%, HPV90 4.4%, HPV35 2.2%, HPV67 2.2%, HPV81 2.2%, and multiple type HPVs 8.9%. The most common HPV types in cytologically abnormal women were HPV 16 (35%), HPV6 (19%) and HPV18 (8%). The rate of multiple HPV infections in women with normal Pap test was 2.2%. Conclusion HPV prevalence and type distribution in this study were similar to that reported worldwide at least in our study population. Hovewer, HPV prevalence was more common compared with previous studies reported from Turkey. This might be related with methodology and hospital based patient accrual and high rate of women with abnormal cytology. Further population based prospective studies are needed to eliminate the drawbacks of our study and to determine nonhospital based HPV prevalence in Turkish women. PMID:19948015

  1. Integrative approach to diagnosis of genital human papillomaviruses (HPV) infection of female.

    PubMed

    Dunjic, Momir; Stanisic, Slavisa; Krstic, Dejan; Stanisic, Miodrag; Ignjatic, Z Jovanovic; Dunjic, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus from the papillomavirus family that is capable of infecting humans. Some types of HPVs cause warts, while others can lead to cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, oropharynx and anus. High-risk human papillomavirus (hr HPV) has been detected in almost all cervical squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas. All patients examined by colposcopy. Cervical swab is routinely done and patients are screened with both HPV DNA by Real Time Polimerase Chain Reaction (RT PCR) testing and Pap testing. Pictures obtained by colposcopy were examined by indirect Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT) by using reference control substance (RCS): HPV 16, HPV 18, and Integrin ?5 ?1. BDORT was developed by Prof. Omura Y. of New York and received U.S. patent in 1993. For detection of HPV DNA we used RT PCR and standard Qiagen method which detect 18 types (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 68, 6, 11, 42, 43, 44) of HPV from smear. From 63 patients where is BDORT indicated presence of HPV, in 49 patients (77.8%) RT PCR confirmed presence of HPV. From 63 patients in 54 patients (85.7%), we detected, by colposcopic exam, some kind of lesions associated with HPV infection. Results obtained by RT PCR: one type (1/18) of DNA HPV in 25 patients (51.02%), 2 types (2/18) in 15 patients (30.61%) and 3 types (3/18) in 9 patients (18.37%). Although BDORT results usually have higher sensitivity and detection rate is much higher, it can be used together with RT PCR in detection of HPV and cervical lesions associated with HPV infection. PMID:25693306

  2. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection in pregnant women and mother-to-child transmission of genital HPV genotypes: a prospective study in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies on HPV infection in pregnant women and HPV transmission to the child have yielded inconsistent results. Methods To estimate mother-to-child HPV transmission we carried out a prospective cohort study that included 66 HPV-positive and 77 HPV-negative pregnant women and their offspring attending a maternity hospital in Barcelona. To estimate HPV prevalence and genotype distribution in pregnancy we also carried out a related screening survey of cervical HPV-DNA detection among 828 pregnant women. Cervical cells from the mother were collected at pregnancy (mean of 31 weeks) and at the 6-week post-partum visit. Exfoliated cells from the mouth and external genitalia of the infants were collected around birth, at the 6-week post-partum visit, and around 3, 6, 12, and 24 months of age. All samples were tested for HPV using PCR. Associations between potential determinants of HPV infection in pregnant women and of HPV positivity in infants were also explored by logistic regression modelling. Results Overall cervical HPV-DNA detection in pregnant women recruited in the HPV screening survey was 6.5% (54/828). Sexual behavior-related variables, previous histories of genital warts or sexually transmitted infections, and presence of cytological abnormalities were statistically significantly and positively associated with HPV DNA detection in pregnant women recruited in the cohort. At 418 infant visits and a mean follow-up time of 14 months, 19.7% of infants born to HPV-positive mothers and 16.9% of those born to HPV-negative mothers tested HPV positive at some point during infants' follow-up. The most frequently detected genotype both in infants and mothers was HPV-16, after excluding untyped HPV infections. We found a strong and statistically significant association between mother's and child's HPV status at the 6-week post-partum visit. Thus, children of mothers' who were HPV-positive at the post-partum visit were about 5 times more likely to test HPV-positive than children of corresponding HPV-negative mothers (p = 0.02). Conclusion This study confirms that the risk of vertical transmission of HPV genotypes is relatively low. HPV persistence in infants is a rare event. These data also indicate that vertical transmission may not be the sole source of HPV infections in infants and provides partial evidence for horizontal mother-to-child HPV transmission. PMID:19473489

  3. Evaluating the Early Benefit of Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine on Genital Warts in Belgium: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Dominiak-Felden, Geraldine; Gobbo, Corrado; Simondon, Franois

    2015-01-01

    Genital warts (GWs) are common, with about 5% to 10% of people having at least one episode in their lifetime. They develop about 2-3 months after infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes 6 and 11. The prophylactic quadrivalent HPV vaccine (qHPV), protects against HPV6/11 infections and diseases. In Belgium, HPV vaccines started to be reimbursed in 2007 and have been fully reimbursed since December 2008 for women 12 to 18 years old. This study aimed at evaluating the real-life benefit of qHPV vaccine introduction in Belgium on GWs by measuring both vaccine impact (VI) at a population level and the direct effect of the qHPV vaccine at an individual level (vaccine effectiveness (VE)), using data from a large sick-fund (MLOZ) reimbursement database. A first reimbursement for imiquimod (most common first-line GWs treatment in Belgium) was used as a surrogate for a first GWs episode; reimbursement of qHPV vaccine was used as surrogate for vaccination. VI was estimated by comparing the incidence of GWs before and after qHPV vaccine introduction in Belgium (ecologic evaluation). VE was assessed by comparing GWs incidences in vaccinated vs. unvaccinated women, among women eligible for HPV vaccination. VI was evaluated in 9,223,384 person-years. Overall, GWs incidence rates decreased significantly between the pre- and post-vaccination periods (-8.1% (95% CI: -15.3; -0.3) for men and women aged 18-59 years. This decrease was highest in women targeted by the HPV vaccination programme (-72.1% (95% CI: -77.9; -64.7) in women aged 16-22 years, with a 43% vaccine uptake in 2013). A significant decrease was also observed in men aged 16-22 years (-51.1%, 95%CI: -67.6; -26.2), suggesting herd-protection. VE was evaluated in 369,881 person-years. Age-adjusted VE for fully vaccinated women was 88.0% (95% CI: 79.4; 93.0). VE was higher when the first dose was given younger and remained high for over 4 years post-vaccination in all ages. High VI and VE of the qHPV vaccine were observed in a real-life setting in Belgium. PMID:26147096

  4. Evaluating the Early Benefit of Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine on Genital Warts in Belgium: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Dominiak-Felden, Geraldine; Gobbo, Corrado; Simondon, Franois

    2015-01-01

    Genital warts (GWs) are common, with about 5% to 10% of people having at least one episode in their lifetime. They develop about 23 months after infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes 6 and 11. The prophylactic quadrivalent HPV vaccine (qHPV), protects against HPV6/11 infections and diseases. In Belgium, HPV vaccines started to be reimbursed in 2007 and have been fully reimbursed since December 2008 for women 12 to 18 years old. This study aimed at evaluating the real-life benefit of qHPV vaccine introduction in Belgium on GWs by measuring both vaccine impact (VI) at a population level and the direct effect of the qHPV vaccine at an individual level (vaccine effectiveness (VE)), using data from a large sick-fund (MLOZ) reimbursement database. A first reimbursement for imiquimod (most common first-line GWs treatment in Belgium) was used as a surrogate for a first GWs episode; reimbursement of qHPV vaccine was used as surrogate for vaccination. VI was estimated by comparing the incidence of GWs before and after qHPV vaccine introduction in Belgium (ecologic evaluation). VE was assessed by comparing GWs incidences in vaccinated vs. unvaccinated women, among women eligible for HPV vaccination. VI was evaluated in 9,223,384 person-years. Overall, GWs incidence rates decreased significantly between the pre- and post-vaccination periods (-8.1% (95% CI: -15.3; -0.3) for men and women aged 1859 years. This decrease was highest in women targeted by the HPV vaccination programme (-72.1% (95% CI: -77.9; -64.7) in women aged 1622 years, with a 43% vaccine uptake in 2013). A significant decrease was also observed in men aged 16-22 years (-51.1%, 95%CI: -67.6; -26.2), suggesting herd-protection. VE was evaluated in 369,881 person-years. Age-adjusted VE for fully vaccinated women was 88.0% (95% CI: 79.4; 93.0). VE was higher when the first dose was given younger and remained high for over 4 years post-vaccination in all ages. High VI and VE of the qHPV vaccine were observed in a real-life setting in Belgium. PMID:26147096

  5. HPV vaccine works against nine viral types.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    In a phase III study, Merck's new V503 human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine prevented 97% of high-grade, precancerous vaginal, vulvar, and cervical disease caused by HPV types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58. The new vaccine also generated immune responses to HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18 that were as good as or better than those generated by the company's Gardasil vaccine. PMID:24402954

  6. Concordance of human papillomavirus types detected on the surface and in the tissue of genital lesions in men.

    PubMed

    Anic, Gabriella M; Messina, Jane L; Stoler, Mark H; Rollison, Dana E; Stockwell, Heather; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Gage, Christine; Silva, Roberto Jose C; Baggio, Maria L; Salmern, Jorge; Giuliano, Anna R

    2013-09-01

    Swabbing the surface of a genital lesion to obtain a sample for HPV DNA testing is less invasive than a biopsy, but may not represent HPV types present in the lesion tissue. The objective of this study was to examine the concordance of HPV types detected in swab and biopsy samples from 165 genital lesions from men ages 18-70. Lesions included 90 condyloma, 10 penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PeIN), 23 non-condyloma with a known histology, and 42 lesions with an undetermined histology. All lesions were sampled by swabbing the surface of the lesion with a pre-wetted Dacron swab and taking a shave biopsy. HPV genotyping was performed using Linear Array for swab samples and INNO-LiPA for biopsy samples. The kappa and McNemar statistics were used to compare the concordance of detecting HPV types in swab and biopsy samples. Both sampling methods had high agreement for detection of HPV DNA in condyloma (87.8% agreement) and PeIN (100% agreement). There was also high concordance for detection of HPV16 (kappa?=?1.00) and HPV18 (kappa?=?1.00) in PeIN, however, agreement was low to moderate for detecting HPV6 (kappa?=?0.31) and HPV11 (kappa?=?0.56) in condyloma. Low to moderate agreement was also observed between sampling methods for detecting individual HPV types in the non-condyloma and lesions with an indefinite histology. The results suggest that obtaining a biopsy in addition to swabbing the surface of a lesion may provide additional information about specific HVP types associated with male genital lesions. PMID:23852680

  7. Concordance of human papillomavirus types detected on the surface and in the tissue of genital lesions in men

    PubMed Central

    Anic, Gabriella M.; Messina, Jane L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Rollison, Dana E.; Stockwell, Heather; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Gage, Christine; Silva, Roberto Jose C.; Baggio, Maria L.; Salmern, Jorge; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Swabbing the surface of a genital lesion to obtain a sample for HPV DNA testing is less invasive than a biopsy, but may not represent HPV types present in the lesion tissue. The objective of this study was to examine the concordance of HPV types detected in swab and biopsy samples from 165 genital lesions from men ages 18-70. Lesions included 90 condyloma, 10 penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PeIN), 23 non-condyloma with a known histology, and 42 lesions with an undetermined histology. All lesions were sampled by swabbing the surface of the lesion with a pre-wetted Dacron swab and taking a shave biopsy. HPV genotyping was performed using Linear Array for swab samples and INNO-LiPA for biopsy samples. The kappa and McNemar statistics were used to compare the concordance of detecting HPV types in swab and biopsy samples. Both sampling methods had high agreement for detection of HPV DNA in condyloma (87.8% agreement) and PeIN (100% agreement). There was also high concordance for detection of HPV16 (kappa = 1.00) and HPV18 (kappa = 1.00) in PeIN, however, agreement was low to moderate for detecting HPV6 (kappa = 0.31) and HPV11 (kappa = 0.56) in condyloma. Low to moderate agreement was also observed between sampling methods for detecting individual HPV types in the non-condyloma and lesions with an indefinite histology. The results suggest that obtaining a biopsy in addition to swabbing the surface of a lesion may provide additional information about specific HVP types associated with male genital lesions. PMID:23852680

  8. Therapeutic benefits of carbon dioxide (CO2) laser on single-site HPV lesions in the lower female genital tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urru, Giovanni; Moretti, Gianfranco

    1998-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown contradictory variable percentages of recurrent HPV lesions, after various therapies. The present study therefore evaluates the effectiveness of CO2 laser vaporization in the treatment of single-site HPV lesions of the lower female genital tract in order to confirm the conviction that physical therapy alone, in agreement with some findings reported in the literature, is capable of guaranteeing a high cure rate in selected patients. From January 1995 to June 1996, seventy- five female patients were treated with CO2 laser vaporization for single-site genital HPV lesions, some of which were associated with low-grade intra-epithelial neoplasia. The success rate after 12 months proved to be 97%. The pre-existing clinical symptoms disappeared in all the patients treated. No complication in the vaporization procedure was encountered.

  9. Efficacy of the HPV-16/18 AS04-Adjuvanted Vaccine Against Low-Risk HPV Types (PATRICIA Randomized Trial): An Unexpected Observation

    PubMed Central

    Szarewski, Anne; Skinner, S. Rachel; Garland, Suzanne M.; Romanowski, Barbara; Schwarz, Tino F.; Apter, Dan; Chow, Song-Nan; Paavonen, Jorma; Del Rosario-Raymundo, M. Rowena; Teixeira, Julio C.; De Carvalho, Newton S.; Castro-Sanchez, Maria; Castellsagu, Xavier; Poppe, Willy A. J.; De Sutter, Philippe; Huh, Warner; Chatterjee, Archana; Tjalma, Wiebren A.; Ackerman, Ronald T.; Martens, Mark; Papp, Kim A.; Bajo-Arenas, Jose; Harper, Diane M.; Torn, Aureli; David, Marie-Pierre; Struyf, Frank; Lehtinen, Matti; Dubin, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Background.?Public Health England has reported a decrease of up to 20.8% in new diagnoses of external genital warts (GWs) among women aged <19 years since the national vaccination program with the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine began in 2008. A post hoc analysis of the phase III PATRICIA (PApilloma TRIal against Cancer In young Adults) trial (NCT00122681) was performed to ascertain whether protection against low-risk HPV types was apparent. Methods.?Vaccine efficacy (VE) at 48 months was assessed against 6-month persistent infection (6MPI) with low-risk HPV types in the total vaccinated cohort (TVC) and in the TVC naive (for 25 HPV types tested) populations. Results.?In the TVC naive cohort, VE against 6MPI (95% confidence interval) was 34.5% (11.3 to 51.8) for HPV-6/11, 34.9% (9.1 to 53.7) for HPV-6, 30.3% (?45.0 to 67.5) for HPV-11, and 49.5% (21.0 to 68.3) for HPV-74. Conclusions.?The HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine appears to have moderate efficacy against persistent infections with a number of low-risk HPV types (HPV-6/11/74), which are responsible for the majority of external GWs, and recently, antibody and cell-mediated immune response to HPV-6/11 have been observed. These findings may help to explain the decrease in external GW diagnoses seen in England. PMID:24092907

  10. Prevalence and Determinants of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Infection in Male Genital Warts

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Jin; Seo, Juhyung; Ha, Seong-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prevalence and type distribution of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in genital warts of Korean men, and for the first time, to describe the risk factors associated with high-risk HPV infection in male genital warts. Materials and Methods In a single private clinic, 150 consecutive male patients with histopathologic-confirmed genital warts who underwent HPV genotyping by use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were included in this study. We detected HPV DNA in male genital warts and evaluated HPV type distribution, especially high-risk HPV types, by use of PCR. The associations between HPV prevalence and various characteristics, such as age, circumcision status, type of genital warts diagnosis (new vs. recurrent), number of lesions, site of lesions, and gross morphology, were assessed by use of unconditional multiple logistic regression. Results High-risk HPV types were detected in 31 cases (23.5%), and of these, 27 cases (20.5%) contained both high-risk and low-risk HPV types. The most frequently detected high-risk HPV types were HPV16 (6.8%), HPV33 (4.5%), HPV18 (2.3%), and HPV68 (2.3%). In particular, the prevalence of infection with HPV16 and/or HPV18 was 8.3% (11 of 132). In the multivariate analysis, lesions located at sites including the base of the penis or the pubic area, papular or mixed genital warts, and lack of circumcision significantly increased the association with high-risk HPV infection in male genital warts. Conclusions The prevalence of high-risk HPV infection was substantial in male genital warts. The site and morphology of lesions and circumcision status were significantly associated with the prevalence of high-risk HPV infection. PMID:24648877

  11. HPV and Genital Warts among Peruvian Men Who Have Sex with Men and Transgender People: Knowledge, Attitudes and Treatment Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Nurea, Csar R.; Brown, Brandon; Galea, Jerome T.; Snchez, Hugo; Blas, Magaly M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have assessed the epidemiology of HPV infection among MSM, but no qualitative studies have specifically assessed how HPV and genital warts (GW) affect South American men who have sex with men (MSM) and male-to-female transgendered women (TG). This study explored the knowledge, attitudes and experiences of Peruvian MSM and TG regarding HPV and GW. Methods We performed a qualitative study consisting of fifteen in-depth interviews and three focus groups carried out in Lima, Peru with diverse MSM and TG groups, including sex workers. Resulting data were analyzed by applying a systematic comparative and descriptive content analysis. Results While knowledge of HPV was limited, awareness of GW was common, particularly among TG persons and sex workers. Still, few participants recognized that GW are sexually transmitted, and many had problems differentiating between GW and other STI/anogenital conditions. Stigmatizing experiences were common during sexual encounters with people who had visible GW. Shame, emotional and physical troubles, and embarrassing sexual experiences were reported by individuals with GW. Search for treatment was mediated by peers, but stigma and apparent health services inability to deal with GW limited the access to effective medical care. Conclusions In Peru, public health interventions should strengthen services for HPV/GW management and increase accurate knowledge of the transmission, treatment, and sequelae of HPV/GW in MSM and TG populations. PMID:23516536

  12. HPV Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 1 • 2 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Genital Warts (HPV) I Can't Afford Treatment for Genital Warts. What Should I Do? Do I Need a Pelvic Exam if I Had the HPV Vaccine? Can You Still Get Genital Warts If You've Had All ...

  13. HPV DNA test

    MedlinePLUS

    The HPV DNA test is used to check for high-risk HPV infection in women. HPV infection around the genitals is ... warts spread when you have sex. The HPV-DNA test is generally not recommended for detecting low- ...

  14. Coinfection of human foreskin fragments with multiple human papillomavirus types (HPV-11, -40, and -LVX82/MM7) produces regionally separate HPV infections within the same athymic mouse xenograft.

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, N D; Koltun, W A; Cladel, N M; Budgeon, L R; Reed, C A; Kreider, J W; Welsh, P A; Patrick, S D; Yang, H

    1997-01-01

    The athymic mouse xenograft system was used to prepare infectious stocks of two additional anogenital tissue-targeting human papillomaviruses (HPVs) in a manner similar to that for the development of infectious stocks of HPV-11. An anal condyloma from a transplant patient was used as material for extraction of infectious virus, and human foreskin fragments were incubated with the virus suspension and transplanted subrenally into athymic mice. Partial viral sequencing indicated that two rare HPV types (HPV-40 and HPVLVX82/MM7) were concurrently present in both the patient condyloma and the foreskin xenografts, and passage of both types was achieved as a mixed infection with HPV-40 predominating. Xenografts that developed from simultaneous infection of human foreskin fragments with HPV-11, -40, and -LVX82/MM7 virions produced regionally separate areas of HPV-11 and -40 infection as determined by in situ hybridization. In addition, in situ hybridization with HPV-40 and HPVLVX82/MM7 DNA probes demonstrated that both of these HPV types were present as adjacent but separate infections within the same anal condyloma of the transplant patient. These studies indicate that multiple HPV types can simultaneously infect genital tissue and that each HPV type predominantly maintains regional separation within the same papilloma. PMID:9311811

  15. Declining Genital Warts in Young Women in England Associated With HPV 16/18 Vaccination: An Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Soldan, Kate; Wetten, Sally; Mesher, David; Williams, Tim; Gill, O. Noel; Hughes, Gwenda

    2013-01-01

    Background.?Diagnoses of genital warts (GW) in genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics have been increasing in England for many years. In 2008, an HPV immunization program began with a bivalent vaccine (Cervarix). This was expected to markedly reduce infections and disease due to human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 but not HPV 6/11 infections or disease. However, from 2009 to 2011 there were decreases in reported diagnoses of GW in young females at GUM clinics. Methods.?Using data from GUM clinics and a sample of general practices (GPs) throughout England, we analyzed rates of GW diagnoses by age, year of diagnosis, and estimated immunization coverage. Results.?The overall reduction in GW diagnoses at GUM clinics between 2008 and 2011 was 13.3% among 16- to 19-year-old females, with the greatest decline of 20.8% in 17-year-olds. Declines were positively associated with estimated immunization coverage. A similar pattern was seen in GP diagnoses, but not among older women, and for other GUM consultations. Conclusions.?Several factors might contribute to declines in GW. However, the size and pattern of the declines strongly suggest that we are observing an unexpected, moderately protective effect of HPV 16/18 vaccination against GW. PMID:24092908

  16. Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Type Distribution and HPV Type 16 E6 Variants in Two Spanish Population Groups with Different Levels of HPV Infection Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, M.; Torres, M.; Muoz, L.; Fernndez-Garca, E.; Canals, J.; Cabornero, A. I.; Aguilar, E.; Ballesteros, J.; del Amo, J.; Garca-Siz, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types and HPV type 16 (HPV16) variant distribution in two Spanish population groups, commercial sex workers and imprisoned women (CSW/IPW) and the general population. A multicenter cross-sectional study of 1,889 women from five clinical settings in two Spanish cities was conducted from May to November 2004. Oncogenic HPV infection was tested by an Hybrid Capture II (HC2) test, and positive samples were genotyped by direct sequencing using three different primer sets in L1 (MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+) and E6/E7. HPV16 variants were identified by sequencing the E6, E2, and L1 regions. Four hundred twenty-five samples were positive for the HC2 test, 31.5% from CSW/IPW and 10.7% from the general population. HPV16 was the most frequent type. Distinct profiles of oncogenic HPV type prevalence were observed across the two populations. In order of decreasing frequency, HPV types 16, 31, 58, 66, 56, and 18 were most frequent in CSW/IPW women, and types 16, 31, 52, 68, 51, and 53 were most frequent in the general population. We analyzed HPV16 intratype variants, and a large majority (78.7%) belonged to the European lineage. AA variants were detected in 16.0% of cases. African variants belonging to classes Af1 (4.0%) and Af2 (1.3%) were detected. Different HPV types and HPV16 intratype variants are involved in oncogenic HPV infections in our population. These results suggest that HPV type distribution differs in CSW/IPW women and in the general population, although further analysis is necessary. PMID:16597872

  17. Genital Tract Leukocytes and Shedding of Genital HIV Type 1 RNA

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brenna L.; Wang, Chia-Ching; DeLong, Allison K.; Liu, Tao; Kojic, Erna Milu; Kurpewski, Jaclynn; Ingersoll, Jessica; Mayer, Kenneth; Caliendo, Angela M.; Cu-Uvin, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background The mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission via heterosexual intercourse is unknown. We sought to determine whether the presence of inflammatory cells in the vagina is associated with the presence of genital tract HIV type 1 (HIV-1) RNA. Methods Analysis of a longitudinal prospective cohort was performed. Women with HIV-1 infection were assessed with use of paired plasma and cervicovaginal lavage specimens. Viral load measurements were performed using nucleic acid sequence—based amplification. White blood cells found in the genital tract (GT WBCs) were quantified using a hemacytometer. Common lower genital tract infections assessed for association with viral shedding (i.e., genital tract viral load [GTVL]) included bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis, and trichomoniasis. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate the prevalence and odds of detectable GTVL by GT WBC. The association was examined both in the presence and in the absence of lower genital tract infections. Results A total of 97 women and 642 visits were included in the analysis. Median duration of follow-up was 30.4 months. Thirty women (31%) had detectable GTVL at any visit. The median CD4 cell count at baseline was 525 cells/μL. Most women were antiretroviral therapy naive at baseline. After adjustment for plasma viral load, the odds of detectable GTVL increased as GT WBC increased, with an odds ratio of 1.36 (95% confidence interval, 1.1–1.7) per 1000-cell increase in GT WBC among women without lower genital tract infections. After adjustment for plasma viral load and lower genital tract infections by incorporating them in a regression model, GT WBC remained significantly associated with GTVL, with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.22 (95% confidence interval, 1.08–1.37). Conclusions The presence of GT WBC is associated with an increased risk of detectable GTVL. PMID:18808359

  18. HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in anal carcinomas worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, L; Saunier, M; Alvarado, I; Quirós, B; Salmeron, J; Shin, HR; Pirog, E; Guimerà, N; Hernández, GA; Felix, A; Clavero, O; Lloveras, B; Kasamatsu, E; Goodman, MT; Hernandez, BY; Laco, J; Tinoco, L; Geraets, DT; Lynch, CF; Mandys, V; Poljak, M; Jach, R; Verge, J; Clavel, C; Ndiaye, C; Klaustermeier, J; Cubilla, A; Castellsagué, X; Bravo, IG; Pawlita, M; Quint, W; Muñoz, N; Bosch, FX; Sanjosé, S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about the human papillomaviruses (HPV) types in anal cancers in some world regions is scanty. Here we describe the HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in a series of invasive anal cancers and anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN) grades 2/3 from 24 countries. We analyzed 43 AIN 2/3 cases and 496 anal cancers diagnosed from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 116 cancers was further tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV-associated transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance in cancer dataset. HPV DNA was detected in 88.3% of anal cancers (95%CI:85.1–91.0%) and in 95.4% of AIN 2/3 (95%CI:84.2–99.4%). Among cancers, the highest prevalence was observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, in younger patients and in North American geographical region. There were no statistically significant differences in prevalence by gender. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV type detected in both cancers (80.7%) and AIN 2/3 lesions (75.4%). HPV18 was the second most common type in invasive cancers (3.6%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 95% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers. In view of HPV DNA results and high proportion of p16INK4a overexpression, infection by HPV is most likely to be a necessary cause for anal cancers in both men and women. The large contribution of HPV16 reinforces the potential impact of HPV vaccines in the prevention of these lesions. PMID:24817381

  19. Quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16, 18) recombinant vaccine (gardasil()): a review of its use in the prevention of premalignant anogenital lesions, cervical and anal cancers, and genital warts.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Paul L

    2014-07-01

    Quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) [types 6, 11, 16, 18] recombinant vaccine (Gardasil(); Silgard()) is composed of virus-like particles formed by self-assembly of recombinant L1 capsid protein from each of HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18. It is indicated for use from the age of 9years as a two- or three-dose vaccination course over 6months for the prevention of premalignant anogenital lesions, cervical and anal cancers, and genital warts caused by the vaccine HPV types. In placebo-controlled trials, quadrivalent HPV vaccine provided high-level protection against infection or disease caused by the vaccine HPV types over 2-4years in females aged 15-45years who were negative for the vaccine HPV types, and provided a degree of cross-protection against certain non-vaccine HPV types. The vaccine also provided high-level protection against persistent infection, anogenital precancerous lesions and genital warts caused by the vaccine HPV types over 3years in susceptible males aged 16-26years. Protection has been demonstrated for up to 8years. In subjects who were negative for the vaccine HPV types, high seroconversion rates and high levels of anti-HPV antibodies were observed in females of all age ranges from 9 to 45years and in males aged 9-26years. The vaccine was generally well tolerated and was usually predicted to be cost effective in girls and young women. Therefore, quadrivalent HPV vaccine offers an effective means to substantially reduce the burden of HPV-related anogenital disease in females and males, particularly cervical cancer and genital warts. PMID:25022951

  20. Nuclear matrix attachment regions of human papillomavirus type 16 point toward conservation of these genomic elements in all genital papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Tan, S H; Bartsch, D; Schwarz, E; Bernard, H U

    1998-05-01

    The gene functions, transcriptional regulation, and genome replication of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been extensively studied. Thus far, however, there has been little research on the organization of HPV genomes in the nuclei of infected cells. As a first step to understand how chromatin and suprachromatin structures may modulate the life cycles of these viruses, we have identified and mapped interactions of HPV DNAs with the nuclear matrix. The endogenous genomes of HPV type 16 (HPV-16) which are present in SiHa, HPKI, and HPKII cells, adhere in vivo to the nuclear matrixes of these cell lines. A tight association with the nuclear matrix in vivo may be common to all genital HPV types, as the genomes of HPV-11, HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-33 showed high affinity in vitro to preparations of the nuclear matrix of C33A cells, as did the well-known nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) of the cellular beta interferon gene. Affinity to the nuclear matrix is not evenly spread over the HPV-16 genome. Five genomic segments have strong MAR properties, while the other parts of the genome have low or no affinity. Some of the five MARs correlate with known cis-responsive elements: a strong MAR lies in the 5' segment of the long control region (LCR), and another one lies in the E6 gene, flanking the HPV enhancer, the replication origin, and the E6 promoter. The strongest MAR coincides with the E5 gene and the early-late intergenic region. Weak MAR activity is present in the E1 and E2 genes and in the 3' part of L2. The in vitro map of MAR activity appears to reflect MAR properties in vivo, as we found for two selected fragments with and without MAR activity. As is typical for many MARs, the two segments with highest affinity, namely, the 5' LCR and the early-late intergenic region, have an extraordinarily high A-T content (up to 85%). It is likely that these MARs have specific functions in the viral life cycle, as MARs predicted by nucleotide sequence analysis, patterns of A-T content, transcription factor YY1 binding sites, and likely topoisomerase II cleavage sites are conserved in similar positions throughout all genital HPVs. PMID:9557642

  1. Variability of human immunodeficiency virus-1 in the female genital reservoir during genital reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    LeGoff, J; Roques, P; Jenabian, M-A; Charpentier, C; Brochier, C; Bouhlal, H; Gresenguet, G; Frost, E; Pepin, J; Mayaud, P; Belec, L

    2015-09-01

    Clinical and subclinical genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactivations have been associated with increases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 genital shedding. Whether HSV-2 shedding contributes to the selection of specific genital HIV-1 variants remains unknown. We evaluated the genetic diversity of genital and blood HIV-1 RNA and DNA in 14 HIV-1/HSV-2-co-infected women, including seven with HSV-2 genital reactivation, and seven without as controls. HIV-1 DNA and HIV-1 RNA env V1-V3 sequences in paired blood and genital samples were compared. The HSV-2 selection pressure on HIV was estimated according to the number of synonymous substitutions (dS), the number of non-synonymous substitutions (dN) and the dS/dN ratio within HIV quasi-species. HIV-1 RNA levels in cervicovaginal secretions were higher in women with HSV-2 replication than in controls (p0.02). Plasma HIV-1 RNA and genital HIV-1 RNA and DNA were genetically compartmentalized. No differences in dS, dN and the dS/dN ratio were observed between the study groups for either genital HIV-1 RNA or plasma HIV-1 RNA. In contrast, dS and dN in genital HIV-1 DNA were significantly higher in patients with HSV-2 genital reactivation (p <0.01 and p <0.05, respectively). The mean of the dS/dN ratio in genital HIV-1 DNA was slightly higher in patients with HSV-2 genital replication, indicating a trend for purifying selection (p 0.056). HSV-2 increased the genetic diversity of genital HIV-1 DNA. These observations confirm molecular interactions between HSV-2 and HIV-1 at the genital tract level. PMID:26003280

  2. Accumulation of RNA homologous to human papillomavirus type 16 open reading frames in genital precancers

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, C.P.; Nuovo, G.; Friedman, D.; Silverstein, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The accumulation of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)-specific RNAs in tissue sections from biopsies of patients with genital precancers was studied by in situ hybridization with single-stranded /sup 35/S-labeled RNA. These analyses revealed that the most abundant early-region RNAs were derived from the E4 and E5 open reading frames (ORFs). RNAs homologous to the E6/E7 ORFs were also detected, whereas RNAs homologous to the intervening E1 ORF were not. This suggest that the E4 and E5 mRNAs are derived by splicing to the upstream E6/E7 ORFs, consistent with studies of HPV-11 in condylomata. Abundant RNAs homologous to the 5' portion of L1 were also detected. These RNAs were localized to the apical strata of the epithelium. HPV-16 RNAs accumulated in discrete regions of these lesions, and when present were most abundant in the upper cell layers of the precancerous epithelium. RNAs homologous to early ORFs were also detected in some germinal cells within the basal layer of the epithelium.

  3. HPV infection-associated anogenital cyto-colpo-histological findings and molecular typing in HIV-positive women.

    PubMed

    Tso, F K; Rodrigues, C L L; Levi, J E; Mattosinho de Castro Ferraz, M G; Speck, N M G; Ribalta, J C L

    2015-01-01

    HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV) coinfection is increasing, especially in the anal canal (AC) and cervico-vaginal regions. We identified anal epithelium abnormalities related to high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) lesions in the lower genital tracts (LGTs) of HIV-positive women, described the HPV genotypes identified, and assessed the expression of E6/E7 oncogenes in coinfected patients. Ninety-eight women were enrolled in groups combining HIV status and presence or absence of HPV in the LGT. Anal and cervical smears were collected for cytology and HR-HPV assays using Cobas() and/or PapilloCheck(). Samples with highly oncogenic HPV genotypes were confirmed by NucliSENS EasyQ(). Forty-two HIV-positive (25-52; mean age 39.5) and 56 HIV-negative (18-58; mean age 35.7) patients were included. E2 and C1 groups presented AC alterations (P = 0.002); altered images for high-resolution anoscopy were higher in E1 and C2 (P < 0.001). Of the 29 women with alterations, 41.38% were HIV-negative and 58.62% were HIV-positive (P < 0.001). HIV-positive patients accounted for 29% of the anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (P = 0.015). The Cobas() positive result frequency was higher in three AC groups than in the other groups. There was variation in the number of HPV types in the cervico-vaginal samples among the study groups (P < 0.001). Anal cytology and anoscopy showed more altered findings in HIV-positive patients with HPV in the LGT. HR-HPV anal infections by various genotypes are common and are associated with cervical infections in HIV-positive patients. E6/E7 expression is apparently more common in the AC of HIV-positive women. PMID:26782408

  4. HPV Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... grant from Roche Diagnostics Corporation . Elsewhere On The Web Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Genital HPV Infection - CDC Fact Sheet Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Making Sense of Your Pap & HPV Test Results Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: HPV ...

  5. Perceptions of HPV, genital warts, and penile/anal cancer and high-risk sexual behaviors among men who have sex with men in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lau, Joseph T F; Wang, Zixin; Lau, Mason; Lai, Coco H Y

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence of HIV and HPV is high among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. It is unclear whether cognitive and affective responses related to HPV and HPV-related diseases are negatively associated with HIV-related risk behaviors among MSM. This cross-sectional study interviewed 449 adult Chinese MSM in Hong Kong. The prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) and having had anal sex with more than one man in the last 6 months (multiple male sex partnerships) was 39.0 and 71.3 %, respectively. After adjusting for four significant background variables (education level, cohabitation with a man, exposure to HIV prevention materials, and HIV voluntary counseling and testing), variables negatively associated with UAI and/or multiple male sex partnerships included (1) correct HPV-related knowledge (AOR = 0.48-0.66), (2) perceived susceptibility (AOR = 0.32-0.55) and perceived severity (AOR = 0.12-0.60) related to HPV and HPV-related diseases, and (3) fear towards contracting genital warts and penile/anal cancer (AOR = 0.40-0.55). Perceived high chance of contracting HPV was positively associated with multiple partnerships (AOR = 4.74). It is possible to reduce HIV-related risk behaviors by increasing levels of knowledge, cognitions, and fear related to HPV and related diseases. It is important to integrate prevention of HIV with prevention of sexually transmitted infections. Such interventions are warranted. PMID:23982568

  6. End-of-study safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of quadrivalent HPV (types 6, 11, 16, 18) recombinant vaccine in adult women 2445 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Castellsagu, X; Muoz, N; Pitisuttithum, P; Ferris, D; Monsonego, J; Ault, K; Luna, J; Myers, E; Mallary, S; Bautista, O M; Bryan, J; Vuocolo, S; Haupt, R M; Saah, A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous analyses from a randomised trial in women aged 2445 years have shown the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccine to be efficacious in the prevention of infection, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and external genital lesions (EGLs) related to HPV 6/11/16/18. In this report, we present end-of-study efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity data with a median follow-up time of 4.0 years. Methods: We enrolled 3819 2445-year-old women with no history of cervical disease or genital warts in the past 5 years. Women received quadrivalent vaccine or placebo at day 1, and at months 2 and 6. Ascertainment of CIN/EGL was accomplished through Pap testing, genital inspection, and cervicovaginal sampling (every 6 months). The main analysis was conducted in a per-protocol efficacy population (that received three doses, was naive to the relevant HPV types at day 1, and remained free of infection through month 7). Efficacy was also estimated in other naive and non-naive populations. Results: Vaccine efficacy against the combined incidence of persistent infection, CIN/EGL related to HPV6/11/16/18 in the per-protocol population was 88.7% (95% CI: 78.1, 94.8). Efficacy for women who were seropositive and DNA negative for the relevant vaccine HPV type at the time of enrolment who received at least 1 dose was 66.9% (95% CI: 4.3, 90.6). At month 48, 91.5, 92.0, 97.4, and 47.9% of vaccinated women were seropositive to HPV 6/11/16/18, respectively. No serious vaccine-related adverse experiences were reported. Conclusions: The qHPV vaccine demonstrated high efficacy, immunogenicity, and acceptable safety in women aged 2445 years, regardless of previous exposure to HPV vaccine type. PMID:21629249

  7. The E7 proteins of the nononcogenic human papillomavirus type 6b (HPV-6b) and of the oncogenic HPV-16 differ in retinoblastoma protein binding and other properties.

    PubMed Central

    Gage, J R; Meyers, C; Wettstein, F O

    1990-01-01

    The E7 early viral protein of the oncogenic human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) has been strongly implicated in the maintenance of the malignant phenotype in cervical cancers and cancer-derived cell lines. HPV-16 E7 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that can cooperate with ras to transform baby rat kidney cells, transactivates the adenovirus E2 promoter, and binds to the retinoblastoma (RB) protein. The E7 phosphoprotein of the nononcogenic HPV-6b, which is generally associated with benign genital warts, is similar to the HPV-16 E7 in amino acid sequence but differs dramatically in migration in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, sedimentation in nondenaturing glycerol gradients, and the ability to bind the RB protein. Our results indicate that the RB protein preferentially binds the phosphorylated form of HPV-6b E7, which comprises a minor fraction of the total E7 expressed in transiently transfected COS-7 cells. These characteristics may help to explain the difference in the oncogenic potential of the oncogenic and nononcogenic types of genital papillomaviruses. Images PMID:2153238

  8. Introduction and sustained high coverage of the HPV bivalent vaccine leads to a reduction in prevalence of HPV 16/18 and closely related HPV types

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, K; Pollock, K G J; Potts, A; Love, J; Cuschieri, K; Cubie, H; Robertson, C; Donaghy, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2008, a national human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation programme began in Scotland for 1213 year old females with a three-year catch-up campaign for those under the age of 18. Since 2008, three-dose uptake of bivalent vaccine in the routine cohort aged 1213 has exceeded 90% annually, while in the catch-up cohort overall uptake is 66%. Methods: To monitor the impact of HPV immunisation, a programme of national surveillance was established (pre and post introduction) which included yearly sampling and HPV genotyping of women attending for cervical screening at age 20. By linking individual vaccination, screening and HPV testing records, we aim to determine the impact of the immunisation programme on circulating type-specific HPV infection particularly for four outcomes: (i) the vaccine types HPV 16 or 18 (ii) types considered to be associated with cross-protection: HPV 31, 33 or 45; (iii) all other high-risk types and (iv) any HPV. Results: From a total of 4679 samples tested, we demonstrate that three doses (n=1100) of bivalent vaccine are associated with a significant reduction in prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 from 29.8% (95% confidence interval 28.3, 31.3%) to 13.6% (95% confidence interval 11.7, 15.8%). The data also suggest cross-protection against HPV 31, 33 and 45. HPV 51 and 56 emerged as the most prevalent (10.5% and 9.6%, respectively) non-vaccine high-risk types in those vaccinated, but at lower rates than HPV 16 (25.9%) in those unvaccinated. Conclusions: This data demonstrate the positive impact of bivalent vaccination on the prevalence of HPV 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 in the target population and is encouraging for countries which have achieved high-vaccine uptake. PMID:24736582

  9. More men than women make mucosal IgA antibodies to Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18: a study of oral HPV and oral HPV antibodies in a normal healthy population

    PubMed Central

    Marais, Dianne J; Sampson, Candice; Jeftha, Anthea; Dhaya, Dherendra; Passmore, Jo-Ann S; Denny, Lynette; Rybicki, Edward P; Van Der Walt, Eric; Stephen, Lawrence XG; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2006-01-01

    Background We have previously shown the high prevalence of oral anti-human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) antibodies in women with HPV-associated cervical neoplasia. It was postulated that the HPV antibodies were initiated after HPV antigenic stimulation at the cervix via the common mucosal immune system. The present study aimed to further evaluate the effectiveness of oral fluid testing for detecting the mucosal humoral response to HPV infection and to advance our limited understanding of the immune response to HPV. Methods The prevalence of oral HPV infection and oral antibodies to HPV types 16, 18 and 11 was determined in a normal, healthy population of children, adolescents and adults, both male and female, attending a dental clinic. HPV types in buccal cells were determined by DNA sequencing. Oral fluid was collected from the gingival crevice of the mouth by the OraSure method. HPV-16, HPV-18 and HPV-11 antibodies in oral fluid were detected by virus-like particle-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. As a reference group 44 women with cervical neoplasia were included in the study. Results Oral HPV infection was highest in children (9/114, 7.9%), followed by adolescents (4/78, 5.1%), and lowest in normal adults (4/116, 3.5%). The predominant HPV type found was HPV-13 (7/22, 31.8%) followed by HPV-32 (5/22, 22.7%). The prevalence of oral antibodies to HPV-16, HPV-18 and HPV-11 was low in children and increased substantially in adolescents and normal adults. Oral HPV-16 IgA was significantly more prevalent in women with cervical neoplasia (30/44, 68.2%) than the women from the dental clinic (18/69, 26.1% P = 0.0001). Significantly more adult men than women displayed oral HPV-16 IgA (30/47 compared with 18/69, OR 5.0, 95% CI 2.0912.1, P < 0.001) and HPV-18 IgA (17/47 compared with 13/69, OR 2.4, 95% CI 0.976.2, P = 0.04). Conclusion The increased prevalence of oral HPV antibodies in adolescent individuals compared with children was attributed to the onset of sexual activity. The increased prevalence of oral anti-HPV IgA in men compared with women was noteworthy considering reportedly fewer men than women make serum antibodies, and warrants further investigation. PMID:16762074

  10. More than 97% of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) was found with chrysotile asbestos & relatively smooth round tumor outline, and less than 3% was found with HPV-18 and tremolite asbestos & irregular sawtooth-like zigzag outline in breast cancer tissues in over 500 mammograms of female patients: their implications in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Jones, Marilyn K; Nihrane, Abdallah; Duvvi, Harsha; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu

    2013-01-01

    In the past, Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV-16) was considered to be the main cause of cancer in the oropharynx and genital organs. Cervical cancer of the uterus is the most well-known cancer associated with HPV-16. Among the oncogenic HPVs, types 16 and 18 are most responsible for the majority of the HPV-caused cancers. Recently, using EMF Resonance Phenomenon between 2 identical substances, we non-invasively measured HPV-16 and HPV-18 among 25 physicians and 25 dentists and found that all 50 have HPV-16 in oral cavities and oropharynx but not HPV-18. However most dentists have a stronger infection than physicians. Among them were 2 female dentists with breast cancer containing HPV-16 and strong infections of HPV-16 in the oral cavities and oropharynx. When the author checked their breast cancer positive areas as well as the mammograms of cancer positive areas, Chrysotile Asbestos co-existed with an infection of HPV-16. We then examined over 500 published mammograms of women with malignant breast cancer published by other institutes, and we found HPV-16 in more than 97% and HPV-18 in less than 3% of the breast cancer mammograms examined. Less than 0.4% of cases were found as a variety of combination of HPV-16 & HPV-18. We also discovered that breast cancer with HPV-16 always co-exists with increased Chrysotile Asbestos deposits, and the outline of the breast cancer positive area is a relatively smooth and round or oval shape, and breast cancer with HPV-18 always co-exists with increased Tremolite Asbestos, where the tumor outline is an irregular saw-tooth like zigzag pattern. Based on these findings, better methods of diagnosis, treatment and prevention with a vaccine can be developed. PMID:24494324

  11. Prophylactic HPV vaccines: reducing the burden of HPV-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Villa, Luisa Lina

    2006-03-30

    HPV-associated diseases, such as cervical and other anogenital cancers, cervical and anal intraepithelial neoplasia, genital warts, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis confer considerable morbidity and mortality, and are significant health care concerns. Successful vaccination strategies that protect against HPV infection are expected to substantially reduce HPV-related disease burden. Prophylactic HPV vaccines in late stages of clinical testing are composed of HPV L1 capsid protein that self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) when expressed in recombinant systems. Proof-of-principle trials have suggested that intramuscular injections of VLPs results in strong adaptive immune responses, both B- and T-cell mediated, that are capable of neutralizing subsequent natural infections. Furthermore, phase 2 trials of a bivalent vaccine designed to protect against high-risk HPV types 16 and 18 and a quadrivalent vaccine designed to protect against HPV 16 and 18, and low-risk, genital wart-causing HPV 6 and 11 have demonstrated that VLP vaccines reduce the incidence of HPV-associated disease in vaccinated individuals. To derive the greatest public health benefit, HPV vaccines offering protection from cervical cancer and genital warts will, ideally, be administered prior to the initiation of sexual activity; therefore, educational initiatives will be essential to communicate the risks and adverse consequences of HPV infection and to foster widespread vaccine acceptance. PMID:16194583

  12. Transmission of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) between Parents and Infant: a Prospective Study of HPV in Families in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Rintala, Marjut A. M.; Grnman, Seija E; Puranen, Mirja H.; Isolauri, Erika; Ekblad, Ulla; Kero, Pentti O.; Syrjnen, Stina M.

    2005-01-01

    The Finnish HPV Family Study is a prospective cohort study assessing the dynamics of human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission between parents and infant. Serial genital and oral scrapings from 76 families, including mother, father, and infant, and semen samples were collected over 2 years of follow-up, analyzed by nested PCR, and confirmed by hybridization with 12 high-risk (HR) HPV types. The most common HPV profile was HR HPV in all family members (29%), followed by HPV-positive mother-infant pairs (26%). HPV-positive father-infant pairs were less frequent (11%), and in six (8%) families, only the infant was HR HPV positive. The prevalence of genital HR HPV in the parents ranged from 13 to 25%, and that of oral HPV ranged from 8 to 34%. In the infants, HPV DNA was detected in 15% of the genital and 10% of the oral samples at birth, reaching peaks of 18 and 21%, respectively, at 6 months, and declining to 10% at 24 months. Persistent HPV in the mother was a risk factor for oral HPV in the infant (odds ratio [OR], 5.69; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.5 to 21.3), while oral HPV in the mother at 6 months was a risk factor for genital HR HPV (OR, 6.38; 95% CI, 1.15 to 35.32). No such independent risk could be attributed to subclinical HPV in the father. Persistent maternal cervical HPV and subclinical oral HPV affect the risk of infant HPV. The age of 6 months is a critical point for the infant to acquire or be free of HR HPV DNA. PMID:15634997

  13. Decline in in-patient treatments of genital warts among young Australians following the national HPV vaccination program

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been a rapid decline in the number of young heterosexuals diagnosed with genital warts at outpatient sexual health services since the national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program started in Australia in 2007. We assessed the impact of the vaccination program on the number of in-patient treatments for genital warts. Methods Data on in-patient treatments of genital warts in all private hospitals were extracted from the Medicare website. Medicare is the universal health insurance scheme of Australia. In the vaccine period (20072011) and pre-vaccine period (20002007) we calculated the percentage change in treatment numbers and trends in annual treatment rates in private hospitals. Australian population data were used to calculate rates. Summary rate ratios of average annual trends were determined. Results Between 2000 and 2011, 6,014 women and 936 men aged 1544?years underwent in-patient treatment for genital warts in private hospitals. In 1524?year old women, there was a significant decreasing trend in annual treatment rates of vulval/vaginal warts in the vaccine period (overall decrease of 85.3% in treatment numbers from 2007 to 2011) compared to no significant trend in the pre-vaccine period (summary rate ratio (SRR)?=?0.33, p?HPV vaccine program. The moderate decline in in-patient treatments for penile warts in men probably reflects herd immunity. PMID:23506489

  14. HPV Population Profiling in Healthy Men by Next-Generation Deep Sequencing Coupled with HPV-QUEST

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Yao, Jin; Chang, Kaifen; Gardner, Brent P.; Yu, Fahong; Giuliano, Anna R.; Goodenow, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple-type human papillomaviruses (HPV) infection presents a greater risk for persistence in asymptomatic individuals and may accelerate cancer development. To extend the scope of HPV types defined by probe-based assays, multiplexing deep sequencing of HPV L1, coupled with an HPV-QUEST genotyping server and a bioinformatic pipeline, was established and applied to survey the diversity of HPV genotypes among a subset of healthy men from the HPV in Men (HIM) Multinational Study. Twenty-one HPV genotypes (12 high-risk and 9 low-risk) were detected in the genital area from 18 asymptomatic individuals. A single HPV type, either HPV16, HPV6b or HPV83, was detected in 7 individuals, while coinfection by 2 to 5 high-risk and/or low-risk genotypes was identified in the other 11 participants. In two individuals studied for over one year, HPV16 persisted, while fluctuations of coinfecting genotypes occurred. HPV L1 regions were generally identical between query and reference sequences, although nonsynonymous and synonymous nucleotide polymorphisms of HPV16, 18, 31, 35h, 59, 70, 73, cand85, 6b, 62, 81, 83, cand89 or JEB2 L1 genotypes, mostly unidentified by linear array, were evident. Deep sequencing coupled with HPV-QUEST provides efficient and unambiguous classification of HPV genotypes in multiple-type HPV infection in host ecosystems. PMID:26821041

  15. HPV Population Profiling in Healthy Men by Next-Generation Deep Sequencing Coupled with HPV-QUEST.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li; Yao, Jin; Chang, Kaifen; Gardner, Brent P; Yu, Fahong; Giuliano, Anna R; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2016-01-01

    Multiple-type human papillomaviruses (HPV) infection presents a greater risk for persistence in asymptomatic individuals and may accelerate cancer development. To extend the scope of HPV types defined by probe-based assays, multiplexing deep sequencing of HPV L1, coupled with an HPV-QUEST genotyping server and a bioinformatic pipeline, was established and applied to survey the diversity of HPV genotypes among a subset of healthy men from the HPV in Men (HIM) Multinational Study. Twenty-one HPV genotypes (12 high-risk and 9 low-risk) were detected in the genital area from 18 asymptomatic individuals. A single HPV type, either HPV16, HPV6b or HPV83, was detected in 7 individuals, while coinfection by 2 to 5 high-risk and/or low-risk genotypes was identified in the other 11 participants. In two individuals studied for over one year, HPV16 persisted, while fluctuations of coinfecting genotypes occurred. HPV L1 regions were generally identical between query and reference sequences, although nonsynonymous and synonymous nucleotide polymorphisms of HPV16, 18, 31, 35h, 59, 70, 73, cand85, 6b, 62, 81, 83, cand89 or JEB2 L1 genotypes, mostly unidentified by linear array, were evident. Deep sequencing coupled with HPV-QUEST provides efficient and unambiguous classification of HPV genotypes in multiple-type HPV infection in host ecosystems. PMID:26821041

  16. Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type distribution, and HPV-associated cytological abnormalities in anal specimens from men infected with HIV who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Damay, Audrey; Fabre, Jaqueline; Costes, Valrie; Didelot, Jean-Michel; Didelot, Marie-Nolle; Boulle, Nathalie; Segondy, Michel

    2010-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) detection and typing using the PapilloCheck test and cytological examination were carried out in anal samples collected from 67 men seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who have sex with men. Fifty (74.6%) patients had anal HPV infection, 46 (68.7%) had high-risk (HR) HPV infection, and 38 (56.7%) had multiple infection involving 2-9 (median, 3) HPV types. The HPV types identified most frequently were HPV 44/55 (19.4%), HPV 53 (19.4%), HPV 16 (16.4%), HPV 39 (16.4%), and HPV 42 (14.9%). Thirty-two of the 66 interpretable smears (48.5%) revealed cytological abnormalities: 9 (13.4%) atypical cells of undetermined significance, 20 (30.3%) low-grade intraepithelial lesions, and 3 (4.5%) high-grade intraepithelial lesions. Cytological abnormalities were associated significantly with HPV detection (P < 0.001), multiple HPV infection (P < 0.001), and increased number of HPV types (P < 0.001). The HPV types associated most frequently with cytological abnormalities were HPV 39 (28.1%), HPV 42 (28.1%), HPV 53 (28.1%), HPV 16 (25.0%), HPV 44/55 (25.0%), and HPV 59 (21.9%). HPV DNA detection as well as cytological abnormalities were associated neither with HIV RNA detection in plasma nor with CD4+ T-cell count. Differences in age or in time since HIV acquisition were not observed in patients with or without cytological abnormalities. The present study confirms the high prevalence of anal HR-HPV infection and cytological abnormalities in men infected with HIV who have sex with men. HPV testing and/or cytological analysis may be helpful in selecting the patients to be referred to proctological examination. PMID:20166175

  17. Male circumcision and prevalence of genital human papillomavirus infection in men: a multinational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulated evidence from epidemiological studies and more recently from randomized controlled trials suggests that male circumcision (MC) may substantially protect against genital HPV infection in men. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between MC and genital HPV infection in men in a large multinational study. Methods A total of 4072 healthy men ages 1870?years were enrolled in a study conducted in Brazil, Mexico, and the United States. Enrollment samples combining exfoliated cells from the coronal sulcus, glans penis, shaft, and scrotum were analyzed for the presence and genotyping of HPV DNA by PCR and linear array methods. Prevalence ratios (PR) were used to estimate associations between MC and HPV detection adjusting for potential confounders. Results MC was not associated with overall prevalence of any HPV, oncogenic HPV types or unclassified HPV types. However, MC was negatively associated with non-oncogenic HPV infections (PR 0.85, 95% confident interval: 0.76-0.95), in particular for HPV types 11, 40, 61, 71, and 81. HPV 16, 51, 62, and 84 were the most frequently identified genotypes regardless of MC status. Conclusions This study shows no overall association between MC and genital HPV infections in men, except for certain non-oncogenic HPV types for which a weak association was found. However, the lack of association with MC might be due to the lack of anatomic site specific HPV data, for example the glans penis, the area expected to be most likely protected by MC. PMID:23327450

  18. Replication of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNAs supported by the HPV type 18 E1 and E2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Sverdrup, F; Khan, S A

    1994-01-01

    Transient replication of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 18 DNA was shown to require the viral E1 and E2 proteins. A 108-bp sequence within the long control region (nucleotides 12 to 119) was sufficient to function as the origin, but maximal replication required a region of 177 bp from positions 7800 to 7857 and 1 to 119 of HPV-18. The E1 and E2 proteins of HPV-18 also supported transient replication of plasmids containing the origins of HPV-1a and bovine papillomavirus type 1 to low levels. Interestingly, the level of replication observed with the HPV-6b origin was higher than that obtained with the homologous HPV-18 origin. PMID:8254762

  19. The HPV Vaccine: Framing the Arguments "for" and "against" Mandatory Vaccination of All Middle School Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vamos, Cheryl A.; McDermott, Robert J.; Daley, Ellen M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus responsible for cervical cancer, is the most common viral sexually transmitted infection in the United States. A vaccine was approved in 2006 that is effective in preventing the types of HPV responsible for 70% of cervical cancers and 90% of genital warts. Proposals for routine and mandatory HPV

  20. Prophylactic HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Szarewski, A

    2007-01-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), in particular HPV 16 and HPV 18, is the main cause of cervical cancer. Two prophylactic vaccines against types 6, 11, 16 and 18 have shown great promise in clinical trials, with recent results demonstrating 100% efficacy against persistent HPV infection and development of CIN up to five years of follow-up. One of these (Gardasil, recently licensed) contains all four HPV types, offering protection against genital warts (types 6 and 11) as well as cervical cancer. The other (Cervarix) contains types 16 and 18, targeting cervical cancer alone. Recent data suggest a degree of cross-protection, against types 31 and 45; this could significantly increase the level of protection afforded by the vaccines. It is envisaged that girls between 11 and 12 will be the target, and this is what has been recommended in the United States. There is still debate about the issue of vaccinating boys. A fundamental issue is the lack of education of both the public and health professionals about HPV. In theory, an HPV vaccine could prevent almost all cervical cancer, eventually removing the need for cervical smears. However, there is at least one whole generation of women for whom the vaccine will come too late, and who will continue to require screening. PMID:17624079

  1. Clinical Inquiry: Does qHPV vaccine prevent anal intraepithelial neoplasia and condylomata in men?

    PubMed

    Shum, Johnny; Kelsberg, Gary; Safranek, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Yes. Quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccine reduces rates of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) by 50% to 54%, and persistent anal infection by 59%, associated with the 4 types of HPV in the vaccine (6, 11, 16, and 18) in young men who have sex with men (MSM); it also reduces external genital lesions by 66%, and persistent HPV infection associated with the same 4 HPV types by 48 to 59% in all young men, heterosexual men, and MSM. PMID:26546954

  2. Vulvar Epidermoid Cyst and Type 2 Radical Genital Mutilation.

    PubMed

    Birge, Ozer; Ozbey, Ertugrul Gazi; Arslan, Deniz; Erkan, Mustafa Melih; Demir, Feyza; Akgor, Utku

    2015-01-01

    About 100 million women are estimated to be circumcised globally. Various rates of complications have been encountered, especially after circumcision, such as bleeding, infection, shock, menstrual irregularity, difficulty in urination or common urinary tract infections, inguinal pain, difficulty in sexual intercourse, and genital circumcision scar especially at the vulvar region, and cystic or solid character mass in short and long term. Furthermore, the maternal-fetal morbidity and mortality increase due to bleeding and fistula, which develop after prolonged labor, travail, and difficult labors. Our aim in this paper was to discuss a 42-year-old multiparous female case who had undergone type 2 radical genital mutilation (circumcision) when she was 7 years of age, along with the literature, which has been evaluated for the gradually growing mass at the left inguinal canal region in the last 10 years and diagnosed as epidermoid inclusion cyst developing secondary to postcircumcision surgical ground trauma, since there was no other case found in the literature search that had been circumcised at such an early age and developing after circumcision at such advanced age, and, therefore, this is suggested to be the first case on this subject. PMID:26682078

  3. Vulvar Epidermoid Cyst and Type 2 Radical Genital Mutilation

    PubMed Central

    Birge, Ozer; Ozbey, Ertugrul Gazi; Arslan, Deniz; Erkan, Mustafa Melih; Demir, Feyza; Akgor, Utku

    2015-01-01

    About 100 million women are estimated to be circumcised globally. Various rates of complications have been encountered, especially after circumcision, such as bleeding, infection, shock, menstrual irregularity, difficulty in urination or common urinary tract infections, inguinal pain, difficulty in sexual intercourse, and genital circumcision scar especially at the vulvar region, and cystic or solid character mass in short and long term. Furthermore, the maternal-fetal morbidity and mortality increase due to bleeding and fistula, which develop after prolonged labor, travail, and difficult labors. Our aim in this paper was to discuss a 42-year-old multiparous female case who had undergone type 2 radical genital mutilation (circumcision) when she was 7 years of age, along with the literature, which has been evaluated for the gradually growing mass at the left inguinal canal region in the last 10 years and diagnosed as epidermoid inclusion cyst developing secondary to postcircumcision surgical ground trauma, since there was no other case found in the literature search that had been circumcised at such an early age and developing after circumcision at such advanced age, and, therefore, this is suggested to be the first case on this subject. PMID:26682078

  4. Multiple Human Papillomavirus Infection Is Associated with High-Risk Infection in Male Genital Warts in Ulsan, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyung Hyun; Yang, Sung-Hak; Roh, Min Cheol; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Je Won; Kim, In Kyu; Roh, Kyoung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Further understanding of male human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is necessary to prevent infection in men, as well as transmission to women. In our current study, we investigated patterns of HPV infection and genotype distributions in male genital warts using the Anyplex II HPV28 Detection kit. We reviewed the medical records of 80 male patients who presented to 5 neighborhood clinics in Ulsan, Korea, for the treatment of genital warts between April 2014 and January 2015. All patients underwent HPV genotyping. The prevalence and characteristics of HPV infection were analyzed, and the patterns of HPV infection according to age were assessed. Among the study patients, 13 (16.3%) were negative for HPV infection, 46 (57.3%) were infected with low-risk HPV, and 21 (26.3%) were infected with high-risk HPV. Patients with multiple HPV infection were more likely to have high-risk HPV infection (P = 0.001). The prevalence of HPV infection was much higher in samples obtained by tissue excision due to a definite lesion (P = 0.001). There were no differences in high-risk HPV infection (P = 0.459), multiple HPV infection (P = 0.185), and recurrence at diagnosis (P = 0.178) according to age. HPV-6 and HPV-11 were the most common type overall (39.7% and 13.8%, respectively). HPV-16 and HPV-18 were the most common high-risk infections (both 3.4%). HPV infection is not only commonly encountered in male genital warts, but is also accompanied by high-risk HPV and multiple infections. PMID:26955236

  5. Immunobiology of HPV and HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Margaret

    2008-05-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection with both low- and high-risk types is common, but most infections resolve as a result of a cell-mediated immune response. Failure to induce an effective immune response is related to inefficient activation of innate immunity and ineffective priming of the adaptive immune response; this defective immune response facilitates viral persistence, a key feature of high-risk HPV infection. This milieu becomes operationally HPV antigen tolerant, and the host's defenses become irrevocably compromised. HPV antigen-specific effector cells are poorly recruited to the infected focus and their activity is downregulated; neoplastic HPV containing cervical keratinocytes expressing high levels of E6 and E7 oncoproteins are not killed in this immunosuppressive, tolerant milieu, and progression to high-grade disease and cancer can result. Highly efficacious prophylactic HPV L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines circumvent viral epithelial evasion strategies since they are delivered by intramuscular injection. The stromal dendritic cells of the muscle that encounter the highly immunogenic repeat structure of the VLP then migrate with their cargo to the lymph node, initiating an immune cascade that results in a robust T-cell dependent B-cell response, which generates high levels of L1-specific serum neutralizing antibodies and immune memory. PMID:18474288

  6. Evaluation of Human Papillomavirus Type Replacement Post-vaccination Must Account for Diagnostic Artifacts: Masking of HPV52 by HPV16 in Anogenital Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Tota, Joseph E.; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V.; Villa, Luisa L.; Richardson, Harriet; Burchell, Ann N.; Koushik, Anita; Mayrand, Marie-Hlne; Coutle, Franois; Franco, Eduardo L.

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that, following a reduction in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine-targeted genotypes, an increase in prevalence of other HPV types may occur due to reduced competition during natural infection. Any apparent post-vaccination increase must be distinguished from diagnostic artifacts consequent to consensus PCR assays failing to detect HPV types present in low copy numbers in co-infected specimens (under the assumption that with a drop in vaccine-preventable types there may be increased detection of previously masked types). We reanalyzed anogenital specimens to evaluate unmasking of HPV52 that may be caused by elimination of HPV16. Using highly sensitive type-specific real-time HPV52 PCR, we retested 1,200 anogenital specimens (all HPV52 negative according to consensus PCR assays) from six epidemiologic studies (200 specimens/study; 100 HPV16+/study). Multivariate logistic regression, with adjustment for age and number of sexual partners was used to evaluate the association between HPV16 positivity and detection of HPV52. In our pooled analysis (n=1,196), presence of HPV16 was positively associated with HPV52 detection (adjusted OR=1.47, 95% CI 0.76-2.82). In our separate (study specific) analyses, a statistically significant association was observed in one study that included HIV infected males (HIPVIRG study; adjusted OR=3.82, 95% CI 1.19-12.26). We observed a positive association between HPV16 viral load (tertiles) and detection of HPV52 (P for trend=0.003). These results indicate that diagnostic artifacts, resulting from unmasking of HPV52, may occur in some settings in the evaluation of HPV type replacement. Additional studies exploring the extent and severity of unmasking are needed. PMID:25277793

  7. Prevalence of cervical infection with HPV type 16 and 18 in Vietnam: implications for vaccine campaign

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Expanded Program on Immunization currently considers offering Human Papilomavirus vaccine on a routine basis in Vietnam. However, as the current available vaccine can prevent only two types HPV 16 and 18, before implementing a large-scale vaccine campaign we need information about the prevalence of infection with only HPV 16 and 18 in Viet Nam. This study was done in 5 large cities in Vietnam to estimate the prevalence of HPV 16 and/or 18 infections and to explore the distribution of other high risk types of HPV among married women in these provinces. Methods The study employed a cross-sectional design with multistage sampling. The sample size included 4500 married women in two rounds (aged ranged from 18-69 years old, median age: 40 year old). Participant were randomly selected, interviewed and given gynaecological examinations. HPV infection status (by real-time PCR kit using TaqMan probe) and HPV genotyping test (by Reverse dot blot) were done for all participants. Results The prevalence of cervical infection with HPV type 16 and/or 18 among married women in this study ranged from 3.1% to 7.4%. Many positive HPV cases (ranged from 24.5% to 56.8%) were infected with other type of high risk HPV which can lead to cervical cancer and cannot prevented by currently available vaccines. In addition to HPV 16 and/or 18, most common types of high risk HPV were types 58, 52, 35 and 45. Awareness about HPV and HPV vaccines was still low in the study samples. Discussion While it is relevant to implement an HPV vaccine campaign in Viet Nam, it is important to note that one can be infected with multiple types of HPV. Vaccination does not protected against all type of high risk HPV types. Future vaccine campaigns should openly disclose this information to women receiving vaccines. Conclusion High prevalence of infection with HPV high risk types was observed in this study. As HPV infection has a high correlation with cervical cancer, this study emphasizes the need for both primary prevention of cervical cancer with HPV vaccines as well as secondary prevention with screening. PMID:23374877

  8. New generic primer system targeting mucosal/genital and cutaneous human papillomaviruses leads to the characterization of HPV 115, a novel Beta-papillomavirus species 3

    PubMed Central

    Chouhy, Diego; Gorosito, Mario; Snchez, Adriana; Serra, Esteban C; Bergero, Adriana; Bussy, Ramn Fernandez; Giri, Adriana A

    2009-01-01

    We explored the cutaneotropic HPV genetic diversity in 71 subjects from Argentina. New generic primers (CUT) targeting 88 mucosal/cutaneous HPV were designed and compared to FAP primers. Overall, 69 different HPV types/putative types were identified, being 17 of them novel putative types. Phylogenetic analysis of partial L1 sequences grouped 2 novel putative types in the Beta-PV, 14 in the Gamma-PV and 1 in the Mu-PV genera. CUT primers showed broader capacity than FAP primers in detecting different genera/species and novel putative types (p<0.01). Using overlapping PCR, the full-length genome of a Beta-PV putative type was amplified and cloned. The new virus, designated HPV 115, encodes 5 early genes and 2 late genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated HPV 115 as the most divergent type within the genus Beta-PV species 3. This report is the first providing data on cutaneous HPVs circulating in South America and expands our knowledge of the Papillomaviridae family. PMID:19948351

  9. HPV vaccination in boys and men

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses are DNA viruses that infect skin or mucosal cells. In the genital tract HPV (especially types 6 and 11) cause genital warts, the commonest viral sexually transmitted disease. At least 13 of the more than 100 known HPV genotypes are oncogenic high-risk genotypes. The 2 most common of these (genotypes 16 and 18) cause approximately 70% of all cervical cancers. Oncogenic HPVs particularly HPV 16 are associated with other anogenital cancers, anus, vagina, vulva and penis, and cancers of the head and neck and current estimates are that 5.2% of all cancers are HPV associated. In industrialised countries cervical cancer is controlled by secondary intervention other HPV associated malignancies are increasing in incidence and the burden of HPV associated disease in men is now comparable to that in women in economically developed countries. Randomized control trials with the quadrivalent HPV VLP vaccine demonstrate robust antibody responses and high efficacy against genital warts anal precancers in men. Few countries have recommended male vaccination on the basis that this is not cost effective. However gender-neutral vaccination has been recommended in the USA, Canada, Austria, and Australia. Careful cost effective modeling has preceded these decisions showing that when the burden of disease in men is included in the models then, depending upon coverage, vaccine price, and other factors male vaccination can become cost effective. PMID:25424825

  10. Identification of a Dendrimeric Heparan Sulfate-Binding Peptide That Inhibits Infectivity of Genital Types of Human Papillomaviruses?

    PubMed Central

    Donalisio, Manuela; Rusnati, Marco; Civra, Andrea; Bugatti, Antonella; Allemand, Donatella; Pirri, Giovanna; Giuliani, Andrea; Landolfo, Santo; Lembo, David

    2010-01-01

    Peptide dendrimers consist of a peptidyl branching core and/or covalently attached surface functional units. They show a variety of biological properties, including antiviral activity. In this study, a minilibrary of linear, dimeric, and dendrimeric peptides containing clusters of basic amino acids was evaluated for in vitro activity against human papillomaviruses (HPVs). The peptide dendrimer SB105-A10 was found to be a potent inhibitor of genital HPV types (i.e., types 16, 18, and 6) in pseudovirus-based neutralization assays. The 50% inhibitory concentration was between 2.8 and 4.2 ?g/ml (0.59 and 0.88 ?M), and no evidence of cytotoxicity was observed. SB105-A10 interacts with immobilized heparin and with heparan sulfates exposed on the cell surface, most likely preventing virus attachment. The findings from this study indicate SB105-A10 to be a leading candidate compound for further development as an active ingredient of a topical microbicide against HPV and other sexually transmitted viral infections. PMID:20643894

  11. Differential Dependence on Host Cell Glycosaminoglycans for Infection of Epithelial Cells by High-Risk HPV Types

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Linda; Meyers, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the leading cause of cervical cancer world-wide. Here, we show that native HPV particles produced in a differentiated epithelium have developed different strategies to infect the host. Using biochemical inhibition assays and glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-negative cells, we show that of the four most common cancer-causing HPV types, HPV18, HPV31, and HPV45 are largely dependent on GAGs to initiate infection. In contrast, HPV16 can bind and enter through a GAG-independent mechanism. Infections of primary human keratinocytes, natural host cells for HPV infections, support our conclusions. Further, this renders the different virus types differentially susceptible to carrageenan, a microbicide targeting virus entry. Our data demonstrates that ordered maturation of papillomavirus particles in a differentiating epithelium may alter the virus entry mechanism. This study should facilitate a better understanding of the attachment and infection by the main oncogenic HPV types, and development of inhibitors of HPV infection. PMID:23861898

  12. Differential dependence on host cell glycosaminoglycans for infection of epithelial cells by high-risk HPV types.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Linda; Meyers, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the leading cause of cervical cancer world-wide. Here, we show that native HPV particles produced in a differentiated epithelium have developed different strategies to infect the host. Using biochemical inhibition assays and glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-negative cells, we show that of the four most common cancer-causing HPV types, HPV18, HPV31, and HPV45 are largely dependent on GAGs to initiate infection. In contrast, HPV16 can bind and enter through a GAG-independent mechanism. Infections of primary human keratinocytes, natural host cells for HPV infections, support our conclusions. Further, this renders the different virus types differentially susceptible to carrageenan, a microbicide targeting virus entry. Our data demonstrates that ordered maturation of papillomavirus particles in a differentiating epithelium may alter the virus entry mechanism. This study should facilitate a better understanding of the attachment and infection by the main oncogenic HPV types, and development of inhibitors of HPV infection. PMID:23861898

  13. Efficacy of Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine against HPV Infection and Disease in Males

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Anna R.; Palefsky, Joel M.; Goldstone, Stephen; Moreira, Edson D.; Penny, Mary E.; Aranda, Carlos; Vardas, Eftyhia; Moi, Harald; Jessen, Heiko; Hillman, Richard; Chang, Yen-Hwa; Ferris, Daron; Rouleau, Danielle; Bryan, Janine; Marshall, J. Brooke; Vuocolo, Scott; Barr, Eliav; Radley, David; Haupt, Richard M.; Guris, Dalya

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) and diseases caused by HPV are common in boys and men. We report on the safety of a quadrivalent vaccine (active against HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18) and on its efficacy in preventing the development of external genital lesions and anogenital HPV infection in boys and men. METHODS We enrolled 4065 healthy boys and men 16 to 26 years of age, from 18 countries in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. The primary efficacy objective was to show that the quadrivalent HPV vaccine reduced the incidence of external genital lesions related to HPV-6, 11, 16, or 18. Efficacy analyses were conducted in a per-protocol population, in which subjects received all three vaccinations and were negative for relevant HPV types at enrollment, and in an intention-to-treat population, in which subjects received vaccine or placebo, regardless of baseline HPV status. RESULTS In the intention-to-treat population, 36 external genital lesions were seen in the vaccine group as compared with 89 in the placebo group, for an observed efficacy of 60.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 40.8 to 73.8); the efficacy was 65.5% (95% CI, 45.8 to 78.6) for lesions related to HPV-6, 11, 16, or 18. In the per-protocol population, efficacy against lesions related to HPV-6, 11, 16, or 18 was 90.4% (95% CI, 69.2 to 98.1). Efficacy with respect to persistent infection with HPV-6, 11, 16, or 18 and detection of related DNA at any time was 47.8% (95% CI, 36.0 to 57.6) and 27.1% (95% CI, 16.6 to 36.3), respectively, in the intention-to-treat population and 85.6% (97.5% CI, 73.4 to 92.9) and 44.7% (95% CI, 31.5 to 55.6) in the per-protocol population. Injection-site pain was significantly more frequent among subjects receiving quadrivalent HPV vaccine than among those receiving placebo (57% vs. 51%, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Quadrivalent HPV vaccine prevents infection with HPV-6, 11, 16, and 18 and the development of related external genital lesions in males 16 to 26 years of age. (Funded by Merck and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00090285.) PMID:21288094

  14. The HPV Vaccine: Framing the Arguments "for" and "against" Mandatory Vaccination of All Middle School Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vamos, Cheryl A.; McDermott, Robert J.; Daley, Ellen M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus responsible for cervical cancer, is the most common viral sexually transmitted infection in the United States. A vaccine was approved in 2006 that is effective in preventing the types of HPV responsible for 70% of cervical cancers and 90% of genital warts. Proposals for routine and mandatory HPV…

  15. Concurrence of oral and genital human papillomavirus infection in healthy men: a population-based cross-sectional study in rural China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangfang; Hang, Dong; Deng, Qiuju; Liu, Mengfei; Xi, Longfu; He, Zhonghu; Zhang, Chaoting; Sun, Min; Liu, Ying; Li, Jingjing; Pan, Yaqi; Ning, Tao; Guo, Chuanhai; Liang, Yongmei; Xu, Ruiping; Zhang, Lixin; Cai, Hong; Ke, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, a primary cause of genital cancer, is also related to the increasing incidence of oropharyngeal cancer among young men. Relatively little is known about the concurrence of oral and genital infection among healthy individuals. Oral and genital swab exfoliated cells were collected simultaneously from 2566 men in rural China. Using general primer-mediated (SPF1/GP6+) PCR and sequencing, HPV testing results were obtained from 2228 men with both valid oral and genital specimens (?-globin-positive). The prevalence of HPV infection was 6.7% in the oral cavity and 16.9% for the external genitalia. Among 43 men (1.9%, 43/2228) with oral-genital coinfection, 60.5% (26/43) harbored an identical HPV type at both sites. The risk of oral HPV infection was higher among men with genital infection than among uninfected men (11.4% vs. 5.7%, Adjusted OR?=?2.3, 95% CI: 1.6-3.4). In addition, having multiple lifetime sexual partners was a significant risk for oral-genital HPV coinfection (Adjusted OR?=?2.6, 95% CI: 1.0-7.0; 2 partners vs. 1 partner). These findings provide a basis for further understanding the natural history and transmission dynamics of oral HPV infection. PMID:26503510

  16. Concurrence of oral and genital human papillomavirus infection in healthy men: a population-based cross-sectional study in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangfang; Hang, Dong; Deng, Qiuju; Liu, Mengfei; Xi, Longfu; He, Zhonghu; Zhang, Chaoting; Sun, Min; Liu, Ying; Li, Jingjing; Pan, Yaqi; Ning, Tao; Guo, Chuanhai; Liang, Yongmei; Xu, Ruiping; Zhang, Lixin; Cai, Hong; Ke, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, a primary cause of genital cancer, is also related to the increasing incidence of oropharyngeal cancer among young men. Relatively little is known about the concurrence of oral and genital infection among healthy individuals. Oral and genital swab exfoliated cells were collected simultaneously from 2566 men in rural China. Using general primer-mediated (SPF1/GP6+) PCR and sequencing, HPV testing results were obtained from 2228 men with both valid oral and genital specimens (β-globin-positive). The prevalence of HPV infection was 6.7% in the oral cavity and 16.9% for the external genitalia. Among 43 men (1.9%, 43/2228) with oral-genital coinfection, 60.5% (26/43) harbored an identical HPV type at both sites. The risk of oral HPV infection was higher among men with genital infection than among uninfected men (11.4% vs. 5.7%, Adjusted OR = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.6–3.4). In addition, having multiple lifetime sexual partners was a significant risk for oral-genital HPV coinfection (Adjusted OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.0–7.0; 2 partners vs. 1 partner). These findings provide a basis for further understanding the natural history and transmission dynamics of oral HPV infection. PMID:26503510

  17. Oncogenic and nononcogenic human genital papillomaviruses generate the E7 mRNA by different mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Smotkin, D; Prokoph, H; Wettstein, F O

    1989-01-01

    A new promoter located within E6 was mapped in human papillomavirus type 6b (HPV6b)- and HPV11-containing benign genital condylomata (genital warts). The RNA transcribed from this promoter represented the major RNA species colinear with open reading frames E6 and E7 and can encode the E7 protein. No equivalent promoter was active in HPV16-containing cancers and cancer-derived cell lines. In those, the major transcripts contained one of two different introns within E6 and the RNAs could encode two different E6 proteins and E7. Images PMID:2536845

  18. Clinical features of external genital warts.

    PubMed

    Lynde, Charles; Vender, Ronald; Bourcier, Marc; Bhatia, Neal

    2013-12-01

    External genital warts (EGWs) are a common sexually transmitted infection caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although over 100 HPV types have been identified, some of which are associated with cancer, EGWs are caused by noncancerous HPV subtypes 6 and 11. This cutaneous manifestation of HPV infection can be asymptomatic or produce warty lesions that may assume a cauliflower-like, flat, papular, or keratotic appearance. Physical symptoms may also accompany warts, such as pruritus, burning, pain, and obstruction. EGWs typically appear in anogenital areas, such as the vulva, penis, groin, perineum, perianal skin, or mucosal surfaces. EGWs are typically a transient type of infection that often spontaneously regresses without treatment, but long-term remission rates are currently unknown. Treatment is determined according to the size and number of lesions, which can cluster or develop at multiple sites. Because of the individual variability in disease, treatment should be determined on a case-by-case basis. Further investigation, such as a biopsy, may be advisable in cases of atypical lesions, lesions that are unresponsive to therapies, and immunocompromised individuals, who are essentially more susceptible to HPV infections and less responsive to treatment. Although HPV testing is available, it is not currently recommended for detection and HPV typing. Differential diagnoses may include normal skin variations, other infectious or inflammatory diseases, and cancerous growths. PMID:24388559

  19. [Anti-HPV vaccination: preventing cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Simon, P; Dupond, I

    2006-09-01

    Two anti-HPV vaccine will soon be registered on the Belgian market. Providing immunity against the L1 protein of several oncogenic types of Papilloma virus, they aim at protecting against cervical cancer and several precancerous lesions. It has been known for years that oncogenic HPV infection of the uterine cervix is a prerequisite to the development of cervical cancer. This is supported by epidemiological has well as biological observations. That is why vaccines against capsid protein of these viruses had been developed. Two of these vaccines are about to be registered in Belgium. Cervarix (GSK) is directed against HPV 16 and 18 which are associated to ca 70% of the cervical cancers in the world. Gardasil (Sanofi Pasteur MSD) propose a vaccination against L1 protein of HPV 16 and 18, but also against HPV 6 and 11 which are responsible of benign lesions of the ano genital area (condylomas). The results obtained so far are very promising considering their preventive efficacy on persistant infections and cervical dysplasias. Two recent publications must be discussed: first, the protection offered by Cervarix is maintained for 4.5 years at least, second, vaccination by Gardasil of patients already infected by one of the HPV types (16, 18, 6, 11) provides a 100% efficacy in preventing diseases caused by the remaining types. It is therefore probable that HPV vaccination will not only concerns naive patients from any contact with HPV but also patients having already be in contact with these viruses. PMID:17091900

  20. Human Papillomavirus neutralizing and cross-reactive antibodies induced in HIV-positive subjects after vaccination with quadrivalent and bivalent HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Faust, Helena; Toft, Lars; Sehr, Peter; Müller, Martin; Bonde, Jesper; Forslund, Ola; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Dillner, Joakim

    2016-03-18

    Ninety-one HIV-infected individuals (61 men and 30 women) were randomized to vaccination either with quadrivalent (Gardasil™) or bivalent (Cervarix™) HPV vaccine. Neutralizing and specific HPV-binding serum antibodies were measured at baseline and 12 months after the first vaccine dose. Presence of neutralizing and binding antibodies had good agreement (average Kappa for HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 was 0.65). At baseline, 88% of subjects had antibodies against at least one genital HPV. Following vaccination with Cervarix™, all subjects became seropositive for HPV16 and 18. After Gardasil™ vaccination, 96% of subjects seroconverted for HPV16 and 73% for HPV18. Levels of HPV16-specific antibodies were <1 international unit (IU) in 87% of study subjects before vaccination but >10IU in 85% of study subjects after vaccination. Antibodies against non-vaccine HPV types appeared after Gardasil™ vaccination for >50% of vaccinated females for HPV 31, 35 and 73 and for >50% of Cervarix™-vaccinated females for HPV 31, 33, 35, 45, 56 and 58. Cross-reactivity with non-genital HPV types was also detected. In conclusion, HIV-infected subjects responded to HPV vaccination with induction of neutralizing antibodies against both vaccine and non-vaccine types. PMID:26896686

  1. Human papillomavirus in men: comparison of different genital sites

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, L V; Lazcano?Ponce, E; Vaccarella, S; Cruz, A; Hernndez, P; Smith, J S; Muoz, N; Kornegay, J R; Hernndez?Avila, M; Franceschi, S

    2006-01-01

    Objective To elucidate which anatomical sites need to be sampled to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the lower male genital tract. Method In an HPV survey of Mexican soldiers (median age 24?years; range 1650?years), a cell sample from 2?cm deep into the distal urethra (group 1; n?=?168 men), or 0.5?cm deep into the meatus urethralis (group 2; n?=?414 men) was collected, along with a sample from the external genitalia. The different samples were tested for 27 HPV types using a polymerase chain reaction based strip assay. Results HPV DNA was detected more frequently in external genitalia samples (46.4%) than in the urethra (20.8%) or meatus samples (12.1%). Lack of samples from the urethra or meatus would have led to 5.1% and 1.5% false HPV negative results, respectively. The most frequently detected high risk HPV types (HPV 59, 52, 51, and 16) were similar in different sites, whereas low risk types were found rarely in urethra samples. Conclusions The addition of cell samples from the meatus to those from external genitalia contributed negligibly to the evaluation of the prevalence of HPV in men. HPV detection was slightly improved by the addition of urethra samples, but the gain may not justify the discomfort of the procedure in large epidemiological studies. PMID:16461598

  2. Cross-Reactivity, Epitope Spreading, and De Novo Immune Stimulation Are Possible Mechanisms of Cross-Protection of Nonvaccine Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in Recipients of HPV Therapeutic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, William; Moerman-Herzog, Andrea; Coleman, Hannah N.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous versions of human papillomavirus (HPV) therapeutic vaccines designed to treat individuals with established HPV infection, including those with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), are in development because approved prophylactic vaccines are not effective once HPV infection is established. As human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) is the most commonly detected type worldwide, all versions of HPV therapeutic vaccines contain HPV-16, and some also contain HPV-18. While these two HPV types are responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases, there are other high-risk HPV types known to cause malignancy. Therefore, it would be of interest to assess whether these HPV therapeutic vaccines may confer cross-protection against other high-risk HPV types. Data available from a few clinical trials that enrolled subjects with CINs regardless of the HPV type(s) present demonstrated clinical responses, as measured by CIN regression, in subjects with both vaccine-matched and nonvaccine HPV types. The currently available evidence demonstrating cross-reactivity, epitope spreading, and de novo immune stimulation as possible mechanisms of cross-protection conferred by investigational HPV therapeutic vaccines is discussed. PMID:25947147

  3. Cross-Reactivity, Epitope Spreading, and De Novo Immune Stimulation Are Possible Mechanisms of Cross-Protection of Nonvaccine Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in Recipients of HPV Therapeutic Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Mayumi; Greenfield, William; Moerman-Herzog, Andrea; Coleman, Hannah N

    2015-07-01

    Numerous versions of human papillomavirus (HPV) therapeutic vaccines designed to treat individuals with established HPV infection, including those with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), are in development because approved prophylactic vaccines are not effective once HPV infection is established. As human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) is the most commonly detected type worldwide, all versions of HPV therapeutic vaccines contain HPV-16, and some also contain HPV-18. While these two HPV types are responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases, there are other high-risk HPV types known to cause malignancy. Therefore, it would be of interest to assess whether these HPV therapeutic vaccines may confer cross-protection against other high-risk HPV types. Data available from a few clinical trials that enrolled subjects with CINs regardless of the HPV type(s) present demonstrated clinical responses, as measured by CIN regression, in subjects with both vaccine-matched and nonvaccine HPV types. The currently available evidence demonstrating cross-reactivity, epitope spreading, and de novo immune stimulation as possible mechanisms of cross-protection conferred by investigational HPV therapeutic vaccines is discussed. PMID:25947147

  4. Clinical validation of a novel real-time human papillomavirus assay for simultaneous detection of 14 high-risk HPV type and genotyping HPV type 16 and 18 in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Li, Lie-Jun; Xie, Long-Xu; Luo, Zhao-Yun; Lu, Min; Lin, Min; Zheng, Xiang-Bin; Huang, Yue; Yang, Li-Ye

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we describe the laboratory workflow and the clinical validation of a novel multiplex real-time PCR-based HPV assay in China. The cross-sectional validation analysis showed that this assay worked well for detection of 14 HR-HPV types and identification of HPV 16 and 18 in a single sensitive assay that is suitable for both clinical usage and high-throughput cervical screening purposes. We predict that this accurate, high-throughput and low-cost HPV assay can greatly reduce the heavy economic burden of HPV detection in China. PMID:26577902

  5. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines: a Canadian update.

    PubMed

    Foerster, V; Murtagh, J

    2007-12-01

    A common sexually transmitted infection, human papillomavirus (HPV) has been linked to the development of cervical, anogenital, and head and neck cancers and genital warts. (2) Several randomized controlled trials have explored the efficacy and safety of two vaccines for primary prevention of infection by HPV types 16 and 18, those most commonly implicated in the development of cervical cancer. (3) An HPV vaccine, Gardasil, was approved in Canada in 2006, and a second vaccine, Cervarix, is undergoing Health Canada review. (4) Some unresolved questions about HPV vaccinations relate to the ideal age for immunization, duration of effect, immunization of women already infected, vaccination of males, implications for Papanicolaou (Pap) smear programs, barriers to uptake, need for monitoring and registries, cost effectiveness, and programs to ensure access for special populations. PMID:18062141

  6. Co-infection with HPV types from the same species provides natural cross-protection from progression to cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The worldwide administration of bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines has resulted in cross-protection against non-vaccine HPV types. Infection with multiple HPV types may offer similar cross-protection in the natural setting. We hypothesized that infections with two or more HPV types from the same species, and independently, infections with two or more HPV types from different species, associate with protection from high-grade lesions. Findings We recruited a cohort of 94 HIV, HPV-positive women from Botswana, with Grade 2 or higher cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Infections with 2 or more HPV types from a single species associated with reduced lesion severity in univariate analysis (OR?=?0.41, 95% CI 0.18-0.97, p?=?0.042), when adjusted for the presence of HPV 16 or 18 types (OR?=?0.41, 95% CI 0.17-1.00, p?=?0.049), or all high-risk HPV type infections (OR?=?0.38, 95% CI 0.16-0.90, p?=?0.028). Infections with 2 or more HPV types from different species did not associate (OR?=?0.68, 95% CI 0.25-1.81, p?=?0.435). Conclusions Our findings show that co-infections with genetically similar HPV types reduce the likelihood of progression to high-grade lesions in HIV positive women, an effect not observed in co-infections with taxonomically different HPV types. This observation is possibly caused by an immune cross-protection through a similar mechanism to that observed after HPV vaccination. PMID:25152769

  7. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Genital Herpes Home For Patients Search FAQs Genital Herpes Page ... Genital Herpes FAQ054, May 2011 PDF Format Genital Herpes Gynecologic Problems What is genital herpes? How does ...

  8. Relationship between HPV typing and the status of G2 cell cycle regulators in cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Yasunori; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Sadako; Inoue, Takeshi; Kawamura, Naoki; Yamamoto, Kumio

    2004-09-01

    We examined human papillomavirus (HPV) typing and the status of ATM, chk2, CDC25C, cdc2 and cyclinB1 in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and invasive cancer (IC). A total of 93 samples [normal: 10; CIN: 34 (CINI:9, CINII:12, CINIII:13); IC: 49 (stage I:10, stage II:21, stage III:15, stage IV:3)] were included in this study. HPV status was evaluated by the PCR non-radioactive HPV detection system. We analyzed ATM, chk2, CDC25C, cdc2 and cyclinB1 protein expression by immunohistochemistry. HPV DNA was detected in 73.5% of 34 CINs and 89.8% of 49 ICs. Detection of HPV subtypes 16 and 18 was more frequent in ICs (46.9%) than in CINs (23.5%) (p=0.0387). Abnormal expression of ATM, chk2, CDC25C, cdc2 and cyclinB1 were 2.9%, 32.4%, 2.9% 20.6% and 0% in CINs and 8.2%, 30.6%, 10.2%, 46.9% and 12.2% in ICs. The alteration of cdc2 was higher in ICs than in CINs (p=0.0198). Altered expression of cdc2 was higher in HPV16 and 18 cases (69.6%) than in other cases (26.9%) (p=0.0042). However, the relationship between HPV typing and ATM, chk2, CDC25C and cyclinB1 expression was not significant. Cdc2 is implicated in cervical carcinogenesis and may be related to p53 inactivation by HPV. PMID:15289842

  9. PDZRN3/LNX3 is a novel target of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18 E6.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Miranda; Banks, Lawrence

    2015-01-15

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 proteins have a C-terminal PDZ binding motif through which they bind, and target for proteasome-mediated degradation, a number of PDZ-containing cellular targets. Recent studies have suggested that the RING-containing ubiquitin-protein ligase PDZRN3 might also be an HPV E6 target. In this analysis, we show that HPV-16 and HPV-18 E6 can target PDZRN3 in a PDZ- and proteasome-dependent manner and provide a connection between the HPV life cycle and differentiation-related STAT signaling. PMID:25355882

  10. PDZRN3/LNX3 Is a Novel Target of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-18 E6

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 proteins have a C-terminal PDZ binding motif through which they bind, and target for proteasome-mediated degradation, a number of PDZ-containing cellular targets. Recent studies have suggested that the RING-containing ubiquitin-protein ligase PDZRN3 might also be an HPV E6 target. In this analysis, we show that HPV-16 and HPV-18 E6 can target PDZRN3 in a PDZ- and proteasome-dependent manner and provide a connection between the HPV life cycle and differentiation-related STAT signaling. PMID:25355882

  11. E6 proteins from diverse cutaneous HPV types inhibit apoptosis in response to UV damage.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S; Storey, A

    2000-01-27

    In addition to their role in anogenital cancer, human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are also involved in the development of a range of cutaneous lesions. HPV types 5 and 8 are associated with the development of skin cancers in individuals with Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). A broad spectrum of HPV types are also commonly found in non-melanoma skin cancers in immunocompromised individuals, such as organ transplant recipients. The skin cancers in EV and immunocompromised patients occur predominantly at body sites exposed to ultra violet (UV) radiation, pointing to a key role for UV in their development. Here we show that the E6 protein from a range of cutaneous HPV types effectively inhibits apoptosis in response to UV damage. This occurs in both p53 null and wild type cells and does not require p53 degradation. PMID:10698529

  12. A cross-sectional, multicentre, epidemiological study on human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in adult women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Tjalma, W.A.A.; Trinh, X.B.; Rosenlund, M.; Makar, A.P.; Kridelka, F.; Rosillon, D.; Van Dam, P.A.; Collas De Souza, S.; Holl, K.; Simon, P.; Jenkins, D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Despite an advanced national cervical cancer screening and vaccination programme cervical cancer is still the third most frequent diagnosed gynaecological tumour in Belgium. The goal of this study is to present the Belgian data of a cross-sectional, multicentre, epidemiological study on human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in adult women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer (ICC) conducted in 12 European countries. Material and Methods: Centres in four major Belgian cities (Antwerp, Brussels, Ghent and Lige) participated in this study. Tissue samples from women with ICC were collected from the period 2001 - 2008. All slides were centrally reviewed and analysed for HPV. The total enrolled cohort included 278 subjects. Results: The histologically eligible cohort comprised of 255 patients (mean age 51.3 15.1 years) and 237 were confirmed HPV positive (mean age 50.6 14.9 years). A single HPV infection was present in 95.8%. The five most frequent HPV types were HPV 16 (68.7%), HPV18 (12.3%), HPV 31 (6.2%), HPV 33 (5.3%) and HPV 45 (1.8%). Multiple HPV types were present in 3.4%, with two HPV types in 2.5% and three HPV types in 0.8%. In the various HPV type combinations observed in multiple infected women, HPV 31 (62.5%) and HPV 33 (50.0%) were the most frequent. The ratio of adenocarcinoma (ADC) versus squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases in the histologically eligible cohort was 1:8. Compared to the pooled European data the Belgium HPV 16 is 1.1, HPV 33 is 1.2 and HPV 31 is 1.7 higher and the HPV 18 is 0.8 and HPV 45 is 0.34 lower. Conclusion: The 5 most frequent HPV types in Belgium are the same as in the rest of Europe, but the distribution is different. Cervical cancer screening should therefore be HPV type specific and HPV prophylactic vaccination should also focus on other types then HPV 16 and HPV 18. A national registry is needed in order to follow the trends of HPV types in the society and to measure the impact of prevention, for which the data presented in this study can be an important basis. PMID:26175888

  13. Epidemiological impact of a genital herpes type 2 vaccine for young females.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yijun; Qesmi, Redouane; Wang, Qian; Steben, Marc; Wu, Jianhong; Heffernan, Jane M

    2012-01-01

    Genital Herpes, which is caused by Herpes Simplex Virus-1 or -2 (HSV-1, -2, predominantly HSV-2) is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that causes a chronic latent infection with outbreak episodes linked to transmission. Antiviral therapies are effective in reducing viral shedding during these episodes, but are ineffective as a whole since many outbreaks are asymptomatic or have mild symptoms. Thus, the development of a vaccine for genital herpes is needed to control this disease. The question of how to implement such a vaccine program is an important one, and may be similar to the vaccination program for Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) for young females. We have developed a mathematical model to describe the epidemiology of vaccination targeting young females against HSV-2. The model population is delineated with respect to age group, sexual activity and infection status including oral infection of HSV-1, which may affect vaccine efficacy. A threshold parameter R(C), which determines the level of vaccine uptake needed to eradicate HSV-2, is found. Computer simulation shows that an adolescent-only vaccination program may be effective in eliminating HSV-2 disease, however, the success of extinction greatly depends on the level of vaccine uptake, the vaccine efficacy, the age of sexual maturity and safe sex practices. However, the time course of eradication would take many years. We also investigate the prevalence of infection in the total population and in women between 16-30 years of age before and after vaccination has been introduced, and show that the adolescent-only vaccination program can be effective in reducing disease prevalence in these populations depending on the level of vaccine uptake and vaccine efficacy. This will also result in a decrease of maternal-fetal transmission of HSV-2 infection. Another important, if commonsense, conclusion is that vaccination of some females reduces infection in men, which then reduces infection in women. PMID:23071536

  14. Epidermodysplasia verruciformis and cutaneous human papillomavirus DNA, but not genital human papillomavirus DNAs, are frequently detected in vulvar and vaginal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Rohwedder, Angela; Slominski, Andrzej; Wolff, Marisa; Kredentser, Daniel; Carlson, J Andrew

    2007-02-01

    Vulvovaginal melanomas are rare and their etiology is unknown. Genital mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 has been identified in both cutaneous and mucosal melanoma, suggesting that it might play a role in the pathogenesis or progression of melanoma. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of HPV DNA by using a broad spectrum of degenerate and type-specific primers for genital-mucosal, epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated (EV), and cutaneous HPV types in 6 vulvar and 3 vaginal melanomas. The patients were mostly postmenopausal women (8/9), had a mean age of 67 years (range, 44-85 years), and had mucosal lentiginous (7) or nodular (2) melanomas. In the adjacent skin/mucosa, mucosal melanosis was found in 5, lichen sclerosus or a lichenoid mucositis in 4, and blue nevi in 2 women. With nested polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by direct sequencing, HPV DNA was identified in 6 of 9 (67%) melanomas; these were either cutaneous (HPV 3) (4/9) or epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated types (HPV 38, Z95969, AJ00151) (4/9). Epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated HPV (type 15) was found solely in 1/10 (10%) normal vulvar controls. Genital-mucosal HPV types were not detected either by degenerate nested polymerase chain reaction or type-specific probes for HPV 16. We propose that the above findings are not coincidental but may represent a molecular record of HPV involvement in pathogenesis or progression of melanoma, which is consistent with the strong but poorly defined association of cutaneous HPV types with nonmelanoma skin cancers. The theory that HPV may act as a cofactor in melanoma development deserves further clinical and experimental investigations. PMID:17284956

  15. Genital warts

    MedlinePLUS

    Condylomata acuminata; Penile warts; Human papillomavirus (HPV); Venereal warts; Condyloma; HPV DNA test; Sexually transmitted disease (STD) - warts; Sexually transmitted infection (STI) - warts; LSIL-HPV; ...

  16. [Prevention of HPV cancer related through HPV-9: state of the art, potential benefits and open issues].

    PubMed

    Mariani, Luciano; Bonanni, Paolo; Castiglia, Paolo; Chiamenti, Giampietro; Conforti, Giorgio; Conversano, Michele; Icardi, Giancarlo; Maio, Tommasa; Mennini, Francesco; Prato, Rosa; Scotti, Silvestro; Signorelli, Carlo; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    HPV vaccines currently marketed in Italy (bivalent and quadrivalent against HPV 16-18 and HPV and 6,11,16,18 respectively) are an extraordinary tool for the primary prevention of HPV related diseases, particularly of the cervical cancer. Although the implementation of the organized vaccination programs has already translated (for some endpoint) in confirmation of clinical efficacy, remains excluded a significant proportion of the diseases linked to non-vaccine HPV types. The new nonavalent vaccine (HPV9), of impending commercialization, represents an evolution of the quadrivalent, the composition of which are added five high-risk HPV types (HPV 31,33,45,52,58). The high clinical-immunological efficacy in experimental trials against the new genotypes (> 96% for CIN2 +), and the equivalence immunogenic to the four already present in the previous vaccine, will render the use of HPV9 a tool able to control in an even more effective HPV disease. The potential of the new vaccine is linked to the reduction of the HPV cancer burden by 2-20% according to anatomical site, with major benefits for cervical cancer, vulvo-vaginal, penile and more limited benefits for anal tumours. Moreover, the potential benefits could be also linked to the reduction of incidence of pre-neoplastic lesions arising in the lower-genital tract, especially in the cervix (CIN2-3), so often cause lengthy and expensive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In the face of this broad provision of benefit from HPV9 vaccine, we have also to consider all the variables related to its introduction in the vaccination calendars: the market price, the schedule of administration (currently in three doses) and data regarding the costeffectiveness. The authors recognize the new vaccine (currently registered only in the US) a lot of potential in the prevention of HPV-related diseases. PMID:26847275

  17. HPV-type distribution and reproducibility of histological diagnosis in cervical neoplasia in Poland.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Andrzej; de Souza, Sabrina Collas; Jach, Robert; Rosillon, Dominique; Ksi??ek, Alicja; Holl, Katsiaryna

    2015-07-01

    This study was performed to assess attribution of high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-CIN) and invasive cervical cancer (ICC) to human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and secondarily to assess reproducibility of HG-CIN/ICC diagnosis obtained in Poland. Formaldehyde fixed, paraffin embedded blocks of HG-CIN/ICC from two distant institutions were sent to a central laboratory together with original histological diagnoses. Central/expert review of histopathological specimens was performed and agreement between local and central/expert diagnoses was calculated. HPV detection and genotyping in the samples was carried out with the use of SPF10-LiPA25 technology. Results were analyzed for 205 HG-CIN and 193 ICC cases with centrally confirmed diagnoses. Kappa coefficients and 95 % confidence intervals for HG-CIN and ICC diagnoses were: 0.13 (0.09;0.17) and 0.19 (0.11;0.26) respectively. Cohen's kappa coefficients for lesions with representative number of samples ranged from 0.01 for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 to 0.75 for adenocarcinoma. HPV DNA was detected in 96.1 and 91.2 % of the confirmed HG-CIN and ICC specimens respectively. HPV positive HG-CIN was most commonly attributed to HPV types: 16 (62.8), 33 (7.8), 31 (6.6), 52 (3.7), 45 (2.6) and 58 (2.6 %). HPV positive ICC was most commonly attributed to HPV types: 16 (72.1), 18 (10.8), 33 (5.7), 45 (3.4) and 31 (1.7 %). Reproducibility of histological diagnosis of HG-CIN/ICC obtained in Poland generally increases with the severity of lesion and is lowest for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 and highest for adenocarcinoma. Over 80 % of ICC cases are vaccine-preventable in Poland. PMID:25547828

  18. Post hoc analysis of the PATRICIA randomized trial of the efficacy of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)/HPV-18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine against incident and persistent infection with nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types using an alternative multiplex type-specific PCR assay for HPV DNA.

    PubMed

    Struyf, Frank; Colau, Brigitte; Wheeler, Cosette M; Naud, Paulo; Garland, Suzanne; Quint, Wim; Chow, Song-Nan; Salmern, Jorge; Lehtinen, Matti; Del Rosario-Raymundo, M Rowena; Paavonen, Jorma; Teixeira, Jlio C; Germar, Maria Julieta; Peters, Klaus; Skinner, S Rachel; Limson, Genara; Castellsagu, Xavier; Poppe, Willy A J; Ramjattan, Brian; Klein, Terry D; Schwarz, Tino F; Chatterjee, Archana; Tjalma, Wiebren A A; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco; Lewis, David J M; Harper, Diane M; Molijn, Anco; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; David, Marie-Pierre; Dubin, Gary

    2015-02-01

    The efficacy of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)/HPV-18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine against cervical infections with HPV in the Papilloma Trial against Cancer in Young Adults (PATRICIA) was evaluated using a combination of the broad-spectrum L1-based SPF10 PCR-DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/line probe assay (LiPA25) system with type-specific PCRs for HPV-16 and -18. Broad-spectrum PCR assays may underestimate the presence of HPV genotypes present at relatively low concentrations in multiple infections, due to competition between genotypes. Therefore, samples were retrospectively reanalyzed using a testing algorithm incorporating the SPF10 PCR-DEIA/LiPA25 plus a novel E6-based multiplex type-specific PCR and reverse hybridization assay (MPTS12 RHA), which permits detection of a panel of nine oncogenic HPV genotypes (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58, and 59). For the vaccine against HPV types 16 and 18, there was no major impact on estimates of vaccine efficacy (VE) for incident or 6-month or 12-month persistent infections when the MPTS12 RHA was included in the testing algorithm versus estimates with the protocol-specified algorithm. However, the alternative testing algorithm showed greater sensitivity than the protocol-specified algorithm for detection of some nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types. More cases were gained in the control group than in the vaccine group, leading to higher point estimates of VE for 6-month and 12-month persistent infections for the nonvaccine oncogenic types included in the MPTS12 RHA assay (types 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58, and 59). This post hoc analysis indicates that the per-protocol testing algorithm used in PATRICIA underestimated the VE against some nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types and that the choice of the HPV DNA testing methodology is important for the evaluation of VE in clinical trials. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00122681.). PMID:25540273

  19. Post Hoc Analysis of the PATRICIA Randomized Trial of the Efficacy of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV-16)/HPV-18 AS04-Adjuvanted Vaccine against Incident and Persistent Infection with Nonvaccine Oncogenic HPV Types Using an Alternative Multiplex Type-Specific PCR Assay for HPV DNA

    PubMed Central

    Colau, Brigitte; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Naud, Paulo; Garland, Suzanne; Quint, Wim; Chow, Song-Nan; Salmerón, Jorge; Lehtinen, Matti; Del Rosario-Raymundo, M. Rowena; Paavonen, Jorma; Teixeira, Júlio C.; Germar, Maria Julieta; Peters, Klaus; Skinner, S. Rachel; Limson, Genara; Castellsagué, Xavier; Poppe, Willy A. J.; Ramjattan, Brian; Klein, Terry D.; Schwarz, Tino F.; Chatterjee, Archana; Tjalma, Wiebren A. A.; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco; Lewis, David J. M.; Harper, Diane M.; Molijn, Anco; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; David, Marie-Pierre; Dubin, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)/HPV-18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine against cervical infections with HPV in the Papilloma Trial against Cancer in Young Adults (PATRICIA) was evaluated using a combination of the broad-spectrum L1-based SPF10 PCR-DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/line probe assay (LiPA25) system with type-specific PCRs for HPV-16 and -18. Broad-spectrum PCR assays may underestimate the presence of HPV genotypes present at relatively low concentrations in multiple infections, due to competition between genotypes. Therefore, samples were retrospectively reanalyzed using a testing algorithm incorporating the SPF10 PCR-DEIA/LiPA25 plus a novel E6-based multiplex type-specific PCR and reverse hybridization assay (MPTS12 RHA), which permits detection of a panel of nine oncogenic HPV genotypes (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58, and 59). For the vaccine against HPV types 16 and 18, there was no major impact on estimates of vaccine efficacy (VE) for incident or 6-month or 12-month persistent infections when the MPTS12 RHA was included in the testing algorithm versus estimates with the protocol-specified algorithm. However, the alternative testing algorithm showed greater sensitivity than the protocol-specified algorithm for detection of some nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types. More cases were gained in the control group than in the vaccine group, leading to higher point estimates of VE for 6-month and 12-month persistent infections for the nonvaccine oncogenic types included in the MPTS12 RHA assay (types 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58, and 59). This post hoc analysis indicates that the per-protocol testing algorithm used in PATRICIA underestimated the VE against some nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types and that the choice of the HPV DNA testing methodology is important for the evaluation of VE in clinical trials. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00122681.) PMID:25540273

  20. HPV vaccination in head and neck HPV-related pathologies.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicka, Ma?gorzata; Jzefiak, Agata; Jackowska, Joanna; Szyd?owski, Jaros?aw; Go?dzicka-Jzefiak, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Recent data demonstrate that human papilloma virus (HPV) plays a role in pathologies other than ano-genital cancers, specifically head and neck malignancies, and non-cancerous conditions such as recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). High-risk HPV16 and 18, and low risk HPV6 and 11 play the main role in HPV-related pathologies. As more and more information about the role of HPV infection in non-cervical diseases is amassed, additional questions about whether prophylactic HPV vaccines will effectively prevent these conditions are raised. HPV vaccination programs for the cervical pathology are being implemented worldwide. In the United States, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the quadrivalent HPV vaccine for girls in 2006 and for boys in 2011. These vaccination programs were aimed at the genital, HPV-related lesions, and there was not much recognition at that time of how HPV vaccination programs might affect oral HPV infection, which is a risk factor for the development of HPV-related head and neck cancers. Vaccination has proved to be a successful policy, and an extant recommendation is aimed at preventing HPV and associated cervical and other anogenital cancers with the routine use of HPV vaccines for males and females. However, HPV vaccines are presently not recommended for preventing oropharyngeal cancer (OPC), although they have been shown to be highly effective against the HPV strains that are most commonly found in the oropharynx. This review is aimed at presenting the evidence-based knowledge concerning HPV vaccination and highlighting the trials and strategies for vaccine administration in HPV-dependent head and neck pathologies. PMID:24981297

  1. From the monovalent to the nine-valent HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pils, S; Joura, E A

    2015-09-01

    An investigational monovalent human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 virus-like particle vaccine has been shown to prevent persistent infection and cervical disease related to HPV 16 and was proof of concept (2002). Designed to prevent the bulk of invasive cervical cancer, quadrivalent (HPV 6/11/16/18) and bivalent (HPV 16/18) vaccines have been available since 2006 and 2007, respectively. They are highly effective in preventing HPV 16/18-related cervical precancer; the quadrivalent version also prevents genital warts related to HPV 6/11. It has been shown that the precursors of vulvar, vaginal and anal cancer related to the vaccine types are effectively prevented. This led to a paradigm shift from a female-only cervical cancer vaccine to a vaccine for the prevention of HPV-related disease and cancer for both sexes. Vaccination before the start of sexual activity is most effective, and consequently most programs target 9- to 12-year-olds. Additionally, recent studies have proven the noninferior immunoresponse of a two-dose schedule in these age cohorts. Gender-neutral vaccination has become more common; it improves coverage and also provides protection to all males. Recently a nine-valent HPV vaccine (HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) was licensed; it provides high and consistent protection against infections and diseases related to these types, with ?90% of cervical and other HPV-related cancers and precancers potentially being avoided. Coverage is key. Efforts must be made to provide HPV vaccination in low-resource countries that lack screening programs. In countries with cervical cancer screening, HPV vaccination will greatly affect screening algorithms. PMID:25980355

  2. The Most Common Type of HPV in Women with Atypical Squamous Cell of Undetermined Significance (ASCUS) in Pap Smear in Iran-Yazd

    PubMed Central

    Karimi-Zarchi, Mojgan; Tabatabaie, Afsarosadat; Dehghani-Firoozabadi, Alie; Shamsi, Farima; Baghianimoghaddam, Maleknaz; Dargahi, Mandana; Yazian, Pouria; Mojahed, Shahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cervical cancer is the third most gynecological cancer and one of the common causes of cancer death in women in Iran and the other developing countries. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is a known Risk factor in cervical cancer, but according to HPV deference types, the high risk and low risks differ. Material and method: We evaluate the most common high risk and low risk HPV type in 180 females with an atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) results in pap smear in Gynecological Oncology Clinic in Shahid Sadoughi Hospital in Yazd, Iran within 2012 to 2014.HPV typing was done with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The data obtained were recorded in a questionnaire and analyzed by SPSS software. Result: More common low risk HPV type in ASCUS patients was type 6 (63.6%) and then type 11 (36.4%). Type 16 was the most common high risk HPV type. Discussion: HPV DNA typing for better management of women With ASCUS is important and this study showed HPV type 16 is the most prevalent type in ASCUS patients. It seems the living region is important in HPV type distribution and Quadri-valant Vaccine can prevent cervical cancer in Iran because the most common low risk HPV is type6 and 11, and HPV 16 is the most common high risk HPV. PMID:26759533

  3. External Genital Human Papillomavirus Prevalence and Associated Factors Among Heterosexual Men on 5 Continents

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Anna R.; Goldstone, Stephen; Palefsky, Joel M.; Moreira, Edson D.; Penny, Mary E.; Aranda, Carlos; Jessen, Heiko; Moi, Harald; Ferris, Daron G.; Liaw, Kai-Li; Marshall, J. Brooke; Vuocolo, Scott; Barr, Eliav; Haupt, Richard M.; Garner, Elizabeth I.O.; Guris, Dalya

    2011-01-01

    Background.?We examined the baseline prevalence of penile, scrotal, and perineal/perianal human papillomavirus (HPV) in heterosexual men (HM). We also evaluated baseline characteristics of HM to assess factors associated with prevalent HPV detection. Methods.?We tested serum samples from 3463 HM aged 1624 years with 15 lifetime female sexual partners for antibodies to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18. We collected baseline swab specimens for the detection of DNA of HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, and 59 from 3 areas: penile, scrotal, and perineal/perianal. Risk factors for prevalent HPV DNA detection were evaluated. Results.?The prevalence of any tested HPV type was 18.7% at the penis, 13.1% at the scrotum, 7.9% at the perineal/perianal region, and 21.0% at any site. Having >3 lifetime female sexual partners had the greatest impact on HPV prevalence: odds ratio (OR) 3.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.14.9) for HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18; and OR 4.5 (95% CI 3.36.1) for all HPV types tested. HPV DNA detection was highest in Africa. Neither condom usage nor circumcision was associated with HPV DNA prevalence. Conclusion.?Genital-HPV DNA detection is common in young, sexually active HM. We found HPV to be most prevalent in African men and least prevalent in men from the Asia-Pacific region. Increased numbers of sexual partners was an important risk factor for HPV DNA prevalence. PMID:21148497

  4. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and their associations with squamous cell neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, K J

    1987-01-01

    Current data implicating an etiological role of Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in precancer lesions (intraepithelial neoplasia) and squamous cell carcinoma of both the genital tract and other sites (oral cavity, larynx, skin, esophagus, nasal cavity, bronchus) can be summarized as follows: a) HPV involvement in benign, precancer, and malignant genital squamous cell lesions has been demonstrated by morphological, immunohistochemical and DNA hybridization techniques; b) HPV infections in the genital tract are sexually transmitted (STD) and associated with the same risk factors as development of cervical carcinoma; c) natural history of cervical HPV lesions is equivalent to that of CIN, i.e. they are potentially progressive to carcinoma in situ; d) latent HPV infections exist in the genital tract of both sexes; e) animal models exist, where papillomaviruses induce malignant transformation; f) HPV 11 induces transformation of human squamous epithelium in vivo (nude mouse renal subcapsule assay); g) malignant transformation of HPV lesions seems to depend on virus type and the physical state of its DNA, i.e. whether or not integrated in the host cell DNA; h) malignant transformation most probably requires synergistic actions between HPV and chemical or physical carcinogens or other infectious agents; i) genetic disposition (at least in animals) significantly contributes to malignant transformation; j) immunological defence mechanisms of the host probably are capable of modifying the course of HPV infection (efficacy in man remains to be elucidated). Many details of the molecular mechanisms still remain to be clarified, however. No applicable model systems exist to elucidate these issues, or the mechanisms leading to the progression to invasive cancer. Improved tissue culture systems for in vitro differentiation of keratinocytes should help in elucidating the biology of papillomaviruses and their interaction with cell division and differentiation. PMID:2829787

  5. Genital Warts

    PubMed Central

    Yanofsky, Valerie R.; Patel, Rita V.

    2012-01-01

    External genital warts, also known as condylomata acuminata, are extremely common, with between 500,000 to one million new cases diagnosed each year in the United States alone. To date, more than 120 distinct subtypes of human papillomavirus have been identified. Human papillomavirus types 6 and 11 rarely give rise to cervical cancers, but are responsible for 90 percent of the cases of genital warts. The current treatment options are largely centered upon removal of the warts rather than elimination of the underlying viral infection. A wide range of therapies are presently in use, which are highly variable and can differ dramatically with respect to cost, side-effect profiles, dosing schedules, duration of treatment, and overall effectiveness. As of yet, no definitive therapy has emerged as the ideal standard of care in the treatment of genital warts, and therapy selection generally occurs in a patient-specific manner. PMID:22768354

  6. Epidemiology of oral HPV in the oral mucosa in women without signs of oral disease from Yucatan, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Losa, Mara del Refugio; Barrera, Ernesto Soria; Herrera-Pech, Vernica; Conde-Ferrez, Laura; Puerto-Sols, Marylin; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are considered necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, there is no doubt that some types of oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with HR-HPV. The epidemiology of oral HPV infections in healthy subjects remains unclear due to a lack of knowledge. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections of the oral mucosa without pathology. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 390 women seeking prenatal care, Pap smears, family planning or gynecological diseases were studied. Oral cells were collected by direct swab sampling. Information regarding sociodemographic status, sexual behavior, infectious diseases, contraceptive history and tobacco and alcohol consumption were obtained through direct interviews. HPV and genotypes were detected by type-specific polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 14% of the women studied had an oral HPV infection. Women ? 20 years of age had the highest HPV prevalence (24.5%). In total, seven genotypes were identified, including the high-risk genotypes 16, 18, 58 and 59 and the low-risk genotypes 6, 81 and 13, the latter of which is a type exclusive to oral mucosa. Sexual behavior was not associated with the presence of genital HPV types in the oral mucosa. Genital HPV types were present in the oral mucosa of women without associated clinical manifestations; however, sexual behavior was not associated with infection, and therefore others routes of transmission should be explored. PMID:26221121

  7. Female genital mutilation/cutting type IV in Cambodia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Abdulcadir, Jasmine; Irion, Olivier; de Tejada, Begoa Martinez

    2015-12-01

    Nontherapeutic female genital modifications can cause short- and long-term consequences. Caregivers should promote women's self knowledge on genitals' anatomy and physiology, and psychophysical and sexual health. They should also inform on possible negative consequences of vulvar nontherapeutic alterations requested and avoid the medicalization of female genital mutilation. PMID:26732824

  8. Decreasing risk: impact of HPV vaccination on outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hymel, Pamela Ann

    2006-12-01

    Cervical cancer, caused by oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV), remains a major health problem worldwide. The recent introduction of a quadrivalent vaccine (Gardasil), which targets HPV strains responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases and 90% of genital warts, has ushered in new hope of substantially reducing global prevalence of HPV disease. A further bivalent HPV vaccine (Cervarix) is in the offing. However, many issues still need to be addressed, including actual vaccine efficacy in preventing cervical cancer, public acceptance, use of the vaccine in men, vaccine access, costs, and impact of the vaccine on cervical cancer screening programs. This review analyzes some of these issues, and emphasizes the need for a coordinated effort of patients, parents, health professionals, hospitals, and policymakers to ensure successful implementation of vaccination programs in the United States. PMID:17203991

  9. In vitro infection and type-restricted antibody-mediated neutralization of authentic human papillomavirus type 16.

    PubMed

    White, W I; Wilson, S D; Bonnez, W; Rose, R C; Koenig, S; Suzich, J A

    1998-02-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) is strongly associated with the development of cervical cancer. Studies of model systems with animal papillomaviruses have demonstrated the importance of neutralizing antibodies in preventing papillomavirus-associated disease. The assessment of neutralizing antibody responses against HPV-16, previously hampered by the lack of a viral source, was enabled by the recent propagation of an HPV-16 stock in xenografted severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. HPV-16 infection of an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line was demonstrated by detection of an HPV-16-specific spliced mRNA amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR. Infection was blocked by preincubation of the virus with antiserum generated against HPV-16 virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of the major capsid protein, L1. To examine potential cross-neutralizing activity among the different genital HPV types, rabbit antisera to L1 VLPs corresponding to HPV-6, -11, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, and -45 were assayed for the ability to block the HPV-16 infection of cultured cells. Antiserum raised against HPV-33 L1 VLPs was the only heterologous antiserum which inhibited HPV-16 infection. Thus, a neutralization assay for HPV-16 may help to characterize the components required to compose a broadly efficacious genital HPV vaccine. PMID:9444988

  10. Genital Warts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... transmitted disease (STD) caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). The warts are soft, moist, pink, or flesh- ... completely eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading HPV. HPV vaccines may help prevent some of the ...

  11. OASL1 deficiency promotes antiviral protection against genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection by enhancing type I interferon production

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Eun; Lee, Myeong Sup; Kim, Young-Joon; Lee, Heung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) interferes with virus replication, promotes antiviral responses, and controls innate and adaptive immune responses to certain viruses. Recently, we reported that 2’–5’ oligoadenylate synthetase-like 1 (OASL1) negatively regulates type I IFN production by inhibiting the translation of the type I IFN-regulating master transcription factor, IRF7. Notably, while OASL1-deficient mice induce robust production of type I IFN and are resistant to systemic viral infection, the effects of OASL1 during localized viral infection has not been studied. To this end, we investigated the role of OASL1 during mucosal HSV-2 infection of the genital tract. Oasl1−/− mice exhibited better survival rates than wild type (WT) mice following intravaginal HSV-2 infection, and suppressed virus replication more efficiently despite comparable recruitment of effector immune cells. Moreover, Ly6Chigh monocytes, and not pDCs or other cell types, displayed enhanced production of type I IFNs in Oasl1−/− mice in response to HSV-2 infection. Furthermore, cytotoxic T cell responses including IFN-γ production were accelerated in Oasl1−/− mice after mucosal HSV-2 infection. Collectively, these results demonstrate that OASL1 deficiency promotes antiviral immunity against local mucosal viral infection and suggest that OASL1 could be a therapeutic target for treatment of HSV-2 infection of the genital mucosa. PMID:26750802

  12. OASL1 deficiency promotes antiviral protection against genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection by enhancing type I interferon production.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Eun; Lee, Myeong Sup; Kim, Young-Joon; Lee, Heung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) interferes with virus replication, promotes antiviral responses, and controls innate and adaptive immune responses to certain viruses. Recently, we reported that 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like 1 (OASL1) negatively regulates type I IFN production by inhibiting the translation of the type I IFN-regulating master transcription factor, IRF7. Notably, while OASL1-deficient mice induce robust production of type I IFN and are resistant to systemic viral infection, the effects of OASL1 during localized viral infection has not been studied. To this end, we investigated the role of OASL1 during mucosal HSV-2 infection of the genital tract. Oasl1(-/-) mice exhibited better survival rates than wild type (WT) mice following intravaginal HSV-2 infection, and suppressed virus replication more efficiently despite comparable recruitment of effector immune cells. Moreover, Ly6C(high) monocytes, and not pDCs or other cell types, displayed enhanced production of type I IFNs in Oasl1(-/-) mice in response to HSV-2 infection. Furthermore, cytotoxic T cell responses including IFN-? production were accelerated in Oasl1(-/-) mice after mucosal HSV-2 infection. Collectively, these results demonstrate that OASL1 deficiency promotes antiviral immunity against local mucosal viral infection and suggest that OASL1 could be a therapeutic target for treatment of HSV-2 infection of the genital mucosa. PMID:26750802

  13. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Genital Herpes Genital Herpes Research Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this ... Studies Help people who are suffering from genital herpes by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  14. Low prevalence of oral and nasal human papillomavirus in employees performing CO2-laser evaporation of genital warts or loop electrode excision procedure of cervical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Kristian; Norrbom, Christina; Forslund, Ola; Mller, Charlotte; Frding, Ligita P; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Markauskas, Algirdas; Blomberg, Maria; Baumgartner-Nielsen, Jane; Madsen, Jakob Torp; Strauss, Gitte; Madsen, Klaus G; Sand, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    Risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission during laser vaporisation of genital warts or loop electrode excision procedure is controversial. An oral rinse, a nasal swabs, history of HPV related diseases and data on HPV exposure were collected from 287 employees at departments of dermato-venerology and gynaecology in Denmark. A mucosal HPV type was found among 5.8% of employees with experience of laser treatment of genital warts as compared to 1.7% of those with no experience (p?=?0.12). HPV prevalence was not higher in employees participating in electrosurgical treatment or cryotherapy of genital warts, or loop electrode excision procedure compared with those who did not. HPV 6 or 11 were not detected in any samples. Hand warts after the age of 24 years was more common among dermatology than among non-dermatology personnel (18% vs. 8.0%, p?=?0.03). Mucosal HPV types are infrequent in the oral and nasal cavity of health care personnel, however, employees at departments of dermato-venereology are at risk of acquiring hand warts. PMID:24941064

  15. Suppression of recurrent genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection by Rhus javanica in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M; Kurokawa, M; Hozumi, T; Saito, A; Ida, M; Morohashi, M; Namba, T; Kawana, T; Shiraki, K

    1998-07-01

    Rhus javanica has been shown to exhibit anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) activity and potentiate the anti-HSV activity of acyclovir in vitro and in vivo. This extract was examined for its suppressive efficacy on recurrent genital infection in guinea pigs. Guinea pigs were primarily infected intravaginally with HSV type 2 (HSV-2). Prophylactic oral administration, at the dose corresponding to human use, of R. javanica significantly reduced the incidence, severity and/or frequency of spontaneous and severe skin lesions as compared with latently infected guinea pigs administered with water. This prophylactic efficacy was confirmed by the crossover administration, for more than 2 months, of R. javanica and water to the infected guinea pigs. Toxicity, such as weight loss, from R. javanica administration was not observed in the guinea pigs. When recurrent HSV-2 disease was induced by ultraviolet irradiation 3 months after primary infection, the prophylaxis with R. javanica was also significantly effective in reducing the severity of ultraviolet-induced skin lesions. Thus, prophylaxis of recurrent genital HSV-2 infection with R. javanica may preserve the efficacy of acyclovir by reducing both the use of acyclovir and the appearance of acyclovir-resistant viruses. PMID:9754947

  16. Analysis of risk-structured vaccination model for the dynamics of oncogenic and warts-causing HPV types.

    PubMed

    Alsaleh, Aliya A; Gumel, Abba B

    2014-07-01

    A new deterministic model is designed and used to assess the community-wide impact of mass vaccination of new sexually active individuals on the dynamics of the oncogenic and warts-causing HPV types. Rigorous qualitative analyses of the model, which incorporates the two currently available anti-HPV vaccines, reveal that it undergoes competitive exclusion when the reproduction of one HPV risk type (low/high) exceeds unity, while that of the other HPV risk type is less than unity. For the case when the reproduction numbers of the two HPV risk types (low/high) exceed unity, the two risk types co-exist. It is shown that the sub-model with the low-risk HPV types only has at least one endemic equilibrium whenever the associated reproduction threshold exceeds unity. Furthermore, this sub-model undergoes a re-infection-induced backward bifurcation under certain conditions. In the absence of the re-infection of recovered individuals and cancer-induced mortality in males, the associated disease-free equilibrium of the full (risk-structured) model is shown to be globally asymptotically stable whenever the reproduction number of the model is less than unity (that is, the full model does not undergo backward bifurcation under this setting). It is shown, via numerical simulations, that the use of the Gardasil vaccine could lead to the effective control of HPV in the community if the coverage rate is in the range of 73-95% (84%). If 70% of the new sexually active susceptible females are vaccinated with the Gardasil vaccine, additionally vaccinating 34-56% (45%) of the new sexually active susceptible males can lead to the effective community-wide control (or elimination) of the HPV types. PMID:25033777

  17. Comparison of different assays to assess human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16- and 18-specific antibodies after HPV infection and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Scherpenisse, Mirte; Schepp, Rutger M; Mollers, Madelief; Mooij, Sofie H; Meijer, Chris J L M; Berbers, Guy A M; van der Klis, Fiona R M

    2013-08-01

    We compared the measurement of human papillomavirus (HPV)-specific serum antibody levels with the virus-like-particle multiplex immunoassay (VLP-MIA), competitive Luminex immunoassay (cLIA), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) L1-based MIA. Using a large panel of serum samples, these assays showed mutually good correlations for both naturally induced and vaccine-derived HPV-specific antibody levels. However, an adaptation of the GST L1-based MIA resulted in an improved correlation with both cLIA and VLP-MIA. PMID:23740920

  18. Comparison of Different Assays To Assess Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Type 16- and 18-Specific Antibodies after HPV Infection and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Schepp, Rutger M.; Mollers, Madelief; Mooij, Sofie H.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Berbers, Guy A. M.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the measurement of human papillomavirus (HPV)-specific serum antibody levels with the virus-like-particle multiplex immunoassay (VLP-MIA), competitive Luminex immunoassay (cLIA), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) L1-based MIA. Using a large panel of serum samples, these assays showed mutually good correlations for both naturally induced and vaccine-derived HPV-specific antibody levels. However, an adaptation of the GST L1-based MIA resulted in an improved correlation with both cLIA and VLP-MIA. PMID:23740920

  19. Determinants of human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 infections in the lower female genital tract in an Italian population.

    PubMed

    Venuti, A; Badaracco, G; Sedati, A; Carbini, R; Marcante, M L

    1994-01-01

    The prevalences of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 infection were determined by a non isotopic molecular hybridization assay on cervical scrapes from 738 women affected by gynaecological lesions different from malignancies. The correlation with known epidemiological risk factors for cervical neoplasia, such as sexual habits, smoking and pill use, was investigated. The overall HPV prevalence rate was 29.8% (220/738). Viral DNA sequences were detected in 26.9% (122/452) of morphologically normal cervices, in 75 of 224 HPV lesions (32.5%), in 1 case of 3 HSV2 lesions and in 22 of 59 dysplastic lesions (37.3%), and the frequency was increasing with the severity of CIN from 22.7% of CIN I to 57.1% of CIN III. The most relevant factor as relative risk for the presence of HPV 16/18 was the multiple lifetime sexual partners, whereas the other investigated factors were mainly associated with the clinically manifested HPV infection. PMID:7957325

  20. T-type Ca2+ channels and the urinary and male genital tracts.

    PubMed

    Fry, C H; Jabr, R I

    2014-04-01

    T-type Ca(2+) channels are widely expressed throughout the urinary and male genital tracts, generally alongside L-type Ca(2+) channels. The use of pharmacological blockers of these channels has suggested functional roles in all regions, with the possible exception of the ureter. Their functional expression is apparent not just in smooth muscle cells but also in interstitial cells that lie in close proximity to muscle, nerve and epithelial components of these tissues. Thus, T-type Ca(2+) channels can contribute directly to modulation of muscle function and indirectly to changes of epithelial and nerve function. T-type Ca(2+) channel activity modulates phasic contractile activity, especially in conjunction with Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, and also to agonist-dependent responses in different tissues. Upregulation of channel density occurs in pathological conditions associated with enhanced contractile responses, e.g. overactive bladder, but it is unclear if this is causal or a response to the pathological state. Moreover, T-type Ca(2+) channels may have a role in the development of prostate tumours regulating the secretion of mitogens from neuroendocrine cells. Although a number of selective channel blockers exist, their relative selectivity over L-type Ca(2+) channels is often low and makes evaluation of T-type Ca(2+) channel function in the whole organism difficult. PMID:24463704

  1. Pathogenic role of the eight probably/possibly carcinogenic HPV types 26, 53, 66, 67, 68, 70, 73 and 82 in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Halec, Gordana; Alemany, Laia; Lloveras, Belen; Schmitt, Markus; Alejo, Maria; Bosch, Franz X; Tous, Sara; Klaustermeier, Jo Ellen; Guimer, Nuria; Grabe, Niels; Lahrmann, Bernd; Gissmann, Lutz; Quint, Wim; Bosch, Francesc X; de Sanjose, Silvia; Pawlita, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Eight HPV types (HPV26, 53, 66, 67, 68, 70, 73 and 82) that are phylogenetically closely related to 12 WHO-defined high-risk (HR) HPV have been rarely but consistently identified as single HPV infections in about 3% of cervical cancer (CxCa) tissues. Due to lack of biological data, these types are referred to as probable/possible (p) HR-HPV. To analyse their biological activity in direct comparison to HR-HPV types, we selected 55 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) CxCa tissues harbouring single pHR-HPV infections (2-13 cases per type) and 266 tissues harbouring single HR-HPV (7-40 cases per type) from a worldwide, retrospective, cross-sectional study. Single HPV infection was verified by two genotyping methods. Presence of type-specific spliced E6*I mRNA transcripts and expression of cellular proteins indicative of HPV transformation were assessed in all cases. In 55 CxCa tissues with pHR-HPV, E6*I mRNA expression was 100%; high p16(INK4a) , 98%; low pRb, 96%; low CyD1, 93%; and low p53, 84%. Compared to HPV16 tissues as a reference, individual frequencies of these five markers did not differ significantly, either for any of the eight pHR-HPV and the 11 other HR types individually or for the groups of pHR and HR types without HPV16. We conclude that the eight pHR-HPV types, when present as a single infection in CxCa, are biologically active and affect the same cellular pathways as any of the fully recognized carcinogenic HR-HPV types. Therefore we have provided molecular evidence of carcinogenicity for types currently classified as probably/possibly carcinogenic. Although this evidence is crucial for HPV-type carcinogenicity classification, per se it is not sufficient for inclusion of these HPV types into population-wide primary and secondary prevention programmes. Such decisions have to include careful estimation of effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses. PMID:25043390

  2. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer ... and Gynecologists. Committee Opinion No. 588: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination. Obstet Gynecol . 2014;123(3):712-718. PMID: ...

  3. HPV Type 6 and 18 Coinfection in a Case of Adult-Onset Laryngeal Papillomatosis: Immunization with Gardasil.

    PubMed

    Fancello, Virginia; Melis, Andrea; Piana, Andrea Fausto; Castiglia, Paolo; Cossu, Andrea; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Bozzo, Corrado; King, Emma Victoria; Meloni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal papillomatosis (LP) is a rare human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease that often requires multiple surgical interventions and residual impairment of voice is almost inevitable. We report the case of a patient with adult onset recurrent LP, showing moderate dysplasia and coinfection with HPV types 6 and 18. The tetravalent HPV vaccine Gardasil was prescribed off label, with the aim of triggering an immunogenic response and consequently reducing the probability of further recurrences. The patient was followed for 9 months with no sign of relapse of his LP. The postexposure use of the anti-HPV vaccine could represent a promising therapeutic agent in established LP. Unfortunately, the potential efficacy of this new therapeutic option in this situation has been suggested only by isolated case reports. Further controlled studies, with a longer follow-up and a larger sample size, are needed to assess efficacy of Gardasil in LP. PMID:26783482

  4. HPV Type 6 and 18 Coinfection in a Case of Adult-Onset Laryngeal Papillomatosis: Immunization with Gardasil

    PubMed Central

    Fancello, Virginia; Melis, Andrea; Piana, Andrea Fausto; Castiglia, Paolo; Cossu, Andrea; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Bozzo, Corrado; King, Emma Victoria; Meloni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal papillomatosis (LP) is a rare human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease that often requires multiple surgical interventions and residual impairment of voice is almost inevitable. We report the case of a patient with adult onset recurrent LP, showing moderate dysplasia and coinfection with HPV types 6 and 18. The tetravalent HPV vaccine Gardasil was prescribed off label, with the aim of triggering an immunogenic response and consequently reducing the probability of further recurrences. The patient was followed for 9 months with no sign of relapse of his LP. The postexposure use of the anti-HPV vaccine could represent a promising therapeutic agent in established LP. Unfortunately, the potential efficacy of this new therapeutic option in this situation has been suggested only by isolated case reports. Further controlled studies, with a longer follow-up and a larger sample size, are needed to assess efficacy of Gardasil in LP. PMID:26783482

  5. Transmission of genital human papillomavirus infection in couples: a population-based cohort study in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengfei; He, Zhonghu; Zhang, Chanyuan; Liu, Fangfang; Liu, Ying; Li, Jingjing; Xu, Zhongyao; Wang, Qiyan; Hang, Dong; Shen, Na; Pan, Yaqi; Guo, Chuanhai; Cai, Hong; Ke, Yang

    2015-01-01

    HPV transmission dynamics have rarely been studied in the general population, especially in China. We followed the genital HPV infection status of both partners in 874 couples aged 25-65 years from rural China for up to 7 bi-annual visits during 2009-2013. The positive HPV concordance and transmission rate for partners in a couple were evaluated and relevant risk factors were assessed. The concordance of any, oncogenic, and non-oncogenic HPV was 15.52%, 16.18% and 10.41%, respectively. Male-to-female transmission rate was 7.11, 12.13 and 4.77/1000 person months for any, oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPV respectively. The female-to-male transmission rate was 5.56, 2.37, and 17.01/1000 person months for any, oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPV respectively. The risk of male-to-female transmission was significantly higher than that of female-to-male transmission for oncogenic types. However, for non-oncogenic types, the risk of male-to-female transmission was significantly lower than that of female-to-male transmission. Younger couples, persistent infection with HPV, higher numbers of sexual partners and higher frequency of sexual intercourse were positively associated with HPV transmission in couples. Our results indicate that men in rural China play a more important role than men in western populations as a source of cervical oncogenic HPV infection in women. PMID:26204471

  6. Association Study between Cervical Lesions and Single or Multiple Vaccine-Target and Non-Vaccine Target Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in Women from Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Chagas, Brbara Simas; Comar, Manola; Gurgel, Ana Pavla Almeida Diniz; Paiva, Srgio; Seraceni, Silva; de Freitas, Antonio Carlos; Crovella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    We performed an association between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and single or multiple vaccine-target as well as non-vaccine target Human papillomavirus (HPV) types. Using bead-based HPV genotyping, 594 gynecological samples were genotyped. An association between squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) and presence of HPV16, 18, 31, 58 and 56 types were calculated. The risk was estimated by using odds ratio (OR) and 95% of confidence intervals (CI). A total of 370 (62.3%) women were HPV positive. Among these, 157 (42.7%) presented a single HPV infection, and 212 (57.3%) were infected by more than one HPV type. HPV31 was the most prevalent genotype, regardless single and multiple HPV infections. Single infection with HPV31 was associated with LSIL (OR=2.32; 95%CI: 1.01 to 5.32; p=0.04); HPV31 was also associated with LSIL (OR=3.28; 95%CI: 1.74 to 6.19; p= 0.0002) and HSIL (OR=3.82; 95%CI: 2.10 to 6.97; p<0.001) in multiple HPV infections. Risk to harbor cervical lesions was observed in multiple HPV infections with regard to the HPV56 (OR=5.39; 95%CI: 2.44 to 11.90; p<0.001for LSIL; OR=5.37; 95%CI: 2.71 to 10.69; p<0.001) and HPV58 (OR=3.29; 95%CI: 1.34 to 8.09; p=0.0091 for LSIL; OR=3.55; 95%CI: 1.56 to 8.11; p=0.0026) genotypes. In addition, women coinfected with HPV16/31/56 types had 6 and 5-fold increased risk of HSIL (OR=6.46; 95%CI: 1.89 to 22.09; p=0.002) and LSIL (OR=5.22; 95%CI: 1.10 to 24.70; p=0.03), respectively. Multiple HPV infections without HPV16/18 has 2-fold increased risk of HSIL (OR=2.57; 95%CI: 1.41 to 4.70; p=0.002) and LSIL OR=2.03; 95%CI: 1.08 to 3.79; p=0.02). The results of this study suggest that single and multiple vaccine target as well as non-vaccine target HPV types are associated with LSIL and HSIL. These finding should be taken into consideration in the design of HPV vaccination strategies. PMID:26176537

  7. Relationship between female genital tract infections, mucosal interleukin-17 production and local T helper type 17 cells.

    PubMed

    Masson, Lindi; Salkinder, Amy L; Olivier, Abraham Jacobus; McKinnon, Lyle R; Gamieldien, Hoyam; Mlisana, Koleka; Scriba, Thomas J; Lewis, David A; Little, Francesca; Jaspan, Heather B; Ronacher, Katharina; Denny, Lynette; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Passmore, Jo-Ann S

    2015-12-01

    T helper type 17 (Th17) cells play an important role in immunity to fungal and bacterial pathogens, although their role in the female genital tract, where exposure to these pathogens is common, is not well understood. We investigated the relationship between female genital tract infections, cervicovaginal interleukin-17 (IL-17) concentrations and Th17 cell frequencies. Forty-two cytokines were measured in cervicovaginal lavages from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected women. Frequencies of Th17 cells (CD3(+) CD4(+) IL-17a(+) ) were evaluated in cervical cytobrushes and blood by flow cytometry. Women were screened for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis and herpes simplex virus 2 by PCR, and candidal infections and bacterial vaginosis by Gram stain. Women with bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs), specifically chlamydia and gonorrhoea, had higher genital IL-17 concentrations than women with no STI, whereas women with candidal pseudohyphae/spores had lower IL-17 concentrations compared with women without candidal infections. Viral STIs (herpes simplex virus 2 and HIV) were not associated with significant changes in genital IL-17 concentrations. Genital IL-17 concentrations correlated strongly with other inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. Although Th17 cells were depleted from blood during HIV infection, cervical Th17 cell frequencies were similar in HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected women. Cervical Th17 cell frequencies were also not associated with STIs or candida, although few women had a STI. These findings suggest that IL-17 production in the female genital tract is induced in response to bacterial but not viral STIs. Decreased IL-17 associated with candidal infections suggests that candida may actively suppress IL-17 production or women with dampened IL-17 responses may be more susceptible to candidal outgrowth. PMID:26302175

  8. A comparative analysis of the epidemiological impact and disease cost-savings of HPV vaccines in France

    PubMed Central

    Bresse, Xavier; Adam, Marjorie; Largeron, Nathalie; Roze, Stephane; Marty, Remi

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to compare the epidemiological and economic impact of 16/18 bivalent and 6/11/16/18 quadrivalent HPV vaccination in France, considering differences in licensed outcomes, protection against non-vaccine HPV types and prevention of HPV-6/11-related diseases. The differential impact of the two vaccines was evaluated using a published model adapted to the French setting. The target population was females aged 1423 y and the time horizon was 100 y. A total of eight different scenarios compared vaccination impact in terms of reduction in HPV-16/18-associated carcinomas (cervical, vulvar, vaginal, anal, penile and head and neck), HPV-6/11-related genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and incremental reduction in cervical cancer due to potential cross-protection. Quadrivalent vaccine was associated with total discounted cost savings ranging from EUR 5441,020 million vs. EUR 177538 million with the bivalent vaccination (100-y time horizon). Genital wart prevention thanks to quadrivalent HPV vaccination accounted for EUR 306380 million savings (3756% of costs saved). In contrast, the maximal assumed cross-protection against cervical cancer resulted in EUR 1333 million savings (4%). Prevention of vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers accounted for additional EUR 7189 million savings (13%). In France, the quadrivalent HPV vaccination would result in significant incremental epidemiological and economic benefits vs. the bivalent vaccination, driven primarily by prevention of genital. The present analysis is the first in the French setting to consider the impact of HPV vaccination on all HPV diseases and non-vaccine types. PMID:23563511

  9. [Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis: indication for HPV vaccination?].

    PubMed

    Pawlita, M; Gissmann, L

    2009-04-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare disease in children and adults. It is characterized by proliferation of benign squamous cell papillomas within the respiratory-digestive tract, predominantly the larynx. RRP is caused by oral infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) types 6 or 11. In aggressive disease, which within few months or even weeks requires multiple surgical interventions to remove papillomas, residual impairment of voice and breathing is almost inevitable. Nowadays immune stimulation with interferon alpha or topic application of Cidofovir are recommended to lower the recurrence rate in aggressive disease but vaccination against mumps virus and photodynamic therapies has also been administered. The recently developed tetravalent HPV vaccine Gardasil induces neutralizing antibodies against capsid antigens of the HPV types 16 and 18, which are associated with cervical cancer, as well as against types 6 and 11, which are associated with condylomata acuminata und respiratory papillomatosis. The vaccine has been shown to be safe and highly immunogenic. It can efficaciously prevent new genital infections by one of the four vaccine types as well as the epithelial lesions induced by them. However, the vaccine had no effect against pre-existing genital infections or lesions. Here we propose the hypothesis that HPV vaccination could have a therapeutic effect in RRP by preventing new papilloma formation at additional sites. First case reports on Gardasil vaccination in juvenile as well as adult onset RRP have become available and their serological findings are presented here. In view of the low risk of this adjuvant immunotherapy a larger controlled multicentric trial is proposed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:19353471

  10. Inclusion of the benefits of enhanced cross-protection against cervical cancer and prevention of genital warts in the cost-effectiveness analysis of human papillomavirus vaccination in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infection with HPV 16 and 18, the major causative agents of cervical cancer, can be prevented through vaccination with a bivalent or quadrivalent vaccine. Both vaccines provide cross-protection against HPV-types not included in the vaccines. In particular, the bivalent vaccine provides additional protection against HPV 31, 33, and 45 and the quadrivalent vaccine against HPV31. The quadrivalent vaccine additionally protects against low-risk HPV type 6 and 11, responsible for most cases of genital warts. In this study, we made an analytical comparison of the two vaccines in terms of cost-effectiveness including the additional benefits of cross-protection and protection against genital warts in comparison with a screening-only strategy. Methods We used a Markov model, simulating the progression from HPV infection to cervical cancer or genital warts. The model was used to estimate the difference in future costs and health effects of both HPV-vaccines separately. Results In a cohort of 100,000 women, use of the bivalent or quadrivalent vaccine (both at 50% vaccination coverage) reduces the cervical cancer incidence by 221 and 207 cases, corresponding to ICERs of 17,600/QALY and 18,900/QALY, respectively. It was estimated that the quadrivalent vaccine additionally prevents 4390 cases of genital warts, reducing the ICER to 16,300/QALY. Assuming a comparable willingness to pay for cancer and genital warts prevention, the difference in ICERs could justify a slightly higher price (~7% per dose) in favor of the quadrivalent vaccine. Conclusions Clearly, HPV vaccination has been implemented for the prevention of cervical cancer. From this perspective, use of the bivalent HPV vaccine appears to be most effective and cost-effective. Including the benefits of prevention against genital warts, the ICER of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was found to be slightly more favourable. However, current decision-making on the introduction of HPV is driven by the primary cervical cancer outcome. New vaccine tenders could consider the benefits of cross-protection and the benefits of genital warts, which requires more balanced decision-making. PMID:23390964

  11. Human papillomavirus and other genital infections in indigenous women from Paraguay: a cross-sectional analytical study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of cervical cancer in Paraguay is among the highest in the world, with the human papillomavirus (HPV) being a necessary factor for cervical cancer. Knowledge about HPV infection among indigenous women is limited. This cross-sectional study analyzed the frequency of HPV and other genital infections in indigenous Paraguayan women of the Department of Presidente Hayes. Methods This study included 181 sexually active women without cervical lesions. They belonged to the following ethnicities: Mak (n?=?40); Nivacl (n?=?23); Sanapan (n?=?33); Enxet Sur (n?=?51) and Toba-Qom (n?=?34). The detection of HPV and other gynecological infectious microorganisms was performed by either molecular methods (for Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Chlamydia trachomatis), gram staining and/or culture (for Gardnerella vaginalis, Candida sp, Trichomonas vaginalis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae), serological methods (for Treponema pallidum, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV]) or cytology (cervical inflammation). Results A high prevalence (41.4%) of women positive for at least one sexually transmitted infection (STI) was found (23.2% any-type HPV, 11.6%T pallidum, 10.5%T vaginalis, 9.9% C trachomatis and 0.6% HIV) with 12.2% having more than one STI. HPV infection was the most frequent, with 16.1% of women positive for high-risk HPV types. There was a statistically significant association observed between any-type HPV and C trachomatis (p?=?0.004), which indicates that the detection of one of these agents should suggest the presence of the other. There was no association between any-type HPV and other genital infections or cervical inflammation, suggesting that other mechanism could exist to favor infection with the virus. Conclusion This multidisciplinary work suggests that STIs are frequent, making it necessary to implement control measures and improve diagnosis in order to increase the number of cases detected, especially in populations with poor access to health centers. PMID:24206645

  12. Prophylactic HPV vaccination: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Castle, P E; Maza, M

    2016-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the necessary cause of cervical cancer, the fourth most common cancer and cause of cancer-related death in females worldwide. HPV also causes anal, vaginal, vulvar, penile, and oropharyngeal cancer. Prophylactic HPV vaccines based on recombinantly expressed virus-like particles have been developed. Two first-generation, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved vaccines prevent infections and disease caused by HPV16 and HPV18, the two HPV genotypes that cause approximately 70% of cervical cancer, and one of these vaccines also prevents HPV6 and HPV11, the two HPV genotypes that cause 90% of genital warts. A next-generation vaccine, recently approved by the U.S. FDA, targets HPV16, HPV18, and five additional HPV genotypes that together causes approximately 90% of cervical cancer as well as HPV6 and HPV11. In clinical trials, these vaccines have shown high levels of efficacy against disease and infections caused by the targeted HPV genotypes in adolescent females and males and older females. Data indicate population effectiveness, and therefore cost effectiveness, is highest in HPV-naive young females prior to becoming sexually active. Countries that implemented HPV vaccination before 2010 have already experienced decreases in population prevalence of targeted HPV genotypes and related anogenital diseases in women and via herd protection in heterosexual men. Importantly, after more than 100 million doses given worldwide, HPV vaccination has demonstrated an excellent safety profile. With demonstrated efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and safety, universal HPV vaccination of all young, adolescent women, and with available resources at least high-risk groups of men, should be a global health priority. Failure to do so will result in millions of women dying from avertable cervical cancers, especially in low- and middle-income countries, and many thousands of women and men dying from other HPV-related cancers. PMID:26429676

  13. A content analysis of news coverage of the HPV vaccine by U.S. newspapers, January 2002-June 2005.

    PubMed

    Calloway, Crystal; Jorgensen, Cynthia M; Saraiya, Mona; Tsui, Jennifer

    2006-09-01

    Genital Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Of the 100 HPV types, HPV type 16 and HPV type 18 have been demonstrated to cause cervical cancer. Two pharmaceutical manufacturers have developed and tested HPV vaccines and are applying to the FDA for licensure. This research describes the content of HPV vaccine information contained in news articles. The Lexis-Nexis database was used to identify 25 articles on HPV that were published in 285 U.S. newspapers from January 1, 2003 to June 17, 2005. The coding schema captured information about the news event and source, as well as HPV and cervical cancer, transmission, vaccine, potential impact of the vaccine, and its relationship to PAP tests. The content analysis revealed that the news coverage of HPV vaccine provides information on the experimental status and efficacy of the vaccine, explains link between HPV and cervical cancer, and reports the manufacturers by name, as well as relies on them for a news source. Detailed information about HPV, however, was frequently missing which could lead to an incomplete picture or lack of understanding of the complexity of HPV and cervical cancer. As a major source of medical information, the media can be particularly important in educating policy makers and the general public about new scientific advances. Public health officials may wish to collaborate with journalists, health educators, healthcare providers, and women's health advocates to ensure that future educational initiatives explain the complexity of the association of HPV and cervical cancer and to stress the importance of continued cervical cancer screening. PMID:16999634

  14. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Genital Herpes Information for adults A A A This image ... blisters on the buttocks in a patient with herpes simplex. Overview Genital herpes is a recurrent, lifelong ...

  15. HPV Type 16 Infection Switches Keratinocytes from Apoptotic to Proliferative Fate under TWEAK/Fn14 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong; Zhan, Na; Ding, Dong; Liu, Xiaoming; Zou, Xiaoyan; Li, Ke; Xia, Yumin

    2015-10-01

    Previously, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) had been known to be an inducer of apoptosis of keratinocytes by engaging the Fn14 receptor. However, the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection confers a proliferation advantage on keratinocytes that may consequently harbor tumorigenicity. This study was designed to investigate the cross-talk in keratinocytes between TWEAK/Fn14 signaling and HPV type 16 infection, which may cooperate in regulating cell-cycle progression. TWEAK and Fn14 expression was determined in anogenital warts and normal skin. Both primary keratinocytes and HaCaT cells were transfected with HPV16 E6/E7 genes. The results showed that Fn14 is highly expressed upon HPV16 transfection and accompanied by an increase in Ras GTPase activity and TNF-receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) expression. Moreover, the E6/E7-transfected keratinocytes exhibit a shift of TNF receptor profile from type 1 to type 2 and weakened apoptotic response to TNF-? stimuli, when compared with the normal control. Surprisingly, significant increase in proliferation but not apoptosis was seen in E6/E7-positive keratinocytes, as TWEAK was additionally supplemented. In conclusion, the HPV16 infection in keratinocytes causes a switch of apoptotic to proliferative fate under TWEAK/Fn14 interaction, possibly by favoring Ras and TRAF2 activation and modulating TNF receptor expression. PMID:26016896

  16. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Genital Herpes KidsHealth > For Teens > Genital Herpes Print A A A Text Size What's in ... How Is It Treated? What Is It? Genital herpes is caused by a virus called herpes simplex ( ...

  17. HPV vaccine (human papillomavirus) Cervarix - what you need to know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Cervarix® Vaccine Information Statement: www.cdc.gov/ ... What is HPV? Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common ... in the United States. More than half of sexually active men ...

  18. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine for the prevention of cervical cancer and HPV-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Skinner, S Rachel; Apter, Dan; De Carvalho, Newton; Harper, Diane M; Konno, Ryo; Paavonen, Jorma; Romanowski, Barbara; Roteli-Martins, Cecilia; Burlet, Nansa; Mihalyi, Attila; Struyf, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Vaccines are available against human papillomavirus (HPV), the causal agent of cervical and other cancers. Efficacy data from the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine clinical trial program were reviewed. Six randomized, controlled phase II/III trials evaluating cervical endpoints enrolled women from diverse populations and geographical locations. The program analyzed extensively the cohorts most relevant from a public health perspective: the total vaccinated cohort (TVC), approximating a general population including those with existing or previous HPV infection, and TVC-naïve, approximating a population of young women before sexual debut. Results show that the vaccine reduces HPV-16/18 infection and associated cervical endpoints in women regardless of age, location, or sexual experience. It provides cross-protection against some non-vaccine oncogenic HPV types and types causing genital warts, and may be effective against vulvar, oral, and anal HPV infection. Early epidemiology data following its introduction suggest a decline in the prevalence of vaccine and some non-vaccine HPV types. PMID:26902666

  19. Identification of a Novel Human Papillomavirus, Type HPV199, Isolated from a Nasopharynx and Anal Canal, and Complete Genomic Characterization of Papillomavirus Species Gamma-12

    PubMed Central

    Oštrbenk, Anja; Kocjan, Boštjan J.; Hošnjak, Lea; Li, Jingjing; Deng, Qiuju; Šterbenc, Anja; Poljak, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The novel human papillomavirus type 199 (HPV199) was initially identified in a nasopharyngeal swab sample obtained from a 25 year-old immunocompetent male. The complete genome of HPV199 is 7,184 bp in length with a GC content of 36.5%. Comparative genomic characterization of HPV199 and its closest relatives showed the classical genomic organization of Gammapapillomaviruses (Gamma-PVs). HPV199 has seven major open reading frames (ORFs), encoding five early (E1, E2, E4, E6, and E7) and two late (L1 and L2) proteins, while lacking the E5 ORF. The long control region (LCR) of 513 bp is located between the L1 and E6 ORFs. Phylogenetic analysis additionally confirmed that HPV-199 clusters into the Gamma-PV genus, species Gamma-12, additionally containing HPV127, HV132, HPV148, HPV165, and three putative HPV types: KC5, CG2 and CG3. HPV199 is most closely related to HPV127 (nucleotide identity 77%). The complete viral genome sequence of additional HPV199 isolate was determined from anal canal swab sample. Two HPV199 complete viral sequences exhibit 99.4% nucleotide identity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first member of Gamma-PV with complete nucleotide sequences determined from two independent clinical samples. To evaluate the tissue tropism of the novel HPV type, 916 clinical samples were tested using HPV199 type-specific real-time PCR: HPV199 was detected in 2/76 tissue samples of histologically confirmed common warts, 2/108 samples of eyebrow hair follicles, 2/137 anal canal swabs obtained from individuals with clinically evident anal pathology, 4/184 nasopharyngeal swabs and 3/411 cervical swabs obtained from women with normal cervical cytology. Although HPV199 was found in 1.4% of cutaneous and mucosal samples only, it exhibits dual tissue tropism. According to the results of our study and literature data, dual tropism of all Gamma-12 members is highly possible. PMID:26375679

  20. Antibody response to human papillomavirus (HPV) type 11 in children with juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP).

    PubMed

    Bonnez, W; Kashima, H K; Leventhal, B; Mounts, P; Rose, R C; Reichman, R C; Shah, K V

    1992-05-01

    We previously established, using an ELISA, the presence of specific antibodies directed at human papillomavirus (HPV) type 11 virions in the sera of patients with condylomata acuminata, mostly a disease of young adults that, like recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP), is caused by two closely related HPVs, types 6 and 11. The present study was done to investigate if children with RRP can make viral-specific antibodies to an infection that is acquired at birth. Using the same ELISA, we studied the sera of 32 children with biopsy-documented juvenile-onset RRP and compared them to the sera of 31 control children. The median (and interquartile range) of the OD values in the controls and the cases was 0.078 (0.003, 0.101) and 0.230 (0.063, 0.725), respectively, a statistically significant difference (P = 0.001). Among the cases, there was no difference in seroreactivity between children with HPV-11-induced RRP and those with HPV-6-induced RRP (P = 0.31). Since HPV-11 viral particles do bind to the ELISA plate and remain intact and accessible to antibodies, we conclude that children with RRP, like adults with condylomata acuminata, develop antibodies directed at HPV-11 virions. PMID:1314464

  1. Detection of HPV-DNA by a PCR-based method in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from rare endocervical carcinoma types.

    PubMed

    Nofech-Mozes, Sharon; Khalifa, Mahmoud M; Ismiil, Nadia; Dub, Valerie; Saad, Reda S; Sun, Peizhu; Seth, Arun; Ghorab, Zeina

    2010-01-01

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of cervical squamous neoplasia and adenocarcinomas of the mucinous and endometrioid cell types. Cervical serous, clear cell, and small cell carcinomas differ from the conventional endocervical adenocarcinoma in their clinical characteristics. The data on the role of HPV in their pathogenesis are limited. In this study, we examined the presence of high-risk HPV-DNA in rare types of cervical carcinoma using polymerase chain reaction-based test. In-house cervical serous, clear cell, and small cell carcinoma cases accessioned between 2000 and 2008 were tested for HPV by polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA extracted from deparaffinized sections using Roche AMPLICOR HPV Amplification Detection and Control Kits. The kit detects all 13 high-risk HPV-DNA genotypes. The positive cut-off point for AMPLICOR HPV Test was A450 = 0.2. We identified 4 serous, 3 clear cell, 1 mixed clear cell and serous, and 5 small cell carcinomas. High-risk HPV-DNA tested positive in 3 out of 4 serous carcinomas, 2 out of 3 cervical clear cell carcinomas, and all 5 cases of small cell carcinoma and the mixed cell type. Our report documents HPV status in a series of archival unusual types of adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. It suggests a robust association between high-risk HPV and these rare subtypes. Despite their unique clinical setting and morphologic appearance, the majority of these tumors likely share a common HPV-mediated carcinogenic pathway. Our observation is particularly significant in cervical cancer prevention as we enter the HPV vaccination era. PMID:19625948

  2. HPV vaccines: their pathology-based discovery, benefits, and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Alcina F; de Andrade, Cecilia V; Russomano, Fabio B; Rodrigues, Luana S L; Oliveira, Nathalia S; Provance, David William; Nuovo, Gerard J

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine illustrates the power of in situ-based pathologic analysis in better understanding and curing diseases. The 2 available HPV vaccines have markedly reduced the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, genital warts, and cervical cancer throughout the world. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, health care officials, and parents to refuse providing the recommended vaccination to the target population. The aims of the study were to discuss the discovery of HPV vaccine and review scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines. The strong type-specific immunity against HPV in humans has been known for more than 25 years. Multiple studies confirm the positive risk benefit of HPV vaccination with minimal documented adverse effects. The most common adverse effect, injection site pain, occurred in about 10% of girls and was less than the rate reported for other vaccines. Use of HPV vaccine should be expanded into more diverse populations, mainly in low-resource settings. PMID:26321154

  3. Differential effects of human papillomavirus type 6, 16, and 18 DNAs on immortalization and transformation of human cervical epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pecoraro, G.; Morgan, D.; Defendi, V. )

    1989-01-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with specific benign and malignant lesions of the skin and mucosal epithelia. Cloned viral DNAs from HPV types 6b, 16, and 18 associated with different pathological manifestations of genital neoplasia in vivo were introduced into primary human cervical epithelial cells by electroporation. Cells transfected with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA acquired indefinite lifespans, distinct morphological alterations, and anchorage-independent growth (HPV18), and contain integrated transcriptionally active viral genomes. HPV6b or plasmid electroporated cells senesced at low passage. The alterations in growth and differentiation of the cells appear to reflect the progressive oncogenic processes that result in cervical carcinoma in vivo.

  4. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection Among HIV-Seronegative Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Palefsky, Joel M.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Moreira, Edson D.; Aranda, Carlos; Jessen, Heiko; Hillman, Richard J.; Ferris, Daron G.; Coutlee, Francois; Liaw, Kai-Li; Marshall, J. Brooke; Zhang, Xuehong; Vuocolo, Scott; Barr, Eliav; Haupt, Richard M.; Guris, Dalya; Garner, Elizabeth I.O.

    2011-01-01

    Background. We examined the baseline prevalence of penile, scrotal, perineal/perianal, and intra-anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)seronegative men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods. Data were analyzed from 602 MSM aged 1627 years with ?5 lifetime sexual partners. Serum samples were tested for antibodies to HPV6/11/16/18. Swab samples were collected separately from several anogenital areas for detection of HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/35/39/45/51/52/56/58/59 DNA. Results. The prevalence of any tested HPV type was 18.5% at the penis, 17.1% at the scrotum, 33.0% at the perineal/perianal region, 42.4% in the anal canal, and 48.0% at any site. Overall, 415 MSM (69.7%) were negative to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 at enrollment by both serology and DNA detection. Men residing in Europe and Latin America had significantly increased risk of HPV infection at external genital sites and the anal canal compared to men from Australia. Tobacco use and greater number of lifetime sexual partners was associated with higher HPV infection prevalence. Conclusions. The prevalence of HPV infection is high among young sexually active MSM, with the anal canal being the most common site of infection. Lifetime number of sexual partners was the most important modifiable risk factor for anogenital HPV infection. PMID:21148498

  5. In silico accelerated identification of structurally conserved CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell epitopes in high-risk HPV types.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir K; Srivastava, Mugdha; Akhoon, Bashir A; Gupta, Shailendra K; Grabe, Niels

    2012-10-01

    Primary approach to prevent cervical cancer includes the development of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. Currently available HPV vaccines (Gardasil and Cervarix) predominantly consider HPV16 and HPV18 strains. However, due to ignorance of the other high-risk strains aside from HPV16 and HPV18 during vaccine development, the critical need is to synthesize a vaccine with possible protection against all the high-risk HPV types. One feasible approach is to design a vaccine containing conserved immunogenic peptides that represent the genotypic diversity of all the current and future high-risk HPV types. While the epitopes derived from sequentially conserved regions may undergo mutations, it is worthwhile to explore the structurally conserved regions as a new dimension for epitope prediction. In the present study, 81 structurally conserved peptides were predicted to have immune relevance as T-cell epitopes of all the reported high-risk HPV proteins studied. A small dataset of three epitopes was also recognized as potential vaccine candidates generating both CD8+ and CD4+ responses. PMID:22634276

  6. Integrating Clinical, Community, and Policy Perspectives on HPV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fernndez, Mara E.; Allen, Jennifer D.; Mistry, Ritesh; Kahn, Jessica A.

    2010-01-01

    Infection with genital human papillomavirus (HPV) may cause anogenital cancers, oropharyngeal cancers, anogenital warts, and respiratory papillomas. Two prophylactic vaccines (a bivalent and a quadrivalent vaccine) are now licensed and currently in use in a number of countries. Both vaccines prevent infection with HPV-16 and HPV-18, which together cause approximately 70% of cervical cancers, and clinical trials have demonstrated 90%-100% efficacy in preventing precancerous cervical lesions attributable to HPV-16 and HPV-18. One vaccine also prevents HPV-6 and HPV-11, which cause 90% of genital warts. A growing literature describes associations between psychosocial, interpersonal, organizational, and societal factors that influence HPV vaccination acceptability. This paper summarizes the current literature and presents an integrated perspective, taking into account these diverse influences. The resulting integrated model can be used as a heuristic tool for organizing factors at multiple levels to guide intervention development and future research. PMID:20001821

  7. Identification of immunoreactive antigens of human papillomavirus type 6b by using Escherichia coli-expressed fusion proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jenison, S A; Firzlaff, J M; Langenberg, A; Galloway, D A

    1988-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPVs) infect the genital epithelium and are found in proliferative lesions ranging from benign condylomata to invasive carcinomas. The immunological response to these infections is poorly understood because of the lack of purified viral antigens. In this study, bacterially derived fusion proteins expressing segments of all the major open reading frames (ORFs) of HPV type 6b (HPV-6b) have been used in Western blot (immunoblot) assays to detect antibodies directed against HPV-encoded proteins. The most striking reactivities present in sera from patients with genital warts were to the HPV-6b L1 ORF protein and, to a lesser extent, to the HPV-6b L2 ORF protein. Two cases of reactivity to HPV-6b E2 ORF were observed, but no reactivities were seen with other HPV-6b constructs. Two sera reacted with the HPV-16 L2 fusion protein, and two sera reacted with the HPV-16 E4 protein. The antibodies directed against the HPV-6b fusion proteins showed no cross-reactivity with comparable regions of the HPV-16 ORFs. This assay provides a useful approach for further studies of HPV serology. Images PMID:2835513

  8. Potential coverage of circulating HPV types by current and developing vaccines in a group of women in Bosnia and Herzegovina with abnormal Pap smears.

    PubMed

    Salimović-Bešić, I; Hukić, M

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in a group of Bosnian-Herzegovinian women with abnormal cytology and to assess their potential coverage by vaccines. HPVs were identified by multiplex real-time PCR test (HPV High Risk Typing Real-TM; Sacace Biotechnologies, Italy) of 105 women with an abnormal cervical Pap smear and positive high-risk (HR) HPV DNA screening test. The most common genotypes in the study were HPV-16 (32·6%, 48/147), HPV-31 (14·3%, 21/147), HPV-51 (9·5%, 14/147) and HPV-18 (7·5%, 11/147). The overall frequency of HR HPV-16 and/or HPV-18, covered by currently available vaccines [Gardasil® (Merck & Co., USA) and Cervarix®; (GlaxoSmithKline, UK)] was lower than the overall frequency of other HPVs detected in the study (40·1%, 59/174, P = 0·017). Group prevalence of HR HPVs targeted by a nine-valent vaccine in development (code-named V503) was higher than total frequency of other HPVs detected (68·0%, 100/147, P < 0·001). Development of cervical cytological abnormalities was independent of the presence of multiple infections (χ 2 = 0·598, P = 0·741). Compared to other HPVs, dependence of cervical diagnosis and HPV-16, -18 (P = 0·008) and HPV-16, -18, -31 (P = 0·008) infections were observed. Vaccines targeting HR HPV-16, -18 and -31 might be an important tool in the prevention of cervical disease in Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:25578155

  9. Immunization with a highly attenuated replication-competent herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant, HF10, protects mice from genital disease caused by herpes simplex virus type 2

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chenhong; Goshima, Fumi; Kamakura, Maki; Mutoh, Yoshifumi; Iwata, Seiko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Yukihiro

    2012-01-01

    Genital herpes is an intractable disease caused mainly by herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 (HSV-2), and is a major concern in public health. A previous infection with HSV type 1 (HSV-1) enhances protection against primary HSV-2 infection to some extent. In this study, we evaluated the ability of HF10, a naturally occurring replication-competent HSV-1 mutant, to protect against genital infection in mice caused by HSV-2. Subcutaneous inoculation of HF10-immunized mice against lethal infection by HSV-2, and attenuated the development of genital ulcer diseases. Immunization with HF10 inhibited HSV-2 replication in the mouse vagina, reduced local inflammation, controlled emergence of neurological dysfunctions of HSV-2 infection, and increased survival. In HF10-immunized mice, we observed rapid and increased production of interferon-? in the vagina in response to HSV-2 infection, and numerous CD4+ and a few CD8+ T cells localized to the infective focus. CD4+ T cells invaded the mucosal subepithelial lamina propria. Thus, the protective effect of HF10 was related to induction of cellular immunity, mediated primarily by Th1 CD4+ cells. These data indicate that the live attenuated HSV-1 mutant strain HF10 is a promising candidate antigen for a vaccine against genital herpes caused by HSV-2. PMID:22557998

  10. Type-Specific HPV Prevalence in Cervical Cancer and High-Grade Lesions in Latin America and the Caribbean: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ciapponi, Agustn; Bardach, Ariel; Glujovsky, Demin; Gibbons, Luz; Picconi, Mara Alejandra

    2011-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is a major public health problem in Latin America and the Caribbean (LA&C), showing some of the highest incidence and mortality rates worldwide. Information on HPV type distribution in high-grade cervical lesions (HSIL) and invasive cervical cancer (ICC) is crucial to predict the future impact of HPV16/18 vaccines and screening programmes, and to establish an appropriate post-vaccinal virologic surveillance. The aim was to assess the prevalence of HPV types in HSIL and ICC in studies in LA&C. Methods and Findings We performed a systematic review, following the MOOSE guidelines for systematic reviews of observational studies, and the PRISMA statement for reporting systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Inclusion criteria were at least ten cases of HSIL/ICC, and HPV-type elicitation. The search, without language restrictions, was performed in MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, LILACS from inception date to December 2009, proceedings, reference lists and consulting experts. A meta-analysis was performed using arc-sine transformations to stabilize the variance of simple proportions. Seventy-nine studies from 18 countries were identified, including 2446 cases of HSIL and 5540 of ICC. Overall, 46.5% of HSIL cases harbored HPV 16 and 8.9% HPV18; in ICC, 53.2% of cases harbored HPV 16 and13.2% HPV 18. The next five most common types, in decreasing frequency, were HPV 31, 58, 33, 45, and 52. Study's limitations comprise the cross-sectional design of most included studies and their inherent risk of bias, the lack of representativeness, and variations in the HPV type-specific sensitivity of different PCR protocols. Conclusions This study is the broadest summary of HPV type distribution in HSIL and ICC in LA&C to date. These data are essential for local decision makers regarding HPV screening and vaccination policies. Continued HPV surveillance would be useful, to assess the potential for changing type-specific HPV prevalence in the post-vaccination era in Latin America. PMID:21991313

  11. Genetically modified cellular vaccines for therapy of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV 16)-associated tumours.

    PubMed

    Bubenik, J

    2008-05-01

    Therapeutic strategies based on the insertion of cytokine or other immunostimulatory genes into the genome of tumour cells followed by vaccination with the resulting, genetically modified, cytokine-producing vaccines represent a new potential prospect for the treatment of cancer patients. HPV 16 is the aetiological agent of more than 60 percent human cervical carcinomas (CC). At present, two prophylactic vaccines against HPV 16 are available (GlaxoSmithKline "Cervarix" and Merck "Gardasil"). These vaccines can almost completely protect the immunized individuals against both, persistent HPV 16 infection and HPV 16-related pathological findings in cervical cytology. In contrast, no clinically utilizable therapeutic vaccines against CC are available. During the last decade animal models have substantially contributed to the development of the therapeutic vaccines against HPV 16-associated tumours. It has been demonstrated that the HPV 16 E6/E7 oncoproteins can serve as tumour rejection antigens (TRA) and that the HPV 16-associated tumour cells can be genetically modified with DNA encoding immunostimulatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-12, GM-CSF) or other immunostimulatory molecules, used for vaccination, and inhibit tumour growth. To improve the HPV 16 antigen presentation in tumour-bearing individuals, dendritic cell-based vaccines loaded with HPV 16 E6/E7 DNA or hybrids of the dendritic and tumour cells have also been successfully employed. Unfortunately, when these encouraging approaches used in animal models were translated into clinical trials, the results were less optimistic. The problems that are still to be faced before the therapeutic vaccines against high-risk HPV-associated tumours can be approved for clinical purposes are discussed. PMID:18473731

  12. Pregnancy Complications: Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Loss > Pregnancy complications > Genital herpes and pregnancy Genital herpes and pregnancy Now playing: E-mail to a ... the United States has genital herpes. Can genital herpes cause complications during pregnancy? Yes. Genital herpes can ...

  13. HPV16-E7 Expression in skin induces TSLP secretion, type 2 ILC infiltration and atopic dermatitis-like lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Monnet, Nastasia; Tran, Le Son; Mittal, Deepak; Al-Kouba, Jane; Steptoe, Raymond J.; Grimbaldeston, Michele A.; Frazer, Ian H.; Wells, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common pruritic and inflammatory skin disorder with unknown etiology. Most commonly occurring during early childhood, atopic dermatitis is associated with eczematous lesions and lichenification, in which the epidermis becomes hypertrophied resulting in thickening of the skin. In this study, we report an atopic dermatitis-like pathophysiology results in a murine model following the expression of the high-risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16 oncoprotein E7 in keratinocytes under the Keratin 14 promoter. We show that HPV 16 E7 expression in the skin is associated with skin thickening, acanthosis and light spongiosis. Locally, HPV 16 E7 expressing skin secreted high levels of TSLP and contained increased numbers of ILCs. High levels of circulating IgE were associated with increased susceptibility to skin allergy in a model of cutaneous challenge, and to airway bronchiolar inflammation, enhanced airway goblet cell metaplasia and mucus production in a model of atopic march. Surprisingly, skin pathology occurred independently of T-cells and mast cells. Thus, our findings suggest that the expression of a single HPV oncogene in the skin can drive the onset of atopic dermatitis-like pathology through the induction of TSLP and type 2 ILC infiltration. PMID:25601274

  14. Changes in Antibody Seroprevalence of Seven High-Risk HPV Types between Nationwide Surveillance Studies from 199596 and 200607 in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Scherpenisse, Mirte; Mollers, Madelief; Schepp, Rutger M.; Boot, Hein J.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Berbers, Guy A. M.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; de Melker, Hester E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study evaluates trends in antibody seroprevalences of seven high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) serotypes (HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58) between the 199596 and 200607 sero-surveys among the Dutch general population in the pre-vaccination era. Methods Serum samples of men and women (079 years of age) from two cross-sectional population-based serosurveillance studies performed in 199596 (n?=?3303) and 200607 (n?=?6384) were tested for HPV-specific antibodies in a VLP-based multiplex immunoassay. Results HPV16-specific antibody seroprevalence increased during adolescence and shifted to younger ages in the 200607 survey compared to the 199596 survey. This step-up in HPV16 seroprevalence was most pronounced in women, while a more gradual increase was observed in men. Also in cohorts older than 49 years, HPV16 seroprevalence was higher in 200607 as compared to 199596 survey. A higher overall seroprevalence in individuals older than 15 years of age was found for HPV16, 18, 31 and 45 in 200607 as compared to 199596. For HPV33, 52 and 58 seroprevalences were comparable over this 11-year time period. Seropositivity for one or more HPV types was significantly higher in 200607 (23.1%) than in 199596 (20.0%) (p?=?0.013). Multi-seropositivity increased from 7.1% in 199596 up to 10.2% in 200607 (p<0.0001). Differences in HPV seropositivity for at least one of the seven HPV types between both surveys could be explained in addition to demographic characteristics (age, sex, urbanization degree and ethnicity), also by changes in sexual behaviour (marital status, age of sexual debut and ever reported an STI). Conclusion The observed increase in particular HPV16 seroprevalence could be due to changes in sexual behaviour over the years, and especially in age of sexual debut. Seroprevalence studies provide insight into the distribution of HPV types and infection dynamics in the general population over time, which is important to assess the impact of HPV-vaccination. PMID:23152809

  15. [Condylomata acuminata: an indication for prophylactic HPV vaccination?].

    PubMed

    Schneede, P; Schlenker, B; Hungerhuber, E

    2006-12-01

    HPV infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Although most infections are transient, persistent ones can lead to condylomata acuminata, genital intraepithelial neoplasia and genital cancer. The recent approval of vaccines against HPV has raised great hopes. Since 1990, 5,392 urological investigations for HPV were carried out in 1,792 men in special HPV centres. We report on the epidemiology and natural course of condylomata, techniques for HPV detection, treatment surveillance and long-term sequelae. Condylomata acuminata proved to be pathognomonic; partner infections were diagnosed in 50% and more. Systematic HPV DNA analyses in partner investigations or as screening investigations cannot be recommended. Ultimately, within the spectrum of therapeutic options for condylomata, no method is really superior to others; recurrences occurred in 30-70% of cases. We definitely need the HPV vaccination programme to get rid of one of the oldest and up to now unsolved problems of mankind. PMID:17096125

  16. Isolation of a novel human papillomavirus (type 51) from a cervical condyloma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuovo, G.J.; Crum, C.P.; Levine, R.U.; Silverstein, S.J. ); De Villiers, E.M. )

    1988-04-01

    The authors cloned the DNA from a novel human papillomavirus (HPV) present in a cervical condyloma. When DNA from this isolate was hybridized at high stringency with HPV types 1 through 50 (HPV-1 through HPV-50), it showed weak homology with HPV-6 and -16 and stronger homology with HPV-26. A detailed restriction endonuclease map was prepared which showed marked differences from the maps for other HPVs that have been isolated from the female genital tract. Reassociation kinetic analysis revealed that HPV-26 and this new isolate were less than 10% homologous; hence, the new isolate is a noel strain of HPV. The approximate positions of the open reading frames of the new strain were surmised by hybridization with probes derived from individual open reading frames of HPV-16. In an analysis of 175 genital biopsies from patients with abnormal Papanicolaou smears, sequences hybridizing under highly stringent conditions to probes from this novel HPV type were found in 4.2, 6.1, and 2.4% of biopsies containing normal squamous epithelium, condylomata, and intraepithelial neoplasia, respectively. In addition, sequences homologous to probes from this novel isolate were detected in one of five cervical carcinomas examined.

  17. Accelerating HPV Vaccine Uptake: Urgency for Action to Prevent Cancer: Home

    Cancer.gov

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) cause most cases of cervical cancer and large proportions of vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers. HPV also causes genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. HPV vaccines could dramatically reduce the incidence of HPV-associated cancers and other conditions among both females and males, but uptake of the vaccines has fallen short of target levels. The President's Cancer Panel finds underuse of HPV vaccines a serious but correctable threat to progress against cancer.

  18. Men's Perceptions and Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and Cervical Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPartland, Tara S.; Weaver, Bethany A.; Lee, Shu-Kuang; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2005-01-01

    The authors assessed young men's knowledge and perceptions of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to identify factors that predict intention to make positive behavioral changes. Male university students aged 18 to 25 years completed a self-report instrument to assess knowledge and perceptions of genital HPV infection. If diagnosed with…

  19. Men's Perceptions and Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and Cervical Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPartland, Tara S.; Weaver, Bethany A.; Lee, Shu-Kuang; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2005-01-01

    The authors assessed young men's knowledge and perceptions of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to identify factors that predict intention to make positive behavioral changes. Male university students aged 18 to 25 years completed a self-report instrument to assess knowledge and perceptions of genital HPV infection. If diagnosed with

  20. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV). It can cause sores on ... also infect their babies during childbirth. Symptoms of herpes are called outbreaks. You usually get sores near ...

  1. Genital Infection with Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 in Women from Natal, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Cleine Aglacy Nunes; Lima, rika Galvo; de Lima, Diego Breno Soares; Cobucci, Ricardo Ney Oliveira; Cornetta, Maria da Conceio de Mesquita; Fernandes, Thales Allyrio Arajo de Medeiros; de Azevedo, Paulo Roberto Medeiros; de Azevedo, Jenner Chrystian Verssimo; de Arajo, Joslio Maria Galvo; Fernandes, Jos Verssimo

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the prevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in pregnant and nonpregnant women, testing the correlation between DNA of the viruses with colposcopic and/or cytological changes, and evaluate association with sociodemographic characteristics and sexual activity. Methods. Included in this study were 106 pregnant and 130 nonpregnant women treated at primary health care units of Natal, Brazil, in the period 2010-2011. The patients were examined by colposcopy, and two cervical specimens were collected: one for cytology examination and another for analysis by PCR for detection of HSV-1 and HSV-2. Results. HSV-1 alone was detected in 16.0% of pregnant and 30.0% of nonpregnant women. For HSV-2, these rates were 12.3% and 15.5%, respectively. HSV-2 had a higher correlation with cytology and/or colposcopy changes than HSV-1 did. Genital HSV-1 infection was not associated with any of the variables tested, whereas HSV-2 infection was associated with ethnicity, marital status, and number of sexual partners. Conclusions. The prevalence of HSV-1 was higher than that observed for HSV-2 in both pregnant and nonpregnant women. The genital infection by HSV-2 was higher in women with changed colposcopy and/or cytology, and it was associated with ethnicity, marital status, and number of sexual partners. PMID:25006480

  2. Numerical simulation of a two-sex human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryani, I.; Adi-Kusumo, F.

    2014-02-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer, precancerous lesions, cancer and other disease. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection. Although HPV virus primarily affects woman but it can also affects man because it cause of cancer of the anus, vulva, vagina, penis and some other cancers. HPV vaccines now used to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts because the vaccine protect against four types of HPV that most commonly cause disease are types 6, 11, 16, and 18. This paper is sequel work of Elbasha (2008). Difference with Elbasha (2008) are give alternative proof global stability, numerical simulation and interpretation. Global stability of the equilibrium on the model of a two-sex HPV vaccination were explored by using Lyapunov. Although we use the same lyapunov function, we use the largest invariant set to proof the global stability. The result show that the global stability of the equilibrium depends on the effective reproduction number (R). If R < 1 then the infection-free equilibrium is asymptotically stable globally. If R > 1 then endemic equilibrium have globally asymptotically stable properties. Then equilibrium proceed with the interpretation of numerical simulation.

  3. Primary Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Type I in Preterm Prelabour Rupture of Membranes at 30 Weeks' Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Anna; Grivell, Rosalie

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disseminated herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the neonate is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines recommend caesarean in third-trimester maternal primary genital HSV outbreaks to prevent transmission from mother to fetus. In the premature fetus, however, expectant management is often necessary to reduce morbidity of prematurity. The benefit of performing caesarean after 6?hrs of rupture of membranes (ROM) to reduce maternal-fetal transmission is unclear. Case. A female patient with primary genital HSV type 1 outbreak coinciding with preterm, prelabour rupture of membranes (PPROM) at 30 + 3 weeks' gestation. An immediate caesarean section was not performed after multidisciplinary team discussion due to the benefits of glucocorticoids on immune complications of prematurity. The patient had expectant management for 5 days with intravenous (IV) aciclovir and then delivered an infant vaginally with disseminated neonatal HSV. Conclusion. We address the rare presentation of primary HSV infection associated with PPROM and the dilemma of how to manage these patients given the limited literature. We discuss the role of intrauterine compartment monitoring with amniocentesis, the mode of delivery when ROM has occurred for 120 hours, expectant management to reduce prematurity, and the effectiveness of aciclovir to reduce viral shedding in the prevention of neonatal HSV. PMID:26649212

  4. Male genital lichen sclerosus.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Christopher Barry; Shim, Tang Ngee

    2015-01-01

    Male genital lichen sclerosus (MGLSc) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease responsible for male sexual dyspareunia and urological morbidity. An afeared complication is squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis. The precise etiopathogenesis of MGLSc remains controversial although genetic, autoimmune and infective (such as human papillomavirus (HPV) hepatitis C (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Borrelia) factors have been implicated: Consideration of all the evidence suggests that chronic exposure of susceptible epithelium to urinary occlusion by the foreskin seems the most likely pathomechanism. The mainstay of treatment is topical ultrapotent corticosteroid therapy. Surgery is indicated for cases unresponsive to topical corticosteroid therapy, phimosis, meatal stenosis, urethral stricture, carcinoma in situ (CIS) and squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25814697

  5. Male Genital Lichen Sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    Bunker, Christopher Barry; Shim, Tang Ngee

    2015-01-01

    Male genital lichen sclerosus (MGLSc) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease responsible for male sexual dyspareunia and urological morbidity. An afeared complication is squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis. The precise etiopathogenesis of MGLSc remains controversial although genetic, autoimmune and infective (such as human papillomavirus (HPV) hepatitis C (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Borrelia) factors have been implicated: Consideration of all the evidence suggests that chronic exposure of susceptible epithelium to urinary occlusion by the foreskin seems the most likely pathomechanism. The mainstay of treatment is topical ultrapotent corticosteroid therapy. Surgery is indicated for cases unresponsive to topical corticosteroid therapy, phimosis, meatal stenosis, urethral stricture, carcinoma in situ (CIS) and squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25814697

  6. Productive replication of adeno-associated virus can occur in human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) episome-containing keratinocytes and is augmented by the HPV-16 E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Ogston, P; Raj, K; Beard, P

    2000-04-01

    We used a sensitive assay to test whether an adeno-associated virus (AAV) productive replication cycle can occur in immortalized human keratinocytes carrying episomal human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) DNA. Following transfection with cloned AAV DNA, infectious AAV was produced, and the infectivity was blocked by anti-AAV antiserum. The HPV-16 E2 protein substantially increased the yield of AAV. Other HPV early proteins did not, in our experiments, show this ability. E2 has been shown to be able to affect p53 levels and to block cell cycle progression at mitosis. We tested the effect of changes in p53 expression on AAV replication and found that large differences in the level of p53 did not alter AAV DNA replication. In extension of this, we found that cellular help for AAV in response to stress was also independent of p53. To test if a mitotic block could trigger AAV DNA replication, we treated the cells with the mitotic inhibitor nocodazole. AAV DNA replication was stimulated by the presence of nocodazole in these and a number of other cell types tested. Yields of infectious virus, however, were not increased by this treatment. We conclude that the HPV-16 E2 protein stimulates AAV multiplication in these cells and propose that this occurs independently of the effects of E2 on p53 and cell cycle progression. Since the effect of E2 was not seen in keratinocytes lacking the HPV-16 episome, we suggest that E2 can help AAV by working in concert with other HPV-16 proteins. PMID:10729123

  7. Association of HIV infection with distribution and viral load of HPV types in Kenya: a survey with 820 female sex workers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) and HIV are each responsible for a considerable burden of disease. Interactions between these infections pose substantial public health challenges, especially where HIV prevalence is high and HPV vaccine coverage low. Methods Between July 2005 and January 2006, a cross-sectional community-based survey in Mombasa, Kenya, enrolled female sex workers using snowball sampling. After interview and a gynaecological examination, blood and cervical cytology samples were taken. Quantitative real-time PCR detected HPV types and viral load measures. Prevalence of high-risk HPV was compared between HIV-infected and -uninfected women, and in women with abnormal cervical cytology, measured using conventional Pap smears. Results Median age of the 820 participants was 28 years (inter-quartile range [IQR] = 24-36 years). One third of women were HIV infected (283/803; 35.2%) and these women were y more likely to have abnormal cervical cytology than HIV-negative women (27%, 73/269, versus 8%, 42/503; P < 0.001). Of HIV-infected women, 73.3% had high-risk HPV (200/273) and 35.5% had HPV 16 and/or 18 (97/273). Corresponding figures for HIV-negative women were 45.5% (229/503) and 15.7% (79/503). After adjusting for age, number of children and condom use, high-risk HPV was 3.6 fold more common in HIV-infected women (95%CI = 2.6-5.1). Prevalence of all 15 of the high-risk HPV types measured was higher among HIV-infected women, between 1.4 and 5.5 fold. Median total HPV viral load was 881 copies/cell in HIV-infected women (IQR = 33-12,110 copies/cell) and 48 copies/cell in HIV-uninfected women (IQR = 6-756 copies/cell; P < 0.001). HPV 16 and/or HPV 18 were identified in 42.7% of LSIL (32/75) and 42.3% of HSIL (11/26) lesions (P = 0.98). High-risk HPV types other than 16 and 18 were common in LSIL (74.7%; 56/75) and HSIL (84.6%; 22/26); even higher among HIV-infected women. Conclusions HIV-infected sex workers had almost four-fold higher prevalence of high-risk HPV, raised viral load and more precancerous lesions. HPV 16 and HPV 18, preventable with current vaccines, were associated with cervical disease, though other high-risk types were commoner. HIV-infected sex workers likely contribute disproportionately to HPV transmission dynamics in the general population. Current efforts to prevent HIV and HPV are inadequate. New interventions are required and improved implementation of existing strategies. PMID:20102630

  8. Genital sores - male

    MedlinePLUS

    Sores - male genitals; Ulcers - male genitals ... A common cause of male genital sores are infections that are spread through sexual contact, such as: Genital herpes (small, painful blisters filled with clear ...

  9. Detection of human papillomavirus type 6/11 DNA in conjunctival papillomas by in situ hybridization with radioactive probes

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, P.J.; McDonnell, J.M.; Kessis, T.; Green, W.R.; Shah, K.V.

    1987-11-01

    Twenty-three conjunctival papillomas and 28 conjunctival dysplasias were examined for human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA sequences by in situ hybridization with nick-translated /sup 35/S-labeled HPV probes. Adjacent paraffin sections were hybridized with HPV type 2, 6, 16, and 18 probes at Tm - 17 degrees C. Fifteen tissues, all papillomas, displayed positive hybridization with the HPV-6 probe. Infection with HPV-6 (or the closely related HPV-11) appeared to be responsible for most of the conjunctival papillomas of children and young adults. The presence of genital tract HPV-6 in these lesions suggests that some of the infections were acquired during passage through an infected birth canal. The lack of hybridization in adult conjunctival dysplasias indicates either that HPVs are not associated with this condition or that the probes and the technique utilized were not adequate for demonstration of this association.

  10. Detection of specific types of human papillomavirus in cervical scrapes, anal scrapes, and anogenital biopsies by DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B R; Thompson, C H; Rose, B R; Cossart, Y E; Morris, B J

    1987-04-01

    Specific varieties of human papillomavirus (HPV) infecting the anogenital region were detected in clinical samples by use of a filter hybridization technique suitable for rapid screening of cervical and anal scrapes. In this way possibly benign types (HPV6 and HPV11) could be differentiated from types thought to be capable of malignant transformation (HPV 16 and HPV 18). Cervical or anal canal cells were applied directly to nylon filters and fixed by u.v. irradiation before hybridization with mixed viral DNA probes under both low- and high-stringency conditions. In addition, probe for the human Alu-repeated DNA sequence was used to assess the relative amount of total nucleic acids in each sample applied to the filter. HPV DNA was detected in 3 of 19 cervical scrapes from patients with no past or present history of wart virus infection or cervical dysplasia. Within a positive study group totalling 71 patients, HPV (6/11 or 16/18) was detected in cervical scrapes from 24% of 41 patients who did not have visible genital dysplasia, 30% of 27 patients with visible genital dysplasia or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) I, and in 1 of 3 patients with past CIN II/III. In addition, HPV6/11 or 16/18 DNA was detected in anal scrapes from 3 of 6 male patients and in 85% of genital biopsies. A notably high proportion (4/6) of vaginal condylomata were positive with both the HPV6/11 and the HPV16/18 mixed viral DNA probes. Of the biopsies prepared for histopathology and positive for HPV DNA, the HPV group-specific antigen could be detected in only 60%. PMID:3035075

  11. Different DNA methylation pattern of HPV16, HPV18 and HPV51 genomes in asymptomatic HPV infection as compared to cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Simanaviciene, Vaida; Popendikyte, Violeta; Gudleviciene, Zivile; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2015-10-01

    Epigenetic alterations of human papillomavirus (HPV) genome play an important role in virus life cycle and carcinogenic progression. The aim of the current study was to investigate the correlation between the grade of cervical pathology and DNA methylation status within the L1 gene and the long control region (LCR) of HPV16, HPV18 and HPV51. HPV genomes were analyzed using bisulfite DNA modification procedure with the subsequent amplification of target DNA regions and sequencing. A collection of 202 cervical specimens was analyzed: 157 HPV16-positive specimens, 21 HPV18-positive specimens and 24 HPV51-positive specimens. This study revealed that methylation of CpG was significantly more prevalent in L1 gene as compared to LCR region of all three studied HPV types and the degree of DNA methylation level correlated with the severity of cervical neoplasia. An increased DNA methylation level of HPV16 promoter region in case of cervical cancer was determined. PMID:26119875

  12. Wild-type p53 reactivation by small-molecule Minnelide in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Caicedo-Granados, Emiro; Lin, Rui; Clements-Green, Caitlin; Yueh, Bevan; Sangwan, Veena; Saluja, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The incidence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) continues to increase, particularly oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) cases. The inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene promotes a chain of molecular events, including cell cycle progression and apoptosis resistance. Reactivation of wild-type p53 function is an intriguing therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a novel compound derived from diterpene triepoxide (Minnelide) can reactivate wild-type p53 function in HPV-positive HNSCC. Materials and Methods For all of our in vitro experiments, we used 2 HPV-positive HNSCC cell lines, University of Michigan squamous cell carcinoma (UM-SCC) 47 and 93-VU-147, and 2 HPV-positive human cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and CaSki. Cells were treated with different concentrations of triptolide and analyzed for p53 activation. Mice bearing UM-SCC 47 subcutaneous xenografts and HPV-positive patient-derived tumor xenografts were treated with Minnelide and evaluated for tumor growth and p53 activation. Results In HPV-positive HNSCC, Minnelide reactivated p53 by suppressing E6 oncoprotein. Activation of apoptosis followed, both in vitro and in vivo. In 2 preclinical HNSCC animal models (a subcutaneous xenograft model and a patient-derived tumor xenograft model), Minnelide reactivated p53 function and significantly decreased tumor progression and tumor volume. Conclusion Triptolide and Minnelide caused cell death in vitro and in vivo in HPV-positive HNSCC by reactivating wild-type p53 and thus inducing apoptosis. In addition, in 2 HPV-positive HNSCC animal models, Minnelide decreased tumor progression and induced apoptosis. PMID:25311433

  13. A Contemporary Review of HPV and Penile Cancer.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Kelly L; Culkin, Daniel J

    2016-03-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a widespread sexually transmitted infection. In both men and women, HPV infection can result in a spectrum of genitourinary manifestations ranging from genital warts to cancer. Cervical cancer is nearly always associated with high-risk HPV infection. For men, penile cancer can develop following or independently of HPV infection. Basaloid and warty subtypes of penile squamous cell carcinoma are most frequently associated with HPV infection. Further research into the molecular alterations caused by HPV infection may provide prognostic markers and future treatment targets. Until an effective treatment for HPV infection is developed, prevention will remain the focus of disease control. For women, vaccination is increasingly utilized to prevent HPV infection and subsequent cervical cancer development. New recommendations for routine male vaccination may further reduce cancers for both men and women. PMID:26984219

  14. HPV Infections Decrease in the U.S.

    Cancer.gov

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types targeted by the quadrivalent HPV vaccine has declined by nearly two-thirds among teenage girls since HPV vaccination was recommended in the United States.

  15. Distribution of 14 high risk HPV types in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia detected by a non-radioactive general primer PCR mediated enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Nindl, I; Lotz, B; Khne-Heid, R; Endisch, U; Schneider, A

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the presence of high risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) in cervical smears showing intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). METHODS: The presence of 14 high risk HPV was evaluated in 114 cervical smears with CIN of different degrees, by comparing a non-radioactive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enzyme immunoassay (EIA) with conventional PCR followed by radioactive Southern blot hybridisation. General primer PCR amplicons detecting low risk and high risk HPV were typed for 14 different high risk HPV types (HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, and 68) by a non-radioactive PCR-EIA. Virus load of HPV 16 positive CIN was assessed using the semiquantitative PCR-EIA. RESULTS: Histological evaluation confirmed CIN I in 49 cases (mean age 29.0 years, range 17 to 52), CIN II in 31 cases (mean age 30.8 years, 18 to 54), and CIN III in 34 cases (mean age 31.1 years, 16 to 57). The non-radioactive PCR-EIA showed an overall agreement rate of 90% (kappa value 0.75) when compared with conventional general primer PCR followed by radioactive Southern blot hybridisation. High risk HPVs were detected in 47% of CIN I, 77% of CIN II, and 97% of CIN III (p < or = 0.02). HPV types 39, 51, 56, and 58 were found in CIN I exclusively (between 2% and 8%). HPV 16 and HPV 31 were detected in 12% and 2% of CIN I, 35% and 21% of CIN II, and 74% and 13% of CIN III, respectively (p < or = 0.03 and p < or = 0.04). The virus load estimated by the semiquantitative PCR-EIA of HPV 16 was similar in CIN I, CIN II, and CIN III. CONCLUSIONS: The PCR-EIA has high clinical sensitivity for detecting CIN II/III (90%). There was a significantly higher prevalence rate of HPV 16 and 31 in CIN III than in CIN I and II. PMID:10343607

  16. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Genital Warts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload ... Marketing Share this: JavaScript is disabled in your browser. To view this content, please enable JavaScript and ...

  17. Genital Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection in Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treated until they are gone. Using condoms during sexual intercourse and dental dams during oral sex may also help to reduce the spread of infection. However, condoms or dams may not ... current (and past) sexual partner(s), so that they can be examined and ...

  18. Seroepidemiology of Human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) L2 and Generation of L2-Specific Human Chimeric Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joshua W; Jagu, Subhashini; Wu, Wai-Hong; Viscidi, Raphael P; Macgregor-Das, Anne; Fogel, Jessica M; Kwak, Kihyuck; Daayana, Sai; Kitchener, Henry; Stern, Peter L; Gravitt, Patti E; Trimble, Cornelia L; Roden, Richard B S

    2015-07-01

    Presently, the seroprevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) minor capsid antigen L2-reactive antibody is not well understood, and no serologic standard exists for L2-specific neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, we screened a total of 1,078 serum samples for HPV16 L2 reactivity, and these were obtained from four prior clinical studies: a population-based (n = 880) surveillance study with a high-risk HPV DNA prevalence of 10.8%, a cohort study of women (n = 160) with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and two phase II trials in women with high-grade vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) receiving imiquimod therapy combined with either photodynamic therapy (PDT) (n = 19) or vaccination with a fusion protein comprising HPV16 L2, E7, and E6 (TA-CIN) (n = 19). Sera were screened sequentially by HPV16 L2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then Western blot. Seven of the 1,078 serum samples tested had L2-specific antibodies, but none were detectably neutralizing for HPV16. To develop a standard, we substituted human IgG1 sequences into conserved regions of two rodent monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for neutralizing epitopes at HPV16 L2 residues 17 to 36 and 58 to 64, creating JWW-1 and JWW-2, respectively. These chimeric MAbs retained neutralizing activity and together reacted with 33/34 clinically relevant HPV types tested. In conclusion, our inability to identify an HPV16 L2-specific neutralizing antibody response even in the sera of patients with active genital HPV disease suggests the subdominance of L2 protective epitopes and the value of the chimeric MAbs JWW-1 and JWW-2 as standards for immunoassays to measure L2-specific human antibodies. PMID:25972404

  19. Seroepidemiology of Human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) L2 and Generation of L2-Specific Human Chimeric Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joshua W.; Jagu, Subhashini; Wu, Wai-Hong; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Macgregor-Das, Anne; Fogel, Jessica M.; Kwak, Kihyuck; Daayana, Sai; Kitchener, Henry; Stern, Peter L.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Trimble, Cornelia L.

    2015-01-01

    Presently, the seroprevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) minor capsid antigen L2-reactive antibody is not well understood, and no serologic standard exists for L2-specific neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, we screened a total of 1,078 serum samples for HPV16 L2 reactivity, and these were obtained from four prior clinical studies: a population-based (n = 880) surveillance study with a high-risk HPV DNA prevalence of 10.8%, a cohort study of women (n = 160) with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and two phase II trials in women with high-grade vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) receiving imiquimod therapy combined with either photodynamic therapy (PDT) (n = 19) or vaccination with a fusion protein comprising HPV16 L2, E7, and E6 (TA-CIN) (n = 19). Sera were screened sequentially by HPV16 L2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then Western blot. Seven of the 1,078 serum samples tested had L2-specific antibodies, but none were detectably neutralizing for HPV16. To develop a standard, we substituted human IgG1 sequences into conserved regions of two rodent monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for neutralizing epitopes at HPV16 L2 residues 17 to 36 and 58 to 64, creating JWW-1 and JWW-2, respectively. These chimeric MAbs retained neutralizing activity and together reacted with 33/34 clinically relevant HPV types tested. In conclusion, our inability to identify an HPV16 L2-specific neutralizing antibody response even in the sera of patients with active genital HPV disease suggests the subdominance of L2 protective epitopes and the value of the chimeric MAbs JWW-1 and JWW-2 as standards for immunoassays to measure L2-specific human antibodies. PMID:25972404

  20. Decreased Management of Genital Warts in Young Women in Australian General Practice Post Introduction of National HPV Vaccination Program: Results from a Nationally Representative Cross-Sectional General Practice Study

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Christopher; Britt, Helena; Garland, Suzanne; Conway, Lynne; Stein, Alicia; Pirotta, Marie; Fairley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Since the introduction of Australia's human papillomavirus vaccination program, the management rate of genital warts in sexual health clinics and private hospitals has decreased in women of vaccine-eligible age. However, most genital warts in Australia are managed in general practice. This study examines whether a similar decrease occurred in Australian general practice after the introduction of the program. Methods Analysis of a nationally representative cross-sectional database of Australian general practice activity (1,175,879 patient encounters with 11,780 general practitioners). Genital warts management rates were estimated for the periods before and after introduction of the program (Pre-program, July 2002-June 2006; Post-program, July 2008-June 2012). Control conditions included genital herpes and gardnerella/bacterial vaginosis in female patients and genital herpes and urethritis in male patients. Trends in management rates by year, pre-vaccine (July 2000-June 2007) and post-vaccine (July 2007-June 2012) were also calculated. Results Management rate of genital warts among women potentially covered by program (aged 1527 years) decreased by 61% from 4.33 per 1,000 encounters in the Pre-program period to 1.67 in the Post-program period. Trend analysis of the post-vaccine period showed, among women of vaccine eligible age, a significant year-on-year reduction in the rate of genital warts management (p<0.0001) and a significant increase in the management rate of control conditions per year (p<0.0001). For all other age-sex groups there was no significant change in the management rate of genital warts between the Pre- and Post-program periods. Conclusion The large decrease in general practice management of genital warts in women of vaccine-eligible age highlights the success of the program in the wider community. PMID:25180698

  1. What women in the United States Virgin Islands still want and need to know about HPV, cervical cancer, and condom use.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Sandra Millon; Ramsay-Johnson, Edith; Browne, Lois; Caines, Natasha; Dean, Ashanti; Duval, Samantha; Ivalis, Ruth; Lawrence, Nishel D; Lewis, Nicole; Mulkanen, Meseret; Pogson, Shenella; Stuard, Princess-Onesha; Randolph, Benita; Riley, Shalini; Ruiz, Melanie; Russ, Jori; Averhart, LaCreessha; De Castro, Tyra; Dockery, Rashida

    2010-07-01

    Cervical cancer is an infection-related cancer caused primarily by the human papilloma virus. Sexual behavior is a primary risk factor for contracting the genital type of the HPV. While studies have shown that vertical transmission, horizontal transmission, and transmission of the HPV following contact with infected secretions without sexual intercourse are possible, they are not common. The incidence of cervical cancer in the Caribbean is the third highest in the world. This report describes the outcomes of a cross-sectional, mixed methods, exploratory study undertaken to examine questions and concerns about HPV transmission, physical examination, cervical cancer screening, and HPV/cervical cancer risk management among a targeted group of single, unmarried women in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Analysis of the data revealed that the women had many questions and concerns about the origin of HPV infection and cervical cancer, HPV and cervical cancer risk factors, HPV and cervical cancer screening, and HPV and cervical cancer prevention and risk management. Results of the study are used to suggest opportunities for nurses to respond to the questions and concerns posed by the women through the University of the Virgin Islands and within community-based settings. PMID:20857773

  2. Genital injuries in adults.

    PubMed

    White, Catherine

    2013-02-01

    The examination of the rape victim should focus on the therapeutic, forensic and psychological needs of the individual patient. One aspect will be an examination for ano-genital injuries. From a medical perspective, they tend to be minor and require little in the way of treatment. They must be considered when assessing the risk of blood-borne viruses and the need for prophylaxis. From a forensic perspective, an understanding of genital injury rates, type of injury, site and healing may assist the clinician to interpret the findings in the context of the allegations that have been made. There are many myths and misunderstandings about ano-genital injuries and rape. The clinician has a duty to dispel these. PMID:23219384

  3. Genital Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from Nemours for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & ... surefire way to prevent genital herpes is abstinence. Teens who do have sex must properly use a latex condom every time ...

  4. Genital Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Scappatura, F. Philip

    1987-01-01

    The author reviews the prevalence of genital herpes, outlines the typical clinical courses of the disease in its primary and recurrent forms. He discusses the physical, psychological and social effects of this sexually transmitted disease and provides three protocols for the use of oral acyclovir in its treatment. PMID:21263803

  5. HPV vaccination for prevention of skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vinzn, Sabrina E; Rsl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous papillomaviruses are associated with specific skin diseases, such as extensive wart formation and the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), especially in immunosuppressed patients. Hence, clinical approaches are required that prevent such lesions. Licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines confer type-restricted protection against HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18, responsible of 90% of genital warts and 70% of cervical cancers, respectively. However, they do not protect against less prevalent high-risk types or cutaneous HPVs. Over the past few years, several studies explored the potential of developing vaccines targeting cutaneous papillomaviruses. These vaccines showed to be immunogenic and prevent skin tumor formation in certain animal models. Furthermore, under conditions mimicking the ones found in the intended target population (i.e., immunosuppression and in the presence of an already established infection before vaccination), recent preclinical data shows that immunization can still be effective. Strategies are currently focused on finding vaccine formulations that can confer protection against a broad range of papillomavirus-associated diseases. The state-of-the-art of these approaches and the future directions in the field will be presented. PMID:25692212

  6. Human papillomaviruses: are we ready to type?

    PubMed Central

    Roman, A; Fife, K H

    1989-01-01

    The issue of determining which human papillomavirus (HPV) is present in a clinical specimen (typing specimens for HPVs) is receiving attention because HPVs cause condyloma acuminata and are associated with the continuum of disease which ranges from dysplasia to invasive genital cancer. Morphological inspection of precancerous lesions is not sufficient to determine which lesions will progress and which will not. A number of research tools based primarily on deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization have been developed. These permit identification and typing of HPV in genital tract scrapings or biopsies. Some HPV types (e.g., HPV-16 and HPV-18) have been identified in high-grade dysplasias and carcinomas more commonly than other types (e.g., HPV-6) and have been designated "high risk" types for cervical cancer. Thus, the question arises whether HPV typing would improve patient management by providing increased sensitivity for detection of patients at risk or by providing a prognostic indicator. In this review, the available typing methods are reviewed from the standpoint of their sensitivity, specificity, and ease of application to large-scale screening programs. Data implicating HPVs in the genesis of genital tract cancers are reviewed, as is the association of specific HPV types with specific outcomes. We conclude that there is currently no simple, inexpensive assay for HPV types, although such assays may be developed in the future. Analysis of the typing data indicates that, while HPV types can be designated high risk and low risk, these designations are not absolute and thus the low-risk group should not be ignored. In addition, interpretation of the data is complicated by finding high-risk types in individuals with no indication of disease. Insufficient data exist to indicate whether knowledge of the presence of a given HPV type is a better prognostic indicator than cytological or histological results. Thus, more research is needed before it can be determined whether typing information will augment the method currently in use for deciding treatment regimen and whether it warrants widespread use. Images PMID:2539898

  7. Evaluation of HPV-16 and HPV-18 genotyping for the triage of women with high-risk HPV+ cytology-negative results.

    PubMed

    Wright, Thomas C; Stoler, Mark H; Sharma, Abha; Zhang, Guili; Behrens, Catherine; Wright, Teresa L

    2011-10-01

    The ATHENA (Addressing THE Need for Advanced HPV Diagnostics) HPV study evaluated the clinical usefulness of the cobas HPV Test (Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, CA) for high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) testing (14 HR types) and individual HPV-16/HPV-18 genotyping in women undergoing routine cervical cytology screening in the United States. For the study, 47,208 women were recruited, including 32,260 women 30 years or older with negative cytology. All women with positive results for HR-HPV (n = 4,219) plus a subset of HR-HPV- women (n = 886) were referred for colposcopy and biopsy. The overall prevalence of HR-HPV was 6.7% and of HPV-16/HPV-18 was 1.5%. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 (CIN 2) or worse was found in 1.2% of women examined. The estimated absolute risk of CIN 2 or worse in HPV-16+ and/or HPV-18+ women was 11.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.4%-14.8%) compared with 6.1% (95% CI, 4.9%-7.2%) in HR-HPV+ and 0.8% (95% CI, 0.3%-1.5%) in HR-HPV- women. These analyses validate the 2006 American Society of Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology guidelines for HPV-16/HPV-18 genotyping, which recommend referral to colposcopy of HPV-16/HPV-18+ women with negative cytology. PMID:21917680

  8. Human papillomavirus type 16 virus-like particles expressed in attenuated Salmonella typhimurium elicit mucosal and systemic neutralizing antibodies in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nardelli-Haefliger, D; Roden, R B; Benyacoub, J; Sahli, R; Kraehenbuhl, J P; Schiller, J T; Lachat, P; Potts, A; De Grandi, P

    1997-01-01

    Attenuated strains of Salmonella are attractive live vaccine candidates for eliciting mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. The ability to induce immune responses in the reproductive tract may be critical for the effectiveness of a prophylactic vaccine against genital human papillomaviruses (HPV), which are important etiologic agents in the development of cervical cancer. To examine the potential of a live Salmonella-based vaccine to prevent genital HPV infection, the L1 major capsid protein from HPV type 16 (HPV16) was constitutively expressed in the PhoPc strain of Salmonella typhimurium. As demonstrated by electron microscopy, the L1 protein expressed in these bacteria assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) that resemble authentic papillomavirus virions. This is the first demonstration that papillomavirus VLPs can self-assemble in prokaryotes. BALB/c mice were immunized with the HPV16 L1 recombinant PhoPc strain by the oral and nasal routes. Despite a low stability of the L1-expressing plasmid in vivo, a double nasal immunization was effective in inducing L1-specific serum antibodies that recognized mainly native, but not disassembled, VLPs. These antibodies effectively neutralized HPV16 pseudotyped virions in an in vitro infectivity assay. Conformationally dependent anti-VLP immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG were also detected in oral and vaginal secretions, indicating that potentially protective antibody responses were elicited at mucosal sites. Recombinant attenuated Salmonella expressing HPV capsids may represent a promising vaccine candidate against genital HPV infection. PMID:9234794

  9. Racial differences in the incidence and clearance of human papillomavirus (HPV): The HPV in Men (HIM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Schabath, Matthew B.; Villa, Luisa L.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J.; Akogbe, Gabriel O.; Abrahamsen, Martha E.; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmern, Jorge; Quiterio, Manuel; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background This analysis assessed the acquisition (incidence) and persistence (clearance) of HPV infection by self-reported race among men in The HPV in Men (HIM) Study, a multinational prospective study of the natural history of genital HPV infections. Methods Self-reported race was categorized as White, Black, Asian/Pacific Islander (PI), or multiple and mixed race. Genital samples were combined for HPV DNA testing and categorized by any-, oncogenic-, and non-oncogenic HPV infections. Results Asian/PI race had significantly the lowest incidence of any-, oncogenic-, and non-oncogenic HPV infection (P < 0.001). In multivariable analyses Asian/PI race was associated with a lower probability of acquiring any- (HR=0.63; 95% CI 0.420.95) and non-oncogenic HPV infection (HR=0.61; 95% CI 0.400.93) when compared to Whites. No significant associations were evident for Asian/PI race for clearance. Multiple and mixed race was significantly associated with lower probability of acquiring non-oncogenic HPV infection (HR=0.83; 95% CI 0.690.99) and borderline significant associations were observed for any HPV (HR=0.91) and oncogenic infections (HR=0.92). Multiple and mixed race was associated with a lower probability of clearing any- (HR=0.92; 95% CI 0.841.00) and oncogenic HPV infections (HR=0.85; 95% CI 0.750.95). Conclusion Asian/PI race had the lowest incidence of HPV and exhibited a lower probability of acquiring new HPV infections. Multiple and mixed race had the second lowest incidence of infection and was associated with a lower probability of acquiring and clearing a HPV infection. Impact Race-specific differences in HPV infection could be due to behavior, innate genetic differences, or circulating intratypic HPV variants. PMID:23872745

  10. Adverse Psychosexual Impact Related to the Treatment of Genital Warts and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Campaner, Adriana Bittencourt; Vespa Junior, Nelson; Giraldo, Paulo Csar; Leal Passos, Mauro Romero

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare the psychosexual impact related to the treatment of genital warts and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in women. Methods. 75 patients presenting with HPV-induced genital lesions, belonging to one of two patient groups, were included in the study: 29 individuals with genital warts (GWs) and 46 individuals with CIN grades 2 or 3 (CIN 2/3). Initially, medical charts of each woman were examined for extraction of data on the type of HPV-induced infection and treatment administered. Subjects were interviewed to collect sociodemographic data as well as personal, gynecologic, obstetric, and sexual history. After this initial anamnesis, the Sexual Quotient-Female Version (SQ-F) questionnaire was applied to assess sexual function. After application of the questionnaire, patients answered specific questions produced by the researchers, aimed at assessing the impact of the disease and its treatment on their sexual lives. Results. It is noteworthy that patients with CIN 2/3 had statistically similar classification of sexual quotient to patients with GWs (P = 0.115). However, patients with GWs more frequently gave positive answers to the specific questions compared to patients with CIN 2/3. Conclusion. Based on these findings, it is clear that GWs have a greater impact on sexual behavior compared to CIN 2/3. PMID:26316956

  11. gp340 Promotes Transcytosis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Genital Tract-Derived Cell Lines and Primary Endocervical Tissue?

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Earl; Ni, Houping; Cannon, Georgetta; Zhou, Chunhui; Kallenbach, Neville; Malamud, Daniel; Weissman, Drew

    2009-01-01

    The human scavenger receptor gp340 has been identified as a binding protein for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope that is expressed on the cell surface of female genital tract epithelial cells. This interaction allows such epithelial cells to efficiently transmit infective virus to susceptible targets and maintain viral infectivity for several days. Within the context of vaginal transmission, HIV must first traverse a normally protective mucosa containing a cell barrier to reach the underlying T cells and dendritic cells, which propagate and spread the infection. The mechanism by which HIV-1 can bypass an otherwise healthy cellular barrier remains an important area of study. Here, we demonstrate that genital tract-derived cell lines and primary human endocervical tissue can support direct transcytosis of cell-free virus from the apical to basolateral surfaces. Further, this transport of virus can be blocked through the addition of antibodies or peptides that directly block the interaction of gp340 with the HIV-1 envelope, if added prior to viral pulsing on the apical side of the cell or tissue barrier. Our data support a role for the previously described heparan sulfate moieties in mediating this transcytosis but add gp340 as an important facilitator of HIV-1 transcytosis across genital tract tissue. This study demonstrates that HIV-1 actively traverses the protective barriers of the human genital tract and presents a second mechanism whereby gp340 can promote heterosexual transmission. PMID:19553331

  12. gp340 promotes transcytosis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in genital tract-derived cell lines and primary endocervical tissue.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Earl; Ni, Houping; Cannon, Georgetta; Zhou, Chunhui; Kallenbach, Neville; Malamud, Daniel; Weissman, Drew

    2009-09-01

    The human scavenger receptor gp340 has been identified as a binding protein for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope that is expressed on the cell surface of female genital tract epithelial cells. This interaction allows such epithelial cells to efficiently transmit infective virus to susceptible targets and maintain viral infectivity for several days. Within the context of vaginal transmission, HIV must first traverse a normally protective mucosa containing a cell barrier to reach the underlying T cells and dendritic cells, which propagate and spread the infection. The mechanism by which HIV-1 can bypass an otherwise healthy cellular barrier remains an important area of study. Here, we demonstrate that genital tract-derived cell lines and primary human endocervical tissue can support direct transcytosis of cell-free virus from the apical to basolateral surfaces. Further, this transport of virus can be blocked through the addition of antibodies or peptides that directly block the interaction of gp340 with the HIV-1 envelope, if added prior to viral pulsing on the apical side of the cell or tissue barrier. Our data support a role for the previously described heparan sulfate moieties in mediating this transcytosis but add gp340 as an important facilitator of HIV-1 transcytosis across genital tract tissue. This study demonstrates that HIV-1 actively traverses the protective barriers of the human genital tract and presents a second mechanism whereby gp340 can promote heterosexual transmission. PMID:19553331

  13. Serial type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) load measurement allows differentiation between regressing cervical lesions and serial virion productive transient infections

    PubMed Central

    Depuydt, Christophe E; Jonckheere, Jef; Berth, Mario; Salembier, Geert M; Vereecken, Annie J; Bogers, Johannes J

    2015-01-01

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is strongly associated with the development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or cancer. Not all persistent infections lead to cancer. Viral load measured at a single time-point is a poor predictor of the natural history of HPV infections. However the profile of viral load evolution over time could distinguish nonprogressive from progressive (carcinogenic) infections. A retrospective natural history study was set up using a Belgian laboratory database including more than 800,000 liquid cytology specimens. All samples were submitted to qPCR identifying E6/E7 genes of 18 HPV types. Viral load changes over time were assessed by the linear regression slope. Database search identified 261 untreated women with persistent type-specific HPV DNA detected (270 infections) in at least three of the last smears for a average period of 3.2 years. Using the coefficient of determination (R²) infections could be subdivided in a latency group (n = 143; R² < 0.85) and a regressing group (n = 127; R² ≥ 0.85). In (≥3) serial viral load measurements, serial transient infections with latency is characterized by a nonlinear limited difference in decrease or increase of type-specific viral load (R² < 0.85 and slopes between 2 measurements 0.0010 and −0.0010 HPV copies/cell per day) over a longer period of time (1553 days), whereas regression of a clonal cell population is characterized by a linear (R² ≥ 0.85) decrease (−0.0033 HPV copies/cell per day) over a shorter period of time (708 days; P < 0.001). Using serial HPV type-specific viral load measurements we could for the first time identify regressing CIN2 and CIN3 lesions. Evolution of the viral load is an objective measurable indicator of the natural history of HPV infections and could be used for future triage in HPV-based cervical screening programs. PMID:25991420

  14. HPV-type-specific response of cervical cancer cells to cisplatin after silencing replication licensing factor MCM4.

    PubMed

    Das, Mitali; Prasad, Shyam Babu; Yadav, Suresh Singh; Modi, Arusha; Singh, Sunita; Pradhan, Satyajit; Narayan, Gopeshwar

    2015-12-01

    Minichoromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins play key role in cell cycle progression by licensing DNA replication only once per cell cycle. These proteins are found to be overexpressed in cervical cancer cells. In this study, we depleted MCM4, one of the MCM 2-7 complex components by RNA interference (RNAi) in four cervical cancer cell lines. The four cell lines were selected on the basis of their human papillomavirus (HPV) infection: HPV16-positive SiHa, HPV18-positive ME-180, HPV16- and HPV18-positive CaSki, and HPV-negative C-33A. The MCM4-deficient cells irrespective of their HPV status grow for several generations and maintain regular cell cycle. We did not find any evidence of augmented response to a short-term (48 h) cisplatin treatment in these MCM4-deficient cells. However, MCM4-/HPV16+ SiHa cells cannot withstand a prolonged treatment (up to 5 days) of even a sublethal dosage of cisplatin. They show increased chromosomal instability compared to their control counterparts. On the other hand, MCM4-deficient CaSki cells (both HPV16+ and 18+) remain resistant to a prolonged exposure to cisplatin. Our study indicates that cervical cancer cells may be using excess MCMs as a backup for replicative stress; however, its regulatory mechanism is dependent on the HPV status of the cells. PMID:26188903

  15. A multiplex real-time PCR-platform integrated into automated extraction method for the rapid detection and measurement of oncogenic HPV type-specific viral DNA load from cervical samples.

    PubMed

    Broccolo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The persistent infection with most frequent high-risk (HR)-HPV types (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45, -52, and -58) is considered to be the true precursor of neoplastic progression. HR-HPV detection and genotyping is the most effective and accurate approach in screening of the early cervical lesions and cervical cancer, although also the HR-HPV DNA load is considered an ancillary marker for persistent HPV infection. Here, it is described an in-house multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)-based typing system for the rapid detection and quantitation of the most common HR-HPV genotypes from cervical cytology screening tests. First, a separate qPCR assay to quantify a single-copy gene is recommended prior to screening (prescreening assay) to verify the adequate cellularity of the sample and the quality of DNA extracted and to normalize the HPV copy number per genomic DNA equivalent in the sample. Subsequently, to minimize the number of reactions, two multiplex qPCR assays (first line screening) are performed to detect and quantify HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45, -52, and -58 (HPV-18 and -45 are measured together by single-fluorophore). In addition, a multiplex qPCR assay specific for HPV-18 and HPV-45 is also available to type precisely the samples found to be positive for one of the two strains. Finally, two nucleic acid extraction methods are proposed by using a 96-well plate format: one manual method (supported by centrifuge or by vacuum) and one automated method integrated into a robotic liquid handler workstation to minimize material and hands-on time. In conclusion, this system provides a reliable high-throughput method for the rapid detection and quantitation of HR-HPV DNA load in cervical samples. PMID:24740223

  16. In vitro evaluation of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides targeted to the E2 mRNA of papillomavirus: potential treatment for genital warts.

    PubMed Central

    Cowsert, L M; Fox, M C; Zon, G; Mirabelli, C K

    1993-01-01

    Papillomaviruses induce benign proliferative lesions, such as genital warts, in humans. The E2 gene product is thought to play a major role in the regulation of viral transcription and DNA replication and may represent a rational target for an antisense oligonucleotide drug action. Phosphorothioate oligonucleotides complementary to E2 mRNAs were synthesized and tested in a series of in vitro bovine papillomavirus (BPV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) models for the ability to inhibit E2 transactivation and virus-induced focus formation. The most active BPV-specific compounds were complementary to the mRNA cap region (ISIS 1751), the translation initiation region for the full-length E2 transactivator (ISIS 1753), and the translation initiation region for the E2 transrepressor mRNA (ISIS 1755). ISIS 1751 and ISIS 1753 were found to reduce E2-dependent transactivation and viral focus formation in a sequence-specific and concentration-dependent manner. ISIS 1755 increased E2 transactivation in a dose-dependent manner but had no effect on focus formation. Oligonucleotides with a chain length of 20 residues had optimal activity in the E2 transactivation assay. On the basis of the above observations, ISIS 2105, a 20-residue phosphorothioate oligonucleotide targeted to the translation initiation of both HPV type 6 (HPV-6) and HPV-11 E2 mRNA, was designed and shown to inhibit E2-dependent transactivation by HPV-11 E2 expressed from a surrogate promoter. These observations support the rationale of E2 as a target for antiviral therapy against papillomavirus infections and specifically identify ISIS 2105 as a candidate antisense oligonucleotide for the treatment of genital warts induced by HPV-6 and HPV-11. Images PMID:8383937

  17. HPV Genotyping 9G Membrane Test

    PubMed Central

    Sayyed, Danishmalik Rafiq; Song, Keum-Soo; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; An, Heejung; Kim, Junghoon; Kim, Taisun

    2013-01-01

    The results of the genital human papillomavirus (HPV) detection in 439 cervical samples by cervical cytology were compared with sequencing analysis and a newly developed HPV genotyping 9G membrane test. The excellent sensitivity and specificity of the HPV genotyping 9G membrane test was assured by a signal to noise ratio of more than 300 and a target hybridization to non-target hybridization ratio of 300 ~ 400 at 25 °C. The final results can be obtained in 29 min by simple loading of the hybridization and washing solutions and scanning the membranes without any drying steps or special handling. The 100% identical results of the HPV genotyping 9G membrane test with sequencing results in 439 clinical samples demonstrate significant clinical application for this test. HPV genotyping 9G membrane tests can identify and discriminate five HR-HPV genotypes which are prevalent in almost 87% of cervical cancer cases. Its simple handling makes the HPV genotyping 9G membrane test a very convenient platform for accurate HPV genotyping. PMID:24284877

  18. HPV Vaccine Effective at Multiple Anatomic Sites

    Cancer.gov

    A new study from NCI researchers finds that the HPV vaccine protects young women from infection with high-risk HPV types at the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed at l

  19. High HPV Infection Prevalence in Men from Infertile Couples and Lack of Relationship between Seminal HPV Infection and Sperm Quality

    PubMed Central

    Golob, Barbara; Verdenik, Ivan; Kolbezen Simoniti, Mojca; Vrta?nik Bokal, Eda; Zorn, Branko

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the most frequently sexually transmitted viruses and etiological agents of several human cancers. Controversial results of the role of HPV in infertile population on sperm parameters have been published. The aim of this study was to estimate the type-specific prevalence of HPV DNA infection of the external genitalia and semen in 340 Slovenian men from infertile couples and to establish the relationship between seminal HPV DNA infection and abnormal sperm parameters. Self-taken swabs of the entire penile surface and semen samples were collected, and HPV detection and genotyping were performed. HPV DNA was detected in 37.12% of external genitalia and in 13.61% of semen samples with high HPV type concordance of both sampling sites. The most prevalent HPV types in the male external genitalia were HPV-CP6108 and HPV-84. The most prevalent HPV types in semen were HPV-53 and HPV-CP6108. The prevalence of HPV infection between normozoospermic men and men with abnormal sperm parameters did not differ significantly. Sperm quality did not differ significantly between men with seminal HPV infection and uninfected men. In conclusion, the men from infertile couples are equally susceptible to HPV infection regardless of their fertile potential; seminal HPV infection does not impair sperm quality. PMID:24809062

  20. Long-term persistence of oral human papillomavirus type 16: the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) study.

    PubMed

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Kreimer, Aime R; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; O'Keefe, Michael T; Ingles, Donna J; Abrahamsen, Martha; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-03-01

    Persistent infection with oral HPV16 is believed to drive the development of most oropharyngeal cancers. However, patterns of oral HPV16 persistence remain understudied, particularly among HIV-negative individuals. Oral HPV16 persistence was evaluated among 1,626 participants of the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Twenty-three oral HPV16-positive men who provided an oral gargle sample on ?2 study visits were included in the analysis. Archived oral samples from all follow-up visits were tested for HPV16 using Linear Array and INNO-LiPA detection methods. Persistence was evaluated using consecutive HPV16-positive visits held approximately 6 months apart and using the Kaplan-Meier method. Oral HPV16-positive men were aged 18 to 64 years [median, 36 years; interquartile range (IQR), 25-42] and were followed for a median of 44.4 months (IQR, 29.9-49.5). Of 13 incident infections, 4 (30.8%) persisted ?12 months, 1 (10.0%) persisted ?24 months, and none persisted ?36 months [median infection duration, 7.3 months; 95% confidence interval (CI), 6.4-NA)]. Of 10 prevalent infections, 9 (90.0%) persisted ?12 months, 8 (80.0%) persisted ?24 months, 4 (57.1%) persisted ?36 months, and 2 (40.0%) persisted ?48 months (median infection duration, NA). Twelve-month persistence of incident infections increased significantly with age (Ptrend = 0.028). Prevalent oral HPV16 infections in men persisted longer than newly acquired infections, and persistence appeared to increase with age. These findings may explain the high prevalence of oral HPV observed at older ages. Understanding oral HPV16 persistence will aid in the identification of men at high-risk of developing HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:25575501

  1. Clinical efficiency of quadrivalent HPV (types 6/11/16/18) vaccine in patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Chiril?, Magdalena; Bolboac?, Sorana D

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the clinical efficiency of quadrivalent HPV (types 6/11/16/18) vaccine in patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). This was a prospective study of patients with RRP treated from January 2009 to July 2012 at the Ear, Nose and Throat Department of the Emergency County Hospital of Cluj-Napoca, Romania. Demographic characteristics, onset of RRP, HPV typing, use and number of cidofovir injections, number of surgeries for RRP per year, and use of human papillomavirus vaccine (types 6, 11, 16, 18) (recombinant, adsorbed)/Silgard were considered from all the patients included in the study. Charts were reviewed for follow-up after diagnosis, after cidofovir, and after Silgard; all the statistical tests were applied at a significance level of 5%. The recurrences were observed within 27.53 11.24 days after intralesional cidofovir injection. Thirteen patients with recurrence after cidofovir agreed and received Silgard vaccine. 85% [54.4499.41] of patients had no recurrences during 1-year follow-up. The recurrence of papillomas was observed in two patients (15%, 95% CI [0.5945.56]), one with adult-onset RRP and one with juvenile-onset RRP. Both recurrences appeared after the first Silgard dose; one month after the third vaccine dose each patient underwent a new surgery for remaining papillomas with no recurrences at 1-year follow-up visit. Silgard vaccination had a good effect and proved to be efficient in the treatment of our patients with RRR without appearance of recurrence in 85% of the patients during 1-year follow-up. PMID:24121781

  2. Robust In Vitro and In Vivo Neutralization against Multiple High-Risk HPV Types Induced by a Thermostable Thioredoxin-L2 Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Hanna; Ribeiro-Mller, Lis; Canali, Elena; Bolchi, Angelo; Tommasino, Massimo; Ottonello, Simone; Mller, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Current prophylactic virus-like particle (VLP) human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are based on the L1 major capsid protein and provide robust but virus type-restricted protection. Moreover, VLP vaccines have a high production cost, require cold-chain storage, and are thus not readily implementable in developing countries, which endure 85% of the cervical cancer-related death burden worldwide. In contrast with L1, immunization with minor capsid protein L2 elicits broad cross-neutralization, and we previously showed that insertion of a peptide spanning amino acids 20-38 of L2 into bacterial thioredoxin (Trx) greatly enhances its immunogenicity. Building on this finding, we use, here, four different neutralization assays to demonstrate that low doses of a trivalent Trx-L2 vaccine, incorporating L2(20-38) epitopes from HPV16, HPV31 and HPV51, and formulated in a human-compatible adjuvant, induce broadly protective responses. Specifically, we show that this vaccine, which uses a far-divergent archaebacterial thioredoxin as scaffold and is amenable to an easy one-step thermal purification, induces robust cross-neutralization against 12 of the 13 known oncogenic HPV types. Immune performance measured with two different in vitro neutralization assays was corroborated by the results of mouse cervico-vaginal challenge and passive transfer experiments indicating robust cross-protection also in vivo. Altogether, our results attest to the potential of Trx-L2 as a thermostable second-generation HPV vaccine particularly well suited for low-resource countries. PMID:26170394

  3. The transcriptional transactivation function of wild-type p53 is inhibited by SV40 large T-antigen and by HPV-16 E6 oncoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Mietz, J A; Unger, T; Huibregtse, J M; Howley, P M

    1992-01-01

    The observed interaction between p53 and the oncoproteins encoded by several DNA tumor viruses suggests that these viruses mediate their transforming activities at least in part by altering the normal growth regulatory function of p53. In this study we examined the effect of viral oncoprotein expression on the transcriptional transactivation function of wild-type p53 in human cells. Plasmids expressing human p53 were cotransfected with either SV40 large T-antigen or human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E6 expression plasmids and assayed for transactivation function using a reporter gene driven by a p53-responsive promoter containing multiple copies of the consensus p53 DNA binding motif, TGCCT. Both large T-antigen and E6 were able to inhibit transactivation by wild-type p53. Furthermore, SV40 T-antigen mutants that are defective for p53 binding were not able to inhibit transactivation and HPV E6 proteins that were either mutant or derived from non-oncogenic HPV types and unable to bind p53, had no effect on p53 transactivation. These results demonstrate the physiological relevance of the interaction of SV40 T-antigen and HPV E6 oncoproteins with p53 in vivo and suggest that the transforming functions of these viral oncoproteins may be linked to their ability to inhibit p53-mediated transcriptional activation. Images PMID:1464323

  4. Exploring the Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Communication Preferences of the General Public regarding HPV: Findings from CDC Focus Group Research and Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Allison L.; Shepeard, Hilda

    2007-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States, causing genital warts, cervical cell abnormalities, and cervical cancer in women. To inform HPV education efforts, 35 focus groups were conducted with members of the general public, stratified by gender, race/ethnicity, and urban/rural

  5. Exploring the Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Communication Preferences of the General Public regarding HPV: Findings from CDC Focus Group Research and Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Allison L.; Shepeard, Hilda

    2007-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States, causing genital warts, cervical cell abnormalities, and cervical cancer in women. To inform HPV education efforts, 35 focus groups were conducted with members of the general public, stratified by gender, race/ethnicity, and urban/rural…

  6. HPV Prevalence in Multiple Anatomical Sites among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Blas, Magaly M.; Brown, Brandon; Menacho, Luis; Alva, Isaac E.; Silva-Santisteban, Alfonso; Carcamo, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Background Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted viral infection worldwide. HPV is highly prevalent in sexually active men who have sex with men (MSM) and has been associated with anal cancer, penile cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods From March to September 2011, we conducted a cross-sectional study of HPV prevalence among MSM above age 18 years. Participants were recruited using respondent driven sampling at Clinica Cayetano Heredia. All participants provided anal, genital, and oral samples for HPV DNA testing, and blood for HIV and HPV antibody testing. Results A total of 200 MSM were recruited in the study. The mean age was 34 years (range 18–59 years, SD = 9.4) and101 participants were HIV negative (99 HIV positive). HPV 6/11/16/18 or quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV4) genotype seroprevalence among HIV negative and positive MSM was 64.3% (55%-75.9%) and 93.8% (87.6%-99.2%) respectively (p<0.001). HIV positivity was associated with a higher prevalence of HPV4 and HPV 16/18 DNA at external genital sites and the anal canal. HPV4 DNA prevalence at external genital sites among HIV negative and positive MSM was 14.9% and 28.7% (p = 0.02) respectively, at anal canal was 50.9% and 79.0% (p = 0.001), and at the oral cavity was 9.9% and 8.5% (p = 0.6). Conclusions HPV4 seroprevalence was high in our study among both HIV positives and negatives, with HPV DNA prevalence much lower, and the anal canal being the anatomical site with the highest HPV DNA prevalence. HPV prevention interventions are needed among MSM at high-risk for HIV infection. PMID:26437318

  7. HPV Carcinomas in Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reusser, Nicole M.; Downing, Christopher; Guidry, Jacqueline; Tyring, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide and can result in pre-malignancies or overt malignancies of the skin and mucosal surfaces. HPV-related illnesses are an important personal and public health problem causing physical, mental, sexual and financial detriments. Moreover, this set of malignancies severely affects the immunosuppressed population, particularly HIV-positive patients and organ-transplant recipients. There is growing incidence of HPV-associated anogenital malignancies as well as a decrease in the average age of affected patients, likely related to the rising number of high-risk individuals. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of HPV-related malignancy. Current treatment options for HPV infection and subsequent disease manifestations include imiquimod, retinoids, intralesional bleomycin, and cidofovir; however, primary prevention with HPV vaccination remains the most effective strategy. This review will discuss anogenital lesions in immunocompromised patients, cutaneous warts at nongenital sites, the association of HPV with skin cancer in immunocompromised patients, warts and carcinomas in organ-transplant patients, HIV-positive patients with HPV infections, and the management of cutaneous disease in the immunocompromised patient. PMID:26239127

  8. The E7 protein of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 expressed by recombinant vaccinia virus can be used for detection of antibodies in sera from cervical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Nindl, I; Gissmann, L; Fisher, S G; Bribiesca, L B; Berumen, J; Mller, M

    1996-10-01

    Sera from 128 Mexican cervical cancer patients (age 30-80; mean 53.6) and from 47 healthy women (age 25-69; mean 49.2) were investigated using a newly developed assay for the detection of serum antibodies to the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 early protein E7. This test (CIPA), based upon immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis, uses the complete E7 protein expressed in HeLa cells infected with recombinant vaccinia virus. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of this assay, these results were compared with previous results of the same sera tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; using synthetic peptides derived from HPV 16 E7) and radio-immunoprecipitation (RIPA) using in vitro translated HPV 16 E7 protein. CIPA (45% positives) demonstrated a significant increase in detection rate compared to the peptide-ELISA (30% positives; P = 0.014, chi2-test) and only a slight increase compared to RIPA (38% positives; P = 0.204, chi2-test). Based on the testing of sera from patients with HPV 16 DNA positive tumors the specificity and sensitivity of the CIPA were 0.98 and 0.59, respectively. PMID:8910651

  9. Bax and Bak expression in cervical smears of women with low-and high-risk HPV types: A study of 120 cases

    PubMed Central

    Klapsinou, Eirini; Argyri, Elena; Panotopoulou, Efstathia; Daskalopoulou, Dimitra; Patsouris, Efstratios; Nonni, Afroditi; Lazaris, Andreas C; Thomopoulou, Georgia-Heleni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is known to be involved in the carcinogenesis of squamous cells in uterine cervix cancer, mostly by binding and inactivating the p53 and pRb tumor suppressor genes. Lately, evidence has emerged suggesting that HPV oncoproteins may interact with proteins involved in cellular apoptosis as well. Aim: This study aimed to investigate the expression of proapoptotic proteins Bax and Bak in women with low-risk and high-risk HPV types as opposed to HPV-negative women, and in women with normal pap smear compared to women with abnormal Papanicolau test (Pap) smear. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 liquid-based cervical samples were subtyped for HPV types with microarray hybridization and then stained and evaluated immunocytochemically for Bax and Bak expression. Statistical analysis was performed on the Bax and Bak scores (percentage of positive cells staining intensity), the overall percentage of positive cells, and the most prevalent staining intensity group found in each sample. Results: A weak association between negative Bax staining and cytologically normal Pap smears was discovered, whereas cytologically abnormal samples tended to stain weakly or moderately positive. No other statistically significant difference was found in the other analyzed parameters. Conclusion: Cytologically normal pap smears seem to have a slight tendency to stain negative for Bax as opposed to cytologically abnormal pap smears. Although the association is weak, it is an indication that there might be a connection between the expression of Bax and the development of cervical intraepithelial dysplasia, which warrants further investigation in larger-scale studies.

  10. HPV9 Vaccine for the Prevention of Human Papillomavirus-Related Cancers.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Holly B; Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the United States, with approximately 79 million Americans currently infected. Persistent infection with HPV has been identified as the causative factor in the development of invasive cervical cancer as well as other oral and genital cancers in women and men. The quadravalent HPV4 vaccine has been available since 2006. In December 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the HPV9 vaccine that provides coverage for five additional oncogenic strains of HPV that are not included in the first generation vaccine. PMID:26264802

  11. Factors associated with type-specific persistence of high-risk human papillomavirus infection: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Stensen, Signe; Kjaer, Susanne K; Jensen, Signe M; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Junge, Jette; Iftner, Thomas; Munk, Christian

    2016-01-15

    Persistent genital infection with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) is a prerequisite for cervical cancer development. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with type-specific persistence of HR HPV infections. From a population-based cohort of 40,399 women participating in cervical cancer screening established during 2002-2005, we selected all HR HPV-positive women (N = 7,778). During follow-up (2005-2008), we collected cervical samples from these women and tested them for HPV DNA to determine type-specific HR HPV persistence in the interval 1-4.5 years after enrolment. Data on hospitalisations, prescriptions and socioeconomic factors were obtained from nationwide registers. Women with abnormal cytology at baseline or who had undergone conisation during follow-up were excluded. Factors associated with persistence were identified by logistic regression analysis. The overall rate of HR HPV persistence was 31.4%. The risk for persistence was significantly increased among women with a previous episode of genital warts (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.04-1.74), current use of oral contraceptives (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.13-1.63) or use of systemic glucocorticoids (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.16-3.56). The number of pregnancies or births or use of a hormonal intrauterine device, hormonal therapy or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was not associated with risk for HR HPV persistence. A history of genital warts and current use of oral contraceptives or systemic glucocorticoids increased the risk, potentially indicating a decreased immune response to HPV infection. These findings suggest that host immune response characteristics are important in HR HPV persistence and consequently in cervical cancer development. PMID:26238558

  12. Effects of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Glycoprotein Vaccines and CLDC Adjuvant on Genital Herpes Infection in the Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, David I; Earwood, Julie D.; Bravo, Fernando J.; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Clark, Jennifer R.; Fairman, Jeffrey; Cardin, Rhonda D.

    2011-01-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are common but results from vaccine trials with HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) have been disappointing. We therefore compared a similar HSV gD2 vaccine, to a further truncated gD2 vaccine, to a vaccine with gD2 plus gB2 and gH2/gL2 and to a vaccine with only gB2 and gH2/gL2 in a guinea pig model of genital herpes. All vaccines were administered with cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) as an adjuvant. All vaccines significantly decreased the severity of acute genital disease and vaginal virus replication compared to the placebo group. The majority of animals in all groups developed at least one episode of recurrent disease but the frequency of recurrent disease was significantly reduced by each vaccine compared to placebo. No vaccine was significantly more protective than gD2 alone for any of the parameters described above. No vaccine decreased recurrent virus shedding. When protection against acute infection of dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord was evaluated all vaccines decreased the per cent of animal with detectable virus and the quantity of virus but again no vaccine was significantly more protective than another. Improvements in HSV-2 vaccines may require inclusion of more T cell targets, more potent adjuvants or live virus vaccines. PMID:21238569

  13. Effects of herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein vaccines and CLDC adjuvant on genital herpes infection in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, David I; Earwood, Julie D; Bravo, Fernando J; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Clark, Jennifer R; Fairman, Jeffrey; Cardin, Rhonda D

    2011-03-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are common but results from vaccine trials with HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) have been disappointing. We therefore compared a similar HSV gD2 vaccine, to a further truncated gD2 vaccine, to a vaccine with gD2 plus gB2 and gH2/gL2 and to a vaccine with only gB2 and gH2/gL2 in a guinea pig model of genital herpes. All vaccines were administered with cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC) as an adjuvant. All vaccines significantly decreased the severity of acute genital disease and vaginal virus replication compared to the placebo group. The majority of animals in all groups developed at least one episode of recurrent disease but the frequency of recurrent disease was significantly reduced by each vaccine compared to placebo. No vaccine was significantly more protective than gD2 alone for any of the parameters described above. No vaccine decreased recurrent virus shedding. When protection against acute infection of dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord was evaluated all vaccines decreased the per cent of animal with detectable virus and the quantity of virus but again no vaccine was significantly more protective than another. Improvements in HSV-2 vaccines may require inclusion of more T cell targets, more potent adjuvants or live virus vaccines. PMID:21238569

  14. Reducing HPV-associated Cancer Globally

    PubMed Central

    Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers are a major worldwide public health concern. Virtually all cervical cancer is HPV-related, with 70% caused by HPV16 and -18. Variable proportions of certain non-cervical cancers (e.g., anal, vulvar, oropharyngeal) are HPV-related; over 90% of the HPV-related ones are related to HPV16, -18. The HPV-related cancers are dominated by cervical cancer in the developing world, where cervical cancer screening is limited. In this setting, widespread uptake of current HPV vaccines by adolescent girls could reduce this cancer's incidence and mortality by approximately two-thirds, with cost-effective screening programs of adult women having the potential to reduce mortality more rapidly. In the industrialized world, non-cervical HPV-related cancers, especially oropharyngeal, are rapidly increasing, and now rival the incidence of cervical cancer, whose rates continue to decline thanks to established cervical screening programs. Therefore, reducing HPV-associated non-cervical cancers with HPV vaccination has greater importance in the industrialized world, especially since there are no approved screening programs for these cancers. Preventing the substantial number of non-cervical HPV cancers in men will require either “herd” immunity through high vaccination rates in females or male vaccination. Current HPV vaccination can complement cervical screening in protecting against cervical cancer and may permit the safe reduction of screening intensity in industrialized countries. Second-generation HPV vaccines (active against a broader array of cervical cancer–related HPV types) could prevent an even higher proportion of cervical precancer and cancer and might permit further reductions in screening intensity. PMID:22219162

  15. HPV Vaccine

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  16. Testing for HPV

    MedlinePLUS

    ... HPV test, what does it mean? Testing for HPV What’s the difference between a Pap test and an HPV test? A Pap test is used to find ... HPV is found. Should I be tested for HPV? If you are a woman under age 30 ...

  17. HPV Awareness and Willingness to HPV Vaccination among High-Risk Men attending an STI Clinic in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Coln-Lpez, Vivian; Del Toro-Mejas, Lizbeth M.; Ortiz, Ana P.; Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective An HPV vaccine has been approved for men aged 9 to 26 in the US for the prevention of genital warts and anal cancer. The purpose of this study is to describe 1) HPV vaccine awareness, 2) willingness to get the HPV vaccine and 3) perceived susceptibility to HPV-related cancers and genital warts among men 1826 years old who attend an STI clinic in San Juan, Puerto Rico (PR). Methods A cross-sectional pilot study consisting of 206 HIV+/HIV? men. For purpose of this analysis, only those participants aged ?26 years old were included in this analysis (n=46). Results None of the study participants had been vaccinated against HPV. Fewer than a third knew about the HPV vaccine (28.3%). However, more than half (76.9%) were willing to be vaccinated against HPV. Information sources about the HPV vaccine included their female sexual partners (13.0%), a female sexual partner who received the vaccine (8.7%) and a male sexual partner (2.2%). Most participants reported that the main reason that would increase their willingness to get vaccinated was if a physician recommend the vaccine (95.7%). Perceived susceptibility was low, particularly for anal and oral cancer. Conclusion This pilot study shows poor awareness of the HPV vaccine, although willingness to getting the HPV vaccine was high among those who knew about the vaccine. Future studies should try to evaluate this paradox and study in depth willingness and barriers to vaccination among male sub-groups, such as men who have sex with men (MSM). These studies should also evaluate predictors of uptake of the HPV vaccine among men in this and other STI clinics in PR, in order to develop interventions to increase male vaccination. PMID:23844472

  18. Chlamydia trachomatis and genital human papillomavirus infections in female university students in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Tbora, Nelba; Zelaya, Arnoldo; Bakkers, Judith; Melchers, Willem J G; Ferrera, Annabelle

    2005-07-01

    Sexually transmitted infections are a serious health problem in Honduras. Human papillomavirus (HPV) and Chlamydia trachomatis are major causes of sexually transmitted diseases. To determine the prevalence of C. trachomatis and HPV in young women, 100 female university students in Honduras were assayed for the presence of these pathogens. Twenty-eight percent were positive for HPV and 6% were positive for C. trachomatis. These results show that genital HPV and C. trachomatis infections are very common among sexually active young women in Honduras. It is vital to promote extensive public awareness campaigns among sexually active women concerning preventive measures of these diseases. PMID:16014831

  19. HPV Serology Testing Confirms High HPV Immunisation Coverage in England

    PubMed Central

    Mesher, David; Stanford, Elaine; White, Joanne; Findlow, Jamie; Warrington, Rosalind; Das, Sukamal; Pebody, Richard; Borrow, Ray; Soldan, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Background Reported human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage in England is high, particularly in girls offered routine immunisation at age 12 years. Serological surveillance can be used to validate reported coverage and explore variations within it and changes in serological markers over time. Methods Residual serum specimens collected from females aged 15–19 years in 2010–2011 were tested for anti-HPV16 and HPV18 IgG by ELISA. Based on these results, females were classified as follows: seronegative, probable natural infection, probable vaccine-induced seropositivity, or possible natural infection/possible vaccine-induced seropositivity. The proportion of females with vaccine-induced seropositivity was compared to the reported vaccination coverage. Results Of 2146 specimens tested, 1380 (64%) were seropositive for both types HPV16 and HPV18 and 159 (7.4%) positive for only one HPV type. The IgG concentrations were far higher for those positive for both HPV types than those positive for only one HPV type. 1320 (62%) females were considered to have probable vaccine-induced seropositivity. Among vaccine-induced seropositives, antibody concentrations declined with increasing age at vaccination and increasing time since vaccination. Conclusions The proportion of females with vaccine-induced seropositivity was closest to the reported 3-dose coverage in those offered the vaccination at younger ages, with a greater discrepancy in the older females. This suggests either some under-reporting of immunisations of older females and/or that partial vaccination (i.e. one- or two-doses) has provided high antibody responses in 13–17 year olds. PMID:26959232

  20. Risk factors for genital ulcerations in Kenyan sex workers. The role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kaul, R; Kimani, J; Nagelkerke, N J; Plummer, F A; Bwayo, J J; Brunham, R C; Ngugi, E N; Ronald, A

    1997-08-01

    Both cross-sectional and prospective studies in Africa have revealed an association between genital ulcer disease (GUD) and HIV-1; it is unclear, however, which of these infections facilitates the other. The epidemiology of GUD was investigated in a prospective cohort study of 302 female sex workers from a slum area in Nairobi, Kenya. At study intake in 1985, 157 women (52%) were HIV-1 seropositive. After a mean follow-up duration of 27.2 months, 36 (25%) initially HIV-negative women seroconverted. 189 women (62.5%) had at least 1 incident ulcer in the follow-up period and a total of 541 new cases were diagnosed. GUD incidence was significantly higher in HIV-positive women (82%) than initially seronegative women (48%). The mean number of new genital ulcerations recorded during the follow-up period was 1.8 (2.7 in initially seropositive women and 1.0 in initially seronegative women). The only significant risk factors for GUD incidence in the regression analyses were HIV-1 seropositivity (odds ratio (OR), 3.42), a CD4 count under 200/ml (OR, 1.94), and oral contraceptive use (OR, 1.35). The significant increase in GUD incidence observed relatively soon after primary HIV infection among the 36 seroconverters strongly suggests that HIV-1 itself plays a causal role in the etiology of genital ulcers. Moreover, the finding that the duration of prostitution was negatively associated with the incidence of ulcers in HIV-negative but not HIV-positive women implies that HIV-1 infection may attenuate the acquisition or retention of effective immune responses against the etiologic agents of GUD. PMID:9263358

  1. Genital Herpes (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Emergency Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child Genital Herpes KidsHealth > For Parents > Genital Herpes Print A A A Text Size What's in ... article? Symptoms Contagiousness Treatment Prevention Getting Help Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that's usually ...

  2. Genital Herpes (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Your Child All About Food Allergies Genital Herpes KidsHealth > For Parents > Genital Herpes Print A A A Text Size What's in ... article? Symptoms Contagiousness Treatment Prevention Getting Help Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that's usually ...

  3. Oncogenic HPV infection interrupts the expression of tumor-suppressive miR-34a through viral oncoprotein E6.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Wang, Hsu-Kun; McCoy, J Philip; Banerjee, Nilam S; Rader, Janet S; Broker, Thomas R; Meyers, Craig; Chow, Louise T; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2009-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) play pivotal roles in controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. Aberrant miRNA expression in human is becoming recognized as a new molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis. However, the causes for alterations in miRNA expression remain largely unknown. Infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus types 16 (HPV16) and 18 (HPV18) can lead to cervical and other ano-genital cancers. Here, we have demonstrated that cervical cancer tissues and cervical cancer-derived cell lines containing oncogenic HPVs display reduced expression of tumor-suppressive miR-34a. The reduction of miR-34a expression in organotypic tissues derived from HPV-containing primary human keratinocytes correlates with the early productive phase and is attributed to the expression of viral E6, which destabilizes the tumor suppressor p53, a known miR-34a transactivator. Knockdown of viral E6 expression in HPV16(+) and HPV18(+) cervical cancer cell lines by siRNAs leads to an increased expression of p53 and miR-34a and accumulation of miR-34a in G(0)/G(1) phase cells. Ectopic expression of miR-34a in HPV18(+) HeLa cells and HPV(-) HCT116 cells results in a substantial induction of cell growth retardation and a moderate cell apoptosis. Together, this is the first time a viral oncoprotein has been shown to regulate cellular miRNA expression. Our data have provided new insights into mechanisms by which high-risk HPVs contribute to the development of cervical cancer. PMID:19258450

  4. Oncogenic HPV infection interrupts the expression of tumor-suppressive miR-34a through viral oncoprotein E6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Wang, Hsu-Kun; McCoy, J. Philip; Banerjee, Nilam S.; Rader, Janet S.; Broker, Thomas R.; Meyers, Craig; Chow, Louise T.; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) play pivotal roles in controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. Aberrant miRNA expression in human is becoming recognized as a new molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis. However, the causes for alterations in miRNA expression remain largely unknown. Infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus types 16 (HPV16) and 18 (HPV18) can lead to cervical and other ano-genital cancers. Here, we have demonstrated that cervical cancer tissues and cervical cancer-derived cell lines containing oncogenic HPVs display reduced expression of tumor-suppressive miR-34a. The reduction of miR-34a expression in organotypic tissues derived from HPV-containing primary human keratinocytes correlates with the early productive phase and is attributed to the expression of viral E6, which destabilizes the tumor suppressor p53, a known miR-34a transactivator. Knockdown of viral E6 expression in HPV16+ and HPV18+ cervical cancer cell lines by siRNAs leads to an increased expression of p53 and miR-34a and accumulation of miR-34a in G0/G1 phase cells. Ectopic expression of miR-34a in HPV18+ HeLa cells and HPV? HCT116 cells results in a substantial induction of cell growth retardation and a moderate cell apoptosis. Together, this is the first time a viral oncoprotein has been shown to regulate cellular miRNA expression. Our data have provided new insights into mechanisms by which high-risk HPVs contribute to the development of cervical cancer. PMID:19258450

  5. HPV and Cancer

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  6. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

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  7. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

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    ... HPV) Vaccines On This Page What are human papillomaviruses? Which cancers are caused by HPV? Who gets ... learn more about HPV infection? What are human papillomaviruses? Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a group of more ...

  8. HPV and Men

    MedlinePLUS

    ... time in their life. Although most HPV infections go away on their own without causing problems, HPV ... me? Most of the time HPV infections completely go away and don’t cause any health problems. ...

  9. Management of external genital warts.

    PubMed

    Karnes, Jonathan B; Usatine, Richard P

    2014-09-01

    Genital warts affect 1% of the sexually active U.S. population and are commonly seen in primary care. Human papillomavirus types 6 and 11 are responsible for most genital warts. Warts vary from small, flat-topped papules to large, cauliflower-like lesions on the anogenital mucosa and surrounding skin. Diagnosis is clinical, but atypical lesions should be confirmed by histology. Treatments may be applied by patients, or by a clinician in the office. Patient-applied treatments include topical imiquimod, podofilox, and sinecatechins, whereas clinician-applied treatments include podophyllin, bichloroacetic acid, and trichloroacetic acid. Surgical treatments include excision, cryotherapy, and electrosurgery. The quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine is active against virus subtypes that cause genital warts in men and women. Additionally, male circumcision may be effective in decreasing the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus, human papillomavirus, and herpes simplex virus. PMID:25251091

  10. Increasing HPV vaccination series completion rates via text message reminders.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Elaine C; Derouin, Anne; Gagliano, Martha; Thompson, Julie A; Blood-Siegfried, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most frequently diagnosed sexually transmitted infection in the United States. It is associated with the development of cervical, anal-genital, and oral-pharyngeal cancers. The rate of HPV infection among adolescents and young adults in the United States remains high, and completion rates of an HPV vaccine series remain low. At an urban pediatric clinic, adolescent and young adult participants aged 11 to 22 years (n = 37) received text message reminders for their second and third dose of HPV vaccine over an 8-month study period. Of the participants receiving text message reminders, 14% completed the vaccine series at the optimal time, whereas 0% of an interested group (n = 43) and only 3% of a standard care group (n = 232) completed the vaccine series at the optimal time. Findings support the use of text message reminders to improve HPV vaccine series completion rates in a pediatric practice. PMID:24200295

  11. Persistence of mucosal T cell responses to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in the female genital tract

    PubMed Central

    Posavad, Christine M.; Zhao, Lin; Mueller, Dawn E.; Stevens, Claire E.; Huang, Meei Li; Wald, Anna; Corey, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the human T cell response to HSV-2 in the female genital tract, a major site of heterosexual HSV-2 acquisition, transmission and reactivation. In order to understand the role of local mucosal immunity in HSV-2 infection, T cell lines were expanded from serial cervical cytobrush samples from 30 HSV-2 infected women and examined for reactivity to HSV-2. Approximately 3% of the CD3+ T cells isolated from the cervix were HSV-2 specific and of these, a median of 91.3% were CD4+ while a median of 3.9% were CD8+. HSV-2 specific CD4+ T cells expanded from the cervix were not only more frequent than CD8+ T cells but also exhibited greater breadth in terms of antigenic reactivity. T cells directed at the same HSV-2 protein were often detected in serial cervical cytobrush samples and in blood. Thus, broad and persistent mucosal T cell responses to HSV-2 were detected in the female genital tract of HSV-2+ women suggesting that these cells are resident at the site of HSV-2 infection. Understanding the role of these T cells at this biologically relevant site will be central to the elucidation of adaptive immune mechanisms involved in controlling HSV-2 disease. PMID:24917455

  12. Genital herpes: a review.

    PubMed

    Beauman, John G

    2005-10-15

    Genital herpes simplex virus infection is a recurrent, lifelong disease with no cure. The strongest predictor for infection is a person's number of lifetime sex partners. The natural history includes first-episode mucocutaneous infection, establishment of latency in the dorsal root ganglion, and subsequent reactivation. Most infections are transmitted via asymptomatic viral shedding. Classic outbreaks consist of a skin prodrome and possible constitutional symptoms such as headache, fever, and inguinal lymphadenopathy. As the infection progresses, papules, vesicles on an erythematous base, and erosions appear over hours to days. These lesions usually crust, re-epithelialize, and heal without scarring. First-episode infections are more extensive: primary lesions last two to six weeks versus approximately one week for lesions in recurrent disease. Atypical manifestations are common. Infected persons experience a median of four recurrences per year after their first episode, but rates vary greatly. Genital herpes simplex virus type 2 recurs six times more frequently than type 1. Viral culture is preferred over polymerase chain reaction testing for diagnosis. Serologic testing can be useful in persons with a questionable history. Effective oral antiviral medications are available for initial, episodic, and suppressive therapy but are not a cure. There is some evidence that alternative therapies such as L-lysine, zinc, and some herbal preparations may offer some benefit. Counseling patients about the risk of transmission is crucial and helps prevent the spread of disease and neonatal complications. PMID:16273819

  13. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 glycoprotein D subunit vaccines and protection against genital HSV-1 or HSV-2 disease in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Nigel; Bravo, Fernando J; Francotte, Myriam; Bernstein, David I; Myers, Martin G; Slaoui, Moncef; Stanberry, Lawrence R

    2003-02-15

    In two recent clinical trials, a vaccine containing herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 glycoprotein D (gD2) and a novel adjuvant AS04 comprising alum (Al) and 3-deactylated monophosphoryl lipid A (3-dMPL) afforded HSV-seronegative women significant protection against HSV-2 genital disease (vaccine efficacy, 73% in study 1 and 74% in study 2) and limited protection against infection (46% in study 1 and 39% in study 2). In the present report, studies in the guinea pig model investigated the protection afforded by gD2/AS04 against HSV-1 and HSV-2 genital herpes and investigated whether immunization could prevent or reduce recurrent disease in guinea pigs that developed mucosal infection. Immunization with gD2/AS04 conveyed nearly complete protection against primary disease with either virus but did not prevent mucosal infection. Guinea pigs immunized with gD2/AS04 were significantly better protected against recurrent disease than were guinea pigs immunized with a gD2/Al vaccine, which suggests that inclusion of 3-dMPL improved protection against latent infection. PMID:12599070

  14. The prospects of HPV vaccination in cervical cancer prevention: results of a new independent trial.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; de Sanjose, Silvia; Castellsague, Xavier

    2011-10-01

    Herrero and colleagues show that in a phase III randomized trial in Guanacaste, Costa Rica, the use of a human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) and HPV18 ASO4-adjuvanted vaccine (Cervarix) resulted in complete efficacy against 12-month persistent HPV16 and HPV18 infections and partial protection against HPV31, 33, and 45 in HPV-nave young women ages 18 to 25. PMID:22586628

  15. Concomitance of oncogenic HPV types, CHEK2 gene mutations, and CYP1B1 gene polymorphism as an increased risk factor for malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Constantinou, Maria; Pietrusi?ski, Micha?; K?pczy?ski, ?ukasz; J?drzejczyk, Adam; Ro?niecki, Marek; Marks, Piotr; Ka?u?ewski, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Urinary bladder carcinoma ranks the fourth position in malignancy incidence rates in men (6.1%) and the 17th position in women (1.6%). In general, neoplastic diseases should be approached from two perspectives: prevention with implementation of prophylactic measures and early diagnostics. Prophylactics is possible in the preclinical phase of neoplasm, being both justified and plausible in patients from highrisk groups. Thus, it is particularly important to select such groups, not only by referring to environmental carcinogenic factors (occupational and extraoccupational) but also from genetic predisposition, which may be conductive for neoplasm formation. The mutations / polymorphisms of CHEK2 and CYP1B1 genes predispose to neoplasm via multiorgan mechanisms, while the human papilloma virus (HPV) may participate in the neoplastic transformation as an environmental factor. Material and methods 131 patients with diagnosed urinary bladder cancer were qualified to the study. Mutations/polymorphisms of CHEK2 (IVS2 + 1G > A gene, 1100delC, del5395, I157T) and CYP1B1 355T/T were identified by the PCR in DNA isolated directly from the tumor and from peripheral blood. The ELISA test was used for the studies of 37 HPV genotypes in DNA, isolated tumour tissue. Results 11 mutations of CHEK2 gene were found, 355T/T polymorphism if CYP1B1 gene occurred in 18 patients (12.9%). Oncogenic HPV was found in 36 (29.3%), out of 123 examined patients. Conclusions The concomitance of CHEK2 gene mutations or 355T/T polymorphism of CYP1B1 gene and the presence of oncogenic HPV types statistically significantly correlates with histological malignancy grades of urinary bladder carcinoma. PMID:24578981

  16. Comparison of the Cobas 4800 HPV and HPV 9G DNA Chip Tests for Detection of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Specimens of Women with Consecutive Positive HPV Tests But Negative Pap Smears

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sun-Young; Park, Eun Su; Kim, Jiyoung; Kang, Jun; Lee, Jae Jun; Bae, Yoonjin; Kim, Sang-Il; Maeng, Lee-So

    2015-01-01

    Detecting high-risk (HR) HPV is important for clinical management of women with persistent HPV-positive and Pap-negative results. The Cobas 4800 HPV test is the first FDA-approved HPV DNA test that can be used alone as a first-line screening tool. The HPV 9G DNA chip test is a PCR-based DNA microarray assay. We evaluated the patients of consecutive HPV-positivity on HPV 9G DNA chip test without cytologic abnormalities. We then compared the performances of HPV 9G DNA chip and the Cobas 4800 HPV tests for detecting HR HPV with each other and confirmed HPV genotyping using direct sequencing. All 214 liquid-based cytology specimens were collected from 100 women with consecutive HPV-positive and Pap-negative results on the HPV 9G DNA chip test between May 2012 and Dec 2013, but only 180 specimens were available for comparing HPV test results. The HPV 9G DNA chip and the Cobas 4800 HPV tests agreed with each other in 81.7% of the samples, and the concordance rate was greater than 97.2% for detecting HPV-16 or -18. For HR genotypes other than HPV types 16 and 18, the two tests agreed for 81.1% of the samples. The sensitivity of both assays for detecting HR HPV was 100%, regardless of HR genotypes. The HPV 9G DNA chip test may be as effective as the Cobas 4800 HPV test in detecting HR HPV, and has a similar ability to identify HPV-16 and -18. PMID:26469982

  17. Development and evaluation of the quantitative real-time PCR assay in detection and typing of herpes simplex virus in swab specimens from patients with genital herpes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junlian; Yi, Yong; Chen, Wei; Si, Shaoyan; Yin, Mengmeng; Jin, Hua; Liu, Jianjun; Zhou, Jinlian; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Genital herpes (GH), which is caused mainly by herpes simplex virus (HSV)-2 and HSV-1, remains a worldwide problem. Laboratory confirmation of GH is important, particularly as there are other conditions which present similarly to GH, while atypical presentations of GH also occur. Currently, virus culture is the classical method for diagnosis of GH, but it is time consuming and with low sensitivity. A major advance for diagnosis of GH is to use Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In this study, to evaluate the significance of the real-time PCR method in diagnosis and typing of genital HSV, the primers and probes targeted at HSV-1 DNA polymerase gene and HSV-2 glycoprotein D gene fraction were designed and applied to amplify DNA from HSV-1 or HSV-2 by employing the real-time PCR technique. Then the PCR reaction system was optimized and evaluated. HSV in swab specimens from patients with genital herpes was detected by real-time PCR. The real-time PCR assay showed good specificity for detection and typing of HSV, with good linear range (5×102~5×108 copies/ml, r=0.997), a sensitivity of 5×102 copies/ml, and good reproducibility (intra-assay coefficients of variation 2.29% and inter-assay coefficients of variation 4.76%). 186 swab specimens were tested for HSV by real-time PCR, and the positive rate was 23.7% (44/186). Among the 44 positive specimens, 8 (18.2%) were positive for HSV-1 with a viral load of 8.5546×106 copies/ml and 36 (81.2%) were positive for HSV-2 with a viral load of 1.9861×106 copies/ml. It is concluded that the real-time PCR is a specific, sensitive and rapid method for the detection and typing of HSV, which can be widely used in clinical diagnosis of GH. PMID:26770492

  18. Second-Generation Prophylactic HPV Vaccines: Successes and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Mitchell; Tumban, Ebenezer; Chackerian, Bryce

    2015-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the causative factor in cervical cancer has led to the development of the HPV vaccines Gardasil and Cervarix. These vaccines effectively protect against two HPV types associated with 70% of cervical cancer cases. Despite this success, researchers continue to develop second generation HPV vaccines to protect against more HPV types and allow increased uptake in developing countries. While a reformulated vaccine based on the current technology is currently in clinical trials, another strategy consists of targeting highly conserved epitopes in the minor capsid protein of HPV, L2. Vaccines targeting L2 induce broadly neutralizing antibodies, capable of blocking infection by a wide range of HPV types. Several vaccine designs have been developed to optimize the display of L2 epitopes to the immune system and to reduce the cost of manufacture and distribution. L2-based vaccines show considerable promise as a potential next-generation HPV vaccine. PMID:24350614

  19. Second-generation prophylactic HPV vaccines: successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Mitchell; Tumban, Ebenezer; Chackerian, Bryce

    2014-02-01

    The role of HPV as the causative factor in cervical cancer has led to the development of the HPV vaccines Gardasil and Cervarix. These vaccines effectively protect against two HPV types associated with 70% of cervical cancer cases. Despite this success, researchers continue to develop second-generation HPV vaccines to protect against more HPV types and allow increased uptake in developing countries. While a reformulated vaccine based on the current technology is currently in clinical trials, another strategy consists of targeting highly conserved epitopes in the minor capsid protein of HPV, L2. Vaccines targeting L2 induce broadly neutralizing antibodies, capable of blocking infection by a wide range of HPV types. Several vaccine designs have been developed to optimize the display of L2 epitopes to the immune system and to reduce the cost of manufacture and distribution. L2-based vaccines show considerable promise as a potential next-generation HPV vaccine. PMID:24350614

  20. Evaluation of the polyclonal ELISA HPV serology assay as a biomarker for HPV exposure

    PubMed Central

    Coseo, Sarah E.; Porras, Carolina; Dodd, Lori E.; Hildesheim, Allan; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Gonzalez, Paula; Sherman, Mark E.; Jimenez, Silvia; Solomon, Diane; Bougelet, Catherine; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Quint, Wim; Safaeian, Mahboobeh

    2011-01-01

    Background Seropositivity to HPV16 and 18 antibodies is used as a measure of cumulative HPV exposure and as a stratifier of HPV exposure for vaccine efficacy analyses. Overall performance of these assays, as a measure of HPV exposure, has not been evaluated. Methods Using data from the enrollment phase of the HPV16/18 vaccine trial in Costa Rica, we evaluated the performance of the polyclonal ELISA HPV16 and 18 serological assays as a measure of HPV exposure. Biological (for eg. HPV infection at the cervix) and behavioral characteristics (for eg. lifetime number of sexual partners) with known associations with current and past HPV infection were used to define cases and controls (HPV exposed vs. not exposed). Pre-vaccination serum was measured for antibodies against HPV16 and HPV18 by ELISA; cervical samples were tested for HPV DNA using PCR SPF10/LiPA25. ELISA results were analyzed using receiver-operator-characteristic curves (ROC); performance was evaluated at the manufacturer set cutpoint (HPV16 =8, HPV18 =7) and at cutpoints chosen to optimize sensitivity and specificity (HPV16 =34, HPV18 =60). Results Defining cases as type-specific HPV DNA positive with high-grade abnormal cytolzogy (i.e. combined molecular and microscopic markers of infection), HPV16-ELISA gave sensitivity that was lower at the optimal cutpoint than the manufacturer cutpoint (62.2 compared with 75.7, respectively; p=0.44). However, specificity was higher (85.3 compared with 70.4, respectively; p<0.0001). Similarly, HPV18-ELISA gave sensitivity that was lower at the optimal cutpoint than the manufacturer cutpoint (34.5 compared with 51.7, respectively; p=0.40), with higher specificities (94.9 compared with 72.6, respectively; p<0.0001). Conclusions Modifying cutpoints did not improve the low sensitivity. The low sensitivity of this assay does not support its use for risk stratification or clinical settings. PMID:21934576

  1. Awareness of Diagnosis and Knowledge of HPV in Women Patients: Data from a Multi-Site Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCree, Donna Hubbard; Daley, Ellen M.; Gorbach, Pamina; Hamm, Robert M.; Sharpe, Patricia A.; Brandt, Heather M.; McFarlane, Mary; Kerndt, Peter; McDermott, Robert J.; Perrin, Karen M.; St. Lawrence, Janet S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Persistent infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with cervical and other anogenital cancers. Purpose: This paper reports results of awareness of an HPV diagnosis and HPV knowledge from a multi-site study of HPV knowledge, attitudes and behavior, and the impact of an HPV diagnosis on women and their…

  2. Prevalence of Anti-Human Papillomavirus Type 16, 18, 31, and 58 Virus-Like Particles in Women in the General Population and in Prostitutes

    PubMed Central

    Touz, Antoine; de Sanjos, Silvia; Coursaget, Pierre; Almirall, M. Rosa; Palacio, Virgilio; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Kornegay, Janet; Bosch, F. Xavier

    2001-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is sexually transmitted. The aim of the study was to characterize serological responses to HPV types 16, 18, 31, and 58 by exploring type-specific virus-like particles (VLPs) in two groups of women with very distinct sexual behaviors. Anti-VLP antibodies for types 16, 18, 31, and 58 and HPV DNA in cervical cells were investigated with 177 prostitutes and 283 age-matched controls from the female general population in Spain. Anti-VLP positivity increased with number of lifetime sexual partners in women from the general population, and no seroresponse was found in virgins. However, in prostitutes HPV infection was characterized by higher multireactivity to three or four VLPs (25%) than the general population (3%) and by a more frequent antibody response to HPV-58 than in the general population. About 75% of the women seropositive for type 58 had been born in a Latin American country. Seroprevalence of HPV and cervical HPV DNA in prostitutes were 14 and 10 times higher than observed in women in the general population (prevalence odds ratio [POR] of HPV seropositivity, 14.04 [95%; CI = 8.4 to 23.6] and POR for HPV DNA, 10.4 [95% CI = 3.9 to 27.6). Our results indicate that prostitutes are at an increased risk of oncogenic HPV infections, and they confirm the validity of anti-VLPs as markers of present or past HPV infection, that the number of sexual partners is the major determinant in acquisition of oncogenic HPV, and that anti-VLPs could be used as a marker of repeated infection in prostitutes. PMID:11724843

  3. Early genital naming.

    PubMed

    Fraley, M C; Nelson, E C; Wolf, A W; Lozoff, B

    1991-10-01

    To evaluate the clinical impression that young girls are given little or confusing information about their genitals, a sample of 117 mothers with 1- to 4-year-old children were asked which words for genitals, if any, they used with their children. The ethnically and socioeconomically heterogeneous sample was composed of 63 girls and 54 boys, with the average ages of 26 and 29 months, respectively. Neither boys nor girls were likely to be given a standard anatomical genital term, although many children received colorful colloquial expressions. However, girls were less likely than boys to receive a term for their genitals. Receiving names for genitals was related to certain family circumstances, such as higher parental education, exposure to adult male nudity, having a sibling of the opposite sex, and cosleeping. Pediatric health professionals have the opportunity to contribute to early sex education by conveying accurate information regarding genital terms in the course of routine physical examinations. PMID:1939685

  4. Papanicolaou test screening and prevalence of genital human papillomavirus among women who have sex with women.

    PubMed Central

    Marrazzo, J M; Koutsky, L A; Kiviat, N B; Kuypers, J M; Stine, K

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to examine frequency of and attitudes toward Papanicolaou (Pap) test screening in women who have sex with women (WSW) and to determine prevalence of genital human papillomavirus (HPV). METHODS: Women were eligible if they reported having engaged in sex with another woman in the preceding year Medical and sexual histories were obtained. Cervical specimens for Pap tests and cervical and vaginal specimens for HPV DNA testing were collected. RESULTS: HPV DNA was detected in 31 of 248 WSW (13%). Women who had never had sex with men were less likely to have undergone pelvic examinations and had fewer recent Pap tests. Reasons for not undergoing Pap tests included lack of insurance, previous adverse experiences, and belief that Pap tests were unnecessary. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the occurrence of genital HPV, WSW do not receive adequate Pap test screening. Pap test screening recommendations should not differ for WSW, regardless of sexual history with men. PMID:11392939

  5. HPV - immune response to infection and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    HPV infection in the genital tract is common in young sexually active individuals, the majority of whom clear the infection without overt clinical disease. However most of those who develop benign lesions eventually mount an effective cell mediated immune (CMI) response and the lesions regress.Failure to develop effective CMI to clear or control infection results in persistent infection and, in the case of the oncogenic HPVs, an increased probability of progression to CIN3 and invasive carcinoma. The prolonged duration of infection associated with HPV seems to be associated with effective evasion of innate immunity thus delaying the activation of adaptive immunity.Natural infections in animals show that neutralising antibody to the virus coat protein L1 is protective suggesting that this would be an effective prophylactic vaccine strategy. The current prophylactic HPV VLP vaccines are delivered i.m. circumventing the intra-epithelial immune evasion strategies. These vaccines generate high levels of antibody and both serological and B cell memory as evidenced by persistence of antibody and robust recall responses. However there is no immune correlate - no antibody level that correlates with protection. Recent data on how HPV infects basal epithelial cells and how antibody can prevent this provides a mechanistic explanation for the effectiveness of HPV VLP vaccines. PMID:20961432

  6. Role of bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) in diseases of cattle. Recent findings on BoHV-5 association with genital disease

    PubMed Central

    Favier, P.A.; Marin, M.S.; Pérez, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) belongs to the family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, genus Varicellovirus. This virus is a major causative agent of non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in young cattle. It was first isolated in 1962 from a neurological disease outbreak in Australia. BoHV-5 is genetically and antigenically related to bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1), a highly prevalent virus responsible for respiratory and genital disease in cattle. Initially, BoHV-5 was considered a subtype of BoHV-1 (BoHV-1.3). However, the exclusive presentation of outbreaks of neurological disease suggested that the virus was a new agent with characteristics of neuropathogenicity. Even though both are neurotropic viruses, only BoHV-5 is capable of replicating extensively in the central nervous system and inducing neurological disease. Occasionally, encephalitis caused by BoHV-1 has been reported. Like other alpha-herpesviruses, BoHV-5 can establish latency in nervous ganglia and, by stress factors or glucocorticoid treatment, latent virus can be reactivated. During episodes of reactivation, the virus is excreted in nasal, ocular and genital secretions and transmitted to other susceptible hosts. Recently, BoHV-5 has been associated with infection of the reproductive tract. The virus has been isolated and the presence of viral DNA has been demonstrated in semen samples from Brazil and Australia and natural transmission of the virus through contaminated semen has also been described. Embryos and oocytes are permissive for BoHV-5 infection and BoHV-5 DNA has been detected in the central nervous system of aborted fetuses. The objective of this review is to compile the limited information on the recent association between BoHV-5 and reproductive disorders in cattle. PMID:26623291

  7. A modeling framework for the analysis of HPV incidence and persistence: a semi-parametric approach for clustered binary longitudinal data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangrong; Gray, Ronald H.; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Wawer, Maria; Wang, Mei-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a common sexually transmitted disease of growing public health importance, and over 40 genotypes have been identified in genital infections. Current HPV cohort studies often follow participants at pre-determined visits, such as every 6-months, and data generated from such epidemiology studies can be described as clustered longitudinal binary data where correlation arises in two ways: the directionless clustering due to the multiple genotypes tested within an individual, and the temporal correlation among the repeated measurements on the same genotype along time. Current analyses for identification of risk factors associated with HPV incidence and persistence often either do not fully utilize information in the dataset or ignore the correlation between the multiple genotypes. Given the scientific definition of incidence and persistence, conditional probability modeling provides us a natural mathematical tool. We thus present a semi-parametric regression model for such data where full specification of the joint multivariate binary distribution is avoided by using conditioning argument to handle the temporal correlation and GEE to account for the correlation between the multiple genotypes. The model is applied to the HPV data from the Rakai male circumcision (MC) trial to evaluate the as-treated efficacy of MC and also identify modifiable risk factors for incidence and persistence of oncogenic HPV types in men. A simulation study is performed to provide empirical information on the number of individuals that is needed for satisfactory power and estimation accuracy of the association parameter estimates in future studies. PMID:20839368

  8. Strategies for Developing Oral Vaccines for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Induced Cancer using Nanoparticle mediated Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Kouzi, Samir A; Hussain, Muhammad Delwar

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) are a diverse group of small non-enveloped DNA viruses. Some HPVs are classified as low-risk as they are very rarely associated with neoplasia or cancer in the general population, and cause lenient warts. Other HPVs are considered as high-risk types because they are responsible for several important human cancers, including cervical cancer, a large proportion of other anogenital cancers, and a growing number of head and neck cancers. Transmission of HPV occurs primarily by skin-to-skin contact. The risk of contracting genital HPV infection and cervical cancer is influenced by sexual activity. Currently two prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck, USA) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline, UK), are available and recommended for mass immunization of adolescents. However, these vaccines have limitations as they are expensive and require cold chain storage and trained personnel to administer them by injection. The use of nano or micro particulate vaccines could address most of these limitations as they are stable at room temperature, inexpensive to produce and distribute to resource poor regions, and can be administered orally without the need for adjuvants in the formulation. Also it is possible to increase the efficiency of these particulate vaccines by decorating the surface of the nano or micro particulates with suitable ligands for targeted delivery. Oral vaccines, which can be delivered using particulate formulations, have the added potential to stimulate mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue located in the digestive tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, both of which are important for the induction of effective mucosal response against many viruses. In addition, oral vaccines provide the opportunity to reduce production and administration costs and are very patient compliant. This review elaborately discusses different strategies that can be pursued to develop a nano or micro particulate oral vaccine for HPV induced cancers and other diseases. PMID:26158287

  9. Immunity in the female genital tract after intravaginal vaccination of mice with an attenuated strain of herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, M R; Smiley, J R; Leslie, P; Brais, J; Rudzroga, H E; Bienenstock, J

    1984-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 is a common human venereal pathogen which causes lethal neurological illness after intravaginal inoculation into BALB/cJ mice. To investigate whether an attenuated, nonlethal strain of this virus would confer immunity after inoculation of mice, we constructed a strain containing a partial deletion of the thymidine kinase gene, which is necessary for viral replication and spread in sensory ganglia. Unlike its wild-type counterpart, this deletion-containing strain of herpes simplex virus type 2 caused mild clinical disease and was not lethal when studied in an age-dependent murine model of intravaginal infection. Furthermore, after intravaginal infection, the deletion-containing strain could not be isolated from sensory ganglia at a time when wild-type virus was abundant. Of greater significance, intravaginal inoculation with the deletion-containing strain rendered mice completely resistant to rechallenge with a 10-fold 50% lethal dose of wild-type virus. These results suggest that a strain of herpes simplex virus type 2 containing a deletion of the thymidine kinase gene will be useful in studying the cellular basis of mucosal immunity in the genital tract. Images PMID:6088797

  10. Genital herpes - self-care

    MedlinePLUS

    Herpes - genital -self-care; Herpes simplex - genital - self-care; Herpesvirus 2 - self-care; HSV-2 - self-care ... worried after finding out that you have genital herpes . But know that you are not alone. Millions ...

  11. Genital Herpes (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Use ©2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient information: Genital herpes (Beyond the Basics) Author Mary A Albrecht, MD ... last updated: Jul 22, 2015. WHAT IS GENITAL HERPES? — Genital herpes is a common sexually transmitted disease ...

  12. Understanding HPV Disease and Prevention: A Guide for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood-Rayermann, Suzy; McIntyre, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) causes 99.7% of all cervical cancers. HPV Types 16 and 18 are responsible for approximately 77% of cases, and peak prevalence occurs in females younger than 25 years of age. The recent implementation of HPV vaccination provides females with the opportunity to prevent infection. School nurses are advocates of

  13. Understanding HPV Disease and Prevention: A Guide for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood-Rayermann, Suzy; McIntyre, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) causes 99.7% of all cervical cancers. HPV Types 16 and 18 are responsible for approximately 77% of cases, and peak prevalence occurs in females younger than 25 years of age. The recent implementation of HPV vaccination provides females with the opportunity to prevent infection. School nurses are advocates of…

  14. Epidemiology of genital herpes - recent advances.

    PubMed

    Halioua, B; Malkin, J E

    1999-01-01

    Genital herpes is a common, distressing infection which, due to increasing incidence world-wide, has become a prominent public health issue over recent years, even throughout the decade of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Since the late 1970's, the prevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection has increased by approximately 30 percent in the US. The number of sufferers world-wide is currently estimated at approximately 86 million people. New serological methods based on the detection of type-specific antibodies to herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins have clarified issues concerning the true incidence of genital herpes, the modifying effect of prior HSV-1 infections, the changing proportions of HSV-1 genital herpes, and the importance of asymptomatic shedding. Patients' ignorance of their diagnosis along with the occurrence of atypical symptomatology and asymptomatic viral shedding of HSV all contribute to the transmission of genital herpes. Genital ulcer disease, of which genital herpes is the most common cause in developed countries, is an important risk factor in the acquisition and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and has contributed to the spread of this disorder. Risk factors for genital herpes HSV-2 are strongly related to lifetime number of sexual partners, number of years of sexual activity, male homosexuality, black race, female gender and a history of previous sexually transmitted diseases (STD). Understanding the epidemiology of genital herpes is of great importance in limiting the spread of this STD. In this review, we summarise current knowledge related to the epidemiology of genital herpes. PMID:10210781

  15. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution, cervical cancer screening practices and current status of vaccination implementation in Central and Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Poljak, Mario; Seme, Katja; Maver, Polona J; Kocjan, Botjan J; Cuschieri, Kate S; Rogovskaya, Svetlana I; Arbyn, Marc; Syrjnen, Stina

    2013-12-31

    We present a review of current cervical cancer screening practices, the implementation status of vaccination against human papillomaviruses (HPV) and available data concerning the burden of HPV infection and HPV type-specific distribution in 16 Central and Eastern European countries: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Montenegro, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia and the Former Yugoslav Republic (FYR) of Macedonia. Since published data were relatively scarce, two detailed surveys were conducted during August-October 2011 and in January 2013 to obtain relevant and updated information. The mean prevalence of HPV infection in 8610 women with normal cervical cytology from the region was 12.6%, with HPV16 being the most frequent HPV type. The overall HPV DNA prevalence in women with high-grade cervical lesions was 78.1%. HPV DNA was found in 86.6% of cervical cancers; the combined prevalence of HPV16/18 among HPV positive cases was 87.5%. The overall HPV DNA prevalence in genital warts and laryngeal papillomas was 94.8% and 95.2%, respectively, with HPV6 and HPV11 being the most frequent types. Opportunistic and organized cervical screening, mainly based on conventional cytology, is performed in nine and seven countries in the region, respectively, with the proposed age of the start of screening ranging from 20 to 30 years and the estimated coverage ranging from a few percent to over 70%. At least one of the current HPV prophylactic vaccines is registered in all Central and Eastern European countries except Montenegro. Only Bulgaria, Czech Republic, FYR Macedonia, Latvia, Romania and Slovenia have actually integrated HPV vaccination into their national immunization programme and currently provide routine vaccination free of charge to the primary target population. The key reasons for lack of implementation of HPV vaccination into the national immunization programme are high vaccine cost and negative public perception. This article forms part of a regional report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases in the Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia Region" Vaccine Volume 31, Supplement 7, 2013. Updates of the progress in the field are presented in a separate monograph entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012. PMID:24332298

  16. HPV and oropharyngeal cancer: etiology and prognostic importance.

    PubMed

    Yom, Sue S

    2015-12-01

    HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease, but the overwhelming majority of individuals clear the infection. A small percentage of individuals develop persistence of oncogenic HPV types, especially HPV-16; and as a result, squamous cell carcinoma can develop in the tonsils and base of the tongue. Over 70% of oropharyngeal cancers are now thought to be associated with oncogenic HPV infection. Immunohistochemistry for p16 protein is often used as a surrogate marker for oncogenic HPV in the oropharyngeal tissues, although alternative HPV DNA testing methods are under intensive study. The clinical profile of patients with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) differs quite notably from that of traditional head and neck cancer patients, and the prognosis for HPV-associated OPC is significantly better. As a result, experimental clinical trials are focused on de-intensification of therapies with the hope of preserving an improved long-term quality of life for these patients. PMID:26650695

  17. The quality of life of patients with genital warts: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genital warts, which are caused by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), are one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in Europe. Although genital warts are commonly perceived as a non-serious condition, treatment is often long, of varying effectiveness and the recurrence rate is high. Very few studies have been performed on the personal consequences of genital warts. The aim of this qualitative study, set in Denmark, was to examine the ways in which genital warts may affect patients' quality of life. Methods To obtain an in-depth understanding of patients' perceptions of genital warts, we used qualitative focus-group interviews with five men and five women aged between 18 and 30 years who had genital warts. The interview guide was based on a literature review that identified important issues and questions. The data were analysed using a medical anthropological approach. Results Patients' experiences were related to cultural conceptions of venereal diseases and the respective identities and sexuality of the sexes. The disease had negative psychological and social effects both for men and for women and it affected their sex and love lives, in particular. The psychological burden of the disease was increased by the uncertain timeline and the varying effectiveness of treatment. We identified a need for more patient information about the disease and its psycho-sexual aspects. Conclusions The men and women participating in this study considered their quality of life to be significantly lowered because of genital warts. The experiences described by the participants give insights that may be valuable in treatment and counselling. The quadrivalent HPV vaccine that has now been added to the childhood vaccination programme for girls in Denmark for the prevention of cervical cancer can also prevent 90% of cases of genital warts. Our results suggest that HPV vaccination could considerably reduce the largely unacknowledged psychological and social burden associated with genital warts, in men as well as women. PMID:20205944

  18. Biological evidence for a causal role of HPV16 in a small fraction of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Halec, G; Holzinger, D; Schmitt, M; Flechtenmacher, C; Dyckhoff, G; Lloveras, B; Hfler, D; Bosch, F X; Pawlita, M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a causal factor in virtually all cervical and a subset of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP-SCC), whereas its role in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (L-SCC) is unclear. Methods: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (N=154) and deep-frozen tissues (N=55) of 102 L-SCC patients were analysed for the presence of 51 mucosal HPV types. HPV DNA-positive (HPV DNA+) cases were analysed for E6*I mRNA transcripts of all high risk (HR)/probably/possibly (p)HR-HPV identified, and for HPV type 16 (HPV16) viral load. Expression of p16INK4a, pRb, cyclin D1 and p53 was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Ninety-two patients were valid in DNA analysis, of which 32 (35%) had at least one HPV DNA+ sample. Among the 29 single infections, 22 (76%) were HPV16, 2 (7%) HPV56 and 1 each (4%) HPV45, HPV53, HPV70, HPV11 and HPV42. Three cases harboured HPV16 with HPV33 (twice) or HPV45. Only 32% of HPV DNA+ findings were reproducible. Among HPV16 DNA+ L-SCC, 2 out of 23 (9%) had high viral loads, 5 out of 25 (21%) expressed E6*I mRNA and 3 out of 21 (14%) showed high p16INK4a and low pRb expression (all three HPV16 RNA-positive), immunohistochemical marker combination not identified in any other HPV DNA+ or HPV DNA-negative (HPV DNA?) L-SCC, respectively. Conclusion: HPV type 16 has a causative role in a small subgroup of L-SCC (<5% in this German hospital series). PMID:23778529

  19. PATTERNS OF PERSISTENT GENITAL HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION AMONG WOMEN WORLDWIDE: A LITERATURE REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Rositch, Anne F.; Koshiol, Jill; Hudgens, Michael; Razzaghi, Hilda; Backes, Danielle M.; Pimenta, Jeanne M.; Franco, Eduardo L.; Poole, Charles; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection is the strongest risk factor for high-grade cervical precancer. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of HPV persistence patterns worldwide. Medline and ISI Web of Science were searched through January 1, 2010 for articles estimating HPV persistence or duration of detection. Descriptive and meta-regression techniques were used to summarize variability and the influence of study definitions and characteristics on duration and persistence of cervical HPV infections in women. Among 86 studies providing data on over 100,000 women, 73% defined persistence as HPV positivity at a minimum of two time points. Persistence varied notably across studies and was largely mediated by study region and HPV type, with HPV-16, 31, 33 and 52 being most persistent. Weighted median duration of any-HPV detection was 9.8 months. HR-HPV (9.3 months) persisted longer than low-risk HPV (8.4 months), and HPV-16 (12.4 months) persisted longer than HPV-18 (9.8 months). Among populations of HPV positive women with normal cytology, the median duration of any-HPV detection was 11.5 and HR-HPV detection was10.9 months. In conclusion, we estimated that approximately half of HPV infections persist past 612 months. Repeat HPV testing at 12 month intervals could identify women at increased risk of high-grade cervical precancer due to persistent HPV infections. PMID:22961444

  20. Advantages and disadvantages of current prophylactic vaccines against HPV.

    PubMed

    Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Lpez-Toledo, Gabriela; Garca-Carranc, Alejandro

    2009-08-01

    Persistent infections with human papillomavirus (HPV) types of the alpha-papillomavirus genus that form the so-called high-risk (HR) group constitute the major risk for developing cancer of the uterine cervix, with nearly 500,000 new cases every year worldwide and approximately 250,000 deaths. Infections with low-risk (LR) types are usually associated with development of genital warts. Asymptomatic infections with both HR and LR types constitute the leading sexually transmitted disease, with approximately 8-12% of all sexually active women infected at a given time. Two commercial vaccines against HPV (Gardasil and Cervarix) are currently in the market in many countries worldwide. Both are produced with recombinant technologies, consist of self-assembled virus-like particles, the so-called VLPs, and have shown high immunogenicity. More important, they have been found to be highly efficient in preventing persistent infections and lesions not only from the uterine cervix, but also from the anus, vagina, and vulva. Unfortunately, vaccines are very expensive and unaffordable for many public health initiatives in developing countries. They include two types involved in cancer development (types 16 and 18); therefore, we can only expect a partial protection against cancer (70/100), making it necessary to implement novel strategies to detect precursor lesions and cancer in the postvaccine era. Strategies that include education and organized screening programs with detection of persistent infections should be implemented in developing countries if a reduction of cancer of the uterine cervix is expected over the next years. PMID:19853187

  1. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... and Share (PDF 1105 KB ) En Español HPV (human papillomavirus) is a sexually transmitted virus. It is ...

  2. HPV and Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Cancer On This Page What are human papillomaviruses? Which cancers are caused by HPV? Who gets ... people learn more about HPV? What are human papillomaviruses? Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a group of more ...

  3. Noninfectious genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kirshen, Carly; Edwards, Libby

    2015-12-01

    Noninfectious genital ulcers are much more common than ulcers arising from infections. Still, it is important to take a thorough history of sexual activity and a sexual abuse screen. A physical exam should include skin, oral mucosa, nails, hair, vulva, and vaginal mucosa if needed. The differential diagnosis of noninfectious genital ulcers includes: lipschütz ulcers, complex aphthosis, Behçet's syndrome, vulvar metastatic Crohn's disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, pyoderma gangrenosum, pressure ulcers, and malignancies. It is important to come to the correct diagnosis to avoid undue testing, stress, and anxiety in patients experiencing genital ulcerations. PMID:26650697

  4. Therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken; Roosinovich, Elena; Ma, Barbara; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2010-01-01

    It is now well established that most cervical cancers are causally associated with HPV infection. This realization has led to efforts to control HPV-associated malignancy through prevention or treatment of HPV infection. Currently, commercially available HPV vaccines are not designed to control established HPV infection and associated premalignant and malignant lesions. To treat and eradicate pre-existing HPV infections and associated lesions which remain prevalent in the U.S. and worldwide, effective therapeutic HPV vaccines are needed. DNA vaccination has emerged as a particularly promising form of therapeutic HPV vaccines due to its safety, stability and ability to induce antigen-specific immunity. This review focuses on improving the potency of therapeutic HPV vaccines through modification of dendritic cells (DCs) by [1] increasing the number of antigen-expressing/antigen-loaded DCs, [2] improving HPV antigen expression, processing and presentation in DCs, and [3] enhancing DC and T cell interaction. Continued improvement in therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines may ultimately lead to an effective DNA vaccine for the treatment of HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:20066511

  5. HPV Vaccine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the HPV vaccine while breastfeeding? Yes. Noninfectious vaccines like the HPV vaccine are compatible with breastfeeding. Be sure to talk to your health care provider about all your choices for breastfeeding. The father of the baby received the HPV vaccine around ...

  6. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Compartir You are being redirected to the HPV Cancer Screening page. Please update your bookmarks to the link below: http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/screening.html Related Links Sexually Transmitted Diseases HPV-Associated Cancers Gynecologic Cancers File Formats Help: How do I ...

  7. Comparison of the immunogenicity of Cervarix and Gardasil human papillomavirus vaccines for oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Toft, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Mller, Martin; Sehr, Peter; Bonde, Jesper; Storgaard, Merete; stergaard, Lars; Sgaard, Ole S

    2014-01-01

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have excess risk of developing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease. A substantial fraction of HPV-associated cancers is caused by HPV serotypes not included in the currently available vaccines. Among healthy women, both Cervarix() (HPV-16/18, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, GSK) and Gardasil() (HPV-6/11/16/18, Merck) have demonstrated partial cross-protection against certain oncogenic non-vaccine HPV-types. Currently, there are no available data on vaccine-induced cross-protection in men and little is known about cross-reactive immunity after HPV-vaccination of HIV-infected individuals. In an investigator-initiated trial, we randomized 91 HIV-positive men and women to receive vaccination with Cervarix() or Gardasil(). The HPV-DNA status of the participants was determined with pcr before and after immunization. Cross-reactive antibody responses against HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 were evaluated for up to 12 months using a pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (PBNA). Geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) were compared among vaccine groups and genders at 7 and 12 months.: Both vaccines induced anti-HPV-31, -33, and -45 neutralizing antibodies in participants who were seronegative and HPV-DNA negative for those types at study entry. Geometric mean antibody titers were comparable between vaccine groups. Interestingly, anti-HPV-31 and -33 antibody titers were higher among women compared with men at 7 and 12 months.: In conclusion, both licensed HPV-vaccines induced cross-neutralizing antibodies against frequent oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults, and women had greater serological responses against HPV-31 and -33 compared with men. PMID:24553190

  8. Commercially available molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV): 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Poljak, Mario; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Oštrbenk, Anja; Seme, Katja

    2016-03-01

    Commercial molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV) are invaluable diagnostic tools in cervical carcinoma screening and management of women with cervical precancerous lesions as well as important research tools for epidemiological studies, vaccine development, and implementation and monitoring of vaccination programs. In this third inventory of commercial HPV tests, we identified 193 distinct commercial HPV tests and at least 127 test variants available on the market in 2015, which represents a 54% and 79% increase in the number of distinct HPV tests and variants, respectively, in comparison to our last inventory performed in 2012. Identified HPV tests were provisionally divided into eight main groups and several subgroups. Among the 193 commercial HPV tests, all but two target alpha-HPV types only. Although the number of commercial HPV tests with at least one published study in peer-reviewed literature has increased significantly in the last three years, several published performance evaluations are still not in line with agreed-upon standards in the HPV community. Manufacturers should invest greater effort into evaluating their products and publishing validation/evaluation results in peer-reviewed journals. To achieve this, more clinically oriented external quality-control panels and initiatives are required. For evaluating the analytical performance of the entire range of HPV tests currently on the market, more diverse and reliable external quality-control programs based on international standards for all important HPV types are indispensable. The performance of a wider range of HPV tests must be promptly evaluated on a variety of alternative clinical specimens. In addition, more complete HPV assays containing validated sample-extraction protocols and appropriate internal controls are urgently needed. Provision of a broader range of automated systems allowing large-scale HPV testing as well as the development of reliable, rapid, and affordable molecular point-of-care tests are priorities for the further improvement of HPV tests. PMID:26601820

  9. Genital herpes simplex.

    PubMed Central

    Tummon, I. S.; Dudley, D. K.; Walters, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the herpes simplex virus. Following the initial infection the virus becomes latent in the sacral ganglia. Approximately 80% of patients are then subject to milder but unpredictable recurrences and may shed the virus even when they are asymptomatic. The disorder causes concern because genital herpes in the mother can result in rare but catastrophic neonatal infection and because of a possible association between genital herpes and cancer of the cervix. No effective treatment is as yet available. Weekly monitoring for virus by cervical culture from 32 weeks' gestation is recommended for women with a history of genital herpes and for those whose sexual partner has such a history. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:7020907

  10. Female genital mutilation.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    More resources and evidence-based guidelines are needed for healthcare practitioners across the world to provide culturally sensitive medical and psychological treatment for women and girls who have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM) or cutting. PMID:26853668

  11. Comparable Genital Tract Infection, Pathology, and Immunity in Rhesus Macaques Inoculated with Wild-Type or Plasmid-Deficient Chlamydia trachomatis Serovar D.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yanyan; Frazer, Lauren C; O'Connell, Catherine M; Tarantal, Alice F; Andrews, Charles W; O'Connor, Shelby L; Russell, Ali N; Sullivan, Jeanne E; Poston, Taylor B; Vallejo, Abbe N; Darville, Toni

    2015-10-01

    Rhesus macaques were studied to directly address the potential for plasmid-deficient Chlamydia trachomatis to serve as a live attenuated vaccine in the genital tract. Five repeated cervical inoculations of rhesus macaques with wild-type serovar D strain D/UW-3/Cx or a plasmid-deficient derivative of this strain, CTD153, resulted in infections with similar kinetics and induced comparable levels of protective immunity. After all animals received five challenges with D/UW-3/Cx, levels of inflammation observed grossly and histologically were similar between the groups. Animals in both groups developed evidence of oviduct dilatation; however, reduced oviduct dilatation was observed for "controllers," i.e., animals without detectable chlamydial DNA in the fimbriae at weeks 5 and 12. Grouping animals into "ascenders" and "controllers" revealed that elevated early T cell responses were associated with protection, whereas higher antibody responses were associated with ascension. Protected animals shared common major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles. Overall, genetic differences of individual animals, rather than the presence or absence of the chlamydial plasmid in the primary infecting strain, appeared to play a role in determining the outcome of infection. PMID:26216426

  12. Cost of Preventing, Managing, and Treating Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-Related Diseases in Sweden before the Introduction of Quadrivalent HPV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Östensson, Ellinor; Fröberg, Maria; Leval, Amy; Hellström, Ann-Cathrin; Bäcklund, Magnus; Zethraeus, Niklas; Andersson, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Costs associated with HPV-related diseases such as cervical dysplasia, cervical cancer, and genital warts have not been evaluated in Sweden. These costs must be estimated in order to determine the potential savings if these diseases were eradicated and to assess the combined cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening. The present study aimed to estimate prevention, management, and treatment costs associated with cervical dysplasia, cervical cancer, and genital warts from a societal perspective in Sweden in 2009, 1 year before the quadrivalent HPV vaccination program was implemented. Methods and Materials Data from the Swedish cervical cancer screening program was used to calculate the costs associated with prevention (cytological cervical cancer screening), management (colposcopy and biopsy following inadequate/abnormal cytological results), and treatment of CIN. Swedish official statistics were used to estimate treatment costs associated with cervical cancer. Published epidemiological data were used to estimate the number of incident, recurrent, and persistent cases of genital warts; a clinical expert panel assessed management and treatment procedures. Estimated visits, procedures, and use of medications were used to calculate the annual cost associated with genital warts. Results From a societal perspective, total estimated costs associated with cervical cancer and genital warts in 2009 were €106.6 million, of which €81.4 million (76%) were direct medical costs. Costs associated with prevention, management, and treatment of CIN were €74 million; screening and management costs for women with normal and inadequate cytology alone accounted for 76% of this sum. The treatment costs associated with incident and prevalent cervical cancer and palliative care were €23 million. Estimated costs for incident, recurrent and persistent cases of genital warts were €9.8 million. Conclusion Prevention, management, and treatment costs associated with cervical dysplasia, cervical cancer, and genital warts are substantial. Defining these costs is important for future cost-effectiveness analyses of the quadrivalent HPV vaccination program in Sweden. PMID:26398189

  13. Nonendemic HPV-Positive Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Association With Poor Prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Schipper, Matthew; Walline, Heather M.; Komarck, Christine; Feng, Felix Y.; Worden, Francis P.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Prince, Mark E.; Bradford, Carol R.; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Carey, Thomas E.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in nonendemic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and assess the prognostic implications of viral status. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from 62 patients with primary NPC diagnosed between 1985 and 2011 were analyzed for EBV and high-risk HPV. EBV status was determined by the use of in situ hybridization for EBV encoded RNA. HPV status was assessed with p16 immunohistochemistry and multiplex polymerase chain reaction MassArray for determination of HPV type. Proportional hazards models were used to compare the risk of death among patients as stratified by viral status. Results: Of 61 evaluable tumors, 26 (43%) were EBV-positive/HPV-negative, 18 (30%) were HPV-positive/EBV-negative, and 17 (28%) were EBV/HPV-negative. EBV and HPV infection was mutually exclusive. HPV positivity was significantly correlated with World Health Organization grade 2 tumors, older age, and smoking (all P<.001). The racial distribution of the study population was 74% white, 15% African American, and 11% Asian/Middle Eastern. Among HPV-positive patients, 94% were white. At a median follow-up time of 7 years, HPV-positive and EBV/HPV-negative tumors exhibited worse outcomes than did EBV-positive tumors, including decreased overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] 2.98, P=.01; and HR 3.89, P=.002), progression-free survival (HR 2.55, P=.02; and HR 4.04, P<.001), and locoregional control (HR 4.01, P=.03; and HR 6.87, P=.001). Conclusion: In our Midwestern population, high-risk HPV infection may play an etiologic role in the development of nonendemic, EBV-negative NPC. Compared with EBV-positive NPC, HPV-positive and EBV/HPV-negative NPC are associated with worse outcomes. A larger confirmatory study is needed to validate these findings.

  14. CD43-, but not CD43+, IL-10-producing CD1dhiCD5+ B cells suppress type 1 immune responses during Chlamydia muridarum genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Moore-Connors, J M; Kim, H S; Marshall, J S; Stadnyk, A W; Halperin, S A; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory B (Breg) cells are known to modulate immune responses through predominantly interleukin-10 (IL-10)-dependent mechanisms and can be hypothetically divided into innate and adaptive subsets based on the nature of their activating signals. However, the specific role of different Breg subsets in modulating immune responses remains ambiguous. Here we have shown that Chlamydia induces IL-10-producing splenic B-cell populations consisting of CD43(+) and CD43(-) subsets of IgM(hi)IgD(lo) innate-like B (ILB) cells in vitro. While CD43(+)IL-10-producing B cells displayed innate type features and were readily induced by Chlamydia via Toll-like-receptor (TLR) signaling, CD43(-)IL-10-producing B cells required additional B-cell activating factor (BAFF)-mediated signals from dendritic cells (DCs) for their differentiation and activation, thereby classifying them as adaptive type Bregs. Importantly, CD43(-), but not CD43(+), IL-10-producing ILB cells displayed bona fide Breg activity by potently suppressing interferon-? (IFN-?) production in vitro in an IL-10-dependent manner. Furthermore, a novel CD43(-)CD1d(hi)CD5(+) IL-10-producing Breg population was predominantly induced by Chlamydia genital infection in vivo. Correspondingly, mixed bone marrow chimeric mice with B-cell-specific IL-10 deficiency exhibited significantly increased type 1 immune responses, decreased bacterial burden, and reduced oviduct pathology upon infection. Our data demonstrate for the first time a distinct role for CD43(-)CD1d(hi)CD5(+)-adaptive Bregs over CD43(+) innate counterparts in controlling mucosal responses against intracellular bacterial infection. PMID:24938746

  15. Parents' knowledge, risk perception and willingness to allow young males to receive human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Muhwezi, Wilson Winstons; Banura, Cecily; Turiho, Andrew Kampikaho; Mirembe, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The Ministry of Health in Uganda in collaboration with the Program for Appropriate Technology for Health (PATH) supported by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in 2008-2009 vaccinated approximately 10,000 girls with the bivalent humanpapilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. We assessed parent's knowledge, risk perception and willingness to allow son(s) to receive HPV vaccines in future through a cross-sectional survey of secondary school boys aged 10-23 years in 4 districts. 377 questionnaires were distributed per district and 870 were used in analysis. Parents that had ever heard about cervical cancer and HPV vaccines; those who would allow daughter(s) to be given the vaccine and those who thought that HPV infection was associated with genital warts were more willing to allow son(s) to receive the HPV vaccine. Unwilling parents considered HPV vaccination of boys unimportant (p = 0.003), believed that only females should receive the vaccine (p = 0.006), thought their son(s) couldn't contract HPV (p = 0.010), didn't know about HPV sexual transmissibility (p = 0.002), knew that males could not acquire HPV (p = 0.000) and never believed that the HPV vaccines could protect against HPV (p = 0.000). Acceptance of HPV vaccination of daughters and likelihood of recommending HPV vaccines to son(s) of friends and relatives predicted parental willingness to allow sons to receive HPV vaccines. Probable HPV vaccination of boys is a viable complement to that of girls. Successfulness of HPV vaccination relies on parental acceptability and sustained sensitization about usefulness of HPV vaccines even for boys is vital. PMID:25203053

  16. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the noncoding region of human papillomavirus type 6

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tzyy-Choou.

    1989-01-01

    The structure and function of the transcriptional regulatory region of human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV-6) has been investigated. To investigate tissue specific gene expression, a sensitive method to detect and localize HPV-6 viral DNA, mRNA and protein in plastic-embedded tissue sections of genital and respiratory tract papillomata by using in situ hybridization and immunoperoxidase assays has been developed. This method, using ultrathin sections and strand-specific {sup 3}H labeled riboprobes, offers the advantages of superior morphological preservation and detection of viral genomes at low copy number with good resolution, and the modified immunocytochemistry provides better sensitivity. The results suggest that genital tract epithelium is more permissive for HPV-6 replication than respiratory tract epithelium. To study the tissue tropism of HPV-6 at the level of regulation of viral gene expression, the polymerase chain reaction was used to isolate the noncoding region (NCR) of HPV-6 in independent isolates. Nucleotide sequence analysis of molecularly cloned DNA identified base substitutions, deletions/insertions and tandem duplications. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the NCR were assayed in recombinant plasmids containing the bacterial gene for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase.

  17. HPV vaccine cross-protection: Highlights on additional clinical benefit.

    PubMed

    De Vincenzo, Rosa; Ricci, Caterina; Conte, Carmine; Scambia, Giovanni

    2013-09-01

    Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are administered in vaccination programs, targeted at young adolescent girls before sexual exposure, and in catch-up programs for young women in some countries. All the data indicate that HPV-virus-like particles (VLPs) effectively prevent papillomavirus infections with a high level of antibodies and safety. Since non-vaccine HPV types are responsible for about 30% of cervical cancers, cross-protection would potentially enhance primary cervical cancer prevention efforts. High levels of specific neutralizing antibodies can be generated after immunization with HPV VLPs. Immunity to HPV is type-specific. However, if we consider the phylogenetic tree including the different HPV types, we realize that a certain degree of cross-protection is possible, due to the high homology of some viral types with vaccine ones. The assessment of cross-protective properties of HPV vaccines is an extremely important matter, which has also increased public health implications and could add further value to their preventive potential. The impact of cross-protection is mostly represented by a reduction of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia CIN2-3 more than what expected. In this article we review the mechanisms and the effectiveness of Bivalent (HPV-16/-18) and Quadrivalent (HPV-6/-11/-16/-18) HPV vaccine cross-protection, focusing on the critical aspects and the potential biases in clinical trials, in order to understand how cross-protection could impact on clinical outcomes and on the new perspectives in post-vaccine era. PMID:23747835

  18. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital shedding in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women receiving effective combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Pr, Hlne; Rascanu, Aida; LeGoff, Jrome; Matta, Mathieu; Bois, Frdric; Lortholary, Olivier; Leroy, Valriane; Launay, Odile; Blec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of genital shedding of HSV-2 DNA was assessed in HIV-1-infected women taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). HIV-1 RNA, HIV-1 DNA and HSV DNA loads were measured during 12-18 months using frozen plasma, PBMC and cervicovaginal lavage samples from 22 HIV-1-infected women, including 17 women naive for antiretroviral therapy initiating cART and 5 women with virological failure switching to a new regimen. Nineteen (86%) women were HSV-2-seropositive. Among HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women, HIV-1 RNA loads showed a rapid fall from baseline after one month of cART, in parallel in paired plasma and cervicovaginal secretions. In contrast, HIV-1 DNA loads did not show significant variations from baseline up to 18 months of treatment in both systemic and genital compartments. HSV DNA was detected at least once in 12 (63%) of 19 women during follow up: HSV-2 shedding in the genital compartment was observed in 11% of cervicovaginal samples at baseline and in 16% after initiating or switching cART. Cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA loads were strongly associated with plasma HIV-1 RNA loads over time, but not with cervicovaginal HSV DNA loads. Reactivation of genital HSV-2 replication frequently occurred despite effective cART in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women. Genital HSV-2 replication under cART does not influence cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA or DNA shedding. PMID:25769886

  19. Sequence Imputation of HPV16 Genomes for Genetic Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Benjamin; Chen, Zigui; Reimers, Laura; van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Schiffman, Mark; DeSalle, Rob; Herrero, Rolando; Yu, Kai; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Tao; Burk, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) causes over half of all cervical cancer and some HPV16 variants are more oncogenic than others. The genetic basis for the extraordinary oncogenic properties of HPV16 compared to other HPVs is unknown. In addition, we neither know which nucleotides vary across and within HPV types and lineages, nor which of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) determine oncogenicity. Methods A reference set of 62 HPV16 complete genome sequences was established and used to examine patterns of evolutionary relatedness amongst variants using a pairwise identity heatmap and HPV16 phylogeny. A BLAST-based algorithm was developed to impute complete genome data from partial sequence information using the reference database. To interrogate the oncogenic risk of determined and imputed HPV16 SNPs, odds-ratios for each SNP were calculated in a case-control viral genome-wide association study (VWAS) using biopsy confirmed high-grade cervix neoplasia and self-limited HPV16 infections from Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Results HPV16 variants display evolutionarily stable lineages that contain conserved diagnostic SNPs. The imputation algorithm indicated that an average of 97.5±1.03% of SNPs could be accurately imputed. The VWAS revealed specific HPV16 viral SNPs associated with variant lineages and elevated odds ratios; however, individual causal SNPs could not be distinguished with certainty due to the nature of HPV evolution. Conclusions Conserved and lineage-specific SNPs can be imputed with a high degree of accuracy from limited viral polymorphic data due to the lack of recombination and the stochastic mechanism of variation accumulation in the HPV genome. However, to determine the role of novel variants or non-lineage-specific SNPs by VWAS will require direct sequence analysis. The investigation of patterns of genetic variation and the identification of diagnostic SNPs for lineages of HPV16 variants provides a valuable resource for future studies of HPV16 pathogenicity. PMID:21731721

  20. Development of AAVLP(HPV16/31L2) Particles as Broadly Protective HPV Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Karen; Weghofer, Margit; Sehr, Peter; Ritter, Mirko; Sedlmeier, Sebastian; Karanam, Balasubramanyam; Seitz, Hanna; Müller, Martin; Kellner, Markus; Hörer, Markus; Michaelis, Uwe; Roden, Richard B. S.; Gissmann, Lutz; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A.

    2012-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) minor capsid protein L2 is a promising candidate for a broadly protective HPV vaccine yet the titers obtained in most experimental systems are rather low. Here we examine the potential of empty AAV2 particles (AAVLPs), assembled from VP3 alone, for display of L2 epitopes to enhance their immunogenicity. Insertion of a neutralizing epitope (amino acids 17–36) from L2 of HPV16 and HPV31 into VP3 at positions 587 and 453, respectively, permitted assembly into empty AAV particles (AAVLP(HPV16/31L2)). Intramuscularly vaccination of mice and rabbits with AAVLP(HPV16/31L2)s in montanide adjuvant, induced high titers of HPV16 L2 antibodies as measured by ELISA. Sera obtained from animals vaccinated with the AAVLP(HPV16/31L2)s neutralized infections with several HPV types in a pseudovirion infection assay. Lyophilized AAVLP(HPV16/31L2) particles retained their immunogenicity upon reconstitution. Interestingly, vaccination of animals that were pre-immunized with AAV2 - simulating the high prevalence of AAV2 antibodies in the population - even increased cross neutralization against HPV31, 45 and 58 types. Finally, passive transfer of rabbit antisera directed against AAVLP(HPV16/31L2)s protected naïve mice from vaginal challenge with HPV16 pseudovirions. In conclusion, AAVLP(HPV16/31L2) particles have the potential as a broadly protective vaccine candidate regardless of prior exposure to AAV. PMID:22761884

  1. Cellular immune responses to HPV-18, -31, and -53 in healthy volunteers immunized with recombinant HPV-16 L1 virus-like particles

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Ligia A.; Harro, Clayton D.; Kemp, Troy J.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Hildesheim, Allan

    2006-09-30

    Human papillomavirus-like particles (HPV VLP) are candidate vaccines that have shown to be efficacious in reducing infection and inducing robust antiviral immunity. Neutralizing antibodies generated by vaccination are largely type-specific, but little is known about the type-specificity of cellular immune responses to VLP vaccination. To determine whether vaccination with HPV-16 L1VLP induces cellular immunity to heterologous HPV types (HPV-18, HPV-31, and HPV-53), we examined proliferative and cytokine responses in vaccine (n = 11) and placebo (n = 5) recipients. Increased proliferative and cytokine responses to heterologous types were observed postvaccination in some individuals. The proportion of women responding to heterologous types postvaccination (36%-55%) was lower than that observed in response to HPV-16 (73%). Response to HPV-16 VLP predicted response to other types. The strongest correlations in response were observed between HPV-16 and HPV-31, consistent with their phylogenetic relatedness. In summary, PBMC from HPV-16 VLP vaccine recipients can respond to L1VLP from heterologous HPV types, suggesting the presence of conserved T cell epitopes.

  2. Recent advances in management of genital herpes.

    PubMed Central

    Ttrault, I.; Boivin, G.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update on new diagnostic tests and antiviral strategies for managing genital herpes. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Treatment guidelines are based on randomized clinical trials and recommendations from the Expert Working Group on Canadian Guidelines for Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Recommendations concerning other aspects of managing genital herpes (e.g., indications for using type-specific serologic tests) are mainly based on expert opinion. MAIN MESSAGE: Genital herpes is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, affecting about 20% of sexually active people; up to 80% of cases are undiagnosed. Because of frequent atypical presentation and the emotional burden associated with genital herpes, clinical diagnosis should be confirmed by viral culture. Type-specific serologic assays are now available, but their use is often restricted to special situations and requires adequate counseling. New antivirals (valacyclovir and famciclovir) with improved pharmacokinetic profiles have now been approved for episodic treatment of recurrences and suppressive therapy. CONCLUSION: Wise use of new diagnostic assays for herpes simplex coupled with more convenient treatment regimens should provide better management of patients with genital herpes. Images Figure 1 PMID:10955181

  3. Prevalence and risk factors for oncogenic HPV infections in high-risk mid-adult women

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Rachel L.; Hughes, James P.; Feng, Qinghua; Xi, Long Fu; Lee, Shu-Kuang; OReilly, Sandra F.; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of high-risk (hr) HPV infections in mid-adult women with new sex partners is undefined. Methods We analyzed baseline data from 518 2565 year old female online daters. Women were mailed questionnaires and kits for self-collecting vaginal specimens for PCR-based hrHPV testing. Risk factors for infection were identified using Poisson regression models to obtain prevalence ratios (PRs). Results The prevalence of hrHPV infection was 35.9%. In multivariate analysis restricted to sexually active women, the likelihood of hrHPV infection was associated with abnormal Pap test history (PR=1.42, 95% CI:1.101.84), lifetime number of sex partners >14 (relative to 14; PR=2.13, 95% CI:1.134.02 for 1524 partners and PR=1.91, 95% CI:1.003.64 for ?25 partners), male partners with ?1 concurrent partnership (PR=1.34, 95% CI:1.051.71) and male partners whom the subject met online (PR=1.39, 95% CI:1.081.79). Age was inversely associated with infection only in women who were sexually inactive (PR=0.67 per 5-year age difference, adjusted for Pap history and lifetime number of partners). Compared to sexually inactive women, the likelihood of infection increased with increasing risk level, (from low-risk to high-risk partners) (p<.0001 by trend test). In multivariate analysis, infection with multiple versus single hrHPV types was inversely associated with ever having been pregnant (PR=0.64, 95% CI:0.460.90) and recent consistent condom use (PR=0.56, 95% CI:0.320.97), and positively associated with genital wart history (PR=1.43, 95% CI:1.031.99). Conclusions Measures of both cumulative and recent sexual history were associated with prevalent hrHPV infection in this high-risk cohort of mid-adult women. PMID:23064533

  4. Expression patterns of immune-associated genes in external genital and perianal warts treated with sinecatechins.

    PubMed

    Doan, Hung Q; Nguyen, Harrison P; Rady, Peter; Tyring, Stephen K

    2015-05-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in human disease includes external genital and perianal warts (EGW), with some HPV genotypes having oncogenic potential (i.e., HPV-16 and -18). While green-tea extracts have antitumor and antiproliferative effects in vitro, the mechanism of action of sinecatechins in the treatment of EGW is not well understood. To investigate the role of immune-regulated genes further, an open-label, single institution, prospective study was conducted enrolling patients with clinically diagnosed EGW. Thirty subjects were enrolled, and 18 completed the trial. All patients applied sinecatechins 15% ointment to target lesions in the study. RNA expression microarrays were obtained from treated EGW lesions and analyzed for differential gene expression of immune-regulated genes. HPV types were analyzed and, based on copy number, were stratified into virological responders (VR) or nonresponders (VNR). Gene expression analysis of RNA samples was performed using TaqMan arrays for human T cell receptor and CD3 complex (TCR), Toll-like receptors (TLR) pathway, interferon (IFN) pathway, and antigen processing pathway. A total of 256 genes were analyzed across the four arrays. Genes that were significantly regulated between VRs and VNRs were CREB3L4, HIST1H3A, HIST1H3H, IFNA1, IFNA4, IFNA5, IFNA6, IFNA8, IFNA14, IFNG, IFNAR1, IL6, IRF9, MAPK4, MAPK5, MAPK14, NET1, and PIK3C2A in the IFN array. In the TCR array, HLA_B was found to be statistically significantly upregulated in both the VR and VNR groups; concomitantly, CD8A was found to be statistically significantly downregulated only in VRs. In the TLR array, only LBP and MAPK8 were found to be differentially regulated. In the antigen processing array, HLA-A, HLA-C, HLA-DMA, HLA-DMB, HLA-F, PSMA5, PSMB8, and PSMB9 were differentially downregulated. Based on these findings, it was determined that sinecatechins treatment modulates and downregulates genes involved in the pro-inflammatory response to HPV infection. PMID:25774455

  5. HPV-QUEST: A highly customized system for automated HPV sequence analysis capable of processing Next Generation sequencing data set.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li; Yao, Jiqiang; Gardner, Brent P; Chang, Kaifen; Yu, Fahong; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2012-01-01

    Next Generation sequencing (NGS) applied to human papilloma viruses (HPV) can provide sensitive methods to investigate the molecular epidemiology of multiple type HPV infection. Currently a genotyping system with a comprehensive collection of updated HPV reference sequences and a capacity to handle NGS data sets is lacking. HPV-QUEST was developed as an automated and rapid HPV genotyping system. The web-based HPV-QUEST subtyping algorithm was developed using HTML, PHP, Perl scripting language, and MYSQL as the database backend. HPV-QUEST includes a database of annotated HPV reference sequences with updated nomenclature covering 5 genuses, 14 species and 150 mucosal and cutaneous types to genotype blasted query sequences. HPV-QUEST processes up to 10 megabases of sequences within 1 to 2 minutes. Results are reported in html, text and excel formats and display e-value, blast score, and local and coverage identities; provide genus, species, type, infection site and risk for the best matched reference HPV sequence; and produce results ready for additional analyses. PMID:22570520

  6. A Population-based Study of HPV Genotype Prevalence in the United States: Baseline Measures Prior to Mass HPV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Cosette M.; Hunt, William C.; Cuzick, Jack; Langsfeld, Erika; Pearse, Amanda; Robertson, Michael; Shearman, Catherine A.; Castle, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, two prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines targeting HPV 16 and 18 have been shown to be highly efficacious for preventing precursor lesions, although the effectiveness of these vaccines in real world clinical settings must still be determined. Toward this end, an ongoing statewide surveillance program was established in New Mexico to assess all aspects of cervical cancer preventive care. Given that the reduction in cervical cancer incidence is expected to take several decades to manifest, a systematic population-based measurement of HPV type-specific prevalence employing an age- and cytology-stratified sample of 47,617 women attending for cervical screening was conducted prior to widespread HPV vaccination. A well-validated PCR method for 37 HPV genotypes was used to test liquid-based cytology specimens. The prevalence for any of the 37 HPV types was 27.3% overall with a maximum of 52% at age 20 years followed by a rapid decline at older ages. The HPV 16 prevalence in women aged ≤ 20 years, 21-29 years, or ≥ 30 years was 9.6%, 6.5%, and 1.8%, respectively. The combined prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 in these age groups was 12.0%, 8.3% and 2.4%, respectively. HPV 16 and/or HPV 18 were detected in 54.5% of high-grade squamous intraepithelial (cytologic) lesions (HSIL) and in 25.0% of those with low-grade SIL (LSIL). These baseline data enable estimates of maximum HPV vaccine impact across time and provide critical reference measurements important to assessing clinical benefits and potential harms of HPV vaccination including increases in non-vaccine HPV types (i.e., type replacement). PMID:22532127

  7. Characterization of Two Novel Gammapapillomaviruses, HPV179 and HPV184, Isolated from Common Warts of a Renal-Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Honjak, Lea; Kocjan, Botjan J.; Pir, Branko; Seme, Katja; Poljak, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Gammapapillomavirus (Gamma-PV) is a diverse and rapidly expanding PV-genus, currently consisting of 76 fully characterized human papillomavirus (HPV) types. In this study, DNA genomes of two novel HPV types, HPV179 and HPV184, obtained from two distinct facial verrucae vulgares specimens of a 64 year-old renal-transplant recipient, were fully cloned, sequenced and characterized. HPV179 and HPV184 genomes comprise 7,228-bp and 7,324-bp, respectively, and contain four early (E1, E2, E6 and E7) and two late genes (L1 and L2); the non-coding region is typically positioned between L1 and E6 genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the L1 nucleotide sequence placed both novel types within the Gamma-PV genus: HPV179 was classified as a novel member of species Gamma-15, additionally containing HPV135 and HPV146, while HPV184 was classified as a single member of a novel species Gamma-25. HPV179 and HPV184 type-specific quantitative real-time PCRs were further developed and used in combination with human beta-globin gene quantitative real-time PCR to determine the prevalence and viral load of the novel types in the patients facial warts and several follow-up skin specimens, and in a representative collection, a total of 569 samples, of HPV-associated benign and malignant neoplasms, hair follicles and anal and oral mucosa specimens obtained from immunocompetent individuals. HPV179 and HPV184 viral loads in patients facial warts were estimated to be 2,463 and 3,200 genome copies per single cell, respectively, suggesting their active role in the development of common warts in organ-transplant recipients. In addition, in this particular patient, both novel types had established a persistent infection of the skin for more than four years. Among immunocompetent individuals, HPV179 was further detected in low-copy numbers in a few skin specimens, indicating its cutaneous tissue tropism, while HPV184 was further detected in low-copy numbers in one mucosal and a few skin specimens, suggesting its dual tissue tropism. PMID:25748516

  8. HPV vaccines and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    Occasionally, pregnant women are inadvertently vaccinated against human papillomavirus. Data are available able on pregnancy outcomes in over a thousand women exposed to the HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine and several hundred exposed to the HPV 16/18 vaccine. No notable risks were identified. No specific safety signals have been identified with the aluminium- and lipid-containing adjuvant AS04 included in the HPV 16/18 vaccine, nor with the aluminium-based adjuvant used in the HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine. PMID:26594728

  9. HPV Vaccination: An Investigation of Physician Reminders and Recommendation Scripts

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 11; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 16; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 18; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 6; Cervical Cancer; Genital Warts; Oropharyngeal Cancer

  10. HPV Vaccination: Evaluation of Reminder Prompts for Doses 2 & 3

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-22

    Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 11; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 16; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 18; Human Papilloma Virus Infection Type 6; Cervical Cancer; Genital Warts; Oropharyngeal Cancer

  11. Genital Warts (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 1 • 2 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC About Birth Control: What Parents Need to Know About Condoms Questions and Answers About Sex Your Child's Immunizations: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Should Girls Who Aren't Sexually Active Be Vaccinated Against ...

  12. Transmission heterogeneity and autoinoculation in a multisite infection model of HPV.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Andrew F; Meza, Rafael; Eisenberg, Marisa C

    2015-12-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is sexually transmitted and can infect oral, genital, and anal sites in the human epithelium. Here, we develop a multisite transmission model that includes autoinoculation to study HPV and other multisite diseases. Under a homogeneous-contacts assumption, we analyze the basic reproduction number R0, as well as type and target reproduction numbers, for a two-site model. In particular, we find that R0 occupies a space between taking the maximum of next generation matrix terms for same site transmission and taking the geometric average of cross-site transmission terms in such a way that heterogeneity in the same-site transmission rates increases R0 while heterogeneity in the cross-site transmission decreases it. Additionally, autoinoculation adds considerable complexity to the form of R0. We extend this analysis to a heterosexual population, which additionally yields dynamics analogous to those of vector-host models. We also examine how these issues of heterogeneity may affect disease control, using type and target reproduction numbers. PMID:26518265

  13. Female Genital Mutilation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... problems (depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, low self-esteem, etc.). Health complications of female genital mutilation Who is at risk? Procedures are mostly carried out on young girls sometime between infancy and adolescence, and occasionally on adult women. More than 3 ...

  14. Healing of Genital Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Carol D.

    2011-01-01

    Child sexual abuse as well as accidental trauma may cause acute injuries in the anogenital area. Most data on residual findings following genital trauma come from longitudinal studies of children who have been sexually assaulted, undergone surgical procedures, or experienced accidental trauma. Like injuries in other part parts of the body, such

  15. Female genital mutilation.

    PubMed

    Ladjali, M; Rattray, T W; Walder, R J

    1993-08-21

    Female genital mutilation, also misleadingly known as female circumcision, is usually performed on girls ranging in from 1 week to puberty. Immediate physical complications include severe pain, shock, infection, bleeding, acute urinary infection, tetanus, and death. Longterm problems include chronic pain, difficulties with micturition and menstruation, pelvic infection leading to infertility, and prolonged and obstructed labor during childbirth. An estimated 80 million girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation. In Britain alone an estimated 10,000 girls are currently at risk. Religious, cultural, medical, and moral grounds rationalize the custom which is practiced primarily in sub-Saharan Africa, the Arab world, Malaysia, Indonesia, and among migrant populations in Western countries. According to WHO it is correlated with poverty, illiteracy, and the low status of women. Women who escape mutilation are not sought in marriage. WHO, the UN Population Fund, the UN Children's Fund, the International Planned Parenthood Federation, and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child have issued declarations on the eradication of female genital mutilation. In Britain, local authorities have intervened to prevent parents from mutilating their daughters. In 1984, the Inter-African Committee Against Harmful Traditional Practices Affecting Women and Children was established to work toward eliminating female genital mutilation and other damaging customs. National committees in 26 African countries coordinate projects run by local people using theater, dance, music, and storytelling for communication. In Australia, Canada, Europe, and the US women have organized to prevent the practice among vulnerable migrants and refugees. PMID:8400925

  16. HPV vaccines: state of the art.

    PubMed

    D'Andrilli, Giuseppina; Bovicelli, Alessandro; Giordano, Antonio

    2010-09-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in women worldwide and is frequent in relatively young women. In the last decades, its incidence has decreased following the implementation of screening programs, mainly in developed countries. Cervical screening programs, while successful if properly carried out, are difficult and expensive to implement, especially in developing countries. Advances in the understanding of the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the etiology of high-grade cervical lesions and cervical cancer have led to the development and evaluation of two prophylactic HPV vaccines. Vaccination against the HPV, which is the major cause of cervical cancer, is a significant step forward. This review article provides a summary of the most recent studies related with the development and efficacy of the two HPV vaccines. PMID:20432468

  17. Vaccine Has Cut HPV Infection Rate in Teen Girls by Two-Thirds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157399.html Vaccine Has Cut HPV Infection Rate in Teen Girls ... the HPV types that are targeted by the vaccine," said lead researcher Dr. Lauri Markowitz, a medical ...

  18. Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose regimen

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody levels against two of the most carcinogenic types of HPV (16 and 18), compared to a standard three dose regimen.

  19. Comparison of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) E6-mediated degradation of p53 in vitro and in vivo reveals significant differences based on p53 structure and cell type but little difference with respect to mutants of HPV-18 E6.

    PubMed

    Gardiol, D; Banks, L

    1998-08-01

    An important characteristic of the E6 proteins derived from oncogenic associated human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is their ability to target the cellular tumour suppressor protein, p53, for ubiquitin mediated degradation. Several studies have attempted to address the important characteristics of both E6 and p53 for this activity in vitro, but the equivalent determinants have not been extensively assessed in vivo. Indeed, recent studies indicate differences between the in vitro and the in vivo degradation assays. We have performed an extensive analysis of the ability of a range of HPV-18 E6 mutants to direct p53 degradation in vivo. In addition, we have also compared the ability of HPV-18 E6 to direct the degradation of different oligomeric forms of p53 both in human and in murine cells. The results of these studies show that mutants of E6 exhibit very similar phenotypes both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, mutants of p53 show markedly different susceptibilities in vitro and in vivo to E6-induced degradation, and this is further affected by the nature of the cell type in which the assays are performed. Finally, using a cell line temperature sensitive for the E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme we have been able to show directly that this enzyme is involved in the process of E6-mediated degradation of p53 in vivo. PMID:9714244

  20. Importance of HPV Genotyping for the Screening, Therapy and Management of Cervical Neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Jentschke, M.; Soergel, P.; Hillemanns, P.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the detection of human papillomaviruses (HPV) has become increasingly important in cervical cancer screening and the treatment of cancer precursors. HPV screening is recommended for the further evaluation of abnormal Pap tests or during follow-up after treating precancerous lesions. Several randomised controlled studies have shown that screening for cervical cancer using HPV detection can be more effective than cytology alone. Genotyping of different high-risk HPV (hrHPV) types obtained from smear tests has not yet gained widespread acceptance in clinical practice. However, significant differences have been noted in the oncogenicity of hrHPV genotypes. HPV 16 is by far the most common and oncogenic genotype. Genotyping of hrHPV could be helpful for the risk stratification of HPV-positive women. PMID:25374431

  1. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins promotes nuclear localization of active caspase 8

    SciTech Connect

    Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Lizano, Marcela

    2014-02-15

    The HPV-16 E6 and E6{sup ⁎} proteins have been shown previously to be capable of regulating caspase 8 activity. We now show that the capacity of E6 to interact with caspase 8 is common to diverse HPV types, being also seen with HPV-11 E6, HPV-18 E6 and HPV-18 E6{sup ⁎}. Unlike most E6-interacting partners, caspase 8 does not appear to be a major proteasomal target of E6, but instead E6 appears able to stimulate caspase 8 activation, without affecting the overall apoptotic activity. This would appear to be mediated in part by the ability of the HPV E6 oncoproteins to recruit active caspase 8 to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Multiple HPV E6 oncoproteins interact with the caspase 8 DED domain. • HPV E6 stimulates activation of caspase 8. • HPV E6 promotes nuclear accumulation of caspase 8.

  2. Human papillomavirus infection with particular reference to genital disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sonnex, C

    1998-01-01

    HPV is the commonest sexually transmitted viral infection in the United Kingdom and as such poses a major public health problem. In addition to the potential physical morbidity associated with genital warts, abnormal cervical cytology, and anogenital dysplasia and neoplasia, the associated psychological morbidity should not be forgotten. Although our knowledge of viral function and disease pathogenesis has advanced appreciably in recent years, we are still some way from developing an in vitro method of viral propagation. Vaccination against HPV infection will hopefully be achieved within the next 10 years, but a prevention and treatment strategy which is appropriate for both developed and developing nations must be our major long term goal. PMID:9930065

  3. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis of genital ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Dangor, Y; Ballard, R C; da L Exposto, F; Fehler, G; Miller, S D; Koornhof, H J

    1990-01-01

    In Africa, establishment of an accurate clinical diagnosis in cases of genital ulcer disease is difficult owing to atypical presentation of ulcerations and mixed infections. This is compounded by the frequent lack of suitable laboratory facilities. In 240 cases of genital ulcer disease among mineworkers in Carletonville, South Africa, this study endeavored to correlate the clinical diagnosis with laboratory findings. Clinical accuracy and positive and negative predictive values were determined for each type of genital ulcer disease encountered. Overall, the accuracy of clinical diagnosis was 68% for single infections, 80% for chancroid, 55% for primary syphilis, 27% for lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV), and 22% for genital herpes. Adequate laboratory facilities are indispensible for the establishment of an accurate etiologic diagnosis of genital ulcer disease and thus the institution of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. PMID:2175951

  4. HPV in HIV-Infected Women: Implications for Primary Prevention

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Nathalie Dauphin; Kobetz, Erin N.; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Rosa-Cunha, Isabella; Potter, JoNell E.; Morishita, Atsushi; Lucci, Joseph A.; Guettouche, Toumy; Hnatyszyn, James H.; Koru-Sengul, Tulay

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women might have a different human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in cervical dysplasia specimens as compared to the general population. This has implications for primary prevention. Objective: We aimed to obtain preliminary data on the HPV genotypes prevalent in histological samples of HIV-infected women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 3/CIS of the cervix in Miami, FL, USA. Methods: Retrospective data were collected on HIV-infected women referred to the University of Miami-Jackson Memorial Hospital colposcopy clinic between years 2000 and 2008. The histology slides of CIN 3/CIS biopsies underwent pathological review and sections were cut from these archived specimens for HPV DNA extraction. HPV genotyping was then performed using the GeneSquare HPV genotyping assay. We report on our first set of 23 samples. Results: Eight high-risk HPV types were detected. Types in decreasing order of frequency were 16, 35, 45, 52, 59, 31, 58, and 56. Most cases had multiple infections. HPV type 16 was the most common (45%) followed by HPV-35 and -45 with equal frequency (40%). No samples contained HPV-18. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that cervical dysplasia specimens of HIV-infected women more likely (55%) contain non-16 and -18 high-risk HPV types. We show that this held true for histologically confirmed severe dysplasia and carcinoma-in situ. Epidemiological studies guide vaccine development, therefore HPV type prevalence in CIS and invasive cervical cancer among HIV-infected women should be more rigorously explored to ensure that this highly vulnerable population receives appropriate primary prevention. PMID:25161956

  5. Relationship between Humoral Immune Responses against HPV16, HPV18, HPV31 and HPV45 in 12-15 Year Old Girls Receiving Cervarix® or Gardasil® Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Godi, Anna; Bissett, Sara L.; Miller, Elizabeth; Beddows, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines confer protection against the oncogenic genotypes HPV16 and HPV18 through the generation of type-specific neutralizing antibodies raised against virus-like particles (VLP) representing these genotypes. The vaccines also confer a degree of cross-protection against HPV31 and HPV45, which are genetically-related to the vaccine types HPV16 and HPV18, respectively, although the mechanism is less certain. There are a number of humoral immune measures that have been examined in relation to the HPV vaccines, including VLP binding, pseudovirus neutralization and the enumeration of memory B cells. While the specificity of responses generated against the vaccine genotypes are fairly well studied, the relationship between these measures in relation to non-vaccine genotypes is less certain. Methods We carried out a comparative study of these immune measures against vaccine and non-vaccine genotypes using samples collected from 12–15 year old girls following immunization with three doses of either Cervarix® or Gardasil® HPV vaccine. Results The relationship between neutralizing and binding antibody titers and HPV-specific memory B cell levels for the vaccine genotypes, HPV16 and HPV18, were very good. The proportion of responders approached 100% for both vaccines while the magnitude of these responses induced by Cervarix® were generally higher than those following Gardasil® immunization. A similar pattern was found for the non-vaccine genotype HPV31, albeit at a lower magnitude compared to its genetically-related vaccine genotype, HPV16. However, both the enumeration of memory B cells and VLP binding responses against HPV45 were poorly related to its neutralizing antibody responses. Purified IgG derived from memory B cells demonstrated specificities similar to those found in the serum, including the capacity to neutralize HPV pseudoviruses. Conclusions These data suggest that pseudovirus neutralization should be used as the preferred humoral immune measure for studying HPV vaccine responses, particularly for non-vaccine genotypes. PMID:26495976

  6. Therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Monie, Archana; Tsen, Shaw-Wei D; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with several human cancers, including cervical cancer, vulvar cancer, vaginal and anal cancer, and a subset of head and neck cancers. The identification of HPV as an etiological factor for HPV-associated malignancies creates the opportunity for the control of these cancers through vaccination. Currently, the preventive HPV vaccine using HPV virus-like particles has been proven to be safe and highly effective. However, this preventive vaccine does not have therapeutic effects, and a significant number of people have established HPV infection and HPV-associated lesions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop therapeutic HPV vaccines to facilitate the control of HPV-associated malignancies and their precursor lesions. Among the various forms of therapeutic HPV vaccines, DNA vaccines have emerged as a potentially promising approach for vaccine development due to their safety profile, ease of preparation and stability. However, since DNA does not have the intrinsic ability to amplify or spread in transfected cells like viral vectors, DNA vaccines can have limited immunogenicity. Therefore, it is important to develop innovative strategies to improve DNA vaccine potency. Since dendritic cells (DCs) are key players in the generation of antigen-specific immune responses, it is important to develop innovative strategies to modify the properties of the DNA-transfected DCs. These strategies include increasing the number of antigen-expressing/antigen-loaded DCs, improving antigen processing and presentation in DCs, and enhancing the interaction between DCs and T cells. Many of the studies on DNA vaccines have been performed on preclinical models. Encouraging results from impressive preclinical studies have led to several clinical trials. PMID:19722895

  7. Prevalence and Correlates of Genital Warts in Kenyan Female Sex Workers

    PubMed Central

    Kavanaugh, Barbara E.; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Jaoko, Walter; Estambale, Benson; Kiarie, James N.; Masese, Linnet N.; Deya, Ruth; Manhart, Lisa E.; Graham, Susan M.; McClelland, R. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Background Our goal in the present study was to investigate the prevalence and correlates of genital warts in a population of female sex workers in Mombasa, Kenya. Because of the high prevalence of HIV-1 in this population, we were particularly interested in the association between HIV-1 infection and genital warts. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of the prevalence and correlates of genital warts among high-risk women in Mombasa, Kenya. Between 2001 and 2007, 1182 women were enrolled, of whom 613 (51.4%) were HIV-1-seropositive. Chi square tests and logistic regression were used to examine the associations between genital warts and potential correlates. Results Genital warts were identified on clinical examination in 27 (2.3%) women. Women who were HIV-1-seropositive were nearly 8 times as likely to have genital warts compared to HIV-1-seronegative women (OR 7.69, 95% CI 2.3025.6). Conclusion Understanding the prevalence and correlates of genital warts will help to determine whether coverage for the wart-inducing subtypes 6 and 11 in an HPV vaccine is an important consideration in resource-limited countries. PMID:23060082

  8. HPV Vaccine Acceptance in a Clinic-Based Sample of Women in the Rural South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Heather M.; Sharpe, Patricia A.; McCree, Donna H.; Wright, Marcie S.; Davis, Jennifer; Hutto, Brent E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a very common sexually transmitted infection linked to cervical disease. Vaccines for some types of HPV were in development at the time of the study. Purpose: The study examined HPV vaccine acceptability among underserved women in a rural region of the southeastern U.S. with high rates of cervical cancer…

  9. HPV genotypes detected in cervical cancers from Alaska Native women, 1980–2007

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Janet J.; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Dunne, Eileen F.; Murphy, Neil J.; Tiesinga, James; Koller, Kathy R.; Swango-Wilson, Amy; Philemonof, Dino; Lounmala, Xay; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Steinau, Martin; Hennessy, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine prevents cervical pre-cancers and cancers caused by HPV types 16 and 18. This study provides information on the HPV types detected in cervical cancers of Alaska Native (AN) women. Methods Cases of invasive cervical cancer diagnosed in AN women aged 18 and above between 1980 and 2007 were identified from the Alaska Native Tumor Registry. A representative formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archived pathology block was retrieved and serially sectioned to allow histologic confirmation of lesion (first and last sections) and PCR testing of intervening sections. Extracted DNA was tested for HPV using Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Diagnostics) with additional INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Assay (Innogenetics) testing on negative or inadequate specimens. All specimens were tested for a minimum 37 HPV types. Results Of 62 cervical cancer specimens evaluated, 57 (91.9%) contained one or more HPV types. Thirty-eight (61.2%) cancers contained HPV types 16 or 18, and 18 (29%) contained an oncogenic type other than type 16 or 18. Conclusions Overall, almost two-thirds (61.2%) of the archived cervical cancers had detectible HPV types 16 or 18, a finding similar to studies of US women. As expected, a proportion of cancers would not be prevented by the current vaccines. HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening are important prevention strategies for AN women. PMID:23984281

  10. Interaction between lactobacilli, bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria, and HIV Type 1 RNA and DNA Genital shedding in U.S. and Kenyan women.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Caroline; Balkus, Jennifer E; Fredricks, David; Liu, Congzhou; McKernan-Mullin, Jennifer; Frenkel, Lisa M; Mwachari, Christina; Luque, Amneris; Cohn, Susan E; Cohen, Craig R; Coombs, Robert; Hitti, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis has been associated with genital HIV-1 shedding; however, the effect of specific vaginal bacterial species has not been assessed. We tested cervicovaginal lavage from HIV-1-seropositive women for common Lactobacillus species: L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and seven BV-associated species: BVAB1, BVAB2, BVAB3, Leptotrichia, Sneathia, Megasphaera, and Atopobium spp. using quantitative PCR. We used linear and Poisson regression to evaluate associations between vaginal bacteria and genital HIV-1 RNA and DNA. Specimens from 54 U.S. (310 visits) and 50 Kenyan women (137 visits) were evaluated. Controlling for plasma viral load, U.S. and Kenyan women had similar rates of HIV-1 RNA (19% of visits vs. 24%; IRR=0.95; 95% CI 0.61, 1.49) and DNA shedding (79% vs. 76%; IRR=0.90; 0.78, 1.05). At visits during antiretroviral therapy (ART), the likelihood of detection of HIV-1 RNA shedding was greater with BVAB3 (IRR=3.16; 95% CI 1.36, 7.32), Leptotrichia, or Sneathia (IRR=2.13; 1.02, 4.72), and less with L. jensenii (IRR=0.39; 0.18, 0.84). At visits without ART, only L. crispatus was associated with a lower likelihood of HIV-1 RNA detection (IRR=0.6; 0.40, 0.91). Vaginal Lactobacillus species were associated with lower risk of genital HIV-1 shedding, while the presence of certain BV-associated species may increase that risk. PMID:23020644

  11. Evaluation of a Radionovela to Promote HPV Vaccine Awareness and Knowledge Among Hispanic Parents

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Gloria D.; Rodriguez, Hector P.; Thompson, Beti

    2014-01-01

    Hispanic women have more than a 1.5-fold increased cervical cancer incidence and mortality compared to non-Hispanic white women in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control recommends the HPV vaccine for females at ages 11 and 12 years, though it is approved for females aged 926 to protect against the primary types of high-risk HPV (HPV-16 and HPV-18) that cause approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases. Few culturally-tailored Spanish HPV vaccine awareness programs have been developed. This study evaluates the efficacy of a Spanish radionovela as an educational tool. Rural Hispanic parents of daughters aged 917 (n = 88; 78 mothers and 10 fathers) were randomized to listen to the HPV vaccine radionovela or to another public service announcement. Participants completed a 30 min pretest posttest questionnaire. Parents who listened to the HPV radionovela (intervention group) scored higher on six knowledge and belief items. They were more likely to confirm that HPV is a common infection (70% vs. 48%, P = .002), to deny that women are able to detect HPV (53% vs. 31%, P = .003), to know vaccine age recommendations (87% vs. 68%, P = .003), and to confirm multiple doses (48% vs. 26%, P = .03) than control group parents. The HPV vaccine radionovela improved HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge and attitudes. Radionovela health education may be an efficacious strategy to increase HPV vaccine awareness among Hispanic parents. PMID:21452030

  12. The HPV Vaccination Crisis

    Cancer.gov

    Following the release of a consensus statement from the NCI-Designated Cancer Centers urging HPV vaccination in the United States, Dr. Noel Brewer discusses the country’s low vaccination rates and how clinicians can help to improve them.

  13. HPV Vaccine Information for Young Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in time. Which girls/women should receive HPV vaccination? HPV vaccination is recommended for 11 and 12 ... help prevent fainting and injuries. Why is HPV vaccination only recommended for women through age 26? HPV ...

  14. Incidence and persistence of carcinogenic genital human papillomavirus infections in young women with or without Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Vriend, Henrike J; Bogaards, Johannes A; van Bergen, Jan E A M; Brink, Antoinette A T P; van den Broek, Ingrid V F; Hoebe, Christian J P A; King, Audrey J; van der Sande, Marianne A B; Wolffs, Petra F G; de Melker, Hester E

    2015-10-01

    We assessed whether infection with chlamydia increases the incidence of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and if HPV persistence is affected by chlamydia co-infection. For 1982 women (16-29 years-old) participating in two consecutive rounds of a chlamydia screening implementation trial, swabs were polymerase chain reaction tested to detect chlamydia and 14 carcinogenic HPV genotypes. HPV type-specific incidence and persistence rates were stratified for chlamydia positivity at follow-up. Associations were assessed by multilevel logistic regression analyses with correction for sexual risk factors. HPV type-specific incidence ranged from 1.4% to 8.9% and persistence from 22.7% to 59.4% after a median follow-up of 11 months (interquartile range: 11-12). Differences in 1-year HPV persistence rates between chlamydia -infected and noninfected women were less distinct than differences in HPV incidence rates (pooled adjusted odds ratios of 1.17 [95% CI: 0.69-1.96] and 1.84 [95% CI: 1.36-2.47], respectively). The effect of chlamydia co-infection on HPV-infection risk did not significantly differ by HPV genotype. In conclusion, infection with chlamydia increases the risk of infection by carcinogenic HPV types and may enhance persistence of some HPV types. Although these findings could reflect residual confounding through unobserved risk factors, our results do give reason to explore more fully the association between chlamydia and HPV type-specific acquisition and persistence. PMID:26194784

  15. Incidence and persistence of carcinogenic genital human papillomavirus infections in young women with or without Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Vriend, Henrike J; Bogaards, Johannes A; van Bergen, Jan E A M; Brink, Antoinette A T P; van den Broek, Ingrid V F; Hoebe, Christian J P A; King, Audrey J; van der Sande, Marianne A B; Wolffs, Petra F G; de Melker, Hester E

    2015-01-01

    We assessed whether infection with chlamydia increases the incidence of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and if HPV persistence is affected by chlamydia co-infection. For 1982 women (1629years-old) participating in two consecutive rounds of a chlamydia screening implementation trial, swabs were polymerase chain reaction tested to detect chlamydia and 14 carcinogenic HPV genotypes. HPV type-specific incidence and persistence rates were stratified for chlamydia positivity at follow-up. Associations were assessed by multilevel logistic regression analyses with correction for sexual risk factors. HPV type-specific incidence ranged from 1.4% to 8.9% and persistence from 22.7% to 59.4% after a median follow-up of 11months (interquartile range: 1112). Differences in 1-year HPV persistence rates between chlamydia -infected and noninfected women were less distinct than differences in HPV incidence rates (pooled adjusted odds ratios of 1.17 [95% CI: 0.691.96] and 1.84 [95% CI: 1.362.47], respectively). The effect of chlamydia co-infection on HPV-infection risk did not significantly differ by HPV genotype. In conclusion, infection with chlamydia increases the risk of infection by carcinogenic HPV types and may enhance persistence of some HPV types. Although these findings could reflect residual confounding through unobserved risk factors, our results do give reason to explore more fully the association between chlamydia and HPV type-specific acquisition and persistence. PMID:26194784

  16. Sterile α Motif Domain Containing 9 Is a Novel Cellular Interacting Partner to Low-Risk Type Human Papillomavirus E6 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Dupuis, Crystal; Tyring, Stephen K.; Underbrink, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Low-risk type human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 and 11 infection causes recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) and genital warts. RRP is the most common benign tumor of the larynx in children with frequent relapses. Repeated surgeries are often needed to improve vocal function and prevent life-threatening respiratory obstruction. Currently, there are no effective treatments available to completely eliminate these diseases, largely due to limited knowledge regarding their viral molecular pathogenesis. HPV E6 proteins contribute to cell immortalization by interacting with a variety of cellular proteins, which have been well studied for the high-risk type HPVs related to cancer progression. However, the functions of low-risk HPV E6 proteins are largely unknown. In this study, we report GST-pulldown coupled mass spectrometry analysis with low-risk HPV E6 proteins that identified sterile alpha motif domain containing 9 (SAMD9) as a novel interacting partner. We then confirmed the interaction between HPV-E6 and SAMD9 using co-immunoprecipitation, proximity ligation assay, and confocal immunofluorescence staining. The SAMD9 gene is down-regulated in a variety of neoplasms and deleteriously mutated in normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis. Interestingly, SAMD9 also has antiviral functions against poxvirus. Our study adds to the limited knowledge of the molecular properties of low-risk HPVs and describes new potential functions for the low-risk HPV E6 protein. PMID:26901061

  17. Sterile α Motif Domain Containing 9 Is a Novel Cellular Interacting Partner to Low-Risk Type Human Papillomavirus E6 Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Dupuis, Crystal; Tyring, Stephen K; Underbrink, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Low-risk type human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 and 11 infection causes recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) and genital warts. RRP is the most common benign tumor of the larynx in children with frequent relapses. Repeated surgeries are often needed to improve vocal function and prevent life-threatening respiratory obstruction. Currently, there are no effective treatments available to completely eliminate these diseases, largely due to limited knowledge regarding their viral molecular pathogenesis. HPV E6 proteins contribute to cell immortalization by interacting with a variety of cellular proteins, which have been well studied for the high-risk type HPVs related to cancer progression. However, the functions of low-risk HPV E6 proteins are largely unknown. In this study, we report GST-pulldown coupled mass spectrometry analysis with low-risk HPV E6 proteins that identified sterile alpha motif domain containing 9 (SAMD9) as a novel interacting partner. We then confirmed the interaction between HPV-E6 and SAMD9 using co-immunoprecipitation, proximity ligation assay, and confocal immunofluorescence staining. The SAMD9 gene is down-regulated in a variety of neoplasms and deleteriously mutated in normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis. Interestingly, SAMD9 also has antiviral functions against poxvirus. Our study adds to the limited knowledge of the molecular properties of low-risk HPVs and describes new potential functions for the low-risk HPV E6 protein. PMID:26901061

  18. Type-specific detection of 30 oncogenic human papillomaviruses by genotyping both E6 and L1 genes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Junping; Gao, Lei; Guo, Junhua; Wang, Ting; Wang, Ling; Yao, Qing; Zhu, Haijun; Jin, Qi

    2013-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the principal cause of invasive cervical cancer and benign genital lesions. There are currently 30 HPV types linked to cervical cancer. HPV infection also leads to other types of cancer. We developed a 61-plex analysis of these 30 HPV types by examining two genes, E6 and L1, using MassARRAY matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) (PCR-MS). Two hundred samples from homosexual males (HM) were screened by PCR-MS and MY09/MY11 primer set-mediated PCR (MY-PCR) followed by sequencing. One hundred thirty-five formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cervical cancer samples were also analyzed by PCR-MS, and results were compared to those of the commercially available GenoArray (GA) assay. One or more HPV types were identified in 64.5% (129/200) of the samples from HM. Comprising all 30 HPV types, PCR-MS detected 51.9% (67/129) of samples with multiple HPV types, whereas MY-PCR detected only one single HPV type in these samples. All PCR-MS results were confirmed by MY-PCR. In the cervical cancer samples, PCR-MS and GA detected 97% (131/135) and 90.4% (122/135) of HPV-positive samples, respectively. PCR-MS and GA results were fully concordant for 122 positive and 4 negative samples. The sequencing results for the 9 samples that tested negative by GA were completely concordant with the positive PCR-MS results. Multiple HPV types were identified in 25.2% (34/135) and 55.6% (75/135) of the cervical cancer samples by GA and PCR-MS, respectively, and results were confirmed by sequencing. The new assay allows the genotyping of >1,000 samples per day. It provides a good alternative to current methods, especially for large-scale investigations of multiple HPV infections and degraded FFPE samples. PMID:23152557

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Viruses Appear Compartmentalized to the Female Genital Tract in Cross-Sectional Analyses but Genital Lineages Do Not Persist Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Marta E.; Heath, Laura M.; McKernan-Mullin, Jennifer L.; Kraft, Kelli M.; Acevedo, Luis; Hitti, Jane E.; Cohn, Susan E.; Tapia, Kenneth A.; Holte, Sarah E.; Dragavon, Joan A.; Coombs, Robert W.; Mullins, James I.; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Background.?Whether unique human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV) genotypes occur in the genital tract is important for vaccine development and management of drug resistant viruses. Multiple cross-sectional studies suggest HIV is compartmentalized within the female genital tract. We hypothesize that bursts of HIV replication and/or proliferation of infected cells captured in cross-sectional analyses drive compartmentalization but over time genital-specific viral lineages do not form; rather viruses mix between genital tract and blood. Methods.?Eight women with ongoing HIV replication were studied during a period of 1.5 to 4.5 years. Multiple viral sequences were derived by single-genome amplification of the HIV C2-V5 region of env from genital secretions and blood plasma. Maximum likelihood phylogenies were evaluated for compartmentalization using 4 statistical tests. Results.?In cross-sectional analyses compartmentalization of genital from blood viruses was detected in three of eight women by all tests; this was associated with tissue specific clades containing multiple monotypic sequences. In longitudinal analysis, the tissues-specific clades did not persist to form viral lineages. Rather, across women, HIV lineages were comprised of both genital tract and blood sequences. Conclusions.?The observation of genital-specific HIV clades only in cross-sectional analysis and an absence of genital-specific lineages in longitudinal analyses suggest a dynamic interchange of HIV variants between the female genital tract and blood. PMID:23315326

  20. Reduced Prevalence of Oral Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 4 Years after Bivalent HPV Vaccination in a Randomized Clinical Trial in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Rolando; Quint, Wim; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula; Struijk, Linda; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Wacholder, Sholom; Kreimer, Aime R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particularly with type 16, causes a growing fraction of oropharyngeal cancers, whose incidence is increasing, mainly in developed countries. In a double-blind controlled trial conducted to investigate vaccine efficacy (VE) of the bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against cervical infections and lesions, we estimated VE against prevalent oral HPV infections 4 years after vaccination. Methods and Findings A total of 7,466 women 1825 years old were randomized (1?1) to receive the HPV16/18 vaccine or hepatitis A vaccine as control. At the final blinded 4-year study visit, 5,840 participants provided oral specimens (919% of eligible women) to evaluate VE against oral infections. Our primary analysis evaluated prevalent oral HPV infection among all vaccinated women with oral and cervical HPV results. Corresponding VE against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection was calculated for comparison. Oral prevalence of identifiable mucosal HPV was relatively low (17%). Approximately four years after vaccination, there were 15 prevalent HPV16/18 infections in the control group and one in the vaccine group, for an estimated VE of 933% (95% CI?=?63% to 100%). Corresponding efficacy against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection for the same cohort at the same visit was 720% (95% CI?=?63% to 79%) (p versus oral VE?=?004). There was no statistically significant protection against other oral HPV infections, though power was limited for these analyses. Conclusions HPV prevalence four years after vaccination with the ASO4-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccine was much lower among women in the vaccine arm compared to the control arm, suggesting that the vaccine affords strong protection against oral HPV16/18 infection, with potentially important implications for prevention of increasingly common HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. ClinicalTrials.gov, Registry number NCT00128661 PMID:23873171

  1. Serological and T-helper cell responses to human papillomavirus type 16 L1 in women with cervical dysplasia or cervical carcinoma and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Luxton, J C; Rose, R C; Coletart, T; Wilson, P; Shepherd, P S

    1997-04-01

    In a cross-sectional study we have investigated serological and T-helper (Th) cell responses to human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) L1 in women with HPV-16 related diseases and related them to cervical histology and HPV DNA status. Using a virus-like particle (VLP) based ELISA to detect antibodies to the HPV-16 L1 capsid protein, 45% (33/73) of women with cervical dysplasia, 40% (2/5) of women with cervical cancer, 36% (4/11) of healthy adult female controls and 6% (2/35) of healthy children were found to be seropositive. Amongst women with cervical dysplasia, the highest levels of seropositivity were found in those who were HPV-16 DNA positive (60%, 15/25) or positive for any of the "high-risk' HPV types, 16/18/33 (58%, 18/31), when compared with those with HPV type "X' (25%, 5/20) or with healthy children (6%, 2/35; P < 0.05 for all comparisons). There was a trend for women with cervical dysplasia to show an increased level of seropositivity with increasing grade of lesion. There was no direct correlation found between seropositivity and Th cell responses in all groups studied. However, a combined analysis of each individual's Th and B cell responses suggests that a Th1 pattern of response is predominant amongst healthy adult controls (80% of responders) but reduced in women with cervical dysplasia (55% of responders). A trend towards a decrease in Th1 type responses was also noted with increasing grade of dysplastic lesion. These findings provide further evidence for the importance of the Th response in the control of genital HPV infections. PMID:9129666

  2. HPV Vaccine - Questions and Answers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Redirect for HPV Vaccine FAQ This page has moved. Please update ... to the address below. http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/questions-answers.html Print page Share Compartir ...

  3. Genital Cancers in Women: Vulvar Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hill-Daniel, Jamie; Roett, Michelle A

    2015-11-01

    Vulvar cancer is uncommon, accounting for 0.3% of all new US cancer diagnoses. The majority of cases are squamous cell carcinoma. Malignant melanoma is the second most common type. Other cases are related to chronic inflammatory skin disorders such as lichen sclerosus. Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) is a precursor to squamous cell vulvar cancer. It may be the usual type associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, or the differentiated type often associated with chronic skin disorders. Risk factors for VIN are HPV infection, cigarette smoking, chronic skin disorders, and immunosuppression. Symptoms of vulvar cancer include pruritus, bleeding, skin color change, skin lesions, and dysuria. VIN and vulvar cancer are diagnosed by skin biopsy. Treatment of VIN includes wide local excision, via surgical removal or with laser or ultrasonic surgical aspiration procedures. Medical therapy with imiquimod also may be used. Prognosis is good with early detection; the 5-year survival rate for stage I cancer is greater than 85%. Advanced disease has a poor prognosis, with a 5-year survival rate in stage IV disease as low as 5%. Although screening for vulvar cancer is not recommended, clinicians should evaluate and biopsy any suspicious vulvar lesions. Current efforts at prevention are aimed at HPV vaccination. PMID:26569049

  4. Pros, cons, and ethics of HPV vaccine in teensWhy such controversy?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection remains one of the most commonly sexually transmitted infections in both females and males. HPV viruses are associated with several manifestations including genital warts, but more importantly for urology practitioners, cervical and penile carcinomas and recurrent genital condylomata in both sexes. The incidence of HPV-related carcinomas has increased in cervical, oropharyngeal, vulvar, penile, and anal cancers. Effective vaccines have been available for almost a decade, but widespread adoption of vaccine administration has been problematic for multiple reasons. Many countries (over 100) have adopted vaccine programs for females and an increasing number of countries are extending the indications to include males between the ages of 9-26. There still seems to be controversy surrounding these universal vaccination programs as well as some ethical and practical concerns regarding the administration of a vaccine for diseases that are associated with sexual contact in both sexes, especially during the early adolescent years. Objective The objective was to provide a review of the available literature so pediatric and adult urologists may be more aware of the issues related to HPV vaccination in order to more effectively counsel patients and parents regarding the risks, benefits, and public health issues regarding HPV vaccination. This topic is especially relevant to pediatric urologists who see patients in the target age group for the HPV vaccine. There has been an explosion of literature regarding HPV vaccination programs and the relative difficulty in adopting the vaccine series with a completion rate of under 50% of patients in the recommended age ranges for vaccination. Methods Articles were obtained from an extensive Medline literature search (1998-present) to evaluate the current HPV vaccination regimens for teenagers with special emphasis on the urologically focused disease burden. Results The adoption of universal HPV vaccination has been difficult, but appears to be increasing over time as public education improves and governmentally- mandated vaccine programs increase. Despite the ethical concerns raised, the benefits of vaccination with regard to cancer prevention outweigh the risks and potential side effects related to the quadrivalent vaccine administration. Clearly, more follow-up over time is required to document these improvements in public health. Urologists need to remain aware of the prevention strategies for HPV infection and should help with counseling parents and patients in the appropriate age groups for HPV vaccination. Urology providers need to help engage and educate the parents and teenage patients to help promote broader adoption of the HPV vaccine regimen. PMID:26816799

  5. HPV prevalence at enrollment and baseline results from the Carolina Womens Care Study, a longitudinal study of HPV persistence in women of college age

    PubMed Central

    Banister, Carolyn E; Messersmith, Amy R; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Wang, Yinding; Spiryda, Lisa B; Glover, Saundra H; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer, a rare outcome of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, disproportionately affects African American women, who are about twice more likely than European American women to die of the disease. Most cervical HPV infections clear in about one year. However, in some women HPV persists, posing a greater risk for cervical dysplasia and cancer. The Carolina Womens Care Study (CWCS) was conducted to explore the biological, genetic, and lifestyle determinants of persistent HPV infection in college-aged European American and African American women. This paper presents the initial results of the CWCS, based upon data obtained at enrollment. Methods Freshman female students attending the University of South Carolina were enrolled in the CWCS and followed until graduation with biannual visits, including two Papanicolaou tests, cervical mucus collection, and a questionnaire assessing lifestyle factors. We recruited 467 women, 293 of whom completed four or more visits for a total of 2274 visits. Results and conclusion CWCS participants were 70% European American, 24% African American, 3% Latina/Hispanic, and 3% Asian. At enrollment, 32% tested positive for any HPV. HPV16 infection was the most common (18% of infections). Together, HPV16, 66, 51, 52, and 18 accounted for 58% of all HPV infections. Sixty-four percent of all HPV-positive samples contained more than one HPV type, with an average of 2.2 HPV types per HPV-positive participant. We found differences between African American and European American women in the prevalence of HPV infection (38.1% African American, 30.7% European American) and abnormal Papanicolaou test results (9.8% African-American, 5.8% European American). While these differences did not reach statistical significance at enrollment, as the longitudinal data of this cohort are analyzed, the sample size will allow us to confirm these results and compare the natural history of HPV infection in college-aged African American and European American women. PMID:23861602

  6. Anogenital hairs are an important reservoir of alpha-papillomaviruses in patients with genital warts.

    PubMed

    Poljak, Mario; Kocjan, Bostjan J; Potocnik, Marko; Seme, Katja

    2009-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) were detected in 69 (43.7%) of 158 and in 7 (4.5%) of 155 anogenital hairs obtained from 53 patients with genital warts (GWs) and from 53 age-matched healthy control subjects, respectively. At least 1 hair sample was positive for 69.8% of patients and for 13.2% of control subjects. For patients, HPV was detected in 64.2%, 39.6%, and 26.9% of hairs plucked from the pubic, scrotal, and perianal regions, respectively. For 91.9% of patients, the same HPV genotype was identified in GWs and hairs from at least 1 sampling site. Having GWs was found to be strongly associated with the presence in anogenital hairs of the HPV genotype causing the GWs (range of odds ratios, 13.0-20.0). PMID:19301978

  7. Prevalence of HPV infection among 28,457 Chinese women in Yunnan Province, southwest China.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Liu, Feng; Cheng, Si; Shi, Lei; Yan, Zhiling; Yang, Jie; Shi, Li; Yao, Yufeng; Ma, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection plays a key role in the development of cervical cancer. The aim of the current study was to investigate the HPV type distribution in Chinese women from Yunnan Province, southwest China. A total of 28,457 individuals ranging in age from 17-84 years were recruited from 13 clinical hospitals located in 10 different regions of Yunnan Province. Cervicovaginal swabs were collected from each participant, and HPV screening was performed using Luminex xMAP technology. Our results showed that the HPV prevalence was 12.9% in Yunnan Province. Overall, 10.6% of the individuals were positive for a single HPV type, and 2.3% were positive for multiple types. Among the individuals who tested positive for a single HPV type and multiple HPV types, the three most prevalent high-risk types were 52, 16, and 58. Age subgroup analysis showed two peaks for the frequencies of single and multiple HPV infections, one for the group of women under 25 years old, and the other for the group over 56 years old. Here, we present data regarding the prevalence and type distribution of HPV infection, which will aid in the estimation of the potential clinical benefit and cost-effectiveness of HPV screening and vaccination in China. PMID:26868772

  8. Prevalence of HPV infection among 28,457 Chinese women in Yunnan Province, southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Liu, Feng; Cheng, Si; Shi, Lei; Yan, Zhiling; Yang, Jie; Shi, Li; Yao, Yufeng; Ma, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection plays a key role in the development of cervical cancer. The aim of the current study was to investigate the HPV type distribution in Chinese women from Yunnan Province, southwest China. A total of 28,457 individuals ranging in age from 17–84 years were recruited from 13 clinical hospitals located in 10 different regions of Yunnan Province. Cervicovaginal swabs were collected from each participant, and HPV screening was performed using Luminex xMAP technology. Our results showed that the HPV prevalence was 12.9% in Yunnan Province. Overall, 10.6% of the individuals were positive for a single HPV type, and 2.3% were positive for multiple types. Among the individuals who tested positive for a single HPV type and multiple HPV types, the three most prevalent high-risk types were 52, 16, and 58. Age subgroup analysis showed two peaks for the frequencies of single and multiple HPV infections, one for the group of women under 25 years old, and the other for the group over 56 years old. Here, we present data regarding the prevalence and type distribution of HPV infection, which will aid in the estimation of the potential clinical benefit and cost-effectiveness of HPV screening and vaccination in China. PMID:26868772

  9. Dermoscopic and Clinical Features of Pigmented Skin Lesions of the Genital Area*

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Emiroglu, Nazan; Wellenhof, Rainer Hofmann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The dermoscopic features of vulvar melanosis lesions are well known. To our knowledge, there are only a few case reports about dermoscopic features of pigmented genital lesions in male patients. OBJECTIVE To evaluate dermoscopic and clinical characteristics of benign lesions of the genital area in both males and females, and to assess the distinguishing dermoscopic criteria of vulvar melanosis and atypical melanocytic nevi of the genital type. METHODS 68 patients with pigmented genital lesions were included in this observational study (28 male and 40 female). A punch biopsy was taken from all pigmented lesions and histopathological examination was performed on all specimens. RESULTS We histopathologically diagnosed: genital melanosis in 40 lesions, atypical melanocytic nevi of the genital type in 15 lesions, melanocytic nevi in 9 lesions, seborrheic keratosis in 4 lesions. The most frequent locations were the glans penis (19 patients, 67.9%) in males and the labia minora (19 patients, 47.5%) in females. The mean age of patients with atypical nevi (28,6 11,36) was significantly lower than the mean age of patients with genital melanosis (47,07 15,33). CONCLUSIONS Parallel pattern is prominent in genital melanosis, ring-like pattern is only observed in genital melanosis. Most pigmented lesions on the genital area are solitary. Blue-white veil and irregular dots are only observed in AMNGT. According to these results, we propose that histopathological examination is performed, especially if blue-white veil and irregular dots are found by dermoscopy. PMID:25830986

  10. HPV Genotype Distribution in Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia among HIV-Infected Women in Pune, India

    PubMed Central

    Mane, Arati; Nirmalkar, Amit; Risbud, Arun R.; Vermund, Sten H.; Mehendale, Sanjay M.; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.

    2012-01-01

    Background The distribution of HPV genotypes, their association with rigorously confirmed cervical precancer endpoints, and factors associated with HPV infection have not been previously documented among HIV-infected women in India. We conducted an observational study to expand this evidence base in this population at high risk of cervical cancer. Methods HIV-infected women (N?=?278) in Pune, India underwent HPV genotyping by Linear Array assay. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) disease ascertainment was maximized by detailed assessment using cytology, colposcopy, and histopathology and a composite endpoint. Results CIN2+ was detected in 11.2% while CIN3 was present in 4.7% participants. HPV genotypes were present in 52.5% (146/278) and carcinogenic HPV genotypes were present in 35.3% (98/278) HIV-infected women. Possibly carcinogenic and non/unknown carcinogenic HPV genotypes were present in 14.7% and 29.5% participants respectively. Multiple (?2) HPV genotypes were present in half (50.7%) of women with HPV, while multiple carcinogenic HPV genotypes were present in just over a quarter (27.8%) of women with carcinogenic HPV. HPV16 was the commonest genotype, present in 12% overall, as well as in 47% and 50% in CIN2+ and CIN3 lesions with a single carcinogenic HPV infection, respectively. The carcinogenic HPV genotypes in declining order of prevalence overall included HPV 16, 56, 18, 39, 35, 51, 31, 59, 33, 58, 68, 45 and 52. Factors independently associated with carcinogenic HPV type detection were reporting ?2 lifetime sexual partners and having lower CD4+ count. HPV16 detection was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts and currently receiving combination antiretroviral therapy. Conclusion HPV16 was the most common HPV genotype, although a wide diversity and high multiplicity of HPV genotypes was observed. Type-specific attribution of carcinogenic HPV genotypes in CIN3 lesions in HIV-infected women, and etiologic significance of concurrently present non/unknown carcinogenic HPV genotypes await larger studies. PMID:22723879

  11. Expression of human papillomavirus type 11 L1 protein in insect cells: in vivo and in vitro assembly of viruslike particles.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, R C; Bonnez, W; Reichman, R C; Garcea, R L

    1993-01-01

    The L1 coat protein of human papillomavirus type 11 (HPV-11) was expressed in Sf-9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus vector Ac11L1. Viruslike particles (VLPs) were identified by electron microscopy in the nucleus and cytoplasm of Sf-9 cells infected with Ac11L1. The L1 protein was purified from Ac11L1-infected insect cells. The purified protein spontaneously assembled in vitro into various aggregates, including particles appearing similar to empty virions. Reaction of VLP-containing insect cell extracts with antisera directed against either denatured or nondenatured capsid epitopes in Western blot (immunoblot) and immuno-dot blot assays suggested that conformational epitopes present in native HPV-11 infectious virions were also present on the baculovirus-produced HPV-11 VLPs. Immuno-dot blot assays using human sera obtained from individuals with biopsy-proven condyloma acuminatum correlated closely with results previously obtained in HPV-11 whole virus particle-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. These morphologic and immunologic similarities to native HPV-11 virions suggest that recombinant VLPs produced in the baculovirus system may be useful in seroepidemiology and pathogenesis studies of genital HPV infection and that they may also be potential candidates for vaccine development. Images PMID:8383219

  12. The role of cytology in the era of HPV-related head and neck carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Krishnamurthy, Savitri

    2015-07-01

    Enlarged neck lymph nodes are very often subject to fine needle aspiration biopsy to detect metastatic disease in patients with suspected or proven squamous cell carcinoma in head and neck region. Cytology specimens of metastatic carcinoma in such patients are routinely evaluated for human papilloma virus (HPV) to identify patients with HPV-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Different types of cytology specimens including smears, cytospins, cell blocks and aspirated material in the rinse can all be used for different types of HPV testing such as immunohistochemistry for p16, HPV-in situ hybridization, and HPV-Polymerase chain reaction. There is currently no consensus regarding the testing of high-risk HPV in cytology specimens. The establishment of standardized HPV testing of cytology specimens is of utmost importance and is eagerly awaited. PMID:25638437

  13. Genotyping of 27 human papillomavirus types by using L1 consensus PCR products by a single-hybridization, reverse line blot detection method.

    PubMed

    Gravitt, P E; Peyton, C L; Apple, R J; Wheeler, C M

    1998-10-01

    Amplification of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA by L1 consensus primer systems (e.g., MY09/11 or GP5(+)/6(+)) can detect as few as 10 to 100 molecules of HPV targets from a genital sample. However, genotype determination by dot blot hybridization is laborious and requires at least 27 separate hybridizations for substantive HPV-type discrimination. A reverse blot method was developed which employs a biotin-labeled PCR product hybridized to an array of immobilized oligonucleotide probes. By the reverse blot strip analysis, genotype discrimination of multiple HPV types can be accomplished in a single hybridization and wash cycle. Twenty-seven HPV probe mixes, two control probe concentrations, and a single reference line were immobilized to 75- by 6-mm nylon strips. Each individual probe line contained a mixture of two bovine serum albumin-conjugated oligonucleotide probes specific to a unique HPV genotype. The genotype spectrum discriminated on this strip includes the high-risk, or cancer-associated, HPV genotypes 16, 18, 26, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 55, 56, 58, 59, 68 (ME180), MM4 (W13B), MM7 (P291), and MM9 (P238A) and the low-risk, or non-cancer-associated, genotypes 6, 11, 40, 42, 53, 54, 57, 66, and MM8 (P155). In addition, two concentrations of beta-globin probes allowed for assessment of individual specimen adequacy following amplification. We have evaluated the performance of the strip method relative to that of a previously reported dot blot format (H. M. Bauer et al., p. 132-152, in C. S. Herrington and J. O. D. McGee (ed.), Diagnostic Molecular Pathology: a Practical Approach, (1992), by testing 328 cervical swab samples collected in Digene specimen transport medium (Digene Diagnostics, Silver Spring, Md.). We show excellent agreement between the two detection formats, with 92% concordance for HPV positivity (kappa = 0.78, P < 0.001). Nearly all of the discrepant HPV-positive samples resulted from weak signals and can be attributed to sampling error from specimens with low concentrations (<1 copy/microliter) of HPV DNA. The primary advantage of the strip-based detection system is the ability to rapidly genotype HPVs present in genital samples with high sensitivity and specificity, minimizing the likelihood of misclassification. PMID:9738060

  14. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Garca, Silvia; Palacios-Marqus, Ana; Martnez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martn-Bayn, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschtz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2?weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschtz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  15. Acute genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Garca, Silvia; Palacios-Marqus, Ana; Martnez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martn-Bayn, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschtz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschtz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  16. Oxidative stress in HPV-driven viral carcinogenesis: redox proteomics analysis of HPV-16 dysplastic and neoplastic tissues.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Federico; Bucaj, Elona; Foppoli, Cesira; Fiorini, Ada; Blarzino, Carla; Filipi, Kozeta; Giorgi, Alessandra; Schinin, Maria Eugenia; Di Domenico, Fabio; Coccia, Raffaella; Butterfield, D Allan; Perluigi, Marzia

    2012-01-01

    Genital infection by high risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV), although recognized as the main etio-pathogenetic factor of cervical cancer, is not per se sufficient to induce tumour development. Oxidative stress (OS) represents an interesting and under-explored candidate as a promoting factor in HPV-initiated carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the role of OS in cervical cancer, HPV-16 positive tissues were collected from patients with invasive squamous cervical carcinoma, from patients with High Grade dysplastic HPV lesions and from patients with no clinical evidence of HPV lesions. After virological characterization, modulation of proteins involved in the redox status regulation was investigated. ERp57 and GST were sharply elevated in dysplastic and neoplastic tissues. TrxR2 peaked in dysplastic samples while iNOS was progressively reduced in dysplastic and neoplastic samples. By redox proteomic approach, five proteins were found to have increased levels of carbonyls in dysplastic samples respect to controls namely: cytokeratin 6, actin, cornulin, retinal dehydrogenase and GAPDH. In carcinoma samples the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A, ERp57, serpin B3, Annexin 2 and GAPDH were found less oxidized than in dysplastic tissues. HPV16 neoplastic progression seems associated with increased oxidant environment. In dysplastic tissues the oxidative modification of DNA and proteins involved in cell morphogenesis and terminal differentiation may provide the conditions for the neoplastic progression. Conversely cancer tissues seem to attain an improved control on oxidative damage as shown by the selective reduction of carbonyl adducts on key detoxifying/pro-survival proteins. PMID:22470562

  17. Genital injuries in neonates following breech presentation.

    PubMed

    Saroha, M; Batra, P; Dewan, P; Faridi, Mma

    2015-12-18

    Breech presentation is seen in 3-4% of babies born. Delivering a breech baby through vaginal route is difficult and carries a much higher complication rate than cesarean sections. Breech born babies carry an overall increased risk of maternal morbidity, neonatal mortality, birth asphyxia and birth injuries. Various types of birth injuries to the babies have been reported following breech delivery, but genital injuries are less commonly reported and thus, less anticipated. We report series of five babies with spectrum of genital injuries following breech delivery. These injuries led to significant short and long term morbidity in these babies. Keeping high index of suspicion, an early cesarean section can be an aide in preventing these complications. Once the baby is born, careful examination and early intervention should be done to prevent long term complications. PMID:26757006

  18. A retrospective analysis of the costs and management of genital warts in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Italy the prevalence of genital warts in women (1564years) is approximately 0.6% with an incidence of 0.4% per year. Treatments for GW are usually long, with moderate success and high costs. The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic-therapeutic pathway, duration and setting of treatment, costs of episodes of condyloma in a population attending a regional STI clinic in Piedmont. Methods This was a retrospective observational study conducted using medical records of outpatients who first visited the STI Clinic of San Lazzaro Dermatological Hospital in 2008. The patients medical histories were analysed for episodes that occurred and were cleared in 18months following the initial visit. Data on screening methods for STIs, type of diagnosis for condyloma, treatment type, treatment setting, and anatomic lesion site were obtained from medical records. The costs were calculated for each episode. Results A total of 450 episodes were analysed (297 men,153 women). The most frequently affected anatomic site was the genital area (74%) in both genders. With regard to treatment setting, 78.44% of patients received outpatient treatment at the STI clinic, 4% were treated at home, and 0.22% were hospitalised; 11.11% were treated in multiple settings. The mean number of treatments per episode was 2.03; although many patients received only 1 treatment (n?=?207, 46%), exspecially cryotherapy or diathermy coagulation (64.73% versus 28.02% of episodes, respectively). The mean episode duration was 80.74days. The mean cost (in 2011 euros) for an episode was 158.46??257.77; the mean costswere 79.13??57.40 for diagnosis and 79.33??233.60 for treatment. The mean cost for treatment in a STI-Clinic setting was 111.39??76.72, that for home treatment was 160.88??95.69, and that for hospital care was 2825.94. Conclusions The treatment of and associated costs for genital warts are significant. Several factors affect the cost, and internal STI clinic protocols, such as the 6month window used to consider a recurrence or new diagnosis, create bias. Nonetheless, our findings how costs similar to those reported in the international literature and should be considered when deciding on which HPV vaccination programs should be provided by the public health system. PMID:24106891

  19. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of adolescents in the South African private health sector: Lessons from the HPV demonstration project in KwaZulu-Natal.

    PubMed

    Tathiah, N; Naidoo, M; Moodley, I

    2015-11-01

    In South Africa (SA), >4,000 women die annually of cervical cancer, a disease caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Infections caused by certain genotypes of HPV increase the risk of cervical cancer. HIV-infected women in particular are more likely to have persistent HPV infection, with higher-risk genotypes. In SA, two vaccines (HPV quadrivalent (types 6, 11, 16, and 18) vaccine, recombinant (Gardasil) and HPV bivalent (types 16 and 18) vaccine, recombinant (Cervarix)) are currently registered for the prevention of HPV-related disease. In the past, there have been significant challenges to achieving high coverage and uptake of vaccination–contributory factors include cost and lack of awareness. An HPV demonstration project among schoolgirls in rural KwaZulu-Natal showed that high vaccine uptake is achievable. In 2014, the National Department of Health launched the national HPV vaccination programme among female learners attending public schools. Awareness of HPV vaccination among healthcare providers, education of parents, teachers and learners, and avoidance of missed opportunities for vaccination are vital to the success of the programme. Primary healthcare practitioners may play an important role in cervical cancer prevention by identifying and offering vaccination to girls who miss the opportunity to be vaccinated at school. HPV vaccination should be considered as one arm of a comprehensive programme of cervical cancer prevention and control. PMID:26937512

  20. Natural History of Progression of HPV Infection to Cervical Lesion or Clearance: Analysis of the Control Arm of the Large, Randomised PATRICIA Study

    PubMed Central

    Jaisamrarn, Unnop; Castellsagu, Xavier; Garland, Suzanne M.; Naud, Paulo; Palmroth, Johanna; Del Rosario-Raymundo, Maria Rowena; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Salmern, Jorge; Chow, Song-Nan; Apter, Dan; Teixeira, Julio C.; Skinner, S. Rachel; Hedrick, James; Szarewski, Anne; Romanowski, Barbara; Aoki, Fred Y.; Schwarz, Tino F.; Poppe, Willy A. J.; Bosch, F. Xavier; de Carvalho, Newton S.; Germar, Maria Julieta; Peters, Klaus; Paavonen, Jorma; Bozonnat, Marie-Cecile; Descamps, Dominique; Struyf, Frank; Dubin, Gary O.; Rosillon, Dominique; Baril, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Background The control arm of PATRICIA (PApillomaTRIal against Cancer In young Adults, NCT00122681) was used to investigate the risk of progression from cervical HPV infection to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or clearance of infection, and associated determinants. Methods and Findings Women aged 15-25 years were enrolled. A 6-month persistent HPV infection (6MPI) was defined as detection of the same HPV type at two consecutive evaluations over 6 months and clearance as ?2 type-specific HPV negative samples taken at two consecutive intervals of approximately 6 months following a positive sample. The primary endpoint was CIN grade 2 or greater (CIN2+) associated with the same HPV type as a 6MPI. Secondary endpoints were CIN1+/CIN3+ associated with the same HPV type as a 6MPI; CIN1+/CIN2+/CIN3+ associated with an infection of any duration; and clearance of infection. The analyses included 4825 women with 16,785 infections (3363 womenwith 6902 6MPIs). Risk of developing a CIN1+/CIN2+/CIN3+ associated with same HPV type as a 6MPI varied with HPV type and was significantly higher for oncogenic versus non-oncogenic types. Hazard ratios for development of CIN2+ were 10.44 (95% CI: 6.96-15.65), 9.65 (5.97-15.60), 5.68 (3.50-9.21), 5.38 (2.87-10.06) and 3.87 (2.38-6.30) for HPV-16, HPV-33, HPV-31, HPV-45 and HPV-18, respectively. HPV-16 or HPV-33 6MPIs had ~25-fold higher risk for progression to CIN3+. Previous or concomitant HPV infection or CIN1+ associated with a different HPV type increased risk. Of the different oncogenic HPV types, HPV-16 and HPV-31 infections were least likely to clear. Conclusions Cervical infections with oncogenic HPV types increased the risk of CIN2+ and CIN3+. Previous or concomitant infection or CIN1+ also increased the risk. HPV-16 and HPV-33 have by far the highest risk of progression to CIN3+, and HPV-16 and HPV-31 have the lowest chance of clearance. PMID:24260180

  1. Preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Monie, Archana; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2007-12-01

    Cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide and HPV infection is responsible for the development of this cancer. Effective vaccination against HPV represents an opportunity for the control of cervical cancer. The newly licensed preventive HPV vaccine in the US, Gardasil, has both a good safety profile and clinical efficacy against the HPV genotypes from which it was derived. However, this vaccine can only protect against up to 70 to 80% of cervical cancer and also lacks therapeutic efficacy against established HPV infection and HPV-associated lesions. Thus, the future of HPV vaccination needs to focus on the development of a new generation of preventive and therapeutic vaccines that are capable of protecting against most cervical cancers. PMID:18058574

  2. AKT1 Loss Correlates with Episomal HPV16 in Vulval Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gibbon, Karen; Byrne, Carolyn R.; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Harwood, Catherine A.; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F. L.

    2012-01-01

    Anogenital malignancy has a significant association with high-risk mucosal alpha-human papillomaviruses (alpha-PV), particularly HPV 16 and 18 whereas extragenital SCC has been linked to the presence of cutaneous beta and gammaHPV types. Vulval skin may be colonised by both mucosal and cutaneous (beta-, mu-, nu- and gamma-) PV types, but there are few systematic studies investigating their presence and their relative contributions to vulval malignancy. Dysregulation of AKT, a serine/threonine kinase, plays a significant role in several cancers. Mucosal HPV types can increase AKT phosphorylation and activity whereas cutaneous HPV types down-regulate AKT1 expression, probably to weaken the cornified envelope to promote viral release. We assessed the presence of mucosal and cutaneous HPV in vulval malignancy and its relationship to AKT1 expression in order to establish the corresponding HPV and AKT1 profile of normal vulval skin, vulval intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) and vulval squamous cell carcinoma (vSCC). We show that HPV16 is the principle HPV type present in VIN, there were few detectable beta types present and AKT1 loss was not associated with the presence of these cutaneous HPV. We show that HPV16 early gene expression reduced AKT1 expression in transgenic mouse epidermis. AKT1 loss in our VIN cohort correlated with presence of high copy number, episomal HPV16. Maintained AKT1 expression correlated with low copy number, an increased frequency of integration and increased HPV16E7 expression, a finding we replicated in another untyped cohort of vSCC. Since expression of E7 reflects tumour progression, these findings suggest that AKT1 loss associated with episomal HPV16 may have positive prognostic implications in vulval malignancy. PMID:22685591

  3. Molecular epidemiology of HPV infection using a clinical array methodology in 2952 women in Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsiodras, S; Hatzakis, A; Spathis, A; Margari, N; Meristoudis, C; Chranioti, A; Kyrgiou, M; Panayiotides, J; Kassanos, D; Petrikkos, G; Nasioutziki, M; Loufopoulos, A; Paraskevaidis, E; Karakitsos, P

    2011-08-01

    The molecular epidemiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in a sample of Greek women (n = 2952, mean age 42.2 ± 13.3 years) was examined. HPV prevalence was 50.7% (95% confidence interval, 48.8-52.6). The most frequent HPV types were HPV 53, 51 and 66 (10.2%, 9.4% and 9.3%, respectively). HPV positivity was associated with age, age of sexual debut, number of sexual partners and duration of sexual relationship, while marriage or multiparity protected against infection (all p <0.001). Follow-up of this cohort will assist in predicting the effect of vaccination with the new HPV vaccines on future screening with HPV-based tests for cervical cancer. PMID:21595788

  4. A 9-valent HPV vaccine against infection and intraepithelial neoplasia in women.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Joura EA; Giuliano AR; Iversen OE; Bouchard C; Mao C; Mehlsen J; Moreira ED Jr; Ngan Y; Petersen LK; Lazcano-Ponce E; Pitisuttithum P; Restrepo JA; Stuart G; Woelber L; Yang YC; Cuzick J; Garland SM; Huh W; Kjaer SK; Bautista OM; Chan IS; Chen J; Gesser R; Moeller E; Ritter M; Vuocolo S; Luxembourg A; Broad Spectrum HPV Vaccine Study

    2015-02-19

    BACKGROUND: The investigational 9-valent viruslike particle vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) includes the HPV types in the quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine (6, 11, 16, and 18) and five additional oncogenic types (31, 33, 45, 52, and 58). Here we present the results of a study of the efficacy and immunogenicity of the 9vHPV vaccine in women 16 to 26 years of age.METHODS: We performed a randomized, international, double-blind, phase 2b-3 study of the 9vHPV vaccine in 14,215 women. Participants received the 9vHPV vaccine or the qHPV vaccine in a series of three intramuscular injections on day 1 and at months 2 and 6. Serum was collected for analysis of antibody responses. Swabs of labial, vulvar, perineal, perianal, endocervical, and ectocervical tissue were obtained and used for HPV DNA testing, and liquid-based cytologic testing (Papanicolaou testing) was performed regularly. Tissue obtained by means of biopsy or as part of definitive therapy (including a loop electrosurgical excision procedure and conization) was tested for HPV.RESULTS: The rate of high-grade cervical, vulvar, or vaginal disease irrespective of HPV type (i.e., disease caused by HPV types included in the 9vHPV vaccine and those not included) in the modified intention-to-treat population (which included participants with and those without prevalent infection or disease) was 14.0 per 1000 person-years in both vaccine groups. The rate of high-grade cervical, vulvar, or vaginal disease related to HPV-31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 in a prespecified per-protocol efficacy population (susceptible population) was 0.1 per 1000 person-years in the 9vHPV group and 1.6 per 1000 person-years in the qHPV group (efficacy of the 9vHPV vaccine, 96.7%; 95% confidence interval, 80.9 to 99.8). Antibody responses to HPV-6, 11, 16, and 18 were noninferior to those generated by the qHPV vaccine. Adverse events related to injection site were more common in the 9vHPV group than in the qHPV group.CONCLUSIONS: The 9vHPV vaccine prevented infection and disease related to HPV-31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 in a susceptible population and generated an antibody response to HPV-6, 11, 16, and 18 that was noninferior to that generated by the qHPV vaccine. The 9vHPV vaccine did not prevent infection and disease related to HPV types beyond the nine types covered by the vaccine. (Funded by Merck; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00543543).

  5. Zip-related genital injury

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, Herman S.; Tasian, Gregory E.; McGeady, James; Blaschko, Sarah D.; McCulloch, Charles E.; McAninch, Jack W.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the epidemiology of genital injuries caused by trouser zips and to educate both consumers and the caregivers of patients who sustain such injuries. Patients and Methods The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, a dataset validated to provide a probability sample of patients who present to emergency departments (EDs) in the USA with injuries, was analysed to characterize zip-related genital injuries occurring between 2002 and 2010. A total of 523 cases were analysed to obtain national estimates. Results Between 2002 and 2010, an estimated 17 616 patients presented to US EDs with trouser zip injuries to the genitals. The penis was almost always the only genital organ involved. Zip injuries represented nearly one-fifth of all penile injuries. Amongst adults, zips were the most frequent cause of penile injuries. Annual zip-related genital injury incidence remained stable over the study period. Conclusions Zip-related genital injuries a3ect both paediatric and adult cohorts. Practitioners should be familiar with various zip-detachment strategies for these populations. PMID:23490164

  6. Natural History of Anal vs Oral HPV Infection in HIV-Infected Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Beachler, Daniel C.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Xiao, Wiehong; Gillison, Maura L.

    2013-01-01

    Background.?Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)infected individuals are at greater risk for human papillomavirus (HPV)associated anal than oropharyngeal cancers. The prevalence of anal vs oral HPV infections is higher in this population, but whether this is explained by higher incidence or persistence is unknown. Methods.?Oral rinse and anal swab samples were collected semiannually from 404 HIV-infected adults in Baltimore, Maryland. Samples were tested for 37 HPV types using PGMY09/11 primers and reverse line-blot hybridization. Risk factors for HPV persistence were explored using adjusted Wei-Lin-Weissfeld models. Results.?The prevalence (84% vs 28%), incidence (145 vs 31 per 1000 person-months), and 12-month persistence (54% vs 29%) were higher for anal vs oral HPV infections, respectively (each P < .001). Heterosexual men had lower incidence of anal HPV than men who have sex with men and women, but a higher incidence of oral HPV infection (test of interaction P < 0.001). In adjusted analyses, risk factors for HPV persistence included prevalent vs incident (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 4.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.54.8) and anal vs oral HPV infections (aHR = 1.5; 95% CI, 1.21.9). Conclusions.?The higher incidence and persistence of anal vs oral HPV infections likely contributes to the higher burden of anal as compared to oral HPV-associated cancers in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:23596319

  7. Therapeutic potential of an AcHERV-HPV L1 DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Yoon, Jong Kwang; Heo, Yoonki; Cho, Hansam; Cho, Yeondong; Gwon, Yongdae; Kim, Kang Chang; Choi, Jiwon; Lee, Jae Sung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2015-06-01

    Cervical cancer is strongly associated with chronic human papillomavirus infections, among which HPV16 is the most common. Two commercial HPV vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix are effective for preventing HPV infection, but cannot be used to treat existing HPV infections. Previously, we developed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV)-enveloped recombinant baculovirus capable of delivering the L1 genes of HPV types 16, 18, and 58 (AcHERV-HP16/18/58L1, AcHERV-HPV). Intramuscular administration of AcHERVHPV vaccines induced a strong cellular immune response as well as a humoral immune response. In this study, to examine the therapeutic effect of AcHERV-HPV in a mouse model, we established an HPV16 L1 expressing tumor cell line. Compared to Cervarix, immunization with AcHERVHPV greatly enhanced HPV16 L1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in C57BL/6 mice. Although vaccination could not remove preexisting tumors, strong CTL activity retarded the growth of inoculated tumor cells. These results indicate that AcHERV-HPV could serve as a potential therapeutic DNA vaccine against concurrent infection with HPV 16, 18, and 58. PMID:26025174

  8. Male genital trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G.H.; Gilbert, D.A.

    1988-07-01

    We have attempted to discuss genital trauma in relatively broad terms. In most cases, patients present with relatively minimal trauma. However, because of the complexity of the structures involved, minimal trauma can lead to significant disability later on. The process of erection requires correct functioning of the arterial, neurologic, and venous systems coupled with intact erectile bodies. The penis is composed of structures that are compliant and distensible to the limits of their compliance. These structures therefore tumesce in equal proportion to each other, allowing for straight erection. Relatively minimal trauma can upset this balance of elasticity, leading to disabling chordee. Likewise, relatively minimal injuries to the vascular erectile structures can lead to significantly disabling spongiofibrosis. The urethra is a conduit of paramount importance. Whereas the development of stricture is generally related to the nature of the trauma, the extent of stricture and of attendant complications is clearly a function of the immediate management. Overzealous debridement can greatly complicate subsequent reconstruction. A delicate balance between aggressive initial management and maximal preservation of viable structures must be achieved. 38 references.

  9. Prevalence of anal human papillomavirus infection and anal HPV-related disorders in women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stier, Elizabeth A; Sebring, Meagan C; Mendez, Audrey E; Ba, Fatimata S; Trimble, Debra D; Chiao, Elizabeth Y

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the findings of publications addressing the epidemiology of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, and anal cancer in women. We conducted a systematic review among publications published from Jan. 1, 1997, to Sept. 30, 2013, to limit to publications from the combined antiretroviral therapy era. Three searches were performed of the National Library of Medicine PubMed database using the following search terms: women and anal HPV, women anal intraepithelial neoplasia, and women and anal cancer. Publications were included in the review if they addressed any of the following outcomes: (1) prevalence, incidence, or clearance of anal HPV infection, (2) prevalence of anal cytological or histological neoplastic abnormalities, or (3) incidence or risk of anal cancer. Thirty-seven publications addressing anal HPV infection and anal cytology remained after applying selection criteria, and 23 anal cancer publications met the selection criteria. Among HIV-positive women, the prevalence of high-risk (HR)-HPV in the anus was 16-85%. Among HIV-negative women, the prevalence of anal HR-HPV infection ranged from 4% to 86%. The prevalence of anal HR-HPV in HIV-negative women with HPV-related pathology of the vulva, vagina, and cervix compared with women with no known HPV-related pathology, varied from 23% to 86% and from 5% to 22%, respectively. Histological anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (anal intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or greater) was found in 3-26% of the women living with HIV, 0-9% among women with lower genital tract pathology, and 0-3% for women who are HIV negative without known lower genital tract pathology. The incidence of anal cancer among HIV-infected women ranged from 3.9 to 30 per 100,000. Among women with a history of cervical cancer or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3, the incidence rates of anal cancer ranged from 0.8 to 63.8 per 100,000 person-years, and in the general population, the incidence rates ranged from 0.55 to 2.4 per 100,000 person-years. This review provides evidence that anal HPV infection and dysplasia are common in women, especially in those who are HIV positive or have a history of HPV-related lower genital tract pathology. The incidence of anal cancer continues to grow in all women, especially those living with HIV, despite the widespread use of combined antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25797230

  10. Cost-effectiveness of vaccination with a quadrivalent HPV vaccine in Germany using a dynamic transmission model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Persistent infections with human papillomavirus (HPV) are a necessary cause of cervical cancer and are responsible for important morbidity in men and women. Since 2007, HPV vaccination has been recommended and funded for all girls aged 12 to 17 in Germany. A previously published cost-effectiveness analysis, using a static model, showed that a quadrivalent HPV vaccination programme for 12-year-old girls in Germany would be cost effective. Here we present the results from a dynamic transmission model that can be used to evaluate the impact and cost-effectiveness of different vaccination schemas. Methods We adapted a HPV dynamic transmission model, which has been used in other countries, to the German context. The model was used to compare a cervical cancer screening only strategy with a strategy of combining vaccination of females aged 12–17 years old and cervical cancer screening, based on the current recommendations in Germany. In addition, the impact of increasing vaccination coverage in this cohort of females aged 12–17 years old was evaluated in sensitivity analysis. Results The results from this analysis show that the current quadrivalent HPV vaccination programme of females ages 12 to 17 in Germany is cost-effective with an ICER of 5,525€/QALY (quality adjusted life year). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) increased to 10,293€/QALY when the vaccine effects on HPV6/11 diseases were excluded. At steady state, the model predicted that vaccinating girls aged 12 to 17 could reduce the number of HPV 6/11/16/18-related cervical cancers by 65% and genital warts among women and men by 70% and 48%, respectively. The impact on HPV-related disease incidence and costs avoided would occur relatively soon after initiating the vaccine programme, with much of the early impact being due to the prevention of HPV6/11-related genital warts. Conclusions These results show that the current quadrivalent HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening programmes in Germany will substantially reduce the incidence of cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and genital warts. The evaluated vaccination strategies were all found to be cost-effective. Future analyses should include more HPV-related diseases. PMID:23009387

  11. Female genital mutilation in Britain.

    PubMed

    Black, J A; Debelle, G D

    1995-06-17

    The practice of female genital mutilation predates the founding of both Christianity and Islam. Though largely confined among Muslims, the operation is also practiced in some Christian communities in Africa such that female genital mutilation takes place in various forms in more than twenty African countries, Oman, Yemen, the United Arab Emirates, and by some Muslims in Malaysia and Indonesia. In recent decades, ethnic groups which practice female genital mutilation have immigrated to Britain. The main groups are from Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, and Yemen. In their own countries, an estimated 80% of women have had the operation. Female genital mutilation has been illegal in Britain since 1985, but it is practiced illegally or children are sent abroad to undergo the operation typically at age 7-9 years. It is a form of child abuse which poses special problems. The authors review the history of female genital mutilation and describe its medical complications. Assuming that the size of the population in Britain of ethnic groups which practice or favor female genital mutilation remains more or less unchanged, adaptation and acculturation will probably cause the practice to die out within a few generations. Meanwhile, there is much to be done. A conspiracy of silence exists in medical circles as well as widespread ignorance. Moreover, none of a number of well-known obstetric and pediatric textbooks mentions female genital mutilation, while the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children has neither information nor instructional material. It is high time that the problem was more widely and openly discussed. PMID:7787654

  12. Biological and clinical relevance of transcriptionally active human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jung, Alain C; Briolat, Jenny; Millon, Rgine; de Reynis, Aurlien; Rickman, David; Thomas, Emilie; Abecassis, Joseph; Clavel, Christine; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2010-04-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are associated with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), particularly HPV16. This study analyzed the presence and genotype of high risk HPVs, viral DNA load and transcription of the E6/E7 mRNAs, in 231 consecutive HNSCC. Twelve out of 30 HPV16 DNA-positive tumors displayed high E6/E7 mRNAs levels and were localized in the oropharyngeal region. While HPV-free and non-transcriptionally active HPV-related patients showed similar 5-years survival rates, E6/E7 expression was associated with a better prognosis. This emphasizes the importance of considering the transcriptional status of HPV-positive tumors for patient stratification. A gene expression profiling analysis of these different types of tumors was carried out. The most significant differentially expressed gene was CDKN2A, a known biomarker for HPV-related cancer. Assessing both the expression level of the E6/E7 mRNAs and of CDKN2A in HNSCC is required to detect active HPV infection. Chromosomic alterations were investigated by Comparative Genomic Hybridation (CGH) analysis of tumors with transcriptionally active HPV and HPV-negative tumors. The loss of the chromosomal region 16q was found to be a major genetic event in HPV-positive lesions. A cluster of genes located in 16q21-24 displayed decreased expression levels, notably APP-BP1 that is involved in the modulation of the transcriptional activity of p53. In conclusion, this study highlights important criteria required to predict clinically active HPV infection, identifies new biological pathways implicated in HPV tumorigenesis and increases the understanding of HPV-HNSCC physiopathology that is required to develop new targets for therapy. PMID:19795456

  13. Prevalence of HPV 16 and HPV 18 Lineages in Galicia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Prez, Sonia; Cid, Ana; Iarrea, Amparo; Pato, Mnica; Lamas, Mara Jos; Couso, Brbara; Gil, Margarita; lvarez, Mara Jess; Rey, Sonia; Lpez-Miragaya, Isabel; Meln, Santiago; de Oa, Mara

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variants of human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 (HPV16/18) could differ in their cancer risk. We studied the prevalence and association with high-grade cervical lesions of different HPV16/18 variant lineages in a case-control study including 217 cases (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or grade 3 or worse: CIN2 or CIN3+) and 116 controls (no CIN2 or CIN3+ in two-year follow-up). HPV lineages were determined by sequencing the long control region (LCR) and the E6 gene. Phylogenetic analysis of HPV16 confirmed that isolates clustered into previously described lineages: A (260, 87.5%), B (4, 1.3%), C (8, 2.7%), and D (25, 8.4%). Lineage D/lineage A strains were, respectively, detected in 4/82 control patients, 19/126 CIN3+ cases (OR?=?3.1, 95%CI: 1.012.9, p?=?0.04), 6/1 glandular high-grade lesions (OR?=?123, 95%CI: 9.75713.6, p<0.0001), and 4/5 invasive lesions (OR?=?16.4, 95%CI: 2.2113.7, p?=?0.002). HPV18 clustered in lineages A (32, 88.9%) and B (4, 11.1%). Lineage B/lineage A strains were respectively detected in 1/23 control patients and 2/5 CIN3+ cases (OR?=?9.2, 95%CI: 0.4565.4, p?=?0.12). In conclusion, lineages A of HPV16/18 were predominant in Spain. Lineage D of HPV16 was associated with increased risk for CIN3+, glandular high-grade lesions, and invasive lesions compared with lineage A. Lineage B of HPV18 may be associated with increased risk for CIN3+ compared with lineage A, but the association was not significant. Large well-designed studies are needed before the application of HPV lineage detection in clinical settings. PMID:25111834

  14. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Diseases HPV-Associated Cancers Gynecologic Cancers Redirect CDC - HPV - Symptoms and Health Consequences Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  15. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  16. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sbastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-01-01

    Cervarix is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells. PMID:24979331

  17. Epidemiological Aspects of Genital Warts in Romania a 2012 Retrospective Survey

    PubMed Central

    SALAVASTRU, Carmen Maria; NICULESCU, Mihaela Cristina; ZOTA, Alexandra; NICOLA, Gheorghe; MORARIU, Horia Silviu; SOLOVAN, Caius; PATRASCU, Virgil; POPOVICI, Georgeta; VLADUTA, Raluca; PANDURU, Mihaela; TIPLICA, George-Sorin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Genital infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) has become one of the most frequently viral sexually transmitted diseases. The infection may remain asymptomatic, may take the form of external genital warts and may give raise to cervical cancers. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of the patients with genital warts addressing to five tertiary referral dermato-venereological units in Romania (where patients from several counties are referred) and to compare the results with the out-patient data reported by all Romanian hospitals. Material and methods: Data regarding patients with external genital warts who addressed to the hospital emergency rooms, in five tertiary referral dermato-venerological units in Romania (Bucharest, Timisoara, Craiova, Constanta, Trgu-Mures) were collected for the year 2012. For comparison there have been used data collected by the National School of Public Health, Management and Professional Development, during the same year. Outcomes: Data reported at national level in 2012 included 952 patients (731 women and 221 men) with 26 males under 20 years of age and 251 female patients in the age group 0-20 years. In the overall population (males and females combined) the total number of genital warts cases registered at the hospital emergency rooms in the five centers, in the year 2012, was 266 patients (119 men and 147 women) with 4 girls under 14 years of age and 6 male patients in the age group 0-14 years. Conclusions: The high prevalence of the infection with HPV, the costs of treatment and the psychological impact prove that prevention of the disease is the most important step for decreasing the incidence of this disease. General measures for patients awareness regarding the disease and its complications need to be completed with the recommendation for vaccination. A closer monitoring of patients would provide information for a strategic national approach leading to a better outcome. PMID:25705269

  18. Assessing the burden of HPV-related cancers in Appalachia

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Paul L.; Fisher, James L.; Hudson, Alana G.; Tucker, Thomas C.; Plascak, Jesse J.; Paskett, Electra D.

    2013-01-01

    Appalachia is a geographic region with existing cancer disparities, yet little is known about its burden of HPV-related cancers outside of cervical cancer. We assessed the burden of HPV-related cancers in three Appalachian states and made comparisons to non-Appalachian regions. We examined 19962008 cancer registry data for Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia and the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) 9 program. For each gender, we calculated age-adjusted incidence rates per 100,000 population for each HPV-related cancer type (cervical, vaginal, vulvar, penile, anal and oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers) and all HPV-related cancers combined. Incidence rates among females for all HPV-related cancers combined were higher in Appalachian Kentucky [24.6 (95% CI: 23.525.7)], West Virginia [22.8 (95% CI: 22.023.6)] and Appalachian Ohio [21.9 (95% CI: 21.022.8)] than SEER 9 [18.8 (95% CI: 18.619.0)]. Similar disparities were found among females when examining cervical and vulvar cancers separately. Among males, Appalachian [21.3 (95% CI: 20.222.4)] and non-Appalachian [21.9 (95% CI: 21.222.7)] Kentucky had higher incidence rates for all HPV-related cancers combined than SEER 9 [18.3 (95% CI: 18.118.6)]. The incidence rate of all HPV-related cancers combined was higher among males from Appalachian Ohio compared with those from non-Appalachian Ohio [17.6 (95% CI: 16.818.5) vs. 16.3 (95% CI: 16.016.6)]. Our study suggests that HPV-related cancer disparities exist in Appalachia beyond the known high cervical cancer incidence rates. These results have important public health implications by beginning to demonstrate the potential impact that widespread HPV vaccination could have in Appalachia. PMID:23143774

  19. The new human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine: pros and cons for pediatric and adolescent health.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tami L

    2008-01-01

    The new human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is a research breakthrough for pediatric/adolescent health to prevent cervical cancer and related morbidity. The annual heath care cost for the treatment of cervical cancer and genital warts is estimated to be more than three billion dollars a year. The new HPV vaccine has incredible potential to improve reproductive health promotion, reduce health care costs, and close health care disparity gaps. However, issues both for and against the new HPV vaccine, including mandating vaccination, high cost of the vaccine, the short duration of protection offered, and the perceived promotion of sexual activity, cause confusion. Pediatric nurses, including those in advanced practice, benefit by understanding the pros and cons of these issues in advocating for their patients. PMID:19051848

  20. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection and phylogenetic analysis of HPV-16 E6 variants among infected women from Northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The main cause of cervical cancer in the world is high risks human papillomavirus infection (mainly represented by HPV-16 and HPV-18), that are associated to the development of malign transformation of the epithelium. HPV prevalence exhibits a wide geographical variability and HPV-16 variants have been related to an increased risk of developing cervical intraepithelial lesion. The aim of this study was to describe DNA-HPV prevalence and HPV-16 variants among a women population from Northern Brazil. Methods One hundred and forty three women, during routine cervical cancer screening, at Juruti Project, fulfilled an epidemiological inquiry and were screened through a molecular HPV test. HPV-16 variants were determined by sequencing the HPV-16 E6 open reading frame. Results Forty two samples were considered HPV positive (29.4%). None of those had abnormal cytology results. HPV prevalence varied between different age groups (Z(U)?=?14.62; p?=?<0.0001) and high-risk HPVs were more frequent among younger ages. The most prevalent type was HPV-16 (14%) and it variants were classified, predominantly, as European (87.5%). Conclusions HPV prevalence in our population was higher than described by others and the most prevalent HPV types were high-risk HPVs. The European HPV-16 variant was the most prevalent among HPV-16 positive samples. Our study reinforces the fact that women with normal cytology and a positive molecular test for high-risk HPVs should be submitted to continuous follow up, in order to verify persistence of infection, promoting an early diagnosis of cervical cancer and/or its precursors. PMID:25143783

  1. HPV E6/E7 mRNA versus HPV DNA biomarker in cervical cancer screening of a group of Macedonian women.

    PubMed

    Duvlis, Sotirija; Popovska-Jankovic, Katerina; Arsova, Zorica Sarafinovska; Memeti, Shaban; Popeska, Zaneta; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2015-09-01

    High risk types of human papillomaviruses E6/E7 oncogenes and their association with tumor suppressor genes products are the key factors of cervical carcinogenesis. This study proposed them as specific markers for cervical dysplasia screening. The aim of the study is to compare the clinical and prognostic significance of HPV E6/E7 mRNA as an early biomarker versus HPV DNA detection and cytology in triage of woman for cervical cancer. The study group consists of 413 women: 258 NILM, 26 ASC-US, 81 LSIL, 41 HSIL, and 7 unsatisfactory cytology. HPV4AACE screening, real-time multiplex PCR and MY09/11 consensus PCR primers methods were used for the HPV DNA detection. The real-time multiplex nucleic acid sequence-based assay (NucliSENS EasyQ HPV assay) was used for HPV E6/E7 mRNA detection of the five most common high risk HPV types in cervical cancer (16, 18, 31, 33, and 45). The results show that HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing had a higher specificity 50% (95% CI 32-67) and positive predictive value (PPV) 62% (95% CI 46-76) for CIN2+ compared to HPV DNA testing that had specificity of 18% (95% CI 7-37) and PPV 52% (95% CI 39-76) respectively. The higher specificity and PPV of HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing are valuable in predicting insignificant HPV DNA infection among cases with borderline cytological finding. It can help in avoiding aggressive procedures (biopsies and over-referral of transient HPV infections) as well as lowering patient's anxiety and follow up period. PMID:25880030

  2. A novel multiplex real-time PCR assay for the detection and quantification of HPV16/18 and HSV1/2 in cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Youyun; Cao, Xuan; Tang, Jingfeng; Zhou, Li; Gao, Yinglin; Wang, Jiangping; Zheng, Yi; Yin, Shanshan; Wang, Yefu

    2012-04-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly HPV16 and HPV18, is the main cause of invasive cervical cancer, although other factors such as herpes simplex virus (HSV) may act in conjunction with HPV in this context. To explore the possibility of developing a system for rapid diagnosis and clinical screening of cervical cancer, we developed a multiplex real-time PCR assay that can simultaneously detect and quantify HPV16/18 and HSV1/2. To evaluate its possibilities and practical uses, 177 samples collected from patients with suspected HPV and HSV infection in exfoliated cervical cells, genital herpes or labial herpes were tested by multiplex real-time PCR and compared with results obtained by DNA sequencing. Each virus was detected over a range from 1.0נ10(1) to 1.0נ10(7) copies/reaction. The clinical sensitivity was 100% for HPV16/18 and HSV1/2. The clinical specificity was 97.1% for HPV16, 98.1% for HPV18, 97.0% for HSV1 and 96.0% for HSV2. The kappa value was 0.96 for HPV16, 0.92 for HPV18, 0.94 for HSV1 and 0.93 for HSV2, when DNA sequencing was used as the reference standard. In summary, this novel multiplex real-time PCR allows the rapid and specific detection of HPV16/18 and HSV1/2, as well as coinfection with HPV and HSV, in clinical samples. In the future, this multiplex real-time PCR assay will assist in cervical cancer screening, viral treatment evaluation and epidemiological studies in which high throughput analysis is required. PMID:22293505

  3. Molekulare Diagnostik der HPV Infektion

    PubMed Central

    Wentzensen, PD Dr. med. Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Carcinogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) cause the majority of cervical cancers and other anogentical cancers. Large randomized trials have shown that HPV testing can be efficiently used for primary cervical cancer screening. Other applications include the triage of abnormal cytology results and the follow-up of women after treatment. Many assays have been developed to measure DNA, RNA, and proteins of HPV. The various tests can have very different applications. It is important to validate HPV assays before they are implemented in screening or clinical care. PMID:21845360

  4. Focal epithelial hyperplasia by human papillomavirus (HPV)-32 misdiagnosed as HPV-16 and treated with combination of retinoids, imiquimod and quadrivalent HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gemigniani, Franco; Hernndez-Losa, Javier; Ferrer, Berta; Garca-Patos, Vicente

    2015-12-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck's disease is a rare, benign and asymptomatic mucosal proliferation associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, mainly with genotypes 13 and 32. We report a florid case of FEH in an 11-year-old Haitian girl with systemic lupus erythematosus receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Cryotherapy was previously performed on numerous occasions with no results. We decided to prescribe a non-invasive and more comfortable treatment. A combination of topical retinoid and imiquimod cream was well tolerated and led to an important improvement. The evidence of infection by HPV-16 detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, prompted us to prescribe the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (types 6, 11,16 and 18). Subsequent PCR sequencing with generic primers GP5-GP6 and further BLAST comparative analysis confirmed that genomic viral sequence in our case truly corresponded with HPV-32. This molecular misdiagnosis can be explained by the similarity between genomic sequences of both HPV-16 and -32 genotypes. At the 1-year follow up, we observed total clinical improvement and no recurrences of the disease. Complete healing in this case may correspond to a potential action of topical retinoid, imiquimod and the cross-protection mechanism of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine. PMID:26047065

  5. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Prevalence in Nasal and Antrochoanal Polyps and Association with Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Knr, Mareike; Tziridis, Konstantin; Agaimy, Abbas; Zenk, Johannes; Wendler, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The pathogenesis of sinonasal polyposis remains unclear, in spite of several investigative approaches. Antrochoanal polyps, a subgroup of sinonasal polyposis along with allergic- and chronic-inflammatory nasal polyps, mostly originate from the maxillary sinus and develop as a unilateral, pedunculated mass towards the nasopharynx. The human papillomavirus (HPV) is discussed as a possible causative and influencing factor in development and progression of sinonasal polyposis. This study aims to elucidate HPV frequency in nasal polyps and antrochoanal polyps. Materials and Methods Genomic DNA from 257 tissue specimens (166 nasal polyps, 39 antrochoanal polyps and 52 nasal turbinates) was subjected to three different established HPV- polymerase chain reaction assays, testing for 37 low- and high-risk HPV. In addition, immunohistochemical analyses for HPV16 were carried out, as well as immunohistochemistry and western blots of p16, a biomarker for HPV induced cancer. Results HPV-DNA was detected in 53.8% of antrochoanal polyps, 15.1% of nasal polyps, and 5.8% of nasal turbinates. HPV16 was the predominant type with a detection rate of 76% in nasal polyps and 62% in antrochoanal polyps. Immunohistochemically, HPV positive tissues stained positive for HPV16 antigens and p16 in epithelial cell layers. No significant p16 overexpression was traceable in antrochoanal polyps, nasal polyps and nasal turbinates by western blot. There was no correlation of HPV-status with sex, age, smoking, alcohol consumption or allergic background. Conclusion The present study shows a significant frequency of high-risk type HPV16 in antrochoanal polyps. Absence of oncogenic transformation or correlation of the HPV-status with clinical data suggests a latent superinfection, possibly because of anatomical proximity to the oropharynx. PMID:26509801

  6. Comparison of Human Papillomavirus Detection by Aptima HPV and cobas HPV Tests in a Population of Women Referred for Colposcopy following Detection of Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance by Pap Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Philip E.; Eaton, Barbara; Reid, Jennifer; Dockter, Janel

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have compared the cobas HPV test to the Aptima HPV assay (AHPV) and the Aptima HPV 16 18/45 genotype assay (AHPV GT) for high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) detection, clinical performance in detecting cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 (CIN2) or more severe (CIN2+) diagnoses, and risk stratification by partial HPV genotyping. The cobas HPV test is a DNA test that separately and concurrently detects HPV16, HPV18, and a pool of 12 other hrHPV types. AHPV is an RNA test for a pool of 14 hrHPV genotypes, and AHPV GT is an RNA test run on AHPV-positive results to detect HPV16 separately from HPV18 and HPV45, which are detected together. In a population of patients (n = 988) referred for colposcopy because of a cervical Pap cytology result of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US), a cervical scrape specimen was taken, placed into a ThinPrep Pap test vial containing PreservCyt liquid cytology medium, and tested in a blinded fashion with cobas and AHPV and with AHPV GT for AHPV-positive results. The final diagnoses were based on a consensus panel review of the biopsy specimen histology. AHPV and cobas were equally sensitive for CIN2+ diagnoses (89.4% each; P = 1.000), and AHPV was more specific than cobas (63.1% versus 59.3%; P ? 0.001). The percent total agreement, percent positive agreement, and kappa value were 90.9%, 81.1%, and 0.815, respectively. Risk stratification using partial HPV genotyping was similar for the two assays. AHPV and AHPV GT had similar sensitivity and risk stratification to cobas HPV, but they were more specific than cobas HPV. PMID:25653409

  7. High Prevalence and Genotype Diversity of Anal HPV Infection among MSM in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Supindham, Taweewat; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Utaipat, Utaiwan; Miura, Toshiyuki; Ruanpeng, Darin; Chotirosniramit, Nuntisa; Kosashunhanan, Natthapol; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Saokhieo, Pongpun; Songsupa, Radchanok; Siriaunkgul, Sumalee; Wongthanee, Antika

    2015-01-01

    Background HPV infection is common and may cause cancer among men who have sex with men (MSM). Anal HPV infection (HPV+) was found in 85% of HIV-positive (HIV+) and 59% of HIV-negative (HIV-) MSM in Bangkok, central Thailand. As little is known about HPV in this group in northern Thailand, we studied MSM subgroups comprised of gay men (GM), bisexual men (BM), and transgender women (TGW). Methods From July 2012 through January 2013, 85 (42.5% of 200) GM, 30 (15%) BM, and 85 (42.5%) TGW who practiced receptive anal intercourse were recruited after informed consent, followed by self-assisted computer interview, HIV testing, and anal swabs for HPV genotyping. Results Of 197 adequate specimens, the overall prevalence of any HPV was 157 (80%). Prevalence was 89% (76/85) in GM, 48% (14/29) in BM, and 81% (67/83) in TGW. The most common high-risk types were HPV16 (27% of 197), HPV58 (23%), and HPV51 (18%). Prevalence of high-risk types was 74% in 85 GM, 35% in 29 BM, and 71% in 83 TGW. Prevalence of any HPV type, or high-risk type, was 100% and 94%, respectively, among 48 HIV+ MSM, 70% and 54% among 120 HIV- MSM. Of the 197 specimens, 36% (70) had HPV types 16 and/or 18 in the bivalent vaccine, compared to 48% (95) with ≥1 of types 16/18/06/11 in the quadrivalent, 56% (111) for 16/18/31/33/45/52/58 in the 7-valent, and 64% (126) for 16/18/31/33/45/52/58/06/11 in the 9-valent. HIV+, GM, and TGW were independently associated with HPV infection. Conclusions We found higher rates of both any HPV and high-risk types than previous studies. Among the heretofore unstudied TGW, their equivalent HPV rates were comparable to GM. Current and investigational HPV vaccines could substantially protect GM, BM, and TGW from the serious consequences of HPV infection especially among HIV + MSM. PMID:25932915

  8. Detection of systemic and mucosal HPV-specific IgG and IgA antibodies in adolescent girls one and two years after HPV vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Scherpenisse, Mirte; Mollers, Madelief; Schepp, Rutger M.; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; de Melker, Hester E.; Berbers, Guy A.M.; van der Klis, Fiona R.M.

    2013-01-01

    The bivalent HPV16/18 vaccine induces high antibody concentrations in serum while data about antibody responses in the cervix are limited. In this study, we investigated pre- and post-vaccination antibody responses against seven high-risk HPV types by detection of IgG and IgA HPV-specific antibodies in cervical secretion samples (CVS) and serum. From an HPV vaccine monitoring study CVS and serum samples were available (pre-vaccination (n = 297), one year (n = 211) and two years (n = 141) post-dose-one vaccination) from girls aged 14–16 y. The girls were vaccinated with the bivalent HPV vaccine at months 0, 1 and 6. CVS was self-sampled using a tampon. Samples were tested for HPV-specific antibodies (HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58) by a VLP-based multiplex immunoassay. Post-vaccination, IgG and IgA antibody levels for HPV16/18 were detectable in CVS and amounted to 2% and 1% of the IgG and IgA antibody levels observed in serum, respectively. The antibody levels remained constant between one and two years after vaccination. The correlation between CVS and serum was similar for IgG and IgA vaccine-derived antibody levels for HPV16 (rs = 0.58, rs = 0.54) and HPV18 (rs = 0.50, rs = 0.55). Vaccine-derived IgG antibody levels against cross-reactive HPV types in CVS and in serum were highest for HPV45. No IgA cross-reactive antibody responses could be detected in CVS. Post-vaccination, HPV16/18 IgG and IgA antibodies are not only detectable in serum but also in CVS. The correlation of HPV16/18 IgG antibody levels between serum and CVS suggests that vaccine induced HPV antibodies transudate and/or exudate from the systemic circulation to the cervical mucosa to provide protection against HPV infections. PMID:23149693

  9. Detection of systemic and mucosal HPV-specific IgG and IgA antibodies in adolescent girls one and two years after HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Scherpenisse, Mirte; Mollers, Madelief; Schepp, Rutger M; Meijer, Chris J L M; de Melker, Hester E; Berbers, Guy A M; van der Klis, Fiona R M

    2013-02-01

    The bivalent HPV16/18 vaccine induces high antibody concentrations in serum while data about antibody responses in the cervix are limited. In this study, we investigated pre- and post-vaccination antibody responses against seven high-risk HPV types by detection of IgG and IgA HPV-specific antibodies in cervical secretion samples (CVS) and serum. From an HPV vaccine monitoring study CVS and serum samples were available (pre-vaccination (n = 297), one year (n = 211) and two years (n = 141) post-dose-one vaccination) from girls aged 14-16 y. The girls were vaccinated with the bivalent HPV vaccine at months 0, 1 and 6. CVS was self-sampled using a tampon. Samples were tested for HPV-specific antibodies (HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58) by a VLP-based multiplex immunoassay. Post-vaccination, IgG and IgA antibody levels for HPV16/18 were detectable in CVS and amounted to 2% and 1% of the IgG and IgA antibody levels observed in serum, respectively. The antibody levels remained constant between one and two years after vaccination. The correlation between CVS and serum was similar for IgG and IgA vaccine-derived antibody levels for HPV16 (rs = 0.58, rs = 0.54) and HPV18 (rs = 0.50, rs = 0.55). Vaccine-derived IgG antibody levels against cross-reactive HPV types in CVS and in serum were highest for HPV45. No IgA cross-reactive antibody responses could be detected in CVS. Post-vaccination, HPV16/18 IgG and IgA antibodies are not only detectable in serum but also in CVS. The correlation of HPV16/18 IgG antibody levels between serum and CVS suggests that vaccine induced HPV antibodies transudate and/or exudate from the systemic circulation to the cervical mucosa to provide protection against HPV infections. PMID:23149693

  10. Human Papillomavirus Infection and Vaccination: Awareness and Knowledge of HPV and Acceptability of HPV Vaccine among Mothers of Teenage Daughters in Weihai, Shandong, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xu, Minglei; Sun, Jiandong; Li, Ruiying; Li, Meilan; Wang, Jianguang; Zhang, Dongfeng; Xu, Aiqiang

    2016-01-01

    In preparation for the introduction of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, we investigated awareness and knowledge of HPV/HPV vaccine and potential acceptability to HPV vaccine among mothers with a teenage daughter in Weihai, Shandong, China. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2013 with a sample of 1850 mothers who had a daughter (aged 9-17 years) attending primary, junior and senior high schools. In the final sample (N = 1578, response rate 85.30%), awareness of HPV was reported by 305 (19.32%) mothers. Awareness varied significantly by daughter's age (P<0.01), mother's education level (P<0.01), mother's occupation (P<0.01), household income (P<0.01) and residence type (P<0.01). Knowledge about HPV/HPV vaccine was poor with a mean total score of 3.56 (SD = 2.40) out of a possible score of 13. Mothers with a higher education level reported higher levels of knowledge (P = 0.02). Slightly more than one-fourth (26.49%) of mothers expressed their potential acceptability of HPV vaccine for their daughters. Acceptability increased along with increased daughters' age (P<0.01), household income (P<0.01) and knowledge level (P<0.01). House wives and unemployed mothers had the highest acceptability (P<0.01). The most common reasons for not accepting HPV vaccination were "My daughter is too young to have risk of cervical cancer (30.95%)", "The vaccine has not been widely used, and the decision will be made after it is widely used (24.91%)", "Worry about the safety of the vaccine (22.85%)". Awareness and knowledge of HPV/HPV vaccines are poor and HPV vaccine acceptability is low among these Chinese mothers. These results may help inform appropriate health education programs in this population. PMID:26766565

  11. Human Papillomavirus Infection and Vaccination: Awareness and Knowledge of HPV and Acceptability of HPV Vaccine among Mothers of Teenage Daughters in Weihai, Shandong, China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiandong; Li, Ruiying; Li, Meilan; Wang, Jianguang; Zhang, Dongfeng; Xu, Aiqiang

    2016-01-01

    In preparation for the introduction of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, we investigated awareness and knowledge of HPV/HPV vaccine and potential acceptability to HPV vaccine among mothers with a teenage daughter in Weihai, Shandong, China. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2013 with a sample of 1850 mothers who had a daughter (aged 9–17 years) attending primary, junior and senior high schools. In the final sample (N = 1578, response rate 85.30%), awareness of HPV was reported by 305 (19.32%) mothers. Awareness varied significantly by daughter’s age (P<0.01), mother’s education level (P<0.01), mother’s occupation (P<0.01), household income (P<0.01) and residence type (P<0.01). Knowledge about HPV/HPV vaccine was poor with a mean total score of 3.56 (SD = 2.40) out of a possible score of 13. Mothers with a higher education level reported higher levels of knowledge (P = 0.02). Slightly more than one-fourth (26.49%) of mothers expressed their potential acceptability of HPV vaccine for their daughters. Acceptability increased along with increased daughters’ age (P<0.01), household income (P<0.01) and knowledge level (P<0.01). House wives and unemployed mothers had the highest acceptability (P<0.01). The most common reasons for not accepting HPV vaccination were “My daughter is too young to have risk of cervical cancer (30.95%)”, “The vaccine has not been widely used, and the decision will be made after it is widely used (24.91%)”, “Worry about the safety of the vaccine (22.85%)”. Awareness and knowledge of HPV/HPV vaccines are poor and HPV vaccine acceptability is low among these Chinese mothers. These results may help inform appropriate health education programs in this population. PMID:26766565

  12. Gene expression profiling in male genital lichen sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Emma; Barton, Geraint; Buisson, Sandrine; Francis, Nick; Gotch, Frances; Game, Laurence; Haddad, Munther; Dinneen, Michael; Bunker, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Male genital lichen sclerosus (MGLSc) has a bimodal distribution in boys and men. It is associated with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The pathogenesis of MGLSc is unknown. HPV and autoimmune mechanisms have been mooted. Anti extracellular matrix protein (ECM)1 antibodies have been identified in women with GLSc. The gene expression pattern of LSc is unknown. Using DNA microarrays we studied differences in gene expression in healthy and diseased prepuces obtained at circumcision in adult males with MGLSc (n = 4), paediatric LSc (n = 2) and normal healthy paediatric foreskin (n = 4). In adult samples 51 genes with significantly increased expression and 87 genes with significantly reduced expression were identified; paediatric samples revealed 190 genes with significantly increased expression and 148 genes with significantly reduced expression. Concordance of expression profiles between adult and paediatric samples indicates the same disease process. Functional analysis revealed increased expression in the adult and child MGSLc samples in the immune response/cellular defence gene ontology (GO) category and reduced expression in other categories including genes related to squamous cancer. No specific HPV, autoimmune or squamous carcinogenesis-associated gene expression patterns were found. ECM1 and CABLES1 expression were significantly reduced in paediatric and adult samples respectively. PMID:21718371

  13. Levels of immunoglobulin G antibodies against defined epitopes of the L1 and L2 capsid proteins of human papillomavirus type 6 are elevated in men with a history of condylomata acuminata.

    PubMed Central

    Wikström, A; Eklund, C; Von Krogh, G; Lidbrink, P; Dillner, J

    1992-01-01

    Sera from 159 men attending the sexually transmitted disease clinic at Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, were analyzed for the presence of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antibodies to a panel of synthetic peptides derived from the E2, L1, and L2 regions of the human papillomavirus types 1 (HPV 1), 6, 8, 11, 16, 18, 31, and 33. The study subjects were divided into three groups: (i) asymptomatic men with no history of genital warts who served as controls, (ii) men with visible condylomata, and (iii) men who had previously been afflicted with condylomata. There were no significant differences in antibody titers for any of the HPV 6- or 11-derived peptides among patients with current condylomata and the controls. For the peptide from L1 of HPV 6, there was an increase in the IgG titers among men with previous condylomata compared with the titers for the controls (52% versus 27% seropositivity; P less than 0.05). Also, for the peptide from L2 of HPV 6, there was an increase in the IgG titers among men who had been afflicted with condylomata previously (P less than 0.05). Increased IgA antibody titers against an HPV 16-derived peptide and an HPV 18-derived peptide were also detected. For the peptides from L1 and L2 of HPV 6, the study was extended to an additional group of 127 males attending the sexually transmitted disease clinic at Huddinge Hospital in southern Stockholm. Again, significantly increased antibody levels were detected only for IgG and only among asymptomatic men with a history of condylomata (P < 0.01 for the L1 peptide and P < 0.05 for the L2 peptide). The results suggest that the IgG response against the late proteins of HPV 6 reflects mainly previous exposure to the virus rather than ongoing viral disease. PMID:1378454

  14. HPV genotypes and associated cervical cytological abnormalities in women from the Pearl River Delta region of Guangdong province, China: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is important to understand the specific HPV genotype distribution in screen-detected lesions. HPV Genotype is helpful for separating HPV-positive women at greater risk of cancer from those who can regress spontaneously and for preventing cervical cancer at early stage. The aim of this study was to investigate the high-risk HPV genotype distribution among cervical cytology abnormality in Pearl River Delta Region, Southern China Methods 5585 HPV-infected women were screened from 77069 women in Pearl River Delta Region. Information was obtained from 3226 screened subjects through questionnaires and personal interviews. Exfoliated cervical cells were collected by doctors for HPV test with MassARRAY (Sequenom, Sandiego, CA) technique based on the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The ThinPrep cytology test was performed to screen for cervical cancer. Unconditional logistic was used to determine the most common HPV carcinogenic types. Results Of the 3226 HPV-positive samples tested, 1744 (54.1%) with normal cervical cytology, 1482 (45.9%) with abnormal cytology. The five most common HPV types in this study were HPV16 (20.2%), HPV52 (17.1%), HPV58 (13.2%), HPV18 (9.5%), HPV6 (7.6%). Overall, HPV16 (OR = 10.5, 95% CI: 3.7 ~ 29.6), HPV33 (OR = 9.1, 95% CI: 2.8 ~ 29.2), HPV58 (OR = 6.3, 95% CI: 2.1 ~ 18.6), HPV31 (OR = 4.5, 95% CI: 1.3 ~ 15.5), multiple genotype infection (OR = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.7 ~ 14.7), especially HPV16 and HPV33, increased the risk of cytology abnormalities. Conclusions HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV58, and multiple HPV genotype infection increased the risk of cytology abnormalities in Pearl River Delta Region and might be useful for the screening, preventing, treating, and monitoring of pre-cancer lesions in southern China. PMID:25016305

  15. A randomized trial of immunotherapy for persistent genital warts

    PubMed Central

    Jardine, David; Lu, Jieqiang; Pang, James; Palmer, Cheryn; Tu, Quanmei; Chuah, John; Frazer, Ian H.

    2012-01-01

    Aim To determine whether immunotherapy with HPV6 L1 virus like particles (VLPs) without adjuvant (VLP immunotherapy) reduces recurrence of genital warts following destructive therapy. Trial design A randomized placebo controlled blinded study of treatment of recurrent genital warts amenable to destructive therapy, conducted independently in Australia and China. Methods Patients received conventional destructive therapy of all evident warts together with intramuscular administration of 1, 5 or 25 g of VLP immunotherapy, or of placebo immunotherapy (0.9% NaCl), as immunotherapy at week 0 and week 4. Primary outcome, assessed at week 8, was recurrence of visible warts. Results Of 33 protocol compliant Brisbane recipients of placebo immunotherapy, 11 were disease free at two months, and a further 9 demonstrated reduction of > 50% in total wart area. Wart area reduction following destructive treatment correlated with prior duration of disease. Among 102 protocol compliant Brisbane recipients of VLP immunotherapy, disease reduction was significantly greater than among the placebo immunotherapy (50% s.e.m. 7%) recipients for subjects receiving 5 g or 25 g of VLP immunotherapy/dose (71% s.e.m.7%) but not for those receiving 1 g VLP immunotherapy/dose (42% 7%). Of 52 protocol compliant placebo immunotherapy recipients in Wenzhou, 37 were disease free at two months, and a further 8 had > 50% disease reduction. Prior disease duration was much shorter in Wenzhou subject (8.1 1.1 mo) than in Brisbane subjects (53.7 5.5 mo). No significant reduction in mean wart area was observed for the 168 Wenzhou protocol compliant subjects who also received VLP immunotherapy. Conclusions This study confirms the findings in a previous open label trial that administration of VLP immunotherapy may assist in clearance of recurrent genital warts in patients for whom destructive therapy is unsuccessful and that unsuccessful destructive therapy is more common with increasing prior disease duration. PMID:22634446

  16. Analytic and Clinical Performance of cobas HPV Testing in Anal Specimens from HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Tokugawa, Diane; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Chen, Jie; Lorey, Thomas S.; Gage, Julia C.; Fetterman, Barbara; Boyle, Sean; Sadorra, Mark; Tang, Scott Dahai; Darragh, Teresa M.; Castle, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common, and the incidence of anal cancer is high in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). To evaluate the performance of HPV assays in anal samples, we compared the cobas HPV test (cobas) to the Roche Linear Array HPV genotyping assay (LA) and cytology in HIV-infected MSM. Cytology and cobas and LA HPV testing were conducted for 342 subjects. We calculated agreement between the HPV assays and the clinical performance of HPV testing and HPV genotyping alone and in combination with anal cytology. We observed high agreement between cobas and LA, with cobas more likely than LA to show positive results for HPV16, HPV18, and other carcinogenic types. Specimens testing positive in cobas but not in LA were more likely to be positive for other markers of HPV-related disease compared to those testing negative in both assays, suggesting that at least some of these were true positives for HPV. cobas and LA showed high sensitivities but low specificities for the detection of anal intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 (AIN2/3) in this population (100% sensitivity and 26% specificity for cobas versus 98.4% sensitivity and 28.9% specificity for LA). A combination of anal cytology and HPV genotyping provided the highest accuracy for detecting anal precancer. A higher HPV load was associated with a higher risk of AIN2/3 with HPV16 (Ptrend < 0.001), HPV18 (Ptrend = 0.07), and other carcinogenic types (Ptrend < 0.001). We demonstrate that cobas can be used for HPV detection in anal cytology specimens. Additional tests are necessary to identify men at the highest risk of anal cancer among those infected with high-risk HPV. PMID:24899025

  17. HPV-Associated Cancers Statistics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Uterine Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer Home HPV-Associated Cancers Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Are Linked with HPV Each Year? Stay Informed Statistics for Other Kinds of Cancer Breast Cervical Colorectal (Colon) Liver Lung Ovarian Prostate ...

  18. Female genital mutilation: cultural awareness and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Braddy, Cathleen M; Files, Julia A

    2007-01-01

    Clinicians in the United States are increasingly encountering girls and women who have undergone female genital mutilation. To foster a more trusting relationship with such patients, health care providers must have an accurate understanding of the cultural background surrounding this practice, a working knowledge of the different types of female genital mutilation procedures that may be encountered, and an awareness of both the acute and long-term complications. Some of these complications are potentially fatal, and the correct clinical diagnosis can be lifesaving. PMID:17336823

  19. Population-based study for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in young women in Japan: A multicenter study by the Japanese human papillomavirus disease education research survey group (J-HERS).

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Toshiyuki; Maehama, Toshiyuki; Ideta, Kazuhisa; Irie, Takuya

    2016-02-01

    A multi-center study was conducted to examine 6,628 eligible Japanese women aged from 16 to 50 years for uterine cervical abnormality and HPV infection with a liquid based-cytology test and a novel HPV test using the PCR-SSOP-Luminex() method identifying 31 HPV genotypes. In 3,047 normal subjects, the overall prevalence across all HPV types was 25%, while that of the common 13 high-risk (Common-13HR) types (HPV-16, 18. 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, and 68) was 17%, and that of the definite high-risk (Definite-HR) types (HPV-16, 18. 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, and 58) was 12%. For Definite-HR, HPV-52, 16, and 58 were the most common, HPV-31 was relatively common, and HPV-18 was less common, while HPV-33, 35, and 45 were rare. Seven Definite-HR excluding HPV-45 and seven Possible-HR (HPV-39, 51, 56, 66, 68, 70, and 82) HPV types were identified as a single type infection in patients with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) or worse. The Common-13HR types were detected in 89% of subjects with HSIL, whereas either Definite-HR or Possible-HR types were detected in 95% of HSIL. These 1420 HPV types appear to be involved with HSIL or worse in Japan. The prevalences of multiple-type HPV infections were identified in roughly half of HPV-positive subjects, and decreased significantly with age in normal population and abnormal cytology groups, although the prevalences of single-type infections increased with age in the latter group. Most HPV infections are cleared for some years, while a certain HR-HPV type persists to induce HSIL. J. Med. Virol. 88:324-335, 2016. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26147986

  20. Impact of HPV infection on the development of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Betiol, J; Villa, L L; Sichero, L

    2013-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is considered to be a distinct clinical entity with better prognosis than the classical tobacco- and alcohol-associated tumors. The increasing incidence of this neoplasia during the last decades highlights the need to better understand the role of HPV in the development of these cancers. Although the proportion of HNSCC attributed to HPV varies considerably according to anatomical site, overall approximately 25% of all HNSCC are HPV-DNA positive, and HPV-16 is by far the most prevalent type. In this review we discuss the existing evidence for a causal association between HPV infection and HNSCC at diverse anatomical head and neck subsites. PMID:23532264

  1. Impact of HPV infection on the development of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Betiol, J.; Villa, L.L.; Sichero, L.

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is considered to be a distinct clinical entity with better prognosis than the classical tobacco- and alcohol-associated tumors. The increasing incidence of this neoplasia during the last decades highlights the need to better understand the role of HPV in the development of these cancers. Although the proportion of HNSCC attributed to HPV varies considerably according to anatomical site, overall approximately 25% of all HNSCC are HPV-DNA positive, and HPV-16 is by far the most prevalent type. In this review we discuss the existing evidence for a causal association between HPV infection and HNSCC at diverse anatomical head and neck subsites. PMID:23532264

  2. Age-specific prevalence of HPV genotypes in cervical cytology samples with equivocal or low-grade lesions

    PubMed Central

    Brismar-Wendel, S; Froberg, M; Hjerpe, A; Andersson, S; Johansson, B

    2009-01-01

    Background: To define the spectrum of human papillomavirus (HPV) types and establish an age limit for triage HPV testing in atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). Materials and methods: 343 liquid-based cytological samples from the population-based screening programme with minor abnormalities were subjected to HPV genotyping (Linear Array, Roche, Basel, Switzerland). Results: High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) was found in 71% of LSIL and 49% of ASCUS cases (P<0.001). High-risk human papillomavirus prevalence was age-dependent in LSIL (P=0.01), with decreasing prevalence until the age of 50 years, followed by a slight increase. Human papillomavirus type 16 was the most common HR-HPV, found in 23% of HPV-positive women. Human papillomavirus type 18 was the sixth most common, found in 9.9% (P<0.001). An age-dependent quadratic trend was observed for multiple infections (P=0.01) with a trough at about 42 years. The most common HR-HPV types to show a coinfection with HPV16 (clade 9) were HPV39 (28%), 45 (38%), and 59 (46%), belonging to HPV18 clade 7. The frequency of low-risk (LR) vs probable HR and HR-HPV also followed an age-dependent quadratic trend. Conclusions: After the age of 25 years, HR-HPV prevalence is similar in LSIL and ASCUS cases, motivating a low age limit for triage HPV testing. Multiple infections and LR/HR-HPV dominance are age-dependent. Genotyping in longitudinal design is needed to elucidate the importance of multiple infections in cancer progression and in cross-protection from vaccination. PMID:19623178

  3. Natural History of Cutaneous Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection in Men: The HIM Study

    PubMed Central

    Hampras, Shalaka S.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fisher, Kate J.; Abrahamsen, Martha E.; Sirak, Bradley A.; Iannacone, Michelle R.; Gheit, Tarik; Tommasino, Massimo; Rollison, Dana E.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Little is known about the natural history of cutaneous HPV. A sub-cohort of 209 men with no NMSC history, initially enrolled in the HPV infection in men (HIM) study, were followed for a median of 12.6 months. Epidemiological data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. Cutaneous HPV DNA was measured in normal skin swabs (SS) and eyebrow hairs (EB) for 25 and 16 HPV types in genera ? and ?, respectively. Any ? HPV infection was more prevalent in SS (67.3%) compared to EB (56.5%, p?=?0.04). Incidence in SS was higher than 20 per 1,000 person-months for HPV types 4, 5, 23, 38 and 76. Median duration of persistence of ? and ? HPV infection was 8.6 and 6.1 months in EB, respectively, and 11.3 months and 6.3 months, in SS, respectively. Older age (>44 years vs. 18-30 years) was significantly associated with prevalent (SS OR?=?3.0, 95% CI?=?1.27.0) and persistent ? HPV infection (EB OR?=?6.1, 95% CI?=?2.614.1). History of blistering sunburn was associated with prevalent (OR?=?2.8, 95% CI?=?1.35.8) and persistent (OR?=?2.3, 95% CI?=?1.24.6) ? HPV infection in SS. Cutaneous HPV is highly prevalent in men, with age and blistering sunburn being significant risk factors for cutaneous ? HPV infection. PMID:25198694

  4. [Guidelines for application of molecular tests identyfying HR HPV DNA in the prevention of cervical cancer. Statement of experts from PGS (PTG) and NCLD (KIDL)].

    PubMed

    2013-05-01

    DNA from high risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV-HR) is detected in virtually all cervical cancer samples. Most of HPV infections are transient, some persist and lead to development of neoplastics or even cervical cancer lesions. Cervical cancer screening programs are designed to detect early precancerous changes, which should decrease the cancer morbidity and mortality and reduce the costs of diagnosis and treatment. The most effective are screening programs that use cytological and HPV testing. Screening with this method are proven to reduce both the incidence and mortality from cervical cancer WOMEN AGED 21-29 YEARS: HPV testing should not be used to screen women aged 21-29 years, either as a stand-alone test or as a cotest with cytology DNA HPV HR testing in this group of women is recommended in diagnostics ofASCUS. Women DNA HPV positive with ASCUS should be referred to colposcopy WOMEN AGED 30-65 YEARS: Screening by HPV testing alone is not recommended. Women should be screened with cytology and HPV testing every 5 years or cytology alone every 3 years (acceptable). DNA HPV HR /+/, PAP /-/: Two options are recommended. Option 1: 12-months follow-up with contesting (PAP and DNA HPV HR tests). Option 2: Test for HPV16 or HPV16/18 genotypes. If HPV16 or HPV16/18 positive: refer to colposcopy If HPV16 or HPV16/18 negative:12-months follow-up with cotesting. DNA HPV HR /-/, ASC-US: Repetition of cytology in 12 moths is recommended. WOMEN AGED >65 YEARS: No screening is recommended following adequate negative prior to screening. Women with a history of CIN2 or a more severe diagnosis should continue routine screening for at least 20 years. WOMEN HPV VACCINATED: Follow age-specific recommendations (same as unvaccinated women). REQUIREMENTS OF DNA HPV HR TESTS IN CERVICAL SCREENING: The DNA HPV tests used in cervical screening should detect as much as possible of 14 HPV HR types (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66 i 68) and genotyping HPV 16/18. Candidates' tests should have control of DNA HPV purification and amplification processes and be preserved against contaminations. Clinical sensitivity for CIN 2 + should be no less than 90%. HPV tests and specimen collection system should fulfill the requirements of the act on medical devices. PMID:23819408

  5. Quantifying the broader economic consequences of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in Germany applying a government perspective framework.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulos, Nikolaos; Connolly, Mark P; Remy, Vanessa

    2015-12-01

    HPV infections can cause substantial burden in females and males as it is associated with several genital cancers, in addition to genital warts. Traditional economic evaluations often focus on quantifying cost-effectiveness, however, it is increasingly recognized that vaccinations may generate broader benefits not captured in cost-effectiveness analysis. Τhe aim of this study was to evaluate the broader economic consequences associated with HPV vaccination in males and females and to conduct a lifetime cost-benefit analysis of investing in universal vaccination in Germany from the perspective of government. Methodologies from generational accounting, human capital and health economics were combined to estimate the broader economic consequences of HPV vaccination including the fiscal impact for the government. A cohort model was developed simulating the medical costs and average lifetime fiscal transfers between the government and 12-year-old immunized and non-immunized males and females. To estimate tax revenue attributed to vaccination-related changes in morbidity and mortality, direct and indirect tax rates were linked to differences in age- and gender-specific earnings. Based on HPV vaccination costs, the base case cost-benefit analysis demonstrated that investing 1 in universal HPV vaccination could yield 1.7 in gross tax revenue over the lifetime of the cohorts. After taking into consideration the governmental transfers, universal HPV vaccination in Germany could result in incremental positive net discounted taxes (i.e. tax revenue-transfers) from 62 million for the German government. The vaccination of males and females with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine is likely to have positive effects on public finances. PMID:26198884

  6. HPV16L1-attenuated Shigella recombinant vaccine induced strong vaginal and systemic immune responses in guinea pig model

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaofei; Wang, Depu; Liang, Fengli; Fu, Ling; Guo, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Though human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines based on L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) have excellent protective effect against HPV-induced cervical cancer, they are too expensive to be afforded by the developing countries, where most cases of cervical cancer occur. A live bacterial-based vaccine could be an inexpensive alternative. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of live attenuated Shigella. flexneri 2a sc602 strain-based HPV16L1 as a high-efficiency, low-cost HPV16L1 mucosal vaccine. Recombinant sc602/L1 vaccine induced high L1-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses as well as cell-mediated Th1 and Th2 immune responses in guinea pig model. Sc602/L1 vaccine induced higher L1-specific IgG and IgA antibodies as well as HPV16-neutralizing antibodies in genital region in sc602/L1 mucosal immunized animals than in L1 intramuscular immunized animals. Though both are via mucosal delivery, immunized sc602/L1 vaccine by rectum route induced higher L1-specific IgA and IgG titers in genital region than by conjunctiva route. In addition, sc602/L1 also strongly increased L1-specific IFN-? and IL-4 expression, implying its effect on cell-mediated immune response. HPV16L1 was expressed in sc602 bacteria and their biologic characteristics were detected by immunoblot, electron microscope and HeLa cell invasion assay. Guinea pigs were immunized with sc602L1 through conjunctiva (i.c.) or rectum (i.r.). Mucosal and systemic immune responses were detected by ELISA, ELISPOT and Neutralization activity assays. Strong mucosal and systemic immune responses were induced by sc602/L1 vaccine. This study provides evidence that sc602/L1 vaccine may have protective effect on HPV infection. PMID:25483698

  7. Warts and All: HPV in Primary Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Leiding, Jennifer W.; Holland, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) is almost universal and eventually asymptomatic, but pathologic infection with HPV is severe, recurrent, and recalcitrant to therapy. It is also an underappreciated manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Mutations in EVER1, EVER2, GATA2, CXCR4, and DOCK8 are typically associated with extensive HPV infections, whereas several other primary immune defects have severe HPV much less frequently. We review immunodeficiencies with severe HPV infections and the mechanisms underlying them. PMID:23036745

  8. Clinical Study of Styping Detection of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection with Microarray from Paraffinembedded Specimens of Cervical Cancer and Precursor Lesions.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai; Wang, Xubo; Geng, Jianxiang; Zhao, Xue

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence and type distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in Jiangsu, China was investigated. A total of 93 cases with cervical cancer and 176 CINII-III tissue samples were obtained from women undergoing biopsy or surgery. The 1047 exfoliated cervical cell samples were collected with cervical brush in physical examination women. HPV DNA and typing were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene-chip. The results showed that HPV DNA was detected in 82 cases with cervical cancer (88.17%), HPV 16 being detected in 65 (69.89%) cases, HPV 18 in 12 (12.90%) cases, HPV 33 in 10 (10.75%) cases, HPV 31 in 4 (4.30%) cases, and HPV 45 in 3 (3.23%) cases. HPV DNA was detected in 154 cases with CINII-III (87.50%), HPV 16 being detected in 92 (52.27%) cases, HPV 18 in 50 (28.41%) cases, HPV 33 in 25 (14.21%) cases, HPV 58 in 25 (14.21%) cases, and HPV 31 in 20 (11.36%) cases. About 20.43% cervical cancer and 38.64% CINII-III specimens exhibited multiple infections (p < 0.01). The total positive rate, single infection and mixed infection rate of the CINII-III and SCC group all had a significant difference (p < 0.05) when compared with the normal cells group. The total positive rate, single infection rate and mixed infection rate of CINII-III group did not show significant difference (p > 0.05) when compared with SCC group. CINII-III and SCC had all intimate relation with HPV infection. The high prevalence of HPV 16, 18, 33, 31 and 58 in Jiangsu (China) deserves more attention, as it has important implications for the successful use of HPV vaccine and choice of diagnostic methods. PMID:26716195

  9. Evaluation of the Long-Term Anti-Human Papillomavirus 6 (HPV6), 11, 16, and 18 Immune Responses Generated by the Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Saah, Alfred; Munk, Christian; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Enerly, Espen; Hortlund, Maria; Sigurdardottir, Lara G.; Vuocolo, Scott; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Dillner, Joakim

    2015-01-01

    This quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) (HPV6, -11, -16, and -18) vaccine long-term follow-up (LTFU) study is an ongoing extension of a pivotal clinical study (FUTURE II) taking place in the Nordic region. The LTFU study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness, immunogenicity, and safety of the qHPV vaccine (Gardasil) for at least 10 years following completion of the base study. The current report presents immunogenicity data from testing samples of the year 5 LTFU visit (approximately 9 years after vaccination). FUTURE II vaccination arm subjects, who consented to being followed in the LTFU, donated serum at regular intervals and in 2012. Anti-HPV6, -11, -16, and -18 antibodies were detected by the competitive Luminex immunoassay (cLIA), and in addition, serum samples from 2012 were analyzed by the total IgG Luminex immunoassay (LIA) (n = 1,598). cLIA geometric mean titers (GMTs) remained between 70% and 93% of their month 48 value depending on HPV type. For all HPV types, the lower bound of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for the year 9 GMTs remained above the serostatus cutoff value. The proportion of subjects who remained seropositive based on the IgG LIA was higher than the proportion based on cLIA, especially for anti-HPV18. As expected, the anti-HPV serum IgG and cLIA responses were strongly correlated for all HPV types. Anti-HPV GMTs and the proportion of vaccinated individuals who are seropositive remain high for up to 9 years of follow-up after vaccination. PMID:26084514

  10. Evaluation of the Long-Term Anti-Human Papillomavirus 6 (HPV6), 11, 16, and 18 Immune Responses Generated by the Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nygrd, Mari; Saah, Alfred; Munk, Christian; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Enerly, Espen; Hortlund, Maria; Sigurdardottir, Lara G; Vuocolo, Scott; Kjaer, Susanne K; Dillner, Joakim

    2015-08-01

    This quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) (HPV6, -11, -16, and -18) vaccine long-term follow-up (LTFU) study is an ongoing extension of a pivotal clinical study (FUTURE II) taking place in the Nordic region. The LTFU study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness, immunogenicity, and safety of the qHPV vaccine (Gardasil) for at least 10 years following completion of the base study. The current report presents immunogenicity data from testing samples of the year 5 LTFU visit (approximately 9 years after vaccination). FUTURE II vaccination arm subjects, who consented to being followed in the LTFU, donated serum at regular intervals and in 2012. Anti-HPV6, -11, -16, and -18 antibodies were detected by the competitive Luminex immunoassay (cLIA), and in addition, serum samples from 2012 were analyzed by the total IgG Luminex immunoassay (LIA) (n = 1,598). cLIA geometric mean titers (GMTs) remained between 70% and 93% of their month 48 value depending on HPV type. For all HPV types, the lower bound of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for the year 9 GMTs remained above the serostatus cutoff value. The proportion of subjects who remained seropositive based on the IgG LIA was higher than the proportion based on cLIA, especially for anti-HPV18. As expected, the anti-HPV serum IgG and cLIA responses were strongly correlated for all HPV types. Anti-HPV GMTs and the proportion of vaccinated individuals who are seropositive remain high for up to 9 years of follow-up after vaccination. PMID:26084514

  11. What School Nurses Need to Know about Cervical Cancer, HPV, and the New Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrhardt, Jeanie

    2007-01-01

    At least 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in the United States, accounting for at least 4,000 deaths. Worldwide, cervical cancer is the second most common type of cancer among women. The human papilloma virus (HPV) has been linked to at least 70% of all cervical cancer. HPV can be divided into 2 categories: (a) low risk,

  12. Isolated Itching of the Genitals

    PubMed Central

    Pomares, Christelle; Marty, Pierre; Delaunay, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old man, returned from Ivory Coast 2 months ago and presented with a 3-month history of pruritus exclusively on the scrotum. Itching was continuous during the day and no pruritus was described in his wife and son. Clinical examination of the genitals revealed several nodules on the scrotum, a chancrous lesion was seen on the penis, and multiple excoriations were noted. Dermoscopy exam with a dermatoscope of the whole body was performed and no papules, nodules, or burrow were found. Microscopic examination of several superficial skin samples obtained by scraping in the peri-genital area revealed one adult of Sarcoptes scabiei. The patient and his relatives were successfully treated with Ivermectin 200 ?g/kg with a second dose 2 weeks later. Very rare cases are described on localized scabies (scalp, feet) and they mainly occurred in an immunocompromised patient unlike this patient who does not have any immunosuppression. PMID:24696404

  13. Current trends in the etiology and diagnosis of HPV-related head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Chai, Ryan C; Lambie, Duncan; Verma, Mukesh; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2015-04-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is a major risk factor for a distinct subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The current review summarizes the epidemiology of HNSCC and the disease burden, the infectious cycle of HPV, the roles of viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, and the downstream cellular events that lead to malignant transformation. Current techniques for the clinical diagnosis of HPV-associated HNSCC will also be discussed, that is, the detection of HPV DNA, RNA, and the HPV surrogate marker, p16 in tumor tissues, as well as HPV-specific antibodies in serum. Such methods do not allow for the early detection of HPV-associated HNSCC and most cases are at an advanced stage upon diagnosis. Novel noninvasive approaches using oral fluid, a clinically relevant biological fluid, allow for the detection of HPV and cellular alterations in infected cells, which may aid in the early detection and HPV-typing of HNSCC tumors. Noninvasive diagnostic methods will enable early detection and intervention, leading to a significant reduction in mortality and morbidity associated with HNSCC. PMID:25644715

  14. [Prokaryotic expression and polyclonal antibody preparation of HPV6b E7 protein].

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi; Zhou, Qiang; Wang, Qi; Cheng, Hao

    2011-09-01

    To express and prepare polyclonal antibody of Human papillomavirus type 6b (HPV6b) E7 protein. a prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-2/HPV6b E7 was constructed and GST-HPV6b E7 fusion protein was expressed as a soluble protein in E. coli. The expressed fusion protein was purified via Glutathione-Sepharose 4B column and thrombin cleavage in order to obtain HPV6b E7 protein. Polyclonal IgG antibody was prepared by immunizing New-Zealand rabbits with HPV6b E7 protein. Western-Blot and immunofluorescence analysis showed that the polyclonal IgG antibody could specifically recognize HPV6b E7 protein and its titer was identified. SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that large amounts of soluble GST-HPV6b E7 fusion protein was expressed in E. coli after 3.0-6.0 hours of IPTG induction. Polyclonal IgG antibody successfully prepared from immunized rabbits showed high titer and high specificity as confirmed by Western-Blot and immunofluorescence. The preparation of anti-HPV6b E7 polyclonal antibody will facilitate further research on the biological and immunological functions of HPV6b E7 protein. PMID:21998951

  15. HPV Genotyping and Site of Viral Integration in Cervical Cancers in Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Das, Poulami; Thomas, Asha; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Deodhar, Kedar; Mulherkar, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Persistent HPV infection plays a major role in cervical cancer. This study was undertaken to identify HPV types in a cohort of Indian women with locally advanced cervical cancer as well as to determine the physical state and/or site of viral integration in the host genome. Pretreatment biopsies (n = 270) from patients were screened for HPV infection by a high throughput HPV genotyping assay based on luminex xMAP technology as well as MY09/11 PCR and SPF1/2 PCR. Overall HPV positivity was observed to be 95%, with HPV16 being most common (63%) followed by infection with HPV18. Integration status of the virus was identified using Amplification of Papillomavirus Oncogene Transcripts (APOT) assay in a subset of samples positive for HPV16 and/or HPV18 (n = 86) and with an adequate follow-up. The data was correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Integration of the viral genome was observed in 79% of the cases and a preference for integration into the chromosomal loci 1p, 3q, 6q, 11q, 13q and 20q was seen. Clinical data revealed that the physical state of the virus (integrated or episomal) could be an important prognostic marker for cervical cancer. PMID:22815898

  16. Current trends in the etiology and diagnosis of HPV-related head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ryan C; Lambie, Duncan; Verma, Mukesh; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is a major risk factor for a distinct subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The current review summarizes the epidemiology of HNSCC and the disease burden, the infectious cycle of HPV, the roles of viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, and the downstream cellular events that lead to malignant transformation. Current techniques for the clinical diagnosis of HPV-associated HNSCC will also be discussed, that is, the detection of HPV DNA, RNA, and the HPV surrogate marker, p16 in tumor tissues, as well as HPV-specific antibodies in serum. Such methods do not allow for the early detection of HPV-associated HNSCC and most cases are at an advanced stage upon diagnosis. Novel noninvasive approaches using oral fluid, a clinically relevant biological fluid, allow for the detection of HPV and cellular alterations in infected cells, which may aid in the early detection and HPV-typing of HNSCC tumors. Noninvasive diagnostic methods will enable early detection and intervention, leading to a significant reduction in mortality and morbidity associated with HNSCC. PMID:25644715

  17. [HPV-associated head and neck cancer : mutational signature and genomic aberrations].

    PubMed

    Wagner, S; Wrdemann, N; Hbbers, C; Reuschenbach, M; Prigge, E-S; Wichmann, G; Hess, J; Dietz, A; Drst, M; Tinhofer, I; von Knebel-Dberitz, M; Wittekindt, C; Klussmann, J P

    2015-11-01

    A significantly increasing proportion of oropharyngeal head and neck carcinomas (OSCC) in North America and Europe are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. HPV-related OSCC is regarded as a distinct tumor type with regard to its cellular, biologic, and clinical characteristics. Patients with HPV-related OSCC have significantly better local control, but higher rates of regional lymph node and distant metastases as compared to patients with HPV-negative OSCC. Classical molecular genetic investigations demonstrated specific chromosomal aberration signatures in HPV-related OSCC, and recent developments in next generation sequencing (NGS) technology have rendered possible the sequencing of entire genomes, and thus detection of specific mutations, in just a few days. Initial data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project obtained by using genome-wide high throughput methods have confirmed that HPV-related OSCC contain fewer, albeit more specific mutations than HPV-negative tumors. Additionally, these data revealed the presence of specific-potentially therapeutically targetable-activating driver mutations in subgroups of HPV-positive OSCC, some of which have a prognostic impact. Specific targeted NGS technologies provide new possibilities for identification of diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers and the development of personalized cancer treatment. Patients with HPV-positive tumors are likely to profit from these developments in the future, since the genetic alterations are relatively homogenous and frequently lead to signal pathway activation. There is an urgent need for network research activities to carry out the necessary basic research in prospective cohort studies. PMID:26507715

  18. A case for immunization of human papillomavirus (HPV) 6/11-infected pregnant women with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine to prevent juvenile-onset laryngeal papilloma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Keerti V

    2014-05-01

    Juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (JORRP) is a rare disease caused by intrapartum or perinatal transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 11 from an infected mother to the newborn. Immunization of a pregnant woman who has condyloma or HPV-6/11 infection with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine will result in a high neutralizing antibody response to HPV 6 and HPV 11 in her serum, and these antibodies transferred to the newborn will likely protect the child against the development of JORRP. Because of the low incidence of disease in at-risk children, it may be difficult to test the effectiveness of maternal immunization for prevention of JORRP. PMID:24265442

  19. Evidence of Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Effectiveness in Reducing Genital Warts: An Analysis of California Public Family Planning Administrative Claims Data, 20072010

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Glenn; Chow, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Because of the rapid development of genital warts (GW) after infection, monitoring GW trends may provide early evidence of population-level human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness. Trends in GW diagnoses were assessed using public family planning administrative data. Between 2007 and 2010, among females younger than 21 years, these diagnoses decreased 35% from 0.94% to 0.61% (Ptrend?HPV vaccine may be preventing GW among young people. PMID:22420808

  20. Prevention of HPV-Related Cancers in Norway: Cost-Effectiveness of Expanding the HPV Vaccination Program to Include Pre-Adolescent Boys

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Emily A.; Sy, Stephen; Nygrd, Mari; Kristiansen, Ivar S.; Kim, Jane J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasingly, countries have introduced female vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV), causally linked to several cancers and genital warts, but few have recommended vaccination of boys. Declining vaccine prices and strong evidence of vaccine impact on reducing HPV-related conditions in both women and men prompt countries to reevaluate whether HPV vaccination of boys is warranted. Methods A previously-published dynamic model of HPV transmission was empirically calibrated to Norway. Reductions in the incidence of HPV, including both direct and indirect benefits, were applied to a natural history model of cervical cancer, and to incidence-based models for other non-cervical HPV-related diseases. We calculated the health outcomes and costs of the different HPV-related conditions under a gender-neutral vaccination program compared to a female-only program. Results Vaccine price had a decisive impact on results. For example, assuming 71% coverage, high vaccine efficacy and a reasonable vaccine tender price of $75 per dose, we found vaccinating both girls and boys fell below a commonly cited cost-effectiveness threshold in Norway ($83,000/quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained) when including vaccine benefit for all HPV-related diseases. However, at the current market price, including boys would not be considered good value for money. For settings with a lower cost-effectiveness threshold ($30,000/QALY), it would not be considered cost-effective to expand the current program to include boys, unless the vaccine price was less than $36/dose. Increasing vaccination coverage to 90% among girls was more effective and less costly than the benefits achieved by vaccinating both genders with 71% coverage. Conclusions At the anticipated tender price, expanding the HPV vaccination program to boys may be cost-effective and may warrant a change in the current female-only vaccination policy in Norway. However, increasing coverage in girls is uniformly more effective and cost-effective than expanding vaccination coverage to boys and should be considered a priority. PMID:24651645

  1. Anal HPV/HIV co-infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men: a cross-sectional survey from three cities in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangwei; Li, Mufei; Yang, Yu; Zhong, Xiang; Feng, Boxuan; Xin, Henan; Li, Zhen; Jin, Qi; Gao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, which is linked to anal warts and anal cancer, is common among men who have sex with men (MSM), especially among those HIV positives. MSM aged 18 years or older were recruited from mainland China. Blood and anal cytologic samples were collected for HIV-1 serological test and HPV genotyping. A total of 889 eligible participations were included. The genotyping results of HPV were available for 822 participants (92.46%), 65.32% of which were positive for the targeted 37 HPV types. Prevalence of infection with any type of HPV was higher among HIV-infected participants (82.69%) as compared to HIV-uninfected participants (62.81%) (p < 0.01). HPV06 (15.45%), HPV18(13.50%), HPV16 (11.44%), and HPV11 (10.71%) were the most frequent types identified in the study population. Ever had paid sex with man was found to be independent predictor for HPV positivity with an adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 2.34 (1.16–4.74). Anal HPV positivity was observed to be independently associated with HIV infection with an adjusted OR of 3.03 (1.76–5.21) in the study population. In conclusion, the prevalence of anal HPV infection was observed to be common among MSM from mainland China, and it was significantly associated with the status of HIV infection. PMID:26892938

  2. Anal HPV/HIV co-infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men: a cross-sectional survey from three cities in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangwei; Li, Mufei; Yang, Yu; Zhong, Xiang; Feng, Boxuan; Xin, Henan; Li, Zhen; Jin, Qi; Gao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, which is linked to anal warts and anal cancer, is common among men who have sex with men (MSM), especially among those HIV positives. MSM aged 18 years or older were recruited from mainland China. Blood and anal cytologic samples were collected for HIV-1 serological test and HPV genotyping. A total of 889 eligible participations were included. The genotyping results of HPV were available for 822 participants (92.46%), 65.32% of which were positive for the targeted 37 HPV types. Prevalence of infection with any type of HPV was higher among HIV-infected participants (82.69%) as compared to HIV-uninfected participants (62.81%) (p < 0.01). HPV06 (15.45%), HPV18(13.50%), HPV16 (11.44%), and HPV11 (10.71%) were the most frequent types identified in the study population. Ever had paid sex with man was found to be independent predictor for HPV positivity with an adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 2.34 (1.16-4.74). Anal HPV positivity was observed to be independently associated with HIV infection with an adjusted OR of 3.03 (1.76-5.21) in the study population. In conclusion, the prevalence of anal HPV infection was observed to be common among MSM from mainland China, and it was significantly associated with the status of HIV infection. PMID:26892938

  3. Alcohol and Tobacco Increases Risk of High Risk HPV Infection in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: Study from North-East Region of India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rupesh; Rai, Avdhesh Kumar; Das, Debabrata; Das, Rajjyoti; Kumar, R. Suresh; Sarma, Anupam; Sharma, Shashi; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Ramteke, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papilloma virus (HPV) associated Head and Neck Cancers (HNCs) have generated significant amount of research interest in recent times. Due to high incidence of HNCs and lack of sufficient data on high-risk HPV (hr-HPV) infection from North -East region of India, this study was conceived to investigate hr-HPV infection, its types and its association with life style habits such as tobacco, alcohol consumption etc. Methods A total of one hundred and six primary HNC tumor biopsy specimens were collected. These samples were analyzed for hr-HPV DNA (13 HPV types) using hybrid capture 2 (HC2) assay and genotyping was done by E6 nested multiplex PCR (NMPCR). Results The presence of hr-HPV was confirmed in 31.13% (n = 33) and 24.52% (n = 26) of the HNC patients by nested multiplex PCR (NMPCR) and HC2 assay respectively. Among hr-HPV positive cases, out of thirteen hr- HPV types analyzed, only two prevalent genotypes, HPV-16 (81.81%) followed by HPV-18 (18.18%) were found. Significant association was observed between hr-HPV infection with alcohol consumption (p <0.001) and tobacco chewing (p = 0.02) in HNC cases. Compared to HPV-18 infection the HPV-16 was found to be significantly associated with tobacco chewing (p = 0.02) habit. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that tobacco chewing and alcohol consumption may act as risk factors for hr-HPV infection in HNCs from the North-East region of India. This was the first study from North-East India which also assessed the clinical applicability of HC2 assay in HNC patient specimens. We suggest that alcohol, tobacco and hr- HPV infection act synergistically or complement each other in the process of HNC development and progression in the present study population. PMID:26473489

  4. High-risk and multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in cancer-free Jamaican women

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Angela; Garwood, David; Jackson, Maria; Younger, Novie; Ragin, Camille; Smikle, Monica; Fletcher, Horace; McFarlane-Anderson, Norma

    2009-01-01

    Background Vaccines, that target human papillomavirus (HPV) high risk genotypes 16 and 18, have recently been developed. This study was aimed at determining genotypes commonly found in high-risk and multiple-HPV infections in Jamaican women. Two hundred and fifty three (253) women were enrolled in the study. Of these, 120 pregnant women, aged 1544 years, were recruited from the Ante Natal Clinic at the University Hospital of the West Indies and 116 non-pregnant, aged 1983, from a family practice in Western Jamaica. Cervical cell samples were collected from the women and HPV DNA was detected using Polymerase Chain Reaction and Reverse Line Hybridization. HPV genotypes were assessed in 236 women. Data were collected from January 2003 to October 2006. Results HPV DNA was detected in 87.7% (207/236) and of these 80.2% were positive for high-risk types. The most common high-risk HPV types were: HPV 45 (21.7%), HPV 58 (18.8%), HPV 16 (18.4%), HPV 35 (15.0%), HPV 18 (14.5%), HPV 52 (12.0%) and HPV 51(11.1%). Other high-risk types were present in frequencies of 1.4% 7.2%. Multivariate regression analyses showed that bacterial vaginosis predicted the presence of multiple infections (OR 3.51; CI, 1.269.82) and that alcohol use (OR 0.31; CI, 0.150.85) and age at first sexual encounter (1215 years: OR 3.56; CI, 1.419.12; 1619 years, OR 3.53, CI, 1.2210.23) were significantly associated with high risk infections. Cervical cytology was normal in the majority of women despite the presence of high-risk and multiple infections. Conclusion HPV genotype distribution in this group of Jamaican women differs from the patterns found in Europe, North America and some parts of Asia. It may be necessary therefore to consider development of other vaccines which target genotypes found in our and similar populations. HPV genotyping as well as Pap smears should be considered. PMID:19208202

  5. Diethylstilbestrol metabolism by the fetal genital tract.

    PubMed

    Maydl, R; Newbold, R R; Metzler, M; McLachlan, J A

    1983-07-01

    Oxidative metabolism of diethylstilbestrol (DES) was measured in both the male and female genital tracts of the fetal mouse in organ culture. The major oxidative metabolite formed was Z,Z-dienestrol, whose formation appeared to be time dependent in the isolated fetal genital tract of both sexes. This peroxidative metabolite, which has been previously linked to bioactivation of DES in adult target tissues, was not detected in the fetal liver cultures. In addition, fetal genital tracts were capable of O-methylation of DES. In fact, a new metabolite, 4'-O-methyl-DES, was formed in fetal genital tissues but not in liver cultures. On the other hand, conjugation of DES occurred extensively in the fetal liver and placenta but not in the fetal genital tissues; conjugated DES was found primarily in the media. Thus, the fetal genital tract, which is the primary target for the transplacental carcinogenicity of DES, has the capacity to metabolize this compound. PMID:6861692

  6. Perspectives for Preventive and Therapeutic HPV Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken; Doolan, Kimberley; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of female cancer death worldwide. Persistent infection with `high risk' HPV genotypes is the major etiological factor in cervical cancer and thus effective vaccination against HPV provides an opportunity to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with HPV. The FDA has approved two preventive vaccines to limit the spread of HPV. However, these are unlikely to impact upon HPV prevalence and cervical cancer rates for many years. Furthermore, preventive vaccines do not exert therapeutic effects on pre-existing HPV infections and HPV-associated lesions. In order to further impact upon the burden of HPV infections worldwide, therapeutic vaccines are being developed. These vaccines aim to generate a cell-mediated immune response to infected cells. This review discusses current preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccines and their future directions. PMID:20123582

  7. How Many Cancers Are Linked with HPV Each Year?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of these cancers. Number of HPV-Associated Cancer Cases per Year An HPV-associated cancer is a ... numbers were calculated. Number of HPV-Attributable Cancer Cases per Year An HPV-attributable cancer is a ...

  8. Implication of high risk Human papillomavirus HR-HPV infection in prostate cancer in Indian population- A pioneering case-control analysis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neha; Hussain, Showket; Kakkar, Nandita; Singh, Shrawan K.; Sobti, Ranbir C.; Bharadwaj, Mausumi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer with sexual history as a consistent risk factor. This is the pioneering study that evaluates the frequency of HPV infection in prostate cancer in India. Ninety five (95) histopathologically confirmed cancer and fifty five (55) BPH from Indian population were analyzed for HPV infection using a pair of consensus sequence primer followed by type specific PCRs for both high-risk and low-risk HPV types. The data demonstrate HPV infection in 41% of prostate tumor biopsies and 20% in BPH. Subsequent PCR- based HPV typing using type - specific primers revealed 32% were infected with HPV type 16 whereas 6% were found to be positive for HPV type 18, while in BPH controls only 5% of the BPH controls were infected with HPV 16 and this difference was highly significant (p = 0.0004). Significant proportion of HPV infected (74%) cases belonged to stage III and IV (p < 0.001) with a high Gleason score ?8 (p = 0.003). The study represents for the first time the incidence of HPV infection in prostate cancer in Indian population and strengthens the hypothesis that HPV infection could be one of the co factor associated with progression of prostate cancer. PMID:25592643

  9. HPV Infection and Cervical Screening in Socially Isolated Indigenous Women Inhabitants of the Amazonian Rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Allex Jardim; Taeko, Daniela; Chaves, Thiciane Araújo; Amorim, Lucia Dayanny da Costa; Murari, Raisa Saron Wanderley; Miranda, Angélica Espinosa; Chen, Zigui; Burk, Robert David; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos Lima

    2015-01-01

    Objective Indigenous women from the Amazon regions have some of the highest rates of cervical cancer in the world. This study evaluated cervical cytology and human papillomavirus (HPV) in native women that differ by lifestyle and interaction with western society. Yanomami women are isolated deep in the Amazon with a hunter/gatherer lifestyle. Macuxi and Wapishana women live in proximity to western society. Methods To select a representative group of women from each district, random cluster sampling was used, considering each registered village as a cluster. Cervical samples were collected for cytology and HPV detection and typing by PCR amplification and next generation sequencing. The study was approved by the National IRB and by tribal leaders. Results 664 native women were enrolled from 13 indigenous villages (76% participation rate). Yanomami women had higher rates of abnormal cytology (5.1% vs. 1.8%, p = 0.04) and prevalent HR-HPV (34.1% vs. 19.2%, p<0.001). Yanomami women >35y of age were significantly more likely to have HR-HPV, whereas women ≤35y did not significantly differ between groups. Prevalence of HPV was significantly different amongst geographically clustered Yanomami women (p<0.004). The most prevalent HPV types in the entire group were HPV31 (8.7%), HPV16 (5.9%) and HPV18 (4.4%). Conclusion Isolated endogenous Yanomami women were more likely to be HPV+ and rates increased with age. Study of HPV in isolated hunter-gather peoples suggests that long-term persistence is a characteristic of prehistoric humans and patterns reflecting decreased prevalence with age in western society represents recent change. These studies have implications for cervical cancer prevention and viral-host relationships. PMID:26207895

  10. Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Radiotherapy or Radiochemotherapy: Prognostic Role of TP53 and HPV Status

    SciTech Connect

    Fallai, Carlo; Perrone, Federica; Licitra, Lisa; Pilotti, Silvana; Locati, Laura; Bossi, Paolo; Orlandi, Ester; Palazzi, Mauro; Olmi, Patrizia

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the TP53 mutation and human papilloma virus (HPV) status in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Methods and materials: The TP53 mutation and HPV status were analyzed in 78 cases of locoregionally advanced OPSCC. The possible correlation of these factors with locoregiownal control, relapse-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival (OS) was also investigated. Results: Of these 78 cases, 22 had disruptive and 22 had non-disruptive (silent) TP53 mutations; the remaining 34 cases had wild-type (WT) TP53. HPV 16 DNA was found in 9 cases (11%), but all HPV-positive (HPV+) cases carried a functional p53 protein, except for 1 case that had a silent mutation. HPV+ patients fared better than HPV-negative (HPV-) patients in terms of all survival parameters, with highly statistically significant differences between the groups. Specifically, no distant metastases were observed in the HPV+ patients, whereas they occurred in 17% of the HPV- patients. However, no difference was observed between the WT TP53 and mutation group, even when this was analyzed in terms of disruptive and non-disruptive mutations. Regardless, treatment with chemotherapy nearly doubled the 5-year OS rates, both in the mutation (42% vs. 22%) and WT (30 vs. 16%) group, but only the mutation group showed improvement in all survival parameters. In addition, the second tumor-free 5-year survival rate was 72% in HPV- cases, but no second tumors were observed in HPV+ and WT p53 cases. Conclusions: Patients with HPV+ OPSCC have an excellent prognosis after radiochemotherapy, but cisplatin-based chemotherapy may not confer a satisfactory outcome, especially in WT cases, thereby justifying the additional or alternative use of taxanes and epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors. Uncommon distant metastases and second tumors in the HPV+ group may be cause for clinicians to review the follow-up policies in these patients.

  11. Cleavage/Alteration of Interleukin-8 by Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 in the Female Lower Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Zariffard, M. Reza; Anastos, Kathryn; French, Audrey L.; Munyazesa, Elisaphane; Cohen, Mardge; Landay, Alan L.; Spear, Gregory T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8) plays important roles in immune responses at mucosal sites including in the lower genital tract. Since several types of bacteria produce proteases that cleave IL-8 and many types of bacteria can be present in lower genital tract microbiota, we assessed genital fluids for IL-8 cleavage/alteration. Study Design Genital fluids collected by lavage from 200 women (23 HIV-seronegative and 177 HIV-seropositive) were tested for IL-8 cleavage/alteration by ELISA. Results IL-8 cleaving/altering activity was observed in fluids from both HIV-positive (28%) and HIV-negative women (35%). There was no clear relationship between the activity and the types of bacteria present in the lower genital tract as determined by high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Protease inhibitors specific for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) reduced the activity and a multiplex assay that detects both inactive and active MMPs showed the presence of multiple MMPs, including MMP-1, -3, -7, -8, -9, -10 and -12 in genital secretions from many of the women. The IL-8-cleaving/altering activity significantly correlated with active MMP-9 as well as with cleavage of a substrate that is acted on by several active MMPs. Conclusions These studies show that multiple MMPs are present in the genital tract of women and strongly suggest that MMP-9 in genital secretions can cleave IL-8 at this mucosal site. These studies suggest that MMP-mediated cleavage of IL-8 can modulate inflammatory responses in the lower genital tract. PMID:25611319

  12. Evolution of Envelope Sequences from the Genital Tract and Peripheral Blood of Women Infected with Clade A Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Poss, Mary; Rodrigo, Allen G.; Gosink, John J.; Learn, Gerald H.; de Vange Panteleeff, Dana; Martin, Harold L.; Bwayo, Job; Kreiss, Joan K.; Overbaugh, Julie

    1998-01-01

    The development of viral diversity during the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection may significantly influence viral pathogenesis. The paradigm for HIV-1 evolution is based primarily on studies of male cohorts in which individuals were presumably infected with a single virus variant of subtype B HIV-1. In this study, we evaluated virus evolution based on sequence information of the V1, V2, and V3 portions of HIV-1 clade A envelope genes obtained from peripheral blood and cervical secretions of three women with genetically heterogeneous viral populations near seroconversion. At the first sample following seroconversion, the number of nonsynonymous substitutions per potential nonsynonymous site (dn) significantly exceeded substitutions at potential synonymous sites (ds) in plasma viral sequences from all individuals. Generally, values of dn remained higher than values of ds as sequences from blood or mucosa evolved. Mutations affected each of the three variable regions of the envelope gene differently; insertions and deletions dominated changes in V1, substitutions involving charged amino acids occurred in V2, and sequential replacement of amino acids over time at a small subset of positions distinguished V3. The relationship among envelope nucleotide sequences obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, plasma, and cervical secretions was evaluated for each individual by both phylogenetic and phenetic analyses. In all subjects, sequences from within each tissue compartment were more closely related to each other than to sequences from other tissues (phylogenetic tissue compartmentalization). At time points after seroconversion in two individuals, there was also greater genetic identity among sequences from the same tissue compartment than among sequences from different tissue compartments (phenetic tissue compartmentalization). Over time, temporal phylogenetic and phenetic structure was detectable in mucosal and plasma viral samples from all three women, suggesting a continual process of migration of one or a few infected cells into each compartment followed by localized expansion and evolution of that population. PMID:9733867

  13. Evolution of envelope sequences from the genital tract and peripheral blood of women infected with clade A human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Poss, M; Rodrigo, A G; Gosink, J J; Learn, G H; de Vange Panteleeff, D; Martin, H L; Bwayo, J; Kreiss, J K; Overbaugh, J

    1998-10-01

    The development of viral diversity during the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection may significantly influence viral pathogenesis. The paradigm for HIV-1 evolution is based primarily on studies of male cohorts in which individuals were presumably infected with a single virus variant of subtype B HIV-1. In this study, we evaluated virus evolution based on sequence information of the V1, V2, and V3 portions of HIV-1 clade A envelope genes obtained from peripheral blood and cervical secretions of three women with genetically heterogeneous viral populations near seroconversion. At the first sample following seroconversion, the number of nonsynonymous substitutions per potential nonsynonymous site (dn) significantly exceeded substitutions at potential synonymous sites (ds) in plasma viral sequences from all individuals. Generally, values of dn remained higher than values of ds as sequences from blood or mucosa evolved. Mutations affected each of the three variable regions of the envelope gene differently; insertions and deletions dominated changes in V1, substitutions involving charged amino acids occurred in V2, and sequential replacement of amino acids over time at a small subset of positions distinguished V3. The relationship among envelope nucleotide sequences obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, plasma, and cervical secretions was evaluated for each individual by both phylogenetic and phenetic analyses. In all subjects, sequences from within each tissue compartment were more closely related to each other than to sequences from other tissues (phylogenetic tissue compartmentalization). At time points after seroconversion in two individuals, there was also greater genetic identity among sequences from the same tissue compartment than among sequences from different tissue compartments (phenetic tissue compartmentalization). Over time, temporal phylogenetic and phenetic structure was detectable in mucosal and plasma viral samples from all three women, suggesting a continual process of migration of one or a few infected cells into each compartment followed by localized expansion and evolution of that population. PMID:9733867

  14. Immunogenicity and Efficacy of Intramuscular Replication-Defective and Subunit Vaccines against Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 in the Mouse Genital Model

    PubMed Central

    Delagrave, Simon; Hernandez, Hector; Zhou, Changhong; Hamberger, John F.; Mundle, Sophia T.; Catalan, John; Baloglu, Simge; Anderson, Stephen F.; DiNapoli, Joshua M.; Londoo-Hayes, Patricia; Parrington, Mark; Almond, Jeffrey; Kleanthous, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a sexually transmitted virus that is highly prevalent worldwide, causing a range of symptoms that result in significant healthcare costs and human suffering. ACAM529 is a replication-defective vaccine candidate prepared by growing the previously described dl5-29 on a cell line appropriate for GMP manufacturing. This vaccine, when administered subcutaneously, was previously shown to protect mice from a lethal vaginal HSV-2 challenge and to afford better protection than adjuvanted glycoprotein D (gD) in guinea pigs. Here we show that ACAM529 given via the intramuscular route affords significantly greater immunogenicity and protection in comparison with subcutaneous administration in the mouse vaginal HSV-2 challenge model. Further, we describe a side-by-side comparison of intramuscular ACAM529 with a gD vaccine across a range of challenge virus doses. While differences in protection against death are not significant, ACAM529 protects significantly better against mucosal infection, reducing peak challenge virus shedding at the highest challenge dose by over 500-fold versus 5-fold for gD. Over 27% (11/40) of ACAM529-immunized animals were protected from viral shedding while 2.5% (1/40) were protected by the gD vaccine. Similarly, 35% (7/20) of mice vaccinated with ACAM529 were protected from infection of their dorsal root ganglia while none of the gD-vaccinated mice were protected. These results indicate that measuring infection of the vaginal mucosa and of dorsal root ganglia over a range of challenge doses is more sensitive than evaluating survival at a single challenge dose as a means of directly comparing vaccine efficacy in the mouse vaginal challenge model. The data also support further investigation of ACAM529 for prophylaxis in human subjects. PMID:23071620

  15. Immunogenicity and efficacy of intramuscular replication-defective and subunit vaccines against herpes simplex virus type 2 in the mouse genital model.

    PubMed

    Delagrave, Simon; Hernandez, Hector; Zhou, Changhong; Hamberger, John F; Mundle, Sophia T; Catalan, John; Baloglu, Simge; Anderson, Stephen F; DiNapoli, Joshua M; Londoo-Hayes, Patricia; Parrington, Mark; Almond, Jeffrey; Kleanthous, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a sexually transmitted virus that is highly prevalent worldwide, causing a range of symptoms that result in significant healthcare costs and human suffering. ACAM529 is a replication-defective vaccine candidate prepared by growing the previously described dl5-29 on a cell line appropriate for GMP manufacturing. This vaccine, when administered subcutaneously, was previously shown to protect mice from a lethal vaginal HSV-2 challenge and to afford better protection than adjuvanted glycoprotein D (gD) in guinea pigs. Here we show that ACAM529 given via the intramuscular route affords significantly greater immunogenicity and protection in comparison with subcutaneous administration in the mouse vaginal HSV-2 challenge model. Further, we describe a side-by-side comparison of intramuscular ACAM529 with a gD vaccine across a range of challenge virus doses. While differences in protection against death are not significant, ACAM529 protects significantly better against mucosal infection, reducing peak challenge virus shedding at the highest challenge dose by over 500-fold versus 5-fold for gD. Over 27% (11/40) of ACAM529-immunized animals were protected from viral shedding while 2.5% (1/40) were protected by the gD vaccine. Similarly, 35% (7/20) of mice vaccinated with ACAM529 were protected from infection of their dorsal root ganglia while none of the gD-vaccinated mice were protected. These results indicate that measuring infection of the vaginal mucosa and of dorsal root ganglia over a range of challenge doses is more sensitive than evaluating survival at a single challenge dose as a means of directly comparing vaccine efficacy in the mouse vaginal challenge model. The data also support further investigation of ACAM529 for prophylaxis in human subjects. PMID:23071620

  16. Characteristics of Memory B Cells Elicited by a Highly Efficacious HPV Vaccine in Subjects with No Pre-existing Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Erin M.; Smith, Robin A.; Simonich, Cassandra A.; Niyonzima, Nixon; Carter, Joseph J.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2014-01-01

    Licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines provide near complete protection against the types of HPV that most commonly cause anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers (HPV 16 and 18) when administered to individuals naive to these types. These vaccines, like most other prophylactic vaccines, appear to protect by generating antibodies. However, almost nothing is known about the immunological memory that forms following HPV vaccination, which is required for long-term immunity. Here, we have identified and isolated HPV 16-specific memory B cells from female adolescents and young women who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in the absence of pre-existing immunity, using fluorescently conjugated HPV 16 pseudoviruses to label antigen receptors on the surface of memory B cells. Antibodies cloned and expressed from these singly sorted HPV 16-pseudovirus labeled memory B cells were predominantly IgG (>IgA>IgM), utilized diverse variable genes, and potently neutralized HPV 16 pseudoviruses in vitro despite possessing only average levels of somatic mutation. These findings suggest that the quadrivalent HPV vaccine provides an excellent model for studying the development of B cell memory; and, in the context of what is known about memory B cells elicited by influenza vaccination/infection, HIV-1 infection, or tetanus toxoid vaccination, indicates that extensive somatic hypermutation is not required to achieve potent vaccine-specific neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:25330199

  17. Evaluation for High-risk HPV in Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Precursor Lesions Arising in the Conjunctiva and Lacrimal Sac.

    PubMed

    Afrogheh, Amir H; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Hammon, Rebecca; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Rocco, James; Lindeman, Neal I; Sadow, Peter M; Faquin, William C

    2016-04-01

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) is a well-established causative agent of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In addition, HR-HPV has occasionally been reported to be present in dysplastic and malignant lesions of the conjunctiva and lacrimal sac, although its overall incidence and etiological role in periocular SCC are controversial. Sequential surgical samples of 52 combined cases of invasive SCC (I-SCC) and SCC in situ (SCCIS) from 2 periocular sites (conjunctiva and lacrimal sac) diagnosed over a 14-year period (2000 to 2014) were selected for evaluation, and relevant patient characteristics were documented. p16 immunohistochemistry was performed as a screening test. All p16-positive cases were further evaluated for HR-HPV using DNA in situ hybridization (DNA ISH), and a subset was also analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 43 ocular surface squamous neoplasias (OSSNs), 30% (n=13; 8 SCCIS and 5 I-SCC cases) were positive for HR-HPV. HPV-positive OSSNs occurred in 8 men and 5 women with a mean age of 60 years (range, 39 to 94 y). HPV type-16 was detected in all conjunctival cases evaluated by PCR. All 5 conjunctival I-SCCs were nonkeratinizing (n=4) or partially keratinizing (n=1) and managed by simple excision. In contrast, HPV-negative conjunctival I-SCCs were predominantly keratinizing (11 keratinizing and 2 nonkeratinizing). Of 9 lacrimal sac I-SCCs (LSSCCs), 66.7% (n=6) were positive for HR-HPV by p16 and DNA ISH; HPV subtypes were HPV-16 (n=5) and HPV-58 (n=1). In addition, 2 p16-positive cases with negative DNA ISH results were HR-HPV positive (HPV-16 and HPV-33) when evaluated by PCR, suggesting that the rate of HR-HPV positivity among the LSSCCs may be as high as 89% (n=8). The combined group of HR-HPV-positive LSSCCs was seen in 4 men and 4 women with a mean age of 60 years (range, 34 to 71 y). Seven of the 8 HPV-positive LSSCCs (87.5%) had a nonkeratinizing or partially keratinizing histomorphology, whereas 1 case (12.5%) was predominantly keratinizing. The presence of HR-HPV in 30% of OSSNs and at least 66.7% of LSSCCs suggests the possibility of an etiologic role for HR-HPV at these sites. PMID:26735858

  18. Female genital mutilation/cutting: an update.

    PubMed

    Rouzi, A A; Alturki, F

    2015-01-01

    Female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is a cultural practice involving several types of external female genitalia cutting. FGM/C is known to occur in all parts of the world but is most prevalent in 28 countries in Africa and the Middle East and among immigrant communities in Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States. Studies of FGM/C suffer from many methodological problems including inadequate analysis and an unclear reporting of results. The evidence to link FGM/C to infertility is weak. The management of epidermal clitoral inclusion cysts includes expensive investigations like comprehensive endocrinology tests and MRI resulting in unnecessary anxiety due to delay in surgical treatment. Similarly, unnecessary cesarean sections or rupture of the infibulation scar continue to occur because of the inadequate use of intrapartum defibulation. A significant amount of efforts is required to improve and correct the inadequate care of FGM/C women and girls. PMID:26151997

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Hand-foot-genital syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hand-foot-genital syndrome On this page: Description Genetic changes ... Glossary definitions Reviewed April 2008 What is hand-foot-genital syndrome? Hand-foot-genital syndrome is a ...

  20. A prospective, open, comparative study of 5% potassium hydroxide solution versus cryotherapy in the treatment of genital warts in men*

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Caio Lamunier de Abreu; Belda, Walter; Fagundes, Luiz Jorge; Romiti, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genital warts are caused by human papillomavirus infection and represent one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases. Many infections are transient but the virus may recur, persist, or become latent. To date, there is no effective antiviral treatment to eliminate HPV infection and most therapies are aimed at the destruction of visible lesions. Potassium hydroxide is a strong alkali that has been shown to be safe and effective for the treatment of genital warts and molluscum contagiosum. Cryotherapy is considered one of the most established treatments for genital warts. No comparative trials have been reported to date on the use of potassium hydroxide for genital warts. OBJECTIVE A prospective, open-label, randomized clinical trial was conducted to compare topical potassium hydroxide versus cryotherapy in the treatment of genital warts affecting immunocompetent, sexually active men. METHODS Over a period of 10 months, 48 patients were enrolled. They were randomly divided into two groups and selected on an alternative basis for either potassium hydroxide therapy or cryotherapy. While response to therapy did not differ substantially between both treatment modalities, side effects such as local pain and post-treatment hypopigmentation were considerably more prevalent in the groups treated using cryotherapy. RESULT In our study, potassium hydroxide therapy proved to be at least as effective as cryotherapy and offered the benefit of a better safety profile. CONCLUSION Topical 5% potassium hydroxide presents an effective, safe, and low-cost treatment modality for genital warts in men and should be included in the spectrum of therapies for genital warts. PMID:24770498

  1. Community Awareness of HPV Screening and Vaccination in Odisha

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Niharika; Ramaseshan, Aparna; Arnold, Stephanie; Panigrahi, Kalpana; Macek, Mark D.; Padhi, Bijaya K.; Samanta, Diptirani; Senapati, Surendra N.; Panigrahi, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. A number of new technologies including cervical cancer screening and vaccination have introduced new tools in the fight against cervical cancer. Methods. This study was set in Odisha, India, at the Acharya Harihar Regional Cancer Center and study research infrastructure at the Asian Institute of Public Health. IRB approvals were obtained and a research assistant recruited 286 women aged 18–49 years, who provided informed consent and completed a survey tool. Data were entered into EpiData software and statistical analysis was conducted. Results. 76.3% women participants were married, 45.5% had sexual debut at age 21 or greater, 60.5% used contraception, 12.2% reported having a Pap smear in the past, and 4.9% reported having prior genital warts. Most, 68.8% had never heard of HPV and 11.9% were aware that HPV is the main cause of cervical cancer. 82.9% women thought that vaccinations prevent disease, and 74.8% said they make the decision to vaccinate their children. Conclusion. The Odisha community demonstrated a low level of knowledge about cervical cancer prevention, accepted vaccinations in the prevention of disease and screening, and identified mothers/guardians as the key family contacts. PMID:26783394

  2. Characterization of the plasma membrane localization and orientation of HPV16 E5 for cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-10-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a non-enveloped DNA virus with an approx 8000 base pair genome. Infection with certain types of HPV is associated with cervical cancer, although the molecular mechanism by which HPV induces carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Three genes encoded by HPV16 are regarded as oncogenic - E5, E6, and E7. The role of E5 has been controversial. Expression of HPV16 E5 causes cell-cell fusion, an event that can lead to increased chromosomal instability, particularly in the presence of cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors like HPV16 E6 and E7. Using biochemical and cell biological assays to better understand HPV16 E5, we find that HPV16 E5 localizes to the plasma membrane with an intracellular amino terminus and an extracellular carboxyl-terminus. Further, HPV16 E5 must be expressed on both cells for cell fusion to occur. When the extracellular epitope of HPV16 E5 is targeted with an antibody, the number of bi-nucleated cells decreases.

  3. HPV-related squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: An update on testing in routine pathology practice.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Lewis, James S; Rocco, James W; Faquin, William C

    2015-09-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma caused by high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is now a well-recognized tumor entity whose incidence is on the rise. Most HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas have a distinct histomorphology, and most patients fit a typical clinical profile. Importantly, HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma patients overall have significantly improved outcomes when compared to their HPV-negative counterparts, and the differences in tumor biology may soon lead to modifications in how they are treated. While high-risk HPV can be detected in a significant minority of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas across anatomic subsites in the head and neck, it has become clear in recent years that the biologically and clinically favorable features are limited to tumors that harbor transcriptionally active, high-risk HPV, something that occurs predominantly (but certainly not exclusively) in the oropharynx. It is now acknowledged that detecting transcriptionally active, high-risk HPV is a necessity in routine clinical practice, but there is considerable confusion among pathologists and clinicians alike about the subsites and settings in which HPV testing should be performed. Compounding this lack of clarity is the fact that there are multiple HPV testing options available, but currently there is no clear consensus on which test or combination of tests is optimal for routine diagnostic use. This review serves as an update for practicing pathologists on the current status of HPV (and surrogate marker) testing in head and neck cancers. PMID:25724476

  4. Predictors of Genital Pain in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Melissa A.; Meston, Cindy M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of genital pain in healthy young adult women, limited research has addressed genital pain during intercourse using contemporary models of multidimensional sexual function. The objectives of this study were threefold: (1) to identify differences in sexual functioning in women who experience genital pain compared to pain free women; (2) to identify predictors of sexual functioning in women with and without genital pain; and (3) to identify predictors of sexual satisfaction in women with and without genital pain. Sexually active female undergraduates (n = 651) were administered the Female Sexual Function Index and the Derogatis Sexual Functioning Inventory. We evaluated the sexual factors that impact the sexual function of women with any pain (including high and low pain groups) versus women with no history of pain. Women with genital pain reported greater rates of sexual dysfunction as compared to pain-free women; however, sexual functioning in the high versus low pain groups was distinguished primarily by vaginal lubrication. Women in the high pain group showed negative correlations between domains of sexual satisfaction and genital pain frequency and intensity that were not found in the low pain group. For pain-free women, intercourse played a strong role in sexual satisfaction, whereas non-intercourse sexual behavior was central to sexual satisfaction in women who reported pain. The evaluation of levels of genital pain may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the impairment of sexual function, sexual behavior, and sexual satisfaction. PMID:17674182

  5. Experiential Interventions for Clients with Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Anne L.

    1999-01-01

    Explores potential benefits of incorporating concepts and interventions from experimental therapy to help clients with psychosocial difficulties in learning to live with genital herpes. Recommends experimental counseling of two-chair dialog, empty chair, and metaphor for helping clients with emotional sequelae of genital herpes. Presents case…

  6. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Genotyping: Automation and Application in Routine Laboratory Testing

    PubMed Central

    Torres, M; Fraile, L; Echevarria, JM; Hernandez Novoa, B; Ortiz, M

    2012-01-01

    A large number of assays designed for genotyping human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been developed in the last years. They perform within a wide range of analytical sensitivity and specificity values for the different viral types, and are used either for diagnosis, epidemiological studies, evaluation of vaccines and implementing and monitoring of vaccination programs. Methods for specific genotyping of HPV-16 and HPV-18 are also useful for the prevention of cervical cancer in screening programs. Some commercial tests are, in addition, fully or partially automated. Automation of HPV genotyping presents advantages such as the simplicity of the testing procedure for the operator, the ability to process a large number of samples in a short time, and the reduction of human errors from manual operations, allowing a better quality assurance and a reduction of cost. The present review collects information about the current HPV genotyping tests, with special attention to practical aspects influencing their use in clinical laboratories. PMID:23248734

  7. HPV in oropharyngeal cancer: the basics to know in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Elrefaey, S; Massaro, M A; Chiocca, S; Chiesa, F; Ansarin, M

    2014-10-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is rising in contrast to the decreasing incidence of carcinomas in other subsites of the head and neck, in spite of the reduced prevalence of smoking. Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, and in particular type 16 (HPV-16), is now recognized as a significant player in the onset of HPV positive OPSCC, with different epidemiological, clinical, anatomical, radiological, behavioural, biological and prognostic characteristics from HPV negative OPSCC. Indeed, the only subsite in the head and neck with a demonstrated aetiological viral link is, at present, the oropharynx. These observations lead to questions regarding management choices for patients based on tumour HPV status with important consequences on treatment, and on the role of vaccines and targeted therapy over the upcoming years. PMID:25709145

  8. From Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection to Cervical Cancer Prevention in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S.; Vigliotti, Veronica S.; Jones, William

    2014-01-01

    The newly gained knowledge of the viral etiology in cervical carcinogenesis has prompted industrial interests in developing virology-based tools for cervical cancer prevention. Due to the long incubation period from viral infection to developing an invasive cancer, a process whose outcome is influenced by numerous life-style and genetic factors, the true efficacy of the genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in cervical cancer prevention cannot be determined for another 30 years. Most HPV DNA test kits designed to replace the traditional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for precancer detection lack the analytical sensitivity and specificity to comprehensively detect all potentially carcinogenic HPVs and to perform reliable genotyping. The authors implemented the classic nested PCR and Sanger DNA-sequencing technology for routine HPV testing. The results showed a true negative HPV PCR invariably indicates the absence of precancerous cells in the cytology samples. However, 80.5% of single positive HPV-16 tests and 97.3% of single positive HPV-18 tests were associated with a negative or a largely self-reversible Pap cytology. Routine sensitive and reliable HPV type-specific or perhaps even variant-specific methods are needed to address the issues of persistence of HPV infection if a virology-based primary cervical screen is used to replace the Pap cytology screening paradigm. PMID:25279452

  9. Prevalent high-risk HPV infection and vaginal microbiota in Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Dareng, E O; Ma, B; Famooto, A O; Akarolo-Anthony, S N; Offiong, R A; Olaniyan, O; Dakum, P S; Wheeler, C M; Fadrosh, D; Yang, H; Gajer, P; Brotman, R M; Ravel, J; Adebamowo, C A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the association between high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) and the vaginal microbiome. Participants were recruited in Nigeria between April and August 2012. Vaginal bacterial composition was characterized by deep sequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA gene fragments (V4) on Illumina MiSeq and HPV was identified using the Roche Linear Array HPV genotyping test. We used exact logistic regression models to evaluate the association between community state types (CSTs) of vaginal microbiota and hrHPV infection, weighted UniFrac distances to compare the vaginal microbiota of individuals with prevalent hrHPV to those without prevalent hrHPV infection, and the Linear Discriminant Analysis effect size (LEfSe) algorithm to characterize bacteria associated with prevalent hrHPV infection. We observed four CSTs: CST IV-B with a low relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. in 50% of participants; CST III (dominated by L. iners) in 392%; CST I (dominated by L. crispatus) in 79%; and CST VI (dominated by proteobacteria) in 29% of participants. LEfSe analysis suggested an association between prevalent hrHPV infection and a decreased abundance of Lactobacillus sp. with increased abundance of anaerobes particularly of the genera Prevotella and Leptotrichia in HIV-negative women (P < 005). These results are hypothesis generating and further studies are required. PMID:26062721

  10. HPV Genotypes Predict Survival Benefits From Concurrent Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, School of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan ; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Huang, Yi-Ting; Chao, Angel; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hong, Ji-Hong; Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, School of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone or concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: Between August 1993 and May 2000, 327 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage III/IVA or stage IIB with positive lymph nodes) were eligible for this study. HPV genotypes were determined using the Easychip Registered-Sign HPV genechip. Outcomes were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: We detected 22 HPV genotypes in 323 (98.8%) patients. The leading 4 types were HPV16, 58, 18, and 33. The 5-year overall and disease-specific survival estimates for the entire cohort were 41.9% and 51.4%, respectively. CCRT improved the 5-year disease-specific survival by an absolute 9.8%, but this was not statistically significant (P=.089). There was a significant improvement in disease-specific survival in the CCRT group for HPV18-positive (60.9% vs 30.4%, P=.019) and HPV58-positive (69.3% vs 48.9%, P=.026) patients compared with the RT alone group. In contrast, the differences in survival with CCRT compared with RT alone in the HPV16-positive and HPV-33 positive subgroups were not statistically significant (P=.86 and P=.53, respectively). An improved disease-specific survival was observed for CCRT treated patients infected with both HPV16 and HPV18, but these differenced also were not statistically significant. Conclusions: The HPV genotype may be a useful predictive factor for the effect of CCRT in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Verifying these results in prospective trials could have an impact on tailoring future treatment based on HPV genotype.

  11. The HPV E2-Host Protein-Protein Interactions: A Complex Hijacking of the Cellular Network

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Mandy; Demeret, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Over 100 genotypes of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been identified as being responsible for unapparent infections or for lesions ranging from benign skin or genital warts to cancer. The pathogenesis of HPV results from complex relationships between viral and host factors, driven in particular by the interplay between the host proteome and the early viral proteins. The E2 protein regulates the transcription, the replication as well as the mitotic segregation of the viral genome through the recruitment of host cell factors to the HPV regulatory region. It is thereby a pivotal factor for the productive viral life cycle and for viral persistence, a major risk factor for cancer development. In addition, the E2 proteins have been shown to engage numerous interactions through which they play important roles in modulating the host cell. Such E2 activities are probably contributing to create cell conditions appropriate for the successive stages of the viral life cycle, and some of these activities have been demonstrated only for the oncogenic high-risk HPV. The recent mapping of E2-host protein-protein interactions with 12 genotypes representative of HPV diversity has shed some light on the large complexity of the host cell hijacking and on its diversity according to viral genotypes. This article reviews the functions of E2 as they emerge from the E2/host proteome interplay, taking into account the large-scale comparative interactomic study. PMID:23341853

  12. Female genital mutilation among Iraqi Kurdish women: a cross-sectional study from Erbil city

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Iraqi Kurdistan region is one of the areas where female genital mutilation is reportedly widely practiced but inadequately studied. The aim of this study was to determine (i) the prevalence of female genital mutilation among Muslim Kurdish women in Erbil city, (ii) the patterns and types of female genital mutilation, (iii) the factors associated with this practice and (iv) women’s knowledge and attitudes towards this practice. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in the primary health care centers and the Maternity Teaching Hospital in Erbil city, involving 1987 women aged 15–49 years. Data were obtained about female genital mutilation status and knowledge and perception towards this practice. The participants were clinically examined to verify the self-reported female genital mutilation status. Results The self-reported prevalence of female genital mutilation was 70.3%, while it was 58.6% according to clinical examination of the women’s genitalia. The most common type of female genital mutilation was type I (99.6%) and the most common age at which mutilation was performed was 4–7 years (60.2%). This practice was mostly performed by traditional birth attendants (72.5%). Only 6.4% of mutilated women reported having complications after mutilation, most commonly bleeding (3.6%). The practice was more reported among housewives (OR = 3.3), those women whose mothers were mutilated (OR = 15.1) or with unknown mutilation status (OR = 7.3) and those women whose fathers were illiterate (OR = 1.4) or could only read and write (OR = 1.6). The common reasons for practicing female genital mutilation were cultural tradition (46.7%) and dictate of religion (38.9%). Only 30% of the participants were aware about the health consequences of female genital mutilation. More than one third (36.6%) of the women support the practice and 34.5% have intention to mutilate their daughters. Conclusions Prevalence of female genital mutilation among Muslim Kurdish women in Erbil city is very high; although, most cases are of type I. There is clear lack of knowledge about the health consequences of female genital mutilation and a relatively important segment of women support this practice. Custom or tradition and dictate of religion are the main reasons for this practice that need further in-depth exploration. PMID:24010850

  13. Epidemiology of HPV infection and current status of cervical cancer prevention in Greece: final results of the LYSISTRATA cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Agorastos, Theodoros; Chatzistamatiou, Kimon; Zafrakas, Menelaos; Siamanta, Vagia; Katsamagkas, Taxiarchis; Constantinidis, Theodoros C; Lampropoulos, Alexandros F

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the overall prevalence of the human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and distribution of high-risk HPV (hrHPV) types in Greece and evaluate the participation of women in primary and secondary cervical cancer prevention. This was a prospective, cross-sectional study carried out between October 2005 and January 2011 in Greece; 5379 women filled out the study questionnaire anonymously. 5107 women underwent cervical HPV-DNA testing, either by Hybrid Capture 2, followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR, or by the Abbott Real-Time High-Risk HPV test. Overall, 5.8% (295/5107) of women were positive for hrHPV infection. The most common hrHPV type was HPV-16 (24.8% among infected women; 1.4% overall), followed by HPV types 31, 35, 53, 18, 51, 56, 58, 52, 39, 66, 45, 33, 59, and 68. In respect to primary prevention of cervical cancer, acceptance of anti-HPV vaccination appeared to decrease over time (from 85-89.9% annually during 2005-2008 to 64.4-60.5% during 2009-2010, P<0.001). In respect to secondary prevention, only 30.3% of women had regular (annually for more than 5 years) Pap smears; regular gynecologic examinations, Papanicolaou testing, and knowledge of HPV were all associated with various demographic parameters (age, education, place of residence, occupation, and income). The prevalence of hrHPV infection in Greece is similar to that in other European countries; the most common type is HPV-16. The initially relatively high acceptance of HPV vaccination decreased after licensing of the vaccine. Demographic parameters appear to influence participation in cervical cancer screening. PMID:24977385

  14. Tumourigenesis Driven by the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Asian-American E6 Variant in a Three-Dimensional Keratinocyte Model

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Robert; Togtema, Melissa; Lambert, Paul F.; Zehbe, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    Infection with a transforming human papillomavirus (HPV) such as type 16 (of species Alphapapillomavirus 9) causes ano-genital and oral tumours via viral persistence in human squamous cell epithelia. Epidemiological studies showed that the naturally occurring HPV16 Asian-American (AA) variant (sublineage D2/D3) is found more often than the European Prototype (EP) (sublineage A1) in high-grade cervical neoplasia and tumours compared to non-cancer controls. Just three amino acid changes within the early gene, E6, of HPV16 AA have been linked to this augmented tumourigenicity. The AAE6 variant's greater immortalizing and transforming potential over EPE6 has recently been confirmed in retrovirally-transduced keratinocytes expressing the E6 gene only. However, the tumourigenic role of the full-length viral genome of HPV16 has not yet been addressed with regard to these E6 variants. To investigate this process in the context of these two HPV16 E6 genotypes, an organotypic tissue culture model was used to simulate the HPV infectious life cycle. The AAE6 variant demonstrated an enhanced ability over EPE6 to drive the viral life cycle toward tumourigenesis, as evidenced phenotypicallyby a more severe grade of epithelial dysplasia with higher proliferation and deregulated differentiation, and molecularlyby high viral oncogene E6 and E7 expression, but lack of productive viral life cycle markers. In contrast, EPE6 had low E6 and E7 but high E1?E4 expression, indicative of a productive life cycle. We suggest increased viral integration into the host genome for AAE6 as one possible mechanism for these observed differences from EPE6. Additionally, we found downstream effects on immortalization and host innate immune evasion. This study highlights how minor genomic variations in transforming viruses can have a significant affect on their tumourigenic ability. PMID:24983759

  15. Clinical Validation of Anyplex II HPV HR Detection Test for Cervical Cancer Screening in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sunkyung; Lee, Byungdoo; Lee, Kap No; Kim, Yonggoo; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    Context .- The Anyplex II HPV HR detection kit (Seegene Inc, Seoul, Korea) is a new, multiplex, real-time polymerase chain reaction assay to detect individual 14 high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) types in a single tube. Objective .- To evaluate the clinical performance of the HPV HR kit in predicting high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical intraepithelial lesions grade 2 or worse in cervical cancer screening. Design .- We analyzed 1137 cervical samples in Huro Path medium (CelltraZone, Seoul, Korea) from Korean women. The clinical performance of the HPV HR kit was compared with Hybrid Capture 2 (Qiagen, Valencia, California) using the noninferiority score test in a routine cervical cancer screening setting. The intralaboratory and interlaboratory agreements of HPV HR were also evaluated. Results .- Overall agreement between the 2 assays was 92.4% (1051 of 1137) with a κ value of 0.787. Clinical sensitivity of HPV HR for high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical intraepithelial lesions grade 2 or worse was 94.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 89.2-99.7) and 92.5% (95% CI, 84.3-100.0), respectively. The respective values for Hybrid Capture 2 were 93.1% (95% CI, 87.2-98.9) and 87.5% (95% CI, 77.3-99.7). Clinical sensitivity and specificity of HPV HR were not inferior to those of Hybrid Capture 2 (P = .005 and P = .04, respectively). The HPV HR showed good intralaboratory and interlaboratory reproducibility at 98.0% (κ = 0.953) and 97.4% (κ = 0.940), respectively. Conclusions .- The HPV HR demonstrates comparable performance to the Hybrid Capture 2 test and can be useful for HPV-based cervical cancer screening testing. PMID:26927723

  16. Prevalence of sexually transmitted pathogens associated with HPV infection in cervical samples in a Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Magaa-Contreras, Mariana; Contreras-Paredes, Adriana; Chavez-Blanco, Alma; Lizano, Marcela; De la Cruz-Hernandez, Yanira; De la Cruz-Hernandez, Erick

    2015-12-01

    Cervical cancer development has been mainly associated with persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. However, HPV infection is unlikely to be sufficient to cause cervical cancer, and the contribution of other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) could be the determining factor for cervical lesion-progression. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of STIs associated with HPV-positivity in 201 cervical samples from patients who underwent annual routine gynecological exams. The overall prevalence of STIs was 57.7%, and the most frequent infection was Ureaplasma spp (UP) (39.8%), followed by Gardnerella vaginalis (GV) (25.9%), ?-HPV (18.4%), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) (1.5%), and Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) (0.5%). The highest prevalence rate of multiple non-HPV infections was observed for the age-range 31-40; for papillomavirus infection, the age-range was 21-30. In normal cervical samples, HPV16 was the most prevalent genotype (24.3%), followed by genotypes 58 (13.5%) and 52 (10.8%). Intriguingly, HPV18 was not detected in the study population, and genotypes 52 and 58 were found exclusively in samples with abnormal cytology. Papillomavirus infection with oncogenic types was significantly associated with GV (P?=?0.025) and strongly associated with multiple non-HPV pathogens (P?=?0.002). The following variables correlated significantly with cytological diagnosis of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL): GV (P?=?0.028), multiple non-HPV infections (P?=?0.001), and high-risk HPV positivity (P?=?0.001). Epidemiological data from this study will contribute to the molecular detection of sexually transmitted pathogens from screening programs to identify those women who are at risk for developing cervical lesions. PMID:26010580

  17. Overcoming barriers to HPV vaccination: A randomized clinical trial of a culturally-tailored, media intervention among African American girls.

    PubMed

    DiClemente, Ralph J; Murray, Colleen Crittenden; Graham, Tracie; Still, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Although genital HPV is the most prevalent STI in the US, rates of vaccination uptake among high-risk subgroups remain low. Investigations of vaccine compliance have mainly targeted mother-daughter dyads, which in some settings may prove difficult. This study examines an innovative culturally tailored, computer-delivered media-based strategy to promote HPV vaccine uptake. Data, inclusive of sociodemographics, sexual behaviors, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about HPV and vaccination were collected via ACASI from 216 African American adolescent females (ages 14-18 years) seeking services in family planning and STI public health clinics in metropolitan Atlanta. Data were obtained prior to randomization and participation in an interactive media-based intervention designed to increase HPV vaccination uptake. Medical record abstraction was conducted 7 month post-randomization to assess initial vaccine uptake and compliance. Participants in the intervention were more compliant to vaccination relative to a placebo comparison condition (26 doses vs. Seventeen doses; p=0.12). However, vaccination series initiation and completion were lower than the national average. Thorough evaluation is needed to better understand factors facilitating HPV vaccine uptake and compliance, particularly perceived susceptibility and the influence of the patient-provider encounter in a clinical setting. PMID:26378650

  18. HPV mRNA and p16 detection as biomarkers for the improved diagnosis of cervical neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cuschieri, Kate; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    HPV infection of the genital tract is very common and normally follows a benign clinical course, however in an unfortunate minority of infected individuals it can cause disease which sometimes leads to cancer. It is accepted that HPV DNA testing has a role in the management of cervical disease both in a pre and post vaccination era, however to improve the specificity of this approach, there is a requirement to develop and validate tools/assays that can identify women at risk for progressive disease. There is evidence to suggest that detection of viral gene expression both directly and indirectly may constitute a more specific approach for delineating clinically significant infection compared with HPV DNA based assays. HPV oncogene expression and evidence of its deregulation can be monitored through direct detection of viral mRNA transcripts or through detection of the cellular protein p16. For both approaches, commercial assays have been introduced and numerous studies have been conducted. The present article describes the scientific theory underpinning these approaches, their amenability to routine-diagnostic specimens/settings and the clinical data that has been garnered through their application thus far. Currently, there is promising data indicating that HPV mRNA and p16 might play an important role in future cervical cancer screening scenarios. Still, large randomized studies are necessary to confirm the preliminary data PMID:18842994

  19. Epidemiology of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pytynia, Kristen B.; Dahlstrom, Kristina R.; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx is increasing in incidence in epidemic proportion. This site specific increase in incidence is due to an increase in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related squamous cell carcinoma, while the incidence of tobacco related squamous cell carcinoma is decreasing. In particular, the incidence of HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increased among middle aged white men, and sexual behavior is a risk factor. HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma represents a growing etiologically distinct subset of head and neck cancers with unique epidemiological, clinical, and molecular characteristics that differ from those of HPV-unassociated cancers. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of HPV-related OPSCC, the prevalence of oral/oropharyngeal HPV infection, and efforts aimed at reducing the incidence of HPV-related OPSCC. PMID:24461628

  20. Epidemiology of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pytynia, Kristen B; Dahlstrom, Kristina R; Sturgis, Erich M

    2014-05-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx is increasing in incidence in epidemic proportion. This site specific increase in incidence is due to an increase in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related squamous cell carcinoma, while the incidence of tobacco related squamous cell carcinoma is decreasing. In particular, the incidence of HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increased among middle aged white men, and sexual behavior is a risk factor. HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma represents a growing etiologically distinct subset of head and neck cancers with unique epidemiological, clinical, and molecular characteristics that differ from those of HPV-unassociated cancers. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of HPV-related OPSCC, the prevalence of oral/oropharyngeal HPV infection, and efforts aimed at reducing the incidence of HPV-related OPSCC. PMID:24461628

  1. Genital divergence in sympatric sister snails.

    PubMed

    Hollander, J; Smadja, C M; Butlin, R K; Reid, D G

    2013-01-01

    A pattern of greater divergence in mating traits between sister-species pairs with overlapping ranges than between allopatric species pairs is expected if reinforcement commonly contributes to speciation. Few large-scale comparative analyses have addressed this prediction, especially for genital form. Here, we show that penial morphology follows the predicted pattern in 40 robustly identified sister-species pairs in the marine gastropod subfamily Littorininae. Further work is needed to exclude other processes that may contribute to genital divergence between sympatric species, but the clear pattern we observe strongly suggests a role for genital form in reproductive isolation in this large clade. PMID:23163483

  2. Distribution of HPV genotypes in Shanghai women

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Suman; Zhou, Qian; Yu, Yunyun; Xu, Xianghong; Huang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Junwei; Han, Lingfei; Wang, Kai; Sun, Jing; Li, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the Distribution of HPV genotypes in Shanghai women. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital affiliated with Tongji University. Population: Patients those attended in the cervical disease diagnosis and treatment center of Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital between January 2011 and December 2014. Methods: HPV GenoArray test kit (HybriBio Ltd) was used to perform HPV genotyping and was also used in DNA amplification and HybriBios proprietary flow-through hybridization technique. Results: In this study, total patients analyzed were 4585. Among 4585 sample the HPV positive patients were 1460 i.e. 31.84% in total. On the basis of pathological report normal were 1358, with inflammation 2441, with low grade lesion were 399, high grade lesion were 353, CIN were 19 and cervical carcinoma were 15. Among normal HPV positive were 215 (15.8%), among inflammation HPV positive were 735 (30.11%). HPV positive in low grade lesion were 353 i.e. 59.77%. In high grade lesion 211 were HPV positive among 272 (68.17%). The percentage of HPV positive was 73.68% i.e. 14 out of 19 patient in cervical carcinoma in situ. 13 patient out of 15 i.e. 86.67% of Cervical carcinoma were HPV positive. Among all percentage of HPV positive was high among cervical carcinoma then cervical carcinoma in situ then high grade lesion in decreasing fashion to low grade lesion and in normal. Highest prevalence i.e. 22.67% is of HPV 52 subtype and HPV 16 has second highest prevalence with 17.67% among HPV positive cases. Sensitivity of TCT detection is 71.6%. Specificity of TCT detection is 79.6%. Sensitivity of HPV-DNA detection is 65.2%. Specificity of HPV-DNA detection is 78.2%. Conclusion: HPV is one of major health concern in shanghai having high prevalence rate in comparison to other part of china and other part of world. This has implications for the future cervical cancer burden and the priority to be given to prevent cervical cancer in Shanghai, especially, given the promising efficacy of prophylactic vaccines against HPV52, 16 and 58. This study also shows high sensitivity and specificity of TCT and HPV-DNA detection. PMID:26617946

  3. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Cervarix)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... HPV vaccine has been in use around the world for several years and has been very safe.However, any medicine could possibly cause a serious problem, such as a severe allergic reaction. The risk of any vaccine causing a serious injury, or death, is extremely small.Life-threatening allergic ...

  4. Female genital cutting practices in Burkina Faso and Mali and their negative health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jones, H; Diop, N; Askew, I; Kabor, I

    1999-09-01

    Observations of the types of female genital cutting and possible associated gynecological and delivery complications were undertaken in 21 clinics in rural Burkina Faso and in four rural and four urban clinics in Mali. Women who came to the clinics for services that included a pelvic exam were included in the study, and trained clinic staff observed the presence and type of cut and any associated complications. Ninety-three percent of the women in the Burkina Faso clinics and 94 percent of the women in the Mali clinics had undergone genital cutting. In Burkina Faso, type 1 (clitoridectomy) was the most prevalent (56 percent), whereas in Mali the more severe type 2 cut (excision) was the most prevalent (74 percent); 5 percent of both samples had undergone type 3 cutting (infibulation). Logistic regression analyses show significant positive relationships between the severity of genital cutting and the probability that a woman would have gynecological and obstetric complications. PMID:10546313

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of HPV Vaccination and Cervical Cancer Screening in Women over Age 30 in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jane J.; Ortendahl, Jesse; Goldie, Sue J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Women over the age of 30 are the main beneficiaries of improved cervical cancer screening with human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing. The role of vaccination against HPV types 16 and 18, recommended routinely in pre-adolescent girls, is unclear in this age group. Objective To assess the health and economic outcomes of HPV vaccination in older women participating in the U.S. screening program. Design Cost-effectiveness analysis with an empirically-calibrated model. Data Sources Published literature. Target Population U.S. women, ages 3545. Time Horizon Lifetime. Perspective Societal. Interventions HPV vaccination added to screening strategies that differ by test (cytology, HPV DNA testing), frequency, and start age, versus screening alone. Outcome Measures Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (2006 U.S. dollars per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained). Results of Base-Case Analysis In the context of annual or biennial screening, HPV vaccination of women ages 3545 ranged from $116,950 to $272,350 per QALY using cytology with HPV DNA testing for triage of equivocal results, and from $193,690 to $381,590 per QALY using combination cytology and HPV DNA testing, depending on age and screening frequency. Results of Sensitivity Analysis Probabilistic sensitivity analysis revealed that the probability of HPV vaccination being cost-effective for women ages 3545 was 0% when screening occurred annually or biennially, and <5% when screening occurred triennially, at thresholds considered good value for money. Limitations Uncertainty in the natural history of disease and vaccine efficacy in older women. Conclusions Given currently available information, the effectiveness of HPV vaccination of screened women over age 30 appears, on average, to be small. Compared with current screening that uses sensitive HPV DNA testing, HPV vaccination in this older population is associated with cost-effectiveness ratios that are less attractive than well-accepted interventions in the U.S. PMID:19841455

  6. TGF-? regulation of gene expression at early and late stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kowli, Sangeeta; Velidandla, Rupa; Creek, Kim E; Pirisi, Lucia

    2013-12-01

    In our in vitro model for HPV16-mediated transformation, HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes (HKc/HPV16) give rise to differentiation resistant, premalignant cells (HKc/DR). HKc/DR, but not HKc/HPV16, are resistant to growth inhibition by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?), due to a partial loss of TGF-? receptor type I. We show that TGF-? activates a Smad-responsive reporter construct in HKc/DR to about 50% of the maximum levels of activation observed in HKc/HPV16. To investigate the functional significance of residual TGF-? signaling in HKc/DR, we compared gene expression profiles elicited by TGF-? treatment of HKc/HPV16 and HKc/DR on Agilent 44k human whole genome microarrays. TGF-? altered the expression of cell cycle and MAP kinase pathway genes in HKc/HPV16, but not in HKc/DR. However, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) responses to TGF-? were comparable in HKc/HPV16 and HKc/DR, indicating that the signaling pathways through which TGF-? elicits growth inhibition diverge from those that induce EMT in HPV16-transformed cells. PMID:24210100

  7. Herpes Simplex (Cold Sores and Genital Herpes)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 19, 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 508 Herpes Simplex (Cold Sores and Genital Herpes) WHAT IS HERPES? HSV AND HIV HOW IS HSV TRANSMITTED? HOW IS HERPES TREATED? CAN HERPES BE PREVENTED? THE BOTTOM LINE ...

  8. Identification of Broad-Genotype HPV L2 Neutralization Site for Pan-HPV Vaccine Development by a Cross-Neutralizing Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daning; Li, Zhihai; Xiao, Jieqiong; Wang, Junqi; Zhang, Li; Liu, Yajing; Fan, Fei; Xin, Lu; Wei, Minxi; Kong, Zhibo; Yu, Hai; Gu, Ying; Zhang, Jun; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV), a non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA virus, is responsible for 5% of human cancers. The HPV capsid consists of major and minor structural proteins, L1 and L2. L1 proteins form an icosahedral shell with building blocks of the pentameric capsomere, and one L2 molecule extends outward from the central hole of the capsid. Thus, L2 is concealed within L1 and only becomes exposed when the capsid interacts with host cells. The low antigenic variation of L2 means that this protein could offer a target for the development of a pan-HPV vaccine. Toward this goal, here we describe an anti-L2 monoclonal antibody, 14H6, which broadly neutralizes at least 11 types of HPV, covering types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58 and 59, in pseudovirionbased cell neutralization assay. The mAb 14H6 recognizes a minimal linear epitope located on amino acids 21 to 30 of the L2 protein. Alanine scanning mutagenesis and sequence alignment identified several conserved residues (Cys22, Lys23, Thr27, Cys28 and Pro29) that are involved in the 14H6 binding with L2. The epitope was grafted to several scaffolding proteins, including HPV16 L1 virus-like particles, HBV 149 core antigen and CRM197. The resultant chimeric constructs were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified with high efficiency. Immunization with these pan-HPV vaccine candidates elicited high titers of the L2-specific antibody in mice and conferred robust (3-log) titers of cross-genotype neutralization, including against HPV11, 16, 18, 45, 52, 58 and 59. These findings will help in the development of an L2-based, pan-HPV vaccine. PMID:25905781

  9. Association of HPV with genetic and epigenetic alterations in colorectal adenocarcinoma from Indian population.

    PubMed

    Laskar, Ruhina S; Talukdar, Fazlur R; Choudhury, Javed H; Singh, Seram Anil; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Dhar, Bishal; Mondal, Rosy; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Several studies from developing countries have shown human papillomavirus to be associated with colorectal cancers, but the molecular characteristics of such cancers are poorly known. We studied the various genetic variations like microsatellite instability (MSI), oncogenic mutations and epigenetic deregulations like CpG island methylation in HPV associated and nonassociated colorectal cancer patients from Indian population. HPV DNA was detected by PCR using My09/My11 and Gp5+/Gp6+ consensus primers and typed using HPV16 and HPV18 specific primers. MSI was detected using BAT 25 and BAT 26 markers, and mutation of KRAS, TP53 and BRAF V600E were detected by direct sequencing. Methyl specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) was used to determine promoter methylation of the classical CIMP panel markers (P16, hMLH1, MINT1, MINT2 and MINT31) and other tumour-related genes (DAPK, RASSF1, BRCA1 and GSTP1). HPV DNA was detected in 34/93 (36.5 %) colorectal tumour tissues, HPV 18 being the predominant high-risk type. MSI was detected in 7.5 % cases; KRAS codon 12, 13, BRAF V600E and TP53 mutations were detected in 36.5, 3.2 and 37.6 % of the cases, respectively. CIMP-high was observed in 44.08 % cases. HPV presence was not associated with age, stage or grade of tumours, MSI or mutations in KRAS, TP53 or BRAF genes. Higher methylation frequencies of all genes/loci under study except RASSF1, as well as significantly higher CIMP-high characteristics were observed in HPV positive tumours as compared to negative cases. HPV in association with genetic and epigenetic features might be a potent risk factor for colorectal cancer in Indian population. PMID:25647260

  10. Cervical cancer screening and HPV genotype distribution among asymptomatic patients of Karachi Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Mubeena; Kazmi, Shahana Urooj; Rehman, Ameena; Ainuddin, Jahanara; Furqan, Sayed; Nazeer, Sobia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer in females worldwide. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a sexually transmitted infection. However, in addition to HPV infection, other factors exist that influence the risk of developing cervical cancer. In Pakistan most women who developed cervical cancer have been infrequently or never screened. Objective: To determine the prevalence of HPV infection and its subtype profile among asymptomatic patients with pre cancerous cervical intraepithelial lesion. Methods: In this hospital-based descriptive study, 160 asymptomatic females attending gynecology clinics were subjected to HPV screening after obtaining informed consent. Cervical Scrapings were examined by cytopathology and colposcopic directed biopsies taken. High-grade intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) CIN-2, and Low-grade intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) CIN-1 were selected. Samples were analyzed for the presence of HPV-DNA general and type specific genotype 16 and 18. HPV- DNA was extracted by QIA amp DNA kit protocol and amplification was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genotyped by type specific primers. Results: Out of 160, 17 Pap smear tests were positive, 6 (35.3%) with abnormal results (HSIL) CIN-2 were HPV-DNA positive. Among them, 5 (83.3%) had subtype 16 and in 1 (16.7%) case the genotype was undetectable. The remaining 11(6.9%) with pre cancer minimal abnormal (LSIL) CIN-1 presented. Out of them 3 (27.3%) were HPV-DNA positive with subtype 16. Five (45.4%) were followed by repeated pap smear every six months for two years, and the rest of 3 (27.3%) patients refused for the test. Conclusion: A high incidence of Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is found in women with pre cancerous lesion of cervix in Pakistani women. PMID:26150831

  11. Quantifying Clinical HPV4 Dose Inefficiencies in a Safety Net Population

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Diane M.; Verdenius, Inge; Ratnaraj, Felicia; Arey, Anne M.; Rosemergey, Beth; Malnar, Gerard J.; Wall, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Purpose HPV4 is the most expensive vaccine requiring three appropriately timed doses to provide maximal efficacy against two oncogenic HPV types. The primary purpose of this study is to quantify the use of HPV4 vaccine in a safety net health care system in terms of its inefficiencies. Methods A retrospective study of HPV4 dosing from 2006–2009, among females 10–26 years old who sought care in a safety net health care system was conducted to determine dose usage patterns among those at highest risk for cervical cancer. Dose descriptors abstracted from the electronic medical record (EMR) included timing and number in series as well as characteristics of the person to whom and visit at which the dose was given. Dose inefficiencies were separated into “less than three doses” and “mistimed doses” for analysis. Results The majority (66%) of HPV4 doses administered were insufficient to induce the maximal immune response necessary for HPV infection prevention. Among on-time doses, 58% were singleton or doublet doses. Mistimed doses accounted for 19% of all doses administered with late intervals being more common than early intervals among those receiving more than one dose (9% vs. 4%, p<0.001). Third doses were mistimed twice as often as second doses (10% vs. 5%, p<0.001). Black women were more likely to have a mistimed second dose and Hispanic women more likely to have a mistimed third dose compared to white women (OR = 1.70 (95% CI: 1.11, 2.61 and 2.44 (1.19, 5.00), respectively). The HPV4-only visit type at which HPV4 was initiated was the most significant predictor of on-time doublet completion. Conclusions In a safety net health care system the large inefficiencies associated with HPV4 vaccination must be addressed in order to maximize our patient’s cervical cancer prevention. PMID:24223131

  12. Angiokeratoma of vulva mimicking genital warts.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Amit Kumar; Pandhi, Deepika; Goyal, Surbhi; Bisherwal, Kavita

    2014-12-01

    Angiokeratoma of vulva is a relatively rare lesion which is occasionally misdiagnosed as melanoma, pyogenic granuloma, seborrheic keratosis, or genital warts. We report a case of vulvar angiokeratomas which were diagnosed and managed as genital warts. All asymptomatic dull red-colored papules over vulva should be subjected to astute clinical and histological examination to diagnose angiokeratoma and differentiate it from other lesions. PMID:25404845

  13. HPV prevalence and genetic predisposition to cervical cancer in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer incidence is low in Saudi Arabian women, suggesting low prevalence to HPV infection due to environmental, cultural and genetic differences. Therefore, we investigated HPV prevalence and genotype distribution in cervical cancer as well as the association with 9 genetic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): CDKN1A (p21) C31A, TP53 C72G, ATM G1853A, HDM2 promoter T309G, HDM2 A110G, LIG4 A591G, XRCC1 G399A, XRCC3 C241T and TGF?1 T10C, presumed to predispose to cancer. Methods One hundred cervical cancer patients (90 squamous cell carcinoma and 10 adenocarcinoma) and 100 age/sex-matched controls were enrolled. SNPs were genotyped by direct sequencing and HPV was detected and typed in tumors using the HPV Linear Array Test. Results Eighty-two cases (82%) were positive for HPV sequences. Seven HPV genotypes were present as single infections (16, 18, 31, 45, 56, 59, 73) and five double infections (16/18, 16/39, 16/70, 35/52, 45/59) were detected. Most common genotypes were HPV-16 (71%), 31 (7%), and 18, 45, 73 (4% each). Only XRCC1 SNP was significantly associated with cervical cancer (P=0.02, OD=1.69; 95% CI= 1.062.66). However, nested analysis revealed a preponderance of HPV-positivity in patients harboring the presumed risk allele TP53 G (P=0.06). Both XRCC1 and TP53 SNPs tended to deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE; P=0.03-0.07). Conclusions HPV prevalence (82%) in cervical cancer is at the lower range of the worldwide estimation (85 - 99%). While XRCC1 G399A was significantly associated with cervical cancer, TP53 G72C showed borderline association only in HPV-positive patients. Deviation from HWE in HPV-positive patients indicates co-selection, hence implicating the combination of HPV and SNPs in cancer predisposition. Thus, SNPs could be more relevant biomarkers of susceptibility to cervical cancer when associated with HPV infection. PMID:23642098

  14. Comparative humoral and cellular immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in healthy women aged 1845years: Follow-up through Month 48 in a Phase III randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Mark H; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Takacs, Peter; Catteau, Grgory; Dessy, Francis J; Moris, Philippe; Lin, Lan; Struyf, Frank; Dubin, Gary

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported higher anti-HPV-16 and -18 immune responses induced by HPV-16/18 vaccine compared with HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine at Month 7 (one month after completion of full vaccination series) in women aged 1845 y in an observer-blind study NCT00423046; the differences of immune response magnitudes were maintained up to Month 24. Here we report follow-up data through Month 48. At Month 48, in according-to-protocol cohort for immunogenicity (seronegative and DNA-negative for HPV type analyzed at baseline), geometric mean titers of serum neutralizing antibodies were 2.0- to 5.2-fold higher (HPV-16) and 8.6- to 12.8-fold higher (HPV-18) in HPV-16/18 vaccine group than in HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine group. The majority of women in both vaccine groups remained seropositive for HPV-16. The same trend was observed for HPV-18 in HPV-16/18 vaccine group; however, seropositivity rates in HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine group decreased considerably, particularly in the older age groups. In the total vaccinated cohort (regardless of baseline serological and HPV-DNA status), anti-HPV-16 and -18 neutralizing antibody levels induced by HPV-16/18 vaccine were higher than those induced by HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine. CD4+ T-cell response for HPV-16 and HPV-18 was higher in HPV-16/18 vaccine group than in HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine group. Memory B-cell responses appeared similar between vaccine groups. Both vaccines were generally well tolerated. Overall, the higher immune response observed with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was maintained up to Month 48. A head-to-head study incorporating clinical endpoints would be required to confirm whether the observed differences in immune response between the vaccines influence the duration of protection they provided. PMID:25483700

  15. Comparative humoral and cellular immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine