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Sample records for genome based cell

  1. Obtaining genomes from uncultivated environmental microorganisms using FACS-based single-cell genomics.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Christian; Lee, Janey; Nath, Nandita; Goudeau, Danielle; Thompson, Brian; Poulton, Nicole; Dmitrieff, Elizabeth; Malmstrom, Rex; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-05-01

    Single-cell genomics is a powerful tool for exploring the genetic makeup of environmental microorganisms, the vast majority of which are difficult, if not impossible, to cultivate with current approaches. Here we present a comprehensive protocol for obtaining genomes from uncultivated environmental microbes via high-throughput single-cell isolation by FACS. The protocol encompasses the preservation and pretreatment of differing environmental samples, followed by the physical separation, lysis, whole-genome amplification and 16S rRNA-based identification of individual bacterial and archaeal cells. The described procedure can be performed with standard molecular biology equipment and a FACS machine. It takes <12 h of bench time over a 4-d time period, and it generates up to 1 μg of genomic DNA from an individual microbial cell, which is suitable for downstream applications such as PCR amplification and shotgun sequencing. The completeness of the recovered genomes varies, with an average of ∼50%. PMID:24722403

  2. Manifold Based Optimization for Single-Cell 3D Genome Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Collas, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structure of the genome is important for orchestration of gene expression and cell differentiation. While mapping genomes in 3D has for a long time been elusive, recent adaptations of high-throughput sequencing to chromosome conformation capture (3C) techniques, allows for genome-wide structural characterization for the first time. However, reconstruction of "consensus" 3D genomes from 3C-based data is a challenging problem, since the data are aggregated over millions of cells. Recent single-cell adaptations to the 3C-technique, however, allow for non-aggregated structural assessment of genome structure, but data suffer from sparse and noisy interaction sampling. We present a manifold based optimization (MBO) approach for the reconstruction of 3D genome structure from chromosomal contact data. We show that MBO is able to reconstruct 3D structures based on the chromosomal contacts, imposing fewer structural violations than comparable methods. Additionally, MBO is suitable for efficient high-throughput reconstruction of large systems, such as entire genomes, allowing for comparative studies of genomic structure across cell-lines and different species. PMID:26262780

  3. SINGLE CELL GENOME SEQUENCING

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Suzan; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-01-01

    Whole genome amplification and next-generation sequencing of single cells has become a powerful approach for studying uncultivated microorganisms that represent 90–99 % of all environmental microbes. Single cell sequencing enables not only the identification of microbes but also linking of functions to species, a feat not achievable by metagenomic techniques. Moreover, it allows the analysis of low abundance species that may be missed in community-based analyses. It has also proved very useful in complementing metagenomics in the assembly and binning of single genomes. With the advent of drastically cheaper and higher throughput sequencing technologies, it is expected that single cell sequencing will become a standard tool in studying the genome and transcriptome of microbial communities. PMID:22154471

  4. Single gene-based distinction of individual microbial genomes from a mixed population of microbial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tamminen, Manu V.; Virta, Marko P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in environmental microbiology has revealed vast populations of microbes in any given habitat that cannot be detected by conventional culturing strategies. The use of sensitive genetic detection methods such as CARD-FISH and in situ PCR have been limited by the cell wall permeabilization requirement that cannot be performed similarly on all cell types without lysing some and leaving some nonpermeabilized. Furthermore, the detection of low copy targets such as genes present in single copies in the microbial genomes, has remained problematic. We describe an emulsion-based procedure to trap individual microbial cells into picoliter-volume polyacrylamide droplets that provide a rigid support for genetic material and therefore allow complete degradation of cellular material to expose the individual genomes. The polyacrylamide droplets are subsequently converted into picoliter-scale reactors for genome amplification. The amplified genomes are labeled based on the presence of a target gene and differentiated from those that do not contain the gene by flow cytometry. Using the Escherichia coli strains XL1 and MC1061, which differ with respect to the presence (XL1), or absence (MC1061) of a single copy of a tetracycline resistance gene per genome, we demonstrate that XL1 genomes present at 0.1% of MC1061 genomes can be differentiated using this method. Using a spiked sediment microbial sample, we demonstrate that the method is applicable to highly complex environmental microbial communities as a target gene-based screen for individual microbes. The method provides a novel tool for enumerating functional cell populations in complex microbial communities. We envision that the method could be optimized for fluorescence-activated cell sorting to enrich genetic material of interest from complex environmental samples. PMID:25814987

  5. Single-Base Pair Genome Editing in Human Cells by Using Site-Specific Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with human diseases or phenotypes. However, causal relationships between most SNPs and the associated disease have not been established, owing to technical challenges such as unavailability of suitable cell lines. Recently, efficient editing of a single base pair in the genome was achieved using programmable site-specific nucleases. This technique enables experimental confirmation of the causality between SNPs and disease, and is potentially valuable in clinical applications. In this review, I introduce the molecular basis and describe examples of single-base pair editing in human cells. I also discuss the challenges associated with the technique, as well as possible solutions. PMID:26404258

  6. Single-cell genomics-based analysis of virus–host interactions in marine surface bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Labonté, Jessica M; Swan, Brandon K; Poulos, Bonnie; Luo, Haiwei; Koren, Sergey; Hallam, Steven J; Sullivan, Matthew B; Woyke, Tanja; Eric Wommack, K; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections dynamically alter the composition and metabolic potential of marine microbial communities and the evolutionary trajectories of host populations with resulting feedback on biogeochemical cycles. It is quite possible that all microbial populations in the ocean are impacted by viral infections. Our knowledge of virus–host relationships, however, has been limited to a minute fraction of cultivated host groups. Here, we utilized single-cell sequencing to obtain genomic blueprints of viruses inside or attached to individual bacterial and archaeal cells captured in their native environment, circumventing the need for host and virus cultivation. A combination of comparative genomics, metagenomic fragment recruitment, sequence anomalies and irregularities in sequence coverage depth and genome recovery were utilized to detect viruses and to decipher modes of virus–host interactions. Members of all three tailed phage families were identified in 20 out of 58 phylogenetically and geographically diverse single amplified genomes (SAGs) of marine bacteria and archaea. At least four phage–host interactions had the characteristics of late lytic infections, all of which were found in metabolically active cells. One virus had genetic potential for lysogeny. Our findings include first known viruses of Thaumarchaeota, Marinimicrobia, Verrucomicrobia and Gammaproteobacteria clusters SAR86 and SAR92. Viruses were also found in SAGs of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A high fragment recruitment of viral metagenomic reads confirmed that most of the SAG-associated viruses are abundant in the ocean. Our study demonstrates that single-cell genomics, in conjunction with sequence-based computational tools, enable in situ, cultivation-independent insights into host–virus interactions in complex microbial communities. PMID:25848873

  7. Single-cell genomics-based analysis of virus-host interactions in marine surface bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Labonté, Jessica M; Swan, Brandon K; Poulos, Bonnie; Luo, Haiwei; Koren, Sergey; Hallam, Steven J; Sullivan, Matthew B; Woyke, Tanja; Wommack, K Eric; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2015-11-01

    Viral infections dynamically alter the composition and metabolic potential of marine microbial communities and the evolutionary trajectories of host populations with resulting feedback on biogeochemical cycles. It is quite possible that all microbial populations in the ocean are impacted by viral infections. Our knowledge of virus-host relationships, however, has been limited to a minute fraction of cultivated host groups. Here, we utilized single-cell sequencing to obtain genomic blueprints of viruses inside or attached to individual bacterial and archaeal cells captured in their native environment, circumventing the need for host and virus cultivation. A combination of comparative genomics, metagenomic fragment recruitment, sequence anomalies and irregularities in sequence coverage depth and genome recovery were utilized to detect viruses and to decipher modes of virus-host interactions. Members of all three tailed phage families were identified in 20 out of 58 phylogenetically and geographically diverse single amplified genomes (SAGs) of marine bacteria and archaea. At least four phage-host interactions had the characteristics of late lytic infections, all of which were found in metabolically active cells. One virus had genetic potential for lysogeny. Our findings include first known viruses of Thaumarchaeota, Marinimicrobia, Verrucomicrobia and Gammaproteobacteria clusters SAR86 and SAR92. Viruses were also found in SAGs of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A high fragment recruitment of viral metagenomic reads confirmed that most of the SAG-associated viruses are abundant in the ocean. Our study demonstrates that single-cell genomics, in conjunction with sequence-based computational tools, enable in situ, cultivation-independent insights into host-virus interactions in complex microbial communities. PMID:25848873

  8. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Based Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kime, Cody; Mandegar, Mohammad A; Srivastava, Deepak; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R; Rand, Tim A

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPS cells) are rapidly emerging as a powerful tool for biomedical discovery. The advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS cells) with human embryonic stem (hES)-cell-like properties has led to hPS cells with disease-specific genetic backgrounds for in vitro disease modeling and drug discovery as well as mechanistic and developmental studies. To fully realize this potential, it will be necessary to modify the genome of hPS cells with precision and flexibility. Pioneering experiments utilizing site-specific double-strand break (DSB)-mediated genome engineering tools, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), have paved the way to genome engineering in previously recalcitrant systems such as hPS cells. However, these methods are technically cumbersome and require significant expertise, which has limited adoption. A major recent advance involving the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) endonuclease has dramatically simplified the effort required for genome engineering and will likely be adopted widely as the most rapid and flexible system for genome editing in hPS cells. In this unit, we describe commonly practiced methods for CRISPR endonuclease genomic editing of hPS cells into cell lines containing genomes altered by insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis or insertion of recombinant genomic DNA. PMID:26724721

  9. Messenger RNA- Versus Retrovirus-Based Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming Strategies: Analysis of Genomic Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Steichen, Clara; Luce, Eléanor; Maluenda, Jérôme; Tosca, Lucie; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Desterke, Christophe; Dianat, Noushin; Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Awan-Toor, Sarah; Burks, Deborah; Marie, Joëlle; Weber, Anne; Tachdjian, Gérard; Melki, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The use of synthetic messenger RNAs to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is particularly appealing for potential regenerative medicine applications, because it overcomes the common drawbacks of DNA-based or virus-based reprogramming strategies, including transgene integration in particular. We compared the genomic integrity of mRNA-derived iPSCs with that of retrovirus-derived iPSCs generated in strictly comparable conditions, by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses. We showed that mRNA-derived iPSCs do not differ significantly from the parental fibroblasts in SNP analysis, whereas retrovirus-derived iPSCs do. We found that the number of CNVs seemed independent of the reprogramming method, instead appearing to be clone-dependent. Furthermore, differentiation studies indicated that mRNA-derived iPSCs differentiated efficiently into hepatoblasts and that these cells did not load additional CNVs during differentiation. The integration-free hepatoblasts that were generated constitute a new tool for the study of diseased hepatocytes derived from patients’ iPSCs and their use in the context of stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation. Our findings also highlight the need to conduct careful studies on genome integrity for the selection of iPSC lines before using them for further applications. PMID:24736403

  10. Genome- and Cell-Based Strategies in Therapy of Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Saada, Y Bou; Dib, Carla; Lipinski, M; Vassetzky, Y S

    2016-07-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic disorders characterized by progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass. Depending on the muscular dystrophy, the muscle weakness varies in degree of severity. The majority of myopathies are due to genetic events leading to a loss of function of key genes involved in muscle function. Although there is until now no curative treatment to stop the progression of most myopathies, a significant number of experimental gene- and cell-based strategies and approaches have been and are being tested in vitro and in animal models, aiming to restore gene function. Genome editing using programmable endonucleases is a powerful tool for modifying target genome sequences and has been extensively used over the last decade to correct in vitro genetic defects of many single-gene diseases. By inducing double-strand breaks (DSBs), the engineered endonucleases specifically target chosen sequences. These DSBs are spontaneously repaired either by homologous recombination in the presence of a sequence template, or by nonhomologous-end joining error prone repair. In this review, we highlight recent developments and challenges for genome-editing based strategies that hold great promise for muscular dystrophies and regenerative medicine. PMID:27449614

  11. Comparative Analysis of Human B Cell Epitopes Based on BCG Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haican; Zhao, Xiuqin; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is a huge global health problem. BCG is the only vaccine used for about 100 years against TB, but the reasons for protection variability in populations remain unclear. To improve BCG efficacy and develop a strategy for new vaccines, the underlying genetic differences among BCG subtypes should be understood urgently. Methods and Findings. Human B cell epitope data were collected from the Immune Epitope Database. Epitope sequences were mapped with those of 15 genomes, including 13 BCGs, M. bovis AF2122/97, and M. tuberculosis H37Rv, to identify epitopes distribution. Among 398 experimentally verified B cell epitopes, 321 (80.7%) were conserved, while the remaining 77 (19.3%) were lost to varying degrees in BCGs. The variable protective efficacy of BCGs may result from the degree of B cell epitopes deficiency. Conclusions. Here we firstly analyzed the genetic characteristics of BCGs based on B cell epitopes and found that B cell epitopes distribution may contribute to vaccine efficacy. Restoration of important antigens or effective B cell epitopes in BCG could be a useful strategy for vaccine development. PMID:27382565

  12. Comparative Analysis of Human B Cell Epitopes Based on BCG Genomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Machao; Liu, Haican; Zhao, Xiuqin; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is a huge global health problem. BCG is the only vaccine used for about 100 years against TB, but the reasons for protection variability in populations remain unclear. To improve BCG efficacy and develop a strategy for new vaccines, the underlying genetic differences among BCG subtypes should be understood urgently. Methods and Findings. Human B cell epitope data were collected from the Immune Epitope Database. Epitope sequences were mapped with those of 15 genomes, including 13 BCGs, M. bovis AF2122/97, and M. tuberculosis H37Rv, to identify epitopes distribution. Among 398 experimentally verified B cell epitopes, 321 (80.7%) were conserved, while the remaining 77 (19.3%) were lost to varying degrees in BCGs. The variable protective efficacy of BCGs may result from the degree of B cell epitopes deficiency. Conclusions. Here we firstly analyzed the genetic characteristics of BCGs based on B cell epitopes and found that B cell epitopes distribution may contribute to vaccine efficacy. Restoration of important antigens or effective B cell epitopes in BCG could be a useful strategy for vaccine development. PMID:27382565

  13. Prediction of cancer cell sensitivity to natural products based on genomic and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Yue, Zhenyu; Zhang, Wenna; Lu, Yongming; Yang, Qiaoyue; Ding, Qiuying; Xia, Junfeng; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Natural products play a significant role in cancer chemotherapy. They are likely to provide many lead structures, which can be used as templates for the construction of novel drugs with enhanced antitumor activity. Traditional research approaches studied structure-activity relationship of natural products and obtained key structural properties, such as chemical bond or group, with the purpose of ascertaining their effect on a single cell line or a single tissue type. Here, for the first time, we develop a machine learning method to comprehensively predict natural products responses against a panel of cancer cell lines based on both the gene expression and the chemical properties of natural products. The results on two datasets, training set and independent test set, show that this proposed method yields significantly better prediction accuracy. In addition, we also demonstrate the predictive power of our proposed method by modeling the cancer cell sensitivity to two natural products, Curcumin and Resveratrol, which indicate that our method can effectively predict the response of cancer cell lines to these two natural products. Taken together, the method will facilitate the identification of natural products as cancer therapies and the development of precision medicine by linking the features of patient genomes to natural product sensitivity. PMID:26644976

  14. Quantifying the heritability of testicular germ cell tumour using both population-based and genomic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Kevin; Thomsen, Hauke; Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Sundquist, Jan; Houlston, Richard S; Hemminki, Kari; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-01

    A sizable fraction of testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT) risk is expected to be explained by heritable factors. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified a number of common SNPs associated with TGCT. It is however, unclear how much common variation there is left to be accounted for by other, yet to be identified, common SNPs and what contribution common genetic variation makes to the heritable risk of TGCT. We approached this question using two complimentary analytical techniques. We undertook a population-based analysis of the Swedish family-cancer database, through which we estimated that the heritability of TGCT at 48.9% (CI:47.2%–52.3%). We also applied Genome-Wide Complex Trait Analysis to 922 cases and 4,842 controls to estimate the heritability of TGCT. The heritability explained by known common risk SNPs identified by GWAS was 9.1%, whereas the heritability explained by all common SNPs was 37.4% (CI:27.6%–47.2%). These complementary findings indicate that the known TGCT SNPs only explain a small proportion of the heritability and many additional common SNPs remain to be identified. The data also suggests that a fraction of the heritability of TGCT is likely to be explained by other classes of genetic variation, such as rare disease-causing alleles. PMID:26349679

  15. Quantifying the heritability of testicular germ cell tumour using both population-based and genomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Kevin; Thomsen, Hauke; Mitchell, Jonathan S; Sundquist, Jan; Houlston, Richard S; Hemminki, Kari; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-01

    A sizable fraction of testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT) risk is expected to be explained by heritable factors. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified a number of common SNPs associated with TGCT. It is however, unclear how much common variation there is left to be accounted for by other, yet to be identified, common SNPs and what contribution common genetic variation makes to the heritable risk of TGCT. We approached this question using two complimentary analytical techniques. We undertook a population-based analysis of the Swedish family-cancer database, through which we estimated that the heritability of TGCT at 48.9% (CI:47.2%-52.3%). We also applied Genome-Wide Complex Trait Analysis to 922 cases and 4,842 controls to estimate the heritability of TGCT. The heritability explained by known common risk SNPs identified by GWAS was 9.1%, whereas the heritability explained by all common SNPs was 37.4% (CI:27.6%-47.2%). These complementary findings indicate that the known TGCT SNPs only explain a small proportion of the heritability and many additional common SNPs remain to be identified. The data also suggests that a fraction of the heritability of TGCT is likely to be explained by other classes of genetic variation, such as rare disease-causing alleles. PMID:26349679

  16. One Bacterial Cell, One Complete Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Woyke, Tanja; Tighe, Damon; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Schackwitz, Wendy; Lapidus, Alla; Wu, Dongying; McCutcheon, John P.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Moran, Nancy A.; Bristow, James; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2010-04-26

    While the bulk of the finished microbial genomes sequenced to date are derived from cultured bacterial and archaeal representatives, the vast majority of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes from these environmental species. Single cell genomics is a novel culture-independent approach, which enables access to the genetic material of an individual cell. No single cell genome has to our knowledge been closed and finished to date. Here we report the completed genome from an uncultured single cell of Candidatus Sulcia muelleri DMIN. Digital PCR on single symbiont cells isolated from the bacteriome of the green sharpshooter Draeculacephala minerva bacteriome allowed us to assess that this bacteria is polyploid with genome copies ranging from approximately 200?900 per cell, making it a most suitable target for single cell finishing efforts. For single cell shotgun sequencing, an individual Sulcia cell was isolated and whole genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA). Sanger-based finishing methods allowed us to close the genome. To verify the correctness of our single cell genome and exclude MDA-derived artifacts, we independently shotgun sequenced and assembled the Sulcia genome from pooled bacteriomes using a metagenomic approach, yielding a nearly identical genome. Four variations we detected appear to be genuine biological differences between the two samples. Comparison of the single cell genome with bacteriome metagenomic sequence data detected two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), indicating extremely low genetic diversity within a Sulcia population. This study demonstrates the power of single cell genomics to generate a complete, high quality, non-composite reference genome within an environmental sample, which can be used for population genetic analyzes.

  17. Accelerating Genome Editing in CHO Cells Using CRISPR Cas9 and CRISPy, a Web-Based Target Finding Tool

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Hansen, Henning Gram; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2014-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry as a host for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. Thus genome engineering of CHO cells for improved product quality and yield is of great interest. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of the CRISPR Cas9 technology in CHO cells by generating site-specific gene disruptions in COSMC and FUT8, both of which encode proteins involved in glycosylation. The tested single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) created an indel frequency up to 47.3% in COSMC, while an indel frequency up to 99.7% in FUT8 was achieved by applying lectin selection. All eight sgRNAs examined in this study resulted in relatively high indel frequencies, demonstrating that the Cas9 system is a robust and efficient genome-editing methodology in CHO cells. Deep sequencing revealed that 85% of the indels created by Cas9 resulted in frameshift mutations at the target sites, with a strong preference for single base indels. Finally, we have developed a user-friendly bioinformatics tool, named “CRISPy” for rapid identification of sgRNA target sequences in the CHO-K1 genome. The CRISPy tool identified 1,970,449 CRISPR targets divided into 27,553 genes and lists the number of off-target sites in the genome. In conclusion, the proven functionality of Cas9 to edit CHO genomes combined with our CRISPy database have the potential to accelerate genome editing and synthetic biology efforts in CHO cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014; 111: 1604–1616. © 2014 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24827782

  18. Accelerating genome editing in CHO cells using CRISPR Cas9 and CRISPy, a web-based target finding tool.

    PubMed

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Hansen, Henning Gram; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2014-08-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry as a host for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. Thus genome engineering of CHO cells for improved product quality and yield is of great interest. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of the CRISPR Cas9 technology in CHO cells by generating site-specific gene disruptions in COSMC and FUT8, both of which encode proteins involved in glycosylation. The tested single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) created an indel frequency up to 47.3% in COSMC, while an indel frequency up to 99.7% in FUT8 was achieved by applying lectin selection. All eight sgRNAs examined in this study resulted in relatively high indel frequencies, demonstrating that the Cas9 system is a robust and efficient genome-editing methodology in CHO cells. Deep sequencing revealed that 85% of the indels created by Cas9 resulted in frameshift mutations at the target sites, with a strong preference for single base indels. Finally, we have developed a user-friendly bioinformatics tool, named "CRISPy" for rapid identification of sgRNA target sequences in the CHO-K1 genome. The CRISPy tool identified 1,970,449 CRISPR targets divided into 27,553 genes and lists the number of off-target sites in the genome. In conclusion, the proven functionality of Cas9 to edit CHO genomes combined with our CRISPy database have the potential to accelerate genome editing and synthetic biology efforts in CHO cells. PMID:24827782

  19. Cancer Cell Line Panels Empower Genomics-Based Discovery of Precision Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Seok; Sung, Yeo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Since the first human cancer cell line, HeLa, was established in the early 1950s, there has been a steady increase in the number and tumor type of available cancer cell line models. Cancer cell lines have made significant contributions to the development of various chemotherapeutic agents. Recent advances in multi-omics technologies have facilitated detailed characterizations of the genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and epigenomic profiles of these cancer cell lines. An increasing number of studies employ the power of a cancer cell line panel to provide predictive biomarkers for targeted and cytotoxic agents, including those that are already used in clinical practice. Different types of statistical and machine learning algorithms have been developed to analyze the large-scale data sets that have been produced. However, much work remains to address the discrepancies in drug assay results from different platforms and the frequent failures to translate discoveries from cell line models to the clinic. Nevertheless, continuous expansion of cancer cell line panels should provide unprecedented opportunities to identify new candidate targeted therapies, particularly for the so-called "dark matter" group of cancers, for which pharmacologically tractable driver mutations have not been identified. PMID:26256959

  20. Virus Integration and Genome Influence in Approaches to Stem Cell Based Therapy for Andro-Urology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longkun; Zhang, Deying; Li, Peng; Damaser, Margot; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential of stem cells in cell-based therapy, major limitations such as cell retention, ingrowth, and trans-differentiation after implantation remain. One technique for genetic modification of cells for tissue repair is the introduction of specific genes using molecular biology techniques, such as virus integration, to provide a gene that adds new functions to enhance cellular function, and to secrete trophic factors for recruiting resident cells to participate in tissue repair. Stem cells can be labelled to track cell survival, migration, and lineage. Increasing evidence demonstrates that cell therapy and gene therapy in combination remarkably improve myogenic differentiation of implanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), revascularization, and innervation in genitourinary tissues, especially to treat urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, lower urinary tract reconstruction, and renal failure. This review discusses the benefits, safety, side effects, and alternatives for using genetically modified MSCs in tissue regeneration in andro-urology. PMID:25453258

  1. Phylogeography, Salinity Adaptations and Metabolic Potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria Based on a Partial Single Cell Genome.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Lisa M; Hyde, Andrew S; MacGregor, Barbara J; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that have been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis - previously developed based on (14)C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines - that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source. PMID:27597842

  2. A new avian leukosis virus-based packaging cell line that uses two separate transcomplementing helper genomes.

    PubMed Central

    Cosset, F L; Legras, C; Chebloune, Y; Savatier, P; Thoraval, P; Thomas, J L; Samarut, J; Nigon, V M; Verdier, G

    1990-01-01

    An avian leukosis virus-based packaging cell line was constructed from the genome of the Rous-associated virus type 1. The gag, pol, and env genes were separated on two different plasmids; the packaging signal and the 3' long terminal repeat were removed. On a plasmid expressing the gag and pol genes, the env gene was replaced by the hygromycin resistance gene. The phleomycin resistance gene was inserted in the place of the gag-pol genes on a plasmid expressing the env gene. The plasmid containing the gag, pol, and Hygror genes was transfected into QT6 cells. Clones that produced high levels of p27gag were transfected with the plasmid containing the Phleor and env genes. Clones that produced high levels of env protein (as measured by an interference assay) were tested for their ability to package NeoR-expressing replication-defective vectors (TXN3'). One of the clones (Isolde) was able to transfer the Neo+ phenotype to recipient cells at a titer of 10(5) resistance focus-forming units per ml. Titers of supernatants of cells infected with Rous-associated virus type 1 prior to transfection by Neor vectors were similar. Tests for recombination events that might result in intact helper virus showed no evidence for the generation of replication-competent virus. The use of selectable genes inserted next to the viral genes to generate high-producer packaging cell lines is discussed. PMID:2154593

  3. A Digital PCR-Based Method for Efficient and Highly Specific Screening of Genome Edited Cells

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Jennifer R.; Postovit, Lynne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The rapid adoption of gene editing tools such as CRISPRs and TALENs for research and eventually therapeutics necessitates assays that can rapidly detect and quantitate the desired alterations. Currently, the most commonly used assay employs “mismatch nucleases” T7E1 or “Surveyor” that recognize and cleave heteroduplexed DNA amplicons containing mismatched base-pairs. However, this assay is prone to false positives due to cancer-associated mutations and/or SNPs and requires large amounts of starting material. Here we describe a powerful alternative wherein droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) can be used to decipher homozygous from heterozygous mutations with superior levels of both precision and sensitivity. We use this assay to detect knockout inducing alterations to stem cell associated proteins, NODAL and SFRP1, generated using either TALENs or an “all-in-one” CRISPR/Cas plasmid that we have modified for one-step cloning and blue/white screening of transformants. Moreover, we highlight how ddPCR can be used to assess the efficiency of varying TALEN-based strategies. Collectively, this work highlights how ddPCR-based screening can be paired with CRISPR and TALEN technologies to enable sensitive, specific, and streamlined approaches to gene editing and validation. PMID:27089539

  4. A Digital PCR-Based Method for Efficient and Highly Specific Screening of Genome Edited Cells.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Scott D; Vincent, Krista M; Berman, Jennifer R; Postovit, Lynne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The rapid adoption of gene editing tools such as CRISPRs and TALENs for research and eventually therapeutics necessitates assays that can rapidly detect and quantitate the desired alterations. Currently, the most commonly used assay employs "mismatch nucleases" T7E1 or "Surveyor" that recognize and cleave heteroduplexed DNA amplicons containing mismatched base-pairs. However, this assay is prone to false positives due to cancer-associated mutations and/or SNPs and requires large amounts of starting material. Here we describe a powerful alternative wherein droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) can be used to decipher homozygous from heterozygous mutations with superior levels of both precision and sensitivity. We use this assay to detect knockout inducing alterations to stem cell associated proteins, NODAL and SFRP1, generated using either TALENs or an "all-in-one" CRISPR/Cas plasmid that we have modified for one-step cloning and blue/white screening of transformants. Moreover, we highlight how ddPCR can be used to assess the efficiency of varying TALEN-based strategies. Collectively, this work highlights how ddPCR-based screening can be paired with CRISPR and TALEN technologies to enable sensitive, specific, and streamlined approaches to gene editing and validation. PMID:27089539

  5. Pathway-Based Analysis Using Genome-wide Association Data from a Korean Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donghoon; Lee, Geon Kook; Yoon, Kyong-Ah; Lee, Jin Soo

    2013-01-01

    Pathway-based analysis, used in conjunction with genome-wide association study (GWAS) techniques, is a powerful tool to detect subtle but systematic patterns in genome that can help elucidate complex diseases, like cancers. Here, we stepped back from genetic polymorphisms at a single locus and examined how multiple association signals can be orchestrated to find pathways related to lung cancer susceptibility. We used single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data from 869 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases from a previous GWAS at the National Cancer Center and 1,533 controls from the Korean Association Resource project for the pathway-based analysis. After mapping single-nucleotide polymorphisms to genes, considering their coding region and regulatory elements (±20 kbp), multivariate logistic regression of additive and dominant genetic models were fitted against disease status, with adjustments for age, gender, and smoking status. Pathway statistics were evaluated using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP) methods. Among 880 pathways, 11 showed relatively significant statistics compared to our positive controls (PGSEA≤0.025, false discovery rate≤0.25). Candidate pathways were validated using the ARTP method and similarities between pathways were computed against each other. The top-ranked pathways were ABC Transporters (PGSEA<0.001, PARTP = 0.001), VEGF Signaling Pathway (PGSEA<0.001, PARTP = 0.008), G1/S Check Point (PGSEA = 0.004, PARTP = 0.013), and NRAGE Signals Death through JNK (PGSEA = 0.006, PARTP = 0.001). Our results demonstrate that pathway analysis can shed light on post-GWAS research and help identify potential targets for cancer susceptibility. PMID:23762359

  6. Efficient Synergistic Single-Cell Genome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Narjes S; Embree, Mallory; Nagarajan, Harish; Zengler, Karsten; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    As the vast majority of all microbes are unculturable, single-cell sequencing has become a significant method to gain insight into microbial physiology. Single-cell sequencing methods, currently powered by multiple displacement genome amplification (MDA), have passed important milestones such as finishing and closing the genome of a prokaryote. However, the quality and reliability of genome assemblies from single cells are still unsatisfactory due to uneven coverage depth and the absence of scattered chunks of the genome in the final collection of reads caused by MDA bias. In this work, our new algorithm Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) demonstrates the power of coassembly of multiple single-cell genomic data sets through significant improvement of the assembly quality in terms of predicted functional elements and length statistics. Coassemblies contain significantly more base pairs and protein coding genes, cover more subsystems, and consist of longer contigs compared to individual assemblies by the same algorithm as well as state-of-the-art single-cell assemblers SPAdes and IDBA-UD. Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) is also able to avoid chimeric assemblies by detecting and separating shared and exclusive pieces of sequence for input data sets. By replacing one deep single-cell sequencing experiment with a few single-cell sequencing experiments of lower depth, the coassembly method can hedge against the risk of failure and loss of the sample, without significantly increasing sequencing cost. Application of the single-cell coassembler HyDA to the study of three uncultured members of an alkane-degrading methanogenic community validated the usefulness of the coassembly concept. HyDA is open source and publicly available at http://chitsazlab.org/software.html, and the raw reads are available at http://chitsazlab.org/research.html. PMID:27243002

  7. Efficient Synergistic Single-Cell Genome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Movahedi, Narjes S.; Embree, Mallory; Nagarajan, Harish; Zengler, Karsten; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    As the vast majority of all microbes are unculturable, single-cell sequencing has become a significant method to gain insight into microbial physiology. Single-cell sequencing methods, currently powered by multiple displacement genome amplification (MDA), have passed important milestones such as finishing and closing the genome of a prokaryote. However, the quality and reliability of genome assemblies from single cells are still unsatisfactory due to uneven coverage depth and the absence of scattered chunks of the genome in the final collection of reads caused by MDA bias. In this work, our new algorithm Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) demonstrates the power of coassembly of multiple single-cell genomic data sets through significant improvement of the assembly quality in terms of predicted functional elements and length statistics. Coassemblies contain significantly more base pairs and protein coding genes, cover more subsystems, and consist of longer contigs compared to individual assemblies by the same algorithm as well as state-of-the-art single-cell assemblers SPAdes and IDBA-UD. Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) is also able to avoid chimeric assemblies by detecting and separating shared and exclusive pieces of sequence for input data sets. By replacing one deep single-cell sequencing experiment with a few single-cell sequencing experiments of lower depth, the coassembly method can hedge against the risk of failure and loss of the sample, without significantly increasing sequencing cost. Application of the single-cell coassembler HyDA to the study of three uncultured members of an alkane-degrading methanogenic community validated the usefulness of the coassembly concept. HyDA is open source and publicly available at http://chitsazlab.org/software.html, and the raw reads are available at http://chitsazlab.org/research.html. PMID:27243002

  8. Genomics of Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Melissa; Devarakonda, Siddhartha

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer have the squamous cell carcinoma (SQCC) histological subtype. Although targeted therapies have improved outcomes in patients with adenocarcinoma, no agents are currently approved specifically for use in SQCC. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) recently published the results of comprehensive genomic analyses of tumor samples from 178 patients with SQCC of the lung. In this review, we briefly discuss key molecular aberrations reported by TCGA and other investigators and their potential therapeutic implications. Carefully designed preclinical and clinical studies based on these large-scale genomic analyses are critical to improve the outcomes of patients with SQCC of lung in the near future. PMID:23728941

  9. Importance of high-throughput cell separation technologies for genomics/proteomics-based clinical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, James F.; Szaniszlo, Peter; Prow, Tarl W.; Reece, Lisa M.; Wang, Nan; Asmuth, David M.

    2002-06-01

    Gene expression microarray analyses of mixtures of cells approximate a weighted average of the gene expression profiles (GEPs) of each cell type according to its relative abundance in the overall cell sample being analyzed. If the targeted subpopulation of cells is in the minority, or the expected perturbations are marginal, then such changes will be masked by the GEP of the normal/unaffected cells. We show that the GEP of a minor cell subpopulation is often lost when that cell subpopulation is of a frequency less than 30 percent. The GEP is almost always masked by the other cell subpopulations when that frequency drops to 10 percent or less. Several methodologies can be employed to enrich the target cells submitted for microarray analyses. These include magnetic sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, high-throughput flow cytometry/cell sorting overcomes many restrictions of experimental enrichment conditions. This technology can also be used to sort smaller numbers of cells of specific cell subpopulations and subsequently amplify their mRNAs before microarray analyses. When purification techniques are applied to unfixed samples, the potential for changes in gene levels during the process of collection is an additional concern. High-throughput cell separation technologies are needed that can process the necessary number of cells expeditiously in order to avoid such uncontrolled changes in the target cells GEP. In cases where even the use of HTS yields only a small number of cells, the mRNAs (after reverse transcription to cDNA's) must be amplified to yield enough material for conventional microarray analyses. However, the problem of using microamplification PCR methods to expand the amount of cDNAs (from mRNAs) is that it is very difficult to amplify equally all of the mRNAs. Unequal amplification leads to a distorted gene expression profile on the microarray. Linear amplifications is difficult to achieve. Unfortunately, present-day gene-chips need to

  10. Phylogeography, Salinity Adaptations and Metabolic Potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria Based on a Partial Single Cell Genome

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Lisa M.; Hyde, Andrew S.; MacGregor, Barbara J.; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that have been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis – previously developed based on 14C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines – that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source. PMID:27597842

  11. Exome-based proteogenomics of HEK-293 human cell line: Coding genomic variants identified at the level of shotgun proteome.

    PubMed

    Lobas, Anna A; Karpov, Dmitry S; Kopylov, Arthur T; Solovyeva, Elizaveta M; Ivanov, Mark V; Ilina, Irina Y; Lazarev, Vassily N; Kuznetsova, Ksenia G; Ilgisonis, Ekaterina V; Zgoda, Victor G; Gorshkov, Mikhail V; Moshkovskii, Sergei A

    2016-07-01

    Genomic and proteomic data were integrated into the proteogenomic workflow to identify coding genomic variants of Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (HEK-293) cell line at the proteome level. Shotgun proteome data published by Geiger et al. (2012), Chick et al. (2015), and obtained in this work for HEK-293 were searched against the customized genomic database generated using exome data published by Lin et al. (2014). Overall, 112 unique variants were identified at the proteome level out of ∼1200 coding variants annotated in the exome. Seven identified variants were shared between all the three considered proteomic datasets, and 27 variants were found in any two datasets. Some of the found variants belonged to widely known genomic polymorphisms originated from the germline, while the others were more likely resulting from somatic mutations. At least, eight of the proteins bearing amino acid variants were annotated as cancer-related ones, including p53 tumor suppressor. In all the considered shotgun datasets, the variant peptides were at the ratio of 1:2.5 less likely being identified than the wild-type ones compared with the corresponding theoretical peptides. This can be explained by the presence of the so-called "passenger" mutations in the genes, which were never expressed in HEK-293 cells. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with the dataset identifier PXD002613 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002613). PMID:27233776

  12. Cell Death in Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xinchen; Hardwick, J. Marie

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate survival of abnormal cells underlies tumorigenesis. Most discoveries about programmed cell death have come from studying model organisms. Revisiting the experimental contexts that inspired these discoveries helps explain confounding biases that inevitably accompany such discoveries. Amending early biases has added a newcomer to the collection of cell death models. Analysis of gene-dependent death in yeast revealed the surprising influence of single gene mutations on subsequent eukaryotic genome evolution. Similar events may influence the selection for mutations during early tumorigenesis. The possibility that an early random mutation might drive the selection for a cancer driver mutation is conceivable but difficult to demonstrate. This was tested in yeast, revealing that mutation of almost any gene appears to specify the selection for a new second mutation. Some human tumors contain pairs of mutant genes homologous to co-occurring mutant genes in yeast. Here we consider how yeast again provide novel insights into tumorigenesis. PMID:25725369

  13. Single cell genomics of subsurface microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanauskas, R.; Onstott, T. C.; Lau, C.; Kieft, T. L.; Woyke, T.; Rinke, C.; Sczyrba, A.; van Heerden, E.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have revealed unexpected abundance and diversity of microorganisms in terrestrial and marine subsurface, providing new perspectives over their biogeochemical significance, evolution, and the limits of life. The now commonly used research tools, such as metagenomics and PCR-based gene surveys enabled cultivation-unbiased analysis of genes encoded by natural microbial communities. However, these methods seldom provide direct evidence for how the discovered genes are organized inside genomes and from which organisms do they come from. Here we evaluated the feasibility of an alternative, single cell genomics approach, in the analysis of subsurface microbial community composition, metabolic potential and microevolution at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), South Dakota, and the Witwaterstrand Basin, South Africa. We successfully recovered genomic DNA from individual microbial cells from multiple locations, including ultra-deep (down to 3,500 m) and low-biomass (down to 10^3 cells mL^-1) fracture water. The obtained single amplified genomes (SAGs) from SURF contained multiple representatives of the candidate divisions OP3, OP11, OD1 and uncharacterized archaea. By sequencing eight of these SAGs, we obtained the first genome content information for these phylum-level lineages that do not contain a single cultured representative. The Witwaterstrand samples were collected from deep fractures, biogeochemical dating of which suggests isolation from tens of thousands to tens of millions of years. Thus, these fractures may be viewed as "underground Galapagos", a natural, long-term experiment of microbial evolution within well-defined temporal and spatial boundaries. We are analyzing multiple SAGs from these environments, which will provide detailed information about adaptations to life in deep subsurface, mutation rates, selective pressures and gene flux within and across microbial populations.

  14. Identifying anti-cancer drug response related genes using an integrative analysis of transcriptomic and genomic variations with cell line-based drug perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunqin; Ma, Qin; Wei, Jia; Liu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical responses to anti-cancer therapies often only benefit a defined subset of patients. Predicting the best treatment strategy hinges on our ability to effectively translate genomic data into actionable information on drug responses. Results To achieve this goal, we compiled a comprehensive collection of baseline cancer genome data and drug response information derived from a large panel of cancer cell lines. This data set was applied to identify the signature genes relevant to drug sensitivity and their resistance by integrating CNVs and the gene expression of cell lines with in vitro drug responses. We presented an efficient in-silico pipeline for integrating heterogeneous cell line data sources with the simultaneous modeling of drug response values across all the drugs and cell lines. Potential signature genes correlated with drug response (sensitive or resistant) in different cancer types were identified. Using signature genes, our collaborative filtering-based drug response prediction model outperformed the 44 algorithms submitted to the DREAM competition on breast cancer cells. The functions of the identified drug response related signature genes were carefully analyzed at the pathway level and the synthetic lethality level. Furthermore, we validated these signature genes by applying them to the classification of the different subtypes of the TCGA tumor samples, and further uncovered their in vivo implications using clinical patient data. Conclusions Our work may have promise in translating genomic data into customized marker genes relevant to the response of specific drugs for a specific cancer type of individual patients. PMID:26824188

  15. Comparative genomic hybridization with single cells after whole genome amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, B.R.; Baldini, A.; Hughes, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    Conventional karyotype analysis is the ideal way to diagnose chromosomal imbalances. However it requires cell culture and chromosome preparation. There are instances where a very small number of cells are available for cytogenetic evaluation and chromosomes cannot be obtained. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a novel molecular cytogenetic technique that provides information about genetic imbalances affecting the genome. The power of this technique lies in its ability to detect genetic imbalances using total genomic DNA. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of whole genome amplification from single cells for subsequent analysis of multiple genetic loci by PCR. In this present work, we combine whole genome amplification with CGH to detect chromosomal imbalances from small numbers of cells. Both cytogenetically normal and abnormal cells were individually picked by micromanipulation and subjected to whole genome amplification using random oligonucleotide primers. Amplified test and control DNA were differentially labeled by incorporation of digoxigenin or biotin, mixed together and hybridized to normal male metaphase spreads. Hybridization was detected with two fluorochromes, rhodamine-anti-digoxigenin and FITC -Avidin. Ratio of intensities of the two fluorochromes along the target chromosomes was analyzed using locally developed computer imaging software. Using the combination of whole genome amplification and CGH, we were able to detect different chromosomal aneuploidies from 30, 20, and 10 cells. It can also be applied to the analysis of fetal cells sorted from maternal circulation, or to tumor cells obtained from needle biopsies or from different body fluids and effusions. Finally, its successful application to single cells will have a great impact on preimplantation diagnosis.

  16. Comparative genome-based identification of a cell wall-anchored protein from Lactobacillus plantarum increases adhesion of Lactococcus lactis to human epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zeng, Zhu; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion to host cells is considered important for Lactobacillus plantarum as well as other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to persist in human gut and thus exert probiotic effects. Here, we sequenced the genome of Lt. plantarum strain NL42 originating from a traditional Chinese dairy product, performed comparative genomic analysis and characterized a novel adhesion factor. The genome of NL42 was highly divergent from its closest neighbors, especially in six large genomic regions. NL42 harbors a total of 42 genes encoding adhesion-associated proteins; among them, cwaA encodes a protein containing multiple domains, including five cell wall surface anchor repeat domains and an LPxTG-like cell wall anchor motif. Expression of cwaA in Lactococcus lactis significantly increased its autoaggregation and hydrophobicity, and conferred the new ability to adhere to human colonic epithelial HT-29 cells by targeting cellular surface proteins, and not carbohydrate moieties, for CwaA adhesion. In addition, the recombinant Lc. lactis inhibited adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to HT-29 cells, mainly by exclusion. We conclude that CwaA is a novel adhesion factor in Lt. plantarum and a potential candidate for improving the adhesion ability of probiotics or other bacteria of interest. PMID:26370773

  17. Comparative genome-based identification of a cell wall-anchored protein from Lactobacillus plantarum increases adhesion of Lactococcus lactis to human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zeng, Zhu; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion to host cells is considered important for Lactobacillus plantarum as well as other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to persist in human gut and thus exert probiotic effects. Here, we sequenced the genome of Lt. plantarum strain NL42 originating from a traditional Chinese dairy product, performed comparative genomic analysis and characterized a novel adhesion factor. The genome of NL42 was highly divergent from its closest neighbors, especially in six large genomic regions. NL42 harbors a total of 42 genes encoding adhesion-associated proteins; among them, cwaA encodes a protein containing multiple domains, including five cell wall surface anchor repeat domains and an LPxTG-like cell wall anchor motif. Expression of cwaA in Lactococcus lactis significantly increased its autoaggregation and hydrophobicity, and conferred the new ability to adhere to human colonic epithelial HT-29 cells by targeting cellular surface proteins, and not carbohydrate moieties, for CwaA adhesion. In addition, the recombinant Lc. lactis inhibited adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to HT-29 cells, mainly by exclusion. We conclude that CwaA is a novel adhesion factor in Lt. plantarum and a potential candidate for improving the adhesion ability of probiotics or other bacteria of interest. PMID:26370773

  18. Development and Validation of a Gene-Based Model for Outcome Prediction in Germ Cell Tumors Using a Combined Genomic and Expression Profiling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Korkola, James E.; Heck, Sandy; Olshen, Adam B.; Feldman, Darren R.; Reuter, Victor E.; Houldsworth, Jane; Bosl, George J.; Chaganti, R. S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Germ Cell Tumors (GCT) have a high cure rate, but we currently lack the ability to accurately identify the small subset of patients who will die from their disease. We used a combined genomic and expression profiling approach to identify genomic regions and underlying genes that are predictive of outcome in GCT patients. We performed array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) on 53 non-seminomatous GCTs (NSGCTs) treated with cisplatin based chemotherapy and defined altered genomic regions using Circular Binary Segmentation. We identified 14 regions associated with two year disease-free survival (2yDFS) and 16 regions associated with five year disease-specific survival (5yDSS). From corresponding expression data, we identified 101 probe sets that showed significant changes in expression. We built several models based on these differentially expressed genes, then tested them in an independent validation set of 54 NSGCTs. These predictive models correctly classified outcome in 64–79.6% of patients in the validation set, depending on the endpoint utilized. Survival analysis demonstrated a significant separation of patients with good versus poor predicted outcome when using a combined gene set model. Multivariate analysis using clinical risk classification with the combined gene model indicated that they were independent prognostic markers. This novel set of predictive genes from altered genomic regions is almost entirely independent of our previously identified set of predictive genes for patients with NSGCTs. These genes may aid in the identification of the small subset of patients who are at high risk of poor outcome. PMID:26624623

  19. Development and Validation of a Gene-Based Model for Outcome Prediction in Germ Cell Tumors Using a Combined Genomic and Expression Profiling Approach.

    PubMed

    Korkola, James E; Heck, Sandy; Olshen, Adam B; Feldman, Darren R; Reuter, Victor E; Houldsworth, Jane; Bosl, George J; Chaganti, R S K

    2015-01-01

    Germ Cell Tumors (GCT) have a high cure rate, but we currently lack the ability to accurately identify the small subset of patients who will die from their disease. We used a combined genomic and expression profiling approach to identify genomic regions and underlying genes that are predictive of outcome in GCT patients. We performed array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) on 53 non-seminomatous GCTs (NSGCTs) treated with cisplatin based chemotherapy and defined altered genomic regions using Circular Binary Segmentation. We identified 14 regions associated with two year disease-free survival (2yDFS) and 16 regions associated with five year disease-specific survival (5yDSS). From corresponding expression data, we identified 101 probe sets that showed significant changes in expression. We built several models based on these differentially expressed genes, then tested them in an independent validation set of 54 NSGCTs. These predictive models correctly classified outcome in 64-79.6% of patients in the validation set, depending on the endpoint utilized. Survival analysis demonstrated a significant separation of patients with good versus poor predicted outcome when using a combined gene set model. Multivariate analysis using clinical risk classification with the combined gene model indicated that they were independent prognostic markers. This novel set of predictive genes from altered genomic regions is almost entirely independent of our previously identified set of predictive genes for patients with NSGCTs. These genes may aid in the identification of the small subset of patients who are at high risk of poor outcome. PMID:26624623

  20. JGI Genomic Single-cell Assembly Workflow

    SciTech Connect

    Trong, S.

    2011-09-16

    JIGSAW is a software package disigned to quality control and assemble genomic DNA sequences from single-cell bacterial and archaeal genomes. Amplification of singel-cell genomes using multiple displacement amplification technology presents challenges that magnify the amount of contaminants in the sample and produce non uniform depth of sequence coverage. these factors pose problems whan assembling the genomic data using currently availible short read assembles. The software addresses these problems by removing contaminants and normalizing the sequence read coverage prior to assemble. A hybrid assembly approach using two different open source genome assembly tools is then applied to piece together the DNA fragments. Additional reporting of QC metrics for the input sample and the genome assembly is provided for further analysis.

  1. JGI Genomic Single-cell Assembly Workflow

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-09-16

    JIGSAW is a software package disigned to quality control and assemble genomic DNA sequences from single-cell bacterial and archaeal genomes. Amplification of singel-cell genomes using multiple displacement amplification technology presents challenges that magnify the amount of contaminants in the sample and produce non uniform depth of sequence coverage. these factors pose problems whan assembling the genomic data using currently availible short read assembles. The software addresses these problems by removing contaminants and normalizing the sequencemore » read coverage prior to assemble. A hybrid assembly approach using two different open source genome assembly tools is then applied to piece together the DNA fragments. Additional reporting of QC metrics for the input sample and the genome assembly is provided for further analysis.« less

  2. Isolation of genomic DNA from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Cheryl M

    2013-01-01

    The isolation of genomic DNA from mammalian cells is a routine molecular biology laboratory technique with numerous downstream applications. The isolated DNA can be used as a template for PCR, cloning, and genotyping and to generate genomic DNA libraries. It can also be used for sequencing to detect mutations and other alterations, and for DNA methylation analyses. PMID:24011044

  3. Embryonic reversions and lineage infidelities in tumour cells: genome-based models and role of genetic instability

    PubMed Central

    Bignold, Leon P

    2005-01-01

    Reversions to ‘embryonic precursor’-type cells and infidelities of tumour cell lineage (including metaplasias) have been recognized as aspects of various tumour types since the 19th century. Since then, evidence of these phenomena has been obtained from numerous clinical, biochemical, immunological and molecular biological studies. In particular, microarray studies have suggested that ‘aberrant’ expressions of relevant genes are common. An unexplained aspect of the results of these studies is that, in many tumour types, the embryonic reversion or lineage infidelity only occurs in a proportion of cases. As a parallel development during the molecular biological investigation of tumours over the last several decades, genetic instability has been found much more marked, at least in some preparations of tumour cells, than that identified by means of previous karyotypic investigations of tumours. This study reviews examples of embryonic reversion and lineage infidelity phenomena, which have derived from the various lines of investigation of cancer over the last 150 or so years. Four categories of circumstances of the occurrence of embryonic reversions or lineage infidelities have been identified – (i) as part of the defining phenotype of the tumour, and hence being presumably integral to the tumour type, (ii) present ab initio in only some cases of the tumour type, and presumably being regularly associated with, but incidental to, the essential features of the tumour type, (iii) occurring later in the course of the disease and thus being possibly a manifestation of in vivo genetic instability and ‘tumour progression’ and (iv) arising probably by genetic instability, during the processes, especially cell culture, associated with ex vivo investigations. Genomic models are described which might account for the origin of these phenomena in each of these circumstances. PMID:15810978

  4. A genomic biomarker signature can predict skin sensitizers using a cell-based in vitro alternative to animal tests

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Allergic contact dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease that affects a significant proportion of the population. This disease is caused by an adverse immune response towards chemical haptens, and leads to a substantial economic burden for society. Current test of sensitizing chemicals rely on animal experimentation. New legislations on the registration and use of chemicals within pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries have stimulated significant research efforts to develop alternative, human cell-based assays for the prediction of sensitization. The aim is to replace animal experiments with in vitro tests displaying a higher predictive power. Results We have developed a novel cell-based assay for the prediction of sensitizing chemicals. By analyzing the transcriptome of the human cell line MUTZ-3 after 24 h stimulation, using 20 different sensitizing chemicals, 20 non-sensitizing chemicals and vehicle controls, we have identified a biomarker signature of 200 genes with potent discriminatory ability. Using a Support Vector Machine for supervised classification, the prediction performance of the assay revealed an area under the ROC curve of 0.98. In addition, categorizing the chemicals according to the LLNA assay, this gene signature could also predict sensitizing potency. The identified markers are involved in biological pathways with immunological relevant functions, which can shed light on the process of human sensitization. Conclusions A gene signature predicting sensitization, using a human cell line in vitro, has been identified. This simple and robust cell-based assay has the potential to completely replace or drastically reduce the utilization of test systems based on experimental animals. Being based on human biology, the assay is proposed to be more accurate for predicting sensitization in humans, than the traditional animal-based tests. PMID:21824406

  5. Automated cell analysis tool for a genome-wide RNAi screen with support vector machine based supervised learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmele, Steffen; Ritzerfeld, Julia; Nickel, Walter; Hesser, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    RNAi-based high-throughput microscopy screens have become an important tool in biological sciences in order to decrypt mostly unknown biological functions of human genes. However, manual analysis is impossible for such screens since the amount of image data sets can often be in the hundred thousands. Reliable automated tools are thus required to analyse the fluorescence microscopy image data sets usually containing two or more reaction channels. The herein presented image analysis tool is designed to analyse an RNAi screen investigating the intracellular trafficking and targeting of acylated Src kinases. In this specific screen, a data set consists of three reaction channels and the investigated cells can appear in different phenotypes. The main issue of the image processing task is an automatic cell segmentation which has to be robust and accurate for all different phenotypes and a successive phenotype classification. The cell segmentation is done in two steps by segmenting the cell nuclei first and then using a classifier-enhanced region growing on basis of the cell nuclei to segment the cells. The classification of the cells is realized by a support vector machine which has to be trained manually using supervised learning. Furthermore, the tool is brightness invariant allowing different staining quality and it provides a quality control that copes with typical defects during preparation and acquisition. A first version of the tool has already been successfully applied for an RNAi-screen containing three hundred thousand image data sets and the SVM extended version is designed for additional screens.

  6. Genomic Heterogeneity of Translocation Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Jérôme; Molinié, Vincent; Escudier, Bernard; Camparo, Philippe; Su, Xiaoping; Yao, Hui; Tamboli, Pheroze; Lopez-Terrada, Dolores; Picken, Maria; Garcia, Marileila; Multani, Asha S.; Pathak, Sen; Wood, Christopher G.; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Translocation renal cell carcinoma (tRCC) is a rare subtype of kidney cancer involving the TFEB/TFE3 genes. We aimed to investigate the genomic and epigenetic features of this entity. Experimental design Cytogenomic analysis was performed with 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism microarrays on 16 tumor specimens and 4 cell lines. LINE-1 methylation, a surrogate marker of DNA methylation, was performed on 27 cases using pyrosequencing. Results tRCC showed cytogenomic heterogeneity, with 31.2% and 18.7% of cases presenting similarities with clear-cell and papillary RCC profiles, respectively. The most common alteration was a 17q gain in 7 tumors (44%), followed by a 9p loss in 6 cases (37%). Less frequent were losses of 3p and 17p in 5 cases (31%) each. Patients with 17q gain were older (P = 0.0006), displayed more genetic alterations (P < 0.003) and had a worse outcome (P = 0.002) than patients without it. Analysis comparing gene-expression profiling of a subset of tumors bearing 17q gain and those without suggest large scale dosage effects and TP53 haploinsufficiency without any somatic TP53 mutation identified. Cell-line based cytogenetic studies revealed that 17q gain can be related to isochromosome 17 and/or to multiple translocations occurring around 17q breakpoints. Finally, LINE-1 methylation was lower in tRCC tumors from adults compared to tumors from young patients (71.1% vs. 76.7%, P = 0.02). Conclusions Our results reveal genomic heterogeneity of tRCC with similarities to other renal tumor subtypes and raise important questions about the role of TFEB/TFE3 translocations and other chromosomal imbalances in tRCC biology. PMID:23817689

  7. BrucellaBase: Genome information resource.

    PubMed

    Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Khader, L K M Abdul; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-09-01

    Brucella sp. causes a major zoonotic disease, brucellosis. Brucella belongs to the family Brucellaceae under the order Rhizobiales of Alphaproteobacteria. We present BrucellaBase, a web-based platform, providing features of a genome database together with unique analysis tools. We have developed a web version of the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) (Whatmore et al., 2007) and phylogenetic analysis of Brucella spp. BrucellaBase currently contains genome data of 510 Brucella strains along with the user interfaces for BLAST, VFDB, CARD, pairwise genome alignment and MLST typing. Availability of these tools will enable the researchers interested in Brucella to get meaningful information from Brucella genome sequences. BrucellaBase will regularly be updated with new genome sequences, new features along with improvements in genome annotations. BrucellaBase is available online at http://www.dbtbrucellosis.in/brucellabase.html or http://59.99.226.203/brucellabase/homepage.html. PMID:27164438

  8. Imaging Specific Genomic DNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baohui; Guan, Juan; Huang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    The three-dimensional organization of the genome plays important roles in regulating the functional output of the genome and even in the maintenance of epigenetic inheritance and genome stability. Here, we review and compare a number of newly developed methods-especially those that utilize the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system-that enable the direct visualization of specific, endogenous DNA sequences in living cells. We also discuss the practical considerations in implementing the CRISPR imaging technique to achieve sufficient signal-to-background levels, high specificity, and high labeling efficiency. These DNA labeling methods enable tracking of the copy number, localization, and movement of genomic elements, and we discuss the potential applications of these methods in understanding the searching and targeting mechanism of the Cas9-sgRNA complex, investigating chromosome organization, and visualizing genome instability and rearrangement. PMID:27145877

  9. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed. PMID:26755333

  10. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed. PMID:26755333

  11. Fish T cells: recent advances through genomics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, Kerry J.; Hansen, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This brief review is intended to provide a concise overview of the current literature concerning T cells, advances in identifying distinct T cell functional subsets, and in distinguishing effector cells from memory cells. We compare and contrast a wealth of recent progress made in T cell immunology of teleost, elasmobranch, and agnathan fish, to knowledge derived from mammalian T cell studies. From genome studies, fish clearly have most components associated with T cell function and we can speculate on the presence of putative T cell subsets, and the ability to detect their differentiation to form memory cells. Some recombinant proteins for T cell associated cytokines and antibodies for T cell surface receptors have been generated that will facilitate studying the functional roles of teleost T cells during immune responses. Although there is still a long way to go, major advances have occurred in recent years for investigating T cell responses, thus phenotypic and functional characterization is on the near horizon.

  12. Comprehensive whole genome array CGH profiling of mantle cell lymphoma model genomes.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Ronald J; Davies, Jonathan J; Rosenwald, Andreas; Bebb, Gwyn; Gascoyne, Randy D; Dyer, Martin J S; Staudt, Louis M; Martinez-Climent, Jose A; Lam, Wan L

    2004-09-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with median patient survival times of approximately 3 years. Although the characteristic t(11;14)(q13;q32) is found in virtually all cases, experimental evidence suggests that this event alone is insufficient to result in lymphoma and secondary genomic alterations are required. Using a newly developed DNA microarray of 32 433 overlapping genomic segments spanning the entire human genome, we can for the first time move beyond marker based analysis and comprehensively search for secondary genomic alterations concomitant with the t(11;14) in eight commonly used cell models of MCL (Granta-519, HBL-2, NCEB-1, Rec-1, SP49, UPN-1, Z138C and JVM-2). Examining these genomes at tiling resolution identified an unexpected average of 35 genetic alterations per cell line, with equal numbers of amplifications and deletions. Recurrent high-level amplifications were identified at 18q21 containing BCL2, and at 13q31 containing GPC5. In addition, a recurrent homozygous deletion was identified at 9p21 containing p15 and p16. Alignment of these profiles revealed 14 recurrent losses and 21 recurrent gains as small as 130 kb. Remarkably, even the intra immunoglobulin gene deletions at 2p11 and 22q11 were detected, demonstrating the power of combining the detection sensitivity of array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) with the resolution of an overlapping whole genome tiling-set. These alterations not only coincided with previously described aberrations in MCL, but also defined 13 novel regions. Further characterization of such minimally altered genomic regions identified using whole genome array CGH will define novel dominant oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that play important roles in the pathogenesis of MCL. PMID:15229187

  13. Genomics in mammalian cell culture bioprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Wuest, Diane M.; Harcum, Sarah W.; Lee, Kelvin H.

    2013-01-01

    Explicitly identifying the genome of a host organism including sequencing, mapping, and annotating its genetic code has become a priority in the field of biotechnology with aims at improving the efficiency and understanding of cell culture bioprocessing. Recombinant protein therapeutics, primarily produced in mammalian cells, constitute a $108 billion global market. The most common mammalian cell line used in biologic production processes is the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and although great improvements have been made in titer production over the past 25 years, the underlying molecular and physiological factors are not well understood. Confident understanding of CHO bioprocessing elements (e.g. cell line selection, protein production, and reproducibility of process performance and product specifications) would significantly improve with a well understood genome. This review describes mammalian cell culture use in bioprocessing, the importance of obtaining CHO cell line genetic sequences, and the current status of sequencing efforts. Furthermore, transcriptomic techniques and gene expression tools are presented, and case studies exploring genomic techniques and applications aimed to improve mammalian bioprocess performance are reviewed. Finally, future implications of genomic advances are surmised. PMID:22079893

  14. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  15. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  16. Genomic Landscape of Developing Male Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tin-Lap; Pang, Alan Lap-Yin; Rennert, Owen M.; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2010-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a highly orchestrated developmental process by which spermatogonia develop into mature spermatozoa. This process involves many testis- or male germ cell-specific gene products whose expressions are strictly regulated. In the past decade the advent of high-throughput gene expression analytical techniques has made functional genomic studies of this process, particularly in model animals such as mice and rats, feasible and practical. These studies have just begun to reveal the complexity of the genomic landscape of the developing male germ cells. Over 50% of the mouse and rat genome are expressed during testicular development. Among transcripts present in germ cells, 40% – 60% are uncharacterized. A number of genes, and consequently their associated biological pathways, are differentially expressed at different stages of spermatogenesis. Developing male germ cells present a rich repertoire of genetic processes. Tissue-specific as well as spermatogenesis stage-specific alternative splicing of genes exemplifies the complexity of genome expression. In addition to this layer of control, discoveries of abundant presence of antisense transcripts, expressed psuedogenes, non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) including long ncRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs) and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), and retrogenes all point to the presence of multiple layers of expression and functional regulation in male germ cells. It is anticipated that application of systems biology approaches will further our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of spermatogenesis.† PMID:19306351

  17. Genome-editing tools for stem cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Vasileva, E A; Shuvalov, O U; Garabadgiu, A V; Melino, G; Barlev, N A

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide a versatile platform for regenerative studies, drug testing and disease modeling. That the expression of only four transcription factors, Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc (OKSM), is sufficient for generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from differentiated somatic cells has revolutionized the field and also highlighted the importance of OKSM as targets for genome editing. A number of novel genome-editing systems have been developed recently. In this review, we focus on successful applications of several such systems for generation of iPSCs. In particular, we discuss genome-editing systems based on zinc-finger fusion proteins (ZFs), transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and an RNA-guided DNA-specific nuclease, Cas9, derived from the bacterial defense system against viruses that utilizes clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). PMID:26203860

  18. Genome Annotation in a Community College Cell Biology Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beagley, C. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Biology Department at Salt Lake Community College has used the IMG-ACT toolbox to introduce a genome mapping and annotation exercise into the laboratory portion of its Cell Biology course. This project provides students with an authentic inquiry-based learning experience while introducing them to computational biology and contemporary learning…

  19. Synthetic genomics and the construction of a synthetic bacterial cell.

    PubMed

    Glass, John I

    2012-01-01

    The first synthetic cellular organism was created in 2010 and based on a very small, very simple bacterium called Mycoplasma mycoides. The bacterium was called synthetic because its DNA genome was chemically synthesized rather than replicated from an existing template DNA, as occurs in all other known cellular life on Earth. The experiment was undertaken in order to develop a system that would allow creation of a minimal bacterial cell that could lead to a better understand of the first principles of cellular life. The effort resulted in new synthetic genomics techniques called genome assembly and genome transplantation. The ability of scientists to design and build bacteria opens new possibilities for creating microbes to solve human problems. PMID:23502559

  20. Dissecting genomic diversity, one cell at a time

    PubMed Central

    Blainey, Paul C; Quake, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Emerging technologies are bringing single-cell genome sequencing into the mainstream; this field has already yielded insights into the genetic architecture and variability between cells that highlight the dynamic nature of the genome. PMID:24524132

  1. A genomics-based classification of human lung tumors.

    PubMed

    2013-10-30

    We characterized genome alterations in 1255 clinically annotated lung tumors of all histological subgroups to identify genetically defined and clinically relevant subtypes. More than 55% of all cases had at least one oncogenic genome alteration potentially amenable to specific therapeutic intervention, including several personalized treatment approaches that are already in clinical evaluation. Marked differences in the pattern of genomic alterations existed between and within histological subtypes, thus challenging the original histomorphological diagnosis. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed many of these reassigned subtypes. The reassignment eliminated almost all cases of large cell carcinomas, some of which had therapeutically relevant alterations. Prospective testing of our genomics-based diagnostic algorithm in 5145 lung cancer patients enabled a genome-based diagnosis in 3863 (75%) patients, confirmed the feasibility of rational reassignments of large cell lung cancer, and led to improvement in overall survival in patients with EGFR-mutant or ALK-rearranged cancers. Thus, our findings provide support for broad implementation of genome-based diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:24174329

  2. A Genomics-Based Classification of Human Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We characterized genome alterations in 1255 clinically annotated lung tumors of all histological subgroups to identify genetically defined and clinically relevant subtypes. More than 55% of all cases had at least one oncogenic genome alteration potentially amenable to specific therapeutic intervention, including several personalized treatment approaches that are already in clinical evaluation. Marked differences in the pattern of genomic alterations existed between and within histological subtypes, thus challenging the original histomorphological diagnosis. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed many of these reassigned subtypes. The reassignment eliminated almost all cases of large cell carcinomas, some of which had therapeutically relevant alterations. Prospective testing of our genomics-based diagnostic algorithm in 5145 lung cancer patients enabled a genome-based diagnosis in 3863 (75%) patients, confirmed the feasibility of rational reassignments of large cell lung cancer, and led to improvement in overall survival in patients with EGFR-mutant or ALK-rearranged cancers. Thus, our findings provide support for broad implementation of genome-based diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:24174329

  3. Genome integrity, stem cells and hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Balazs, Endre A.

    2012-01-01

    Faithful preservation of genome integrity is the critical mission of stem cells as well as of germ cells. Reviewed are the following mechanisms involved in protecting DNA in these cells: (a) The efflux machinery that can pump out variety of genotoxins in ATP-dependent manner; (b) the mechanisms maintaining minimal metabolic activity which reduces generation of reactive oxidants, by-products of aerobic respiration; (c) the role of hypoxic niche of stem cells providing a gradient of variable oxygen tension; (d) (e) the presence of hyaluronan (HA) and HA receptors on stem cells and in the niche; (f) the role of HA in protecting DNA from oxidative damage; (g) the specific function of HA in protecting DNA in stem cells; (h) the interactions of HA with sperm cells and oocytes that also may shield their DNA from oxidative damage, and (e) mechanisms by which HA exerts the anti-oxidant activity. While HA has multitude of functions its anti-oxidant capabilities are often overlooked but may be of significance in preservation of integrity of stem and germ cells genome. PMID:22383371

  4. Genomic landscape of cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaehyuk; Goh, Gerald; Walradt, Trent; Hong, Bok S.; Bunick, Christopher G.; Chen, Kan; Bjornson, Robert D.; Maman, Yaakov; Wang, Tiffany; Tordoff, Jesse; Carlson, Kacie; Overton, John D.; Liu, Kristina J.; Lewis, Julia M.; Devine, Lesley; Barbarotta, Lisa; Foss, Francine M.; Subtil, Antonio; Vonderheid, Eric C.; Edelson, Richard L.; Schatz, David G.; Boggon, Titus J.; Girardi, Michael; Lifton, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma of skin-homing T lymphocytes. We performed exome and whole genome DNA sequence and RNA sequencing on purified CTCL and matched normal cells. The results implicate mutations in 17 genes in CTCL pathogenesis, including genes involved in T cell activation and apoptosis, NFκB signaling, chromatin remodeling, and DNA damage response. CTCL is distinctive in that somatic copy number variants (SCNVs) comprise 92% of all driver mutations (mean of 11.8 pathogenic SCNVs vs. 1.0 somatic single nucleotide variants per CTCL). These findings have implications for novel therapeutics. PMID:26192916

  5. Population-based 3D genome structure analysis reveals driving forces in spatial genome organization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyuan; Kalhor, Reza; Dai, Chao; Hao, Shengli; Gong, Ke; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Haochen; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Le Gros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Chen, Lin; Alber, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Conformation capture technologies (e.g., Hi-C) chart physical interactions between chromatin regions on a genome-wide scale. However, the structural variability of the genome between cells poses a great challenge to interpreting ensemble-averaged Hi-C data, particularly for long-range and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we present a probabilistic approach for deconvoluting Hi-C data into a model population of distinct diploid 3D genome structures, which facilitates the detection of chromatin interactions likely to co-occur in individual cells. Our approach incorporates the stochastic nature of chromosome conformations and allows a detailed analysis of alternative chromatin structure states. For example, we predict and experimentally confirm the presence of large centromere clusters with distinct chromosome compositions varying between individual cells. The stability of these clusters varies greatly with their chromosome identities. We show that these chromosome-specific clusters can play a key role in the overall chromosome positioning in the nucleus and stabilizing specific chromatin interactions. By explicitly considering genome structural variability, our population-based method provides an important tool for revealing novel insights into the key factors shaping the spatial genome organization. PMID:26951677

  6. Efficient delivery of nuclease proteins for genome editing in human stem cells and primary cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Gaj, Thomas; Yang, Yifeng; Wang, Nan; Shui, Sailan; Kim, Sojung; Kanchiswamy, Chidananda Nagamangala; Kim, Jin-Soo; Barbas, Carlos F

    2015-11-01

    Targeted nucleases, including zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), have provided researchers with the ability to manipulate nearly any genomic sequence in human cells and model organisms. However, realizing the full potential of these genome-modifying technologies requires their safe and efficient delivery into relevant cell types. Unlike methods that rely on expression from nucleic acids, the direct delivery of nuclease proteins to cells provides rapid action and fast turnover, leading to fewer off-target effects while maintaining high rates of targeted modification. These features make nuclease protein delivery particularly well suited for precision genome engineering. Here we describe procedures for implementing protein-based genome editing in human embryonic stem cells and primary cells. Protocols for the expression, purification and delivery of ZFN proteins, which are intrinsically cell-permeable; TALEN proteins, which can be internalized via conjugation with cell-penetrating peptide moieties; and Cas9 ribonucleoprotein, whose nucleofection into cells facilitates rapid induction of multiplexed modifications, are described, along with procedures for evaluating nuclease protein activity. Once they are constructed, nuclease proteins can be expressed and purified within 6 d, and they can be used to induce genomic modifications in human cells within 2 d. PMID:26492140

  7. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M.C.; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R.; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R.; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J.; Tan, Benita K.T.; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N.; Martens, John W.M.; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E.; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L.; Purdie, Colin A.; Thompson, Alastair M.; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. PMID:25963125

  8. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M C; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J; Tan, Benita K T; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N; Martens, John W M; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Lakhani, Sunil R; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Purdie, Colin A; Thompson, Alastair M; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells. PMID:25963125

  9. From CO2 to cell: energetic expense of creating biomass using the Calvin-Benson-Bassham and reductive citric acid cycles based on genome data.

    PubMed

    Mangiapia, Mary; Scott, Kathleen

    2016-04-01

    The factors driving the dominance of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle (CBB) or reductive citric acid cycle (rCAC) in autotrophic microorganisms in different habitats are debated. Based on costs for synthesizing a few metabolic intermediates, it has been suggested that the CBB poses a disadvantage due to higher metabolic cost. The purpose of this study was to extend this estimate of cost from metabolite synthesis to biomass synthesis. For 12 gammaproteobacteria (CBB) and five epsilonproteobacteria (rCAC), the amount of ATP to synthesize a gram of biomass from CO2 was calculated from genome sequences via metabolic maps. The eleven central carbon metabolites needed to synthesize biomass were all less expensive to synthesize via the rCAC (66%-89% of the ATP needed to synthesize them via CBB). Differences in cell compositions did result in differing demands for metabolites among the organisms, but the differences in cost to synthesize biomass were small among organisms that used a particular pathway (e.g. rCAC), compared to the difference between pathways (rCAC versus CBB). The rCAC autotrophs averaged 0.195 moles ATP per g biomass, while their CBB counterparts averaged 0.238. This is the first in silico estimate of the relative expense of both pathways to generate biomass. PMID:26940292

  10. Genome-wide nucleosome positioning during embryonic stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Teif, Vladimir B; Vainshtein, Yevhen; Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Mallm, Jan-Philipp; Marth, Caroline; Höfer, Thomas; Rippe, Karsten

    2012-11-01

    We determined genome-wide nucleosome occupancies in mouse embryonic stem cells and their neural progenitor and embryonic fibroblast counterparts to assess features associated with nucleosome positioning during lineage commitment. Cell-type- and protein-specific binding preferences of transcription factors to sites with either low (Myc, Klf4 and Zfx) or high (Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2) nucleosome occupancy as well as complex patterns for CTCF were identified. Nucleosome-depleted regions around transcription start and transcription termination sites were broad and more pronounced for active genes, with distinct patterns for promoters classified according to CpG content or histone methylation marks. Throughout the genome, nucleosome occupancy was correlated with certain histone methylation or acetylation modifications. In addition, the average nucleosome repeat length increased during differentiation by 5-7 base pairs, with local variations for specific regions. Our results reveal regulatory mechanisms of cell differentiation that involve nucleosome repositioning. PMID:23085715

  11. The somatic genomic landscape of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Caleb F.; Ricketts, Christopher; Wang, Min; Yang, Lixing; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Shen, Hui; Buhay, Christian; Kang, Hyojin; Kim, Sang Cheol; Fahey, Catherine C.; Hacker, Kathryn E.; Bhanot, Gyan; Gordenin, Dmitry A.; Chu, Andy; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Biehl, Michael; Seth, Sahil; Kaipparettu, Benny A.; Bristow, Christopher A.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Wallen, Eric M.; Smith, Angela B.; Tickoo, Satish K.; Tamboli, Pheroze; Reuter, Victor; Schmidt, Laura S.; Hsieh, James J.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Chin, Lynda; Meyerson, Matthew; Kucherlapati, Raju; Park, Woong-Yang; Robertson, A. Gordon; Laird, Peter W.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Park, Peter J.; Morgan, Margaret; Shuch, Brian; Muzny, Donna; Wheeler, David A.; Linehan, W. Marston; Gibbs, Richard A.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Creighton, Chad J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations of 66 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas (ChRCCs) based on multidimensional and comprehensive characterization, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and whole genome sequencing. The result is consistent that ChRCC originates from the distal nephron compared to other kidney cancers with more proximal origins. Combined mtDNA and gene expression analysis implicates changes in mitochondrial function as a component of the disease biology, while suggesting alternative roles for mtDNA mutations in cancers relying on oxidative phosphorylation. Genomic rearrangements lead to recurrent structural breakpoints within TERT promoter region, which correlates with highly elevated TERT expression and manifestation of kataegis, representing a mechanism of TERT up-regulation in cancer distinct from previously-observed amplifications and point mutations. PMID:25155756

  12. [Updated genomics of testicular germ cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; He, An-bang; Cai, Zhi-ming; Wu, Song

    2015-04-01

    Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is a most common testicular malignancy with an increasing incidence, and its pathogenesis and mechanisms are not yet clear. The next generation sequencing has become the main tool to uncover the underlying mechanisms of TGCT. The differential gene expressions, gene mutation, predisposing gene-dominated signaling pathways, and changes of the relevant genes in the sex chromosome are largely involved in the occurrence and development of TGCT. Studies on the genomics of TGCT contribute a lot to identifying the pivotal pathogenic genes and paving a theoretical ground for the early screening and targeted therapy of TGCT. This paper summarizes the advances in the studies of the genomics of TGCT so as to reveal thetmechanisms of the disease at the genetic level. PMID:26027106

  13. Controlling gene networks and cell fate with precision-targeted DNA-binding proteins and small-molecule-based genome readers

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Asuka; Lee, Garrett O.; Wan, Fang; Erwin, Graham S.; Ansari, Aseem Z.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors control the fate of a cell by regulating the expression of genes and regulatory networks. Recent successes in inducing pluripotency in terminally differentiated cells as well as directing differentiation with natural transcription factors has lent credence to the efforts that aim to direct cell fate with rationally designed transcription factors. Because DNA-binding factors are modular in design, they can be engineered to target specific genomic sequences and perform pre-programmed regulatory functions upon binding. Such precision-tailored factors can serve as molecular tools to reprogramme or differentiate cells in a targeted manner. Using different types of engineered DNA binders, both regulatory transcriptional controls of gene networks, as well as permanent alteration of genomic content, can be implemented to study cell fate decisions. In the present review, we describe the current state of the art in artificial transcription factor design and the exciting prospect of employing artificial DNA-binding factors to manipulate the transcriptional networks as well as epigenetic landscapes that govern cell fate. PMID:25145439

  14. Shared clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in aberrant mast cells and leukemic myeloid blasts detected by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based whole-genome scanning.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Shao, Lina; Bixby, Dale L; Ross, Charles W

    2016-04-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by a clonal proliferation of aberrant mast cells within extracutaneous sites. In a subset of SM cases, a second associated hematologic non-mast cell disease (AHNMD) is also present, usually of myeloid origin. Polymerase chain reaction and targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization studies have provided evidence that, in at least some cases, the aberrant mast cells are related clonally to the neoplastic cells of the AHNMD. In this work, a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray (SNP-A) was used to characterize the cytogenetics of the aberrant mast cells from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia and concomitant mast cell leukemia associated with a KIT D816A mutation. The results demonstrate the presence of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the mast cells and myeloid blasts, as well as additional abnormalities within mast cells (copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity) not detectable by routine karyotypic analysis. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of SNP-A whole-genome scanning to the detection of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the two components of a case of SM-AHNMD. The findings provide additional evidence of a frequent clonal link between aberrant mast cells and cells of myeloid AHNMDs, and also highlight the importance of direct sequencing for identifying uncommon activating KIT mutations. PMID:26865278

  15. Defining cell types and states with single-cell genomics

    PubMed Central

    Trapnell, Cole

    2015-01-01

    A revolution in cellular measurement technology is under way: For the first time, we have the ability to monitor global gene regulation in thousands of individual cells in a single experiment. Such experiments will allow us to discover new cell types and states and trace their developmental origins. They overcome fundamental limitations inherent in measurements of bulk cell population that have frustrated efforts to resolve cellular states. Single-cell genomics and proteomics enable not only precise characterization of cell state, but also provide a stunningly high-resolution view of transitions between states. These measurements may finally make explicit the metaphor that C.H. Waddington posed nearly 60 years ago to explain cellular plasticity: Cells are residents of a vast “landscape” of possible states, over which they travel during development and in disease. Single-cell technology helps not only locate cells on this landscape, but illuminates the molecular mechanisms that shape the landscape itself. However, single-cell genomics is a field in its infancy, with many experimental and computational advances needed to fully realize its full potential. PMID:26430159

  16. Genome editing in pluripotent stem cells: research and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Deleidi, Michela; Yu, Cong

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) and genome editing technologies has opened up new avenues for the investigation of human biology in health and disease as well as the development of therapeutic applications. Gene editing approaches with programmable nucleases have been successfully established in hPSCs and applied to study gene function, develop novel animal models and perform genetic and chemical screens. Several studies now show the successful editing of disease-linked alleles in somatic and patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as well as in animal models. Importantly, initial clinical trials have shown the safety of programmable nucleases for ex vivo somatic gene therapy. In this context, the unlimited proliferation potential and the pluripotent properties of iPSCs may offer advantages for gene targeting approaches. However, many technical and safety issues still need to be addressed before genome-edited iPSCs are translated into the clinical setting. Here, we provide an overview of the available genome editing systems and discuss opportunities and perspectives for their application in basic research and clinical practice, with a particular focus on hPSC based research and gene therapy approaches. Finally, we discuss recent research on human germline genome editing and its social and ethical implications. PMID:26930470

  17. Effects of sample treatments on genome recovery via single-cell genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Schwientek, Patrick; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-06-13

    It is known that single-cell genomics is a powerful tool for accessing genetic information from uncultivated microorganisms. Methods of handling samples before single-cell genomic amplification may affect the quality of the genomes obtained. Using three bacterial strains we demonstrate that, compared to cryopreservation, lower-quality single-cell genomes are recovered when the sample is preserved in ethanol or if the sample undergoes fluorescence in situ hybridization, while sample preservation in paraformaldehyde renders it completely unsuitable for sequencing.

  18. Genome exposure and regulation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, T T; Webb, P; Johnson, R

    1998-09-01

    A method of measurement of exposed DNA (i.e. hypersensitive to DNase I hydrolysis) as opposed to sequestered (hydrolysis resistant) DNA in isolated nuclei of mammalian cells is described. While cell cultures exhibit some differences in behavior from day to day, the general pattern of exposed and sequestered DNA is satisfactorily reproducible and agrees with results previously obtained by other methods. The general pattern of DNA hydrolysis exhibited by all cells tested consists of a curve which at first rises sharply with increasing DNase I, and then becomes almost horizontal, indicating that roughly about half of the nuclear DNA is highly sequestered. In 4 cases where transformed cells (Raszip6, CHO, HL60 and PC12) were compared, each with its more normal homolog (3T3, and the reverse transformed versions of CHO, HL60 and PC12, achieved by dibutyryl cyclic AMP [DBcAMP], retinoic acid, and nerve growth factor [NGF] respectively), the transformed form displayed less genome exposure than the nontransformed form at every DNase I dose tested. When Ca++ was excluded from the hydrolysis medium in both the Raszip6-3T3 and the CHO-DBcAMP systems, the normal cell forms lost their increased exposure reverting to that of the transformed forms. Therefore Ca++ appears necessary for maintenance of the DNA in the more highly exposed state characteristic of the nontransformed phenotype. LiCl increases the DNA exposure of all transformed cells tested. Dextran sulfate and heparin each can increase the DNA exposure of several different cancers. Colcemid prevents the increase of exposure of CHO by DBcAMP but it must be administered before or simultaneously with the latter compound. Measurements on mouse biopsies reveal large differences in exposure in different normal tissues. Thus, the exposure from adult liver cells was greater than that of adult brain, but both fetal liver and fetal brain had significantly greater exposure than their adult counterparts. Exposure in normal human

  19. Are we Genomic Mosaics? Variations of the Genome of Somatic Cells can Contribute to Diversify our Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, P A; Salamini, F; Sgaramella, V

    2010-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidences support the hypothesis that the genomes and the epigenomes may be different in the somatic cells of complex organisms. In the genome, the differences range from single base substitutions to chromosome number; in the epigenome, they entail multiple postsynthetic modifications of the chromatin. Somatic genome variations (SGV) may accumulate during development in response both to genetic programs, which may differ from tissue to tissue, and to environmental stimuli, which are often undetected and generally irreproducible. SGV may jeopardize physiological cellular functions, but also create novel coding and regulatory sequences, to be exposed to intraorganismal Darwinian selection. Genomes acknowledged as comparatively poor in genes, such as humans', could thus increase their pristine informational endowment. A better understanding of SGV will contribute to basic issues such as the "nature vs nurture" dualism and the inheritance of acquired characters. On the applied side, they may explain the low yield of cloning via somatic cell nuclear transfer, provide clues to some of the problems associated with transdifferentiation, and interfere with individual DNA analysis. SGV may be unique in the different cells types and in the different developmental stages, and thus explain the several hundred gaps persisting in the human genomes "completed" so far. They may compound the variations associated to our epigenomes and make of each of us an "(epi)genomic" mosaic. An ensuing paradigm is the possibility that a single genome (the ephemeral one assembled at fertilization) has the capacity to generate several different brains in response to different environments. PMID:21358981

  20. CRISPR/Cas9 Based Genome Editing of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Pohl, C; Kiel, J A K W; Driessen, A J M; Bovenberg, R A L; Nygård, Y

    2016-07-15

    CRISPR/Cas9 based systems have emerged as versatile platforms for precision genome editing in a wide range of organisms. Here we have developed powerful CRISPR/Cas9 tools for marker-based and marker-free genome modifications in Penicillium chrysogenum, a model filamentous fungus and industrially relevant cell factory. The developed CRISPR/Cas9 toolbox is highly flexible and allows editing of new targets with minimal cloning efforts. The Cas9 protein and the sgRNA can be either delivered during transformation, as preassembled CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) or expressed from an AMA1 based plasmid within the cell. The direct delivery of the Cas9 protein with in vitro synthesized sgRNA to the cells allows for a transient method for genome engineering that may rapidly be applicable for other filamentous fungi. The expression of Cas9 from an AMA1 based vector was shown to be highly efficient for marker-free gene deletions. PMID:27072635

  1. Calibrating genomic and allelic coverage bias in single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Adalsteinsson, Viktor A; Francis, Joshua; Cornils, Hauke; Jung, Joonil; Maire, Cecile; Ligon, Keith L; Meyerson, Matthew; Love, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts introduced in whole-genome amplification (WGA) make it difficult to derive accurate genomic information from single-cell genomes and require different analytical strategies from bulk genome analysis. Here, we describe statistical methods to quantitatively assess the amplification bias resulting from whole-genome amplification of single-cell genomic DNA. Analysis of single-cell DNA libraries generated by different technologies revealed universal features of the genome coverage bias predominantly generated at the amplicon level (1-10 kb). The magnitude of coverage bias can be accurately calibrated from low-pass sequencing (∼0.1 × ) to predict the depth-of-coverage yield of single-cell DNA libraries sequenced at arbitrary depths. We further provide a benchmark comparison of single-cell libraries generated by multi-strand displacement amplification (MDA) and multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles (MALBAC). Finally, we develop statistical models to calibrate allelic bias in single-cell whole-genome amplification and demonstrate a census-based strategy for efficient and accurate variant detection from low-input biopsy samples. PMID:25879913

  2. Calibrating genomic and allelic coverage bias in single-cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Joshua; Cornils, Hauke; Jung, Joonil; Maire, Cecile; Ligon, Keith L.; Meyerson, Matthew; Love, J. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Artifacts introduced in whole-genome amplification (WGA) make it difficult to derive accurate genomic information from single-cell genomes and require different analytical strategies from bulk genome analysis. Here, we describe statistical methods to quantitatively assess the amplification bias resulting from whole-genome amplification of single-cell genomic DNA. Analysis of single-cell DNA libraries generated by different technologies revealed universal features of the genome coverage bias predominantly generated at the amplicon level (1–10 kb). The magnitude of coverage bias can be accurately calibrated from low-pass sequencing (~0.1 ×) to predict the depth-of-coverage yield of single-cell DNA libraries sequenced at arbitrary depths. We further provide a benchmark comparison of single-cell libraries generated by multi-strand displacement amplification (MDA) and multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles (MALBAC). Finally, we develop statistical models to calibrate allelic bias in single-cell whole-genome amplification and demonstrate a census-based strategy for efficient and accurate variant detection from low-input biopsy samples. PMID:25879913

  3. Genome Editing in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cory; Ye, Zhaohui; Cheng, Linzhao

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), defined by their capacity for self-renewal and differentiation into all cell types, are an integral tool for basic biological research and disease modeling. However, full use of PSCs for research and regenerative medicine requires the ability to precisely edit their DNA to correct disease-causing mutations and for functional analysis of genetic variations. Recent advances in DNA editing of human stem cells (including PSCs) have benefited from the use of designer nucleases capable of making double-strand breaks (DSBs) at specific sequences that stimulate endogenous DNA repair. The clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system has become the preferred designer nuclease for genome editing in human PSCs and other cell types. Here we describe the principles for designing a single guide RNA to uniquely target a gene of interest and describe strategies for disrupting, inserting, or replacing a specific DNA sequence in human PSCs. The improvements in efficiency and ease provided by these techniques allow individuals to precisely engineer PSCs in a way previously limited to large institutes and core facilities. PMID:27037079

  4. Accuracy of Answers to Cell Lineage Questions Depends on Single-Cell Genomics Data Quality and Quantity.

    PubMed

    Spiro, Adam; Shapiro, Ehud

    2016-06-01

    Advances in single-cell (SC) genomics enable commensurate improvements in methods for uncovering lineage relations among individual cells, as determined by phylogenetic analysis of the somatic mutations harbored by each cell. Theoretically, complete and accurate knowledge of the genome of each cell of an individual can produce an extremely accurate cell lineage tree of that individual. However, the reality of SC genomics is that such complete and accurate knowledge would be wanting, in quality and in quantity, for the foreseeable future. In this paper we offer a framework for systematically exploring the feasibility of answering cell lineage questions based on SC somatic mutational analysis, as a function of SC genomics data quality and quantity. We take into consideration the current limitations of SC genomics in terms of mutation data quality, most notably amplification bias and allele dropouts (ADO), as well as cost, which puts practical limits on mutation data quantity obtained from each cell as well as on cell sample density. We do so by generating in silico cell lineage trees using a dedicated formal language, eSTG, and show how the ability to answer correctly a cell lineage question depends on the quality and quantity of the SC mutation data. The presented framework can serve as a baseline for the potential of current SC genomics to unravel cell lineage dynamics, as well as the potential contributions of future advancement, both biochemical and computational, for the task. PMID:27295404

  5. Accuracy of Answers to Cell Lineage Questions Depends on Single-Cell Genomics Data Quality and Quantity

    PubMed Central

    Spiro, Adam; Shapiro, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    Advances in single-cell (SC) genomics enable commensurate improvements in methods for uncovering lineage relations among individual cells, as determined by phylogenetic analysis of the somatic mutations harbored by each cell. Theoretically, complete and accurate knowledge of the genome of each cell of an individual can produce an extremely accurate cell lineage tree of that individual. However, the reality of SC genomics is that such complete and accurate knowledge would be wanting, in quality and in quantity, for the foreseeable future. In this paper we offer a framework for systematically exploring the feasibility of answering cell lineage questions based on SC somatic mutational analysis, as a function of SC genomics data quality and quantity. We take into consideration the current limitations of SC genomics in terms of mutation data quality, most notably amplification bias and allele dropouts (ADO), as well as cost, which puts practical limits on mutation data quantity obtained from each cell as well as on cell sample density. We do so by generating in silico cell lineage trees using a dedicated formal language, eSTG, and show how the ability to answer correctly a cell lineage question depends on the quality and quantity of the SC mutation data. The presented framework can serve as a baseline for the potential of current SC genomics to unravel cell lineage dynamics, as well as the potential contributions of future advancement, both biochemical and computational, for the task. PMID:27295404

  6. UV Decontamination of MDA Reagents for Single Cell Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Janey; Tighe, Damon; Sczyrba, Alexander; Malmatrom, Rex; Clingenpeel, Scott; Malfatti, Stephanie; Rinke, Christian; Wang, Zhong; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-03-18

    Single cell genomics, the amplification and sequencing of genomes from single cells, can provide a glimpse into the genetic make-up and thus life style of the vast majority of uncultured microbial cells, making it an immensely powerful and increasingly popular tool. This is accomplished by use of multiple displacement amplification (MDA), which can generate billions of copies of a single bacterial genome producing microgram-range DNA required for shotgun sequencing. Here, we address a key challenge inherent to this approach and propose a solution for the improved recovery of single cell genomes. While DNA-free reagents for the amplification of a single cell genome are a prerequisite for successful single cell sequencing and analysis, DNA contamination has been detected in various reagents, which poses a considerable challenge. Our study demonstrates the effect of UV irradiation in efficient elimination of exogenous contaminant DNA found in MDA reagents, while maintaining Phi29 activity. Consequently, we also find that increased UV exposure to Phi29 does not adversely affect genome coverage of MDA amplified single cells. While additional challenges in single cell genomics remain to be resolved, the proposed methodology is relatively quick and simple and we believe that its application will be of high value for future single cell sequencing projects.

  7. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Echophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Margrethe H. Serres

    2012-06-29

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a motile, facultative {gamma}-Proteobacterium with remarkable respiratory versatility; it can utilize a range of organic and inorganic compounds as terminal electronacceptors for anaerobic metabolism. The ability to effectively reduce nitrate, S0, polyvalent metals andradionuclides has established MR-1 as an important model dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganism for genome-based investigations of biogeochemical transformation of metals and radionuclides that are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites nationwide. Metal-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella also have a highly developed capacity for extracellular transfer of respiratory electrons to solid phase Fe and Mn oxides as well as directly to anode surfaces in microbial fuel cells. More broadly, Shewanellae are recognized free-living microorganisms and members of microbial communities involved in the decomposition of organic matter and the cycling of elements in aquatic and sedimentary systems. To function and compete in environments that are subject to spatial and temporal environmental change, Shewanella must be able to sense and respond to such changes and therefore require relatively robust sensing and regulation systems. The overall goal of this project is to apply the tools of genomics, leveraging the availability of genome sequence for 18 additional strains of Shewanella, to better understand the ecophysiology and speciation of respiratory-versatile members of this important genus. To understand these systems we propose to use genome-based approaches to investigate Shewanella as a system of integrated networks; first describing key cellular subsystems - those involved in signal transduction, regulation, and metabolism - then building towards understanding the function of whole cells and, eventually, cells within populations. As a general approach, this project will employ complimentary "top-down" - bioinformatics-based genome functional predictions, high

  8. Single cell genome analysis of an uncultured heterotrophic stramenopile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Rajat S.; Price, Dana C.; Schliep, Alexander; Cai, Guohong; Korobeynikov, Anton; Yoon, Hwan Su; Yang, Eun Chan; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2014-04-01

    A broad swath of eukaryotic microbial biodiversity cannot be cultivated in the lab and is therefore inaccessible to conventional genome-wide comparative methods. One promising approach to study these lineages is single cell genomics (SCG), whereby an individual cell is captured from nature and genome data are produced from the amplified total DNA. Here we tested the efficacy of SCG to generate a draft genome assembly from a single sample, in this case a cell belonging to the broadly distributed MAST-4 uncultured marine stramenopiles. Using de novo gene prediction, we identified 6,996 protein-encoding genes in the MAST-4 genome. This genetic inventory was sufficient to place the cell within the ToL using multigene phylogenetics and provided preliminary insights into the complex evolutionary history of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the MAST-4 lineage.

  9. Mechanisms of Base Substitution Mutagenesis in Cancer Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Bacolla, Albino; Cooper, David N.; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequence data provide an invaluable resource for inferring the key mechanisms by which mutations arise in cancer cells, favoring their survival, proliferation and invasiveness. Here we examine recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the predominant type of genetic alteration found in cancer cells, somatic single base substitutions (SBSs). Cytosine methylation, demethylation and deamination, charge transfer reactions in DNA, DNA replication timing, chromatin status and altered DNA proofreading activities are all now known to contribute to the mechanisms leading to base substitution mutagenesis. We review current hypotheses as to the major processes that give rise to SBSs and evaluate their relative relevance in the light of knowledge acquired from cancer genome sequencing projects and the study of base modifications, DNA repair and lesion bypass. Although gene expression data on APOBEC3B enzymes provide support for a role in cancer mutagenesis through U:G mismatch intermediates, the enzyme preference for single-stranded DNA may limit its activity genome-wide. For SBSs at both CG:CG and YC:GR sites, we outline evidence for a prominent role of damage by charge transfer reactions that follow interactions of the DNA with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other endogenous or exogenous electron-abstracting molecules. PMID:24705290

  10. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  11. Recent advances in Echinococcus genomics and stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Koziol, U; Brehm, K

    2015-10-30

    Alveolar and cystic echinococcosis, caused by the metacestode larval stages of the tapeworms Echinococcus multilocularis and Echinococcus granulosus, respectively, are life-threatening diseases and very difficult to treat. The introduction of benzimidazole-based chemotherapy, which targets parasite β-tubulin, has significantly improved the life-span and prognosis of echinococcosis patients. However, benzimidazoles show only parasitostatic activity, are associated with serious adverse side effects and have to be administered for very long time periods, underlining the need for new drugs. Very recently, the nuclear genomes of E. multilocularis and E. granulosus have been characterised, revealing a plethora of data for gaining a deeper understanding of host-parasite interaction, parasite development and parasite evolution. Combined with extensive transcriptome analyses of Echinococcus life cycle stages these investigations also yielded novel clues for targeted drug design. Recent years also witnessed significant advancements in the molecular and cellular characterisation of the Echinococcus 'germinative cell' population, which forms a unique stem cell system that differs from stem cells of other organisms in the expression of several genes associated with the maintenance of pluripotency. As the only parasite cell type capable of undergoing mitosis, the germinative cells are central to all developmental transitions of Echinococcus within the host and to parasite expansion via asexual proliferation. In the present article, we will briefly introduce and discuss recent advances in Echinococcus genomics and stem cell research in the context of drug design and development. Interestingly, it turns out that benzimidazoles seem to have very limited effects on Echinococcus germinative cells, which could explain the high recurrence rates observed after chemotherapeutic treatment of echinococcosis patients. This clearly indicates that future efforts into the development of

  12. Recent advances in microbial single cell genomics technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanauskas, R.

    2015-12-01

    Single cell genomics is increasingly utilized as a powerful tool to decipher the metabolic potential, evolutionary histories and in situ interactions of environmental microorganisms. I will present several new developments of this exciting technology, which improve genomic data recovery from individual cells and allow its integration with cell's phenotypic properties. I will also demonstrate how these new technical capabilities help understanding the biology of the "microbial dark matter" inhabiting marine and terrestrial subsurface environments.

  13. A Single-Cell Genome for Thiovulum sp.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Ian P. G.; Blainey, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    We determined a significant fraction of the genome sequence of a representative of Thiovulum, the uncultivated genus of colorless sulfur Epsilonproteobacteria, by analyzing the genome sequences of four individual cells collected from phototrophic mats from Elkhorn Slough, California. These cells were isolated utilizing a microfluidic laser-tweezing system, and their genomes were amplified by multiple-displacement amplification prior to sequencing. Thiovulum is a gradient bacterium found at oxic-anoxic marine interfaces and noted for its distinctive morphology and rapid swimming motility. The genomic sequences of the four individual cells were assembled into a composite genome consisting of 221 contigs covering 2.083 Mb including 2,162 genes. This single-cell genome represents a genomic view of the physiological capabilities of isolated Thiovulum cells. Thiovulum is the second-fastest bacterium ever observed, swimming at 615 μm/s, and this genome shows that this rapid swimming motility is a result of a standard flagellar machinery that has been extensively characterized in other bacteria. This suggests that standard flagella are capable of propelling bacterial cells at speeds much faster than typically thought. Analysis of the genome suggests that naturally occurring Thiovulum populations are more diverse than previously recognized and that studies performed in the past probably address a wide range of unrecognized genotypic and phenotypic diversities of Thiovulum. The genome presented in this article provides a basis for future isolation-independent studies of Thiovulum, where single-cell and metagenomic tools can be used to differentiate between different Thiovulum genotypes. PMID:23023751

  14. Prognostic value of genomic damage in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    de Juan, C.; Iniesta, P.; Vega, F. J.; Peinado, M. A.; Fernandez, C.; Caldés, T.; Massa, M. J.; López, J. A.; Sánchez, A.; Torres, A. J.; Balibrea, J. L.; Benito, M.

    1998-01-01

    Genomic alterations have been analysed in 65 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissue samples by using the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR), which is a PCR-based genomic fingerprinting. We have shown that AP-PCR may be applied as a useful and feasible practical method for detection of the genomic alterations that accompany malignancy in NSCLC. Genomic changes detected by us consisted of: allelic losses or gains in anonymous DNA sequences, homozygously deleted DNA sequences and polymorphic DNA sequences. According to these genomic changes, lung tumours evaluated in the present study have been scored into three groups: low, moderate and high genomic damage tumours. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of genomic damage on patient survival. Survival analysis was carried out in 51 NSCLC patients. Our results revealed that high genomic damage patients showed a poorer prognosis than those with low or moderate genomic damage (P = 0.038). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that patients with higher genomic alterations displayed an adjusted-by-stage risk ratio 4.26 times higher than the remaining patients (95% CI = 1.03-17.54). We can conclude that genomic damage has an independent prognostic value of poor clinical evolution in NSCLC. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9667677

  15. GenColors-based comparative genome databases for small eukaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Felder, Marius; Romualdi, Alessandro; Petzold, Andreas; Platzer, Matthias; Sühnel, Jürgen; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    Many sequence data repositories can give a quick and easily accessible overview on genomes and their annotations. Less widespread is the possibility to compare related genomes with each other in a common database environment. We have previously described the GenColors database system (http://gencolors.fli-leibniz.de) and its applications to a number of bacterial genomes such as Borrelia, Legionella, Leptospira and Treponema. This system has an emphasis on genome comparison. It combines data from related genomes and provides the user with an extensive set of visualization and analysis tools. Eukaryote genomes are normally larger than prokaryote genomes and thus pose additional challenges for such a system. We have, therefore, adapted GenColors to also handle larger datasets of small eukaryotic genomes and to display eukaryotic gene structures. Further recent developments include whole genome views, genome list options and, for bacterial genome browsers, the display of horizontal gene transfer predictions. Two new GenColors-based databases for two fungal species (http://fgb.fli-leibniz.de) and for four social amoebas (http://sacgb.fli-leibniz.de) were set up. Both new resources open up a single entry point for related genomes for the amoebozoa and fungal research communities and other interested users. Comparative genomics approaches are greatly facilitated by these resources. PMID:23193285

  16. Ten years of bacterial genome sequencing: comparative-genomics-based discoveries.

    PubMed

    Binnewies, Tim T; Motro, Yair; Hallin, Peter F; Lund, Ole; Dunn, David; La, Tom; Hampson, David J; Bellgard, Matthew; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Ussery, David W

    2006-07-01

    It has been more than 10 years since the first bacterial genome sequence was published. Hundreds of bacterial genome sequences are now available for comparative genomics, and searching a given protein against more than a thousand genomes will soon be possible. The subject of this review will address a relatively straightforward question: "What have we learned from this vast amount of new genomic data?" Perhaps one of the most important lessons has been that genetic diversity, at the level of large-scale variation amongst even genomes of the same species, is far greater than was thought. The classical textbook view of evolution relying on the relatively slow accumulation of mutational events at the level of individual bases scattered throughout the genome has changed. One of the most obvious conclusions from examining the sequences from several hundred bacterial genomes is the enormous amount of diversity--even in different genomes from the same bacterial species. This diversity is generated by a variety of mechanisms, including mobile genetic elements and bacteriophages. An examination of the 20 Escherichia coli genomes sequenced so far dramatically illustrates this, with the genome size ranging from 4.6 to 5.5 Mbp; much of the variation appears to be of phage origin. This review also addresses mobile genetic elements, including pathogenicity islands and the structure of transposable elements. There are at least 20 different methods available to compare bacterial genomes. Metagenomics offers the chance to study genomic sequences found in ecosystems, including genomes of species that are difficult to culture. It has become clear that a genome sequence represents more than just a collection of gene sequences for an organism and that information concerning the environment and growth conditions for the organism are important for interpretation of the genomic data. The newly proposed Minimal Information about a Genome Sequence standard has been developed to obtain this

  17. Extraction and Elongation of Genomic DNA from a Single Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Christelle; Tegenfeldt, Jonas; Austin, Robert

    2001-03-01

    We are developing ways to use microfabricated electrode arrays to extract genomic DNA from single E. coli cells and then move the genomic material into an dielectrophoretic trap for clean-up and fractionation. We will present some preliminary data and discuss some of basic polymer physics that impact on these experiments.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of histone methylation reveals chromatin state-based complex regulation of differential gene transcription and function of CD8 memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Yasuto; Wang, Zhibin; Zang, Chongzhi; Wood, William H.; Schones, Dustin; Cui, Kairong; Roh, Tae-Young; Lhotsky, Brad; Wersto, Robert P.; Peng, Weiqun; Becker, Kevin G.; Zhao, Keji; Weng, Nan-ping

    2009-01-01

    Summary Memory lymphocytes are characterized by their ability to exhibit a rapid response to the recall antigen, in which differential transcription plays a significant role, yet the underlying mechanism is not understood. We report here a genome-wide analysis of histone methylation on two histone H3 lysine residues (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) and gene expression profiles in naïve and memory CD8 T cells. We found that a general correlation exists between the levels of gene expression and the levels of H3K4me3 (positive correlation) and H3K27me3 (negative correlation) across the gene body. These correlations display four distinct modes: repressive, active, poised, and bivalent, reflecting different functions of these genes. Furthermore, a permissive chromatin state of each gene is established by a combination of different histone modifications. Our findings reveal a complex regulation by histone methylation in differential gene expression and suggest that histone methylation may be responsible for memory CD8 T cell function. PMID:19523850

  19. Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis Reveals Chromosomal Copy Number Aberrations Associated with Clinical Outcome in Canine Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bresolin, Silvia; Marconato, Laura; Comazzi, Stefano; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Aresu, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Canine Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (cDLBCL) is an aggressive cancer with variable clinical response. Despite recent attempts by gene expression profiling to identify the dog as a potential animal model for human DLBCL, this tumor remains biologically heterogeneous with no prognostic biomarkers to predict prognosis. The aim of this work was to identify copy number aberrations (CNAs) by high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in 12 dogs with newly diagnosed DLBCL. In a subset of these dogs, the genetic profiles at the end of therapy and at relapse were also assessed. In primary DLBCLs, 90 different genomic imbalances were counted, consisting of 46 gains and 44 losses. Two gains in chr13 were significantly correlated with clinical stage. In addition, specific regions of gains and losses were significantly associated to duration of remission. In primary DLBCLs, individual variability was found, however 14 recurrent CNAs (>30%) were identified. Losses involving IGK, IGL and IGH were always found, and gains along the length of chr13 and chr31 were often observed (>41%). In these segments, MYC, LDHB, HSF1, KIT and PDGFRα are annotated. At the end of therapy, dogs in remission showed four new CNAs, whereas three new CNAs were observed in dogs at relapse compared with the previous profiles. One ex novo CNA, involving TCR, was present in dogs in remission after therapy, possibly induced by the autologous vaccine. Overall, aCGH identified small CNAs associated with outcome, which, along with future expression studies, may reveal target genes relevant to cDLBCL. PMID:25372838

  20. Identification and analyses of miRNA genes in allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum fiber cells based on the sequenced diploid G. raimondii genome.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Jin, Xiang; Zhu, Yu-Xian

    2012-07-20

    The plant genome possesses a large number of microRNAs (miRNAs) mainly 21-24 nucleotides in length. They play a vital role in regulation of target gene expression at various stages throughout the whole plant life cycle. Here we sequenced and analyzed ≈ 10 million non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) derived from fiber tissue of the allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) 7 days post-anthesis using ncRNA-seq technology. In terms of distinct reads, 24 nt ncRNA is by far the dominant species, followed by 21 nt and 23 nt ncRNAs. Using ab initio prediction, we identified and characterized a total of 562 candidate miRNA gene loci on the recently assembled D(5) genome of the diploid cotton G. raimondii. Of all the 562 predicted miRNAs, 22 were previously discovered in cotton species and 187 had sequence conservation and homology to homologous miRNAs of other plant species. Nucleotide bias analysis showed that the 9th and 1st positions were significantly conserved among different types of miRNA genes. Among the 463 putative miRNA target genes, most significant up/down-regulation occurred in 10-20 days post-anthesis, indicating that miRNAs played an important role during the elongation and secondary cell wall synthesis stages of cotton fiber development. The discovery of new miRNA genes will help understand the mechanisms of miRNA generation and regulation in cotton. PMID:22835981

  1. Genome size and DNA base composition of geophytes: the mirror of phenology and ecology?

    PubMed Central

    Veselý, Pavel; Bureš, Petr; Šmarda, Petr; Pavlíček, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Genome size is known to affect various plant traits such as stomatal size, seed mass, and flower or shoot phenology. However, these associations are not well understood for species with very large genomes, which are laregly represented by geophytic plants. No detailed associations are known between DNA base composition and genome size or species ecology. Methods Genome sizes and GC contents were measured in 219 geophytes together with tentative morpho-anatomical and ecological traits. Key Results Increased genome size was associated with earliness of flowering and tendency to grow in humid conditions, and there was a positive correlation between an increase in stomatal size in species with extremely large genomes. Seed mass of geophytes was closely related to their ecology, but not to genomic parameters. Genomic DNA GC content showed a unimodal relationship with genome size but no relationship with species ecology. Conclusions Evolution of genome size in geophytes is closely related to their ecology and phenology and is also associated with remarkable changes in DNA base composition. Although geophytism together with producing larger cells appears to be an advantageous strategy for fast development of an organism in seasonal habitats, the drought sensitivity of large stomata may restrict the occurrence of geophytes with very large genomes to regions not subject to water stress. PMID:22021815

  2. Systematic genome sequence differences among leaf cells within individual trees

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Even in the age of next-generation sequencing (NGS), it has been unclear whether or not cells within a single organism have systematically distinctive genomes. Resolving this question, one of the most basic biological problems associated with DNA mutation rates, can assist efforts to elucidate essential mechanisms of cancer. Results Using genome profiling (GP), we detected considerable systematic variation in genome sequences among cells in individual woody plants. The degree of genome sequence difference (genomic distance) varied systematically from the bottom to the top of the plant, such that the greatest divergence was observed between leaf genomes from uppermost branches and the remainder of the tree. This systematic variation was observed within both Yoshino cherry and Japanese beech trees. Conclusions As measured by GP, the genomic distance between two cells within an individual organism was non-negligible, and was correlated with physical distance (i.e., branch-to-branch distance). This phenomenon was assumed to be the result of accumulation of mutations from each cell division, implying that the degree of divergence is proportional to the number of generations separating the two cells. PMID:24548431

  3. Recombinant genomes which express chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, C.M.; Moffat, L.F.; Howard, B.H.

    1982-09-01

    The authors constructed a series of recombinant genomes which directed expression of the enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in mammalian cells. The prototype recombinant in this series, pSV2-cat, consisted of the beta-lactamase gene and origin of replication from pBR322 coupled to a simian virus 40 (SV40) early transcription region into which CAT coding sequences were inserted. Readily measured levels of CAT accumulated within 48 h after the introduction of pSV2-cat DNA into African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Because endogenous CAT activity is not present in CV-1 or other mammalian cells, and because rapid, sensitive assays for CAT activity are available, these recombinants provided a uniquely convenient system for monitoring the expression of foreign DNAs in tissue culture cells. To demonstrate the usefulness of this system, we constructed derivatives of pSV2-cat from which part or all of the SV 40 promoter region was removed. Deletion of one copy of the 72-base-pair repeat sequence in the SV40 promoter caused no significant decrease in CAT synthesis in monkey kidney CV-1 cells; however, an additional deletion of 50 base pairs from the second copy of the repeats reduced CAT synthesis to 11% of its level in the wild type. They also constructed a recombinant, pSVO-cat, in which the entire SV40 promoter region was removed and a unique HindIII site was substituted for the insertion of other promoter sequences.

  4. Genome organization, instabilities, stem cells, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pazhanisamy, S; Jyothi, V

    2009-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that advances in exploring genome organization provide remarkable insights on the induction and progression of chromosome abnormalities. Much of what we know about how mutations evolve and consequently transform into genome instabilities has been characterized in the spatial organization context of chromatin. Nevertheless, many underlying concepts of impact of the chromatin organization on perpetuation of multiple mutations and on propagation of chromosomal aberrations remain to be investigated in detail. Genesis of genome instabilities from accumulation of multiple mutations that drive tumorigenesis is increasingly becoming a focal theme in cancer studies. This review focuses on structural alterations evolve to raise a variety of genome instabilities that are manifested at the nucleotide, gene or sub-chromosomal, and whole chromosome level of genome. Here we explore an underlying connection between genome instability and cancer in the light of genome architecture. This review is limited to studies directed towards spatial organizational aspects of origin and propagation of aberrations into genetically unstable tumors. PMID:24693037

  5. FISH 'N' Chips : a single cell genomic analyzer for the human microbiome.

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Yooli Kim; Perroud, Thomas D.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Meagher, Robert J.; Singh, Anup K.; Malamud, Daniel; Saxena, Deepak; Liu, Peng

    2010-09-01

    Uncultivable microorganisms likely play significant roles in the ecology within the human body, with subtle but important implications for human health. Focusing on the oral microbiome, we are developing a processor for targeted isolation of individual microbial cells, facilitating whole-genome analysis without the need for isolation of pure cultures. The processor consists of three microfluidic modules: identification based on 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), fluorescence-based sorting, and encapsulation of individual selected cells into small droplets for whole genome amplification. We present here a technique for performing microscale FISH and flow cytometry, as a prelude to single cell sorting.

  6. Differentiation and Genomic Instability in a Human Mammary Cell Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, R.; Kale, R.; Pettengill, O.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Harvest of prophylactic mastectomy specimens from an obligate heterozygote for ataxia-telangiectasia provided autologous fibroblasts as well epithelial cells (HMEC). The routine availability of these autologous cells has provided an opportunity to study cell-cell interactions in coculture and monoculture, and in 3-dimensional cultures grown in the NASA rotating bioreactor. HMEC and stromal fibroblasts grown in 2-dimensional monoculture were both observed to produce extracellular matrix. Similar matrix was encountered in 3-dimensional cultures containing HMEC. Metaphases were analyzed. For stromal fibroblasts, genomic aberrations were found in 18% of metaphase spreads. For HMEC, aberrations were greater such that a majority were found to be abnormal. The level of genomic instability determined for these noncancerous cells in 2-dimensional monoculture should be useful for generating a human cell model that can correlate the effects of differentiation in 3-dimensional coculture on the level of genomic instability.

  7. Low-dose carbon-based nanoparticle-induced effects in A549 lung cells determined by biospectroscopy are associated with increases in genomic methylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junyi; Tian, Meiping; Cui, Li; Dwyer, John; Fullwood, Nigel J.; Shen, Heqing; Martin, Francis L.

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology has introduced many manufactured carbon-based nanoparticles (CNPs) into our environment, generating a debate into their risks and benefits. Numerous nanotoxicology investigations have been carried, and nanoparticle-induced toxic effects have been reported. However, there remain gaps in our knowledge, primarily regarding mechanism. Herein, we assessed the global alterations induced by CNPs in A549 lung cells using biospectroscopy techniques, including attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). A549 cells were treated with fullerene (C60), long or short multi-walled carbon nanotubes, or single-walled carbon nanotubes at concentrations of 0.1 mg/L, 0.01 mg/L and 0.001 mg/L. Exposed cells were then analysed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and SERS. Spectra were pre-processed via computational analysis, and information on biochemical alterations in exposed cells were identified. Additionally, global DNA methylation levels in cells exposed to CNPs at 0.1 mg/L were determined using HPLC-MS and genetic regulators (for DNA methylation) were checked by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. It was found that CNPs exert marked effects in A549 cells and also contribute to increases in global DNA methylation. For the first time, this study highlights that real-world levels of nanoparticles can alter the methylome of exposed cells; this could have enormous implications for their regulatory assessment. PMID:26831369

  8. Low-dose carbon-based nanoparticle-induced effects in A549 lung cells determined by biospectroscopy are associated with increases in genomic methylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junyi; Tian, Meiping; Cui, Li; Dwyer, John; Fullwood, Nigel J.; Shen, Heqing; Martin, Francis L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanotechnology has introduced many manufactured carbon-based nanoparticles (CNPs) into our environment, generating a debate into their risks and benefits. Numerous nanotoxicology investigations have been carried, and nanoparticle-induced toxic effects have been reported. However, there remain gaps in our knowledge, primarily regarding mechanism. Herein, we assessed the global alterations induced by CNPs in A549 lung cells using biospectroscopy techniques, including attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). A549 cells were treated with fullerene (C60), long or short multi-walled carbon nanotubes, or single-walled carbon nanotubes at concentrations of 0.1 mg/L, 0.01 mg/L and 0.001 mg/L. Exposed cells were then analysed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and SERS. Spectra were pre-processed via computational analysis, and information on biochemical alterations in exposed cells were identified. Additionally, global DNA methylation levels in cells exposed to CNPs at 0.1 mg/L were determined using HPLC-MS and genetic regulators (for DNA methylation) were checked by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. It was found that CNPs exert marked effects in A549 cells and also contribute to increases in global DNA methylation. For the first time, this study highlights that real-world levels of nanoparticles can alter the methylome of exposed cells; this could have enormous implications for their regulatory assessment.

  9. Single-cell genome sequencing: current state of the science.

    PubMed

    Gawad, Charles; Koh, Winston; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-03-01

    The field of single-cell genomics is advancing rapidly and is generating many new insights into complex biological systems, ranging from the diversity of microbial ecosystems to the genomics of human cancer. In this Review, we provide an overview of the current state of the field of single-cell genome sequencing. First, we focus on the technical challenges of making measurements that start from a single molecule of DNA, and then explore how some of these recent methodological advancements have enabled the discovery of unexpected new biology. Areas highlighted include the application of single-cell genomics to interrogate microbial dark matter and to evaluate the pathogenic roles of genetic mosaicism in multicellular organisms, with a focus on cancer. We then attempt to predict advances we expect to see in the next few years. PMID:26806412

  10. Nontransgenic Genome Modification in Plant Cells1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Marton, Ira; Zuker, Amir; Shklarman, Elena; Zeevi, Vardit; Tovkach, Andrey; Roffe, Suzy; Ovadis, Marianna; Tzfira, Tzvi; Vainstein, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are a powerful tool for genome editing in eukaryotic cells. ZFNs have been used for targeted mutagenesis in model and crop species. In animal and human cells, transient ZFN expression is often achieved by direct gene transfer into the target cells. Stable transformation, however, is the preferred method for gene expression in plant species, and ZFN-expressing transgenic plants have been used for recovery of mutants that are likely to be classified as transgenic due to the use of direct gene-transfer methods into the target cells. Here we present an alternative, nontransgenic approach for ZFN delivery and production of mutant plants using a novel Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based expression system for indirect transient delivery of ZFNs into a variety of tissues and cells of intact plants. TRV systemically infected its hosts and virus ZFN-mediated targeted mutagenesis could be clearly observed in newly developed infected tissues as measured by activation of a mutated reporter transgene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and petunia (Petunia hybrida) plants. The ability of TRV to move to developing buds and regenerating tissues enabled recovery of mutated tobacco and petunia plants. Sequence analysis and transmission of the mutations to the next generation confirmed the stability of the ZFN-induced genetic changes. Because TRV is an RNA virus that can infect a wide range of plant species, it provides a viable alternative to the production of ZFN-mediated mutants while avoiding the use of direct plant-transformation methods. PMID:20876340

  11. Sequencing genomes from single cells by polymerase cloning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Martiny, Adam C; Reppas, Nikos B; Barry, Kerrie W; Malek, Joel; Chisholm, Sallie W; Church, George M

    2006-06-01

    Genome sequencing currently requires DNA from pools of numerous nearly identical cells (clones), leaving the genome sequences of many difficult-to-culture microorganisms unattainable. We report a sequencing strategy that eliminates culturing of microorganisms by using real-time isothermal amplification to form polymerase clones (plones) from the DNA of single cells. Two Escherichia coli plones, analyzed by Affymetrix chip hybridization, demonstrate that plonal amplification is specific and the bias is randomly distributed. Whole-genome shotgun sequencing of Prochlorococcus MIT9312 plones showed 62% coverage of the genome from one plone at a sequencing depth of 3.5x, and 66% coverage from a second plone at a depth of 4.7x. Genomic regions not revealed in the initial round of sequencing are recovered by sequencing PCR amplicons derived from plonal DNA. The mutation rate in single-cell amplification is <2 x 10(5), better than that of current genome sequencing standards. Polymerase cloning should provide a critical tool for systematic characterization of genome diversity in the biosphere. PMID:16732271

  12. Nuclear envelope and genome interactions in cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Talamas, Jessica A.; Capelson, Maya

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus houses an organism’s genome and is the location within the cell where all signaling induced and development-driven gene expression programs are ultimately specified. The genome is enclosed and separated from the cytoplasm by the nuclear envelope (NE), a double-lipid membrane bilayer, which contains a large variety of trans-membrane and associated protein complexes. In recent years, research regarding multiple aspects of the cell nucleus points to a highly dynamic and coordinated concert of efforts between chromatin and the NE in regulation of gene expression. Details of how this concert is orchestrated and how it directs cell differentiation and disease are coming to light at a rapid pace. Here we review existing and emerging concepts of how interactions between the genome and the NE may contribute to tissue specific gene expression programs to determine cell fate. PMID:25852741

  13. Efficient genomic correction methods in human iPS cells using CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongmei Lisa; Gee, Peter; Ishida, Kentaro; Hotta, Akitsu

    2016-05-15

    Precise gene correction using the CRISPR-Cas9 system in human iPS cells holds great promise for various applications, such as the study of gene functions, disease modeling, and gene therapy. In this review article, we summarize methods for effective editing of genomic sequences of iPS cells based on our experiences correcting dystrophin gene mutations with the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Designing specific sgRNAs as well as having efficient transfection methods and proper detection assays to assess genomic cleavage activities are critical for successful genome editing in iPS cells. In addition, because iPS cells are fragile by nature when dissociated into single cells, a step-by-step confirmation during the cell recovery process is recommended to obtain an adequate number of genome-edited iPS cell clones. We hope that the techniques described here will be useful for researchers from diverse backgrounds who would like to perform genome editing in iPS cells. PMID:26525194

  14. Barcode server: a visualization-based genome analysis system.

    PubMed

    Mao, Fenglou; Olman, Victor; Wang, Yan; Xu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    We have previously developed a computational method for representing a genome as a barcode image, which makes various genomic features visually apparent. We have demonstrated that this visual capability has made some challenging genome analysis problems relatively easy to solve. We have applied this capability to a number of challenging problems, including (a) identification of horizontally transferred genes, (b) identification of genomic islands with special properties and (c) binning of metagenomic sequences, and achieved highly encouraging results. These application results inspired us to develop this barcode-based genome analysis server for public service, which supports the following capabilities: (a) calculation of the k-mer based barcode image for a provided DNA sequence; (b) detection of sequence fragments in a given genome with distinct barcodes from those of the majority of the genome, (c) clustering of provided DNA sequences into groups having similar barcodes; and (d) homology-based search using Blast against a genome database for any selected genomic regions deemed to have interesting barcodes. The barcode server provides a job management capability, allowing processing of a large number of analysis jobs for barcode-based comparative genome analyses. The barcode server is accessible at http://csbl1.bmb.uga.edu/Barcode. PMID:23457606

  15. Barcode Server: A Visualization-Based Genome Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Fenglou; Olman, Victor; Wang, Yan; Xu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    We have previously developed a computational method for representing a genome as a barcode image, which makes various genomic features visually apparent. We have demonstrated that this visual capability has made some challenging genome analysis problems relatively easy to solve. We have applied this capability to a number of challenging problems, including (a) identification of horizontally transferred genes, (b) identification of genomic islands with special properties and (c) binning of metagenomic sequences, and achieved highly encouraging results. These application results inspired us to develop this barcode-based genome analysis server for public service, which supports the following capabilities: (a) calculation of the k-mer based barcode image for a provided DNA sequence; (b) detection of sequence fragments in a given genome with distinct barcodes from those of the majority of the genome, (c) clustering of provided DNA sequences into groups having similar barcodes; and (d) homology-based search using Blast against a genome database for any selected genomic regions deemed to have interesting barcodes. The barcode server provides a job management capability, allowing processing of a large number of analysis jobs for barcode-based comparative genome analyses. The barcode server is accessible at http://csbl1.bmb.uga.edu/Barcode. PMID:23457606

  16. Genomic instability and telomere fusion of canine osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Junko; Yurkon, Charles R; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Masami; Genet, Stefan C; Roybal, Erica J; Rota, Garrett W; Saffer, Ethan R; Rose, Barbara J; Hanneman, William H; Thamm, Douglas H; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2012-01-01

    Canine osteosarcoma (OSA) is known to present with highly variable and chaotic karyotypes, including hypodiploidy, hyperdiploidy, and increased numbers of metacentric chromosomes. The spectrum of genomic instabilities in canine OSA has significantly augmented the difficulty in clearly defining the biological and clinical significance of the observed cytogenetic abnormalities. In this study, eight canine OSA cell lines were used to investigate telomere fusions by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a peptide nucleotide acid probe. We characterized each cell line by classical cytogenetic studies and cellular phenotypes including telomere associated factors and then evaluated correlations from this data. All eight canine OSA cell lines displayed increased abnormal metacentric chromosomes and exhibited numerous telomere fusions and interstitial telomeric signals. Also, as evidence of unstable telomeres, colocalization of γ-H2AX and telomere signals in interphase cells was observed. Each cell line was characterized by a combination of data representing cellular doubling time, DNA content, chromosome number, metacentric chromosome frequency, telomere signal level, cellular radiosensitivity, and DNA-PKcs protein expression level. We have also studied primary cultures from 10 spontaneous canine OSAs. Based on the observation of telomere aberrations in those primary cell cultures, we are reasonably certain that our observations in cell lines are not an artifact of prolonged culture. A correlation between telomere fusions and the other characteristics analyzed in our study could not be identified. However, it is important to note that all of the canine OSA samples exhibiting telomere fusion utilized in our study were telomerase positive. Pending further research regarding telomerase negative canine OSA cell lines, our findings may suggest telomere fusions can potentially serve as a novel marker for canine OSA. PMID:22916246

  17. An algorithm for classifying tumors based on genomic aberrations and selecting representative tumor models

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer is a heterogeneous disease caused by genomic aberrations and characterized by significant variability in clinical outcomes and response to therapies. Several subtypes of common cancers have been identified based on alterations of individual cancer genes, such as HER2, EGFR, and others. However, cancer is a complex disease driven by the interaction of multiple genes, so the copy number status of individual genes is not sufficient to define cancer subtypes and predict responses to treatments. A classification based on genome-wide copy number patterns would be better suited for this purpose. Method To develop a more comprehensive cancer taxonomy based on genome-wide patterns of copy number abnormalities, we designed an unsupervised classification algorithm that identifies genomic subgroups of tumors. This algorithm is based on a modified genomic Non-negative Matrix Factorization (gNMF) algorithm and includes several additional components, namely a pilot hierarchical clustering procedure to determine the number of clusters, a multiple random initiation scheme, a new stop criterion for the core gNMF, as well as a 10-fold cross-validation stability test for quality assessment. Result We applied our algorithm to identify genomic subgroups of three major cancer types: non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), and malignant melanoma. High-density SNP array datasets for patient tumors and established cell lines were used to define genomic subclasses of the diseases and identify cell lines representative of each genomic subtype. The algorithm was compared with several traditional clustering methods and showed improved performance. To validate our genomic taxonomy of NSCLC, we correlated the genomic classification with disease outcomes. Overall survival time and time to recurrence were shown to differ significantly between the genomic subtypes. Conclusions We developed an algorithm for cancer classification based on genome-wide patterns

  18. Genomic Sequencing of Single Microbial Cells from Environmental Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ishoey, Thomas; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Novotny, Mark; Lasken, Roger S.

    2008-02-01

    Recently developed techniques allow genomic DNA sequencing from single microbial cells [Lasken RS: Single-cell genomic sequencing using multiple displacement amplification, Curr Opin Microbiol 2007, 10:510-516]. Here, we focus on research strategies for putting these methods into practice in the laboratory setting. An immediate consequence of single-cell sequencing is that it provides an alternative to culturing organisms as a prerequisite for genomic sequencing. The microgram amounts of DNA required as template are amplified from a single bacterium by a method called multiple displacement amplification (MDA) avoiding the need to grow cells. The ability to sequence DNA from individual cells will likely have an immense impact on microbiology considering the vast numbers of novel organisms, which have been inaccessible unless culture-independent methods could be used. However, special approaches have been necessary to work with amplified DNA. MDA may not recover the entire genome from the single copy present in most bacteria. Also, some sequence rearrangements can occur during the DNA amplification reaction. Over the past two years many research groups have begun to use MDA, and some practical approaches to single-cell sequencing have been developed. We review the consensus that is emerging on optimum methods, reliability of amplified template, and the proper interpretation of 'composite' genomes which result from the necessity of combining data from several single-cell MDA reactions in order to complete the assembly. Preferred laboratory methods are considered on the basis of experience at several large sequencing centers where >70% of genomes are now often recovered from single cells. Methods are reviewed for preparation of bacterial fractions from environmental samples, single-cell isolation, DNA amplification by MDA, and DNA sequencing.

  19. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated domain (TAD) repositioning and alterations of tissue-restricted genomic neighborhoods and chromatin loops, effectively erasing the somatic-cell-specific genome structures while establishing an embryonic stem-cell-like 3D genome. Yet, early passage iPSCs carry topological hallmarks that enable recognition of their cell of origin. These hallmarks are not remnants of somatic chromosome topologies. Instead, the distinguishing topological features are acquired during reprogramming, as we also find for cell-of-origin-dependent gene expression patterns. PMID:26971819

  20. Mutation of mitochondria genome: trigger of somatic cell transforming to cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Jianping, Du

    2010-01-01

    Nearly 80 years ago, scientist Otto Warburg originated a hypothesis that the cause of cancer is primarily a defect in energy metabolism. Following studies showed that mitochondria impact carcinogenesis to remodel somatic cells to cancer cells through modifying the genome, through maintenance the tumorigenic phenotype, and through apoptosis. And the Endosymbiotic Theory explains the origin of mitochondria and eukaryotes, on the other hands, the mitochondria also can fall back. Compared to chromosome genomes, the mitochondria genomes were not restricted by introns so they were mutated(fall back) easy. The result is that mitochondria lose function and internal environment of somatic cell become acid and evoked chromosome genomes to mutate, in the end somatic cells become cancer cells. It is the trigger of somatic cell transforming to cancer cell that mitochondria genome happen mutation and lose function. PMID:20181100

  1. BACFinder: genomic localisation of large insert genomic clones based on restriction fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Mark L.; Rana, Debashis; Fraser, Fiona; Bancroft, Ian; Trick, Martin

    2002-01-01

    We have developed software that allows the prediction of the genomic location of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone, or other large genomic clone, based on a simple restriction digest of the BAC. The mapping is performed by comparing the experimentally derived restriction digest of the BAC DNA with a virtual restriction digest of the whole genome sequence. Our trials indicate that this program identified the genomic regions represented by BAC clones with a degree of accuracy comparable to that of end-sequencing, but at considerably less cost. Although the program has been developed principally for use with Arabidopsis BACs, it should align large insert genomic clones to any fully sequenced genome. PMID:12409477

  2. Genomic Analysis at the Single-Cell Level

    PubMed Central

    Kalisky, Tomer; Blainey, Paul; Quake, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Studying complex biological systems such as a developing embryo, a tumor, or a microbial ecosystem often involves understanding the behavior and heterogeneity of the individual cells that constitute the system and their interactions. In this review, we discuss a variety of approaches to single-cell genomic analysis. PMID:21942365

  3. Viral Genome Tethering to Host Cell Chromatin: Cause and Consequences.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Inci; Schelhaas, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Viruses are small infectious agents that replicate in cells of a host organism and that evolved to use cellular machineries for all stages of the viral life cycle. Here, we critically assess current knowledge on a particular mechanism of persisting viruses, namely, how they tether their genomes to host chromatin, and what consequences arise from this process. A group of persisting DNA viruses, i.e. gamma-herpesviruses and papillomaviruses (PV), uses this tethering strategy to maintain their genomes in the nuclei during cell division. Thus, these viruses face the challenge of viral genome loss during mitosis, as they are transported with the host chromosomes to the nascent daughter nuclei. Incidentally, another group of viruses, certain retroviruses and PV, have adopted this tethering strategy to deliver their genomes into the nuclei of dividing cells during cell entry. By exploiting a phase in the cell cycle when the nuclear envelope is disassembled, viruses bypass the need to engage with the nuclear import machinery. Recent reports suggest that tethering may induce severe cellular consequences that involve activation of mitotic checkpoints, causing missegregation of host chromosomes and genomic instability, which may contribute to cancer. PMID:26787361

  4. CRISPR-Based Methods for Caenorhabditis elegans Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Daniel J; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-03-01

    The advent of genome editing techniques based on the clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system has revolutionized research in the biological sciences. CRISPR is quickly becoming an indispensible experimental tool for researchers using genetic model organisms, including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we provide an overview of CRISPR-based strategies for genome editing in C. elegans. We focus on practical considerations for successful genome editing, including a discussion of which strategies are best suited to producing different kinds of targeted genome modifications. PMID:26953268

  5. CRISPR-Based Methods for Caenorhabditis elegans Genome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Daniel J.; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-01-01

    The advent of genome editing techniques based on the clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)–Cas9 system has revolutionized research in the biological sciences. CRISPR is quickly becoming an indispensible experimental tool for researchers using genetic model organisms, including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we provide an overview of CRISPR-based strategies for genome editing in C. elegans. We focus on practical considerations for successful genome editing, including a discussion of which strategies are best suited to producing different kinds of targeted genome modifications. PMID:26953268

  6. CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Owen W; Poddar, Snigdha; Cate, Jamie H D

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing that results in scarless and marker-free integrations of DNA into Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. DNA integration results from cotransforming (1) a single plasmid (pCAS) that coexpresses the Cas9 endonuclease and a uniquely engineered single guide RNA (sgRNA) expression cassette and (2) a linear DNA molecule that is used to repair the chromosomal DNA damage by homology-directed repair. For target specificity, the pCAS plasmid requires only a single cloning modification: replacing the 20-bp guide RNA sequence within the sgRNA cassette. This CRISPR-Cas9 protocol includes methods for (1) cloning the unique target sequence into pCAS, (2) assembly of the double-stranded DNA repair oligonucleotides, and (3) cotransformation of pCAS and linear repair DNA into yeast cells. The protocol is technically facile and requires no special equipment. It can be used in any S. cerevisiae strain, including industrial polyploid isolates. Therefore, this CRISPR-Cas9-based DNA integration protocol is achievable by virtually any yeast genetics and molecular biology laboratory. PMID:27250940

  7. Ontology-Based Search of Genomic Metadata.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Javier D; Lenzerini, Maurizio; Masseroli, Marco; Venco, Francesco; Ceri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) is a huge and still expanding public repository of more than 4,000 experiments and 25,000 data files, assembled by a large international consortium since 2007; unknown biological knowledge can be extracted from these huge and largely unexplored data, leading to data-driven genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic discoveries. Yet, search of relevant datasets for knowledge discovery is limitedly supported: metadata describing ENCODE datasets are quite simple and incomplete, and not described by a coherent underlying ontology. Here, we show how to overcome this limitation, by adopting an ENCODE metadata searching approach which uses high-quality ontological knowledge and state-of-the-art indexing technologies. Specifically, we developed S.O.S. GeM (http://www.bioinformatics.deib.polimi.it/SOSGeM/), a system supporting effective semantic search and retrieval of ENCODE datasets. First, we constructed a Semantic Knowledge Base by starting with concepts extracted from ENCODE metadata, matched to and expanded on biomedical ontologies integrated in the well-established Unified Medical Language System. We prove that this inference method is sound and complete. Then, we leveraged the Semantic Knowledge Base to semantically search ENCODE data from arbitrary biologists' queries. This allows correctly finding more datasets than those extracted by a purely syntactic search, as supported by the other available systems. We empirically show the relevance of found datasets to the biologists' queries. PMID:26529777

  8. Prediction of microbial phenotypes based on comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The accessibility of almost complete genome sequences of uncultivable microbial species from metagenomes necessitates computational methods predicting microbial phenotypes solely based on genomic data. Here we investigate how comparative genomics can be utilized for the prediction of microbial phenotypes. The PICA framework facilitates application and comparison of different machine learning techniques for phenotypic trait prediction. We have improved and extended PICA's support vector machine plug-in and suggest its applicability to large-scale genome databases and incomplete genome sequences. We have demonstrated the stability of the predictive power for phenotypic traits, not perturbed by the rapid growth of genome databases. A new software tool facilitates the in-depth analysis of phenotype models, which associate expected and unexpected protein functions with particular traits. Most of the traits can be reliably predicted in only 60-70% complete genomes. We have established a new phenotypic model that predicts intracellular microorganisms. Thereby we could demonstrate that also independently evolved phenotypic traits, characterized by genome reduction, can be reliably predicted based on comparative genomics. Our results suggest that the extended PICA framework can be used to automatically annotate phenotypes in near-complete microbial genome sequences, as generated in large numbers in current metagenomics studies. PMID:26451672

  9. Genomic instability and tumorigenic induction in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, T. K.; Piao, C. Q.; Wu, L. J.; Willey, J. C.; Hall, E. J.

    1998-11-01

    Carcinogenesis is postulated to be a progressive multistage process characterized by an increase in genomic instability and clonal selection with each mutational event endowing a selective growth advantage. Genomic instability as manifested by the amplification of specific gene fragments is common among tumor and transformed cells. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 1GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions or 150 keV/μm alpha particles. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Tumorigenic cells showed neither ras mutations nor deletion in the p16 tumor suppressor gene. In contrast, they harbored mutations in the p53 gene and over-expressed cyclin D1. Genomic instability among transformed cells at various stage of the carcinogenic process was examined based on frequencies of PALA resistance. Incidence of genomic instability was highest among established tumor cell lines relative to transformed, non-tumorigenic and control cell lines. Treatment of BEP2D cells with a 4 mM dose of the aminothiol WR-1065 significantly reduced their neoplastic transforming response to 56Fe particles. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in malignant transformation of human epithelial cells by heavy ions.

  10. Genomic instability and tumorigenic induction in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells by heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Hei, T K; Piao, C Q; Wu, L J; Willey, J C; Hall, E J

    1998-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is postulated to be a progressive multistage process characterized by an increase in genomic instability and clonal selection with each mutational event endowing a selective growth advantage. Genomic instability as manifested by the amplification of specific gene fragments is common among tumor and transformed cells. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 1GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions or 150 keV/micrometer alpha particles. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Tumorigenic cells showed neither ras mutations nor deletion in the p16 tumor suppressor gene. In contrast, they harbored mutations in the p53 gene and over-expressed cyclin D1. Genomic instability among transformed cells at various stage of the carcinogenic process was examined based on frequencies of PALA resistance. Incidence of genomic instability was highest among established tumor cell lines relative to transformed, non-tumorigenic and control cell lines. Treatment of BEP2D cells with a 4 mM dose of the aminothiol WR-1065 significantly reduced their neoplastic transforming response to 56Fe particles. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in malignant transformation of human epithelial cells by heavy ions. PMID:11542414

  11. Enrichment of Root Endophytic Bacteria from Populus deltoides and Single-Cell-Genomics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Cude, W. Nathan; Robeson, Michael S.; Yang, Zamin K.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Land, Miriam L.; Allman, Steve L.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Podar, Mircea; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial endophytes that colonize Populus trees contribute to nutrient acquisition, prime immunity responses, and directly or indirectly increase both above- and below-ground biomasses. Endophytes are embedded within plant material, so physical separation and isolation are difficult tasks. Application of culture-independent methods, such as metagenome or bacterial transcriptome sequencing, has been limited due to the predominance of DNA from the plant biomass. Here, we describe a modified differential and density gradient centrifugation-based protocol for the separation of endophytic bacteria from Populus roots. This protocol achieved substantial reduction in contaminating plant DNA, allowed enrichment of endophytic bacteria away from the plant material, and enabled single-cell genomics analysis. Four single-cell genomes were selected for whole-genome amplification based on their rarity in the microbiome (potentially uncultured taxa) as well as their inferred abilities to form associations with plants. Bioinformatics analyses, including assembly, contamination removal, and completeness estimation, were performed to obtain single-amplified genomes (SAGs) of organisms from the phyla Armatimonadetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, which were unrepresented in our previous cultivation efforts. Comparative genomic analysis revealed unique characteristics of each SAG that could facilitate future cultivation efforts for these bacteria. IMPORTANCE Plant roots harbor a diverse collection of microbes that live within host tissues. To gain a comprehensive understanding of microbial adaptations to this endophytic lifestyle from strains that cannot be cultivated, it is necessary to separate bacterial cells from the predominance of plant tissue. This study provides a valuable approach for the separation and isolation of endophytic bacteria from plant root tissue. Isolated live bacteria provide material for microbiome sequencing, single-cell genomics, and analyses

  12. Post-Fragmentation Whole Genome Amplification-Based Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benardini, James; LaDuc, Myron T.; Langmore, John

    2011-01-01

    This innovation is derived from a proprietary amplification scheme that is based upon random fragmentation of the genome into a series of short, overlapping templates. The resulting shorter DNA strands (<400 bp) constitute a library of DNA fragments with defined 3 and 5 termini. Specific primers to these termini are then used to isothermally amplify this library into potentially unlimited quantities that can be used immediately for multiple downstream applications including gel eletrophoresis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR), comparative genomic hybridization microarray, SNP analysis, and sequencing. The standard reaction can be performed with minimal hands-on time, and can produce amplified DNA in as little as three hours. Post-fragmentation whole genome amplification-based technology provides a robust and accurate method of amplifying femtogram levels of starting material into microgram yields with no detectable allele bias. The amplified DNA also facilitates the preservation of samples (spacecraft samples) by amplifying scarce amounts of template DNA into microgram concentrations in just a few hours. Based on further optimization of this technology, this could be a feasible technology to use in sample preservation for potential future sample return missions. The research and technology development described here can be pivotal in dealing with backward/forward biological contamination from planetary missions. Such efforts rely heavily on an increasing understanding of the burden and diversity of microorganisms present on spacecraft surfaces throughout assembly and testing. The development and implementation of these technologies could significantly improve the comprehensiveness and resolving power of spacecraft-associated microbial population censuses, and are important to the continued evolution and advancement of planetary protection capabilities. Current molecular procedures for assaying spacecraft-associated microbial burden and diversity have

  13. Genome Informed Trait-Based Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoz, U.; Cheng, Y.; Bouskill, N.; Tang, J.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E.; Riley, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    Trait-based approaches are powerful tools for representing microbial communities across both spatial and temporal scales within ecosystem models. Trait-based models (TBMs) represent the diversity of microbial taxa as stochastic assemblages with a distribution of traits constrained by trade-offs between these traits. Such representation with its built-in stochasticity allows the elucidation of the interactions between the microbes and their environment by reducing the complexity of microbial community diversity into a limited number of functional ';guilds' and letting them emerge across spatio-temporal scales. From the biogeochemical/ecosystem modeling perspective, the emergent properties of the microbial community could be directly translated into predictions of biogeochemical reaction rates and microbial biomass. The accuracy of TBMs depends on the identification of key traits of the microbial community members and on the parameterization of these traits. Current approaches to inform TBM parameterization are empirical (i.e., based on literature surveys). Advances in omic technologies (such as genomics, metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, and metaproteomics) pave the way to better-initialize models that can be constrained in a generic or site-specific fashion. Here we describe the coupling of metagenomic data to the development of a TBM representing the dynamics of metabolic guilds from an organic carbon stimulated groundwater microbial community. Illumina paired-end metagenomic data were collected from the community as it transitioned successively through electron-accepting conditions (nitrate-, sulfate-, and Fe(III)-reducing), and used to inform estimates of growth rates and the distribution of metabolic pathways (i.e., aerobic and anaerobic oxidation, fermentation) across a spatially resolved TBM. We use this model to evaluate the emergence of different metabolisms and predict rates of biogeochemical processes over time. We compare our results to observational

  14. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pesko, Kendra; Voigt, Emily A; Swick, Adam; Morley, Valerie J; Timm, Collin; Yin, John; Turner, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wild type gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense non-segmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales) have specific genome architecture: 3' UTR - core protein genes - envelope protein genes - RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene - 5' UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) variants with the nucleocapsid (N) gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N gene translocation toward the 5' end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC-3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function), especially on PC-3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture) adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective environments for a given gene

  15. Single-cell genomics for dissection of complex malaria infections

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Shalini; Nkhoma, Standwell C.; Serre, David; Zimmerman, Peter A.; Gorena, Karla; Daniel, Benjamin J.; Nosten, François; Anderson, Timothy J.C.; Cheeseman, Ian H.

    2014-01-01

    Most malaria infections contain complex mixtures of distinct parasite lineages. These multiple-genotype infections (MGIs) impact virulence evolution, drug resistance, intra-host dynamics, and recombination, but are poorly understood. To address this we have developed a single-cell genomics approach to dissect MGIs. By combining cell sorting and whole-genome amplification (WGA), we are able to generate high-quality material from parasite-infected red blood cells (RBCs) for genotyping and next-generation sequencing. We optimized our approach through analysis of >260 single-cell assays. To quantify accuracy, we decomposed mixtures of known parasite genotypes and obtained highly accurate (>99%) single-cell genotypes. We applied this validated approach directly to infections of two major malaria species, Plasmodium falciparum, for which long term culture is possible, and Plasmodium vivax, for which no long-term culture is feasible. We demonstrate that our single-cell genomics approach can be used to generate parasite genome sequences directly from patient blood in order to unravel the complexity of P. vivax and P. falciparum infections. These methods open the door for large-scale analysis of within-host variation of malaria infections, and reveal information on relatedness and drug resistance haplotypes that is inaccessible through conventional sequencing of infections. PMID:24812326

  16. Recent advances in developing molecular tools for targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang-il

    2015-01-01

    Various biological molecules naturally existing in diversified species including fungi, bacteria, and bacteriophage have functionalities for DNA binding and processing. The biological molecules have been recently actively engineered for use in customized genome editing of mammalian cells as the molecule-encoding DNA sequence information and the underlying mechanisms how the molecules work are unveiled. Excitingly, multiple novel methods based on the newly constructed artificial molecular tools have enabled modifications of specific endogenous genetic elements in the genome context at efficiencies that are much higher than that of the conventional homologous recombination based methods. This minireview introduces the most recently spotlighted molecular genome engineering tools with their key features and ongoing modifications for better performance. Such ongoing efforts have mainly focused on the removal of the inherent DNA sequence recognition rigidity from the original molecular platforms, the addition of newly tailored targeting functions into the engineered molecules, and the enhancement of their targeting specificity. Effective targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells will enable not only sophisticated genetic studies in the context of the genome, but also widely-applicable universal therapeutics based on the pinpointing and correction of the disease-causing genetic elements within the genome in the near future. PMID:25104401

  17. Variation block-based genomics method for crop plants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In contrast with wild species, cultivated crop genomes consist of reshuffled recombination blocks, which occurred by crossing and selection processes. Accordingly, recombination block-based genomics analysis can be an effective approach for the screening of target loci for agricultural traits. Results We propose the variation block method, which is a three-step process for recombination block detection and comparison. The first step is to detect variations by comparing the short-read DNA sequences of the cultivar to the reference genome of the target crop. Next, sequence blocks with variation patterns are examined and defined. The boundaries between the variation-containing sequence blocks are regarded as recombination sites. All the assumed recombination sites in the cultivar set are used to split the genomes, and the resulting sequence regions are termed variation blocks. Finally, the genomes are compared using the variation blocks. The variation block method identified recurring recombination blocks accurately and successfully represented block-level diversities in the publicly available genomes of 31 soybean and 23 rice accessions. The practicality of this approach was demonstrated by the identification of a putative locus determining soybean hilum color. Conclusions We suggest that the variation block method is an efficient genomics method for the recombination block-level comparison of crop genomes. We expect that this method will facilitate the development of crop genomics by bringing genomics technologies to the field of crop breeding. PMID:24929792

  18. Annotation-based genome-wide SNP discovery in the large and complex Aegilops tauschii genome using next-generation sequencing without a reference genome sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An annotation-based, genome-wide SNP discovery pipeline is reported using NGS data for large and complex genomes without a reference genome sequence. Roche 454 shotgun reads with low genome coverage of one genotype are annotated in order to distinguish single-copy sequences and repeat junctions fr...

  19. Single-Cell Genomics for Virology.

    PubMed

    Ciuffi, Angela; Rato, Sylvie; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing technologies, i.e., single cell analysis followed by deep sequencing investigate cellular heterogeneity in many biological settings. It was only in the past year that single-cell sequencing analyses has been applied in the field of virology, providing new ways to explore viral diversity and cell response to viral infection, which are summarized in the present review. PMID:27153082

  20. Single-Cell Genomics for Virology

    PubMed Central

    Ciuffi, Angela; Rato, Sylvie; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing technologies, i.e., single cell analysis followed by deep sequencing investigate cellular heterogeneity in many biological settings. It was only in the past year that single-cell sequencing analyses has been applied in the field of virology, providing new ways to explore viral diversity and cell response to viral infection, which are summarized in the present review. PMID:27153082

  1. Evolution of genome size in Carex (Cyperaceae) in relation to chromosome number and genomic base composition

    PubMed Central

    Lipnerová, Ivana; Bureš, Petr; Horová, Lucie; Šmarda, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The genus Carex exhibits karyological peculiarities related to holocentrism, specifically extremely broad and almost continual variation in chromosome number. However, the effect of these peculiarities on the evolution of the genome (genome size, base composition) remains unknown. While in monocentrics, determining the arithmetic relationship between the chromosome numbers of related species is usually sufficient for the detection of particular modes of karyotype evolution (i.e. polyploidy and dysploidy), in holocentrics where chromosomal fission and fusion occur such detection requires knowledge of the DNA content. Methods The genome size and GC content were estimated in 157 taxa using flow cytometry. The exact chromosome numbers were known for 96 measured samples and were taken from the available literature for other taxa. All relationships were tested in a phylogenetic framework using the ITS tree of 105 species. Key Results The 1C genome size varied between 0·24 and 1·64 pg in Carex secalina and C. cuspidata, respectively. The genomic GC content varied from 34·8 % to 40·6 % from C. secalina to C. firma. Both genomic parameters were positively correlated. Seven polyploid and two potentially polyploid taxa were detected in the core Carex clade. A strong negative correlation between genome size and chromosome number was documented in non-polyploid taxa. Non-polyploid taxa of the core Carex clade exhibited a higher rate of genome-size evolution compared with the Vignea clade. Three dioecious taxa exhibited larger genomes, larger chromosomes, and a higher GC content than their hermaphrodite relatives. Conclusions Genomes of Carex are relatively small and very GC-poor compared with other angiosperms. We conclude that the evolution of genome and karyotype in Carex is promoted by frequent chromosomal fissions/fusions, rare polyploidy and common repetitive DNA proliferation/removal. PMID:23175591

  2. Single Cell Genomics and Transcriptomics for Unicellular Eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Ciobanu, Doina; Clum, Alicia; Singh, Vasanth; Salamov, Asaf; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Grigoriev, Igor; James, Timothy; Singer, Steven; Woyke, Tanja; Malmstrom, Rex; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2014-03-14

    Despite their small size, unicellular eukaryotes have complex genomes with a high degree of plasticity that allow them to adapt quickly to environmental changes. Unicellular eukaryotes live with prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes, frequently in symbiotic or parasitic niches. To this day their contribution to the dynamics of the environmental communities remains to be understood. Unfortunately, the vast majority of eukaryotic microorganisms are either uncultured or unculturable, making genome sequencing impossible using traditional approaches. We have developed an approach to isolate unicellular eukaryotes of interest from environmental samples, and to sequence and analyze their genomes and transcriptomes. We have tested our methods with six species: an uncharacterized protist from cellulose-enriched compost identified as Platyophrya, a close relative of P. vorax; the fungus Metschnikowia bicuspidate, a parasite of water flea Daphnia; the mycoparasitic fungi Piptocephalis cylindrospora, a parasite of Cokeromyces and Mucor; Caulochytrium protosteloides, a parasite of Sordaria; Rozella allomycis, a parasite of the water mold Allomyces; and the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here, we present the four components of our approach: pre-sequencing methods, sequence analysis for single cell genome assembly, sequence analysis of single cell transcriptomes, and genome annotation. This technology has the potential to uncover the complexity of single cell eukaryotes and their role in the environmental samples.

  3. Evolution of early eukaryotic cells: genomes, proteomes, and compartments.

    PubMed

    Bogorad, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotes arose from an endosymbiotic association of an alpha-proteobacterium-like organism (the ancestor of mitochondria) with a host cell (lacking mitochondria or plastids). Plants arose by the addition of a cyanobacterium-like endosymbiont (the ancestor of plastids) to the two-member association. Each member of the association brought a unique internal environment and a unique genome. Analyses of recently acquired genomic sequences with newly developed algorithms have revealed (a) that the number of endosymbiont genes that remain in eukaryotic cells-principally in the nucleus-is surprisingly large, (b) that protein products of a large number of genes (or their descendents) that entered the association in the genome of the host are now directed to an organelle derived from an endosymbiont, and (c) that protein products of genes traceable to endosymbiont genomes are directed to the nucleo-cytoplasmic compartment. Consideration of these remarkable findings has led to the present suggestion that contemporary eukaryotic cells evolved through continual chance relocation and testing of genes as well as combinations of gene products and biochemical processes in each unique cell compartment derived from a member of the eukaryotic association. Most of these events occurred during about 300 million years, or so, before contemporary forms of eukaryotic cells appear in the fossil record; they continue today. PMID:17912611

  4. Genomic Copy Number Dictates a Gene-Independent Cell Response to CRISPR/Cas9 Targeting | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system enables genome editing and somatic cell genetic screens in mammalian cells. We performed genome-scale loss-of-function screens in 33 cancer cell lines to identify genes essential for proliferation/survival and found a strong correlation between increased gene copy number and decreased cell viability after genome editing. Within regions of copy-number gain, CRISPR/Cas9 targeting of both expressed and unexpressed genes, as well as intergenic loci, led to significantly decreased cell proliferation through induction of a G2 cell-cycle arrest.

  5. Single-Cell (Meta-)Genomics of a Dimorphic Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Reveals Genomic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Beverly E.; Fliss, Palmer; Jones, Daniel S.; Dick, Gregory J.; Jain, Sunit; Kaster, Anne-Kristin; Winkel, Matthias; Mußmann, Marc; Bailey, Jake

    2016-01-01

    The genus Thiomargarita includes the world's largest bacteria. But as uncultured organisms, their physiology, metabolism, and basis for their gigantism are not well understood. Thus, a genomics approach, applied to a single Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii cell was employed to explore the genetic potential of one of these enigmatic giant bacteria. The Thiomargarita cell was obtained from an assemblage of budding Ca. T. nelsonii attached to a provannid gastropod shell from Hydrate Ridge, a methane seep offshore of Oregon, USA. Here we present a manually curated genome of Bud S10 resulting from a hybrid assembly of long Pacific Biosciences and short Illumina sequencing reads. With respect to inorganic carbon fixation and sulfur oxidation pathways, the Ca. T. nelsonii Hydrate Ridge Bud S10 genome was similar to marine sister taxa within the family Beggiatoaceae. However, the Bud S10 genome contains genes suggestive of the genetic potential for lithotrophic growth on arsenite and perhaps hydrogen. The genome also revealed that Bud S10 likely respires nitrate via two pathways: a complete denitrification pathway and a dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia pathway. Both pathways have been predicted, but not previously fully elucidated, in the genomes of other large, vacuolated, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Surprisingly, the genome also had a high number of unusual features for a bacterium to include the largest number of metacaspases and introns ever reported in a bacterium. Also present, are a large number of other mobile genetic elements, such as insertion sequence (IS) transposable elements and miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs). In some cases, mobile genetic elements disrupted key genes in metabolic pathways. For example, a MITE interrupts hupL, which encodes the large subunit of the hydrogenase in hydrogen oxidation. Moreover, we detected a group I intron in one of the most critical genes in the sulfur oxidation pathway, dsrA. The dsrA group

  6. Genome of a low-salinity ammonia-oxidizing archaeon determined by single-cell and metagenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Blainey, Paul C; Mosier, Annika C; Potanina, Anastasia; Francis, Christopher A; Quake, Stephen R

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are thought to be among the most abundant microorganisms on Earth and may significantly impact the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. We sequenced the genome of AOA in an enrichment culture from low-salinity sediments in San Francisco Bay using single-cell and metagenomic genome sequence data. Five single cells were isolated inside an integrated microfluidic device using laser tweezers, the cells' genomic DNA was amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) in 50 nL volumes and then sequenced by high-throughput DNA pyrosequencing. This microscopy-based approach to single-cell genomics minimizes contamination and allows correlation of high-resolution cell images with genomic sequences. Statistical properties of coverage across the five single cells, in combination with the contrasting properties of the metagenomic dataset allowed the assembly of a high-quality draft genome. The genome of this AOA, which we designate Candidatus Nitrosoarchaeum limnia SFB1, is ∼1.77 Mb with >2100 genes and a G+C content of 32%. Across the entire genome, the average nucleotide identity to Nitrosopumilus maritimus, the only AOA in pure culture, is ∼70%, suggesting this AOA represents a new genus of Crenarchaeota. Phylogenetically, the 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) genes of this AOA are most closely related to sequences reported from a wide variety of freshwater ecosystems. Like N. maritimus, the low-salinity AOA genome appears to have an ammonia oxidation pathway distinct from ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In contrast to other described AOA, these low-salinity AOA appear to be motile, based on the presence of numerous motility- and chemotaxis-associated genes in the genome. This genome data will be used to inform targeted physiological and metabolic studies of this novel group of AOA, which may ultimately advance our understanding of AOA metabolism and their impacts on the global carbon and nitrogen cycles. PMID

  7. Genome of a Low-Salinity Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon Determined by Single-Cell and Metagenomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Potanina, Anastasia; Francis, Christopher A.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are thought to be among the most abundant microorganisms on Earth and may significantly impact the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. We sequenced the genome of AOA in an enrichment culture from low-salinity sediments in San Francisco Bay using single-cell and metagenomic genome sequence data. Five single cells were isolated inside an integrated microfluidic device using laser tweezers, the cells' genomic DNA was amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) in 50 nL volumes and then sequenced by high-throughput DNA pyrosequencing. This microscopy-based approach to single-cell genomics minimizes contamination and allows correlation of high-resolution cell images with genomic sequences. Statistical properties of coverage across the five single cells, in combination with the contrasting properties of the metagenomic dataset allowed the assembly of a high-quality draft genome. The genome of this AOA, which we designate Candidatus Nitrosoarchaeum limnia SFB1, is ∼1.77 Mb with >2100 genes and a G+C content of 32%. Across the entire genome, the average nucleotide identity to Nitrosopumilus maritimus, the only AOA in pure culture, is ∼70%, suggesting this AOA represents a new genus of Crenarchaeota. Phylogenetically, the 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) genes of this AOA are most closely related to sequences reported from a wide variety of freshwater ecosystems. Like N. maritimus, the low-salinity AOA genome appears to have an ammonia oxidation pathway distinct from ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In contrast to other described AOA, these low-salinity AOA appear to be motile, based on the presence of numerous motility- and chemotaxis-associated genes in the genome. This genome data will be used to inform targeted physiological and metabolic studies of this novel group of AOA, which may ultimately advance our understanding of AOA metabolism and their impacts on the global carbon and nitrogen cycles. PMID

  8. Multiplexed tracking of combinatorial genomic mutations in engineered cell populations.

    PubMed

    Zeitoun, Ramsey I; Garst, Andrew D; Degen, George D; Pines, Gur; Mansell, Thomas J; Glebes, Tirzah Y; Boyle, Nanette R; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-06-01

    Multiplexed genome engineering approaches can be used to generate targeted genetic diversity in cell populations on laboratory timescales, but methods to track mutations and link them to phenotypes have been lacking. We present an approach for tracking combinatorial engineered libraries (TRACE) through the simultaneous mapping of millions of combinatorially engineered genomes at single-cell resolution. Distal genomic sites are assembled into individual DNA constructs that are compatible with next-generation sequencing strategies. We used TRACE to map growth selection dynamics for Escherichia coli combinatorial libraries created by recursive multiplex recombineering at a depth 10(4)-fold greater than before. TRACE was used to identify genotype-to-phenotype correlations and to map the evolutionary trajectory of two individual combinatorial mutants in E. coli. Combinatorial mutations in the human ES2 ovarian carcinoma cell line were also assessed with TRACE. TRACE completes the combinatorial engineering cycle and enables more sophisticated approaches to genome engineering in both bacteria and eukaryotic cells than are currently possible. PMID:25798935

  9. CGCI Investigators Reveal Comprehensive Landscape of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) Genomes | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers from British Columbia Cancer Agency used whole genome sequencing to analyze 40 DLBCL cases and 13 cell lines in order to fill in the gaps of the complex landscape of DLBCL genomes. Their analysis, “Mutational and structural analysis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using whole genome sequencing,” was published online in Blood on May 22. The authors are Ryan Morin, Marco Marra, and colleagues.  

  10. Deciphering Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using Multidimensional Genomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Ewan A.; Enfield, Katey S. S.; Tsui, Ivy F. L.; Chari, Raj; Lam, Stephen; Alvarez, Carlos E.; Lam, Wan L.

    2011-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SqCCs) arise in a wide range of tissues including skin, lung, and oral mucosa. Although all SqCCs are epithelial in origin and share common nomenclature, these cancers differ greatly with respect to incidence, prognosis, and treatment. Current knowledge of genetic similarities and differences between SqCCs is insufficient to describe the biology of these cancers, which arise from diverse tissue origins. In this paper we provide a general overview of whole genome approaches for gene and pathway discovery and highlight the advancement of integrative genomics as a state-of-the-art technology in the study of SqCC genetics. PMID:21234096

  11. A Method for Checking Genomic Integrity in Cultured Cell Lines from SNP Genotyping Data

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Shane A.; Durbin, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Genomic screening for chromosomal abnormalities is an important part of quality control when establishing and maintaining stem cell lines. We present a new method for sensitive detection of copy number alterations, aneuploidy, and contamination in cell lines using genome-wide SNP genotyping data. In contrast to other methods designed for identifying copy number variations in a single sample or in a sample composed of a mixture of normal and tumor cells, this new method is tailored for determining differences between cell lines and the starting material from which they were derived, which allows us to distinguish between normal and novel copy number variation. We implemented the method in the freely available BCFtools package and present results based on induced pluripotent stem cell lines obtained in the HipSci project. PMID:27176002

  12. Exploring Arabidopsis thaliana Root Endophytes via Single-Cell Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, Derek; Woyke, Tanja; Tringe, Susannah; Dangl, Jeff

    2014-03-19

    Land plants grow in association with microbial communities both on their surfaces and inside the plant (endophytes). The relationships between microbes and their host can vary from pathogenic to mutualistic. Colonization of the endophyte compartment occurs in the presence of a sophisticated plant immune system, implying finely tuned discrimination of pathogens from mutualists and commensals. Despite the importance of the microbiome to the plant, relatively little is known about the specific interactions between plants and microbes, especially in the case of endophytes. The vast majority of microbes have not been grown in the lab, and thus one of the few ways of studying them is by examining their DNA. Although metagenomics is a powerful tool for examining microbial communities, its application to endophyte samples is technically difficult due to the presence of large amounts of host plant DNA in the sample. One method to address these difficulties is single-cell genomics where a single microbial cell is isolated from a sample, lysed, and its genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) to produce enough DNA for genome sequencing. This produces a single-cell amplified genome (SAG). We have applied this technology to study the endophytic microbes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Extensive 16S gene profiling of the microbial communities in the roots of multiple inbred A. thaliana strains has identified 164 OTUs as being significantly enriched in all the root endophyte samples compared to their presence in bulk soil.

  13. Hellbender Genome Sequences Shed Light on Genomic Expansion at the Base of Crown Salamanders

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2014-01-01

    Among animals, genome sizes range from 20 Mb to 130 Gb, with 380-fold variation across vertebrates. Most of the largest vertebrate genomes are found in salamanders, an amphibian clade of 660 species. Thus, salamanders are an important system for studying causes and consequences of genomic gigantism. Previously, we showed that plethodontid salamander genomes accumulate higher levels of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons than do other vertebrates, although the evolutionary origins of such sequences remained unexplored. We also showed that some salamanders in the family Plethodontidae have relatively slow rates of DNA loss through small insertions and deletions. Here, we present new data from Cryptobranchus alleganiensis, the hellbender. Cryptobranchus and Plethodontidae span the basal phylogenetic split within salamanders; thus, analyses incorporating these taxa can shed light on the genome of the ancestral crown salamander lineage, which underwent expansion. We show that high levels of LTR retrotransposons likely characterize all crown salamanders, suggesting that disproportionate expansion of this transposable element (TE) class contributed to genomic expansion. Phylogenetic and age distribution analyses of salamander LTR retrotransposons indicate that salamanders’ high TE levels reflect persistence and diversification of ancestral TEs rather than horizontal transfer events. Finally, we show that relatively slow DNA loss rates through small indels likely characterize all crown salamanders, suggesting that a decreased DNA loss rate contributed to genomic expansion at the clade’s base. Our identification of shared genomic features across phylogenetically distant salamanders is a first step toward identifying the evolutionary processes underlying accumulation and persistence of high levels of repetitive sequence in salamander genomes. PMID:25115007

  14. AgBase: a functional genomics resource for agriculture

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Fiona M; Wang, Nan; Magee, G Bryce; Nanduri, Bindu; Lawrence, Mark L; Camon, Evelyn B; Barrell, Daniel G; Hill, David P; Dolan, Mary E; Williams, W Paul; Luthe, Dawn S; Bridges, Susan M; Burgess, Shane C

    2006-01-01

    Background Many agricultural species and their pathogens have sequenced genomes and more are in progress. Agricultural species provide food, fiber, xenotransplant tissues, biopharmaceuticals and biomedical models. Moreover, many agricultural microorganisms are human zoonoses. However, systems biology from functional genomics data is hindered in agricultural species because agricultural genome sequences have relatively poor structural and functional annotation and agricultural research communities are smaller with limited funding compared to many model organism communities. Description To facilitate systems biology in these traditionally agricultural species we have established "AgBase", a curated, web-accessible, public resource for structural and functional annotation of agricultural genomes. The AgBase database includes a suite of computational tools to use GO annotations. We use standardized nomenclature following the Human Genome Organization Gene Nomenclature guidelines and are currently functionally annotating chicken, cow and sheep gene products using the Gene Ontology (GO). The computational tools we have developed accept and batch process data derived from different public databases (with different accession codes), return all existing GO annotations, provide a list of products without GO annotation, identify potential orthologs, model functional genomics data using GO and assist proteomics analysis of ESTs and EST assemblies. Our journal database helps prevent redundant manual GO curation. We encourage and publicly acknowledge GO annotations from researchers and provide a service for researchers interested in GO and analysis of functional genomics data. Conclusion The AgBase database is the first database dedicated to functional genomics and systems biology analysis for agriculturally important species and their pathogens. We use experimental data to improve structural annotation of genomes and to functionally characterize gene products. AgBase is also

  15. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Meet Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-05-01

    It is extremely rare for a single experiment to be so impactful and timely that it shapes and forecasts the experiments of the next decade. Here, we review how two such experiments-the generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the development of CRISPR/Cas9 technology-have fundamentally reshaped our approach to biomedical research, stem cell biology, and human genetics. We will also highlight the previous knowledge that iPSC and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies were built on as this groundwork demonstrated the need for solutions and the benefits that these technologies provided and set the stage for their success. PMID:27152442

  16. A Web-Based Comparative Genomics Tutorial for Investigating Microbial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    STRONG, MICHAEL; CASCIO, DUILIO; EISENBERG, DAVID

    2004-01-01

    As the number of completely sequenced microbial genomes continues to rise at an impressive rate, it is important to prepare students with the skills necessary to investigate microorganisms at the genomic level. As a part of the core curriculum for first-year graduate students in the biological sciences, we have implemented a web-based tutorial to introduce students to the fields of comparative and functional genomics. The tutorial focuses on recent computational methods for identifying functionally linked genes and proteins on a genome-wide scale and was used to introduce students to the Rosetta Stone, Phylogenetic Profile, conserved Gene Neighbor, and Operon computational methods. Students learned to use a number of publicly available web servers and databases to identify functionally linked genes in the Escherichia coli genome, with emphasis on genome organization and operon structure. The overall effectiveness of the tutorial was assessed based on student evaluations and homework assignments. The tutorial is available to other educators at http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/~strong/m253.php. PMID:23653555

  17. GENOME EDITING IN HUMAN CELLS USING CRISPR/CAS NUCLEASES

    PubMed Central

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Tsai, Shengdar; Joung, J. Keith

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been broadly adopted for highly efficient genome editing in a variety of model organisms and human cell types. Unlike previous genome editing technologies such as Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), the CRISPR/Cas technology does not require complex protein engineering and can be utilized by any researcher proficient in basic molecular biology and cell culture techniques. Here we describe protocols for design and cloning of vectors expressing single or multiplex gRNAs, for transient transfection of human cell lines, and for quantitation of mutation frequencies by T7 Endonuclease I assay. These protocols also include guidance for using two improvements that increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases: truncated gRNAs and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases. PMID:26423589

  18. Current Developments in Prokaryotic Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Goudeau, Danielle; Nath, Nandita; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Malmstrom, Rex

    2014-03-14

    Our approach to prokaryotic single-cell Whole Genome Amplification at the JGI continues to evolve. To increase both the quality and number of single-cell genomes produced, we explore all aspects of the process from cell sorting to sequencing. For example, we now utilize specialized reagents, acoustic liquid handling, and reduced reaction volumes eliminate non-target DNA contamination in WGA reactions. More specifically, we use a cleaner commercial WGA kit from Qiagen that employs a UV decontamination procedure initially developed at the JGI, and we use the Labcyte Echo for tip-less liquid transfer to set up 2uL reactions. Acoustic liquid handling also dramatically reduces reagent costs. In addition, we are exploring new cell lysis methods including treatment with Proteinase K, lysozyme, and other detergents, in order to complement standard alkaline lysis and allow for more efficient disruption of a wider range of cells. Incomplete lysis represents a major hurdle for WGA on some environmental samples, especially rhizosphere, peatland, and other soils. Finding effective lysis strategies that are also compatible with WGA is challenging, and we are currently assessing the impact of various strategies on genome recovery.

  19. The somatic genomic landscape of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Davis, Caleb F; Ricketts, Christopher J; Wang, Min; Yang, Lixing; Cherniack, Andrew D; Shen, Hui; Buhay, Christian; Kang, Hyojin; Kim, Sang Cheol; Fahey, Catherine C; Hacker, Kathryn E; Bhanot, Gyan; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Chu, Andy; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Biehl, Michael; Seth, Sahil; Kaipparettu, Benny A; Bristow, Christopher A; Donehower, Lawrence A; Wallen, Eric M; Smith, Angela B; Tickoo, Satish K; Tamboli, Pheroze; Reuter, Victor; Schmidt, Laura S; Hsieh, James J; Choueiri, Toni K; Hakimi, A Ari; Chin, Lynda; Meyerson, Matthew; Kucherlapati, Raju; Park, Woong-Yang; Robertson, A Gordon; Laird, Peter W; Henske, Elizabeth P; Kwiatkowski, David J; Park, Peter J; Morgan, Margaret; Shuch, Brian; Muzny, Donna; Wheeler, David A; Linehan, W Marston; Gibbs, Richard A; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Creighton, Chad J

    2014-09-01

    We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations of 66 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas (ChRCCs) on the basis of multidimensional and comprehensive characterization, including mtDNA and whole-genome sequencing. The result is consistent that ChRCC originates from the distal nephron compared with other kidney cancers with more proximal origins. Combined mtDNA and gene expression analysis implicates changes in mitochondrial function as a component of the disease biology, while suggesting alternative roles for mtDNA mutations in cancers relying on oxidative phosphorylation. Genomic rearrangements lead to recurrent structural breakpoints within TERT promoter region, which correlates with highly elevated TERT expression and manifestation of kataegis, representing a mechanism of TERT upregulation in cancer distinct from previously observed amplifications and point mutations. PMID:25155756

  20. mGenomeSubtractor: a web-based tool for parallel in silico subtractive hybridization analysis of multiple bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yucheng; He, Xinyi; Harrison, Ewan M; Tai, Cui; Ou, Hong-Yu; Rajakumar, Kumar; Deng, Zixin

    2010-07-01

    mGenomeSubtractor performs an mpiBLAST-based comparison of reference bacterial genomes against multiple user-selected genomes for investigation of strain variable accessory regions. With parallel computing architecture, mGenomeSubtractor is able to run rapid BLAST searches of the segmented reference genome against multiple subject genomes at the DNA or amino acid level within a minute. In addition to comparison of protein coding sequences, the highly flexible sliding window-based genome fragmentation approach offered can be used to identify short unique sequences within or between genes. mGenomeSubtractor provides powerful schematic outputs for exploration of identified core and accessory regions, including searches against databases of mobile genetic elements, virulence factors or bacterial essential genes, examination of G+C content and binucleotide distribution bias, and integrated primer design tools. mGenomeSubtractor also allows for the ready definition of species-specific gene pools based on available genomes. Pan-genomic arrays can be easily developed using the efficient oligonucleotide design tool. This simple high-throughput in silico 'subtractive hybridization' analytical tool will support the rapidly escalating number of comparative bacterial genomics studies aimed at defining genomic biomarkers of evolutionary lineage, phenotype, pathotype, environmental adaptation and/or disease-association of diverse bacterial species. mGenomeSubtractor is freely available to all users without any login requirement at: http://bioinfo-mml.sjtu.edu.cn/mGS/. PMID:20435682

  1. Chemically modified guide RNAs enhance CRISPR-Cas genome editing in human primary cells.

    PubMed

    Hendel, Ayal; Bak, Rasmus O; Clark, Joseph T; Kennedy, Andrew B; Ryan, Daniel E; Roy, Subhadeep; Steinfeld, Israel; Lunstad, Benjamin D; Kaiser, Robert J; Wilkens, Alec B; Bacchetta, Rosa; Tsalenko, Anya; Dellinger, Douglas; Bruhn, Laurakay; Porteus, Matthew H

    2015-09-01

    CRISPR-Cas-mediated genome editing relies on guide RNAs that direct site-specific DNA cleavage facilitated by the Cas endonuclease. Here we report that chemical alterations to synthesized single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) enhance genome editing efficiency in human primary T cells and CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Co-delivering chemically modified sgRNAs with Cas9 mRNA or protein is an efficient RNA- or ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-based delivery method for the CRISPR-Cas system, without the toxicity associated with DNA delivery. This approach is a simple and effective way to streamline the development of genome editing with the potential to accelerate a wide array of biotechnological and therapeutic applications of the CRISPR-Cas technology. PMID:26121415

  2. Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Lung squamous cell carcinoma (lung SqCC) is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in lung SqCC have not been comprehensively characterized and no molecularly targeted agents have been developed specifically for its treatment. As part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we profiled 178 lung SqCCs to provide a comprehensive landscape of genomic and epigenomic alterations. Lung SqCC is characterized by complex genomic alterations, with a mean of 360 exonic mutations, 165 genomic rearrangements, and 323 segments of copy number alteration per tumor. We found statistically recurrent mutations in 18 genes in including mutation of TP53 in nearly all specimens. Previously unreported loss-of-function mutations were seen in the HLA-A class I major histocompatibility gene. Significantly altered pathways included NFE2L2/KEAP1 in 34%, squamous differentiation genes in 44%, PI3K/AKT in 47%, and CDKN2A/RB1 in 72% of tumors. We identified a potential therapeutic target in the majority of tumors, offering new avenues of investigation for lung SqCC treatment. PMID:22960745

  3. Isolation of genomic DNA from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J R; Vance, J M

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes simple, cost-effective preparation of DNA from whole blood or cultured cells that yields high-molecular-weight DNA suitable for both Southern blotting and the polymerase chain reaction. Preparation time may be shortened by substituting a high-salt precipitation procedure for the dialysis step; however, this results in a smaller average fragment size. The isolation of DNA from buccal swabs, collected from the inside of the cheek, is also described. The DNA is suitable for PCR analysis. Preparation of buffered phenol for DNA extraction is described in a support protocol. This unit describes simple, cost-effective preparation of DNA from whole blood or cultured cells that yields high-molecular-we. PMID:18428220

  4. Long-term multilineage engraftment of autologous genome-edited hematopoietic stem cells in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Christopher W; Wang, Jianbin; Norman, Krystin K; Norgaard, Zachary K; Humbert, Olivier; Tse, Collette K; Yan, Jenny J; Trimble, Richard G; Shivak, David A; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2016-05-19

    Genome editing in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) is a promising novel technology for the treatment of many human diseases. Here, we evaluated whether the disruption of the C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) locus in pigtailed macaque HSPCs by zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) was feasible. We show that macaque-specific CCR5 ZFNs efficiently induce CCR5 disruption at levels of up to 64% ex vivo, 40% in vivo early posttransplant, and 3% to 5% in long-term repopulating cells over 6 months following HSPC transplant. These genome-edited HSPCs support multilineage engraftment and generate progeny capable of trafficking to secondary tissues including the gut. Using deep sequencing technology, we show that these ZFNs are highly specific for the CCR5 locus in primary cells. Further, we have adapted our clonal tracking methodology to follow individual CCR5 mutant cells over time in vivo, reinforcing that CCR5 gene-edited HSPCs are capable of long-term engraftment. Together, these data demonstrate that genome-edited HSPCs engraft, and contribute to multilineage repopulation after autologous transplantation in a clinically relevant large animal model, an important step toward the development of stem cell-based genome-editing therapies for HIV and potentially other diseases as well. PMID:26980728

  5. Somatic alterations in the melanoma genome: a high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Gast, Andreas; Scherer, Dominique; Chen, Bowang; Bloethner, Sandra; Melchert, Stephanie; Sucker, Antje; Hemminki, Kari; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kumar, Rajiv

    2010-08-01

    We performed DNA microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization to identify somatic alterations specific to melanoma genome in 60 human cell lines from metastasized melanoma and from 44 corresponding peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Our data showed gross but nonrandom somatic changes specific to the tumor genome. Although the CDKN2A (78%) and PTEN (70%) loci were the major targets of mono-allelic and bi-allelic deletions, amplifications affected loci with BRAF (53%) and NRAS (12%) as well as EGFR (52%), MITF (40%), NOTCH2 (35%), CCND1 (18%), MDM2 (18%), CCNE1 (10%), and CDK4 (8%). The amplified loci carried additional genes, many of which could potentially play a role in melanoma. Distinct patterns of copy number changes showed that alterations in CDKN2A tended to be more clustered in cell lines with mutations in the BRAF and NRAS genes; the PTEN locus was targeted mainly in conjunction with BRAF mutations. Amplification of CCND1, CDK4, and other loci was significantly increased in cell lines without BRAF-NRAS mutations and so was the loss of chromosome arms 13q and 16q. Our data suggest involvement of distinct genetic pathways that are driven either through oncogenic BRAF and NRAS mutations complemented by aberrations in the CDKN2A and PTEN genes or involve amplification of oncogenic genomic loci and loss of 13q and 16q. It also emerges that each tumor besides being affected by major and most common somatic genetic alterations also acquires additional genetic alterations that could be crucial in determining response to small molecular inhibitors that are being currently pursued. PMID:20544847

  6. Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering from a single lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Kabadi, Ami M; Ousterout, David G; Hilton, Isaac B; Gersbach, Charles A

    2014-10-29

    Engineered DNA-binding proteins that manipulate the human genome and transcriptome have enabled rapid advances in biomedical research. In particular, the RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been engineered to create site-specific double-strand breaks for genome editing or to direct targeted transcriptional regulation. A unique capability of the CRISPR/Cas9 system is multiplex genome engineering by delivering a single Cas9 enzyme and two or more single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) targeted to distinct genomic sites. This approach can be used to simultaneously create multiple DNA breaks or to target multiple transcriptional activators to a single promoter for synergistic enhancement of gene induction. To address the need for uniform and sustained delivery of multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering tools, we developed a single lentiviral system to express a Cas9 variant, a reporter gene and up to four sgRNAs from independent RNA polymerase III promoters that are incorporated into the vector by a convenient Golden Gate cloning method. Each sgRNA is efficiently expressed and can mediate multiplex gene editing and sustained transcriptional activation in immortalized and primary human cells. This delivery system will be significant to enabling the potential of CRISPR/Cas9-based multiplex genome engineering in diverse cell types. PMID:25122746

  7. KRAS Genomic Status Predicts the Sensitivity of Ovarian Cancer Cells to Decitabine | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Decitabine, a cancer therapeutic that inhibits DNA methylation, produces variable antitumor response rates in patients with solid tumors that might be leveraged clinically with identification of a predictive biomarker. In this study, we profiled the response of human ovarian, melanoma, and breast cancer cells treated with decitabine, finding that RAS/MEK/ERK pathway activation and DNMT1 expression correlated with cytotoxic activity. Further, we showed that KRAS genomic status predicted decitabine sensitivity in low-grade and high-grade serous ovarian cancer cells.

  8. OMIGA: Optimized Maker-Based Insect Genome Annotation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinding; Xiao, Huamei; Huang, Shuiqing; Li, Fei

    2014-08-01

    Insects are one of the largest classes of animals on Earth and constitute more than half of all living species. The i5k initiative has begun sequencing of more than 5,000 insect genomes, which should greatly help in exploring insect resource and pest control. Insect genome annotation remains challenging because many insects have high levels of heterozygosity. To improve the quality of insect genome annotation, we developed a pipeline, named Optimized Maker-Based Insect Genome Annotation (OMIGA), to predict protein-coding genes from insect genomes. We first mapped RNA-Seq reads to genomic scaffolds to determine transcribed regions using Bowtie, and the putative transcripts were assembled using Cufflink. We then selected highly reliable transcripts with intact coding sequences to train de novo gene prediction software, including Augustus. The re-trained software was used to predict genes from insect genomes. Exonerate was used to refine gene structure and to determine near exact exon/intron boundary in the genome. Finally, we used the software Maker to integrate data from RNA-Seq, de novo gene prediction, and protein alignment to produce an official gene set. The OMIGA pipeline was used to annotate the draft genome of an important insect pest, Chilo suppressalis, yielding 12,548 genes. Different strategies were compared, which demonstrated that OMIGA had the best performance. In summary, we present a comprehensive pipeline for identifying genes in insect genomes that can be widely used to improve the annotation quality in insects. OMIGA is provided at http://ento.njau.edu.cn/omiga.html . PMID:24609470

  9. Enrichment of Root Endophytic Bacteria from Populus deltoides and Single-Cell-Genomics Analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Cude, W. Nathan; Robeson, Jr., Michael S.; Yang, Zamin Koo; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Land, Miriam L.; Allman, Steve L.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; et al

    2016-07-15

    Bacterial endophytes that colonize Populus trees contribute to nutrient acquisition, prime immunity responses, and directly or indirectly increase both above- and below-ground biomasses. Endophytes are embedded within plant material, so physical separation and isolation are difficult tasks. Application of culture-independent methods, such as metagenome or bacterial transcriptome sequencing, has been limited due to the predominance of DNA from the plant biomass. In this paper, we present a modified differential and density gradient centrifugation-based protocol for the separation of endophytic bacteria from Populus roots. This protocol achieved substantial reduction in contaminating plant DNA, allowed enrichment of endophytic bacteria away from themore » plant material, and enabled single-cell genomics analysis. Four single-cell genomes were selected for whole-genome amplification based on their rarity in the microbiome (potentially uncultured taxa) as well as their inferred abilities to form associations with plants. Bioinformatics analyses, including assembly, contamination removal, and completeness estimation, were performed to obtain single-amplified genomes (SAGs) of organisms from the phyla Armatimonadetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, which were unrepresented in our previous cultivation efforts. Finally, comparative genomic analysis revealed unique characteristics of each SAG that could facilitate future cultivation efforts for these bacteria.« less

  10. Comprehensive genomic profiles of small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    George, Julie; Lim, Jing Shan; Jang, Se Jin; Cun, Yupeng; Ozretić, Luka; Kong, Gu; Leenders, Frauke; Lu, Xin; Fernández-Cuesta, Lynnette; Bosco, Graziella; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Jahchan, Nadine S; Park, Kwon-Sik; Yang, Dian; Karnezis, Anthony N; Vaka, Dedeepya; Torres, Angela; Wang, Maia Segura; Korbel, Jan O; Menon, Roopika; Chun, Sung-Min; Kim, Deokhoon; Wilkerson, Matt; Hayes, Neil; Engelmann, David; Pützer, Brigitte; Bos, Marc; Michels, Sebastian; Vlasic, Ignacija; Seidel, Danila; Pinther, Berit; Schaub, Philipp; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi; Iwakawa, Reika; Tsuta, Koji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Muley, Thomas; Hoffmann, Hans; Schnabel, Philipp A; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Soltermann, Alex; Tischler, Verena; Choi, Chang-min; Kim, Yong-Hee; Massion, Pierre P; Zou, Yong; Jovanovic, Dragana; Kontic, Milica; Wright, Gavin M; Russell, Prudence A; Solomon, Benjamin; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Muscarella, Lucia A; la Torre, Annamaria; Field, John K; Jakopovic, Marko; Knezevic, Jelena; Castaños-Vélez, Esmeralda; Roz, Luca; Pastorino, Ugo; Brustugun, Odd-Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Thunnissen, Erik; Köhler, Jens; Schuler, Martin; Botling, Johan; Sandelin, Martin; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Salvesen, Helga B; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Bogus, Magdalena; Schneider, Peter M; Zander, Thomas; Ansén, Sascha; Hallek, Michael; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Yatabe, Yasushi; Travis, William D; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Christian; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas; Büttner, Reinhard; Haas, Stefan A; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Peifer, Martin; Sage, Julien; Thomas, Roman K

    2015-08-01

    We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We discovered somatic genomic rearrangements of TP73 that create an oncogenic version of this gene, TP73Δex2/3. In rare cases, SCLC tumours exhibited kinase gene mutations, providing a possible therapeutic opportunity for individual patients. Finally, we observed inactivating mutations in NOTCH family genes in 25% of human SCLC. Accordingly, activation of Notch signalling in a pre-clinical SCLC mouse model strikingly reduced the number of tumours and extended the survival of the mutant mice. Furthermore, neuroendocrine gene expression was abrogated by Notch activity in SCLC cells. This first comprehensive study of somatic genome alterations in SCLC uncovers several key biological processes and identifies candidate therapeutic targets in this highly lethal form of cancer. PMID:26168399

  11. CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-01

    Targeted modulation of transcription is necessary for understanding complex gene networks and has great potential for medical and industrial applications. CRISPR is emerging as a powerful system for targeted genome activation and repression, in addition to its use in genome editing. This protocol describes how to design, construct, and experimentally validate the function of sequence-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for sequence-specific repression (CRISPRi) or activation (CRISPRa) of transcription in mammalian cells. In this technology, the CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is catalytically deactivated (dCas9) to provide a general platform for RNA-guided DNA targeting of any locus in the genome. Fusion of dCas9 to effector domains with distinct regulatory functions enables stable and efficient transcriptional repression or activation in mammalian cells. Delivery of multiple sgRNAs further enables activation or repression of multiple genes. By using scaffold RNAs (scRNAs), different effectors can be recruited to different genes for simultaneous activation of some and repression of others. The CRISPRi and CRISPRa methods provide powerful tools for sequence-specific control of gene expression on a genome-wide scale to aid understanding gene functions and for engineering genetic regulatory systems. PMID:26729910

  12. Comprehensive genomic profiles of small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    George, Julie; Lim, Jing Shan; Jang, Se Jin; Cun, Yupeng; Ozretić, Luka; Kong, Gu; Leenders, Frauke; Lu, Xin; Fernández-Cuesta, Lynnette; Bosco, Graziella; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Jahchan, Nadine S.; Park, Kwon-Sik; Yang, Dian; Karnezis, Anthony N.; Vaka, Dedeepya; Torres, Angela; Wang, Maia Segura; Korbel, Jan O.; Menon, Roopika; Chun, Sung-Min; Kim, Deokhoon; Wilkerson, Matt; Hayes, Neil; Engelmann, David; Pützer, Brigitte; Bos, Marc; Michels, Sebastian; Vlasic, Ignacija; Seidel, Danila; Pinther, Berit; Schaub, Philipp; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi; Iwakawa, Reika; Tsuta, Koji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Muley, Thomas; Hoffmann, Hans; Schnabel, Philipp A.; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Soltermann, Alex; Tischler, Verena; Choi, Chang-min; Kim, Yong-Hee; Massion, Pierre P.; Zou, Yong; Jovanovic, Dragana; Kontic, Milica; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence A.; Solomon, Benjamin; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Muscarella, Lucia A.; la Torre, Annamaria; Field, John K.; Jakopovic, Marko; Knezevic, Jelena; Castaños-Vélez, Esmeralda; Roz, Luca; Pastorino, Ugo; Brustugun, Odd-Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Thunnissen, Erik; Köhler, Jens; Schuler, Martin; Botling, Johan; Sandelin, Martin; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Salvesen, Helga B.; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Bogus, Magdalena; Schneider, Peter M.; Zander, Thomas; Ansén, Sascha; Hallek, Michael; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Yatabe, Yasushi; Travis, William D.; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Christian; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas; Büttner, Reinhard; Haas, Stefan A.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Peifer, Martin; Sage, Julien; Thomas, Roman K.

    2016-01-01

    We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We discovered somatic genomic rearrangements of TP73 that create an oncogenic version of this gene, TP73Δex2/3. In rare cases, SCLC tumours exhibited kinase gene mutations, providing a possible therapeutic opportunity for individual patients. Finally, we observed inactivating mutations in NOTCH family genes in 25% of human SCLC. Accordingly, activation of Notch signalling in a pre-clinical SCLC mouse model strikingly reduced the number of tumours and extended the survival of the mutant mice. Furthermore, neuroendocrine gene expression was abrogated by Notch activity in SCLC cells. This first comprehensive study of somatic genome alterations in SCLC uncovers several key biological processes and identifies candidate therapeutic targets in this highly lethal form of cancer. PMID:26168399

  13. Whole-genome sequencing of nine esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Contino, Gianmarco; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Secrier, Maria; Bower, Lawrence; Fels Elliott, Rachael; Weaver, Jamie; Lynch, Andy G.; Edwards, Paul A.W.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is highly mutated and molecularly heterogeneous. The number of cell lines available for study is limited and their genome has been only partially characterized. The availability of an accurate annotation of their mutational landscape is crucial for accurate experimental design and correct interpretation of genotype-phenotype findings. We performed high coverage, paired end whole genome sequencing on eight EAC cell lines—ESO26, ESO51, FLO-1, JH-EsoAd1, OACM5.1 C, OACP4 C, OE33, SK-GT-4—all verified against original patient material, and one esophageal high grade dysplasia cell line, CP-D. We have made available the aligned sequence data and report single nucleotide variants (SNVs), small insertions and deletions (indels), and copy number alterations, identified by comparison with the human reference genome and known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We compare these putative mutations to mutations found in primary tissue EAC samples, to inform the use of these cell lines as a model of EAC.

  14. Whole-genome sequencing of nine esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Contino, Gianmarco; Eldridge, Matthew D; Secrier, Maria; Bower, Lawrence; Fels Elliott, Rachael; Weaver, Jamie; Lynch, Andy G; Edwards, Paul A W; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is highly mutated and molecularly heterogeneous. The number of cell lines available for study is limited and their genome has been only partially characterized. The availability of an accurate annotation of their mutational landscape is crucial for accurate experimental design and correct interpretation of genotype-phenotype findings. We performed high coverage, paired end whole genome sequencing on eight EAC cell lines-ESO26, ESO51, FLO-1, JH-EsoAd1, OACM5.1 C, OACP4 C, OE33, SK-GT-4-all verified against original patient material, and one esophageal high grade dysplasia cell line, CP-D. We have made available the aligned sequence data and report single nucleotide variants (SNVs), small insertions and deletions (indels), and copy number alterations, identified by comparison with the human reference genome and known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We compare these putative mutations to mutations found in primary tissue EAC samples, to inform the use of these cell lines as a model of EAC. PMID:27594985

  15. Modeling genome coverage in single-cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Timothy; Smith, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Single-cell DNA sequencing is necessary for examining genetic variation at the cellular level, which remains hidden in bulk sequencing experiments. But because they begin with such small amounts of starting material, the amount of information that is obtained from single-cell sequencing experiment is highly sensitive to the choice of protocol employed and variability in library preparation. In particular, the fraction of the genome represented in single-cell sequencing libraries exhibits extreme variability due to quantitative biases in amplification and loss of genetic material. Results: We propose a method to predict the genome coverage of a deep sequencing experiment using information from an initial shallow sequencing experiment mapped to a reference genome. The observed coverage statistics are used in a non-parametric empirical Bayes Poisson model to estimate the gain in coverage from deeper sequencing. This approach allows researchers to know statistical features of deep sequencing experiments without actually sequencing deeply, providing a basis for optimizing and comparing single-cell sequencing protocols or screening libraries. Availability and implementation: The method is available as part of the preseq software package. Source code is available at http://smithlabresearch.org/preseq. Contact: andrewds@usc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary material is available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25107873

  16. Genome management and mismanagement—cell-level opportunities and challenges of whole-genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    Yant, Levi; Bomblies, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD) doubles the DNA content in the nucleus and leads to polyploidy. In whole-organism polyploids, WGD has been implicated in adaptability and the evolution of increased genome complexity, but polyploidy can also arise in somatic cells of otherwise diploid plants and animals, where it plays important roles in development and likely environmental responses. As with whole organisms, WGD can also promote adaptability and diversity in proliferating cell lineages, although whether WGD is beneficial is clearly context-dependent. WGD is also sometimes associated with aging and disease and may be a facilitator of dangerous genetic and karyotypic diversity in tumorigenesis. Scaling changes can affect cell physiology, but problems associated with WGD in large part seem to arise from problems with chromosome segregation in polyploid cells. Here we discuss both the adaptive potential and problems associated with WGD, focusing primarily on cellular effects. We see value in recognizing polyploidy as a key player in generating diversity in development and cell lineage evolution, with intriguing parallels across kingdoms. PMID:26637526

  17. Reconstructing each cell's genome within complex microbial communities-dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Clum, Alicia; Schwientek, Patrick; Rinke, Christian; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    As the vast majority of microorganisms have yet to be cultivated in a laboratory setting, access to their genetic makeup has largely been limited to cultivation-independent methods. These methods, namely metagenomics and more recently single-cell genomics, have become cornerstones for microbial ecology and environmental microbiology. One ultimate goal is the recovery of genome sequences from each cell within an environment to move toward a better understanding of community metabolic potential and to provide substrate for experimental work. As single-cell sequencing has the ability to decipher all sequence information contained in an individual cell, this method holds great promise in tackling such challenge. Methodological limitations and inherent biases however do exist, which will be discussed here based on environmental and benchmark data, to assess how far we are from reaching this goal. PMID:25620966

  18. MarinegenomicsDB: an integrated genome viewer for community-based annotation of genomes.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Ryo; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Hisata, Kanako; Gyoja, Fuki; Shoguchi, Eiichi; Satoh, Nori; Kawashima, Takeshi

    2013-10-01

    We constructed a web-based genome annotation platform, MarinegenomicsDB, to integrate genome data from various marine organisms including the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata and the coral Acropora digitifera. This newly developed viewer application provides open access to published data and a user-friendly environment for community-based manual gene annotation. Development on a flexible framework enables easy expansion of the website on demand. To date, more than 2000 genes have been annotated using this system. In the future, the website will be expanded to host a wider variety of data, more species, and different types of genome-wide analyses. The website is available at the following URL: http://marinegenomics.oist.jp. PMID:24125644

  19. The future is now: single-cell genomics of bacteria and archaea

    PubMed Central

    Blainey, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in the expanding catalog of uncultivated microorganisms, increasing recognition of heterogeneity among seemingly similar cells, and technological advances in whole-genome amplification and single-cell manipulation are driving considerable progress in single-cell genomics. Here, the spectrum of applications for single-cell genomics, key advances in the development of the field, and emerging methodology for single-cell genome sequencing are reviewed by example with attention to the diversity of approaches and their unique characteristics. Experimental strategies transcending specific methodologies are identified and organized as a road map for future studies in single-cell genomics of environmental microorganisms. Over the next decade, increasingly powerful tools for single-cell genome sequencing and analysis will play key roles in accessing the genomes of uncultivated organisms, determining the basis of microbial community functions, and fundamental aspects of microbial population biology. PMID:23298390

  20. Super-enhancers: Asset management in immune cell genomes.

    PubMed

    Witte, Steven; O'Shea, John J; Vahedi, Golnaz

    2015-09-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs) are regions of the genome consisting of clusters of regulatory elements bound with very high amounts of transcription factors, and this architecture appears to be the hallmark of genes and noncoding RNAs linked with cell identity. Recent studies have identified SEs in CD4(+) T cells and have further linked these regions to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with immune-mediated disorders, pointing to an important role for these structures in the T cell differentiation and function. Here we review the features that define SEs, and discuss their function within the broader understanding of the mechanisms that define immune cell identity and function. We propose that SEs present crucial regulatory hubs, coordinating intrinsic and extrinsic differentiation signals, and argue that delineating these regions will provide important insight into the factors and mechanisms that define immune cell identity. PMID:26277449

  1. Super-enhancers: Asset management in immune cell genomes

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Steven; O’Shea, John J.; Vahedi, Golnaz

    2015-01-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs) are regions of the genome consisting of clusters of regulatory elements bound with very high amounts of transcription factors, and this architecture appears to be the hallmark of genes and noncoding RNAs linked with cell identity. Recent studies have identified SEs in CD4+ T cells and have further linked these regions to SNPs associated with immune-mediated disorders, pointing to an important role for these structures in the T cell differentiation and function. Here we review the features that define SEs, and discuss their function within the broader understanding of the mechanisms that define immune cell identity and function. We propose that SEs present crucial regulatory hubs, coordinating intrinsic and extrinsic differentiation signals, and argue that delineating these regions will provide important insight into the factors and mechanisms that define immune cell identity. PMID:26277449

  2. Challenges and Triumphs to Genomics-Based Natural Product Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Paul R.; Chavarria, Krystle L.; Fenical, William; Moore, Bradley S.; Ziemert, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing is rapidly changing the field of natural products research by providing opportunities to assess the biosynthetic potential of strains prior to chemical analysis or biological testing. Ready access to sequence data is driving the development of new bioinformatic tools and methods to identify the products of silent or cryptic pathways. While genome mining has fast become a useful approach to natural product discovery, it has also become clear that identifying pathways of interest is much easier than finding the associated products. This has led to bottlenecks in the discovery process that must be overcome for the potential of genomics-based natural product discovery to be fully realized. In this perspective, we address some of these challenges in the context of our work with the marine actinomycete genus Salinispora, which is proving to be a useful model with which to apply genome mining as an approach to natural product discovery. PMID:24104399

  3. Bacterial Recombineering: Genome Engineering via Phage-Based Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Pines, Gur; Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The ability to specifically modify bacterial genomes in a precise and efficient manner is highly desired in various fields, ranging from molecular genetics to metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Much has changed from the initial realization that phage-derived genes may be employed for such tasks to today, where recombineering enables complex genetic edits within a genome or a population. Here, we review the major developments leading to recombineering becoming the method of choice for in situ bacterial genome editing while highlighting the various applications of recombineering in pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology. We also present the current understanding of the mechanism of recombineering. Finally, we discuss in detail issues surrounding recombineering efficiency and future directions for recombineering-based genome editing. PMID:25856528

  4. The Candidate Phylum Poribacteria by Single-Cell Genomics: New Insights into Phylogeny, Cell-Compartmentation, Eukaryote-Like Repeat Proteins, and Other Genomic Features

    PubMed Central

    Kamke, Janine; Rinke, Christian; Schwientek, Patrick; Mavromatis, Kostas; Ivanova, Natalia; Sczyrba, Alexander; Woyke, Tanja; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The candidate phylum Poribacteria is one of the most dominant and widespread members of the microbial communities residing within marine sponges. Cell compartmentalization had been postulated along with their discovery about a decade ago and their phylogenetic association to the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae superphylum was proposed soon thereafter. In the present study we revised these features based on genomic data obtained from six poribacterial single cells. We propose that Poribacteria form a distinct monophyletic phylum contiguous to the PVC superphylum together with other candidate phyla. Our genomic analyses supported the possibility of cell compartmentalization in form of bacterial microcompartments. Further analyses of eukaryote-like protein domains stressed the importance of such proteins with features including tetratricopeptide repeats, leucin rich repeats as well as low density lipoproteins receptor repeats, the latter of which are reported here for the first time from a sponge symbiont. Finally, examining the most abundant protein domain family on poribacterial genomes revealed diverse phyH family proteins, some of which may be related to dissolved organic posphorus uptake. PMID:24498082

  5. Metabolic diversity and ecological niches of Achromatium populations revealed with single-cell genomic sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Muammar; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Fantle, Matthew S.; Macalady, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Large, sulfur-cycling, calcite-precipitating bacteria in the genus Achromatium represent a significant proportion of bacterial communities near sediment-water interfaces at sites throughout the world. Our understanding of their potentially crucial roles in calcium, carbon, sulfur, nitrogen, and iron cycling is limited because they have not been cultured or sequenced using environmental genomics approaches to date. We utilized single-cell genomic sequencing to obtain one incomplete and two nearly complete draft genomes for Achromatium collected at Warm Mineral Springs (WMS), FL. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the three cells represent distinct and relatively distant Achromatium populations (91–92% identity). The draft genomes encode key genes involved in sulfur and hydrogen oxidation; oxygen, nitrogen and polysulfide respiration; carbon and nitrogen fixation; organic carbon assimilation and storage; chemotaxis; twitching motility; antibiotic resistance; and membrane transport. Known genes for iron and manganese energy metabolism were not detected. The presence of pyrophosphatase and vacuolar (V)-type ATPases, which are generally rare in bacterial genomes, suggests a role for these enzymes in calcium transport, proton pumping, and/or energy generation in the membranes of calcite-containing inclusions. PMID:26322031

  6. Development of cancer-initiating cells and immortalized cells with genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Ken-Ichi; Atsumi, Yuko; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2015-03-26

    Cancers that develop after middle age usually exhibit genomic instability and multiple mutations. This is in direct contrast to pediatric tumors that usually develop as a result of specific chromosomal translocations and epigenetic aberrations. The development of genomic instability is associated with mutations that contribute to cellular immortalization and transformation. Cancer occurs when cancer-initiating cells (CICs), also called cancer stem cells, develop as a result of these mutations. In this paper, we explore how CICs develop as a result of genomic instability, including looking at which cancer suppression mechanisms are abrogated. A recent in vitro study revealed the existence of a CIC induction pathway in differentiating stem cells. Under aberrant differentiation conditions, cells become senescent and develop genomic instabilities that lead to the development of CICs. The resulting CICs contain a mutation in the alternative reading frame of CDKN2A (ARF)/p53 module, i.e., in either ARF or p53. We summarize recently established knowledge of CIC development and cellular immortality, explore the role of the ARF/p53 module in protecting cells from transformation, and describe a risk factor for genomic destabilization that increases during the process of normal cell growth and differentiation and is associated with the downregulation of histone H2AX to levels representative of growth arrest in normal cells. PMID:25815132

  7. Development of cancer-initiating cells and immortalized cells with genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Ken-ichi; Atsumi, Yuko; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2015-01-01

    Cancers that develop after middle age usually exhibit genomic instability and multiple mutations. This is in direct contrast to pediatric tumors that usually develop as a result of specific chromosomal translocations and epigenetic aberrations. The development of genomic instability is associated with mutations that contribute to cellular immortalization and transformation. Cancer occurs when cancer-initiating cells (CICs), also called cancer stem cells, develop as a result of these mutations. In this paper, we explore how CICs develop as a result of genomic instability, including looking at which cancer suppression mechanisms are abrogated. A recent in vitro study revealed the existence of a CIC induction pathway in differentiating stem cells. Under aberrant differentiation conditions, cells become senescent and develop genomic instabilities that lead to the development of CICs. The resulting CICs contain a mutation in the alternative reading frame of CDKN2A (ARF)/p53 module, i.e., in either ARF or p53. We summarize recently established knowledge of CIC development and cellular immortality, explore the role of the ARF/p53 module in protecting cells from transformation, and describe a risk factor for genomic destabilization that increases during the process of normal cell growth and differentiation and is associated with the downregulation of histone H2AX to levels representative of growth arrest in normal cells. PMID:25815132

  8. MonarchBase: the monarch butterfly genome database

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Shuai; Reppert, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is emerging as a model organism to study the mechanisms of circadian clocks and animal navigation, and the genetic underpinnings of long-distance migration. The initial assembly of the monarch genome was released in 2011, and the biological interpretation of the genome focused on the butterfly’s migration biology. To make the extensive data associated with the genome accessible to the general biological and lepidopteran communities, we established MonarchBase (available at http://monarchbase.umassmed.edu). The database is an open-access, web-available portal that integrates all available data associated with the monarch butterfly genome. Moreover, MonarchBase provides access to an updated version of genome assembly (v3) upon which all data integration is based. These include genes with systematic annotation, as well as other molecular resources, such as brain expressed sequence tags, migration expression profiles and microRNAs. MonarchBase utilizes a variety of retrieving methods to access data conveniently and for integrating biological interpretations. PMID:23143105

  9. MonarchBase: the monarch butterfly genome database.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Shuai; Reppert, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is emerging as a model organism to study the mechanisms of circadian clocks and animal navigation, and the genetic underpinnings of long-distance migration. The initial assembly of the monarch genome was released in 2011, and the biological interpretation of the genome focused on the butterfly's migration biology. To make the extensive data associated with the genome accessible to the general biological and lepidopteran communities, we established MonarchBase (available at http://monarchbase.umassmed.edu). The database is an open-access, web-available portal that integrates all available data associated with the monarch butterfly genome. Moreover, MonarchBase provides access to an updated version of genome assembly (v3) upon which all data integration is based. These include genes with systematic annotation, as well as other molecular resources, such as brain expressed sequence tags, migration expression profiles and microRNAs. MonarchBase utilizes a variety of retrieving methods to access data conveniently and for integrating biological interpretations. PMID:23143105

  10. Evidence-based gene predictions in plant genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Automated evidence-based gene building is a rapid and cost-effective way to provide reliable gene annotations on newly sequenced genomes. One of the limitations of evidence-based gene builders, however, is their requirement for gene expression evidence—known proteins, full-length cDNAs, or expressed...

  11. Small cell ovarian carcinoma: genomic stability and responsiveness to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The biology of small cell ovarian carcinoma of the hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT), which is a rare and aggressive form of ovarian cancer, is poorly understood. Tumourigenicity, in vitro growth characteristics, genetic and genomic anomalies, and sensitivity to standard and novel chemotherapeutic treatments were investigated in the unique SCCOHT cell line, BIN-67, to provide further insight in the biology of this rare type of ovarian cancer. Method The tumourigenic potential of BIN-67 cells was determined and the tumours formed in a xenograft model was compared to human SCCOHT. DNA sequencing, spectral karyotyping and high density SNP array analysis was performed. The sensitivity of the BIN-67 cells to standard chemotherapeutic agents and to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the JX-594 vaccinia virus was tested. Results BIN-67 cells were capable of forming spheroids in hanging drop cultures. When xenografted into immunodeficient mice, BIN-67 cells developed into tumours that reflected the hypercalcemia and histology of human SCCOHT, notably intense expression of WT-1 and vimentin, and lack of expression of inhibin. Somatic mutations in TP53 and the most common activating mutations in KRAS and BRAF were not found in BIN-67 cells by DNA sequencing. Spectral karyotyping revealed a largely normal diploid karyotype (in greater than 95% of cells) with a visibly shorter chromosome 20 contig. High density SNP array analysis also revealed few genomic anomalies in BIN-67 cells, which included loss of heterozygosity of an estimated 16.7 Mb interval on chromosome 20. SNP array analyses of four SCCOHT samples also indicated a low frequency of genomic anomalies in the majority of cases. Although resistant to platinum chemotherapeutic drugs, BIN-67 cell viability in vitro was reduced by >75% after infection with oncolytic viruses. Conclusions These results show that SCCOHT differs from high-grade serous carcinomas by exhibiting few chromosomal anomalies and lacking TP53

  12. Insights from a chimpanzee adipose stromal cell population: opportunities for adult stem cells to expand primate functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Pfefferle, Lisa W; Wray, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Comparisons between humans and chimpanzees are essential for understanding traits unique to each species. However, linking important phenotypic differences to underlying molecular changes is often challenging. The ability to generate, differentiate, and profile adult stem cells provides a powerful but underutilized opportunity to investigate the molecular basis for trait differences between species within specific cell types and in a controlled environment. Here, we characterize adipose stromal cells (ASCs) from Clint, the chimpanzee whose genome was first sequenced. Using imaging and RNA-Seq, we compare the chimpanzee ASCs with three comparable human cell lines. Consistent with previous studies on ASCs in humans, the chimpanzee cells have fibroblast-like morphology and express genes encoding components of the extracellular matrix at high levels. Differentially expressed genes are enriched for distinct functional classes between species: immunity and protein processing are higher in chimpanzees, whereas cell cycle and DNA processing are higher in humans. Although hesitant to draw definitive conclusions from these data given the limited sample size, we wish to stress the opportunities that adult stem cells offer for studying primate evolution. In particular, adult stem cells provide a powerful means to investigate the profound disease susceptibilities unique to humans and a promising tool for conservation efforts with nonhuman primates. By allowing for experimental perturbations in relevant cell types, adult stem cells promise to complement classic comparative primate genomics based on in vivo sampling. PMID:24092797

  13. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna; Shoaie, Saeed; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted 85 antimetabolites that can inhibit growth of, or even kill, any of the cell lines, while at the same time not being toxic for 83 different healthy human cell types. 60 of these antimetabolites were found to inhibit growth in all cell lines. Finally, we experimentally validated one of the predicted antimetabolites using two cell lines with different phenotypic origins, and found that it is effective in inhibiting the growth of these cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed high or moderate expression levels of proteins targeted by the validated antimetabolite. Identified anti-growth factors for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25640694

  14. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna; Shoaie, Saeed; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted 85 antimetabolites that can inhibit growth of, or even kill, any of the cell lines, while at the same time not being toxic for 83 different healthy human cell types. 60 of these antimetabolites were found to inhibit growth in all cell lines. Finally, we experimentally validated one of the predicted antimetabolites using two cell lines with different phenotypic origins, and found that it is effective in inhibiting the growth of these cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed high or moderate expression levels of proteins targeted by the validated antimetabolite. Identified anti-growth factors for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25640694

  15. The CHR site: definition and genome-wide identification of a cell cycle transcriptional element

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerd A.; Wintsche, Axel; Stangner, Konstanze; Prohaska, Sonja J.; Stadler, Peter F.; Engeland, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) has been identified as a DNA element with an important role in transcriptional regulation of late cell cycle genes. It has been shown that such genes are controlled by DREAM, MMB and FOXM1-MuvB and that these protein complexes can contact DNA via CHR sites. However, it has not been elucidated which sequence variations of the canonical CHR are functional and how frequent CHR-based regulation is utilized in mammalian genomes. Here, we define the spectrum of functional CHR elements. As the basis for a computational meta-analysis, we identify new CHR sequences and compile phylogenetic motif conservation as well as genome-wide protein-DNA binding and gene expression data. We identify CHR elements in most late cell cycle genes binding DREAM, MMB, or FOXM1-MuvB. In contrast, Myb- and forkhead-binding sites are underrepresented in both early and late cell cycle genes. Our findings support a general mechanism: sequential binding of DREAM, MMB and FOXM1-MuvB complexes to late cell cycle genes requires CHR elements. Taken together, we define the group of CHR-regulated genes in mammalian genomes and provide evidence that the CHR is the central promoter element in transcriptional regulation of late cell cycle genes by DREAM, MMB and FOXM1-MuvB. PMID:25106871

  16. MethylC-seq library preparation for base-resolution whole-genome bisulfite sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Urich, Mark A; Nery, Joseph R; Lister, Ryan; Schmitz, Robert J; Ecker, Joseph R

    2015-01-01

    Current high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies enable acquisition of billions of data points through which myriad biological processes can be interrogated, including genetic variation, chromatin structure, gene expression patterns, small RNAs and protein–DNA interactions. Here we describe the MethylC-sequencing (MethylC-seq) library preparation method, a 2-d protocol that enables the genome-wide identification of cytosine DNA methylation states at single-base resolution. The technique involves fragmentation of genomic DNA followed by adapter ligation, bisulfite conversion and limited amplification using adapter-specific PCR primers in preparation for sequencing. To date, this protocol has been successfully applied to genomic DNA isolated from primary cell culture, sorted cells and fresh tissue from over a thousand plant and animal samples. PMID:25692984

  17. Defective DNA repair and increased genomic instability in Cernunnos-XLF-deficient murine ES cells.

    PubMed

    Zha, Shan; Alt, Frederick W; Cheng, Hwei-Ling; Brush, James W; Li, Gang

    2007-03-13

    Nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in mammalian cells, and it functions to join both specifically programmed DSBs that occur in the context of V(D)J recombination during early lymphocyte development as well as general DSBs that occur in all cells. Thus, defects in NHEJ impair V(D)J recombination and lead to general genomic instability. In human patients, mutations of Cernunnos-XLF (also called NHEJ1), a recently identified NHEJ factor, underlie certain severe combined immune deficiencies associated with defective V(D)J recombination and radiosensitivity. To characterize Cernunnos-XLF function in mouse cells, we used gene-targeted mutation to delete exons 4 and 5 from both copies of the Cernunnos-XLF gene in ES cell (referred to as Cer(Delta/Delta) ES cells). Analyses of Cer(Delta/Delta) ES cells showed that they produce no readily detectable Cernunnos-XLF protein. Based on transient V(D)J recombination assays, we find that Cer(Delta/Delta) ES cells have dramatic impairments in ability to form both V(D)J coding joins and joins of their flanking recombination signal sequences (RS joins). Cer(Delta/Delta) ES cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation and have intrinsic DNA DSB repair defects as measured by pulse field gel electrophoresis. Finally, the Cernunnos-XLF mutations led to increased spontaneous genomic instability, including translocations. We conclude that, in mice, Cernunnos-XLF is essential for normal NHEJ-mediated repair of DNA DSBs and that Cernunnos-XLF acts as a genomic caretaker to prevent genomic instability. PMID:17360556

  18. Unclassified renal cell carcinoma: a clinicopathological, comparative genomic hybridization, and whole-genome exon sequencing study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhen-Yan; Pang, Li-Juan; Qi, Yan; Kang, Xue-Ling; Hu, Jian-Ming; Wang, Lianghai; Liu, Kun-Peng; Ren, Yuan; Cui, Mei; Song, Li-Li; Li, Hong-An; Zou, Hong; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Unclassified renal cell carcinoma (URCC) is a rare variant of RCC, accounting for only 3-5% of all cases. Studies on the molecular genetics of URCC are limited, and hence, we report on 2 cases of URCC analyzed using comparative genome hybridization (CGH) and the genome-wide human exon GeneChip technique to identify the genomic alterations of URCC. Both URCC patients (mean age, 72 years) presented at an advanced stage and died within 30 months post-surgery. Histologically, the URCCs were composed of undifferentiated, multinucleated, giant cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunostaining revealed that both URCC cases had strong p53 protein expression and partial expression of cluster of differentiation-10 and cytokeratin. The CGH profiles showed chromosomal imbalances in both URCC cases: gains were observed in chromosomes 1p11-12, 1q12-13, 2q20-23, 3q22-23, 8p12, and 16q11-15, whereas losses were detected on chromosomes 1q22-23, 3p12-22, 5p30-ter, 6p, 11q, 16q18-22, 17p12-14, and 20p. Compared with 18 normal renal tissues, 40 mutated genes were detected in the URCC tissues, including 32 missense and 8 silent mutations. Functional enrichment analysis revealed that the missense mutation genes were involved in 11 different biological processes and pathways, including cell cycle regulation, lipid localization and transport, neuropeptide signaling, organic ether metabolism, and ATP-binding cassette transporter signaling. Our findings indicate that URCC may be a highly aggressive cancer, and the genetic alterations identified herein may provide clues regarding the tumorigenesis of URCC and serve as a basis for the development of targeted therapies against URCC in the future. PMID:25120763

  19. Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplifications Tools (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect

    Quake, Steve

    2011-10-12

    Stanford University's Steve Quake on "Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplification Tools" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  20. Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplifications Tools (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema

    Quake, Steve [University of Stanford

    2013-01-22

    Stanford University's Steve Quake on "Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplification Tools" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  1. Minireview: Genome Editing of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Modeling Metabolic Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haojie; Cowan, Chad A

    2016-06-01

    The pathophysiology of metabolic diseases such as coronary artery disease, diabetes, and obesity is complex and multifactorial. Developing new strategies to prevent or treat these diseases requires in vitro models with which researchers can extensively study the molecular mechanisms that lead to disease. Human pluripotent stem cells and their differentiated derivatives have the potential to provide an unlimited source of disease-relevant cell types and, when combined with recent advances in genome editing, make the goal of generating functional metabolic disease models, for the first time, consistently attainable. However, this approach still has certain limitations including lack of robust differentiation methods and potential off-target effects. This review describes the current progress in human pluripotent stem cell-based metabolic disease research using genome-editing technology. PMID:27075706

  2. Emerging Paradigms in Genomics-Based Crop Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Bohra, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequencing platforms and high-throughput genotyping assays have remarkably expedited the pace of development of genomic tools and resources for several crops. Complementing the technological developments, conceptual shifts have also been witnessed in designing experimental populations. Availability of second generation mapping populations encompassing multiple alleles, multiple traits, and extensive recombination events is radically changing the phenomenon of classical QTL mapping. Additionally, the rising molecular breeding approaches like marker assisted recurrent selection (MARS) that are able to harness several QTLs are of particular importance in obtaining a “designed” genotype carrying the most desirable combinations of favourable alleles. Furthermore, rapid generation of genome-wide marker data coupled with easy access to precise and accurate phenotypic screens enable large-scale exploitation of LD not only to discover novel QTLs via whole genome association scans but also to practise genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV)-based selection of genotypes. Given refinements being experienced in analytical methods and software tools, the multiparent populations will be the resource of choice to undertake genome wide association studies (GWAS), multiparent MARS, and genomic selection (GS). With this, it is envisioned that these high-throughput and high-power molecular breeding methods would greatly assist in exploiting the enormous potential underlying breeding by design approach to facilitate accelerated crop improvement. PMID:24348171

  3. Genome-Based Microbial Taxonomy Coming of Age.

    PubMed

    Hugenholtz, Philip; Skarshewski, Adam; Parks, Donovan H

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing the complete evolutionary history of extant life on our planet will be one of the most fundamental accomplishments of scientific endeavor, akin to the completion of the periodic table, which revolutionized chemistry. The road to this goal is via comparative genomics because genomes are our most comprehensive and objective evolutionary documents. The genomes of plant and animal species have been systematically targeted over the past decade to provide coverage of the tree of life. However, multicellular organisms only emerged in the last 550 million years of more than three billion years of biological evolution and thus comprise a small fraction of total biological diversity. The bulk of biodiversity, both past and present, is microbial. We have only scratched the surface in our understanding of the microbial world, as most microorganisms cannot be readily grown in the laboratory and remain unknown to science. Ground-breaking, culture-independent molecular techniques developed over the past 30 years have opened the door to this so-called microbial dark matter with an accelerating momentum driven by exponential increases in sequencing capacity. We are on the verge of obtaining representative genomes across all life for the first time. However, historical use of morphology, biochemical properties, behavioral traits, and single-marker genes to infer organismal relationships mean that the existing highly incomplete tree is riddled with taxonomic errors. Concerted efforts are now needed to synthesize and integrate the burgeoning genomic data resources into a coherent universal tree of life and genome-based taxonomy. PMID:26988968

  4. The GDB Human Genome Data Base anno 1994.

    PubMed Central

    Fasman, K H; Cuticchia, A J; Kingsbury, D T

    1994-01-01

    In 1991 the Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine was selected as the central repository for mapping data from the Human Genome Project, and was funded by NIH and DOE under a three year award. GDB has now finished 28 months of Federally funded operation. During this period a great deal of progress and many internal changes have taken place. In addition, many changes have also occurred in the external environment, and GDB has adapted its strategies to play an appropriate role in those changes as well. Recognizing the central role of mapping information in the genome project, it is important that GDB respond aggressively to the increasing demands of genomic researchers, as well as formulate a program of response to a number of long standing, but still unmet, needs of that community. It is even more important that GDB provide leadership in the genome informatics enterprise. Three themes described here are dominant in our future plans and represent the essence of the major changes made in the past year. They include: enhanced data acquisition, better map representation, and full integration into the collection of genomic databases. PMID:7937047

  5. Hierarchical structure analysis describing abnormal base composition of genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Zhengqing; Liu, Jian-Kun; She, Zhen-Su

    2005-10-01

    Abnormal base compositional patterns of genomic DNA sequences are studied in the framework of a hierarchical structure (HS) model originally proposed for the study of fully developed turbulence [She and Lévêque, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 336 (1994)]. The HS similarity law is verified over scales between 103bp and 105bp , and the HS parameter β is proposed to describe the degree of heterogeneity in the base composition patterns. More than one hundred bacteria, archaea, virus, yeast, and human genome sequences have been analyzed and the results show that the HS analysis efficiently captures abnormal base composition patterns, and the parameter β is a characteristic measure of the genome. Detailed examination of the values of β reveals an intriguing link to the evolutionary events of genetic material transfer. Finally, a sequence complexity (S) measure is proposed to characterize gradual increase of organizational complexity of the genome during the evolution. The present study raises several interesting issues in the evolutionary history of genomes.

  6. Genomic DNA extraction from cells by electroporation on an integrated microfluidic platform

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Tao; Bao, Ning; Sriranganathanw, Nammalwar; Li, Liwu; Lu, Chang

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of genetic analysis of cells involves chemical lysis for release of DNA molecules. However, chemical reagents required in the lysis interfere with downstream molecular biology and often require removal after the step. Electrical lysis based on irreversible electroporation is a promising technique to prepare samples for genetic analysis due to its purely physical nature, fast speed, and simple operation. However, there has been no experimental confirmation on whether electrical lysis extracts genomic DNA from cells in a reproducible and efficient fashion in comparison to chemical lysis, especially for eukaryotic cells that have most of DNA enclosed in the nucleus. In this work, we construct an integrated microfluidic chip that physically traps a low number of cells, lyses the cells using electrical pulses rapidly, then purifies and concentrates genomic DNA. We demonstrate that electrical lysis offers high efficiency for DNA extraction from both eukaryotic cells (up to ~36% for Chinese hamster ovary cells) and bacterial cells (up to ~45% for Salmonella typhimurium) that is comparable to the widely-used chemical lysis. The DNA extraction efficiency has dependence on both electric parameters and relative amount of beads used for DNA adsorption. We envision that electroporation-based DNA extraction will find use in ultrasensitive assays that benefit from minimal dilution and simple procedure. PMID:23061629

  7. A Method for Genome Editing in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cory; Ye, Zhaohui; Cheng, Linzhao

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) hold great potential for regenerative medicine and currently are being used as a research tool for basic discovery and disease modeling. To evaluate the role of a single genetic variant, a system of genome editing is needed to precisely mutate any desired DNA sequence in isolation and measure its effect on phenotype when compared to the isogenic parental PSC from which it was derived. This protocol describes the general targeting schemes used by researchers to edit PSCs to knock out, knock-in, or precisely alter a single nucleotide, covering conditions for electroporation, clonal isolation, and screening of edited PSCs for the targeted mutation. These recent advances simplify the procedure for genome editing, allowing individual researchers to induce nearly any desired mutation to further study its function or to reverse a disease-causing variant for future applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:27037073

  8. CRISPR mediated somatic cell genome engineering in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Véron, Nadège; Qu, Zhengdong; Kipen, Phoebe A S; Hirst, Claire E; Marcelle, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Gene-targeted knockout technologies are invaluable tools for understanding the functions of genes in vivo. CRISPR/Cas9 system of RNA-guided genome editing is revolutionizing genetics research in a wide spectrum of organisms. Here, we combined CRISPR with in vivo electroporation in the chicken embryo to efficiently target the transcription factor PAX7 in tissues of the developing embryo. This approach generated mosaic genetic mutations within a wild-type cellular background. This series of proof-of-principle experiments indicate that in vivo CRISPR-mediated cell genome engineering is an effective method to achieve gene loss-of-function in the tissues of the chicken embryo and it completes the growing genetic toolbox to study the molecular mechanisms regulating development in this important animal model. PMID:26277216

  9. Limiting replication stress during somatic cell reprogramming reduces genomic instability in induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Sergio; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J.; Gabut, Mathieu; Marion, Rosa M.; Gutierrez-Martinez, Paula; Bua, Sabela; Ramirez, Oscar; Olalde, Iñigo; Rodrigo-Perez, Sara; Li, Han; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Serrano, Manuel; Blasco, Maria A.; Batada, Nizar N.; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from adult somatic cells is one of the most remarkable discoveries in recent decades. However, several works have reported evidence of genomic instability in iPSC, raising concerns on their biomedical use. The reasons behind the genomic instability observed in iPSC remain mostly unknown. Here we show that, similar to the phenomenon of oncogene-induced replication stress, the expression of reprogramming factors induces replication stress. Increasing the levels of the checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) reduces reprogramming-induced replication stress and increases the efficiency of iPSC generation. Similarly, nucleoside supplementation during reprogramming reduces the load of DNA damage and genomic rearrangements on iPSC. Our data reveal that lowering replication stress during reprogramming, genetically or chemically, provides a simple strategy to reduce genomic instability on mouse and human iPSC. PMID:26292731

  10. Comprehensive genome and epigenome characterization of CHO cells in response to evolutionary pressures and over time.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, Julia; Hernández, Inmaculada; Fischer, Christoph; Hanscho, Michael; Auer, Norbert; Hackl, Matthias; Jadhav, Vaibhav; Baumann, Martina; Krempl, Peter M; Schmidl, Christian; Farlik, Matthias; Schuster, Michael; Merkel, Angelika; Sommer, Andreas; Heath, Simon; Rico, Daniel; Bock, Christoph; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Borth, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    The most striking characteristic of CHO cells is their adaptability, which enables efficient production of proteins as well as growth under a variety of culture conditions, but also results in genomic and phenotypic instability. To investigate the relative contribution of genomic and epigenetic modifications towards phenotype evolution, comprehensive genome and epigenome data are presented for six related CHO cell lines, both in response to perturbations (different culture conditions and media as well as selection of a specific phenotype with increased transient productivity) and in steady state (prolonged time in culture under constant conditions). Clear transitions were observed in DNA-methylation patterns upon each perturbation, while few changes occurred over time under constant conditions. Only minor DNA-methylation changes were observed between exponential and stationary growth phase; however, throughout a batch culture the histone modification pattern underwent continuous adaptation. Variation in genome sequence between the six cell lines on the level of SNPs, InDels, and structural variants is high, both upon perturbation and under constant conditions over time. The here presented comprehensive resource may open the door to improved control and manipulation of gene expression during industrial bioprocesses based on epigenetic mechanisms. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2241-2253. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27072894

  11. Global Genomic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus 6 Based on 724 Isolates and 190 Complete Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Jelen, Mateja M.; Chen, Zigui; Kocjan, Boštjan J.; Burt, Felicity J.; Chan, Paul K. S.; Chouhy, Diego; Combrinck, Catharina E.; Coutlée, François; Estrade, Christine; Ferenczy, Alex; Fiander, Alison; Franco, Eduardo L.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Giri, Adriana A.; González, Joaquín Víctor; Gröning, Arndt; Heidrich, Kerstin; Hibbitts, Sam; Hošnjak, Lea; Luk, Tommy N. M.; Marinic, Karina; Matsukura, Toshihiko; Neumann, Anna; Oštrbenk, Anja; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Richardson, Harriet; Sagadin, Martin; Sahli, Roland; Seedat, Riaz Y.; Seme, Katja; Severini, Alberto; Sinchi, Jessica L.; Smahelova, Jana; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Tachezy, Ruth; Tohme, Sarah; Uloza, Virgilijus; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Wong, Yong Wee; Židovec Lepej, Snježana; Burk, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV6) is the major etiological agent of anogenital warts and laryngeal papillomas and has been included in both the quadrivalent and nonavalent prophylactic HPV vaccines. This study investigated the global genomic diversity of HPV6, using 724 isolates and 190 complete genomes from six continents, and the association of HPV6 genomic variants with geographical location, anatomical site of infection/disease, and gender. Initially, a 2,800-bp E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment was sequenced from 492/530 (92.8%) HPV6-positive samples collected for this study. Among them, 130 exhibited at least one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), indel, or amino acid change in the E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment and were sequenced in full. A global alignment and maximum likelihood tree of 190 complete HPV6 genomes (130 fully sequenced in this study and 60 obtained from sequence repositories) revealed two variant lineages, A and B, and five B sublineages: B1, B2, B3, B4, and B5. HPV6 (sub)lineage-specific SNPs and a 960-bp representative region for whole-genome-based phylogenetic clustering within the L2 open reading frame were identified. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that lineage B predominated globally. Sublineage B3 was more common in Africa and North and South America, and lineage A was more common in Asia. Sublineages B1 and B3 were associated with anogenital infections, indicating a potential lesion-specific predilection of some HPV6 sublineages. Females had higher odds for infection with sublineage B3 than males. In conclusion, a global HPV6 phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two variant lineages and five sublineages, showing some degree of ethnogeographic, gender, and/or disease predilection in their distribution. IMPORTANCE This study established the largest database of globally circulating HPV6 genomic variants and contributed a total of 130 new, complete HPV6 genome sequences to available sequence repositories. Two HPV

  12. Metabolite-based genome-wide association studies in plants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie

    2015-04-01

    The plant metabolome is the readout of plant physiological status and is regarded as the bridge between the genome and the phenome of plants. Unraveling the natural variation and the underlying genetic basis of plant metabolism has received increasing interest from plant biologists. Enabled by the recent advances in high-throughput profiling and genotyping technologies, metabolite-based genome-wide association study (mGWAS) has emerged as a powerful alternative forward genetics strategy to dissect the genetic and biochemical bases of metabolism in model and crop plants. In this review, recent progress and applications of mGWAS in understanding the genetic control of plant metabolism and in interactive functional genomics and metabolomics are presented. Further directions and perspectives of mGWAS in plants are also discussed. PMID:25637954

  13. Genome-wide examination of myoblast cell cycle withdrawal duringdifferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xun; Collier, John Michael; Hlaing, Myint; Zhang, Leanne; Delshad, Elizabeth H.; Bristow, James; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2002-12-02

    Skeletal and cardiac myocytes cease division within weeks of birth. Although skeletal muscle retains limited capacity for regeneration through recruitment of satellite cells, resident populations of adult myocardial stem cells have not been identified. Because cell cycle withdrawal accompanies myocyte differentiation, we hypothesized that C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line previously used to characterize myocyte differentiation, also would provide a model for studying cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. C2C12 cells were differentiated in culture medium containing horse serum and harvested at various time points to characterize the expression profiles of known cell cycle and myogenic regulatory factors by immunoblot analysis. BrdU incorporation decreased dramatically in confluent cultures 48 hr after addition of horse serum, as cells started to form myotubes. This finding was preceded by up-regulation of MyoD, followed by myogenin, and activation of Bcl-2. Cyclin D1 was expressed in proliferating cultures and became undetectable in cultures containing 40 percent fused myotubes, as levels of p21(WAF1/Cip1) increased and alpha-actin became detectable. Because C2C12 myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle during myocyte differentiation following a course that recapitulates this process in vivo, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify other gene products involved in this process. Using microarrays containing approximately 10,000 minimally redundant mouse sequences that map to the UniGene database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, we compared gene expression profiles between proliferating, differentiating, and differentiated C2C12 cells and verified candidate genes demonstrating differential expression by RT-PCR. Cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed groups of gene products involved in cell cycle withdrawal, muscle differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, we identified several genes, including DDAH2 and Ly

  14. Genomic portfolio of Merkel cell carcinoma as determined by comprehensive genomic profiling: implications for targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R; Tomson, Brett N; Elkin, Sheryl K; Marchlik, Erica; Carter, Jennifer L; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-04-26

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an ultra-rare cutaneous neuroendocrine cancer for which approved treatment options are lacking. To better understand potential actionability, the genomic landscape of Merkel cell cancers was assessed. The molecular aberrations in 17 patients with Merkel cell carcinoma were, on physician request, tested in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) laboratory (Foundation Medicine, Cambridge, MA) using next-generation sequencing (182 or 236 genes) and analyzed by N-of-One, Inc. (Lexington, MA). There were 30 genes harboring aberrations and 60 distinct molecular alterations identified in this patient population. The most common abnormalities involved the TP53 gene (12/17 [71% of patients]) and the cell cycle pathway (CDKN2A/B, CDKN2C or RB1) (12/17 [71%]). Abnormalities also were observed in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway (AKT2, FBXW7, NF1, PIK3CA, PIK3R1, PTEN or RICTOR) (9/17 [53%]) and DNA repair genes (ATM, BAP1, BRCA1/2, CHEK2, FANCA or MLH1) (5/17 [29%]). Possible cognate targeted therapies, including FDA-approved drugs, could be identified in most of the patients (16/17 [94%]). In summary, Merkel cell carcinomas were characterized by multiple distinct aberrations that were unique in the majority of analyzed cases. Most patients had theoretically actionable alterations. These results provide a framework for investigating tailored combinations of matched therapies in Merkel cell carcinoma patients. PMID:26981779

  15. Extraction of genomic DNA from yeasts for PCR-based applications.

    PubMed

    Lõoke, Marko; Kristjuhan, Kersti; Kristjuhan, Arnold

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a quick and low-cost genomic DNA extraction protocol from yeast cells for PCR-based applications. This method does not require any enzymes, hazardous chemicals, or extreme temperatures, and is especially powerful for simultaneous analysis of a large number of samples. DNA can be efficiently extracted from different yeast species (Kluyveromyces lactis, Hansenula polymorpha, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Candida albicans, Pichia pastoris, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The protocol involves lysis of yeast colonies or cells from liquid culture in a lithium acetate (LiOAc)-SDS solution and subsequent precipitation of DNA with ethanol. Approximately 100 nanograms of total genomic DNA can be extracted from 1 × 10(7) cells. DNA extracted by this method is suitable for a variety of PCR-based applications (including colony PCR, real-time qPCR, and DNA sequencing) for amplification of DNA fragments of ≤ 3500 bp. PMID:21548894

  16. Changing Histopathological Diagnostics by Genome-Based Tumor Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Michael; Buettner, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, tumors are classified by histopathological criteria, i.e., based on their specific morphological appearances. Consequently, current therapeutic decisions in oncology are strongly influenced by histology rather than underlying molecular or genomic aberrations. The increase of information on molecular changes however, enabled by the Human Genome Project and the International Cancer Genome Consortium as well as the manifold advances in molecular biology and high-throughput sequencing techniques, inaugurated the integration of genomic information into disease classification. Furthermore, in some cases it became evident that former classifications needed major revision and adaption. Such adaptations are often required by understanding the pathogenesis of a disease from a specific molecular alteration, using this molecular driver for targeted and highly effective therapies. Altogether, reclassifications should lead to higher information content of the underlying diagnoses, reflecting their molecular pathogenesis and resulting in optimized and individual therapeutic decisions. The objective of this article is to summarize some particularly important examples of genome-based classification approaches and associated therapeutic concepts. In addition to reviewing disease specific markers, we focus on potentially therapeutic or predictive markers and the relevance of molecular diagnostics in disease monitoring. PMID:24879454

  17. WormBase 2016: expanding to enable helminth genomic research

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Kevin L.; Bolt, Bruce J.; Cain, Scott; Chan, Juancarlos; Chen, Wen J.; Davis, Paul; Done, James; Down, Thomas; Gao, Sibyl; Grove, Christian; Harris, Todd W.; Kishore, Ranjana; Lee, Raymond; Lomax, Jane; Li, Yuling; Muller, Hans-Michael; Nakamura, Cecilia; Nuin, Paulo; Paulini, Michael; Raciti, Daniela; Schindelman, Gary; Stanley, Eleanor; Tuli, Mary Ann; Van Auken, Kimberly; Wang, Daniel; Wang, Xiaodong; Williams, Gary; Wright, Adam; Yook, Karen; Berriman, Matthew; Kersey, Paul; Schedl, Tim; Stein, Lincoln; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    WormBase (www.wormbase.org) is a central repository for research data on the biology, genetics and genomics of Caenorhabditis elegans and other nematodes. The project has evolved from its original remit to collect and integrate all data for a single species, and now extends to numerous nematodes, ranging from evolutionary comparators of C. elegans to parasitic species that threaten plant, animal and human health. Research activity using C. elegans as a model system is as vibrant as ever, and we have created new tools for community curation in response to the ever-increasing volume and complexity of data. To better allow users to navigate their way through these data, we have made a number of improvements to our main website, including new tools for browsing genomic features and ontology annotations. Finally, we have developed a new portal for parasitic worm genomes. WormBase ParaSite (parasite.wormbase.org) contains all publicly available nematode and platyhelminth annotated genome sequences, and is designed specifically to support helminth genomic research. PMID:26578572

  18. From evidence-based medicine to genomic medicine

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The concept of ‘evidence-based medicine’ dates back to mid-19th century or even earlier. It remains pivotal in planning, funding and in delivering the health care. Clinicians, public health practitioners, health commissioners/purchasers, health planners, politicians and public seek formal ‘evidence’ in approving any form of health care provision. Essentially ‘evidence-based medicine’ aims at the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. It is in fact the ‘personalised medicine’ in practice. Since the completion of the human genome project and the rapid accumulation of huge amount of data, scientists and physicians alike are excited on the prospect of ‘personalised health care’ based on individual’s genotype and phenotype. The first decade of the new millennium now witnesses the transition from ‘evidence-based medicine’ to the ‘genomic medicine’. The practice of medicine, including health promotion and prevention of disease, stands now at a wide-open road as the scientific and medical community embraces itself with the rapidly expanding and revolutionising field of genomic medicine. This article reviews the rapid transformation of modern medicine from the ‘evidence-based medicine’ to ‘genomic medicine’. PMID:18923934

  19. An integrated BAC/BIBAC-based physical and genetic map of the cotton genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrated genome-wide genetic and physical maps are crucial to many aspects of cotton genome research. We report a genome-wide BAC/BIBAC-based physical and genetic map of the upland cotton genome using a high-resolution and high-throughput capillary-based fingerprinting method. The map was constr...

  20. Genomic instability, driver genes and cell selection: Projections from cancer to stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Uri

    2015-04-01

    Cancer cells and stem cells share many traits, including a tendency towards genomic instability. Human cancers exhibit tumor-specific genomic aberrations, which often affect their malignancy and drug response. During their culture propagation, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) also acquire characteristic genomic aberrations, which may have significant impact on their molecular and cellular phenotypes. These aberrations vary in size from single nucleotide alterations to copy number alterations to whole chromosome gains. A prominent challenge in both cancer and stem cell research is to identify "driver aberrations" that confer a selection advantage, and "driver genes" that underlie the recurrence of these aberrations. Following principles that are already well-established in cancer research, candidate driver genes have also been suggested in hPSCs. Experimental validation of the functional role of such candidates can uncover whether these are bona fide driver genes. The identification of driver genes may bring us closer to a mechanistic understanding of the genomic instability of stem cells. Guided by terminologies and methodologies commonly applied in cancer research, such understanding may have important ramifications for both stem cell and cancer biology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stress as a fundamental theme in cell plasticity. PMID:25132386

  1. Systematic quantification of HDR and NHEJ reveals effects of locus, nuclease, and cell type on genome-editing

    PubMed Central

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Berman, Jennifer R.; Cooper, Samantha B.; Mayerl, Steven J.; Chan, Amanda H.; Zhang, Bin; Karlin-Neumann, George A.; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Precise genome-editing relies on the repair of sequence-specific nuclease-induced DNA nicking or double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homology-directed repair (HDR). However, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), an error-prone repair, acts concurrently, reducing the rate of high-fidelity edits. The identification of genome-editing conditions that favor HDR over NHEJ has been hindered by the lack of a simple method to measure HDR and NHEJ directly and simultaneously at endogenous loci. To overcome this challenge, we developed a novel, rapid, digital PCR–based assay that can simultaneously detect one HDR or NHEJ event out of 1,000 copies of the genome. Using this assay, we systematically monitored genome-editing outcomes of CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), Cas9 nickases, catalytically dead Cas9 fused to FokI, and transcription activator–like effector nuclease at three disease-associated endogenous gene loci in HEK293T cells, HeLa cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cells. Although it is widely thought that NHEJ generally occurs more often than HDR, we found that more HDR than NHEJ was induced under multiple conditions. Surprisingly, the HDR/NHEJ ratios were highly dependent on gene locus, nuclease platform, and cell type. The new assay system, and our findings based on it, will enable mechanistic studies of genome-editing and help improve genome-editing technology. PMID:27030102

  2. Acetaminophen-NAPQI Hepatotoxicity: A Cell Line Model System Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Ann M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Jenkins, Gregory D.; Batzler, Anthony J.; Pelleymounter, Linda L.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Ji, Yuan; Chai, Yubo; Nordgren, Kendra K. S.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the leading cause of acute hepatic failure in many developed nations. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is mediated by the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine (NAPQI). We performed a “discovery” genome-wide association study using a cell line–based model system to study the possible contribution of genomics to NAPQI-induced cytotoxicity. A total of 176 lymphoblastoid cell lines from healthy subjects were treated with increasing concentrations of NAPQI. Inhibiting concentration 50 values were determined and were associated with “glutathione pathway” gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genome-wide basal messenger RNA expression, as well as with 1.3 million genome-wide SNPs. A group of SNPs in linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 3 was highly associated with NAPQI toxicity. The p value for rs2880961, the SNP with the lowest p value, was 1.88 × 10−7. This group of SNPs mapped to a “gene desert,” but chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated binding of several transcription factor proteins including heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and HSF2, at or near rs2880961. These chromosome 3 SNPs were not significantly associated with variation in basal expression for any of the genome-wide genes represented on the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChip. We have used a cell line–based model system to identify a SNP signal associated with NAPQI cytotoxicity. If these observations are validated in future clinical studies, this SNP signal might represent a potential biomarker for risk of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear. PMID:21177773

  3. The genomic landscape of epithelioid sarcoma cell lines and tumours.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Farzad; Bashashati, Ali; Shumansky, Karey; Dickson, Brendan; Gokgoz, Nalan; Wunder, Jay S; Andrulis, Irene L; Lazar, Alexander J; Shah, Sohrab P; Huntsman, David G; Nielsen, Torsten O

    2016-01-01

    We carried out whole genome and transcriptome sequencing on four tumour/normal pairs of epithelioid sarcoma. These index cases were supplemented with whole transcriptome sequencing of three additional tumours and three cell lines. Unlike rhabdoid tumour (the other major group of SMARCB1-negative cancers), epithelioid sarcoma shows a complex genome with a higher mutational rate, comparable to that of ovarian carcinoma. Despite this mutational burden, SMARCB1 mutations remain the most frequently recurring event and are probably critical drivers of tumour formation. Several cases show heterozygous SMARCB1 mutations without inactivation of the second allele, and we explore this further in vitro. Finding CDKN2A deletions in our discovery cohort, we evaluated CDKN2A protein expression in a tissue microarray. Six out of 16 cases had lost CDKN2A in greater than or equal to 90% of cells, while the remaining cases had retained the protein. Expression analysis of epithelioid sarcoma cell lines by transcriptome sequencing shows a unique profile that does not cluster with any particular tissue type or with other SWI/SNF-aberrant lines. Evaluation of the levels of members of the SWI/SNF complex other than SMARCB1 revealed that these proteins are expressed as part of a residual complex, similarly to previously studied rhabdoid tumour lines. This residual SWI/SNF is susceptible to synthetic lethality and may therefore indicate a therapeutic opportunity. PMID:26365879

  4. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    TIEDJE, JAMES M; KONSTANTINIDIS, KOSTAS; WORDEN, MARK

    2014-01-08

    The aim of the work reported is to study Shewanella population genomics, and to understand the evolution, ecophysiology, and speciation of Shewanella. The tasks supporting this aim are: to study genetic and ecophysiological bases defining the core and diversification of Shewanella species; to determine gene content patterns along redox gradients; and to Investigate the evolutionary processes, patterns and mechanisms of Shewanella.

  5. A Novel SDHA-deficient Renal Cell Carcinoma Revealed by Comprehensive Genomic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Yakirevich, Evgeny; Ali, Siraj M; Mega, Anthony; McMahon, Caitlin; Brodsky, Alexander S; Ross, Jeffrey S; Allen, Justin; Elvin, Julia A; Safran, Howard; Resnick, Murray B

    2015-06-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an emerging provisional entity included in the 2013 International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification. Most genomic alterations in patients with SDH-deficient RCCs involve the SDHB subunit, and the associated renal tumors have loss of immunohistochemical SDHB expression and distinctive morphologic features. Renal tumors less commonly possess genomic alterations involving the SDHC and SDHD subunits, but no SDHA alterations have as yet been described. Here we identified a novel SDHA homozygous deletion in an aggressive variant of RCC diagnosed initially as unclassified type in a 54-year-old patient. A search for novel actionable mutations by comprehensive genomic profiling based on clinical next-generation sequencing evaluating entire coding regions of 315 cancer-related genes, including all SDH subunits, was performed. Sequencing identified a novel 17 kbp homozygous deletion of 9 SDHA exons on chromosome 5p15. SDHA and SDHB immunohistochemistry further confirmed that the homozygous deletion led to the loss of SDHA and SDHB protein expression. Histologically, the tumor had a mixed pattern of high-grade papillary and collecting duct carcinoma and distinctive pale eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions similar to those described in SDHB-deficient RCC. This is the first report that identifies SDHA inactivation in RCC. Additional studies utilizing comprehensive genomic profiling, immunohistochemistry, and careful morphologic evaluation are needed both prospectively and retrospectively to identify the group of RCCs harboring SDHA genomic alterations. PMID:25724004

  6. WormBase: methods for data mining and comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Harris, Todd W; Stein, Lincoln D

    2006-01-01

    WormBase is a comprehensive repository for information on Caenorhabditis elegans and related nematodes. Although the primary web-based interface of WormBase (http:// www.wormbase.org/) is familiar to most C. elegans researchers, WormBase also offers powerful data-mining features for addressing questions of comparative genomics, genome structure, and evolution. In this chapter, we focus on data mining at WormBase through the use of flexible web interfaces, custom queries, and scripts. The intended audience includes users wishing to query the database beyond the confines of the web interface or fetch data en masse. No knowledge of programming is necessary or assumed, although users with intermediate skills in the Perl scripting language will be able to utilize additional data-mining approaches. PMID:16988424

  7. Whole-genome duplication increases tumor cell sensitivity to MPS1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jemaà, Mohamed; Manic, Gwenola; Lledo, Gwendaline; Lissa, Delphine; Reynes, Christelle; Morin, Nathalie; Chibon, Frédéric; Sistigu, Antonella; Castedo, Maria; Vitale, Ilio; Kroemer, Guido; Abrieu, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that whole-genome duplication resulting in tetraploidy facilitates carcinogenesis by providing an intermediate and metastable state more prone to generate oncogenic aneuploidy. Here, we report a novel strategy to preferentially kill tetraploid cells based on the abrogation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) via the targeting of TTK protein kinase (better known as monopolar spindle 1, MPS1). The pharmacological inhibition as well as the knockdown of MPS1 kills more efficiently tetraploid cells than their diploid counterparts. By using time-lapse videomicroscopy, we show that tetraploid cells do not survive the aborted mitosis due to SAC abrogation upon MPS1 depletion. On the contrary diploid cells are able to survive up to at least two more cell cycles upon the same treatment. This effect might reflect the enhanced difficulty of cells with whole-genome doubling to tolerate a further increase in ploidy and/or an elevated level of chromosome instability in the absence of SAC functions. We further show that MPS1-inhibited tetraploid cells promote mitotic catastrophe executed by the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, as indicated by the loss of mitochondrial potential, the release of the pro-apoptotic cytochrome c from mitochondria, and the activation of caspases. Altogether, our results suggest that MPS1 inhibition could be used as a therapeutic strategy for targeting tetraploid cancer cells. PMID:26637805

  8. A high-throughput approach to identify genomic variants of bacterial metabolite producers at the single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Binder, Stephan; Schendzielorz, Georg; Stäbler, Norma; Krumbach, Karin; Hoffmann, Kristina; Bott, Michael; Eggeling, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method for visualizing intracellular metabolite concentrations within single cells of Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum that expedites the screening process of producers. It is based on transcription factors and we used it to isolate new L-lysine producing mutants of C. glutamicum from a large library of mutagenized cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). This high-throughput method fills the gap between existing high-throughput methods for mutant generation and genome analysis. The technology has diverse applications in the analysis of producer populations and screening of mutant libraries that carry mutations in plasmids or genomes. PMID:22640862

  9. A high-throughput approach to identify genomic variants of bacterial metabolite producers at the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method for visualizing intracellular metabolite concentrations within single cells of Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum that expedites the screening process of producers. It is based on transcription factors and we used it to isolate new L-lysine producing mutants of C. glutamicum from a large library of mutagenized cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). This high-throughput method fills the gap between existing high-throughput methods for mutant generation and genome analysis. The technology has diverse applications in the analysis of producer populations and screening of mutant libraries that carry mutations in plasmids or genomes. PMID:22640862

  10. FusoBase: an online Fusobacterium comparative genomic analysis platform

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Mia Yang; Heydari, Hamed; Jakubovics, Nick S.; Mahmud, Mahafizul Imran; Dutta, Avirup; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah; Mutha, Naresh V.R.; Tan, Shi Yang; Choo, Siew Woh

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium are anaerobic gram-negative bacteria that have been associated with a wide spectrum of human infections and diseases. As the biology of Fusobacterium is still not well understood, comparative genomic analysis on members of this species will provide further insights on their taxonomy, phylogeny, pathogenicity and other information that may contribute to better management of infections and diseases. To facilitate the ongoing genomic research on Fusobacterium, a specialized database with easy-to-use analysis tools is necessary. Here we present FusoBase, an online database providing access to genome-wide annotated sequences of Fusobacterium strains as well as bioinformatics tools, to support the expanding scientific community. Using our custom-developed Pairwise Genome Comparison tool, we demonstrate how differences between two user-defined genomes and how insertion of putative prophages can be identified. In addition, Pathogenomics Profiling Tool is capable of clustering predicted genes across Fusobacterium strains and visualizing the results in the form of a heat map with dendrogram. Database URL: http://fusobacterium.um.edu.my. PMID:25149689

  11. CFGP: a web-based, comparative fungal genomics platform.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongsun; Park, Bongsoo; Jung, Kyongyong; Jang, Suwang; Yu, Kwangyul; Choi, Jaeyoung; Kong, Sunghyung; Park, Jaejin; Kim, Seryun; Kim, Hyojeong; Kim, Soonok; Kim, Jihyun F; Blair, Jaime E; Lee, Kwangwon; Kang, Seogchan; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2008-01-01

    Since the completion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome sequencing project in 1996, the genomes of over 80 fungal species have been sequenced or are currently being sequenced. Resulting data provide opportunities for studying and comparing fungal biology and evolution at the genome level. To support such studies, the Comparative Fungal Genomics Platform (CFGP; http://cfgp.snu.ac.kr), a web-based multifunctional informatics workbench, was developed. The CFGP comprises three layers, including the basal layer, middleware and the user interface. The data warehouse in the basal layer contains standardized genome sequences of 65 fungal species. The middleware processes queries via six analysis tools, including BLAST, ClustalW, InterProScan, SignalP 3.0, PSORT II and a newly developed tool named BLASTMatrix. The BLASTMatrix permits the identification and visualization of genes homologous to a query across multiple species. The Data-driven User Interface (DUI) of the CFGP was built on a new concept of pre-collecting data and post-executing analysis instead of the 'fill-in-the-form-and-press-SUBMIT' user interfaces utilized by most bioinformatics sites. A tool termed Favorite, which supports the management of encapsulated sequence data and provides a personalized data repository to users, is another novel feature in the DUI. PMID:17947331

  12. InsectBase: a resource for insect genomes and transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chuanlin; Shen, Gengyu; Guo, Dianhao; Wang, Shuping; Ma, Xingzhou; Xiao, Huamei; Liu, Jinding; Zhang, Zan; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yiqun; Yu, Kaixiang; Huang, Shuiqing; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The genomes and transcriptomes of hundreds of insects have been sequenced. However, insect community lacks an integrated, up-to-date collection of insect gene data. Here, we introduce the first release of InsectBase, available online at http://www.insect-genome.com. The database encompasses 138 insect genomes, 116 insect transcriptomes, 61 insect gene sets, 36 gene families of 60 insects, 7544 miRNAs of 69 insects, 96,925 piRNAs of Drosophila melanogaster and Chilo suppressalis, 2439 lncRNA of Nilaparvata lugens, 22,536 pathways of 78 insects, 678,881 untranslated regions (UTR) of 84 insects and 160,905 coding sequences (CDS) of 70 insects. This release contains over 12 million sequences and provides search functionality, a BLAST server, GBrowse, insect pathway construction, a Facebook-like network for the insect community (iFacebook), and phylogenetic analysis of selected genes. PMID:26578584

  13. InsectBase: a resource for insect genomes and transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chuanlin; Shen, Gengyu; Guo, Dianhao; Wang, Shuping; Ma, Xingzhou; Xiao, Huamei; Liu, Jinding; Zhang, Zan; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yiqun; Yu, Kaixiang; Huang, Shuiqing; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The genomes and transcriptomes of hundreds of insects have been sequenced. However, insect community lacks an integrated, up-to-date collection of insect gene data. Here, we introduce the first release of InsectBase, available online at http://www.insect-genome.com. The database encompasses 138 insect genomes, 116 insect transcriptomes, 61 insect gene sets, 36 gene families of 60 insects, 7544 miRNAs of 69 insects, 96 925 piRNAs of Drosophila melanogaster and Chilo suppressalis, 2439 lncRNA of Nilaparvata lugens, 22 536 pathways of 78 insects, 678 881 untranslated regions (UTR) of 84 insects and 160 905 coding sequences (CDS) of 70 insects. This release contains over 12 million sequences and provides search functionality, a BLAST server, GBrowse, insect pathway construction, a Facebook-like network for the insect community (iFacebook), and phylogenetic analysis of selected genes. PMID:26578584

  14. Improvements to the GDB Human Genome Data Base.

    PubMed Central

    Fasman, K H; Letovsky, S I; Cottingham, R W; Kingsbury, D T

    1996-01-01

    Version 6.0 of the Human Genome Data Base introduces a number of significant improvements over previous releases of GDB. The most important of these are revised data representations for genes and genomic maps and a new curatorial model for the database. GDB 6.0 is the first major genomic database to provide read/write access directly to the scientific community, including capabilities for third-party annotation. The revised database can represent all major categories of genetic and physical maps, along with the underlying order and distance information used to construct them. The improved representation permits more sophisticated map queries to be posed and supports the graphical display of maps. In addition the new GDB has a richer model for gene information, better suited for supporting cross-references to databases describing gene function, structure, products, expression and associated phenotypes. PMID:8594601

  15. Single-Cell-Genomics-Facilitated Read Binning of Candidate Phylum EM19 Genomes from Geothermal Spring Metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Becraft, Eric D; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Murugapiran, Senthil K; Ohlsson, J Ingemar; Briggs, Brandon R; Kanbar, Jad; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Quake, Stephen R; Dong, Hailiang; Hedlund, Brian P; Swingley, Wesley D

    2016-02-01

    The vast majority of microbial life remains uncatalogued due to the inability to cultivate these organisms in the laboratory. This "microbial dark matter" represents a substantial portion of the tree of life and of the populations that contribute to chemical cycling in many ecosystems. In this work, we leveraged an existing single-cell genomic data set representing the candidate bacterial phylum "Calescamantes" (EM19) to calibrate machine learning algorithms and define metagenomic bins directly from pyrosequencing reads derived from Great Boiling Spring in the U.S. Great Basin. Compared to other assembly-based methods, taxonomic binning with a read-based machine learning approach yielded final assemblies with the highest predicted genome completeness of any method tested. Read-first binning subsequently was used to extract Calescamantes bins from all metagenomes with abundant Calescamantes populations, including metagenomes from Octopus Spring and Bison Pool in Yellowstone National Park and Gongxiaoshe Spring in Yunnan Province, China. Metabolic reconstruction suggests that Calescamantes are heterotrophic, facultative anaerobes, which can utilize oxidized nitrogen sources as terminal electron acceptors for respiration in the absence of oxygen and use proteins as their primary carbon source. Despite their phylogenetic divergence, the geographically separate Calescamantes populations were highly similar in their predicted metabolic capabilities and core gene content, respiring O2, or oxidized nitrogen species for energy conservation in distant but chemically similar hot springs. PMID:26637598

  16. Single-Cell-Genomics-Facilitated Read Binning of Candidate Phylum EM19 Genomes from Geothermal Spring Metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Becraft, Eric D.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Murugapiran, Senthil K.; Ohlsson, J. Ingemar; Briggs, Brandon R.; Kanbar, Jad; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Quake, Stephen R.; Dong, Hailiang; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of microbial life remains uncatalogued due to the inability to cultivate these organisms in the laboratory. This “microbial dark matter” represents a substantial portion of the tree of life and of the populations that contribute to chemical cycling in many ecosystems. In this work, we leveraged an existing single-cell genomic data set representing the candidate bacterial phylum “Calescamantes” (EM19) to calibrate machine learning algorithms and define metagenomic bins directly from pyrosequencing reads derived from Great Boiling Spring in the U.S. Great Basin. Compared to other assembly-based methods, taxonomic binning with a read-based machine learning approach yielded final assemblies with the highest predicted genome completeness of any method tested. Read-first binning subsequently was used to extract Calescamantes bins from all metagenomes with abundant Calescamantes populations, including metagenomes from Octopus Spring and Bison Pool in Yellowstone National Park and Gongxiaoshe Spring in Yunnan Province, China. Metabolic reconstruction suggests that Calescamantes are heterotrophic, facultative anaerobes, which can utilize oxidized nitrogen sources as terminal electron acceptors for respiration in the absence of oxygen and use proteins as their primary carbon source. Despite their phylogenetic divergence, the geographically separate Calescamantes populations were highly similar in their predicted metabolic capabilities and core gene content, respiring O2, or oxidized nitrogen species for energy conservation in distant but chemically similar hot springs. PMID:26637598

  17. A Comprehensive Toolbox for Genome Editing in Cultured Drosophila melanogaster Cells.

    PubMed

    Kunzelmann, Stefan; Böttcher, Romy; Schmidts, Ines; Förstemann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Custom genome editing has become an essential element of molecular biology. In particular, the generation of fusion constructs with epitope tags or fluorescent proteins at the genomic locus facilitates the analysis of protein expression, localization, and interaction partners at physiologic levels. Following up on our initial publication, we now describe a considerably simplified, more efficient, and readily scalable experimental workflow for PCR-based genome editing in cultured Drosophila melanogaster cells. Our analysis at the act5C locus suggests that PCR-based homology arms of 60 bp are sufficient to reach targeting efficiencies of up to 80% after selection; extension to 80 bp (PCR) or 500 bp (targeting vector) did not further improve the yield. We have expanded our targeting system to N-terminal epitope tags; this also allows the generation of cell populations with heterologous expression control of the tagged locus via the copper-inducible mtnDE promoter. We present detailed, quantitative data on editing efficiencies for several genomic loci that may serve as positive controls or benchmarks in other laboratories. While our first PCR-based editing approach offered only blasticidin-resistance for selection, we now introduce puromycin-resistance as a second, independent selection marker; it is thus possible to edit two loci (e.g., for coimmunoprecipitation) without marker removal. Finally, we describe a modified FLP recombinase expression plasmid that improves the efficiency of marker cassette FLP-out. In summary, our technique and reagents enable a flexible, robust, and cloning-free genome editing approach that can be parallelized for scale-up. PMID:27172193

  18. A Comprehensive Toolbox for Genome Editing in Cultured Drosophila melanogaster Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kunzelmann, Stefan; Böttcher, Romy; Schmidts, Ines; Förstemann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Custom genome editing has become an essential element of molecular biology. In particular, the generation of fusion constructs with epitope tags or fluorescent proteins at the genomic locus facilitates the analysis of protein expression, localization, and interaction partners at physiologic levels. Following up on our initial publication, we now describe a considerably simplified, more efficient, and readily scalable experimental workflow for PCR-based genome editing in cultured Drosophila melanogaster cells. Our analysis at the act5C locus suggests that PCR-based homology arms of 60 bp are sufficient to reach targeting efficiencies of up to 80% after selection; extension to 80 bp (PCR) or 500 bp (targeting vector) did not further improve the yield. We have expanded our targeting system to N-terminal epitope tags; this also allows the generation of cell populations with heterologous expression control of the tagged locus via the copper-inducible mtnDE promoter. We present detailed, quantitative data on editing efficiencies for several genomic loci that may serve as positive controls or benchmarks in other laboratories. While our first PCR-based editing approach offered only blasticidin-resistance for selection, we now introduce puromycin-resistance as a second, independent selection marker; it is thus possible to edit two loci (e.g., for coimmunoprecipitation) without marker removal. Finally, we describe a modified FLP recombinase expression plasmid that improves the efficiency of marker cassette FLP-out. In summary, our technique and reagents enable a flexible, robust, and cloning-free genome editing approach that can be parallelized for scale-up. PMID:27172193

  19. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    NEALSON, KENNETH H.

    2013-10-15

    laboratories. Applications: 1. Corrosion: Electron flow is often part of the corrosive process, and several studies were done in concert with this proposal with regard to the ability of EET-capable bacteria to enhance, inhibit, or detect corrosion. These included using EET-capable bacteria to detect corrosion in its earliest stages [5], to use corrosion-causing bacteria for the study of the microbe/mineral interface during corrosion [1], and to study the groups of microbes involved with corrosion of natural systems [19]. 2. Bioenergy and microbial fuel cells: The production of electricity by Shewanella was shown early in this program (several years ago) to be dependent on the genes for extracellular electron transport (EET), and applied work involved the testing of various strains and conditions for the optimization of current production by the shewanellae [11,14,16]. 3. Identification of shewanellae strains: Based on similarities seen in genomic comparisons, a rapid method was employed for distinguishing between shewanellae strains [17]. Interactions with other laboratories: This grant was an extension of a grant involving the so-called ?Shewanella Federation?, and as such, a number of our publications were joint with other members of this group. The groups included: 1. Pacific Northwest Laboratories ? 2. Oak Ridge National Labs 3. Michigan State University 4. University of Oklahoma 5. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC 6. Burnham Medical Research Institute, San Diego 7. J. Craig Venter Institute, San Diego Education: Graduate Students: Michael Waters, Ph.D. ? at NIST, Washington D.C. Lewis Hsu, Ph.D. ? at NRL, San Diego Howard Harris, Ph.D. ? Postdoc at University, France Everett Salas, Ph.D. ? Scientist at Chevron McLean, Jeffrey, Ph.D. ? Scientist at J. Craig Venter Institute McCrow, John, Ph.D. ? Scientist at J. Craig Venter Institute Postdocs: Mohamed El-Naggar ? Professor of Physics, USC Jinjun Kan ? Senior Researcher at Undergraduatges: During this year, we had

  20. CRISPR-based screening of genomic island excision events in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Selle, Kurt; Klaenhammer, Todd R.; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    Genomic analysis of Streptococcus thermophilus revealed that mobile genetic elements (MGEs) likely contributed to gene acquisition and loss during evolutionary adaptation to milk. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–CRISPR-associated genes (CRISPR-Cas), the adaptive immune system in bacteria, limits genetic diversity by targeting MGEs including bacteriophages, transposons, and plasmids. CRISPR-Cas systems are widespread in streptococci, suggesting that the interplay between CRISPR-Cas systems and MGEs is one of the driving forces governing genome homeostasis in this genus. To investigate the genetic outcomes resulting from CRISPR-Cas targeting of integrated MGEs, in silico prediction revealed four genomic islands without essential genes in lengths from 8 to 102 kbp, totaling 7% of the genome. In this study, the endogenous CRISPR3 type II system was programmed to target the four islands independently through plasmid-based expression of engineered CRISPR arrays. Targeting lacZ within the largest 102-kbp genomic island was lethal to wild-type cells and resulted in a reduction of up to 2.5-log in the surviving population. Genotyping of Lac− survivors revealed variable deletion events between the flanking insertion-sequence elements, all resulting in elimination of the Lac-encoding island. Chimeric insertion sequence footprints were observed at the deletion junctions after targeting all of the four genomic islands, suggesting a common mechanism of deletion via recombination between flanking insertion sequences. These results established that self-targeting CRISPR-Cas systems may direct significant evolution of bacterial genomes on a population level, influencing genome homeostasis and remodeling. PMID:26080436

  1. Use of genome-editing tools to treat sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Tasan, Ipek; Jain, Surbhi; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in genome-editing techniques have made it possible to modify any desired DNA sequence by employing programmable nucleases. These next-generation genome-modifying tools are the ideal candidates for therapeutic applications, especially for the treatment of genetic disorders like sickle cell disease (SCD). SCD is an inheritable monogenic disorder which is caused by a point mutation in the β-globin gene. Substantial success has been achieved in the development of supportive therapeutic strategies for SCD, but unfortunately there is still a lack of long-term universal cure. The only existing curative treatment is based on allogeneic stem cell transplantation from healthy donors; however, this treatment is applicable to a limited number of patients only. Hence, a universally applicable therapy is highly desirable. In this review, we will discuss the three programmable nucleases that are commonly used for genome-editing purposes: zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9). We will continue by exemplifying uses of these methods to correct the sickle cell mutation. Additionally, we will present induction of fetal globin expression as an alternative approach to cure sickle cell disease. We will conclude by comparing the three methods and explaining the concerns about their use in therapy. PMID:27250347

  2. Retinoic acid signaling and mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation: Cross talk between genomic and non-genomic effects of RA.

    PubMed

    Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active derivative of vitamin A, a fat-soluble vitamin, plays key roles in cell growth and differentiation by activating nuclear receptors, RARs (α, β and γ), which are ligand dependent regulators of transcription. The past years highlighted several novelties in the field that increased the complexity of RA effects. Indeed, in addition to its classical genomic effects, RA also has extranuclear and non-transcriptional effects. RA induces the rapid and transient activation of kinase cascades, which are integrated in the nucleus via the phosphorylation of RARs at a conserved serine residue located in the N-terminal domain and their coregulators. In order to investigate the relevance of RARs' phosphorylation in cell differentiation, mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells were used as a model. When treated with RA, these pluripotent cells give rise to neuronal cells. Cells invalidated for each RAR were generated as well as stable rescue lines expressing RARs mutated in phosphor acceptor sites. Such a strategy revealed that RA-induced neuronal differentiation involves the RARγ2 subtype and requires RARγ2 phosphorylation. Moreover, in gene expression profiling experiments, the phosphorylated form of RARγ2 was found to regulate a small subset of genes through binding a novel RA response element consisting of two direct repeats with a 7 base pair spacer. These new findings suggest an important role for RAR phosphorylation during cell differentiation, and pave the way for further investigations with other cell types and during embryonic development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics. PMID:24768681

  3. Combining magnetic sorting of mother cells and fluctuation tests to analyze genome instability during mitotic cell aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Melissa N; Maxwell, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an excellent model system for examining mechanisms and consequences of genome instability. Information gained from this yeast model is relevant to many organisms, including humans, since DNA repair and DNA damage response factors are well conserved across diverse species. However, S. cerevisiae has not yet been used to fully address whether the rate of accumulating mutations changes with increasing replicative (mitotic) age due to technical constraints. For instance, measurements of yeast replicative lifespan through micromanipulation involve very small populations of cells, which prohibit detection of rare mutations. Genetic methods to enrich for mother cells in populations by inducing death of daughter cells have been developed, but population sizes are still limited by the frequency with which random mutations that compromise the selection systems occur. The current protocol takes advantage of magnetic sorting of surface-labeled yeast mother cells to obtain large enough populations of aging mother cells to quantify rare mutations through phenotypic selections. Mutation rates, measured through fluctuation tests, and mutation frequencies are first established for young cells and used to predict the frequency of mutations in mother cells of various replicative ages. Mutation frequencies are then determined for sorted mother cells, and the age of the mother cells is determined using flow cytometry by staining with a fluorescent reagent that detects bud scars formed on their cell surfaces during cell division. Comparison of predicted mutation frequencies based on the number of cell divisions to the frequencies experimentally observed for mother cells of a given replicative age can then identify whether there are age-related changes in the rate of accumulating mutations. Variations of this basic protocol provide the means to investigate the influence of alterations in specific gene functions or specific environmental conditions on

  4. Comprehensive genomic characterization of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas profiled 279 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) to provide a comprehensive landscape of somatic genomic alterations. We find that human papillomavirus-associated (HPV) tumors are dominated by helicase domain mutations of the oncogene PIK3CA, novel alterations involving loss of TRAF3, and amplification of the cell cycle gene E2F1. Smoking-related HNSCCs demonstrate near universal loss of TP53 mutations and CDKN2A with frequent copy number alterations including a novel amplification of 11q22. A subgroup of oral cavity tumors with favorable clinical outcomes displayed infrequent CNAs in conjunction with activating mutations of HRAS or PIK3CA, coupled with inactivating mutations of CASP8, NOTCH1 and wild-type TP53. Other distinct subgroups harbored novel loss of function alterations of the chromatin modifier NSD1, Wnt pathway genes AJUBA and FAT1, and activation of oxidative stress factor NFE2L2, mainly in laryngeal tumors. Therapeutic candidate alterations were identified in the majority of HNSCC's. PMID:25631445

  5. Comprehensive genomic characterization of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    2015-01-29

    The Cancer Genome Atlas profiled 279 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) to provide a comprehensive landscape of somatic genomic alterations. Here we show that human-papillomavirus-associated tumours are dominated by helical domain mutations of the oncogene PIK3CA, novel alterations involving loss of TRAF3, and amplification of the cell cycle gene E2F1. Smoking-related HNSCCs demonstrate near universal loss-of-function TP53 mutations and CDKN2A inactivation with frequent copy number alterations including amplification of 3q26/28 and 11q13/22. A subgroup of oral cavity tumours with favourable clinical outcomes displayed infrequent copy number alterations in conjunction with activating mutations of HRAS or PIK3CA, coupled with inactivating mutations of CASP8, NOTCH1 and TP53. Other distinct subgroups contained loss-of-function alterations of the chromatin modifier NSD1, WNT pathway genes AJUBA and FAT1, and activation of oxidative stress factor NFE2L2, mainly in laryngeal tumours. Therapeutic candidate alterations were identified in most HNSCCs. PMID:25631445

  6. Genomic Correlates of Immune-Cell Infiltrates in Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Giannakis, Marios; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Shukla, Sachet A.; Qian, Zhi Rong; Cohen, Ofir; Nishihara, Reiko; Bahl, Samira; Cao, Yin; Amin-Mansour, Ali; Yamauchi, Mai; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Stewart, Chip; Rosenberg, Mara; Mima, Kosuke; Inamura, Kentaro; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Nowak, Jonathan A.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Chan, Andrew T.; Ng, Kimmie; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Getz, Gad; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Wu, Catherine J.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ogino, Shuji; Garraway, Levi A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Large-scale genomic characterization of tumors from prospective cohort studies may yield new insights into cancer pathogenesis. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 619 incident colorectal cancers (CRCs) and integrated the results with tumor immunity, pathology, and survival data. We identified recurrently mutated genes in CRC, such as BCL9L, RBM10, CTCF, and KLF5, that were not previously appreciated in this disease. Furthermore, we investigated the genomic correlates of immune-cell infiltration and found that higher neoantigen load was positively associated with overall lymphocytic infiltration, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), memory T cells, and CRC-specific survival. The association with TILs was evident even within microsatellite-stable tumors. We also found positive selection of mutations in HLA genes and other components of the antigen-processing machinery in TIL-rich tumors. These results may inform immunotherapeutic approaches in CRC. More generally, this study demonstrates a framework for future integrative molecular epidemiology research in colorectal and other malignancies. PMID:27149842

  7. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  8. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  9. CheckM: assessing the quality of microbial genomes recovered from isolates, single cells, and metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Donovan H.; Imelfort, Michael; Skennerton, Connor T.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Tyson, Gene W.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale recovery of genomes from isolates, single cells, and metagenomic data has been made possible by advances in computational methods and substantial reductions in sequencing costs. Although this increasing breadth of draft genomes is providing key information regarding the evolutionary and functional diversity of microbial life, it has become impractical to finish all available reference genomes. Making robust biological inferences from draft genomes requires accurate estimates of their completeness and contamination. Current methods for assessing genome quality are ad hoc and generally make use of a limited number of “marker” genes conserved across all bacterial or archaeal genomes. Here we introduce CheckM, an automated method for assessing the quality of a genome using a broader set of marker genes specific to the position of a genome within a reference genome tree and information about the collocation of these genes. We demonstrate the effectiveness of CheckM using synthetic data and a wide range of isolate-, single-cell-, and metagenome-derived genomes. CheckM is shown to provide accurate estimates of genome completeness and contamination and to outperform existing approaches. Using CheckM, we identify a diverse range of errors currently impacting publicly available isolate genomes and demonstrate that genomes obtained from single cells and metagenomic data vary substantially in quality. In order to facilitate the use of draft genomes, we propose an objective measure of genome quality that can be used to select genomes suitable for specific gene- and genome-centric analyses of microbial communities. PMID:25977477

  10. CheckM: assessing the quality of microbial genomes recovered from isolates, single cells, and metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Parks, Donovan H; Imelfort, Michael; Skennerton, Connor T; Hugenholtz, Philip; Tyson, Gene W

    2015-07-01

    Large-scale recovery of genomes from isolates, single cells, and metagenomic data has been made possible by advances in computational methods and substantial reductions in sequencing costs. Although this increasing breadth of draft genomes is providing key information regarding the evolutionary and functional diversity of microbial life, it has become impractical to finish all available reference genomes. Making robust biological inferences from draft genomes requires accurate estimates of their completeness and contamination. Current methods for assessing genome quality are ad hoc and generally make use of a limited number of "marker" genes conserved across all bacterial or archaeal genomes. Here we introduce CheckM, an automated method for assessing the quality of a genome using a broader set of marker genes specific to the position of a genome within a reference genome tree and information about the collocation of these genes. We demonstrate the effectiveness of CheckM using synthetic data and a wide range of isolate-, single-cell-, and metagenome-derived genomes. CheckM is shown to provide accurate estimates of genome completeness and contamination and to outperform existing approaches. Using CheckM, we identify a diverse range of errors currently impacting publicly available isolate genomes and demonstrate that genomes obtained from single cells and metagenomic data vary substantially in quality. In order to facilitate the use of draft genomes, we propose an objective measure of genome quality that can be used to select genomes suitable for specific gene- and genome-centric analyses of microbial communities. PMID:25977477