Science.gov

Sample records for genomics developing tools

  1. Coral Reef Genomics: Developing tools for functional genomics ofcoral symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Jodi; Brokstein, Peter; Manohar, Chitra; Coffroth, MaryAlice; Szmant, Alina; Medina, Monica

    2005-03-01

    Symbioses between cnidarians and dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium are widespread in the marine environment. The importance of this symbiosis to reef-building corals and reef nutrient and carbon cycles is well documented, but little is known about the mechanisms by which the partners establish and regulate the symbiosis. Because the dinoflagellate symbionts live inside the cells of their host coral, the interactions between the partners occur on cellular and molecular levels, as each partner alters the expression of genes and proteins to facilitate the partnership. These interactions can examined using high-throughput techniques that allow thousands of genes to be examined simultaneously. We are developing the groundwork so that we can use DNA microarray profiling to identify genes involved in the Montastraea faveolata and Acropora palmata symbioses. Here we report results from the initial steps in this microarray initiative, that is, the construction of cDNA libraries from 4 of 16 target stages, sequencing of 3450 cDNA clones to generate Expressed Sequenced Tags (ESTs), and annotation of the ESTs to identify candidate genes to include in the microarrays. An understanding of how the coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis is regulated will have implications for atmospheric and ocean sciences, conservation biology, the study and diagnosis of coral bleaching and disease, and comparative studies of animal-protest interactions.

  2. Development of peanut EST (expressed sequence tag)-based genomic resources and tools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    U.S. Peanut Genome Initiative (PGI) has widely recognized the need for peanut genome tools and resources development for mitigating peanut allergens and food safety. Genomics such as Expressed Sequence Tag (EST), microarray technologies, and whole genome sequencing provides robotic tools for profili...

  3. Development of peanut expessed sequence tag-based genomic resources and tools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    U.S. Peanut Genome Initiative (PGI) has widely recognized the need for peanut genome tools and resources development for mitigating peanut allergens and food safety. Genomics such as Expressed Sequence Tag (EST), microarray technologies, and whole genome sequencing provides robotic tools for profili...

  4. Development and Use of Genomic Tools in Analyzing Spatial Genetic Structure of Lowbush Blueberry Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overall aim of the Specialty Crop Research Initiative-funded project, “Generating Genomic Tools for Blueberry Improvement,” is to develop genomic tools for molecular breeding and assessing genetic diversity of blueberry. Two of the objectives are to perform deeper transcriptome sequencing of bl...

  5. Development of applied genomics tools for cucumber breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The past three years have witnessed rapid accumulation of whole genome sequences and other genomics resources in cucumber. So far, draft genomes of three cucumber inbred lines have been released; many cucumber lines are being re-sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies; nearly three m...

  6. Genomic tools for developing markers for postharvest disease resistance in Rosaceae fruit crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wealth of new plant genomic information and molecular tools have been developed over the past ten years and now the challenge is to learn how to apply this information to address critical production problems, such as disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance. Malus sieversii, an apple speci...

  7. Functional Genomics Tools for Papaya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the genome of papaya (Carica papaya L.) sequenced, the study of gene function is becoming an increasing priority. Our research is to develop an RNA-induced gene silencing tool for the study of functional genomics in papaya. We employed agrobacterium leaf infiltration to induce PTGS in '-glucuro...

  8. Recent advances in developing molecular tools for targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang-il

    2015-01-01

    Various biological molecules naturally existing in diversified species including fungi, bacteria, and bacteriophage have functionalities for DNA binding and processing. The biological molecules have been recently actively engineered for use in customized genome editing of mammalian cells as the molecule-encoding DNA sequence information and the underlying mechanisms how the molecules work are unveiled. Excitingly, multiple novel methods based on the newly constructed artificial molecular tools have enabled modifications of specific endogenous genetic elements in the genome context at efficiencies that are much higher than that of the conventional homologous recombination based methods. This minireview introduces the most recently spotlighted molecular genome engineering tools with their key features and ongoing modifications for better performance. Such ongoing efforts have mainly focused on the removal of the inherent DNA sequence recognition rigidity from the original molecular platforms, the addition of newly tailored targeting functions into the engineered molecules, and the enhancement of their targeting specificity. Effective targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells will enable not only sophisticated genetic studies in the context of the genome, but also widely-applicable universal therapeutics based on the pinpointing and correction of the disease-causing genetic elements within the genome in the near future. PMID:25104401

  9. Transcriptome sequencing and microarray development for the Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum: genomic tools for environmental monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, is one of the major aquaculture species in the world and a potential sentinel organism for monitoring the status of marine ecosystems. However, genomic resources for R. philippinarum are still extremely limited. Global analysis of gene expression profiles is increasingly used to evaluate the biological effects of various environmental stressors on aquatic animals under either artificial conditions or in the wild. Here, we report on the development of a transcriptomic platform for global gene expression profiling in the Manila clam. Results A normalized cDNA library representing a mixture of adult tissues was sequenced using a ultra high-throughput sequencing technology (Roche 454). A database consisting of 32,606 unique transcripts was constructed, 9,747 (30%) of which could be annotated by similarity. An oligo-DNA microarray platform was designed and applied to profile gene expression of digestive gland and gills. Functional annotation of differentially expressed genes between different tissues was performed by enrichment analysis. Expression of Natural Antisense Transcripts (NAT) analysis was also performed and bi-directional transcription appears a common phenomenon in the R. philippinarum transcriptome. A preliminary study on clam samples collected in a highly polluted area of the Venice Lagoon demonstrated the applicability of genomic tools to environmental monitoring. Conclusions The transcriptomic platform developed for the Manila clam confirmed the high level of reproducibility of current microarray technology. Next-generation sequencing provided a good representation of the clam transcriptome. Despite the known limitations in transcript annotation and sequence coverage for non model species, sufficient information was obtained to identify a large set of genes potentially involved in cellular response to environmental stress. PMID:21569398

  10. Overview of USDA-SCRI Project: Cucumber applied genomics: tool development and applications for recessive disease resistance genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cucumber project was recently funded by the USDA NIFA-SCRI program which is titled “Translational genomics in cucumber - tool development and application for recessive disease resistances”. This grant was the result of a joint effort of the UW public cucumber research community with strong support...

  11. Integrative genomics--a basic and essential tool for the development of molecular medicine.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of disease requires the introduction of molecular diagnostics into medical practice. Current medicine employs only elements of molecular diagnostics, and usually on the scale of single genes. Medicine in the post-genomic era will utilize thousands of molecular markers associated with disease that are provided by high-throughput sequencing and functional genomic, proteomic and metabolomic studies. Such a spectrum of techniques will link clinical medicine based on molecularly oriented diagnostics with the prediction and prevention of disease. To achieve this task, large-scale and genome-wide biological and medical data must be combined with biostatistical analyses and bioinformatic modeling of biological systems. The collecting, cataloging and comparison of data from molecular studies and the subsequent development of conclusions create the fundamentals of systems biology. This highly complex analytical process reflects a new scientific paradigm called integrative genomics. PMID:19172842

  12. Applied genomics: Tools ranging from genomic prediction to bioconservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This invited presentation will provide an overview of the development of genomic tools in cattle and goats, and how these approaches and methodologies can be adapted for bioconservation of endangered ruminant species....

  13. Development of Genomic and Genetic Tools for Foxtail Millet, and Use of These Tools in the Improvement of Biomass Production for Bioenergy Crops

    SciTech Connect

    Doust, Andrew, N.

    2011-11-11

    The overall aim of this research was to develop genomic and genetic tools in foxtail millet that will be useful in improving biomass production in bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, napier grass, and pearl millet. A variety of approaches have been implemented, and our lab has been primarily involved in genome analysis and quantitative genetic analysis. Our progress in these activities has been substantially helped by the genomic sequence of foxtail millet produced by the Joint Genome Institute (Bennetzen et al., in prep). In particular, the annotation and analysis of candidate genes for architecture, biomass production and flowering has led to new insights into the control of branching and flowering time, and has shown how closely related flowering time is to vegetative architectural development and biomass accumulation. The differences in genetic control identified at high and low density plantings have direct relevance to the breeding of bioenergy grasses that are tolerant of high planting densities. The developmental analyses have shown how plant architecture changes over time and may indicate which genes may best be manipulated at various times during development to obtain required biomass characteristics. This data contributes to the overall aim of significantly improving genetic and genomic tools in foxtail millet that can be directed to improvement of bioenergy grasses such as switchgrass, where it is important to maximize vegetative growth for greatest biomass production.

  14. Developing genomics tools for the western corn rootworm - Progress and promise

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cooperative efforts among a number of interested scientists and institutions in the U.S. and Europe are being undertaken to expand genomics resources for the western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera). Such resources include development of hundreds of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP...

  15. Application of Genomic Tools in Plant Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-de-Castro, A.M.; Vilanova, S.; Cañizares, J.; Pascual, L.; Blanca, J.M.; Díez, M.J.; Prohens, J.; Picó, B.

    2012-01-01

    Plant breeding has been very successful in developing improved varieties using conventional tools and methodologies. Nowadays, the availability of genomic tools and resources is leading to a new revolution of plant breeding, as they facilitate the study of the genotype and its relationship with the phenotype, in particular for complex traits. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are allowing the mass sequencing of genomes and transcriptomes, which is producing a vast array of genomic information. The analysis of NGS data by means of bioinformatics developments allows discovering new genes and regulatory sequences and their positions, and makes available large collections of molecular markers. Genome-wide expression studies provide breeders with an understanding of the molecular basis of complex traits. Genomic approaches include TILLING and EcoTILLING, which make possible to screen mutant and germplasm collections for allelic variants in target genes. Re-sequencing of genomes is very useful for the genome-wide discovery of markers amenable for high-throughput genotyping platforms, like SSRs and SNPs, or the construction of high density genetic maps. All these tools and resources facilitate studying the genetic diversity, which is important for germplasm management, enhancement and use. Also, they allow the identification of markers linked to genes and QTLs, using a diversity of techniques like bulked segregant analysis (BSA), fine genetic mapping, or association mapping. These new markers are used for marker assisted selection, including marker assisted backcross selection, ‘breeding by design’, or new strategies, like genomic selection. In conclusion, advances in genomics are providing breeders with new tools and methodologies that allow a great leap forward in plant breeding, including the ‘superdomestication’ of crops and the genetic dissection and breeding for complex traits. PMID:23115520

  16. Developing molecular tools and insights into the Penstemon genome using genomic reduction and next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Penstemon’s unique phenotypic diversity, hardiness, and drought-tolerance give it great potential for the xeric landscaping industry. Molecular markers will accelerate the breeding and domestication of drought tolerant Penstemon cultivars by, creating genetic maps, and clarifying of phylogenetic relationships. Our objectives were to identify and validate interspecific molecular markers from four diverse Penstemon species in order to gain specific insights into the Penstemon genome. Results We used a 454 pyrosequencing and GR-RSC (genome reduction using restriction site conservation) to identify homologous loci across four Penstemon species (P. cyananthus, P. davidsonii, P. dissectus, and P. fruticosus) representing three diverse subgenera with considerable genome size variation. From these genomic data, we identified 133 unique interspecific markers containing SSRs and INDELs of which 51 produced viable PCR-based markers. These markers produced simple banding patterns in 90% of the species × marker interactions (~84% were polymorphic). Twelve of the markers were tested across 93, mostly xeric, Penstemon taxa (72 species), of which ~98% produced reproducible marker data. Additionally, we identified an average of one SNP per 2,890 bp per species and one per 97 bp between any two apparent homologous sequences from the four source species. We selected 192 homologous sequences, meeting stringent parameters, to create SNP markers. Of these, 75 demonstrated repeatable polymorphic marker functionality across the four sequence source species. Finally, sequence analysis indicated that repetitive elements were approximately 70% more prevalent in the P. cyananthus genome, the largest genome in the study, than in the smallest genome surveyed (P. dissectus). Conclusions We demonstrated the utility of GR-RSC to identify homologous loci across related Penstemon taxa. Though PCR primer regions were conserved across a broadly sampled survey of Penstemon species

  17. Developing tools for the study of molluscan immunity: The sequencing of the genome of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Chiarri, Marta; Warren, Wesley C; Guo, Ximing; Proestou, Dina

    2015-09-01

    The eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, provides important ecological and economical services, making it the target of restoration projects and supporting a significant fishery/aquaculture industry with landings valued at more than $100 million in 2012 in the United States of America. Due to the impact of infectious diseases on wild, restored, and cultured populations, the eastern oyster has been the focus of studies on host-pathogen interactions and immunity, as well as the target of selective breeding efforts for disease resistant oyster lines. Despite these efforts, relatively little is known about the genetic basis of resistance to diseases or environmental stress, not only in eastern oyster, but also in other molluscan species of commercial interest worldwide. In order to develop tools and resources to assist in the elucidation of the genomic basis of traits of commercial, biological, and ecological interest in oysters, a team of genome and bioinformatics experts, in collaboration with the oyster research community, is sequencing, assembling, and annotating the first reference genome for the eastern oyster and producing an exhaustive transcriptome from a variety of oyster developmental stages and tissues in response to a diverse set of environmentally-relevant stimuli. These transcriptomes and reference genome for the eastern oyster, added to the already available genome and transcriptomes for the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and other bivalve species, will be an essential resource for the discovery of candidate genes and markers associated with traits of commercial, biological, and ecologic importance in bivalve molluscs, including those related to host-pathogen interactions and immunity. PMID:25982405

  18. Generating genomic tools for blueberry improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of their recognized health benefits, there has been increased demand and consumption of blueberries in recent years. Great strides have been made in cultivar development since its domestication using traditional breeding approaches. However, genomic tools are lacking in blueberry, which coul...

  19. Development and validation of a comprehensive genomic diagnostic tool for myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    McKerrell, Thomas; Moreno, Thaidy; Ponstingl, Hannes; Bolli, Niccolo; Dias, João M L; Tischler, German; Colonna, Vincenza; Manasse, Bridget; Bench, Anthony; Bloxham, David; Herman, Bram; Fletcher, Danielle; Park, Naomi; Quail, Michael A; Manes, Nicla; Hodkinson, Clare; Baxter, Joanna; Sierra, Jorge; Foukaneli, Theodora; Warren, Alan J; Chi, Jianxiang; Costeas, Paul; Rad, Roland; Huntly, Brian; Grove, Carolyn; Ning, Zemin; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Varela, Ignacio; Scott, Mike; Nomdedeu, Josep; Mustonen, Ville; Vassiliou, George S

    2016-07-01

    The diagnosis of hematologic malignancies relies on multidisciplinary workflows involving morphology, flow cytometry, cytogenetic, and molecular genetic analyses. Advances in cancer genomics have identified numerous recurrent mutations with clear prognostic and/or therapeutic significance to different cancers. In myeloid malignancies, there is a clinical imperative to test for such mutations in mainstream diagnosis; however, progress toward this has been slow and piecemeal. Here we describe Karyogene, an integrated targeted resequencing/analytical platform that detects nucleotide substitutions, insertions/deletions, chromosomal translocations, copy number abnormalities, and zygosity changes in a single assay. We validate the approach against 62 acute myeloid leukemia, 50 myelodysplastic syndrome, and 40 blood DNA samples from individuals without evidence of clonal blood disorders. We demonstrate robust detection of sequence changes in 49 genes, including difficult-to-detect mutations such as FLT3 internal-tandem and mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) partial-tandem duplications, and clinically significant chromosomal rearrangements including MLL translocations to known and unknown partners, identifying the novel fusion gene MLL-DIAPH2 in the process. Additionally, we identify most significant chromosomal gains and losses, and several copy neutral loss-of-heterozygosity mutations at a genome-wide level, including previously unreported changes such as homozygosity for DNMT3A R882 mutations. Karyogene represents a dependable genomic diagnosis platform for translational research and for the clinical management of myeloid malignancies, which can be readily adapted for use in other cancers. PMID:27121471

  20. Development and validation of a comprehensive genomic diagnostic tool for myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    McKerrell, Thomas; Moreno, Thaidy; Ponstingl, Hannes; Bolli, Niccolo; Dias, João M. L.; Tischler, German; Colonna, Vincenza; Manasse, Bridget; Bench, Anthony; Bloxham, David; Herman, Bram; Fletcher, Danielle; Park, Naomi; Quail, Michael A.; Manes, Nicla; Hodkinson, Clare; Baxter, Joanna; Sierra, Jorge; Foukaneli, Theodora; Warren, Alan J.; Chi, Jianxiang; Costeas, Paul; Rad, Roland; Huntly, Brian; Grove, Carolyn; Ning, Zemin; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Varela, Ignacio; Scott, Mike; Nomdedeu, Josep; Mustonen, Ville

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of hematologic malignancies relies on multidisciplinary workflows involving morphology, flow cytometry, cytogenetic, and molecular genetic analyses. Advances in cancer genomics have identified numerous recurrent mutations with clear prognostic and/or therapeutic significance to different cancers. In myeloid malignancies, there is a clinical imperative to test for such mutations in mainstream diagnosis; however, progress toward this has been slow and piecemeal. Here we describe Karyogene, an integrated targeted resequencing/analytical platform that detects nucleotide substitutions, insertions/deletions, chromosomal translocations, copy number abnormalities, and zygosity changes in a single assay. We validate the approach against 62 acute myeloid leukemia, 50 myelodysplastic syndrome, and 40 blood DNA samples from individuals without evidence of clonal blood disorders. We demonstrate robust detection of sequence changes in 49 genes, including difficult-to-detect mutations such as FLT3 internal-tandem and mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) partial-tandem duplications, and clinically significant chromosomal rearrangements including MLL translocations to known and unknown partners, identifying the novel fusion gene MLL-DIAPH2 in the process. Additionally, we identify most significant chromosomal gains and losses, and several copy neutral loss-of-heterozygosity mutations at a genome-wide level, including previously unreported changes such as homozygosity for DNMT3A R882 mutations. Karyogene represents a dependable genomic diagnosis platform for translational research and for the clinical management of myeloid malignancies, which can be readily adapted for use in other cancers. PMID:27121471

  1. Comparative genomics tools applied to bioterrorism defence.

    PubMed

    Slezak, Tom; Kuczmarski, Tom; Ott, Linda; Torres, Clinton; Medeiros, Dan; Smith, Jason; Truitt, Brian; Mulakken, Nisha; Lam, Marisa; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Zemla, Adam; Zhou, Carol Ecale; Gardner, Shea

    2003-06-01

    Rapid advances in the genomic sequencing of bacteria and viruses over the past few years have made it possible to consider sequencing the genomes of all pathogens that affect humans and the crops and livestock upon which our lives depend. Recent events make it imperative that full genome sequencing be accomplished as soon as possible for pathogens that could be used as weapons of mass destruction or disruption. This sequence information must be exploited to provide rapid and accurate diagnostics to identify pathogens and distinguish them from harmless near-neighbours and hoaxes. The Chem-Bio Non-Proliferation (CBNP) programme of the US Department of Energy (DOE) began a large-scale effort of pathogen detection in early 2000 when it was announced that the DOE would be providing bio-security at the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah. Our team at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) was given the task of developing reliable and validated assays for a number of the most likely bioterrorist agents. The short timeline led us to devise a novel system that utilised whole-genome comparison methods to rapidly focus on parts of the pathogen genomes that had a high probability of being unique. Assays developed with this approach have been validated by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). They were used at the 2002 Winter Olympics, have entered the public health system, and have been in continual use for non-publicised aspects of homeland defence since autumn 2001. Assays have been developed for all major threat list agents for which adequate genomic sequence is available, as well as for other pathogens requested by various government agencies. Collaborations with comparative genomics algorithm developers have enabled our LLNL team to make major advances in pathogen detection, since many of the existing tools simply did not scale well enough to be of practical use for this application. It is hoped that a discussion of a real-life practical application of

  2. Strategies and tools for whole genome alignments

    SciTech Connect

    Couronne, Olivier; Poliakov, Alexander; Bray, Nicolas; Ishkhanov,Tigran; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Rubin, Edward; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna

    2002-11-25

    The availability of the assembled mouse genome makespossible, for the first time, an alignment and comparison of two largevertebrate genomes. We have investigated different strategies ofalignment for the subsequent analysis of conservation of genomes that areeffective for different quality assemblies. These strategies were appliedto the comparison of the working draft of the human genome with the MouseGenome Sequencing Consortium assembly, as well as other intermediatemouse assemblies. Our methods are fast and the resulting alignmentsexhibit a high degree of sensitivity, covering more than 90 percent ofknown coding exons in the human genome. We have obtained such coveragewhile preserving specificity. With a view towards the end user, we havedeveloped a suite of tools and websites for automatically aligning, andsubsequently browsing and working with whole genome comparisons. Wedescribe the use of these tools to identify conserved non-coding regionsbetween the human and mouse genomes, some of which have not beenidentified by other methods.

  3. Bioinformatics tools for small genomes, such as hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Bell, Trevor G; Kramvis, Anna

    2015-02-01

    DNA sequence analysis is undertaken in many biological research laboratories. The workflow consists of several steps involving the bioinformatic processing of biological data. We have developed a suite of web-based online bioinformatic tools to assist with processing, analysis and curation of DNA sequence data. Most of these tools are genome-agnostic, with two tools specifically designed for hepatitis B virus sequence data. Tools in the suite are able to process sequence data from Sanger sequencing, ultra-deep amplicon resequencing (pyrosequencing) and chromatograph (trace files), as appropriate. The tools are available online at no cost and are aimed at researchers without specialist technical computer knowledge. The tools can be accessed at http://hvdr.bioinf.wits.ac.za/SmallGenomeTools, and the source code is available online at https://github.com/DrTrevorBell/SmallGenomeTools. PMID:25690798

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF GENOMIC AND GENETIC TOOLS FOR FOXTAIL MILLET, AND USE OF THESE TOOLS IN THE IMPROVEMENT OF BIOMASS PRODUCTION FOR BIOENERGY CROPS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xinlu; Zale, Janice; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-22

    Foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.) is a warm-season, C4 annual crop commonly grown for grain and forage worldwide. It has a relatively short generation time, yet produces hundreds of seeds per inflorescence. The crop is inbred and it has a small-size genome (~500 Mb). These features make foxtail millet an attractive grass model, especially for bioenergy crops. While a number of genomic tools have been established for foxtail millet, including a fully sequenced genome and molecular markers, the objectives of this project were to develop a tissue culture system, determine the best explant(s) for tissue culture, optimize transient gene expression, and establish a stable transformation system for foxtail millet cultivar Yugu1. In optimizing a tissue culture medium for the induction of calli and somatic embryos from immature inflorescences and mature seed explants, Murashige and Skoog medium containing 2.5 mg l-1 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 0.6 mg l-1 6- benzylaminopurine was determined to be optimal for callus induction of foxtail millet. The efficiency of callus induction from explants of immature inflorescences was significantly higher at 76% compared to that of callus induction from mature seed explants at 68%. The calli induced from this medium were regenerated into plants at high frequency (~100%) using 0.2 mg l-1 kinetin in the regeneration media. For performing transient gene expression, immature embryos were first isolated from inflorescences. Transient expression of the GUS reporter gene in immature embryos was significantly increased after sonication, a vacuum treatment, centrifugation and the addition of L-cysteine and dithiothreitol, which led to the efficiency of transient expression at levels greater than 70% after Agrobacterium inoculation. Inoculation with Agrobacterium was also tested with germinated seeds. The radicals of germinated seeds were pierced with needles and dipped into Agrobacterium solution. This method achieved a 10% transient

  5. GMOL: An Interactive Tool for 3D Genome Structure Visualization.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Jackson; Wells, Avery; Oluwadare, Oluwatosin; Xu, Lingfei; Cao, Renzhi; Trieu, Tuan; He, Chenfeng; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that genome spatial structures largely affect both genome activity and DNA function. Knowing this, many researchers are currently attempting to accurately model genome structures. Despite these increased efforts there still exists a shortage of tools dedicated to visualizing the genome. Creating a tool that can accurately visualize the genome can aid researchers by highlighting structural relationships that may not be obvious when examining the sequence information alone. Here we present a desktop application, known as GMOL, designed to effectively visualize genome structures so that researchers may better analyze genomic data. GMOL was developed based upon our multi-scale approach that allows a user to scale between six separate levels within the genome. With GMOL, a user can choose any unit at any scale and scale it up or down to visualize its structure and retrieve corresponding genome sequences. Users can also interactively manipulate and measure the whole genome structure and extract static images and machine-readable data files in PDB format from the multi-scale structure. By using GMOL researchers will be able to better understand and analyze genome structure models and the impact their structural relations have on genome activity and DNA function. PMID:26868282

  6. DCODE.ORG Anthology of Comparative Genomic Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I

    2005-01-11

    Comparative genomics provides the means to demarcate functional regions in anonymous DNA sequences. The successful application of this method to identifying novel genes is currently shifting to deciphering the noncoding encryption of gene regulation across genomes. To facilitate the use of comparative genomics to practical applications in genetics and genomics we have developed several analytical and visualization tools for the analysis of arbitrary sequences and whole genomes. These tools include two alignment tools: zPicture and Mulan; a phylogenetic shadowing tool: eShadow for identifying lineage- and species-specific functional elements; two evolutionary conserved transcription factor analysis tools: rVista and multiTF; a tool for extracting cis-regulatory modules governing the expression of co-regulated genes, CREME; and a dynamic portal to multiple vertebrate and invertebrate genome alignments, the ECR Browser. Here we briefly describe each one of these tools and provide specific examples on their practical applications. All the tools are publicly available at the http://www.dcode.org/ web site.

  7. Genomic sequence analysis tools: a user's guide.

    PubMed

    Fortna, A; Gardiner, K

    2001-03-01

    The wealth of information from various genome sequencing projects provides the biologist with a new perspective from which to analyze, and design experiments with, mammalian systems. The complexity of the information, however, requires new software tools, and numerous such tools are now available. Which type and which specific system is most effective depends, in part, upon how much sequence is to be analyzed and with what level of experimental support. Here we survey a number of mammalian genomic sequence analysis systems with respect to the data they provide and the ease of their use. The hope is to aid the experimental biologist in choosing the most appropriate tool for their analyses. PMID:11226611

  8. Galaxy tools to study genome diversity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intra-species genetic variation can be used to investigate population structure, selection, and gene flow in non-model vertebrates; and due to the plummeting costs for genome sequencing, it is now possible for small labs to obtain full-genome variation data from their species of interest. However, those labs may not have easy access to, and familiarity with, computational tools to analyze those data. Results We have created a suite of tools for the Galaxy web server aimed at handling nucleotide and amino-acid polymorphisms discovered by full-genome sequencing of several individuals of the same species, or using a SNP genotyping microarray. In addition to providing user-friendly tools, a main goal is to make published analyses reproducible. While most of the examples discussed in this paper deal with nuclear-genome diversity in non-human vertebrates, we also illustrate the application of the tools to fungal genomes, human biomedical data, and mitochondrial sequences. Conclusions This project illustrates that a small group can design, implement, test, document, and distribute a Galaxy tool collection to meet the needs of a particular community of biologists. PMID:24377391

  9. Bovine Genome Database: new tools for gleaning function from the Bos taurus genome.

    PubMed

    Elsik, Christine G; Unni, Deepak R; Diesh, Colin M; Tayal, Aditi; Emery, Marianne L; Nguyen, Hung N; Hagen, Darren E

    2016-01-01

    We report an update of the Bovine Genome Database (BGD) (http://BovineGenome.org). The goal of BGD is to support bovine genomics research by providing genome annotation and data mining tools. We have developed new genome and annotation browsers using JBrowse and WebApollo for two Bos taurus genome assemblies, the reference genome assembly (UMD3.1.1) and the alternate genome assembly (Btau_4.6.1). Annotation tools have been customized to highlight priority genes for annotation, and to aid annotators in selecting gene evidence tracks from 91 tissue specific RNAseq datasets. We have also developed BovineMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, to integrate the bovine genome, annotation, QTL, SNP and expression data with external sources of orthology, gene ontology, gene interaction and pathway information. BovineMine provides powerful query building tools, as well as customized query templates, and allows users to analyze and download genome-wide datasets. With BovineMine, bovine researchers can use orthology to leverage the curated gene pathways of model organisms, such as human, mouse and rat. BovineMine will be especially useful for gene ontology and pathway analyses in conjunction with GWAS and QTL studies. PMID:26481361

  10. Bovine Genome Database: new tools for gleaning function from the Bos taurus genome

    PubMed Central

    Elsik, Christine G.; Unni, Deepak R.; Diesh, Colin M.; Tayal, Aditi; Emery, Marianne L.; Nguyen, Hung N.; Hagen, Darren E.

    2016-01-01

    We report an update of the Bovine Genome Database (BGD) (http://BovineGenome.org). The goal of BGD is to support bovine genomics research by providing genome annotation and data mining tools. We have developed new genome and annotation browsers using JBrowse and WebApollo for two Bos taurus genome assemblies, the reference genome assembly (UMD3.1.1) and the alternate genome assembly (Btau_4.6.1). Annotation tools have been customized to highlight priority genes for annotation, and to aid annotators in selecting gene evidence tracks from 91 tissue specific RNAseq datasets. We have also developed BovineMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, to integrate the bovine genome, annotation, QTL, SNP and expression data with external sources of orthology, gene ontology, gene interaction and pathway information. BovineMine provides powerful query building tools, as well as customized query templates, and allows users to analyze and download genome-wide datasets. With BovineMine, bovine researchers can use orthology to leverage the curated gene pathways of model organisms, such as human, mouse and rat. BovineMine will be especially useful for gene ontology and pathway analyses in conjunction with GWAS and QTL studies. PMID:26481361

  11. Genomic Tools in Groundnut Breeding Program: Status and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Janila, P.; Variath, Murali T.; Pandey, Manish K.; Desmae, Haile; Motagi, Babu N.; Okori, Patrick; Manohar, Surendra S.; Rathnakumar, A. L.; Radhakrishnan, T.; Liao, Boshou; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Groundnut, a nutrient-rich food legume, is cultivated world over. It is valued for its good quality cooking oil, energy and protein rich food, and nutrient-rich fodder. Globally, groundnut improvement programs have developed varieties to meet the preferences of farmers, traders, processors, and consumers. Enhanced yield, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses and quality parameters have been the target traits. Spurt in genetic information of groundnut was facilitated by development of molecular markers, genetic, and physical maps, generation of expressed sequence tags (EST), discovery of genes, and identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for some important biotic and abiotic stresses and quality traits. The first groundnut variety developed using marker assisted breeding (MAB) was registered in 2003. Since then, USA, China, Japan, and India have begun to use genomic tools in routine groundnut improvement programs. Introgression lines that combine foliar fungal disease resistance and early maturity were developed using MAB. Establishment of marker-trait associations (MTA) paved way to integrate genomic tools in groundnut breeding for accelerated genetic gain. Genomic Selection (GS) tools are employed to improve drought tolerance and pod yield, governed by several minor effect QTLs. Draft genome sequence and low cost genotyping tools such as genotyping by sequencing (GBS) are expected to accelerate use of genomic tools to enhance genetic gains for target traits in groundnut. PMID:27014312

  12. Genomic Tools in Groundnut Breeding Program: Status and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Janila, P; Variath, Murali T; Pandey, Manish K; Desmae, Haile; Motagi, Babu N; Okori, Patrick; Manohar, Surendra S; Rathnakumar, A L; Radhakrishnan, T; Liao, Boshou; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-01-01

    Groundnut, a nutrient-rich food legume, is cultivated world over. It is valued for its good quality cooking oil, energy and protein rich food, and nutrient-rich fodder. Globally, groundnut improvement programs have developed varieties to meet the preferences of farmers, traders, processors, and consumers. Enhanced yield, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses and quality parameters have been the target traits. Spurt in genetic information of groundnut was facilitated by development of molecular markers, genetic, and physical maps, generation of expressed sequence tags (EST), discovery of genes, and identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for some important biotic and abiotic stresses and quality traits. The first groundnut variety developed using marker assisted breeding (MAB) was registered in 2003. Since then, USA, China, Japan, and India have begun to use genomic tools in routine groundnut improvement programs. Introgression lines that combine foliar fungal disease resistance and early maturity were developed using MAB. Establishment of marker-trait associations (MTA) paved way to integrate genomic tools in groundnut breeding for accelerated genetic gain. Genomic Selection (GS) tools are employed to improve drought tolerance and pod yield, governed by several minor effect QTLs. Draft genome sequence and low cost genotyping tools such as genotyping by sequencing (GBS) are expected to accelerate use of genomic tools to enhance genetic gains for target traits in groundnut. PMID:27014312

  13. A functional genomics tool for the Pacific bluefin tuna: Development of a 44K oligonucleotide microarray from whole-genome sequencing data for global transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Yasuike, Motoshige; Fujiwara, Atushi; Nakamura, Yoji; Iwasaki, Yuki; Nishiki, Issei; Sugaya, Takuma; Shimizu, Akio; Sano, Motohiko; Kobayashi, Takanori; Ototake, Mitsuru

    2016-02-01

    Bluefin tunas are one of the most important fishery resources worldwide. Because of high market values, bluefin tuna farming has been rapidly growing during recent years. At present, the most common form of the tuna farming is based on the stocking of wild-caught fish. Therefore, concerns have been raised about the negative impact of the tuna farming on wild stocks. Recently, the Pacific bluefin tuna (PBT), Thunnus orientalis, has succeeded in completing the reproduction cycle under aquaculture conditions, but production bottlenecks remain to be solved because of very little biological information on bluefin tunas. Functional genomics approaches promise to rapidly increase our knowledge on biological processes in the bluefin tuna. Here, we describe the development of the first 44K PBT oligonucleotide microarray (oligo-array), based on whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing and large-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs) data. In addition, we also introduce an initial 44K PBT oligo-array experiment using in vitro grown peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) stimulated with immunostimulants such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS: a cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria) or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C: a synthetic mimic of viral infection). This pilot 44K PBT oligo-array analysis successfully addressed distinct immune processes between LPS- and poly I:C- stimulated PBLs. Thus, we expect that this oligo-array will provide an excellent opportunity to analyze global gene expression profiles for a better understanding of diseases and stress, as well as for reproduction, development and influence of nutrition on tuna aquaculture production. PMID:26477480

  14. The UCSC genome browser and associated tools.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Robert M; Haussler, David; Kent, W James

    2013-03-01

    The UCSC Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu) is a graphical viewer for genomic data now in its 13th year. Since the early days of the Human Genome Project, it has presented an integrated view of genomic data of many kinds. Now home to assemblies for 58 organisms, the Browser presents visualization of annotations mapped to genomic coordinates. The ability to juxtapose annotations of many types facilitates inquiry-driven data mining. Gene predictions, mRNA alignments, epigenomic data from the ENCODE project, conservation scores from vertebrate whole-genome alignments and variation data may be viewed at any scale from a single base to an entire chromosome. The Browser also includes many other widely used tools, including BLAT, which is useful for alignments from high-throughput sequencing experiments. Private data uploaded as Custom Tracks and Data Hubs in many formats may be displayed alongside the rich compendium of precomputed data in the UCSC database. The Table Browser is a full-featured graphical interface, which allows querying, filtering and intersection of data tables. The Saved Session feature allows users to store and share customized views, enhancing the utility of the system for organizing multiple trains of thought. Binary Alignment/Map (BAM), Variant Call Format and the Personal Genome Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) data formats are useful for visualizing a large sequencing experiment (whole-genome or whole-exome), where the differences between the data set and the reference assembly may be displayed graphically. Support for high-throughput sequencing extends to compact, indexed data formats, such as BAM, bigBed and bigWig, allowing rapid visualization of large datasets from RNA-seq and ChIP-seq experiments via local hosting. PMID:22908213

  15. Sequence Maneuverer: tool for sequence extraction from genomes

    PubMed Central

    Yasmin, Tayyaba; Rehman, Inayat Ur; Ansari, Adnan Ahmad; liaqat, Khurrum; khan, Muhammad Irfan

    2012-01-01

    The availability of genomic sequences of many organisms has opened new challenges in many aspects particularly in terms of genome analysis. Sequence extraction is a vital step and many tools have been developed to solve this issue. These tools are available publically but have limitations with reference to the sequence extraction, length of the sequence to be extracted, organism specificity and lack of user friendly interface. We have developed a java based software package having three modules which can be used independently or sequentially. The tool efficiently extracts sequences from large datasets with few simple steps. It can efficiently extract multiple sequences of any desired length from a genome of any organism. The results are crosschecked by published data. Availability URL 1: http://ww3.comsats.edu.pk/bio/ResearchProjects.aspx URL 2: http://ww3.comsats.edu.pk/bio/SequenceManeuverer.aspx PMID:23275734

  16. VISTA - computational tools for comparative genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Pachter, Lior; Poliakov, Alexander; Rubin,Edward M.; Dubchak, Inna

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of DNA sequences from different species is a fundamental method for identifying functional elements in genomes. Here we describe the VISTA family of tools created to assist biologists in carrying out this task. Our first VISTA server at http://www-gsd.lbl.gov/VISTA/ was launched in the summer of 2000 and was designed to align long genomic sequences and visualize these alignments with associated functional annotations. Currently the VISTA site includes multiple comparative genomics tools and provides users with rich capabilities to browse pre-computed whole-genome alignments of large vertebrate genomes and other groups of organisms with VISTA Browser, submit their own sequences of interest to several VISTA servers for various types of comparative analysis, and obtain detailed comparative analysis results for a set of cardiovascular genes. We illustrate capabilities of the VISTA site by the analysis of a 180 kilobase (kb) interval on human chromosome 5 that encodes for the kinesin family member3A (KIF3A) protein.

  17. GenomeTools: a comprehensive software library for efficient processing of structured genome annotations.

    PubMed

    Gremme, Gordon; Steinbiss, Sascha; Kurtz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Genome annotations are often published as plain text files describing genomic features and their subcomponents by an implicit annotation graph. In this paper, we present the GenomeTools, a convenient and efficient software library and associated software tools for developing bioinformatics software intended to create, process or convert annotation graphs. The GenomeTools strictly follow the annotation graph approach, offering a unified graph-based representation. This gives the developer intuitive and immediate access to genomic features and tools for their manipulation. To process large annotation sets with low memory overhead, we have designed and implemented an efficient pull-based approach for sequential processing of annotations. This allows to handle even the largest annotation sets, such as a complete catalogue of human variations. Our object-oriented C-based software library enables a developer to conveniently implement their own functionality on annotation graphs and to integrate it into larger workflows, simultaneously accessing compressed sequence data if required. The careful C implementation of the GenomeTools does not only ensure a light-weight memory footprint while allowing full sequential as well as random access to the annotation graph, but also facilitates the creation of bindings to a variety of script programming languages (like Python and Ruby) sharing the same interface. PMID:24091398

  18. Bioinformatics tools for analysing viral genomic data.

    PubMed

    Orton, R J; Gu, Q; Hughes, J; Maabar, M; Modha, S; Vattipally, S B; Wilkie, G S; Davison, A J

    2016-04-01

    The field of viral genomics and bioinformatics is experiencing a strong resurgence due to high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technology, which enables the rapid and cost-effective sequencing and subsequent assembly of large numbers of viral genomes. In addition, the unprecedented power of HTS technologies has enabled the analysis of intra-host viral diversity and quasispecies dynamics in relation to important biological questions on viral transmission, vaccine resistance and host jumping. HTS also enables the rapid identification of both known and potentially new viruses from field and clinical samples, thus adding new tools to the fields of viral discovery and metagenomics. Bioinformatics has been central to the rise of HTS applications because new algorithms and software tools are continually needed to process and analyse the large, complex datasets generated in this rapidly evolving area. In this paper, the authors give a brief overview of the main bioinformatics tools available for viral genomic research, with a particular emphasis on HTS technologies and their main applications. They summarise the major steps in various HTS analyses, starting with quality control of raw reads and encompassing activities ranging from consensus and de novo genome assembly to variant calling and metagenomics, as well as RNA sequencing. PMID:27217183

  19. GenomePeek—an online tool for prokaryotic genome and metagenome analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McNair, Katelyn; Edwards, Robert A.

    2015-06-16

    As increases in prokaryotic sequencing take place, a method to quickly and accurately analyze this data is needed. Previous tools are mainly designed for metagenomic analysis and have limitations; such as long runtimes and significant false positive error rates. The online tool GenomePeek (edwards.sdsu.edu/GenomePeek) was developed to analyze both single genome and metagenome sequencing files, quickly and with low error rates. GenomePeek uses a sequence assembly approach where reads to a set of conserved genes are extracted, assembled and then aligned against the highly specific reference database. GenomePeek was found to be faster than traditional approaches while still keeping errormore » rates low, as well as offering unique data visualization options.« less

  20. GenomePeek—an online tool for prokaryotic genome and metagenome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McNair, Katelyn; Edwards, Robert A.

    2015-06-16

    As increases in prokaryotic sequencing take place, a method to quickly and accurately analyze this data is needed. Previous tools are mainly designed for metagenomic analysis and have limitations; such as long runtimes and significant false positive error rates. The online tool GenomePeek (edwards.sdsu.edu/GenomePeek) was developed to analyze both single genome and metagenome sequencing files, quickly and with low error rates. GenomePeek uses a sequence assembly approach where reads to a set of conserved genes are extracted, assembled and then aligned against the highly specific reference database. GenomePeek was found to be faster than traditional approaches while still keeping error rates low, as well as offering unique data visualization options.

  1. mGenomeSubtractor: a web-based tool for parallel in silico subtractive hybridization analysis of multiple bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yucheng; He, Xinyi; Harrison, Ewan M; Tai, Cui; Ou, Hong-Yu; Rajakumar, Kumar; Deng, Zixin

    2010-07-01

    mGenomeSubtractor performs an mpiBLAST-based comparison of reference bacterial genomes against multiple user-selected genomes for investigation of strain variable accessory regions. With parallel computing architecture, mGenomeSubtractor is able to run rapid BLAST searches of the segmented reference genome against multiple subject genomes at the DNA or amino acid level within a minute. In addition to comparison of protein coding sequences, the highly flexible sliding window-based genome fragmentation approach offered can be used to identify short unique sequences within or between genes. mGenomeSubtractor provides powerful schematic outputs for exploration of identified core and accessory regions, including searches against databases of mobile genetic elements, virulence factors or bacterial essential genes, examination of G+C content and binucleotide distribution bias, and integrated primer design tools. mGenomeSubtractor also allows for the ready definition of species-specific gene pools based on available genomes. Pan-genomic arrays can be easily developed using the efficient oligonucleotide design tool. This simple high-throughput in silico 'subtractive hybridization' analytical tool will support the rapidly escalating number of comparative bacterial genomics studies aimed at defining genomic biomarkers of evolutionary lineage, phenotype, pathotype, environmental adaptation and/or disease-association of diverse bacterial species. mGenomeSubtractor is freely available to all users without any login requirement at: http://bioinfo-mml.sjtu.edu.cn/mGS/. PMID:20435682

  2. Genome editing strategies: potential tools for eradicating HIV-1/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Kamel; Gordon, Jennifer; Cosentino, Laura; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Current therapy for controlling HIV-1 infection and preventing AIDS progression has profoundly decreased viral replication in cells susceptible to HIV-1 infection, but it does not eliminate the low level of viral replication in latently infected cells which contain integrated copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA. There is an urgent need for the development of HIV-1 genome eradication strategies that will lead to a permanent or “sterile” cure of HIV-1/AIDS. In the past few years, novel nuclease-initiated genome editing tools have been developing rapidly, including ZFNs, TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These surgical knives, which can excise any genome, provide a great opportunity to eradicate the HIV-1 genome by targeting highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 long terminal repeats or essential viral genes. Given the time consuming and costly engineering of target-specific ZFNs and TALENs, the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 technology has emerged as a simpler and more versatile technology to allow permanent removal of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA in eukaryotic cells, and hopefully animal models or human patients. The major unmet challenges of this approach at present include inefficient nuclease gene delivery, potential off-target cleavage, and cell-specific genome targeting. Nanoparticle or lentivirus-mediated delivery of next generation Cas9 technologies including nickase or RNA-guided FokI nuclease (RFN) will further improve the potential for genome editing to become a promising approach for curing HIV-1/AIDS. PMID:25716921

  3. Gramene, a tool for grass genomics.

    PubMed

    Ware, Doreen H; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Ni, Junjian; Yap, Immanuel V; Pan, Xioakang; Clark, Ken Y; Teytelman, Leonid; Schmidt, Steven C; Zhao, Wei; Chang, Kuan; Cartinhour, Sam; Stein, Lincoln D; McCouch, Susan R

    2002-12-01

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is a comparative genome mapping database for grasses and a community resource for rice (Oryza sativa). It combines a semi-automatically generated database of cereal genomic and expressed sequence tag sequences, genetic maps, map relations, and publications, with a curated database of rice mutants (genes and alleles), molecular markers, and proteins. Gramene curators read and extract detailed information from published sources, summarize that information in a structured format, and establish links to related objects both inside and outside the database, providing seamless connections between independent sources of information. Genetic, physical, and sequence-based maps of rice serve as the fundamental organizing units and provide a common denominator for moving across species and genera within the grass family. Comparative maps of rice, maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), barley (Hordeum vulgare), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and oat (Avena sativa) are anchored by a set of curated correspondences. In addition to sequence-based mappings found in comparative maps and rice genome displays, Gramene makes extensive use of controlled vocabularies to describe specific biological attributes in ways that permit users to query those domains and make comparisons across taxonomic groups. Proteins are annotated for functional significance using gene ontology terms that have been adopted by numerous model species databases. Genetic variants including phenotypes are annotated using plant ontology terms common to all plants and trait ontology terms that are specific to rice. In this paper, we present a brief overview of the search tools available to the plant research community in Gramene. PMID:12481044

  4. GATB: Genome Assembly & Analysis Tool Box

    PubMed Central

    Drezen, Erwan; Rizk, Guillaume; Chikhi, Rayan; Deltel, Charles; Lemaitre, Claire; Peterlongo, Pierre; Lavenier, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Efficient and fast next-generation sequencing (NGS) algorithms are essential to analyze the terabytes of data generated by the NGS machines. A serious bottleneck can be the design of such algorithms, as they require sophisticated data structures and advanced hardware implementation. Results: We propose an open-source library dedicated to genome assembly and analysis to fasten the process of developing efficient software. The library is based on a recent optimized de-Bruijn graph implementation allowing complex genomes to be processed on desktop computers using fast algorithms with low memory footprints. Availability and implementation: The GATB library is written in C++ and is available at the following Web site http://gatb.inria.fr under the A-GPL license. Contact: lavenier@irisa.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24990603

  5. Rapid SAW Sensor Development Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    The lack of integrated design tools for Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices has led us to develop tools for the design, modeling, analysis, and automatic layout generation of SAW devices. These tools enable rapid development of wireless SAW sensors. The tools developed have been designed to integrate into existing Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools to take advantage of existing 3D modeling, and Finite Element Analysis (FEA). This paper presents the SAW design, modeling, analysis, and automated layout generation tools.

  6. A web-based genomic sequence database for the Streptomycetaceae: a tool for systematics and genome mining

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ARS Microbial Genome Sequence Database (http://199.133.98.43), a web-based database server, was established utilizing the BIGSdb (Bacterial Isolate Genomics Sequence Database) software package, developed at Oxford University, as a tool to manage multi-locus sequence data for the family Streptomy...

  7. Development of Genomic GMACE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of genomics to enhance national genetic evaluation systems of dairy cattle is quickly becoming standard practice. The current MACE procedure used by Interbull may not accommodate these new “genomically-enhanced” national evaluations. An important assumption in MACE may no longer be valid in ...

  8. A new set of bioinformatics tools for genome projects.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luiz G P; Paixão, Roger; Souza, Rangel C; Costa, Gisele C da; Almeida, Darcy F de; Vasconcelos, Ana T R de

    2004-01-01

    A new tool called System for Automated Bacterial Integrated Annotation--SABIA (SABIA being a very well-known bird in Brazil) was developed for the assembly and annotation of bacterial genomes. This system performs automatic tasks of assembly analysis, ORFs identification/analysis, and extragenic region analyses. Genome assembly and contig automatic annotation data are also available in the same working environment. The system integrates several public domains and newly developed software programs capable of dealing with several types of databases, and it is portable to other operational systems. These programs interact with most of the well-known biological database/softwares, such as Glimmer, Genemark, the BLAST family programs, InterPro, COG, Kegg, PSORT, GO, tRNAScan and RBSFinder, and can also be used to identify metabolic pathways. PMID:15100986

  9. Genomics and vaccine development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic-based approaches are driving fundamental changes in our understanding of microbiology. Comparative analysis of microbial strain is providing new insights into pathogen evolution, virulence mechanisms, and host range specificity. Most importantly, gene discovery and genetic variations can now...

  10. GAViT: Genome Assembly Visualization Tool for Short Read Data

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Aijazuddin; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Trong, Stephan

    2008-03-14

    It is a challenging job for genome analysts to accurately debug, troubleshoot, and validate genome assembly results. Genome analysts rely on visualization tools to help validate and troubleshoot assembly results, including such problems as mis-assemblies, low-quality regions, and repeats. Short read data adds further complexity and makes it extremely challenging for the visualization tools to scale and to view all needed assembly information. As a result, there is a need for a visualization tool that can scale to display assembly data from the new sequencing technologies. We present Genome Assembly Visualization Tool (GAViT), a highly scalable and interactive assembly visualization tool developed at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  11. CucCAP - Developing genomic resources for the cucurbit community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. cucurbit community has initiated a USDA-SCRI funded cucurbit genomics project, CucCAP: Leveraging applied genomics to increase disease resistance in cucurbit crops. Our primary objectives are: develop genomic and bioinformatic breeding tool kits for accelerated crop improvement across the...

  12. Cytoscape: the network visualization tool for GenomeSpace workflows

    PubMed Central

    Demchak, Barry; Hull, Tim; Reich, Michael; Liefeld, Ted; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2014-01-01

    Modern genomic analysis often requires workflows incorporating multiple best-of-breed tools. GenomeSpace is a web-based visual workbench that combines a selection of these tools with mechanisms that create data flows between them. One such tool is Cytoscape 3, a popular application that enables analysis and visualization of graph-oriented genomic networks. As Cytoscape runs on the desktop, and not in a web browser, integrating it into GenomeSpace required special care in creating a seamless user experience and enabling appropriate data flows. In this paper, we present the design and operation of the Cytoscape GenomeSpace app, which accomplishes this integration, thereby providing critical analysis and visualization functionality for GenomeSpace users. It has been downloaded over 850 times since the release of its first version in September, 2013. PMID:25165537

  13. GRAT--genome-scale rapid alignment tool.

    PubMed

    Kindlund, Ellen; Tammi, Martti T; Arner, Erik; Nilsson, Daniel; Andersson, Björn

    2007-04-01

    Modern alignment methods designed to work rapidly and efficiently with large datasets often do so at the cost of method sensitivity. To overcome this, we have developed a novel alignment program, GRAT, built to accurately align short, highly similar DNA sequences. The program runs rapidly and requires no more memory and CPU power than a desktop computer. In addition, specificity is ensured by statistically separating the true alignments from spurious matches using phred quality values. An efficient separation is especially important when searching large datasets and whenever there are repeats present in the dataset. Results are superior in comparison to widely used existing software, and analysis of two large genomic datasets show the usefulness and scalability of the algorithm. PMID:17292508

  14. Genomic Tools in Pea Breeding Programs: Status and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tayeh, Nadim; Aubert, Grégoire; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle; Warkentin, Thomas D; Burstin, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an annual cool-season legume and one of the oldest domesticated crops. Dry pea seeds contain 22-25% protein, complex starch and fiber constituents, and a rich array of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals which make them a valuable source for human consumption and livestock feed. Dry pea ranks third to common bean and chickpea as the most widely grown pulse in the world with more than 11 million tons produced in 2013. Pea breeding has achieved great success since the time of Mendel's experiments in the mid-1800s. However, several traits still require significant improvement for better yield stability in a larger growing area. Key breeding objectives in pea include improving biotic and abiotic stress resistance and enhancing yield components and seed quality. Taking advantage of the diversity present in the pea genepool, many mapping populations have been constructed in the last decades and efforts have been deployed to identify loci involved in the control of target traits and further introgress them into elite breeding materials. Pea now benefits from next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies that are paving the way for genome-wide association studies and genomic selection approaches. This review covers the significant development and deployment of genomic tools for pea breeding in recent years. Future prospects are discussed especially in light of current progress toward deciphering the pea genome. PMID:26640470

  15. Genomic Tools in Pea Breeding Programs: Status and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tayeh, Nadim; Aubert, Grégoire; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle; Warkentin, Thomas D.; Burstin, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an annual cool-season legume and one of the oldest domesticated crops. Dry pea seeds contain 22–25% protein, complex starch and fiber constituents, and a rich array of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals which make them a valuable source for human consumption and livestock feed. Dry pea ranks third to common bean and chickpea as the most widely grown pulse in the world with more than 11 million tons produced in 2013. Pea breeding has achieved great success since the time of Mendel's experiments in the mid-1800s. However, several traits still require significant improvement for better yield stability in a larger growing area. Key breeding objectives in pea include improving biotic and abiotic stress resistance and enhancing yield components and seed quality. Taking advantage of the diversity present in the pea genepool, many mapping populations have been constructed in the last decades and efforts have been deployed to identify loci involved in the control of target traits and further introgress them into elite breeding materials. Pea now benefits from next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies that are paving the way for genome-wide association studies and genomic selection approaches. This review covers the significant development and deployment of genomic tools for pea breeding in recent years. Future prospects are discussed especially in light of current progress toward deciphering the pea genome. PMID:26640470

  16. Comparison of complete mitochondrial genomes of pine wilt nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Bursaphelenchus mucronatus (Nematoda: Aphelenchoidea) and development of a molecular tool for species identification.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Tahera; Han, Hyerim; Park, Joong-Ki

    2013-05-10

    We determined the complete mitochondrial genome sequences for Bursaphelenchus mucronatus, one species of pinewood nematode. The genome is a circular-DNA molecule of 14,583 bp (195 bp smaller than its congener Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) and contains 12 protein-coding genes (lacking atp8), 22 tRNA genes, and 2 rRNA genes encoded in the same direction, consistent with most other nematodes. Based on sequence comparison of mtDNA genomes, we developed a PCR-based molecular assay to differentiate B. xylophilus (highly pathogenic) and B. mucronatus (relatively less virulent) using species-specific primers. The molecular identification system employs multiplex-PCR and is very effective and reliable for discriminating these Bursaphelenchus species, which are economically important, but difficult to distinguish based on morphology. The comparison of the mitochondrial genomes and molecular identification system of the two species of Bursaphelenchus spp. should provide a rich source of genetic information to support the effective control and management (quarantine) of the pine wilt disease caused by pinewood nematodes. PMID:23434520

  17. Elucidating the molecular responses of apple rootstock resistant to ARD pathogens: challenges and opportunities for development of genomics-assisted breeding tools

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanmin; Fazio, Gennaro; Mazzola, Mark

    2014-01-01

    may lead to different outcomes between rootstocks in response to invasion by necrotrophic pathogens. Elucidation of host defense mechanisms is critical in developing molecular tools for genomics-assisted breeding of resistant apple rootstocks. Due to their perennial nature, use of resistant rootstocks as a component for disease management might offer a durable and cost-effective benefit to tree performance than the standard practice of soil fumigation for control of ARD. PMID:26504547

  18. Elucidating the molecular responses of apple rootstock resistant to ARD pathogens: challenges and opportunities for development of genomics-assisted breeding tools.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanmin; Fazio, Gennaro; Mazzola, Mark

    2014-01-01

    may lead to different outcomes between rootstocks in response to invasion by necrotrophic pathogens. Elucidation of host defense mechanisms is critical in developing molecular tools for genomics-assisted breeding of resistant apple rootstocks. Due to their perennial nature, use of resistant rootstocks as a component for disease management might offer a durable and cost-effective benefit to tree performance than the standard practice of soil fumigation for control of ARD. PMID:26504547

  19. FDA Bioinformatics Tool for Microbial Genomics Research on Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens Using Microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Advances in microbial genomics and bioinformatics are offering greater insights into the emergence and spread of foodborne pathogens in outbreak scenarios. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has developed the genomics tool ArrayTrackTM, which provides extensive functionalities to man...

  20. Integrons: natural tools for bacterial genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Magnus, D A; Mazel, D

    2001-10-01

    Integrons were first identified as the primary mechanism for antibiotic resistance gene capture and dissemination among Gram-negative bacteria. More recently, their role in genome evolution has been extended with the discovery of larger integron structures, the super-integrons, as genuine components of the genomes of many species throughout the gamma-proteobacterial radiation. The functional platforms of these integrons appear to be sedentary, whereas their gene cassette contents are highly variable. Nevertheless, the gene cassettes for which an activity has been experimentally demonstrated encode proteins related to simple adaptive functions and their recruitment is seen as providing the bacterial host with a selective advantage. The widespread occurrence of the integron system among Gram-negative bacteria is discussed, with special focus on the super-integrons. Some of the adaptive functions encoded by these genes are also reviewed, and implications of integron-mediated genome evolution in the emergence of novel bacterial species are highlighted. PMID:11587934

  1. Application of Genomics Tools to Animal Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Dekkers, Jack C.M.

    2012-01-01

    The main goal in animal breeding is to select individuals that have high breeding values for traits of interest as parents to produce the next generation and to do so as quickly as possible. To date, most programs rely on statistical analysis of large data bases with phenotypes on breeding populations by linear mixed model methodology to estimate breeding values on selection candidates. However, there is a long history of research on the use of genetic markers to identify quantitative trait loci and their use in marker-assisted selection but with limited implementation in practical breeding programs. The advent of high-density SNP genotyping, combined with novel statistical methods for the use of this data to estimate breeding values, has resulted in the recent extensive application of genomic or whole-genome selection in dairy cattle and research to implement genomic selection in other livestock species is underway. The high-density SNP data also provides opportunities to detect QTL and to encover the genetic architecture of quantitative traits, in terms of the distribution of the size of genetic effects that contribute to trait differences in a population. Results show that this genetic architecture differs between traits but that for most traits, over 50% of the genetic variation resides in genomic regions with small effects that are of the order of magnitude that is expected under a highly polygenic model of inheritance. PMID:23115522

  2. Fine-Tuning Next-Generation Genome Editing Tools.

    PubMed

    Kanchiswamy, Chidananda Nagamangala; Maffei, Massimo; Malnoy, Mickael; Velasco, Riccardo; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The availability of genome sequences of numerous organisms and the revolution brought about by genome editing tools (e.g., ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 or RGENs) has provided a breakthrough in introducing targeted genetic changes both to explore emergent phenotypes and to introduce new functionalities. However, the wider application of these tools in biology, agriculture, medicine, and biotechnology is limited by off-target mutation effects. In this review, we compare available methods for detecting, measuring, and analyzing off-target mutations. Furthermore, we particularly focus on CRISPR/Cas9 regarding various methods, tweaks, and software tools available to nullify off-target effects. PMID:27167723

  3. Development of genome viewer (Web Omics Viewer) for managing databases of cucumber genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcieszek, M.; RóŻ, P.; Pawełkowicz, M.; Nowak, R.; Przybecki, Z.

    Cucumber is an important plant in horticulture and science world. Sequencing projects of C. sativus genome enable new methodological aproaches in further investigation of this species. Accessibility is crucial to fully exploit obtained information about detail structure of genes, markers and other characteristic features such contigs, scaffolds and chromosomes. Genome viewer is one of tools providing plain and easy way for presenting genome data for users and for databases administration. Gbrowse - the main viewer has several very useful features but lacks in managing simplicity. Our group developed new genome browser Web Omics Viewer (WOV), keeping functionality but improving utilization and accessibility to cucumber genome data.

  4. Groundnut improvement: use of genetic and genomic tools

    PubMed Central

    Janila, Pasupuleti; Nigam, S. N.; Pandey, Manish K.; Nagesh, P.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2013-01-01

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.), a self-pollinated legume is an important crop cultivated in 24 million ha world over for extraction of edible oil and food uses. The kernels are rich in oil (48–50%) and protein (25–28%), and are source of several vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, biologically active polyphenols, flavonoids, and isoflavones. Improved varieties of groundnut with high yield potential were developed and released for cultivation world over. The improved varieties belong to different maturity durations and possess resistance to diseases, tolerance to drought, enhanced oil content, and improved quality traits for food uses. Conventional breeding procedures along with the tools for phenotyping were largely used in groundnut improvement programs. Mutations were used to induce variability and wide hybridization was attempted to tap variability from wild species. Low genetic variability has been a bottleneck for groundnut improvement. The vast potential of wild species, reservoir of new alleles remains under-utilized. Development of linkage maps of groundnut during the last decade was followed by identification of markers and quantitative trait loci for the target traits. Consequently, the last decade has witnessed the deployment of molecular breeding approaches to complement the ongoing groundnut improvement programs in USA, China, India, and Japan. The other potential advantages of molecular breeding are the feasibility to target multiple traits for improvement and provide tools to tap new alleles from wild species. The first groundnut variety developed through marker-assisted back-crossing is a root-knot nematode-resistant variety, NemaTAM in USA. The uptake of molecular breeding approaches in groundnut improvement programs by NARS partners in India and many African countries is slow or needs to be initiated in part due to inadequate infrastructure, high genotyping costs, and human capacities. Availability of draft genome sequence for diploid (AA and

  5. Groundnut improvement: use of genetic and genomic tools.

    PubMed

    Janila, Pasupuleti; Nigam, S N; Pandey, Manish K; Nagesh, P; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2013-01-01

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.), a self-pollinated legume is an important crop cultivated in 24 million ha world over for extraction of edible oil and food uses. The kernels are rich in oil (48-50%) and protein (25-28%), and are source of several vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, biologically active polyphenols, flavonoids, and isoflavones. Improved varieties of groundnut with high yield potential were developed and released for cultivation world over. The improved varieties belong to different maturity durations and possess resistance to diseases, tolerance to drought, enhanced oil content, and improved quality traits for food uses. Conventional breeding procedures along with the tools for phenotyping were largely used in groundnut improvement programs. Mutations were used to induce variability and wide hybridization was attempted to tap variability from wild species. Low genetic variability has been a bottleneck for groundnut improvement. The vast potential of wild species, reservoir of new alleles remains under-utilized. Development of linkage maps of groundnut during the last decade was followed by identification of markers and quantitative trait loci for the target traits. Consequently, the last decade has witnessed the deployment of molecular breeding approaches to complement the ongoing groundnut improvement programs in USA, China, India, and Japan. The other potential advantages of molecular breeding are the feasibility to target multiple traits for improvement and provide tools to tap new alleles from wild species. The first groundnut variety developed through marker-assisted back-crossing is a root-knot nematode-resistant variety, NemaTAM in USA. The uptake of molecular breeding approaches in groundnut improvement programs by NARS partners in India and many African countries is slow or needs to be initiated in part due to inadequate infrastructure, high genotyping costs, and human capacities. Availability of draft genome sequence for diploid (AA and BB

  6. Public data and open source tools for multi-assay genomic investigation of disease.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Lavanya; Ramos, Marcel; Re, Angela; El-Hachem, Nehme; Safikhani, Zhaleh; Gendoo, Deena M A; Davis, Sean; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Castelo, Robert; Hansen, Kasper D; Carey, Vincent J; Morgan, Martin; Culhane, Aedín C; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Waldron, Levi

    2016-07-01

    Molecular interrogation of a biological sample through DNA sequencing, RNA and microRNA profiling, proteomics and other assays, has the potential to provide a systems level approach to predicting treatment response and disease progression, and to developing precision therapies. Large publicly funded projects have generated extensive and freely available multi-assay data resources; however, bioinformatic and statistical methods for the analysis of such experiments are still nascent. We review multi-assay genomic data resources in the areas of clinical oncology, pharmacogenomics and other perturbation experiments, population genomics and regulatory genomics and other areas, and tools for data acquisition. Finally, we review bioinformatic tools that are explicitly geared toward integrative genomic data visualization and analysis. This review provides starting points for accessing publicly available data and tools to support development of needed integrative methods. PMID:26463000

  7. Public data and open source tools for multi-assay genomic investigation of disease

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Lavanya; Ramos, Marcel; Re, Angela; El-Hachem, Nehme; Safikhani, Zhaleh; Gendoo, Deena M.A.; Davis, Sean; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Castelo, Robert; Hansen, Kasper D.; Carey, Vincent J.; Morgan, Martin; Culhane, Aedín C.; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Molecular interrogation of a biological sample through DNA sequencing, RNA and microRNA profiling, proteomics and other assays, has the potential to provide a systems level approach to predicting treatment response and disease progression, and to developing precision therapies. Large publicly funded projects have generated extensive and freely available multi-assay data resources; however, bioinformatic and statistical methods for the analysis of such experiments are still nascent. We review multi-assay genomic data resources in the areas of clinical oncology, pharmacogenomics and other perturbation experiments, population genomics and regulatory genomics and other areas, and tools for data acquisition. Finally, we review bioinformatic tools that are explicitly geared toward integrative genomic data visualization and analysis. This review provides starting points for accessing publicly available data and tools to support development of needed integrative methods. PMID:26463000

  8. Integrative genomic analysis by interoperation of bioinformatics tools in GenomeSpace

    PubMed Central

    Thorvaldsdottir, Helga; Liefeld, Ted; Ocana, Marco; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Pochet, Nathalie; Robinson, James T.; Demchak, Barry; Hull, Tim; Ben-Artzi, Gil; Blankenberg, Daniel; Barber, Galt P.; Lee, Brian T.; Kuhn, Robert M.; Nekrutenko, Anton; Segal, Eran; Ideker, Trey; Reich, Michael; Regev, Aviv; Chang, Howard Y.; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2015-01-01

    Integrative analysis of multiple data types to address complex biomedical questions requires the use of multiple software tools in concert and remains an enormous challenge for most of the biomedical research community. Here we introduce GenomeSpace (http://www.genomespace.org), a cloud-based, cooperative community resource. Seeded as a collaboration of six of the most popular genomics analysis tools, GenomeSpace now supports the streamlined interaction of 20 bioinformatics tools and data resources. To facilitate the ability of non-programming users’ to leverage GenomeSpace in integrative analysis, it offers a growing set of ‘recipes’, short workflows involving a few tools and steps to guide investigators through high utility analysis tasks. PMID:26780094

  9. The Plant Ontology: A Tool for Plant Genomics.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Laurel; Jaiswal, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    The use of controlled, structured vocabularies (ontologies) has become a critical tool for scientists in the post-genomic era of massive datasets. Adoption and integration of common vocabularies and annotation practices enables cross-species comparative analyses and increases data sharing and reusability. The Plant Ontology (PO; http://www.plantontology.org/ ) describes plant anatomy, morphology, and the stages of plant development, and offers a database of plant genomics annotations associated to the PO terms. The scope of the PO has grown from its original design covering only rice, maize, and Arabidopsis, and now includes terms to describe all green plants from angiosperms to green algae.This chapter introduces how the PO and other related ontologies are constructed and organized, including languages and software used for ontology development, and provides an overview of the key features. Detailed instructions illustrate how to search and browse the PO database and access the associated annotation data. Users are encouraged to provide input on the ontology through the online term request form and contribute datasets for integration in the PO database. PMID:26519402

  10. GREAT: a web portal for Genome Regulatory Architecture Tools.

    PubMed

    Bouyioukos, Costas; Bucchini, François; Elati, Mohamed; Képès, François

    2016-07-01

    GREAT (Genome REgulatory Architecture Tools) is a novel web portal for tools designed to generate user-friendly and biologically useful analysis of genome architecture and regulation. The online tools of GREAT are freely accessible and compatible with essentially any operating system which runs a modern browser. GREAT is based on the analysis of genome layout -defined as the respective positioning of co-functional genes- and its relation with chromosome architecture and gene expression. GREAT tools allow users to systematically detect regular patterns along co-functional genomic features in an automatic way consisting of three individual steps and respective interactive visualizations. In addition to the complete analysis of regularities, GREAT tools enable the use of periodicity and position information for improving the prediction of transcription factor binding sites using a multi-view machine learning approach. The outcome of this integrative approach features a multivariate analysis of the interplay between the location of a gene and its regulatory sequence. GREAT results are plotted in web interactive graphs and are available for download either as individual plots, self-contained interactive pages or as machine readable tables for downstream analysis. The GREAT portal can be reached at the following URL https://absynth.issb.genopole.fr/GREAT and each individual GREAT tool is available for downloading. PMID:27151196

  11. GREAT: a web portal for Genome Regulatory Architecture Tools

    PubMed Central

    Bouyioukos, Costas; Bucchini, François; Elati, Mohamed; Képès, François

    2016-01-01

    GREAT (Genome REgulatory Architecture Tools) is a novel web portal for tools designed to generate user-friendly and biologically useful analysis of genome architecture and regulation. The online tools of GREAT are freely accessible and compatible with essentially any operating system which runs a modern browser. GREAT is based on the analysis of genome layout -defined as the respective positioning of co-functional genes- and its relation with chromosome architecture and gene expression. GREAT tools allow users to systematically detect regular patterns along co-functional genomic features in an automatic way consisting of three individual steps and respective interactive visualizations. In addition to the complete analysis of regularities, GREAT tools enable the use of periodicity and position information for improving the prediction of transcription factor binding sites using a multi-view machine learning approach. The outcome of this integrative approach features a multivariate analysis of the interplay between the location of a gene and its regulatory sequence. GREAT results are plotted in web interactive graphs and are available for download either as individual plots, self-contained interactive pages or as machine readable tables for downstream analysis. The GREAT portal can be reached at the following URL https://absynth.issb.genopole.fr/GREAT and each individual GREAT tool is available for downloading. PMID:27151196

  12. From bacterial genomics to metagenomics: concept, tools and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pooja; Kumari, Hansi; Kumar, Mukesh; Verma, Mansi; Kumari, Kirti; Malhotra, Shweta; Khurana, Jitendra; Lal, Rup

    2008-06-01

    In the last 20 years, the applications of genomics tools have completely transformed the field of microbial research. This has primarily happened due to revolution in sequencing technologies that have become available today. This review therefore, first describes the discoveries, upgradation and automation of sequencing techniques in a chronological order, followed by a brief discussion on microbial genomics. Some of the recently sequenced bacterial genomes are described to explain how complete genome data is now being used to derive interesting findings. Apart from the genomics of individual microbes, the study of unculturable microbiota from different environments is increasingly gaining importance. The second section is thus dedicated to the concept of metagenomics describing environmental DNA isolation, metagenomic library construction and screening methods to look for novel and potentially important genes, enzymes and biomolecules. It also deals with the pioneering studies in the area of metagenomics that are offering new insights into the previously unappreciated microbial world. PMID:23100712

  13. Next generation tools for genomic data generation, distribution, and visualization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background With the rapidly falling cost and availability of high throughput sequencing and microarray technologies, the bottleneck for effectively using genomic analysis in the laboratory and clinic is shifting to one of effectively managing, analyzing, and sharing genomic data. Results Here we present three open-source, platform independent, software tools for generating, analyzing, distributing, and visualizing genomic data. These include a next generation sequencing/microarray LIMS and analysis project center (GNomEx); an application for annotating and programmatically distributing genomic data using the community vetted DAS/2 data exchange protocol (GenoPub); and a standalone Java Swing application (GWrap) that makes cutting edge command line analysis tools available to those who prefer graphical user interfaces. Both GNomEx and GenoPub use the rich client Flex/Flash web browser interface to interact with Java classes and a relational database on a remote server. Both employ a public-private user-group security model enabling controlled distribution of patient and unpublished data alongside public resources. As such, they function as genomic data repositories that can be accessed manually or programmatically through DAS/2-enabled client applications such as the Integrated Genome Browser. Conclusions These tools have gained wide use in our core facilities, research laboratories and clinics and are freely available for non-profit use. See http://sourceforge.net/projects/gnomex/, http://sourceforge.net/projects/genoviz/, and http://sourceforge.net/projects/useq. PMID:20828407

  14. Emerging Genomic Tools for Legume Breeding: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manish K; Roorkiwal, Manish; Singh, Vikas K; Ramalingam, Abirami; Kudapa, Himabindu; Thudi, Mahendar; Chitikineni, Anu; Rathore, Abhishek; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-01-01

    Legumes play a vital role in ensuring global nutritional food security and improving soil quality through nitrogen fixation. Accelerated higher genetic gains is required to meet the demand of ever increasing global population. In recent years, speedy developments have been witnessed in legume genomics due to advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) and high-throughput genotyping technologies. Reference genome sequences for many legume crops have been reported in the last 5 years. The availability of the draft genome sequences and re-sequencing of elite genotypes for several important legume crops have made it possible to identify structural variations at large scale. Availability of large-scale genomic resources and low-cost and high-throughput genotyping technologies are enhancing the efficiency and resolution of genetic mapping and marker-trait association studies. Most importantly, deployment of molecular breeding approaches has resulted in development of improved lines in some legume crops such as chickpea and groundnut. In order to support genomics-driven crop improvement at a fast pace, the deployment of breeder-friendly genomics and decision support tools seems appear to be critical in breeding programs in developing countries. This review provides an overview of emerging genomics and informatics tools/approaches that will be the key driving force for accelerating genomics-assisted breeding and ultimately ensuring nutritional and food security in developing countries. PMID:27199998

  15. Emerging Genomic Tools for Legume Breeding: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manish K.; Roorkiwal, Manish; Singh, Vikas K.; Ramalingam, Abirami; Kudapa, Himabindu; Thudi, Mahendar; Chitikineni, Anu; Rathore, Abhishek; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Legumes play a vital role in ensuring global nutritional food security and improving soil quality through nitrogen fixation. Accelerated higher genetic gains is required to meet the demand of ever increasing global population. In recent years, speedy developments have been witnessed in legume genomics due to advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) and high-throughput genotyping technologies. Reference genome sequences for many legume crops have been reported in the last 5 years. The availability of the draft genome sequences and re-sequencing of elite genotypes for several important legume crops have made it possible to identify structural variations at large scale. Availability of large-scale genomic resources and low-cost and high-throughput genotyping technologies are enhancing the efficiency and resolution of genetic mapping and marker-trait association studies. Most importantly, deployment of molecular breeding approaches has resulted in development of improved lines in some legume crops such as chickpea and groundnut. In order to support genomics-driven crop improvement at a fast pace, the deployment of breeder-friendly genomics and decision support tools seems appear to be critical in breeding programs in developing countries. This review provides an overview of emerging genomics and informatics tools/approaches that will be the key driving force for accelerating genomics-assisted breeding and ultimately ensuring nutritional and food security in developing countries. PMID:27199998

  16. Frageria vesca, a useful tool for Rosaceae Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diploid woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca subsp. vesca forma semperflorens, has many characteristics that make it an ideal plant for strawberry genomics research. A brief review of some of the tools available for using this plant as a reference for studying gene function in strawberry and oth...

  17. Genomic Tools in Cowpea Breeding Programs: Status and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Boukar, Ousmane; Fatokun, Christian A; Huynh, Bao-Lam; Roberts, Philip A; Close, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Cowpea is one of the most important grain legumes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It provides strong support to the livelihood of small-scale farmers through its contributions to their nutritional security, income generation and soil fertility enhancement. Worldwide about 6.5 million metric tons of cowpea are produced annually on about 14.5 million hectares. The low productivity of cowpea is attributable to numerous abiotic and biotic constraints. The abiotic stress factors comprise drought, low soil fertility, and heat while biotic constraints include insects, diseases, parasitic weeds, and nematodes. Cowpea farmers also have limited access to quality seeds of improved varieties for planting. Some progress has been made through conventional breeding at international and national research institutions in the last three decades. Cowpea improvement could also benefit from modern breeding methods based on molecular genetic tools. A number of advances in cowpea genetic linkage maps, and quantitative trait loci associated with some desirable traits such as resistance to Striga, Macrophomina, Fusarium wilt, bacterial blight, root-knot nematodes, aphids, and foliar thrips have been reported. An improved consensus genetic linkage map has been developed and used to identify QTLs of additional traits. In order to take advantage of these developments single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping is being streamlined to establish an efficient workflow supported by genotyping support service (GSS)-client interactions. About 1100 SNPs mapped on the cowpea genome were converted by LGC Genomics to KASP assays. Several cowpea breeding programs have been exploiting these resources to implement molecular breeding, especially for MARS and MABC, to accelerate cowpea variety improvement. The combination of conventional breeding and molecular breeding strategies, with workflow managed through the CGIAR breeding management system (BMS), promises an increase in the number of improved

  18. Genomic Tools in Cowpea Breeding Programs: Status and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Boukar, Ousmane; Fatokun, Christian A.; Huynh, Bao-Lam; Roberts, Philip A.; Close, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Cowpea is one of the most important grain legumes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It provides strong support to the livelihood of small-scale farmers through its contributions to their nutritional security, income generation and soil fertility enhancement. Worldwide about 6.5 million metric tons of cowpea are produced annually on about 14.5 million hectares. The low productivity of cowpea is attributable to numerous abiotic and biotic constraints. The abiotic stress factors comprise drought, low soil fertility, and heat while biotic constraints include insects, diseases, parasitic weeds, and nematodes. Cowpea farmers also have limited access to quality seeds of improved varieties for planting. Some progress has been made through conventional breeding at international and national research institutions in the last three decades. Cowpea improvement could also benefit from modern breeding methods based on molecular genetic tools. A number of advances in cowpea genetic linkage maps, and quantitative trait loci associated with some desirable traits such as resistance to Striga, Macrophomina, Fusarium wilt, bacterial blight, root-knot nematodes, aphids, and foliar thrips have been reported. An improved consensus genetic linkage map has been developed and used to identify QTLs of additional traits. In order to take advantage of these developments single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping is being streamlined to establish an efficient workflow supported by genotyping support service (GSS)-client interactions. About 1100 SNPs mapped on the cowpea genome were converted by LGC Genomics to KASP assays. Several cowpea breeding programs have been exploiting these resources to implement molecular breeding, especially for MARS and MABC, to accelerate cowpea variety improvement. The combination of conventional breeding and molecular breeding strategies, with workflow managed through the CGIAR breeding management system (BMS), promises an increase in the number of improved

  19. GAPIT: genome association and prediction integrated tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advances in high throughput sequencing have improved the detection of genes underlying important traits as well as the prediction accuracy of disease risk and breeding value of crop or livestock. Software programs developed to perform statistical genetic analysis that support these activities should...

  20. Developing ICALL Tools Using GATE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the use of the General Architecture for Text Engineering (GATE) as a tool for the development of ICALL and NLP applications. It outlines a paradigm shift in software development, which is mainly influenced by projects such as the Free Software Foundation. It looks at standards that have been proposed to facilitate the…

  1. Emerging Tools for Synthetic Genome Design

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-Rahm; Cho, Suhyung; Song, Yoseb; Kim, Sun Chang; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging discipline for designing and synthesizing predictable, measurable, controllable, and transformable biological systems. These newly designed biological systems have great potential for the development of cheaper drugs, green fuels, biodegradable plastics, and targeted cancer therapies over the coming years. Fortunately, our ability to quickly and accurately engineer biological systems that behave predictably has been dramatically expanded by significant advances in DNA-sequencing, DNA-synthesis, and DNA-editing technologies. Here, we review emerging technologies and methodologies in the field of building designed biological systems, and we discuss their future perspectives. PMID:23708771

  2. Databases and web tools for cancer genomics study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yadong; Dong, Xunong; Xie, Bingbing; Ding, Nan; Chen, Juan; Li, Yongjun; Zhang, Qian; Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2015-02-01

    Publicly-accessible resources have promoted the advance of scientific discovery. The era of genomics and big data has brought the need for collaboration and data sharing in order to make effective use of this new knowledge. Here, we describe the web resources for cancer genomics research and rate them on the basis of the diversity of cancer types, sample size, omics data comprehensiveness, and user experience. The resources reviewed include data repository and analysis tools; and we hope such introduction will promote the awareness and facilitate the usage of these resources in the cancer research community. PMID:25707591

  3. Databases and Web Tools for Cancer Genomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yadong; Dong, Xunong; Xie, Bingbing; Ding, Nan; Chen, Juan; Li, Yongjun; Zhang, Qian; Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    Publicly-accessible resources have promoted the advance of scientific discovery. The era of genomics and big data has brought the need for collaboration and data sharing in order to make effective use of this new knowledge. Here, we describe the web resources for cancer genomics research and rate them on the basis of the diversity of cancer types, sample size, omics data comprehensiveness, and user experience. The resources reviewed include data repository and analysis tools; and we hope such introduction will promote the awareness and facilitate the usage of these resources in the cancer research community. PMID:25707591

  4. Biological database of images and genomes: tools for community annotations linking image and genomic information.

    PubMed

    Oberlin, Andrew T; Jurkovic, Dominika A; Balish, Mitchell F; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-01-01

    Genomic data and biomedical imaging data are undergoing exponential growth. However, our understanding of the phenotype-genotype connection linking the two types of data is lagging behind. While there are many types of software that enable the manipulation and analysis of image data and genomic data as separate entities, there is no framework established for linking the two. We present a generic set of software tools, BioDIG, that allows linking of image data to genomic data. BioDIG tools can be applied to a wide range of research problems that require linking images to genomes. BioDIG features the following: rapid construction of web-based workbenches, community-based annotation, user management and web services. By using BioDIG to create websites, researchers and curators can rapidly annotate a large number of images with genomic information. Here we present the BioDIG software tools that include an image module, a genome module and a user management module. We also introduce a BioDIG-based website, MyDIG, which is being used to annotate images of mycoplasmas. PMID:23550062

  5. Stacks: an analysis tool set for population genomics

    PubMed Central

    CATCHEN, JULIAN; HOHENLOHE, PAUL A.; BASSHAM, SUSAN; AMORES, ANGEL; CRESKO, WILLIAM A.

    2014-01-01

    Massively parallel short-read sequencing technologies, coupled with powerful software platforms, are enabling investigators to analyse tens of thousands of genetic markers. This wealth of data is rapidly expanding and allowing biological questions to be addressed with unprecedented scope and precision. The sizes of the data sets are now posing significant data processing and analysis challenges. Here we describe an extension of the Stacks software package to efficiently use genotype-by-sequencing data for studies of populations of organisms. Stacks now produces core population genomic summary statistics and SNP-by-SNP statistical tests. These statistics can be analysed across a reference genome using a smoothed sliding window. Stacks also now provides several output formats for several commonly used downstream analysis packages. The expanded population genomics functions in Stacks will make it a useful tool to harness the newest generation of massively parallel genotyping data for ecological and evolutionary genetics. PMID:23701397

  6. Correcting Inconsistencies and Errors in Bacterial Genome Metadata Using an Automated Curation Tool in Excel (AutoCurE).

    PubMed

    Schmedes, Sarah E; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome data are invaluable for large-scale comparative genomic studies. Current sequencing technologies have made it feasible to sequence entire bacterial genomes with relative ease and time with a substantially reduced cost per nucleotide, hence cost per genome. More than 3,000 bacterial genomes have been sequenced and are available at the finished status. Publically available genomes can be readily downloaded; however, there are challenges to verify the specific supporting data contained within the download and to identify errors and inconsistencies that may be present within the organizational data content and metadata. AutoCurE, an automated tool for bacterial genome database curation in Excel, was developed to facilitate local database curation of supporting data that accompany downloaded genomes from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. AutoCurE provides an automated approach to curate local genomic databases by flagging inconsistencies or errors by comparing the downloaded supporting data to the genome reports to verify genome name, RefSeq accession numbers, the presence of archaea, BioProject/UIDs, and sequence file descriptions. Flags are generated for nine metadata fields if there are inconsistencies between the downloaded genomes and genomes reports and if erroneous or missing data are evident. AutoCurE is an easy-to-use tool for local database curation for large-scale genome data prior to downstream analyses. PMID:26442252

  7. Software tool for the analysis and visualization of whole genome alignments

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-08-01

    GenomeVISTA is a tool which performs and displays pairwise and multiple whole genome DNA alignments. The tools provides a graphical user interface by which users can navigate alignments and multiple levels of resolution and get imformation about individual aligned regions. Users can load their own sequences into GenomeVISTA or view pre-computed alignments for genomes in the VISTA database.

  8. Employability Skills Assessment Tool Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Rauf, Rose Amnah Abd; Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Puvanasvaran, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Research nationally and internationally found that technical graduates are lacking in employability skills. As employability skills are crucial in outcome-based education, the main goal of this research is to develop an Employability Skill Assessment Tool to help students and lecturers produce competent graduates in employability skills needed by…

  9. Tetrahymena as a Unicellular Model Eukaryote: Genetic and Genomic Tools.

    PubMed

    Ruehle, Marisa D; Orias, Eduardo; Pearson, Chad G

    2016-06-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila is a ciliate model organism whose study has led to important discoveries and insights into both conserved and divergent biological processes. In this review, we describe the tools for the use of Tetrahymena as a model eukaryote, including an overview of its life cycle, orientation to its evolutionary roots, and methodological approaches to forward and reverse genetics. Recent genomic tools have expanded Tetrahymena's utility as a genetic model system. With the unique advantages that Tetrahymena provide, we argue that it will continue to be a model organism of choice. PMID:27270699

  10. Integrative genomic analysis by interoperation of bioinformatics tools in GenomeSpace.

    PubMed

    Qu, Kun; Garamszegi, Sara; Wu, Felix; Thorvaldsdottir, Helga; Liefeld, Ted; Ocana, Marco; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Pochet, Nathalie; Robinson, James T; Demchak, Barry; Hull, Tim; Ben-Artzi, Gil; Blankenberg, Daniel; Barber, Galt P; Lee, Brian T; Kuhn, Robert M; Nekrutenko, Anton; Segal, Eran; Ideker, Trey; Reich, Michael; Regev, Aviv; Chang, Howard Y; Mesirov, Jill P

    2016-03-01

    Complex biomedical analyses require the use of multiple software tools in concert and remain challenging for much of the biomedical research community. We introduce GenomeSpace (http://www.genomespace.org), a cloud-based, cooperative community resource that currently supports the streamlined interaction of 20 bioinformatics tools and data resources. To facilitate integrative analysis by non-programmers, it offers a growing set of 'recipes', short workflows to guide investigators through high-utility analysis tasks. PMID:26780094

  11. Generating genomic tools for blueberry improvement -- an update of our progress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is increased demand for and consumption of blueberries worldwide because of their many recognized health benefits. Great strides have been made in blueberry cultivar development since its domestication using traditional breeding approaches. However, genomic tools are lacking in blueberry, whic...

  12. BioViews: Java-based tools for genomic data visualization.

    PubMed

    Helt, G A; Lewis, S; Loraine, A E; Rubin, G M

    1998-03-01

    Visualization tools for bioinformatics ideally should provide universal access to the most current data in an interactive and intuitive graphical user interface. Since the introduction of Java, a language designed for distributed programming over the Web, the technology now exists to build a genomic data visualization tool that meets these requirements. Using Java we have developed a prototype genome browser applet (BioViews) that incorporates a three-level graphical view of genomic data: a physical map, an annotated sequence map, and a DNA sequence display. Annotated biological features are displayed on the physical and sequence-based maps, and the different views are interconnected. The applet is linked to several databases and can retrieve features and display hyperlinked textual data on selected features. In addition to browsing genomic data, different types of analyses can be performed interactively and the results of these analyses visualized alongside prior annotations. Our genome browser is built on top of extensible, reusable graphic components specifically designed for bioinformatics. Other groups can (and do) reuse this work in various ways. Genome centers can reuse large parts of the genome browser with minor modifications, bioinformatics groups working on sequence analysis can reuse components to build front ends for analysis programs, and biology laboratories can reuse components to publish results as dynamic Web documents. PMID:9521932

  13. The CRISPR/Cas Genome-Editing Tool: Application in Improvement of Crops

    PubMed Central

    Khatodia, Surender; Bhatotia, Kirti; Passricha, Nishat; Khurana, S. M. P.; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats associated Cas9/sgRNA system is a novel targeted genome-editing technique derived from bacterial immune system. It is an inexpensive, easy, most user friendly and rapidly adopted genome editing tool transforming to revolutionary paradigm. This technique enables precise genomic modifications in many different organisms and tissues. Cas9 protein is an RNA guided endonuclease utilized for creating targeted double-stranded breaks with only a short RNA sequence to confer recognition of the target in animals and plants. Development of genetically edited (GE) crops similar to those developed by conventional or mutation breeding using this potential technique makes it a promising and extremely versatile tool for providing sustainable productive agriculture for better feeding of rapidly growing population in a changing climate. The emerging areas of research for the genome editing in plants include interrogating gene function, rewiring the regulatory signaling networks and sgRNA library for high-throughput loss-of-function screening. In this review, we have described the broad applicability of the Cas9 nuclease mediated targeted plant genome editing for development of designer crops. The regulatory uncertainty and social acceptance of plant breeding by Cas9 genome editing have also been described. With this powerful and innovative technique the designer GE non-GM plants could further advance climate resilient and sustainable agriculture in the future and maximizing yield by combating abiotic and biotic stresses. PMID:27148329

  14. The CRISPR/Cas Genome-Editing Tool: Application in Improvement of Crops.

    PubMed

    Khatodia, Surender; Bhatotia, Kirti; Passricha, Nishat; Khurana, S M P; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats associated Cas9/sgRNA system is a novel targeted genome-editing technique derived from bacterial immune system. It is an inexpensive, easy, most user friendly and rapidly adopted genome editing tool transforming to revolutionary paradigm. This technique enables precise genomic modifications in many different organisms and tissues. Cas9 protein is an RNA guided endonuclease utilized for creating targeted double-stranded breaks with only a short RNA sequence to confer recognition of the target in animals and plants. Development of genetically edited (GE) crops similar to those developed by conventional or mutation breeding using this potential technique makes it a promising and extremely versatile tool for providing sustainable productive agriculture for better feeding of rapidly growing population in a changing climate. The emerging areas of research for the genome editing in plants include interrogating gene function, rewiring the regulatory signaling networks and sgRNA library for high-throughput loss-of-function screening. In this review, we have described the broad applicability of the Cas9 nuclease mediated targeted plant genome editing for development of designer crops. The regulatory uncertainty and social acceptance of plant breeding by Cas9 genome editing have also been described. With this powerful and innovative technique the designer GE non-GM plants could further advance climate resilient and sustainable agriculture in the future and maximizing yield by combating abiotic and biotic stresses. PMID:27148329

  15. The SickKids Genome Clinic: developing and evaluating a pediatric model for individualized genomic medicine.

    PubMed

    Bowdin, S C; Hayeems, R Z; Monfared, N; Cohn, R D; Meyn, M S

    2016-01-01

    Our increasing knowledge of how genomic variants affect human health and the falling costs of whole-genome sequencing are driving the development of individualized genomic medicine. This new clinical paradigm uses knowledge of an individual's genomic variants to anticipate, diagnose and manage disease. While individualized genetic medicine offers the promise of transformative change in health care, it forces us to reconsider existing ethical, scientific and clinical paradigms. The potential benefits of pre-symptomatic identification of at-risk individuals, improved diagnostics, individualized therapy, accurate prognosis and avoidance of adverse drug reactions coexist with the potential risks of uninterpretable results, psychological harm, outmoded counseling models and increased health care costs. Here we review the challenges, opportunities and limits of integrating genomic analysis into pediatric clinical practice and describe a model for implementing individualized genomic medicine. Our multidisciplinary team of bioinformaticians, health economists, health services and policy researchers, ethicists, geneticists, genetic counselors and clinicians has designed a 'Genome Clinic' research project that addresses multiple challenges in pediatric genomic medicine--ranging from development of bioinformatics tools for the clinical assessment of genomic variants and the discovery of disease genes to health policy inquiries, assessment of clinical care models, patient preference and the ethics of consent. PMID:25813238

  16. Revolutions in Neuroscience: Tool Development.

    PubMed

    Bickle, John

    2016-01-01

    Thomas Kuhn's famous model of the components and dynamics of scientific revolutions is still dominant to this day across science, philosophy, and history. The guiding philosophical theme of this article is that, concerning actual revolutions in neuroscience over the past 60 years, Kuhn's account is wrong. There have been revolutions, and new ones are brewing, but they do not turn on competing paradigms, anomalies, or the like. Instead, they turn exclusively on the development of new experimental tools. I adopt a metascientific approach and examine in detail the development of two recent neuroscience revolutions: the impact of engineered genetically mutated mammals in the search for causal mechanisms of "higher" cognitive functions; and the more recent impact of optogenetics and designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs). The two key metascientific concepts, I derive from these case studies are a revolutionary new tool's motivating problem, and its initial and second-phase hook experiments. These concepts hardly exhaust a detailed metascience of tool development experiments in neuroscience, but they get that project off to a useful start and distinguish the subsequent account of neuroscience revolutions clearly from Kuhn's famous model. I close with a brief remark about the general importance of molecular biology for a current philosophical understanding of science, as comparable to the place physics occupied when Kuhn formulated his famous theory of scientific revolutions. PMID:27013992

  17. Molecular Tools for Exploring Polyploid Genomes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Aversano, Riccardo; Ercolano, Maria Raffaella; Caruso, Immacolata; Fasano, Carlo; Rosellini, Daniele; Carputo, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Polyploidy is a very common phenomenon in the plant kingdom, where even diploid species are often described as paleopolyploids. The polyploid condition may bring about several advantages compared to the diploid state. Polyploids often show phenotypes that are not present in their diploid progenitors or exceed the range of the contributing species. Some of these traits may play a role in heterosis or could favor adaptation to new ecological niches. Advances in genomics and sequencing technology may create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring the molecular effects of polyploidization. Through this review, we provide an overview of technologies and strategies that may allow an in-depth analysis of polyploid genomes. After introducing some basic aspects on the origin and genetics of polyploids, we highlight the main tools available for genome and gene expression analysis and summarize major findings. In the last part of this review, the implications of next generation sequencing are briefly discussed. The accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists to understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement. PMID:22949863

  18. Whole genome multilocus sequence typing as an epidemiologic tool for Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Kingry, Luke C; Rowe, Lori A; Respicio-Kingry, Laurel B; Beard, Charles B; Schriefer, Martin E; Petersen, Jeannine M

    2016-04-01

    Human plague is a severe and often fatal zoonotic disease caused by Yersinia pestis. For public health investigations of human cases, nonintensive whole genome molecular typing tools, capable of defining epidemiologic relationships, are advantageous. Whole genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST) is a recently developed methodology that simplifies genomic analyses by transforming millions of base pairs of sequence into character data for each gene. We sequenced 13 US Y. pestis isolates with known epidemiologic relationships. Sequences were assembled de novo, and multilocus sequence typing alleles were assigned by comparison against 3979 open reading frames from the reference strain CO92. Allele-based cluster analysis accurately grouped the 13 isolates, as well as 9 publicly available Y. pestis isolates, by their epidemiologic relationships. Our findings indicate wgMLST is a simplified, sensitive, and scalable tool for epidemiologic analysis of Y. pestis strains. PMID:26778487

  19. Sugarcane genome sequencing by methylation filtration provides tools for genomic research in the genus Saccharum

    PubMed Central

    Grativol, Clícia; Regulski, Michael; Bertalan, Marcelo; McCombie, W. Richard; da Silva, Felipe Rodrigues; Neto, Adhemar Zerlotini; Vicentini, Renato; Farinelli, Laurent; Hemerly, Adriana Silva; Martienssen, Robert A.; Ferreira, Paulo Cavalcanti Gomes

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Many economically important crops have large and complex genomes, which hampers sequencing of their genome by standard methods such as WGS. Large tracts of methylated repeats occur at plant genomes interspersed by hypomethylated gene-rich regions. Gene enrichment strategies based on methylation profile offer an alternative to sequencing repetitive genomes. Here, we have applied methyl filtration (MF) with McrBC digestion to enrich for euchromatic regions of sugarcane genome. To verify the efficiency of MF and the assembly quality of sequences submitted to gene-enrichment strategy, we have compared assemblies using MF and unfiltered (UF) libraries. The MF allowed the achievement of a better assembly by filtering out 35% of the sugarcane genome and by producing 1.5 times more scaffolds and 1.7 times more assembled Mb compared to unfiltered scaffolds. The coverage of sorghum CDS by MF scaffolds was at least 36% higher than by UF scaffolds. Using MF technology, we increased by 134X the coverage of genic regions of the monoploid sugarcane genome. The MF reads assembled into scaffolds covering all genes at sugarcane BACs, 97.2% of sugarcane ESTs, 92.7% of sugarcane RNA-seq reads and 98.4% of sorghum protein sequences. Analysis of MF scaffolds encoding enzymes of the sucrose/starch pathway discovered 291 SNPs in the wild sugarcane species, S. spontaneum and S. officinarum. A large number of microRNA genes were also identified in the MF scaffolds. The information achieved by the MF dataset provides a valuable tool for genomic research in the genus Saccharum and improvement of sugarcane as a biofuel crop. PMID:24773339

  20. Sugarcane genome sequencing by methylation filtration provides tools for genomic research in the genus Saccharum.

    PubMed

    Grativol, Clícia; Regulski, Michael; Bertalan, Marcelo; McCombie, W Richard; da Silva, Felipe Rodrigues; Zerlotini Neto, Adhemar; Vicentini, Renato; Farinelli, Laurent; Hemerly, Adriana Silva; Martienssen, Robert A; Ferreira, Paulo Cavalcanti Gomes

    2014-07-01

    Many economically important crops have large and complex genomes that hamper their sequencing by standard methods such as whole genome shotgun (WGS). Large tracts of methylated repeats occur in plant genomes that are interspersed by hypomethylated gene-rich regions. Gene-enrichment strategies based on methylation profiles offer an alternative to sequencing repetitive genomes. Here, we have applied methyl filtration with McrBC endonuclease digestion to enrich for euchromatic regions in the sugarcane genome. To verify the efficiency of methylation filtration and the assembly quality of sequences submitted to gene-enrichment strategy, we have compared assemblies using methyl-filtered (MF) and unfiltered (UF) libraries. The use of methy filtration allowed a better assembly by filtering out 35% of the sugarcane genome and by producing 1.5× more scaffolds and 1.7× more assembled Mb in length compared with unfiltered dataset. The coverage of sorghum coding sequences (CDS) by MF scaffolds was at least 36% higher than by the use of UF scaffolds. Using MF technology, we increased by 134× the coverage of gene regions of the monoploid sugarcane genome. The MF reads assembled into scaffolds that covered all genes of the sugarcane bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), 97.2% of sugarcane expressed sequence tags (ESTs), 92.7% of sugarcane RNA-seq reads and 98.4% of sorghum protein sequences. Analysis of MF scaffolds from encoded enzymes of the sucrose/starch pathway discovered 291 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the wild sugarcane species, S. spontaneum and S. officinarum. A large number of microRNA genes was also identified in the MF scaffolds. The information achieved by the MF dataset provides a valuable tool for genomic research in the genus Saccharum and for improvement of sugarcane as a biofuel crop. PMID:24773339

  1. A comparison of tools for the simulation of genomic next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Escalona, Merly; Rocha, Sara; Posada, David

    2016-08-01

    Computer simulation of genomic data has become increasingly popular for assessing and validating biological models or for gaining an understanding of specific data sets. Several computational tools for the simulation of next-generation sequencing (NGS) data have been developed in recent years, which could be used to compare existing and new NGS analytical pipelines. Here we review 23 of these tools, highlighting their distinct functionality, requirements and potential applications. We also provide a decision tree for the informed selection of an appropriate NGS simulation tool for the specific question at hand. PMID:27320129

  2. Functional Genomics Tools for Haemonchus contortus and Lessons From Other Helminths.

    PubMed

    Britton, C; Roberts, B; Marks, N D

    2016-01-01

    The availability of genome and transcriptome data for parasitic nematodes, including Haemonchus contortus, has highlighted the need to develop functional genomics tools. Comparative genomic analysis, particularly using data from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, can help predict gene function. Reliable approaches to study function directly in parasitic nematodes are currently lacking. However, gene knockdown by RNA interference (RNAi) is being successfully used in schistosome and planarian species to define gene functions. Lessons from these systems may be applied to improve RNAi in H. contortus. Previous studies in H. contortus and related nematodes demonstrated reliable RNAi-mediated silencing of some genes, but not others. Current data suggest that susceptibility to RNAi in these nematodes is limited to genes expressed in sites accessible to the environment, such as the gut, amphids and excretory cell. Therefore, RNAi is functional in H. contortus, but improvements are needed to develop this system as a functional genomics platform. Here, we summarize RNAi studies on H. contortus and discuss the optimization of RNA delivery and improvements to culture methods to enhance larval development, protein turnover and the induction of phenotypic effects in vitro. The transgenic delivery of RNA or dominant-negative gene constructs and the recently developed CRISPR/Cas genome-editing technique are considered as potential alternative approaches for gene knockout. This is a key time to devote greater effort in progressing from genome to function, to improve our understanding of the biology of Haemonchus and identify novel targets for parasite control. PMID:27238014

  3. Recent developments of genomic research in soybean.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ching; Qi, Xinpeng; Li, Man-Wah; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2012-07-20

    Soybean is an important cash crop with unique and important traits such as the high seed protein and oil contents, and the ability to perform symbiotic nitrogen fixation. A reference genome of cultivated soybeans was established in 2010, followed by whole-genome re-sequencing of wild and cultivated soybean accessions. These efforts revealed unique features of the soybean genome and helped to understand its evolution. Mapping of variations between wild and cultivated soybean genomes were performed. These genomic variations may be related to the process of domestication and human selection. Wild soybean germplasms exhibited high genomic diversity and hence may be an important source of novel genes/alleles. Accumulation of genomic data will help to refine genetic maps and expedite the identification of functional genes. In this review, we summarize the major findings from the whole-genome sequencing projects and discuss the possible impacts on soybean researches and breeding programs. Some emerging areas such as transcriptomic and epigenomic studies will be introduced. In addition, we also tabulated some useful bioinformatics tools that will help the mining of the soybean genomic data. PMID:22835978

  4. A Tool for Multiple Targeted Genome Deletions that Is Precise, Scar-Free, and Suitable for Automation

    PubMed Central

    Aubrey, Wayne; Riley, Michael C.; Young, Michael; King, Ross D.; Oliver, Stephen G.; Clare, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Many advances in synthetic biology require the removal of a large number of genomic elements from a genome. Most existing deletion methods leave behind markers, and as there are a limited number of markers, such methods can only be applied a fixed number of times. Deletion methods that recycle markers generally are either imprecise (remove untargeted sequences), or leave scar sequences which can cause genome instability and rearrangements. No existing marker recycling method is automation-friendly. We have developed a novel openly available deletion tool that consists of: 1) a method for deleting genomic elements that can be repeatedly used without limit, is precise, scar-free, and suitable for automation; and 2) software to design the method’s primers. Our tool is sequence agnostic and could be used to delete large numbers of coding sequences, promoter regions, transcription factor binding sites, terminators, etc in a single genome. We have validated our tool on the deletion of non-essential open reading frames (ORFs) from S. cerevisiae. The tool is applicable to arbitrary genomes, and we provide primer sequences for the deletion of: 90% of the ORFs from the S. cerevisiae genome, 88% of the ORFs from S. pombe genome, and 85% of the ORFs from the L. lactis genome. PMID:26630677

  5. Revolutions in Neuroscience: Tool Development

    PubMed Central

    Bickle, John

    2016-01-01

    Thomas Kuhn’s famous model of the components and dynamics of scientific revolutions is still dominant to this day across science, philosophy, and history. The guiding philosophical theme of this article is that, concerning actual revolutions in neuroscience over the past 60 years, Kuhn’s account is wrong. There have been revolutions, and new ones are brewing, but they do not turn on competing paradigms, anomalies, or the like. Instead, they turn exclusively on the development of new experimental tools. I adopt a metascientific approach and examine in detail the development of two recent neuroscience revolutions: the impact of engineered genetically mutated mammals in the search for causal mechanisms of “higher” cognitive functions; and the more recent impact of optogenetics and designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs). The two key metascientific concepts, I derive from these case studies are a revolutionary new tool’s motivating problem, and its initial and second-phase hook experiments. These concepts hardly exhaust a detailed metascience of tool development experiments in neuroscience, but they get that project off to a useful start and distinguish the subsequent account of neuroscience revolutions clearly from Kuhn’s famous model. I close with a brief remark about the general importance of molecular biology for a current philosophical understanding of science, as comparable to the place physics occupied when Kuhn formulated his famous theory of scientific revolutions. PMID:27013992

  6. A survey of tools for variant analysis of next-generation genome sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Pabinger, Stephan; Dander, Andreas; Fischer, Maria; Snajder, Rene; Sperk, Michael; Efremova, Mirjana; Krabichler, Birgit; Speicher, Michael R.; Zschocke, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genome sequencing technologies provide unprecedented opportunities to characterize individual genomic landscapes and identify mutations relevant for diagnosis and therapy. Specifically, whole-exome sequencing using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies is gaining popularity in the human genetics community due to the moderate costs, manageable data amounts and straightforward interpretation of analysis results. While whole-exome and, in the near future, whole-genome sequencing are becoming commodities, data analysis still poses significant challenges and led to the development of a plethora of tools supporting specific parts of the analysis workflow or providing a complete solution. Here, we surveyed 205 tools for whole-genome/whole-exome sequencing data analysis supporting five distinct analytical steps: quality assessment, alignment, variant identification, variant annotation and visualization. We report an overview of the functionality, features and specific requirements of the individual tools. We then selected 32 programs for variant identification, variant annotation and visualization, which were subjected to hands-on evaluation using four data sets: one set of exome data from two patients with a rare disease for testing identification of germline mutations, two cancer data sets for testing variant callers for somatic mutations, copy number variations and structural variations, and one semi-synthetic data set for testing identification of copy number variations. Our comprehensive survey and evaluation of NGS tools provides a valuable guideline for human geneticists working on Mendelian disorders, complex diseases and cancers. PMID:23341494

  7. Genome-editing tools for stem cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Vasileva, E A; Shuvalov, O U; Garabadgiu, A V; Melino, G; Barlev, N A

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide a versatile platform for regenerative studies, drug testing and disease modeling. That the expression of only four transcription factors, Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc (OKSM), is sufficient for generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from differentiated somatic cells has revolutionized the field and also highlighted the importance of OKSM as targets for genome editing. A number of novel genome-editing systems have been developed recently. In this review, we focus on successful applications of several such systems for generation of iPSCs. In particular, we discuss genome-editing systems based on zinc-finger fusion proteins (ZFs), transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and an RNA-guided DNA-specific nuclease, Cas9, derived from the bacterial defense system against viruses that utilizes clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). PMID:26203860

  8. GEnomes Management Application (GEM.app): a new software tool for large-scale collaborative genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Michael A; Lebrigio, Rafael F Acosta; Van Booven, Derek; Ulloa, Rick H; Powell, Eric; Speziani, Fiorella; Tekin, Mustafa; Schüle, Rebecca; Züchner, Stephan

    2013-06-01

    Novel genes are now identified at a rapid pace for many Mendelian disorders, and increasingly, for genetically complex phenotypes. However, new challenges have also become evident: (1) effectively managing larger exome and/or genome datasets, especially for smaller labs; (2) direct hands-on analysis and contextual interpretation of variant data in large genomic datasets; and (3) many small and medium-sized clinical and research-based investigative teams around the world are generating data that, if combined and shared, will significantly increase the opportunities for the entire community to identify new genes. To address these challenges, we have developed GEnomes Management Application (GEM.app), a software tool to annotate, manage, visualize, and analyze large genomic datasets (https://genomics.med.miami.edu/). GEM.app currently contains ∼1,600 whole exomes from 50 different phenotypes studied by 40 principal investigators from 15 different countries. The focus of GEM.app is on user-friendly analysis for nonbioinformaticians to make next-generation sequencing data directly accessible. Yet, GEM.app provides powerful and flexible filter options, including single family filtering, across family/phenotype queries, nested filtering, and evaluation of segregation in families. In addition, the system is fast, obtaining results within 4 sec across ∼1,200 exomes. We believe that this system will further enhance identification of genetic causes of human disease. PMID:23463597

  9. Building a model: developing genomic resources for common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) with low coverage genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Milkweeds (Asclepias L.) have been extensively investigated in diverse areas of evolutionary biology and ecology; however, there are few genetic resources available to facilitate and compliment these studies. This study explored how low coverage genome sequencing of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) could be useful in characterizing the genome of a plant without prior genomic information and for development of genomic resources as a step toward further developing A. syriaca as a model in ecology and evolution. Results A 0.5× genome of A. syriaca was produced using Illumina sequencing. A virtually complete chloroplast genome of 158,598 bp was assembled, revealing few repeats and loss of three genes: accD, clpP, and ycf1. A nearly complete rDNA cistron (18S-5.8S-26S; 7,541 bp) and 5S rDNA (120 bp) sequence were obtained. Assessment of polymorphism revealed that the rDNA cistron and 5S rDNA had 0.3% and 26.7% polymorphic sites, respectively. A partial mitochondrial genome sequence (130,764 bp), with identical gene content to tobacco, was also assembled. An initial characterization of repeat content indicated that Ty1/copia-like retroelements are the most common repeat type in the milkweed genome. At least one A. syriaca microread hit 88% of Catharanthus roseus (Apocynaceae) unigenes (median coverage of 0.29×) and 66% of single copy orthologs (COSII) in asterids (median coverage of 0.14×). From this partial characterization of the A. syriaca genome, markers for population genetics (microsatellites) and phylogenetics (low-copy nuclear genes) studies were developed. Conclusions The results highlight the promise of next generation sequencing for development of genomic resources for any organism. Low coverage genome sequencing allows characterization of the high copy fraction of the genome and exploration of the low copy fraction of the genome, which facilitate the development of molecular tools for further study of a target species and its relatives

  10. OmniMapFree: A unified tool to visualise and explore sequenced genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    • Background Acquiring and exploring whole genome sequence information for a species under investigation is now a routine experimental approach. On most genome browsers, typically, only the DNA sequence, EST support, motif search results, and GO annotations are displayed. However, for many species, a growing volume of additional experimental information is available but this is rarely searchable within the landscape of the entire genome. • Results We have developed a generic software which permits users to view a single genome in entirety either within its chromosome or supercontig context within a single window. This software permits the genome to be displayed at any scales and with any features. Different data types and data sets are displayed onto the genome, which have been acquired from other types of studies including classical genetics, forward and reverse genetics, transcriptomics, proteomics and improved annotation from alternative sources. In each display, different types of information can be overlapped, then retrieved in the desired combinations and scales and used in follow up analyses. The displays generated are of publication quality. • Conclusions OmniMapFree provides a unified, versatile and easy-to-use software tool for studying a single genome in association with all the other datasets and data types available for the organism. PMID:22085540

  11. ECR Browser: A Tool For Visualizing And Accessing Data From Comparisons Of Multiple Vertebrate Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Nobrega, M A

    2004-01-06

    The increasing number of vertebrate genomes being sequenced in draft or finished form provide a unique opportunity to study and decode the language of DNA sequence through comparative genome alignments. However, novel tools and strategies are required to accommodate this increasing volume of genomic information and to facilitate experimental annotation of genome function. Here we present the ECR Browser, a tool that provides an easy and dynamic access to whole genome alignments of human, mouse, rat and fish sequences. This web-based tool (http://ecrbrowser.dcode.org) provides the starting point for discovery of novel genes, identification of distant gene regulatory elements and prediction of transcription factor binding sites. The genome alignment portal of the ECR Browser also permits fast and automated alignment of any user-submitted sequence to the genome of choice. The interconnection of the ECR browser with other DNA sequence analysis tools creates a unique portal for studying and exploring vertebrate genomes.

  12. Single cell analytic tools for drug discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    Heath, James R.; Ribas, Antoni; Mischel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic, functional, or compositional heterogeneity of healthy and diseased tissues presents major challenges in drug discovery and development.1-3 In cancers, heterogeneity may be essential for tumor stability,4 but its precise role in tumor biology is poorly resolved. This challenges the design of accurate disease models for use in drug development, and can confound the interpretation of biomarker levels, and of patient responses to specific therapies. The complex nature of heterogeneous tissues has motivated the development of tools for single cell genomic, transcriptomic, and multiplex proteomic analysis. We review these tools, assess their advantages and limitations, and explore their potential applications in drug discovery and development. PMID:26669673

  13. VibrioBase: a model for next-generation genome and annotation database development.

    PubMed

    Choo, Siew Woh; Heydari, Hamed; Tan, Tze King; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Beh, Ching Yew; Wee, Wei Yee; Mutha, Naresh V R; Wong, Guat Jah; Ang, Mia Yang; Yazdi, Amir Hessam

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate the ongoing research of Vibrio spp., a dedicated platform for the Vibrio research community is needed to host the fast-growing amount of genomic data and facilitate the analysis of these data. We present VibrioBase, a useful resource platform, providing all basic features of a sequence database with the addition of unique analysis tools which could be valuable for the Vibrio research community. VibrioBase currently houses a total of 252 Vibrio genomes developed in a user-friendly manner and useful to enable the analysis of these genomic data, particularly in the field of comparative genomics. Besides general data browsing features, VibrioBase offers analysis tools such as BLAST interfaces and JBrowse genome browser. Other important features of this platform include our newly developed in-house tools, the pairwise genome comparison (PGC) tool, and pathogenomics profiling tool (PathoProT). The PGC tool is useful in the identification and comparative analysis of two genomes, whereas PathoProT is designed for comparative pathogenomics analysis of Vibrio strains. Both of these tools will enable researchers with little experience in bioinformatics to get meaningful information from Vibrio genomes with ease. We have tested the validity and suitability of these tools and features for use in the next-generation database development. PMID:25243218

  14. VibrioBase: A Model for Next-Generation Genome and Annotation Database Development

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Siew Woh; Tan, Tze King; Mutha, Naresh V. R.; Wong, Guat Jah

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate the ongoing research of Vibrio spp., a dedicated platform for the Vibrio research community is needed to host the fast-growing amount of genomic data and facilitate the analysis of these data. We present VibrioBase, a useful resource platform, providing all basic features of a sequence database with the addition of unique analysis tools which could be valuable for the Vibrio research community. VibrioBase currently houses a total of 252 Vibrio genomes developed in a user-friendly manner and useful to enable the analysis of these genomic data, particularly in the field of comparative genomics. Besides general data browsing features, VibrioBase offers analysis tools such as BLAST interfaces and JBrowse genome browser. Other important features of this platform include our newly developed in-house tools, the pairwise genome comparison (PGC) tool, and pathogenomics profiling tool (PathoProT). The PGC tool is useful in the identification and comparative analysis of two genomes, whereas PathoProT is designed for comparative pathogenomics analysis of Vibrio strains. Both of these tools will enable researchers with little experience in bioinformatics to get meaningful information from Vibrio genomes with ease. We have tested the validity and suitability of these tools and features for use in the next-generation database development. PMID:25243218

  15. The capsicum transcriptome DB: a "hot" tool for genomic research.

    PubMed

    Góngora-Castillo, Elsa; Fajardo-Jaime, Rubén; Fernández-Cortes, Araceli; Jofre-Garfias, Alba E; Lozoya-Gloria, Edmundo; Martínez, Octavio; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí; Rivera-Bustamante, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Chili pepper (Capsicum annuum) is an economically important crop with no available public genome sequence. We describe a genomic resource to facilitate Capsicum annuum research. A collection of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) derived from five C. annuum organs (root, stem, leaf, flower and fruit) were sequenced using the Sanger method and multiple leaf transcriptomes were deeply sampled using with GS-pyrosequencing. A hybrid assembly of 1,324,516 raw reads yielded 32,314 high quality contigs as validated by coverage and identity analysis with existing pepper sequences. Overall, 75.5% of the contigs had significant sequence similarity to entries in nucleic acid and protein databases; 23% of the sequences have not been previously reported for C. annuum and expand sequence resources for this species. A MySQL database and a user-friendly Web interface were constructed with search-tools that permit queries of the ESTs including sequence, functional annotation, Gene Ontology classification, metabolic pathways, and assembly information. The Capsicum Transcriptome DB is free available from http://www.bioingenios.ira.cinvestav.mx:81/Joomla/ PMID:22359434

  16. Genomes correction and assembling: present methods and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcieszek, Michał; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; Nowak, Robert; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2014-11-01

    Recent rapid development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies provided significant impact into genomics field of study enabling implementation of many de novo sequencing projects of new species which was previously confined by technological costs. Along with advancement of NGS there was need for adjustment in assembly programs. New algorithms must cope with massive amounts of data computation in reasonable time limits and processing power and hardware is also an important factor. In this paper, we address the issue of assembly pipeline for de novo genome assembly provided by programs presently available for scientist both as commercial and as open - source software. The implementation of four different approaches - Greedy, Overlap - Layout - Consensus (OLC), De Bruijn and Integrated resulting in variation of performance is the main focus of our discussion with additional insight into issue of short and long reads correction.

  17. PREDetector: a new tool to identify regulatory elements in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Hiard, Samuel; Marée, Raphaël; Colson, Séverine; Hoskisson, Paul A; Titgemeyer, Fritz; van Wezel, Gilles P; Joris, Bernard; Wehenkel, Louis; Rigali, Sébastien

    2007-06-15

    In the post-genomic area, the prediction of transcription factor regulons by position weight matrix-based programmes is a powerful approach to decipher biological pathways and to modelize regulatory networks in bacteria. The main difficulty once a regulon prediction is available is to estimate its reliability prior to start expensive experimental validations and therefore trying to find a way how to identify true positive hits from an endless list of potential target genes of a regulatory protein. Here we introduce PREDetector (Prokaryotic Regulatory Elements Detector), a tool developed for predicting regulons of DNA-binding proteins in bacterial genomes that, beside the automatic prediction, scoring and positioning of potential binding sites and their respective target genes in annotated bacterial genomes, it also provides an easy way to estimate the thresholds where to find reliable possible new target genes. PREDetector can be downloaded freely at http://www.montefiore.ulg.ac.be/~hiard/PreDetector/PreDetector.php. PMID:17451648

  18. AUTOGSCAN: powerful tools for automated genome-wide linkage and linkage disequilibrium analysis.

    PubMed

    Hiekkalinna, Tero; Terwilliger, Joseph D; Sammalisto, Sampo; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus

    2005-02-01

    Genome-wide linkage analysis using multiple traits and statistical software packages is a tedious process which requires a significant amount of manual file manipulation. Different linkage analysis programs require different input file formats, making the task of analyzing data with multiple methods even more time-consuming. We have developed a software tool, AUTOGSCAN, that automates file formatting, the running of statistical analyses, and the summarizing of resulting statistics for whole genome scans with a push of a button, using several independent, and often idiosyncratic, statistical software packages such as MERLIN, SOLAR and GENEHUNTER. We also describe a program, ANALYZE, designed to run qualitative linkage analysis with several different statistical strategies and programs to efficiently screen for linkage and linkage disequilibrium for a given discrete trait. The ANALYZE program can also be used by AUTOGSCAN in a genome-wide sense. PMID:15836805

  19. Tools for Accurate and Efficient Analysis of Complex Evolutionary Mechanisms in Microbial Genomes. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhleh, Luay

    2014-03-12

    I proposed to develop computationally efficient tools for accurate detection and reconstruction of microbes' complex evolutionary mechanisms, thus enabling rapid and accurate annotation, analysis and understanding of their genomes. To achieve this goal, I proposed to address three aspects. (1) Mathematical modeling. A major challenge facing the accurate detection of HGT is that of distinguishing between these two events on the one hand and other events that have similar "effects." I proposed to develop a novel mathematical approach for distinguishing among these events. Further, I proposed to develop a set of novel optimization criteria for the evolutionary analysis of microbial genomes in the presence of these complex evolutionary events. (2) Algorithm design. In this aspect of the project, I proposed to develop an array of e cient and accurate algorithms for analyzing microbial genomes based on the formulated optimization criteria. Further, I proposed to test the viability of the criteria and the accuracy of the algorithms in an experimental setting using both synthetic as well as biological data. (3) Software development. I proposed the nal outcome to be a suite of software tools which implements the mathematical models as well as the algorithms developed.

  20. CHOPCHOP: a CRISPR/Cas9 and TALEN web tool for genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Tessa G.; Cruz, José M.; Gagnon, James A.; Church, George M.; Valen, Eivind

    2014-01-01

    Major advances in genome editing have recently been made possible with the development of the TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 methods. The speed and ease of implementing these technologies has led to an explosion of mutant and transgenic organisms. A rate-limiting step in efficiently applying TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 methods is the selection and design of targeting constructs. We have developed an online tool, CHOPCHOP (https://chopchop.rc.fas.harvard.edu), to expedite the design process. CHOPCHOP accepts a wide range of inputs (gene identifiers, genomic regions or pasted sequences) and provides an array of advanced options for target selection. It uses efficient sequence alignment algorithms to minimize search times, and rigorously predicts off-target binding of single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and TALENs. Each query produces an interactive visualization of the gene with candidate target sites displayed at their genomic positions and color-coded according to quality scores. In addition, for each possible target site, restriction sites and primer candidates are visualized, facilitating a streamlined pipeline of mutant generation and validation. The ease-of-use and speed of CHOPCHOP make it a valuable tool for genome engineering. PMID:24861617

  1. System analysis: Developing tools for the future

    SciTech Connect

    De Jong, K.; clever, J.; Draper, J.V.; Davies, B.; Lonks, A.

    1996-02-01

    This report introduces and evaluates system analysis tools that were developed, or are under development, for the Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). Additionally, it discusses system analysis work completed using these tools aimed at completing a system analysis of the retrieval of waste from underground storage tanks on the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. The tools developed and evaluated include a mixture of commercially available tools adapted to RTDP requirements, and some tools developed in house. The tools that are included in this report include: a Process Diagramming Tool, a Cost Modeling Tool, an Amortization Modeling Tool, a graphical simulation linked to the Cost Modeling Tool, a decision assistance tool, and a system thinking tool. Additionally, the importance of performance testing to the RTDP and the results of such testing executed is discussed. Further, the results of the Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR) System Diagram, the TWR Operations Cost Model, and the TWR Amortization Model are presented, and the implication of the results are discussed. Finally, the RTDP system analysis tools are assessed and some recommendations are made regarding continuing development of the tools and process.

  2. Sequencing quality assessment tools to enable data-driven informatics for high throughput genomics

    PubMed Central

    Leggett, Richard M.; Ramirez-Gonzalez, Ricardo H.; Clavijo, Bernardo J.; Waite, Darren; Davey, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    The processes of quality assessment and control are an active area of research at The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC). Unlike other sequencing centers that often concentrate on a certain species or technology, TGAC applies expertise in genomics and bioinformatics to a wide range of projects, often requiring bespoke wet lab and in silico workflows. TGAC is fortunate to have access to a diverse range of sequencing and analysis platforms, and we are at the forefront of investigations into library quality and sequence data assessment. We have developed and implemented a number of algorithms, tools, pipelines and packages to ascertain, store, and expose quality metrics across a number of next-generation sequencing platforms, allowing rapid and in-depth cross-platform Quality Control (QC) bioinformatics. In this review, we describe these tools as a vehicle for data-driven informatics, offering the potential to provide richer context for downstream analysis and to inform experimental design. PMID:24381581

  3. FilooT: a visualization tool for exploring genomic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinaly, Mahshid; Soltangheis, Mina; Shaw, Chris D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to enhance analysis of synthetic health data of the IEEE VAST Challenge 2010, we introduce an interactive Visual Analytics tool called FilooT designed as a part of the Interactive Multi-genomic Analysis System (IMAS) project. In this paper, we describe different interactive views of FilooT: the Tabular View for exploring and comparing genetic sequences, the Matrix View for sorting sequences according to the values of different characteristics, the P-value View for finding the most important mutations across a family of sequences, the Graph View for finding related sequences and the Group View to group them for further investigation. We followed the Nested Process Model framework throughout the design process and the evaluation. To understand the tool's design capabilities for target domain analysts, we conducted a User Experience scenario-based study followed by an informal interview. The findings indicated how analysts employ each of the visualization and interaction designs in their Bioinformatics task-analysis process. The critical analysis of the results inspired design informing suggestions.

  4. Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplifications Tools (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect

    Quake, Steve

    2011-10-12

    Stanford University's Steve Quake on "Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplification Tools" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  5. Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplifications Tools (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema

    Quake, Steve [University of Stanford

    2013-01-22

    Stanford University's Steve Quake on "Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplification Tools" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  6. Optical Whole-Genome Restriction Mapping as a Tool for Rapidly Distinguishing and Identifying Bacterial Contaminants in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Optical restriction genome mapping is a technology in which a genome is linearized on a surface and digested with specific restriction enzymes, giving an arrangement of the genome with gaps whose order and size are unique for a given organism. Current applications of this technology include assisting with the correct scaffolding and ordering of genomes in conjunction with whole-genome sequencing, observation of genetic drift and evolution using comparative genomics and epidemiological monitoring of the spread of infections. Here, we investigated the suitability of genome mapping for use in clinical labs as a potential diagnostic tool. Materials and Methods Using whole genome mapping, we investigated the basic performance of the technology for identifying two bacteria of interest for food-safety (Lactobacilli spp. and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli). We further evaluated the performance for identifying multiple organisms from both simple and complex mixtures. Results We were able to successfully generate optical restriction maps of four Lactobacillus species as well as a strain of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli from within a mixed solution, each distinguished using a common compatible restriction enzyme. Finally, we demonstrated that optical restriction maps were successfully obtained and the correct organism identified within a clinical matrix. Conclusion With additional development, whole genome mapping may be a useful clinical tool for rapid invitro diagnostics. PMID:26435946

  7. Single Virus Genomics: A New Tool for Virus Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Lisa Zeigler; Ishoey, Thomas; Novotny, Mark A.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Lasken, Roger S.; Williamson, Shannon J.

    2011-01-01

    Whole genome amplification and sequencing of single microbial cells has significantly influenced genomics and microbial ecology by facilitating direct recovery of reference genome data. However, viral genomics continues to suffer due to difficulties related to the isolation and characterization of uncultivated viruses. We report here on a new approach called ‘Single Virus Genomics’, which enabled the isolation and complete genome sequencing of the first single virus particle. A mixed assemblage comprised of two known viruses; E. coli bacteriophages lambda and T4, were sorted using flow cytometric methods and subsequently immobilized in an agarose matrix. Genome amplification was then achieved in situ via multiple displacement amplification (MDA). The complete lambda phage genome was recovered with an average depth of coverage of approximately 437X. The isolation and genome sequencing of uncultivated viruses using Single Virus Genomics approaches will enable researchers to address questions about viral diversity, evolution, adaptation and ecology that were previously unattainable. PMID:21436882

  8. Genomic Editing Tools to Model Human Diseases with Isogenic Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Huen Suk; Bernitz, Jeffrey M.; Lee, Dung-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are considered a versatile resource in the field of biomedicine. As iPSCs are generated on an individual basis, iPSCs may be the optimal cellular material to use for disease modeling, drug discovery, and the development of patient-specific cellular therapies. Recently, to gain an in-depth understanding of human pathologies, patient-specific iPSCs have been used to model human diseases with some iPSC-derived cells recapitulating pathological phenotypes in vitro. However, complex multigenic diseases generally have not resulted in concise conclusions regarding the underlying mechanisms of disease, in large part due to genetic variations between disease-state and control iPSCs. To circumvent this, the use of genomic editing tools to generate perfect isogenic controls is gaining momentum. To date, DNA binding domain-based zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases have been utilized to create genetically defined conditions in patient-specific iPSCs, with some examples leading to the successful identification of novel mechanisms of disease. As the feasibility and utility of genomic editing tools in iPSCs improve, along with the introduction of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat system, understanding the features and limitations of genomic editing tools and their applications to iPSC technology is critical to expending the field of human disease modeling. PMID:25075441

  9. Genomic Imprinting and Epigenetic Control of Development

    PubMed Central

    Fedoriw, Andrew; Mugford, Joshua; Magnuson, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are extensively utilized during mammalian development. Specific patterns of gene expression are established during cell fate decisions, maintained as differentiation progresses, and often augmented as more specialized cell types are required. Much of what is known about these mechanisms comes from the study of two distinct epigenetic phenomena: genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. In the case of genomic imprinting, alleles are expressed in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner, whereas X-chromosome inactivation in females requires that only one X chromosome is active in each somatic nucleus. As model systems for epigenetic regulation, genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation have identified and elucidated the numerous regulatory mechanisms that function throughout the genome during development. PMID:22687277

  10. Genomic imprinting and epigenetic control of development.

    PubMed

    Fedoriw, Andrew; Mugford, Joshua; Magnuson, Terry

    2012-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are extensively utilized during mammalian development. Specific patterns of gene expression are established during cell fate decisions, maintained as differentiation progresses, and often augmented as more specialized cell types are required. Much of what is known about these mechanisms comes from the study of two distinct epigenetic phenomena: genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. In the case of genomic imprinting, alleles are expressed in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner, whereas X-chromosome inactivation in females requires that only one X chromosome is active in each somatic nucleus. As model systems for epigenetic regulation, genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation have identified and elucidated the numerous regulatory mechanisms that function throughout the genome during development. PMID:22687277

  11. The integrated microbial genomes (IMG) system in 2007: datacontent and analysis tool extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Szeto, Ernest; Palaniappan, Krishna; Grechkin, Yuri; Chu, Ken; Chen, I-Min A.; Dubchak, Inna; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2007-08-01

    The Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system is a data management, analysis and annotation platform for all publicly available genomes. IMG contains both draft and complete JGI microbial genomes integrated with all other publicly available genomes from all three domains of life, together with a large number of plasmids and viruses. IMG provides tools and viewers for analyzing and annotating genomes, genes and functions, individually or in a comparative context. Since its first release in 2005, IMG's data content and analytical capabilities have been constantly expanded through quarterly releases. IMG is provided by the DOE-Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and is available from http://img.jgi.doe.gov.

  12. Genetic Simulation Tools for Post-Genome Wide Association Studies of Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.; Bafna, Vineet; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Li, Chun; Liberles, David A.; McAllister, Kimberly; Moore, Jason H.; Paltoo, Dina N.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Peng, Bo; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Rosenfeld, Gabriel; Witte, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic simulation programs are used to model data under specified assumptions to facilitate the understanding and study of complex genetic systems. Standardized data sets generated using genetic simulation are essential for the development and application of novel analytical tools in genetic epidemiology studies. With continuing advances in high-throughput genomic technologies and generation and analysis of larger, more complex data sets, there is a need for updating current approaches in genetic simulation modeling. To provide a forum to address current and emerging challenges in this area, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop, entitled “Genetic Simulation Tools for Post-Genome Wide Association Studies of Complex Diseases” at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland on March 11-12, 2014. The goals of the workshop were to: (i) identify opportunities, challenges and resource needs for the development and application of genetic simulation models; (ii) improve the integration of tools for modeling and analysis of simulated data; and (iii) foster collaborations to facilitate development and applications of genetic simulation. During the course of the meeting the group identified challenges and opportunities for the science of simulation, software and methods development, and collaboration. This paper summarizes key discussions at the meeting, and highlights important challenges and opportunities to advance the field of genetic simulation. PMID:25371374

  13. Probing the impact of chromatin conformation on genome editing tools.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Rinsma, Marrit; Janssen, Josephine M; Liu, Jin; Maggio, Ignazio; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-07-27

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and RNA-guided nucleases derived from clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 systems have become ubiquitous genome editing tools. Despite this, the impact that distinct high-order chromatin conformations have on these sequence-specific designer nucleases is, presently, ill-defined. The same applies to the relative performance of TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases at isogenic target sequences subjected to different epigenetic modifications. Here, to address these gaps in our knowledge, we have implemented quantitative cellular systems based on genetic reporters in which the euchromatic and heterochromatic statuses of designer nuclease target sites are stringently controlled by small-molecule drug availability. By using these systems, we demonstrate that TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases are both significantly affected by the high-order epigenetic context of their target sequences. In addition, this outcome could also be ascertained for S. pyogenes CRISPR/Cas9 complexes harbouring Cas9 variants whose DNA cleaving specificities are superior to that of the wild-type Cas9 protein. Thus, the herein investigated cellular models will serve as valuable functional readouts for screening and assessing the role of chromatin on designer nucleases based on different platforms or with different architectures or compositions. PMID:27280977

  14. Program Development Tools and Infrastructures

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, M

    2012-03-12

    Exascale class machines will exhibit a new level of complexity: they will feature an unprecedented number of cores and threads, will most likely be heterogeneous and deeply hierarchical, and offer a range of new hardware techniques (such as speculative threading, transactional memory, programmable prefetching, and programmable accelerators), which all have to be utilized for an application to realize the full potential of the machine. Additionally, users will be faced with less memory per core, fixed total power budgets, and sharply reduced MTBFs. At the same time, it is expected that the complexity of applications will rise sharply for exascale systems, both to implement new science possible at exascale and to exploit the new hardware features necessary to achieve exascale performance. This is particularly true for many of the NNSA codes, which are large and often highly complex integrated simulation codes that push the limits of everything in the system including language features. To overcome these limitations and to enable users to reach exascale performance, users will expect a new generation of tools that address the bottlenecks of exascale machines, that work seamlessly with the (set of) programming models on the target machines, that scale with the machine, that provide automatic analysis capabilities, and that are flexible and modular enough to overcome the complexities and changing demands of the exascale architectures. Further, any tool must be robust enough to handle the complexity of large integrated codes while keeping the user's learning curve low. With the ASC program, in particular the CSSE (Computational Systems and Software Engineering) and CCE (Common Compute Environment) projects, we are working towards a new generation of tools that fulfill these requirements and that provide our users as well as the larger HPC community with the necessary tools, techniques, and methodologies required to make exascale performance a reality.

  15. Capitalizing on App Development Tools and Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luterbach, Kenneth J.; Hubbell, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Instructional developers and others creating apps must choose from a wide variety of app development tools and technologies. Some app development tools have incorporated visual programming features, which enable some drag and drop coding and contextual programming. While those features help novices begin programming with greater ease, questions…

  16. Developing molecular tools for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor-Mohammadi, Samaneh

    Microalgae have garnered increasing interest over the years for their ability to produce compounds ranging from biofuels to neutraceuticals. A main focus of researchers has been to use microalgae as a natural bioreactor for the production of valuable and complex compounds. Recombinant protein expression in the chloroplasts of green algae has recently become more routine; however, the heterologous expression of multiple proteins or complete biosynthetic pathways remains a significant challenge. To take full advantage of these organisms' natural abilities, sophisticated molecular tools are needed to be able to introduce and functionally express multiple gene biosynthetic pathways in its genome. To achieve the above objective, we have sought to establish a method to construct, integrate and express multigene operons in the chloroplast and nuclear genome of the model microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here we show that a modified DNA Assembler approach can be used to rapidly assemble multiple-gene biosynthetic pathways in yeast and then integrate these assembled pathways at a site-specific location in the chloroplast, or by random integration in the nuclear genome of C. reinhardtii. As a proof of concept, this method was used to successfully integrate and functionally express up to three reporter proteins (AphA6, AadA, and GFP) in the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii and up to three reporter proteins (Ble, AphVIII, and GFP) in its nuclear genome. An analysis of the relative gene expression of the engineered strains showed significant differences in the mRNA expression levels of the reporter genes and thus highlights the importance of proper promoter/untranslated-region selection when constructing a target pathway. In addition, this work focuses on expressing the cofactor regeneration enzyme phosphite dehydrogenase (PTDH) in the chloroplast and nuclear genomes of C. reinhardtii. The PTDH enzyme converts phosphite into phosphate and NAD(P)+ into NAD(P)H. The reduced

  17. Use of Genomic Tools to Improve Cattle Health in the Context of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Raszek, Mikolaj M.; Guan, Le L.; Plastow, Graham S.

    2016-01-01

    Although infectious diseases impose a heavy economic burden on the cattle industry, the etiology of many disorders that affect livestock is not fully elucidated, and effective countermeasures are often lacking. The main tools available until now have been vaccines, antibiotics and antiparasitic drugs. Although these have been very successful in some cases, the appearance of parasite and microbial resistance to these treatments is a cause of concern. Next-generation sequencing provides important opportunities to tackle problems associated with pathogenic illnesses. This review describes the rapid gains achieved to track disease progression, identify the pathogens involved, and map pathogen interactions with the host. Use of novel genomic tools subsequently aids in treatment development, as well as successful creation of breeding programs aimed toward less susceptible livestock. These may be important tools for mitigating the long term effects of combating infection and helping reduce the reliance on antibiotic treatment. PMID:27014337

  18. Genome-Wide Approaches to Drosophila Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Frasch, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The development of the dorsal vessel in Drosophila is one of the first systems in which key mechanisms regulating cardiogenesis have been defined in great detail at the genetic and molecular level. Due to evolutionary conservation, these findings have also provided major inputs into studies of cardiogenesis in vertebrates. Many of the major components that control Drosophila cardiogenesis were discovered based on candidate gene approaches and their functions were defined by employing the outstanding genetic tools and molecular techniques available in this system. More recently, approaches have been taken that aim to interrogate the entire genome in order to identify novel components and describe genomic features that are pertinent to the regulation of heart development. Apart from classical forward genetic screens, the availability of the thoroughly annotated Drosophila genome sequence made new genome-wide approaches possible, which include the generation of massive numbers of RNA interference (RNAi) reagents that were used in forward genetic screens, as well as studies of the transcriptomes and proteomes of the developing heart under normal and experimentally manipulated conditions. Moreover, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments have been performed with the aim to define the full set of genomic binding sites of the major cardiogenic transcription factors, their relevant target genes, and a more complete picture of the regulatory network that drives cardiogenesis. This review will give an overview on these genome-wide approaches to Drosophila heart development and on computational analyses of the obtained information that ultimately aim to provide a description of this process at the systems level. PMID:27294102

  19. Analysis of interactions between the epigenome and structural mutability of the genome using Genboree workbench tools

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interactions between the epigenome and structural genomic variation are potentially bi-directional. In one direction, structural variants may cause epigenomic changes in cis. In the other direction, specific local epigenomic states such as DNA hypomethylation associate with local genomic instability. Methods To study these interactions, we have developed several tools and exposed them to the scientific community using the Software-as-a-Service model via the Genboree Workbench. One key tool is Breakout, an algorithm for fast and accurate detection of structural variants from mate pair sequencing data. Results By applying Breakout and other Genboree Workbench tools we map breakpoints in breast and prostate cancer cell lines and tumors, discriminate between polymorphic breakpoints of germline origin and those of somatic origin, and analyze both types of breakpoints in the context of the Human Epigenome Atlas, ENCODE databases, and other sources of epigenomic profiles. We confirm previous findings that genomic instability in human germline associates with hypomethylation of DNA, binding sites of Suz12, a key member of the PRC2 Polycomb complex, and with PRC2-associated histone marks H3K27me3 and H3K9me3. Breakpoints in germline and in breast cancer associate with distal regulatory of active gene transcription. Breast cancer cell lines and tumors show distinct patterns of structural mutability depending on their ER, PR, or HER2 status. Conclusions The patterns of association that we detected suggest that cell-type specific epigenomes may determine cell-type specific patterns of selective structural mutability of the genome. PMID:25080362

  20. Genome Duplication: The Heartbeat of Developing Organisms

    PubMed Central

    DePamphilis, Melvin L.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism that duplicates the nuclear genome during the trillions of cell divisions required to develop from zygote to adult is the same throughout the eukarya, but the mechanisms that determine where, when and how much nuclear genome duplication occur regulate development and differ among the eukarya. They allow organisms to change the rate of cell proliferation during development, to activate zygotic gene expression independently of DNA replication, and to restrict nuclear DNA replication to once per cell division. They allow specialized cells to exit their mitotic cell cycle and differentiate into polyploid cells, and in some cases, to amplify the number of copies of specific genes. It is genome duplication that drives evolution, by virtue of the errors that inevitably occur when the same process is repeated trillions of times. It is, unfortunately, the same errors that produce age-related genetic disorders such as cancer. PMID:26970621

  1. Observation Tools for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malu, Kathleen F.

    2015-01-01

    Professional development of teachers, including English language teachers, empowers them to change in ways that improve teaching and learning (Gall and Acheson 2011; Murray 2010). In their seminal research on staff development--professional development in today's terms--Joyce and Showers (2002) identify key factors that promote teacher change.…

  2. ReplicationDomain: a visualization tool and comparative database for genome-wide replication timing data

    PubMed Central

    Weddington, Nodin; Stuy, Alexander; Hiratani, Ichiro; Ryba, Tyrone; Yokochi, Tomoki; Gilbert, David M

    2008-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic DNA replication is regulated at the level of large chromosomal domains (0.5–5 megabases in mammals) within which replicons are activated relatively synchronously. These domains replicate in a specific temporal order during S-phase and our genome-wide analyses of replication timing have demonstrated that this temporal order of domain replication is a stable property of specific cell types. Results We have developed ReplicationDomain as a web-based database for analysis of genome-wide replication timing maps (replication profiles) from various cell lines and species. This database also provides comparative information of transcriptional expression and is configured to display any genome-wide property (for instance, ChIP-Chip or ChIP-Seq data) via an interactive web interface. Our published microarray data sets are publicly available. Users may graphically display these data sets for a selected genomic region and download the data displayed as text files, or alternatively, download complete genome-wide data sets. Furthermore, we have implemented a user registration system that allows registered users to upload their own data sets. Upon uploading, registered users may choose to: (1) view their data sets privately without sharing; (2) share with other registered users; or (3) make their published or "in press" data sets publicly available, which can fulfill journal and funding agencies' requirements for data sharing. Conclusion ReplicationDomain is a novel and powerful tool to facilitate the comparative visualization of replication timing in various cell types as well as other genome-wide chromatin features and is considerably faster and more convenient than existing browsers when viewing multi-megabase segments of chromosomes. Furthermore, the data upload function with the option of private viewing or sharing of data sets between registered users should be a valuable resource for the scientific community. PMID:19077204

  3. Progress in TILLING as a tool for functional genomics and improvement of crops.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Hao, Liugen; Parry, Martin A J; Phillips, Andrew L; Hu, Yin-Gang

    2014-05-01

    Food security is a global concern and substantial yield increases in crops are required to feed the growing world population. Mutagenesis is an important tool in crop improvement and is free of the regulatory restrictions imposed on genetically modified organisms. Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING), which combines traditional chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput genome-wide screening for point mutations in desired genes, offers a powerful way to create novel mutant alleles for both functional genomics and improvement of crops. TILLING is generally applicable to genomes whether small or large, diploid or even allohexaploid, and shows great potential to address the major challenge of linking sequence information to the function of genes and to modulate key traits for plant breeding. TILLING has been successfully applied in many crop species and recent progress in TILLING is summarized below, especially on the developments in mutation detection technology, application of TILLING in gene functional studies and crop breeding. The potential of TILLING/EcoTILLING for functional genetics and crop improvement is also discussed. Furthermore, a small-scale forward strategy including backcross and selfing was conducted to release the potential mutant phenotypes masked in M2 (or M3) plants. PMID:24618006

  4. GACT: a Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool for SNP imputation and meta-analysis in genetic association studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified genes associated with complex human diseases. Although much of the heritability remains unexplained, combining single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes from multiple studies for meta-analysis will increase the statistical power to identify new disease-associated variants. Meta-analysis requires same allele definition (nomenclature) and genome build among individual studies. Similarly, imputation, commonly-used prior to meta-analysis, requires the same consistency. However, the genotypes from various GWAS are generated using different genotyping platforms, arrays or SNP-calling approaches, resulting in use of different genome builds and allele definitions. Incorrect assumptions of identical allele definition among combined GWAS lead to a large portion of discarded genotypes or incorrect association findings. There is no published tool that predicts and converts among all major allele definitions. Results In this study, we have developed a tool, GACT, which stands for Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool, that predicts and inter-converts between any of the common SNP allele definitions and between the major genome builds. In addition, we assessed several factors that may affect imputation quality, and our results indicated that inclusion of singletons in the reference had detrimental effects while ambiguous SNPs had no measurable effect. Unexpectedly, exclusion of genotypes with missing rate > 0.001 (40% of study SNPs) showed no significant decrease of imputation quality (even significantly higher when compared to the imputation with singletons in the reference), especially for rare SNPs. Conclusion GACT is a new, powerful, and user-friendly tool with both command-line and interactive online versions that can accurately predict, and convert between any of the common allele definitions and between genome builds for genome-wide meta-analysis and imputation of

  5. Novel integrative genomic tool for interrogating lithium response in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hunsberger, J G; Chibane, F L; Elkahloun, A G; Henderson, R; Singh, R; Lawson, J; Cruceanu, C; Nagarajan, V; Turecki, G; Squassina, A; Medeiros, C D; Del Zompo, M; Rouleau, G A; Alda, M; Chuang, D-M

    2015-01-01

    We developed a novel integrative genomic tool called GRANITE (Genetic Regulatory Analysis of Networks Investigational Tool Environment) that can effectively analyze large complex data sets to generate interactive networks. GRANITE is an open-source tool and invaluable resource for a variety of genomic fields. Although our analysis is confined to static expression data, GRANITE has the capability of evaluating time-course data and generating interactive networks that may shed light on acute versus chronic treatment, as well as evaluating dose response and providing insight into mechanisms that underlie therapeutic versus sub-therapeutic doses or toxic doses. As a proof-of-concept study, we investigated lithium (Li) response in bipolar disorder (BD). BD is a severe mood disorder marked by cycles of mania and depression. Li is one of the most commonly prescribed and decidedly effective treatments for many patients (responders), although its mode of action is not yet fully understood, nor is it effective in every patient (non-responders). In an in vitro study, we compared vehicle versus chronic Li treatment in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs) (derived from either responders or non-responders) using both microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA gene expression profiling. We present both Li responder and non-responder network visualizations created by our GRANITE analysis in BD. We identified by network visualization that the Let-7 family is consistently downregulated by Li in both groups where this miRNA family has been implicated in neurodegeneration, cell survival and synaptic development. We discuss the potential of this analysis for investigating treatment response and even providing clinicians with a tool for predicting treatment response in their patients, as well as for providing the industry with a tool for identifying network nodes as targets for novel drug discovery. PMID:25646593

  6. Development and application of camelid molecular cytogenetic tools.

    PubMed

    Avila, Felipe; Das, Pranab J; Kutzler, Michelle; Owens, Elaine; Perelman, Polina; Rubes, Jiri; Hornak, Miroslav; Johnson, Warren E; Raudsepp, Terje

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic chromosome maps offer molecular tools for genome analysis and clinical cytogenetics and are of particular importance for species with difficult karyotypes, such as camelids (2n = 74). Building on the available human-camel zoo-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) data, we developed the first cytogenetic map for the alpaca (Lama pacos, LPA) genome by isolating and identifying 151 alpaca bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones corresponding to 44 specific genes. The genes were mapped by FISH to 31 alpaca autosomes and the sex chromosomes; 11 chromosomes had 2 markers, which were ordered by dual-color FISH. The STS gene mapped to Xpter/Ypter, demarcating the pseudoautosomal region, whereas no markers were assigned to chromosomes 14, 21, 22, 28, and 36. The chromosome-specific markers were applied in clinical cytogenetics to identify LPA20, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-carrying chromosome, as a part of an autosomal translocation in a sterile male llama (Lama glama, LGL; 2n = 73,XY). FISH with LPAX BACs and LPA36 paints, as well as comparative genomic hybridization, were also used to investigate the origin of the minute chromosome, an abnormally small LPA36 in infertile female alpacas. This collection of cytogenetically mapped markers represents a new tool for camelid clinical cytogenetics and has applications for the improvement of the alpaca genome map and sequence assembly. PMID:23109720

  7. Genomic Landscape of Developing Male Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tin-Lap; Pang, Alan Lap-Yin; Rennert, Owen M.; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2010-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a highly orchestrated developmental process by which spermatogonia develop into mature spermatozoa. This process involves many testis- or male germ cell-specific gene products whose expressions are strictly regulated. In the past decade the advent of high-throughput gene expression analytical techniques has made functional genomic studies of this process, particularly in model animals such as mice and rats, feasible and practical. These studies have just begun to reveal the complexity of the genomic landscape of the developing male germ cells. Over 50% of the mouse and rat genome are expressed during testicular development. Among transcripts present in germ cells, 40% – 60% are uncharacterized. A number of genes, and consequently their associated biological pathways, are differentially expressed at different stages of spermatogenesis. Developing male germ cells present a rich repertoire of genetic processes. Tissue-specific as well as spermatogenesis stage-specific alternative splicing of genes exemplifies the complexity of genome expression. In addition to this layer of control, discoveries of abundant presence of antisense transcripts, expressed psuedogenes, non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) including long ncRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs) and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), and retrogenes all point to the presence of multiple layers of expression and functional regulation in male germ cells. It is anticipated that application of systems biology approaches will further our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of spermatogenesis.† PMID:19306351

  8. Mi-DISCOVERER: A bioinformatics tool for the detection of mi-RNA in human genome.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Saadia; Mumtaz, Asia; Ahmad, Freed; Liaquat, Sadia; Nadeem, Shahid; Mehboob, Shahid; Afzal, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 22 nucleotides non-coding RNAs that play pivotal regulatory roles in diverse organisms including the humans and are difficult to be identified due to lack of either sequence features or robust algorithms to efficiently identify. Therefore, we made a tool that is Mi-Discoverer for the detection of miRNAs in human genome. The tools used for the development of software are Microsoft Office Access 2003, the JDK version 1.6.0, BioJava version 1.0, and the NetBeans IDE version 6.0. All already made miRNAs softwares were web based; so the advantage of our project was to make a desktop facility to the user for sequence alignment search with already identified miRNAs of human genome present in the database. The user can also insert and update the newly discovered human miRNA in the database. Mi-Discoverer, a bioinformatics tool successfully identifies human miRNAs based on multiple sequence alignment searches. It's a non redundant database containing a large collection of publicly available human miRNAs. PMID:21364831

  9. The GLOBE 3D Genome Platform - towards a novel system-biological paper tool to integrate the huge complexity of genome organization and function.

    PubMed

    Knoch, Tobias A; Lesnussa, Michael; Kepper, Nick; Eussen, Hubert B; Grosveld, Frank G

    2009-01-01

    Genomes are tremendous co-evolutionary holistic systems for molecular storage, processing and fabrication of information. Their system-biological complexity remains, however, still largely mysterious, despite immense sequencing achievements and huge advances in the understanding of the general sequential, three-dimensional and regulatory organization. Here, we present the GLOBE 3D Genome Platform a completely novel grid based virtual "paper" tool and in fact the first system-biological genome browser integrating the holistic complexity of genomes in a single easy comprehensible platform: Based on a detailed study of biophysical and IT requirements, every architectural level from sequence to morphology of one or several genomes can be approached in a real and in a symbolic representation simultaneously and navigated by continuous scale-free zooming within a unique three-dimensional OpenGL and grid driven environment. In principle an unlimited number of multi-dimensional data sets can be visualized, customized in terms of arrangement, shape, colour, and texture etc. as well as accessed and annotated individually or in groups using internal or external data bases/facilities. Any information can be searched and correlated by importing or calculating simple relations in real-time using grid resources. A general correlation and application platform for more complex correlative analysis and a front-end for system-biological simulations both using again the huge capabilities of grid infrastructures is currently under development. Hence, the GLOBE 3D Genome Platform is an example of a grid based approach towards a virtual desktop for genomic work combining the three fundamental distributed resources: i) visual data representation, ii) data access and management, and iii) data analysis and creation. Thus, the GLOBE 3D Genome Platform is the novel system-biology oriented information system urgently needed to access, present, annotate, and to simulate the holistic genome

  10. Fastbreak: a tool for analysis and visualization of structural variations in genomic data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Genomic studies are now being undertaken on thousands of samples requiring new computational tools that can rapidly analyze data to identify clinically important features. Inferring structural variations in cancer genomes from mate-paired reads is a combinatorially difficult problem. We introduce Fastbreak, a fast and scalable toolkit that enables the analysis and visualization of large amounts of data from projects such as The Cancer Genome Atlas. PMID:23046488

  11. Phytozome: a Tool for Green Plant Comparative Genomics

    DOE Data Explorer

    Phytozome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst green plants. Clusters of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These clusters allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of release v4.0, Phytozome provides access to nine sequenced and annotated green plant genomes, eight of which have been clustered into gene families at six evolutionarily significant nodes. Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, TAIR, JGI are hyper-linked and searchable. [Copied from the Overview at http://www.phytozome.net/Phytozome_info.php

  12. Interactive Tools to Track Child Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Interactive Tools to Track Child Development Recommend on Facebook ... maintained by: Office of the Associate Director for Communication, Digital Media Branch, Division of Public Affairs Email ...

  13. A Practical Comparison of De Novo Genome Assembly Software Tools for Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenyu; Chen, Jiajia; Yang, Yang; Tang, Yifei; Shang, Jing; Shen, Bairong

    2011-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies is accompanied with the development of many whole-genome sequence assembly methods and software, especially for de novo fragment assembly. Due to the poor knowledge about the applicability and performance of these software tools, choosing a befitting assembler becomes a tough task. Here, we provide the information of adaptivity for each program, then above all, compare the performance of eight distinct tools against eight groups of simulated datasets from Solexa sequencing platform. Considering the computational time, maximum random access memory (RAM) occupancy, assembly accuracy and integrity, our study indicate that string-based assemblers, overlap-layout-consensus (OLC) assemblers are well-suited for very short reads and longer reads of small genomes respectively. For large datasets of more than hundred millions of short reads, De Bruijn graph-based assemblers would be more appropriate. In terms of software implementation, string-based assemblers are superior to graph-based ones, of which SOAPdenovo is complex for the creation of configuration file. Our comparison study will assist researchers in selecting a well-suited assembler and offer essential information for the improvement of existing assemblers or the developing of novel assemblers. PMID:21423806

  14. Data Mining and Optimization Tools for Developing Engine Parameters Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhawan, Atam P.

    1998-01-01

    This project was awarded for understanding the problem and developing a plan for Data Mining tools for use in designing and implementing an Engine Condition Monitoring System. Tricia Erhardt and I studied the problem domain for developing an Engine Condition Monitoring system using the sparse and non-standardized datasets to be available through a consortium at NASA Lewis Research Center. We visited NASA three times to discuss additional issues related to dataset which was not made available to us. We discussed and developed a general framework of data mining and optimization tools to extract useful information from sparse and non-standard datasets. These discussions lead to the training of Tricia Erhardt to develop Genetic Algorithm based search programs which were written in C++ and used to demonstrate the capability of GA algorithm in searching an optimal solution in noisy, datasets. From the study and discussion with NASA LeRC personnel, we then prepared a proposal, which is being submitted to NASA for future work for the development of data mining algorithms for engine conditional monitoring. The proposed set of algorithm uses wavelet processing for creating multi-resolution pyramid of tile data for GA based multi-resolution optimal search.

  15. Software development tools: A bibliography, appendix C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    A bibliography containing approximately 200 citations on tools which help software developers perform some development task (such as text manipulation, testing, etc.), and which would not necessarily be found as part of a computing facility is given. The bibliography comes from a relatively random sampling of the literature and is not complete. But it is indicative of the nature and range of tools currently being prepared or currently available.

  16. HGT-Finder: A New Tool for Horizontal Gene Transfer Finding and Application to Aspergillus genomes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Marcus; Ekstrom, Alex; Li, Xueqiong; Yin, Yanbin

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a fast-track mechanism that allows genetically unrelated organisms to exchange genes for rapid environmental adaptation. We developed a new phyletic distribution-based software, HGT-Finder, which implements a novel bioinformatics algorithm to calculate a horizontal transfer index and a probability value for each query gene. Applying this new tool to the Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, and Aspergillus nidulans genomes, we found 273, 542, and 715 transferred genes (HTGs), respectively. HTGs have shorter length, higher guanine-cytosine (GC) content, and relaxed selection pressure. Metabolic process and secondary metabolism functions are significantly enriched in HTGs. Gene clustering analysis showed that 61%, 41% and 74% of HTGs in the three genomes form physically linked gene clusters (HTGCs). Overlapping manually curated, secondary metabolite gene clusters (SMGCs) with HTGCs found that 9 of the 33 A. fumigatus SMGCs and 31 of the 65 A. nidulans SMGCs share genes with HTGCs, and that HTGs are significantly enriched in SMGCs. Our genome-wide analysis thus presented very strong evidence to support the hypothesis that HGT has played a very critical role in the evolution of SMGCs. The program is freely available at http://cys.bios.niu.edu/HGTFinder/HGTFinder.tar.gz. PMID:26473921

  17. A decision tool to guide the ethics review of a challenging breed of emerging genomic projects.

    PubMed

    Joly, Yann; So, Derek; Osien, Gladys; Crimi, Laura; Bobrow, Martin; Chalmers, Don; Wallace, Susan E; Zeps, Nikolajs; Knoppers, Bartha

    2016-08-01

    Recent projects conducted by the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) have raised the important issue of distinguishing quality assurance (QA) activities from research in the context of genomics. Research was historically defined as a systematic effort to expand a shared body of knowledge, whereas QA was defined as an effort to ascertain whether a specific project met desired standards. However, the two categories increasingly overlap due to advances in bioinformatics and the shift toward open science. As few ethics review policies take these changes into account, it is often difficult to determine the appropriate level of review. Mislabeling can result in unnecessary burdens for the investigators or, conversely, in underestimation of the risks to participants. Therefore, it is important to develop a consistent method of selecting the review process for genomics and bioinformatics projects. This paper begins by discussing two case studies from the ICGC, followed by a literature review on the distinction between QA and research and a comparative analysis of ethics review policies from Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia. These results are synthesized into a novel two-step decision tool for researchers and policymakers, which uses traditional criteria to sort clearly defined activities while requiring the use of actual risk levels to decide more complex cases. PMID:26785834

  18. Use of genome-editing tools to treat sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Tasan, Ipek; Jain, Surbhi; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in genome-editing techniques have made it possible to modify any desired DNA sequence by employing programmable nucleases. These next-generation genome-modifying tools are the ideal candidates for therapeutic applications, especially for the treatment of genetic disorders like sickle cell disease (SCD). SCD is an inheritable monogenic disorder which is caused by a point mutation in the β-globin gene. Substantial success has been achieved in the development of supportive therapeutic strategies for SCD, but unfortunately there is still a lack of long-term universal cure. The only existing curative treatment is based on allogeneic stem cell transplantation from healthy donors; however, this treatment is applicable to a limited number of patients only. Hence, a universally applicable therapy is highly desirable. In this review, we will discuss the three programmable nucleases that are commonly used for genome-editing purposes: zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9). We will continue by exemplifying uses of these methods to correct the sickle cell mutation. Additionally, we will present induction of fetal globin expression as an alternative approach to cure sickle cell disease. We will conclude by comparing the three methods and explaining the concerns about their use in therapy. PMID:27250347

  19. MADAP, a flexible clustering tool for the interpretation of one-dimensional genome annotation data.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Christoph D; Sengstag, Thierry; Bucher, Philipp; Delorenzi, Mauro

    2007-07-01

    A recurring task in the analysis of mass genome annotation data from high-throughput technologies is the identification of peaks or clusters in a noisy signal profile. Examples of such applications are the definition of promoters on the basis of transcription start site profiles, the mapping of transcription factor binding sites based on ChIP-chip data and the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) from whole genome SNP profiles. Input to such an analysis is a set of genome coordinates associated with counts or intensities. The output consists of a discrete number of peaks with respective volumes, extensions and center positions. We have developed for this purpose a flexible one-dimensional clustering tool, called MADAP, which we make available as a web server and as standalone program. A set of parameters enables the user to customize the procedure to a specific problem. The web server, which returns results in textual and graphical form, is useful for small to medium-scale applications, as well as for evaluation and parameter tuning in view of large-scale applications, requiring a local installation. The program written in C++ can be freely downloaded from ftp://ftp.epd.unil.ch/pub/software/unix/madap. The MADAP web server can be accessed at http://www.isrec.isb-sib.ch/madap/. PMID:17526516

  20. UniPrimer: A Web-Based Primer Design Tool for Comparative Analyses of Primate Genomes.

    PubMed

    Batnyam, Nomin; Lee, Jimin; Lee, Jungnam; Hong, Seung Bok; Oh, Sejong; Han, Kyudong

    2012-01-01

    Whole genome sequences of various primates have been released due to advanced DNA-sequencing technology. A combination of computational data mining and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to validate the data is an excellent method for conducting comparative genomics. Thus, designing primers for PCR is an essential procedure for a comparative analysis of primate genomes. Here, we developed and introduced UniPrimer for use in those studies. UniPrimer is a web-based tool that designs PCR- and DNA-sequencing primers. It compares the sequences from six different primates (human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, and rhesus macaque) and designs primers on the conserved region across species. UniPrimer is linked to RepeatMasker, Primer3Plus, and OligoCalc softwares to produce primers with high accuracy and UCSC In-Silico PCR to confirm whether the designed primers work. To test the performance of UniPrimer, we designed primers on sample sequences using UniPrimer and manually designed primers for the same sequences. The comparison of the two processes showed that UniPrimer was more effective than manual work in terms of saving time and reducing errors. PMID:22693428

  1. Development of chloroplast genomic resources for Cynara.

    PubMed

    Curci, Pasquale L; De Paola, Domenico; Sonnante, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    In this study, new chloroplast (cp) resources were developed for the genus Cynara, using whole cp genomes from 20 genotypes, by means of high-throughput sequencing technologies. Our target species included seven globe artichokes, two cultivated cardoons, eight wild artichokes, and three other wild Cynara species (C. baetica, C. cornigera and C. syriaca). One complete cp genome was isolated using short reads from a whole-genome sequencing project, while the others were obtained by means of long-range PCR, for which primer pairs are provided here. A de novo assembly strategy combined with a reference-based assembly allowed us to reconstruct each cp genome. Comparative analyses among the newly sequenced genotypes and two additional Cynara cp genomes ('Brindisino' artichoke and C. humilis) retrieved from public databases revealed 126 parsimony informative characters and 258 singletons in Cynara, for a total of 384 variable characters. Thirty-nine SSR loci and 34 other INDEL events were detected. After data analysis, 37 primer pairs for SSR amplification were designed, and these molecular markers were subsequently validated in our Cynara genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis based on all cp variable characters provided the best resolution when compared to what was observed using only parsimony informative characters, or only short 'variable' cp regions. The evaluation of the molecular resources obtained from this study led us to support the 'super-barcode' theory and consider the total cp sequence of Cynara as a reliable and valuable molecular marker for exploring species diversity and examining variation below the species level. PMID:26354522

  2. TALEN and CRISPR/Cas Genome Editing Systems: Tools of Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Nemudryi, A. A.; Valetdinova, K. R.; Medvedev, S. P.; Zakian, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Precise studies of plant, animal and human genomes enable remarkable opportunities of obtained data application in biotechnology and medicine. However, knowing nucleotide sequences isn’t enough for understanding of particular genomic elements functional relationship and their role in phenotype formation and disease pathogenesis. In post-genomic era methods allowing genomic DNA sequences manipulation, visualization and regulation of gene expression are rapidly evolving. Though, there are few methods, that meet high standards of efficiency, safety and accessibility for a wide range of researchers. In 2011 and 2013 novel methods of genome editing appeared – this are TALEN (Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases) and CRISPR (Clustered Regulatory Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)/Cas9 systems. Although TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 appeared recently, these systems have proved to be effective and reliable tools for genome engineering. Here we generally review application of these systems for genome editing in conventional model objects of current biology, functional genome screening, cell-based human hereditary disease modeling, epigenome studies and visualization of cellular processes. Additionally, we review general strategies for designing TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 and analyzing their activity. We also discuss some obstacles researcher can face using these genome editing tools. PMID:25349712

  3. Computational Tools to Accelerate Commercial Development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C

    2013-01-01

    The goals of the work reported are: to develop new computational tools and models to enable industry to more rapidly develop and deploy new advanced energy technologies; to demonstrate the capabilities of the CCSI Toolset on non-proprietary case studies; and to deploy the CCSI Toolset to industry. Challenges of simulating carbon capture (and other) processes include: dealing with multiple scales (particle, device, and whole process scales); integration across scales; verification, validation, and uncertainty; and decision support. The tools cover: risk analysis and decision making; validated, high-fidelity CFD; high-resolution filtered sub-models; process design and optimization tools; advanced process control and dynamics; process models; basic data sub-models; and cross-cutting integration tools.

  4. Genomic resource development for shellfish of conservation concern.

    PubMed

    Timmins-Schiffman, Emma B; Friedman, Carolyn S; Metzger, Dave C; White, Samuel J; Roberts, Steven B

    2013-03-01

    Effective conservation of threatened species depends on the ability to assess organism physiology and population demography. To develop genomic resources to better understand the dynamics of two ecologically vulnerable species in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, larval transcriptomes were sequenced for the pinto abalone, Haliotis kamtschatkana kamtschatkana, and the Olympia oyster, Ostrea lurida. Based on comparative species analysis the Ostrea lurida transcriptome (41 136 contigs) is relatively complete. These transcriptomes represent the first significant contribution to genomic resources for both species. Genes are described based on biological function with particular attention to those associated with temperature change, oxidative stress and immune function. In addition, transcriptome-derived genetic markers are provided. Together, these resources provide valuable tools for future studies aimed at conservation of Haliotis kamtschatkana kamtschatkana, Ostrea lurida and related species. PMID:23280275

  5. ICT Tools and Students' Competence Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuglestad, Anne Berit

    2004-01-01

    In this paper I will present the rationale that motivates the study in an ongoing three-year project following students in school years 8 to 10. The aim is to develop the students' competence with use of ICT tools in mathematics in such a way that they will be able to choose tools for themselves, not rely just on the teacher telling them what to…

  6. Data Mining and Optimization Tools for Developing Engine Parameters Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhawan, Atam P.

    1998-01-01

    This project was awarded for understanding the problem and developing a plan for Data Mining tools for use in designing and implementing an Engine Condition Monitoring System. From the total budget of $5,000, Tricia and I studied the problem domain for developing ail Engine Condition Monitoring system using the sparse and non-standardized datasets to be available through a consortium at NASA Lewis Research Center. We visited NASA three times to discuss additional issues related to dataset which was not made available to us. We discussed and developed a general framework of data mining and optimization tools to extract useful information from sparse and non-standard datasets. These discussions lead to the training of Tricia Erhardt to develop Genetic Algorithm based search programs which were written in C++ and used to demonstrate the capability of GA algorithm in searching an optimal solution in noisy datasets. From the study and discussion with NASA LERC personnel, we then prepared a proposal, which is being submitted to NASA for future work for the development of data mining algorithms for engine conditional monitoring. The proposed set of algorithm uses wavelet processing for creating multi-resolution pyramid of the data for GA based multi-resolution optimal search. Wavelet processing is proposed to create a coarse resolution representation of data providing two advantages in GA based search: 1. We will have less data to begin with to make search sub-spaces. 2. It will have robustness against the noise because at every level of wavelet based decomposition, we will be decomposing the signal into low pass and high pass filters.

  7. Development of a transportation planning tool

    SciTech Connect

    Funkhouser, B.R.; Moyer, J.W.; Ballweg, E.L.

    1994-07-01

    This paper describes the application of simulation modeling and logistics techniques to the development of a planning tool for the Department of Energy (DOE). The focus of the Transportation Planning Model (TPM) tool is to aid DOE and Sandia analysts in the planning of future fleet sizes, driver and support personnel sizes, base site locations, and resource balancing among the base sites. The design approach is to develop a rapid modeling environment which will allow analysts to easily set up a shipment scenario and perform multiple ``what if`` evaluations. The TPM is being developed on personal computers using commercial off-the shelf (COTS) software tools under the WINDOWS{reg_sign} operating environment. Prototype development of the TPM has been completed.

  8. The Developing Child: Tools for Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Micheline

    1991-01-01

    This document examines the use of measurement tools to evaluate children's psychological development. The first part of the document discusses the identification and quantification of developmental landmarks and the reasons for evaluation. The second part reviews several evaluation instruments. The Ruth Griffiths mental development scales are used…

  9. CAGO: A Software Tool for Dynamic Visual Comparison and Correlation Measurement of Genome Organization

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Feng; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    CAGO (Comparative Analysis of Genome Organization) is developed to address two critical shortcomings of conventional genome atlas plotters: lack of dynamic exploratory functions and absence of signal analysis for genomic properties. With dynamic exploratory functions, users can directly manipulate chromosome tracks of a genome atlas and intuitively identify distinct genomic signals by visual comparison. Signal analysis of genomic properties can further detect inconspicuous patterns from noisy genomic properties and calculate correlations between genomic properties across various genomes. To implement dynamic exploratory functions, CAGO presents each genome atlas in Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format and allows users to interact with it using a SVG viewer through JavaScript. Signal analysis functions are implemented using R statistical software and a discrete wavelet transformation package waveslim. CAGO is not only a plotter for generating complex genome atlases, but also a platform for exploring genome atlases with dynamic exploratory functions for visual comparison and with signal analysis for comparing genomic properties across multiple organisms. The web-based application of CAGO, its source code, user guides, video demos, and live examples are publicly available and can be accessed at http://cbs.ym.edu.tw/cago. PMID:22114666

  10. Mutagenesis as a Tool in Plant Genetics, Functional Genomics, and Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Per; Chawade, Aakash; Larsson, Mikael; Olsson, Johanna; Olsson, Olof

    2011-01-01

    Plant mutagenesis is rapidly coming of age in the aftermath of recent developments in high-resolution molecular and biochemical techniques. By combining the high variation of mutagenised populations with novel screening methods, traits that are almost impossible to identify by conventional breeding are now being developed and characterised at the molecular level. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of the various techniques and workflows available to researchers today in the field of molecular breeding, and how these tools complement the ones already used in traditional breeding. Both genetic (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes; TILLING) and phenotypic screens are evaluated. Finally, different ways of bridging the gap between genotype and phenotype are discussed. PMID:22315587

  11. A genomic regulatory network for development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Eric H.; Rast, Jonathan P.; Oliveri, Paola; Ransick, Andrew; Calestani, Cristina; Yuh, Chiou-Hwa; Minokawa, Takuya; Amore, Gabriele; Hinman, Veronica; Arenas-Mena, Cesar; Otim, Ochan; Brown, C. Titus; Livi, Carolina B.; Lee, Pei Yun; Revilla, Roger; Rust, Alistair G.; Pan, Zheng jun; Schilstra, Maria J.; Clarke, Peter J C.; Arnone, Maria I.; Rowen, Lee; Cameron, R. Andrew; McClay, David R.; Hood, Leroy; Bolouri, Hamid

    2002-01-01

    Development of the body plan is controlled by large networks of regulatory genes. A gene regulatory network that controls the specification of endoderm and mesoderm in the sea urchin embryo is summarized here. The network was derived from large-scale perturbation analyses, in combination with computational methodologies, genomic data, cis-regulatory analysis, and molecular embryology. The network contains over 40 genes at present, and each node can be directly verified at the DNA sequence level by cis-regulatory analysis. Its architecture reveals specific and general aspects of development, such as how given cells generate their ordained fates in the embryo and why the process moves inexorably forward in developmental time.

  12. Genomic tools to assist breeding for drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Langridge, Peter; Reynolds, Matthew P

    2015-04-01

    Water deficit or drought stress is a major limitation to crop production globally. Plant breeders have used a wide range of technologies to successfully breed varieties that perform well under the growth conditions for their target environments but they are always seeking new opportunities to enhance rates of genetic gain. Under drought, yield is determined by the integration of variable levels of water deficit across the developmental life of the crop. Genomics technologies were seen as a path to understand the genetic and environmental complexity of drought stress. To be relevant to breeding programs, genomic studies must consider the nature of drought stress in the target environment and use plant material and phenotyping techniques that relate to field conditions. PMID:25531270

  13. The Rat Genome Database curation tool suite: a set of optimized software tools enabling efficient acquisition, organization, and presentation of biological data

    PubMed Central

    Laulederkind, Stanley J. F.; Shimoyama, Mary; Hayman, G. Thomas; Lowry, Timothy F.; Nigam, Rajni; Petri, Victoria; Smith, Jennifer R.; Wang, Shur-Jen; de Pons, Jeff; Kowalski, George; Liu, Weisong; Rood, Wes; Munzenmaier, Diane H.; Dwinell, Melinda R.; Twigger, Simon N.; Jacob, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is the premier repository of rat genomic and genetic data and currently houses over 40 000 rat gene records as well as human and mouse orthologs, 1771 rat and 1911 human quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and 2209 rat strains. Biological information curated for these data objects includes disease associations, phenotypes, pathways, molecular functions, biological processes and cellular components. A suite of tools has been developed to aid curators in acquiring and validating data objects, assigning nomenclature, attaching biological information to objects and making connections among data types. The software used to assign nomenclature, to create and edit objects and to make annotations to the data objects has been specifically designed to make the curation process as fast and efficient as possible. The user interfaces have been adapted to the work routines of the curators, creating a suite of tools that is intuitive and powerful. Database URL: http://rgd.mcw.edu PMID:21321022

  14. New bioinformatic tool for quick identification of functionally relevant endogenous retroviral inserts in human genome

    PubMed Central

    Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Suntsova, Maria; Malakhova, Galina; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and LTR retrotransposons (LRs) occupy ∼8% of human genome. Deep sequencing technologies provide clues to understanding of functional relevance of individual ERVs/LRs by enabling direct identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and other landmarks of functional genomic elements. Here, we performed the genome-wide identification of human ERVs/LRs containing TFBS according to the ENCODE project. We created the first interactive ERV/LRs database that groups the individual inserts according to their familial nomenclature, number of mapped TFBS and divergence from their consensus sequence. Information on any particular element can be easily extracted by the user. We also created a genome browser tool, which enables quick mapping of any ERV/LR insert according to genomic coordinates, known human genes and TFBS. These tools can be used to easily explore functionally relevant individual ERV/LRs, and for studying their impact on the regulation of human genes. Overall, we identified ∼110,000 ERV/LR genomic elements having TFBS. We propose a hypothesis of “domestication” of ERV/LR TFBS by the genome milieu including subsequent stages of initial epigenetic repression, partial functional release, and further mutation-driven reshaping of TFBS in tight coevolution with the enclosing genomic loci. PMID:25853282

  15. New bioinformatic tool for quick identification of functionally relevant endogenous retroviral inserts in human genome.

    PubMed

    Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Suntsova, Maria; Malakhova, Galina; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and LTR retrotransposons (LRs) occupy ∼8% of human genome. Deep sequencing technologies provide clues to understanding of functional relevance of individual ERVs/LRs by enabling direct identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and other landmarks of functional genomic elements. Here, we performed the genome-wide identification of human ERVs/LRs containing TFBS according to the ENCODE project. We created the first interactive ERV/LRs database that groups the individual inserts according to their familial nomenclature, number of mapped TFBS and divergence from their consensus sequence. Information on any particular element can be easily extracted by the user. We also created a genome browser tool, which enables quick mapping of any ERV/LR insert according to genomic coordinates, known human genes and TFBS. These tools can be used to easily explore functionally relevant individual ERV/LRs, and for studying their impact on the regulation of human genes. Overall, we identified ∼110,000 ERV/LR genomic elements having TFBS. We propose a hypothesis of "domestication" of ERV/LR TFBS by the genome milieu including subsequent stages of initial epigenetic repression, partial functional release, and further mutation-driven reshaping of TFBS in tight coevolution with the enclosing genomic loci. PMID:25853282

  16. Bypassing genomic imprinting allows seed development.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Moritz K; Shirzadi, Reza; Dissmeyer, Nico; Dolf, Andreas; Endl, Elmar; Grini, Paul E; Schnittger, Arp

    2007-05-17

    In developing progeny of mammals the two parental genomes are differentially expressed according to imprinting marks, and embryos with only a uniparental genetic contribution die. Gene expression that is dependent on the parent of origin has also been observed in the offspring of flowering plants, and mutations in the imprinting machinery lead to embryonic lethality, primarily affecting the development of the endosperm-a structure in the seed that nourishes the embryo, analogous to the function of the mammalian placenta. Here we have generated Arabidopsis thaliana seeds in which the endosperm is of uniparental, that is, maternal, origin. We demonstrate that imprinting in developing seeds can be bypassed and viable albeit smaller seedlings can develop from seeds lacking a paternal contribution to the endosperm. Bypassing is only possible if the mother is mutant for any of the FIS-class genes, which encode Polycomb group chromatin-modifying factors. Thus, these data provide functional evidence that the action of the FIS complex balances the contribution of the paternal genome. As flowering plants have evolved a special reproduction system with a parallel fusion of two female with two male gametes, our findings support the hypothesis that only with the evolution of double fertilization did the action of the FIS genes become a requirement for seed development. Furthermore, our data argue for a gametophytic origin of endosperm in flowering plants, thereby supporting a hypothesis raised in 1900 by Eduard Strasburger. PMID:17468744

  17. OntoMate: a text-mining tool aiding curation at the Rat Genome Database.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weisong; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Hayman, G Thomas; Wang, Shur-Jen; Nigam, Rajni; Smith, Jennifer R; De Pons, Jeff; Dwinell, Melinda R; Shimoyama, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is the premier repository of rat genomic, genetic and physiologic data. Converting data from free text in the scientific literature to a structured format is one of the main tasks of all model organism databases. RGD spends considerable effort manually curating gene, Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) and strain information. The rapidly growing volume of biomedical literature and the active research in the biological natural language processing (bioNLP) community have given RGD the impetus to adopt text-mining tools to improve curation efficiency. Recently, RGD has initiated a project to use OntoMate, an ontology-driven, concept-based literature search engine developed at RGD, as a replacement for the PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) search engine in the gene curation workflow. OntoMate tags abstracts with gene names, gene mutations, organism name and most of the 16 ontologies/vocabularies used at RGD. All terms/ entities tagged to an abstract are listed with the abstract in the search results. All listed terms are linked both to data entry boxes and a term browser in the curation tool. OntoMate also provides user-activated filters for species, date and other parameters relevant to the literature search. Using the system for literature search and import has streamlined the process compared to using PubMed. The system was built with a scalable and open architecture, including features specifically designed to accelerate the RGD gene curation process. With the use of bioNLP tools, RGD has added more automation to its curation workflow. Database URL: http://rgd.mcw.edu. PMID:25619558

  18. OntoMate: a text-mining tool aiding curation at the Rat Genome Database

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weisong; Laulederkind, Stanley J. F.; Hayman, G. Thomas; Wang, Shur-Jen; Nigam, Rajni; Smith, Jennifer R.; De Pons, Jeff; Dwinell, Melinda R.; Shimoyama, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is the premier repository of rat genomic, genetic and physiologic data. Converting data from free text in the scientific literature to a structured format is one of the main tasks of all model organism databases. RGD spends considerable effort manually curating gene, Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) and strain information. The rapidly growing volume of biomedical literature and the active research in the biological natural language processing (bioNLP) community have given RGD the impetus to adopt text-mining tools to improve curation efficiency. Recently, RGD has initiated a project to use OntoMate, an ontology-driven, concept-based literature search engine developed at RGD, as a replacement for the PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) search engine in the gene curation workflow. OntoMate tags abstracts with gene names, gene mutations, organism name and most of the 16 ontologies/vocabularies used at RGD. All terms/ entities tagged to an abstract are listed with the abstract in the search results. All listed terms are linked both to data entry boxes and a term browser in the curation tool. OntoMate also provides user-activated filters for species, date and other parameters relevant to the literature search. Using the system for literature search and import has streamlined the process compared to using PubMed. The system was built with a scalable and open architecture, including features specifically designed to accelerate the RGD gene curation process. With the use of bioNLP tools, RGD has added more automation to its curation workflow. Database URL: http://rgd.mcw.edu PMID:25619558

  19. CGUG: in silico proteome and genome parsing tool for the determination of "core" and unique genes in the analysis of genomes up to ca. 1.9 Mb

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Padmanabhan; King, John F; Seto, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Background Viruses and small-genome bacteria (~2 megabases and smaller) comprise a considerable population in the biosphere and are of interest to many researchers. These genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and require complementary computational tools to analyze. "CoreGenesUniqueGenes" (CGUG) is an in silico genome data mining tool that determines a "core" set of genes from two to five organisms with genomes in this size range. Core and unique genes may reflect similar niches and needs, and may be used in classifying organisms. Findings CGUG is available at as a web-based on-the-fly tool that performs iterative BLASTP analyses using a reference genome and up to four query genomes to provide a table of genes common to these genomes. The result is an in silico display of genomes and their proteomes, allowing for further analysis. CGUG can be used for "genome annotation by homology", as demonstrated with Chlamydophila and Francisella genomes. Conclusion CGUG is used to reanalyze the ICTV-based classifications of bacteriophages, to reconfirm long-standing relationships and to explore new classifications. These genomes have been problematic in the past, due largely to horizontal gene transfers. CGUG is validated as a tool for reannotating small genome bacteria using more up-to-date annotations by similarity or homology. These serve as an entry point for wet-bench experiments to confirm the functions of these "hypothetical" and "unknown" proteins. PMID:19706165

  20. Gnome View: A tool for visual representation of human genome data

    SciTech Connect

    Pelkey, J.E.; Thomas, G.S.; Thurman, D.A.; Lortz, V.B.; Douthart, R.J.

    1993-02-01

    GnomeView is a tool for exploring data generated by the Human Gemone Project. GnomeView provides both graphical and textural styles of data presentation: employs an intuitive window-based graphical query interface: and integrates its underlying genome databases in such a way that the user can navigate smoothly across databases and between different levels of data. This paper describes GnomeView and discusses how it addresses various genome informatics issues.

  1. Software Tools for Empowering Instructional Developers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayeski, Diane M.

    1991-01-01

    Software systems are being created to assist both novice and expert instructional technologists in response to perceived need of organizations to increase their training. Underlying philosophies and goals of instructional developer automation tools and their potential effects upon the organizations who adopt them must be examined so they will help…

  2. Update on SLD Engineering Tools Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean R.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Bond, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    The airworthiness authorities (FAA, JAA, Transport Canada) will be releasing a draft rule in the 2006 timeframe concerning the operation of aircraft in a Supercooled Large Droplet (SLD) environment aloft. The draft rule will require aircraft manufacturers to demonstrate that their aircraft can operate safely in an SLD environment for a period of time to facilitate a safe exit from the condition. It is anticipated that aircraft manufacturers will require a capability to demonstrate compliance with this rule via experimental means (icing tunnels or tankers) and by analytical means (ice prediction codes). Since existing icing research facilities and analytical codes were not developed to account for SLD conditions, current engineering tools are not adequate to support compliance activities in SLD conditions. Therefore, existing capabilities need to be augmented to include SLD conditions. In response to this need, NASA and its partners conceived a strategy or Roadmap for developing experimental and analytical SLD simulation tools. Following review and refinement by the airworthiness authorities and other international research partners, this technical strategy has been crystallized into a project plan to guide the SLD Engineering Tool Development effort. This paper will provide a brief overview of the latest version of the project plan and technical rationale, and provide a status of selected SLD Engineering Tool Development research tasks which are currently underway.

  3. Spliceosomal introns as tools for genomic and evolutionary analysis

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Manuel; Roy, Scott William

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, the availability of dozens of whole genomic sequences from a wide variety of eukaryotic lineages has revealed a very large amount of information about the dynamics of intron loss and gain through eukaryotic history, as well as the evolution of intron sequences. Implicit in these advances is a great deal of information about the structure and evolution of surrounding sequences. Here, we review the wealth of ways in which structures of spliceosomal introns as well as their conservation and change through evolution may be harnessed for evolutionary and genomic analysis. First, we discuss uses of intron length distributions and positions in sequence assembly and annotation, and for improving alignment of homologous regions. Second, we review uses of introns in evolutionary studies, including the utility of introns as indicators of rates of sequence evolution, for inferences about molecular evolution, as signatures of orthology and paralogy, and for estimating rates of nucleotide substitution. We conclude with a discussion of phylogenetic methods utilizing intron sequences and positions. PMID:18263615

  4. Kvik: three-tier data exploration tools for flexible analysis of genomic data in epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Fjukstad, Bjørn; Standahl Olsen, Karina; Jareid, Mie; Lund, Eiliv; Bongo, Lars Ailo

    2015-01-01

    Kvik is an open-source framework that we developed for explorative analysis of functional genomics data from large epidemiological studies. Creating such studies requires a significant amount of time and resources. It is therefore usual to reuse the data from one study for several research projects. Often each project requires implementing new analysis code, integration with specific knowledge bases, and specific visualizations. Although existing data exploration tools are available for single study data exploration, no tool provides all the required functionality for multistudy data exploration. We have therefore used the Kvik framework to develop Kvik Pathways, an application for exploring gene expression data in the context of biological pathways. We have used Kvik Pathways to explore data from both a cross-sectional study design and a case-control study within the Norwegian Women and Cancer (NOWAC) cohort. Kvik Pathways follows the three-tier architecture in web applications using a powerful back-end for statistical analyses and retrieval of metadata.In this note, we describe how we used the Kvik framework to develop the Kvik Pathways application. Kvik Pathways was used by our team of epidemiologists toexplore gene expression data from healthy women with high and low plasma ratios of essential fatty acids. PMID:26425340

  5. Snat: a SNP annotation tool for bovine by integrating various sources of genomic information

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most recently, with maturing of bovine genome sequencing and high throughput SNP genotyping technologies, a large number of significant SNPs associated with economic important traits can be identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To further determine true association findings in GWAS, the common strategy is to sift out most promising SNPs for follow-up replication studies. Hence it is crucial to explore the functional significance of the candidate SNPs in order to screen and select the potential functional ones. To systematically prioritize these statistically significant SNPs and facilitate follow-up replication studies, we developed a bovine SNP annotation tool (Snat) based on a web interface. Results With Snat, various sources of genomic information are integrated and retrieved from several leading online databases, including SNP information from dbSNP, gene information from Entrez Gene, protein features from UniProt, linkage information from AnimalQTLdb, conserved elements from UCSC Genome Browser Database and gene functions from Gene Ontology (GO), KEGG PATHWAY and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA). Snat provides two different applications, including a CGI-based web utility and a command-line version, to access the integrated database, target any single nucleotide loci of interest and perform multi-level functional annotations. For further validation of the practical significance of our study, SNPs involved in two commercial bovine SNP chips, i.e., the Affymetrix Bovine 10K chip array and the Illumina 50K chip array, have been annotated by Snat, and the corresponding outputs can be directly downloaded from Snat website. Furthermore, a real dataset involving 20 identified SNPs associated with milk yield in our recent GWAS was employed to demonstrate the practical significance of Snat. Conclusions To our best knowledge, Snat is one of first tools focusing on SNP annotation for livestock. Snat confers researchers with a

  6. Visualization tool for advanced laser system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Gregg A.; Brunson, Richard L.

    2002-06-01

    Simulation development for Laser Weapon Systems design and system trade analyses has progressed to new levels with the advent of object-oriented software development tools and PC processor capabilities. These tools allow rapid visualization of upcoming laser weapon system architectures and the ability to rapidly respond to what-if scenario questions from potential user commands. These simulations can solve very intensive problems in short time periods to investigate the parameter space of a newly emerging weapon system concept, or can address user mission performance for many different scenario engagements. Equally important to the rapid solution of complex numerical problems is the ability to rapidly visualize the results of the simulation, and to effectively interact with visualized output to glean new insights into the complex interactions of a scenario. Boeing has applied these ideas to develop a tool called the Satellite Visualization and Signature Tool (SVST). This Windows application is based upon a series of C++ coded modules that have evolved from several programs at Boeing-SVS. The SVST structure, extensibility, and some recent results of applying the simulation to weapon system concepts and designs will be discussed in this paper.

  7. H1640 caster tool development report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.A.

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the development and certification of the H1640 caster tool. This tool is used to rotate swivel caster wheels 90 degrees on bomb hand trucks or shipping containers. The B83 is a heavy bomb system and weighs close to 5,600 pounds for a two-high stack configuration. High castering moments (handle length times the force exerted on handle) are required to caster a wheel for a two-high stack of B83s. The H1640 is available to the DoD (Air Force) through the Special Equipment List (SEL) for the B83 as a replacement for the H631 and H1216 caster tools.

  8. The Architecture of a Scrambled Genome Reveals Massive Levels of Genomic Rearrangement during Development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Bracht, John R.; Goldman, Aaron David; Dolzhenko, Egor; Clay, Derek M.; Swart, Estienne C.; Perlman, David H.; Doak, Thomas G.; Stuart, Andrew; Amemiya, Chris T.; Sebra, Robert P.; Landweber, Laura F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Programmed DNA rearrangements in the single-celled eukaryote Oxytricha trifallax completely rewire its germline into a somatic nucleus during development. This elaborate, RNA-mediated pathway eliminates noncoding DNA sequences that interrupt gene loci and reorganizes the remaining fragments by inversions and permutations to produce functional genes. Here, we report the Oxytricha germline genome and compare it to the somatic genome to present a global view of its massive scale of genome rearrangements. The remarkably encrypted genome architecture contains >3,500 scrambled genes, as well as >800 predicted germline-limited genes expressed, and some posttranslationally modified, during genome rearrangements. Gene segments for different somatic loci often interweave with each other. Single gene segments can contribute to multiple, distinct somatic loci. Terminal precursor segments from neighboring somatic loci map extremely close to each other, often overlapping. This genome assembly provides a draft of a scrambled genome and a powerful model for studies of genome rearrangement. PMID:25171416

  9. nWayComp: a genome-wide sequence comparison tool for multiple strains/species of phylogenetically related microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiqiang; Lin, Hong; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Civerolo, Edwin L

    2007-01-01

    The increasing number of whole genomic sequences of microorganisms has led to the complexity of genome-wide annotation and gene sequence comparison among multiple microorganisms. To address this problem, we have developed nWayComp software that compares DNA and protein sequences of phylogenetically-related microorganisms. This package integrates a series of bioinformatics tools such as BLAST, ClustalW, ALIGN, PHYLIP and PRIMER3 for sequence comparison. It searches for homologous sequences among multiple organisms and identifies genes that are unique to a particular organism. The homologous gene sets are then ranked in the descending order of the sequence similarity. For each set of homologous sequences, a table of sequence identity among homologous genes along with sequence variations such as SNPs and INDELS is developed, and a phylogenetic tree is constructed. In addition, a common set of primers that can amplify all the homologous sequences are generated. The nWayComp package provides users with a quick and convenient tool to compare genomic sequences among multiple organisms at the whole-genome level. PMID:17688445

  10. Computational and molecular tools for scalable rAAV-mediated genome editing.

    PubMed

    Stoimenov, Ivaylo; Ali, Muhammad Akhtar; Pandzic, Tatjana; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2015-03-11

    The rapid discovery of potential driver mutations through large-scale mutational analyses of human cancers generates a need to characterize their cellular phenotypes. Among the techniques for genome editing, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene targeting is suited for knock-in of single nucleotide substitutions and to a lesser degree for gene knock-outs. However, the generation of gene targeting constructs and the targeting process is time-consuming and labor-intense. To facilitate rAAV-mediated gene targeting, we developed the first software and complementary automation-friendly vector tools to generate optimized targeting constructs for editing human protein encoding genes. By computational approaches, rAAV constructs for editing ~71% of bases in protein-coding exons were designed. Similarly, ~81% of genes were predicted to be targetable by rAAV-mediated knock-out. A Gateway-based cloning system for facile generation of rAAV constructs suitable for robotic automation was developed and used in successful generation of targeting constructs. Together, these tools enable automated rAAV targeting construct design, generation as well as enrichment and expansion of targeted cells with desired integrations. PMID:25488813

  11. Spatial Genome Organization and Its Emerging Role as a Potential Diagnosis Tool

    PubMed Central

    Meaburn, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells the genome is highly spatially organized. Functional relevance of higher order genome organization is implied by the fact that specific genes, and even whole chromosomes, alter spatial position in concert with functional changes within the nucleus, for example with modifications to chromatin or transcription. The exact molecular pathways that regulate spatial genome organization and the full implication to the cell of such an organization remain to be determined. However, there is a growing realization that the spatial organization of the genome can be used as a marker of disease. While global genome organization patterns remain largely conserved in disease, some genes and chromosomes occupy distinct nuclear positions in diseased cells compared to their normal counterparts, with the patterns of reorganization differing between diseases. Importantly, mapping the spatial positioning patterns of specific genomic loci can distinguish cancerous tissue from benign with high accuracy. Genome positioning is an attractive novel biomarker since additional quantitative biomarkers are urgently required in many cancer types. Current diagnostic techniques are often subjective and generally lack the ability to identify aggressive cancer from indolent, which can lead to over- or under-treatment of patients. Proof-of-principle for the use of genome positioning as a diagnostic tool has been provided based on small scale retrospective studies. Future large-scale studies are required to assess the feasibility of bringing spatial genome organization-based diagnostics to the clinical setting and to determine if the positioning patterns of specific loci can be useful biomarkers for cancer prognosis. Since spatial reorganization of the genome has been identified in multiple human diseases, it is likely that spatial genome positioning patterns as a diagnostic biomarker may be applied to many diseases. PMID:27507988

  12. Mapping by sequencing the Pneumocystis genome using the ordering DNA sequences V3 tool.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Lance, Britton; Vargas, Claudia; Arpinar, Budak; Bhandarkar, Suchendra; Kraemer, Eileen; Kochut, Krys J; Miller, John A; Wagner, Jeff R; Weise, Michael J; Wunderlich, John K; Stringer, James; Smulian, George; Cushion, Melanie T; Arnold, Jonathan

    2003-04-01

    A bioinformatics tool called ODS3 has been created for mapping by sequencing. The tool allows the creation of integrated genomic maps from genetic, physical mapping, and sequencing data and permits an integrated genome map to be stored, retrieved, viewed, and queried in a stand-alone capacity, in a client/server relationship with the Fungal Genome Database (FGDB), and as a web-browsing tool for the FGDB. In that ODS3 is programmed in Java, the tool promotes platform independence and supports export of integrated genome-mapping data in the extensible markup language (XML) for data interchange with other genome information systems. The tool ODS3 is used to create an initial integrated genome map of the AIDS-related fungal pathogen, Pneumocystis carinii. Contig dynamics would indicate that this physical map is approximately 50% complete with approximately 200 contigs. A total of 10 putative multigene families were found. Two of these putative families were previously characterized in P. carinii, namely the major surface glycoproteins (MSGs) and HSP70 proteins; three of these putative families (not previously characterized in P. carinii) were found to be similar to families encoding the HSP60 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the heat-shock psi protein in S. pombe, and the RNA synthetase family (i.e., MES1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Physical mapping data are consistent with the 16S, 5.8S, and 26S rDNA genes being single copy in P. carinii. No other fungus outside this genus is known to have the rDNA genes in single copy. PMID:12702676

  13. Bioinformatic tools for using whole genome sequencing as a rapid high resolution diagnostic typing tool when tracing bioterror organisms in the food and feed chain.

    PubMed

    Segerman, Bo; De Medici, Dario; Ehling Schulz, Monika; Fach, Patrick; Fenicia, Lucia; Fricker, Martina; Wielinga, Peter; Van Rotterdam, Bart; Knutsson, Rickard

    2011-03-01

    The rapid technological development in the field of parallel sequencing offers new opportunities when tracing and tracking microorganisms in the food and feed chain. If a bioterror organism is deliberately spread it is of crucial importance to get as much information as possible regarding the strain as fast as possible to aid the decision process and select suitable controls, tracing and tracking tools. A lot of efforts have been made to sequence multiple strains of potential bioterror organisms so there is a relatively large set of reference genomes available. This study is focused on how to use parallel sequencing for rapid phylogenomic analysis and screen for genetic modifications. A bioinformatic methodology has been developed to rapidly analyze sequence data with minimal post-processing. Instead of assembling the genome, defining genes, defining orthologous relations and calculating distances, the present method can achieve a similar high resolution directly from the raw sequence data. The method defines orthologous sequence reads instead of orthologous genes and the average similarity of the core genome (ASC) is calculated. The sequence reads from the core and from the non-conserved genomic regions can also be separated for further analysis. Finally, the comparison algorithm is used to visualize the phylogenomic diversity of the bacterial bioterror organisms Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium botulinum using heat plot diagrams. PMID:20826036

  14. Development of a HT seismic downhole tool.

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, Frank P.; Greving, Jeffrey J.; Henfling, Joseph Anthony; Chavira, David J.; Uhl, James Eugene; Polsky, Yarom

    2009-06-01

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) require the stimulation of the drilled well, likely through hydraulic fracturing. Whether fracturing of the rock occurs by shear destabilization of natural fractures or by extensional failure of weaker zones, control of the fracture process will be required to create the flow paths necessary for effective heat mining. As such, microseismic monitoring provides one method for real-time mapping of the fractures created during the hydraulic fracturing process. This monitoring is necessary to help assess stimulation effectiveness and provide the information necessary to properly create the reservoir. In addition, reservoir monitoring of the microseismic activity can provide information on reservoir performance and evolution over time. To our knowledge, no seismic tool exists that will operate above 125 C for the long monitoring durations that may be necessary. Replacing failed tools is costly and introduces potential errors such as depth variance, etc. Sandia has designed a high temperature seismic tool for long-term deployment in geothermal applications. It is capable of detecting microseismic events and operating continuously at temperatures up to 240 C. This project includes the design and fabrication of two High Temperature (HT) seismic tools that will have the capability to operate in both temporary and long-term monitoring modes. To ensure the developed tool meets industry requirements for high sampling rates (>2ksps) and high resolution (24-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter) two electronic designs will be implemented. One electronic design will utilize newly developed 200 C electronic components. The other design will use qualified Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) devices and will have a continuous operating temperature of 240 C.

  15. Development of wavelet analysis tools for turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertelrud, A.; Erlebacher, G.; Dussouillez, PH.; Liandrat, M. P.; Liandrat, J.; Bailly, F. Moret; Tchamitchian, PH.

    1992-01-01

    Presented here is the general framework and the initial results of a joint effort to derive novel research tools and easy to use software to analyze and model turbulence and transition. Given here is a brief review of the issues, a summary of some basic properties of wavelets, and preliminary results. Technical aspects of the implementation, the physical conclusions reached at this time, and current developments are discussed.

  16. Genetic and Genomic Tools for the Marine Annelid Platynereis dumerilii

    PubMed Central

    Zantke, Juliane; Bannister, Stephanie; Rajan, Vinoth Babu Veedin; Raible, Florian; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    The bristle worm Platynereis dumerilii displays many interesting biological characteristics. These include its reproductive timing, which is synchronized to the moon phase, its regenerative capacity that is hormonally controlled, and a slow rate of evolution, which permits analyses of ancestral genes and cell types. As a marine annelid, Platynereis is also representative of the marine ecosystem, as well as one of the three large animal subphyla, the Lophotrochozoa. Here, we provide an overview of the molecular resources, functional techniques, and behavioral assays that have recently been established for the bristle worm. This combination of tools now places Platynereis in an excellent position to advance research at the frontiers of neurobiology, chronobiology, evo-devo, and marine biology. PMID:24807110

  17. Accelerating Genome Editing in CHO Cells Using CRISPR Cas9 and CRISPy, a Web-Based Target Finding Tool

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Hansen, Henning Gram; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2014-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry as a host for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. Thus genome engineering of CHO cells for improved product quality and yield is of great interest. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of the CRISPR Cas9 technology in CHO cells by generating site-specific gene disruptions in COSMC and FUT8, both of which encode proteins involved in glycosylation. The tested single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) created an indel frequency up to 47.3% in COSMC, while an indel frequency up to 99.7% in FUT8 was achieved by applying lectin selection. All eight sgRNAs examined in this study resulted in relatively high indel frequencies, demonstrating that the Cas9 system is a robust and efficient genome-editing methodology in CHO cells. Deep sequencing revealed that 85% of the indels created by Cas9 resulted in frameshift mutations at the target sites, with a strong preference for single base indels. Finally, we have developed a user-friendly bioinformatics tool, named “CRISPy” for rapid identification of sgRNA target sequences in the CHO-K1 genome. The CRISPy tool identified 1,970,449 CRISPR targets divided into 27,553 genes and lists the number of off-target sites in the genome. In conclusion, the proven functionality of Cas9 to edit CHO genomes combined with our CRISPy database have the potential to accelerate genome editing and synthetic biology efforts in CHO cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014; 111: 1604–1616. © 2014 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24827782

  18. Accelerating genome editing in CHO cells using CRISPR Cas9 and CRISPy, a web-based target finding tool.

    PubMed

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Hansen, Henning Gram; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2014-08-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry as a host for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. Thus genome engineering of CHO cells for improved product quality and yield is of great interest. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of the CRISPR Cas9 technology in CHO cells by generating site-specific gene disruptions in COSMC and FUT8, both of which encode proteins involved in glycosylation. The tested single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) created an indel frequency up to 47.3% in COSMC, while an indel frequency up to 99.7% in FUT8 was achieved by applying lectin selection. All eight sgRNAs examined in this study resulted in relatively high indel frequencies, demonstrating that the Cas9 system is a robust and efficient genome-editing methodology in CHO cells. Deep sequencing revealed that 85% of the indels created by Cas9 resulted in frameshift mutations at the target sites, with a strong preference for single base indels. Finally, we have developed a user-friendly bioinformatics tool, named "CRISPy" for rapid identification of sgRNA target sequences in the CHO-K1 genome. The CRISPy tool identified 1,970,449 CRISPR targets divided into 27,553 genes and lists the number of off-target sites in the genome. In conclusion, the proven functionality of Cas9 to edit CHO genomes combined with our CRISPy database have the potential to accelerate genome editing and synthetic biology efforts in CHO cells. PMID:24827782

  19. Fernald Silo Remote Retrieval Tool Development

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, V.K.

    2004-05-18

    A long-reach tool was developed to remove discrete objects from the silos at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in Ohio. If they are not removed, these objects can potentially cause problems during the retrieval and transfer of waste from the silos. Most of the objects are on top of the Bentogrout cap inside the silos at or near the primary opening into the tank and will therefore require only vertical lifting. The objects are located about 20 ft from the top of the silo. Although most of the objects can be retrieved from 20 ft, the long-reach tool was designed to for a reach up to 40 ft in case objects roll towards the walls of the tank or need to be removed during heel retrieval operations. This report provides a detailed description of the tool that was developed, tested, and demonstrated at the Tanks Technology Cold Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Scaffolding was erected over two experimental cells to simulate the 40-ft maximum working depth anticipated in the silos at Fernald. Plastic bottles and plastic sheeting simulated the debris that could be encountered during waste retrieval operations.

  20. Ori-Finder 2, an integrated tool to predict replication origins in the archaeal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hao; Zhang, Chun-Ting; Gao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is one of the most basic processes in all three domains of cellular life. With the advent of the post-genomic era, the increasing number of complete archaeal genomes has created an opportunity for exploration of the molecular mechanisms for initiating cellular DNA replication by in vivo experiments as well as in silico analysis. However, the location of replication origins (oriCs) in many sequenced archaeal genomes remains unknown. We present a web-based tool Ori-Finder 2 to predict oriCs in the archaeal genomes automatically, based on the integrated method comprising the analysis of base composition asymmetry using the Z-curve method, the distribution of origin recognition boxes identified by FIMO tool, and the occurrence of genes frequently close to oriCs. The web server is also able to analyze the unannotated genome sequences by integrating with gene prediction pipelines and BLAST software for gene identification and function annotation. The result of the predicted oriCs is displayed as an HTML table, which offers an intuitive way to browse the result in graphical and tabular form. The software presented here is accurate for the genomes with single oriC, but it does not necessarily find all the origins of replication for the genomes with multiple oriCs. Ori-Finder 2 aims to become a useful platform for the identification and analysis of oriCs in the archaeal genomes, which would provide insight into the replication mechanisms in archaea. The web server is freely available at http://tubic.tju.edu.cn/Ori-Finder2/. PMID:25309521

  1. Process-Based Quality (PBQ) Tools Development

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, J.L.

    2001-12-03

    The objective of this effort is to benchmark the development of process-based quality tools for application in CAD (computer-aided design) model-based applications. The processes of interest are design, manufacturing, and quality process applications. A study was commissioned addressing the impact, current technologies, and known problem areas in application of 3D MCAD (3-dimensional mechanical computer-aided design) models and model integrity on downstream manufacturing and quality processes. The downstream manufacturing and product quality processes are profoundly influenced and dependent on model quality and modeling process integrity. The goal is to illustrate and expedite the modeling and downstream model-based technologies for available or conceptual methods and tools to achieve maximum economic advantage and advance process-based quality concepts.

  2. CHOPCHOP v2: a web tool for the next generation of CRISPR genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Labun, Kornel; Montague, Tessa G; Gagnon, James A; Thyme, Summer B; Valen, Eivind

    2016-07-01

    In just 3 years CRISPR genome editing has transformed biology, and its popularity and potency continue to grow. New CRISPR effectors and rules for locating optimum targets continue to be reported, highlighting the need for computational CRISPR targeting tools to compile these rules and facilitate target selection and design. CHOPCHOP is one of the most widely used web tools for CRISPR- and TALEN-based genome editing. Its overarching principle is to provide an intuitive and powerful tool that can serve both novice and experienced users. In this major update we introduce tools for the next generation of CRISPR advances, including Cpf1 and Cas9 nickases. We support a number of new features that improve the targeting power, usability and efficiency of CHOPCHOP. To increase targeting range and specificity we provide support for custom length sgRNAs, and we evaluate the sequence composition of the whole sgRNA and its surrounding region using models compiled from multiple large-scale studies. These and other new features, coupled with an updated interface for increased usability and support for a continually growing list of organisms, maintain CHOPCHOP as one of the leading tools for CRISPR genome editing. CHOPCHOP v2 can be found at http://chopchop.cbu.uib.no. PMID:27185894

  3. D-peaks: a visual tool to display ChIP-seq peaks along the genome.

    PubMed

    Brohée, Sylvain; Bontempi, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    ChIP-sequencing is a method of choice to localize the positions of protein binding sites on DNA on a whole genomic scale. The deciphering of the sequencing data produced by this novel technique is challenging and it is achieved by their rigorous interpretation using dedicated tools and adapted visualization programs. Here, we present a bioinformatics tool (D-peaks) that adds several possibilities (including, user-friendliness, high-quality, relative position with respect to the genomic features) to the well-known visualization browsers or databases already existing. D-peaks is directly available through its web interface http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/dpeaks/ as well as a command line tool. PMID:23132505

  4. Developing a mapping tool for tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Alan; Collins, Nathan; Krus, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Digital field mapping offers significant benefits when compared with traditional paper mapping techniques in that it provides closer integration with downstream geological modelling and analysis. It also provides the mapper with the ability to rapidly integrate new data with existing databases without the potential degradation caused by repeated manual transcription of numeric, graphical and meta-data. In order to achieve these benefits, a number of PC-based digital mapping tools are available which have been developed for specific communities, eg the BGS•SIGMA project, Midland Valley's FieldMove®, and a range of solutions based on ArcGIS® software, which can be combined with either traditional or digital orientation and data collection tools. However, with the now widespread availability of inexpensive tablets and smart phones, a user led demand for a fully integrated tablet mapping tool has arisen. This poster describes the development of a tablet-based mapping environment specifically designed for geologists. The challenge was to deliver a system that would feel sufficiently close to the flexibility of paper-based geological mapping while being implemented on a consumer communication and entertainment device. The first release of a tablet-based geological mapping system from this project is illustrated and will be shown as implemented on an iPad during the poster session. Midland Valley is pioneering tablet-based mapping and, along with its industrial and academic partners, will be using the application in field based projects throughout this year and will be integrating feedback in further developments of this technology.

  5. Development of a lightning activity nowcasting tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiannidis, Athanassios; Lagouvardos, Kostas; Kotroni, Vassiliki

    2015-04-01

    Electrical phenomena inside thunderstorm clouds are a significant threat to numerous activities. Summertime convective activity is usually associated to local thermal instability, which is hard to predict using numerical weather prediction models. Despite their relatively small areal extend, these thunderstorms can be violent, resulting to infrastructure damage and loss of life. In the frame of TALOS project the National Observatory of Athens has developed a lightning activity nowcasting tool. This tool uses as sole inputs: (i) real time infrared Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) imagery and (ii) real time flashes provided by the VLF lightning detection system ZEUS, which is operated by the National Observatory of Athens. The MSG SEVIRI 10.8 and 6.2μm channels data are utilized to produce 3 Interest Fields (IFs). These fields are the TB10.8 brightness temperature (indicative of the cloud top glaciation), the TB6.2-TB10.8 difference (indicative of the cloud depth) and the TB10.8 15 minute trend, which will be referenced as "TB10.8trend" (indicative of the cloud growth rate). The latter is defined as the difference between two successive 15 minutes images of the TB10.8. When a predefined threshold value is surpassed, the delimited area is considered to be favorable for lightning activity. A statistical procedure is employed to identify the optimum threshold values for the three IFs, based on the performance of each one. The assessment of their efficiency showed that these three IFs can be used independently as predictors of lightning activity. However, in an effort to improve the tool's efficiency a combined estimation is performed. When all three IFs agree that lightning activity is expected over an area, then a Warning Level 3 (WL3) is issued. When 2 or 1 IFs indicate upcoming activity then a WL2 or WL1 is issued. The assessment of the efficiency of the combined IF tool showed that the combined estimation is more skillful than the individual IFs estimations. In a

  6. Genetics and genomics of flower initiation and development in roses

    PubMed Central

    Bendahmane, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Roses hold high symbolic value and great cultural importance in different societies throughout human history. They are widely used as garden ornamental plants, as cut flowers, and for the production of essential oils for the perfume and cosmetic industries. Domestication of roses has a long and complex history, and the rose species have been hybridized across vast geographic areas such as Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. The domestication processes selected several flower characters affecting floral quality, such as recurrent flowering, double flowers, petal colours, and fragrance. The molecular and genetic events that determine some of these flower characters cannot be studied using model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana, or at least only in a limited manner. In this review, we comment on the recent development of genetic, genomic, and transcriptomic tools for roses, and then focus on recent advances that have helped unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying several rose floral traits. PMID:23364936

  7. Genome editing: intellectual property and product development in plant biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Schinkel, Helga; Schillberg, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Genome editing is a revolutionary technology in molecular biology. While scientists are fascinated with the unlimited possibilities provided by directed and controlled changes in DNA in eukaryotes and have eagerly adopted such tools for their own experiments, an understanding of the intellectual property (IP) implications involved in bringing genome editing-derived products to market is often lacking. Due to the ingenuity of genome editing, the time between new product conception and its actual existence can be relatively short; therefore knowledge about IP of the various genome editing methods is relevant. This point must be regarded in a national framework as patents are instituted nationally. Therefore, when designing scientific work that could lead to a product, it is worthwhile to consider the different methods used for genome editing not only for their scientific merits but also for their compatibility with a speedy and reliable launch into the desired market. PMID:27146974

  8. Using linkage maps to correct and scaffold de novo genome assemblies: methods, challenges, and computational tools

    PubMed Central

    Fierst, Janna L.

    2015-01-01

    Modern high-throughput DNA sequencing has made it possible to inexpensively produce genome sequences, but in practice many of these draft genomes are fragmented and incomplete. Genetic linkage maps based on recombination rates between physical markers have been used in biology for over 100 years and a linkage map, when paired with a de novo sequencing project, can resolve mis-assemblies and anchor chromosome-scale sequences. Here, I summarize the methodology behind integrating de novo assemblies and genetic linkage maps, outline the current challenges, review the available software tools, and discuss new mapping technologies. PMID:26150829

  9. Tandem repeat coupled with endonuclease cleavage (TREC): a seamless modification tool for genome engineering in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Noskov, Vladimir N.; Segall-Shapiro, Thomas H.; Chuang, Ray-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The complete synthetic Mycoplasma genitalium genome (∼583 kb) has been assembled and cloned as a circular plasmid in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Attempts to engineer the cloned genome by standard genetic methods involving the URA3/5-fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA) counter-selection have shown a high background of 5-FOA resistant clones derived from spontaneous deletions of the bacterial genome maintained in yeast. Here, we report a method that can seamlessly modify the bacterial genome in yeast with high efficiency. This method requires two sequential homologous recombination events. First, the target region is replaced with a mutagenesis cassette that consists of a knock-out CORE (an18-bp I-SceI recognition site, the SCEI gene under the control of the GAL1 promoter, and the URA3 marker) and a DNA fragment homologous to the sequence upstream of the target site. The replacement generates tandem repeat sequences flanking the CORE. Second, galactose induces the expression of I-SceI, which generates a double-strand break (DSB) at the recognition site. This DSB promotes intra-molecular homologous recombination between the repeat sequences, and leads to an excision of the CORE. As a result, a seamless modification is generated. This method can be adapted for a variety of genomic modifications and may provide an important tool to modify and design natural or synthetic genomes propagated in yeast. PMID:20228123

  10. Cryogenic Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lusby, Brian S.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Collins, Jacob A.

    2011-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Branch at NASA s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has developed a parametric analytical tool to address the need to rapidly predict heat leak into propellant distribution lines based on insulation type, installation technique, line supports, penetrations, and instrumentation. The Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool (PFSAT) will also determine the optimum orifice diameter for an optional thermodynamic vent system (TVS) to counteract heat leak into the feed line and ensure temperature constraints at the end of the feed line are met. PFSAT was developed primarily using Fortran 90 code because of its number crunching power and the capability to directly access real fluid property subroutines in the Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Database developed by NIST. A Microsoft Excel front end user interface was implemented to provide convenient portability of PFSAT among a wide variety of potential users and its ability to utilize a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The focus of PFSAT is on-orbit reaction control systems and orbital maneuvering systems, but it may be used to predict heat leak into ground-based transfer lines as well. PFSAT is expected to be used for rapid initial design of cryogenic propellant distribution lines and thermodynamic vent systems. Once validated, PFSAT will support concept trades for a variety of cryogenic fluid transfer systems on spacecraft, including planetary landers, transfer vehicles, and propellant depots, as well as surface-based transfer systems. The details of the development of PFSAT, its user interface, and the program structure will be presented.

  11. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis Using JSpecies Tool Establishes Clonal Relationships between Listeria monocytogenes Strains from Epidemiologically Unrelated Listeriosis Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Burall, Laurel S.; Grim, Christopher J.; Mammel, Mark K.; Datta, Atin R.

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to build a comprehensive genomic approach to food safety challenges, the FDA has implemented a whole genome sequencing effort, GenomeTrakr, which involves the sequencing and analysis of genomes of foodborne pathogens. As a part of this effort, we routinely sequence whole genomes of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) isolates associated with human listeriosis outbreaks, as well as those isolated through other sources. To rapidly establish genetic relatedness of these genomes, we evaluated tetranucleotide frequency analysis via the JSpecies program to provide a cursory analysis of strain relatedness. The JSpecies tetranucleotide (tetra) analysis plots standardized (z-score) tetramer word frequencies of two strains against each other and uses linear regression analysis to determine similarity (r2). This tool was able to validate the close relationships between outbreak related strains from four different outbreaks. Included in this study was the analysis of Lm strains isolated during the recent caramel apple outbreak and stone fruit incident in 2014. We identified that many of the isolates from these two outbreaks shared a common 4b variant (4bV) serotype, also designated as IVb-v1, using a qPCR protocol developed in our laboratory. The 4bV serotype is characterized by the presence of a 6.3 Kb DNA segment normally found in serotype 1/2a, 3a, 1/2c and 3c strains but not in serotype 4b or 1/2b strains. We decided to compare these strains at a genomic level using the JSpecies Tetra tool. Specifically, we compared several 4bV and 4b isolates and identified a high level of similarity between the stone fruit and apple 4bV strains, but not the 4b strains co-identified in the caramel apple outbreak or other 4b or 4bV strains in our collection. This finding was further substantiated by a SNP-based analysis. Additionally, we were able to identify close relatedness between isolates from clinical cases from 1993–1994 and a single case from 2011 as well as links between

  12. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis Using JSpecies Tool Establishes Clonal Relationships between Listeria monocytogenes Strains from Epidemiologically Unrelated Listeriosis Outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Burall, Laurel S; Grim, Christopher J; Mammel, Mark K; Datta, Atin R

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to build a comprehensive genomic approach to food safety challenges, the FDA has implemented a whole genome sequencing effort, GenomeTrakr, which involves the sequencing and analysis of genomes of foodborne pathogens. As a part of this effort, we routinely sequence whole genomes of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) isolates associated with human listeriosis outbreaks, as well as those isolated through other sources. To rapidly establish genetic relatedness of these genomes, we evaluated tetranucleotide frequency analysis via the JSpecies program to provide a cursory analysis of strain relatedness. The JSpecies tetranucleotide (tetra) analysis plots standardized (z-score) tetramer word frequencies of two strains against each other and uses linear regression analysis to determine similarity (r2). This tool was able to validate the close relationships between outbreak related strains from four different outbreaks. Included in this study was the analysis of Lm strains isolated during the recent caramel apple outbreak and stone fruit incident in 2014. We identified that many of the isolates from these two outbreaks shared a common 4b variant (4bV) serotype, also designated as IVb-v1, using a qPCR protocol developed in our laboratory. The 4bV serotype is characterized by the presence of a 6.3 Kb DNA segment normally found in serotype 1/2a, 3a, 1/2c and 3c strains but not in serotype 4b or 1/2b strains. We decided to compare these strains at a genomic level using the JSpecies Tetra tool. Specifically, we compared several 4bV and 4b isolates and identified a high level of similarity between the stone fruit and apple 4bV strains, but not the 4b strains co-identified in the caramel apple outbreak or other 4b or 4bV strains in our collection. This finding was further substantiated by a SNP-based analysis. Additionally, we were able to identify close relatedness between isolates from clinical cases from 1993-1994 and a single case from 2011 as well as links between two

  13. Genome-wide SNP detection, validation, and development of an 8K SNP array for apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As high-throughput genetic marker screening systems are essential for a range of genetics studies and plant breeding applications, the International RosBREED SNP Consortium (IRSC) has utilized the Illumina Infinium® II system to develop a medium- to high-throughput SNP screening tool for genome-wide...

  14. C-Sibelia: an easy-to-use and highly accurate tool for bacterial genome comparison

    PubMed Central

    Minkin, Ilya; Pham, Hoa; Starostina, Ekaterina; Vyahhi, Nikolay; Pham, Son

    2013-01-01

    We present C-Sibelia, a highly accurate and easy-to-use software tool for comparing two closely related bacterial genomes, which can be presented as either finished sequences or fragmented assemblies. C-Sibelia takes as input two FASTA files and produces: (1) a VCF file containing all identified single nucleotide variations and indels; (2) an XMFA file containing alignment information. The software also produces Circos diagrams visualizing high level genomic architecture for rearrangement analyses. C-Sibelia is a part of the Sibelia comparative genomics suite, which is freely available under the GNU GPL v.2 license at http://sourceforge.net/projects/sibelia-bio. C-Sibelia is compatible with Unix-like operating systems. A web-based version of the software is available at http://etool.me/software/csibelia. PMID:25110578

  15. MetaBAT, an efficient tool for accurately reconstructing single genomes from complex microbial communities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kang, Dongwan D.; Froula, Jeff; Egan, Rob; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Grouping large genomic fragments assembled from shotgun metagenomic sequences to deconvolute complex microbial communities, or metagenome binning, enables the study of individual organisms and their interactions. Because of the complex nature of these communities, existing metagenome binning methods often miss a large number of microbial species. In addition, most of the tools are not scalable to large datasets. Here we introduce automated software called MetaBAT that integrates empirical probabilistic distances of genome abundance and tetranucleotide frequency for accurate metagenome binning. MetaBAT outperforms alternative methods in accuracy and computational efficiency on both synthetic and real metagenome datasets. Lastly, it automatically formsmore » hundreds of high quality genome bins on a very large assembly consisting millions of contigs in a matter of hours on a single node. MetaBAT is open source software and available at https://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/metabat.« less

  16. MetaBAT, an efficient tool for accurately reconstructing single genomes from complex microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Dongwan D.; Froula, Jeff; Egan, Rob; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Grouping large genomic fragments assembled from shotgun metagenomic sequences to deconvolute complex microbial communities, or metagenome binning, enables the study of individual organisms and their interactions. Because of the complex nature of these communities, existing metagenome binning methods often miss a large number of microbial species. In addition, most of the tools are not scalable to large datasets. Here we introduce automated software called MetaBAT that integrates empirical probabilistic distances of genome abundance and tetranucleotide frequency for accurate metagenome binning. MetaBAT outperforms alternative methods in accuracy and computational efficiency on both synthetic and real metagenome datasets. Lastly, it automatically forms hundreds of high quality genome bins on a very large assembly consisting millions of contigs in a matter of hours on a single node. MetaBAT is open source software and available at https://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/metabat.

  17. Prophage Finder: a prophage loci prediction tool for prokaryotic genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Bose, M; Barber, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    Prophage loci often remain under-annotated or even unrecognized in prokaryotic genome sequencing projects. A PHP application, Prophage Finder, has been developed and implemented to predict prophage loci, based upon clusters of phage-related gene products encoded within DNA sequences. This application provides results detailing several facets of these clusters to facilitate rapid prediction and analysis of prophage sequences. Prophage Finder was tested using previously annotated prokaryotic genomic sequences with manually curated prophage loci as benchmarks. Additional analyses from Prophage Finder searches of several draft prokaryotic genome sequences are available through the Web site (http://bioinformatics.uwp.edu/~phage/DOEResults.php) to illustrate the potential of this application. PMID:16922685

  18. Development of advanced composite ceramic tool material

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Chuanzhen; Ai Xing

    1996-08-01

    An advanced ceramic cutting tool material has been developed by means of silicon carbide whisker (SiCw) reinforcement and silicon carbide particle (SiCp) dispersion. The material has the advantage of high bending strength and fracture toughness. Compared with the mechanical properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiCp(AP), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiCw(JX-1), and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiCp/SiCw(JX-2-I), it confirms that JX-2-I composites have obvious additive effects of both reinforcing and toughening. The reinforcing and toughening mechanisms of JX-2-I composites were studied based on the analysis of thermal expansion mismatch and the observation of microstructure. The cutting performance of JX-2-I composites was investigated primarily.

  19. Development of the SOFIA Image Processing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Alexander N.

    2011-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a Boeing 747SP carrying a 2.5 meter infrared telescope capable of operating between at altitudes of between twelve and fourteen kilometers, which is above more than 99 percent of the water vapor in the atmosphere. The ability to make observations above most water vapor coupled with the ability to make observations from anywhere, anytime, make SOFIA one of the world s premiere infrared observatories. SOFIA uses three visible light CCD imagers to assist in pointing the telescope. The data from these imagers is stored in archive files as is housekeeping data, which contains information such as boresight and area of interest locations. A tool that could both extract and process data from the archive files was developed.

  20. Development of Fuel Accounting Software Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, Jong Won; Suk, Juil

    1996-12-01

    A successful spacecraft mission depends on the proper maintenance of the orbit and attitude. One important requirement for the orbit and attitude planning is the accurate estimation of the propellant remaining onboard the spacecraft. For GEO communi-cations satellite, a precise fuel remaining estimation is of particular importance. This paper focuses on the bookkeeping method that was developed for calculating the pro-pellant budget by recording fuel consumption history. In general, the bookkeeping method includes detailed observation of spacecraft maneuver operations throughout the whole mission life. Application of this method is illustrated using a communica-tions satellite. In this the fuel accounting s/w tool, a PC-based spread sheet is utilized to provide an overall view of input/output elements, and to provide strong numerical and graphical merits for analyses.

  1. Solar Array Verification Analysis Tool (SAVANT) Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Long, KIenwyn J.; Curtis, Henry B.; Gardner, Barbara; Davis, Victoria; Messenger, Scott; Walters, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Modeling solar cell performance for a specific radiation environment to obtain the end-of-life photovoltaic array performance has become both increasingly important and, with the rapid advent of new types of cell technology, more difficult. For large constellations of satellites, a few percent difference in the lifetime prediction can have an enormous economic impact. The tool described here automates the assessment of solar array on-orbit end-of-life performance and assists in the development and design of ground test protocols for different solar cell designs. Once established, these protocols can be used to calculate on-orbit end-of-life performance from ground test results. The Solar Array Verification Analysis Tool (SAVANT) utilizes the radiation environment from the Environment Work Bench (EWB) model developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center s Photovoltaic and Space Environmental Effects Branch in conjunction with Maxwell Technologies. It then modifies and combines this information with the displacement damage model proposed by Summers et al. (ref. 1) of the Naval Research Laboratory to determine solar cell performance during the course of a given mission. The resulting predictions can then be compared with flight data. The Environment WorkBench (ref. 2) uses the NASA AE8 (electron) and AP8 (proton) models of the radiation belts to calculate the trapped radiation flux. These fluxes are integrated over the defined spacecraft orbit for the duration of the mission to obtain the total omnidirectional fluence spectra. Components such as the solar cell coverglass, adhesive, and antireflective coatings can slow and attenuate the particle fluence reaching the solar cell. In SAVANT, a continuous slowing down approximation is used to model this effect.

  2. DNA-binding protein prediction using plant specific support vector machines: validation and application of a new genome annotation tool

    PubMed Central

    Motion, Graham B.; Howden, Andrew J. M.; Huitema, Edgar; Jones, Susan

    2015-01-01

    There are currently 151 plants with draft genomes available but levels of functional annotation for putative protein products are low. Therefore, accurate computational predictions are essential to annotate genomes in the first instance, and to provide focus for the more costly and time consuming functional assays that follow. DNA-binding proteins are an important class of proteins that require annotation, but current computational methods are not applicable for genome wide predictions in plant species. Here, we explore the use of species and lineage specific models for the prediction of DNA-binding proteins in plants. We show that a species specific support vector machine model based on Arabidopsis sequence data is more accurate (accuracy 81%) than a generic model (74%), and based on this we develop a plant specific model for predicting DNA-binding proteins. We apply this model to the tomato proteome and demonstrate its ability to perform accurate high-throughput prediction of DNA-binding proteins. In doing so, we have annotated 36 currently uncharacterised proteins by assigning a putative DNA-binding function. Our model is publically available and we propose it be used in combination with existing tools to help increase annotation levels of DNA-binding proteins encoded in plant genomes. PMID:26304539

  3. Novel Genome-Editing Tools to Model and Correct Primary Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Ott de Bruin, Lisa M.; Volpi, Stefano; Musunuru, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and other severe non-SCID primary immunodeficiencies (non-SCID PID) can be treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, but when histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-matched donors are lacking, this can be a high-risk procedure. Correcting the patient’s own HSCs with gene therapy offers an attractive alternative. Gene therapies currently being used in clinical settings insert a functional copy of the entire gene by means of a viral vector. With this treatment, severe complications may result due to integration within oncogenes. A promising alternative is the use of endonucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 to introduce a double-stranded break in the DNA and thus induce homology-directed repair. With these genome-editing tools a correct copy can be inserted in a precisely targeted “safe harbor.” They can also be used to correct pathogenic mutations in situ and to develop cellular or animal models needed to study the pathogenic effects of specific genetic defects found in immunodeficient patients. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these endonucleases in gene correction and modeling with an emphasis on CRISPR/Cas9, which offers the most promise due to its efficacy and versatility. PMID:26052330

  4. Novel genomic tools for specific and real-time detection of biothreat and frequently encountered foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Woubit, Abdela; Yehualaeshet, Teshome; Habtemariam, Tsegaye; Samuel, Temesgen

    2012-04-01

    The bacterial genera Escherichia, Salmonella, Shigella, Vibrio, Yersinia, and Francisella include important food safety and biothreat agents. By extensive mining of the whole genome and protein databases of diverse, closely and distantly related bacterial species and strains, we have identified novel genome regions, which we utilized to develop a rapid detection platform for these pathogens. The specific genomic targets we have identified to design the primers in Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis, F. tularensis subsp. novicida, Shigella dysenteriae, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia pestis, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis contained either known genes or putative proteins. Primer sets were designed from the target regions for use in real-time PCR assays to detect specific biothreat pathogens at species or strain levels. The primer sets were first tested by in silico PCR against whole-genome sequences of different species, subspecies, or strains and then by in vitro PCR against genomic DNA preparations from 23 strains representing six biothreat agents (Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL 933, Shigella dysenteriae, S. enterica serovar Typhi, F. tularensis subsp. tularensis, V. cholerae, and Y. pestis) and six foodborne pathogens (Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Saintpaul, Shigella sonnei, F. tularensis subsp. novicida, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Y. pseudotuberculosis). Each pathogen was specifically identifiable at the genus and species levels. Sensitivity assays performed with purified DNA showed the lowest detection limit of 128 fg of DNA/μl for F. tularensis subsp. tularensis. A preliminary test to detect Shigella organisms in a milk matrix also enabled the detection of 6 to 60 CFU/ml. These new tools could ultimately be used to develop platforms to simultaneously detect these pathogens. PMID:22488053

  5. The Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA): Developing Community Resources to Study Diverse Invertebrate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of all metazoan (animal) species comprise the “invertebrates,” but very few genomes from these organisms have been sequenced. We have, therefore, formed a “Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance” (GIGA). Our intent is to build a collaborative network of diverse scientists to tackle major challenges (e.g., species selection, sample collection and storage, sequence assembly, annotation, analytical tools) associated with genome/transcriptome sequencing across a large taxonomic spectrum. We aim to promote standards that will facilitate comparative approaches to invertebrate genomics and collaborations across the international scientific community. Candidate study taxa include species from Porifera, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Annelida, Bryozoa, and Platyhelminthes, among others. GIGA will target 7000 noninsect/nonnematode species, with an emphasis on marine taxa because of the unrivaled phyletic diversity in the oceans. Priorities for selecting invertebrates for sequencing will include, but are not restricted to, their phylogenetic placement; relevance to organismal, ecological, and conservation research; and their importance to fisheries and human health. We highlight benefits of sequencing both whole genomes (DNA) and transcriptomes and also suggest policies for genomic-level data access and sharing based on transparency and inclusiveness. The GIGA Web site (http://giga.nova.edu) has been launched to facilitate this collaborative venture. PMID:24336862

  6. The Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA): developing community resources to study diverse invertebrate genomes.

    PubMed

    Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Collins, Allen G; Collins, Timothy; Crandall, Keith; Distel, Daniel; Dunn, Casey; Giribet, Gonzalo; Haddock, Steven; Knowlton, Nancy; Martindale, Mark; Medina, Mónica; Messing, Charles; O'Brien, Stephen J; Paulay, Gustav; Putnam, Nicolas; Ravasi, Timothy; Rouse, Greg W; Ryan, Joseph F; Schulze, Anja; Wörheide, Gert; Adamska, Maja; Bailly, Xavier; Breinholt, Jesse; Browne, William E; Diaz, M Christina; Evans, Nathaniel; Flot, Jean-François; Fogarty, Nicole; Johnston, Matthew; Kamel, Bishoy; Kawahara, Akito Y; Laberge, Tammy; Lavrov, Dennis; Michonneau, François; Moroz, Leonid L; Oakley, Todd; Osborne, Karen; Pomponi, Shirley A; Rhodes, Adelaide; Santos, Scott R; Satoh, Nori; Thacker, Robert W; Van de Peer, Yves; Voolstra, Christian R; Welch, David Mark; Winston, Judith; Zhou, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of all metazoan (animal) species comprise the "invertebrates," but very few genomes from these organisms have been sequenced. We have, therefore, formed a "Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance" (GIGA). Our intent is to build a collaborative network of diverse scientists to tackle major challenges (e.g., species selection, sample collection and storage, sequence assembly, annotation, analytical tools) associated with genome/transcriptome sequencing across a large taxonomic spectrum. We aim to promote standards that will facilitate comparative approaches to invertebrate genomics and collaborations across the international scientific community. Candidate study taxa include species from Porifera, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Annelida, Bryozoa, and Platyhelminthes, among others. GIGA will target 7000 noninsect/nonnematode species, with an emphasis on marine taxa because of the unrivaled phyletic diversity in the oceans. Priorities for selecting invertebrates for sequencing will include, but are not restricted to, their phylogenetic placement; relevance to organismal, ecological, and conservation research; and their importance to fisheries and human health. We highlight benefits of sequencing both whole genomes (DNA) and transcriptomes and also suggest policies for genomic-level data access and sharing based on transparency and inclusiveness. The GIGA Web site (http://giga.nova.edu) has been launched to facilitate this collaborative venture. PMID:24336862

  7. Development of Advanced Tools for Cryogenic Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugby, D. C.; Marland, B. C.; Stouffer, C. J.; Kroliczek, E. J.

    2004-06-01

    This paper describes four advanced devices (or tools) that were developed to help solve problems in cryogenic integration. The four devices are: (1) an across-gimbal nitrogen cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP); (2) a miniaturized neon CLHP; (3) a differential thermal expansion (DTE) cryogenic thermal switch (CTSW); and (4) a dual-volume nitrogen cryogenic thermal storage unit (CTSU). The across-gimbal CLHP provides a low torque, high conductance solution for gimbaled cryogenic systems wishing to position their cryocoolers off-gimbal. The miniaturized CLHP combines thermal transport, flexibility, and thermal switching (at 35 K) into one device that can be directly mounted to both the cooler cold head and the cooled component. The DTE-CTSW, designed and successfully tested in a previous program using a stainless steel tube and beryllium (Be) end-pieces, was redesigned with a polymer rod and high-purity aluminum (Al) end-pieces to improve performance and manufacturability while still providing a miniaturized design. Lastly, the CTSU was designed with a 6063 Al heat exchanger and integrally welded, segmented, high purity Al thermal straps for direct attachment to both a cooler cold head and a Be component whose peak heat load exceeds its average load by 2.5 times. For each device, the paper will describe its development objective, operating principles, heritage, requirements, design, test data and lessons learned.

  8. Animal QTLdb: an improved database tool for livestock animal QTL/association data dissemination in the post-genome era.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-Liang; Park, Carissa A; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Reecy, James M

    2013-01-01

    The Animal QTL database (QTLdb; http://www.animalgenome.org/QTLdb) is designed to house all publicly available QTL and single-nucleotide polymorphism/gene association data on livestock animal species. An earlier version was published in the Nucleic Acids Research Database issue in 2007. Since then, we have continued our efforts to develop new and improved database tools to allow more data types, parameters and functions. Our efforts have transformed the Animal QTLdb into a tool that actively serves the research community as a quality data repository and more importantly, a provider of easily accessible tools and functions to disseminate QTL and gene association information. The QTLdb has been heavily used by the livestock genomics community since its first public release in 2004. To date, there are 5920 cattle, 3442 chicken, 7451 pigs, 753 sheep and 88 rainbow trout data points in the database, and at least 290 publications that cite use of the database. The rapid advancement in genomic studies of cattle, chicken, pigs, sheep and other livestock animals has presented us with challenges, as well as opportunities for the QTLdb to meet the evolving needs of the research community. Here, we report our progress over the recent years and highlight new functions and services available to the general public. PMID:23180796

  9. A Survey of Agent-oriented Development Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokahr, Alexander; Braubach, Lars

    Development tools represent an important additive for the practical realization of software applications, mainly because they help automating development activities and are able to hide complexity from developers. In this chapter, the requirements for tools are generically analyzed by the various tasks that need to be performed in the different development phases. These requirements are the foundation for a detailed investigation of the landscape of available agent-oriented development tools. In order to assess the variety of tools systematically, existing surveys and evaluations have been used to isolate three important categories of tools, which are treated separately: modeling tools, IDEs and phase-specic tools. For each of these categories specic requirements are elaborated, an overview of existing tools is given and one representative tool is presented in more detail.

  10. Development and psychometric evaluation of the genomic nursing concept inventory.

    PubMed

    Ward, Linda D; Haberman, Mel; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina

    2014-09-01

    Translation of genome science to improve health outcomes requires nurses to develop genomic competency and literacy, and a robust measure of genomic literacy is needed to advance evidence-based nursing education. This study aimed to develop and evaluate the Genomic Nursing Concept Inventory (GNCI), which is a scale to measure understanding of the genetic/genomic concepts most critical to nursing practice. Applying a multistep process, key concepts were drawn from essential nursing genetic/genomic competencies and validated by expert opinion. Surveys and cognitive interviews of baccalaureate nursing (BSN) students informed item development. A 52-item draft inventory was administered to 238 BSN students. Item analysis informed inventory reduction, and the resulting 31-item inventory was tested with 705 BSN students. Scale difficulty was 47%, item difficulty 13% to 84%, and Cronbach’s alpha 0.77. As scale refinement proceeds, the GNCI provides a useful measure of genomic literacy to inform curriculum design and evaluate outcomes in genomic nursing education. PMID:25102130

  11. Developing genomic resources for the apiaceae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Apiaceae family includes carrot, celery, cilantro, dill, fennel and numerous other spice and medicinal crops. Carrot is the most economically important member of the Apiaceae with an annual value of $600 M in the United States alone. There are few genomic resources for carrot or other Apiaceae, ...

  12. Stakeholder engagement in policy development: challenges and opportunities for human genomics

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Amy A.; Harris-Wai, Julie N.

    2015-01-01

    Along with rapid advances in human genomics, policies governing genomic data and clinical technologies have proliferated. Stakeholder engagement is widely lauded as an important methodology for improving clinical, scientific, and public health policy decision making. The purpose of this paper is to examine how stakeholder engagement is used to develop policies in genomics research and public health areas, as well as to identify future priorities for conducting evidence-based stakeholder engagements. We focus on exemplars in biobanking and newborn screening to illustrate a variety of current stakeholder engagement in policy-making efforts. Each setting provides an important context for examining the methods of obtaining and integrating informed stakeholder voices into the policy-making process. While many organizations have an interest in engaging stakeholders with regard to genomic policy issues, there is broad divergence with respect to the stakeholders involved, the purpose of engagements, when stakeholders are engaged during policy development, methods of engagement, and the outcomes reported. Stakeholder engagement in genomics policy development is still at a nascent stage. Several challenges of using stakeholder engagement as a tool for genomics policy development remain, and little evidence regarding how to best incorporate stakeholder feedback into policy-making processes is currently available. PMID:25764215

  13. TreeSeq, a Fast and Intuitive Tool for Analysis of Whole Genome and Metagenomic Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Wintermans, Bastiaan; Brandt, Bernd; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina; Budding, Andries

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is not yet commonly used in clinical laboratories because of a lack of simple and intuitive tools. We developed a software tool (TreeSeq) with a quaternary tree search structure for the analysis of sequence data. This permits rapid searches for sequences of interest in large datasets. We used TreeSeq to screen a gut microbiota metagenomic dataset and a whole genome sequencing (WGS) dataset of a strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae for antibiotic resistance genes and compared the results with BLAST and phenotypic resistance determination. TreeSeq was more than thirty times faster than BLAST and accurately detected resistance gene sequences in complex metagenomic data and resistance genes corresponding with the phenotypic resistance pattern of the Klebsiella strain. Resistance genes found by TreeSeq were visualized as a gene coverage heat map, aiding in the interpretation of results. TreeSeq brings analysis of metagenomic and WGS data within reach of clinical diagnostics. PMID:25933115

  14. Ensembl Plants: Integrating Tools for Visualizing, Mining, and Analyzing Plant Genomics Data.

    PubMed

    Bolser, Dan; Staines, Daniel M; Pritchard, Emily; Kersey, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Ensembl Plants ( http://plants.ensembl.org ) is an integrative resource presenting genome-scale information for a growing number of sequenced plant species (currently 33). Data provided includes genome sequence, gene models, functional annotation, and polymorphic loci. Various additional information are provided for variation data, including population structure, individual genotypes, linkage, and phenotype data. In each release, comparative analyses are performed on whole genome and protein sequences, and genome alignments and gene trees are made available that show the implied evolutionary history of each gene family. Access to the data is provided through a genome browser incorporating many specialist interfaces for different data types, and through a variety of additional methods for programmatic access and data mining. These access routes are consistent with those offered through the Ensembl interface for the genomes of non-plant species, including those of plant pathogens, pests, and pollinators.Ensembl Plants is updated 4-5 times a year and is developed in collaboration with our international partners in the Gramene ( http://www.gramene.org ) and transPLANT projects ( http://www.transplantdb.org ). PMID:26519403

  15. DNA Microarrays: a Powerful Genomic Tool for Biomedical and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Victor; Falciani, Francesco; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2007-01-01

    Among the many benefits of the Human Genome Project are new and powerful tools such as the genome-wide hybridization devices referred to as microarrays. Initially designed to measure gene transcriptional levels, microarray technologies are now used for comparing other genome features among individuals and their tissues and cells. Results provide valuable information on disease subcategories, disease prognosis, and treatment outcome. Likewise, they reveal differences in genetic makeup, regulatory mechanisms, and subtle variations and move us closer to the era of personalized medicine. To understand this powerful tool, its versatility, and how dramatically it is changing the molecular approach to biomedical and clinical research, this review describes the technology, its applications, a didactic step-by-step review of a typical microarray protocol, and a real experiment. Finally, it calls the attention of the medical community to the importance of integrating multidisciplinary teams to take advantage of this technology and its expanding applications that, in a slide, reveals our genetic inheritance and destiny. PMID:17660860

  16. Next generation genome-wide association tool: Design and coverage of a high-throughput European-optimized SNP array

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Kvale, Mark N.; Hesselson, Stephanie E.; Zhan, Yiping; Aquino, Christine; Cao, Yang; Cawley, Simon; Chung, Elaine; Connell, Sheryl; Eshragh, Jasmin; Ewing, Marcia; Gollub, Jeremy; Henderson, Mary; Hubbell, Earl; Iribarren, Carlos; Kaufman, Jay; Lao, Richard Z.; Lu, Yontao; Ludwig, Dana; Mathauda, Gurpreet K.; McGuire, William; Mei, Gangwu; Miles, Sunita; Purdy, Matthew M.; Quesenberry, Charles; Ranatunga, Dilrini; Rowell, Sarah; Sadler, Marianne; Shapero, Michael H.; Shen, Ling; Shenoy, Tanushree R.; Smethurst, David; Van den Eeden, Stephen K.; Walter, Larry; Wan, Eunice; Wearley, Reid; Webster, Teresa; Wen, Christopher C.; Weng, Li; Whitmer, Rachel A.; Williams, Alan; Wong, Simon C.; Zau, Chia; Finn, Andrea; Schaefer, Catherine; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Risch, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The success of genome-wide association studies has paralleled the development of efficient genotyping technologies. We describe the development of a next-generation microarray based on the new highly-efficient Affymetrix Axiom genotyping technology that we are using to genotype individuals of European ancestry from the Kaiser Permanente Research Program on Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH). The array contains 674,517 SNPs, and provides excellent genome-wide as well as gene-based and candidate-SNP coverage. Coverage was calculated using an approach based on imputation and cross validation. Preliminary results for the first 80,301 saliva-derived DNA samples from the RPGEH demonstrate very high quality genotypes, with sample success rates above 94% and over 98% of successful samples having SNP call rates exceeding 98%. At steady state, we have produced 462 million genotypes per week for each Axiom system. The new array provides a valuable addition to the repertoire of tools for large scale genome-wide association studies. PMID:21565264

  17. Meta-tools for software development and knowledge acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, Henrik; Musen, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of tools that provide support for software development is highly dependent on the match between the tools and their task. Knowledge-acquisition (KA) tools constitute a class of development tools targeted at knowledge-based systems. Generally, KA tools that are custom-tailored for particular application domains are more effective than are general KA tools that cover a large class of domains. The high cost of custom-tailoring KA tools manually has encouraged researchers to develop meta-tools for KA tools. Current research issues in meta-tools for knowledge acquisition are the specification styles, or meta-views, for target KA tools used, and the relationships between the specification entered in the meta-tool and other specifications for the target program under development. We examine different types of meta-views and meta-tools. Our current project is to provide meta-tools that produce KA tools from multiple specification sources--for instance, from a task analysis of the target application.

  18. Engineering plastid genomes: methods, tools, and applications in basic research and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Bock, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The small bacterial-type genome of the plastid (chloroplast) can be engineered by genetic transformation, generating cells and plants with transgenic plastid genomes, also referred to as transplastomic plants. The transformation process relies on homologous recombination, thereby facilitating the site-specific alteration of endogenous plastid genes as well as the precisely targeted insertion of foreign genes into the plastid DNA. The technology has been used extensively to analyze chloroplast gene functions and study plastid gene expression at all levels in vivo. Over the years, a large toolbox has been assembled that is now nearly comparable to the techniques available for plant nuclear transformation and that has enabled new applications of transplastomic technology in basic and applied research. This review describes the state of the art in engineering the plastid genomes of algae and land plants (Embryophyta). It provides an overview of the existing tools for plastid genome engineering, discusses current technological limitations, and highlights selected applications that demonstrate the immense potential of chloroplast transformation in several key areas of plant biotechnology. PMID:25494465

  19. ANItools web: a web tool for fast genome comparison within multiple bacterial strains

    PubMed Central

    Han, Na; Qiang, Yujun; Zhang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early classification of prokaryotes was based solely on phenotypic similarities, but modern prokaryote characterization has been strongly influenced by advances in genetic methods. With the fast development of the sequencing technology, the ever increasing number of genomic sequences per species offers the possibility for developing distance determinations based on whole-genome information. The average nucleotide identity (ANI), calculated from pair-wise comparisons of all sequences shared between two given strains, has been proposed as the new metrics for bacterial species definition and classification. Results: In this study, we developed the web version of ANItools (http://ani.mypathogen.cn/), which helps users directly get ANI values from online sources. A database covering ANI values of any two strains in a genus was also included (2773 strains, 1487 species and 668 genera). Importantly, ANItools web can automatically run genome comparison between the input genomic sequence and data sequences (Genus and Species levels), and generate a graphical report for ANI calculation results. Conclusion: ANItools web is useful for defining the relationship between bacterial strains, further contributing to the classification and identification of bacterial species using genome data. Database URL: http://ani.mypathogen.cn/ PMID:27270714

  20. Novel R tools for analysis of genome-wide population genetic data with emphasis on clonality

    PubMed Central

    Kamvar, Zhian N.; Brooks, Jonah C.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    2015-01-01

    To gain a detailed understanding of how plant microbes evolve and adapt to hosts, pesticides, and other factors, knowledge of the population dynamics and evolutionary history of populations is crucial. Plant pathogen populations are often clonal or partially clonal which requires different analytical tools. With the advent of high throughput sequencing technologies, obtaining genome-wide population genetic data has become easier than ever before. We previously contributed the R package poppr specifically addressing issues with analysis of clonal populations. In this paper we provide several significant extensions to poppr with a focus on large, genome-wide SNP data. Specifically, we provide several new functionalities including the new function mlg.filter to define clone boundaries allowing for inspection and definition of what is a clonal lineage, minimum spanning networks with reticulation, a sliding-window analysis of the index of association, modular bootstrapping of any genetic distance, and analyses across any level of hierarchies. PMID:26113860

  1. Novel R tools for analysis of genome-wide population genetic data with emphasis on clonality.

    PubMed

    Kamvar, Zhian N; Brooks, Jonah C; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2015-01-01

    To gain a detailed understanding of how plant microbes evolve and adapt to hosts, pesticides, and other factors, knowledge of the population dynamics and evolutionary history of populations is crucial. Plant pathogen populations are often clonal or partially clonal which requires different analytical tools. With the advent of high throughput sequencing technologies, obtaining genome-wide population genetic data has become easier than ever before. We previously contributed the R package poppr specifically addressing issues with analysis of clonal populations. In this paper we provide several significant extensions to poppr with a focus on large, genome-wide SNP data. Specifically, we provide several new functionalities including the new function mlg.filter to define clone boundaries allowing for inspection and definition of what is a clonal lineage, minimum spanning networks with reticulation, a sliding-window analysis of the index of association, modular bootstrapping of any genetic distance, and analyses across any level of hierarchies. PMID:26113860

  2. Optimized CRISPR/Cas tools for efficient germline and somatic genome engineering in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Port, Fillip; Chen, Hui-Min; Lee, Tzumin; Bullock, Simon L

    2014-07-22

    The type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has emerged recently as a powerful method to manipulate the genomes of various organisms. Here, we report a toolbox for high-efficiency genome engineering of Drosophila melanogaster consisting of transgenic Cas9 lines and versatile guide RNA (gRNA) expression plasmids. Systematic evaluation reveals Cas9 lines with ubiquitous or germ-line-restricted patterns of activity. We also demonstrate differential activity of the same gRNA expressed from different U6 snRNA promoters, with the previously untested U6:3 promoter giving the most potent effect. An appropriate combination of Cas9 and gRNA allows targeting of essential and nonessential genes with transmission rates ranging from 25-100%. We also demonstrate that our optimized CRISPR/Cas tools can be used for offset nicking-based mutagenesis. Furthermore, in combination with oligonucleotide or long double-stranded donor templates, our reagents allow precise genome editing by homology-directed repair with rates that make selection markers unnecessary. Last, we demonstrate a novel application of CRISPR/Cas-mediated technology in revealing loss-of-function phenotypes in somatic cells following efficient biallelic targeting by Cas9 expressed in a ubiquitous or tissue-restricted manner. Our CRISPR/Cas tools will facilitate the rapid evaluation of mutant phenotypes of specific genes and the precise modification of the genome with single-nucleotide precision. Our results also pave the way for high-throughput genetic screening with CRISPR/Cas. PMID:25002478

  3. Reverse Vaccinology: Developing Vaccines in the Era of Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Sette, Alessandro; Rappuoli, Rino

    2012-01-01

    The sequence of microbial genomes made all potential antigens of each pathogen available for vaccine development. This increased by orders of magnitude potential vaccine targets in bacteria, parasites, and large viruses and revealed virtually all their CD4+ and CD8+ T cell epitopes. The genomic information was first used for the development of a vaccine against serogroup B meningococcus, and it is now being used for several other bacterial vaccines. In this review, we will first summarize the impact that genome sequencing has had on vaccine development, and then we will analyze how the genomic information can help further our understanding of immunity to infection or vaccination and lead to the design of better vaccines by diving into the world of T cell immunity. PMID:21029963

  4. Algal Functional Annotation Tool from the DOE-UCLA Institute for Genomics and Proteomics

    DOE Data Explorer

    Lopez, David

    The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a bioinformatics resource to visualize pathway maps, identify enriched biological terms, or convert gene identifiers to elucidate biological function in silico. These types of analysis have been catered to support lists of gene identifiers, such as those coming from transcriptome gene expression analysis. By analyzing the functional annotation of an interesting set of genes, common biological motifs may be elucidated and a first-pass analysis can point further research in the right direction. Currently, the following databases have been parsed, processed, and added to the tool: 1( Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Pathways Database, 2) MetaCyc Encyclopedia of Metabolic Pathways, 3) Panther Pathways Database, 4) Reactome Pathways Database, 5) Gene Ontology, 6) MapMan Ontology, 7) KOG (Eukaryotic Clusters of Orthologous Groups), 5)Pfam, 6) InterPro.

  5. Using Genomics to Dissect Seed Development (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Goldberg, Robert [UCLA

    2013-01-22

    Robert Goldberg of UCLA presents "Using Genomics to Dissect Seed Development" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  6. Using Genomics to Dissect Seed Development (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Robert

    2012-03-21

    Robert Goldberg of UCLA presents "Using Genomics to Dissect Seed Development" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  7. Hordeum chilense genome, a useful tool to investigate the endosperm yellow pigment content in the Triticeae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The wild barley Hordeum chilense fulfills some requirements for being a useful tool to investigate the endosperm yellow pigment content (YPC) in the Triticeae including its diploid constitution, the availability of genetic resources (addition and deletion stocks and a high density genetic map) and, especially, its high seed YPC not silenced in tritordeums (amphiploids derived from H. chilense and wheat). Thus, the aim of this work was to test the utility of the H. chilense genome for investigating the YPC in the Triticeae. Results Twelve genes related to endosperm carotenoid content and/or YPC in grasses (Dxr, Hdr [synonym ispH], Ggpps1, Psy2, Psy3, Pds, Zds, e-Lcy, b-Lcy, Hyd3, Ccd1 and Ppo1) were identified, and mapped in H. chilense using rice genes to identify orthologs from barley, wheat, sorghum and maize. Macrocolinearity studies revealed that gene positions were in agreement in H. vulgare and H. chilense. Additionally, three main regions associated with YPC were identified in chromosomes 2Hch, 3Hch and 7Hch in H. chilense, the former being the most significant one. Conclusions The results obtained are consistent with previous findings in wheat and suggest that Ggpps1, Zds and Hyd3 on chromosome 2Hch may be considered candidate genes in wheat for further studies in YPC improvement. Considering the syntenic location of carotenoid genes in H. chilense, we have concluded that the Hch genome may constitute a valuable tool for YPC studies in the Triticeae. PMID:23122232

  8. A new tool called DISSECT for analysing large genomic data sets using a Big Data approach

    PubMed Central

    Canela-Xandri, Oriol; Law, Andy; Gray, Alan; Woolliams, John A.; Tenesa, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale genetic and genomic data are increasingly available and the major bottleneck in their analysis is a lack of sufficiently scalable computational tools. To address this problem in the context of complex traits analysis, we present DISSECT. DISSECT is a new and freely available software that is able to exploit the distributed-memory parallel computational architectures of compute clusters, to perform a wide range of genomic and epidemiologic analyses, which currently can only be carried out on reduced sample sizes or under restricted conditions. We demonstrate the usefulness of our new tool by addressing the challenge of predicting phenotypes from genotype data in human populations using mixed-linear model analysis. We analyse simulated traits from 470,000 individuals genotyped for 590,004 SNPs in ∼4 h using the combined computational power of 8,400 processor cores. We find that prediction accuracies in excess of 80% of the theoretical maximum could be achieved with large sample sizes. PMID:26657010

  9. A new tool called DISSECT for analysing large genomic data sets using a Big Data approach.

    PubMed

    Canela-Xandri, Oriol; Law, Andy; Gray, Alan; Woolliams, John A; Tenesa, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale genetic and genomic data are increasingly available and the major bottleneck in their analysis is a lack of sufficiently scalable computational tools. To address this problem in the context of complex traits analysis, we present DISSECT. DISSECT is a new and freely available software that is able to exploit the distributed-memory parallel computational architectures of compute clusters, to perform a wide range of genomic and epidemiologic analyses, which currently can only be carried out on reduced sample sizes or under restricted conditions. We demonstrate the usefulness of our new tool by addressing the challenge of predicting phenotypes from genotype data in human populations using mixed-linear model analysis. We analyse simulated traits from 470,000 individuals genotyped for 590,004 SNPs in ∼4 h using the combined computational power of 8,400 processor cores. We find that prediction accuracies in excess of 80% of the theoretical maximum could be achieved with large sample sizes. PMID:26657010

  10. Tool Forces Developed During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melendez, M.; Tang, W.; Schmidt, C.; McClure, J. C.; Nunes, A. C.; Murr, L. E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper will describe a technique for measuring the various forces and the torque that exist on the Friction Stir Welding pin tool. Results for various plunge depths, weld speeds, rotational speed, and tool configurations will be presented. Welds made on 6061 aluminum with typical welding conditions require a downward force of 2800 lbs. (12.5 kN) a longitudinal force in the direction of motion of 300 lbs (1.33 kN), a transverse force in the omega x v direction of 30 lbs (135 N). Aluminum 2195 under typical weld conditions requires a downward force of 3100 lbs. (1.38 kN), a longitudinal force of 920 lbs. (4.1 kN), and a transverse force of 45 lbs. (200 N) in the omega x v direction.