Science.gov

Sample records for genome studies progress

  1. Progress of genome wide association study in domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Domestic animals are invaluable resources for study of the molecular architecture of complex traits. Although the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for economically important traits in domestic animals has achieved remarkable results in recent decades, not all of the genetic variation in the complex traits has been captured because of the low density of markers used in QTL mapping studies. The genome wide association study (GWAS), which utilizes high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), provides a new way to tackle this issue. Encouraging achievements in dissection of the genetic mechanisms of complex diseases in humans have resulted from the use of GWAS. At present, GWAS has been applied to the field of domestic animal breeding and genetics, and some advances have been made. Many genes or markers that affect economic traits of interest in domestic animals have been identified. In this review, advances in the use of GWAS in domestic animals are described. PMID:22958308

  2. Identifying the genomic determinants of aging and longevity in human population studies: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Capri, Miriam; Franceschi, Claudio; Slagboom, P Eline

    2013-04-01

    Human lifespan variation is mainly determined by environmental factors, whereas the genetic contribution is 25-30% and expected to be polygenic. Two complementary fields go hand in hand in order to unravel the mechanisms of biological aging: genomic and biomarker research. Explorative and candidate gene studies of the human genome by genetic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic approaches have resulted in the identification of a limited number of interesting positive linkage regions, genes, and pathways that contribute to lifespan variation. The possibilities to further exploit these findings are rapidly increasing through the use of novel technologies, such as next-generation sequencing. Genomic research is progressively being integrated with biomarker studies on aging, including the application of (noninvasive) deep phenotyping and omics data - generated using novel technologies - in a wealth of studies in human populations. Hence, these studies may assist in obtaining a more holistic perspective on the role of the genome in aging and lifespan regulation. PMID:23423909

  3. Progress and Promise of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Human Complex Trait Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Stranger, Barbara E.; Stahl, Eli A.; Raj, Towfique

    2011-01-01

    Enormous progress in mapping complex traits in humans has been made in the last 5 yr. There has been early success for prevalent diseases with complex phenotypes. These studies have demonstrated clearly that, while complex traits differ in their underlying genetic architectures, for many common disorders the predominant pattern is that of many loci, individually with small effects on phenotype. For some traits, loci of large effect have been identified. For almost all complex traits studied in humans, the sum of the identified genetic effects comprises only a portion, generally less than half, of the estimated trait heritability. A variety of hypotheses have been proposed to explain why this might be the case, including untested rare variants, and gene–gene and gene–environment interaction. Effort is currently being directed toward implementation of novel analytic approaches and testing rare variants for association with complex traits using imputed variants from the publicly available 1000 Genomes Project resequencing data and from direct resequencing of clinical samples. Through integration with annotations and functional genomic data as well as by in vitro and in vivo experimentation, mapping studies continue to characterize functional variants associated with complex traits and address fundamental issues such as epistasis and pleiotropy. This review focuses primarily on the ways in which genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revolutionized the field of human quantitative genetics. PMID:21115973

  4. Genome-wide association study of corticobasal degeneration identifies risk variants shared with progressive supranuclear palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kouri, Naomi; Ross, Owen A.; Dombroski, Beth; Younkin, Curtis S.; Serie, Daniel J.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Baker, Matthew; Finch, Ni Cole A.; Yoon, Hyejin; Kim, Jungsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; McLean, Catriona A.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Spina, Salvatore; Cantwell, Laura B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Grafman, Jordan; Huey, Edward D.; Ryung Han, Mi; Beecher, Sherry; Geller, Evan T.; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Roeber, Sigrun; Gearing, Marla; Juncos, Jorge L.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Grossman, Murray; Hurtig, Howard I.; Gross, Rachel G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.; Wenning, Gregor K.; White, Charles L.; Höglinger, Günter U.; Müller, Ulrich; Devlin, Bernie; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Crook, Julia; Parisi, Joseph E.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Josephs, Keith A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Litvan, Irene; Younkin, Steven G.; Wang, Li-San; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Rademakers, Rosa; Hakonarsen, Hakon; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting movement and cognition, definitively diagnosed only at autopsy. Here, we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in CBD cases (n=152) and 3,311 controls, and 67 CBD cases and 439 controls in a replication stage. Associations with meta-analysis were 17q21 at MAPT (P=1.42 × 10−12), 8p12 at lnc-KIF13B-1, a long non-coding RNA (rs643472; P=3.41 × 10−8), and 2p22 at SOS1 (rs963731; P=1.76 × 10−7). Testing for association of CBD with top progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) GWAS single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified associations at MOBP (3p22; rs1768208; P=2.07 × 10−7) and MAPT H1c (17q21; rs242557; P=7.91 × 10−6). We previously reported SNP/transcript level associations with rs8070723/MAPT, rs242557/MAPT, and rs1768208/MOBP and herein identified association with rs963731/SOS1. We identify new CBD susceptibility loci and show that CBD and PSP share a genetic risk factor other than MAPT at 3p22 MOBP (myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic protein). PMID:26077951

  5. Genome-wide association study of corticobasal degeneration identifies risk variants shared with progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Kouri, Naomi; Ross, Owen A; Dombroski, Beth; Younkin, Curtis S; Serie, Daniel J; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Baker, Matthew; Finch, Ni Cole A; Yoon, Hyejin; Kim, Jungsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; McLean, Catriona A; Ghetti, Bernardino; Spina, Salvatore; Cantwell, Laura B; Farlow, Martin R; Grafman, Jordan; Huey, Edward D; Ryung Han, Mi; Beecher, Sherry; Geller, Evan T; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Roeber, Sigrun; Gearing, Marla; Juncos, Jorge L; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Grossman, Murray; Hurtig, Howard I; Gross, Rachel G; Arnold, Steven E; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M; Wenning, Gregor K; White, Charles L; Höglinger, Günter U; Müller, Ulrich; Devlin, Bernie; Golbe, Lawrence I; Crook, Julia; Parisi, Joseph E; Boeve, Bradley F; Josephs, Keith A; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Litvan, Irene; Younkin, Steven G; Wang, Li-San; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Rademakers, Rosa; Hakonarsen, Hakon; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting movement and cognition, definitively diagnosed only at autopsy. Here, we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in CBD cases (n=152) and 3,311 controls, and 67 CBD cases and 439 controls in a replication stage. Associations with meta-analysis were 17q21 at MAPT (P=1.42 × 10(-12)), 8p12 at lnc-KIF13B-1, a long non-coding RNA (rs643472; P=3.41 × 10(-8)), and 2p22 at SOS1 (rs963731; P=1.76 × 10(-7)). Testing for association of CBD with top progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) GWAS single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified associations at MOBP (3p22; rs1768208; P=2.07 × 10(-7)) and MAPT H1c (17q21; rs242557; P=7.91 × 10(-6)). We previously reported SNP/transcript level associations with rs8070723/MAPT, rs242557/MAPT, and rs1768208/MOBP and herein identified association with rs963731/SOS1. We identify new CBD susceptibility loci and show that CBD and PSP share a genetic risk factor other than MAPT at 3p22 MOBP (myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic protein). PMID:26077951

  6. Genome-Wide Association Studies: Progress in Identifying Genetic Biomarkers in Common, Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Lindquist, Ingrid E.; Mudge, Joann; Beavis, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Novel, comprehensive approaches for biomarker discovery and validation are urgently needed. One particular area of methodologic need is for discovery of novel genetic biomarkers in complex diseases and traits. Here, we review recent successes in the use of genome wide association (GWA) approaches to identify genetic biomarkers in common human diseases and traits. Such studies are yielding initial insights into the allelic architecture of complex traits. In general, it appears that complex diseases are associated with many common polymorphisms, implying profound genetic heterogeneity between affected individuals. PMID:19662211

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple novel loci associated with disease progression in subjects with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Hu, X; Pickering, E H; Hall, S K; Naik, S; Liu, Y C; Soares, H; Katz, E; Paciga, S A; Liu, W; Aisen, P S; Bales, K R; Samad, T A; John, S L

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia among the elderly population; however, knowledge about genetic risk factors involved in disease progression is limited. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using clinical decline as measured by changes in the Clinical Dementia Rating-sum of boxes as a quantitative trait to test for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were associated with the rate of progression in 822 Caucasian subjects of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI). There was no significant association with disease progress for any of the recently identified disease susceptibility variants in CLU, CR1, PICALM, BIN1, EPHA1, MS4A6A, MS4A4E or CD33 following multiple testing correction. We did, however, identify multiple novel loci that reached genome-wide significance at the 0.01 level. These top variants (rs7840202 at chr8 in UBR5: P=4.27 × 10(-14); rs11637611 with a cluster of SNPs at chr15q23 close to the Tay-Sachs disease locus: P=1.07 × 10(-15); and rs12752888 at chr1: P=3.08 × 10(-11)) were also associated with a significant decline in cognition as well as the conversion of subjects with MCI to a diagnosis of AD. Taken together, these variants define approximately 16.6% of the MCI sub-population with a faster rate of decline independent of the other known disease risk factors. In addition to providing new insights into protein pathways that may be involved with the progress to AD in MCI subjects, these variants if further validated may enable the identification of a more homogeneous population of subjects at an earlier stage of disease for testing novel hypotheses and/or therapies in the clinical setting. PMID:22833209

  8. Mosquito genomics: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Severson, David W; Behura, Susanta K

    2012-01-01

    The whole-genome sequencing of mosquitoes has facilitated our understanding of fundamental biological processes at their basic molecular levels and holds potential for application to mosquito control and prevention of mosquito-borne disease transmission. Draft genome sequences are available for Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus. Collectively, these represent the major vectors of African malaria, dengue fever and yellow fever viruses, and lymphatic filariasis, respectively. Rapid advances in genome technologies have revealed detailed information on genome architecture as well as phenotype-specific transcriptomics and proteomics. These resources allow for detailed comparative analyses within and across populations as well as species. Next-generation sequencing technologies will likely promote a proliferation of genome sequences for additional mosquito species as well as for individual insects. Here we review the current status of genome research in mosquitoes and identify potential areas for further investigations. PMID:21942845

  9. Current Progress in Sports Genomics.

    PubMed

    Ahmetov, Ildus I; Fedotovskaya, Olga N

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of athletic performance is an important step in the development of methods for talent identification in sport. Research concerned with molecular predictors has highlighted a number of potentially important DNA polymorphisms contributing to predisposition to success in certain types of sport. This review summarizes the evidence and mechanistic insights on the associations between DNA polymorphisms and athletic performance. A literature search (period: 1997-2014) revealed that at least 120 genetic markers are linked to elite athlete status (77 endurance-related genetic markers and 43 power/strength-related genetic markers). Notably, 11 (9%) of these genetic markers (endurance markers: ACE I, ACTN3 577X, PPARA rs4253778 G, PPARGC1A Gly482; power/strength markers: ACE D, ACTN3 Arg577, AMPD1 Gln12, HIF1A 582Ser, MTHFR rs1801131 C, NOS3 rs2070744 T, PPARG 12Ala) have shown positive associations with athlete status in three or more studies, and six markers (CREM rs1531550 A, DMD rs939787 T, GALNT13 rs10196189 G, NFIA-AS1 rs1572312 C, RBFOX1 rs7191721 G, TSHR rs7144481 C) were identified after performing genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of African-American, Jamaican, Japanese, and Russian athletes. On the other hand, the significance of 29 (24%) markers was not replicated in at least one study. Future research including multicenter GWAS, whole-genome sequencing, epigenetic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic profiling and performing meta-analyses in large cohorts of athletes is needed before these findings can be extended to practice in sport. PMID:26231489

  10. A Multiancestral Genome-Wide Exome Array Study of Alzheimer Disease, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jason A.; Wang, Qing; Davis-Turak, Jeremy; Li, Yun; Karydas, Anna M.; Hsu, Sandy C.; Sears, Renee L.; Chatzopoulou, Doxa; Huang, Alden Y.; Wojta, Kevin J.; Klein, Eric; Lee, Jason; Beekly, Duane L.; Boxer, Adam; Faber, Kelley M.; Haase, Claudia M.; Miller, Josh; Poon, Wayne W.; Rosen, Ami; Rosen, Howard; Sapozhnikova, Anna; Shapira, Jill; Varpetian, Arousiak; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Levenson, Robert W.; Levey, Allan I.; Kukull, Walter A.; Mendez, Mario F.; Ringman, John; Chui, Helena; Cotman, Carl; DeCarli, Charles; Miller, Bruce L.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Coppola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Previous studies have indicated a heritable component of the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). However, few have examined the contribution of low-frequency coding variants on a genome-wide level. OBJECTIVE To identify low-frequency coding variants that affect susceptibility to AD, FTD, and PSP. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We used the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip array to genotype a large number of variants (most of which are low-frequency coding variants) in a cohort of patients with neurodegenerative disease (224 with AD, 168 with FTD, and 48 with PSP) and in 224 control individuals without dementia enrolled between 2005–2012 from multiple centers participating in the Genetic Investigation in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease (GIFT) Study. An additional multiancestral replication cohort of 240 patients with AD and 240 controls without dementia was used to validate suggestive findings. Variant-level association testing and gene-based testing were performed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Statistical association of genetic variants with clinical diagnosis of AD, FTD, and PSP. RESULTS Genetic variants typed by the exome array explained 44%, 53%, and 57% of the total phenotypic variance of AD, FTD, and PSP, respectively. An association with the known AD gene ABCA7 was replicated in several ancestries (discovery P = .0049, European P = .041, African American P = .043, and Asian P = .027), suggesting that exonic variants within this gene modify AD susceptibility. In addition, 2 suggestive candidate genes, DYSF (P = 5.53 × 10−5) and PAXIP1 (P = 2.26 × 10−4), were highlighted in patients with AD and differentially expressed in AD brain. Corroborating evidence from other exome array studies and gene expression data points toward potential involvement of these genes in the pathogenesis of AD. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Low

  11. DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, David

    2009-03-12

    dominated how sequencing was done in the last decade is being replaced by a variety of new processes and sequencing instruments. The JGI, with an increasing number of next-generation sequencers, whose throughput is 100- to 1,000-fold greater than the Sanger capillary-based sequencers, is increasingly focused in new directions on projects of scale and complexity not previously attempted. These new directions for the JGI come, in part, from the 2008 National Research Council report on the goals of the National Plant Genome Initiative as well as the 2007 National Research Council report on the New Science of Metagenomics. Both reports outline a crucial need for systematic large-scale surveys of the plant and microbial components of the biosphere as well as an increasing need for large-scale analysis capabilities to meet the challenge of converting sequence data into knowledge. The JGI is extensively discussed in both reports as vital to progress in these fields of major national interest. JGI's future plan for plants and microbes includes a systematic approach for investigation of these organisms at a scale requiring the special capabilities of the JGI to generate, manage, and analyze the datasets. JGI will generate and provide not only community access to these plant and microbial datasets, but also the tools for analyzing them. These activities will produce essential knowledge that will be needed if we are to be able to respond to the world's energy and environmental challenges. As the JGI Plant and Microbial programs advance, the JGI as a user facility is also evolving. The Institute has been highly successful in bending its technical and analytical skills to help users solve large complex problems of major importance, and that effort will continue unabated. The JGI will increasingly move from a central focus on 'one-off' user projects coming from small user communities to much larger scale projects driven by systematic and problem-focused approaches to selection of

  12. Poultry Genome Sequences: Progress and Outstanding Challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first build of the chicken genome sequence appeared in March 2004 – the first genome sequence of any animal agriculture species. That sequence was done primarily by whole genome shotgun Sanger sequencing, along with the use of an extensive BAC contig-based physical map to assemble the sequence ...

  13. Overcoming Barriers to Progress in Exercise Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Claude

    2011-01-01

    This commentary focuses on the issues of statistical power, the usefulness of hypothesis-free approaches such as in genome-wide association explorations, the necessity of expanding the research beyond common DNA variants, the advantage of combining transcriptomics with genomics, and the complexities inherent to the search for links between genotype and phenotype in exercise genomics research. PMID:21697717

  14. Comprehensive nucleosome mapping of the human genome in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Druliner, Brooke R.; Vera, Daniel; Johnson, Ruth; Ruan, Xiaoyang; Apone, Lynn M.; Dimalanta, Eileen T.; Stewart, Fiona J.; Boardman, Lisa; Dennis, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Altered chromatin structure is a hallmark of cancer, and inappropriate regulation of chromatin structure may represent the origin of transformation. Important studies have mapped human nucleosome distributions genome wide, but the role of chromatin structure in cancer progression has not been addressed. We developed a MNase-Transcription Start Site Sequence Capture method (mTSS-seq) to map the nucleosome distribution at human transcription start sites genome-wide in primary human lung and colon adenocarcinoma tissue. Here, we confirm that nucleosome redistribution is an early, widespread event in lung (LAC) and colon (CRC) adenocarcinoma. These altered nucleosome architectures are consistent between LAC and CRC patient samples indicating that they may serve as important early adenocarcinoma markers. We demonstrate that the nucleosome alterations are driven by the underlying DNA sequence and potentiate transcription factor binding. We conclude that DNA-directed nucleosome redistributions are widespread early in cancer progression. We have proposed an entirely new hierarchical model for chromatin-mediated genome regulation. PMID:26735342

  15. Genomics and disease progression in IgA nephritis.

    PubMed

    Woo, Keng Thye; Lau, Yeow Kok; Choong, Hui Lin; Tan, Han Khim; Foo, Marjorie Wy; Lee, Evan Jc; Anantharaman, Vathsala; Lee, Grace Sl; Yap, Hui Kim; Yi, Zhao; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Wong, Kok Seng; Chan, Choong Meng

    2013-12-01

    Apart from clinical, histological and biochemical indices, genomics are now being employed to unravel the pathogenetic mechanisms in the disease progression of IgA nephritis (IgAN). The results of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism have been controversial. Those patients with the DD genotype seem to have a poorer prognosis. However, with high dose angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy, the ACE gene polymorphism status of a patient may no longer be a matter for concern as those with the DD genotype would also respond favourably to high dose ARB therapy. Association studies with gene sequencing and haplotypes have suggested that multiple genes are involved in the pathogenesis of IgAN. Some workers have reported a synergistic effect in the combined analysis of AGT-M235T and ACE I/D polymorphism. With the use of deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) microarray, tens of thousands of gene expressions genome-wide can be examined together simultaneously. A locus of familial IgAN has been described with strong evidence of linkage to IgAN1 on chromosome 6q22-23. Two other loci were reported at 4q26-31 and 17q12-22. DNA microarray techniques could also help in the identification of specific pathogenic genes that are up- or down-regulated and this may allow genome wide analyses of these genes and their role in the pathogenesis and progression of IgAN. Recently, using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) more loci for disease susceptibility for IgAN have been identified at 17p13, 8p23, 22q12, 1q32 and 6p21. PMID:24463829

  16. [Genome plasticity and catabolic potential of pseudomonas cepacia]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This progress report describes efforts directed at understanding the genomic structure of Pseudomonas cepacia. Variously reported are descriptions of the replicons in the genome, organization of macrorestriction fragments comprising the genome, use of a Tn-5- 751S to insertionally inactivate and map selected genes, construction of IS407 derivatives containing a trimethoprim resistance marker and SwaI site, and analysis of nucleotide sequences of IS401 and IS408.

  17. Human Genome Program Report. Part 1, Overview and Progress

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  18. Human genome program report. Part 1, overview and progress

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  19. Integrated genomic characterization of IDH1-mutant glioma malignant progression

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hanwen; Harmanci, Akdes Serin; Erson-Omay, E Zeynep; Li, Jie; Coşkun, Süleyman; Simon, Matthias; Krischek, Boris; Özduman, Koray; Omay, S Bülent; Sorensen, Eric A; Turcan, Şevin; Bakırcığlu, Mehmet; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Murray, Phillip B; Clark, Victoria E; Ercan-Sencicek, A Gulhan; Knight, James; Sencar, Leman; Altınok, Selin; Kaulen, Leon D; Gülez, Burcu; Timmer, Marco; Schramm, Johannes; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Henegariu, Octavian; Moliterno, Jennifer; Louvi, Angeliki; Chan, Timothy A; Tannheimer, Stacey L; Pamir, M Necmettin; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Bilguvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas represent approximately 30% of all central nervous system tumors and 80% of malignant brain tumors1. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the malignant progression of low-grade gliomas with mutations in IDH1 (encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase 1), we studied paired tumor samples from 41 patients, comparing higher-grade, progressed samples to their lower-grade counterparts. Integrated genomic analyses, including whole-exome sequencing and copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling, demonstrated nonlinear clonal expansion of the original tumors and identified oncogenic pathways driving progression. These include activation of the MYC and RTK-RAS-PI3K pathways and upregulation of the FOXM1- and E2F2-mediated cell cycle transitions, as well as epigenetic silencing of developmental transcription factor genes bound by Polycomb repressive complex 2 in human embryonic stem cells. Our results not only provide mechanistic insight into the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms driving glioma progression but also identify inhibition of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family as a potential therapeutic approach. PMID:26618343

  20. Studying Culicoides vectors of BTV in the post-genomic era: resources, bottlenecks to progress and future directions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are a major vector group responsible for the biological transmission of a wide variety of globally significant arboviruses, including bluetongue virus (BTV). In this review we examine current biological resources for the study of this genus, with a...

  1. The Cassava Genome: Current Progress, Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Prochnik, Simon; Marri, Pradeep Reddy; Desany, Brian; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Kodira, Chinnappa; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Rodriguez, Fausto; Fauquet, Claude; Tohme, Joseph; Harkins, Timothy; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Rounsley, Steve

    2012-03-01

    The starchy swollen roots of cassava provide an essential food source for nearly a billion people, as well as possibilities for bioenergy, yet improvements to nutritional content and resistance to threatening diseases are currently impeded. A 454-based whole genome shotgun sequence has been assembled, which covers 69% of the predicted genome size and 96% of protein-coding gene space, with genome finishing underway. The predicted 30,666 genes and 3,485 alternate splice forms are supported by 1.4 M expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Maps based on simple sequence repeat (SSR)-, and EST-derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) already exist. Thanks to the genome sequence, a high-density linkage map is currently being developed from a cross between two diverse cassava cultivars: one susceptible to cassava brown streak disease; the other resistant. An efficient genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach is being developed to catalog SNPs both within the mapping population and among diverse African farmer-preferred varieties of cassava. These resources will accelerate marker-assisted breeding programs, allowing improvements in disease-resistance and nutrition, and will help us understand the genetic basis for disease resistance. PMID:22523606

  2. 2013 Progress Report -- DOE Joint Genome Institute

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    In October 2012, we introduced a 10-Year Strategic Vision [http://bit.ly/JGI-Vision] for the Institute. A central focus of this Strategic Vision is to bridge the gap between sequenced genomes and an understanding of biological functions at the organism and ecosystem level. This involves the continued massive-scale generation of sequence data, complemented by orthogonal new capabilities to functionally annotate these large sequence data sets. Our Strategic Vision lays out a path to guide our decisions and ensure that the evolving set of experimental and computational capabilities available to DOE JGI users will continue to enable groundbreaking science.

  3. A Review of Catfish Genomics: Progress and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Catfish is one of the lower teleosts whose genome research is important for evolutionary genomics. As the major aquaculture species in the USA, its genome research also has practical and economical implications. Much progress has been made in recent years, including the development of large numbers of molecular markers, the construction of framework genetic linkage maps, the identification of putative markers involved in performance traits, and the development of genomic resources. Repetitive elements have been identified and characterized in the catfish genome that should facilitate physical analysis of the catfish genome. A large number of genes or full-length cDNAs have been analysed using genomic approaches, providing information on gene structure, gene evolution and gene expression in relation to functions. Catfish genome research has come to a stage when physical mapping through BAC contig construction is greatly demanded, in order to develop regional markers for QTL analysis and for large-scale comparative mapping. The current effort in large-scale EST analysis and type I marker mapping should further enhance research efficiency through comparative mapping. Candidate gene identification is being accelerated through the use of cDNA microarrays. PMID:18629126

  4. Research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yunsheng, Wang

    2016-08-01

    Population genomics, a new paradigm for population genetics, combine the concepts and techniques of genomics with the theoretical system of population genetics and improve our understanding of microevolution through identification of site-specific effect and genome-wide effects using genome-wide polymorphic sites genotypeing. With the appearance and improvement of the next generation high-throughput sequencing technology, the numbers of plant species with complete genome sequences increased rapidly and large scale resequencing has also been carried out in recent years. Parallel sequencing has also been done in some plant species without complete genome sequences. These studies have greatly promoted the development of population genomics and deepened our understanding of the genetic diversity, level of linking disequilibium, selection effect, demographical history and molecular mechanism of complex traits of relevant plant population at a genomic level. In this review, I briely introduced the concept and research methods of population genomics and summarized the research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing. I also discussed the prospect as well as existing problems of plant population genomics in order to provide references for related studies. PMID:27531607

  5. In situ quantification of genomic instability in breast cancer progression

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Chin, Koei; Gray, Joe W.; Lockett, Stephen J.

    2003-05-15

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of breast and other solid cancers. Presumably caused by critical telomere reduction, GI is responsible for providing the genetic diversity required in the multi-step progression of the disease. We have used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and 3D image analysis to quantify genomic instability cell-by-cell in thick, intact tissue sections of normal breast epithelium, preneoplastic lesions (usual ductal hyperplasia), ductal carcinona is situ or invasive carcinoma of the breast. Our in situ-cell by cell-analysis of genomic instability shows an important increase of genomic instability in the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma, followed by a reduction of instability in invasive carcinoma. This pattern suggests that the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma corresponds to telomere crisis and invasive carcinoma is a consequence of telomerase reactivation afertelomere crisis.

  6. White matter lesion progression: A genome-wide search for genetic influences

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Edith; Cavalieri, Margherita; Bis, Joshua C; DeCarli, Charles; Fornage, Myriam; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Srikanth, Velandai; Trompet, Stella; Verhaaren, Benjamin FJ; Wolf, Christiane; Yang, Qiong; Adams, Hieab HH; Amouyel, Philippe; Beiser, Alexa; Buckley, Brendan M; Callisaya, Michele; Chauhan, Ganesh; de Craen, Anton JM; Dufouil, Carole; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ford, Ian; Freudenberger, Paul; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Heiss, Gerardo; Hofman, Albert; Lumley, Thomas; Martinez, Oliver; Mazoyer, Bernard; Moran, Chris; Niessen, Wiro J.; Phan, Thanh; Psaty, Bruce M; Satizabal, Claudia L; Sattar, Naveed; Schilling, Sabrina; Shibata, Dean K; Slagboom, P Eline; Smith, Albert; Stott, David J; Taylor, Kent D; Thomson, Russell; Töglhofer, Anna M; Tzourio, Christophe; van Buchem, Mark; Wang, Jing; Westendorp, Rudi GJ; Windham, B Gwen; Vernooij, Meike W; Zijdenbos, Alex; Beare, Richard; Debette, Stéphanie; Ikram, M Arfan; Jukema, J Wouter; Launer, Lenore J; Longstreth, W T; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose White matter lesion (WML) progression on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is related to cognitive decline and stroke, but its determinants besides baseline WML burden are largely unknown. Here, we estimated heritability of WML progression, and sought common genetic variants associated with WML progression in elderly participants from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium. Methods Heritability of WML progression was calculated in the Framingham Heart Study. The genome-wide association study included 7773 elderly participants from 10 cohorts. To assess the relative contribution of genetic factors to progression of WML, we compared in seven cohorts risk models including demographics, vascular risk factors plus single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have been shown to be associated cross-sectionally with WML in the current and previous association studies. Results A total of 1085 subjects showed WML progression. The heritability estimate for WML progression was low at 6.5%, and no SNPs achieved genome-wide significance (p-value < 5×10−8). Four loci were suggestive (p-value < 1×10−5) of an association with WML progression: 10q24.32 (rs10883817, p=1.46×10−6); 12q13.13 (rs4761974, p=8.71×10−7); 20p12.1 (rs6135309, p=3.69×10−6); and 4p15.31 (rs7664442, p=2.26×10−6). Variants that have been previously related to WML explained only 0.8% to 11.7% more of the variance in WML progression than age, vascular risk factors and baseline WML burden. Conclusions Common genetic factors contribute little to the progression of age-related WML in middle-aged and older adults. Future research on determinants of WML progression should focus more on environmental, life-style or host-related biological factors. PMID:26451028

  7. Personal genomes in progress: from the Human Genome Project to the Personal Genome Project

    PubMed Central

    Lunshof (Co-first author), Jeantine E.; Bobe (Co-first author), Jason; Aach, John; Angrist, Misha; V. Thakuria, Joseph; Vorhaus, Daniel B.; R. Hoehe (Co-last author), Margret; Church (Co-last author), George M.

    2010-01-01

    The cost of a diploid human genome sequence has dropped from about $70M to $2000 since 2007- even as the standards for redundancy have increased from 7x to 40x in order to improve call rates. Coupled with the low return on investment for common single-nucleotide polymorphisms, this has caused a significant rise in interest in correlating genome sequences with comprehensive environmental and trait data (GET). The cost of electronic health records, imaging, and microbial, immunological, and behavioral data are also dropping quickly. Sharing such integrated GET datasets and their interpretations with a diversity of researchers and research subjects highlights the need for informed-consent models capable of addressing novel privacy and other issues, as well as for flexible data-sharing resources that make materials and data available with minimum restrictions on use. This article examines the Personal Genome Project's effort to develop a GET database as a public genomics resource broadly accessible to both researchers and research participants, while pursuing the highest standards in research ethics. PMID:20373666

  8. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.

    2016-07-01

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  9. Correlating tumor metabolic progression index measured by serial FDG PET-CT, apparent diffusion coefficient measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and blood genomics to patient’s outcome in advanced colorectal cancer: the CORIOLAN study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) may present various behaviours that define different courses of tumor evolution. There is presently no available tool designed to assess tumor aggressiveness, despite the fact that this is considered to have a major impact on patient outcome. Methods/Design CORIOLAN is a single-arm prospective interventional non-therapeutic study aiming mainly to assess the natural tumor metabolic progression index (TMPI) measured by serial FDG PET-CT without any intercurrent antitumor therapy as a prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) in patients with mCRC. Secondary objectives of the study aim to test the TMPI as a prognostic marker for progression-free survival (PFS), to assess the prognostic value of baseline tumor FDG uptake on PFS and OS, to compare TMPI to classical clinico-biological assessment of prognosis, and to test the prognostic value on OS and PFS of MRI-based apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and variation of vADC using voxel-based diffusion maps. Additionally, this study intends to identify genomic and epigenetic factors that correlate with progression of tumors and the OS of patients with mCRC. Consequently, this analysis will provide information about the signaling pathways that determine the natural and therapy-free course of the disease. Finally, it would be of great interest to investigate whether in a population of patients with mCRC, for which at present no known effective therapy is available, tumor aggressiveness is related to elevated levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and to patient outcome. Discussion Tumor aggressiveness is one of the major determinants of patient outcome in advanced disease. Despite its importance, supported by findings reported in the literature of extreme outcomes for patients with mCRC treated with chemotherapy, no objective tool allows clinicians to base treatment decisions on this factor. The CORIOLAN study will characterize TMPI using FDG-PET-based metabolic imaging

  10. Progress in TILLING as a tool for functional genomics and improvement of crops.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Hao, Liugen; Parry, Martin A J; Phillips, Andrew L; Hu, Yin-Gang

    2014-05-01

    Food security is a global concern and substantial yield increases in crops are required to feed the growing world population. Mutagenesis is an important tool in crop improvement and is free of the regulatory restrictions imposed on genetically modified organisms. Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING), which combines traditional chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput genome-wide screening for point mutations in desired genes, offers a powerful way to create novel mutant alleles for both functional genomics and improvement of crops. TILLING is generally applicable to genomes whether small or large, diploid or even allohexaploid, and shows great potential to address the major challenge of linking sequence information to the function of genes and to modulate key traits for plant breeding. TILLING has been successfully applied in many crop species and recent progress in TILLING is summarized below, especially on the developments in mutation detection technology, application of TILLING in gene functional studies and crop breeding. The potential of TILLING/EcoTILLING for functional genetics and crop improvement is also discussed. Furthermore, a small-scale forward strategy including backcross and selfing was conducted to release the potential mutant phenotypes masked in M2 (or M3) plants. PMID:24618006

  11. Adaptive radiations: From field to genomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Scott A.; Derieg, Nathan J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive radiations were central to Darwin's formation of his theory of natural selection, and today they are still the centerpiece for many studies of adaptation and speciation. Here, we review the advantages of adaptive radiations, especially recent ones, for detecting evolutionary trends and the genetic dissection of adaptive traits. We focus on Aquilegia as a primary example of these advantages and highlight progress in understanding the genetic basis of flower color. Phylogenetic analysis of Aquilegia indicates that flower color transitions proceed by changes in the types of anthocyanin pigments produced or their complete loss. Biochemical, crossing, and gene expression studies have provided a wealth of information about the genetic basis of these transitions in Aquilegia. To obtain both enzymatic and regulatory candidate genes for the entire flavonoid pathway, which produces anthocyanins, we used a combination of sequence searches of the Aquilegia Gene Index, phylogenetic analyses, and the isolation of novel sequences by using degenerate PCR and RACE. In total we identified 34 genes that are likely involved in the flavonoid pathway. A number of these genes appear to be single copy in Aquilegia and thus variation in their expression may have been key for floral color evolution. Future studies will be able to use these sequences along with next-generation sequencing technologies to follow expression and sequence variation at the population level. The genetic dissection of other adaptive traits in Aquilegia should also be possible soon as genomic resources such as whole-genome sequencing become available. PMID:19528644

  12. Adaptive radiations: from field to genomic studies.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Scott A; Derieg, Nathan J

    2009-06-16

    Adaptive radiations were central to Darwin's formation of his theory of natural selection, and today they are still the centerpiece for many studies of adaptation and speciation. Here, we review the advantages of adaptive radiations, especially recent ones, for detecting evolutionary trends and the genetic dissection of adaptive traits. We focus on Aquilegia as a primary example of these advantages and highlight progress in understanding the genetic basis of flower color. Phylogenetic analysis of Aquilegia indicates that flower color transitions proceed by changes in the types of anthocyanin pigments produced or their complete loss. Biochemical, crossing, and gene expression studies have provided a wealth of information about the genetic basis of these transitions in Aquilegia. To obtain both enzymatic and regulatory candidate genes for the entire flavonoid pathway, which produces anthocyanins, we used a combination of sequence searches of the Aquilegia Gene Index, phylogenetic analyses, and the isolation of novel sequences by using degenerate PCR and RACE. In total we identified 34 genes that are likely involved in the flavonoid pathway. A number of these genes appear to be single copy in Aquilegia and thus variation in their expression may have been key for floral color evolution. Future studies will be able to use these sequences along with next-generation sequencing technologies to follow expression and sequence variation at the population level. The genetic dissection of other adaptive traits in Aquilegia should also be possible soon as genomic resources such as whole-genome sequencing become available. PMID:19528644

  13. The complete genome sequence of a chronic atrophic gastritis Helicobacter pylori strain: Evolution during disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung D.; Kling-Bäckhed, Helene; Giannakis, Marios; Xu, Jian; Fulton, Robert S.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Cordum, Holland S.; Wang, Chunyan; Elliott, Glendoria; Edwards, Jennifer; Mardis, Elaine R.; Engstrand, Lars G.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori produces acute superficial gastritis in nearly all of its human hosts. However, a subset of individuals develops chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG), a condition characterized in part by diminished numbers of acid-producing parietal cells and increased risk for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Previously, we used a gnotobiotic transgenic mouse model with an engineered ablation of parietal cells to show that loss of parietal cells provides an opportunity for a H. pylori isolate from a patient with ChAG (HPAG1) to bind to, enter, and persist within gastric stem cells. This finding raises the question of how ChAG influences H. pylori genome evolution, physiology, and tumorigenesis. Here we describe the 1,596,366-bp HPAG1 genome. Custom HPAG1 Affymetrix GeneChips, representing 99.6% of its predicted ORFs, were used for whole-genome genotyping of additional H. pylori ChAG isolates obtained from Swedish patients enrolled in a case-control study of gastric cancer, as well as ChAG- and cancer-associated isolates from an individual who progressed from ChAG to gastric adenocarcinoma. The results reveal a shared gene signature among ChAG strains, as well as genes that may have been lost or gained during progression to adenocarcinoma. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling of HPAG1’s response to acid during in vitro growth indicates that genes encoding components of metal uptake and utilization pathways, outer membrane proteins, and virulence factors are among those associated with H. pylori’s adaptation to ChAG. PMID:16788065

  14. Research progress of genome editing and derivative technologies in plants.

    PubMed

    Qiwei, Shan; Caixia, Gao

    2015-10-01

    Genome editing technologies using engineered nucleases have been widely used in many model organisms. Genome editing with sequence-specific nuclease (SSN) creates DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the genomic target sites that are primarily repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathways, which can be employed to achieve targeted genome modifications such as gene mutations, insertions, replacements or chromosome rearrangements. There are three major SSNs─zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system. In contrast to ZFN and TALEN, which require substantial protein engineering to each DNA target, the CRISPR/Cas9 system requires only a change in the guide RNA. For this reason, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple, inexpensive and versatile tool for genome engineering. Furthermore, a modified version of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has been developed to recruit heterologous domains that can regulate endogenous gene expression, such as activation, depression and epigenetic regulation. In this review, we summarize the development and applications of genome editing technologies for basic research and biotechnology, as well as highlight challenges and future directions, with particular emphasis on plants. PMID:26496748

  15. Progress of targeted genome modification approaches in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Cardi, Teodoro; Neal Stewart, C

    2016-07-01

    Transgene integration in plants is based on illegitimate recombination between non-homologous sequences. The low control of integration site and number of (trans/cis)gene copies might have negative consequences on the expression of transferred genes and their insertion within endogenous coding sequences. The first experiments conducted to use precise homologous recombination for gene integration commenced soon after the first demonstration that transgenic plants could be produced. Modern transgene targeting categories used in plant biology are: (a) homologous recombination-dependent gene targeting; (b) recombinase-mediated site-specific gene integration; (c) oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis; (d) nuclease-mediated site-specific genome modifications. New tools enable precise gene replacement or stacking with exogenous sequences and targeted mutagenesis of endogeneous sequences. The possibility to engineer chimeric designer nucleases, which are able to target virtually any genomic site, and use them for inducing double-strand breaks in host DNA create new opportunities for both applied plant breeding and functional genomics. CRISPR is the most recent technology available for precise genome editing. Its rapid adoption in biological research is based on its inherent simplicity and efficacy. Its utilization, however, depends on available sequence information, especially for genome-wide analysis. We will review the approaches used for genome modification, specifically those for affecting gene integration and modification in higher plants. For each approach, the advantages and limitations will be noted. We also will speculate on how their actual commercial development and implementation in plant breeding will be affected by governmental regulations. PMID:27025856

  16. Bacterial genome reduction using the progressive clustering of deletions via yeast sexual cycling

    PubMed Central

    Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Kostylev, Maxim; Noskov, Vladimir N.; Wise, Kim S.; Karas, Bogumil J.; Stam, Jason; Montague, Michael G.; Hanly, Timothy J.; Enriquez, Nico J.; Ramon, Adi; Goldgof, Gregory M.; Richter, R. Alexander; Vashee, Sanjay; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Hutchison, Clyde A.; Gibson, Daniel G.; Smith, Hamilton O.; Glass, John I.; Venter, J. Craig

    2015-01-01

    The availability of genetically tractable organisms with simple genomes is critical for the rapid, systems-level understanding of basic biological processes. Mycoplasma bacteria, with the smallest known genomes among free-living cellular organisms, are ideal models for this purpose, but the natural versions of these cells have genome complexities still too great to offer a comprehensive view of a fundamental life form. Here we describe an efficient method for reducing genomes from these organisms by identifying individually deletable regions using transposon mutagenesis and progressively clustering deleted genomic segments using meiotic recombination between the bacterial genomes harbored in yeast. Mycoplasmal genomes subjected to this process and transplanted into recipient cells yielded two mycoplasma strains. The first simultaneously lacked eight singly deletable regions of the genome, representing a total of 91 genes and ∼10% of the original genome. The second strain lacked seven of the eight regions, representing 84 genes. Growth assay data revealed an absence of genetic interactions among the 91 genes under tested conditions. Despite predicted effects of the deletions on sugar metabolism and the proteome, growth rates were unaffected by the gene deletions in the seven-deletion strain. These results support the feasibility of using single-gene disruption data to design and construct viable genomes lacking multiple genes, paving the way toward genome minimization. The progressive clustering method is expected to be effective for the reorganization of any mega-sized DNA molecules cloned in yeast, facilitating the construction of designer genomes in microbes as well as genomic fragments for genetic engineering of higher eukaryotes. PMID:25654978

  17. Ancient population genomics and the study of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Parks, M.; Subramanian, S.; Baroni, C.; Salvatore, M. C.; Zhang, G.; Millar, C. D.; Lambert, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the study of ancient DNA (aDNA) has been greatly enhanced by the development of second-generation DNA sequencing technologies and targeted enrichment strategies. These developments have allowed the recovery of several complete ancient genomes, a result that would have been considered virtually impossible only a decade ago. Prior to these developments, aDNA research was largely focused on the recovery of short DNA sequences and their use in the study of phylogenetic relationships, molecular rates, species identification and population structure. However, it is now possible to sequence a large number of modern and ancient complete genomes from a single species and thereby study the genomic patterns of evolutionary change over time. Such a study would herald the beginnings of ancient population genomics and its use in the study of evolution. Species that are amenable to such large-scale studies warrant increased research effort. We report here progress on a population genomic study of the Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae). This species is ideally suited to ancient population genomic research because both modern and ancient samples are abundant in the permafrost conditions of Antarctica. This species will enable us to directly address many of the fundamental questions in ecology and evolution. PMID:25487332

  18. Challenges of flow-cytometric estimation of nuclear genome size in orchids, a plant group with both whole-genome and progressively partial endoreplication.

    PubMed

    Trávníček, Pavel; Ponert, Jan; Urfus, Tomáš; Jersáková, Jana; Vrána, Jan; Hřibová, Eva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Suda, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear genome size is an inherited quantitative trait of eukaryotic organisms with both practical and biological consequences. A detailed analysis of major families is a promising approach to fully understand the biological meaning of the extensive variation in genome size in plants. Although Orchidaceae accounts for ∼10% of the angiosperm diversity, the knowledge of patterns and dynamics of their genome size is limited, in part due to difficulties in flow cytometric analyses. Cells in various somatic tissues of orchids undergo extensive endoreplication, either whole-genome or partial, and the G1-phase nuclei with 2C DNA amounts may be lacking, resulting in overestimated genome size values. Interpretation of DNA content histograms is particularly challenging in species with progressively partial endoreplication, in which the ratios between the positions of two neighboring DNA peaks are lower than two. In order to assess distributions of nuclear DNA amounts and identify tissue suitable for reliable estimation of nuclear DNA content, we analyzed six different tissue types in 48 orchid species belonging to all recognized subfamilies. Although traditionally used leaves may provide incorrect C-values, particularly in species with progressively partial endoreplication, young ovaries and pollinaria consistently yield 2C and 1C peaks of their G1-phase nuclei, respectively, and are, therefore, the most suitable parts for genome size studies in orchids. We also provide new DNA C-values for 22 orchid genera and 42 species. Adhering to the proposed methodology would allow for reliable genome size estimates in this largest plant family. Although our research was limited to orchids, the need to find a suitable tissue with dominant 2C peak of G1-phase nuclei applies to all endopolyploid species. PMID:25929591

  19. Microenvironmental Heterogeneity Parallels Breast Cancer Progression: A Histology–Genomic Integration Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Natrajan, Rachael; Sailem, Heba; Mardakheh, Faraz K.; Arias Garcia, Mar; Tape, Christopher J.; Dowsett, Mitch; Bakal, Chris; Yuan, Yinyin

    2016-01-01

    Background The intra-tumor diversity of cancer cells is under intense investigation; however, little is known about the heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment that is key to cancer progression and evolution. We aimed to assess the degree of microenvironmental heterogeneity in breast cancer and correlate this with genomic and clinical parameters. Methods and Findings We developed a quantitative measure of microenvironmental heterogeneity along three spatial dimensions (3-D) in solid tumors, termed the tumor ecosystem diversity index (EDI), using fully automated histology image analysis coupled with statistical measures commonly used in ecology. This measure was compared with disease-specific survival, key mutations, genome-wide copy number, and expression profiling data in a retrospective study of 510 breast cancer patients as a test set and 516 breast cancer patients as an independent validation set. In high-grade (grade 3) breast cancers, we uncovered a striking link between high microenvironmental heterogeneity measured by EDI and a poor prognosis that cannot be explained by tumor size, genomics, or any other data types. However, this association was not observed in low-grade (grade 1 and 2) breast cancers. The prognostic value of EDI was superior to known prognostic factors and was enhanced with the addition of TP53 mutation status (multivariate analysis test set, p = 9 × 10−4, hazard ratio = 1.47, 95% CI 1.17–1.84; validation set, p = 0.0011, hazard ratio = 1.78, 95% CI 1.26–2.52). Integration with genome-wide profiling data identified losses of specific genes on 4p14 and 5q13 that were enriched in grade 3 tumors with high microenvironmental diversity that also substratified patients into poor prognostic groups. Limitations of this study include the number of cell types included in the model, that EDI has prognostic value only in grade 3 tumors, and that our spatial heterogeneity measure was dependent on spatial scale and tumor size. Conclusions To

  20. Progress of the rainbow trout reference genome assembly project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout are the most widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and an important model species for many research areas. Despite this importance, the complex nature of the rainbow trout genome (pseudotetraploid and high repeat content) has hindered the production of a high-quality refe...

  1. Genomic Data and Cooperation Result in Faster Progress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotypes for 38,416 markers of 5,335 Holstein bulls were combined with traditional evaluations to test predictive ability. Genomic evaluations were significantly (P < .0001) more accurate than official parent averages for all 27 traits tested. Squared correlations with future daughter deviations av...

  2. Invited review: Genomic selection in dairy cattle: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hayes, B J; Bowman, P J; Chamberlain, A J; Goddard, M E

    2009-02-01

    A new technology called genomic selection is revolutionizing dairy cattle breeding. Genomic selection refers to selection decisions based on genomic breeding values (GEBV). The GEBV are calculated as the sum of the effects of dense genetic markers, or haplotypes of these markers, across the entire genome, thereby potentially capturing all the quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contribute to variation in a trait. The QTL effects, inferred from either haplotypes or individual single nucleotide polymorphism markers, are first estimated in a large reference population with phenotypic information. In subsequent generations, only marker information is required to calculate GEBV. The reliability of GEBV predicted in this way has already been evaluated in experiments in the United States, New Zealand, Australia, and the Netherlands. These experiments used reference populations of between 650 and 4,500 progeny-tested Holstein-Friesian bulls, genotyped for approximately 50,000 genome-wide markers. Reliabilities of GEBV for young bulls without progeny test results in the reference population were between 20 and 67%. The reliability achieved depended on the heritability of the trait evaluated, the number of bulls in the reference population, the statistical method used to estimate the single nucleotide polymorphism effects in the reference population, and the method used to calculate the reliability. A common finding in 3 countries (United States, New Zealand, and Australia) was that a straightforward BLUP method for estimating the marker effects gave reliabilities of GEBV almost as high as more complex methods. The BLUP method is attractive because the only prior information required is the additive genetic variance of the trait. All countries included a polygenic effect (parent average breeding value) in their GEBV calculation. This inclusion is recommended to capture any genetic variance not associated with the markers, and to put some selection pressure on low

  3. Loss of photoreceptorness and gain of genomic alterations in retinoblastoma reveal tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Kooi, Irsan E.; Mol, Berber M.; Moll, Annette C.; van der Valk, Paul; de Jong, Marcus C.; de Graaf, Pim; van Mil, Saskia E.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y.N.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Kaspers, Gertjan L.; te Riele, Hein; Cloos, Jacqueline; Dorsman, Josephine C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Retinoblastoma is a pediatric eye cancer associated with RB1 loss or MYCN amplification (RB1+/+MYCNA). There are controversies concerning the existence of molecular subtypes within RB1−/− retinoblastoma. To test whether these molecular subtypes exist, we performed molecular profiling. Methods Genome-wide mRNA expression profiling was performed on 76 primary human retinoblastomas. Expression profiling was complemented by genome-wide DNA profiling and clinical, histopathological, and ex vivo drug sensitivity data. Findings RNA and DNA profiling identified major variability between retinoblastomas. While gene expression differences between RB1+/+MYCNA and RB1−/− tumors seemed more dichotomous, differences within the RB1−/− tumors were gradual. Tumors with high expression of a photoreceptor gene signature were highly differentiated, smaller in volume and diagnosed at younger age compared with tumors with low photoreceptor signature expression. Tumors with lower photoreceptor expression showed increased expression of genes involved in M-phase and mRNA and ribosome synthesis and increased frequencies of somatic copy number alterations. Interpretation Molecular, clinical and histopathological differences between RB1−/− tumors are best explained by tumor progression, reflected by a gradual loss of differentiation and photoreceptor expression signature. Since copy number alterations were more frequent in tumors with less photoreceptorness, genomic alterations might be drivers of tumor progression. Research in context Retinoblastoma is an ocular childhood cancer commonly caused by mutations in the RB1 gene. In order to determine optimal treatment, tumor subtyping is considered critically important. However, except for very rare retinoblastomas without an RB1 mutation, there are controversies as to whether subtypes of retinoblastoma do exist. Our study shows that retinoblastomas are highly diverse but rather than reflecting distinct tumor types with

  4. The Multifunctions of WD40 Proteins in Genome Integrity and Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caiguo; Zhang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic genome encodes numerous WD40 repeat proteins, which generally function as platforms of protein-protein interactions and are involved in numerous biological process, such as signal transduction, gene transcriptional regulation, protein modifications, cytoskeleton assembly, vesicular trafficking, DNA damage and repair, cell death and cell cycle progression. Among these diverse functions, genome integrity maintenance and cell cycle progression are extremely important as deregulation of them is clinically linked to uncontrolled proliferative diseases such as cancer. Thus, we mainly summarize and discuss the recent understanding of WD40 proteins and their molecular mechanisms linked to genome stability and cell cycle progression in this review, thereby demonstrating their pervasiveness and importance in cellular networks. PMID:25653723

  5. DOE project on genome mapping and sequencing. Progress report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.A.

    1992-12-31

    These efforts on the human genome project were initiated in September, 1990, to contribute towards completion of the human genome project physical mapping effort. In the original application, the authors proposed a novel strategy for constructing a physical map of human chromosome 11, based upon techniques derived in this group and by others. The original goals were to (1) produce a set of cosmid reference clones mapped to specific sites by high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization, (2) produce a set of associated STS sequences and PCR primers for each site, (3) isolate YAC clones corresponding to each STS and, (4) construct YAC contigs such that > 90% of the chromosome would be covered by contigs of 2 mb or greater. Since that time, and with the advent of new technology and reagents, the strategy has been modified slightly but still retains the same goals as originally proposed. The authors have added a project to produce chromosome 11-specific cDNAs and determine the map location and DNA sequence of a selected portion of them.

  6. Metabolite-based genome-wide association studies in plants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie

    2015-04-01

    The plant metabolome is the readout of plant physiological status and is regarded as the bridge between the genome and the phenome of plants. Unraveling the natural variation and the underlying genetic basis of plant metabolism has received increasing interest from plant biologists. Enabled by the recent advances in high-throughput profiling and genotyping technologies, metabolite-based genome-wide association study (mGWAS) has emerged as a powerful alternative forward genetics strategy to dissect the genetic and biochemical bases of metabolism in model and crop plants. In this review, recent progress and applications of mGWAS in understanding the genetic control of plant metabolism and in interactive functional genomics and metabolomics are presented. Further directions and perspectives of mGWAS in plants are also discussed. PMID:25637954

  7. Final progress report, Construction of a genome-wide highly characterized clone resource for genome sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Nierman, William C.

    2000-02-14

    At TIGR, the human Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) end sequencing and trimming were with an overall sequencing success rate of 65%. CalTech human BAC libraries A, B, C and D as well as Roswell Park Cancer Institute's library RPCI-11 were used. To date, we have generated >300,000 end sequences from >186,000 human BAC clones with an average read length {approx}460 bp for a total of 141 Mb covering {approx}4.7% of the genome. Over sixty percent of the clones have BAC end sequences (BESs) from both ends representing over five-fold coverage of the genome by the paired-end clones. The average phred Q20 length is {approx}400 bp. This high accuracy makes our BESs match the human finished sequences with an average identity of 99% and a match length of 450 bp, and a frequency of one match per 12.8 kb contig sequence. Our sample tracking has ensured a clone tracking accuracy of >90%, which gives researchers a high confidence in (1) retrieving the right clone from the BA C libraries based on the sequence matches; and (2) building a minimum tiling path of sequence-ready clones across the genome and genome assembly scaffolds.

  8. Progressive genomic instability in the FVB/KrasLA2 mouse model of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    To, Minh D.; Quigley, David A.; Mao, Jian-Hua; Rosario, Reyno Del; Hsu, Jeff; Hodgson, Graeme; Jacks, Tyler; Balmain, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in DNA copy number contribute to the development and progression of cancers and are common in epithelial tumors. We have used array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to visualize DNA copy number alterations across the genomes of lung tumors in the KrasLA2 model of lung cancer. Copy number gain involving the Kras locus, as focal amplification or whole chromosome gain, is the most common alteration in these tumors, and with a prevalence that increased significantly with increasing tumor size. Furthermore, Kras amplification was the only major genomic event among the smallest lung tumors, suggesting that this alteration occurs early during the development of mutant Kras driven lung cancers. Recurring gains and deletions of other chromosomes occur progressively more frequently among larger tumors. These results are in contrast to a previous aCGH analysis of lung tumors from KrasLA2 mice on a mixed genetic background, in which relatively few DNA copy number alterations were observed regardless of tumor size. Our model features the KrasLA2 allele on the inbred FVB/N mouse strain, and in this genetic background there is a highly statistically significant increase in level of genomic instability with increasing tumor size. These data suggest that recurring DNA copy alterations are important for tumor progression in the KrasLA2 model of lung cancer, and that the requirement for these alterations may be dependent on the genetic background of the mouse strain. PMID:21807965

  9. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1996-01-16

    This report describes progress in the experimental nuclear physics program of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. It presents findings related to properties of high-spin states, low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability, and high-energy heavy-ion physics, as well as a brief description of the Joint Institute of Heavy Ion Research (a collaboration between the University of Tennessee, Vanderbilt University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and its activities (particularly those of the last few years), and a list of publications. 89 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. The origins and progress of genomics research on Tef (Eragrostis tef).

    PubMed

    Girma, Dejene; Assefa, Kebebew; Chanyalew, Solomon; Cannarozzi, Gina; Kuhlemeier, Cris; Tadele, Zerihun

    2014-06-01

    Tef, Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter, is the most important cereal in Ethiopia. Tef is cultivated by more than five million small-scale farmers annually and constitutes the staple food for more than half of the population of 80 million. The crop is preferred by both farmers and consumers due to its beneficial traits associated with its agronomy and utilization. The genetic and phenotypic diversity of tef in Ethiopia is a national treasure of potentially global importance. In order for this diversity to be effectively conserved and utilized, a better understanding at the genomic level is necessary. In the recent years, tef has become the subject of genomic research in Ethiopia and abroad. Genomic-assisted tef improvement holds tremendous potential for improving productivity, thereby benefiting the smallholder farmers who have cultivated and relied on the crop for thousands of years. It is hoped that such research endeavours will provide solutions to some of the age-old problems of tef's husbandry. In this review, we provide a brief description of the genesis and progress of tef genomic research to date, suggest ways to utilize the genomic tools developed so far, discuss the potential of genomics to enable sustainable conservation and use of tef genetic diversity and suggest opportunities for the future research. PMID:24891040

  11. From prenatal genomic diagnosis to fetal personalized medicine: progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Diana W

    2015-01-01

    Thus far, the focus of personalized medicine has been the prevention and treatment of conditions that affect adults. Although advances in genetic technology have been applied more frequently to prenatal diagnosis than to fetal treatment, genetic and genomic information is beginning to influence pregnancy management. Recent developments in sequencing the fetal genome combined with progress in understanding fetal physiology using gene expression arrays indicate that we could have the technical capabilities to apply an individualized medicine approach to the fetus. Here I review recent advances in prenatal genetic diagnostics, the challenges associated with these new technologies and how the information derived from them can be used to advance fetal care. Historically, the goal of prenatal diagnosis has been to provide an informed choice to prospective parents. We are now at a point where that goal can and should be expanded to incorporate genetic, genomic and transcriptomic data to develop new approaches to fetal treatment. PMID:22772565

  12. ING2 controls the progression of DNA replication forks to maintain genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu, Delphine; Ythier, Damien; Binet, Romuald; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Sengupta, Sagar; Pedeux, Rémy

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitor of growth 2 (ING2) is a candidate tumour suppressor gene the expression of which is frequently lost in tumours. Here, we identified a new function for ING2 in the control of DNA replication and in the maintenance of genome stability. Global replication rate was markedly reduced during normal S-phase in small interfering RNA (siRNA) ING2 cells, as seen in a DNA fibre spreading experiment. Accordingly, we found that ING2 interacts with proliferating cell nuclear antigen and regulates its amount to the chromatin fraction, allowing normal replication progression and normal cell proliferation. Deregulation of DNA replication has been previously associated with genome instability. Hence, a high proportion of siRNA ING2 cells presented endoreduplication of their genome as well as an increased frequency of sister chromatid exchange. Thus, we propose for the first time that ING2 might function as a tumour suppressor gene by directly maintaining DNA integrity. PMID:19730436

  13. Genome-Wide Search for Host Association Factors during Ovine Progressive Pneumonia Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Meghan; Xiang, Shi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) is an important virus that causes serious diseases in sheep and goats with a prevalence of 36% in the USA. Although OPPV was discovered more than half of a century ago, little is known about the infection and pathogenesis of this virus. In this report, we used RNA-seq technology to conduct a genome-wide probe for cellular factors that are associated with OPPV infection. A total of approximately 22,000 goat host genes were detected of which 657 were found to have been significantly up-regulated and 889 down-regulated at 12 hours post-infection. In addition to previously known restriction factors from other viral infections, a number of factors which may be specific for OPPV infection were uncovered. The data from this RNA-seq study will be helpful in our understanding of OPPV infection, and also for further study in the prevention and intervention of this viral disease. PMID:26950733

  14. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Zsofia K.; Thom, Peter; Robson, Mark E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Kauff, Noah D.; Hurley, Karen E.; Devlin, Vincent; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the inherited risk for cancer is an important component of preventive oncology. In addition to well-established syndromes of cancer predisposition, much remains to be discovered about the genetic variation underlying susceptibility to common malignancies. Increased knowledge about the human genome and advances in genotyping technology have made possible genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of human diseases. These studies have identified many important regions of genetic variation associated with an increased risk for human traits and diseases including cancer. Understanding the principles, major findings, and limitations of GWAS is becoming increasingly important for oncologists as dissemination of genomic risk tests directly to consumers is already occurring through commercial companies. GWAS have contributed to our understanding of the genetic basis of cancer and will shed light on biologic pathways and possible new strategies for targeted prevention. To date, however, the clinical utility of GWAS-derived risk markers remains limited. PMID:20585100

  15. Phosphorylation of EB2 by Aurora B and CDK1 ensures mitotic progression and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Iimori, Makoto; Watanabe, Sugiko; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Sakasai, Ryo; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Temporal regulation of microtubule dynamics is essential for proper progression of mitosis and control of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins by phosphorylation is an essential component of this regulation. Here we show that Aurora B and CDK1 phosphorylate microtubule end-binding protein 2 (EB2) at multiple sites within the amino terminus and a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the calponin homology and end-binding homology domains. EB2 phosphorylation, which is strictly associated with mitotic entry and progression, reduces the binding affinity of EB2 for microtubules. Expression of non-phosphorylatable EB2 induces stable kinetochore microtubule dynamics and delays formation of bipolar metaphase plates in a microtubule binding-dependent manner, and leads to aneuploidy even in unperturbed mitosis. We propose that Aurora B and CDK1 temporally regulate the binding affinity of EB2 for microtubules, thereby ensuring kinetochore microtubule dynamics, proper mitotic progression and genome stability. PMID:27030108

  16. Polyphosphate is involved in cell cycle progression and genomic stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bru, Samuel; Martínez-Laínez, Joan Marc; Hernández-Ortega, Sara; Quandt, Eva; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Martí, Ramón; Canadell, David; Ariño, Joaquin; Sharma, Sushma; Jiménez, Javier; Clotet, Josep

    2016-08-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) is a linear chain of up to hundreds of inorganic phosphate residues that is necessary for many physiological functions in all living organisms. In some bacteria, polyP supplies material to molecules such as DNA, thus playing an important role in biosynthetic processes in prokaryotes. In the present study, we set out to gain further insight into the role of polyP in eukaryotic cells. We observed that polyP amounts are cyclically regulated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and those mutants that cannot synthesise (vtc4Δ) or hydrolyse polyP (ppn1Δ, ppx1Δ) present impaired cell cycle progression. Further analysis revealed that polyP mutants show delayed nucleotide production and increased genomic instability. Based on these findings, we concluded that polyP not only maintains intracellular phosphate concentrations in response to fluctuations in extracellular phosphate levels, but also muffles internal cyclic phosphate fluctuations, such as those produced by the sudden demand of phosphate to synthetize deoxynucleotides just before and during DNA duplication. We propose that the presence of polyP in eukaryotic cells is required for the timely and accurate duplication of DNA. PMID:27072996

  17. [Meibomian gland morphology study progression].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqian; Dong, Nuo; Wu, Huping

    2014-04-01

    The meibomian gland (MG) in the eyelids, which is the largest sebaceous gland throughout the body, synthesize and secrete lipids to form the superficial tear film layer. It plays a key role in maintaining the ocular surface health. Abnormalities in meibomian gland morphology lead to meibomian gland dysfunction, which is the main cause of evaporative dry eye. Study on meibomian gland morphology will contribute significantly to the diagnosis and treatment of meibomian gland dysfunction. This review is just focusing on the current studies about techniques to visualize the morphology of the MG and changes of meibomian gland morphology related to diseases. PMID:24931156

  18. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1994-02-18

    The Nuclear Physics group at UTK is involved in heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. During the last year experimental work has been in 3 broad areas: structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, structure of nuclei far from stability, and ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. Results in these areas are described in this document under: properties of high-spin states, study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability, and high-energy heavy-ion physics (PHENIX, etc.). Another important component of the work is theoretical interpretation of experimental results (Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research).

  19. Progressive hemifacial atrophy. A natural history study.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M T; Spencer, M A

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe two very different natural history courses in 2 patients with hemifacial atrophy. Progressive hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome, Romberg syndrome, PHA) is characterized by slowly progressive atrophy, frequently involving only one side of the face, primarily affecting the subcutaneous tissue and fat. The onset usually occurs during the first 2 decades of life. The cause and pathophysiology are unknown. Ophthalmic involvement is common, with progressive enophthalmos a frequent finding. Pupillary disturbances, heterochromia, uveitis, pigmentary disturbances of the ocular fundus, and restrictive strabismus have also been reported. Neurologic findings may be present, but the natural history and progression of ocular findings are often not described in the literature. METHODS: We studied the records and present findings of 2 patients with progressive hemifacial atrophy who were observed in our institution over a 10-year period. RESULTS: Both patients showed progression of ophthalmic findings, primarily on the affected side. One patient has had chronic uveitis with secondary cataract and glaucoma, in addition to retinal pigmentary changes. She also had a third-nerve paresis of the contralateral eye and mild seizure activity. The other patient had mild uveitis, some progression of unilateral retinal pigmentary changes, and a significant increase in hyperopia in the affected eye, in addition to hypotony at age 19 without a clear cause, but with secondary retinal and refractive changes. CONCLUSION: Ocular manifestations of progressive hemifacial atrophy are varied, but can progress from mild visual impairment to blindness. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8719679

  20. Drosophila Sld5 is essential for normal cell cycle progression and maintenance of genomic integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, Catherine A.; Christensen, Tim W.

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} Drosophila Sld5 interacts with Psf1, PPsf2, and Mcm10. {yields} Haploinsufficiency of Sld5 leads to M-phase delay and genomic instability. {yields} Sld5 is also required for normal S phase progression. -- Abstract: Essential for the normal functioning of a cell is the maintenance of genomic integrity. Failure in this process is often catastrophic for the organism, leading to cell death or mis-proliferation. Central to genomic integrity is the faithful replication of DNA during S phase. The GINS complex has recently come to light as a critical player in DNA replication through stabilization of MCM2-7 and Cdc45 as a member of the CMG complex which is likely responsible for the processivity of helicase activity during S phase. The GINS complex is made up of 4 members in a 1:1:1:1 ratio: Psf1, Psf2, Psf3, And Sld5. Here we present the first analysis of the function of the Sld5 subunit in a multicellular organism. We show that Drosophila Sld5 interacts with Psf1, Psf2, and Mcm10 and that mutations in Sld5 lead to M and S phase delays with chromosomes exhibiting hallmarks of genomic instability.

  1. Genome-wide association studies in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jayanta; Kanetsky, Peter A; Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Schaefer, Franz; Wong, Craig S

    2016-08-01

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) has become an established scientific method that provides an unbiased screen for genetic loci potentially associated with phenotypes of clinical interest, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Thus, GWAS provides opportunities to gain new perspectives regarding the genetic architecture of CKD progression by identifying new candidate genes and targets for intervention. As such, it has become an important arm of translational science providing a complementary line of investigation to identify novel therapeutics to treat CKD. In this review, we describe the method and the challenges of performing GWAS in the pediatric CKD population. We also provide an overview of successful GWAS for kidney disease, and we discuss the established pediatric CKD cohorts in North America and Europe that are poised to identify genetic risk variants associated with CKD progression. PMID:26490952

  2. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1993-02-08

    The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While our main emphasis is on experimental problems involving heavy-ion accelerators, we have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of our measurements. During the last year we have led several experiments at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and participated in others at Argonne National Laboratory. Also, we continue to be very active in the collaboration to study ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in a RHIC detector R&D project. Our experimental work is in four broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) heavy-ion induced transfer reactions, (3) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (4) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas will be described in this document in sections IIA, IIB, IIC, and IID, respectively. Areas (1), (3), and (4) concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Area (2) pursues the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum, both to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions. An important component of our program is the strong emphasis on the theoretical aspects of nuclear structure and reactions.

  3. Genomics and disease resistance studies in livestock☆

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Stephen C; Woolliams, John A

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the application of genetic and genomic techniques to disease resistance, the interpretation of data arising from such studies and the utilisation of the research outcomes to breed animals for enhanced resistance. Resistance and tolerance are defined and contrasted, factors affecting the analysis and interpretation of field data presented, and appropriate experimental designs discussed. These general principles are then applied to two detailed case studies, infectious pancreatic necrosis in Atlantic salmon and bovine tuberculosis in dairy cattle, and the lessons learnt are considered in detail. It is concluded that the rate limiting step in disease genetic studies will generally be provision of adequate phenotypic data, and its interpretation, rather than the genomic resources. Lastly, the importance of cross-disciplinary dialogue between the animal health and animal genetics communities is stressed. PMID:26339300

  4. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K

    2010-04-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies for pharmacogenomics-related traits are increasingly being performed to identify loci that affect either drug response or susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. Until now, only the largest effects have been detected, partly because of the challenges of obtaining large numbers of cases for pharmacogenomic studies. Since 2007, a range of pharmacogenomics GWA studies have been published that have identified several interesting and novel associations between drug responses or reactions and clinically relevant loci, showing the value of this approach. PMID:20300088

  5. Basic Studies: A Description and Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Charles N.; And Others

    This is a description and a progress report of the Basic Studies Program at Tarrant County Junior College (Texas), a 1-year program in general education designed for students who rank in the lower quarter of their junior college class and who have experienced little academic success in the past. Communications, humanities, social science, natural…

  6. Integrative genomics identifies molecular alterations that challenge the linear model of melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Rose, Amy E; Poliseno, Laura; Wang, Jinhua; Clark, Michael; Pearlman, Alexander; Wang, Guimin; Vega Y Saenz de Miera, Eleazar C; Medicherla, Ratna; Christos, Paul J; Shapiro, Richard; Pavlick, Anna; Darvishian, Farbod; Zavadil, Jiri; Polsky, David; Hernando, Eva; Ostrer, Harry; Osman, Iman

    2011-04-01

    Superficial spreading melanoma (SSM) and nodular melanoma (NM) are believed to represent sequential phases of linear progression from radial to vertical growth. Several lines of clinical, pathologic, and epidemiologic evidence suggest, however, that SSM and NM might be the result of independent pathways of tumor development. We utilized an integrative genomic approach that combines single nucleotide polymorphism array (6.0; Affymetrix) with gene expression array (U133A 2.0; Affymetrix) to examine molecular differences between SSM and NM. Pathway analysis of the most differentially expressed genes between SSM and NM (N = 114) revealed significant differences related to metabolic processes. We identified 8 genes (DIS3, FGFR1OP, G3BP2, GALNT7, MTAP, SEC23IP, USO1, and ZNF668) in which NM/SSM-specific copy number alterations correlated with differential gene expression (P < 0.05; Spearman's rank). SSM-specific genomic deletions in G3BP2, MTAP, and SEC23IP were independently verified in two external data sets. Forced overexpression of metabolism-related gene MTAP (methylthioadenosine phosphorylase) in SSM resulted in reduced cell growth. The differential expression of another metabolic-related gene, aldehyde dehydrogenase 7A1 (ALDH7A1), was validated at the protein level by using tissue microarrays of human melanoma. In addition, we show that the decreased ALDH7A1 expression in SSM may be the result of epigenetic modifications. Our data reveal recurrent genomic deletions in SSM not present in NM, which challenge the linear model of melanoma progression. Furthermore, our data suggest a role for altered regulation of metabolism-related genes as a possible cause of the different clinical behavior of SSM and NM. PMID:21343389

  7. Comparison of genomic abnormalities between BRCAX and sporadic breast cancers studied by comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gronwald, Jacek; Jauch, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Schoell, Brigitte; Böhm-Steuer, Barbara; Lener, Marcin; Grabowska, Ewa; Górski, Bohdan; Jakubowska, Anna; Domagała, Wenancjusz; Chosia, Maria; Scott, Rodney J; Lubiński, Jan

    2005-03-20

    Very little is known about the chromosomal regions harbouring genes involved in initiation and progression of BRCAX-associated breast cancers. We applied comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to identify the most frequent genomic imbalances in 18 BRCAX hereditary breast cancers and compared them to chromosomal aberrations detected in a group of 27 sporadic breast cancers. The aberrations observed most frequently in BRCAX tumours were gains of 8q (83%), 19q (67%), 19p (61%), 20q (61%), 1q (56%), 17q (56%) and losses of 8p (56%), 11q (44%) and 13q (33%). The sporadic cases most frequently showed gains of 1q (67%), 8q (48%), 17q (37%), 16p (33%), 19q (33%) and losses of 11q (26%), 8p (22%) and 16q (19%). Losses of 8p and gains 8q, 19 as well as gains of 20q (with respect to ductal tumours only) were detected significantly more often in BRCAX than in sporadic breast cancers. Analysis of 8p-losses and 8q-gains showed that these aberrations are early events in the tumorigenesis of BRCAX tumors. The findings of this report indicate similarities between BRCAX and BRCA2 tumours, possibly suggesting a common pathway of disease. These findings need confirmation by more extensive studies because only a limited number of cases were analysed and there are relatively few reports published. PMID:15540206

  8. Translation of genomics and epigenomics in prostate cancer: progress and promising directions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wennuan; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    During the last several years, exciting discoveries have been made in prostate cancer (PCa) as a result of significant advances in genomic technology and information. For example, using genome-wide association studies, more than 100 inherited genetic variants associated with PCa risk have been identified. Similarly, with the use of next-generation sequencing, various types of recurrent somatic DNA alterations in prostate tumors have been revealed. Some of these discoveries have potential clinical application to supplement existing tools for better decision-making regarding the need for screening, biopsy, and treatment of PCa. However, because of the complexity of these genomic findings and incomplete understanding of the genetics of this multifactorial disease, this potential has not yet been fully realized. PMID:27270344

  9. Applying genomics to the study of complex disease.

    PubMed

    Juran, Brian D; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2007-02-01

    The interest in dissecting the genetic and environmental components of complex human disease is growing, fueled by the emerging advances in the field of genomics and related disciplines. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of complex liver diseases such as gallbladder stones, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, and hepatocellular carcinoma remains a goal of the clinical and experimental hepatologist alike. Despite the scientific progress and technological advancement, elucidating the underlying mechanisms of complex hepatic diseases from the genomic standpoint will be demanding. Complexity of genomic structure and function, disease heterogeneity, influence of the environment on disease development and progression, and epigenetics all contribute to the challenge. To overcome these obstacles, novel conceptual frameworks regarding biological systems and human diseases are necessary in addition to a coordinated endeavor among different scientific disciplines. Deciphering in an integrated fashion the genomic, transcriptional, and translational aspects of the pathogenesis of complex liver diseases will lead to their better prediction, diagnostics, and treatment. PMID:17295173

  10. Sinbase: an integrated database to study genomics, genetics and comparative genomics in Sesamum indicum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linhai; Yu, Jingyin; Li, Donghua; Zhang, Xiurong

    2015-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an ancient and important oilseed crop grown widely in tropical and subtropical areas. It belongs to the gigantic order Lamiales, which includes many well-known or economically important species, such as olive (Olea europaea), leonurus (Leonurus japonicus) and lavender (Lavandula spica), many of which have important pharmacological properties. Despite their importance, genetic and genomic analyses on these species have been insufficient due to a lack of reference genome information. The now available S. indicum genome will provide an unprecedented opportunity for studying both S. indicum genetic traits and comparative genomics. To deliver S. indicum genomic information to the worldwide research community, we designed Sinbase, a web-based database with comprehensive sesame genomic, genetic and comparative genomic information. Sinbase includes sequences of assembled sesame pseudomolecular chromosomes, protein-coding genes (27,148), transposable elements (372,167) and non-coding RNAs (1,748). In particular, Sinbase provides unique and valuable information on colinear regions with various plant genomes, including Arabidopsis thaliana, Glycine max, Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum. Sinbase also provides a useful search function and data mining tools, including a keyword search and local BLAST service. Sinbase will be updated regularly with new features, improvements to genome annotation and new genomic sequences, and is freely accessible at http://ocri-genomics.org/Sinbase/. PMID:25480115

  11. Human genome libraries. Final progress report, February 1, 1994--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this program is to use a novel technology of chromosome microdissection and microcloning to construct chromosome region-specific libraries as resources for various human genome program studies. Region specific libraries have been constructed for the entire human chromosomes 2 and 18.

  12. Genome-wide association studies in neurology

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meng-Shan; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful tool for understanding the genetic underpinnings of human disease. In this article, we briefly review the role and findings of GWAS in common neurological diseases, including Stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, migraine, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, restless legs syndrome, intracranial aneurysm, human prion diseases and moyamoya disease. We then discuss the present and future implications of these findings with regards to disease prediction, uncovering basic biology, and the development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID:25568877

  13. Genome-Wide Association Studies: A Primer

    PubMed Central

    Corvin, Aiden; Craddock, Nick; Sullivan, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    There have been nearly 400genome-wide association studies published since 2005. The GWAS approach has been exceptionally successful in identifying common genetic variants that predispose to a variety of complex human diseases and biochemical and anthropometric traits. Although this approach is relatively new, there are many excellent reviews of different aspects of the GWAS method. Here, we provide a primer, an annotated overview of the GWAS method with particular reference to psychiatric genetics. We dissect the GWAS methodology into its components and provide a brief description with citations and links to reviews that cover the topic in detail. PMID:19895722

  14. [Progress in molecular biology study of DNA computer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Zhou; Zhao, Jian; He, Lin

    2003-09-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleotide acids) computer is an emerging new study area that basically combines molecular biology study of DNA molecules and computational study on how to employ these specific molecules to calculate. In 1994 Adleman described his pioneering research on DNA computing in Science. This is the first experimental report on DNA computer study. In 2001 Benenson et al published a paper in Nature regarding a programmable and autonomous DNA computing device. Because of its Turing-like functions, the device is regarded as another milestone progress for DNA computer study. The main features of DNA computer are massively parallel computing ability and potential enormous data storage capacity. Comparing with conventional electronic computers, DNA molecules provide conceptually a revolution in computing, and more and more implications have been found in various disciplines. DNA computer studies have brought great progress not only in its own computing mechanisms, but also in DNA manipulation technologies especially nano-technology. This article presents the basic principles of DNA computer, its applications, its important relationship with genomic research and our comments on all above issues. PMID:14577383

  15. A New Model Army: Emerging fish models to study the genomics of vertebrate Evo-Devo

    PubMed Central

    Braasch, Ingo; Peterson, Samuel M.; Desvignes, Thomas; McCluskey, Braedan M.; Batzel, Peter; Postlethwait, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Many fields of biology – including vertebrate Evo-Devo research – are facing an explosion of genomic and transcriptomic sequence information and a multitude of fish species are now swimming in this ‘genomic tsunami’. Here, we first give an overview of recent developments in sequencing fish genomes and transcriptomes that identify properties of fish genomes requiring particular attention and propose strategies to overcome common challenges in fish genomics. We suggest that the generation of chromosome-level genome assemblies - for which we introduce the term ‘chromonome’ – should be a key component of genomic investigations in fish because they enable large-scale conserved synteny analyses that inform orthology detection, a process critical for connectivity of genomes. Orthology calls in vertebrates, especially in teleost fish, are complicated by divergent evolution of gene repertoires and functions following two rounds of genome duplication in the ancestor of vertebrates and a third round at the base of teleost fish. Second, using examples of spotted gar, basal teleosts, zebrafish-related cyprinids, cavefish, livebearers, icefish, and lobefin fish, we illustrate how next generation sequencing technologies liberate emerging fish systems from genomic ignorance and transform them into a new model army to answer longstanding questions on the genomic and developmental basis of their biodiversity. Finally, we discuss recent progress in the genetic toolbox for the major fish models for functional analysis, zebrafish and medaka, that can be transferred to many other fish species to study in vivo the functional effect of evolutionary genomic change as Evo-Devo research enters the postgenomic era. PMID:25111899

  16. A new model army: Emerging fish models to study the genomics of vertebrate Evo-Devo.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Ingo; Peterson, Samuel M; Desvignes, Thomas; McCluskey, Braedan M; Batzel, Peter; Postlethwait, John H

    2015-06-01

    Many fields of biology--including vertebrate Evo-Devo research--are facing an explosion of genomic and transcriptomic sequence information and a multitude of fish species are now swimming in this "genomic tsunami." Here, we first give an overview of recent developments in sequencing fish genomes and transcriptomes that identify properties of fish genomes requiring particular attention and propose strategies to overcome common challenges in fish genomics. We suggest that the generation of chromosome-level genome assemblies--for which we introduce the term "chromonome"--should be a key component of genomic investigations in fish because they enable large-scale conserved synteny analyses that inform orthology detection, a process critical for connectivity of genomes. Orthology calls in vertebrates, especially in teleost fish, are complicated by divergent evolution of gene repertoires and functions following two rounds of genome duplication in the ancestor of vertebrates and a third round at the base of teleost fish. Second, using examples of spotted gar, basal teleosts, zebrafish-related cyprinids, cavefish, livebearers, icefish, and lobefin fish, we illustrate how next generation sequencing technologies liberate emerging fish systems from genomic ignorance and transform them into a new model army to answer longstanding questions on the genomic and developmental basis of their biodiversity. Finally, we discuss recent progress in the genetic toolbox for the major fish models for functional analysis, zebrafish, and medaka, that can be transferred to many other fish species to study in vivo the functional effect of evolutionary genomic change as Evo-Devo research enters the postgenomic era. PMID:25111899

  17. Application of genomics-assisted breeding for generation of climate resilient crops: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Kole, Chittaranjan; Muthamilarasan, Mehanathan; Henry, Robert; Edwards, David; Sharma, Rishu; Abberton, Michael; Batley, Jacqueline; Bentley, Alison; Blakeney, Michael; Bryant, John; Cai, Hongwei; Cakir, Mehmet; Cseke, Leland J; Cockram, James; de Oliveira, Antonio Costa; De Pace, Ciro; Dempewolf, Hannes; Ellison, Shelby; Gepts, Paul; Greenland, Andy; Hall, Anthony; Hori, Kiyosumi; Hughes, Stephen; Humphreys, Mike W; Iorizzo, Massimo; Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Marshall, Athole; Mayes, Sean; Nguyen, Henry T; Ogbonnaya, Francis C; Ortiz, Rodomiro; Paterson, Andrew H; Simon, Philipp W; Tohme, Joe; Tuberosa, Roberto; Valliyodan, Babu; Varshney, Rajeev K; Wullschleger, Stan D; Yano, Masahiro; Prasad, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Climate change affects agricultural productivity worldwide. Increased prices of food commodities are the initial indication of drastic edible yield loss, which is expected to increase further due to global warming. This situation has compelled plant scientists to develop climate change-resilient crops, which can withstand broad-spectrum stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salinity, flood, submergence and pests, thus helping to deliver increased productivity. Genomics appears to be a promising tool for deciphering the stress responsiveness of crop species with adaptation traits or in wild relatives toward identifying underlying genes, alleles or quantitative trait loci. Molecular breeding approaches have proven helpful in enhancing the stress adaptation of crop plants, and recent advances in high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping platforms have transformed molecular breeding to genomics-assisted breeding (GAB). In view of this, the present review elaborates the progress and prospects of GAB for improving climate change resilience in crops, which is likely to play an ever increasing role in the effort to ensure global food security. PMID:26322050

  18. Application of genomics-assisted breeding for generation of climate resilient crops: Progress and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Chittaranjan; Muthamiliarasan, Mehanathan; Henry, Robert; Edwards, David; Sharma, Rishu; Abberton, Michael; Batley, Jacqueline; Bentley, Alison; Blakeney, Michael; Bryant, John; Cai, Hongwei; Cakir, Mehmet; Cseke, Leland J.; Cockram, James; de Oliveira, Antonio Costa; De Pace, Ciro; Dempewolf, Hannes; Ellison, Shelby; Gepts, Paul; Greenland, Andy; Hall, Anthony; Hori, Kiyosumi; Hughes, Stephen; Humphreys, Mike W.; Iorizzo, Massimo; Ismail, Abdelgabi M.; Marshall, Athole; Mayes, Sean; Nguyen, Henry T.; Ogbannaya, Francis C.; Ortiz, Rodomiro; Paterson, Andrew H.; Simon, Philipp W.; Tohme, Joe; Tuberosa, Roberto; Valliyodan, Babu; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Yano, Masahiro; Prasad, Manoj

    2015-08-11

    Climate change affects agricultural productivity worldwide. Increased prices of food commodities are the initial indication of drastic edible yield loss, which is expected to increase further due to global warming. This situation has compelled plant scientists to develop climate change-resilient crops, which can withstand broad-spectrum stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salinity, flood, submergence and pests, thus helping to deliver increased productivity. Genomics appears to be a promising tool for deciphering the stress responsiveness of crop species with adaptation traits or in wild relatives toward identifying underlying genes, alleles or quantitative trait loci. Molecular breeding approaches have proven helpful in enhancing the stress adaptation of crop plants, and recent advances in high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping platforms have transformed molecular breeding to genomics-assisted breeding (GAB). In view of this, the present review elaborates the progress and prospects of GAB for improving climate change resilience in crops, which is likely to play an ever increasing role in the effort to ensure global food security.

  19. Application of genomics-assisted breeding for generation of climate resilient crops: Progress and prospects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kole, Chittaranjan; Muthamiliarasan, Mehanathan; Henry, Robert; Edwards, David; Sharma, Rishu; Abberton, Michael; Batley, Jacqueline; Bentley, Alison; Blakeney, Michael; Bryant, John; et al

    2015-08-11

    Climate change affects agricultural productivity worldwide. Increased prices of food commodities are the initial indication of drastic edible yield loss, which is expected to increase further due to global warming. This situation has compelled plant scientists to develop climate change-resilient crops, which can withstand broad-spectrum stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salinity, flood, submergence and pests, thus helping to deliver increased productivity. Genomics appears to be a promising tool for deciphering the stress responsiveness of crop species with adaptation traits or in wild relatives toward identifying underlying genes, alleles or quantitative trait loci. Molecular breeding approaches have proven helpful inmore » enhancing the stress adaptation of crop plants, and recent advances in high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping platforms have transformed molecular breeding to genomics-assisted breeding (GAB). In view of this, the present review elaborates the progress and prospects of GAB for improving climate change resilience in crops, which is likely to play an ever increasing role in the effort to ensure global food security.« less

  20. PROGRESSIVE RECRUITMENT OF RUNX2 TO GENOMIC TARGETS DESPITE DECREASING EXPRESSION DURING OSTEOBLAST DIFFERENTIATION

    PubMed Central

    Pregizer, Steven; Baniwal, Sanjeev K.; Yan, Xiting; Borok, Zea; Frenkel, Baruch

    2008-01-01

    The mRNAs encoding Runx2, a master osteoblast transcription factor, and its target gene Osteocalcin (OC), are commonly used as markers of osteoblast differentiation. We found that while OC mRNA levels do indeed increase during development of the osteoblast phenotype in MC3T3-E1 cultures, Runx2 mRNA levels surprisingly decrease. Neither translational control of Runx2 (based on Western analysis) nor regulation of its DNA-binding ability (assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay) could explain the unexpected opposite patterns of Runx2 and OC expression. Instead, a series of ChIP assays during osteoblast differentiation revealed that early on, when Runx2 protein amount and DNA-binding activity are maximal, it is practically absent from the OC promoter. At later stages, Runx2 is recruited to the OC promoter while Runx2 mRNA, protein, and in vitro DNA binding progressively decrease. We also followed Runx2 occupancy at a novel genomic target discovered by ChIP-Chip analysis of cells in which the OC promoter is maximally occupied. The results revealed that Runx2 is recruited to this locus and to the OC promoter with a remarkably similar temporal pattern . These observations highlight a mechanism that restrains Runx2-mediated transcriptional control by confining its access to genomic targets to a narrow window of time. The need for such stringent control is consistent with the severe consequences of Runx2 over-expression in vivo. PMID:18821584

  1. Application of genomics-assisted breeding for generation of climate resilient crops: progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Kole, Chittaranjan; Muthamilarasan, Mehanathan; Henry, Robert; Edwards, David; Sharma, Rishu; Abberton, Michael; Batley, Jacqueline; Bentley, Alison; Blakeney, Michael; Bryant, John; Cai, Hongwei; Cakir, Mehmet; Cseke, Leland J.; Cockram, James; de Oliveira, Antonio Costa; De Pace, Ciro; Dempewolf, Hannes; Ellison, Shelby; Gepts, Paul; Greenland, Andy; Hall, Anthony; Hori, Kiyosumi; Hughes, Stephen; Humphreys, Mike W.; Iorizzo, Massimo; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.; Marshall, Athole; Mayes, Sean; Nguyen, Henry T.; Ogbonnaya, Francis C.; Ortiz, Rodomiro; Paterson, Andrew H.; Simon, Philipp W.; Tohme, Joe; Tuberosa, Roberto; Valliyodan, Babu; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Yano, Masahiro; Prasad, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Climate change affects agricultural productivity worldwide. Increased prices of food commodities are the initial indication of drastic edible yield loss, which is expected to increase further due to global warming. This situation has compelled plant scientists to develop climate change-resilient crops, which can withstand broad-spectrum stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salinity, flood, submergence and pests, thus helping to deliver increased productivity. Genomics appears to be a promising tool for deciphering the stress responsiveness of crop species with adaptation traits or in wild relatives toward identifying underlying genes, alleles or quantitative trait loci. Molecular breeding approaches have proven helpful in enhancing the stress adaptation of crop plants, and recent advances in high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping platforms have transformed molecular breeding to genomics-assisted breeding (GAB). In view of this, the present review elaborates the progress and prospects of GAB for improving climate change resilience in crops, which is likely to play an ever increasing role in the effort to ensure global food security. PMID:26322050

  2. Deregulated expression of DNA polymerase β is involved in the progression of genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qingying; Lai, Yanhao; Liu, Shukun; Wu, Mei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Zunzhen

    2013-01-01

    Deregulated expression of DNA polymerase beta (pol β) has been implicated in genomic instability that leads to tumorigenesis, yet the mechanisms underlying the pol β-mediated genetic instability remain elusive. In this study, we investigated the roles of deregulated expression of pol β in spontaneous and xenobiotic-induced genetic instability using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) that express distinct pol β levels (wild-type, null and over-expression) as a model system. Three genetic instability endpoints, DNA strand breaks, chromosome breakage and gene mutation, were examined under various expression levels of pol β by comet assay, micronuclei test and hprt mutation assay. Our results demonstrate that neither pol β deficiency nor pol β over-expression is sufficient for accumulation of spontaneous DNA damage that promotes a hyper-proliferation phenotype. However, pol β null cells exhibit increased sensitivity to exogenous DNA damaging agents with increased genomic instability compared with pol β wild-type and over-expression cells. This finding suggests that a pol β deficiency may underlie genomic instability induced by exogenous DNA damaging agents. Interestingly, pol β over-expression cells exhibit less chromosomal or DNA damage, but display a higher hprt mutation frequency upon methyl methanesulfonate exposure compared with the other two cell types. Our results therefore indicate that an excessive amount of pol β may promote genomic instability, presumably through an error-prone repair response, although it enhances overall BER capacity for induced DNA damage. PMID:22576475

  3. Clonal expansion and linear genome evolution through breast cancer progression from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Knoop, Ann S.; Jensen, Jeanette D.; Bak, Martin; Mollenhauer, Jan; Kruse, Torben A.; Thomassen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of the breast cancer genome from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis is complex and mostly unexplored, but highly demanded as it may provide novel markers for and mechanistic insights in cancer progression. The increasing use of personalized therapy of breast cancer necessitates knowledge of the degree of genomic concordance between different steps of malignant progression as primary tumors often are used as surrogates of systemic disease. Based on exome sequencing we performed copy number profiling and point mutation detection on successive steps of breast cancer progression from one breast cancer patient, including two different regions of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS), primary tumor and an asynchronous metastasis. We identify a remarkable landscape of somatic mutations, retained throughout breast cancer progression and with new mutational events emerging at each step. Our data, contrary to the proposed model of early dissemination of metastatic cells and parallel progression of primary tumors and metastases, provide evidence of linear progression of breast cancer with relatively late dissemination from the primary tumor. The genomic discordance between the different stages of tumor evolution in this patient emphasizes the importance of molecular profiling of metastatic tissue directing molecularly targeted therapy at recurrence. PMID:25730902

  4. Progress in unraveling the genetic etiology of Parkinson disease in a genomic era.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Aline; Theuns, Jessie; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) and Parkinson-plus syndromes are genetically heterogeneous neurological diseases. Initial studies into the genetic causes of PD relied on classical molecular genetic approaches in well-documented case families. More recently, these approaches have been combined with exome sequencing and together have identified 15 causal genes. Additionally, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered over 25 genetic risk factors. Elucidation of the genetic architecture of sporadic and familial parkinsonism, however, has lagged behind that of simple Mendelian conditions, suggesting the existence of features confounding genetic data interpretation. Here we discuss the successes and potential pitfalls of gene discovery in PD and related disorders in the post-genomic era. With an estimated 30% of trait variance currently unexplained, tackling current limitations will further expedite gene discovery and lead to increased application of these genetic insights in molecular diagnostics using gene panel and exome sequencing strategies. PMID:25703649

  5. Genome-wide association study for semen quality traits in German Warmblood stallions.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Maren; Metzger, Julia; Martinsson, Gunilla; Sieme, Harald; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-08-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study for semen quality traits in 139 German Warmblood stallions. Stallions were genotyped using the Illumina equine SNP50 Beadchip. Traits analysed were de-regressed estimated breeding values (EBVs) for gel-free volume, sperm concentration, total number of sperm, progressive motility and the total number of progressively motile sperm. The GWAS revealed 29 SNPs on 12 different chromosomes as genome-wide significantly associated with semen quality traits. For ten genomic regions we could retrieve candidate genes influencing stallion fertility. Among the candidate genes, we could find the genes encoding cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISP1, CRISP2 and CRISP3). This was the first GWAS in horses performed for semen quality traits. PMID:27334685

  6. Genome-wide association study of swine farrowing traits. Part I: Genetic and genomic parameter estimates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary objective of this study was to determine genetic and genomic parameters among swine farrowing traits. Genetic parameters were obtained by using MTDFREML and genomic parameters were obtained using GenSel. Genetic and residual variances obtained from MTDFREML were used as priors for the ...

  7. SNPLims: a data management system for genome wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Orro, Alessandro; Guffanti, Guia; Salvi, Erika; Macciardi, Fabio; Milanesi, Luciano

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent progresses in genotyping technologies allow the generation high-density genetic maps using hundreds of thousands of genetic markers for each DNA sample. The availability of this large amount of genotypic data facilitates the whole genome search for genetic basis of diseases. We need a suitable information management system to efficiently manage the data flow produced by whole genome genotyping and to make it available for further analyses. Results We have developed an information system mainly devoted to the storage and management of SNP genotype data produced by the Illumina platform from the raw outputs of genotyping into a relational database. The relational database can be accessed in order to import any existing data and export user-defined formats compatible with many different genetic analysis programs. After calculating family-based or case-control association study data, the results can be imported in SNPLims. One of the main features is to allow the user to rapidly identify and annotate statistically relevant polymorphisms from the large volume of data analyzed. Results can be easily visualized either graphically or creating ASCII comma separated format output files, which can be used as input to further analyses. Conclusions The proposed infrastructure allows to manage a relatively large amount of genotypes for each sample and an arbitrary number of samples and phenotypes. Moreover, it enables the users to control the quality of the data and to perform the most common screening analyses and identify genes that become “candidate” for the disease under consideration. PMID:18387201

  8. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    The GABEX I experiment is designed to provide synoptic coverage of a series of Gulf Stream wave-like disturbances, the effect of these on the circulation of the entire shelf, and on biological and chemical processes. This study was initiated in February 1980 when current meter arrays were deployed. These meters will be removed in July 1980. In April three ships will simultaneously study the effects of Gulf Stream disturbances on the hydrography, chemistry, and biology of the shelf. One vessel will track a specific wave-like disturbance and provide synoptic coverage of the shelf area. The second vessel will determine the effect of shelf break processes on adjacent shelf water; and the third will study trace metal distributions in and outside of disturbances. Research progress is reported in continental shelf studies, nearshore and estuarine studies (diffusion of freshwater out of nearshore zone), tidal currents and material transport, and mixing of inlet plumes.

  9. Genomic study of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine

    PubMed Central

    IKEGAWA, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL) is a common disease after the middle age. OPLL frequently causes serious neurological problems due to compression of the spinal cord and/or nerve roots. OPLL occurs in patients with monogenic metabolic diseases including rickets/osteomalacia and hypoparathyroidism; however most of OPLL is idiopathic and is considered as a multi-factorial (polygenic) disease influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Genomic studies for the genetic factors of OPLL have been conducted, mainly in Japan, including linkage and association studies. This paper reviews the recent progress in the genomic study of OPLL and comments on its future direction. PMID:25504229

  10. The genomic landscape and evolution of endometrial carcinoma progression and abdominopelvic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Gibson, William J; Hoivik, Erling A; Halle, Mari K; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Cherniack, Andrew D; Berg, Anna; Holst, Frederik; Zack, Travis I; Werner, Henrica M J; Staby, Kjersti M; Rosenberg, Mara; Stefansson, Ingunn M; Kusonmano, Kanthida; Chevalier, Aaron; Mauland, Karen K; Trovik, Jone; Krakstad, Camilla; Giannakis, Marios; Hodis, Eran; Woie, Kathrine; Bjorge, Line; Vintermyr, Olav K; Wala, Jeremiah A; Lawrence, Michael S; Getz, Gad; Carter, Scott L; Beroukhim, Rameen; Salvesen, Helga B

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have detailed the genomic landscape of primary endometrial cancers, but the evolution of these cancers into metastases has not been characterized. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 98 tumor biopsies including complex atypical hyperplasias, primary tumors and paired abdominopelvic metastases to survey the evolutionary landscape of endometrial cancer. We expanded and reanalyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data, identifying new recurrent alterations in primary tumors, including mutations in the estrogen receptor cofactor gene NRIP1 in 12% of patients. We found that likely driver events were present in both primary and metastatic tissue samples, with notable exceptions such as ARID1A mutations. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the sampled metastases typically arose from a common ancestral subclone that was not detected in the primary tumor biopsy. These data demonstrate extensive genetic heterogeneity in endometrial cancers and relative homogeneity across metastatic sites. PMID:27348297

  11. A Gene Gravity Model for the Evolution of Cancer Genomes: A Study of 3,000 Cancer Genomes across 9 Cancer Types.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Liu, Chuang; Lin, Chen-Ching; Zhao, Junfei; Jia, Peilin; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-09-01

    Cancer development and progression result from somatic evolution by an accumulation of genomic alterations. The effects of those alterations on the fitness of somatic cells lead to evolutionary adaptations such as increased cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and altered anticancer drug responses. However, there are few general mathematical models to quantitatively examine how perturbations of a single gene shape subsequent evolution of the cancer genome. In this study, we proposed the gene gravity model to study the evolution of cancer genomes by incorporating the genome-wide transcription and somatic mutation profiles of ~3,000 tumors across 9 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into a broad gene network. We found that somatic mutations of a cancer driver gene may drive cancer genome evolution by inducing mutations in other genes. This functional consequence is often generated by the combined effect of genetic and epigenetic (e.g., chromatin regulation) alterations. By quantifying cancer genome evolution using the gene gravity model, we identified six putative cancer genes (AHNAK, COL11A1, DDX3X, FAT4, STAG2, and SYNE1). The tumor genomes harboring the nonsynonymous somatic mutations in these genes had a higher mutation density at the genome level compared to the wild-type groups. Furthermore, we provided statistical evidence that hypermutation of cancer driver genes on inactive X chromosomes is a general feature in female cancer genomes. In summary, this study sheds light on the functional consequences and evolutionary characteristics of somatic mutations during tumorigenesis by propelling adaptive cancer genome evolution, which would provide new perspectives for cancer research and therapeutics. PMID:26352260

  12. A Gene Gravity Model for the Evolution of Cancer Genomes: A Study of 3,000 Cancer Genomes across 9 Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen-Ching; Zhao, Junfei; Jia, Peilin; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    Cancer development and progression result from somatic evolution by an accumulation of genomic alterations. The effects of those alterations on the fitness of somatic cells lead to evolutionary adaptations such as increased cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and altered anticancer drug responses. However, there are few general mathematical models to quantitatively examine how perturbations of a single gene shape subsequent evolution of the cancer genome. In this study, we proposed the gene gravity model to study the evolution of cancer genomes by incorporating the genome-wide transcription and somatic mutation profiles of ~3,000 tumors across 9 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into a broad gene network. We found that somatic mutations of a cancer driver gene may drive cancer genome evolution by inducing mutations in other genes. This functional consequence is often generated by the combined effect of genetic and epigenetic (e.g., chromatin regulation) alterations. By quantifying cancer genome evolution using the gene gravity model, we identified six putative cancer genes (AHNAK, COL11A1, DDX3X, FAT4, STAG2, and SYNE1). The tumor genomes harboring the nonsynonymous somatic mutations in these genes had a higher mutation density at the genome level compared to the wild-type groups. Furthermore, we provided statistical evidence that hypermutation of cancer driver genes on inactive X chromosomes is a general feature in female cancer genomes. In summary, this study sheds light on the functional consequences and evolutionary characteristics of somatic mutations during tumorigenesis by propelling adaptive cancer genome evolution, which would provide new perspectives for cancer research and therapeutics. PMID:26352260

  13. Review: Progress in the Researches on Insect Mitochondrial Genome and Analysis of Gene Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li; Jianyu, Gao; Haiyu, Liu; Wanzhi, Cai

    2009-04-01

    Insect mitochondrial genome is a double-stranded circular genomes which range from 14,503 bp to 19,571 bp in size. Nearly all the sequenced insect mitochondrial genomes encode 37 genes: two for rRNAs, 13 for proteins and 22 for tRNAs. This review compares and summarizes the features of complete mitochondrial genomes from 175 sequenced species of insects in 22 orders. The genomic organization, contents, gene order, and rearrangements of gene order are analyzed.

  14. Dual Roles of RNF2 in Melanoma Progression | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Epigenetic regulators have emerged as critical factors governing the biology of cancer. Here, in the context of melanoma, we show that RNF2 is prognostic, exhibiting progression-correlated expression in human melanocytic neoplasms. Through a series of complementary gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies in mouse and human systems, we establish that RNF2 is oncogenic and prometastatic.

  15. Genomic signatures of chromosomal instability and osteosarcoma progression detected by high resolution array CGH and interphase FISH.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, S; Yoshimoto, M; Ludkovski, O; Park, P C; Bayani, J; Thorner, P; Maire, G; Squire, J A; Zielenska, M

    2008-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is characterized by an unstable karyotype which typically has a heterogeneous pattern of complex chromosomal abnormalities. High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) in combination with interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses provides a complete description of genomic imbalances together with an evaluation of the contribution of cell-to-cell variation to copy number changes. There have been no analyses to date documenting genomic signatures consistent with chromosomal instability mechanisms in OS tumors using array CGH. In this study, we utilized high-resolution array CGH to identify and characterize recurrent signatures of genomic imbalances using ten OS tumors. Comparison between the genomic profiles identified tumor groups with low, intermediate and high levels of genomic imbalance. Bands 6p22-->p21, 8q24 and 17p12--> p11.2 were consistently involved in high copy gain or amplification events. Since these three locations have been consistently associated with OS oncogenesis, FISH probes from each cytoband were used to derive an index of cellular heterogeneity for copy number within each region. OS with the highest degree of genomic imbalance also exhibited the most extreme cell-to-cell copy number variation. Significantly, the three OS with the most imbalance and genomic copy number heterogeneity also had the poorest response to preoperative chemotherapy. This genome wide analysis is the first utilizing oligonucleotide array CGH in combination with FISH analysis to derive genomic signatures of chromosomal instability in OS tumors by studying genomic imbalance and intercellular heterogeneity. This comprehensive genomic screening approach provides important insights concerning the mechanisms responsible for generating complex genomes. The resulting phenotypic diversity can generate tumors with a propensity for an aggressive disease course. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms leading to OS

  16. Chronic Periodontitis Genome-wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rhodin, K.; Divaris, K.; North, K.E.; Barros, S.P.; Moss, K.; Beck, J.D.; Offenbacher, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of chronic periodontitis (CP) offer rich data sources for the investigation of candidate genes, functional elements, and pathways. We used GWAS data of CP (n = 4,504) and periodontal pathogen colonization (n = 1,020) from a cohort of adult Americans of European descent participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study and employed a MAGENTA approach (i.e., meta-analysis gene set enrichment of variant associations) to obtain gene-centric and gene set association results corrected for gene size, number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and local linkage disequilibrium characteristics based on the human genome build 18 (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 36). We used the Gene Ontology, Ingenuity, KEGG, Panther, Reactome, and Biocarta databases for gene set enrichment analyses. Six genes showed evidence of statistically significant association: 4 with severe CP (NIN, p = 1.6 × 10−7; ABHD12B, p = 3.6 × 10−7; WHAMM, p = 1.7 × 10−6; AP3B2, p = 2.2 × 10−6) and 2 with high periodontal pathogen colonization (red complex–KCNK1, p = 3.4 × 10−7; Porphyromonas gingivalis–DAB2IP, p = 1.0 × 10−6). Top-ranked genes for moderate CP were HGD (p = 1.4 × 10−5), ZNF675 (p = 1.5 × 10−5), TNFRSF10C (p = 2.0 × 10−5), and EMR1 (p = 2.0 × 10−5). Loci containing NIN, EMR1, KCNK1, and DAB2IP had showed suggestive evidence of association in the earlier single-nucleotide polymorphism–based analyses, whereas WHAMM and AP2B2 emerged as novel candidates. The top gene sets included severe CP (“endoplasmic reticulum membrane,” “cytochrome P450,” “microsome,” and “oxidation reduction”) and moderate CP (“regulation of gene expression,” “zinc ion binding,” “BMP signaling pathway,” and “ruffle”). Gene-centric analyses offer a promising avenue for efficient interrogation of large-scale GWAS data. These results highlight genes in previously identified loci and

  17. Genes with Relevance for Early to Late Progression of Colon Carcinoma Based on Combined Genomic and Transcriptomic Information from the Same Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lagerstedt, Kristina K.; Kristiansson, Erik; Lönnroth, Christina; Andersson, Marianne; Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Gustafsson, Annika; Hansson, Elisabeth; Kressner, Ulf; Nordgren, Svante; Enlund, Fredrik; Lundholm, Kent

    2010-01-01

    Background: Genetic and epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer are numerous. However, it is difficult to judge whether such changes are primary or secondary to the appearance and progression of tumors. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to identify altered DNA regions with significant covariation to transcription alterations along colon cancer progression. Methods: Tumor and normal colon tissue were obtained at primary operations from 24 patients selected by chance. DNA, RNA and microRNAs were extracted from the same biopsy material in all individuals and analyzed by oligo-nucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), mRNA- and microRNA oligo-arrays. Statistical analyses were performed to assess statistical interactions (correlations, co-variations) between DNA copy number changes and significant alterations in gene and microRNA expression using appropriate parametric and non-parametric statistics. Results: Main DNA alterations were located on chromosome 7, 8, 13 and 20. Tumor DNA copy number gain increased with tumor progression, significantly related to increased gene expression. Copy number loss was not observed in Dukes A tumors. There was no significant relationship between expressed genes and tumor progression across Dukes A–D tumors; and no relationship between tumor stage and the number of microRNAs with significantly altered expression. Interaction analyses identified overall 41 genes, which discriminated early Dukes A plus B tumors from late Dukes C plus D tumor; 28 of these genes remained with correlations between genomic and transcriptomic alterations in Dukes C plus D tumors and 17 in Dukes D. One microRNA (microR-663) showed interactions with DNA alterations in all Dukes A-D tumors. Conclusions: Our modeling confirms that colon cancer progression is related to genomic instability and altered gene expression. However, early invasive tumor growth seemed rather related to transcriptomic alterations, where changes in

  18. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing throws descriptive 3-D genome folding studies for a loop.

    PubMed

    Beagan, Jonathan A; Phillips-Cremins, Jennifer E

    2016-07-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing studies have recently shed new light into the causal link between the linear DNA sequence and 3-D chromatin architecture. Here we describe current models for the folding of genomes into a nested hierarchy of higher-order structures and discuss new insights into the organizing principles governing genome folding at each length scale. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:286-299. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1338 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27265842

  19. Galaxy tools to study genome diversity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intra-species genetic variation can be used to investigate population structure, selection, and gene flow in non-model vertebrates; and due to the plummeting costs for genome sequencing, it is now possible for small labs to obtain full-genome variation data from their species of interest. However, those labs may not have easy access to, and familiarity with, computational tools to analyze those data. Results We have created a suite of tools for the Galaxy web server aimed at handling nucleotide and amino-acid polymorphisms discovered by full-genome sequencing of several individuals of the same species, or using a SNP genotyping microarray. In addition to providing user-friendly tools, a main goal is to make published analyses reproducible. While most of the examples discussed in this paper deal with nuclear-genome diversity in non-human vertebrates, we also illustrate the application of the tools to fungal genomes, human biomedical data, and mitochondrial sequences. Conclusions This project illustrates that a small group can design, implement, test, document, and distribute a Galaxy tool collection to meet the needs of a particular community of biologists. PMID:24377391

  20. Data management for genomic mapping applications: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, V.M.; Lewis, S.; McCarthy, J.; Olken, F.; Zorn, M.

    1992-05-01

    In this paper we describe a new approach to the construction of data management systems for genomic mapping applications in molecular biology, genetics, and plant breeding. We discuss the architecture of such systems and propose an incremental approach to the development of such systems. We illustrate the proposed approach and architecture with a case study of a prototype data management system for genomic maps.

  1. [Advances in Genomics Studies for Coronary Artery Disease].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhu, Hui-juan; Zeng, Yong

    2015-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the major life-threatening diseases. In addition to traditional risk factors including age, sex, smoking, hypertension,and diabetes, genomic studies have shown that CAD has obvious genetic predisposition. In recent years, the rapid advances in genomics shed new light on early diagnosis, risk stratification and new treatment targets. PMID:26564468

  2. Genomic Study of Cardiovascular Continuum Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Makeeva, O. A.; Sleptsov, A. A.; Kulish, E. V.; Barbarash, O. L.; Mazur, A. M.; Prokhorchuk, E. B.; Chekanov, N. N.; Stepanov, V. A.; Puzyrev, V. P.

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidity or a combination of several diseases in the same individual is a common and widely investigated phenomenon. However, the genetic background for non–random disease combinations is not fully understood. Modern technologies and approaches to genomic data analysis enable the investigation of the genetic profile of patients burdened with several diseases (polypathia, disease conglomerates) and its comparison with the profiles of patients with single diseases. An association study featuring three groups of patients with various combinations of cardiovascular disorders and a control group of relatively healthy individuals was conducted. Patients were selected as follows: presence of only one disease, ischemic heart disease (IHD); a combination of two diseases, IHD and arterial hypertension (AH); and a combination of several diseases, including IHD, AH, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypercholesterolemia (HC). Genotyping was performed using the “My Gene” genomic service (www.i–gene.ru). An analysis of 1,400 polymorphic genetic variants and their associations with the studied phenotypes are presented. A total of 14 polymorphic variants were associated with the phenotype “IHD only,” including those in the APOB, CD226, NKX2–5, TLR2, DPP6, KLRB1, VDR, SCARB1, NEDD4L, and SREBF2 genes, and intragenic variants rs12487066, rs7807268, rs10896449, and rs944289. A total of 13 genetic markers were associated with the “IHD and AH” phenotype, including variants in the BTNL2, EGFR, CNTNAP2, SCARB1, and HNF1A genes, and intragenic polymorphisms rs801114, rs10499194, rs13207033, rs2398162, rs6501455, and rs1160312. A total of 14 genetic variants were associated with a combination of several diseases of cardiovascular continuum (CVC), including those in the TAS2R38, SEZ6L, APOA2, KLF7, CETP, ITGA4, RAD54B, LDLR, and MTAP genes, along with intragenic variants rs1333048, rs1333049, and rs6501455. One common genetic marker was identified for the

  3. Appearance traits in fish farming: progress from classical genetics to genomics, providing insight into current and potential genetic improvement

    PubMed Central

    Colihueque, Nelson; Araneda, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Appearance traits in fish, those external body characteristics that influence consumer acceptance at point of sale, have come to the forefront of commercial fish farming, as culture profitability is closely linked to management of these traits. Appearance traits comprise mainly body shape and skin pigmentation. Analysis of the genetic basis of these traits in different fish reveals significant genetic variation within populations, indicating potential for their genetic improvement. Work into ascertaining the minor or major genes underlying appearance traits for commercial fish is emerging, with substantial progress in model fish in terms of identifying genes that control body shape and skin colors. In this review, we describe research progress to date, especially with regard to commercial fish, and discuss genomic findings in model fish in order to better address the genetic basis of the traits. Given that appearance traits are important in commercial fish, the genomic information related to this issue promises to accelerate the selection process in coming years. PMID:25140172

  4. Appearance traits in fish farming: progress from classical genetics to genomics, providing insight into current and potential genetic improvement.

    PubMed

    Colihueque, Nelson; Araneda, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Appearance traits in fish, those external body characteristics that influence consumer acceptance at point of sale, have come to the forefront of commercial fish farming, as culture profitability is closely linked to management of these traits. Appearance traits comprise mainly body shape and skin pigmentation. Analysis of the genetic basis of these traits in different fish reveals significant genetic variation within populations, indicating potential for their genetic improvement. Work into ascertaining the minor or major genes underlying appearance traits for commercial fish is emerging, with substantial progress in model fish in terms of identifying genes that control body shape and skin colors. In this review, we describe research progress to date, especially with regard to commercial fish, and discuss genomic findings in model fish in order to better address the genetic basis of the traits. Given that appearance traits are important in commercial fish, the genomic information related to this issue promises to accelerate the selection process in coming years. PMID:25140172

  5. Database management research for the Human Genome Project: Progress report, 7/1/96-3/15/97

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, N.

    1997-03-01

    Progress is reported on the development of software that works in conjunction with database management systems (DBMSs) in ways that are useful for genomics. This new release of LabBase has two major advantages over the previous version, namely it runs on the Sybase relational DBMS rather than ObjectStore and offers more complete data modeling features than the previous version so is suitable for more kinds of genetic databases.

  6. FY-1979 progress report. Hydrotransport plugging study.

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Hydrotransport Plugging Study is to investigate phenomena associated with predicting the onset and occurrence of plugging in pipeline transport of coal. This study addresses large particle transport plugging phenomena that may be encountered in run-of-mine operations. The project is being conducted in four tasks: review and analysis of current capabilities and available data, analytical modeling, experimental investigations, and unplugging and static start-up. This report documents work completed in FY-1979 as well as work currently in progress. A review of currently available prediction methods was completed. Applicability of the methods to large particle hydrotransport and the prediction of plugging was evaluated. It was determined that available models were inadequate, either because they are empirical and tuned to a given solid or because they are simplified analytical models incapable of accounting for a wide range of parameters. Complicated regression curve fit models lacking a physical basis cannot be extrapolated with confidence. Several specific conclusions were reached: Recent developments in mechanistic modeling, describing flow conditions at the limit of stationary deposition, provide the best basis for prediction and extrapolation of large particle flow. Certain modeled phenomena require further analytical and experimental investigation to improve confidence levels. Experimental work needs to be performed to support modeling and to provide an adequate data base for comparison purposes. No available model permits treatment of solids mixtures such as coal and rock.

  7. A progress report on seismic model studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, J.H.; Mangan, G.B.

    1963-01-01

    The value of seismic-model studies as an aid to understanding wave propagation in the Earth's crust was recognized by early investigators (Tatel and Tuve, 1955). Preliminary model results were very promising, but progress in model seismology has been restricted by two problems: (1) difficulties in the development of models with continuously variable velocity-depth functions, and (2) difficulties in the construction of models of adequate size to provide a meaningful wave-length to layer-thickness ratio. The problem of a continuously variable velocity-depth function has been partly solved by a technique using two-dimensional plate models constructed by laminating plastic to aluminum, so that the ratio of plastic to aluminum controls the velocity-depth function (Healy and Press, 1960). These techniques provide a continuously variable velocity-depth function, but it is not possible to construct such models large enough to study short-period wave propagation in the crust. This report describes improvements in our ability to machine large models. Two types of models are being used: one is a cylindrical aluminum tube machined on a lathe, and the other is a large plate machined on a precision planer. Both of these modeling techniques give promising results and are a significant improvement over earlier efforts.

  8. Genomic Loss of DUSP4 Contributes to the Progression of Intraepithelial Neoplasm of Pancreas to Invasive Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hijiya, Naoki; Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Nakada, Chisato; Tung Nguyen, Lam; Kai, Tomoki; Matsuura, Keiko; Shibata, Kohei; Inomata, Masafumi; Uchida, Tomohisa; Tokunaga, Akinori; Amada, Kohei; Shirao, Kuniaki; Yamada, Yasunari; Mori, Hiromu; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Seto, Masao; Aoki, Masahiro; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Moriyama, Masatsugu

    2016-05-01

    The progression from precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer, including pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), to invasive disease is characterized by stepwise accumulation of genetic alterations. However, it remains unclear whether additional alterations are required for the progression of high-grade neoplasms to invasive pancreatic carcinoma. We compared the genomic profiles of paired noninvasive and invasive carcinoma tissues collected from patients with IPMN. We demonstrate that the frequency of genomic copy-number aberrations significantly increased during the course of invasion, and the loss of 8p11.22-ter was more often associated with invasive tissues. Expression profiling in pancreatic cancer cell lines with and without 8p11.22-ter revealed that DUSP4, an MAPK phosphatase, was significantly downregulated in cells lacking 8p11.22-ter as well as in invasive carcinomas due to genomic loss. Restoration of DUSP4 expression in pancreatic cancer cells significantly suppressed invasiveness and anoikis resistance via ERK inactivation. Accordingly, we found that blockade of ERK signaling by MEK inhibition was effective in an orthotopic xenograft model and significantly extended survival. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a genetic mechanism by which pancreatic precursor lesions progress to invasive carcinomas and highlight DUSP4 as a novel invasion suppressor that can be therapeutically exploited through manipulation of ERK signaling. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2612-25. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26941286

  9. Tracking the progression of speciation: variable patterns of introgression across the genome provide insights on the species delimitation between progenitor-derivative spruces (Picea mariana × P. rubens).

    PubMed

    de Lafontaine, Guillaume; Prunier, Julien; Gérardi, Sébastien; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-10-01

    The genic species concept implies that while most of the genome can be exchanged somewhat freely between species through introgression, some genomic regions remain impermeable to interspecific gene flow. Hence, interspecific differences can be maintained despite ongoing gene exchange within contact zones. This study assessed the heterogeneous patterns of introgression at gene loci across the hybrid zone of an incipient progenitor-derivative species pair, Picea mariana (black spruce) and Picea rubens (red spruce). The spruce taxa likely diverged in geographic isolation during the Pleistocene and came into secondary contact during late Holocene. A total of 300 SNPs distributed across the 12 linkage groups (LG) of black spruce were genotyped for 385 individual trees from 33 populations distributed across the allopatric zone of each species and within the zone of sympatry. An integrative framework combining three population genomic approaches was used to scan the genomes, revealing heterogeneous patterns of introgression. A total of 23 SNPs scattered over 10 LG were considered impermeable to introgression and putatively under diverging selection. These loci revealed the existence of impermeable genomic regions forming the species boundary and are thus indicative of ongoing speciation between these two genetic lineages. Another 238 SNPs reflected selectively neutral diffusion across the porous species barrier. Finally, 39 highly permeable SNPs suggested ancestral polymorphism along with balancing selection. The heterogeneous patterns of introgression across the genome indicated that the speciation process between black spruce and red spruce is young and incomplete, albeit some interspecific differences are maintained, allowing ongoing species divergence even in sympatry. The approach developed in this study can be used to track the progression of ongoing speciation processes. PMID:26346701

  10. Integrative functional genomic delineation of the cascades of transcriptional changes involved in hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Vignesh; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2016-10-01

    Development of targeted therapeutics is still at its early stage for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to the incomplete understanding of the confounding regulations at signaling pathway level. In this investigation, gene co-expression-based networking and integrative functional genomic modeling of HCC mRNA profiles as signaling processes were employed to understand the complex signaling cascades involved in HCC development toward understanding the avenues for targeted therapeutics. Multiple sets of genes and molecular biological processes involved during HCC development were identified from this integrative analysis: (i) Loss of liver cellular features due to the reduced HNF4A & PPAR signaling in the early stages of HCC, (ii) activated inflammatory and stress signals in the cirrhosis stages and (iii) highly activated cellular proliferation with the activated E2F-MYC oncogenic signaling with the gain of embryonic liver stem cell-like features in the advanced stage tumors. Upon connecting these gene-sets with the established drug sensitivity-related gene signatures, targeted therapeutic strategies for the heterogeneous HCC conditions have been identified. PPAR agonist class of drugs for early stage HCC conditions, anti-inflammatory drugs for cirrhosis and topoisomerase inhibitors for the advanced HCC conditions were inferred. Integrative functional genomic analysis of HCC transcriptome profiles at the context of signaling pathways has defined the key molecular processes involved in HCC development. Further, the study highlights the stage-specific and pathway focused targeted therapeutics for HCC. These findings deserve extensive preclinical explorations toward the establishment of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27194100

  11. Study of heavy flavored particles. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses progress on the following topics: time-of- flight system; charmed baryon production and decays; D decays to baryons; measurement of sigma plus particles magnetic moments; and strong interaction coupling. (LSP)

  12. [Genome-wide association study on complex diseases: study design and genetic markers].

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei-Li

    2008-04-01

    Genome-wide association study used to be a dream of geneticists years ago, but now it came true. Since the first paper reported the finding of genetic variation contributing to human age-related macular degeneration by genome-wide association study in 2005, a numbers of whole genome studies have been published. The present paper reviewed some common comments in whole genome association study on complex diseases, including achievements of genome-wide association studies on complex traits or diseases, principles of study design, selection of genetic marker in genome, and comparisons of different commercial products for whole genome association study. Finally a newly defined genetic variation, copy number variation, was briefly introduced. This paper also summarized the shortcomings of current genome-wide association studies and perspectives of its future. PMID:18424408

  13. Genomics Study of Gastric Cancer and Its Molecular Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Siu Tsan; Leung, Suet Yi

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous disease encompassing diverse morphological (intestinal versus diffuse) and molecular subtypes (MSI, EBV, TP53 mutation). Recent advances in genomic technology have led to an improved understanding of the driver gene mutational profile, gene expression, and epigenetic alterations that underlie each of the subgroups, with therapeutic implications in some of these alterations. There have been attempts to classify gastric cancers based on these genomic features, with an aim to improve prognostication and predict responsiveness to specific drug therapy. The eventual aims of these genomic studies are to develop deep biological insights into the carcinogenic pathway in each of these subtypes. Future large-scale drug screening strategies may then be able to link these genomic features to drug responsiveness, eventually leading to genome-guided personalized medicine with improved cure rates. PMID:27573784

  14. The Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA): developing community resources to study diverse invertebrate genomes.

    PubMed

    Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Collins, Allen G; Collins, Timothy; Crandall, Keith; Distel, Daniel; Dunn, Casey; Giribet, Gonzalo; Haddock, Steven; Knowlton, Nancy; Martindale, Mark; Medina, Mónica; Messing, Charles; O'Brien, Stephen J; Paulay, Gustav; Putnam, Nicolas; Ravasi, Timothy; Rouse, Greg W; Ryan, Joseph F; Schulze, Anja; Wörheide, Gert; Adamska, Maja; Bailly, Xavier; Breinholt, Jesse; Browne, William E; Diaz, M Christina; Evans, Nathaniel; Flot, Jean-François; Fogarty, Nicole; Johnston, Matthew; Kamel, Bishoy; Kawahara, Akito Y; Laberge, Tammy; Lavrov, Dennis; Michonneau, François; Moroz, Leonid L; Oakley, Todd; Osborne, Karen; Pomponi, Shirley A; Rhodes, Adelaide; Santos, Scott R; Satoh, Nori; Thacker, Robert W; Van de Peer, Yves; Voolstra, Christian R; Welch, David Mark; Winston, Judith; Zhou, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of all metazoan (animal) species comprise the "invertebrates," but very few genomes from these organisms have been sequenced. We have, therefore, formed a "Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance" (GIGA). Our intent is to build a collaborative network of diverse scientists to tackle major challenges (e.g., species selection, sample collection and storage, sequence assembly, annotation, analytical tools) associated with genome/transcriptome sequencing across a large taxonomic spectrum. We aim to promote standards that will facilitate comparative approaches to invertebrate genomics and collaborations across the international scientific community. Candidate study taxa include species from Porifera, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Annelida, Bryozoa, and Platyhelminthes, among others. GIGA will target 7000 noninsect/nonnematode species, with an emphasis on marine taxa because of the unrivaled phyletic diversity in the oceans. Priorities for selecting invertebrates for sequencing will include, but are not restricted to, their phylogenetic placement; relevance to organismal, ecological, and conservation research; and their importance to fisheries and human health. We highlight benefits of sequencing both whole genomes (DNA) and transcriptomes and also suggest policies for genomic-level data access and sharing based on transparency and inclusiveness. The GIGA Web site (http://giga.nova.edu) has been launched to facilitate this collaborative venture. PMID:24336862

  15. The Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA): Developing Community Resources to Study Diverse Invertebrate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of all metazoan (animal) species comprise the “invertebrates,” but very few genomes from these organisms have been sequenced. We have, therefore, formed a “Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance” (GIGA). Our intent is to build a collaborative network of diverse scientists to tackle major challenges (e.g., species selection, sample collection and storage, sequence assembly, annotation, analytical tools) associated with genome/transcriptome sequencing across a large taxonomic spectrum. We aim to promote standards that will facilitate comparative approaches to invertebrate genomics and collaborations across the international scientific community. Candidate study taxa include species from Porifera, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Annelida, Bryozoa, and Platyhelminthes, among others. GIGA will target 7000 noninsect/nonnematode species, with an emphasis on marine taxa because of the unrivaled phyletic diversity in the oceans. Priorities for selecting invertebrates for sequencing will include, but are not restricted to, their phylogenetic placement; relevance to organismal, ecological, and conservation research; and their importance to fisheries and human health. We highlight benefits of sequencing both whole genomes (DNA) and transcriptomes and also suggest policies for genomic-level data access and sharing based on transparency and inclusiveness. The GIGA Web site (http://giga.nova.edu) has been launched to facilitate this collaborative venture. PMID:24336862

  16. 2012 U.S. Department of Energy: Joint Genome Institute: Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, David

    2013-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) is to serve the diverse scientific community as a user facility, enabling the application of large-scale genomics and analysis of plants, microbes, and communities of microbes to address the DOE mission goals in bioenergy and the environment. The DOE JGI's sequencing efforts fall under the Eukaryote Super Program, which includes the Plant and Fungal Genomics Programs; and the Prokaryote Super Program, which includes the Microbial Genomics and Metagenomics Programs. In 2012, several projects made news for their contributions to energy and environment research.

  17. Prospects and pitfalls in whole genome association studies

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Robert W; Evans, David M; Cardon, Lon R

    2005-01-01

    Recent large-scale studies of common genetic variation throughout the human genome are making it feasible to conduct whole genome studies of genotype–phenotype associations. Such studies have the potential to uncover novel contributors to common complex traits and thus lead to insights into the aetiology of multifactorial phenotypes. Despite this promise, it is important to recognize that the availability of genetic markers and the ability to assay them at realistic cost does not guarantee success of this approach. There are a number of practical issues that require close attention, some forms of allelic architecture are not readily amenable to the association approach with even the most rigorous design, and doubtless new hurdles will emerge as the studies begin. Here we discuss the promise and current challenges of the whole genome approach, and raise some issues to consider in interpreting the results of the first whole genome studies. PMID:16096108

  18. Progress in the search for genetic linkage with Tourette syndrome: An exclusion map covering more than 50% of the autosomal genome

    PubMed Central

    Pakstis, Andrew J.; Heutink, Peter; Pauls, David L.; Kurlan, Roger; van de Wetering, Ben J. M.; Leckman, James F.; Sandkuyl, Lodewijk A.; Kidd, Judith R.; Breedveld, Guido J.; Castiglione, Carmela M.; Weber, James; Sparkes, Robert S.; Cohen, Donald J.; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Oostra, Ben A.

    1991-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and reduced penetrance at a single genetic locus. Several research groups have genetic linkage studies underway to detect the chromosomal location of the gene that predisposes for this disorder. Strong and clear evidence of linkage has not yet been produced for Tourette syndrome. This paper presents an overview of the methods and progress of the groups centered at Yale University and Erasmus University in excluding linkage from a large portion of the genome. Our labs have screened 228 genetic marker loci for linkage with a gene for this disorder in a series of affected families in the United States, Canada, The Netherlands, and Norway. More than 50% (and perhaps as much as 66%) of the autosomal genome has now been excluded on the assumption that genetic heterogeneity is not an important factor in the Tourette syndrome pedigrees pooled for this summary. PMID:1990837

  19. Functional Analysis of the Human Genome:. Study of Genetic Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-04-01

    I will divide my remarks into 3 parts. First, I will give a brief summary of the Human Genome Project. Second, I will describe our work on human chromosome 7 to illustrate how we could contribute to the Project and disease research. Third, I would like to bring across the argument that study of genetic disease is an integral component of the Human Genome Project. In particular, I will use cystic fibrosis as an example to elaborate why I consider disease study is a part of functional genomics.

  20. Stories and Challenges of Genome Wide Association Studies in Livestock — A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aditi; Lee, Jun Seop; Dang, Chang Gwon; Sudrajad, Pita; Kim, Hyeong Cheol; Yeon, Seong Heum; Kang, Hee Seol; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Undoubtedly livestock is one of the major contributors to the economy of any country. The economic value of livestock includes meat, dairy products, fiber, fertilizer etc. Understanding and identifying the associations of quantitative trait loci (QTL) with the economically important traits is believed to substantially benefit the livestock industry. The past two decades have seen a flurry of interest in mapping the QTL associated with traits of economic importance on the genome. With the availability of single nucleotide polymorphism chip of various densities it is possible to identify regions, QTL and genes on the genome that explain the association and its effect on the phenotype under consideration. Remarkable advancement has been seen in genome wide association studies (GWAS) since its inception till the present day. In this review we describe the progress and challenges of GWAS in various livestock species. PMID:26194229

  1. Stories and Challenges of Genome Wide Association Studies in Livestock - A Review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aditi; Lee, Jun Seop; Dang, Chang Gwon; Sudrajad, Pita; Kim, Hyeong Cheol; Yeon, Seong Heum; Kang, Hee Seol; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    Undoubtedly livestock is one of the major contributors to the economy of any country. The economic value of livestock includes meat, dairy products, fiber, fertilizer etc. Understanding and identifying the associations of quantitative trait loci (QTL) with the economically important traits is believed to substantially benefit the livestock industry. The past two decades have seen a flurry of interest in mapping the QTL associated with traits of economic importance on the genome. With the availability of single nucleotide polymorphism chip of various densities it is possible to identify regions, QTL and genes on the genome that explain the association and its effect on the phenotype under consideration. Remarkable advancement has been seen in genome wide association studies (GWAS) since its inception till the present day. In this review we describe the progress and challenges of GWAS in various livestock species. PMID:26194229

  2. Using CAVE technology for functional genomics studies.

    PubMed

    Sensen, Christoph W

    2002-01-01

    We have established the first Java 3D-enabled CAVE (CAVE automated virtual environment). The Java application programming interface allows the complete separation of the program development from the program execution, opening new application domains for the CAVE technology. Programs can be developed on any Java-enabled computer platform, including Windows, Macintosh, and Linux workstations, and executed in the CAVE without modification. The introduction of Java, one of the major programming environments for bioinformatics, into the CAVE environment allows the rapid development applications for genome research, especially for the analysis of the spatial and temporal data that are being produced by functional genomics experiments. The CAVE technology will play a major role in the modeling of biological systems that is necessary to understand how these systems are organized and how they function. PMID:12614491

  3. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili

    2014-04-08

    As a part of the Shewanella Federation project, we have used integrated genomic, proteomic and computational technologies to study various aspects of energy metabolism of two Shewanella strains from a systems-level perspective.

  4. A SUPER Powerful Method for Genome Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yuchun; Buckler, Edward S.; Zhang, Zhiwu

    2014-01-01

    Genome-Wide Association Studies shed light on the identification of genes underlying human diseases and agriculturally important traits. This potential has been shadowed by false positive findings. The Mixed Linear Model (MLM) method is flexible enough to simultaneously incorporate population structure and cryptic relationships to reduce false positives. However, its intensive computational burden is prohibitive in practice, especially for large samples. The newly developed algorithm, FaST-LMM, solved the computational problem, but requires that the number of SNPs be less than the number of individuals to derive a rank-reduced relationship. This restriction potentially leads to less statistical power when compared to using all SNPs. We developed a method to extract a small subset of SNPs and use them in FaST-LMM. This method not only retains the computational advantage of FaST-LMM, but also remarkably increases statistical power even when compared to using the entire set of SNPs. We named the method SUPER (Settlement of MLM Under Progressively Exclusive Relationship) and made it available within an implementation of the GAPIT software package. PMID:25247812

  5. The International Pea Genome Sequencing Project: Sequencing and Assembly Progresses Updates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Consortium for the Pea Genome Sequencing (ICPG) includes scientists from six countries around the world. Its aim is to provide a high quality reference of the pea genome to the scientific community as well as to the pea breeder community. The consortium proposed a strategy that int...

  6. Progress towards the complete American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) plastid genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology has been rapidly adopted for sequencing complete plant genomes due to its high-throughput and cost effective benefits. Advances towards the complete plastid genome sequence of the cranberry cultivar “HyRed” are presented using in silico procedures. We used...

  7. Identifying disease mutations in genomic medicine settings: current challenges and how to accelerate progress.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Gholson J; Wang, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The pace of exome and genome sequencing is accelerating, with the identification of many new disease-causing mutations in research settings, and it is likely that whole exome or genome sequencing could have a major impact in the clinical arena in the relatively near future. However, the human genomics community is currently facing several challenges, including phenotyping, sample collection, sequencing strategies, bioinformatics analysis, biological validation of variant function, clinical interpretation and validity of variant data, and delivery of genomic information to various constituents. Here we review these challenges and summarize the bottlenecks for the clinical application of exome and genome sequencing, and we discuss ways for moving the field forward. In particular, we urge the need for clinical-grade sample collection, high-quality sequencing data acquisition, digitalized phenotyping, rigorous generation of variant calls, and comprehensive functional annotation of variants. Additionally, we suggest that a 'networking of science' model that encourages much more collaboration and online sharing of medical history, genomic data and biological knowledge, including among research participants and consumers/patients, will help establish causation and penetrance for disease causal variants and genes. As we enter this new era of genomic medicine, we envision that consumer-driven and consumer-oriented efforts will take center stage, thus allowing insights from the human genome project to translate directly back into individualized medicine. PMID:22830651

  8. Identifying disease mutations in genomic medicine settings: current challenges and how to accelerate progress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The pace of exome and genome sequencing is accelerating, with the identification of many new disease-causing mutations in research settings, and it is likely that whole exome or genome sequencing could have a major impact in the clinical arena in the relatively near future. However, the human genomics community is currently facing several challenges, including phenotyping, sample collection, sequencing strategies, bioinformatics analysis, biological validation of variant function, clinical interpretation and validity of variant data, and delivery of genomic information to various constituents. Here we review these challenges and summarize the bottlenecks for the clinical application of exome and genome sequencing, and we discuss ways for moving the field forward. In particular, we urge the need for clinical-grade sample collection, high-quality sequencing data acquisition, digitalized phenotyping, rigorous generation of variant calls, and comprehensive functional annotation of variants. Additionally, we suggest that a 'networking of science' model that encourages much more collaboration and online sharing of medical history, genomic data and biological knowledge, including among research participants and consumers/patients, will help establish causation and penetrance for disease causal variants and genes. As we enter this new era of genomic medicine, we envision that consumer-driven and consumer-oriented efforts will take center stage, thus allowing insights from the human genome project to translate directly back into individualized medicine. PMID:22830651

  9. Mycobacterial species as case-study of comparative genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Zakham, F; Belayachi, L; Ussery, D; Akrim, M; Benjouad, A; El Aouad, R; Ennaji, M M

    2011-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium represents more than 120 species including important pathogens of human and cause major public health problems and illnesses. Further, with more than 100 genome sequences from this genus, comparative genome analysis can provide new insights for better understanding the evolutionary events of these species and improving drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics tools for controlling Mycobacterial diseases. In this present study we aim to outline a comparative genome analysis of fourteen Mycobacterial genomes: M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K—10, M. bovis AF2122/97, M. bovis BCG str. Pasteur 1173P2, M. leprae Br4923, M. marinum M, M. sp. KMS, M. sp. MCS, M. tuberculosis CDC1551, M. tuberculosis F11, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis KZN 1435 , M. ulcerans Agy99,and M. vanbaalenii PYR—1, For this purpose a comparison has been done based on their length of genomes, GC content, number of genes in different data bases (Genbank, Refseq, and Prodigal). The BLAST matrix of these genomes has been figured to give a lot of information about the similarity between species in a simple scheme. As a result of multiple genome analysis, the pan and core genome have been defined for twelve Mycobacterial species. We have also introduced the genome atlas of the reference strain M. tuberculosis H37Rv which can give a good overview of this genome. And for examining the phylogenetic relationships among these bacteria, a phylogenic tree has been constructed from 16S rRNA gene for tuberculosis and non tuberculosis Mycobacteria to understand the evolutionary events of these species. PMID:21396338

  10. Whole genome comparative studies between chicken and turkey and their implications for avian genome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Darren K; Robertson, Lindsay B; Tempest, Helen G; Vignal, Alain; Fillon, Valérie; Crooijmans, Richard PMA; Groenen, Martien AM; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gaginskaya, Elena; Carré, Wilfrid; Waddington, David; Talbot, Richard; Völker, Martin; Masabanda, Julio S; Burt, Dave W

    2008-01-01

    Background Comparative genomics is a powerful means of establishing inter-specific relationships between gene function/location and allows insight into genomic rearrangements, conservation and evolutionary phylogeny. The availability of the complete sequence of the chicken genome has initiated the development of detailed genomic information in other birds including turkey, an agriculturally important species where mapping has hitherto focused on linkage with limited physical information. No molecular study has yet examined conservation of avian microchromosomes, nor differences in copy number variants (CNVs) between birds. Results We present a detailed comparative cytogenetic map between chicken and turkey based on reciprocal chromosome painting and mapping of 338 chicken BACs to turkey metaphases. Two inter-chromosomal changes (both involving centromeres) and three pericentric inversions have been identified between chicken and turkey; and array CGH identified 16 inter-specific CNVs. Conclusion This is the first study to combine the modalities of zoo-FISH and array CGH between different avian species. The first insight into the conservation of microchromosomes, the first comparative cytogenetic map of any bird and the first appraisal of CNVs between birds is provided. Results suggest that avian genomes have remained relatively stable during evolution compared to mammalian equivalents. PMID:18410676

  11. From NGS assembly challenges to instability of fungal mitochondrial genomes: A case study in genome complexity.

    PubMed

    Misas, Elizabeth; Muñoz, José Fernando; Gallo, Juan Esteban; McEwen, Juan Guillermo; Clay, Oliver Keatinge

    2016-04-01

    The presence of repetitive or non-unique DNA persisting over sizable regions of a eukaryotic genome can hinder the genome's successful de novo assembly from short reads: ambiguities in assigning genome locations to the non-unique subsequences can result in premature termination of contigs and thus overfragmented assemblies. Fungal mitochondrial (mtDNA) genomes are compact (typically less than 100 kb), yet often contain short non-unique sequences that can be shown to impede their successful de novo assembly in silico. Such repeats can also confuse processes in the cell in vivo. A well-studied example is ectopic (out-of-register, illegitimate) recombination associated with repeat pairs, which can lead to deletion of functionally important genes that are located between the repeats. Repeats that remain conserved over micro- or macroevolutionary timescales despite such risks may indicate functionally or structurally (e.g., for replication) important regions. This principle could form the basis of a mining strategy for accelerating discovery of function in genome sequences. We present here our screening of a sample of 11 fully sequenced fungal mitochondrial genomes by observing where exact k-mer repeats occurred several times; initial analyses motivated us to focus on 17-mers occurring more than three times. Based on the diverse repeats we observe, we propose that such screening may serve as an efficient expedient for gaining a rapid but representative first insight into the repeat landscapes of sparsely characterized mitochondrial chromosomes. Our matching of the flagged repeats to previously reported regions of interest supports the idea that systems of persisting, non-trivial repeats in genomes can often highlight features meriting further attention. PMID:26970210

  12. Personal Commitment, Support and Progress in Doctoral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsuo, Miia; Turkulainen, Virpi

    2011-01-01

    Earlier research on doctoral education has associated study progress with the student's own capabilities and faculty support. The purpose of this study is to investigate how students' personal commitment and various forms of support, as well as their complementary effects, explain progress in doctoral studies. Data were collected by a…

  13. Genome-wide Association Study Implicates PARD3B-based AIDS Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, George W.; Lautenberger, James A.; Chinn, Leslie; McIntosh, Carl; Johnson, Randall C.; Sezgin, Efe; Kessing, Bailey; Malasky, Michael; Hendrickson, Sher L.; Pontius, Joan; Tang, Minzhong; An, Ping; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Limou, Sophie; Le Clerc, Sigrid; Delaneau, Olivier; Zagury, Jean-François; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van Manen, Daniëlle; Bream, Jay H.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Buchbinder, Susan; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Host genetic variation influences human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and progression to AIDS. Here we used clinically well-characterized subjects from 5 pretreatment HIV/AIDS cohorts for a genome-wide association study to identify gene associations with rate of AIDS progression. Methods.  European American HIV seroconverters (n = 755) were interrogated for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (n = 700,022) associated with progression to AIDS 1987 (Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, co-dominant model). Results.  Association with slower progression was observed for SNPs in the gene PARD3B. One of these, rs11884476, reached genome-wide significance (relative hazard = 0.3; P =3. 370 × 10−9) after statistical correction for 700,022 SNPs and contributes 4.52% of the overall variance in AIDS progression in this study. Nine of the top-ranked SNPs define a PARD3B haplotype that also displays significant association with progression to AIDS (hazard ratio, 0.3; P = 3.220 × 10−8). One of these SNPs, rs10185378, is a predicted exonic splicing enhancer; significant alteration in the expression profile of PARD3B splicing transcripts was observed in B cell lines with alternate rs10185378 genotypes. This SNP was typed in European cohorts of rapid progressors and was found to be protective for AIDS 1993 definition (odds ratio, 0.43, P = .025). Conclusions. These observations suggest a potential unsuspected pathway of host genetic influence on the dynamics of AIDS progression. PMID:21502085

  14. Elucidating Genomic Characteristics of Lung Cancer Progression from In Situ to Invasive Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vinayanuwattikun, Chanida; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Zaridze, David; Mukeria, Anush; Voegele, Catherine; Vallée, Maxime; Purnomosari, Dewajani; Forey, Nathalie; Durand, Geoffroy; Byrnes, Graham; Mckay, James; Brennan, Paul; Scelo, Ghislaine

    2016-01-01

    To examine the diversity of somatic alterations and clonal evolution according to aggressiveness of disease, nineteen tumor-blood pairs of ‘formerly bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma (BAC)’ which had been reclassified into preinvasive lesion (adenocarcinoma in situ; AIS), focal invasive lesion (minimally invasive adenocarcinoma; MIA), and invasive lesion (lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma; LPA and non-lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma; non-LPA) according to IASLC/ATS/ERS 2011 classification were explored by whole exome sequencing. Several distinct somatic alterations were observed compare to the lung adenocarcinoma study from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). There were higher numbers of tumors with significant APOBEC mutation fold enrichment (73% vs. 58% TCGA). The frequency of KRAS mutations was lower in our study (5% vs. 32% TCGA), while a higher number of mutations of RNA-splicing genes, RBM10 and U2AF1, were found (37% vs. 11% TCGA). We found neither mutational pattern nor somatic copy number alterations that were specific to AIS/MIA. We demonstrated that clonal cell fraction was the only distinctive feature that discriminated LPA/non-LPA from AIS/MIA. The broad range of clonal frequency signified a more branched clonal evolution at the time of diagnosis. Assessment of tumor clonal cell fraction might provide critical information for individualized therapy as a prognostic factor, however this needs further study. PMID:27545006

  15. Elucidating Genomic Characteristics of Lung Cancer Progression from In Situ to Invasive Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vinayanuwattikun, Chanida; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Zaridze, David; Mukeria, Anush; Voegele, Catherine; Vallée, Maxime; Purnomosari, Dewajani; Forey, Nathalie; Durand, Geoffroy; Byrnes, Graham; Mckay, James; Brennan, Paul; Scelo, Ghislaine

    2016-01-01

    To examine the diversity of somatic alterations and clonal evolution according to aggressiveness of disease, nineteen tumor-blood pairs of 'formerly bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma (BAC)' which had been reclassified into preinvasive lesion (adenocarcinoma in situ; AIS), focal invasive lesion (minimally invasive adenocarcinoma; MIA), and invasive lesion (lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma; LPA and non-lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma; non-LPA) according to IASLC/ATS/ERS 2011 classification were explored by whole exome sequencing. Several distinct somatic alterations were observed compare to the lung adenocarcinoma study from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). There were higher numbers of tumors with significant APOBEC mutation fold enrichment (73% vs. 58% TCGA). The frequency of KRAS mutations was lower in our study (5% vs. 32% TCGA), while a higher number of mutations of RNA-splicing genes, RBM10 and U2AF1, were found (37% vs. 11% TCGA). We found neither mutational pattern nor somatic copy number alterations that were specific to AIS/MIA. We demonstrated that clonal cell fraction was the only distinctive feature that discriminated LPA/non-LPA from AIS/MIA. The broad range of clonal frequency signified a more branched clonal evolution at the time of diagnosis. Assessment of tumor clonal cell fraction might provide critical information for individualized therapy as a prognostic factor, however this needs further study. PMID:27545006

  16. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    The objectives are to identify important physical, chemical and biological processes which affect the transfer of materials on the southeast continental shelf, determine important parameters which govern observed temporal and spatial varibility on the continental shelf, determine the extent and modes of coupling between events at the shelf break and nearshore, and determine physical, chemical and biological exchange rates on the inner shelf. Progress in meeting these research objectives is presented. (ACR)

  17. Dissecting ancestry genomic background in substance dependence genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Polimanti, Renato; Yang, Can; Zhao, Hongyu; Gelernter, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Aims To understand the role of ancestral genomic background in substance dependence (SD) genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we analyzed population diversity at genetic loci associated with SD traits and evaluated its effect on GWAS outcomes. Materials & methods We investigated 24 genes with variants associated with SD by GWAS; and 82 loci with putative subordinate roles with respect to SD-associated genes. Results We observed high ancestry-related frequency differences in common functional alleles in GWAS relevant genes and their interactive partners. Common functional alleles with high frequency differences demonstrated significant effects on the GWAS outcomes. Conclusion Population differences in SD GWAS outcomes seem not to be influenced by general variation across the genome, but by ancestry-related local haplotype structures at SD-associated loci. PMID:26267224

  18. 78 FR 47674 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Progress and Planning Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ...: select appropriate sources for whole genome RMs and identify or design synthetic DNA constructs that... and synthetic DNA RMs along with the methods (documentary standards) and reference data necessary...

  19. Study of Transposable Elements and Their Genomic Impact.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Lopez, Martin; Vilar-Astasio, Raquel; Tristan-Ramos, Pablo; Lopez-Ruiz, Cesar; Garcia-Pérez, Jose L

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) have been considered traditionally as junk DNA, i.e., DNA sequences that despite representing a high proportion of genomes had no evident cellular functions. However, over the last decades, it has become undeniable that not only TE-derived DNA sequences have (and had) a fundamental role during genome evolution, but also TEs have important implications in the origin and evolution of many genomic disorders. This concise review provides a brief overview of the different types of TEs that can be found in genomes, as well as a list of techniques and methods used to study their impact and mobilization. Some of these techniques will be covered in detail in this Method Book. PMID:26895043

  20. Progress in the study of drug nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Guo, Fei; Zheng, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Sun, Jianxu

    2015-12-01

    The poor water solubility of many candidate drugs remains a major obstacle to their development and clinical use, especially for oral drug delivery. Nanocrystal technology can improve the solubility and dissolution rates of many poorly water-soluble drugs very effectively, significantly improving their oral bioavailability and decreasing the food effect. For this reason, this technology is becoming a key area of drug delivery research. This review presents much of the recent progress in nanocrystal drug pharmaceuticals, including the characteristics, composition, preparation technology, and clinical applications of these drugs. Finally, the effect of nanocrystal technology on insoluble drugs is quantified and described. PMID:26817271

  1. Integrated genome based studies of Shewanella ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Saffarini, Daad A

    2013-03-07

    Progress is reported in these areas: Regulation of anaerobic respiration by cAMP receptor protein and role of adenylate cyclases; Identification of an octaheme c cytochrome as the terminal sulfite reductase in S. oneidensis MR-1; Identification and analysis of components of the electron transport chains that lead to reduction of thiosulfate, tetrathionate, and elemental sulfur in MR-1; Involvement of pili and flagella in metal reduction by S. oneidensis MR-1; and work suggesting that HemN1 is the major enzyme that is involved in heme biosynthesis under anaerobic conditions.

  2. [Progress of non-genomic action of estrogen and its impact on female reproduction].

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Lin; Yuan, Dong-Zhi; Zhang, Shi-Mao; Yue, Li-Min

    2016-08-25

    Estrogen is one of the steroid hormones. Besides the genomic action mediated by its intracellular receptor on target cells, there is now increasing body of evidence indicating that estrogen also has non-genomic action. For the non-genomic action, estrogen binds to its receptor on cell membrane, subsequently rapidly activates various intracellular signaling pathways, such as PLC/Ca(2+), ERK/MAPK, cAMP-PKA, PI3K-AKT-NOS, and finally induces biological effects. The non-genomic effects of estrogen on physiologic and pathologic processes have been found in many tissues within the reproductive, nervous and cardiovascular systems and bone etc. In reproductive system, it has been demonstrated that estrogen plays important roles in follicle development, fertilization and embryo implantation, and it is involved in the genesis and development of genital tract tumors and breast cancer. In this review, we focus on the general characteristics of non-genomic action of estrogen, its main nonnuclear signaling pathways and physiological and pathological significance, especially its influences in female reproductive functions. PMID:27546514

  3. Genome-wide alterations of the DNA replication program during tumor progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, A.; Goldar, A.; Argoul, F.; Hyrien, O.; Audit, B.

    2016-08-01

    Oncogenic stress is a major driving force in the early stages of cancer development. Recent experimental findings reveal that, in precancerous lesions and cancers, activated oncogenes may induce stalling and dissociation of DNA replication forks resulting in DNA damage. Replication timing is emerging as an important epigenetic feature that recapitulates several genomic, epigenetic and functional specificities of even closely related cell types. There is increasing evidence that chromosome rearrangements, the hallmark of many cancer genomes, are intimately associated with the DNA replication program and that epigenetic replication timing changes often precede chromosomic rearrangements. The recent development of a novel methodology to map replication fork polarity using deep sequencing of Okazaki fragments has provided new and complementary genome-wide replication profiling data. We review the results of a wavelet-based multi-scale analysis of genomic and epigenetic data including replication profiles along human chromosomes. These results provide new insight into the spatio-temporal replication program and its dynamics during differentiation. Here our goal is to bring to cancer research, the experimental protocols and computational methodologies for replication program profiling, and also the modeling of the spatio-temporal replication program. To illustrate our purpose, we report very preliminary results obtained for the chronic myelogeneous leukemia, the archetype model of cancer. Finally, we discuss promising perspectives on using genome-wide DNA replication profiling as a novel efficient tool for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized treatment.

  4. Genome-wide effects of acute progressive feed restriction in liver and white adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjanvirta, Raimo Boutros, Paul C.; Moffat, Ivy D.; Linden, Jere; Wendelin, Dominique; Okey, Allan B.

    2008-07-01

    Acute progressive feed restriction (APFR) represents a specific form of caloric restriction in which feed availability is increasingly curtailed over a period of a few days to a few weeks. It is often used for control animals in toxicological and pharmacological studies on compounds causing body weight loss to equalize weight changes between experimental and control groups and thereby, intuitively, to also set their metabolic states to the same phase. However, scientific justification for this procedure is lacking. In the present study, we analyzed by microarrays the impact on hepatic gene expression in rats of two APFR regimens that caused identical diminution of body weight (19%) but differed slightly in duration (4 vs. 10 days). In addition, white adipose tissue (WAT) was also subjected to the transcriptomic analysis on day-4. The data revealed that the two regimens led to distinct patterns of differentially expressed genes in liver, albeit some major pathways of energy metabolism were similarly affected (particularly fatty acid and amino acid catabolism). The reason for the divergence appeared to be entrainment by the longer APFR protocol of peripheral oscillator genes, which resulted in derailment of circadian rhythms and consequent interaction of altered diurnal fluctuations with metabolic adjustments in gene expression activities. WAT proved to be highly unresponsive to the 4-day APFR as only 17 mRNA levels were influenced by the treatment. This study demonstrates that body weight is a poor proxy of metabolic state and that the customary protocols of feed restriction can lead to rhythm entrainment.

  5. Construction of a genome-wide human BAC-Unigene resource. Final progress report, 1989--1996

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, C.S.; Xu, R.X.; Wang, M.

    1996-12-31

    Currently, over 30,000 mapped STSs and 27,000 mapped Unigenes (non-redundant, unigene sets of cDNA representing EST clusters) are available for human alone. A total of 44,000 Unigene cDNA clones have been supplied by Research Genetics. Unigenes, or cDNAs are excellent resource for map building for two reasons. Firstly, they exist in two alternative forms -- as both sequence information for PCR primer pairs, and cDNA clones -- thus making library screening by colony hybridization as well as pooled library PCR possible. The authors have developed an efficient and robust procedure to screen genomic libraries with large number of DNA probes. Secondly, the linkage and order of expressed sequences, or genes are highly conserved among human, mouse and other mammalian species. Therefore, mapping with cDNA markers rather than random anonymous STSs will greatly facilitate comparative, evolutionary studies as well as physical map building. They have currently deconvoluted over 10,000 Unigene probes against a 4X coverage human BAC clones from the approved library D by high density colony hybridization method. 10,000 batches of Unigenes are arrayed in an imaginary 100 X 100 matrix from which 100 row pools and 100 column pools are obtained. Library filters are hybridized with pooled probes, thus reducing the number of hybridization required for addressing the positives for each Unigene from 10,000 to 200. Details on the experimental scheme as well as daily progress report is posted on the Web site (http://www.tree.caltech.edu).

  6. Studying Genome Heterogeneity within the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Halary, Sébastien; Bapteste, Eric; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Although heterokaryons have been reported in nature, multicellular organisms are generally assumed genetically homogeneous. Here, we investigate the case of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that form symbiosis with plant roots. The growth advantages they confer to their hosts are of great potential benefit to sustainable agricultural practices. However, measuring genetic diversity for these coenocytes is a major challenge: Within the same cytoplasm, AMF contain thousands of nuclei and show extremely high levels of genetic variation for some loci. The extent and physical location of polymorphism within and between AMF genomes is unclear. We used two complementary strategies to estimate genetic diversity in AMF, investigating polymorphism both on a genome scale and in putative single copy loci. First, we used data from whole-genome pyrosequencing of four AMF isolates to describe genetic diversity, based on a conservative network-based clustering approach. AMF isolates showed marked differences in genome-wide diversity patterns in comparison to a panel of control fungal genomes. This clustering approach further allowed us to provide conservative estimates of Rhizophagus spp. genomes sizes. Second, we designed new putative single copy genomic markers, which we investigated by massive parallel amplicon sequencing for two Rhizophagus irregularis and one Rhizophagus sp. isolates. Most loci showed high polymorphism, with up to 103 alleles per marker. This polymorphism could be distributed within or between nuclei. However, we argue that the Rhizophagus isolates under study might be heterokaryotic, at least for the putative single copy markers we studied. Considering that genetic information is the main resource for identification of AMF, we suggest that special attention is warranted for the study of these ecologically important organisms. PMID:25573960

  7. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Shlomo E.; Heller, Elimelech D.; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  8. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blum, Shlomo E; Heller, Elimelech D; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  9. The tumor suppressor SirT2 regulates cell cycle progression and genome stability by modulating the mitotic deposition of H4K20 methylation

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Lourdes; Martínez-Redondo, Paloma; Marazuela-Duque, Anna; Vazquez, Berta N.; Dooley, Scott J.; Voigt, Philipp; Beck, David B.; Kane-Goldsmith, Noriko; Tong, Qiang; Rabanal, Rosa M.; Fondevila, Dolors; Muñoz, Purificación; Krüger, Marcus; Tischfield, Jay A.; Vaquero, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of the epigenetic mark H4K20me1 (monomethylation of H4K20) by PR-Set7 during G2/M directly impacts S-phase progression and genome stability. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of this event are not well understood. Here we show that SirT2 regulates H4K20me1 deposition through the deacetylation of H4K16Ac (acetylation of H4K16) and determines the levels of H4K20me2/3 throughout the cell cycle. SirT2 binds and deacetylates PR-Set7 at K90, modulating its chromatin localization. Consistently, SirT2 depletion significantly reduces PR-Set7 chromatin levels, alters the size and number of PR-Set7 foci, and decreases the overall mitotic deposition of H4K20me1. Upon stress, the interaction between SirT2 and PR-Set7 increases along with the H4K20me1 levels, suggesting a novel mitotic checkpoint mechanism. SirT2 loss in mice induces significant defects associated with defective H4K20me1–3 levels. Accordingly, SirT2-deficient animals exhibit genomic instability and chromosomal aberrations and are prone to tumorigenesis. Our studies suggest that the dynamic cross-talk between the environment and the genome during mitosis determines the fate of the subsequent cell cycle. PMID:23468428

  10. Progressive engineering of a homing endonuclease genome editing reagent for the murine X-linked immunodeficiency locus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yupeng; Khan, Iram F; Boissel, Sandrine; Jarjour, Jordan; Pangallo, Joseph; Thyme, Summer; Baker, David; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Rawlings, David J

    2014-06-01

    LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (LHEs) are compact endonucleases with 20-22 bp recognition sites, and thus are ideal scaffolds for engineering site-specific DNA cleavage enzymes for genome editing applications. Here, we describe a general approach to LHE engineering that combines rational design with directed evolution, using a yeast surface display high-throughput cleavage selection. This approach was employed to alter the binding and cleavage specificity of the I-Anil LHE to recognize a mutation in the mouse Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) gene causative for mouse X-linked immunodeficiency (XID)-a model of human X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). The required re-targeting of I-AniI involved progressive resculpting of the DNA contact interface to accommodate nine base differences from the native cleavage sequence. The enzyme emerging from the progressive engineering process was specific for the XID mutant allele versus the wild-type (WT) allele, and exhibited activity equivalent to WT I-AniI in vitro and in cellulo reporter assays. Fusion of the enzyme to a site-specific DNA binding domain of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) resulted in a further enhancement of gene editing efficiency. These results illustrate the potential of LHE enzymes as specific and efficient tools for therapeutic genome engineering. PMID:24682825

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies 14 novel risk alleles associated with basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Harvind S.; Wu, Wenting; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Yang, Lingyao; Hedlin, Haley; Desai, Manisha; Lin, Yuan; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Hinds, David A.; Tang, Jean Y.; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y.

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of 2.8 million cases in the United States alone. Previous studies have demonstrated an association between 21 distinct genetic loci and BCC risk. Here, we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of BCC, totalling 17,187 cases and 287,054 controls. We confirm 17 previously reported loci and identify 14 new susceptibility loci reaching genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8, logistic regression). These newly associated SNPs lie within predicted keratinocyte regulatory elements and in expression quantitative trait loci; furthermore, we identify candidate genes and non-coding RNAs involved in telomere maintenance, immune regulation and tumour progression, providing deeper insight into the pathogenesis of BCC. PMID:27539887

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies 14 novel risk alleles associated with basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Harvind S; Wu, Wenting; Ransohoff, Katherine J; Yang, Lingyao; Hedlin, Haley; Desai, Manisha; Lin, Yuan; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Hinds, David A; Tang, Jean Y; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of 2.8 million cases in the United States alone. Previous studies have demonstrated an association between 21 distinct genetic loci and BCC risk. Here, we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of BCC, totalling 17,187 cases and 287,054 controls. We confirm 17 previously reported loci and identify 14 new susceptibility loci reaching genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8), logistic regression). These newly associated SNPs lie within predicted keratinocyte regulatory elements and in expression quantitative trait loci; furthermore, we identify candidate genes and non-coding RNAs involved in telomere maintenance, immune regulation and tumour progression, providing deeper insight into the pathogenesis of BCC. PMID:27539887

  13. Using high-throughput genomics to study hepatitis C: what determines the outcome of infection?

    PubMed

    Walters, Kathie-Anne; Katze, Michael G

    2009-03-01

    High-throughput genomic methods are now being used to study a wide variety of viral diseases, in an effort to understand how host responses to infection can lead either to efficient elimination of the pathogen or the development of severe disease. This article reviews how gene expression studies are addressing important clinical issues related to hepatitis C virus infection, in which some 15-25% of infected individuals are able to clear the virus without treatment, while the remainder progress to chronic liver disease that can lead to cirrhosis and death. Similar methods are also being used in an effort to identify the mechanisms underlying the failure of some hepatitis C patients to respond to interferon-alpha/ribavirin therapy. By providing a detailed picture of virus-host interactions, high-throughput genomics could potentially lead to the identification of novel cellular targets for the treatment of hepatitis C. PMID:19135090

  14. A genome-wide association study on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in the Taiwanese Han population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Jim; Chen, Chien-Ming; Pai, Tun-Wen; Chang, Hao-Teng; Hwang, Chi-Shin

    2016-06-01

    Identification of mutations in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in a genome-wide association study can reveal possible biomarkers of such a rapidly progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease. It was observed that significant single nucleotide polymorphisms vary when the tested population changes from one ethnic group to another. To identify new loci associated with ALS susceptibility in the Taiwanese Han population, we performed a genome-wide association study on 94 patients with sporadic ALS and 376 matched controls. We uncovered two new susceptibility loci at 13q14.3 (rs2785946) and 11q25 (rs11224052). In addition, we analyzed the functions of all the associated genes among 54 significant single nucleotide polymorphisms using Gene Ontology annotations, and the results showed several statistically significant neural- and muscle-related Gene Ontology terms and the associated diseases. PMID:26580837

  15. Generating genomic tools for blueberry improvement -- an update of our progress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is increased demand for and consumption of blueberries worldwide because of their many recognized health benefits. Great strides have been made in blueberry cultivar development since its domestication using traditional breeding approaches. However, genomic tools are lacking in blueberry, whic...

  16. Developing genomics tools for the western corn rootworm - Progress and promise

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cooperative efforts among a number of interested scientists and institutions in the U.S. and Europe are being undertaken to expand genomics resources for the western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera). Such resources include development of hundreds of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP...

  17. The ten years (2004-2014): Progress in peanut genetics and genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant breeding, genetics, and genomics play a critical role in sustainable agriculture specifically in improving crop productivity, quality, and resistance to pests and diseases. The germplasm collections have been treasures of crop genetic resources. Utilization of the collections of wild peanut sp...

  18. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    TIEDJE, JAMES M; KONSTANTINIDIS, KOSTAS; WORDEN, MARK

    2014-01-08

    The aim of the work reported is to study Shewanella population genomics, and to understand the evolution, ecophysiology, and speciation of Shewanella. The tasks supporting this aim are: to study genetic and ecophysiological bases defining the core and diversification of Shewanella species; to determine gene content patterns along redox gradients; and to Investigate the evolutionary processes, patterns and mechanisms of Shewanella.

  19. Genome-wide association study for longevity with whole-genome sequencing in 3 cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianqian; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Thomasen, Jørn Rind; Lund, Mogens Sandø; Sahana, Goutam

    2016-09-01

    Longevity is an important economic trait in dairy production. Improvements in longevity could increase the average number of lactations per cow, thereby affecting the profitability of the dairy cattle industry. Improved longevity for cows reduces the replacement cost of stock and enables animals to achieve the highest production period. Moreover, longevity is an indirect indicator of animal welfare. Using whole-genome sequencing variants in 3 dairy cattle breeds, we carried out an association study and identified 7 genomic regions in Holstein and 5 regions in Red Dairy Cattle that were associated with longevity. Meta-analyses of 3 breeds revealed 2 significant genomic regions, located on chromosomes 6 (META-CHR6-88MB) and 18 (META-CHR18-58MB). META-CHR6-88MB overlaps with 2 known genes: neuropeptide G-protein coupled receptor (NPFFR2; 89,052,210-89,059,348 bp) and vitamin D-binding protein precursor (GC; 88,695,940-88,739,180 bp). The NPFFR2 gene was previously identified as a candidate gene for mastitis resistance. META-CHR18-58MB overlaps with zinc finger protein 717 (ZNF717; 58,130,465-58,141,877 bp) and zinc finger protein 613 (ZNF613; 58,115,782-58,117,110 bp), which have been associated with calving difficulties. Information on longevity-associated genomic regions could be used to find causal genes/variants influencing longevity and exploited to improve the reliability of genomic prediction. PMID:27289149

  20. [Research progress on case-control study].

    PubMed

    Zhang, F F; Liu, Z D; Zhang, C X; Jiang, B F

    2016-04-10

    Several new varients related to the case-control designs have been developed in the recent decades, and this article briefly summarized four new designs: two-stage design, case-specular study, exposure-crossover study and case-case-time-control study. This paper involved principles of study design, requisites for application, advantages and disadvantages on all the studies. PMID:27087230

  1. Beyond Endometriosis Genome-Wide Association Study: From Genomics to Phenomics to the Patient.

    PubMed

    Zondervan, Krina T; Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Morris, Andrew P; Nyholt, Dale R; Montgomery, Grant W; Becker, Christian M; Missmer, Stacey A

    2016-07-01

    Endometriosis is a heritable, complex chronic inflammatory disease, for which much of the causal pathogenic mechanism remains unknown. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to date have identified 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms at 10 independent genetic loci associated with endometriosis. Most of these were more strongly associated with revised American Fertility Society stage III/IV, rather than stage I/II. The loci are almost all located in intergenic regions that are known to play a role in the regulation of expression of target genes yet to be identified. To identify the target genes and pathways perturbed by the implicated variants, studies are required involving functional genomic annotation of the surrounding chromosomal regions, in terms of transcription factor binding, epigenetic modification (e.g., DNA methylation and histone modification) sites, as well as their correlation with RNA transcription. These studies need to be conducted in tissue types relevant to endometriosis-in particular, endometrium. In addition, to allow biologically and clinically relevant interpretation of molecular profiling data, they need to be combined and correlated with detailed, systematically collected phenotypic information (surgical and clinical). The WERF Endometriosis Phenome and Biobanking Harmonisation Project is a global standardization initiative that has produced consensus data and sample collection protocols for endometriosis research. These now pave the way for collaborative studies integrating phenomic with genomic data, to identify informative subtypes of endometriosis that will enhance understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease and discovery of novel, targeted treatments. PMID:27513026

  2. Quality Control Procedures for Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Stephen; Armstrong, Loren L.; Bradford, Yuki; Carlson, Christopher S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; de Andrade, Mariza; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hayes, Geoffrey; Jarvik, Gail; Jiang, Lan; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Li, Rongling; Ling, Hua; Manolio, Teri A.; Matsumoto, Martha; McCarty, Catherine A.; McDavid, Andrew N.; Mirel, Daniel B.; Paschall, Justin E.; Pugh, Elizabeth W.; Rasmussen, Luke V.; Wilke, Russell A.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are being conducted at an unprecedented rate in population-based cohorts and have increased our understanding of the pathophysiology of complex disease. The recent application of GWAS to clinic-based cohorts has also yielded genetic predictors of clinical outcomes. Regardless of context, the practical utility of this information will ultimately depend upon the quality of the original data. Quality control (QC) procedures for GWAS are computationally intensive, operationally challenging, and constantly evolving. With each new dataset, new realities are discovered about GWAS data and best practices continue to be developed. The Genomics Workgroup of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) funded electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network has invested considerable effort in developing strategies for QC of these data. The lessons learned by this group will be valuable for other investigators dealing with large scale genomic datasets. Here we enumerate some of the challenges in QC of GWAS data and describe the approaches that the eMERGE network is using for quality assurance in GWAS data, thereby minimizing potential bias and error in GWAS results. In this protocol we discuss common issues associated with QC of GWAS data, including data file formats, software packages for data manipulation and analysis, sex chromosome anomalies, sample identity, sample relatedness, population substructure, batch effects, and marker quality. We propose best practices and discuss areas of ongoing and future research. PMID:21234875

  3. Accurate Computation of Survival Statistics in Genome-Wide Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vandin, Fabio; Papoutsaki, Alexandra; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Upfal, Eli

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge in genomics is to identify genetic variants that distinguish patients with different survival time following diagnosis or treatment. While the log-rank test is widely used for this purpose, nearly all implementations of the log-rank test rely on an asymptotic approximation that is not appropriate in many genomics applications. This is because: the two populations determined by a genetic variant may have very different sizes; and the evaluation of many possible variants demands highly accurate computation of very small p-values. We demonstrate this problem for cancer genomics data where the standard log-rank test leads to many false positive associations between somatic mutations and survival time. We develop and analyze a novel algorithm, Exact Log-rank Test (ExaLT), that accurately computes the p-value of the log-rank statistic under an exact distribution that is appropriate for any size populations. We demonstrate the advantages of ExaLT on data from published cancer genomics studies, finding significant differences from the reported p-values. We analyze somatic mutations in six cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), finding mutations with known association to survival as well as several novel associations. In contrast, standard implementations of the log-rank test report dozens-hundreds of likely false positive associations as more significant than these known associations. PMID:25950620

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of Copy Number Variation Identifies Candidate Gene Loci Associated with the Progression of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Cooper, David N.; Razali, Rozaimi; Rampal, Sanjay; Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Chan, Wah-Kheong; Anwar, Arif; Rosli, Nurul Shielawati Mohamed; Mahfudz, Anis Shafina; Cheah, Phaik-Leng; Basu, Roma Choudhury; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2014-01-01

    Between 10 and 25% of individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) develop hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To investigate the molecular basis of disease progression, we performed a genome-wide analysis of copy number variation (CNV) in a total of 49 patients with NAFLD [10 simple steatosis and 39 non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)] and 49 matched controls using high-density comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarrays. A total of 11 CNVs were found to be unique to individuals with simple steatosis, whilst 22 were common between simple steatosis and NASH, and 224 were unique to NASH. We postulated that these CNVs could be involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD progression. After stringent filtering, we identified four rare and/or novel CNVs that may influence the pathogenesis of NASH. Two of these CNVs, located at 13q12.11 and 12q13.2 respectively, harbour the exportin 4 (XPO4) and phosphodiesterase 1B (PDE1B) genes which are already known to be involved in the etiology of liver cirrhosis and HCC. Cross-comparison of the genes located at these four CNV loci with genes already known to be associated with NAFLD yielded a set of genes associated with shared biological processes including cell death, the key process involved in ‘second hit’ hepatic injury. To our knowledge, this pilot study is the first to provide CNV information of potential relevance to the NAFLD spectrum. These data could prove invaluable in predicting patients at risk of developing NAFLD and more importantly, those who will subsequently progress to NASH. PMID:24743702

  5. Case Study Evaluations: A Decade of Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    In the last 10 years, there has been increased use of case study methodology, with accompanying refinement and improvement of the methods. Case studies have become legitimate research methods in evaluation, but it is too soon to say whether improvements in methodology are really resulting in improvements in the case studies conducted. (SLD)

  6. Case-control association studies with matching and genomic controlling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Chung

    2004-07-01

    Family-based association studies have gained in popularity for mapping disease-susceptibility gene(s) of complex diseases. However, recruiting family controls is often more difficult than recruiting unrelated controls. The author proposes a case-control study, where the possible biases due to population stratification are controlled by matching in the design stage and by genomic controlling in the data-analytic stage. The matching is based on a set of "stratum-delineating variables," such as, race, ethnicity, nationality, ancestry, and birthplace; and the genomic controlling is based on typing a number of null markers across the genome and applying the principle of multiplicative scaling of chi-square distribution. It pays to match carefully to have a higher proportion of correctly matched sets, as computer simulation showed that this would increase the power of the study. If matching is crude, one loses power but still has the correct type I error rate after genomic controlling. Power studies showed that the numbers of affected subjects required for the pair-matched study are comparable to those required by the case-parents design, if the study was conducted in a homogeneous population. As the (control-to-case) matching ratio increases, the number of affected subjects required decreases. With matching ratio tending toward infinity, the number required shrinks roughly by half. The case-control study with matching and genomic controlling frees us from family bondage, and the genetic problem as complicated as mapping genes can now be studied using simple epidemiologic methods. PMID:15185398

  7. Genome-wide Association Study of Chicken Plumage Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Na; Choi, Jin Ae; Lee, Kyung-Tai; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Tae-Hun; Cho, Seoae; Lee, Taeheon

    2013-11-01

    To increase plumage color uniformity and understand the genetic background of Korean chickens, we performed a genome-wide association study of different plumage color in Korean native chickens. We analyzed 60K SNP chips on 279 chickens with GEMMA methods for GWAS and estimated the genetic heritability for plumage color. The estimated heritability suggests that plumage coloration is a polygenic trait. We found new loci associated with feather pigmentation at the genome-wide level and from the results infer that there are additional genetic effect for plumage color. The results will be used for selecting and breeding chicken for plumage color uniformity. PMID:25049737

  8. Population Genetics, Evolutionary Genomics, and Genome-Wide Studies of Malaria: A View across the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Jane M.; Volkman, Sarah K.; Uplekar, Swapna; Hupalo, Daniel N.; Alves, João Marcelo Pereira; Cui, Liwang; Donnelly, Martin; Roos, David S.; Harb, Omar S.; Acosta, Monica; Read, Andrew; Ribolla, Paulo E. M.; Singh, Om P.; Valecha, Neena; Wassmer, Samuel C.; Ferreira, Marcelo; Escalante, Ananias A.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the three protagonists in malaria—the Plasmodium parasite, the Anopheles mosquito, and the human host—is key to developing methods to control and eventually eliminate the disease. Genomic technologies, including the recent development of next-generation sequencing, enable interrogation of this triangle to an unprecedented level of scrutiny, and promise exciting progress toward real-time epidemiology studies and the study of evolutionary adaptation. We discuss the use of genomics by the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research, a network of field sites and laboratories in malaria-endemic countries that undertake cutting-edge research, training, and technology transfer in malarious countries of the world. PMID:26259940

  9. EPA releases progress report on hydraulic fracturing study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided a 21 December progress report on its ongoing national study about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. The agency said that a draft of the congressionally requested study will be released in 2014 for public and peer review and that its progress report does not draw conclusions about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing, often referred to as fracking.

  10. Longitudinal whole genome analysis of pre and post drug treatment Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates reveals progressive steps to drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Datta, Gargi; Nieto, Luisa M; Davidson, Rebecca M; Mehaffy, Carolina; Pederson, Caroline; Dobos, Karen M; Strong, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading causes of death due to an infectious disease in the world. Understanding the mechanisms of drug resistance has become pivotal in the detection and treatment of newly emerging resistant TB cases. We have analyzed three pairs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains pre- and post-drug treatment to identify mutations involved in the progression of resistance to the drugs rifampicin and isoniazid. In the rifampicin resistant strain, we confirmed a mutation in rpoB (S450L) that is known to confer resistance to rifampicin. We discovered a novel L101R mutation in the katG gene of an isoniazid resistant strain, which may directly contribute to isoniazid resistance due to the proximity of the mutation to the katG isoniazid-activating site. Another isoniazid resistant strain had a rare mutation in the start codon of katG. We also identified a number of mutations in each longitudinal pair, such as toxin-antitoxin mutations that may influence the progression towards resistance or may play a role in compensatory fitness. These findings improve our knowledge of drug resistance progression during therapy and provide a methodology to monitor longitudinal strains using whole genome sequencing, polymorphism comparison, and functional annotation. PMID:27156618

  11. Development and characterization of genomics resources for leafy spurge: A model perennial weed for functional genomics studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High throughput genomics approaches to study weed biology have so far been limited to a small number of research groups within the weed science community. In most cases, these groups have relied on heterologous approaches, since resources needed for functional genomics studies within desired species...

  12. A super powerful method for genome wide association study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-Wide Association Studies shed light on the identification of genes underlying human diseases and agriculturally important traits. This potential has been shadowed by false positive findings. The Mixed Linear Model (MLM) method is flexible enough to simultaneously incorporate population struct...

  13. Studies in genetic discrimination. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    We have screened 1006 respondents in a study of genetic discrimination. Analysis of these responses has produced evidence of the range of institutions engaged in genetic discrimination and demonstrates the impact of this discrimination on the respondents to the study. We have found that both ignorance and policy underlie genetic discrimination and that anti-discrimination laws are being violated.

  14. Listeria Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  15. Pfh1 Is an Accessory Replicative Helicase that Interacts with the Replisome to Facilitate Fork Progression and Preserve Genome Integrity.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Karin R; Guise, Amanda J; Pourbozorgi-Langroudi, Parham; Cristea, Ileana M; Zakian, Virginia A; Capra, John A; Sabouri, Nasim

    2016-09-01

    Replicative DNA helicases expose the two strands of the double helix to the replication apparatus, but accessory helicases are often needed to help forks move past naturally occurring hard-to-replicate sites, such as tightly bound proteins, RNA/DNA hybrids, and DNA secondary structures. Although the Schizosaccharomyces pombe 5'-to-3' DNA helicase Pfh1 is known to promote fork progression, its genomic targets, dynamics, and mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Here we address these questions by integrating genome-wide identification of Pfh1 binding sites, comprehensive analysis of the effects of Pfh1 depletion on replication and DNA damage, and proteomic analysis of Pfh1 interaction partners by immunoaffinity purification mass spectrometry. Of the 621 high confidence Pfh1-binding sites in wild type cells, about 40% were sites of fork slowing (as marked by high DNA polymerase occupancy) and/or DNA damage (as marked by high levels of phosphorylated H2A). The replication and integrity of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes, and nucleosome depleted regions were particularly Pfh1-dependent. The association of Pfh1 with genomic integrity at highly transcribed genes was S phase dependent, and thus unlikely to be an artifact of high transcription rates. Although Pfh1 affected replication and suppressed DNA damage at discrete sites throughout the genome, Pfh1 and the replicative DNA polymerase bound to similar extents to both Pfh1-dependent and independent sites, suggesting that Pfh1 is proximal to the replication machinery during S phase. Consistent with this interpretation, Pfh1 co-purified with many key replisome components, including the hexameric MCM helicase, replicative DNA polymerases, RPA, and the processivity clamp PCNA in an S phase dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that Pfh1 is an accessory DNA helicase that interacts with the replisome and promotes replication and suppresses DNA damage at hard-to-replicate sites. These data

  16. Recent Progress in Presolar Grain Studies

    PubMed Central

    Amari, Sachiko

    2014-01-01

    Presolar grains are stardust that condensed in stellar outflows or stellar ejecta, and was incorporated in meteorites. They remain mostly intact throughout the journey from stars to the earth, keeping information of their birthplaces. Studies of presolar grains, which started in 1987, have produced a wealth of information about nucleosynthesis in stars, mixing in stellar ejecta, and temporal variations of isotopic and elemental abundances in the Galaxy. Recent instrumental advancements in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) brought about the identification of presolar silicate grains. Isotopic and mineralogical investigations of sub-μm grains have been performed using a combination of SIMS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. Two instruments have been developed to study even smaller grains (∼50 nm) and measure isotopes and elements of lower abundances than those in previous studies. PMID:26819886

  17. Recent Progress in Presolar Grain Studies.

    PubMed

    Amari, Sachiko

    2014-01-01

    Presolar grains are stardust that condensed in stellar outflows or stellar ejecta, and was incorporated in meteorites. They remain mostly intact throughout the journey from stars to the earth, keeping information of their birthplaces. Studies of presolar grains, which started in 1987, have produced a wealth of information about nucleosynthesis in stars, mixing in stellar ejecta, and temporal variations of isotopic and elemental abundances in the Galaxy. Recent instrumental advancements in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) brought about the identification of presolar silicate grains. Isotopic and mineralogical investigations of sub-μm grains have been performed using a combination of SIMS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. Two instruments have been developed to study even smaller grains (∼50 nm) and measure isotopes and elements of lower abundances than those in previous studies. PMID:26819886

  18. Coordination: Southeast Continental Shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    An overview of the Oceanograhic Program of Skidaway Institute of Oceanograhy is presented. Included are the current five year plan for studies of the Southeast Continental Shelf, a summary of research accomplishments, proposed research for 1981-1982, current status of the Savannah Navigational Light Tower, and a list of publications. (ACR)

  19. The Human Genome Project and Mental Retardation: An Educational Program. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Sharon

    1999-05-03

    The Arc, a national organization on mental retardation, conducted an educational program for members, many of whom have a family member with a genetic condition causing mental retardation. The project informed members about the Human Genome scientific efforts, conducted training regarding ethical, legal and social implications and involved members in issue discussions. Short reports and fact sheets on genetic and ELSI topics were disseminated to 2,200 of the Arc's leaders across the country and to other interested individuals. Materials produced by the project can e found on the Arc's web site, TheArc.org.

  20. Elucidation and pharmacological targeting of novel molecular drivers of follicular lymphoma progression | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Follicular lymphoma (FL), the most common indolent subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, is associated with a relatively long overall survival rate ranging from 6 to 10 years from time of diagnosis. However, in 20-60% of FL patients, transformation to aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) reduces median survival to only 1.2 years. The specific functional and genetic determinants of FL transformation remain elusive, and genomic alterations underlying disease advancement have only been identified for a subset of cases.

  1. ICPP water inventory study progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, B.T.

    1993-05-01

    Recent data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) indicate that water is entering the sumps located in the bottom of Tank Firm Vaults in quantities that exceed expected levels. In addition, perched water body(s) exist beneath the northern portion of the ICPP. Questions have been raised concerning the origin of water entering the Tank Farm sumps and the recharge sources for the perched water bodies. Therefore, in an effort to determine the source of water, a project has been initiated to identify the source of water for Tank Farm sumps and the perched water bodies. In addition, an accurate water balance for the ICPP will be developed. The purpose of this report is to present the specific results and conclusions for the ICPP water balance portion of the study. In addition, the status of the other activities being conducted as part of study, along with the associated action plans, is provided.

  2. Progress report on nuclear spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1994-02-18

    The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) is involved in several aspects of heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. While the main emphasis is on experimental problems, the authors have maintained a strong collaboration with several theorists in order to best pursue the physics of their measurements. During the last year they have had several experiments at the ATLAS at Argonne National Laboratory, the GAMMASPHERE at the LBL 88 Cyclotron, and with the NORDBALL at the Niels Bohr Institute Tandem. Also, they continue to be very active in the WA93/98 collaboration studying ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics utilizing the SPS accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and in the PHENIX Collaboration at the RHIC accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. During the last year their experimental work has been in three broad areas: (1) the structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, (2) the structure of nuclei far from stability, and (3) ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. The results of studies in these particular areas are described in this document. These studies concentrate on the structure of nuclear matter in extreme conditions of rotational motion, imbalance of neutrons and protons, or very high temperature and density. Another area of research is heavy-ion-induced transfer reactions, which utilize the transfer of nucleons to states with high angular momentum to learn about their structure and to understand the transfer of particles, energy, and angular momentum in collisions between heavy ions.

  3. [Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  4. Improving livestock for agriculture - technological progress from random transgenesis to precision genome editing heralds a new era.

    PubMed

    Laible, Götz; Wei, Jingwei; Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Humans have a long history in shaping the genetic makeup of livestock to optimize production and meet growing human demands for food and other animal products. Until recently, this has only been possible through traditional breeding and selection, which is a painstakingly slow process of accumulating incremental gains over a long period. The development of transgenic livestock technology offers a more direct approach with the possibility for making genetic improvements with greater impact and within a single generation. However, initially the technology was hampered by technical difficulties and limitations, which have now largely been overcome by progressive improvements over the past 30 years. Particularly, the advent of genome editing in combination with homologous recombination has added a new level of efficiency and precision that holds much promise for the genetic improvement of livestock using the increasing knowledge of the phenotypic impact of genetic sequence variants. So far not a single line of transgenic livestock has gained approval for commercialization. The step change to genome-edited livestock with precise sequence changes may accelerate the path to market, provided applications of this new technology for agriculture can deliver, in addition to economic incentives for producers, also compelling benefits for animals, consumers, and the environment. PMID:25515661

  5. Human genome research and the public interest: Progress notes from an American Science Policy Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Juengst, E.T. )

    1994-01-01

    This essay reviews the efforts of the US Human Genome Project to anticipate and address the ethical, legal, and social implications of new advances in human genetics. Since 1990, approximately $10 million has been awarded by the National Institutes of Health and the DOE, in support of 65 research, education, and public discussion projects. These projects address four major areas of need: (1) the need for both client-centered assessments of new genetic services and for improved knowledge of the psychosocial and ethnocultural factors that shape clients' clinical genetic experiences; (2) the need for clear professional policies regarding human-subject research, clinical practical standards, and public health goals in human genetics; (3) the need for social policy protection against unfair access to and use of personal genetic information; (4) the need for improved public and professional understanding and discussion of these issues. The Human Genome Project's goal is to have defined, by 1995, policy options and programs capable of addressing these needs. 47 refs.

  6. Progress report on nuclear spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.R.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1996-01-16

    The experimental program in nuclear physics at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is led by Professors Carrol Bingham, Lee Riedinger, and Soren Sorenseni who respectively lead the studies of the exotic decay modes of nuclei far from stability, the program of high-spin research, and our effort in relativistic heavy-ion physics. Over the years, this broad program of research has been successful partially because of the shared University resources applied to this group effort. The proximity of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has allowed us to build extremely strong programs of joint research, and in addition to play an important leadership role in the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research (JIHIR). Our experimental program is also very closely linked with those at other national laboratories: Argonne (collaborations involving the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) and {gamma}-ray arrays), Brookhaven (the RHIC and Phenix projects), and Berkeley (GAMMASPHERE). We have worked closely with a variety of university groups in the last three years, especially those in the UNISOR and now UNIRIB collaborations. And, in all aspects of our program, we have maintained close collaborations with theorists, both to inspire the most exciting experiments to perform and to extract the pertinent physics from the results. The specific areas discussed in this report are: properties of high-spin states; study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability; and high energy heavy-ion physics.

  7. Insights into kidney diseases from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have considerably improved our understanding of the genetic basis of kidney function and disease. Population-based studies, used to investigate traits that define chronic kidney disease (CKD), have identified >50 genomic regions in which common genetic variants associate with estimated glomerular filtration rate or urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Case-control studies, used to study specific CKD aetiologies, have yielded risk loci for specific kidney diseases such as IgA nephropathy and membranous nephropathy. In this Review, we summarize important findings from GWAS and clinical and experimental follow-up studies. We also compare risk allele frequency, effect sizes, and specificity in GWAS of CKD-defining traits and GWAS of specific CKD aetiologies and the implications for study design. Genomic regions identified in GWAS of CKD-defining traits can contain causal genes for monogenic kidney diseases. Population-based research on kidney function traits can therefore generate insights into more severe forms of kidney diseases. Experimental follow-up studies have begun to identify causal genes and variants, which are potential therapeutic targets, and suggest mechanisms underlying the high allele frequency of causal variants. GWAS are thus a useful approach to advance knowledge in nephrology. PMID:27477491

  8. Automated quality control for genome wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Sally R.; Fardo, David W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides details on the necessary steps to assess and control data in genome wide association studies (GWAS) using genotype information on a large number of genetic markers for large number of individuals. Due to varied study designs and genotyping platforms between multiple sites/projects as well as potential genotyping errors, it is important to ensure high quality data. Scripts and directions are provided to facilitate others in this process.

  9. Evaluation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Study Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckendahl, Chad W.; Davis, Susan L.; Plake, Barbara S.; Sireci, Stephen G.; Hambleton, Ronald K.; Zenisky, April L.; Wells, Craig S.

    2009-01-01

    The "Evaluation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress: Study Reports" describes the special studies that comprised the design of the evaluation. In the Final Report, the authors presented a practical discussion of the evaluation studies to its primary, intended audience, namely policymakers. On this accompanying CD, readers will find…

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10−11) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10−9), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10−8) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10−9). PMID:21926974

  11. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E.; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes. PMID:26809117

  12. [Strategies of the study on herb genome program].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi-lin; Sun, Yong-zhen; Xu, Jiang; Luo, Hong-mei; Sun, Chao; He, Liu; Cheng, Xiang-lin; Zhang, Bo-li; Xiao, Pei-gen

    2010-07-01

    Herb Genome Program (HerbGP) includes a series of projects on whole genome sequencing (WGS) and post-genomics research of medicinal plants with unique secondary metabolism pathways or/and those of great medical and pharmaceutical importance. In this paper, we systematically discussed the strategy of HerbGP, from species selection, whole-genome sequencing, assembly and bioinformatics analysis, to postgenomics research. HerbGP will push study on Chinese traditional medicines into the front field of life science, by selecting a series of plants with unique secondary metabolism pathways as models and introducing "omics" methods into the research of these medicinal plants. HerbGP will provide great opportunities for China to be the leader in the basic research field of traditional Chinese medicine. HerbGP shall also have significant impacts on the R&D of natural medicines and the development of medicinal farming by analysis of secondary metabolic pathways and selection of cultivars with good agricultural traits. PMID:20931775

  13. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Amin, Najaf; Bakshis, Erin; Baumert, Jens; Ding, Jingzhong; Liu, Yongmei; Marciante, Kristin; Meirelles, Osorio; Nalls, Michael A.; Sun, Yan V.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Yu, Lei; Bandinelli, Stefania; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bennett, David A.; Boomsma, Dorret; Cannas, Alessandra; Coker, Laura H.; de Geus, Eco; De Jager, Philip L.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Purcell, Shaun; Hu, Frank B.; Rimma, Eric B.; Hunter, David J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Curhan, Gary; Rice, Kenneth; Penman, Alan D.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Emeny, Rebecca; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, Denis A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Illig, Thomas; Kardia, Sharon; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; Koenen, Karestan; Kraft, Peter; Kuningas, Maris; Massaro, Joseph M.; Melzer, David; Mulas, Antonella; Mulder, Cornelis L.; Murray, Anna; Oostra, Ben A.; Palotie, Aarno; Penninx, Brenda; Petersmann, Astrid; Pilling, Luke C.; Psaty, Bruce; Rawal, Rajesh; Reiman, Eric M.; Schulz, Andrea; Shulman, Joshua M.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Smith, Albert V.; Sutin, Angelina R.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Völzke, Henry; Widen, Elisabeth; Yaffe, Kristine; Zonderman, Alan B.; Cucca, Francesco; Harris, Tamara; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Llewellyn, David J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Tanaka, Toshiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is a heritable trait that exists on a continuum of varying severity and duration. Yet, the search for genetic variants associated with depression has had few successes. We exploit the entire continuum of depression to find common variants for depressive symptoms. Methods In this genome-wide association study, we combined the results of 17 population-based studies assessing depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Replication of the independent top hits (p < 1 × 10−5) was performed in five studies assessing depressive symptoms with other instruments. In addition, we performed a combined meta-analysis of all 22 discovery and replication studies. Results The discovery sample comprised 34,549 individuals (mean age of 66.5) and no loci reached genome-wide significance (lowest p = 1.05 × 10−7). Seven independent single nucleotide polymorphisms were considered for replication. In the replication set (n = 16,709), we found suggestive association of one single nucleotide polymorphism with depressive symptoms (rs161645, 5q21, p = 9.19 × 10−3). This 5q21 region reached genome-wide significance (p = 4.78 × 10−8) in the overall meta-analysis combining discovery and replication studies (n = 51,258). Conclusions The results suggest that only a large sample comprising more than 50,000 subjects may be sufficiently powered to detect genes for depressive symptoms. PMID:23290196

  14. [Research progress in the third-generation genomic editing technology - CRISPR/Cas9].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yalan; Zong, Yanan; Kong, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology originated from type II CRISPR/Cas system, which is widely found in bacteria and equips them with acquired immunity against viruses and plasmids. CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is a RNA-guided endonuclease, which can efficiently introduce double-strand breaks at specific sites and activate homologous recombination and/or non-homologous end joining mechanism for the repair of impaired DNA. Features such as easy-to-use, cost-effectiveness, multiple targeting ability have made it the third-generation genomic engineering tool following ZFNs and TALENs. Here the history of discovery and molecular mechanism of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology are reviewed. The rapid advance in its various applications, especially for the treatment of human genetic disorders, as well as some concomitant problems are discussed. PMID:27577230

  15. New study reveals relatively few mutations in AML genomes - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have detailed and broadly classified the genomic alterations that frequently underlie the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  16. Resources for Functional Genomics Studies in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Stephanie E.; Hu, Yanhui; Kim, Kevin; Housden, Benjamin E.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has become a system of choice for functional genomic studies. Many resources, including online databases and software tools, are now available to support design or identification of relevant fly stocks and reagents or analysis and mining of existing functional genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, etc. datasets. These include large community collections of fly stocks and plasmid clones, “meta” information sites like FlyBase and FlyMine, and an increasing number of more specialized reagents, databases, and online tools. Here, we introduce key resources useful to plan large-scale functional genomics studies in Drosophila and to analyze, integrate, and mine the results of those studies in ways that facilitate identification of highest-confidence results and generation of new hypotheses. We also discuss ways in which existing resources can be used and might be improved and suggest a few areas of future development that would further support large- and small-scale studies in Drosophila and facilitate use of Drosophila information by the research community more generally. PMID:24653003

  17. Social Studies Progress Monitoring and Intervention for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyers, Sarah J.; Lembke, Erica S.; Curs, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the technical adequacy of vocabulary-matching curriculum-based measurement (CBM) to identify and monitor the progress of 148 middle school students in social studies. In addition, the effectiveness of a reading comprehension intervention, Collaborative Strategic Reading (Klingner, Vaughn, Dimino, Schumm, & Bryant, 2001),…

  18. Big data challenges in bone research: genome-wide association studies and next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Nerea; Lucas, Gavin; Hysi, Pirro

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been developed as a practical method to identify genetic loci associated with disease by scanning multiple markers across the genome. Significant advances in the genetics of complex diseases have been made owing to advances in genotyping technologies, the progress of projects such as HapMap and 1000G and the emergence of genetics as a collaborative discipline. Because of its great potential to be used in parallel by multiple collaborators, it is important to adhere to strict protocols assuring data quality and analyses. Quality control analyses must be applied to each sample and each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). The software package PLINK is capable of performing the whole range of necessary quality control tests. Genotype imputation has also been developed to substantially increase the power of GWAS methodology. Imputation permits the investigation of associations at genetic markers that are not directly genotyped. Results of individual GWAS reports can be combined through meta-analysis. Finally, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has gained popularity in recent years through its capacity to analyse a much greater number of markers across the genome. Although NGS platforms are capable of examining a higher number of SNPs compared with GWA studies, the results obtained by NGS require careful interpretation, as their biological correlation is incompletely understood. In this article, we will discuss the basic features of such protocols. PMID:25709812

  19. Unclassified renal cell carcinoma: a clinicopathological, comparative genomic hybridization, and whole-genome exon sequencing study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhen-Yan; Pang, Li-Juan; Qi, Yan; Kang, Xue-Ling; Hu, Jian-Ming; Wang, Lianghai; Liu, Kun-Peng; Ren, Yuan; Cui, Mei; Song, Li-Li; Li, Hong-An; Zou, Hong; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Unclassified renal cell carcinoma (URCC) is a rare variant of RCC, accounting for only 3-5% of all cases. Studies on the molecular genetics of URCC are limited, and hence, we report on 2 cases of URCC analyzed using comparative genome hybridization (CGH) and the genome-wide human exon GeneChip technique to identify the genomic alterations of URCC. Both URCC patients (mean age, 72 years) presented at an advanced stage and died within 30 months post-surgery. Histologically, the URCCs were composed of undifferentiated, multinucleated, giant cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunostaining revealed that both URCC cases had strong p53 protein expression and partial expression of cluster of differentiation-10 and cytokeratin. The CGH profiles showed chromosomal imbalances in both URCC cases: gains were observed in chromosomes 1p11-12, 1q12-13, 2q20-23, 3q22-23, 8p12, and 16q11-15, whereas losses were detected on chromosomes 1q22-23, 3p12-22, 5p30-ter, 6p, 11q, 16q18-22, 17p12-14, and 20p. Compared with 18 normal renal tissues, 40 mutated genes were detected in the URCC tissues, including 32 missense and 8 silent mutations. Functional enrichment analysis revealed that the missense mutation genes were involved in 11 different biological processes and pathways, including cell cycle regulation, lipid localization and transport, neuropeptide signaling, organic ether metabolism, and ATP-binding cassette transporter signaling. Our findings indicate that URCC may be a highly aggressive cancer, and the genetic alterations identified herein may provide clues regarding the tumorigenesis of URCC and serve as a basis for the development of targeted therapies against URCC in the future. PMID:25120763

  20. Common Variants Confer Susceptibility to Barrett's Esophagus: Insights from the First Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Palles, Claire; Findlay, John M; Tomlinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Eight loci have been identified by the two genome-wide association studies of Barrett's esophagus that have been conducted to date. Esophageal adenocarcinoma cases were included in the second study following evidence that predisposing genetic variants for this cancer overlap with those for Barrett's esophagus. Genes with roles in embryonic development of the foregut are adjacent to 6 of the loci identified (FOXF1, BARX1, FOXP1, GDF7, TBX5, and ALDH1A2). An additional locus maps to a gene with known oncogenic potential (CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1), but expression quantitative trait data implicates yet another gene involved in esophageal development (PBX4). These results strongly support a model whereby dysregulation of genes involved in esophageal and thoracic development increases susceptibility to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma, probably by reducing anatomical antireflux mechanisms. An additional signal at 6p21 in the major histocompatibility complex also reinforces evidence that immune and inflammatory response to reflux is involved in the development of both diseases. All of the variants identified are intronic or intergenic rather than coding and are presumed to be or to mark regulatory variants. As with genome-wide association studies of other diseases, the functional variants at each locus are yet to be identified and the genes affected need confirming. In this chapter as well as discussing the biology behind each genome-wide association signal, we review the requirements for successfully conducting genome-wide association studies and discuss how progress in understanding the genetic variants that contribute to Barrett's esophagus/esophageal adenocarcinoma susceptibility compares to other cancers. PMID:27573776

  1. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision. PMID:26176695

  2. Genome-wide association studies in diverse populations

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Noah A; Huang, Lucy; Jewett, Ethan M; Szpiech, Zachary A; Jankovic, Ivana; Boehnke, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified a large number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with disease phenotypes. As most GWA studies have been performed primarily in populations of European descent, this review examines the issues involved in extending consideration of GWA studies to diverse worldwide populations. Although challenges exist with such issues as imputation, admixture, and replication, investigation of diverse populations in GWA studies has significant potential to advance the project of mapping the genetic determinants of complex diseases for the human population as a whole. PMID:20395969

  3. Disturbed mitotic progression and genome segregation are involved in cell transformation mediated by nano-TiO2 long-term exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shing; Chueh Pinju; Lin Yunwei; Shih Tungsheng; Chuang Showmei

    2009-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nano-particles (< 100 nm in diameter) have been of interest in a wide range of applications, such as in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals because of their low toxicity. However, recent studies have shown that TiO2 nano-particles (nano-TiO2) induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in various lines of cultured cells as well as tumorigenesis in animal models. The biological roles of nano-TiO2 are shown to be controversial and no comprehensive study paradigm has been developed to investigate their molecular mechanisms. In this study, we showed that short-term exposure to nano-TiO2 enhanced cell proliferation, survival, ERK signaling activation and ROS production in cultured fibroblast cells. Moreover, long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 not only increased cell survival and growth on soft agar but also the numbers of multinucleated cells and micronucleus (MN) as suggested in confocal microscopy analysis. Cell cycle phase analysis showed G2/M delay and slower cell division in long-term exposed cells. Most importantly, long-term TiO2 exposure remarkably affected mitotic progression at anaphase and telophase leading to aberrant multipolar spindles and chromatin alignment/segregation. Moreover, PLK1 was demonstrated as the target for nano-TiO2 in the regulation of mitotic progression and exit. Notably, a higher fraction of sub-G1 phase population appeared in TiO2-exposed cells after releasing from G2/M synchronization. Our results demonstrate that long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 disturbs cell cycle progression and duplicated genome segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cell transformation.

  4. The application of genome editing in studying hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Zou, Bing; Mittal, Rahul; Grati, M'hamed; Lu, Zhongmin; Shu, Yilai; Tao, Yong; Feng, Youg; Xie, Dinghua; Kong, Weijia; Yang, Shiming; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Liu, Xuezhong

    2015-09-01

    Targeted genome editing mediated by clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) technology has emerged as one of the most powerful tools to study gene functions, and with potential to treat genetic disorders. Hearing loss is one of the most common sensory disorders, affecting approximately 1 in 500 newborns with no treatment. Mutations of inner ear genes contribute to the largest portion of genetic deafness. The simplicity and robustness of CRISPR/Cas9-directed genome editing in human cells and model organisms such as zebrafish, mice and primates make it a promising technology in hearing research. With CRISPR/Cas9 technology, functions of inner ear genes can be studied efficiently by the disruption of normal gene alleles through non-homologous-end-joining (NHEJ) mechanism. For genetic hearing loss, CRISPR/Cas9 has potential to repair gene mutations by homology-directed-repair (HDR) or to disrupt dominant mutations by NHEJ, which could restore hearing. Our recent work has shown CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing can be efficiently performed in the mammalian inner ear in vivo. Thus, application of CRISPR/Cas9 in hearing research will open up new avenues for understanding the pathology of genetic hearing loss and provide new routes in the development of treatment to restore hearing. In this review, we describe major methodologies currently used for genome editing. We will highlight applications of these technologies in studies of genetic disorders and discuss issues pertaining to applications of CRISPR/Cas9 in auditory systems implicated in genetic hearing loss. PMID:25987504

  5. Progress in the Laboratory Study of Interstellar Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in the laboratory study of cosmic carbon analogs will be discussed. After a brief review of the history of laboratory studies of interstellar carbon molecules and ions, new gas-phase results will be discussed and contrasted to previous studies that used the techniques of matrix isolation spectroscopy. Finally, the impact of these new laboratory studies on the field of astrophysics will be discussed.

  6. Genome-Scale Studies of Aging: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Mark A; Kennedy, Brian K

    2012-01-01

    Whole-genome studies involving a phenotype of interest are increasingly prevalent, in part due to a dramatic increase in speed at which many high throughput technologies can be performed coupled to simultaneous decreases in cost. This type of genome-scale methodology has been applied to the phenotype of lifespan, as well as to whole-transcriptome changes during the aging process or in mutants affecting aging. The value of high throughput discovery-based science in this field is clearly evident, but will it yield a true systems-level understanding of the aging process? Here we review some of this work to date, focusing on recent findings and the unanswered puzzles to which they point. In this context, we also discuss recent technological advances and some of the likely future directions that they portend. PMID:23633910

  7. Quality control procedures for genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Stephen; Armstrong, Loren L; Bradford, Yuki; Carlson, Christopher S; Crawford, Dana C; Crenshaw, Andrew T; de Andrade, Mariza; Doheny, Kimberly F; Haines, Jonathan L; Hayes, Geoffrey; Jarvik, Gail; Jiang, Lan; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Li, Rongling; Ling, Hua; Manolio, Teri A; Matsumoto, Martha; McCarty, Catherine A; McDavid, Andrew N; Mirel, Daniel B; Paschall, Justin E; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Rasmussen, Luke V; Wilke, Russell A; Zuvich, Rebecca L; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are being conducted at an unprecedented rate in population-based cohorts and have increased our understanding of the pathophysiology of complex disease. Regardless of context, the practical utility of this information will ultimately depend upon the quality of the original data. Quality control (QC) procedures for GWAS are computationally intensive, operationally challenging, and constantly evolving. Here we enumerate some of the challenges in QC of GWAS data and describe the approaches that the electronic MEdical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network is using for quality assurance in GWAS data, thereby minimizing potential bias and error in GWAS results. We discuss common issues associated with QC of GWAS data, including data file formats, software packages for data manipulation and analysis, sex chromosome anomalies, sample identity, sample relatedness, population substructure, batch effects, and marker quality. We propose best practices and discuss areas of ongoing and future research. PMID:21234875

  8. Genome-wide association study of Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scharf, J M; Yu, D; Mathews, C A; Neale, B M; Stewart, S E; Fagerness, J A; Evans, P; Gamazon, E; Edlund, C K; Service, S K; Tikhomirov, A; Osiecki, L; Illmann, C; Pluzhnikov, A; Konkashbaev, A; Davis, L K; Han, B; Crane, J; Moorjani, P; Crenshaw, A T; Parkin, M A; Reus, V I; Lowe, T L; Rangel-Lugo, M; Chouinard, S; Dion, Y; Girard, S; Cath, D C; Smit, J H; King, R A; Fernandez, T V; Leckman, J F; Kidd, K K; Kidd, J R; Pakstis, A J; State, M W; Herrera, L D; Romero, R; Fournier, E; Sandor, P; Barr, C L; Phan, N; Gross-Tsur, V; Benarroch, F; Pollak, Y; Budman, C L; Bruun, R D; Erenberg, G; Naarden, A L; Lee, P C; Weiss, N; Kremeyer, B; Berrío, G B; Campbell, D D; Cardona Silgado, J C; Ochoa, W C; Mesa Restrepo, S C; Muller, H; Valencia Duarte, A V; Lyon, G J; Leppert, M; Morgan, J; Weiss, R; Grados, M A; Anderson, K; Davarya, S; Singer, H; Walkup, J; Jankovic, J; Tischfield, J A; Heiman, G A; Gilbert, D L; Hoekstra, P J; Robertson, M M; Kurlan, R; Liu, C; Gibbs, J R; Singleton, A; Hardy, J; Strengman, E; Ophoff, R A; Wagner, M; Moessner, R; Mirel, D B; Posthuma, D; Sabatti, C; Eskin, E; Conti, D V; Knowles, J A; Ruiz-Linares, A; Rouleau, G A; Purcell, S; Heutink, P; Oostra, B A; McMahon, W M; Freimer, N B; Cox, N J; Pauls, D L

    2013-06-01

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS in 1285 cases and 4964 ancestry-matched controls of European ancestry, including two European-derived population isolates, Ashkenazi Jews from North America and Israel and French Canadians from Quebec, Canada. In a primary meta-analysis of GWAS data from these European ancestry samples, no markers achieved a genome-wide threshold of significance (P<5 × 10(-8)); the top signal was found in rs7868992 on chromosome 9q32 within COL27A1 (P=1.85 × 10(-6)). A secondary analysis including an additional 211 cases and 285 controls from two closely related Latin American population isolates from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and Antioquia, Colombia also identified rs7868992 as the top signal (P=3.6 × 10(-7) for the combined sample of 1496 cases and 5249 controls following imputation with 1000 Genomes data). This study lays the groundwork for the eventual identification of common TS susceptibility variants in larger cohorts and helps to provide a more complete understanding of the full genetic architecture of this disorder. PMID:22889924

  9. Genome-wide association study of Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Fagerness, Jesen A; Evans, Patrick; Gamazon, Eric; Edlund, Christopher K.; Service, Susan; Tikhomirov, Anna; Osiecki, Lisa; Illmann, Cornelia; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Davis, Lea K; Han, Buhm; Crane, Jacquelyn; Moorjani, Priya; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; Parkin, Melissa A.; Reus, Victor I.; Lowe, Thomas L.; Rangel-Lugo, Martha; Chouinard, Sylvain; Dion, Yves; Girard, Simon; Cath, Danielle C; Smit, Jan H; King, Robert A.; Fernandez, Thomas; Leckman, James F.; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kidd, Judith R.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; State, Matthew; Herrera, Luis Diego; Romero, Roxana; Fournier, Eduardo; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L; Phan, Nam; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Benarroch, Fortu; Pollak, Yehuda; Budman, Cathy L.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Erenberg, Gerald; Naarden, Allan L; Lee, Paul C; Weiss, Nicholas; Kremeyer, Barbara; Berrío, Gabriel Bedoya; Campbell, Desmond; Silgado, Julio C. Cardona; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Restrepo, Sandra C. Mesa; Muller, Heike; Duarte, Ana V. Valencia; Lyon, Gholson J; Leppert, Mark; Morgan, Jubel; Weiss, Robert; Grados, Marco A.; Anderson, Kelley; Davarya, Sarah; Singer, Harvey; Walkup, John; Jankovic, Joseph; Tischfield, Jay A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Robertson, Mary M.; Kurlan, Roger; Liu, Chunyu; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Strengman, Eric; Ophoff, Roel; Wagner, Michael; Moessner, Rainald; Mirel, Daniel B.; Posthuma, Danielle; Sabatti, Chiara; Eskin, Eleazar; Conti, David V.; Knowles, James A.; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Rouleau, Guy A.; Purcell, Shaun; Heutink, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; McMahon, William; Freimer, Nelson; Cox, Nancy J.; Pauls, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS in 1285 cases and 4964 ancestry-matched controls of European ancestry, including two European-derived population isolates, Ashkenazi Jews from North America and Israel, and French Canadians from Quebec, Canada. In a primary meta-analysis of GWAS data from these European ancestry samples, no markers achieved a genome-wide threshold of significance (p<5 × 10−8); the top signal was found in rs7868992 on chromosome 9q32 within COL27A1 (p=1.85 × 10−6). A secondary analysis including an additional 211 cases and 285 controls from two closely-related Latin-American population isolates from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and Antioquia, Colombia also identified rs7868992 as the top signal (p=3.6 × 10−7 for the combined sample of 1496 cases and 5249 controls following imputation with 1000 Genomes data). This study lays the groundwork for the eventual identification of common TS susceptibility variants in larger cohorts and helps to provide a more complete understanding of the full genetic architecture of this disorder. PMID:22889924

  10. Genome-wide gene-based association study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Chou; Liang, Yu-Jen; Chung, Chia-Min; Chen, Jia-Wei; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies, which analyzes hundreds of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms to identify disease susceptibility genes, are challenging because the work involves intensive computation and complex modeling. We propose a two-stage genome-wide association scanning procedure, consisting of a single-locus association scan for the first stage and a gene-based association scan for the second stage. Marginal effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms are examined by using the exact Armitage trend test or logistic regression, and gene effects are examined by using a p-value combination method. Compared with some existing single-locus and multilocus methods, the proposed method has the following merits: 1) convenient for definition of biologically meaningful regions, 2) powerful for detection of minor-effect genes, 3) helpful for alleviation of a multiple-testing problem, and 4) convenient for result interpretation. The method was applied to study Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 Problem 1 rheumatoid arthritis data, and strong association signals were found. The results show that the human major histocompatibility complex region is the most important genomic region associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, previously reported genes including PTPN22, C5, and IL2RB were confirmed; novel genes including HLA-DRA, BTNL2, C6orf10, NOTCH4, TAP2, and TNXB were identified by our analysis. PMID:20018002

  11. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Stefan; Atzmon, Gil; Demerath, Ellen W.; Garcia, Melissa E.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kumari, Meena; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J.; Völker, Uwe; Yu, Lei; Arnold, Alice; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Biffar, Reiner; Buchman, Aron S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Couper, David; De Jager, Philip L.; Evans, Denis A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kocher, Thomas; Kuningas, Maris; Launer, Lenore J.; Lohman, Kurt K.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Mackenbach, Johan; Marciante, Kristin; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reiman, Eric M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shardell, Michelle D.; Smith, Albert V.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Walston, Jeremy; Zillikens, M. Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Bennett, David A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Liu, Yongmei; Murabito, Joanne M.; Newman, Anne B.; Tiemeier, Henning; Franceschini, Nora

    2011-01-01

    Human longevity and healthy aging show moderate heritability (20–50%). We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from nine studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium for two outcomes: a) all-cause mortality and b) survival free of major disease or death. No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was a genome-wide significant predictor of either outcome (p < 5 × 10−8). We found fourteen independent SNPs that predicted risk of death, and eight SNPs that predicted event-free survival (p < 10−5). These SNPs are in or near genes that are highly expressed in the brain (HECW2, HIP1, BIN2, GRIA1), genes involved in neural development and function (KCNQ4, LMO4, GRIA1, NETO1) and autophagy (ATG4C), and genes that are associated with risk of various diseases including cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to considerable overlap between the traits, pathway and network analysis corroborated these findings. These findings indicate that variation in genes involved in neurological processes may be an important factor in regulating aging free of major disease and achieving longevity. PMID:21782286

  12. Functional Genomics in the Study of Mind-Body Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Niles, Halsey; Mehta, Darshan H.; Corrigan, Alexandra A.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Denninger, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mind-body therapies (MBTs) are used throughout the world in treatment, disease prevention, and health promotion. However, the mechanisms by which MBTs exert their positive effects are not well understood. Investigations into MBTs using functional genomics have revolutionized the understanding of MBT mechanisms and their effects on human physiology. Methods We searched the literature for the effects of MBTs on functional genomics determinants using MEDLINE, supplemented by a manual search of additional journals and a reference list review. Results We reviewed 15 trials that measured global or targeted transcriptomic, epigenomic, or proteomic changes in peripheral blood. Sample sizes ranged from small pilot studies (n=2) to large trials (n=500). While the reliability of individual genes from trial to trial was often inconsistent, genes related to inflammatory response, particularly those involved in the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway, were consistently downregulated across most studies. Conclusion In general, existing trials focusing on gene expression changes brought about by MBTs have revealed intriguing connections to the immune system through the NF-κB cascade, to telomere maintenance, and to apoptotic regulation. However, these findings are limited to a small number of trials and relatively small sample sizes. More rigorous randomized controlled trials of healthy subjects and specific disease states are warranted. Future research should investigate functional genomics areas both upstream and downstream of MBT-related gene expression changes—from epigenomics to proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:25598735

  13. Multiple Hypotheses Testing Procedures in Clinical Trials and Genomic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qing

    2013-01-01

    We review and compare multiple hypothesis testing procedures used in clinical trials and those in genomic studies. Clinical trials often employ global tests, which draw an overall conclusion for all the hypotheses, such as SUM test, Two-Step test, Approximate Likelihood Ratio test (ALRT), Intersection-Union Test (IUT), and MAX test. The SUM and Two-Step tests are most powerful under homogeneous treatment effects, while the ALRT and MAX test are robust in cases with non-homogeneous treatment effects. Furthermore, the ALRT is robust to unequal sample sizes in testing different hypotheses. In genomic studies, stepwise procedures are used to draw marker-specific conclusions and control family wise error rate (FWER) or false discovery rate (FDR). FDR refers to the percent of false positives among all significant results and is preferred over FWER in screening high-dimensional genomic markers due to its interpretability. In cases where correlations between test statistics cannot be ignored, Westfall-Young resampling method generates the joint distribution of P-values under the null and maintains their correlation structure. Finally, the GWAS data from a clinical trial searching for SNPs associated with nephropathy among Type 1 diabetic patients are used to illustrate various procedures. PMID:24350232

  14. Genome-wide association study of periodontal pathogen colonization.

    PubMed

    Divaris, K; Monda, K L; North, K E; Olshan, A F; Lange, E M; Moss, K; Barros, S P; Beck, J D; Offenbacher, S

    2012-07-01

    Pathological shifts of the human microbiome are characteristic of many diseases, including chronic periodontitis. To date, there is limited evidence on host genetic risk loci associated with periodontal pathogen colonization. We conducted a genome-wide association (GWA) study among 1,020 white participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, whose periodontal diagnosis ranged from healthy to severe chronic periodontitis, and for whom "checkerboard" DNA-DNA hybridization quantification of 8 periodontal pathogens was performed. We examined 3 traits: "high red" and "high orange" bacterial complexes, and "high" Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) colonization. Genotyping was performed on the Affymetrix 6.0 platform. Imputation to 2.5 million markers was based on HapMap II-CEU, and a multiple-test correction was applied (genome-wide threshold of p < 5 × 10(-8)). We detected no genome-wide significant signals. However, 13 loci, including KCNK1, FBXO38, UHRF2, IL33, RUNX2, TRPS1, CAMTA1, and VAMP3, provided suggestive evidence (p < 5 × 10(-6)) of association. All associations reported for "red" and "orange" complex microbiota, but not for Aa, had the same effect direction in a second sample of 123 African-American participants. None of these polymorphisms was associated with periodontitis diagnosis. Investigations replicating these findings may lead to an improved understanding of the complex nature of host-microbiome interactions that characterizes states of health and disease. PMID:22699663

  15. Genome-wide Association Studies from the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    CGEMS identifies common inherited genetic variations associated with a number of cancers, including breast and prostate. Data from these genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are available through the Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics website.

  16. A genome-wide DNA methylation study in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We performed a genome-wide scan of 27,578 CpG loci covering 14,475 genes to identify differentially methylated loci (DML) in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Methods We used Illumina's Infinium methylation assay in paired DNA samples extracted from 24 fresh frozen CRC tissues and their corresponding normal colon tissues from 24 consecutive diagnosed patients at a tertiary medical center. Results We found a total of 627 DML in CRC covering 513 genes, of which 535 are novel DML covering 465 genes. We also validated the Illumina Infinium methylation data for top-ranking genes by non-bisulfite conversion q-PCR-based methyl profiler assay in a subset of the same samples. We also carried out integration of genome-wide copy number and expression microarray along with methylation profiling to see the functional effect of methylation. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) showed that among the major "gene sets" that are hypermethylated in CRC are the sets: "inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by G-protein signaling", "Rac guanyl-nucleotide exchange factor activity", "regulation of retinoic acid receptor signaling pathway" and "estrogen receptor activity". Two-level nested cross validation showed that DML-based predictive models may offer reasonable sensitivity (around 89%), specificity (around 95%), positive predictive value (around 95%) and negative predictive value (around 89%), suggesting that these markers may have potential clinical application. Conclusion Our genome-wide methylation study in CRC clearly supports most of the previous findings; additionally we found a large number of novel DML in CRC tissue. If confirmed in future studies, these findings may lead to identification of genomic markers for potential clinical application. PMID:21699707

  17. Genome-wide association study of schizophrenia in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Goes, Fernando S; McGrath, John; Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Wolyniec, Paula; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Ruczinski, Ingo; Nestadt, Gerald; Kenny, Eimear E; Vacic, Vladimir; Peters, Inga; Lencz, Todd; Darvasi, Ariel; Mulle, Jennifer G; Warren, Stephen T; Pulver, Ann E

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a common, clinically heterogeneous disorder associated with lifelong morbidity and early mortality. Several genetic variants associated with schizophrenia have been identified, but the majority of the heritability remains unknown. In this study, we report on a case-control sample of Ashkenazi Jews (AJ), a founder population that may provide additional insights into genetic etiology of schizophrenia. We performed a genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) of 592 cases and 505 controls of AJ ancestry ascertained in the US. Subsequently, we performed a meta-analysis with an Israeli AJ sample of 913 cases and 1640 controls, followed by a meta-analysis and polygenic risk scoring using summary results from Psychiatric GWAS Consortium 2 schizophrenia study. The U.S. AJ sample showed strong evidence of polygenic inheritance (pseudo-R(2) ∼9.7%) and a SNP-heritability estimate of 0.39 (P = 0.00046). We found no genome-wide significant associations in the U.S. sample or in the combined US/Israeli AJ meta-analysis of 1505 cases and 2145 controls. The strongest AJ specific associations (P-values in 10(-6) -10(-7) range) were in the 22q 11.2 deletion region and included the genes TBX1, GLN1, and COMT. Supportive evidence (meta P < 1 × 10(-4) ) was also found for several previously identified genome-wide significant findings, including the HLA region, CNTN4, IMMP2L, and GRIN2A. The meta-analysis of the U.S. sample with the PGC2 results provided initial genome-wide significant evidence for six new loci. Among the novel potential susceptibility genes is PEPD, a gene involved in proline metabolism, which is associated with a Mendelian disorder characterized by developmental delay and cognitive deficits. PMID:26198764

  18. Bioinformatics challenges for genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jason H.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Williams, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: The sequencing of the human genome has made it possible to identify an informative set of >1 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome that can be used to carry out genome-wide association studies (GWASs). The availability of massive amounts of GWAS data has necessitated the development of new biostatistical methods for quality control, imputation and analysis issues including multiple testing. This work has been successful and has enabled the discovery of new associations that have been replicated in multiple studies. However, it is now recognized that most SNPs discovered via GWAS have small effects on disease susceptibility and thus may not be suitable for improving health care through genetic testing. One likely explanation for the mixed results of GWAS is that the current biostatistical analysis paradigm is by design agnostic or unbiased in that it ignores all prior knowledge about disease pathobiology. Further, the linear modeling framework that is employed in GWAS often considers only one SNP at a time thus ignoring their genomic and environmental context. There is now a shift away from the biostatistical approach toward a more holistic approach that recognizes the complexity of the genotype–phenotype relationship that is characterized by significant heterogeneity and gene–gene and gene–environment interaction. We argue here that bioinformatics has an important role to play in addressing the complexity of the underlying genetic basis of common human diseases. The goal of this review is to identify and discuss those GWAS challenges that will require computational methods. Contact: jason.h.moore@dartmouth.edu PMID:20053841

  19. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin; Zhao, Han; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Over the past several years, the field of reproductive medicine has witnessed great advances in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), leading to identification of several promising genes involved in hormone action, type 2 diabetes, and cell proliferation. This review summarizes the key findings and discusses their potential implications with regard to genetic mechanisms of PCOS. Limitations of GWAS are evaluated, emphasizing the understanding of the reasons for variability in results between individual studies. Root causes of misinterpretations of GWASs are also addressed. Finally, the impact of GWAS on future directions of multi- and interdisciplinary studies is discussed. PMID:27513023

  20. Genomics of sorghum.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Andrew H

    2008-01-01

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is a subject of plant genomics research based on its importance as one of the world's leading cereal crops, a biofuels crop of high and growing importance, a progenitor of one of the world's most noxious weeds, and a botanical model for many tropical grasses with complex genomes. A rich history of genome analysis, culminating in the recent complete sequencing of the genome of a leading inbred, provides a foundation for invigorating progress toward relating sorghum genes to their functions. Further characterization of the genomes other than Saccharinae cereals may shed light on mechanisms, levels, and patterns of evolution of genome size and structure, laying the foundation for further study of sugarcane and other economically important members of the group. PMID:18483564

  1. Optical studies of dynamical processes in disordered systems. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, W.M.

    1994-05-01

    The authors present an abbreviated summary of the progress they have attained in the course of the abbreviated first year of the present three-year grant. The focus of their research continues to be on studies which help them understand various dynamical processes which affect the structure and the optical properties of disordered and amorphous materials. They continue to make significant progress in their attempts to understand the factors which affect, for example, the efficiencies of activated glasses. This report contains a brief description of the work they have carried out during the present grant period and an outline of the initiatives they are presently undertaking or continuing during the second period.

  2. [Application progress of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology in the treatment of HIV-1 infection].

    PubMed

    Han, Yinglun; Li, Qingwei

    2016-01-01

    The goal of gene therapy is to introduce foreign genes into human target cells in a certain way to correct or compensate diseases caused by defective or abnormal genes. Therefore, gene therapy has great practical significance in studying the treatment of persistent or latent HIV-1 infection. At present, the existing methods of gene therapy have some major defects such as limited target site recognition and high frequency of off-targets. The latest research showed that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) /CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) system from bacteria and archaea has been successfully reformed to a targeted genome editing tool. Thus, how to achieve the goal of treating HIV-1 infection by modifying targeted HIV-1 virus genome effectively using the CRISPR/Cas9 system has become a current research focus. Here we review the latest achievements worldwide and briefly introduce applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, including CCR5 gene editing, removal of HIV-1 virus and activation of HIV-1 virus, in order to provide reference for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:26787519

  3. Progressive genomic convergence of two Helicobacter pylori strains during mixed infection of a patient with chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qizhi; Didelot, Xavier; Wu, Zhongbiao; Li, Zongwei; He, Lihua; Li, Yunsheng; Ni, Ming; You, Yuanhai; Lin, Xi; Li, Zhen; Gong, Yanan; Zheng, Minqiao; Zhang, Minli; Liu, Jie; Wang, Weijun; Bo, Xiaochen; Falush, Daniel; Wang, Shengqi; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the detailed nature of genomic microevolution during mixed infection with multiple Helicobacter pylori strains in an individual. Design We sampled 18 isolates from a single biopsy from a patient with chronic gastritis and nephritis. Whole-genome sequencing was applied to these isolates, and statistical genetic tools were used to investigate their evolutionary history. Results The genomes fall into two clades, reflecting colonisation of the stomach by two distinct strains, and these lineages have accumulated diversity during an estimated 2.8 and 4.2 years of evolution. We detected about 150 clear recombination events between the two clades. Recombination between the lineages is a continuous ongoing process and was detected on both clades, but the effect of recombination in one clade was nearly an order of magnitude higher than in the other. Imputed ancestral sequences also showed evidence of recombination between the two strains prior to their diversification, and we estimate that they have both been infecting the same host for at least 12 years. Recombination tracts between the lineages were, on average, 895 bp in length, and showed evidence for the interspersion of recipient sequences that has been observed in in vitro experiments. The complex evolutionary history of a phage-related protein provided evidence for frequent reinfection of both clades by a single phage lineage during the past 4 years. Conclusions Whole genome sequencing can be used to make detailed conclusions about the mechanisms of genetic change of H. pylori based on sampling bacteria from a single gastric biopsy. PMID:25007814

  4. Biological Sciences Curriculum Study Newsletter Number 56, Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, George M., Ed.

    This newsletter presents a progress report for the 1973-74 year for the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). The program for the Educable Mentally Handicapped is reviewed and a new series of Animal Behavior films is described. Other articles in the newsletter include information on the Human Sciences Program with emphasis on the…

  5. On Studies of Moral Socialization of Students: Progress and Perplexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Renjie

    2008-01-01

    Moral socialization of students consists of five elements: process, subject, agent, content and pattern. This paper discusses the studies of the former three: their progress and perplexities, covering the following puzzles: "Why does the youth socialization take longer time?" "Are there any critical periods in student socialization?" "How do we…

  6. Progressive Macular Hypomelanosis in Korean Patients: A Clinicopathologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seon Wook; Hong, Soon Kwon; Kim, Sang Hyun; Park, Jeong Hoon; Seo, Jong Keun; Sung, Ho Suk

    2009-01-01

    Background Progressive macular hypomelanosis is characterized by ill-defined, non-scaly, hypopigmented macules primarily on the trunk of the body. Although numerous cases of progressive macular hypomelanosis have been reported, there have been no clinicopathologic studies of progressive macular hypomelanosis in Korean patients. Objective In this study we examined the clinical characteristics, histologic findings, and treatment methods for progressive macular hypomelanosis in a Korean population. Methods Between 1996 and 2005, 20 patients presented to the Department of Dermatology at Busan Paik Hospital with acquired, non-scaly, confluent, hypopigmented macules on the trunk, and with no history of inflammation or infection. The medical records, clinical photographs, and pathologic findings for each patient were examined. Results The patients included 5 men and 15 women. The mean age of onset was 21.05±3.47 years. The back was the most common site of involvement. All KOH examinations were negative. A Wood's lamp examination showed hypopigmented lesions compared with the adjacent normal skin. A microscopic examination showed a reduction in the number of melanin granules in the lesions compared with the adjacent normal skin, although S-100 immunohistochemical staining did not reveal significant differences in the number of melanocytes. Among the 20 patients, 7 received topical drug therapy, 6 were treated with narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy, 4 received oral minocycline, and 3 did not receive any treatment. Conclusion Most of the patients with progressive macular hypomelanosis had asymptomatic ill-defined, non-scaly, and symmetric hypopigmented macules, especially on the back and abdomen. Histologically, the number of melanocytes did not differ significantly between the hypopigmented macules and the normal perilesional skin. No effective treatment is known for progressive macular hypomelanosis; however, narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy may be a useful

  7. A Bivariate Whole Genome Linkage Study Identified Genomic Regions Influencing Both BMD and Bone Structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Gang; Liu, Yong-Jun; Liu, Jianfeng; Pei, Yufang; Xiong, Dong-Hai; Shen, Hui; Deng, Hong-Yi; Papasian, Christopher J; Drees, Betty M; Hamilton, James J; Recker, Robert R; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2008-01-01

    Areal BMD (aBMD) and areal bone size (ABS) are biologically correlated traits and are each important determinants of bone strength and risk of fractures. Studies showed that aBMD and ABS are genetically correlated, indicating that they may share some common genetic factors, which, however, are largely unknown. To study the genetic factors influencing both aBMD and ABS, bivariate whole genome linkage analyses were conducted for aBMD-ABS at the femoral neck (FN), lumbar spine (LS), and ultradistal (UD)-forearm in a large sample of 451 white pedigrees made up of 4498 individuals. We detected significant linkage on chromosome Xq27 (LOD = 4.89) for LS aBMD-ABS. In addition, we detected suggestive linkages at 20q11 (LOD = 3.65) and Xp11 (LOD = 2.96) for FN aBMD-ABS; at 12p11 (LOD = 3.39) and 17q21 (LOD = 2.94) for LS aBMD-ABS; and at 5q23 (LOD = 3.54), 7p15 (LOD = 3.45), Xq27 (LOD = 2.93), and 12p11 (LOD = 2.92) for UD-forearm aBMD-ABS. Subsequent discrimination analyses indicated that quantitative trait loci (QTLs) at 12p11 and 17q21 may have pleiotropic effects on aBMD and ABS. This study identified several genomic regions that may contain QTLs important for both aBMD and ABS. Further endeavors are necessary to follow these regions to eventually pinpoint the genetic variants affecting bone strength and risk of fractures. PMID:18597637

  8. [Genome-wide association study for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yoji; Kou, Ikuyo; Scoliosis, Japan; Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis(AIS)is a polygenic disease. Genome-wide association studies(GWASs)have been performed for a lot of polygenic diseases. For AIS, we conducted GWAS and identified the first AIS locus near LBX1. After the discovery, we have extended our study by increasing the numbers of subjects and SNPs. In total, our Japanese GWAS has identified four susceptibility genes. GWASs for AIS have also been performed in the USA and China, which identified one and three susceptibility genes, respectively. Here we review GWASs in Japan and abroad and functional analysis to clarify the pathomechanism of AIS. PMID:27013625

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study of Parity in Bangladeshi Women

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Argos, Maria; Pierce, Brandon L.; Tong, Lin; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-01-01

    Human fertility is a complex trait determined by gene-environment interactions in which genetic factors represent a significant component. To better understand inter-individual variability in fertility, we performed one of the first genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common fertility phenotypes, lifetime number of pregnancies and number of children in a developing country population. The fertility phenotype data and DNA samples were obtained at baseline recruitment from individuals participating in a large prospective cohort study in Bangladesh. GWAS analyses of fertility phenotypes were conducted among 1,686 married women. One SNP on chromosome 4 was non-significantly associated with number of children at P <10-7 and number of pregnancies at P <10-6. This SNP is located in a region without a gene within 1 Mb. One SNP on chromosome 6 was non-significantly associated with extreme number of children at P <10-6. The closest gene to this SNP is HDGFL1, a hepatoma-derived growth factor. When we excluded hormonal contraceptive users, a SNP on chromosome 5 was non-significantly associated at P <10-5 for number of children and number of pregnancies. This SNP is located near C5orf64, an open reading frame, and ZSWIM6, a zinc ion binding gene. We also estimated the heritability of these phenotypes from our genotype data using GCTA (Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis) for number of children (hg2 = 0.149, SE = 0.24, p-value = 0.265) and number of pregnancies (hg2 = 0.007, SE = 0.22, p-value = 0.487). Our genome-wide association study and heritability estimates of number of pregnancies and number of children in Bangladesh did not confer strong evidence of common variants for parity variation. However, our results suggest that future studies may want to consider the role of 3 notable SNPs in their analysis. PMID:25742292

  10. Genome-wide association study of parity in Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Argos, Maria; Pierce, Brandon L; Tong, Lin; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-01-01

    Human fertility is a complex trait determined by gene-environment interactions in which genetic factors represent a significant component. To better understand inter-individual variability in fertility, we performed one of the first genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common fertility phenotypes, lifetime number of pregnancies and number of children in a developing country population. The fertility phenotype data and DNA samples were obtained at baseline recruitment from individuals participating in a large prospective cohort study in Bangladesh. GWAS analyses of fertility phenotypes were conducted among 1,686 married women. One SNP on chromosome 4 was non-significantly associated with number of children at P <10(-7) and number of pregnancies at P <10(-6). This SNP is located in a region without a gene within 1 Mb. One SNP on chromosome 6 was non-significantly associated with extreme number of children at P <10(-6). The closest gene to this SNP is HDGFL1, a hepatoma-derived growth factor. When we excluded hormonal contraceptive users, a SNP on chromosome 5 was non-significantly associated at P <10(-5) for number of children and number of pregnancies. This SNP is located near C5orf64, an open reading frame, and ZSWIM6, a zinc ion binding gene. We also estimated the heritability of these phenotypes from our genotype data using GCTA (Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis) for number of children (hg2 = 0.149, SE = 0.24, p-value = 0.265) and number of pregnancies (hg2 = 0.007, SE = 0.22, p-value = 0.487). Our genome-wide association study and heritability estimates of number of pregnancies and number of children in Bangladesh did not confer strong evidence of common variants for parity variation. However, our results suggest that future studies may want to consider the role of 3 notable SNPs in their analysis. PMID:25742292

  11. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenetics research debate

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kent R; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Will genome-wide association studies (GWAS) ‘work’ for pharmacogenetics research? This question was the topic of a staged debate, with pro and con sides, aimed to bring out the strengths and weaknesses of GWAS for pharmacogenetics studies. After a full day of seminars at the Fifth Statistical Analysis Workshop of the Pharmacogenetics Research Network, the lively debate was held – appropriately – at Goonies Comedy Club in Rochester (MN, USA). The pro side emphasized that the many GWAS successes for identifying genetic variants associated with disease risk show that it works; that the current genotyping platforms are efficient, with good imputation methods to fill in missing data; that its global assessment is always a success even if no significant associations are detected; and that genetic effects are likely to be large because humans have not evolved in a drug-therapy environment. By contrast, the con side emphasized that we have limited knowledge of the complexity of the genome; limited clinical phenotypes compromise studies; the likely multifactorial nature of drug response clouding the small genetic effects; and limitations of sample size and replication studies in pharmacogenetic studies. Lively and insightful discussions emphasized further research efforts that might benefit GWAS in pharmacogenetics. PMID:20235786

  12. Effectiveness study of atropine for progressive myopia in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Polling, J R; Kok, R G W; Tideman, J W L; Meskat, B; Klaver, C C W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Randomized controlled trials have shown the efficacy of atropine for progressive myopia, and this treatment has become the preferred pattern for this condition in Taiwan. This study explores the effectiveness of atropine 0.5% treatment for progressive high myopia and adherence to therapy in a non-Asian country. Methods An effectiveness study was performed in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Overall 77 children (mean age 10.3 years±2.3), of European (n=53), Asian (n=18), and African (n=6) descent with progressive myopia were prescribed atropine 0.5% eye drops daily. Both parents and children filled in a questionnaire regarding adverse events and adherence to therapy. A standardized eye examination including cycloplegic refraction and axial length was performed at baseline and 1, 4, and 12 months after initiation of therapy. Results Mean spherical equivalent at baseline was −6.6D (±3.3). The majority (60/77, 78%) of children adhered to atropine treatment for 12 months; 11 of the 17 children who discontinued therapy did so within 1 month after the start of therapy. The most prominent reported adverse events were photophobia (72%), followed by reading problems (38%), and headaches (22%). The progression rate of spherical equivalent before treatment (−1.0D/year±0.7) diminished substantially during treatment (−0.1D/year±0.7) compared to those who ceased therapy (−0.5D/year±0.6; P=0.03). Conclusions Despite the relatively high occurrence of adverse events, our study shows that atropine can be an effective and sustainable treatment for progressive high myopia in Europeans. PMID:27101751

  13. Effectiveness study of atropine for progressive myopia in Europeans.

    PubMed

    Polling, J R; Kok, R G W; Tideman, J W L; Meskat, B; Klaver, C C W

    2016-07-01

    PurposeRandomized controlled trials have shown the efficacy of atropine for progressive myopia, and this treatment has become the preferred pattern for this condition in Taiwan. This study explores the effectiveness of atropine 0.5% treatment for progressive high myopia and adherence to therapy in a non-Asian country.MethodsAn effectiveness study was performed in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Overall 77 children (mean age 10.3 years±2.3), of European (n=53), Asian (n=18), and African (n=6) descent with progressive myopia were prescribed atropine 0.5% eye drops daily. Both parents and children filled in a questionnaire regarding adverse events and adherence to therapy. A standardized eye examination including cycloplegic refraction and axial length was performed at baseline and 1, 4, and 12 months after initiation of therapy.ResultsMean spherical equivalent at baseline was -6.6D (±3.3). The majority (60/77, 78%) of children adhered to atropine treatment for 12 months; 11 of the 17 children who discontinued therapy did so within 1 month after the start of therapy. The most prominent reported adverse events were photophobia (72%), followed by reading problems (38%), and headaches (22%). The progression rate of spherical equivalent before treatment (-1.0D/year±0.7) diminished substantially during treatment (-0.1D/year±0.7) compared to those who ceased therapy (-0.5D/year±0.6; P=0.03).ConclusionsDespite the relatively high occurrence of adverse events, our study shows that atropine can be an effective and sustainable treatment for progressive high myopia in Europeans. PMID:27101751

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces ambofaciens DSM 40697, a Paradigm for Genome Plasticity Studies

    PubMed Central

    Thibessard, Annabelle

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of Streptomyces ambofaciens DSM 40697 was completely determined. The genome consists of an 8.1-Mbp linear chromosome with terminal inverted repeats of 210 kb. Genomic islands were identified, one of which corresponds to a new putative integrative and conjugative element (ICE) called pSAM3. PMID:27257195

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces ambofaciens DSM 40697, a Paradigm for Genome Plasticity Studies.

    PubMed

    Thibessard, Annabelle; Leblond, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of Streptomyces ambofaciens DSM 40697 was completely determined. The genome consists of an 8.1-Mbp linear chromosome with terminal inverted repeats of 210 kb. Genomic islands were identified, one of which corresponds to a new putative integrative and conjugative element (ICE) called pSAM3. PMID:27257195

  16. Voxelwise genome-wide association study (vGWAS)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jason L.; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Ho, April J.; Leow, Alex D.; Toga, Arthur W.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Gerber, Jill D.; Allen, April N.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; DeChairo, Bryan M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the human brain is highly heritable, and is thought to be influenced by many common genetic variants, many of which are currently unknown. Recent advances in neuroimaging and genetics have allowed collection of both highly detailed structural brain scans and genome-wide genotype information. This wealth of information presents a new opportunity to find the genes influencing brain structure. Here we explore the relation between 448,293 single nucleotide polymorphisms in each of 31,622 voxels of the entire brain across 740 elderly subjects (mean age±s.d.: 75.52±6.82 years; 438 male) including subjects with Alzheimer's disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and healthy elderly controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We used tensor-based morphometry to measure individual differences in brain structure at the voxel level relative to a study-specific template based on healthy elderly subjects. We then conducted a genome-wide association at each voxel to identify genetic variants of interest. By studying only the most associated variant at each voxel, we developed a novel method to address the multiple comparisons problem and computational burden associated with the unprecedented amount of data. No variant survived the strict significance criterion, but several genes worthy of further exploration were identified, including CSMD2 and CADPS2. These genes have high relevance to brain structure. This is the first voxelwise genome wide association study to our knowledge, and offers a novel method to discover genetic influences on brain structure. PMID:20171287

  17. GenomicusPlants: A Web Resource to Study Genome Evolution in Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Alexandra; Murat, Florent; Salse, Jérôme; Roest Crollius, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomics combined with phylogenetic reconstructions are powerful approaches to study the evolution of genes and genomes. However, the current rapid expansion of the volume of genomic information makes it increasingly difficult to interrogate, integrate and synthesize comparative genome data while taking into account the maximum breadth of information available. GenomicusPlants (http://www.genomicus.biologie.ens.fr/genomicus-plants) is an extension of the Genomicus webserver that addresses this issue by allowing users to explore flowering plant genomes in an intuitive way, across the broadest evolutionary scales. Extant genomes of 26 flowering plants can be analyzed, as well as 23 ancestral reconstructed genomes. Ancestral gene order provides a long-term chronological view of gene order evolution, greatly facilitating comparative genomics and evolutionary studies. Four main interfaces (‘views’) are available where: (i) PhyloView combines phylogenetic trees with comparisons of genomic loci across any number of genomes; (ii) AlignView projects loci of interest against all other genomes to visualize its topological conservation; (iii) MatrixView compares two genomes in a classical dotplot representation; and (iv) Karyoview visualizes chromosome karyotypes ‘painted’ with colours of another genome of interest. All four views are interconnected and benefit from many customizable features. PMID:25432975

  18. [New insight of genome-wide association study (GWAS)].

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kikuko

    2013-02-01

    The number of obese patients is increasing in Japan, due to the westernization of lifestyle. Obesity, especially visceral fat obesity, is important for the development of metabolic syndrome. Genetic factors are important for the development of obesity as well as environmental factors. Importance of genetic factors of fat distribution is also reported. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed the obesity and fat distribution-related polymorphisms. GWAS will highlight a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms in the regulation of obesity and distribution of body fat. PMID:23631198

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study of Metabolic Syndrome in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seok Won; Chung, Myungguen; Park, Soo-Jung; Cho, Seong Beom

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (METS) is a disorder of energy utilization and storage and increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. To identify the genetic risk factors of METS, we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for 2,657 cases and 5,917 controls in Korean populations. As a result, we could identify 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with genome-wide significance level p-values (<5 × 10-8), 8 SNPs with genome-wide suggestive p-values (5 × 10-8 ≤ p < 1 × 10-5), and 2 SNPs of more functional variants with borderline p-values (5 × 10-5 ≤ p < 1 × 10-4). On the other hand, the multiple correction criteria of conventional GWASs exclude false-positive loci, but simultaneously, they discard many true-positive loci. To reconsider the discarded true-positive loci, we attempted to include the functional variants (nonsynonymous SNPs [nsSNPs] and expression quantitative trait loci [eQTL]) among the top 5,000 SNPs based on the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by genotypic variance. In total, 159 eQTLs and 18 nsSNPs were presented in the top 5,000 SNPs. Although they should be replicated in other independent populations, 6 eQTLs and 2 nsSNP loci were located in the molecular pathways of LPL, APOA5, and CHRM2, which were the significant or suggestive loci in the METS GWAS. Conclusively, our approach using the conventional GWAS, reconsidering functional variants and pathway-based interpretation, suggests a useful method to understand the GWAS results of complex traits and can be expanded in other genomewide association studies. PMID:25705157

  20. Genome-wide association study of periweaning failure-to-thrive syndrome (PFTS) in pigs.

    PubMed

    Zanella, R; Morés, N; Morés, M A Z; Peixoto, J O; Zanella, E L; Ciacci-Zanella, J R; Ibelli, A M G; Gava, D; Cantão, M E; Ledur, M C

    2016-06-25

    Porcine periweaning-failure-to-thrive syndrome (PFTS) is a condition that affects newly weaned piglets. It is characterised by a progressive debilitation leading to death, in the absence of infectious, nutritional, management or environmental factors. In this study, we present the first report of PFTS in South America and the results of a genome-wide association study to identify the genetic markers associated with the appearance of this condition in a crossbred swine population. Four chromosomal regions were associated with PFTS predisposition, one located on SSCX, one on SSC8, and the two other regions on SSC14. Regions on SSC8 and SSC14 harbour important functional candidate genes involved in human depression and might have an important role in PFTS. Our findings contribute to the increasing knowledge about this syndrome, which has been investigated since 2007, and to the identification of the aetiology of this disease. PMID:27162284

  1. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Emily R; Cusanovich, Darren A; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10-7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  2. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Emily R.; Cusanovich, Darren A.; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B.; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10−7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  3. Study Progress on Tissue Culture of Maize Mature Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhen; Cheng, Jun; Cheng, Yanping; Zhou, Xioafu

    It has been paid more and more attention on maize tissue culture as it is a basic work in maize genetic transformation, especially huge breakthrough has been made in maize tissue culture utilizing mature embryos as explants in the recent years. This paper reviewed the study progress on maize tissue culture and plant regeneration utilizing mature embryos as explants from callus induction, subculture, plant regeneration and browning reduction and so on.

  4. The tumor suppressor SirT2 regulates cell cycle progression and genome stability by modulating the mitotic deposition of H4K20 methylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The establishment of the epigenetic mark H4K20me1 (monomethylation of H4K20) by PR-Set7 during G2/M directly impacts S-phase progression and genome stability. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of this event are not well understood. Here we show that SirT2 regulates H4K20me1 depositi...

  5. Genotype imputation in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Eleonora; Sanna, Serena; Fuchsberger, Christian; Fritsche, Lars G

    2013-07-01

    Imputation is an in silico method that can increase the power of association studies by inferring missing genotypes, harmonizing data sets for meta-analyses, and increasing the overall number of markers available for association testing. This unit provides an introductory overview of the imputation method and describes a two-step imputation approach that consists of the phasing of the study genotypes and the imputation of reference panel genotypes into the study haplotypes. Detailed steps for data preparation and quality control illustrate how to run the computationally intensive two-step imputation with the high-density reference panels of the 1000 Genomes Project, which currently integrates more than 39 million variants. Additionally, the influence of reference panel selection, input marker density, and imputation settings on imputation quality are demonstrated with a simulated data set to give insight into crucial points of successful genotype imputation. PMID:23853078

  6. Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaohan; Ye, Chuyu; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wullschleger, Stan D; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2011-01-01

    Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

  7. Progress in a genome scan for linkage in schizophrenia in a large Swedish kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, C.L.; Kennedy, J.L.; Pakstis, A.J.

    1994-03-15

    Genetic linkage studies of a kindred from Sweden segregating for schizophrenia have been performed using a genetic model (autosomal dominant, f - 0.72, q - 0.02, phenocopies=0.001) as described in Kennedy et al., 1988. Analyses of the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), allele-specific oligonucleotides (ASO), and short tandem repeat (STR also called microsatellite) data for 180 polymorphisms (individual probe-enzyme, ASO, or STR systems) at 155 loci have been completed using the MLINK and LIPED programs. Linkage to schizophrenia was excluded, under the given model, at 47 loci; indeterminate lod scores occurred at 108 loci. The total exclusion region across 20 chromosomes is estimated at 330 cM; 211 cM excluded by pairwise analyses and 119 cM previously excluded by multipoint analyses. 37 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  9. Cytokine Gene Polymorphisms and Human Autoimmune Disease in the Era of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cytokine (receptor) genes have traditionally attracted great interest as plausible genetic risk factors for autoimmune disease. Since 2007, the implementation of genome-wide association studies has facilitated the robust identification of allelic variants in more than 35 cytokine loci as susceptibility factors for a wide variety of over 15 autoimmune disorders. In this review, we catalog the gene loci of interleukin, chemokine, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily and ligands that have emerged as autoimmune risk factors. We examine recent progress made in the clarification of the functional mechanisms by which polymorphisms in the genes coding for interleukin-2 receptor alpha (IL2RA), IL7R, and IL23R may alter risk for autoimmune disease, and discuss opposite autoimmune risk alleles found, among others, at the IL10 locus. PMID:22191464

  10. Realizing privacy preserving genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Sean; Berger, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: As genomics moves into the clinic, there has been much interest in using this medical data for research. At the same time the use of such data raises many privacy concerns. These circumstances have led to the development of various methods to perform genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on patient records while ensuring privacy. In particular, there has been growing interest in applying differentially private techniques to this challenge. Unfortunately, up until now all methods for finding high scoring SNPs in a differentially private manner have had major drawbacks in terms of either accuracy or computational efficiency. Results: Here we overcome these limitations with a substantially modified version of the neighbor distance method for performing differentially private GWAS, and thus are able to produce a more viable mechanism. Specifically, we use input perturbation and an adaptive boundary method to overcome accuracy issues. We also design and implement a convex analysis based algorithm to calculate the neighbor distance for each SNP in constant time, overcoming the major computational bottleneck in the neighbor distance method. It is our hope that methods such as ours will pave the way for more widespread use of patient data in biomedical research. Availability and implementation: A python implementation is available at http://groups.csail.mit.edu/cb/DiffPriv/. Contact: bab@csail.mit.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26769317

  11. Estuarine Physical Processes Research: Some Recent Studies and Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uncles, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    The literature on estuarine physical studies is vast, diverse and contains many valuable case studies in addition to pure, process-based research. This essay is an attempt to summarize both some of the more recent studies that have been undertaken during the last several years, as well as some of the trends in research direction and progress that they represent. The topics covered include field and theoretical studies on hydrodynamics, turbulence, salt and fine sediment transport and morphology. The development and ease-of-application of numerical and analytical models and technical software has been essential for much of the progress, allowing the interpretation of large amounts of data and assisting with the understanding of complex processes. The development of instrumentation has similarly been essential for much of the progress with field studies. From a process viewpoint, much more attention is now being given to interpreting intratidal behaviour, including the effects of tidal straining and suspended fine sediment on water column stratification, stability and turbulence generation and dissipation. Remote sensing from satellites and aircraft, together with fast sampling towed instruments and high frequency radar now provide unique, frequently high resolution views of spatial variability, including currents, frontal and plume phenomena, and tidal and wave-generated turbidity. Observations of fine sediment characteristics (floc size, aggregation mechanisms, organic coatings and settling velocity) are providing better parameterizations for sediment transport models. These models have enhanced our understanding both of the estuarine turbidity maximum and its relationship to fronts and intratidal hydrodynamic and sedimentological variability, as well as that of simple morphological features such as intertidal mudflats. Although few, interdisciplinary studies to examine the relationships between biology and estuarine morphology show that bivalve activity and the

  12. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Optic Disc Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Jansonius, Nomdo M.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Isaacs, Aaron; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Oostra, Ben A.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hysi, Pirro; Hammond, Christopher J.; Lemij, Hans G.; Vingerling, Johannes R.

    2010-01-01

    The optic nerve head is involved in many ophthalmic disorders, including common diseases such as myopia and open-angle glaucoma. Two of the most important parameters are the size of the optic disc area and the vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR). Both are highly heritable but genetically largely undetermined. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) data to identify genetic variants associated with optic disc area and VCDR. The gene discovery included 7,360 unrelated individuals from the population-based Rotterdam Study I and Rotterdam Study II cohorts. These cohorts revealed two genome-wide significant loci for optic disc area, rs1192415 on chromosome 1p22 (p = 6.72×10−19) within 117 kb of the CDC7 gene and rs1900004 on chromosome 10q21.3-q22.1 (p = 2.67×10−33) within 10 kb of the ATOH7 gene. They revealed two genome-wide significant loci for VCDR, rs1063192 on chromosome 9p21 (p = 6.15×10−11) in the CDKN2B gene and rs10483727 on chromosome 14q22.3-q23 (p = 2.93×10−10) within 40 kbp of the SIX1 gene. Findings were replicated in two independent Dutch cohorts (Rotterdam Study III and Erasmus Rucphen Family study; N = 3,612), and the TwinsUK cohort (N = 843). Meta-analysis with the replication cohorts confirmed the four loci and revealed a third locus at 16q12.1 associated with optic disc area, and four other loci at 11q13, 13q13, 17q23 (borderline significant), and 22q12.1 for VCDR. ATOH7 was also associated with VCDR independent of optic disc area. Three of the loci were marginally associated with open-angle glaucoma. The protein pathways in which the loci of optic disc area are involved overlap with those identified for VCDR, suggesting a common genetic origin. PMID:20548946

  13. Polygenic risk accelerates the developmental progression to heavy, persistent smoking and nicotine dependence: Evidence from a 4-Decade Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Terrie E; Baker, Timothy B; Biddle, Andrea K; Evans, James P; Harrington, HonaLee; Houts, Renate; Meier, Madeline; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Poulton, Richie; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test how genomic loci identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) influence the developmental progression of smoking behavior. DESIGN A 38-year prospective longitudinal study of a representative birth-cohort. SETTING The Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study, New Zealand. PARTICIPANTS N=1037 male and female study members. MAIN EXPOSURES We assessed genetic risk with a multi-locus genetic risk score (GRS). The GRS was composed of single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified in three meta-analyses of GWAS of smoking quantity phenotypes. OUTCOME MEASURES Smoking initiation, conversion to daily smoking, progression to heavy smoking, nicotine dependence (Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence), and cessation difficulties were evaluated at eight assessments spanning ages 11-38 years. RESULTS Genetic risk score was unrelated to smoking initiation. However, individuals at higher genetic risk were more likely to convert to daily smoking as teenagers, progressed more rapidly from smoking initiation to heavy smoking, persisted longer in smoking heavily, developed nicotine dependence more frequently, were more reliant on smoking to cope with stress, and were more likely to fail in their cessation attempts. Further analysis revealed that two adolescent developmental phenotypes—early conversion to daily smoking and rapid progression to heavy smoking--mediated associations between the genetic risk score and mature phenotypes of persistent heavy smoking, nicotine dependence, and cessation failure. The genetic risk score predicted smoking risk over and above family history. CONCLUSIONS Initiatives that disrupt the developmental progression of smoking behavior among adolescents may mitigate genetic risks for developing adult smoking problems. Future genetic research may maximize discovery potential by focusing on smoking behavior soon after smoking initiation and by studying young smokers. PMID:23536134

  14. Progress in computational studies of host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hufeng; Jin, Jingjing; Wong, Limsoon

    2013-04-01

    Host-pathogen interactions are important for understanding infection mechanism and developing better treatment and prevention of infectious diseases. Many computational studies on host-pathogen interactions have been published. Here, we review recent progress and results in this field and provide a systematic summary, comparison and discussion of computational studies on host-pathogen interactions, including prediction and analysis of host-pathogen protein-protein interactions; basic principles revealed from host-pathogen interactions; and database and software tools for host-pathogen interaction data collection, integration and analysis. PMID:23600809

  15. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. Twenty-fourth progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980`s became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  16. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of Atherosclerosis Progression in Arterial Walls.

    PubMed

    Timashev, Peter S; Kotova, Svetlana L; Belkova, Galina V; Gubar'kova, Ekaterina V; Timofeeva, Lidia B; Gladkova, Natalia D; Solovieva, Anna B

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Here we suggest a novel approach for tracking atherosclerosis progression based on the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using AFM, we studied cross-sections of coronary arteries with the following types of lesions: Type II-thickened intima; Type III-thickened intima with a lipid streak; Type IV-fibrotic layer over a lipid core; Type Va-unstable fibrotic layer over a lipid core; Type Vc-very thick fibrotic layer. AFM imaging revealed that the fibrotic layer of an atherosclerotic plaque is represented by a basket-weave network of collagen fibers and a subscale network of fibrils that become looser with atherosclerosis progression. In an unstable plaque (Type Va), packing of the collagen fibers and fibrils becomes even less uniform than that at the previous stages, while a stable fibrotic plaque (Vc) has significantly tighter packing. Such alterations of the collagen network morphology apparently, led to deterioration of the Type Va plaque mechanical properties, that, in turn, resulted in its instability and propensity to rupture. Thus, AFM may serve as a useful tool for tracking atherosclerosis progression in the arterial wall tissue. PMID:26843417

  17. Anonymizing patient genomic data for public sharing association studies.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Lopez-Campos, Guillermo; Seoane, Jose A; Lopez-Alonso, Victoria; Dorado, Julian; Martín-Sanchez, Fernando; Pazos, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    The development of personalized medicine is tightly linked with the correct exploitation of molecular data, especially those associated with the genome sequence along with these use of genomic data there is an increasing demand to share these data for research purposes. Transition of clinical data to research is based in the anonymization of these data so the patient cannot be identified, the use of genomic data poses a great challenge because its nature of identifying data. In this work we have analyzed current methods for genome anonymization and propose a one way encryption method that may enable the process of genomic data sharing accessing only to certain regions of genomes for research purposes. PMID:23920753

  18. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53-3.14), P=1.9 × 10(-5)). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951-LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37-1.85), P=1.6 × 10(-9)) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder. PMID:27598967

  19. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Comb Traits in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Meng; Dou, Taocun; Lu, Jian; Guo, Jun; Hu, Yuping; Yi, Guoqiang; Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The comb, as a secondary sexual character, is an important trait in chicken. Indicators of comb length (CL), comb height (CH), and comb weight (CW) are often selected in production. DNA-based marker-assisted selection could help chicken breeders to accelerate genetic improvement for comb or related economic characters by early selection. Although a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes have been identified with advances in molecular genetics, candidate genes underlying comb traits are limited. The aim of the study was to use genome-wide association (GWA) studies by 600 K Affymetrix chicken SNP arrays to detect genes that are related to comb, using an F2 resource population. For all comb characters, comb exhibited high SNP-based heritability estimates (0.61–0.69). Chromosome 1 explained 20.80% genetic variance, while chromosome 4 explained 6.89%. Independent univariate genome-wide screens for each character identified 127, 197, and 268 novel significant SNPs with CL, CH, and CW, respectively. Three candidate genes, VPS36, AR, and WNT11B, were determined to have a plausible function in all comb characters. These genes are important to the initiation of follicle development, gonadal growth, and dermal development, respectively. The current study provides the first GWA analysis for comb traits. Identification of the genetic basis as well as promising candidate genes will help us understand the underlying genetic architecture of comb development and has practical significance in breeding programs for the selection of comb as an index for sexual maturity or reproduction. PMID:27427764

  20. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Comb Traits in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Shen, Manman; Qu, Liang; Ma, Meng; Dou, Taocun; Lu, Jian; Guo, Jun; Hu, Yuping; Yi, Guoqiang; Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The comb, as a secondary sexual character, is an important trait in chicken. Indicators of comb length (CL), comb height (CH), and comb weight (CW) are often selected in production. DNA-based marker-assisted selection could help chicken breeders to accelerate genetic improvement for comb or related economic characters by early selection. Although a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes have been identified with advances in molecular genetics, candidate genes underlying comb traits are limited. The aim of the study was to use genome-wide association (GWA) studies by 600 K Affymetrix chicken SNP arrays to detect genes that are related to comb, using an F2 resource population. For all comb characters, comb exhibited high SNP-based heritability estimates (0.61-0.69). Chromosome 1 explained 20.80% genetic variance, while chromosome 4 explained 6.89%. Independent univariate genome-wide screens for each character identified 127, 197, and 268 novel significant SNPs with CL, CH, and CW, respectively. Three candidate genes, VPS36, AR, and WNT11B, were determined to have a plausible function in all comb characters. These genes are important to the initiation of follicle development, gonadal growth, and dermal development, respectively. The current study provides the first GWA analysis for comb traits. Identification of the genetic basis as well as promising candidate genes will help us understand the underlying genetic architecture of comb development and has practical significance in breeding programs for the selection of comb as an index for sexual maturity or reproduction. PMID:27427764

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies novel susceptibility loci for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Harvind S.; Lin, Yuan; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Hinds, David A.; Wu, Wenting; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Tang, Jean Y.; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma represents the second most common cutaneous malignancy, affecting 7–11% of Caucasians in the United States. The genetic determinants of susceptibility to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma remain largely unknown. Here we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, totalling 7,404 cases and 292,076 controls. Eleven loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8) including seven previously confirmed pigmentation-related loci: MC1R, ASIP, TYR, SLC45A2, OCA2, IRF4 and BNC2. We identify an additional four susceptibility loci: 11q23.3 CADM1, a metastasis suppressor gene involved in modifying tumour interaction with cell-mediated immunity; 2p22.3; 7p21.1 AHR, the dioxin receptor involved in anti-apoptotic pathways and melanoma progression; and 9q34.3 SEC16A, a putative oncogene with roles in secretion and cellular proliferation. These susceptibility loci provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27424798

  2. Integrative computational approach for genome-based study of microbial lipid-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vorapreeda, Tayvich; Thammarongtham, Chinae; Laoteng, Kobkul

    2016-07-01

    Lipid-degrading or lipolytic enzymes have gained enormous attention in academic and industrial sectors. Several efforts are underway to discover new lipase enzymes from a variety of microorganisms with particular catalytic properties to be used for extensive applications. In addition, various tools and strategies have been implemented to unravel the functional relevance of the versatile lipid-degrading enzymes for special purposes. This review highlights the study of microbial lipid-degrading enzymes through an integrative computational approach. The identification of putative lipase genes from microbial genomes and metagenomic libraries using homology-based mining is discussed, with an emphasis on sequence analysis of conserved motifs and enzyme topology. Molecular modelling of three-dimensional structure on the basis of sequence similarity is shown to be a potential approach for exploring the structural and functional relationships of candidate lipase enzymes. The perspectives on a discriminative framework of cutting-edge tools and technologies, including bioinformatics, computational biology, functional genomics and functional proteomics, intended to facilitate rapid progress in understanding lipolysis mechanism and to discover novel lipid-degrading enzymes of microorganisms are discussed. PMID:27263017

  3. Genome-wide association study identifies novel susceptibility loci for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Harvind S; Lin, Yuan; Ransohoff, Katherine J; Hinds, David A; Wu, Wenting; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Tang, Jean Y; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma represents the second most common cutaneous malignancy, affecting 7-11% of Caucasians in the United States. The genetic determinants of susceptibility to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma remain largely unknown. Here we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, totalling 7,404 cases and 292,076 controls. Eleven loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)) including seven previously confirmed pigmentation-related loci: MC1R, ASIP, TYR, SLC45A2, OCA2, IRF4 and BNC2. We identify an additional four susceptibility loci: 11q23.3 CADM1, a metastasis suppressor gene involved in modifying tumour interaction with cell-mediated immunity; 2p22.3; 7p21.1 AHR, the dioxin receptor involved in anti-apoptotic pathways and melanoma progression; and 9q34.3 SEC16A, a putative oncogene with roles in secretion and cellular proliferation. These susceptibility loci provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27424798

  4. More genomic resources for less-studied crops.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Rajeev K; Glaszmann, Jean-Christophe; Leung, Hei; Ribaut, Jean-Marcel

    2010-09-01

    Many of the crop species considered to be minor on a global scale, yet are important locally for food security in the developing world, have remained less-studied crops. Recent years have witnessed the development of large-scale genomic and genetic resources, including simple sequence repeat, single nucleotide polymorphism and diversity array technology markers, expressed sequence tags or transcript reads, bacterial artificial chromosome libraries, genetic and physical maps, and genetic stocks with rich genetic diversity, such as core reference sets and introgression lines in these crops. These resources have the potential to accelerate gene discovery and initiate molecular breeding in these crops, thereby enhancing crop productivity to ensure food security in developing countries. PMID:20692061

  5. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Cram, L.S.; Stafford, C.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Life Sciences Division and the biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1994. The technical portion of the report is divided into two parts, (1) selected research highlights and (2) research projects and accomplishments. The research highlights provide a more detailed description of a select set of projects. A technical description of all projects is presented in sufficient detail so that the informed reader will be able to assess the scope and significance of each project. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the group leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  6. A whole genome association study on meat palatability in hanwoo.

    PubMed

    Hyeong, K-E; Lee, Y-M; Kim, Y-S; Nam, K C; Jo, C; Lee, K-H; Lee, J-E; Kim, J-J

    2014-09-01

    A whole genome association (WGA) study was carried out to find quantitative trait loci (QTL) for sensory evaluation traits in Hanwoo. Carcass samples of 250 Hanwoo steers were collected from National Agricultural Cooperative Livestock Research Institute, Ansung, Gyeonggi province, Korea, between 2011 and 2012 and genotyped with the Affymetrix Bovine Axiom Array 640K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip. Among the SNPs in the chip, a total of 322,160 SNPs were chosen after quality control tests. After adjusting for the effects of age, slaughter-year-season, and polygenic effects using genome relationship matrix, the corrected phenotypes for the sensory evaluation measurements were regressed on each SNP using a simple linear regression additive based model. A total of 1,631 SNPs were detected for color, aroma, tenderness, juiciness and palatability at 0.1% comparison-wise level. Among the significant SNPs, the best set of 52 SNP markers were chosen using a forward regression procedure at 0.05 level, among which the sets of 8, 14, 11, 10, and 9 SNPs were determined for the respectively sensory evaluation traits. The sets of significant SNPs explained 18% to 31% of phenotypic variance. Three SNPs were pleiotropic, i.e. AX-26703353 and AX-26742891 that were located at 101 and 110 Mb of BTA6, respectively, influencing tenderness, juiciness and palatability, while AX-18624743 at 3 Mb of BTA10 affected tenderness and palatability. Our results suggest that some QTL for sensory measures are segregating in a Hanwoo steer population. Additional WGA studies on fatty acid and nutritional components as well as the sensory panels are in process to characterize genetic architecture of meat quality and palatability in Hanwoo. PMID:25178363

  7. Whole-genome Association Study of Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sklar, P; Smoller, JW; Fan, J; Ferreira, MAR; Perlis, RH; Chambert, K; Nimgaonkar, VL; McQueen, MB; Faraone, SV; Kirby, A; de Bakker, PIW; Ogdie, MN; Thase, ME; Sachs, GS; Todd-Brown, K; Gabriel, SB; Sougnez, C; Gates, C; Blumenstiel, B; Defelice, M; Ardlie, KG; Franklin, J; Muir, WJ; McGhee, KA; MacIntyre, DM; McLean, A; VanBeck, M; McQuillin, A; Bass, NJ; Robinson, M; Lawrence, J; Anjorin, A; Curtis, D; Scolnick, EM; Daly, MJ; Blackwood, DH; Gurling, HM; Purcell, SM

    2013-01-01

    We performed a genome wide association scan in 1,461 patients with bipolar 1 disorder and 2,008 controls drawn from the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) and University College London sample collections with successful genotyping for 372,193 SNPs. Our strongest single SNP results are found in myosin5B (MYO5B; p=1.66 × 10−7) and tetraspanin-8 (TSPAN8; p=6.11 × 10−7). Haplotype analysis further supported single SNP results highlighting MYO5B, TSPAN8 and the epidermal growth factor receptor (MYO5B; p=2.04 × 10−8, TSPAN8; p=7.57 × 10−7 and EGFR; p=8.36 × 10−8). For replication, we genotyped 304 SNPs in a family-based NIMH sample (n=409 trios) and a University of Edinburgh case-control sample (n=365 cases, 351 controls) which do not provide independent replication after correction for multiple testing. A comparison of our strongest associations with the genome-wide scan of 1,868 patients with bipolar disorder and 2,938 controls completed as part of the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium (1) indicates concordant signals for SNPs within the voltage-dependent calcium channel, L-type, alpha 1C subunit (CACNA1C) gene, but no other single SNP associations are highly significant in both studies. Given the heritability of bipolar disorder, the lack of agreement between studies emphasizes that susceptibility alleles are likely to be modest in effect size and require even larger samples for detection. PMID:18317468

  8. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, A A; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery data sets. Seventy-six (72 independent) single nucleotide polymorphisms were taken forward for in silico (two data sets) or de novo (13 data sets) replication genotyping in 2677 independent AN cases and 8629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication data sets comprised 5551 AN cases and 21 080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1606 AN restricting; 1445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01 × 10(-7)) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84 × 10(-6)) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76 × 10(-)(6)) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05 × 10(-)(6)) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery with replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4 × 10(-6)), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  9. A Whole Genome Association Study on Meat Palatability in Hanwoo

    PubMed Central

    Hyeong, K.-E.; Lee, Y.-M.; Kim, Y.-S.; Nam, K. C.; Jo, C.; Lee, K.-H.; Lee, J.-E.; Kim, J.-J.

    2014-01-01

    A whole genome association (WGA) study was carried out to find quantitative trait loci (QTL) for sensory evaluation traits in Hanwoo. Carcass samples of 250 Hanwoo steers were collected from National Agricultural Cooperative Livestock Research Institute, Ansung, Gyeonggi province, Korea, between 2011 and 2012 and genotyped with the Affymetrix Bovine Axiom Array 640K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip. Among the SNPs in the chip, a total of 322,160 SNPs were chosen after quality control tests. After adjusting for the effects of age, slaughter-year-season, and polygenic effects using genome relationship matrix, the corrected phenotypes for the sensory evaluation measurements were regressed on each SNP using a simple linear regression additive based model. A total of 1,631 SNPs were detected for color, aroma, tenderness, juiciness and palatability at 0.1% comparison-wise level. Among the significant SNPs, the best set of 52 SNP markers were chosen using a forward regression procedure at 0.05 level, among which the sets of 8, 14, 11, 10, and 9 SNPs were determined for the respectively sensory evaluation traits. The sets of significant SNPs explained 18% to 31% of phenotypic variance. Three SNPs were pleiotropic, i.e. AX-26703353 and AX-26742891 that were located at 101 and 110 Mb of BTA6, respectively, influencing tenderness, juiciness and palatability, while AX-18624743 at 3 Mb of BTA10 affected tenderness and palatability. Our results suggest that some QTL for sensory measures are segregating in a Hanwoo steer population. Additional WGA studies on fatty acid and nutritional components as well as the sensory panels are in process to characterize genetic architecture of meat quality and palatability in Hanwoo. PMID:25178363

  10. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Landt, Margarita CT Slof-Op t; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O'Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10-7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10-6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10-6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10-6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4×10-6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  11. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Slof-Op t Landt, Margarita CT; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O’Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10−7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10−6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10−6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10−6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P= 4×10−6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:21079607

  12. Progressive Failure Studies of Stiffened Panels Subjected to Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Jaunky, Navin; Hilburger, Mark W.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented for progressive failure of stiffened composite panels with and without a notch and subjected to in plane shear loading well into their postbuckling regime. Initial geometric imperfections are included in the finite element models. Ply damage modes such as matrix cracking, fiber-matrix shear, and fiber failure are modeled by degrading the material properties. Experimental results from the test include strain field data from video image correlation in three dimensions in addition to other strain and displacement measurements. Results from nonlinear finite element analyses are compared with experimental data. Good agreement between experimental data and numerical results are observed for the stitched stiffened composite panels studied.

  13. Effects of General Medical Health on Alzheimer Progression: the Cache County Dementia Progression Study

    PubMed Central

    Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Han, Dingfen; Mielke, Michelle M.; Forrester, Sarah N.; Tschanz, JoAnn T.; Corcoran, Chris D.; Green, Robert C.; Norton, Maria C.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Several observational studies suggested a link between health status and rate of decline among individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We sought to quantify the relationship in a population-based study of incident AD, and to compare global comorbidity ratings to counts of comorbid conditions and medications as predictors of AD progression. Methods Design Case-only cohort study arising from population-based longitudinal study of memory and aging. Setting Cache County, Utah Participants 335 individuals with incident AD followed for up to 11 years. Measurements Patient descriptors included sex, age, education, dementia duration at baseline, and APOE genotype. Measures of health status made at each visit included the GMHR (General Medical Health Rating), number of comorbid medical conditions, and number of non-psychiatric medications. Dementia outcomes included the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), Clinical Dementia Rating – sum of boxes (CDR-sb), and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Results Health Status tended to fluctuate over time within individuals. None of the baseline medical variables (GMHR, comorbidities, non-psychiatric medications) were associated with differences in rates of decline in longitudinal linear mixed effects models. Over time, low GMHR ratings, but not comorbidities or medications, were associated with poorer outcomes (MMSE: β=−1.07 p=0.01; CDR-sb: β=1.79 p<0.001; NPI: β=4.57 p=0.01) Conclusions Given that time-varying GMHR, but not baseline GMHR, was associated with the outcomes, there is likely a dynamic relationship between medical and cognitive health. GMHR is a more sensitive measure of health than simple counts of comorbidities or medications. Since health status is a potentially modifiable risk factor, further study is warranted. PMID:22687143

  14. A salmonid EST genomic study: genes, duplications, phylogeny and microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Salmonids are of interest because of their relatively recent genome duplication, and their extensive use in wild fisheries and aquaculture. A comprehensive gene list and a comparison of genes in some of the different species provide valuable genomic information for one of the most wide...

  15. Genome-wide association study for host response to bovine leukemia virus in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Brym, P; Bojarojć-Nosowicz, B; Oleński, K; Hering, D M; Ruść, A; Kaczmarczyk, E; Kamiński, S

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms of leukemogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and the processes underlying the phenomenon of differential host response to BLV infection still remain poorly understood. The aim of the study was to screen the entire cattle genome to identify markers and candidate genes that might be involved in host response to bovine leukemia virus infection. A genome-wide association study was performed using Holstein cows naturally infected by BLV. A data set included 43 cows (BLV positive) and 30 cows (BLV negative) genotyped for 54,609 SNP markers (Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip). The BLV status of cows was determined by serum ELISA, nested-PCR and hematological counts. Linear Regression Analysis with a False Discovery Rate and kinship matrix (computed on the autosomal SNPs) was calculated to find out which SNP markers significantly differentiate BLV-positive and BLV-negative cows. Nine markers reached genome-wide significance. The most significant SNPs were located on chromosomes 23 (rs41583098), 3 (rs109405425, rs110785500) and 8 (rs43564499) in close vicinity of a patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 1 (PNPLA1); adaptor-related protein complex 4, beta 1 subunit (AP4B1); tripartite motif-containing 45 (TRIM45) and cell division cycle associated 2 (CDCA2) genes, respectively. Furthermore, a list of 41 candidate genes was composed based on their proximity to significant markers (within a distance of ca. 1 Mb) and functional involvement in processes potentially underlying BLV-induced pathogenesis. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that host response to BLV infection involves nine sub-regions of the cattle genome (represented by 9 SNP markers), containing many genes which, based on the literature, could be involved to enzootic bovine leukemia progression. New group of promising candidate genes associated with the host response to BLV infection were identified and could therefore be a target for future studies. The functions of candidate genes

  16. Therapeutic insights from genomic studies of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hammerman, Peter S.; Hayes, D. Neil; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    Large and comprehensive genomic surveys of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas are now greatly increasing our understanding of the diversity of this disease and the key genomic changes, which drive these tumors. The results from these studies are beginning to inform the introduction of novel therapies for patients with head and neck squamous cell cancers. Here, we review some of the key findings from recent genomic studies of head and neck cancers including the most comprehensive study to date from The Cancer Genome Atlas Network. PMID:25643909

  17. The Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS): A Progress Report

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Kissela, Brett M.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Beck, Jeanne; Skarp, Alexa N.

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that genetic factors are associated with ischemic stroke, including multiple recent reports of association with the gene PDE4D, encoding phosphodiesterase 4D, on chromosome 5q12. Genetic studies of stroke are important but can be logistically difficult to perform. This article reviews the design of the Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS) and discusses problems in performing a sibling-based pedigree study where proband-initiated consent is used to enroll pedigree members. Proband-initiated enrollment optimizes privacy protections for family members, but it is associated with a substantial pedigree non-completion rate such that 3 to 4 probands must be identified to obtain one completed sibling pedigree. This report updates the progress of enrollment in the SWISS protocol, discusses barriers to pedigree completion and describes innovative approaches used by the SWISS investigators to enhance enrollment. PMID:16595789

  18. Effect of organic solvent exposure on chronic kidney disease progression: the GN-PROGRESS cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Sophie; Héry, Michel; Protois, Jean-Claude; Rossert, Jérôme; Stengel, Bénédicte

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that solvent exposure may have a role in the progression of glomerulonephritis (GN) to end-stage renal failure (ESRD), but this has never been tested with an appropriate cohort study design. We included 338 nonESRD patients with a first biopsy for primary GN between 1994 and 2001: 194 IgA nephropathies (IgAN), 75 membranous nephropathies (MN) and 69 focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). ESRD, defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate < 15 mL/min/1.73m2 or dialysis, was registered over a mean follow-up period of 5 years. Patients’ lifelong solvent exposures before and after diagnosis were recorded by interview and assessed by industrial hygienist experts. We used Cox models to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of ESRD related to exposures. Overall, 15% of the patients had been exposed at a low level before diagnosis and 14% at a high level. Forty-two with IgA N reached ESRD, 12 with MN, and 22 with FSGS. A graded relationship was observed for MN: age- and gender-adjusted HR [95% confidence interval] for low exposure vs none 3.1 [0.5–18.2], and for high exposure vs none 8.2 [1.9–34.7], as well as for IgA N: 1.6 [0.7–3.9] and 2.2 [1.0–4.8], respectively, but not for FSGS. Solvent risk was only partly mediated by baseline proteinuria: adjusted HR for high exposure vs none = 5.5 [1.3 – 23.9] for MN and 1.8 [0.8 – 3.9] for IgA N. In patients with IgA N, there was a trend in increasing HR with exposure duration before and its persistence after diagnosis. These findings support the hypothesized association of solvent exposure with the progression of GN to ESRD. They should prompt clinicians to give greater attention to patients’ occupational exposures and possibly to consider professional reclassification. PMID:17135394

  19. Overview of Genomic Insights into Chicken Growth Traits Based on Genome-Wide Association Study and microRNA Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenqiang; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2013-01-01

    Over the two past decades, a significant number of studies have observed animal growth traits to examine animal genetic mechanisms due to their ease of measurement and high heritability. Chicken which has a significant impact on fundamental biology is a major source of protein worldwide, making it an ideal model for examining animal growth trait development. The genetic mechanisms of chicken growth traits have been studied using quantitative trait loci mapping through genome-scan and candidate gene approaches, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), comparative genomic strategies, microRNA (miRNA) regulation of growth development analysis, and epigenomic analysis. This review focuses on chicken GWAS and miRNA regulation of growth traits. Several recently published GWAS reports showed that most genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms are located on chromosomes 1 and 4 in chickens. Chicken growth, particularly skeletal muscle growth and development, is greatly regulated by miRNA. Using dwarf and normal chickens, let-7b was found to be involved in determining chicken dwarf phenotypes by regulating growth hormone receptor gene expression. PMID:24082823

  20. Genome-Wide Association Study for Endothelial Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, Wolfgang; Chen, Ming-Huei; Larson, Martin G.; Safa, Radwan; Teumer, Alexander; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Lin, Honghuang; Smith, Holly M.; Koch, Manja; Lorbeer, Roberto; Völker, Uwe; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endothelial growth factors including angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), its soluble receptor Tie-2 (sTie-2) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) play important roles in angiogenesis, vascular remodeling, local tumor growth and metastatic potential of various cancers. Circulating levels of these biomarkers have a heritable component (between 13% and 56%), but the underlying genetic variation influencing these biomarker levels is largely unknown. Methods and Results We performed a genome-wide association study for circulating Ang-2, sTie-2, and HGF in 3571 Framingham Heart Study (FHS) participants and assessed replication of the top hits for Ang-2 and sTie-2 in 3184 participants of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). In multivariable-adjusted models, sTie-2 and HGF concentrations were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes encoding the respective biomarkers (top p=2.40×10−65 [rs2273720] and 3.64×10−19 [rs5745687], respectively). Likewise, rs2442517 in the MCPH1 gene (in which the Ang-2 gene is embedded) was associated with Ang-2 levels (p=5.05×10−8 in FHS and 8.39×10−5 in SHIP). Furthermore, SNPs in the AB0 gene were associated with sTie-2 (top SNP rs8176693 with p=1.84×10−33 in FHS; p=2.53×10−30 in SHIP) and Ang-2 (rs8176746 with p=2.07×10−8 in FHS; p=0.001 in SHIP) levels on a genome-wide significant level. The top genetic loci explained between 1.7% (Ang-2) and 11.2% (sTie-2) of the inter-individual variation in biomarker levels. Conclusions Genetic variation contributes to the inter-individual variation in growth factor levels and explains a modest proportion of circulating HGF, Ang-2, and Tie-2. This may potentially contribute to the familial susceptibility to cancer, a premise that warrants further studies. PMID:25552591

  1. Genetic, Genomic and Epigenomic Studies of Balkan Endemic Nephropathy (Ben).

    PubMed

    Staneva, Rada G; Balabanski, L; Dimova, I; Rukova, B; Hadjidekova, S; Dimitrov, P; Simeonov, V; Ivanov, S; Vagarova, R; Malinov, M; Cukuranovic, R; Stefanovic, V; Polenakovic, M; Djonov, V; Galabov, A; Toncheva, D

    2015-01-01

    BEN is a primary, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis characterized with chronic anemia, absence of edema, xantoderma, normal blood pressure and normal findings on the fundus oculi. The disease is distributed in restricted areas in Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia, Bosnia, Former Yugoslavia. Despite numerous studies on genetic and environmental factors and their possible involvement in BEN, its etiopathogenesis still remains elusive. Our recent study aim to elucidate the possible epigenetic component in BEN development. Whole genome DNA array methylation analysis was applied to compare the methylation profiles of male and female BEN patients from endemic regions in Bulgaria and Serbia and healthy controls. All three most prominent candidate genes with aberrations in the epigenetic profile discovered with this study are involved in the inflammatory/immune processes and oncogenesis. These data are in concordance with the reported pathological alterations in BEN. This research supports the role of epigenetic changes in BEN pathology. Exome sequencing of 22.000 genes with Illumina Nextera Exome Enrichment Kit revealed three mutant genes (CELA1, HSPG2, and KCNK5) in BEN patients which encode proteins involved in basement membrane/extracellular matrix and vascular tone, tightly connected to process of angiogenesis. We suggest that an abnormal process of angiogenesis plays a key role in the molecular pathogenesis of BEN. PMID:27442376

  2. Genome wide association study on early puberty in Bos indicus.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, A V; Matos, M C; Seno, L O; Romero, A R S; Garcia, J F; Grisolia, A B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a genome wide association study (GWAS) approach to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with fertility traits (early puberty) in Nellore cattle (Bos indicus). Fifty-five Nellore cows were selected from a herd monitored for early puberty onset (positive pregnancy at 18 months of age). Extremes of this phenotype were selected; 30 and 25 individuals were pregnant and non-pregnant, respectively, at that age. DNA samples were genotyped using a high-density SNP chip (>777.000 SNP). GWAS using a case-control strategy highlighted a number of significant markers based on their proximity with the Bonferroni correction line. Results indicated that chromosomes 5, 6, 9, 10, and 22 were associated with the traits of interest. The most significant SNPs on these chromosomes were rs133039577, rs110013280, rs134702839, rs109551605, and rs41639155. Candidate genes, as well as quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously reported in the Ensembl and Cattle QTLdb databases, were further investigated. Analysis of the regions close to the SNP on chromosomes 9 and 10 revealed that four QTL had been previously classified under the reproduction category. In conclusion, we have identified SNPs in close proximity to genes associated with reproductive traits. Moreover, U6 spliceosomal RNA was present on three different chromosomes, which is possibly associated with age at first calving, suggesting that it might be a strong candidate for future studies. PMID:26909970

  3. Genetic Studies of Quantitative MCI and AD Phenotypes in ADNI: Progress, Opportunities, and Plans

    PubMed Central

    Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Yao, Xiaohui; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Risacher, Shannon L.; Ramanan, Vijay K.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Faber, Kelly M.; Sarwar, Nadeem; Munsie, Leanne M.; Hu, Xiaolan; Soares, Holly D.; Potkin, Steven G.; Thompson, Paul M.; Kauwe, John S.K.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Green, Robert C.; Toga, Arthur W.; Weiner, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Genetic data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has been crucial in advancing the understanding of AD pathophysiology. Here we provide an update on sample collection, scientific progress and opportunities, conceptual issues, and future plans. METHODS Lymphoblastoid cell lines and DNA and RNA samples from blood have been collected and banked, and data and biosamples have been widely disseminated. To date, APOE genotyping, genome-wide association study (GWAS), and whole exome and whole genome sequencing (WES, WGS) data have been obtained and disseminated. RESULTS ADNI genetic data have been downloaded thousands of times and over 300 publications have resulted, including reports of large scale GWAS by consortia to which ADNI contributed. Many of the first applications of quantitative endophenotype association studies employed ADNI data, including some of the earliest GWAS and pathway-based studies of biospecimen and imaging biomarkers, as well as memory and other clinical/cognitive variables. Other contributions include some of the first WES and WGS data sets and reports in healthy controls, MCI, and AD. DISCUSSION Numerous genetic susceptibility and protective markers for AD and disease biomarkers have been identified and replicated using ADNI data, and have heavily implicated immune, mitochondrial, cell cycle/fate, and other biological processes. Early sequencing studies suggest that rare and structural variants are likely to account for significant additional phenotypic variation. Longitudinal analyses of transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and epigenomic changes will also further elucidate dynamic processes underlying preclinical and prodromal stages of disease. Integration of this unique collection of multi-omics data within a systems biology framework will help to separate truly informative markers of early disease mechanisms and potential novel therapeutic targets from the vast background of less relevant biological

  4. The human genome project: Information management, access, and regulation. Technical progress report, 1 April--31 August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, J.D.; Micikas, L.B.

    1993-09-10

    Efforts are described to prepare educational materials including computer based as well as conventional type teaching materials for training interested high school and elementary students in aspects of Human Genome Project.

  5. Genomic Resources for Gene Discovery, Functional Genome Annotation, and Evolutionary Studies of Maize and Its Close Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Shi, Xue; Liu, Lin; Li, Haiyan; Ammiraju, Jetty S.S.; Kudrna, David A.; Xiong, Wentao; Wang, Hao; Dai, Zhaozhao; Zheng, Yonglian; Lai, Jinsheng; Jin, Weiwei; Messing, Joachim; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Wing, Rod A.; Luo, Meizhong

    2013-01-01

    Maize is one of the most important food crops and a key model for genetics and developmental biology. A genetically anchored and high-quality draft genome sequence of maize inbred B73 has been obtained to serve as a reference sequence. To facilitate evolutionary studies in maize and its close relatives, much like the Oryza Map Alignment Project (OMAP) (www.OMAP.org) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) resource did for the rice community, we constructed BAC libraries for maize inbred lines Zheng58, Chang7-2, and Mo17 and maize wild relatives Zea mays ssp. parviglumis and Tripsacum dactyloides. Furthermore, to extend functional genomic studies to maize and sorghum, we also constructed binary BAC (BIBAC) libraries for the maize inbred B73 and the sorghum landrace Nengsi-1. The BAC/BIBAC vectors facilitate transfer of large intact DNA inserts from BAC clones to the BIBAC vector and functional complementation of large DNA fragments. These seven Zea Map Alignment Project (ZMAP) BAC/BIBAC libraries have average insert sizes ranging from 92 to 148 kb, organellar DNA from 0.17 to 2.3%, empty vector rates between 0.35 and 5.56%, and genome equivalents of 4.7- to 8.4-fold. The usefulness of the Parviglumis and Tripsacum BAC libraries was demonstrated by mapping clones to the reference genome. Novel genes and alleles present in these ZMAP libraries can now be used for functional complementation studies and positional or homology-based cloning of genes for translational genomics. PMID:24037269

  6. Geneious! Simplified genome skimming methods for phylogenetic systematic studies: A case study in Oreocarya (Boraginaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Ripma, Lee A.; Simpson, Michael G.; Hasenstab-Lehman, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: As systematists grapple with how to best harness the power of next-generation sequencing (NGS), a deluge of review papers, methods, and analytical tools make choosing the right method difficult. Oreocarya (Boraginaceae), a genus of 63 species, is a good example of a group lacking both species-level resolution and genomic resources. The use of Geneious removes bioinformatic barriers and makes NGS genome skimming accessible to even the least tech-savvy systematists. • Methods: A combination of de novo and reference-guided assemblies was used to process 100-bp single-end Illumina HiSeq 2000 reads. A subset of 25 taxa was used to test the suitability of genome skimming for future systematic studies in recalcitrant lineages like Oreocarya. • Results: The nuclear ribosomal cistron, the plastome, and 12 mitochondrial genes were recovered from all 25 taxa. All data processing and phylogenomic analyses were performed in Geneious. We report possible future multiplexing levels and published low-copy nuclear genes represented within de novo contigs. • Discussion: Genome skimming represents a much-improved primary data collection over PCR+Sanger sequencing when chloroplast DNA (cpDNA), nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA), and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are the target sequences. This study details methods that plant systematists can employ to study their own taxa of interest. PMID:25506521

  7. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J. L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus additional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method: We used case-control analyses of 896 cases…

  8. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J. L.; Langely, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of…

  9. Genomic approaches to studying human-specific developmental traits.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Lucía F; Pollard, Katherine S

    2015-09-15

    Changes in developmental regulatory programs drive both disease and phenotypic differences among species. Linking human-specific traits to alterations in development is challenging, because we have lacked the tools to assay and manipulate regulatory networks in human and primate embryonic cells. This field was transformed by the sequencing of hundreds of genomes--human and non-human--that can be compared to discover the regulatory machinery of genes involved in human development. This approach has identified thousands of human-specific genome alterations in developmental genes and their regulatory regions. With recent advances in stem cell techniques, genome engineering, and genomics, we can now test these sequences for effects on developmental gene regulation and downstream phenotypes in human cells and tissues. PMID:26395139

  10. Study establishes basis for genomic classification of endometrial cancers

    Cancer.gov

    A comprehensive genomic analysis of nearly 400 endometrial tumors suggests that certain molecular characteristics – such as the frequency of mutations – could complement current pathology methods and help distinguish between principal types of endometrial

  11. Genome-wide association study of selenium concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Fornage, Myriam; Foy, Millennia; Xun, Pengcheng; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Morris, Steve; Chasman, Daniel I.; Hu, Frank B.; Rimm, Eric B.; Kraft, Peter; Jordan, Joanne M.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; He, Ka

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element in human nutrition, but its role in certain health conditions, particularly among Se sufficient populations, is controversial. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of blood Se concentrations previously identified a locus at 5q14 near BHMT. We performed a GW meta-analysis of toenail Se concentrations, which reflect a longer duration of exposure than blood Se concentrations, including 4162 European descendants from four US cohorts. Toenail Se was measured using neutron activation analysis. We identified a GW-significant locus at 5q14 (P < 1 × 10−16), the same locus identified in the published GWAS of blood Se based on independent cohorts. The lead single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) explained ∼1% of the variance in toenail Se concentrations. Using GW-summary statistics from both toenail and blood Se, we observed statistical evidence of polygenic overlap (P < 0.001) and meta-analysis of results from studies of either trait (n = 9639) yielded a second GW-significant locus at 21q22.3, harboring CBS (P < 4 × 10−8). Proteins encoded by genes at 5q14 and 21q22.3 function in homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism, and index SNPs for each have previously been associated with betaine and Hcy levels in GWAS. Our findings show evidence of a genetic link between Se and Hcy pathways, both involved in cardiometabolic disease. PMID:25343990

  12. Genome-wide association study of selenium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Marilyn C; Fornage, Myriam; Foy, Millennia; Xun, Pengcheng; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Morris, Steve; Chasman, Daniel I; Hu, Frank B; Rimm, Eric B; Kraft, Peter; Jordan, Joanne M; Mozaffarian, Dariush; He, Ka

    2015-03-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element in human nutrition, but its role in certain health conditions, particularly among Se sufficient populations, is controversial. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of blood Se concentrations previously identified a locus at 5q14 near BHMT. We performed a GW meta-analysis of toenail Se concentrations, which reflect a longer duration of exposure than blood Se concentrations, including 4162 European descendants from four US cohorts. Toenail Se was measured using neutron activation analysis. We identified a GW-significant locus at 5q14 (P < 1 × 10(-16)), the same locus identified in the published GWAS of blood Se based on independent cohorts. The lead single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) explained ∼1% of the variance in toenail Se concentrations. Using GW-summary statistics from both toenail and blood Se, we observed statistical evidence of polygenic overlap (P < 0.001) and meta-analysis of results from studies of either trait (n = 9639) yielded a second GW-significant locus at 21q22.3, harboring CBS (P < 4 × 10(-8)). Proteins encoded by genes at 5q14 and 21q22.3 function in homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism, and index SNPs for each have previously been associated with betaine and Hcy levels in GWAS. Our findings show evidence of a genetic link between Se and Hcy pathways, both involved in cardiometabolic disease. PMID:25343990

  13. Genome-Wide Association Studies in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Gulamhusein, Aliya F; Juran, Brian D; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been a significant technological advance in our ability to evaluate the genetic architecture of complex diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). To date, six large-scale studies have been performed that have identified 27 risk loci in addition to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associated with PBC. The identified risk variants emphasize important disease concepts; namely, that disturbances in immunoregulatory pathways are important in the pathogenesis of PBC and that such perturbations are shared among a diverse number of autoimmune diseases-suggesting the risk architecture may confer a generalized propensity to autoimmunity not necessarily specific to PBC. Furthermore, the impact of non-HLA risk variants, particularly in genes involved with interleukin-12 signaling, and ethnic variation in conferring susceptibility to PBC have been highlighted. Although GWASs have been a critical stepping stone in understanding common genetic variation contributing to PBC, limitations pertaining to power, sample availability, and strong linkage disequilibrium across genes have left us with an incomplete understanding of the genetic underpinnings of disease pathogenesis. Future efforts to gain insight into this missing heritability, the genetic variation that contributes to important disease outcomes, and the functional consequences of associated variants will be critical if practical clinical translation is to be realized. PMID:26676814

  14. The rise of genomics.

    PubMed

    Weissenbach, Jean

    2016-01-01

    A brief history of the development of genomics is provided. Complete sequencing of genomes of uni- and multicellular organisms is based on important progress in sequencing and bioinformatics. Evolution of these methods is ongoing and has triggered an explosion in data production and analysis. Initial analyses focused on the inventory of genes encoding proteins. Completeness and quality of gene prediction remains crucial. Genome analyses profoundly modified our views on evolution, biodiversity and contributed to the detection of new functions, yet to be fully elucidated, such as those fulfilled by non-coding RNAs. Genomics has become the basis for the study of biology and provides the molecular support for a bunch of large-scale studies, the omics. PMID:27263360

  15. Rare variant genotype imputation with thousands of study-specific whole-genome sequences: implications for cost-effective study designs

    PubMed Central

    Pistis, Giorgio; Porcu, Eleonora; Vrieze, Scott I; Sidore, Carlo; Steri, Maristella; Danjou, Fabrice; Busonero, Fabio; Mulas, Antonella; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Maschio, Andrea; Brennan, Christine; Lai, Sandra; Miller, Michael B; Marcelli, Marco; Urru, Maria Francesca; Pitzalis, Maristella; Lyons, Robert H; Kang, Hyun M; Jones, Chris M; Angius, Andrea; Iacono, William G; Schlessinger, David; McGue, Matt; Cucca, Francesco; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Sanna, Serena

    2015-01-01

    The utility of genotype imputation in genome-wide association studies is increasing as progressively larger reference panels are improved and expanded through whole-genome sequencing. Developing general guidelines for optimally cost-effective imputation, however, requires evaluation of performance issues that include the relative utility of study-specific compared with general/multipopulation reference panels; genotyping with various array scaffolds; effects of different ethnic backgrounds; and assessment of ranges of allele frequencies. Here we compared the effectiveness of study-specific reference panels to the commonly used 1000 Genomes Project (1000G) reference panels in the isolated Sardinian population and in cohorts of European ancestry including samples from Minnesota (USA). We also examined different combinations of genome-wide and custom arrays for baseline genotypes. In Sardinians, the study-specific reference panel provided better coverage and genotype imputation accuracy than the 1000G panels and other large European panels. In fact, even gene-centered custom arrays (interrogating ~200 000 variants) provided highly informative content across the entire genome. Gain in accuracy was also observed for Minnesotans using the study-specific reference panel, although the increase was smaller than in Sardinians, especially for rare variants. Notably, a combined panel including both study-specific and 1000G reference panels improved imputation accuracy only in the Minnesota sample, and only at rare sites. Finally, we found that when imputation is performed with a study-specific reference panel, cutoffs different from the standard thresholds of MACH-Rsq and IMPUTE-INFO metrics should be used to efficiently filter badly imputed rare variants. This study thus provides general guidelines for researchers planning large-scale genetic studies. PMID:25293720

  16. Rare variant genotype imputation with thousands of study-specific whole-genome sequences: implications for cost-effective study designs.

    PubMed

    Pistis, Giorgio; Porcu, Eleonora; Vrieze, Scott I; Sidore, Carlo; Steri, Maristella; Danjou, Fabrice; Busonero, Fabio; Mulas, Antonella; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Maschio, Andrea; Brennan, Christine; Lai, Sandra; Miller, Michael B; Marcelli, Marco; Urru, Maria Francesca; Pitzalis, Maristella; Lyons, Robert H; Kang, Hyun M; Jones, Chris M; Angius, Andrea; Iacono, William G; Schlessinger, David; McGue, Matt; Cucca, Francesco; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Sanna, Serena

    2015-07-01

    The utility of genotype imputation in genome-wide association studies is increasing as progressively larger reference panels are improved and expanded through whole-genome sequencing. Developing general guidelines for optimally cost-effective imputation, however, requires evaluation of performance issues that include the relative utility of study-specific compared with general/multipopulation reference panels; genotyping with various array scaffolds; effects of different ethnic backgrounds; and assessment of ranges of allele frequencies. Here we compared the effectiveness of study-specific reference panels to the commonly used 1000 Genomes Project (1000G) reference panels in the isolated Sardinian population and in cohorts of European ancestry including samples from Minnesota (USA). We also examined different combinations of genome-wide and custom arrays for baseline genotypes. In Sardinians, the study-specific reference panel provided better coverage and genotype imputation accuracy than the 1000G panels and other large European panels. In fact, even gene-centered custom arrays (interrogating ~200 000 variants) provided highly informative content across the entire genome. Gain in accuracy was also observed for Minnesotans using the study-specific reference panel, although the increase was smaller than in Sardinians, especially for rare variants. Notably, a combined panel including both study-specific and 1000G reference panels improved imputation accuracy only in the Minnesota sample, and only at rare sites. Finally, we found that when imputation is performed with a study-specific reference panel, cutoffs different from the standard thresholds of MACH-Rsq and IMPUTE-INFO metrics should be used to efficiently filter badly imputed rare variants. This study thus provides general guidelines for researchers planning large-scale genetic studies. PMID:25293720

  17. Progress in the Study of ALFALFA Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troischt, Parker; Nichols, Nathan

    2013-04-01

    The Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team Groups Project is a collaborative undertaking of faculty and students at 11 institutions, aimed at investigating properties of galaxy groups surveyed by the ALFALFA blind HI survey. The survey covers 7,000 square degrees and is expected to include more than 30,000 extragalactic sources when completed. Here we present analysis of HI spectra taken at the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center and report on progress made with developing analysis software tools as part of the UAT study. These tools will be implemented with follow up observations of targeted sources generated from the original blind survey. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918, AST-0725267 and AST-0725380.

  18. Progress in studies of solar eclipses recorded in early China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ciyuan

    2003-03-01

    Systematic records of solar eclipses started from Chunqiu period. Such records are complete and regular from the Han to the Qing Dynasties. Before then, in the Xia, Shang and West Zhou Dynasties, records of solar eclipses were vague and scattered. Many people investigated them, but it is difficult to get final conclusions. With recent progress in astronomical computation and historic chronology, new achievements have been reached in studies of early solar eclipses. These records include "Sanmiao" and "Zhongkang" eclipses in the legends of the Xia Dynasty; "Three flames ate the Sun", "The sun and the moon were eclipsed" and "The sun was Zhi" on the oracle bones of the Shang Dynasty; "Tianda yi", "Double dawn" and "Poem eclipse" in the literature of West Zhou Dynasty.

  19. Progress of drug-loaded polymeric micelles into clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Horacio; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-09-28

    Targeting tumors with long-circulating nano-scaled carriers is a promising strategy for systemic cancer treatment. Compared with free small therapeutic agents, nanocarriers can selectively accumulate in solid tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, which is characterized by leaky blood vessels and impaired lymphatic drainage in tumor tissues, and achieve superior therapeutic efficacy, while reducing side effects. In this way, drug-loaded polymeric micelles, i.e. self-assemblies of amphiphilic block copolymers consisting of a hydrophobic core as a drug reservoir and a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrophilic shell, have demonstrated outstanding features as tumor-targeted nanocarriers with high translational potential, and several micelle formulations are currently under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes recent efforts in the development of these polymeric micelles and their performance in human studies, as well as our recent progress in polymeric micelles for the delivery of nucleic acids and imaging. PMID:24993430

  20. THREE STUDIES OF THE STANDARD PROGRESSIVE MATRICES IN MOROCCO (.).

    PubMed

    Attallah Bakhiet, Salaheldin Farah; Lynn, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Results are given for three studies of samples tested with the Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM) in Morocco. The first consisted of 85 children (boys, girls; M age = 8.5 yr.) in the town of Kenitra and obtained a British IQ of 74. The second consisted of 202 adults (92 men, 110 women; M age = 26 yr.) in four cities and obtained a British IQ of 81. The third consisted of 1,177 secondary school children (723 boys, 454 girls; ages 12-17 yr.) in a rural area and obtained a British IQ of 73.3. It is proposed that the best estimate of the Moroccan IQ can be obtained as the average of the three results, giving an IQ of 76. PMID:26595289

  1. Genome-wide association study using whole-genome sequencing rapidly identifies new genes influencing agronomic traits in rice.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kenji; Yamamoto, Eiji; Aya, Koichiro; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Lo, Pei-Ching; Hu, Li; Yamasaki, Masanori; Yoshida, Shinya; Kitano, Hidemi; Hirano, Ko; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) can be a powerful tool for the identification of genes associated with agronomic traits in crop species, but it is often hindered by population structure and the large extent of linkage disequilibrium. In this study, we identified agronomically important genes in rice using GWAS based on whole-genome sequencing, followed by the screening of candidate genes based on the estimated effect of nucleotide polymorphisms. Using this approach, we identified four new genes associated with agronomic traits. Some genes were undetectable by standard SNP analysis, but we detected them using gene-based association analysis. This study provides fundamental insights relevant to the rapid identification of genes associated with agronomic traits using GWAS and will accelerate future efforts aimed at crop improvement. PMID:27322545

  2. Molecular studies of functional aspects of plant mitochondria. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Siedow, J.N.

    1992-03-03

    The goal of this research is to characterize the mechanism by which a protein encoded by mitochondrial genome of cms-T maize (URF13) interacts with a family of the compounds produced by certain fungi (T-toxins) to permeabilize biological membranes. The research carried out during the current funding period has focused on the structure of URF13, and the results support the validity of the three-helix model of URF13 and provide direct evidence for the oligomeric nature of at least some of the URF13 molecules in the membrane. In addition, the toxin binding studies have provided insight into the dynamic nature of the T-toxin:URF13 interaction and the extent to which Asp-39 is crucial to the interaction that leads to membrane pore formation. Additional knowledge of the structure of URF13 is needed if the nature of the interaction between URF13 and T-toxin to produce a hydrophilic pore within the membrane is to ultimately be understood.

  3. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    NEALSON, KENNETH H.

    2013-10-15

    This project had as its goals the understanding of the ecophysiology of the genus Shewanella using various genomics approaches. As opposed to other programs involving Shewanella, this one branched out into the various areas in which Shewanella cells are active, and included both basic and applied studies. All of the work was, to some extent, related to the ability of the bacteria to accomplish electron exchange between the cell and solid state electron acceptors and/or electron donors, a process we call Extracellular Electron Transport, or EET. The major accomplishments related to several different areas: Basic Science Studies: 1. Genetics and genomics of nitrate reduction, resulting in elucidation of atypical nitrate reduction systems in Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1)[2]. 2. Influence of bacterial strain and growth conditions on iron reduction, showing that rates of reduction, extents of reduction, and the formation of secondary minerals were different for different strains of Shewanella [3,4,9]. 3. Comparative genomics as a tool for comparing metabolic capacities of different Shewanella strains, and for predicting growth and metabolism [6,10,15]. In these studies, collaboration with ORNL, PNNL, and 4. Basic studies of electron transport in strain MR-1, both to poised electrodes, and via conductive nanowires [12,13]. This included the first accurate measurements of electrical energy generation by a single cell during electrode growth [12], and the demonstration of electrical conductivity along the length of bacterial nanowires [13]. 5. Impact of surface charge and electron flow on cell movement, cell attachment, cell growth, and biofilm formation [7.18]. The demonstration that interaction with solid state electron acceptors resulted in increased motility [7] led to the description of a phenomenon called electrokinesis. The importance of this for biofilm formation and for electron flow was hypothesized by Nealson & Finkel [18], and is now under study in several

  4. Genome-wide association study of aggressive behaviour in chicken.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Zhenqiang; Ye, Qiao; Xu, Haiping; Luo, Wei; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    In the poultry industry, aggressive behaviour is a large animal welfare issue all over the world. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the aggressive behaviour. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to explore the genetic mechanism associated with aggressive behaviour in chickens. The GWAS results showed that a total of 33 SNPs were associated with aggressive behaviour traits (P < 4.6E-6). rs312463697 on chromosome 4 was significantly associated with aggression (P = 2.10905E-07), and it was in the intron region of the sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2 (SORCS2) gene. In addition, biological function analysis of the nearest 26 genes around the significant SNPs was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. An interaction network contained 17 genes was obtained and SORCS2 was involved in this network, interacted with nerve growth factor (NGF), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), dopa decarboxylase (L-dopa) and dopamine. After knockdown of SORCS2, the mRNA levels of NGF, L-dopa and dopamine receptor genes DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In summary, our data indicated that SORCS2 might play an important role in chicken aggressive behaviour through the regulation of dopaminergic pathways and NGF. PMID:27485826

  5. Imputing Phenotypes for Genome-wide Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Hormozdiari, Farhad; Kang, Eun Yong; Bilow, Michael; Ben-David, Eyal; Vulpe, Chris; McLachlan, Stela; Lusis, Aldons J; Han, Buhm; Eskin, Eleazar

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been successful in detecting variants correlated with phenotypes of clinical interest. However, the power to detect these variants depends on the number of individuals whose phenotypes are collected, and for phenotypes that are difficult to collect, the sample size might be insufficient to achieve the desired statistical power. The phenotype of interest is often difficult to collect, whereas surrogate phenotypes or related phenotypes are easier to collect and have already been collected in very large samples. This paper demonstrates how we take advantage of these additional related phenotypes to impute the phenotype of interest or target phenotype and then perform association analysis. Our approach leverages the correlation structure between phenotypes to perform the imputation. The correlation structure can be estimated from a smaller complete dataset for which both the target and related phenotypes have been collected. Under some assumptions, the statistical power can be computed analytically given the correlation structure of the phenotypes used in imputation. In addition, our method can impute the summary statistic of the target phenotype as a weighted linear combination of the summary statistics of related phenotypes. Thus, our method is applicable to datasets for which we have access only to summary statistics and not to the raw genotypes. We illustrate our approach by analyzing associated loci to triglycerides (TGs), body mass index (BMI), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort dataset. PMID:27292110

  6. Genome-wide association study of aggressive behaviour in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Zhenqiang; Ye, Qiao; Xu, Haiping; Luo, Wei; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    In the poultry industry, aggressive behaviour is a large animal welfare issue all over the world. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the aggressive behaviour. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to explore the genetic mechanism associated with aggressive behaviour in chickens. The GWAS results showed that a total of 33 SNPs were associated with aggressive behaviour traits (P < 4.6E-6). rs312463697 on chromosome 4 was significantly associated with aggression (P = 2.10905E-07), and it was in the intron region of the sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2 (SORCS2) gene. In addition, biological function analysis of the nearest 26 genes around the significant SNPs was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. An interaction network contained 17 genes was obtained and SORCS2 was involved in this network, interacted with nerve growth factor (NGF), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), dopa decarboxylase (L-dopa) and dopamine. After knockdown of SORCS2, the mRNA levels of NGF, L-dopa and dopamine receptor genes DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In summary, our data indicated that SORCS2 might play an important role in chicken aggressive behaviour through the regulation of dopaminergic pathways and NGF. PMID:27485826

  7. Students’ perspective on genomics: from sample to sequence using the case study of blueberry

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, Austin B.; White, Elizabeth J.; Bolloskis, Michael P.; Kapur, Nicholas P.; Everhart, Koyt W.; Lin, Ying-Chen; Bussler, Weston W.; Reid, Robert W.; Brown, Ryan H.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in genomic sequencing technologies in the past decade have revolutionized the field of genomics, resulting in faster and less expensive sequencing. Holding back the potential for innovation, however, is a widespread lack of understanding of genomics and sequencing by the general public. In an attempt to remedy this problem, this paper presents an introduction to the fields of genomics, bioinformatics, and proteomics using the blueberry genome as a model case study of the plant genomics field. The blueberry (Vaccinium sect. Cyanococcus) is often cited as a “super food” in the media due to its nutritional benefits and global economic importance. There have been a number of related genomic publications in the past 20 years; however, a completed genome and a full analysis into the health-related pathways are still needed. As exemplified by this blueberry case study, there are opportunities for future genomic research into numerous beneficial plant species. The solid background presented in this paper provides future researchers the foundation to explore these uncharted areas. PMID:24324481

  8. Speech Therapy in Primary Progressive Aphasia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Farrajota, Luísa; Maruta, Carolina; Maroco, João; Martins, Isabel Pavão; Guerreiro, Manuela; de Mendonça, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative disorder with no effective pharmacological treatment. Cognition-based interventions are adequate alternatives, but their benefit has not been thoroughly explored. Our aim was to study the effect of speech and language therapy (SLT) on naming ability in PPA. Methods An open parallel prospective longitudinal study involving two centers was designed to compare patients with PPA submitted to SLT (1 h/week for 11 months) with patients receiving no therapy. Twenty patients were enrolled and undertook baseline language and neuropsychological assessments; among them, 10 received SLT and 10 constituted an age- and education-matched historical control group. The primary outcome measure was the change in group mean performance on the Snodgrass and Vanderwart naming test between baseline and follow-up assessments. Results Intervention and control groups did not significantly differ on demographic and clinical variables at baseline. A mixed repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant main effect of therapy (F(1,18) = 10.763; p = 0.005) on the performance on the Snodgrass and Vanderwart naming test. Conclusion Although limited by a non-randomized open study design with a historical control group, the present study suggests that SLT may have a benefit in PPA, and it should prompt a randomized, controlled, rater-blind clinical trial. PMID:22962556

  9. Genome-wide association study of sleep in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sleep is a highly conserved behavior, yet its duration and pattern vary extensively among species and between individuals within species. The genetic basis of natural variation in sleep remains unknown. Results We used the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) to perform a genome-wide association (GWA) study of sleep in D. melanogaster. We identified candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differences in the mean as well as the environmental sensitivity of sleep traits; these SNPs typically had sex-specific or sex-biased effects, and were generally located in non-coding regions. The majority of SNPs (80.3%) affecting sleep were at low frequency and had moderately large effects. Additive models incorporating multiple SNPs explained as much as 55% of the genetic variance for sleep in males and females. Many of these loci are known to interact physically and/or genetically, enabling us to place them in candidate genetic networks. We confirmed the role of seven novel loci on sleep using insertional mutagenesis and RNA interference. Conclusions We identified many SNPs in novel loci that are potentially associated with natural variation in sleep, as well as SNPs within genes previously known to affect Drosophila sleep. Several of the candidate genes have human homologues that were identified in studies of human sleep, suggesting that genes affecting variation in sleep are conserved across species. Our discovery of genetic variants that influence environmental sensitivity to sleep may have a wider application to all GWA studies, because individuals with highly plastic genotypes will not have consistent phenotypes. PMID:23617951

  10. Multicentric Genome-Wide Association Study for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Inês; Abrantes, Patrícia; Francisco, Vânia; Teixeira, Gilberto; Monteiro, Marta; Neves, João; Norte, Ana; Robalo Cordeiro, Carlos; Moura E Sá, João; Reis, Ernestina; Santos, Patrícia; Oliveira, Manuela; Sousa, Susana; Fradinho, Marta; Malheiro, Filipa; Negrão, Luís; Feijó, Salvato; Oliveira, Sofia A

    2016-01-01

    Despite elevated incidence and recurrence rates for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax (PSP), little is known about its etiology, and the genetics of idiopathic PSP remains unexplored. To identify genetic variants contributing to sporadic PSP risk, we conducted the first PSP genome-wide association study. Two replicate pools of 92 Portuguese PSP cases and of 129 age- and sex-matched controls were allelotyped in triplicate on the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 arrays. Markers passing quality control were ranked by relative allele score difference between cases and controls (|RASdiff|), by a novel cluster method and by a combined Z-test. 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected using these three approaches for technical validation by individual genotyping in the discovery dataset. 87 out of 94 successfully tested SNPs were nominally associated in the discovery dataset. Replication of the 87 technically validated SNPs was then carried out in an independent replication dataset of 100 Portuguese cases and 425 controls. The intergenic rs4733649 SNP in chromosome 8 (between LINC00824 and LINC00977) was associated with PSP in the discovery (P = 4.07E-03, ORC[95% CI] = 1.88[1.22-2.89]), replication (P = 1.50E-02, ORC[95% CI] = 1.50[1.08-2.09]) and combined datasets (P = 8.61E-05, ORC[95% CI] = 1.65[1.29-2.13]). This study identified for the first time one genetic risk factor for sporadic PSP, but future studies are warranted to further confirm this finding in other populations and uncover its functional role in PSP pathogenesis. PMID:27203581

  11. Multicentric Genome-Wide Association Study for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Abrantes, Patrícia; Francisco, Vânia; Teixeira, Gilberto; Monteiro, Marta; Neves, João; Norte, Ana; Robalo Cordeiro, Carlos; Moura e Sá, João; Reis, Ernestina; Santos, Patrícia; Oliveira, Manuela; Sousa, Susana; Fradinho, Marta; Malheiro, Filipa; Negrão, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Despite elevated incidence and recurrence rates for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax (PSP), little is known about its etiology, and the genetics of idiopathic PSP remains unexplored. To identify genetic variants contributing to sporadic PSP risk, we conducted the first PSP genome-wide association study. Two replicate pools of 92 Portuguese PSP cases and of 129 age- and sex-matched controls were allelotyped in triplicate on the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 arrays. Markers passing quality control were ranked by relative allele score difference between cases and controls (|RASdiff|), by a novel cluster method and by a combined Z-test. 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected using these three approaches for technical validation by individual genotyping in the discovery dataset. 87 out of 94 successfully tested SNPs were nominally associated in the discovery dataset. Replication of the 87 technically validated SNPs was then carried out in an independent replication dataset of 100 Portuguese cases and 425 controls. The intergenic rs4733649 SNP in chromosome 8 (between LINC00824 and LINC00977) was associated with PSP in the discovery (P = 4.07E-03, ORC[95% CI] = 1.88[1.22–2.89]), replication (P = 1.50E-02, ORC[95% CI] = 1.50[1.08–2.09]) and combined datasets (P = 8.61E-05, ORC[95% CI] = 1.65[1.29–2.13]). This study identified for the first time one genetic risk factor for sporadic PSP, but future studies are warranted to further confirm this finding in other populations and uncover its functional role in PSP pathogenesis. PMID:27203581

  12. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  13. Progressive Non-Fluent Aphasia in Malayalam: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Annamma; Mathuranath, P. S.

    2010-01-01

    Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) is a degenerative condition characterized by deterioration in language for at least two years without deterioration in other cognitive domains. This report highlights the language profile in a 79-year-old male with progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) who was assessed using the Western Aphasia Battery and the…

  14. Genetic Studies on Diabetic Microvascular Complications: Focusing on Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Soo Heon

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a common metabolic disorder with a worldwide prevalence of 8.3% and is the leading cause of visual loss, end-stage renal disease and amputation. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified genetic risk factors for diabetic microvascular complications of retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. We summarized the recent findings of GWASs on diabetic microvascular complications and highlighted the challenges and our opinion on future directives. Five GWASs were conducted on diabetic retinopathy, nine on nephropathy, and one on neuropathic pain. The majority of recent GWASs were underpowered and heterogeneous in terms of study design, inclusion criteria and phenotype definition. Therefore, few reached the genome-wide significance threshold and the findings were inconsistent across the studies. Recent GWASs provided novel information on genetic risk factors and the possible pathophysiology of diabetic microvascular complications. However, further collaborative efforts to standardize phenotype definition and increase sample size are necessary for successful genetic studies on diabetic microvascular complications. PMID:26194074

  15. Androgen receptor genomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hong-Jian; Kim, Jung

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) is not only critical for the normal development and function of the prostate but also pivotal to the onset and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). The studies of AR transcriptional regulation were previously limited to a handful of AR-target genes. Owing to the development of various high-throughput genomic technologies, significant advances have been made in recent years. Here we discuss the discoveries of genome-wide androgen-regulated genes in PCa cell lines, animal models and tissues using expression microarray and sequencing, the mapping of genomic landscapes of AR using Combining Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip and ChIP-seq assays, the interplay of transcriptional cofactors in defining AR binding profiles, and the genomic regulation and AR reprogramming in advanced PCa. PMID:25237629

  16. The genomics of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2012-12-22

    The amount and nature of genetic variation available to natural selection affect the rate, course and outcome of evolution. Consequently, the study of the genetic basis of adaptive evolutionary change has occupied biologists for decades, but progress has been hampered by the lack of resolution and the absence of a genome-level perspective. Technological advances in recent years should now allow us to answer many long-standing questions about the nature of adaptation. The data gathered so far are beginning to challenge some widespread views of the way in which natural selection operates at the genomic level. Papers in this Special Feature of Proceedings of the Royal Society B illustrate various aspects of the broad field of adaptation genomics. This introductory article sets up a context and, on the basis of a few selected examples, discusses how genomic data can advance our understanding of the process of adaptation. PMID:23097510

  17. The Impact of Genomic Profiling for Novel Cancer Therapy--Recent Progress in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingwu; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2016-01-20

    There is high expectation for significant improvements in cancer patient care after completion of the human genome project in 2003. Through pains-taking analyses of genomic profiles in cancer patients, a number of targetable gene alterations have been discovered, with some leading to novel therapies, such as activating mutations of EGFR, BRAF and ALK gene fusions. As a result, clinical management of cancer through targeted therapy has finally become a reality for a subset of cancers, such as lung adenocarcinomas and melanomas. In this review, we summarize how gene mutation discovery leads to new treatment strategies using non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as an example. We also discuss possible future implications of cancer genome analyses. PMID:26842989

  18. Application of genome editing technologies to the study and treatment of hematological disease.

    PubMed

    Pellagatti, Andrea; Dolatshad, Hamid; Yip, Bon Ham; Valletta, Simona; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies have advanced significantly over the past few years, providing a fast and effective tool to precisely manipulate the genome at specific locations. The three commonly used genome editing technologies are Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), and the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system. ZFNs and TALENs consist of endonucleases fused to a DNA-binding domain, while the CRISPR/Cas9 system uses guide RNAs to target the bacterial Cas9 endonuclease to the desired genomic location. The double-strand breaks made by these endonucleases are repaired in the cells either by non-homologous end joining, resulting in the introduction of insertions/deletions, or, if a repair template is provided, by homology directed repair. The ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 systems take advantage of these repair mechanisms for targeted genome modification and have been successfully used to manipulate the genome in human cells. These genome editing tools can be used to investigate gene function, to discover new therapeutic targets, and to develop disease models. Moreover, these genome editing technologies have great potential in gene therapy. Here, we review the latest advances in the application of genome editing technology to the study and treatment of hematological disorders. PMID:26433620

  19. Genome-wide association study for renal traits in the Framingham Heart and Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kottgen, Anna; Kao, Wen Hong L; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Boerwinkle, Eric; Yang, Qiong; Levy, Daniel; Benjamin, Emelia J; Larson, Martin G; Astor, Brad C; Coresh, Josef; Fox, Caroline S

    2008-01-01

    Background The Framingham Heart Study (FHS) recently obtained initial results from the first genome-wide association scan for renal traits. The study of 70,987 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1,010 FHS participants provides a list of SNPs showing the strongest associations with renal traits which need to be verified in independent study samples. Methods Sixteen SNPs were selected for replication based on the most promising associations with chronic kidney disease (CKD), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and serum cystatin C in FHS. These SNPs were genotyped in 15,747 participants of the Atherosclerosis in Communities (ARIC) Study and evaluated for association using multivariable adjusted regression analyses. Primary outcomes in ARIC were CKD and eGFR. Secondary prospective analyses were conducted for association with kidney disease progression using multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression. The definition of the outcomes, all covariates, and the use of an additive genetic model was consistent with the original analyses in FHS. Results The intronic SNP rs6495446 in the gene MTHFS was significantly associated with CKD among white ARIC participants at visit 4: the odds ratio per each C allele was 1.24 (95% CI 1.09–1.41, p = 0.001). Borderline significant associations of rs6495446 were observed with CKD at study visit 1 (p = 0.024), eGFR at study visits 1 (p = 0.073) and 4 (lower mean eGFR per C allele by 0.6 ml/min/1.73 m2, p = 0.043) and kidney disease progression (hazard ratio 1.13 per each C allele, 95% CI 1.00–1.26, p = 0.041). Another SNP, rs3779748 in EYA1, was significantly associated with CKD at ARIC visit 1 (odds ratio per each T allele 1.22, p = 0.01), but only with eGFR and cystatin C in FHS. Conclusion This genome-wide association study provides unbiased information implicating MTHFS as a candidate gene for kidney disease. Our findings highlight the importance of replication to identify common SNPs associated with

  20. Genome-Wide Association Study of Proneness to Anger

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Eric; McGough, James; Deutsch, Curtis K.; Frazier, Jean A.; Kennedy, David; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community samples suggest that approximately 1 in 20 children and adults exhibit clinically significant anger, hostility, and aggression. Individuals with dysregulated emotional control have a greater lifetime burden of psychiatric morbidity, severe impairment in role functioning, and premature mortality due to cardiovascular disease. Methods With publically available data secured from dbGaP, we conducted a genome-wide association study of proneness to anger using the Spielberger State-Trait Anger Scale in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study (n = 8,747). Results Subjects were, on average, 54 (range 45–64) years old at baseline enrollment, 47% (n = 4,117) were male, and all were of European descent by self-report. The mean Angry Temperament and Angry Reaction scores were 5.8±1.8 and 7.6±2.2. We observed a nominally significant finding (p = 2.9E-08, λ = 1.027 - corrected pgc = 2.2E-07, λ = 1.0015) on chromosome 6q21 in the gene coding for the non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, Fyn. Conclusions Fyn interacts with NDMA receptors and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-gated channels to regulate calcium influx and intracellular release in the post-synaptic density. These results suggest that signaling pathways regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis, which are relevant to memory, learning, and neuronal survival, may in part underlie the expression of Angry Temperament. PMID:24489884

  1. Methodological Issues in Multistage Genome-wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Duncan C.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Haile, Robert W.; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Stram, Daniel O.

    2010-01-01

    Because of the high cost of commercial genotyping chip technologies, many investigations have used a two-stage design for genome-wide association studies, using part of the sample for an initial discovery of “promising” SNPs at a less stringent significance level and the remainder in a joint analysis of just these SNPs using custom genotyping. Typical cost savings of about 50% are possible with this design to obtain comparable levels of overall type I error and power by using about half the sample for stage I and carrying about 0.1% of SNPs forward to the second stage, the optimal design depending primarily upon the ratio of costs per genotype for stages I and II. However, with the rapidly declining costs of the commercial panels, the generally low observed ORs of current studies, and many studies aiming to test multiple hypotheses and multiple endpoints, many investigators are abandoning the two-stage design in favor of simply genotyping all available subjects using a standard high-density panel. Concern is sometimes raised about the absence of a “replication” panel in this approach, as required by some high-profile journals, but it must be appreciated that the two-stage design is not a discovery/replication design but simply a more efficient design for discovery using a joint analysis of the data from both stages. Once a subset of highly-significant associations has been discovered, a truly independent “exact replication” study is needed in a similar population of the same promising SNPs using similar methods. This can then be followed by (1) “generalizability” studies to assess the full scope of replicated associations across different races, different endpoints, different interactions, etc.; (2) fine-mapping or re-sequencing to try to identify the causal variant; and (3) experimental studies of the biological function of these genes. Multistage sampling designs may be more useful at this stage, say for selecting subsets of subjects for deep re

  2. Databases and web tools for cancer genomics study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yadong; Dong, Xunong; Xie, Bingbing; Ding, Nan; Chen, Juan; Li, Yongjun; Zhang, Qian; Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2015-02-01

    Publicly-accessible resources have promoted the advance of scientific discovery. The era of genomics and big data has brought the need for collaboration and data sharing in order to make effective use of this new knowledge. Here, we describe the web resources for cancer genomics research and rate them on the basis of the diversity of cancer types, sample size, omics data comprehensiveness, and user experience. The resources reviewed include data repository and analysis tools; and we hope such introduction will promote the awareness and facilitate the usage of these resources in the cancer research community. PMID:25707591

  3. Databases and Web Tools for Cancer Genomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yadong; Dong, Xunong; Xie, Bingbing; Ding, Nan; Chen, Juan; Li, Yongjun; Zhang, Qian; Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    Publicly-accessible resources have promoted the advance of scientific discovery. The era of genomics and big data has brought the need for collaboration and data sharing in order to make effective use of this new knowledge. Here, we describe the web resources for cancer genomics research and rate them on the basis of the diversity of cancer types, sample size, omics data comprehensiveness, and user experience. The resources reviewed include data repository and analysis tools; and we hope such introduction will promote the awareness and facilitate the usage of these resources in the cancer research community. PMID:25707591

  4. Integrating Genomes, Brain and Behavior in the Study of Songbirds

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, David F.; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.; London, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    Songbirds share some essential traits but are extraordinarily diverse, allowing comparative analyses aimed at identifying specific genotype–phenotype associations. This diversity encompasses traits like vocal communication and complex social behaviors that are of great interest to humans, but that are not well represented in other accessible research organisms. Many songbirds are readily observable in nature and thus afford unique insight into the links between environment and organism. The distinctive organization of the songbird brain will facilitate analysis of genomic links to brain and behavior. Access to the zebra finch genome sequence will, therefore, prompt new questions and provide the ability to answer those questions. PMID:19788884

  5. The KRAB Zinc Finger Protein Roma/Zfp157 Is a Critical Regulator of Cell-Cycle Progression and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Teresa L.F.; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Blow, J. Julian; Sale, Julian E.; Watson, Christine J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regulation of DNA replication and cell division is essential for tissue growth and maintenance of genomic integrity and is particularly important in tissues that undergo continuous regeneration such as mammary glands. We have previously shown that disruption of the KRAB-domain zinc finger protein Roma/Zfp157 results in hyperproliferation of mammary epithelial cells (MECs) during pregnancy. Here, we delineate the mechanism by which Roma engenders this phenotype. Ablation of Roma in MECs leads to unscheduled proliferation, replication stress, DNA damage, and genomic instability. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) depleted for Roma exhibit downregulation of p21Cip1 and geminin and have accelerated replication fork velocities, which is accompanied by a high rate of mitotic errors and polyploidy. In contrast, overexpression of Roma in MECs halts cell-cycle progression, whereas siRNA-mediated p21Cip1 knockdown ameliorates, in part, this phenotype. Thus, Roma is an essential regulator of the cell cycle and is required to maintain genomic stability. PMID:27149840

  6. Recent progress of 10Be tracer studies in Chinese loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijian; Xie, Xingjun; Beck, Warren; Kong, Xianghui; Xian, Feng; Du, Yajuan; Wu, Zhenkun

    2015-10-01

    Studies of cosmogenic 10Be in Chinese loess began about twenty-five years ago and since then a number of research groups worldwide have contributed to a firm understanding of the production, transport, deposition and storage of 10Be in loess. The essential characteristics that make 10Be a useful isotopic tracer in loess, include: (1) dominant atmospheric production directly linked to the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field; (2) climate-dependent deposition; and (3) subsequent immobility, so that as 10Be accumulates in a loess profile its stratigraphic integrity is preserved. This fact, combined with very high deposition rates in loess on the Chinese Loess Plateau, makes 10Be an especially valuable continental archive of paleoclimate and paleomagnetism, complementing marine and ice-core records. Here we provide in particular the most recent progress of 10Be tracer studies in Chinese loess, including the determination of the correct age of the Brunhes-Matuyama polarity reversal at 780 ± 3 ka B.P., in accord with marine and ice records, and quantitative reconstruction of 130-ka paleoprecipitation using 10Be from Chinese loess profiles.

  7. Comparative genomic study of three species within the genus Ornithinibacillus, reflecting the adaption to different habitats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia-Wei; Cheng, Hong; Zheng, Bei-Wen; Li, Ang; Lv, Long-Xian; Ling, Zong-Xin; Yan, Ren; Jiang, Hui-Yong; Cheng, Yi-Wen; Gu, Si-Lan; Li, Lan-Juan

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we report the whole genome sequences of two species, Ornithinibacillus contaminans DSM22953(T) isolated from human blood and Ornithinibacillus californiensis DSM 16628(T) isolated from marine sediment, in genus Ornithinibacillus. Comparative genomic study of the two species was conducted together with their close relative Ornithinibacillus scapharcae TW25(T), a putative pathogenic bacteria isolated from dead ark clam. The comparisons showed O. contaminans DSM22953(T) had the smallest genome size of the three species indicating that it has a relatively more stable habitat. More stress response and heavy metal resistance genes were found in the genome of O. californiensis DSM 16628(T) reflecting its adaption to the complex marine environment. O. scapharcae TW25(T) contained more antibiotic resistance genes and virus factors in the genome than the other two species, which revealed its pathogen potential. PMID:26706221

  8. Recent Developments in Using Advanced Sequencing Technologies for the Genomic Studies of Lignin and Cellulose Degrading Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Kameshwar, Ayyappa Kumar Sista; Qin, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Lignin is a complex polyphenyl aromatic compound which exists in tight associations with cellulose and hemicellulose to form plant primary and secondary cell wall. Lignocellulose is an abundant renewable biomaterial present on the earth. It has gained much attention in the scientific community in recent years because of its potential applications in bio-based industries. Microbial degradation of lignocellulose polymers was well studied in wood decaying fungi. Based on the plant materials they degrade these fungi were classified as white rot, brown rot and soft rot. However, some groups of bacteria belonging to the actinomycetes, α-proteobacteria and β-proteobacteria were also found to be efficient in degrading lignocellulosic biomass but not well understood unlike the fungi. In this review we focus on recent advancements deployed for finding and understanding the lignocellulose degradation by microorganisms. Conventional molecular methods like sequencing 16s rRNA and Inter Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions were used for identification and classification of microbes. Recent progression in genomics mainly next generation sequencing technologies made the whole genome sequencing of microbes possible in a great ease. The whole genome sequence studies reveals high quality information about genes and canonical pathways involved in the lignin and other cell wall components degradation. PMID:26884714

  9. Recent Developments in Using Advanced Sequencing Technologies for the Genomic Studies of Lignin and Cellulose Degrading Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Kameshwar, Ayyappa kumar Sista; Qin, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Lignin is a complex polyphenyl aromatic compound which exists in tight associations with cellulose and hemicellulose to form plant primary and secondary cell wall. Lignocellulose is an abundant renewable biomaterial present on the earth. It has gained much attention in the scientific community in recent years because of its potential applications in bio-based industries. Microbial degradation of lignocellulose polymers was well studied in wood decaying fungi. Based on the plant materials they degrade these fungi were classified as white rot, brown rot and soft rot. However, some groups of bacteria belonging to the actinomycetes, α-proteobacteria and β-proteobacteria were also found to be efficient in degrading lignocellulosic biomass but not well understood unlike the fungi. In this review we focus on recent advancements deployed for finding and understanding the lignocellulose degradation by microorganisms. Conventional molecular methods like sequencing 16s rRNA and Inter Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions were used for identification and classification of microbes. Recent progression in genomics mainly next generation sequencing technologies made the whole genome sequencing of microbes possible in a great ease. The whole genome sequence studies reveals high quality information about genes and canonical pathways involved in the lignin and other cell wall components degradation. PMID:26884714

  10. Large-Scale Development of Gene-Associated Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers for Molluscan Population Genomic, Comparative Genomic, and Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Wenqian; Fu, Xiaoteng; Li, Jinqin; Li, Ling; Feng, Liying; Lv, Jia; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Xiaojian; Li, Yangping; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Lingling; Hu, Xiaoli; Wang, Shi; Bao, Zhenmin

    2014-01-01

    Mollusca is the second most diverse group of animals in the world. Despite their perceived importance, omics-level studies have seldom been applied to this group of animals largely due to a paucity of genomic resources. Here, we report the first large-scale gene-associated marker development and evaluation for a bivalve mollusc, Chlamys farreri. More than 21,000 putative single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified from the C. farreri transcriptome. Primers and probes were designed and synthesized for 4500 SNPs, and 1492 polymorphic markers were successfully developed using a high-resolution melting genotyping platform. These markers are particularly suitable for population genomic analysis due to high polymorphism within and across populations, a low frequency of null alleles, and conformation to neutral expectations. Unexpectedly, high cross-species transferability was observed, suggesting that the transferable SNPs may largely represent ancestral genetic variations that have been preserved differentially among subfamilies of Pectinidae. Gene annotations were available for 73% of the markers, and 65% could be anchored to the recently released Pacific oyster genome. Large-scale association analysis revealed key candidate genes responsible for scallop growth regulation, and provided markers for further genetic improvement of C. farreri in breeding programmes. PMID:24277739

  11. Computational Study of the Genomic and Epigenomic Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjing

    Biological systems are perhaps the ultimate complex systems, uniquely capable of processing and communicating information, reproducing in their lifetimes, and adapting in evolutionary time scales. My dissertation research focuses on using computational approaches to understand the biocomplexity manifested in the multitude of length scales and time scales. At the molecular and cellular level, central to the complex behavior of a biological system is the regulatory network. My research study focused on epigenetics, which is essential for multicellular organisms to establish cellular identity during development or in response to intracellular and environmental stimuli. My computational study of epigenomics is greatly facilitated by recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technology, which enables high-resolution snapshots of epigenomes and transcriptomes. Using human CD4+ T cell as a model system, the dynamical changes in epigenome and transcriptome pertinent to T cell activation were investigated at the genome scale. Going beyond traditional focus on transcriptional regulation, I provided evidences that post-transcriptional regulation may serve as a major component of the regulatory network. In addition, I explored alternative polyadenylation, another novel aspect of gene regulation, and how it cross-talks with the local chromatin structure. As the renowned theoretical biologist Theodosius Dobzhansky said eloquently, "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution''. To better understand this ubiquitous driving force in the biological world, I went beyond molecular events in a single organism, and investigated the dynamical changes of population structure along the evolutionary time scale. To this end, we used HIV virus population dynamics in the host immune system as a model system. The evolution of HIV viral population plays a key role in AIDS immunopathogenesis with its exceptionally high mutation rate. However, the theoretical studies of

  12. Using the Human Genome: A Case Study in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, John A.

    2002-01-01

    The working drafts of the human genome, announced in February 2001, have clearly provided a breakthrough in biochemistry and molecular biology research. The scientific data also provide an opportunity to vary a typical approach to teaching. Advanced graduate students at our university can elect to take a course in molecular genetics. The human…

  13. Studying Cattle Genomic Structural Variations in the Green Economy Era

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic cattle carrying multiple genomic modifications have been produced by serial rounds of somatic cell chromatin transfer (cloning) of sequentially genetically targeted somatic cells. However, cloning efficiency tends to decline with the increase of rounds of cloning. It is possible that mult...

  14. Evaluating Theobroma grandiflorum for comparative genomic studies with Theobroma cacao

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The seeds of Theobroma cacao (cacao) are the source of cocoa, the raw material for the multi-billion dollar chocolate industry. Cacao’s two most important traits are its unique seed storage triglyceride (cocoa butter) and the flavor of its fermented beans (chocolate). The genome of T. cacao is bei...

  15. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer in Hispanics.

    PubMed

    Schmit, Stephanie L; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Edlund, Christopher K; Conti, David V; Ihenacho, Ugonna; Wan, Peggy; Van Den Berg, David; Casey, Graham; Fortini, Barbara K; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Ordóñez-Sánchez, María Luisa; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; Cruz-Bautista, Ivette; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Muñóz-Hernández, Linda Liliana; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Gómez, Donají; Alvirde, Ulices; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; González-Villalpando, María Elena; Le Marchand, Loic; Haiman, Christopher A; Figueiredo, Jane C

    2016-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 58 susceptibility alleles across 37 regions associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) with P < 5×10(-8) Most studies have been conducted in non-Hispanic whites and East Asians; however, the generalizability of these findings and the potential for ethnic-specific risk variation in Hispanic and Latino (HL) individuals have been largely understudied. We describe the first GWAS of common genetic variation contributing to CRC risk in HL (1611 CRC cases and 4330 controls). We also examine known susceptibility alleles and implement imputation-based fine-mapping to identify potential ethnicity-specific association signals in known risk regions. We discovered 17 variants across 4 independent regions that merit further investigation due to suggestive CRC associations (P < 1×10(-6)) at 1p34.3 (rs7528276; Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.86 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.47-2.36); P = 2.5×10(-7)], 2q23.3 (rs1367374; OR = 1.37 (95% CI: 1.21-1.55); P = 4.0×10(-7)), 14q24.2 (rs143046984; OR = 1.65 (95% CI: 1.36-2.01); P = 4.1×10(-7)) and 16q12.2 [rs142319636; OR = 1.69 (95% CI: 1.37-2.08); P=7.8×10(-7)]. Among the 57 previously published CRC susceptibility alleles with minor allele frequency ≥1%, 76.5% of SNPs had a consistent direction of effect and 19 (33.3%) were nominally statistically significant (P < 0.05). Further, rs185423955 and rs60892987 were identified as novel secondary susceptibility variants at 3q26.2 (P = 5.3×10(-5)) and 11q12.2 (P = 6.8×10(-5)), respectively. Our findings demonstrate the importance of fine mapping in HL. These results are informative for variant prioritization in functional studies and future risk prediction modeling in minority populations. PMID:27207650

  16. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer in Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Schmit, Stephanie L.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Conti, David V.; Ihenacho, Ugonna; Wan, Peggy; Van Den Berg, David; Casey, Graham; Fortini, Barbara K.; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Ordóñez-Sánchez, María Luisa; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; Cruz-Bautista, Ivette; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Muñóz-Hernández, Linda Liliana; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Gómez, Donají; Alvirde, Ulices; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; González-Villalpando, María Elena; Le Marchand, Loic; Haiman, Christopher A.; Figueiredo, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 58 susceptibility alleles across 37 regions associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) with P < 5×10−8. Most studies have been conducted in non-Hispanic whites and East Asians; however, the generalizability of these findings and the potential for ethnic-specific risk variation in Hispanic and Latino (HL) individuals have been largely understudied. We describe the first GWAS of common genetic variation contributing to CRC risk in HL (1611 CRC cases and 4330 controls). We also examine known susceptibility alleles and implement imputation-based fine-mapping to identify potential ethnicity-specific association signals in known risk regions. We discovered 17 variants across 4 independent regions that merit further investigation due to suggestive CRC associations (P < 1×10−6) at 1p34.3 (rs7528276; Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.86 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.47–2.36); P = 2.5×10−7], 2q23.3 (rs1367374; OR = 1.37 (95% CI: 1.21–1.55); P = 4.0×10−7), 14q24.2 (rs143046984; OR = 1.65 (95% CI: 1.36–2.01); P = 4.1×10−7) and 16q12.2 [rs142319636; OR = 1.69 (95% CI: 1.37–2.08); P=7.8×10−7]. Among the 57 previously published CRC susceptibility alleles with minor allele frequency ≥1%, 76.5% of SNPs had a consistent direction of effect and 19 (33.3%) were nominally statistically significant (P < 0.05). Further, rs185423955 and rs60892987 were identified as novel secondary susceptibility variants at 3q26.2 (P = 5.3×10–5) and 11q12.2 (P = 6.8×10−5), respectively. Our findings demonstrate the importance of fine mapping in HL. These results are informative for variant prioritization in functional studies and future risk prediction modeling in minority populations. PMID:27207650

  17. Genomic and Proteomic Profiles Reveal the Association of Gelsolin to TP53 Status and Bladder Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Socci, Nicholas D.; Richstone, Lee; Corton, Marta; Behrendt, Nille; Wulkfuhle, Julia; Bochner, Bernard; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Bladder cancer transformation and immortalization require the inactivation of key regulatory genes, including TP53. Genotyping of a large cohort of bladder cancer patients (n = 256) using the TP53 GeneChip showed mutations in 103 cases (40.2%), the majority of them mapping to the DNA-binding core domain. TP53 mutation status was significantly associated with tumor stage (P = 0.0001) and overall survival for patients with advanced disease (P = 0.01). Transcript profiling using oligonucleotide arrays was performed on a subset of these cases (n = 46). Supervised analyses identified genes differentially expressed between invasive bladder tumors with wild-type (n = 24) and mutated TP53 (n = 22). Pathway analyses of top-ranked genes supported the central role of TP53 in the functional network of such gene patterns. A proteomic strategy using reverse phase arrays with protein extracts of bladder cancer cell lines validated the association of identified differentially expressed genes, such as gelsolin, to TP53 status. Immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays (n = 294) revealed that gelsolin was associated with tumor stage and overall survival, correlating positively with TP53 status in a subset of these patients. This study further reveals that TP53 mutations are frequent events in bladder cancer progression and identified gelsolin related to TP53 status, tumor staging, and clinical outcome by independent high-throughput strategies. PMID:17982131

  18. Progress in preliminary studies at Ottana Solar Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demontis, V.; Camerada, M.; Cau, G.; Cocco, D.; Damiano, A.; Melis, T.; Musio, M.

    2016-05-01

    The fast increasing share of distributed generation from non-programmable renewable energy sources, such as the strong penetration of photovoltaic technology in the distribution networks, has generated several problems for the management and security of the whole power grid. In order to meet the challenge of a significant share of solar energy in the electricity mix, several actions aimed at increasing the grid flexibility and its hosting capacity, as well as at improving the generation programmability, need to be investigated. This paper focuses on the ongoing preliminary studies at the Ottana Solar Facility, a new experimental power plant located in Sardinia (Italy) currently under construction, which will offer the possibility to progress in the study of solar plants integration in the power grid. The facility integrates a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant, including a thermal energy storage system and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) unit, with a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) plant and an electrical energy storage system. The facility has the main goal to assess in real operating conditions the small scale concentrating solar power technology and to study the integration of the two technologies and the storage systems to produce programmable and controllable power profiles. A model for the CSP plant yield was developed to assess different operational strategies that significantly influence the plant yearly yield and its global economic effectiveness. In particular, precise assumptions for the ORC module start-up operation behavior, based on discussions with the manufacturers and technical datasheets, will be described. Finally, the results of the analysis of the: "solar driven", "weather forecasts" and "combined storage state of charge (SOC)/ weather forecasts" operational strategies will be presented.

  19. Progressive macular hypomelanosis among Egyptian patients: a clinicopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Selim, Mohamed Khaled; Ahmed, El-Shahat Farag; Abdelgawad, Mamdouh Morsy; El-Kamel, Mohammed Fawzy

    2011-01-01

    Background: Progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH) is a disease of unclear etiology. Propionbacterium acnes (P. acnes) was claimed to be an etiological factor. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to document the clinicopathological features of PMH in Egyptian patients and to evaluate the therapeutic outcome. Methods: Patients with clinical features of PMH were recruited. Wood’s lamp examination, skin scrapings for fungi, and skin biopsy specimens were obtained. Biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, PAS, Fontana-Masson, and S100 protein. Patients received either narrow-band UVB (nbUVB) or nbUVB plus daily topical clindamycin 1% and benzoyl peroxide gel 5% (bcUVB). The period of active treatment was 14 weeks followed by a follow-up period of 24 weeks. Results: Twenty-nine patients were included. Microscopic evaluation of skin biopsy specimens showed no significant differences between lesional and normal skin. Fontana-Masson stained sections showed overall reduction of melanin granules in the basal layer of lesional skin only and S100 staining did not detect significant differences in the number of melanocytes in lesional and normal skin. Nearly complete repigmentation was reported in 10 patients treated with bcUVB compared to 9 patients treated with nbUVb with no significant differences between both groups after 14 weeks. Only 2 patients in each group retained the pigmentation and the remaining patients returned to the baseline color before treatment. Conclusions: This study documented the clinicopathological features of PMH among Egyptians. No permanently effective treatment is available. Further studies are needed to prove or disprove the pathogenic role of P. acnes in PMH. PMID:24396712

  20. Duplex stem-loop-containing quadruplex motifs in the human genome: a combined genomic and structural study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kah Wai; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Low, Zhen Jie; Khong, Zi Jian; Ng, Yi Siang; Kuznetsov, Vladimir Andreevich; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2015-01-01

    Duplex stem-loops and four-stranded G-quadruplexes have been implicated in (patho)biological processes. Overlap of stem-loop- and quadruplex-forming sequences could give rise to quadruplex–duplex hybrids (QDH), which combine features of both structural forms and could exhibit unique properties. Here, we present a combined genomic and structural study of stem-loop-containing quadruplex sequences (SLQS) in the human genome. Based on a maximum loop length of 20 nt, our survey identified 80 307 SLQS, embedded within 60 172 unique clusters. Our analysis suggested that these should cover close to half of total SLQS in the entire genome. Among these, 48 508 SLQS were strand-specifically located in genic/promoter regions, with the majority of genes displaying a low number of SLQS. Notably, genes containing abundant SLQS clusters were strongly associated with brain tissues. Enrichment analysis of SLQS-positive genes and mapping of SLQS onto transcriptional/mutagenesis hotspots and cancer-associated genes, provided a statistical framework supporting the biological involvements of SLQS. In vitro formation of diverse QDH by selective SLQS hits were successfully verified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Folding topologies of two SLQS were elucidated in detail. We also demonstrated that sequence changes at mutation/single-nucleotide polymorphism loci could affect the structural conformations adopted by SLQS. Thus, our predicted SLQS offer novel insights into the potential involvement of QDH in diverse (patho)biological processes and could represent novel regulatory signals. PMID:25958397

  1. A genome-wide association study identifies a genomic region for the polycerate phenotype in sheep (Ovis aries)

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xue; Yang, Guang-Li; Peng, Wei-Feng; Zhao, Yong-Xin; Zhang, Min; Chen, Ze-Hui; Wu, Fu-An; Kantanen, Juha; Shen, Min; Li, Meng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Horns are a cranial appendage found exclusively in Bovidae, and play important roles in accessing resources and mates. In sheep (Ovies aries), horns vary from polled to six-horned, and human have been selecting polled animals in farming and breeding. Here, we conducted a genome-wide association study on 24 two-horned versus 22 four-horned phenotypes in a native Chinese breed of Sishui Fur sheep. Together with linkage disequilibrium (LD) analyses and haplotype-based association tests, we identified a genomic region comprising 132.0–133.1 Mb on chromosome 2 that contained the top 10 SNPs (including 4 significant SNPs) and 5 most significant haplotypes associated with the polycerate phenotype. In humans and mice, this genomic region contains the HOXD gene cluster and adjacent functional genes EVX2 and KIAA1715, which have a close association with the formation of limbs and genital buds. Our results provide new insights into the genetic basis underlying variable numbers of horns and represent a new resource for use in sheep genetics and breeding. PMID:26883901

  2. Placental Genome and Maternal-Placental Genetic Interactions: A Genome-Wide and Candidate Gene Association Study of Placental Abruption

    PubMed Central

    Denis, Marie; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Gelaye, Bizu; Sanchez, Sixto E.; Salazar, Manuel; Ananth, Cande V.; Williams, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    While available evidence supports the role of genetics in the pathogenesis of placental abruption (PA), PA-related placental genome variations and maternal-placental genetic interactions have not been investigated. Maternal blood and placental samples collected from participants in the Peruvian Abruptio Placentae Epidemiology study were genotyped using Illumina’s Cardio-Metabochip platform. We examined 118,782 genome-wide SNPs and 333 SNPs in 32 candidate genes from mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways in placental DNA from 280 PA cases and 244 controls. We assessed maternal-placental interactions in the candidate gene SNPS and two imprinted regions (IGF2/H19 and C19MC). Univariate and penalized logistic regression models were fit to estimate odds ratios. We examined the combined effect of multiple SNPs on PA risk using weighted genetic risk scores (WGRS) with repeated ten-fold cross-validations. A multinomial model was used to investigate maternal-placental genetic interactions. In placental genome-wide and candidate gene analyses, no SNP was significant after false discovery rate correction. The top genome-wide association study (GWAS) hits were rs544201, rs1484464 (CTNNA2), rs4149570 (TNFRSF1A) and rs13055470 (ZNRF3) (p-values: 1.11e-05 to 3.54e-05). The top 200 SNPs of the GWAS overrepresented genes involved in cell cycle, growth and proliferation. The top candidate gene hits were rs16949118 (COX10) and rs7609948 (THRB) (p-values: 6.00e-03 and 8.19e-03). Participants in the highest quartile of WGRS based on cross-validations using SNPs selected from the GWAS and candidate gene analyses had a 8.40-fold (95% CI: 5.8–12.56) and a 4.46-fold (95% CI: 2.94–6.72) higher odds of PA compared to participants in the lowest quartile. We found maternal-placental genetic interactions on PA risk for two SNPs in PPARG (chr3∶12313450 and chr3∶12412978) and maternal imprinting effects for multiple SNPs in the C19MC and IGF2/H19 regions

  3. Advances in genome editing technology and its promising application in evolutionary and ecological studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Genetic modification has long provided an approach for “reverse genetics”, analyzing gene function and linking DNA sequence to phenotype. However, traditional genome editing technologies have not kept pace with the soaring progress of the genome sequencing era, as a result of their inefficiency, time-consuming and labor-intensive methods. Recently, invented genome modification technologies, such as ZFN (Zinc Finger Nuclease), TALEN (Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease), and CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/Cas9 nuclease) can initiate genome editing easily, precisely and with no limitations by organism. These new tools have also offered intriguing possibilities for conducting functional large-scale experiments. In this review, we begin with a brief introduction of ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies, then generate an extensive prediction of effective TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 target sites in the genomes of a broad range of taxonomic species. Based on the evidence, we highlight the potential and practicalities of TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 editing in non-model organisms, and also compare the technologies and test interesting issues such as the functions of candidate domesticated, as well as candidate genes in life-environment interactions. When accompanied with a high-throughput sequencing platform, we forecast their potential revolutionary impacts on evolutionary and ecological research, which may offer an exciting prospect for connecting the gap between DNA sequence and phenotype in the near future. PMID:25414792

  4. Utilization of the human louse genome to study insecticide resistance and innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J. Marshall; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Kim, Ju Hyeon; Lee, Si Hyeock; Pittendrigh, Barry R.

    2015-01-01

    Since sequencing the human body louse genome, substantial advances have occurred in the utilization of the information gathered from louse genomes and transcriptomes. Comparatively, the body louse genome contains far fewer genes involved in environmental response, such as xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune response. Additionally, the body louse maintains a primary bacterial endosymbiont, Candidatus Riesia pediculicola, and a number of bacterial pathogens that it vectors, which have genomes that are also reduced in size. Thus, human louse genomes offer unique information and tools for use in advancing our understanding of coevolution among vectors, endosymbionts and pathogens. In this review, we summarize the current literature on the extent of pediculicide resistance, the availability of new pediculicides and information establishing this organism as an efficient model to study how xenobiotic metabolism, which is involved in insecticide resistance, is induced and how insects modify their innate immune response upon bacterial challenge resulting in enhanced vector competence. PMID:25987230

  5. Biomedical applications and studies of molecular evolution: a proposal for a primate genomic library resource.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Evan E; DeJong, Pieter J

    2002-05-01

    The anticipated completion of two of the most biomedically relevant genomes, mouse and human, within the next three years provides an unparalleled opportunity for the large-scale exploration of genome evolution. Targeted sequencing of genomic regions in a panel of primate species and comparison to reference genomes will provide critical insight into the nature of single-base pair variation, mechanisms of chromosomal rearrangement, patterns of selection, and species adaptation. Although not recognized as model "genetic organisms" because of their longevity and low fecundity, 30 of the approximately 300 primate species are targets of biomedical research. The existence of a human reference sequence and genomic primate BAC libraries greatly facilitates the recovery of genes/genomic regions of high biological interest because of an estimated maximum neutral nucleotide sequence divergence of 25%. Primate species, therefore, may be regarded as the ideal model "genomic organisms". Based on existing BAC library resources, we propose the construction of a panel of primate BAC libraries from phylogenetic anchor species for the purpose of comparative medicine as well as studies of genome evolution. PMID:11997334

  6. Genomics education training needs of U.S. health educators: a (qualitative) pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei-Shih; Goodson, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    As genomic advances have turned the promise of personalized prevention and health promotion into a concrete possibility in the near future, scholars and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have begun to call for U.S. health educators to develop their genomic competencies. This advocacy, however, begs the question whether health educators feel the need for further genomic training. Using an emergent design, the authors analyze qualitative data obtained from in-depth interviews with 24 health educators in the United States. Data are searched for salient, emergent themes (salience is determined by the frequency of a theme's occurrence across interviews). Findings indicate that although the majority (78.3%) of health educators have received minimal or no genomic education, 81.0% acknowledge the importance of adding some type of training to their future professional development. Participants suggest conference presentations, workshops, and symposia (54.5%) as the most preferable approach for delivering such training. The four most frequently desired training topics include applied genetics/genomics (85.7%), basic genetics/genomics (42.9%), current and future developments in genetics/genomics (28.6%), and genetic testing and screening (19.0%). Findings from this qualitative study can become catalysts for future examinations of this topic and provide the conceptual basis for developing genomics training materials specifically for health educators. PMID:20223938

  7. Functional genomics of tomato in a post-genome-sequencing phase

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Koh; Ogata, Yoshiyuki; Igarashi, Kaori; Yano, Kentaro; Nagasaki, Hideki; Kaminuma, Eli; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Completion of tomato genome sequencing project has broad impacts on genetic and genomic studies of tomato and Solanaceae plants. The reference genome sequence derived from Solanum lycopersicum cv ‘Heinz 1706’ serves as the firm basis for sequencing-based approaches to tomato genomics. In this article, we first present a brief summary of the genome sequencing project and a summary of the reference genome sequence. We then focus on recent progress in transcriptome sequencing and small RNA sequencing and show how the reference genome sequence makes these analyses more comprehensive than before. We discuss the potential of in-depth analysis that is based on DNA methylome sequencing and transcription start-site detection. Finally, we describe the current status of efforts to resequence S. lycopersicum cultivars to demonstrate how resequencing can allow the use of intraspecific genomic diversity for detailed phenotyping and breeding. PMID:23641177

  8. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Echophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Margrethe H. Serres

    2012-06-29

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a motile, facultative {gamma}-Proteobacterium with remarkable respiratory versatility; it can utilize a range of organic and inorganic compounds as terminal electronacceptors for anaerobic metabolism. The ability to effectively reduce nitrate, S0, polyvalent metals andradionuclides has established MR-1 as an important model dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganism for genome-based investigations of biogeochemical transformation of metals and radionuclides that are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites nationwide. Metal-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella also have a highly developed capacity for extracellular transfer of respiratory electrons to solid phase Fe and Mn oxides as well as directly to anode surfaces in microbial fuel cells. More broadly, Shewanellae are recognized free-living microorganisms and members of microbial communities involved in the decomposition of organic matter and the cycling of elements in aquatic and sedimentary systems. To function and compete in environments that are subject to spatial and temporal environmental change, Shewanella must be able to sense and respond to such changes and therefore require relatively robust sensing and regulation systems. The overall goal of this project is to apply the tools of genomics, leveraging the availability of genome sequence for 18 additional strains of Shewanella, to better understand the ecophysiology and speciation of respiratory-versatile members of this important genus. To understand these systems we propose to use genome-based approaches to investigate Shewanella as a system of integrated networks; first describing key cellular subsystems - those involved in signal transduction, regulation, and metabolism - then building towards understanding the function of whole cells and, eventually, cells within populations. As a general approach, this project will employ complimentary "top-down" - bioinformatics-based genome functional predictions, high

  9. Theoretical studies in high energy nuclear physics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This paper is a progress report for the period 1-1-93 to 6-30-95 on a project primarily directed at the application of high energy physics techniques to nuclear structure studies, and the ability to study hadron dynamics through interactions with nuclear targets. This work has included the first legitimate QCD calculations of hard coherent diffractive processes off nucleon (nuclear) targets which established novel features of color transparency phenomenon not anticipated in the previous intuitive or QCD inspired model calculations and predicted the fast increase of the cross section for electroproduction of {rho}-mesons with increase of the energy, which was confirmed very recently by the first HERA data on this reaction. First theoretical demonstration that color transparency phenomenon for the hard diffractive processes follow from QCD in the kinematics when both x{yields}0 and Q{sup 2}{yields}{infinity}. Establishing the pattern of color (cross section) fluctuations in hadrons. Confirmed by the FNAL inelastic diffraction data. Finding that in realistic quark, skyrmion models of a hadron large momentum transfer elastic lepton-hadron scattering occurs through formation of small spatial size configurations. Discovering a novel class of color transparency sensitive double interaction processes which is complementary to quasielastic reactions originally suggested by S. Brodsky and A. Mueller. Adopting ideas suggested elsewhere for hadron initiated reactions they developed a method for taking into account nuclear correlations in (e,e{prime}p) reactions. Such an approach gives practical possibility to overcome ambiguities of optical model approximation used before and to reliably interpret color transparency effects at intermediate Q{sup 2}.

  10. Genome-wide association study with 1000 genomes imputation identifies signals for nine sex hormone-related phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ruth, Katherine S; Campbell, Purdey J; Chew, Shelby; Lim, Ee Mun; Hadlow, Narelle; Stuckey, Bronwyn GA; Brown, Suzanne J; Feenstra, Bjarke; Joseph, John; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Zheng, Hou Feng; Richards, J Brent; Murray, Anna; Spector, Tim D; Wilson, Scott G; Perry, John RB

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute strongly to sex hormone levels, yet knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms remains incomplete. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified only a small number of loci associated with sex hormone levels, with several reproductive hormones yet to be assessed. The aim of the study was to identify novel genetic variants contributing to the regulation of sex hormones. We performed GWAS using genotypes imputed from the 1000 Genomes reference panel. The study used genotype and phenotype data from a UK twin register. We included 2913 individuals (up to 294 males) from the Twins UK study, excluding individuals receiving hormone treatment. Phenotypes were standardised for age, sex, BMI, stage of menstrual cycle and menopausal status. We tested 7 879 351 autosomal SNPs for association with levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), oestradiol, free androgen index (FAI), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, progesterone, sex hormone-binding globulin and testosterone. Eight independent genetic variants reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8), with minor allele frequencies of 1.3–23.9%. Novel signals included variants for progesterone (P=7.68 × 10−12), oestradiol (P=1.63 × 10−8) and FAI (P=1.50 × 10−8). A genetic variant near the FSHB gene was identified which influenced both FSH (P=1.74 × 10−8) and LH (P=3.94 × 10−9) levels. A separate locus on chromosome 7 was associated with both DHEAS (P=1.82 × 10−14) and progesterone (P=6.09 × 10−14). This study highlights loci that are relevant to reproductive function and suggests overlap in the genetic basis of hormone regulation. PMID:26014426

  11. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei L. Osterman, Ph.D.

    2012-12-17

    Integration of bioinformatics and experimental techniques was applied to mapping and characterization of the key components (pathways, enzymes, transporters, regulators) of the core metabolic machinery in Shewanella oneidensis and related species with main focus was on metabolic and regulatory pathways involved in utilization of various carbon and energy sources. Among the main accomplishments reflected in ten joint publications with other participants of Shewanella Federation are: (i) A systems-level reconstruction of carbohydrate utilization pathways in the genus of Shewanella (19 species). This analysis yielded reconstruction of 18 sugar utilization pathways including 10 novel pathway variants and prediction of > 60 novel protein families of enzymes, transporters and regulators involved in these pathways. Selected functional predictions were verified by focused biochemical and genetic experiments. Observed growth phenotypes were consistent with bioinformatic predictions providing strong validation of the technology and (ii) Global genomic reconstruction of transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Of those, 45 regulons were inferred directly from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in other species. Selected regulatory predictions were experimentally tested. Integration of this analysis with microarray data revealed overall consistency and provided additional layer of interactions between regulons. All the results were captured in the new database RegPrecise, which is a joint development with the LBNL team. A more detailed analysis of the individual subsystems, pathways and regulons in Shewanella spp included bioinfiormatics-based prediction and experimental characterization of: (i) N-Acetylglucosamine catabolic pathway; (ii)Lactate utilization machinery; (iii) Novel Nrt

  12. Dissecting Inflammatory Complications in Critically Injured Patients by Within-Patient Gene Expression Changes: A Longitudinal Clinical Genomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Leek, Jeffrey T.; Maier, Ronald V.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Storey, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Trauma is the number one killer of individuals 1–44 y of age in the United States. The prognosis and treatment of inflammatory complications in critically injured patients continue to be challenging, with a history of failed clinical trials and poorly understood biology. New approaches are therefore needed to improve our ability to diagnose and treat this clinical condition. Methods and Findings We conducted a large-scale study on 168 blunt-force trauma patients over 28 d, measuring ∼400 clinical variables and longitudinally profiling leukocyte gene expression with ∼800 microarrays. Marshall MOF (multiple organ failure) clinical score trajectories were first utilized to organize the patients into five categories of increasingly poor outcomes. We then developed an analysis framework modeling early within-patient expression changes to produce a robust characterization of the genomic response to trauma. A quarter of the genome shows early expression changes associated with longer-term post-injury complications, captured by at least five dynamic co-expression modules of functionally related genes. In particular, early down-regulation of MHC-class II genes and up-regulation of p38 MAPK signaling pathway were found to strongly associate with longer-term post-injury complications, providing discrimination among patient outcomes from expression changes during the 40–80 h window post-injury. Conclusions The genomic characterization provided here substantially expands the scope by which the molecular response to trauma may be characterized and understood. These results may be instrumental in furthering our understanding of the disease process and identifying potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Additionally, the quantitative approach we have introduced is potentially applicable to future genomics studies of rapidly progressing clinical conditions. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00257231 Please see later in the article for the Editors

  13. The draft genome sequence of the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) facilitates study of human respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinxia; Alföldi, Jessica; Gori, Kevin; Eisfeld, Amie J; Tyler, Scott R; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Brawand, David; Law, G Lynn; Skunca, Nives; Hatta, Masato; Gasper, David J; Kelly, Sara M; Chang, Jean; Thomas, Matthew J; Johnson, Jeremy; Berlin, Aaron M; Lara, Marcia; Russell, Pamela; Swofford, Ross; Turner-Maier, Jason; Young, Sarah; Hourlier, Thibaut; Aken, Bronwen; Searle, Steve; Sun, Xingshen; Yi, Yaling; Suresh, M; Tumpey, Terrence M; Siepel, Adam; Wisely, Samantha M; Dessimoz, Christophe; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Birren, Bruce W; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Di Palma, Federica; Engelhardt, John F; Palermo, Robert E; Katze, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) is an important animal model for multiple human respiratory diseases. It is considered the 'gold standard' for modeling human influenza virus infection and transmission. Here we describe the 2.41 Gb draft genome assembly of the domestic ferret, constituting 2.28 Gb of sequence plus gaps. We annotated 19,910 protein-coding genes on this assembly using RNA-seq data from 21 ferret tissues. We characterized the ferret host response to two influenza virus infections by RNA-seq analysis of 42 ferret samples from influenza time-course data and showed distinct signatures in ferret trachea and lung tissues specific to 1918 or 2009 human pandemic influenza virus infections. Using microarray data from 16 ferret samples reflecting cystic fibrosis disease progression, we showed that transcriptional changes in the CFTR-knockout ferret lung reflect pathways of early disease that cannot be readily studied in human infants with cystic fibrosis disease. PMID:25402615

  14. The draft genome sequence of the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) facilitates study of human respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinxia; Alföldi, Jessica; Gori, Kevin; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Tyler, Scott R.; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Brawand, David; Law, G. Lynn; Skunca, Nives; Hatta, Masato; Gasper, David J.; Kelly, Sara M.; Chang, Jean; Thomas, Matthew J.; Johnson, Jeremy; Berlin, Aaron M.; Lara, Marcia; Russell, Pamela; Swofford, Ross; Turner-Maier, Jason; Young, Sarah; Hourlier, Thibaut; Aken, Bronwen; Searle, Steve; Sun, Xingshen; Yi, Yaling; Suresh, M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Siepel, Adam; Wisely, Samantha M.; Dessimoz, Christophe; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Birren, Bruce W.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Di Palma, Federica; Engelhardt, John F.; Palermo, Robert E.; Katze, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) is an important animal model for multiple human respiratory diseases. It is considered the ‘gold standard’ for modeling human influenza virus infection and transmission1–4. Here we describe the 2.41 Gb draft genome assembly of the domestic ferret, constituting 2.28 Gb of sequence plus gaps. We annotate 19,910 protein-coding genes on this assembly using RNA-seq data from 21 ferret tissues. We characterize the ferret host response to two influenza virus infections by RNA-seq analysis of 42 ferret samples from influenza time courses, and show distinct signatures in ferret trachea and lung tissues specific to 1918 or 2009 human pandemic influenza virus infections. Using microarray data from 16 ferret samples reflecting cystic fibrosis (CF) disease progression, we show that transcriptional changes in the CFTR-knockout ferret lung reflect pathways of early disease that cannot be readily studied in human infants with CF disease. PMID:25402615

  15. New resources inform study of genome size, content, and organization in nonavian reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Daniel E.; Organ, Christopher; Valenzuela, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Genomic resources for studies of nonavian reptiles have recently improved and will reach a new level of access once the genomes of the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta) and the green anole (Anolis carolinensis) have been published. Eleven speakers gathered for a symposium on reptilian genomics and evolutionary genetics at the 2008 meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in San Antonio, Texas. Presentations described results of reptilian genetic studies concerning molecular evolution, chromosomal evolution, genomic architecture, population dynamics, endocrinology and endocrine disruption, and the evolution of developmental mechanisms. The presented studies took advantage of the recent generation of genetic and genomic tools and resources. Novel findings demonstrated the positive impact made by the improved availability of resources like genome annotations and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The symposium was timely and important because it provided a vehicle for the dissemination of novel findings that advance the field. Moreover, this meeting fostered the synergistic interaction of the participants as a group, which is anticipated to encourage the funding and creation of further resources such as additional BAC libraries and genomic projects. Novel data have already been collected and studies like those presented in this symposium promise to shape and improve our understanding of overall amniote evolution. Additional reptilian taxa such as the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), and garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) should be the foci of future genomic projects. We hope that the following articles in this volume will help promote these efforts by describing the conclusions and the potential that the improvement of genomic resources for nonavian reptiles can continue having in this important area of integrative and comparative biology. PMID:21669805

  16. [Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions]. Progress summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The experimental goals are focused on developing an understanding of strong interactions and the structure of hadronic systems by determination of the electromagnetic response; these goals will be accomplished through coincidence detection of final states. Nuclear modeling objectives are to organize and interpret the data through a consistent description of a broad spectrum of reaction observables; calculations are performed in a nonrelativistic diagrammatic framework as well as a relativistic QHD approach. Work is described according to the following arrangement: direct knockout reactions (completion of {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p), {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}pp) progress, large acceptance detector physics simulations), giant resonance studies (intermediate-energy experiments with solid-state detectors, the third response function in {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p{sub 0}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 0}), comparison of the {sup 12}C(e, e{prime}p{sub 0}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 3}) reactions, quadrupole strength in the {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}{alpha}{sub 0}) reaction, quadrupole strength in the {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}{alpha}) reaction, analysis of the {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}p{sub 1}) and {sup 16}O(e,e{prime}p{sub 3}) angular distributions, analysis of the {sup 40}Ca(e,e{prime}x) reaction at low q, analysis of the higher-q {sup 12}C(e,e{prime}x) data from Bates), models of nuclear structure (experimental work, Hartree-Fock calculations, phonon excitations in spherical nuclei, shell model calculations, variational methods for relativistic fields), and instrumentation development efforts (developments at CEBAF, CLAS contracts, BLAST developments).

  17. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Regulators of Micronucleus Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Rebecca E.; Nicod, Jérôme; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Maciejowski, John; Cai, Na; Hill, Jennifer; Verstraten, Ruth; Iyer, Vivek; Rust, Alistair G.; Balmus, Gabriel; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan; Adams, David J.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals the regulation of genomic instability plays a key role in tumor suppression and also controls genome plasticity, which is important for recombination during the processes of immunity and meiosis. Most studies to identify regulators of genomic instability have been performed in cells in culture or in systems that report on gross rearrangements of the genome, yet subtle differences in the level of genomic instability can contribute to whole organism phenotypes such as tumor predisposition. Here we performed a genome-wide association study in a population of 1379 outbred Crl:CFW(SW)-US_P08 mice to dissect the genetic landscape of micronucleus formation, a biomarker of chromosomal breaks, whole chromosome loss, and extranuclear DNA. Variation in micronucleus levels is a complex trait with a genome-wide heritability of 53.1%. We identify seven loci influencing micronucleus formation (false discovery rate <5%), and define candidate genes at each locus. Intriguingly at several loci we find evidence for sexual dimorphism in micronucleus formation, with a locus on chromosome 11 being specific to males. PMID:27233670

  18. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Regulators of Micronucleus Formation in Mice.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Rebecca E; Nicod, Jérôme; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Maciejowski, John; Cai, Na; Hill, Jennifer; Verstraten, Ruth; Iyer, Vivek; Rust, Alistair G; Balmus, Gabriel; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan; Adams, David J

    2016-01-01

    In mammals the regulation of genomic instability plays a key role in tumor suppression and also controls genome plasticity, which is important for recombination during the processes of immunity and meiosis. Most studies to identify regulators of genomic instability have been performed in cells in culture or in systems that report on gross rearrangements of the genome, yet subtle differences in the level of genomic instability can contribute to whole organism phenotypes such as tumor predisposition. Here we performed a genome-wide association study in a population of 1379 outbred Crl:CFW(SW)-US_P08 mice to dissect the genetic landscape of micronucleus formation, a biomarker of chromosomal breaks, whole chromosome loss, and extranuclear DNA. Variation in micronucleus levels is a complex trait with a genome-wide heritability of 53.1%. We identify seven loci influencing micronucleus formation (false discovery rate <5%), and define candidate genes at each locus. Intriguingly at several loci we find evidence for sexual dimorphism in micronucleus formation, with a locus on chromosome 11 being specific to males. PMID:27233670

  19. Genomic studies on the nature of species: adaptation and speciation in Mimulus.

    PubMed

    Twyford, Alex D; Streisfeld, Matthew A; Lowry, David B; Friedman, Jannice

    2015-06-01

    Evolutionary biology is in an exciting era, in which powerful genomic tools make the answers accessible to long-standing questions about variation, adaptation and speciation. The availability of a suite of genomic resources, a shared knowledge base and a long history of study have made the phenotypically diverse plant genus Mimulus an important system for understanding ecological and evolutionary processes. An international Mimulus Research Meeting was held at Duke University in June 2014 to discuss developments in ecological and evolutionary genetic studies in Mimulus. Here, we report major recent discoveries presented at the meeting that use genomic approaches to advance our understanding of three major themes: the parallel genetic basis of adaptation; the ecological genomics of speciation; and the evolutionary significance of structural genetic variation. We also suggest future research directions for studies of Mimulus and highlight challenges faced when developing new ecological and evolutionary model systems. PMID:25856725

  20. Studies in iodine metabolism. Progress report, 1982-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Van Middlesworth, L.

    1983-01-01

    Research progress is reported for the period 1982 to 1983 in the following areas: (1) monitoring of animal thyroids for /sup 129/I, /sup 125/I, /sup 131/I, /sup 226/Ra, and /sup 228/Ra; and (2) neonatal hypo-l thyroidism in laboratory rats. (ACR)

  1. Genome-wide association study of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S E; Yu, D; Scharf, J M; Neale, B M; Fagerness, J A; Mathews, C A; Arnold, P D; Evans, P D; Gamazon, E R; Davis, L K; Osiecki, L; McGrath, L; Haddad, S; Crane, J; Hezel, D; Illman, C; Mayerfeld, C; Konkashbaev, A; Liu, C; Pluzhnikov, A; Tikhomirov, A; Edlund, C K; Rauch, S L; Moessner, R; Falkai, P; Maier, W; Ruhrmann, S; Grabe, H-J; Lennertz, L; Wagner, M; Bellodi, L; Cavallini, M C; Richter, M A; Cook, E H; Kennedy, J L; Rosenberg, D; Stein, D J; Hemmings, S M J; Lochner, C; Azzam, A; Chavira, D A; Fournier, E; Garrido, H; Sheppard, B; Umaña, P; Murphy, D L; Wendland, J R; Veenstra-VanderWeele, J; Denys, D; Blom, R; Deforce, D; Van Nieuwerburgh, F; Westenberg, H G M; Walitza, S; Egberts, K; Renner, T; Miguel, E C; Cappi, C; Hounie, A G; Conceição do Rosário, M; Sampaio, A S; Vallada, H; Nicolini, H; Lanzagorta, N; Camarena, B; Delorme, R; Leboyer, M; Pato, C N; Pato, M T; Voyiaziakis, E; Heutink, P; Cath, D C; Posthuma, D; Smit, J H; Samuels, J; Bienvenu, O J; Cullen, B; Fyer, A J; Grados, M A; Greenberg, B D; McCracken, J T; Riddle, M A; Wang, Y; Coric, V; Leckman, J F; Bloch, M; Pittenger, C; Eapen, V; Black, D W; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; Cusi, D; Turiel, M; Frau, F; Macciardi, F; Gibbs, J R; Cookson, M R; Singleton, A; Hardy, J; Crenshaw, A T; Parkin, M A; Mirel, D B; Conti, D V; Purcell, S; Nestadt, G; Hanna, G L; Jenike, M A; Knowles, J A; Cox, N; Pauls, D L

    2013-07-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, debilitating neuropsychiatric illness with complex genetic etiology. The International OCD Foundation Genetics Collaborative (IOCDF-GC) is a multi-national collaboration established to discover the genetic variation predisposing to OCD. A set of individuals affected with DSM-IV OCD, a subset of their parents, and unselected controls, were genotyped with several different Illumina SNP microarrays. After extensive data cleaning, 1465 cases, 5557 ancestry-matched controls and 400 complete trios remained, with a common set of 469,410 autosomal and 9657 X-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Ancestry-stratified case-control association analyses were conducted for three genetically-defined subpopulations and combined in two meta-analyses, with and without the trio-based analysis. In the case-control analysis, the lowest two P-values were located within DLGAP1 (P=2.49 × 10(-6) and P=3.44 × 10(-6)), a member of the neuronal postsynaptic density complex. In the trio analysis, rs6131295, near BTBD3, exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold with a P-value=3.84 × 10(-8). However, when trios were meta-analyzed with the case-control samples, the P-value for this variant was 3.62 × 10(-5), losing genome-wide significance. Although no SNPs were identified to be associated with OCD at a genome-wide significant level in the combined trio-case-control sample, a significant enrichment of methylation QTLs (P<0.001) and frontal lobe expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) (P=0.001) was observed within the top-ranked SNPs (P<0.01) from the trio-case-control analysis, suggesting these top signals may have a broad role in gene expression in the brain, and possibly in the etiology of OCD. PMID:22889921

  2. 21 CFR 601.70 - Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. 601.70 Section 601.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Postmarketing Studies § 601.70 Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. (a) General requirements....

  3. Population genetic studies in the genomic sequencing era

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of population genetics. Data now routinely contain genomic level polymorphism information, and the low cost of DNA sequencing enables researchers to investigate tens of thousands of subjects at a time. This provides an unprecedented opportunity to address fundamental evolutionary questions, while posing challenges on traditional population genetic theories and methods. This review provides an overview of the recent methodological developments in the field of population genetics, specifically methods used to infer ancient population history and investigate natural selection using large-sample, large-scale genetic data. Several open questions are also discussed at the end of the review. PMID:26228473

  4. A genomic case study of mixed fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, O. L.; Griffith, M.; Krysiak, K.; Magrini, V.; Ramu, A.; Skidmore, Z. L.; Kunisaki, J.; Austin, R.; McGrath, S.; Zhang, J.; Demeter, R.; Graves, T.; Eldred, J. M.; Walker, J.; Larson, D. E.; Maher, C. A.; Lin, Y.; Chapman, W.; Mahadevan, A.; Miksad, R.; Nasser, I.; Hanto, D. W.; Mardis, E. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mixed fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (mFL-HCC) is a rare liver tumor defined by the presence of both pure FL-HCC and conventional HCC components, represents up to 25% of cases of FL-HCC, and has been associated with worse prognosis. Recent genomic characterization of pure FL-HCC identified a highly recurrent transcript fusion (DNAJB1:PRKACA) not found in conventional HCC. Patients and Methods We performed exome and transcriptome sequencing of a case of mFL-HCC. A novel BAC-capture approach was developed to identify a 400 kb deletion as the underlying genomic mechanism for a DNAJB1:PRKACA fusion in this case. A sensitive Nanostring Elements assay was used to screen for this transcript fusion in a second case of mFL-HCC, 112 additional HCC samples and 44 adjacent non-tumor liver samples. Results We report the first comprehensive genomic analysis of a case of mFL-HCC. No common HCC-associated mutations were identified. The very low mutation rate of this case, large number of mostly single-copy, long-range copy number variants, and high expression of ERBB2 were more consistent with previous reports of pure FL-HCC than conventional HCC. In particular, the DNAJB1:PRKACA fusion transcript specifically associated with pure FL-HCC was detected at very high expression levels. Subsequent analysis revealed the presence of this fusion in all primary and metastatic samples, including those with mixed or conventional HCC pathology. A second case of mFL-HCC confirmed our finding that the fusion was detectable in conventional components. An expanded screen identified a third case of fusion-positive HCC, which upon review, also had both conventional and fibrolamellar features. This screen confirmed the absence of the fusion in all conventional HCC and adjacent non-tumor liver samples. Conclusion These results indicate that mFL-HCC is similar to pure FL-HCC at the genomic level and the DNAJB1:PRKACA fusion can be used as a diagnostic tool for both pure and m

  5. Trypanosomatid comparative genomics: Contributions to the study of parasite biology and different parasitic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Santuza M.; de Paiva, Rita Márcia Cardoso; Kangussu-Marcolino, Monica M.; DaRocha, Wanderson D.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, draft sequences of the genomes of Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania major, also known as the Tri-Tryp genomes, were published. These protozoan parasites are the causative agents of three distinct insect-borne diseases, namely sleeping sickness, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis, all with a worldwide distribution. Despite the large estimated evolutionary distance among them, a conserved core of ~6,200 trypanosomatid genes was found among the Tri-Tryp genomes. Extensive analysis of these genomic sequences has greatly increased our understanding of the biology of these parasites and their host-parasite interactions. In this article, we review the recent advances in the comparative genomics of these three species. This analysis also includes data on additional sequences derived from other trypanosmatid species, as well as recent data on gene expression and functional genomics. In addition to facilitating the identification of key parasite molecules that may provide a better understanding of these complex diseases, genome studies offer a rich source of new information that can be used to define potential new drug targets and vaccine candidates for controlling these parasitic infections. PMID:22481868

  6. Governing population genomics: law, bioethics, and biopolitics in three case studies.

    PubMed

    Winickoff, David E

    2003-01-01

    Existing scholarship on population genomics has only superficially addressed issues of power and political process. Accordingly, questions of politics and governance pervade the analysis of three population genomics case studies that follow: the Human Genome Diversity Project, Iceland's Health Sector Database, and "Clinical Genomics" as defined by the Beth Israel-Ardais collaboration. An examination of these case studies reveals that the common law, U.S. regulatory law, and international law have not developed the political sophistication to make the traditional promises of biomedical ethics--respect for autonomy, justice, and beneficence--come to fruition. Further, comparisons of these projects illuminate three areas ripe for reframing--informed consent, expert ethical oversight, and commercial benefits. Four avenues of reform are suggested. PMID:15156881

  7. Integrated genome-based studies of Shewanella ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Segre Daniel; Beg Qasim

    2012-02-14

    This project was a component of the Shewanella Federation and, as such, contributed to the overall goal of applying the genomic tools to better understand eco-physiology and speciation of respiratory-versatile members of Shewanella genus. Our role at Boston University was to perform bioreactor and high throughput gene expression microarrays, and combine dynamic flux balance modeling with experimentally obtained transcriptional and gene expression datasets from different growth conditions. In the first part of project, we designed the S. oneidensis microarray probes for Affymetrix Inc. (based in California), then we identified the pathways of carbon utilization in the metal-reducing marine bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, using our newly designed high-density oligonucleotide Affymetrix microarray on Shewanella cells grown with various carbon sources. Next, using a combination of experimental and computational approaches, we built algorithm and methods to integrate the transcriptional and metabolic regulatory networks of S. oneidensis. Specifically, we combined mRNA microarray and metabolite measurements with statistical inference and dynamic flux balance analysis (dFBA) to study the transcriptional response of S. oneidensis MR-1 as it passes through exponential, stationary, and transition phases. By measuring time-dependent mRNA expression levels during batch growth of S. oneidensis MR-1 under two radically different nutrient compositions (minimal lactate and nutritionally rich LB medium), we obtain detailed snapshots of the regulatory strategies used by this bacterium to cope with gradually changing nutrient availability. In addition to traditional clustering, which provides a first indication of major regulatory trends and transcription factors activities, we developed and implemented a new computational approach for Dynamic Detection of Transcriptional Triggers (D2T2). This new method allows us to infer a putative topology of transcriptional dependencies

  8. Experimental Approaches to Study Genome Packaging of Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    Isel, Catherine; Munier, Sandie; Naffakh, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The genome of influenza A viruses (IAV) consists of eight single-stranded negative sense viral RNAs (vRNAs) encapsidated into viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). It is now well established that genome packaging (i.e., the incorporation of a set of eight distinct vRNPs into budding viral particles), follows a specific pathway guided by segment-specific cis-acting packaging signals on each vRNA. However, the precise nature and function of the packaging signals, and the mechanisms underlying the assembly of vRNPs into sub-bundles in the cytoplasm and their selective packaging at the viral budding site, remain largely unknown. Here, we review the diverse and complementary methods currently being used to elucidate these aspects of the viral cycle. They range from conventional and competitive reverse genetics, single molecule imaging of vRNPs by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography of budding viral particles, to solely in vitro approaches to investigate vRNA-vRNA interactions at the molecular level. PMID:27517951

  9. Experimental Approaches to Study Genome Packaging of Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Isel, Catherine; Munier, Sandie; Naffakh, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The genome of influenza A viruses (IAV) consists of eight single-stranded negative sense viral RNAs (vRNAs) encapsidated into viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). It is now well established that genome packaging (i.e., the incorporation of a set of eight distinct vRNPs into budding viral particles), follows a specific pathway guided by segment-specific cis-acting packaging signals on each vRNA. However, the precise nature and function of the packaging signals, and the mechanisms underlying the assembly of vRNPs into sub-bundles in the cytoplasm and their selective packaging at the viral budding site, remain largely unknown. Here, we review the diverse and complementary methods currently being used to elucidate these aspects of the viral cycle. They range from conventional and competitive reverse genetics, single molecule imaging of vRNPs by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography of budding viral particles, to solely in vitro approaches to investigate vRNA-vRNA interactions at the molecular level. PMID:27517951

  10. The Genetic Basis of Pancreas Cancer Development and Progression: Insights From Whole-Exome and Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Velculescu, Victor E.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is caused by inherited and acquired mutations in specific cancer-associated genes. The discovery of the most common genetic alterations in pancreatic cancer has not only provided insight into the fundamental pathways driving the progression from a normal cell, to non-invasive precursor lesions, to widely metastatic disease, but recent genetic discoveries have also opened new opportunities for gene-based approaches to early detection, personalized treatment, and molecular classification of pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:22896692

  11. Progressive Failure Studies of Composite Panels with and without Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaunky, Navin; Ambur, Damodar R.; Davila, Carlos G.; Hilburger, Mark; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Progressive failure analyses results are presented for composite panels with and without a cutout and subjected to in-plane shear loading and compression loading well into their postbuckling regime. Ply damage modes such as matrix cracking, fiber-matrix shear, and fiber failure are modeled by degrading the material properties. Results from finite element analyses are compared with experimental data. Good agreement between experimental data and numerical results are observed for most structural configurations when initial geometric imperfections are appropriately modeled.

  12. Genetic and statistical study of HIV integration in the human genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequeira, Inês J.; Gonçalves, Juliana; Moreira, Elsa; Mexia, João T.; Rueff, José; Brás, Aldina

    2013-10-01

    Integration of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA into human genome is essential for HIV-induced disease. The human genome is organized into chromosomes and within these we can define the chromosomal fragile sites. Our aim is to contribute to help clarifying the integration sites preferences of HIV1 and HIV2 in fragile or non-fragile regions. Here we apply statistical techniques, namely non-parametric tests and analysis of variance for analyzing two sets of data of HIV1 and HIV2 integrations in the human genome. The results show that the integrations occur significantly with more intensity in the non-fragile regions of the human genome and that the HIV1 in particular has the major contribution to this fact. This study could have implications in human disease.

  13. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Loci for the Polled Phenotype in Yak.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chunnian; Wang, Lizhong; Wu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Kun; Ding, Xuezhi; Wang, Mingcheng; Chu, Min; Xie, Xiuyue; Qiu, Qiang; Yan, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The absence of horns, known as the polled phenotype, is an economically important trait in modern yak husbandry, but the genomic structure and genetic basis of this phenotype have yet to be discovered. Here, we conducted a genome-wide association study with a panel of 10 horned and 10 polled yaks using whole genome sequencing. We mapped the POLLED locus to a 200-kb interval, which comprises three protein-coding genes. Further characterization of the candidate region showed recent artificial selection signals resulting from the breeding process. We suggest that expressional variations rather than structural variations in protein probably contribute to the polled phenotype. Our results not only represent the first and important step in establishing the genomic structure of the polled region in yak, but also add to our understanding of the polled trait in bovid species. PMID:27389700

  14. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Loci for the Polled Phenotype in Yak

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Kun; Ding, Xuezhi; Wang, Mingcheng; Chu, Min; Xie, Xiuyue; Qiu, Qiang; Yan, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The absence of horns, known as the polled phenotype, is an economically important trait in modern yak husbandry, but the genomic structure and genetic basis of this phenotype have yet to be discovered. Here, we conducted a genome-wide association study with a panel of 10 horned and 10 polled yaks using whole genome sequencing. We mapped the POLLED locus to a 200-kb interval, which comprises three protein-coding genes. Further characterization of the candidate region showed recent artificial selection signals resulting from the breeding process. We suggest that expressional variations rather than structural variations in protein probably contribute to the polled phenotype. Our results not only represent the first and important step in establishing the genomic structure of the polled region in yak, but also add to our understanding of the polled trait in bovid species. PMID:27389700

  15. A genomic multi-process survey of the machineries that control and link cell shape, microtubule organisation and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Geymonat, Marco; Bortfeld-Miller, Miriam; Walter, Thomas; Wagstaff, Laura; Piddini, Eugenia; Carazo Salas, Rafael E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding cells as integrated systems requires that we systematically decipher how single genes affect multiple biological processes and how processes are functionally linked. Here, we used multi-process phenotypic profiling, combining high-resolution 3D confocal microscopy and multi-parametric image analysis, to simultaneously survey the fission yeast genome with respect to three key cellular processes: cell shape, microtubule organisation and cell cycle progression. We identify, validate and functionally annotate 262 genes controlling specific aspects of those processes. Of these 62% had not been linked to these processes before and 35% are implicated in multiple processes. Importantly, we identify a conserved role for DNA-damage responses in controlling microtubule stability. In addition, we investigate how the processes are functionally linked. We show unexpectedly that disruption of cell cycle progression does not necessarily impact on cell size control and that distinct aspects of cell shape regulate microtubules and vice-versa, identifying important systems-level links across these processes. PMID:25373780

  16. Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) of Chagas Cardiomyopathy in Trypanosoma cruzi Seropositive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xutao; Sabino, Ester C.; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Ribeiro, Antonio L.; Ianni, Barbara; Mady, Charles; Busch, Michael P.; Seielstad, Mark; Component, International

    2013-01-01

    Background Familial aggregation of Chagas cardiac disease in T. cruzi–infected persons suggests that human genetic variation may be an important determinant of disease progression. Objective To perform a GWAS using a well-characterized cohort to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genes associated with cardiac outcomes. Methods A retrospective cohort study was developed by the NHLBI REDS-II program in Brazil. Samples were collected from 499 T. cruzi seropositive blood donors who had donated between1996 and 2002, and 101 patients with clinically diagnosed Chagas cardiomyopathy. In 2008–2010, all subjects underwent a complete medical examination. After genotype calling, quality control filtering with exclusion of 20 cases, and imputation of 1,000 genomes variants; association analysis was performed for 7 cardiac and parasite related traits, adjusting for population stratification. Results The cohort showed a wide range of African, European, and modest Native American admixture proportions, consistent with the recent history of Brazil. No SNPs were found to be highly (P<10−8) associated with cardiomyopathy. The two mostly highly associated SNPs for cardiomyopathy (rs4149018 and rs12582717; P-values <10−6) are located on Chromosome 12p12.2 in the SLCO1B1 gene, a solute carrier family member. We identified 44 additional genic SNPs associated with six traits at P-value <10-6: Ejection Fraction, PR, QRS, QT intervals, antibody levels by EIA, and parasitemia by PCR. Conclusion This GWAS identified suggestive SNPs that may impact the risk of progression to cardiomyopathy. Although this Chagas cohort is the largest examined by GWAS to date, (580 subjects), moderate sample size may explain in part the limited number of significant SNP variants. Enlarging the current sample through expanded cohorts and meta-analyses, and targeted studies of candidate genes, will be required to confirm and extend the results reported here. Future studies should also

  17. GStream: Improving SNP and CNV Coverage on Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Arnald; Marsal, Sara; Tortosa, Raül; Canela-Xandri, Oriol; Julià, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We present GStream, a method that combines genome-wide SNP and CNV genotyping in the Illumina microarray platform with unprecedented accuracy. This new method outperforms previous well-established SNP genotyping software. More importantly, the CNV calling algorithm of GStream dramatically improves the results obtained by previous state-of-the-art methods and yields an accuracy that is close to that obtained by purely CNV-oriented technologies like Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH). We demonstrate the superior performance of GStream using microarray data generated from HapMap samples. Using the reference CNV calls generated by the 1000 Genomes Project (1KGP) and well-known studies on whole genome CNV characterization based either on CGH or genotyping microarray technologies, we show that GStream can increase the number of reliably detected variants up to 25% compared to previously developed methods. Furthermore, the increased genome coverage provided by GStream allows the discovery of CNVs in close linkage disequilibrium with SNPs, previously associated with disease risk in published Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). These results could provide important insights into the biological mechanism underlying the detected disease risk association. With GStream, large-scale GWAS will not only benefit from the combined genotyping of SNPs and CNVs at an unprecedented accuracy, but will also take advantage of the computational efficiency of the method. PMID:23844243

  18. Evolution of a microbial nitrilase gene family: a comparative and environmental genomics study

    PubMed Central

    Podar, Mircea; Eads, Jonathan R; Richardson, Toby H

    2005-01-01

    Background Completed genomes and environmental genomic sequences are bringing a significant contribution to understanding the evolution of gene families, microbial metabolism and community eco-physiology. Here, we used comparative genomics and phylogenetic analyses in conjunction with enzymatic data to probe the evolution and functions of a microbial nitrilase gene family. Nitrilases are relatively rare in bacterial genomes, their biological function being unclear. Results We examined the genetic neighborhood of the different subfamily genes and discovered conserved gene clusters or operons associated with specific nitrilase clades. The inferred evolutionary transitions that separate nitrilases which belong to different gene clusters correlated with changes in their enzymatic properties. We present evidence that Darwinian adaptation acted during one of those transitions and identified sites in the enzyme that may have been under positive selection. Conclusion Changes in the observed biochemical properties of the nitrilases associated with the different gene clusters are consistent with a hypothesis that those enzymes have been recruited to a novel metabolic pathway following gene duplication and neofunctionalization. These results demonstrate the benefits of combining environmental genomic sampling and completed genomes data with evolutionary and biochemical analyses in the study of gene families. They also open new directions for studying the functions of nitrilases and the genes they are associated with. PMID:16083508

  19. Attitudes towards personal genomics among older Swiss adults: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Mählmann, Laura; Röcke, Christina; Brand, Angela; Hafen, Ernst; Vayena, Effy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore attitudes of Swiss older adults towards personal genomics (PG). Methods Using an anonymized voluntary paper-and-pencil survey, data were collected from 151 men and women aged 60–89 years attending the Seniorenuniversität Zurich, Switzerland (Seniors' University). Analyses were conducted using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results One third of the respondents were aware of PG, and more than half indicated interest in undergoing PG testing. The primary motivation provided was respondents' interest in finding out about their own disease risk, followed by willingness to contribute to scientific research. Forty-four percent were not interested in undergoing testing because results might be worrisome, or due to concerns about the validity of the results. Only a minority of respondents mentioned privacy-related concerns. Further, 66% were interested in undergoing clinic-based PG motivated by the opportunity to contribute to scientific research (78%) and 75% of all study participants indicated strong preferences to donate genomic data to public research institutions. Conclusion This study indicates a relatively positive overall attitude towards personal genomic testing among older Swiss adults, a group not typically represented in surveys about personal genomics. Genomic data of older adults can be highly relevant to late life health and maintenance of quality of life. In addition they can be an invaluable source for better understanding of longevity, health and disease. Understanding the attitudes of this population towards genomic analyses, although important, remains under-examined. PMID:27047754

  20. Multiscale modeling of three-dimensional genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter

    The genome, the blueprint of life, contains nearly all the information needed to build and maintain an entire organism. A comprehensive understanding of the genome is of paramount interest to human health and will advance progress in many areas, including life sciences, medicine, and biotechnology. The overarching goal of my research is to understand the structure-dynamics-function relationships of the human genome. In this talk, I will be presenting our efforts in moving towards that goal, with a particular emphasis on studying the three-dimensional organization, the structure of the genome with multi-scale approaches. Specifically, I will discuss the reconstruction of genome structures at both interphase and metaphase by making use of data from chromosome conformation capture experiments. Computationally modeling of chromatin fiber at atomistic level from first principles will also be presented as our effort for studying the genome structure from bottom up.

  1. Progressive Failure Studies of Composite Panels With and Without Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Jaunky, Navin; Davila, Carlos G.; Hilburger, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Progressive failure analyses results are presented for composite panels with and without a cutout and are subjected to in-plane shear loading and compression loading well into their post-buckling regime. Ply damage modes such as matrix cracking, fiber-matrix shear, and fiber failure are modeled by degrading the material properties. Results from finite element analyses are compared with experimental data. Good agreement between experimental data and numerical results are observed for most structural configurations when initial geometric imperfections are appropriately modeled.

  2. Frontotemporal dementia and its subtypes: a genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Hernandez, Dena G; Nalls, Michael A; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Kwok, John B J; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Brooks, William S; Schofield, Peter R; Halliday, Glenda M; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier; Bartley, Lauren; Thompson, Elizabeth; Haan, Eric; Hernández, Isabel; Ruiz, Agustín; Boada, Mercè; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Cruchaga, Carlos; Cairns, Nigel J; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta; Forloni, Gianluigi; Galimberti, Daniela; Fenoglio, Chiara; Serpente, Maria; Scarpini, Elio; Clarimón, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Blesa, Rafael; Waldö, Maria Landqvist; Nilsson, Karin; Nilsson, Christer; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Mann, David M A; Grafman, Jordan; Morris, Christopher M; Attems, Johannes; Griffiths, Timothy D; McKeith, Ian G; Thomas, Alan J; Pietrini, P; Huey, Edward D; Wassermann, Eric M; Baborie, Atik; Jaros, Evelyn; Tierney, Michael C; Pastor, Pau; Razquin, Cristina; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Alonso, Elena; Perneczky, Robert; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Kurz, Alexander; Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, Elisa; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Rossi, Giacomina; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Giaccone, Giorgio; Rowe, James B; Schlachetzki, J C M; Uphill, James; Collinge, John; Mead, S; Danek, Adrian; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Grossman, Murray; Trojanowsk, John Q; van der Zee, Julie; Deschamps, William; Van Langenhove, Tim; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Cappa, Stefano F; Le Ber, Isabelle; Hannequin, Didier; Golfier, Véronique; Vercelletto, Martine; Brice, Alexis; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Bagnoli, Silvia; Piaceri, Irene; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Hjermind, Lena E; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Mayhaus, Manuel; Ibach, Bernd; Gasparoni, Gilles; Pichler, Sabrina; Gu, Wei; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C; Warren, Jason D; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Morris, Huw R; Rizzu, Patrizia; Heutink, Peter; Snowden, Julie S; Rollinson, Sara; Richardson, Anna; Gerhard, Alexander; Bruni, Amalia C; Maletta, Raffaele; Frangipane, Francesca; Cupidi, Chiara; Bernardi, Livia; Anfossi, Maria; Gallo, Maura; Conidi, Maria Elena; Smirne, Nicoletta; Rademakers, Rosa; Baker, Matt; Dickson, Dennis W; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Petersen, Ronald C; Knopman, David; Josephs, Keith A; Boeve, Bradley F; Parisi, Joseph E; Seeley, William W; Miller, Bruce L; Karydas, Anna M; Rosen, Howard; van Swieten, John C; Dopper, Elise G P; Seelaar, Harro; Pijnenburg, Yolande AL; Scheltens, Philip; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Capozzo, Rosa; Novelli, Valeria; Puca, Annibale A; Franceschi, M; Postiglione, Alfredo; Milan, Graziella; Sorrentino, Paolo; Kristiansen, Mark; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Graff, Caroline; Pasquier, Florence; Rollin, Adeline; Deramecourt, Vincent; Lebert, Florence; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Ferrucci, Luigi; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a complex disorder characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations, differential pathological signatures, and genetic variability. Mutations in three genes—MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72—have been associated with FTD. We sought to identify novel genetic risk loci associated with the disorder. Methods We did a two-stage genome-wide association study on clinical FTD, analysing samples from 3526 patients with FTD and 9402 healthy controls. All participants had European ancestry. In the discovery phase (samples from 2154 patients with FTD and 4308 controls), we did separate association analyses for each FTD subtype (behavioural variant FTD, semantic dementia, progressive non-fluent aphasia, and FTD overlapping with motor neuron disease [FTD-MND]), followed by a meta-analysis of the entire dataset. We carried forward replication of the novel suggestive loci in an independent sample series (samples from 1372 patients and 5094 controls) and then did joint phase and brain expression and methylation quantitative trait loci analyses for the associated (p<5 × 10−8) and suggestive single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Findings We identified novel associations exceeding the genome-wide significance threshold (p<5 × 10−8) that encompassed the HLA locus at 6p21.3 in the entire cohort. We also identified a potential novel locus at 11q14, encompassing RAB38/CTSC, for the behavioural FTD subtype. Analysis of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci data suggested that these loci might affect expression and methylation incis. Interpretation Our findings suggest that immune system processes (link to 6p21.3) and possibly lysosomal and autophagy pathways (link to 11q14) are potentially involved in FTD. Our findings need to be replicated to better define the association of the newly identified loci with disease and possibly to shed light on the pathomechanisms contributing to FTD. Funding The National Institute of

  3. Whole Genome Selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole genome selection (WGS) is an approach to using DNA markers that are distributed throughout the entire genome. Genes affecting most economically-important traits are distributed throughout the genome and there are relatively few that have large effects with many more genes with progressively sm...

  4. The era of genome-wide association studies: opportunities and challenges for asthma genetics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guicheng; Goldblatt, Jack; LeSouëf, Peter

    2009-11-01

    In the era of genome-wide association (GWA) studies, delineating pathogenic asthma genetic pathways has provided both challenges and opportunities. Initial GWA studies on asthma and asthma-like phenotypes provided some successes in terms of ascertaining new potential asthma candidate genes. However, due to asthma having a heterogeneous etiology, replications of these genotype-phenotype association studies are generally lacking. Furthermore, genes by environment interactions are generally not considered when GWA studies are conducted. Therefore, there is a need for extensive collaborations in multi-disciplinary research fields, including different environments and populations, to investigate the functional importance of variations in the human genome in relation to asthma pathogenesis. PMID:19816512

  5. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  6. Genome-Wide Association Studies Suggest Limited Immune Gene Enrichment in Schizophrenia Compared to 5 Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pouget, Jennie G; Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Spain, Sarah L; Finucane, Hilary K; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kennedy, James L; Knight, Jo

    2016-09-01

    There has been intense debate over the immunological basis of schizophrenia, and the potential utility of adjunct immunotherapies. The major histocompatibility complex is consistently the most powerful region of association in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of schizophrenia and has been interpreted as strong genetic evidence supporting the immune hypothesis. However, global pathway analyses provide inconsistent evidence of immune involvement in schizophrenia, and it remains unclear whether genetic data support an immune etiology per se. Here we empirically test the hypothesis that variation in immune genes contributes to schizophrenia. We show that there is no enrichment of immune loci outside of the MHC region in the largest genetic study of schizophrenia conducted to date, in contrast to 5 diseases of known immune origin. Among 108 regions of the genome previously associated with schizophrenia, we identify 6 immune candidates (DPP4, HSPD1, EGR1, CLU, ESAM, NFATC3) encoding proteins with alternative, nonimmune roles in the brain. While our findings do not refute evidence that has accumulated in support of the immune hypothesis, they suggest that genetically mediated alterations in immune function may not play a major role in schizophrenia susceptibility. Instead, there may be a role for pleiotropic effects of a small number of immune genes that also regulate brain development and plasticity. Whether immune alterations drive schizophrenia progression is an important question to be addressed by future research, especially in light of the growing interest in applying immunotherapies in schizophrenia. PMID:27242348

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies QTLs for EBV of backfat thickness and average daily gain in Duroc pigs.

    PubMed

    Long, Y; Ruan, G R; Su, Y; Xiao, S J; Zhang, Z Y; Ren, J; Ding, N S; Huang, L S

    2015-03-01

    Backfat thickness (BFT) and average daily gain (ADG) are two important economic traits in commercial swine production. Identifying QTLs and uncovering the molecular mechanism for BFT and ADG would greatly help to speed up the breeding progress. In current breeding program, EBV for these two traits are calculated and formulated a comprehensive breeding index, which then be used to improve pig performance. Using Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip, a pilot genomewide association studies (GWAS) for BFT and ADG in 83 Duroc pigs were performed. A total of 31 genome-wise significant SN Ps were detected to be associated with BFT on SSC 4, 9, 11, 12 and 14, ten of which were coincident with previously reported QTL regions. There are two genome-wise loci prominently associated with ADG on SSC2 and SSC13, respectively. The two loci on SSC2 are well overlapped with the QTL regions previously reported. All the 31 significant SNPs associated with BFT are verified on 219 outbreed pigs, six SN Ps reach an extreme significant level and seven SNP reaches a significant level, CACNA1E and ACBD6 are chosen as positional candidate genes. Our findings not only confirmed previously findings, but also revealed a number of novel SNPs associated with BFT and ADG. Two positional candidate genes CACNA1E and ACBD6 were identified for further study. These results would facilitate the identification of causative genes for BFT and ADG. PMID:26027376

  8. Extending information retrieval methods to personalized genomic-based studies of disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shuyun; Dawson, John A; Kendziorski, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Genomic-based studies of disease now involve diverse types of data collected on large groups of patients. A major challenge facing statistical scientists is how best to combine the data, extract important features, and comprehensively characterize the ways in which they affect an individual's disease course and likelihood of response to treatment. We have developed a survival-supervised latent Dirichlet allocation (survLDA) modeling framework to address these challenges. Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) models have proven extremely effective at identifying themes common across large collections of text, but applications to genomics have been limited. Our framework extends LDA to the genome by considering each patient as a "document" with "text" detailing his/her clinical events and genomic state. We then further extend the framework to allow for supervision by a time-to-event response. The model enables the efficient identification of collections of clinical and genomic features that co-occur within patient subgroups, and then characterizes each patient by those features. An application of survLDA to The Cancer Genome Atlas ovarian project identifies informative patient subgroups showing differential response to treatment, and validation in an independent cohort demonstrates the potential for patient-specific inference. PMID:25733795

  9. Extending Information Retrieval Methods to Personalized Genomic-Based Studies of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shuyun; Dawson, John A; Kendziorski, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Genomic-based studies of disease now involve diverse types of data collected on large groups of patients. A major challenge facing statistical scientists is how best to combine the data, extract important features, and comprehensively characterize the ways in which they affect an individual’s disease course and likelihood of response to treatment. We have developed a survival-supervised latent Dirichlet allocation (survLDA) modeling framework to address these challenges. Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) models have proven extremely effective at identifying themes common across large collections of text, but applications to genomics have been limited. Our framework extends LDA to the genome by considering each patient as a “document” with “text” detailing his/her clinical events and genomic state. We then further extend the framework to allow for supervision by a time-to-event response. The model enables the efficient identification of collections of clinical and genomic features that co-occur within patient subgroups, and then characterizes each patient by those features. An application of survLDA to The Cancer Genome Atlas ovarian project identifies informative patient subgroups showing differential response to treatment, and validation in an independent cohort demonstrates the potential for patient-specific inference. PMID:25733795

  10. iGWAS: Integrative Genome-Wide Association Studies of Genetic and Genomic Data for Disease Susceptibility Using Mediation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Tsung; Liang, Liming; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William O C M; Lin, Xihong

    2015-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been a standard practice in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for disease susceptibility. We propose a new approach, termed integrative GWAS (iGWAS) that exploits the information of gene expressions to investigate the mechanisms of the association of SNPs with a disease phenotype, and to incorporate the family-based design for genetic association studies. Specifically, the relations among SNPs, gene expression, and disease are modeled within the mediation analysis framework, which allows us to disentangle the genetic effect on a disease phenotype into two parts: an effect mediated through a gene expression (mediation effect, ME) and an effect through other biological mechanisms or environment-mediated mechanisms (alternative effect, AE). We develop omnibus tests for the ME and AE that are robust to underlying true disease models. Numerical studies show that the iGWAS approach is able to facilitate discovering genetic association mechanisms, and outperforms the SNP-only method for testing genetic associations. We conduct a family-based iGWAS of childhood asthma that integrates genetic and genomic data. The iGWAS approach identifies six novel susceptibility genes (MANEA, MRPL53, LYCAT, ST8SIA4, NDFIP1, and PTCH1) using the omnibus test with false discovery rate less than 1%, whereas no gene using SNP-only analyses survives with the same cut-off. The iGWAS analyses further characterize that genetic effects of these genes are mostly mediated through their gene expressions. In summary, the iGWAS approach provides a new analytic framework to investigate the mechanism of genetic etiology, and identifies novel susceptibility genes of childhood asthma that were biologically meaningful. PMID:25997986

  11. iGWAS: Integrative Genome-Wide Association Studies of Genetic and Genomic Data for Disease Susceptibility Using Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Tsung; Liang, Liang; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Cookson, William O. C. M.; Lin, Xihong

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been a standard practice in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for disease susceptibility. We propose a new approach, termed integrative GWAS (iGWAS) that exploits the information of gene expressions to investigate the mechanisms of the association of SNPs with a disease phenotype, and to incorporate the family-based design for genetic association studies. Specifically, the relations among SNPs, gene expression, and disease are modeled within the mediation analysis framework, which allows us to disentangle the genetic effect on a disease phenotype into two parts: an effect mediated through a gene expression (mediation effect, ME) and an effect through other biological mechanisms or environment-mediated mechanisms (alternative effect, AE). We develop omnibus tests for the ME and AE that are robust to underlying true disease models. Numerical studies show that the iGWAS approach is able to facilitate discovering genetic association mechanisms, and outperforms the SNP-only method for testing genetic associations. We conduct a family-based iGWAS of childhood asthma that integrates genetic and genomic data. The iGWAS approach identifies six novel susceptibility genes (MANEA, MRPL53, LYCAT, ST8SIA4, NDFIP1, and PTCH1) using the omnibus test with false discovery rate less than 1%, whereas no gene using SNP-only analyses survives with the same cut-off. The iGWAS analyses further characterize that genetic effects of these genes are mostly mediated through their gene expressions. In summary, the iGWAS approach provides a new analytic framework to investigate the mechanism of genetic etiology, and identifies novel susceptibility genes of childhood asthma that were biologically meaningful. PMID:25997986

  12. Genome-wide pathway analysis of genome-wide association studies on systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ho; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Choi, Sung Jae; Ji, Jong Dae; Song, Gwan Gyu

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and candidate mechanisms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Two SLE genome-wide association studies (GWASs) datasets were included in this study. Meta-analysis was conducted using 737,984 SNPs in 1,527 SLE cases and 3,421 controls of European ancestry, and 4,429 SNPs that met a threshold of p < 0.01 in a Korean RA GWAS dataset was used. ICSNPathway (identify candidate causal SNPs and pathways) analysis was applied to the meta-analysis results of the SLE GWAS datasets, and a RA GWAS dataset. The most significant result of SLE GWAS meta-analysis concerned rs2051549 in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region (p = 3.36E-22). In the non-HLA region, meta-analysis identified 6 SNPs associated with SLE with genome-wide significance (STAT4, TNPO3, BLK, FAM167A, and IRF5). ICSNPathway identified five candidate causal SNPs and 13 candidate causal pathways. This pathway-based analysis provides three hypotheses of the biological mechanism involved. First, rs8084 and rs7192 → HLA-DRA → bystander B cell activation. Second, rs1800629 → TNF → cytokine network. Third, rs1150752 and rs185819 → TNXB → collagen metabolic process. ICSNPathway analysis identified three candidate causal non-HLA SNPs and four candidate causal pathways involving the PADI4, MTR, PADI2, and TPH2 genes of RA. We identified five candidate SNPs and thirteen pathways, involving bystander B cell activation, cytokine network, and collagen metabolic processing, which may contribute to SLE susceptibility, and we revealed candidate causal non-HLA SNPs, genes, and pathways of RA. PMID:23053960

  13. Progression of Microstructural Degeneration in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Syndrome: A Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Rudolph; Ng, Peter; Luong, Phi N.; Dutt, Shubir; Heuer, Hilary; Rojas-Rodriguez, Julio C.; Tsai, Richard; Litvan, Irene; Dickerson, Bradford C.; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Rabinovici, Gil; Miller, Bruce L.; Rosen, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS) are both 4 microtubule binding repeat tauopathy related disorders. Clinical trials need new biomarkers to assess the effectiveness of tau-directed therapies. This study investigated the regional distribution of longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging changes, measured by fractional anisotropy, radial and axial diffusivity over 6 months median interval, in 23 normal control subjects, 35 patients with PSP, and 25 patients with CBS. A mixed-effects framework was used to test longitudinal changes within and between groups. Correlations between changes in diffusion variables and clinical progression were also tested. The study found that over a 6 month period and compared to controls, the most prominent changes in PSP were up to 3±1% higher rates of FA reduction predominantly in superior cerebellar peduncles, and up to 18±6% higher rates of diffusivity increases in caudate nuclei. The most prominent changes in CBS compared to controls were up to 4±1% higher rates of anisotropy reduction and 18±6% higher rates of diffusivity increase in basal ganglia and widespread white matter regions. Compared to PSP, CBS was mainly associated with up to 3±1% greater rates of anisotropy reduction around the central sulci, and 11±3% greater rates of diffusivity increase in superior fronto-occipital fascicules. Rates of diffusivity increases in the superior cerebellar peduncle correlated with rates of ocular motor decline in PSP patients. This study demonstrated that longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging measurement is a promising surrogate marker of disease progression in PSP and CBS over a relatively short period. PMID:27310132

  14. Progress on the Europium Neutron-Capture Study using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Macri, R A; Parker, W; Wilk, P; Wu, C Y; Bredeweg, T A; Esch, E; Haight, R C; O'Donnell, J M; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R S; Schwantes, J M; Ullmann, J L; Vieira, D J; Wilhelmy, J B; Wouters, J M; Mitchell, G E; Sheets, S A; Becvar, F; Krticka, M

    2006-09-05

    The accurate measurement of neutron-capture cross sections of the Eu isotopes is important for many reasons including nuclear astrophysics and nuclear diagnostics. Neutron capture excitation functions of {sup 151,153}Eu targets were measured recently using a 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter array DANCE located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for E{sub n} = 0.1-100 keV. The progress on the data analysis efforts is given in the present paper. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distributions for the Eu targets and Be backing are significantly different. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution is found to be the same for different neutron energies for both {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu. The statistical simulation to model the {gamma}-ray decay cascade is summarized.

  15. [The progress of study about endoplasmic reticulum stress in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Hu, J; Jiang, B

    2016-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the most secreted proteins and membrane proteins are compounded, modified and folded into the correct structure in the endoplasmic reticulum. Only correctly folded proteins can be transported to the golgi apparatus for further processing. If the endoplasmic reticulum is insufficient to deal with the accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins, balance will be broken, and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) will be started. To eliminate the unfolded proteins, cells will activate unfolded protein response (UPR) immediately for self-protection. If the induced ERS is strong or persistent, the UPR could not maintain the balance of homeostasis in endoplasmic reticulum. Then the ERS will lead to C/EBP homologous protein activation and initiate cell apoptosis. The continuous ERS may participate in the occurrence and development of many diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases and type 2 diabetes. In this article, the research progress of ERS and its relationship with glaucoma is reviewed. PMID:26979122

  16. Integrating sequence, evolution and functional genomics in regulatory genomics

    PubMed Central

    Vingron, Martin; Brazma, Alvis; Coulson, Richard; van Helden, Jacques; Manke, Thomas; Palin, Kimmo; Sand, Olivier; Ukkonen, Esko

    2009-01-01

    With genome analysis expanding from the study of genes to the study of gene regulation, 'regulatory genomics' utilizes sequence information, evolution and functional genomics measurements to unravel how regulatory information is encoded in the genome. PMID:19226437

  17. The Perceptions of Women's Roles and Progress: A Study of Malay Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Kalthom; Noor, Noraini M.; Wok, Saodah

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the general perceptions of women towards their roles, their interpretation of progress, as well as the facilitating factors and barriers to their progress. Questionnaires were distributed to 1,000 Malay women in Malaysia from rural and urban areas, from various age and income groups. Interviews were also carried out on the…

  18. Predictors of waterpipe smoking progression among youth in Irbid, Jordan: A Longitudinal Study (2008-2011)

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Rana; Madhivanan, Purnima; Khader, Yousef; Mzayek, Fawaz; Ward, Kenneth; Maziak, Wasim

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The predictors of waterpipe smoking progression are yet to be examined using a longitudinal study that is guided by a theoretical model of behavioral change. This study identifies the gender-specific predictors of waterpipe smoking progression among adolescents in Irbid, Jordan. METHODS This study uses data from a school longitudinal study of smoking behavior in Irbid, Jordan. A random sample of 19 schools was selected by probability proportionate to size. A total of 1781 seventh graders were enrolled at baseline, and completed a questionnaire annually from 2008 through 2011. Students who reported ever smoking waterpipe (N = 864) at any time point were assessed for progression (escalation in the frequency of waterpipe smoking) in the subsequent follow-up. Grouped-time survival analysis was used to identify the risk of progression. RESULTS During the three years of follow-up, 29.6% of students progressed in waterpipe smoking. Predictors of waterpipe smoking progression were higher mother's education, enrollment in public school, frequent physical activity, and low refusal self-efficacy among boys, having ever smoked cigarettes, and having friends and siblings who smoke waterpipe among girls. Awareness of harms of waterpipe was protective among boys and seeing warning labels on the tobacco packs was protective among girls. CONCLUSIONS Even at this early stage, about a third of waterpipe smokers progressed in their habit during the 3 year follow up. Factors predicting progression of use differed by gender, which calls for gender-specific approaches to waterpipe interventions among Jordanian youth. PMID:26024787

  19. The Educational Progress of Language Minority Children: Findings from the NAEP 1985-86 Special Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratz-Snowden, Joan; And Others

    From 1985-86, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) conducted a special survey of reading and mathematics performance of language minority Asian American, Hispanic American, and Native American children to determine the progress of these children at grades 3, 7, and 11. The study also sought to identify whether the differences in…

  20. The human genome project.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, M V

    1993-01-01

    The Human Genome Project in the United States is now well underway. Its programmatic direction was largely set by a National Research Council report issued in 1988. The broad framework supplied by this report has survived almost unchanged despite an upheaval in the technology of genome analysis. This upheaval has primarily affected physical and genetic mapping, the two dominant activities in the present phase of the project. Advances in mapping techniques have allowed good progress toward the specific goals of the project and are also providing strong corollary benefits throughout biomedical research. Actual DNA sequencing of the genomes of the human and model organisms is still at an early stage. There has been little progress in the intrinsic efficiency of DNA-sequence determination. However, refinements in experimental protocols, instrumentation, and project management have made it practical to acquire sequence data on an enlarged scale. It is also increasingly apparent that DNA-sequence data provide a potent means of relating knowledge gained from the study of model organisms to human biology. There is as yet little indication that the infusion of technology from outside biology into the Human Genome Project has been effectively stimulated. Opportunities in this area remain large, posing substantial technical and policy challenges. PMID:8506271

  1. A Review of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Stimulant and Opioid Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kevin P

    2016-05-01

    Substance use disorders (SUD) are a major contributor to disability and disease burden worldwide. Risk for developing SUDs is influenced by variation in the genome. Identifying the genetic variants that influence SUD risk may help us to understand the biological mechanisms for the disorders and improve treatments. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying many regions of the genome associated with common human disorders. Here, findings from recent GWAS of SUDs that involve illicit substances will be reviewed. Several GWAS have been reported, including studies on opioid and stimulant use disorder (cocaine and methamphetamine). Several of these GWAS report associations that are biologically interesting and statistically robust. Replication of the associations in independent samples and functional studies to understand the basis for the statistical associations will be important next steps. PMID:27606319

  2. Advancing our understanding of functional genome organisation through studies in the fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Ida

    2010-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the functional organisation of the cell nucleus. Still many questions remain to be answered about the relationship between the spatial organisation of the nucleus and the regulation of the genome function. There are many conflicting data in the field making it very difficult to merge published results on mammalian cells into one model on subnuclear chromatin organisation. The fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, over the last decades has emerged as a valuable model organism in understanding basic biological mechanisms, especially the cell cycle and chromosome biology. In this review we describe and compare the nuclear organisation in mammalian and fission yeast cells. We believe that fission yeast is a good tool to resolve at least some of the contradictions and unanswered questions concerning functional nuclear architecture, since S. pombe has chromosomes structurally similar to that of human. S. pombe also has the advantage over higher eukaryotes in that the genome can easily be manipulated via homologous recombination making it possible to integrate the tools needed for visualisation of chromosomes using live-cell microscopy. Classical genetic experiments can be used to elucidate what factors are involved in a certain mechanism. The knowledge we have gained during the last few years indicates similarities between the genome organisation in fission yeast and mammalian cells. We therefore propose the use of fission yeast for further advancement of our understanding of functional nuclear organisation. PMID:21113595

  3. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative. 34 refs.

  4. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative.

  5. A genome-wide association study platform built on iPlant cyber-infrastructure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We demonstrated a flexible Genome-Wide Association (GWA) Study (GWAS) platform built upon the iPlant Collaborative Cyber-infrastructure. The platform supports big data management, sharing, and large scale study of both genotype and phenotype data on clusters. End users can add their own analysis too...

  6. A genomic approach to coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis: studies of Acropora digitifera and Symbiodinium minutum

    PubMed Central

    Shinzato, Chuya; Mungpakdee, Sutada; Satoh, Nori; Shoguchi, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Far more intimate knowledge of scleractinian coral biology is essential in order to understand how diverse coral-symbiont endosymbioses have been established. In particular, molecular and cellular mechanisms enabling the establishment and maintenance of obligate endosymbiosis with photosynthetic dinoflagellates require further clarification. By extension, such understanding may also shed light upon environmental conditions that promote the collapse of this mutualism. Genomic data undergird studies of all symbiotic processes. Here we review recent genomic data derived from the scleractinian coral, Acropora digitifera, and the endosymbiotic dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium minutum. We discuss Acropora genes involved in calcification, embryonic development, innate immunity, apoptosis, autophagy, UV resistance, fluorescence, photoreceptors, circadian clocks, etc. We also detail gene loss in amino acid metabolism that may explain at least part of the Acropora stress-response. Characteristic features of the Symbiodinium genome are also reviewed, focusing on the expansion of certain gene families, the molecular basis for permanently condensed chromatin, unique spliceosomal splicing, and unusual gene arrangement. Salient features of the Symbiodinium plastid and mitochondrial genomes are also illuminated. Although many questions regarding these interdependent genomes remain, we summarize information necessary for future studies of coral-dinoflagellate endosymbiosis. PMID:25071748

  7. [Genome-Wide Association Studies for life-style related diseases].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shiro

    2016-03-01

    After the completion of human genome project, development of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing technology and collation of information regarding linkage disequilibrium in the human genome have facilitated genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for investigating genes associated with disease susceptibility across the entire human genome. In case of type 2 diabetes, approximately 100 genetic loci have been identified and confirmed as susceptibility to the disease through GWAS in different ethnic groups, including Japanese, European, East Asian and South Asian populations. However, integration of these information accounts for less than 20% of the disease heritability, and thus most of the heritability of type 2 diabetes remain to be identified. Since the rationale of GWAS is based on the hypothesis that common variants contribute to the susceptibility to common diseases, common disease-common variant hypothesis, GWAS have selectively identified common susceptibility variants (allele frequency>=0.05) with lower effect size (odds ratio<1.5), that is a limitation of the GWAS approach. Although GWAS have brought a significant breakthrough in the field of genetic study for life-style related diseases, new approaches other than GWAS, such as whole genome sequencing to identify rare variants with greater effect size or integration of genetic and environmental information, will be required to elucidate a heritability of life-style related diseases completely. PMID:26923980

  8. Linking the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) in Reading to the 2011 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a statistical linking between the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) in Grade 4 reading and the 2011 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) in Grade 4 reading. The primary purpose of the linking study is to obtain a statistical comparison between NAEP (a national assessment) and PIRLS (an…

  9. Integrating genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics in translational studies of molecular medicine.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Jerzy; Wyrwicz, Lucjan S

    2009-09-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of disease requires the introduction of molecular diagnostics into medical practice. Current medicine employs only elements of molecular diagnostics, which are usually applied on the scale of single genes. Medicine in the postgenomic era will utilize thousands of disease-associated molecular markers provided by high-throughput sequencing and functional genomic, proteomic and metabolomic studies. Such a spectrum of techniques will link clinical medicine based on molecularly oriented diagnostics with the prediction and prevention of disease. To achieve this task, large-scale and genome-wide biological and medical data must be combined with biostatistical and bioinformatic analyses to model biological systems. Collecting, cataloging and comparing data from molecular studies, and the subsequent development of conclusions, creates the fundamentals of systems biology. This highly complex analytical process reflects a new scientific paradigm known as integrative genomics. PMID:19732006

  10. FINEMAP: efficient variable selection using summary data from genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Benner, Christian; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Pirinen, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The goal of fine-mapping in genomic regions associated with complex diseases and traits is to identify causal variants that point to molecular mechanisms behind the associations. Recent fine-mapping methods using summary data from genome-wide association studies rely on exhaustive search through all possible causal configurations, which is computationally expensive. Results: We introduce FINEMAP, a software package to efficiently explore a set of the most important causal configurations of the region via a shotgun stochastic search algorithm. We show that FINEMAP produces accurate results in a fraction of processing time of existing approaches and is therefore a promising tool for analyzing growing amounts of data produced in genome-wide association studies and emerging sequencing projects. Availability and implementation: FINEMAP v1.0 is freely available for Mac OS X and Linux at http://www.christianbenner.com. Contact: christian.benner@helsinki.fi or matti.pirinen@helsinki.fi PMID:26773131

  11. Moving image analysis to the cloud: A case study with a genome-scale tomographic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Kevin; Stampanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, the time required to measure a terabyte of microscopic imaging data has gone from years to minutes. This shift has moved many of the challenges away from experimental design and measurement to scalable storage, organization, and analysis. As many scientists and scientific institutions lack training and competencies in these areas, major bottlenecks have arisen and led to substantial delays and gaps between measurement, understanding, and dissemination. We present in this paper a framework for analyzing large 3D datasets using cloud-based computational and storage resources. We demonstrate its applicability by showing the setup and costs associated with the analysis of a genome-scale study of bone microstructure. We then evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages associated with local versus cloud infrastructures.

  12. Social Studies Objectives, Second Assessment. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    Major social studies objectives delineated in this booklet provide a framework for the measurement of student achievement in the social studies. The booklet is arranged in four chapters. The first chapter describes the development of social studies objectives; the other chapters respectively list the social studies objectives for the specific age…

  13. Genomic and Epigenomic Alterations in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chakravarthi, Balabhadrapatruni V S K; Nepal, Saroj; Varambally, Sooryanarayana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple genetic and epigenetic events characterize tumor progression and define the identity of the tumors. Advances in high-throughput technologies, like gene expression profiling, next-generation sequencing, proteomics, and metabolomics, have enabled detailed molecular characterization of various tumors. The integration and analyses of these high-throughput data have unraveled many novel molecular aberrations and network alterations in tumors. These molecular alterations include multiple cancer-driving mutations, gene fusions, amplification, deletion, and post-translational modifications, among others. Many of these genomic events are being used in cancer diagnosis, whereas others are therapeutically targeted with small-molecule inhibitors. Multiple genes/enzymes that play a role in DNA and histone modifications are also altered in various cancers, changing the epigenomic landscape during cancer initiation and progression. Apart from protein-coding genes, studies are uncovering the critical regulatory roles played by noncoding RNAs and noncoding regions of the genome during cancer progression. Many of these genomic and epigenetic events function in tandem to drive tumor development and metastasis. Concurrent advances in genome-modulating technologies, like gene silencing and genome editing, are providing ability to understand in detail the process of cancer initiation, progression, and signaling as well as opening up avenues for therapeutic targeting. In this review, we discuss some of the recent advances in cancer genomic and epigenomic research. PMID:27338107

  14. Residents' awareness and attitudes about an ongoing community-based genome cohort study in Nagahama, Japan.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Keiko; Iwakuma, Miho; Nakayama, Takeo

    2015-11-01

    This study's objective was to examine residents' attitudes toward and factors associated with an ongoing, real genome cohort study based on a community in Japan. After the genome cohort study's launch in 2007, in November and December 2009, a self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted with 2500 randomly sampled residents aged 30-74 years, living in Nagahama, Japan. Responses were received from 1363 people (response rate = 54.5%), of whom 187 respondents had already participated in the study. Although the local government and researchers disseminated information through leaflets and citizen-information papers to every household, sent notices by personalized letter, and held symposia and other meetings, 65.7% of males and 47.2% of females first became aware of the study when they received our questionnaire. Among all respondents, 81.2% of those who knew that the genome cohort study had begun and 68.6% of those who did not know had a positive attitude toward the study. Their attitudes were significantly associated with high health consciousness and the desire for an extensive health check-up. Although for males there were no particular negative aspects of the genome study, for females, positive aspects were associated with participating in community activities and desiring an extensive health check-up. Although promoting a community-based genome cohort study requires huge effort, it is essential to popularize it. Actions are vital both for monitoring public awareness and attitudes at a community level and for keeping communication channels open. PMID:25767212

  15. New Genetic and Genomic Approaches After the Genome-wide Association Study Era--Back to the Future.

    PubMed

    Ngeow, Joanne; Eng, Charis

    2015-10-01

    Identification of all human genes and their regulatory regions provides the essential framework for our understanding of the molecular basis of disease. There is a lot of enthusiasm for applying next-generation sequencing methods toward achieving the goals of precision medicine. To do so will require us to go beyond genomics and fundamentally understand how genomics impacts on biology and clinical outcomes through gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions. Clinicians and healthcare systems alike need to embrace the cultural and mindset change needed for the implementation of genomics in the clinic. PMID:26073374

  16. The mitochondrial genome of Protostrongylus rufescens – implications for population and systematic studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protostrongylus rufescens is a metastrongyloid nematode of small ruminants, such as sheep and goats, causing protostrongylosis. In spite of its importance, the ecology and epidemiology of this parasite are not entirely understood. In addition, genetic data are scant for P. rufescens and related metastrongyloids. Methods The mt genome was amplified from a single adult worm of P. rufescens (from sheep) by long-PCR, sequenced using 454-technology and annotated using bioinformatic tools. Amino acid sequences inferred from individual genes of the mt genomes were concatenated and subjected to phylogenetic analysis using Bayesian inference. Results The circular mitochondrial genome was 13,619 bp in length and contained two ribosomal RNA, 12 protein-coding and 22 transfer RNA genes, consistent with nematodes of the order Strongylida for which mt genomes have been determined. Phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated amino acid sequence data for the 12 mt proteins showed that P. rufescens was closely related to Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, Angiostrongylus vasorum, Angiostrongylus cantonensis and Angiostrongylus costaricensis. Conclusions The mt genome determined herein provides a source of markers for future investigations of P. rufescens. Molecular tools, employing such mt markers, are likely to find applicability in studies of the population biology of this parasite and the systematics of lungworms. PMID:24025317

  17. NMR and optical studies of piezoelectric polymers. Annual progress report, April 1, 1990--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, V.H.; Tuthill, G.F.

    1993-04-01

    Progress is reported in several areas dealing with piezoelectric (electroactive) polymers (mostly vinylidene fluoride, trifluoroethylene, copolymers, PVF{sub 2}) and liquid crystals. Optical studies, neutron scattering, NMR, thermal, theory and modeling were done.

  18. Genomic profiling of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anjita; Singh, Alok Kumar; Maurya, Sanjeev Kumar; Rai, Rajani; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Hari S

    2009-05-01

    Genome study provides significant changes in the advancement of molecular diagnosis and treatment in Breast cancer. Several recent critical advances and high-throughput techniques identified the genomic trouble and dramatically accelerated the pace of research in preventing and curing this malignancy. Tumor-suppressor genes, proto-oncogenes, DNA-repair genes, carcinogen-metabolism genes are critically involved in progression of breast cancer. We reviewed imperative finding in breast genetics, ongoing work to segregate further susceptible genes, and preliminary studies on molecular profiling. PMID:19235775

  19. Leveraging epidemiologic and clinical collections for genomic studies of complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Dana C.; Goodloe, Robert; Farber-Eger, Eric; Boston, Jonathan; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Bush, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Present day limited resources demand DNA and phenotyping alternatives to the traditional prospective population-based epidemiologic collections. Methods To accelerate genomic discovery with an emphasis on diverse populations, we as part of the Epidemiologic Architecture for Genes Linked to Environment (EAGLE) study accessed all non-European American samples (n=15,863) available in BioVU, the Vanderbilt University biorepository linked to de-identified electronic medical records, for genomic studies as part of the larger Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) I Study. Given previous studies have cautioned against the secondary use of clinically collected data compared with epidemiologically-collected data, we present here a characterization of EAGLE BioVU, including the billing and diagnostic (ICD-9) code distributions for adult and pediatric patients as well as comparisons made for select health metrics (body mass index, glucose, HbA1c, HDL-C, LDL-C, and triglycerides) with the population-based National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) linked to DNA samples (NHANES III; n=7,159 and NHANES 1999–2002; n=7,839). Results Overall, the distributions of billing and diagnostic codes suggest this clinical sample is mixture of healthy and sick patients like that expected for a contemporary American population. Conclusion Little bias is observed among health metrics suggesting this clinical collection is suitable for genomic studies along with traditional epidemiologic cohorts. PMID:26201699

  20. What are genome-wide association studies telling us about B-cell tumor development?

    PubMed Central

    Sherborne, Amy L; Houlston, Richard S

    2010-01-01

    It has long been speculated that common genetic variation influences the development of B-cell malignancy, however until recently evidence for this assertion was lacking. The advent of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has allowed the search for this class of susceptibility allele to be conducted on a genome-wide basis. Recent GWAS of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have identified novel disease genes for CLL and ALL and underscore the importance of polymorphic variation in B-cell development genes as determinants of leukemia risk. PMID:21307401

  1. Comparative genomics study for identification of putative drug targets in Salmonella typhi Ty2.

    PubMed

    Batool, Nisha; Waqar, Maleeha; Batool, Sidra

    2016-01-15

    Typhoid presents a major health concern in developing countries with an estimated annual infection rate of 21 million. The disease is caused by Salmonella typhi, a pathogenic bacterium acquiring multiple drug resistance. We aim to identify proteins that could prove to be putative drug targets in the genome of S. typhi str. Ty2. We employed comparative and subtractive genomics to identify targets that are absent in humans and are essential to S. typhi Ty2. We concluded that 46 proteins essential to pathogen are absent in the host genome. Filtration on the basis of drug target prioritization singled out 20 potentially therapeutic targets. Their absence in the host and specificity to S. typhi Ty2 makes them ideal targets for treating typhoid in Homo sapiens. 3D structures of two of the final target enzymes, MurA and MurB have been predicted via homology modeling which are then used for a docking study. PMID:26555890

  2. Evaluation of Study and Patient Characteristics of Clinical Studies in Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ziemssen, T.; Rauer, S.; Stadelmann, C.; Henze, T.; Koehler, J.; Penner, I.-K.; Lang, M.; Poehlau, D.; Baier-Ebert, M.; Schieb, H.; Meuth, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background So far, clinical studies in primary progressive MS (PPMS) have failed to meet their primary efficacy endpoints. To some extent this might be attributable to the choice of assessments or to the selection of the study population. Objective The aim of this study was to identify outcome influencing factors by analyzing the design and methods of previous randomized studies in PPMS patients without restriction to intervention or comparator. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS and the COCHRANE Central Register of Controlled Trials (inception to February 2015). Keywords included PPMS, primary progressive multiple sclerosis and chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. Randomized, controlled trials of at least one year’s duration were selected if they included only patients with PPMS or if they reported sufficient PPMS subgroup data. No restrictions with respect to intervention or comparator were applied. Study quality was assessed by a biometrics expert. Relevant baseline characteristics and outcomes were extracted and compared. Results Of 52 PPMS studies identified, four were selected. Inclusion criteria were notably different among studies with respect to both the definition of PPMS and the requirements for the presence of disability progression at enrolment. Differences between the study populations included the baseline lesion load, pretreatment status and disease duration. The rate of disease progression may also be an important factor, as all but one of the studies included a large proportion of patients with a low progression rate. In addition, the endpoints specified could not detect progression adequately. Conclusion Optimal PPMS study methods involve appropriate patient selection, especially regarding the PPMS phenotype and progression rate. Functional composite endpoints might be more sensitive than single endpoints in capturing progression. PMID:26393519

  3. Genome-wide association studies in Africans and African Americans: Expanding the Framework of the Genomics of Human Traits and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Peprah, Emmanuel; Xu, Huichun; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Royal, Charmaine D.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic research is one of the tools for elucidating the pathogenesis of diseases of global health relevance, and paving the research dimension to clinical and public health translation. Recent advances in genomic research and technologies have increased our understanding of human diseases, genes associated with these disorders, and the relevant mechanisms. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have proliferated since the first studies were published several years ago, and have become an important tool in helping researchers comprehend human variation and the role genetic variants play in disease. However, the need to expand the diversity of populations in GWAS has become increasingly apparent as new knowledge is gained about genetic variation. Inclusion of diverse populations in genomic studies is critical to a more complete understanding of human variation and elucidation of the underpinnings of complex diseases. In this review, we summarize the available data on GWAS in recent-African ancestry populations within the western hemisphere (i.e. African Americans and peoples of the Caribbean) and continental African populations. Furthermore, we highlight ways in which genomic studies in populations of recent African ancestry have led to advances in the areas of malaria, HIV, prostate cancer, and other diseases. Finally, we discuss the advantages of conducting GWAS in recent African ancestry populations in the context of addressing existing and emerging global health conditions. PMID:25427668

  4. Mixed linear model approach adapted for genome-wide association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixed linear model (MLM) methods have proven useful in controlling for population structure and relatedness within genome-wide association studies. However, MLM-based methods can be computationally challenging for large datasets. We report a compression approach, called ‘compressed MLM,’ that decrea...

  5. Comparative genomic hybridization study of paraffin-embedded dedifferentiated liposarcoma fixed with Holland Bouin's fluid.

    PubMed

    Hostein, Isabelle; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Derré, Josette; Mariani, Odette; Chibon, Frédéric; Aurias, Alain

    2003-09-01

    Dedifferentiated and differentiated liposarcoma are characterized by 12q15 chromosomal amplification. Comparative genomic hybridization is a powerful tool able to detect DNA copy number changes in the genome. This technique has been widely used in frozen tumors and in some studies in paraffin-embedded tumors fixed with formalin. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the ability of CGH to detect DNA copy number changes in the genome when the DNA was extracted from tissues fixed with Holland Bouin's fluid. Sixteen liposarcoma tumors both frozen and fixed in Holland Bouin's fluid were characterized by CGH. Eighty-one percent of the main chromosomal alterations detected in the frozen liposarcomas (amp 12q15, amp 6q23, amp 1p32, amp 16q22, +7, +8) were detected in the corresponding fixed tumors. The limitation of this technique when using Holland Bouin's fluid extracted DNA compared with formalin-extracted DNA was the yield of analyzable samples. Eighty-one percent of tumors fixed with Holland Bouin's fluid (13/16) were analyzable compared with 100% of formalin-fixed tumors (4/4). This study demonstrates that comparative genomic hybridization is a useful tool even if only fixed tissues (formalin and Holland Bouin's fluid tissues) are available, and that it allows more tumors to be analyzed in retrospective studies. PMID:12960699

  6. Methods for meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A limitation of many genome-wide association studies (GWA) in animal breeding is that there are many loci with small effect sizes; thus, larger sample sizes (N) are required to guarantee suitable power of detection. For increasing N, results from different GWA can be combined in a meta-analysis (MA-...

  7. Linkage Disequilibrium And Genome-Wide Association Studies In O. sativa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is increasing evidence that genome-wide association studies provide a powerful approach to find the genetic basis of complex phenotypic variation in all kinds of species. For this purpose, we developed the first generation 44K Affymetrix SNP array in rice (see Tung et al. poster). We genotyped...

  8. Genome-wide association study of agronomic traits in common bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a global Andean diversity panel (ADP) of 237 genotypes of common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris was conducted to gain insight into the genetic architecture of several agronomic traits controlling phenology, biomass, yield components and seed yield. The panel wa...

  9. Mitochondrial genomes of Bremia lactucae and development of haplotype markers for population and genetic studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bremia lactucae, the causative agent of lettuce downy mildew, is the most important pathogen of lettuce in the US and worldwide. In order to identify cytoplasmic markers for use in population and genetic studies the reference mitochondrial genome of B. lactucae isolate SF5 was assembled from Illumi...

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study of Intelligence: Additive Effects of Novel Brain Expressed Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Sandra K.; Shtir, Corina; Doyle, Alysa E.; Mick, Eric; McGough, James J.; McCracken, James; Biederman, Joseph; Smalley, Susan L.; Cantor, Rita M.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nelson, Stanley F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to identify common genetic variants that are associated with human intelligence or general cognitive ability. Method: We performed a genome-wide association analysis with a dense set of 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative intelligence scores within an ancestrally…

  11. Genome-wide association study of swine farrowing traits. Part II: Bayesian analysis of marker data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reproductive efficiency has a great impact on the economic success of pork production. Number born alive (NBA) and average piglet birth weight (ABW) contribute greatly to reproductive efficiency. To better understand the underlying genetics of birth traits, a genome wide association study (GWAS) w...

  12. Implementing meta-analysis from genome-wide association studies for pork quality traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pork quality plays an important role in the meat processing industry, thus different methodologies have been implemented to elucidate the genetic architecture of traits affecting meat quality. One of the most common and widely used approaches is to perform genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Howe...

  13. CNV-based genome wide association study reveals additional variants contributing to meat quality in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pork quality is important both to the meat processing industry and consumers’ purchasing attitudes. Copy number variation (CNV) is a burgeoning kind of variant that may influence meat quality. Herein, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed between CNVs and meat quality traits in swine....

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study of Receptive Language Ability of 12-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlaar, Nicole; Meaburn, Emma L.; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Docherty, Sophia; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Price, Thomas S.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Researchers have previously shown that individual differences in measures of receptive language ability at age 12 are highly heritable. In the current study, the authors attempted to identify some of the genes responsible for the heritability of receptive language ability using a "genome-wide association" approach. Method: The…

  15. FORESEE: Fully Outsourced secuRe gEnome Study basEd on homomorphic Encryption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The increasing availability of genome data motivates massive research studies in personalized treatment and precision medicine. Public cloud services provide a flexible way to mitigate the storage and computation burden in conducting genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, data privacy has been widely concerned when sharing the sensitive information in a cloud environment. Methods We presented a novel framework (FORESEE: Fully Outsourced secuRe gEnome Study basEd on homomorphic Encryption) to fully outsource GWAS (i.e., chi-square statistic computation) using homomorphic encryption. The proposed framework enables secure divisions over encrypted data. We introduced two division protocols (i.e., secure errorless division and secure approximation division) with a trade-off between complexity and accuracy in computing chi-square statistics. Results The proposed framework was evaluated for the task of chi-square statistic computation with two case-control datasets from the 2015 iDASH genome privacy protection challenge. Experimental results show that the performance of FORESEE can be significantly improved through algorithmic optimization and parallel computation. Remarkably, the secure approximation division provides significant performance gain, but without missing any significance SNPs in the chi-square association test using the aforementioned datasets. Conclusions Unlike many existing HME based studies, in which final results need to be computed by the data owner due to the lack of the secure division operation, the proposed FORESEE framework support complete outsourcing to the cloud and output the final encrypted chi-square statistics. PMID:26733391

  16. Software engineering the mixed model for genome-wide association studies on large samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixed models improve the ability to detect phenotype-genotype associations in the presence of population stratification and multiple levels of relatedness in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), but for large data sets the resource consumption becomes impractical. At the same time, the sample siz...

  17. Genome-wide association study of maize identifies genes affecting leaf architecture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    U.S. maize yield has increased eightfold in the past 80 years with half of the improvement attributed to genetics. Changes in maize leaf angle and size provided a basis for more efficient light capture as plant densities increased. Through a genome wide association study (GWAS) of the maize nested a...

  18. A genome-wide association study of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is one of the most common adverse events caused by conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, yet there has been very little progress in the prevention or treatment of this side effect. Although this is not a life-threatening event, alopecia is very psychologically difficult for many women to manage. In order to improve the quality of life for these women, it is important to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced alopecia and develop ways to effectively prevent and/or treat it. To identify the genetic risk factors associated with chemotherapy-induced alopecia, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using DNA samples from breast cancer patients who were treated with chemotherapy. Methods We performed a case-control association study of 303 individuals who developed grade 2 alopecia, and compared them with 880 breast cancer patients who did not show hair loss after being treated with conventional chemotherapy. In addition, we separately analyzed a subset of patients who received specific combination therapies by GWASs and applied the weighted genetic risk scoring (wGRS) system to investigate the cumulative effects of the associated SNPs. Results We identified an SNP significantly associated with drug-induced grade 2 alopecia (rs3820706 in CACNB4 (calcium channel voltage-dependent subunit beta 4) on 2q23, P = 8.13 × 10-9, OR = 3.71) and detected several SNPs that showed some suggestive associations by subgroup analyses. We also classified patients into four groups on the basis of wGRS analysis and found that patients who classified in the highest risk group showed 443 times higher risk of antimicrotubule agents-induced alopecia than the lowest risk group. Conclusions Our study suggests several associated genes and should shed some light on the molecular mechanism of alopecia in chemotherapy-treated breast cancer patients and hopefully will contribute to development of interventions that will

  19. Constructing Rubrics and Assessing Progress Collaboratively with Social Studies Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallavan, Nancy P.; Kottler, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    When social studies students have a role in the processes of designing assignments, constructing rubrics, and conducting assessments, they participate in authentic democratic principles relative to their own learning. When given voice, choice, and ownership in their education, social studies students gain opportunities to strengthen their depth of…

  20. Navajo Reading Study. Progress Report No. 4, December 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Paul, Ed.

    A summary of the discussions of the Navajo Reading Study Conference, held on December 4-5, 1969, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, was presented in this report. A group of consultants met to discuss the collection of data and its analysis for a study on Navajo reading materials and the language of 6-year-old Navajo children. The consultants included Mr.…

  1. Pacific Language Use in the Schools (PLUS) Study. Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Resources for Education and Learning, Honolulu, HI.

    This study sought to address concerns that high levels of literacy in both English and local languages are not being attained by children in U.S.-affiliated Pacific entities served by Pacific Resources for Education and Learning (PREL). The study was designed to answer the following question: Do classroom language use and instructional practices…

  2. Sparse principal component analysis for identifying ancestry-informative markers in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seokho; Epstein, Michael P; Duncan, Richard; Lin, Xihong

    2012-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) routinely apply principal component analysis (PCA) to infer population structure within a sample to correct for confounding due to ancestry. GWAS implementation of PCA uses tens of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to infer structure, despite the fact that only a small fraction of such SNPs provides useful information on ancestry. The identification of this reduced set of ancestry-informative markers (AIMs) from a GWAS has practical value; for example, researchers can genotype the AIM set to correct for potential confounding due to ancestry in follow-up studies that utilize custom SNP or sequencing technology. We propose a novel technique to identify AIMs from genome-wide SNP data using sparse PCA. The procedure uses penalized regression methods to identify those SNPs in a genome-wide panel that significantly contribute to the principal components while encouraging SNPs that provide negligible loadings to vanish from the analysis. We found that sparse PCA leads to negligible loss of ancestry information compared to traditional PCA analysis of genome-wide SNP data. We further demonstrate the value of sparse PCA for AIM selection using real data from the International HapMap Project and a genomewide study of inflammatory bowel disease. We have implemented our approach in open-source R software for public use. PMID:22508067

  3. Genome-wide methylation study of diploid and triploid brown trout (Salmo trutta L.).

    PubMed

    Covelo-Soto, L; Leunda, P M; Pérez-Figueroa, A; Morán, P

    2015-06-01

    The induction of triploidization in fish is a very common practice in aquaculture. Although triploidization has been applied successfully in many salmonid species, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms implicated in the maintenance of the normal functions of the new polyploid genome. By means of methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) techniques, genome-wide methylation changes associated with triploidization were assessed in DNA samples obtained from diploid and triploid siblings of brown trout (Salmo trutta). Simple comparative body measurements showed that the triploid trout used in the study were statistically bigger, however, not heavier than their diploid counterparts. The statistical analysis of the MSAP data showed no significant differences between diploid and triploid brown trout in respect to brain, gill, heart, liver, kidney or muscle samples. Nonetheless, local analysis pointed to the possibility of differences in connection with concrete loci. This is the first study that has investigated DNA methylation alterations associated with triploidization in brown trout. Our results set the basis for new studies to be undertaken and provide a new approach concerning triploidization effects of the salmonid genome while also contributing to the better understanding of the genome-wide methylation processes. PMID:25917300

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies novel loci predisposing to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Amos, Christopher I; Wang, Li-E; Lee, Jeffrey E; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Chen, Wei V; Fang, Shenying; Kosoy, Roman; Zhang, Mingfeng; Qureshi, Abrar A; Vattathil, Selina; Schacherer, Christopher W; Gardner, Julie M; Wang, Yuling; Bishop, D Tim; Barrett, Jennifer H; MacGregor, Stuart; Hayward, Nicholas K; Martin, Nicholas G; Duffy, David L; Mann, Graham J; Cust, Anne; Hopper, John; Brown, Kevin M; Grimm, Elizabeth A; Xu, Yaji; Han, Younghun; Jing, Kaiyan; McHugh, Caitlin; Laurie, Cathy C; Doheny, Kim F; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Seldin, Michael F; Han, Jiali; Wei, Qingyi

    2011-12-15

    We performed a multistage genome-wide association study of melanoma. In a discovery cohort of 1804 melanoma cases and 1026 controls, we identified loci at chromosomes 15q13.1 (HERC2/OCA2 region) and 16q24.3 (MC1R) regions that reached genome-wide significance within this study and also found strong evidence for genetic effects on susceptibility to melanoma from markers on chromosome 9p21.3 in the p16/ARF region and on chromosome 1q21.3 (ARNT/LASS2/ANXA9 region). The most significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 15q13.1 locus (rs1129038 and rs12913832) lie within a genomic region that has profound effects on eye and skin color; notably, 50% of variability in eye color is associated with variation in the SNP rs12913832. Because eye and skin colors vary across European populations, we further evaluated the associations of the significant SNPs after carefully adjusting for European substructure. We also evaluated the top 10 most significant SNPs by using data from three other genome-wide scans. Additional in silico data provided replication of the findings from the most significant region on chromosome 1q21.3 rs7412746 (P = 6 × 10(-10)). Together, these data identified several candidate genes for additional studies to identify causal variants predisposing to increased risk for developing melanoma. PMID:21926416

  5. Combined thermodynamic study of nickel-base alloys. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, C. R.; Meschter, P. J.

    1981-02-15

    Achievements during this period are the following: (1) initiation of a high-temperature study of the Ni-Ta system using the galvanic cell technique, (2) emf study of high-temperature thermodynamics in the Ni-Mo system, (3) measured heat capacity data on ordered and disordered Ni/sub 4/Mo, (4) heat capacities of Ni and disordered Ni/sub 3/Fe, and (5) computer correlation of thermodynamic and phase diagram data in binary Ni-base alloys. (MOW)

  6. Brain Expression Genome-Wide Association Study (eGWAS) Identifies Human Disease-Associated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V. Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Rowley, Christopher N.; Nair, Asha A.; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G.; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P.; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Younkin, Steven G.; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n = 197, temporal cortex n = 202) and with other brain pathologies (non–AD, cerebellar n = 177, temporal cortex n = 197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ±100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non–ADs (q<0.05, p = 7.70×10−5–1.67×10−82). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p = 1.85×10−5–1.70×10−141). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10−6). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9–3.3 fold enrichment (p<10−6) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD–risk association (p<10−3) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non–CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with

  7. Brain expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) identifies human disease-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis S; Allen, Mariet; Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Rowley, Christopher N; Nair, Asha A; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n=197, temporal cortex n=202) and with other brain pathologies (non-AD, cerebellar n=177, temporal cortex n=197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ± 100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non-ADs (q<0.05, p=7.70 × 10(-5)-1.67 × 10(-82)). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p=1.85 × 10(-5)-1.70 × 10(-141)). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10(-6)). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9-3.3 fold enrichment (p<10(-6)) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD-risk association (p<10(-3)) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non-CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with functional implications. Our findings

  8. (Study of plant cells and tumors): Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Studies of the cell and molecular biology of animal cell tumors has long been recognized as a fertile and productive area for obtaining new and fundamental insights into mechanisms regulating the growth and differentiation of animal cells. As a novel approach to studying similar phenomena in plant cells, we have isolated a number of tumors in the small cruciferous plant Arabidopsis thaliana and have begun to characterize these at the cellular and molecular levels. Studies at the cellular level should lead to new insights into the relationships between hormones, cell growth and cell differentiation, while studies at the molecular level may reveal and allow us to isolate genes involved either in the hormone response, or in other important aspects of the cells' growth regulatory network. Tumors were induced on the plant by irradiation of seed or seedlings with Co-60 gamma rays. When placed in culture, these tumors were able to grow on hormone-free medium, in contrast to normal plant tissues which requires both an auxin and a cytokinin for growth. In the first phase of this project, we have concentrated on characterizing the growth, general phenotype, and hormonal sensitivity of the tumors. These studies will lead into a molecular analysis of the changes expressed in each tumor which may be responsible for the altered phenotype. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Progress of the Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS).

    PubMed

    Bryant, P J

    1999-06-01

    The Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS) was set up following an agreement between Professor M. Regler of the Med-AUSTRON (Austria) and Professor U. Amaldi of the TERA Foundation (Italy) to join their efforts in the design of a medical synchrotron that could later be adapted to individual national needs. CERN agreed to host this study inside its PS Division and to contribute one full-time member to the study team. The study group has worked in collaboration with GSI (Germany) and was more recently joined by Onkologie 2000 (Czech Republic). Work started in January 1996 and is expected to finish during 1998. The agreed aim of the study was to investigate and design a generic facility that would allow the direct clinical comparison of protons and carbon ions for cancer treatment. The accelerator was to be designed primarily for high-precision active beam scanning with both protons and ions, but was also to be capable of delivering proton beams with passive spreading. PMID:10394382

  10. Great Basin paleoenvironmental studies project; Technical progress report: First quarter (January--August 1993)

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Project goals, project tasks, progress on tasks, and problems encountered are described and discussed for each of the studies that make up the Great Basin Paleoenvironmental Studies Project for Yucca Mountain. These studies are: Paleobotany, Paleofauna, Geomorphology, and Transportation. Budget summaries are also given for each of the studies and for the overall project.

  11. Human genetics and genomics a decade after the release of the draft sequence of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in human genetics and genomics research over the past ten years since the publication of the draft sequence of the human genome in 2001. Findings emanating directly from the Human Genome Project, together with those from follow-on studies, have had an enormous impact on our understanding of the architecture and function of the human genome. Major developments have been made in cataloguing genetic variation, the International HapMap Project, and with respect to advances in genotyping technologies. These developments are vital for the emergence of genome-wide association studies in the investigation of complex diseases and traits. In parallel, the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies has ushered in the 'personal genome sequencing' era for both normal and cancer genomes, and made possible large-scale genome sequencing studies such as the 1000 Genomes Project and the International Cancer Genome Consortium. The high-throughput sequencing and sequence-capture technologies are also providing new opportunities to study Mendelian disorders through exome sequencing and whole-genome sequencing. This paper reviews these major developments in human genetics and genomics over the past decade. PMID:22155605

  12. Environmental Response and Genomic Regions Correlated with Rice Root Growth and Yield under Drought in the OryzaSNP Panel across Multiple Study Systems.

    PubMed

    Wade, Len J; Bartolome, Violeta; Mauleon, Ramil; Vasant, Vivek Deshmuck; Prabakar, Sumeet Mankar; Chelliah, Muthukumar; Kameoka, Emi; Nagendra, K; Reddy, K R Kamalnath; Varma, C Mohan Kumar; Patil, Kalmeshwar Gouda; Shrestha, Roshi; Al-Shugeairy, Zaniab; Al-Ogaidi, Faez; Munasinghe, Mayuri; Gowda, Veeresh; Semon, Mande; Suralta, Roel R; Shenoy, Vinay; Vadez, Vincent; Serraj, Rachid; Shashidhar, H E; Yamauchi, Akira; Babu, Ranganathan Chandra; Price, Adam; McNally, Kenneth L; Henry, Amelia

    2015-01-01

    The rapid progress in rice genotyping must be matched by advances in phenotyping. A better understanding of genetic variation in rice for drought response, root traits, and practical methods for studying them are needed. In this study, the OryzaSNP set (20 diverse genotypes that have been genotyped for SNP markers) was phenotyped in a range of field and container studies to study the diversity of rice root growth and response to drought. Of the root traits measured across more than 20 root experiments, root dry weight showed the most stable genotypic performance across studies. The environment (E) component had the strongest effect on yield and root traits. We identified genomic regions correlated with root dry weight, percent deep roots, maximum root depth, and grain yield based on a correlation analysis with the phenotypes and aus, indica, or japonica introgression regions using the SNP data. Two genomic regions were identified as hot spots in which root traits and grain yield were co-located; on chromosome 1 (39.7-40.7 Mb) and on chromosome 8 (20.3-21.9 Mb). Across experiments, the soil type/ growth medium showed more correlations with plant growth than the container dimensions. Although the correlations among studies and genetic co-location of root traits from a range of study systems points to their potential utility to represent responses in field studies, the best correlations were observed when the two setups had some similar properties. Due to the co-location of the identified genomic regions (from introgression block analysis) with QTL for a number of previously reported root and drought traits, these regions are good candidates for detailed characterization to contribute to understanding rice improvement for response to drought. This study also highlights the utility of characterizing a small set of 20 genotypes for root growth, drought response, and related genomic regions. PMID:25909711

  13. Environmental Response and Genomic Regions Correlated with Rice Root Growth and Yield under Drought in the OryzaSNP Panel across Multiple Study Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Len J.; Bartolome, Violeta; Mauleon, Ramil; Vasant, Vivek Deshmuck; Prabakar, Sumeet Mankar; Chelliah, Muthukumar; Kameoka, Emi; Nagendra, K.; Reddy, K. R. Kamalnath; Varma, C. Mohan Kumar; Patil, Kalmeshwar Gouda; Shrestha, Roshi; Al-Shugeairy, Zaniab; Al-Ogaidi, Faez; Munasinghe, Mayuri; Gowda, Veeresh; Semon, Mande; Suralta, Roel R.; Shenoy, Vinay; Vadez, Vincent; Serraj, Rachid; Shashidhar, H. E.; Yamauchi, Akira; Babu, Ranganathan Chandra; Price, Adam; McNally, Kenneth L.; Henry, Amelia

    2015-01-01

    The rapid progress in rice genotyping must be matched by advances in phenotyping. A better understanding of genetic variation in rice for drought response, root traits, and practical methods for studying them are needed. In this study, the OryzaSNP set (20 diverse genotypes that have been genotyped for SNP markers) was phenotyped in a range of field and container studies to study the diversity of rice root growth and response to drought. Of the root traits measured across more than 20 root experiments, root dry weight showed the most stable genotypic performance across studies. The environment (E) component had the strongest effect on yield and root traits. We identified genomic regions correlated with root dry weight, percent deep roots, maximum root depth, and grain yield based on a correlation analysis with the phenotypes and aus, indica, or japonica introgression regions using the SNP data. Two genomic regions were identified as hot spots in which root traits and grain yield were co-located; on chromosome 1 (39.7–40.7 Mb) and on chromosome 8 (20.3–21.9 Mb). Across experiments, the soil type/ growth medium showed more correlations with plant growth than the container dimensions. Although the correlations among studies and genetic co-location of root traits from a range of study systems points to their potential utility to represent responses in field studies, the best correlations were observed when the two setups had some similar properties. Due to the co-location of the identified genomic regions (from introgression block analysis) with QTL for a number of previously reported root and drought traits, these regions are good candidates for detailed characterization to contribute to understanding rice improvement for response to drought. This study also highlights the utility of characterizing a small set of 20 genotypes for root growth, drought response, and related genomic regions. PMID:25909711

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Loci Associated With Diisocyanate-Induced Occupational Asthma.

    PubMed

    Yucesoy, Berran; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Lummus, Zana L; Weirauch, Matthew T; Zhang, Ge; Cartier, André; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Sastre, Joaquin; Quirce, Santiago; Tarlo, Susan M; Cruz, Maria-Jesus; Munoz, Xavier; Harley, John B; Bernstein, David I

    2015-07-01

    Diisocyanates, reactive chemicals used to produce polyurethane products, are the most common causes of occupational asthma. The aim of this study is to identify susceptibility gene variants that could contribute to the pathogenesis of diisocyanate asthma (DA) using a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) approach. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was performed in 74 diisocyanate-exposed workers with DA and 824 healthy controls using Omni-2.5 and Omni-5 SNP microarrays. We identified 11 SNPs that exceeded genome-wide significance; the strongest association was for the rs12913832 SNP located on chromosome 15, which has been mapped to the HERC2 gene (p = 6.94 × 10(-14)). Strong associations were also found for SNPs near the ODZ3 and CDH17 genes on chromosomes 4 and 8 (rs908084, p = 8.59 × 10(-9) and rs2514805, p = 1.22 × 10(-8), respectively). We also prioritized 38 SNPs with suggestive genome-wide significance (p < 1 × 10(-6)). Among them, 17 SNPs map to the PITPNC1, ACMSD, ZBTB16, ODZ3, and CDH17 gene loci. Functional genomics data indicate that 2 of the suggestive SNPs (rs2446823 and rs2446824) are located within putative binding sites for the CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein (CEBP) and Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4, Alpha transcription factors (TFs), respectively. This study identified SNPs mapping to the HERC2, CDH17, and ODZ3 genes as potential susceptibility loci for DA. Pathway analysis indicated that these genes are associated with antigen processing and presentation, and other immune pathways. Overlap of 2 suggestive SNPs with likely TF binding sites suggests possible roles in disruption of gene regulation. These results provide new insights into the genetic architecture of DA and serve as a basis for future functional and mechanistic studies. PMID:25918132

  15. Experimental studies of the structure of grain boundaries. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, S.L.

    1993-04-01

    Goals are to understand factors affecting structure of grain boundaries in intermetallic compounds, understand how solute segregation affects grain boundary structure and causes embrittlement in Fe-base alloys, and explore control of grain boundary properties. Fe and boron-doped Ni{sub 3}Al and NiAl were studied. 7 figs, 1 tab, 18 refs.

  16. Developmental Studies at Nunez Community College: A Work in Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Accomando, Annette

    2004-01-01

    This paper chronicles the process undertaken by one community college to analyze its Developmental Studies Program. A participant/observer faculty member involved in the college's assessment activities contemplated the institution's complex past, the challenging present, and the unfolding future. An interesting account explicating committee…

  17. The HapMap and Genome-Wide Association Studies in Diagnosis and Therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Manolio, Teri A.; Collins, Francis S.

    2009-01-01

    The International HapMap Project produced a genome-wide database of human genetic variation for use in genetic association studies of common diseases. The initial output of these studies has been overwhelming, with over 150 risk loci identified in studies of more than 60 common diseases and traits. These associations have suggested previously unsuspected etiologic pathways for common diseases that will be of use in identifying new therapeutic targets and developing targeted interventions based on genetically defined risk. Here we examine the development and application of the HapMap to genome-wide association (GWA) studies; present and future technologies for GWA research; current major efforts in GWA studies; successes and limitations of the GWA approach in identifying polymorphisms related to complex diseases; data release and privacy polices; use of these findings by clinicians, the public, and academic physicians; and sources of ongoing authoritative information on this rapidly evolving field. PMID:19630580

  18. Refinements in the care and use of animals in toxicology studies-regulation, validation, and progress.

    PubMed

    Turner, Patricia V; Smiler, Kathleen L; Hargaden, Maureen; Koch, Michael A

    2003-11-01

    During the past decade, important advances have been made in the humane care and use of laboratory animals used in toxicology studies, and there is strong international interest by the pharmaceutical sector in continuing with this progress. Because of the potential influence on human health, safety studies are highly regulated, and implementing refinements in laboratory animal care and use may require an initial validation study to demonstrate a lack of effect on study outcome. This paper provides an overview of issues surrounding implementation of animal care refinements in toxicology laboratory settings, including regulatory constraints, conducting validation studies, current progress in refinements, and areas for future consideration. PMID:14615954

  19. A Fast Implementation of a Scan Statistic for Identifying Chromosomal Patterns of Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan V.; Jacobsen, Douglas M.; Turner, Stephen T.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kardia, Sharon L.R.

    2009-01-01

    In order to take into account the complex genomic distribution of SNP variations when identifying chromosomal regions with significant SNP effects, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association scan statistic was developed. To address the computational needs of genome wide association (GWA) studies, a fast Java application, which combines single-locus SNP tests and a scan statistic for identifying chromosomal regions with significant clusters of significant SNP effects, was developed and implemented. To illustrate this application, SNP associations were analyzed in a pharmacogenomic study of the blood pressure lowering effect of thiazide-diuretics (N=195) using the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K Set. 55,335 tagSNPs (pair-wise linkage disequilibrium R2<0.5) were selected to reduce the frequency correlation between SNPs. A typical workstation can complete the whole genome scan including 10,000 permutation tests within 3 hours. The most significant regions locate on chromosome 3, 6, 13 and 16, two of which contain candidate genes that may be involved in the underlying drug response mechanism. The computational performance of ChromoScan-GWA and its scalability were tested with up to 1,000,000 SNPs and up to 4,000 subjects. Using 10,000 permutations, the computation time grew linearly in these datasets. This scan statistic application provides a robust statistical and computational foundation for identifying genomic regions associated with disease and provides a method to compare GWA results even across different platforms. PMID:20161066

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel loci for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kazuo; Fujita, Hayato; Johnson, Todd A; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Yasuda, Kazuki; Horikoshi, Momoko; Peng, Chen; Hu, Cheng; Ma, Ronald C W; Imamura, Minako; Iwata, Minoru; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Morizono, Takashi; Shojima, Nobuhiro; So, Wing Yee; Leung, Ting Fan; Kwan, Patrick; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Jie; Yu, Weihui; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Hirose, Hiroshi; Kaku, Kohei; Ito, Chikako; Watada, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Yasushi; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Jia, Weiping; Chan, Juliana C N; Teo, Yik Ying; Shyong, Tai E; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kubo, Michiaki; Maeda, Shiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Although over 60 loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been identified, there still remains a large genetic component to be clarified. To explore unidentified loci for T2D, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 6 209 637 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which were directly genotyped or imputed using East Asian references from the 1000 Genomes Project (June 2011 release) in 5976 Japanese patients with T2D and 20 829 nondiabetic individuals. Nineteen unreported loci were selected and taken forward to follow-up analyses. Combined discovery and follow-up analyses (30 392 cases and 34 814 controls) identified three new loci with genome-wide significance, which were MIR129-LEP [rs791595; risk allele = A; risk allele frequency (RAF) = 0.080; P = 2.55 × 10(-13); odds ratio (OR) = 1.17], GPSM1 [rs11787792; risk allele = A; RAF = 0.874; P = 1.74 × 10(-10); OR = 1.15] and SLC16A13 (rs312457; risk allele = G; RAF = 0.078; P = 7.69 × 10(-13); OR = 1.20). This study demonstrates that GWASs based on the imputation of genotypes using modern reference haplotypes such as that from the 1000 Genomes Project data can assist in identification of new loci for common diseases. PMID:23945395

  1. Integrating Nonadditive Genomic Relationship Matrices into the Study of Genetic Architecture of Complex Traits.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Alireza; Gezan, Salvador A

    2016-03-01

    The study of genetic architecture of complex traits has been dramatically influenced by implementing genome-wide analytical approaches during recent years. Of particular interest are genomic prediction strategies which make use of genomic information for predicting phenotypic responses instead of detecting trait-associated loci. In this work, we present the results of a simulation study to improve our understanding of the statistical properties of estimation of genetic variance components of complex traits, and of additive, dominance, and genetic effects through best linear unbiased prediction methodology. Simulated dense marker information was used to construct genomic additive and dominance matrices, and multiple alternative pedigree- and marker-based models were compared to determine if including a dominance term into the analysis may improve the genetic analysis of complex traits. Our results showed that a model containing a pedigree- or marker-based additive relationship matrix along with a pedigree-based dominance matrix provided the best partitioning of genetic variance into its components, especially when some degree of true dominance effects was expected to exist. Also, we noted that the use of a marker-based additive relationship matrix along with a pedigree-based dominance matrix had the best performance in terms of accuracy of correlations between true and estimated additive, dominance, and genetic effects. PMID:26712858

  2. Genome-Wide Association Study of Copy Number Variations (CNVs) with Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dawei; Zhao, Hongyu; Kranzler, Henry R; Li, Ming D; Jensen, Kevin P; Zayats, Tetyana; Farrer, Lindsay A; Gelernter, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms that have been associated with opioid dependence (OD) altogether account for only a small proportion of the known heritability. Most of the genetic risk factors are unknown. Some of the ‘missing heritability' might be explained by copy number variations (CNVs) in the human genome. We used Illumina HumanOmni1 arrays to genotype 5152 African-American and European-American OD cases and screened controls and implemented combined CNV calling methods. After quality control measures were applied, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of CNVs with OD was performed. For common CNVs, two deletions and one duplication were significantly associated with OD genome-wide (eg, P=2 × 10−8 and OR (95% CI)=0.64 (0.54–0.74) for a chromosome 18q12.3 deletion). Several rare or unique CNVs showed suggestive or marginal significance with large effect sizes. This study is the first GWAS of OD using CNVs. Some identified CNVs harbor genes newly identified here to be of biological importance in addiction, whereas others affect genes previously known to contribute to substance dependence risk. Our findings augment our specific knowledge of the importance of genomic variation in addictive disorders, and provide an addiction CNV pool for further research. These findings require replication. PMID:25345593

  3. InSilico DB genomic datasets hub: an efficient starting point for analyzing genome-wide studies in GenePattern, Integrative Genomics Viewer, and R/Bioconductor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Genomics datasets are increasingly useful for gaining biomedical insights, with adoption in the clinic underway. However, multiple hurdles related to data management stand in the way of their efficient large-scale utilization. The solution proposed is a web-based data storage hub. Having clear focus, flexibility and adaptability, InSilico DB seamlessly connects genomics dataset repositories to state-of-the-art and free GUI and command-line data analysis tools. The InSilico DB platform is a powerful collaborative environment, with advanced capabilities for biocuration, dataset sharing, and dataset subsetting and combination. InSilico DB is available from https://insilicodb.org. PMID:23158523

  4. Radioactivity studies. Progress report, April 30, 1984-June 1, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.

    1985-06-01

    This report includes information pertaining to metabolic studies of neptunium and protactinium in the adult baboon. Recent investigations have provided additional data on the uptake, distribution, retention and excretion of Np-237, Np-239 and Pa-233 in baboons following single intravenous and gavage administrations. Data is also presented on the gastrointestinal absorption of isotopes of uranium, neptunium and plutonium in individual baboons after receiving multiple gavage administrations at selected time intervals and nutritional states. The gastrointestinal (GI) absorption (f/sub 1/ values) and retention factors have been calculated for each of these nuclides. We have begun metabolic studies on the adult tamarin (Saquinis labiatus). Data are presented in this report on the preliminary results of the metabolism of Np-239 bicarbonate intravenously injected into three females and one male tamarin. These data are discussed in comparison with similar results obtained with our baboons and with other species. 28 refs., 20 figs., 14 tabs.

  5. Introduction. Progress in Earth science and climate studies.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J Michael T

    2008-12-28

    In this introductory paper, I review the 'visions of the future' articles prepared by top young scientists for the second of the two Christmas 2008 Triennial Issues of Phil. Trans. R. Soc.A, devoted respectively to astronomy and Earth science. Topics covered in the Earth science issue include: trace gases in the atmosphere; dynamics of the Antarctic circumpolar current; a study of the boundary between the Earth's rocky mantle and its iron core; and two studies of volcanoes and their plumes. A final section devoted to ecology and climate covers: the mathematical modelling of plant-soil interactions; the effects of the boreal forests on the Earth's climate; the role of the past palaeoclimate in testing and calibrating today's numerical climate models; and the evaluation of these models including the quantification of their uncertainties. PMID:18818152

  6. Recent Progress of RF Cavity Study at Mucool Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

    2011-12-02

    Summar of presentation is: (1) MTA is a multi task working space to investigate RF cavities for R&D of muon beam cooling channel - (a) Intense 400 MeV H{sup -} beam, (b) Handle hydrogen (flammable) gas, (c) 5 Tesla SC solenoid magnet, (d) He cryogenic/recycling system; (2) Pillbox cavity has been refurbished to search better RF material - Beryllium button test will be happened soon; (3) E x B effect has been tested in a box cavity - Under study (result seems not to be desirable); (4) 201 MHz RF cavity with SRF cavity treatment has been tested at low magnetic field - (a) Observed some B field effect on maximum field gradient and (b) Further study is needed (large bore SC magnet will be delivered end of 2011); and (5) HPRF cavity beam test has started - (a) No RF breakdown observed and (b) Design a new HPRF cavity to investigate more plasma loading effect.

  7. Progress in genetic association studies of plasma lipids

    PubMed Central

    Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Lovering, Ruth C.; Drenos, Fotios

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes recently published large-scale efforts elucidating the genetic architecture of lipid levels. A supplemental file with all genetic loci is provided for research purposes and we performed bioinformatic analyses of the genetic variants to give an oversight of involved pathways. Recent findings In total, 52 genes for HDL cholesterol, 42 genes for LDL cholesterol, 59 genes for total cholesterol, and 39 genes for triglycerides have been identified. Genetic overlap is present between the different traits and similar pathways are involved. Most of the SNPs that were detected in the European studies could be replicated in other ethnicities and these SNPs show the same direction of effect suggesting that the underlying genetic architecture of blood lipids is similar between ethnicities. Summary Genetic studies have identified many loci associated with plasma lipids and have provided insight into the underlying mechanisms of lipid homeostasis. Future research is needed to determine whether these loci may be novel targets for lipid-lowering therapy and for reducing cardiovascular disease risk. In addition, the proportion of genetic variance explained by these lipid loci is still limited and new large-scale genetic studies are ongoing to identify additional common and rare variants associated with lipid levels. PMID:23385652

  8. Study and Therapeutic Progress on Intracranial Serpentine Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kan; Yu, Tiecheng; Guo, Yunbao; Yu, Jinlu

    2016-01-01

    An intracranial serpentine aneurysm (SA) is a clinically rare entity, and very few multi-case studies on SA have been published. The present study reviewed the relevant literature available on PubMed. The studied information included the formation mechanism and natural history of SA as well as its clinical manifestation, imaging characteristics, and current treatments. After reviewing the literature, we conclude that intracranial SA can be managed surgically and by endovascular embolization, but the degree of blood flow in normal brain tissue distal to the SA must be evaluated. A balloon occlusion test (BOT) or cross compression test is recommended for this evaluation. If the collateral circulation is sufficiently compensatory, direct excision or embolization can be performed. However, if the compensatory collateral circulation is poor, a bypass surgery is necessary. Satisfactory results can be achieved in the majority of SA patients after treatment. However, the size of the aneurysm may increase in some patients after endovascular treatment. Special attention should be paid to cases exhibiting a significant mass effect to avoid subsequent SA excision due to an intolerable mass effect. Satisfactory results can be achieved with careful treatment of SA. PMID:27279792

  9. Recent Progress in Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    The synchrotron-emitting nebulae formed by energetic winds from young pulsars provide information on a wide range phenomena that contribute to their structure. High resolution X-ray observations reveal jets and toroidal structures in many systems, along with knot-like structures whose emission is observed to be time-variable. Large-scale filaments seen in optical and radio images mark instability regions where the expanding nebulae interact with the surrounding ejecta, and spectral studies reveal the presence of these ejecta in the form of thermal X-ray emission. Infrared studies probe the frequency region where evolutionary and magnetic field effects conspire to change the broadband synchrotron spectrum dramatically, and studies of the innermost regions of the nebulae provide constraints on the spectra of particles entering the nebula. At the highest energies, TeV gamma-ray observations provide a probe of the spectral region that, for low magnetic fields, corresponds to particles with energies just below the X-ray-emitting regime. Here I summarize the structure of pulsar wind nebulae and review several new observations that have helped drive a recent resurgence in theoretical modeling of these systems.

  10. Progress in Fast Ignition Studies with Electrons and Protons

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, A. J.; Chen, H.; Hey, D.; Key, M. H.; MacPhee, A. G.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Chawla, S.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; King, J. A.; Ma, T.; Wei, M. S.; Chen, C. D.; Chowdhury, E.; Link, A.

    2009-09-10

    Isochoric heating of inertially confined fusion plasmas by laser driven MeV electrons or protons is an area of great topical interest in the inertial confinement fusion community, particularly with respect to the fast ignition (FI) concept for initiating burn in a fusion capsule. In order to investigate critical aspects needed for a FI point design, experiments were performed to study 1) laser-to-electrons or protons conversion issues and 2) laser-cone interactions including prepulse effects. A large suite of diagnostics was utilized to study these important parameters. Using cone--wire surrogate targets it is found that pre-pulse levels on medium scale lasers such as Titan at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory produce long scale length plasmas that strongly effect coupling of the laser to FI relevant electrons inside cones. The cone wall thickness also affects coupling to the wire. Conversion efficiency to protons has also been measured and modeled as a function of target thickness, material. Conclusions from the proton and electron source experiments will be presented. Recent advances in modeling electron transport and innovative target designs for reducing igniter energy and increasing gain curves will also be discussed. In conclusion, a program of study will be presented based on understanding the fundamental physics of the electron or proton source relevant to FI.

  11. Radioactivity studies. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.

    1983-06-01

    During the last year, the research program in actinide biokinetics in nonhuman primates has been expanded to include preliminary studies of the element neptunium. Recently, Np-237, which is known to be present in high-level nuclear reactor waste, has received increased attention as a potential long-range hazard to man. In addition to the neptunium studies, the metabolism of protactinium-233, the daughter of Np-237, has been investigated. Although characterization of Pa-233 metabolism was originally conducted in order to correct for Pa-233 interference during in vivo and in vitro gamma spectrometry of Np-237, several other considerations indicated that Pa might be of radiological concern itself and should thereby warrant further investigation. Due to the limited amount of data in the literature defining the biokinetics of both neptunium and protactinium, metabolis studies of these nuclides are now being conducted in adult female baboons in a manner similar to that which has been successfully performed at this laboratory for Am-241 and Cm-243,244. Procedures routinely performed include external whole-body counting, excreta collection (separation and measurement), blood sampling, biopsies of liver and bone, and complete tissue and organ analysis after sacrifice.

  12. Study and Therapeutic Progress on Intracranial Serpentine Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kan; Yu, Tiecheng; Guo, Yunbao; Yu, Jinlu

    2016-01-01

    An intracranial serpentine aneurysm (SA) is a clinically rare entity, and very few multi-case studies on SA have been published. The present study reviewed the relevant literature available on PubMed. The studied information included the formation mechanism and natural history of SA as well as its clinical manifestation, imaging characteristics, and current treatments. After reviewing the literature, we conclude that intracranial SA can be managed surgically and by endovascular embolization, but the degree of blood flow in normal brain tissue distal to the SA must be evaluated. A balloon occlusion test (BOT) or cross compression test is recommended for this evaluation. If the collateral circulation is sufficiently compensatory, direct excision or embolization can be performed. However, if the compensatory collateral circulation is poor, a bypass surgery is necessary. Satisfactory results can be achieved in the majority of SA patients after treatment. However, the size of the aneurysm may increase in some patients after endovascular treatment. Special attention should be paid to cases exhibiting a significant mass effect to avoid subsequent SA excision due to an intolerable mass effect. Satisfactory results can be achieved with careful treatment of SA. PMID:27279792

  13. (Studies of heavy-ion induced reactions): Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1986-10-01

    An experiment was performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac, extending previous studies using inverse reactions to 50 MeV/u /sup 139/La incident on targets of C and Al. Studies of excitation energy division in lower energy division in lower energy heavy-ion reactions were furthered using kinematic coincidences to measure the excitation energies of primary products in the Fe + Ho reaction at 12 MeV/u. These results will provide important systematics for comparisons with previous measurements at 9 MeV/u on the same system and at 15 MeV/u on the Fe + Fe and Fe + U systems. Also studied were different aspects of 15 MeV/u Fe-induced reactions, with experiments performed at the Oak Ridge HHIRF. The first three contributions of this report constitute a major portion of the results from this research. Finally, at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac a large detector array for coincident detection of fragmentation products in heavy-ion collisions below 100 MeV/u is being built. A list of publications, personnel, and activities is provided.

  14. Cloning of the BamHI repeat from Amaranthus and study of its methylation in genomic DNA during dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Sharma, A K; Sopory, S K

    1993-07-01

    A 670 bp BamHI repeat was isolated from the genomic DNA of Amaranthus paniculatus and was cloned in pUC19 vector (pABH3). The level of methylation of total genomic DNA and the BamHI repeat therein was studied by employing methylation sensitive enzymes to digest genomic DNA isolated from whole seedlings, hypocotyl, callus, and suspension culture of Amaranthus. The restriction pattern indicated double methylation of the target site CCGG. Methylation pattern of both the total genomic DNA and the cloned repeat was found to be similar during dedifferentiation indicating that there may not be a general relationship between hypomethylation and dedifferentiation. PMID:8401314

  15. Genome-wide association studies using haplotypes and individual SNPs in Simmental cattle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Fan, Huizhong; Wang, Yanhui; Zhang, Lupei; Gao, Xue; Chen, Yan; Li, Junya; Ren, HongYan; Gao, Huijiang

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping technologies have provided the opportunity to map genes using associations between complex traits and markers. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) based on either a single marker or haplotype have identified genetic variants and underlying genetic mechanisms of quantitative traits. Prompted by the achievements of studies examining economic traits in cattle and to verify the consistency of these two methods using real data, the current study was conducted to construct the haplotype structure in the bovine genome and to detect relevant genes genuinely affecting a carcass trait and a meat quality trait. Using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip, 942 young bulls with genotyping data were introduced as a reference population to identify the genes in the beef cattle genome significantly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels. In total, 92,553 haplotype blocks were detected in the genome. The regions of high linkage disequilibrium extended up to approximately 200 kb, and the size of haplotype blocks ranged from 22 bp to 199,266 bp. Additionally, the individual SNP analysis and the haplotype-based analysis detected similar regions and common SNPs for these two representative traits. A total of 12 and 7 SNPs in the bovine genome were significantly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels, respectively. By comparison, 4 and 5 haplotype blocks containing the majority of significant SNPs were strongly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels, respectively. In addition, 36 SNPs with high linkage disequilibrium were detected in the GNAQ gene, a potential hotspot that may play a crucial role for regulating carcass trait components. PMID:25330174

  16. Genome-Wide Association Studies Using Haplotypes and Individual SNPs in Simmental Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Fan, Huizhong; Wang, Yanhui; Zhang, Lupei; Gao, Xue; Chen, Yan; Li, Junya; Ren, HongYan; Gao, Huijiang

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping technologies have provided the opportunity to map genes using associations between complex traits and markers. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) based on either a single marker or haplotype have identified genetic variants and underlying genetic mechanisms of quantitative traits. Prompted by the achievements of studies examining economic traits in cattle and to verify the consistency of these two methods using real data, the current study was conducted to construct the haplotype structure in the bovine genome and to detect relevant genes genuinely affecting a carcass trait and a meat quality trait. Using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip, 942 young bulls with genotyping data were introduced as a reference population to identify the genes in the beef cattle genome significantly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels. In total, 92,553 haplotype blocks were detected in the genome. The regions of high linkage disequilibrium extended up to approximately 200 kb, and the size of haplotype blocks ranged from 22 bp to 199,266 bp. Additionally, the individual SNP analysis and the haplotype-based analysis detected similar regions and common SNPs for these two representative traits. A total of 12 and 7 SNPs in the bovine genome were significantly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels, respectively. By comparison, 4 and 5 haplotype blocks containing the majority of significant SNPs were strongly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels, respectively. In addition, 36 SNPs with high linkage disequilibrium were detected in the GNAQ gene, a potential hotspot that may play a crucial role for regulating carcass trait components. PMID:25330174

  17. Acetaminophen-NAPQI Hepatotoxicity: A Cell Line Model System Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Ann M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Jenkins, Gregory D.; Batzler, Anthony J.; Pelleymounter, Linda L.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Ji, Yuan; Chai, Yubo; Nordgren, Kendra K. S.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the leading cause of acute hepatic failure in many developed nations. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is mediated by the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine (NAPQI). We performed a “discovery” genome-wide association study using a cell line–based model system to study the possible contribution of genomics to NAPQI-induced cytotoxicity. A total of 176 lymphoblastoid cell lines from healthy subjects were treated with increasing concentrations of NAPQI. Inhibiting concentration 50 values were determined and were associated with “glutathione pathway” gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genome-wide basal messenger RNA expression, as well as with 1.3 million genome-wide SNPs. A group of SNPs in linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 3 was highly associated with NAPQI toxicity. The p value for rs2880961, the SNP with the lowest p value, was 1.88 × 10−7. This group of SNPs mapped to a “gene desert,” but chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated binding of several transcription factor proteins including heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and HSF2, at or near rs2880961. These chromosome 3 SNPs were not significantly associated with variation in basal expression for any of the genome-wide genes represented on the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChip. We have used a cell line–based model system to identify a SNP signal associated with NAPQI cytotoxicity. If these observations are validated in future clinical studies, this SNP signal might represent a potential biomarker for risk of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear. PMID:21177773

  18. Agroclimatic study of mountainous regions and its progress in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yangcai

    1992-02-01

    In recent years, the agroclimatic investigations have been made at various temporal and spatial scales in moun-tainous and hilly regions, and so have the adaptability tests on the crop ecoclimate. A large quantity of reliable and representative data are obtained. Through the synthetic studies on “ belt” , “ layer” , “ topography” and “ecological-type” in mountainy and hilly regions, climate with agriculture ard zonality with non-zonality are closely combined to show the similarities and differences of agroclimatic resources at various layers and with different topography types in mountainy and hilly regions. A general review is given in this paper.

  19. Studies in Low Energy Nuclear Science, Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Brune; Steven M. Grimes; Thomas N. Massey

    2004-03-01

    OAK-B135 Research in the area of low-energy nuclear science is described. We report on studies of the Z dependence of nuclear level densities, the development of a new Hauser-Feshbach computer code, and plans to measure level densities in nuclei off the line of stability. We also discuss the development of our R-matrix fitting capabilities, including new codes and the application to the C-14 system. Plans for future measurements of the Be-9(alpha,n) and B-11(alpha,n) reactions are discussed.

  20. Genome-wide association study of insect bite hypersensitivity in two horse populations in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Insect bite hypersensitivity is a common allergic disease in horse populations worldwide. Insect bite hypersensitivity is affected by both environmental and genetic factors. However, little is known about genes contributing to the genetic variance associated with insect bite hypersensitivity. Therefore, the aim of our study was to identify and quantify genomic associations with insect bite hypersensitivity in Shetland pony mares and Icelandic horses in the Netherlands. Methods Data on 200 Shetland pony mares and 146 Icelandic horses were collected according to a matched case–control design. Cases and controls were matched on various factors (e.g. region, sire) to minimize effects of population stratification. Breed-specific genome-wide association studies were performed using 70 k single nucleotide polymorphisms genotypes. Bayesian variable selection method Bayes-C with a threshold model implemented in GenSel software was applied. A 1 Mb non-overlapping window approach that accumulated contributions of adjacent single nucleotide polymorphisms was used to identify associated genomic regions. Results The percentage of variance explained by all single nucleotide polymorphisms was 13% in Shetland pony mares and 28% in Icelandic horses. The 20 non-overlapping windows explaining the largest percentages of genetic variance were found on nine chromosomes in Shetland pony mares and on 14 chromosomes in Icelandic horses. Overlap in identified associated genomic regions between breeds would suggest interesting candidate regions to follow-up on. Such regions common to both breeds (within 15 Mb) were found on chromosomes 3, 7, 11, 20 and 23. Positional candidate genes within 2 Mb from the associated windows were identified on chromosome 20 in both breeds. Candidate genes are within the equine lymphocyte antigen class II region, which evokes an immune response by recognizing many foreign molecules. Conclusions The genome-wide association study identified several

  1. Study of methanogens by genetic techniques. A subcontract progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Baresi, L.; Bertani, G.

    1984-06-01

    Genetic studies of methanogenic bacteria could lead to better exploitation of these organisms in the production of methane from biomass. The objective of this study is to develop a workable genetic system for these bacteria. We have tried to apply standard genetic techniques to these slow growing, strictly anaerobic bacteria. We have been able to isolate several types of mutants both spontaneous and induced. For Methanococcus voltae we have (a) established survival curves to ultraviolet light and gamma ray irradiation, (b) isolated by direct selection mutants resistant to bromo-ethane-sulfonate and to 5-methyl-tryptophan, and a double mutant exhibiting both resistances, (c) isolated after mutagenesis two nutritional mutants (one requiring histidine and the other requiring adenine and possibly another factor). For Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum we have (a) established an ultraviolet light survival curve, (b) isolated by direct selection mutants resistant to bromo-ethane-sulfonate and to gentamicin. We have developed a routine technique for the purpose of isolating phages capable of infecting methanogenic bacteria. 10 figures, 1 table.

  2. Studying protein-protein interactions: progress, pitfalls and solutions.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Sheri; Malacrida, Beatrice; Kiely, Maeve; Kiely, Patrick A

    2016-08-15

    Signalling proteins are intrinsic to all biological processes and interact with each other in tightly regulated and orchestrated signalling complexes and pathways. Characterization of protein binding can help to elucidate protein function within signalling pathways. This information is vital for researchers to gain a more comprehensive knowledge of cellular networks which can then be used to develop new therapeutic strategies for disease. However, studying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) can be challenging as the interactions can be extremely transient downstream of specific environmental cues. There are many powerful techniques currently available to identify and confirm PPIs. Choosing the most appropriate range of techniques merits serious consideration. The aim of this review is to provide a starting point for researchers embarking on a PPI study. We provide an overview and point of reference for some of the many methods available to identify interactions from in silico analysis and large scale screening tools through to the methods used to validate potential PPIs. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method and we also provide a workflow chart to highlight the main experimental questions to consider when planning cell lysis to maximize experimental success. PMID:27528744

  3. Progression of leprosy neuropathy: a case series study

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Robson T; Illarramendi, Ximena; Nascimento, Osvaldo; Hacker, Mariana A; Sarno, Euzenir N; Jardim, Marcia R

    2012-01-01

    A need still exists to determine the clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of leprosy neuropathy at distinct times of the disease by different methods that measure the various nerve fiber functions. A prospective clinical study was performed with 10 paucibacillary (PB) and 12 multibacillary (MB) patients evaluated at diagnosis and one year after cessation of multidrug therapy (MDT). Peripheral nerve function was assessed clinically and by means of the sympathetic skin response, skin vasomotor reflex, and nerve conduction study (NCS). At diagnosis, 73% of the total 22 patients had nerve function impairment (NFI). Autonomic function (χ2= 5.5, P= 0.019) and NCS (χ2= 7.765, P= 0.01) were significantly more altered in MB than PB patients. At final evaluation, NFI of the MB patients had worsened, especially among the six who had leprosy reaction. As the NFI of PB patients showed improvement, a significant difference between the two groups (χ2= 12.320, P= 0.001) was observed. A high prevalence of neuropathy was observed in newly diagnosed patients. Associating different tests with a thorough clinical neurological evaluation increases detection rates. PMID:22741099

  4. Progression of leprosy neuropathy: a case series study.

    PubMed

    Vital, Robson T; Illarramendi, Ximena; Nascimento, Osvaldo; Hacker, Mariana A; Sarno, Euzenir N; Jardim, Marcia R

    2012-05-01

    A need still exists to determine the clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of leprosy neuropathy at distinct times of the disease by different methods that measure the various nerve fiber functions. A prospective clinical study was performed with 10 paucibacillary (PB) and 12 multibacillary (MB) patients evaluated at diagnosis and one year after cessation of multidrug therapy (MDT). Peripheral nerve function was assessed clinically and by means of the sympathetic skin response, skin vasomotor reflex, and nerve conduction study (NCS). At diagnosis, 73% of the total 22 patients had nerve function impairment (NFI). Autonomic function (χ(2)= 5.5, P= 0.019) and NCS (χ(2)= 7.765, P= 0.01) were significantly more altered in MB than PB patients. At final evaluation, NFI of the MB patients had worsened, especially among the six who had leprosy reaction. As the NFI of PB patients showed improvement, a significant difference between the two groups (χ(2)= 12.320, P= 0.001) was observed. A high prevalence of neuropathy was observed in newly diagnosed patients. Associating different tests with a thorough clinical neurological evaluation increases detection rates. PMID:22741099

  5. DNA amplification in glial cells of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: An image analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Ariza, A.; Mate, J.L.; Serrano, S.

    1996-06-01

    JC virus (JCV), the agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), has been shown by both immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry to be associated with p53 protein stabilization. Since stabilization/inactivation of p53 is associated with the development of genomic instability, abnormal cell DNA contents are to be expected in JCV-infected cells of PML. This work explores that possibility by image analysis evaluation of DNA content in PML-infected oligodendrocytes and bizarre astrocytes. Brain paraffin sections of PML lesions from five adults male patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were treated with the Feulgen technique to obtain a stochiometric staining of DNA and analyzed with a microscope image processor. Inclusion-bearing oligodendrocytes exhibited near tetraploid DNA indices in each of the five cases, whereas atypical astrocytes were in the hypertetraploid range in all cases and were polyploid in four instances. This evidence of DNA amplification in PML glial cells is congruent with the functional abolition of p53 protein in association with JCV infection and lends further support to the role of p53 as a keeper of diploid status and guardian of genomic stability. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Heritability in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: From the First Twin Study to Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Trier Moller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Harbord, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Since Tysk et al's pioneering analysis of the Swedish twin registry, twin and family studies continue to support a strong genetic basis of the inflammatory bowel diseases. The coefficient of heritability for siblings of inflammatory bowel disease probands is 25 to 42 for Crohn's disease and 4 to 15 for ulcerative colitis. Heritability estimates for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis from pooled twin studies are 0.75 and 0.67, respectively. However, this is at odds with the much lower heritability estimates from Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). This “missing heritability” is likely due to shortfalls in both family studies and GWAS. The coefficient of heritability fails to account for familial shared environment. Heritability calculations from twin data are based on Falconer's method, with premises that are increasingly understood to be flawed. GWAS based heritability estimates may underestimate heritability due to incomplete linkage disequilibrium, and because some single nucleotide polypeptides (SNPs) do not reach a level of significance to allow detection. SNPs missed by GWAS include common SNPs with low penetrance and rare SNPs with high penetrance. All methods of heritability estimation regard genetic and environmental variance as separate entities, although it is now understood that there is a complex multidirectional interplay between genetic are environmental factors mediated by the microbiota, the epigenome, and the innate and acquired immune systems. Due to the limitations of heritability estimates, it is unlikely that a true value for heritability will be reached. Further work aimed at quantifying the variance explained across GWAS, epigenome-wide, and microbiota-wide association studies will help to define factors leading to inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25895112

  7. Genome-Wide Pathway Association Studies of Multiple Correlated Quantitative Phenotypes Using Principle Component Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Guo, Xiong; Wu, Shixun; Han, Jing; Liu, Yongjun; Shen, Hui; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide pathway association studies provide novel insight into the biological mechanism underlying complex diseases. Current pathway association studies primarily focus on single important disease phenotype, which is sometimes insufficient to characterize the clinical manifestations of complex diseases. We present a multi-phenotypes pathway association study(MPPAS) approach using principle component analysis(PCA). In our approach, PCA is first applied to multiple correlated quantitative phenotypes for extracting a set of orthogonal phenotypic components. The extracted phenotypic components are then used for pathway association analysis instead of original quantitative phenotypes. Four statistics were proposed for PCA-based MPPAS in this study. Simulations using the real data from the HapMap project were conducted to evaluate the power and type I error rates of PCA-based MPPAS under various scenarios considering sample sizes, additive and interactive genetic effects. A real genome-wide association study data set of bone mineral density (BMD) at hip and spine were also analyzed by PCA-based MPPAS. Simulation studies illustrated the performance of PCA-based MPPAS for identifying the causal pathways underlying complex diseases. Genome-wide MPPAS of BMD detected associations between BMD and KENNY_CTNNB1_TARGETS_UP as well as LONGEVITYPATHWAY pathways in this study. We aim to provide a applicable MPPAS approach, which may help to gain deep understanding the potential biological mechanism of association results for complex diseases. PMID:23285279

  8. Highlights of theoretical progress related to the International Magnetospheric Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    U.S. theoretical research efforts have addressed three areas within the International Magnetospheric Study. The first, solar wind/magnetosphere interaction, is presently concerned with the suggestion that magnetic merging may predominantly occur near the polar cusps rather than near the subsolar point. Mechanisms have been proposed for noncollisional diffusion of solar wind plasma across the closed magnetopause entailed by such a phenomenon. The second area considers the importance to magnetotail dynamics of a continuous source of solar wind plasma, and of sporadic plasma loss associated with an unsteady convection cycle. In the third area, the electrodynamic magnetosphere/ionosphere interaction, an advanced state has been reached in the understanding of the relevant physics, with respect both to coupling in the subauroral region and the large scale structure of auroral zone electric fields parallel, and perpendicular to, the magnetic field.

  9. Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies : Annual Progress Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Timothy; Putnam, Scott

    2008-12-01

    The goal of Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies is to collect monitoring data to evaluate wild and natural steelhead populations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. During 2007, intensive population data were collected in Fish Creek (Lochsa River tributary) and Rapid River (Little Salmon River tributary); extensive data were collected in other selected spawning tributaries. Weirs were operated in Fish Creek and Rapid River to estimate adult escapement and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. Snorkel surveys were conducted in Fish Creek, Rapid River, and Boulder Creek (Little Salmon River tributary) to estimate parr density. Screw traps were operated in Fish Creek, Rapid River, Secesh River, and Big Creek to estimate juvenile emigrant abundance, to tag fish for survival estimation, and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. The estimated wild adult steelhead escapement in Fish Creek was 81 fish and in Rapid River was 32 fish. We estimate that juvenile emigration was 24,127 fish from Fish Creek; 5,632 fish from Rapid River; and 43,674 fish from Big Creek. The Secesh trap was pulled for an extended period due to wildfires, so we did not estimate emigrant abundance for that location. In cooperation with Idaho Supplementation Studies, trap tenders PIT tagged 25,618 steelhead juveniles at 18 screw trap sites in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. To estimate age composition, 143 adult steelhead and 5,082 juvenile steelhead scale samples were collected. At the time of this report, 114 adult and 1,642 juvenile samples have been aged. Project personnel collected genetic samples from 122 adults and 839 juveniles. We sent 678 genetic samples to the IDFG Eagle Fish Genetics Laboratory for analysis. Water temperature was recorded at 37 locations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages.

  10. High energy physics studies. Progress report for Task B

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.; Mandelkern, M.A.

    1991-08-01

    Task B is involved in a unified program investigating charmed quark physics in two different, yet related accelerator experiments. The first of these is Fermilab Experiment E760, a high resolution study of the formation of charmonium states in proton-antiproton interactions. E760, which is actively running at the present time, has already produced results adding significantly to knowledge of the properties of several charmonium states, and is engaged in an important search for new states which cannot be formed in electron-positron collisions. The second experiment, which the Task B Group has joined during the past year, is an intensive study of charmonium and charmed mesons using electron-positron collisions in the BEijing Spectrometer (BES) at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). This is a collaboration between several universities in the United States, SLAC and the Institute of High Energy Physics in Beijing. Work on one of the group`s previous projects, a search for baryonium states in proton-antinucleon interactions at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN, was completed during the past contract year, and final papers reporting results have been submitted for publication. The entire Task B Group is participating in the E760 project at Fermilab. Although the UCI group`s primary responsibility has been the design, construction, calibration, installation and operation of the lead glass Central Calorimeter, which is the principal component of the detector, the group has participated significantly in all facets of the preparation, installation and running of the experiment. These activities have included work on the development of the data acquisition system, trigger design, software development and code management, participation in beam deceleration and beam operation during running, and data analysis on a variety of channels.

  11. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. Eighteenth progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Semonin, R.G.; Bartlett, J.D.; Bowersox, V.C.; Gatz, D.F.; Naiman, D.Q.; Peden, M.E.; Stahlhut, R.K.; Stensland, G.J.

    1980-07-01

    The analysis of aerosol samples obtained in rural east-central Illinois reveals a seasonal maximum in SO/sub 4/ during May to July and a similar pattern for NH/sub 4/. The annual median SO/sub 4/ is about 1 to 1.5 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/. In contrast to these ions, NO/sub 3/ displays highest values in the cold season. Soil-related species (Ca, K) seem to maximize in relation to farm tillage and harvesting practices. The NO/sub 3/ in recent precipitation samples over the northeast US increased between 1 and 2 times the values observed in the mid-1950's. A case study from SCORE-78 suggests that all ion concentrations analyzed from sequentially collected samples decreased from the onset of rain to a minimum corresponding to the heaviest rain rates. Four groups of elements in 10 event rain samples were identified using factor analysis. The groups include soluble and insoluble crustal elements, soluble pollutant metals and sulfate, and insoluble pollutant metals. Utilizing the factor analysis approach, the St. Louis METROMEX precipitation chemistry data showed that the SO/sub 4/ deposition patterns group consistently with those of other soluble pollutants. Additional factor analysis efforts on the St. Louis rainwater data set revealed that soluble and insoluble concentrations of a given element have different deposition patterns suggesting that scavenging and/or precipitation formation processes dictate the patterns. An approach to managing the vast data base of rain chemistry used in the above studies is described. The software also examines the data for certain aspects of quality assurance. The procedures used to analyze ambient air filter samples are discussed.

  12. Progression to Impaired Glucose Regulation and Diabetes in the Population-Based Inter99 Study

    PubMed Central

    Engberg, Susanne; Vistisen, Dorte; Lau, Cathrine; Glümer, Charlotte; Jørgensen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to estimate the progression rates to impaired glucose regulation (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance) and diabetes in the Danish population–based Inter99 study and in a high-risk subpopulation, separately. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS From a population-based primary prevention study, the Inter99 study, 4,615 individuals without diabetes at baseline and with relevant follow-up data were divided into a low- and a high-risk group based on a risk estimate of ischemic heart disease or the presence of risk factors (smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, or impaired glucose tolerance). High-risk individuals (57.1%) were examined with an oral glucose tolerance test at 1 and 3 years, and all of the participants were reexamined at the 5-year follow-up. Person-years at risk were calculated. Progression rates to impaired glucose regulation and diabetes were estimated directly from baseline to the 5-year follow-up for all the participants and from baseline through the 1- and 3- to 5-year follow-up examinations for the high-risk individuals, separately. RESULTS In the combined low- and high-risk group, 2.1 individuals per 100 person-years progressed from normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to impaired glucose regulation or diabetes. Among high-risk individuals, 5.8 per 100 person-years with NGT progressed to impaired glucose regulation or diabetes, and 4.9 per 100 person-years progressed from impaired glucose regulation to diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Progression rates to impaired glucose regulation using the current World Health Organization classification criteria were calculated for the first time in a large European population-based study. The progression rates to diabetes show the same pattern as seen in the few similar European studies. PMID:19114617

  13. Vascular Mortality in Participants of the Bipolar Genomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Jancic, Dubravka; Potash, James B.; Butcher, Brandon; Coryell, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In prior work, we have identified a relationship between symptom burden and vascular outcomes in bipolar disorder. We sought to replicate these findings using a readily accessible measure of mood disorder chronicity and vascular mortality. Methods We conducted a mortality assessment using the National Death Index for 1,716 participants with bipolar I disorder from the National Institute of Mental Health Genetics Initiative Bipolar Disorder Consortium. We assessed the relationship between the duration of the most severe depressive and manic episodes and time to vascular mortality (cardiovascular or cerebrovascular) using Cox Proportional Hazards Models, adjusting for potentially confounding variables. Results Mortality was assessed a mean of 7 years following study intake at which time 58 participants died, 18 from vascular causes. These participants were depressed much longer than their counterparts (Wilcoxon Rank Sum Z=2.30, p=0.02) and the duration of the longest depressive episode in years was significantly associated with time to vascular mortality in models (HR=1.16, 95% C.I. 1.02–1.33, p=0.02), which controlled for age, gender, vascular disease equivalents, and vascular disease risk factors. The duration of longest mania was not related to vascular mortality. Conclusion The duration of the most severe depression is independently predictive of vascular mortality, lending further support to the idea that mood disorders hasten vascular mortality in a dose-dependent fashion. Further study of relevant mechanisms by which mood disorders may hasten vascular disease and of integrated treatments for mood and cardiovascular risk factors is warranted. PMID:24746452

  14. Integrated Genomic Analysis of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas Reveals Genomic Rearrangement Events as Significant Drivers of Disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephen J; Hart, Steven N; Halling, Geoffrey C; Johnson, Sarah H; Smadbeck, James B; Drucker, Travis; Lima, Joema Felipe; Rohakhtar, Fariborz Rakhshan; Harris, Faye R; Kosari, Farhad; Subramanian, Subbaya; Petersen, Gloria M; Wiltshire, Timothy D; Kipp, Benjamin R; Truty, Mark J; McWilliams, Robert R; Couch, Fergus J; Vasmatzis, George

    2016-02-01

    Many somatic mutations have been detected in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), leading to the identification of some key drivers of disease progression, but the involvement of large genomic rearrangements has often been overlooked. In this study, we performed mate pair sequencing (MPseq) on genomic DNA from 24 PDAC tumors, including 15 laser-captured microdissected PDAC and 9 patient-derived xenografts, to identify genome-wide rearrangements. Large genomic rearrangements with intragenic breakpoints altering key regulatory genes involved in PDAC progression were detected in all tumors. SMAD4, ZNF521, and FHIT were among the most frequently hit genes. Conversely, commonly reported genes with copy number gains, including MYC and GATA6, were frequently observed in the absence of direct intragenic breakpoints, suggesting a requirement for sustaining oncogenic function during PDAC progression. Integration of data from MPseq, exome sequencing, and transcriptome analysis of primary PDAC cases identified limited overlap in genes affected by both rearrangements and point mutations. However, significant overlap was observed in major PDAC-associated signaling pathways, with all PDAC exhibiting reduced SMAD4 expression, reduced SMAD-dependent TGFβ signaling, and increased WNT and Hedgehog signaling. The frequent loss of SMAD4 and FHIT due to genomic rearrangements strongly implicates these genes as key drivers of PDAC, thus highlighting the strengths of an integrated genomic and transcriptomic approach for identifying mechanisms underlying disease initiation and progression. PMID:26676757

  15. Studies on genome relationship and species-specific PCR marker for Dasypyrum breviaristatum in Triticeae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zu-Jun; Liu, Cheng; Feng, Juan; Li, Guang-Rong; Zhou, Jian-Ping; Deng, Ke-Jun; Ren, Zheng-Long

    2006-12-01

    Dasypyrum breviaristatum and nine related species in Triticeae were analyzed using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique, in order to understand the genetic relationship and to develop species specific markers. The genome relationship dendrogram shows that D. breviaristatum and D. villosum could not be grouped together, indicating that D. breviaristatum was unlikely to be directly derived from D. villosum, while D. breviaristatum was closest to Thinopyrum intermedium, which implied that they might have similar breeding behaviors when introducing their chromatins into wheat. A D. breviaristatum genome specific RAPD product of 1182bp, was cloned and designated as pDb12H. Sequence analysis revealed that pDb12H was strongly homologuos to a long terminal repeat (LTR) Sabrina retrotransposon newly reported in Hordeum. The pDb12H was converted into a PCR based marker, which allows effectively monitoring the D. breviaristatum chromatin introgression into wheat. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) suggested that pDb12H was specifically hybridized throughout all D. breviaristatum chromosomes arms except for the terminal and centromeric regions, which can be used to characterize wheat -D. breviaristatum chromosome translocation. The genomes repetitive element will also be useful to study gene interactions between the wheat and alien genomes after the polyploidization. PMID:17362333

  16. The Chloroplast Genome of Hyoscyamus niger and a Phylogenetic Study of the Tribe Hyoscyameae (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Puerta, M. Virginia; Abbona, Cinthia Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The tribe Hyoscyameae (Solanaceae) is restricted to Eurasia and includes the genera Archihyoscyamus, Anisodus, Atropa, Atropanthe, Hyoscyamus, Physochlaina, Przewalskia and Scopolia. Even though the monophyly of Hyoscyameae is strongly supported, the relationships of the taxa within the tribe remain unclear. Chloroplast markers have been widely used to elucidate plant relationships at low taxonomic levels. Identification of variable chloroplast intergenic regions has been developed based on comparative genomics of chloroplast genomes, but these regions have a narrow phylogenetic utility. In this study, we present the chloroplast genome sequence of Hyoscyamus niger and make comparisons to other solanaceous plastid genomes in terms of gene order, gene and intron content, editing sites, origins of replication, repeats, and hypothetical open reading frames. We developed and sequenced three variable plastid markers from eight species to elucidate relationships within the tribe Hyoscyameae. The presence of a horizontally transferred intron in the mitochondrial cox1 gene of some species of the tribe is considered here a likely synapomorphy uniting five genera of the Hyoscyameae. Alternatively, the cox1 intron could be a homoplasious character acquired twice within the tribe. A homoplasious inversion in the intergenic plastid spacer trnC-psbM was recognized as a source of bias and removed from the data set used in the phylogenetic analyses. Almost 12 kb of plastid sequence data were not sufficient to completely resolve relationships among genera of Hyoscyameae but some clades were identified. Two alternative hypotheses of the evolution of the genera within the tribe are proposed. PMID:24851862

  17. Single cell genomic study of dehalogenating Chloroflexi from deep sea sediments of Peruvian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spormann, A.; Kaster, A.; Meyer-Blackwell, K.; Biddle, J.

    2012-12-01

    Dehalogenating Chloroflexi, such as Dehalococcoidites (Dhc), are members of the rare biosphere of deep sea sediments but were originally discovered as the key microbes mediating reductive dehalogenation of the prevalent groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene to ethene. Dhc are slow growing, highly niche adapted microbes that are specialized to organohalide respiration as the sole mode of energy conservation. These strictly anaerobic microbes depend on a supporting microbial community to mitigate electron donor and cofactor requirements among other factors. Molecular and genomic studies on the key enzymes for energy conservation, reductive dehalogenases, have provided evidence for rapid adaptive evolution in terrestrial environments. However, the metabolic life style of Dhc in the absence of anthropogenic contaminants, such as in pristine deep sea sediments, is still unknown. In order to provide fundamental insights into life style, genomic population structure and evolution of Dhc, we analyzed a non-contaminated deep sea sediment sample of the Peru Margin 1230 site collected 6 mbf by a metagenomic and single cell genomic. We present for the first time single cell genomic data on dehalogenating Chloroflexi, a significant microbial population in the poorly understood oligotrophic marine sub-surface environments.

  18. Single cell genomic study of dehalogenating Chloroflexi in deep sea sediments of Peru Margin 1230

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaster, A.; Meyer-Blackwell, K.; Biddle, J.; Spormann, A.

    2012-12-01

    Dehalogenating Chloroflexi, such as Dehalococcoidites (Dhc), are members of the rare biosphere of deep sea sediments but were originally discovered as the key microbes mediating reductive dehalogenation of the prevalent groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene to ethene. Dhc are slow growing, highly niche adapted microbes that are specialized to organohalide respiration as the sole mode of energy conservation. They are strictly anaerobic microbes that depend on a supporting microbial community for electron donor and cofactor requirements among other factors. Molecular and genomic studies on the key enzymes for energy conservation, reductive dehalogenases, have provided evidence for rapid adaptive evolution in terrestrial environments. However, the metabolic life style of Dhc in the absence of anthropogenic contaminants, such as in pristine deep sea sediments, is still unknown. In order to provide fundamental insights into life style, genomic population structure and evolution of Dhc, we analyzed a non-contaminated deep sea sediment sample of the Peru Margin 1230 site collected 6 mbsf by a metagenomic and single cell genomic approach. We present for the first time single cell genomic data on dehalogenating Chloroflexi, a significant microbial population in the poorly understood oligotrophic marine sub-surface environment.

  19. Development of the catfish 250K SNP array for