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Sample records for genotoxic effects induced

  1. Evaluation of protective effect of amifostine on dacarbazine induced genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Etebari, M; Jafarian-Dehkordi, A; Lame, V

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer therapy with alkylating agents has been used for many years. Dacarbazine (DTIC) as an alkylating agent is used alone or in combination with other chemotherapy drugs. In order to inhibit the formation of secondary cancers resulting from chemotherapy with DTIC, preventional strategies is necessary. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the genoprotective effect of amifostine on the genotoxic effects of DTIC in cell culture condition. To determine the optimum genotoxic concentration of DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with various DTIC concentrations including 5, 10 and 20 μg/ml for 2 h and the genotoxic effects were evaluated by the comet assay. The result of this part of the study showed that incubation of HepG2 cells with DTIC at 5 μg/ml was sufficient to produce genotoxic effect. In order to determine the protective effects of amifostine on genotoxicity induced by DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with different concentrations of amifostine (2, 3 and 5 mg/ml) for 1 h which was followed by incubation with DTIC at 5 μg/ml for 2 h. One hour incubation of cells with different concentrations of amifostine before incubation with DITC indicated that at least 5 mg/ml concentration of amifostine can prevent genotoxic effects induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells under described condition. In conclusion amifostine could prevent DNA damage induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells. PMID:26430459

  2. Antigenotoxic effect of allicin against methyl methanesulphonate induced genotoxic damage.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Yasir Hasan; Afzal, Mohammad

    2005-07-01

    Allicin, one of the sulfur compounds especially thiosulphonates of garlic (Allium sativum), possesses antioxidant and thioldisulphide exchange activity and is also shown to cause a variety of actions potentially useful for human health. In this investigation we determined its antigenotoxic potential using chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) induced by methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) as genotoxic end points both in the presence as well as absence of rat liver microsomal activation system (S9 mix) in cultured human lymphocytes. We tested the effect of 5, 10 and 20 microM of allicin on the damage exerted by 60 microM of MMS. The levels of CAs and SCEs were lowered suggesting an antigenotoxic role of allicin against genotoxic damage both in the presence as well as absence of metabolic activation. PMID:16334295

  3. Antigenotoxic effect of allicin against estradiol-17beta-induced genotoxic damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Yasir Hasan; Beg, Tanveer; Ara, Gulshan; Gupta, Jyoti; Afzal, Mohammad

    2010-07-01

    Antigenotoxic activity of allicin, one of the sulphur compounds of garlic (Allium sativum) which possesses antioxidant and thiol disulphide exchange activity, was studied against estradiol-17beta-induced genotoxic damage using chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) as parameters. Approximately 10, 20 and 40 microM of estradiol-17beta was tested for its genotoxic effect in the presence of metabolic activation and was found to be genotoxic at 20 and 40 microM. Approximately 20 microM of estradiol-17beta was treated along with 5, 10 and 15 microM of allicin, separately, in the presence of metabolic activation. Similar treatments were given with 40 microM of estradiol-17beta. Treatments along with allicin result in the reduction of CAs and SCEs, suggesting its anti-genotoxic activity in human lymphocytes in vitro against estradiol-17beta-induced genotoxic damage. PMID:20582805

  4. Ameliorative effect of certain antioxidants against mercury induced genotoxicity in peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tapan A; Rao, Mandava V

    2015-10-01

    Various antioxidants play an important role in reducing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) by scavenging them directly or indirectly. Mercury (Hg) is one of the known hazardous genotoxicant, induces the genotoxicity by enhancing the ROS. In the present study, three structurally different bioactive compounds such as melatonin (0.2 mM), curcumin (3.87 µM) and andrographolide (0.4 µM) were evaluated against the genotoxic effect of mercury. All the experiments were conducted using the peripheral blood lymphocytes In Vitro. The cultures were exposed to different doses (2.63 µM; 6.57 µM; 10.52 µM) of mercury salt (HgCl2) for studying various genotoxic indices. All three antioxidant compounds, alone and in combination with high dose of mercury, were added to the cultures with controls. For ascertaining genotoxicity, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), cell cycle proliferative index/replicative index (CCPI/RI), average generation time (AGT), population doubling time (PDT), %M1, %M2 and %M3 were assessed and analyzed using suitable statistical analysis. The results revealed a dose dependent increase in SCEs, AGT and PDT, with a concomitant reduction in CCPI values after treatment of mercury. Supplementation of these three antioxidant compounds effectively negated these genotoxic endpoints in treated cultures with improvement in the cell cycle kinetics i.e. CCPI. The antimutagenic activity of these compounds on mercury induced genotoxicity was in the following order: melatonin > curcumin > andrographolide. In conclusion, these compounds have ameliorated mercury induced increase in genotoxic indices due to their excellent antioxidant properties and the combination seems to be effective. PMID:25645230

  5. Modulatory Effect of Betulinic Acid on the Genotoxicity Induced by Different Mutagens in V79 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Acésio, Nathália Oliveira; de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Mastrocola, Daiane Fernanda Pereira; Lima, Ildercílio Mota de Souza; Munari, Carla Carolina; Sato, Vânia Luiza Ferreira Lucatti; Souza, Andressa Aparecida Silva; Flauzino, Lúzio Gabriel Bocalon; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2016-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BA) is a pentacyclic triterpene that can be isolated from many medicinal plants around the world. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of BA and its effect on the genotoxicity induced by different mutagens in V79 cells using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Different BA concentrations were combined with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), doxorubicin (DXR), camptothecin (CPT), and etoposide (VP-16). The frequencies of micronuclei in cultures treated with different BA concentrations did not differ from those of the negative control. Treatment with BA and MMS resulted in lower micronucleus frequencies than those observed for cultures treated with MMS alone. On the other hand, a significant increase in micronucleus frequencies was observed in cultures treated with BA combined with DXR or VP-16 when compared to these mutagens alone. The results showed no effect of BA on CPT-induced genotoxicity. Therefore, BA was not genotoxic under the present experimental conditions and exerted a different influence on the genotoxicity induced by different mutagens. The modulatory effect of BA depends on the type of mutagen and concentrations used. PMID:27195016

  6. Protective Effects of Quercetin against Dimethoate-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Allium sativum Test

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Waseem; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Nazam, Nazia; Lone, Mohammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was directed to study the possible protective activity of quercetin—a natural antioxidant against dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in meristematic cells of Allium sativum. So far there is no report on the biological properties of quercetin in plant test systems. Chromosome breaks, multipolar anaphase, stick chromosome, and mitotic activity were undertaken in the current study as markers of cyto- and genotoxicity. Untreated control, quercetin controls (@ 5, 10 and 20 μg/mL for 3 h), and dimethoate exposed groups (@ 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h) were maintained. For protection against cytogenotoxicity, the root tip cells treated with dimethoate at 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h and quercetin treatment at 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL for 16 h, prior to dimethoate treatment, were undertaken. Quercetin was found to be neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic in Allium sativum control at these doses. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in chromosomal aberrations was noted in dimethoate treated Allium. Pretreatment of Allium sativum with quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) reduced dimethoate-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in meristematic cells, and these effects were dose dependent. In conclusion, quercetin has a protective role in the abatement of dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in the meristematic cells of Allium sativum that resides, at least in part, on its antioxidant effects. PMID:27379342

  7. THE EFFECTS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70) AND EXPOSURE PROTOCOL ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Effects of Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Exposure Protocol on Arsenite Induced Genotoxicity

    Barnes, J.A.1,2, Collins, B.W.2, Dix, D.J.3 and Allen J.W2.
    1National Research Council, 2Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, 3Reproductive Toxicology Division, Office...

  8. EFFECT OF EXPOSURE PROTOCOL AND HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN EXPRESSION ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Effect of exposure protocol and heat shock protein expression on arsenite induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    The genotoxic effects of arsenic (As) are well accepted, yet its mechanism of action is not clearly defined. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) protect...

  9. Protective effect of boric acid on lead- and cadmium-induced genotoxicity in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Ustündağ, Aylin; Behm, Claudia; Föllmann, Wolfram; Duydu, Yalçin; Degen, Gisela H

    2014-06-01

    The toxic heavy metals cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are important environmental pollutants which can cause serious damage to human health. As the metal ions (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) accumulate in the organism, there is special concern regarding chronic toxicity and damage to the genetic material. Metal-induced genotoxicity has been attributed to indirect mechanisms, such as induction of oxidative stress and interference with DNA repair. Boron is a naturally occurring element and considered to be an essential micronutrient, although the cellular activities of boron compounds remain largely unexplored. The present study has been conducted to evaluate potential protective effects of boric acid (BA) against genotoxicity induced by cadmium chloride (CdCl2) and lead chloride (PbCl2) in V79 cell cultures. Cytotoxicity assays (neutral red uptake and cell titer blue assay) served to determine suitable concentrations for subsequent genotoxicity assays. Chromosomal damage and DNA strand breaks were assessed by micronucleus tests and comet assays. Both PbCl2 and CdCl2 (at 3, 5 and 10 µM) were shown to induce concentration-dependent increases in micronucleus frequencies and DNA strand breaks in V79 cells. BA itself was not cytotoxic (up to 300 µM) and showed no genotoxic effects. Pretreatment of cells with low levels of BA (2.5 and 10 µM) was found to strongly reduce the genotoxic effects of the tested metals. Based on the findings of this in vitro study, it can be suggested that boron provides an efficient protection against the induction of DNA strand breaks and micronuclei by lead and cadmium. Further studies on the underlying mechanisms for the protective effect of boron are needed. PMID:24710572

  10. The organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos confers its genotoxic effects by inducing DNA damage and cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Diqiu; Huang, Qingchun; Lu, Miaoqing; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Zhichuan; Zong, Mimi; Tao, Liming

    2015-09-01

    The organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) is known to induce neurological effects, malformation and micronucleus formation, persistent developmental disorders, and maternal toxicity in rats and mice. The binding of chlorpyrifos with DNA to produce DNA adducts leads to an increasing social concern about the genotoxic risk of CPF in human, but CPF-induced cytotoxicity through DNA damage and cell apoptosis is not well understood. Here, we quantified the cytotoxicity and potential genotoxicity of CPF using the alkaline comet assay, γH2AX foci formation, and the DNA laddering assay in order to detect DNA damage and apoptosis in human HeLa and HEK293 cells in vitro. Drosophila S2 cells were used as a positive control. The alkaline comet assay showed that sublethal concentrations of CPF induced significant concentration-dependent increases in single-strand DNA breaks in the treated cells compared with the control. The percentage of γH2AX-positive HeLa cells revealed that CPF also causes DNA double-strand breaks in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, DNA fragmentation analysis demonstrated that exposure to CPF induced a significant concentration- and time-dependent increase in cell apoptosis. We conclude that CPF is a strongly genotoxic agent that induces DNA damage and cell apoptosis. PMID:26002045

  11. Genotoxicity Induced by Foetal and Infant Exposure to Magnetic Fields and Modulation of Ionising Radiation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Udroiu, Ion; Antoccia, Antonio; Tanzarella, Caterina; Giuliani, Livio; Pacchierotti, Francesca; Cordelli, Eugenia; Eleuteri, Patrizia; Villani, Paola; Sgura, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated the toxicity and genotoxicity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) during prenatal and neonatal development. These phases of life are characterized by cell proliferation and differentiation, which might make them sensitive to environmental stressors. Although in vitro evidences suggest that ELF-MF may modify the effects of ionizing radiation, no research has been conducted so far in vivo on the genotoxic effects of ELF-MF combined with X-rays. Aim and methods Aim of this study was to investigate in somatic and germ cells the effects of chronic ELF-MF exposure from mid gestation until weaning, and any possible modulation produced by ELF-MF exposure on ionizing radiation-induced damage. Mice were exposed to 50 Hz, 65 μT magnetic field, 24 hours/day, for a total of 30 days, starting from 12 days post-conception. Another group was irradiated with 1 Gy X-rays immediately before ELF-MF exposure, other groups were only X-irradiated or sham-exposed. Micronucleus test on blood erythrocytes was performed at multiple times from 1 to 140 days after birth. Additionally, 42 days after birth, genotoxic and cytotoxic effects on male germ cells were assessed by comet assay and flow cytometric analysis. Results ELF-MF exposure had no teratogenic effect and did not affect survival, growth and development. The micronucleus test indicated that ELF-MF induced a slight genotoxic damage only after the maximum exposure time and that this effect faded away in the months following the end of exposure. ELF-MF had no effects on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced genotoxicity in erythrocytes. Differently, ELF–MF appeared to modulate the response of male germ cells to X-rays with an impact on proliferation/differentiation processes. These results point to the importance of tissue specificity and development on the impact of ELF-MF on the early stages of life and indicate the need of further research on the molecular mechanisms underlying

  12. Flurochloridone-based herbicides induced genotoxicity effects on Rhinella arenarum tadpoles (Anura: Bufonidae).

    PubMed

    Nikoloff, Noelia; Natale, Guillermo S; Marino, Damián; Soloneski, Sonia; Larramendy, Marcelo L

    2014-02-01

    Acute toxicity and genotoxicity of the flurochloridone (FLC)-containing commercial formulation herbicides Twin Pack Gold(®) (25 percent a.i.) and Rainbow(®) (25 percent a.i.) were evaluated on Rhinella arenarum (Anura: Bufonidae) tadpoles exposed under laboratory conditions. Lethal effect was evaluated as end point for lethality, whereas frequency of micronuclei (MN) and single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) were employed as end points for genotoxicity. Lethality studies revealed equivalent LC-5096 h values of 2.96 and 2.85 mg/L for Twin Pack Gold(®) and Rainbow(®), respectively. Twin Pack Gold(®) did not induce DNA damage at the chromosomal level, whereas Rainbow(®) increased the frequency of MN only when the lowest concentration (0.71 mg/L) was used. However, all concentrations of Twin Pack Gold(®) and Rainbow(®) increased the frequencies of primary DNA lesions estimated by alkaline SCGE. This study represents the first evidence of the acute toxic and genotoxic effects exerted by two FLC-based commercial formulations, Twin Pack Gold(®) and Rainbow(®), on tadpoles of an amphibian species native to Argentina under laboratory conditions. Finally, our findings highlight the importance of minimizing the impacts on nontarget living species exposed to agrochemicals. PMID:24239267

  13. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Joong Won; Woo, Hae Dong; Lee, Sunyeong; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Younghyun; Shin, Sangah; Joung, Hyojee; Chung, Hai Won

    2016-02-01

    Following one of the world's largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM), a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL), the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. PMID:26907305

  14. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Joong Won; Woo, Hae Dong; Lee, Sunyeong; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Younghyun; Shin, Sangah; Joung, Hyojee; Chung, Hai Won

    2016-01-01

    Following one of the world’s largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM), a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL), the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. PMID:26907305

  15. Protective effect of S-allylcysteine and lycopene in combination against N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Balaiya; Santhiya, Santhiyavedu T; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2004-01-01

    Chemoprotection by diet-derived antioxidants has emerged as a cost-effective approach in preventing genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of S-allylcysteine (SAC) and lycopene against N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced genotoxicity. Quantification of bone marrow micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations in male Wistar rats was used to monitor the protective effects of SAC and lycopene. Intragastric administration of MNNG (40 mg/kg) induced a significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations. Although pretreatment with SAC and lycopene significantly reduced the frequency of MNNG-induced bone marrow micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations, the combination of SAC and lycopene exerted a greater protective effect. These findings indicate that antioxidants such as SAC and lycopene, are effective chemoprotective agents against genotoxicity and carcinogenicity especially when used in combination. PMID:15156075

  16. Radioprotective Effect of Achillea millefolium L Against Genotoxicity Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Human Normal Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Somayeh; Rostamnezhad, Mostafa; Ghaffari-rad, Vahid; Ghasemi, Arash; Allahverdi Pourfallah, Tayyeb

    2015-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of Achillea millefolium L (ACM) extract was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in human lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers and incubated with the methanolic extract of ACM at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL) for 2 hours. At each dose point, the whole blood was exposed in vitro to 2.5 Gy of X-ray and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cell. Antioxidant capacity of the extract was determined using free radical-scavenging method. The treatment of lymphocytes with the extract showed a significant decrease in the incidence of micronuclei binucleated cells, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without any extract treatment. The maximum protection and decrease in frequency of micronuclei were observed at 200 μg/mL of ACM extract which completely protected genotoxicity induced by IR in human lymphocytes. Achillea millefolium extract exhibited concentration-dependent radical-scavenging activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radicals. These data suggest that the methanolic extract of ACM may play an important role in the protection of normal tissues against genetic damage induced by IR. PMID:26675116

  17. Long-term exposure of rabbits to imidaclorpid as quantified in blood induces genotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Stivaktakis, Polychronis D; Kavvalakis, Matthaios P; Tzatzarakis, Manolis N; Alegakis, Athanasios K; Panagiotakis, Michael N; Fragkiadaki, Persefoni; Vakonaki, Elena; Ozcagli, Eren; Hayes, Wallace A; Rakitskii, Valerii N; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-04-01

    The present in-vivo study focuses on the genotoxic effect of the neonicotinoid pesticide imidacloprid (IMI) in rabbits. The purpose of the study was to establish a possible relationship between exposure to the pesticide (dose and duration) and genotoxicity. Furthermore, an analytical method for the simultaneous determination of IMI and its major metabolite 6-chloronicotinic acid (6-ClNA) in blood was developed and validated. The isolation of the two analytes from blood was performed by liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane. Analysis was performed by Liquid Chromatography - Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization - Mass Spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). The method was applied on the determination of IMI and 6-ClNA in serum samples obtained from rabbits fed with the insecticide at two low doses. Furthermore, parameters of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity were evaluated by measuring binucleated cells with micronuclei (BNMN), micronuclei (MN) and the Cytokinesis Block Proliferation Index (CBPI), in lymphocytes of exposed rabbits. The results revealed a genotoxic effect of IMI for both exposed groups. There were statistically significant differences in the frequencies of BNMN and MN between control and exposed groups but there was no dose-dependence, neither time-dependence of the genotoxic effect for the administered doses. This is the first time that long term exposure to IMI in rabbits was studied for the determination of its genotoxic effect. The genotoxic effect of IMI as it is depicted by the current study is in accordance with previous studies. PMID:26855213

  18. Radioprotective effect of chicory seeds against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human normal lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghaffari-Rad, V; Rostamnezhad, M; Ghasemi, A; Allahverdi Pourfallah, T; Shahani, S

    2015-01-01

    The search for less-toxic radioprotective agents has led to a growing trend towards natural products. Protective effect of the methanolic extract of chicory seeds (MCS) was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood samples were collected and incubated with MCS at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL) for two hours. The whole blood samples were exposed in vitro to X-ray at dose 2.5 Gy. Then, the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronucleus in cytokinesis blocked binucleated cell. The methanolic extract at all doses significantly reduced the frequency of micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without any extract treatment. The maximum protection was observed at 200 μg/mL of MCS, it completely protected genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes. The extract exhibited a concentration-dependent radical scavenging activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radicals. HPLC analysis of MCS showed this extract is containing chlorogenic acid as a phenolic compound. These data suggest that the radioprotective effect of methanolic extract of chicory seeds can be attributed to the presence of phenolic compounds such as chlorogenic acid which act as antioxidant agents. PMID:26278267

  19. Protective effects of acerola juice on genotoxicity induced by iron in vivo.

    PubMed

    Horta, Roberta Nunes; Kahl, Vivian Francilia Silva; Sarmento, Merielen da Silva; Nunes, Marisa Fernanda Silva; Porto, Carem Rejane Maglione; Andrade, Vanessa Moraes de; Ferraz, Alexandre de Barros Falcão; Silva, Juliana Da

    2016-03-01

    Metal ions such as iron can induce DNA damage by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Vitamin C is one of the most widely consumed antioxidants worldwide, present in many fruits and vegetables, especially inMalpighia glabra L., popularly known as acerola, native to Brazil. Acerola is considered a functional fruit due to its high antioxidant properties and phenolic contents, and therefore is consumed to prevent diseases or as adjuvant in treatment strategies. Here, the influence of ripe and unripe acerola juices on iron genotoxicity was analyzed in vivo using the comet assay and micronucleus test. The comet assay results showed that acerola juice exerted no genotoxic or antigenotoxic activity. Neither ripe nor unripe acerola juices were mutagenic to animals treated with juices, in micronucleus test. However, when compared to iron group, the pre-treatment with acerola juices exerted antimutagenic activity, decreasing significantly micronucleus mean values in bone marrow. Stage of ripeness did not influence the interaction of acerola compounds with DNA, and both ripe and unripe acerola juices exerted protective effect over DNA damage generated by iron. PMID:27007905

  20. Protective effects of acerola juice on genotoxicity induced by iron in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Horta, Roberta Nunes; Kahl, Vivian Francilia Silva; Sarmento, Merielen da Silva; Nunes, Marisa Fernanda Silva; Porto, Carem Rejane Maglione; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes; Ferraz, Alexandre de Barros Falcão; Silva, Juliana Da

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metal ions such as iron can induce DNA damage by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Vitamin C is one of the most widely consumed antioxidants worldwide, present in many fruits and vegetables, especially inMalpighia glabra L., popularly known as acerola, native to Brazil. Acerola is considered a functional fruit due to its high antioxidant properties and phenolic contents, and therefore is consumed to prevent diseases or as adjuvant in treatment strategies. Here, the influence of ripe and unripe acerola juices on iron genotoxicity was analyzed in vivo using the comet assay and micronucleus test. The comet assay results showed that acerola juice exerted no genotoxic or antigenotoxic activity. Neither ripe nor unripe acerola juices were mutagenic to animals treated with juices, in micronucleus test. However, when compared to iron group, the pre-treatment with acerola juices exerted antimutagenic activity, decreasing significantly micronucleus mean values in bone marrow. Stage of ripeness did not influence the interaction of acerola compounds with DNA, and both ripe and unripe acerola juices exerted protective effect over DNA damage generated by iron. PMID:27007905

  1. Protective effects of Vernonia amygdalina against sodium arsenite-induced genotoxicity in rat

    PubMed Central

    Adetutu, Adewale; Oyewo, Emmanuel Bukoye; Adesokan, Ayoade A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Contamination of the environment with arsenic (As) from both human and natural sources is known as a global problem. This study investigated the chemoprotective potential of Vernonia amygdalina leave extract against sodium arsenite-induced genotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Genotoxic effects were evaluated in the rat bone marrow using micronuclei. The gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities were assayed in rat serum. Results: Pre-treatment with extract of V. amygdalina at doses 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg significantly decreased the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs). The GGT and ALP activities were elevated more than fourfold, in the liver of rats treated with sodium arsenite, while it was reduced almost to half when the sodium arsenit-treated rats were fed fresh V. amgdalina leave extracts The phytochemical constituents of V. amygdalina assayed in this study may be responsible for high radical scavenging of the DPPH free radical observed. Conclusion: The present results indicate that V. amygdalina extract is capable of suppressing the chromosomal aberration induced by sodium arsenite in rat. Thus, V. amygdalina may be a potent chemoprotective agent against the toxicity of sodium arsenite in rats. PMID:23900237

  2. Antimutagenic Effect of Dioscorea Pentaphylla on Genotoxic Effect Induced By Methyl Methanesulfonate in the Drosophila Wing Spot Test

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, G.; Hosetti, B. B.; Dhananjaya, B. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Plants as dietary sources are known to have several chemoprotective agents. Dioscorea pentaphylla is an important medicinal plant, which is often used as edible food. This study was undertaken to evaluate the antigenotoxic potential of D. pentaphylla extracts on the genotoxic effect induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in the Drosophila wing spot test. Materials and Methods: The somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) was carried out in Drosophila melanogaster. In transheterogyous larvae, multiple wing hair (mwh 3-0.3) and flare (flr3-38.8) genes were used as markers of the extent of mutagenicity. Results: It was observed thatall the three extracts (petroleum ether, choloroform, and ethyl alcohol) in the combined treatment had significantly inhibited the effect of MMS-induced genotoxic effects. When compared to others, the ethanol extract showed a very significant antimutagenic activity. Conclusion: The compounds that are present in the extracts may directly interact with the methyl radical groups of MMS and inactivate them by chemical reaction. It is also possible that the compounds in the extract compete to interact with the nucleophilic sites in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), thus altering the binding of the mutagen to these sites. Although our results indicate that the compounds present in the extracts may directly interact with the methyl radical groups of MMS and inactivate them by chemical reaction, it may also be quite interesting to investigate through the other different mechanisms by which D. pentaphylla could interfere in vivo on the effect of genotoxic agents. PMID:25948963

  3. EFFECTS OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 (HSP70) ON ARSENITE INDUCED GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (As), a human carcinogen, is known to be genotoxic although its mechanism(s) of action for tumorigenesis is not well understood. Among the toxicity-related properties of this chemical are its clastogenic and aneugenic activities, as well as its capacity for inducing stres...

  4. Nickel oxide nanoparticles induce inflammation and genotoxic effect in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Laura; Camatini, Marina; Gualtieri, Maurizio

    2014-04-01

    Nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs) toxicity has been evaluated in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines: BEAS-2B and A549. The nanoparticles, used at the doses of 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 μg/ml, induced a significant reduction of cell viability and an increase of apoptotic and necrotic cells at 24h. A significant release of interleukin-6 and -8 was assessed after 24h of treatment, even intracellular ROS increased already at 45 min after exposure. The results obtained evidenced that the cytokines release was dependent on mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) cascade through the induction of NF-kB pathway. NiONPs induced cell cycle alteration in both the cell lines even in different phases and these modifications may be induced by the NPs genotoxic effect, suggested by the nuclear translocation of phospho-ATM and phospho-ATR. Our results confirm the cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory potential of NiONPs. Moreover their ability in inducing DNA damage responses has been demonstrated. Such effects were present in A549 cells which internalize the NPs and BEAS-2B cells in which endocytosis has not been observed. PMID:24503009

  5. Arsenic-induced biochemical and genotoxic effects and distribution in tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Anita K; Todorov, Todor I; Tchounwou, Paul B; van der Voet, Gijsbert; Centeno, Jose A

    2012-11-01

    Arsenic (As) is a well documented human carcinogen. However, its mechanisms of toxic action and carcinogenic potential in animals have not been conclusive. In this research, we investigated the biochemical and genotoxic effects of As and studied its distribution in selected tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats. Four groups of six male rats, each weighing approximately 60 ± 2 g, were injected intraperitoneally, once a day for 5 days with doses of 5, 10, 15, 20 mg/kg bw of arsenic trioxide. A control group was also made of 6 animals injected with distilled water. Following anaesthetization, blood was collected and enzyme analysis was performed by spectrophotometry following standard protocols. At the end of experimentation, the animals were sacrificed, and the lung, liver, brain and kidney were collected 24 h after the fifth day treatment. Chromosome and micronuclei preparation was obtained from bone marrow cells. Arsenic exposure significantly increased (p<0.05) the activities of plasma alanine aminotransferase-glutamate pyruvate transaminase (ALT/GPT), and aspartate aminotransferase-glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (AST/GOT), as well as the number of structural chromosomal aberrations (SCA) and frequency of micronuclei (MN) in the bone marrow cells. In contrast, the mitotic index in these cells was significantly reduced (p<0.05). These findings indicate that aminotransferases are candidate biomarkers for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results also demonstrate that As has a strong genotoxic potential, as measured by the bone marrow SCA and MN tests in Sprague-Dawley rats. Total arsenic concentrations in tissues were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A dynamic reaction cell (DRC) with hydrogen gas was used to eliminate the ArCl interference at mass 75, in the measurement of total As. Total As doses in tissues tended to correlate with specific exposure levels. PMID:23175155

  6. Textile effluent induced genotoxic effects and oxidative stress in Clarias gariepinus.

    PubMed

    Ayoola, S O; Bassey, B O; Alimba, C G; Ajani, E K

    2012-09-01

    Human and ecological disorder experienced in industrial settlements as a result of improper disposal of chemicals such as textile effluent calls for careful surveillance on the state of the environment. This study investigated the toxicity of textile effluent discharge using biochemical and cytogenetic responses to ascertain the acute and sub lethal effects on Clarias gariepinus. The 96 h LC50 of C. gariepinus exposed to the textile effluent was 8.203 ml L(-1). Fourteen day exposures to 1, 2, 4 and 6 ml L(-1) doses were conducted and several toxicological endpoints were evaluated. Sub lethal genotoxicity and biochemical study was also carried out for fourteen days. The genotoxicity studies utilized micronucleus test while the biochemical studies quantified serum anti-oxidant status Total Protein (TP), Catalase (CAT), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Malondialdehyde (MDA) of the exposed fish. Toxicity factor indicates that the 96 h LC50 was significantly more toxic than the 24 h LC50 (p < 0.05). The textile effluent at the tested concentrations induced micronucleus and nuclear abnormalities in the peripheral blood of exposed fish. Micronucleus, notch and binucleated cell formation were significant (p < 0.05) compared to control while lobed and blebbed cells were insignificant (p < 0.05). SOD, TP and CAT significantly (p < 0.05) decreased compared to control group while MDA increased compared to control but was insignificant (p > 0.05). The results obtained from this study showed that textile effluent increase cytogenetic damage and altered anti-oxidant status in C. gariepinus. Chemicals in the effluent can be bioaccumulated and biomagnified in the aquatic organism hence affecting man. PMID:24163963

  7. Protective effects of ethanolic neem leaf extract on DMBA-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Subapriya, Rajamanickam; Kumaraguruparan, Ramasamy; Abraham, Suresh K; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of pretreatment with ethanolic neem leaf extract on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in male Swiss albino mice. The frequency of bone marrow micronuclei, the extent of hepatic lipid peroxidation and the status of antioxidants-reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were used as intermediate biomarkers of chemoprotection. In DMBA-treated mice, the increases in micronuclei and lipid peroxides were accompanied by compromised antioxidant defenses. Pretreatment with ethanolic neem leaf extract (200 mg/kg body weight) significantly reduced DMBA-induced micronuclei and lipid peroxides and enhanced GSH-dependent antioxidant activities. The results of the present study suggest that ethanolic neem leaf extract exerts protective effects against DMBA-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress by enhancing the antioxidant status. PMID:16635967

  8. Radioprotective effect of mefenamic acid against radiation-induced genotoxicity in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nobakht, Reyhaneh; Ghasemi, Arash; Pourfallah, Tayyeb Allahverdi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mefenamic acid (MEF) as a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug is used as a medication for relieving of pain and inflammation. Radiation-induced inflammation process is involved in DNA damage and cell death. In this study, the radioprotective effect of MEF was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human blood lymphocytes. Materials and Methods Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers and incubated with MEF at different concentrations (5, 10, 50, or 100 µM) for two hours. The whole blood was exposed to ionizing radiation at a dose 1.5 Gy. Lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis blocked binucleated lymphocyte. Results A significant decreasing in the frequency of micronuclei was observed in human lymphocytes irradiated with MEF as compared to irradiated lymphocytes without MEF. The maximum decreasing in frequency of micronuclei was observed at 100 µM of MEF (38% decrease), providing maximal protection against ionizing radiation. Conclusion The radioprotective effect of MEF is probably related to anti-inflammatory property of MEF on human lymphocytes. PMID:26484310

  9. Genotoxic Effects Induced by Cd(+2), Cr(+6), Cu(+2) in the Gill and Liver of Odontesthes bonariensis (Piscies, Atherinopsidae).

    PubMed

    Gasulla, J; Picco, S J; Carriquiriborde, P; Dulout, F N; Ronco, A E; de Luca, J C

    2016-05-01

    Genotoxic effects of Cd(+2), Cr(+6), and Cu(+2) on the gill and liver of the Argentinean Silverside (Odontesthes bonariensis) were studied using the comet assay and in relation with the metal tissue accumulation. Fish were exposed to three waterborne concentrations of each metal for 2 and 16 days. Genotoxicity was assessed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). After 2 days, significant increase of the genetic damage index (GDI) was only observed in the gill of fish exposed to Cr(+6) and Cu(+2), and the LOECs were 2160 nM and 921.1 nM, respectively. The gill LOEC for Cd(+2) by 16 days was 9.4 nM. In the liver, LOECs were obtained only for Cd(+2) and Cr(+6) and were 9.4 and 2160 nM, respectively. The three metals were able to induce genotoxic effects at environmentally relevant concentrations and the gill was the most sensitive organ. PMID:27003804

  10. Folk medicine Terminalia catappa and its major tannin component, punicalagin, are effective against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, P S; Li, J H; Liu, T Y; Lin, T C

    2000-05-01

    Terminalia catappa L. is a popular folk medicine for preventing hepatoma and treating hepatitis in Taiwan. In this paper, we examined the protective effects of T. catappa leaf water extract (TCE) and its major tannin component, punicalagin, on bleomycin-induced genotoxicity in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. Pre-treatment with TCE or punicalagin prevented bleomycin-induced hgprt gene mutations and DNA strand breaks. TCE and punicalagin suppressed the generation of bleomycin-induced intracellular free radicals, identified as superoxides and hydrogen peroxides. The effectiveness of TCE and punicalagin against bleomycin-induced genotoxicity could be, at least in part, due to their antioxidative potentials. PMID:10773401

  11. Effect of recombinant human erythropoietin on mitomycin C-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in rat kidney and heart tissues.

    PubMed

    Rjiba-Touati, K; Ayed-Boussema, I; Guedri, Y; Achour, A; Bacha, H; Abid-Essefi, S

    2016-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is an antineoplastic agent used for the treatment of several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the prolonged use of the drug may result in a serious heart and kidney injuries. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) has recently been shown to exert an important cytoprotective effect in experimental brain injury and ischemic acute renal failure. The aim of the present work is to investigate the cardioprotective and renoprotective effects of rhEPO against MMC-induced oxidative damage and genotoxicity. Our results showed that MMC induced oxidative stress and DNA damage. rhEPO administration in any treatment conditions decreased oxidative damage induced by MMC. It reduced malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels. rhEPO ameliorated reduced glutathione plus oxidized glutathione modulation and the increased catalase activity after MMC treatment. Furthermore, rhEPO restored DNA damage caused by MMC. We concluded that rhEPO administration especially in pretreatment condition protected rats against MMC-induced heart and renal oxidative stress and genotoxicity. PMID:25733728

  12. Chromium induced biochemical, genotoxic and histopathologic effects in liver and kidney of Goldfish, Carassius auratus

    PubMed Central

    Velma, Venkatramreddy; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Fish constitute an excellent model to understand the mechanistic aspects of metal toxicity vis-à-vis oxidative stress in aquatic ecosystems. Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)), due to its redox potential can induce oxidative stress (OS) in fish and impair their health. In the present investigation, we hypothesize that OS plays a key role in chromium induced toxicity in goldfish; leading to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O· 2, H2O2, OH·, and subsequent modulation of the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), metallothioneins (MT), glutathione proxidase (GPx), genotoxicity and histopathology. To test this hypothesis, antioxidant enzymes, DNA damage and histopathology assays were performed in liver and kidney tissues of goldfish exposed to different concentrations of Cr (VI) (LC12.5, LC25 and LC50) following 96h static renewal bioassay. The results of this study clearly show that the fish experienced OS as characterized by significant modulation of enzyme activities, induction of DNA damage and microscopic morphological changes in the liver and kidney. In both tissues, CAT activity was decreased whereas SOD activity and hydroperoxide levels were increased. In addition, GPx activity also increased significantly in higher test concentrations, especially in the kidney. MT induction and DNA damage were observed in both tissues in a concentration dependent manner. Microscopic examination of organ morphology indicated degeneration of liver tissue and necrosis of central vein. Necrosis of kidney tubular epithelial cells and tubules was observed at higher Cr (VI) concentrations. Taking together the findings of this study are helpful in organ-specific risk assessment of Cr (VI)-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity and histopathology in fish. PMID:20348018

  13. Cyto-genotoxic effects induced by three brominated diphenyl ether congeners on the freshwater mussel Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Parolini, Marco; Binelli, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a group of highly hydrophobic and persistent chemicals that has been used as flame retardants in several industrial applications. They have been detected in various environmental matrices worldwide and an increasing number of studies have recently been carried out to investigate their potential toxicity on ecosystem communities. Although a variety of biological damage has been documented in vertebrates, the effects on invertebrates are largely unknown. The objective of the present study was to determine the cyto-genotoxic effects induced by single exposure to three concentrations of 2,4,2',4'-tetra BDE (BDE 47), 2,2',4,4',6-penta BDE (BDE-100) and 2,2',4,4',5,6'-hexa BDE (BDE-154) on the freshwater mussel Dreissena polymorpha by a multi-biomarker approach. We performed on bivalve hemocytes the Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) assay, the DNA Diffusion assay and the Micronucleus test (MN test) to assess genotoxicity, while the Neutral Red Retention Assay (NRRA) was used to evaluate cytotoxic effects. Results showed that BDE-47 did not produce any genetic damage at the tested concentrations (0.1 μg/L, 0.5 μg/L and 1 μg/L), while BDE-100 and BDE-154 can be considered moderately genotoxic, since both primary and fixed DNA injuries were induced. The NRRA indicated a moderate increase in cellular stress in BDEs-treated bivalves. Thus, our data seems to suggest that investigated BDEs may pose a low risk to freshwater mussels at environmental concentrations. PMID:22280972

  14. Disperse Red 1 (textile dye) induces cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in mouse germ cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fábio Henrique; Bustos-Obregon, Eduardo; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero

    2015-06-01

    Disperse Red 1 (DR1), which is widely used in the textile industry, is an azo dye that contributes to the toxicity and pollution of wastewater. To assess the toxic effects of DR1 on reproduction, sexually mature male mice (Mus musculus, strain CF-1) were orally (gavage) treated with single doses of the compound at 20, 100 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Testicular features and sperm parameters were evaluated 8.3, 16.6 and 24.9 days after treatments. In addition to testicular toxicity caused by the dye, the data clearly showed an increased frequency of sperm with abnormal morphology and decreased fertility. An increased amount of DNA damage was also detected in testis cells 16.6 and 24.9 days after treatments with 100 and 500 mg/kg. This study demonstrated the toxic and genotoxic effects of DR1, indicating the harmful activity of this dye on reproductive health. PMID:25883024

  15. Anti-genotoxic effect of naringin against bleomycin-induced genomic damage in human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Dilek; Teksoy, Ozgun; Bilaloglu, Rahmi; Çinkilic, Nilufer

    2016-01-01

    Naringin is a flavonoid found in grapefruit and other citrus fruits that shows antioxidant activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-genotoxic and protective effects of naringin on the chemotherapeutic/radiomimetic agent bleomycin (BLM) in human blood lymphocyte cultures in vitro using micronucleus test and chromosomal aberrations (CA) assay. We tested the three doses of naringin (1, 2, 3 µg/mL) and a single dose of BLM (20 µg/mL). BLM significantly increased the total CAs and micronucleus frequency at a concentration of 20 µg/mL. Naringin did not show any toxicity in doses of 1, 2, and 3 µg/mL. Combined treatments of BLM and naringin (2 and 3 µg/mL) significantly reduced micronucleus formation. Naringin dose-dependently decreased the total chromosome aberrations frequency induced by BLM. These results indicate that naringin could prevent BLM (20 µg/mL)-induced genotoxicity. PMID:25941869

  16. Genotoxic effects induced by the exposure to an environmental mixture of illicit drugs to the zebra mussel.

    PubMed

    Parolini, Marco; Magni, Stefano; Castiglioni, Sara; Binelli, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Despite the growing interest on the presence of illicit drugs in freshwater ecosystems, just recently the attention has been focused on their potential toxicity towards non-target aquatic species. However, these studies largely neglected the effects induced by exposure to complex mixtures of illicit drugs, which could be different compared to those caused by single psychoactive molecules. This study was aimed at investigating the genetic damage induced by a 14-day exposure to a realistic mixture of the most common illicit drugs found in surface waters worldwide (cocaine, benzoylecgonine, amphetamine, morphine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) on the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). The mixture caused a significant increase of DNA fragmentation and triggered the apoptotic process and micronuclei formation in zebra mussel hemocytes, pointing out its potential genotoxicity towards this bivalve species. PMID:27261879

  17. Effects of cytochrome P450 inducers on tamoxifen genotoxicity in female mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, B; Sriram, P; Randerath, E; Randerath, K

    1997-03-01

    We recently reported that administration of the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) gives rise to two groups of DNA adducts in female mouse liver in vivo, as measured by 32P-postlabeling, and provided evidence that 4-hydroxytamoxifen and alpha-hydroxytamoxifen are proximate carcinogenic metabolites leading to group I and group II adducts, respectively (Randerath et al., Carcinogenesis 15: 2087-2094, 1994). Because cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play an important role in TAM metabolism, in this investigation we tested the hypothesis that induction of liver CYP enzymes may affect TAM metabolism profoundly, resulting in increased or decreased TAM-DNA adduct formation in vivo. To this end, we treated female ICR mice with TAM either alone or in combination with one of several classic CYP inducers, i.e. phenobarbital (PB), beta-naphthoflavone (BNF), and pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), and determined the levels of 32P-postlabeled TAM-DNA adducts and the activities of several CYP-dependent enzymes. Each of the inducers greatly diminished levels of group II, but did not affect group I adducts. TAM elicited induction of benzphetamine N-demethylase activity in liver, while activities of other enzymes were not affected. TAM, when given in combination with BNF, elicited a synergistic induction of ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) (CYP1A1) and methoxyresorufin O-demethylase (MROD) (CYP1A2) activities. Likewise, PCN given along with TAM caused synergistic induction of EROD and ethylmorphine N-demethylase activities. There was no synergism between PB and TAM, however. Overall, the results further support the existence of two pathways of TAM metabolism to DNA-reactive electrophiles and strongly suggest that the classic CYP inducers tested enhance detoxication of TAM to non-genotoxic metabolites. PMID:9113085

  18. Protective effects of pomegranate peel against hematotoxicity, chromosomal aberrations, and genotoxicity induced by barium chloride in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Elwej, Awatef; Ben Salah, Ghada; Kallel, Choumous; Fakhfakh, Faiza; Zeghal, Najiba; Ben Amara, Ibtissem

    2016-06-01

    Context Pomegranate peel (PP) has health benefits including antibacterial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimutagenic properties. Objective This study investigated the biochemical composition and protective effects of PP against hematotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by barium chloride (BaCl2) in adult rats. Materials and methods Adult Wistar rats were divided into four groups of six each: control, barium (67 ppm via drinking water), PP (5% via diet), and their combination during 21 d. Oxidative stress was determined by MDA, AOPP, and antioxidant status: CAT, GPx, GSH, Vit C. Osmotic fragility (OF), chromosomal aberrations (CAs), and micronucleus (MN) assays were also studied. Results PP showed a rich composition of antioxidant compounds. DPPH test found IC50 value= 5.3 μg/mL and a high polysaccharides content (315 ± 5 mg/g of extract). In vivo study showed a decrease in red blood cells (70%) and platelet counts (46%), hemoglobin content (8%), hematocrit percent (7%), and an 80% increase of white blood cells in Ba-treated rats. A reduction in antioxidant status: catalase, glutathione peroxidase activities, glutathione, and vitamin C levels by 31, 21, 28, and 29%, respectively, and an increase in MDA (46%) and AOPP levels (72%) were also observed compared with controls. BaCl2-treatment showed a significant increase in the frequencies of total chromosomal aberrations with abnormal metaphases and micronucleus in bone-marrow cells. Oxidative stress induced by BaCl2 might be the major cause for chromosomal abnormalities leading to DNA damage. Discussion and conclusion A decrease in hematotoxic and genotoxic effects induced by PP is due to its powerful antioxidant capacity. PMID:26971618

  19. In vivo protective effect of Uridine, a pyrimidine nucleoside, on genotoxicity induced by Levodopa/Carbidopa in mice.

    PubMed

    Orenlili Yaylagul, Esra; Cansev, Mehmet; Celikler Kasimogullari, Serap

    2015-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects millions of people all over the world. Motor symptoms of PD are most commonly controlled by L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Levodopa, L-DOPA), a precursor of dopamine, plus a peripherally-acting aromatic-L-amino-acid decarboxylase (dopa decarboxylase) inhibitor, such as carbidopa. However, chronic treatment with a combination of Levodopa plus carbidopa has been demonstrated to cause a major complication, namely abnormal involuntary movements. On the other hand, the effect of this treatment on bone marrow cells is unknown. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate possible genotoxic effects of Levodopa and Carbidopa using male Balb/C mice. Our results showed that Levodopa alone or in combination with carbidopa caused genotoxicity in in vivo micronucleus test (mouse bone marrow) and Comet assay (blood cells). Furthermore, we showed that simultaneous administration of uridine, a pyrimidine nucleoside, reversed the genotoxic effect of Levodopa and Carbidopa in both assays. Our data show for the first time that Levodopa plus carbidopa combination causes genotoxicity which is reversed by uridine treatment. These findings might enhance our understanding for the complications of a common Parkinson's treatment and confer benefit in terms of reducing a possible genotoxic effect of this treatment. PMID:25976300

  20. Safrole-2',3'-oxide induces cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in HepG2 cells and in mice.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Su-yin; Lee, Pei-yi; Lai, Ming-tsung; Shen, Li-ching; Chung, Wen-sheng; Huang, Hui-fen; Wu, Kuen-yuh; Wu, Hsiu-ching

    2011-12-24

    Safrole-2',3'-oxide (SAFO) is a reactive electrophilic metabolite of the hepatocarcinogen safrole, the main component of sassafras oil. Safrole occurs naturally in a variety of spices and herbs, including the commonly used Chinese medicine Xi xin (Asari Radix et Rhizoma) and Dong quai (Angelica sinensis). SAFO is the most mutagenic metabolite of safrole tested in the Ames test. However, little or no data are available on the genotoxicity of SAFO in mammalian systems. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of SAFO in human HepG2 cells and male FVB mice. Using MTT assay, SAFO exhibited a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect in HepG2 cells with TC(50) values of 361.9μM and 193.2μM after 24 and 48h exposure, respectively. In addition, treatment with SAFO at doses of 125μM and higher for 24h in HepG2 cells resulted in a 5.1-79.6-fold increase in mean Comet tail moment by the alkaline Comet assay and a 2.6-7.8-fold increase in the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Furthermore, repeated intraperitoneal administration of SAFO (15, 30, 45, and 60mg/kg) to mice every other day for a total of twelve doses caused a significant dose-dependent increase in mean Comet tail moment in peripheral blood leukocytes (13.3-43.4-fold) and in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes (1.5-5.8-fold). Repeated administration of SAFO (60mg/kg) to mice caused liver lesions manifested as a rim of ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes immediately surrounding the central vein. Our data clearly demonstrate that SAFO significantly induced cytotoxicity, DNA strand breaks, micronuclei formation both in human cells in vitro and in mice. More studies are needed to explore the role SAFO plays in safrole-induced genotoxicity. PMID:21986196

  1. Mechanism of genotoxicity induced by targeted cytoplasmic irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, M; Xu, A; Zhou, H; Wu, L; Randers-Pehrson, G; Santella, R M; Yu, Z; Hei, T K

    2010-01-01

    Background: Direct damage to DNA is generally accepted as the main initiator of mutation and cancer induced by environmental carcinogens or ionising radiation. However, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that extracellular/extranuclear targets may also have a key role in mediating the genotoxic effects of ionising radiation. As the possibility of a particle traversal through the cytoplasm is much higher than through the nuclei in environmental radiation exposure, the contribution to genotoxic damage from cytoplasmic irradiation should not be ignored in radiation risk estimation. Although targeted cytoplasmic irradiation has been shown to induce mutations in mammalian cells, the precise mechanism(s) underlying the mutagenic process is largely unknown. Methods: A microbeam that can target the cytoplasm of cells with high precision was used to study mechanisms involved in mediating the genotoxic effects in irradiated human–hamster hybrid (AL) cells. Results: Targeted cytoplasmic irradiation induces oxidative DNA damages and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in AL cells. Lipid peroxidation, as determined by the induction of 4-hydroxynonenal was enhanced in irradiated cells, which could be suppressed by butylated hydroxyl toluene treatment. Moreover, cytoplasmic irradiation of AL cells increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) pathway. Conclusion: We herein proposed a possible signalling pathway involving reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and COX-2 in the cytoplasmic irradiation-induced genotoxicity effect. PMID:20842121

  2. Modulatory effects of catechin hydrate against genotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis induced by benzo(a)pyrene in mice.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Ayaz; Ali, Rashid; Ali, Nemat; Hasan, Syed Kazim; Bernwal, Preeti; Afzal, Shekh Mohammad; Vafa, Abul; Sultana, Sarwat

    2016-06-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P], a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) is a strong mutagen and potent carcinogen. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of catechin hydrate against B(a)P induced genotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis and to explore its underlying molecular mechanisms in the lungs of Swiss albino mice. Administration of B(a)P (125 mg/kg b. wt., p. o.) increased the activities of toxicity markers such as LPO, LDH and B(a)P metabolizing enzymes [NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CYPOR) and microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH)] with subsequent decrease in the activities of tissue anti-oxidant armory (SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, GST, QR and GSH). It also caused DNA damage and activation of apoptotic and inflammatory pathway by upregulation of TNF-α, IL-6, NF-kB, COX-2, p53, bax, caspase-3 and down regulating Bcl-2. However, pre-treatment with catechin at a dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg significantly decreased LDH, LPO, B(a)P metabolizing enzymes and increased anti-oxidant armory as well as regulated apoptosis and inflammation in lungs. Histological results also supported the protective effects of catechin. The findings of the present studies suggested that catechin as an effective natural product attenuates B(a)P induced lung toxicity. PMID:27020533

  3. Correlations between embryotoxic and genotoxic effects of phenytoin in mice.

    PubMed

    Barcellona, P S; Barale, R; Campana, A; Zucconi, D; Rossi, V; Caranti, S

    1987-01-01

    The anticonvulsant drug phenytoin (DPH) has been suspected to produce embryotoxicity through an arene oxide intermediate. This drug was also found to be a genotoxic agent. These hypotheses were tested in pregnant mice modulating the phases I and II metabolizing enzymes. DPH was studied by assessing embryotoxicity, teratogenicity, and genotoxicity, the latter by the micronucleus test on the polychromatic erythrocytes of dams and fetuses. DPH embryotoxicity was potentiated by inhibiting both cytochrome P-450 and epoxide hydrase and decreased by inducing cytochrome P-450. Equivocal results were obtained by modulating cytochrome P-448. The main DPH metabolite, p-hydroxyphenytoin (HPPH), was ineffective both per se and after cytochrome induction or epoxide hydrase inhibition. DPH did not exert genotoxicity on the maternal organism, no matter which modulating agent was used. In the fetus, however, weak genotoxic effects were observed. These effects significantly increased with inhibition of epoxide hydrase; they disappeared with induction of both cytochromes P-448 and P-450 or with inhibition of the latter. No genotoxicity was exerted by HPPH, even when the enzymatic pattern was modulated. It is concluded that the major role in DPH embryotoxicity is played by the unchanged drug, while the presence of the arene oxide is determinant for genotoxic effects. PMID:2885938

  4. Effect of cotreatment of aspirin metabolites on mitomycin C-induced genotoxicity using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, Miki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2006-01-01

    In our previous reports, aspirin, an antipyretic analgesic, suppressed the genotoxicity of mitomycin C (MMC) in a somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to reveal the mechanism of the anti-genotoxicity of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressing ability of each aspirin metabolite, such as salicylic acid (SA), salicyluric acid (SUA), gentisic acid (GA), gentisuric acid (GUA), and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), in SMART in Drosophila melanogaster using the cotreatment protocol in this report. SUA, GA, GUA, and DHBA reduced the number of the three types of spot induced by MMC without decrease of survival. These aspirin metabolites decreased the genotoxicity frequency of MMC for total spots in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, each metabolite decreased the genotoxicity frequency of MMC by approximately 80% at a dose of 40 mg/bottle, respectively. It is suggested that these metabolites are the main substances of anti-genotoxicity in the aspirin metabolic pathway. PMID:16931440

  5. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by CeO2 nanoparticles in human dermal fibroblasts: Evidence of a clastogenic effect as a mechanism of genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Benameur, Laila; Auffan, Mélanie; Cassien, Mathieu; Liu, Wei; Culcasi, Marcel; Rahmouni, Hidayat; Stocker, Pierre; Tassistro, Virginie; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Rose, Jérôme; Botta, Alain; Pietri, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    The broad range of applications of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (nano-CeO2) has attracted industrial interest, resulting in greater exposures to humans and environmental systems in the coming years. Their health effects and potential biological impacts need to be determined for risk assessment. The aims of this study were to gain insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the genotoxic effects of nano-CeO2 in relation with their physicochemical properties. Primary human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to environmentally relevant doses of nano-CeO2 (mean diameter, 7 nm; dose range, 6 × 10(-5)-6 × 10(-3) g/l corresponding to a concentration range of 0.22-22 µM) and DNA damages at the chromosome level were evaluated by genetic toxicology tests and compared to that induced in cells exposed to micro-CeO2 particles (mean diameter, 320 nm) under the same conditions. For this purpose, cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay in association with immunofluorescence staining of centromere protein A in micronuclei were used to distinguish between induction of structural or numerical chromosome changes (i.e. clastogenicity or aneuploidy). The results provide the first evidence of a genotoxic effect of nano-CeO2, (while not significant with micro-CeO2) by a clastogenic mechanism. The implication of oxidative mechanisms in this genotoxic effect was investigated by (i) assessing the impact of catalase, a hydrogen peroxide inhibitor, and (ii) by measuring lipid peroxidation and glutathione status and their reversal by application of N-acetylcysteine, a precusor of glutathione synthesis in cells. The data are consistent with the implication of free radical-related mechanisms in the nano-CeO2-induced clastogenic effect, that can be modulated by inhibition of cellular hydrogen peroxide release. PMID:25325158

  6. Effectiveness of activated carbon and Egyptian montmorillonite in the protection against deoxynivalenol-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A; El-Kady, Ahmed A; Hassan, Aziza M; Abd El-Moneim, Omaima M; Abdel-Aziem, Sekena H

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to prepare and characterize activated carbon (AC) and to evaluate its protective effect against deoxynivalenol (DON) toxicity in rats compared to Egyptian montmorillonite (EM). AC was prepared using a single-step chemical activation with phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The resulted AC has a high surface area and a high total pore volume. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 6 groups (n = 10) and treated for 3 weeks as follow: the control group, the groups fed AC or EM-supplemented diet (0.5% w/w), the group treated orally with DON (5 mg/kg b.w.) and the groups fed AC or EM-supplemented diet and treated with DON. Blood and liver samples were collected for different analyses. Treatment with DON increased liver function enzymes, lipid peroxidation, tumor necrosis factor α, DNA fragmentation, decreased hepatic glutathione content, up regulating mRNA Fas and TNF-α genes expression and increased micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes and normochromatic erythrocytes in bone marrow. Co-treatment of DON plus AC or EM succeeded to normalize the levels of the biochemical parameters, reduced the cytotoxicity of bone marrow and ameliorated the hepatic genotoxicity. Moreover, AC was more effective than EM and has a high affinity to adsorb DON and to reduce its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. PMID:26115597

  7. Lagos lagoon sediment organic extracts and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce embryotoxic, teratogenic and genotoxic effects in Danio rerio (zebrafish) embryos.

    PubMed

    Sogbanmu, Temitope O; Nagy, Eszter; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M; Otitoloju, Adebayo A; Bury, Nic R

    2016-07-01

    An expansion of anthropogenic activity around Lagos lagoon, Nigeria, has raised concerns over increasing contaminants entering the lagoon's ecosystem. The embryotoxicity, teratogenicity and genotoxicity of sediment organic extracts from four sampling zones around Lagos lagoon, Ilaje, Iddo, Atlas Cove and Apapa, as well as the dominant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) identified in water measured during the wet season (naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene and a mixture of these), were assessed with Danio rerio embryos. Embryos were exposed to varying concentrations of toxicants from 0-72 h post-fertilization (hpf). Embryotoxicity at 72 hpf showed a dose-dependent increase in mortality upon exposure to extracts from all zones, except Atlas Cove. Similarly, higher levels of teratogenic effects, such as increased oedema, and haemorrhage and developmental abnormalities resulted from exposure to extracts from Ilaje, Iddo and Apapa zones. Treatment with single PAHs revealed that significant levels of detrimental effects were obtained only for phenanthrene. The modified comet assay revealed that the oxidative damage to DNA was generally low (<12 %) overall for all sediment extracts, but was significantly elevated with Ilaje and Iddo sediment extracts when compared with solvent controls. Oxidative damage was observed with the single PAHs, phenanthrene and benzo[a]pyrene, as well as with the PAH mixture. This study highlights that Lagos lagoon sediment extracts have teratogenic, embryotoxic and genotoxic properties, which are likely due to the high molecular weight PAHs present in the extracts, some of which are known or are suspected human carcinogens. PMID:27068906

  8. Protective effects of ethanolic neem leaf extract on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Subapriya, R; Kumaraguruparan, R; Abraham, S K; Nagini, S

    2004-02-01

    We evaluated the effects of pretreatment with ethanolic neem leaf extract on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in male Swiss albino mice. The frequency of micronuclei (MN), concentrations of lipid peroxides and the status of the antioxidants, reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were used as intermediate biomarkers of chemoprotection. Animals were divided into four groups of five animals each. Animals in group 1 were given MNNG (40 mg/kg body weight) by intragastric intubation. Animals in group 2 received intragastric administration of ethanolic neem leaf extract at a concentration of 200 mg/kg body weight for 5 days followed by MNNG 1.5 h after the final feeding. Group 3 animals received ethanolic neem leaf extract alone for five days. Group 4 received the same volume of normal saline and served as control. The animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation 27 h after the carcinogen exposure. In MNNG-treated mice, enhanced lipid peroxidation with compromised antioxidant defences in the stomach, liver and erythrocytes was accompanied by increase in bone marrow micronuclei. Pretreatment with ethanolic neem leaf extract significantly reduced MNNG-induced micronuclei and lipid peroxides and enhanced GSH-dependent antioxidant activities. The results of the present study demonstrate that ethanolic neem leaf extract exerts protective effects against MNNG-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress by augmenting host antioxidant defence mechanisms. PMID:15038245

  9. Lack of an EMF-induced genotoxic effect in the Ames assay.

    PubMed

    Morandi, M A; Pak, C M; Caren, R P; Caren, L D

    1996-01-01

    A few epidemiological studies have linked exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) and the incidence of cancer. Since many carcinogens are mutagens in the Ames assay, the purpose of this study was to determine if exposure of four tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium (TA97a, TA98, TA100, and TA102) to EMF would increase their rate of mutation. Parallel plate electrodes and Helmholtz coils were used to create uniform field properties (300 V/in., 0.3 mT). Separate and combined alternating electric and magnetic fields effects were studied at a combined field frequency of 60, 600, and 6000 Hz at room temperature. These fields did not elevate the temperature of the culture plates above room temperature, Petri dishes containing each tester strain in top agar were exposed to an electric field (E), magnetic field (M), combined electric and magnetic field (EM), or no additional field above ambient conditions in the lab (control). Four plates containing each strain were exposed in each condition: two plates had the appropriate positive-control mutagen for each strain included in the top agar and two plates did not. Plates were exposed to either E, M, EM, or control conditions at room temperature for 48 hr. and then incubated an additional 24 hr. at 37 deg. C. The plates containing mutagen in the top agar showed an increased number of colonies consistent with mutagenesis. However, the rate of mutation in the S. typhimurium strains TA97a, TA98, TA100, and TA102 in either the presence or absence of mutagen was not affected by 48 hr. exposure at room temperature to E, M, or EM fields at 60, 600, or 6000 Hz. PMID:8699937

  10. Reduced effect of bromide on the genotoxicity in secondary effluent of a municipal wastewater treatment plant during chlorination.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian-Yuan; Li, Yi; Hu, Hong-Ying; Sun, Ying-Xue; Zhao, Feng-Yun

    2010-07-01

    Chlorination of wastewater can form genotoxic, mutagenic, and/or carcinogenic disinfection byproduct (DBPs). In this study, the effect of bromide on genotoxicity in secondary effluent of a municipal wastewater treatment plant during chlorination was evaluated by the SOS/umu test. The presence of bromide notably decreased the genotoxicity in secondary effluent during chlorination, especially under conditions of high ammonia concentration. Bromide significantly decreased the concentration of ofloxacin, a genotoxic chemical in secondary effluent, during chlorination with high concentration of ammonia, while genotoxic DBPs formation of humic acid and aromatic amino acids associated with bromide limitedly contributed to the changes of genotoxicity in secondary effluent under the conditions of this study. By fractionating dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the secondary effluent into different fractions, the fractions containing hydrophilic substances (HIS) and hydrophobic acids (HOA) contributed to the decrease in genotoxicity induced by bromide. Chlorination of HOA without bromide increased genotoxicity, while the addition of bromide decreased genotoxicity. PMID:20521844

  11. [In vitro study of genotoxic and oxidative effects induced on human pulmonary cells by exposure to PAHs extracted from airborne particulate matter collected in a coke plant].

    PubMed

    Cavallo, D; Ursini, C L; Pira, E; Romano, C; Ciervo, A; Maiello, R; Caglieri, A; Iavicoli, S

    2007-01-01

    Genotoxic and oxidative effect of airborne particulate matter collected in a coke plant were evaluated on lung epithelial cells (A549). We aimed to clarify the mechanism of action of complex mixtures of PAHs and to identify biomarkers of effect of lung cancer. Particulate matter was analysed by GC/MS. Genotoxic and oxidative effects induced by the exposure to the extract were evaluated by Fpg comet assay. The cells were exposed for 30 min, 2h and 4h to 0.01%, 0.02% and 0.05% of the extract. We evaluated comet percentage and analysed tail moment values of exposed and unexposed cells treated with Fpg enzyme (TMenz) and untreated (TM) that indicate respectively oxidative and direct DNA damage. We found 0.328 ng/m3 of pyrene, 0.33 ng/m3 of benzo(a)anthracene, 1.073 ng/m3 of benzo(b)fluoranthene, 0.22 ng/m3 of benzo(k)fluoranthene, 0.35 ng/m3 of benzo(a)pyrene, 0.079 ng/m3 of dibenzo(a,h)anthracene and 0.40 ng/m3 of benzo(g,h,i)perylene. A dose-dependent increase, although not significant, of TM and TMenz in the exposed cells in respect to controls was found that indicates a slight increase of both direct and oxidative damage in exposed cells. A slight increase of comet percentage was found at the highest dose. We show the high sensibility of comet assay to measure early DNA damage also at low doses suggesting the use of such test on A549 to evaluate on target organ the effects of complex mixtures of genotoxic substances. PMID:18409689

  12. Chemopreventive effects of Furan-2-yl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propenone against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-inducible genotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Han, Eun Hee; Choi, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Lee, Kyung Jin; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Eung Seok; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-05-01

    1-Furan-2-yl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propenone (FPP-3) is an anti-inflammatory agent with a propenone moiety and chemically synthesized recently. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effect of FPP-3 on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. FPP-3 reduced the formation of the DMBA-DNA adduct. DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene expression and enzyme activity were inhibited by FPP-3. It inhibited DMBA-induced aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transactivation and DMBA-inducible nuclear localization of the AhR. Induction of detoxifying phase II genes by chemopreventive agents represents a coordinated protective response against oxidative stress and neoplastic effects of carcinogens. Transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates antioxidant response element (ARE) of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QR). FPP-3 increased the expression and enzymatic activity of GST and QR. Moreover, FPP-3 increased transcriptional activity of GST and QR. GST and QR induction and Nrf2 translocation by FPP-3 were blocked by the PKC inhibitor Goe6983, and the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These results reflected a partial role of PKC{delta} and p38 signaling in FPP-3-mediated GSTA and QR induction through nuclear translocation of Nrf2. Classically, chemopreventive agents either inhibit CYP metabolizing enzyme or induce phase II detoxifying enzymes. These results suggest that FPP-3 has a potent protective effect against DMBA-induced genotoxicity through modulating phase I and II enzymes and that it has potential as a chemopreventive agent.

  13. Tempol protects human lymphocytes from genotoxicity induced by cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Khabour, Omar F; Alzoubi, Karem H; Mfady, Doa'a S; Alasseiri, Mohammed; Hasheesh, Taghrid F

    2014-01-01

    The use of cisplatin in treatments of human malignancies is limited by its side effects that include DNA damage and the subsequent risk of developing secondary cancer. In this study, we examined the possible protective effect of Tempol against DNA damage induced by cisplatin in human lymphocytes using chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) assays. Cisplatin induced significant elevation in the frequencies of CAs and SCEs in cultured human lymphocytes (P < 0.01). Treatment of lymphocytes with Tempol significantly lowered CAs and SCEs induced by cisplatin. Tempol alone did not affect spontaneous levels of SCEs and CAs observed in the control group (P > 0.05). In conclusion, Tempol protects human lymphocytes against genotoxicity induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin. PMID:24955171

  14. Assessment of isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside from Acacia salicina: protective effects toward oxidation damage and genotoxicity induced by aflatoxin B1 and nifuroxazide.

    PubMed

    Bouhlel, Ines; Limem, Ilef; Skandrani, Ines; Nefatti, Aicha; Ghedira, Kamel; Dijoux-Franca, Marie-Genevieve; Leila, Chekir-Ghedira

    2010-08-01

    Antioxidant activity of isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside, isolated from the leaves of Acacia salicina, was determined by the ability of this compound to inhibit xanthine oxidase activity and to scavenge the free radical 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS(.-)) diammonium salt. Antigenotoxic activity was assessed using the SOS chromotest assay. This compound has the ability to scavenge the ABTS(.+) radical by a hydrogen donating mechanism. We also envisaged the study of the antioxidant effect of this compound by the enzymatic xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XOD) assay. Results indicated that isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside was a potent inhibitor of xanthine oxidase and superoxide anion scavengers. Moreover, this compound induced an inhibitory activity against nifuroxazide and aflatoxine B1 (AFB1) induced genotoxicity. Taken together, these observations provide evidence that isorhamnetin 3-O-neohesperidoside isolated from the leaves of A. salicina is able to protect cells against the consequences of oxidative stress. PMID:20809543

  15. Nongenotoxic effects and a reduction of the DXR-induced genotoxic effects of Helianthus annuus Linné (sunflower) seeds revealed by micronucleus assays in mouse bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This research evaluated the genotoxicity of oil and tincture of H. annuus L. seeds using the micronucleus assay in bone marrow of mice. The interaction between these preparations and the genotoxic effects of doxorubicin (DXR) was also analysed (antigenotoxicity test). Methods Experimental groups were evaluated at 24-48 h post treatment with N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea (positive control – NEU), DXR (chemotherapeutic), NaCl (negative control), a sunflower tincture (THALS) and two sources of sunflower oils (POHALS and FOHALS). Antigenotoxic assays were carried out using the sunflower tincture and oils separately and in combination with NUE or DXR. Results For THALS, analysis of the MNPCEs showed no significant differences between treatment doses (250–2,000 mg.Kg-1) and NaCl. A significant reduction in MNPCE was observed when THALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) was administered in combination with DXR (5 mg.Kg-1). For POHALS or FOHALS, analysis of the MNPCEs also showed no significant differences between treatment doses (250–2,000 mg.Kg-1) and NaCl. However, the combination DXR + POHALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) or DXR + FOHALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) not contributed to the MNPCEs reduction. Conclusions This research suggests absence of genotoxicity of THALS, dose-, time- and sex-independent, and its combination with DXR can reduce the genotoxic effects of DXR. POHALS and FOHALS also showed absence of genotoxicity, but their association with DXR showed no antigenotoxic effects. PMID:24694203

  16. Protective effect of black tea polyphenols against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress during hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Letchoumy, P Vidjaya; Subapriya, R; Nagini, S; Abraham, S K

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of black tea polyphenols (Polyphenon B) against genotoxicity and oxidative stress during 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis. Since the bone marrow reflects hematopoietic stress caused by tumor cells, we used the frequency of micronuclei, the extent of lipid peroxidation, and the status of antioxidants in the bone marrow plasma as intermediate biomarkers of oxidative stress. All the hamsters painted with DMBA alone for 14 weeks developed buccal pouch carcinomas with a 75.4% increase in the incidence of bone marrow micronuclei as compared to untreated control (group 4). This was accompanied by an increase in lipid peroxidation as evidenced by the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) (61.3% and 17.8%, respectively) and a decrease in the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and the activities of GSH-dependent enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) by 32.6%, 35.9%, and 62.8%, respectively, as compared to untreated control. Dietary administration of Polyphenon B significantly suppressed DMBA-induced HBP carcinomas by 20% and reduced the frequency of bone marrow micronuclei by 57.3% and TBARS and LOOH by 38.8% and 25.8%, respectively, compared to group 1 animals with significant elevations in the GSH:GSSG ratio (16.0%) and activities of GPx (29.8%) and GST (53.8%). Our results reveal that dietary supplementation of Polyphenon B exerts protection against DMBA-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress by augmenting bone marrow antioxidant defense mechanisms. PMID:20020977

  17. Mutagenic and Genotoxic Effect of Hydroxyurea

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Jean L.; Bosquesi, Priscila L.; Almeida, Adélia E.; Chin, Chung Man; Varanda, Eliana A.

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxyurea, a cytotoxic drug, is the mainly available therapeutical strategy for the treatment of sickle cell disease. This study aimed to evaluate the mutagenic and genotoxic potential of the hydroxyurea through the Salmonella/Microsome assay and micronucleus test in peripheral blood of mice. The doses were evaluated at 29.25-468 μmol/plate in Salmonella/Microsome assay in presence and absence of metabolic activation the drug. In the micronucleus test the doses were evaluated at 12.5; 25; 50; 75 and 100 mg/kg. The results show that hydroxyurea present mutagenic activity in TA98 and TA100 in doses above 117 μmol/plate and 234 μmol/plate respectively. The drug induced a significant increase in the frequency of micronuclei in reticulocytes of mice at concentrations of 50, 75 and 100 mg/kg, compared to negative control (water). These results demonstrated the mutagenic and genotoxic potential of hydroxyurea. PMID:23675245

  18. Protective effect of cactus cladode extract against cisplatin induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity and apoptosis in balb/c mice: combination with phytochemical composition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cis-Platinum (II) (cis-diammine dichloroplatinum; CDDP) is a potent antitumor compound widely used for the treatment of many malignancies. An important side-effect of CDDP is nephrotoxicity. The cytotoxic action of this drug is often thought to induce oxidative stress and be associated with its ability to bind DNA to form CDDP–DNA adducts and apoptosis in kidney cells. In this study, the protective effect of cactus cladode extract (CCE) against CDDP-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity were investigated in mice. We also looked for levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, chromosome aberrations (CA) test, SOS Chromotest, expressions of p53, bax and bcl2 in kidney and we also analyzed several parameters of renal function markers toxicity such as serum biochemical analysis. Methods Adult, healthy balb/c (20–25 g) male mice aged of 4–5 weeks were pre-treated by intraperitonial administration of CCE (50 mg/Kg.b.w) for 2 weeks. Control animals were treated 3 days a week for 4 weeks by intraperitonial administration of 100 μg/Kg.b.w CDDP. Animals which treated by CDDP and CCE were divided into two groups: the first group was administrated CCE 2 hours before each treatment with CDDP 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The second group was administrated without pre-treatment with CCE but this extract was administrated 24 hours after each treatment with CDDP 3 days a week for 4 weeks. Results Our results showed that CDDP induced significant alterations in all tested oxidative stress markers. In addition it induced CA in bone morrow cells, increased the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins p53 and bax and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein bcl2 in kidney. On the other hand, CDDP significantly increased the levels of urea and creatinine and decreased the levels of albumin and total protein.The treatment of CCE before or after treatment with CDDP showed, (i) a total reduction

  19. Effects of Viscum album L. extract and quercetin on methotrexate-induced cyto-genotoxicity in mouse bone-marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Sekeroğlu, Zülal Atlı; Sekeroğlu, Vedat

    2012-07-01

    Viscum album, a semi-parasitic plant, has been used both in traditional and supplementary medicine in the treatment of many diseases. Quercetin (QE), one of the major flavonoids in some fruits and vegetables, has anti-oxidative and anti-carcinogenic activities. Methotrexate (MTX), an anti-folate anti-metabolite, is a widely used anti-neoplastic drug with significant clastogenic effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-cytogenotoxic effects of pre-treatment with V. album extract (VAE) and QE on MTX-induced chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in mouse bone-marrow cells. Pre-treatment of mice by gavage with VAE (250mg/kgbw/day for 10 days) and QE (50mg/kgbw/day for 10 days) caused a significant decrease in CAs and in the number of aberrant cells with CAs induced by intramuscular treatment of the mice with MTX (10mg/kgbw/day for 3 days), when compared with the group treated with MTX alone. These compounds also significantly increased the mitotic index (MI) in bone-marrow cells that had been suppressed by MTX. In conclusion, from the findings we suggest that VAE and QE may play a role in reducing cyto-genotoxicity induced by anti-neoplastic drugs during cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22464986

  20. Modulation of monocrotaline-induced hepatic genotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Petry, T W; Sipes, I G

    1987-03-01

    Monocrotaline (MCT), a hepatotoxic/hepatocarcinogenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) induced DNA-DNA interstrand crosslinks in a dose-dependent manner through 30 mg/kg. Hepatic cytochrome P-450 has been shown to bioactivate MCT to pyrrole derivatives which are thought to be responsible for these genotoxic lesions. We have hypothesized these lesions to be related to the adverse hepatic actions of MCT and other PAs. Studies reported here investigated the effect of phenobarbital, a P-450 inducer, 2-dimethylaminoethyl-2,2-diphenylvalerate, a P-450 inhibitor and butylated hydroxyanisole, a dietary antioxidant, on hepatic DNA-DNA interstrand cross-links induced by a single dose of MCT (15 mg/kg i.p.) administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats. DNA damage was assessed by alkaline elution. The effects of these pretreatment regimens on MCT-induced DNA-DNA interstrand cross-linking was qualitatively similar to their reported effects on the hepatotoxicity of MCT. The effects of these pretreatments on hepatic cytochrome P-450 content, hepatic non-protein sulfhydryl levels and hepatic glutathione S-transferase activities were similarly investigated in attempts to explain the observed effects on DNA cross-link induction. These data provide further support for the association between DNA damage and the adverse hepatic effects of MCT. PMID:3102099

  1. Zinc-Oxide Nanoparticles Exhibit Genotoxic, Clastogenic, Cytotoxic and Actin Depolymerization Effects by Inducing Oxidative Stress Responses in Macrophages and Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Pati, Rashmirekha; Das, Ishani; Mehta, Ranjit Kumar; Sahu, Rojalin; Sonawane, Avinash

    2016-04-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) have wide biological applications, which have raised serious concerns about their impact on the health and environment. Although, various studies have shown ZnO-NP toxicity on different cells underin vitroconditions, sufficient information is lacking regarding toxicity and underlying mechanisms underin vivoconditions. In this work, we investigated genotoxic, clastogenic, and cytotoxic effects of ZnO-NPs on macrophages and in adult mice. ZnO-NP-treated mice showed signs of toxicity such as loss in body weight, passive behavior and reduced survival. Further mechanistic studies revealed that administration of higher dose caused severe DNA damage in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells as evident by the formation of COMET tail, micronuclei, chromosomal fragmentation, and phosphorylation of H2A histone family member X. Moreover, ZnO-NPs inhibited DNA repair mechanism by downregulating the expression offen-1andpolBproteins. Histopathological examinations showed severe inflammation and damage to liver, lungs, and kidneys. Cell viability and wound healing assays revealed that ZnO-NPs killed macrophages in a dose-dependent manner, caused severe wounds and inhibited cellular migration by irreversible actin depolymerization and degradation. Reduction in the viability of macrophages was due to the arrest of the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, inhibition of superoxide dismutase and catalase and eventually reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, treatment with an antioxidant drug N-acetyl cysteine significantly reduced the ZnO-NP induced genotoxicity bothin vitroandin vivo Altogether, this study gives detailed pathological insights of ZnO-NP that impair cellular functions, thus will enable to arbitrate their biological applications. PMID:26794139

  2. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge on higher plants.

    PubMed

    Corrêa Martins, Maria Nilza; de Souza, Victor Ventura; Souza, Tatiana da Silva

    2016-02-01

    Sewage treatment yields sludge, which is often used as a soil amendment in agriculture and crop production. Although the sludge contains elevated concentrations of macro and micronutrients, high levels of inorganic and organic compounds with genotoxic and mutagenic properties are present in sludge. Application of sludge in agriculture is a pathway for direct contact of crops to toxic chemicals. The objective of this study was to compile information related to the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge in different plant species. In addition, data are presented on toxicological effects in animals fed with plants grown in soils supplemented with sewage sludge. Despite the benefits of using sewage sludge as organic fertilizer, the data showcased in this review suggest that this residue can induce genetic damage in plants. This review alerts potential risks to health outcomes after the intake of food cultivated in sewage sludge-amended soils. PMID:26643763

  3. Genotoxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Julia; Felder, Eva; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Kaltbeitzel, Anke; Heinrich, Ulf Ruediger; Brochhausen, Christoph; Mailänder, Volker; Tremel, Wolfgang; Brieger, Juergen

    2015-05-01

    The potential toxicity of nanoparticles has currently provoked public and scientific discussions, and attempts to develop generally accepted handling procedures for nanoparticles are under way. The investigation of the impact of nanoparticles on human health is overdue and reliable test systems accounting for the special properties of nanomaterials must be developed. Nanoparticular zinc oxide (ZnO) may be internalised through ambient air or the topical application of cosmetics, only to name a few, with unpredictable health effects. Therefore, we analysed the determinants of ZnO nanoparticle (NP) genotoxicity. ZnO NPs (15-18 nm in diameter) were investigated at concentrations of 0.1, 10 and 100 μg mL-1 using the cell line A549. Internalised NPs were only infrequently detectable by TEM, but strongly increased Zn2+ levels in the cytoplasm and even more in the nuclear fraction, as measured by atom absorption spectroscopy, indicative of an internalised zinc and nuclear accumulation. We observed a time and dosage dependent reduction of cellular viability after ZnO NP exposure. ZnCl2 exposure to cells induced similar impairments of cellular viability. Complexation of Zn2+ with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) resulted in the loss of toxicity of NPs, indicating the relevant role of Zn2+ for ZnO NP toxicity. Foci analyses showed the induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by ZnO NPs and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Treatment of the cells with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) resulted in strongly decreased intracellular ROS levels and reduced DNA damage. However, a slow increase of ROS after ZnO NP exposure and reduced but not quashed DSBs after NAC-treatment suggest that Zn2+ may exert genotoxic activities without the necessity of preceding ROS-induction. Our data indicate that ZnO NP toxicity is a result of cellular Zn2+ intake. Subsequently increased ROS-levels cause DNA damage. However, we found evidence for

  4. Genotoxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Julia; Felder, Eva; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Kaltbeitzel, Anke; Heinrich, Ulf Ruediger; Brochhausen, Christoph; Mailänder, Volker; Tremel, Wolfgang; Brieger, Juergen

    2015-05-01

    The potential toxicity of nanoparticles has currently provoked public and scientific discussions, and attempts to develop generally accepted handling procedures for nanoparticles are under way. The investigation of the impact of nanoparticles on human health is overdue and reliable test systems accounting for the special properties of nanomaterials must be developed. Nanoparticular zinc oxide (ZnO) may be internalised through ambient air or the topical application of cosmetics, only to name a few, with unpredictable health effects. Therefore, we analysed the determinants of ZnO nanoparticle (NP) genotoxicity. ZnO NPs (15-18 nm in diameter) were investigated at concentrations of 0.1, 10 and 100 μg mL-1 using the cell line A549. Internalised NPs were only infrequently detectable by TEM, but strongly increased Zn2+ levels in the cytoplasm and even more in the nuclear fraction, as measured by atom absorption spectroscopy, indicative of an internalised zinc and nuclear accumulation. We observed a time and dosage dependent reduction of cellular viability after ZnO NP exposure. ZnCl2 exposure to cells induced similar impairments of cellular viability. Complexation of Zn2+ with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) resulted in the loss of toxicity of NPs, indicating the relevant role of Zn2+ for ZnO NP toxicity. Foci analyses showed the induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by ZnO NPs and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Treatment of the cells with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) resulted in strongly decreased intracellular ROS levels and reduced DNA damage. However, a slow increase of ROS after ZnO NP exposure and reduced but not quashed DSBs after NAC-treatment suggest that Zn2+ may exert genotoxic activities without the necessity of preceding ROS-induction. Our data indicate that ZnO NP toxicity is a result of cellular Zn2+ intake. Subsequently increased ROS-levels cause DNA damage. However, we found evidence for

  5. Prevention of myelosuppression and genotoxicity induced by cisplatin in murine bone marrow cells: effect of an organovanadium compound vanadium(III)-l-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Basu, Abhishek; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Bhattacharjee, Arin; Patra, Arup Ranjan; Bhattacharya, Sudin

    2015-07-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is one of the first-line anticancer drugs indicated for use against various form of human malignancies; but, the therapeutic outcome of CDDP chemotherapy is limited due to the development of myelosuppression and genotoxicity which may lead to secondary cancer. Induction of oxidative stress in normal host cells is thought to be responsible for these adverse effects. Therefore, in search of a potential chemoprotectant, an oraganovanadium compound, viz., vanadium(III)-l-cysteine (VC-III) was evaluated against CDDP-induced clastogenicity and cytotoxicity in bone marrow cells of Swiss albino mice. CDDP was administered intraperitoneally (5mg/kg body weight [b.w.]) and VC-III was given by oral gavage (1mg/kg b.w.) in concomitant and pretreatment schedule. The results showed that VC-III administration significantly (P < 0.001) enhanced cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis in the bone marrow niche indicating recovery of CDDP-induced myelosuppression. VC-III also significantly (P < 0.001) decreased the percentage of chromosomal aberrations, the frequency of micronuclei formation and the extent of DNA damage. The observed antigenotoxic and cytoprotective effect of VC-III was attributed to its attenuation of free radicals status and restoration of oxidised and reduced glutathione levels. These results suggest that VC-III is a potential candidate for future development as a chemoprotective agent against chemotherapy-associated primary and secondary complications. PMID:25778689

  6. Pre-Exposure to 50 Hz Magnetic Fields Modifies Menadione-Induced Genotoxic Effects in Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luukkonen, Jukka; Liimatainen, Anu; Höytö, Anne; Juutilainen, Jukka; Naarala, Jonne

    2011-01-01

    Background Extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MF) are generated by power lines and various electric appliances. They have been classified as possibly carcinogenic by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, but a mechanistic explanation for carcinogenic effects is lacking. A previous study in our laboratory showed that pre-exposure to ELF MF altered cancer-relevant cellular responses (cell cycle arrest, apoptosis) to menadione-induced DNA damage, but it did not include endpoints measuring actual genetic damage. In the present study, we examined whether pre-exposure to ELF MF affects chemically induced DNA damage level, DNA repair rate, or micronucleus frequency in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Exposure to 50 Hz MF was conducted at 100 µT for 24 hours, followed by chemical exposure for 3 hours. The chemicals used for inducing DNA damage and subsequent micronucleus formation were menadione and methyl methanesulphonate (MMS). Pre-treatment with MF enhanced menadione-induced DNA damage, DNA repair rate, and micronucleus formation in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Although the results with MMS indicated similar effects, the differences were not statistically significant. No effects were observed after MF exposure alone. Conclusions The results confirm our previous findings showing that pre-exposure to MFs as low as 100 µT alters cellular responses to menadione, and show that increased genotoxicity results from such interaction. The present findings also indicate that complementary data at several chronological points may be critical for understanding the MF effects on DNA damage, repair, and post-repair integrity of the genome. PMID:21448285

  7. Protective effects of melatonin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules on paraquat-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in a pulmonary cell line.

    PubMed

    Charão, Mariele F; Baierle, Marília; Gauer, Bruna; Goethel, Gabriela; Fracasso, Rafael; Paese, Karina; Brucker, Natália; Moro, Angela M; Bubols, Guilherme B; Dias, Bruna B; Matte, Ursula S; Guterres, Silvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Garcia, Solange C

    2015-06-01

    Many acute poisonings lack effective and specific antidotes. Due to both intentional and accidental exposures, paraquat (PQ) causes thousands of deaths annually, especially by pulmonary fibrosis. Melatonin (Mel), when incorporated into lipid-core nanocapsules (Mel-LNC), has enhanced antioxidant properties. The effects of such a formulation have not yet been studied with respect to mitigation of PQ- induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage. Here, we have tested whether Mel-LNC can ameliorate PQ-induced toxicity in the A549 alveolar epithelial cell line. Physicochemical characterization of the formulations was performed. Cellular uptake was measured using nanocapsules marked with rhodamine B. Cell viability was determined by the MTT assay and DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay. The enzyme-modified comet assay with endonuclease III (Endo III) and formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) were used to investigate oxidative DNA damage. Incubation with culture medium for 24h did not alter the granulometric profile of Mel-LNC formulations. Following treatment (3 and 24h), red fluorescence was detected around the cell nucleus, indicating internalization of the formulation. Melatonin solution (Mel), Mel-LNC, and LNC did not have significant effects on cell viability or DNA damage. Pre-treatment with Mel-LNC enhanced cell viability and showed a remarkable reduction in % DNA in tail compared to the PQ group; this was not observed in cells pre-treated with Mel. PQ induces oxidative DNA damage detected with the enzyme-modified comet assay. Mel-LNC reduced this damage more effectively than did Mel. In summary, Mel-LNC is better than Mel at protecting A549 cells from the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of PQ. PMID:26046970

  8. DNA melting and genotoxicity induced by silver nanoparticles and graphene.

    PubMed

    Ivask, Angela; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Seabrook, Shane A; Hor, Maryam; Kirby, Jason K; Fenech, Michael; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun

    2015-05-18

    We have revealed a connection between DNA-nanoparticle (NP) binding and in vitro DNA damage induced by citrate- and branched polyethylenimine-coated silver nanoparticles (c-AgNPs and b-AgNPs) as well as graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets. All three types of nanostructures triggered an early onset of DNA melting, where the extent of the melting point shift depends upon both the type and concentration of the NPs. Specifically, at a DNA/NP weight ratio of 1.1/1, the melting temperature of lambda DNA dropped from 94 °C down to 76 °C, 60 °C, and room temperature for GO, c-AgNPs and b-AgNPs, respectively. Consistently, dynamic light scattering revealed that the largest changes in DNA hydrodynamic size were also associated with the binding of b-AgNPs. Upon introduction to cells, b-AgNPs also exhibited the highest cytotoxicity, at the half-maximal inhibitory (IC50) concentrations of 3.2, 2.9, and 5.2 mg/L for B and T-lymphocyte cell lines and primary lymphocytes, compared to the values of 13.4, 12.2, and 12.5 mg/L for c-AgNPs and 331, 251, and 120 mg/L for GO nanosheets, respectively. At cytotoxic concentrations, all NPs elicited elevated genotoxicities via the increased number of micronuclei in the lymphocyte cells. However, b-AgNPs also induced micronuclei at subtoxic concentrations starting from 0.1 mg/L, likely due to their stronger cellular adhesion and internalization, as well as their subsequent interference with normal DNA synthesis or chromosome segregation during the cell cycle. This study facilitates our understanding of the effects of NP chemical composition, surface charge, and morphology on DNA stability and genotoxicity, with implications ranging from nanotoxicology to nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. PMID:25781053

  9. INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECTS MCF-7 CELLS FROM THE CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECTS OF ARSENITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear wether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical ...

  10. DNA damage as an indicator of pollutant-induced genotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    Biological monitoring is an approach of considerable interest to scientists in the field of environmental genotoxicity who are investigating the effects of hazardous substances on the biota. In essence the technique involves an evaluation of various types of responses in living organisms for their potential to identify exposure to dangerous substances and to define or to predict subsequent deleterious effects. The rationale for the selection of DNA damage as an indicator of exposure to genotoxic agents is based mainly on the mechanisms of action of chemicals that are known mutagens and carcinogens. An alkaline unwinding assay that detects excess strand breakage within the DNA polymer was applied to sunfish in a local stream as a biological monitor for environmental genotoxicity due to industrial pollution. The study was conducted over a period of 15 months and the temporal and spatial aspects of the data were evaluated for the effect of remedial action. 16 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. The Mitigating Effect of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Fruit Extract against Genotoxicity Induced by Cyclophosphamide in Mice Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chabra, Aroona; Naghshvar, Farshad; Ahmadi, Amirhossein

    2013-01-01

    Possible genoprotective effect of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) (CCT) fruits extract against cyclophosphamide- (CP-)induced DNA damage in mice bone marrow cells was evaluated using micronucleus assay, as an index of induced chromosomal damage. Mice were preadministered with different doses of CCT via intraperitoneal injection for 7 consecutive days followed by injection with CP (70 mg/kg b.w.) 1 hr after the last injection of CCT. After 24 hr, mice were scarified to evaluate the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs). In addition, the number of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) among 1000 normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs) per animal was recorded to evaluate bone marrow. Pretreatment with CCT significantly reduced the number of MnPCEs induced by CP in bone marrow cells (P < 0.0001). At 200 mg/kg, CCT had a maximum chemoprotective effect and reduced the number of MnPCEs by 6.37-fold and completely normalized the mitotic activity. CCT also led to marked proliferation and hypercellularity of immature myeloid elements after mice were treated with CP and mitigated the bone marrow suppression. Our study revealed that CCT has an antigenotoxic effect against CP-induced oxidative DNA damage in mice. Therefore, it could be used concomitantly as a supplement to protect people undergoing chemotherapy. PMID:24324391

  12. Anti-genotoxic ability of α-tocopherol and Anthocyanin to counteract fish DNA damage induced by musk xylene.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Lucia; Mottola, Filomena; Santonastaso, Marianna; Saputo, Valentina; Cusano, Elena; Costagliola, Domenico; Suero, Teresa; Pacifico, Severina; Stingo, Vincenzo

    2015-11-01

    Many compounds released into the environment are able to interact with genetic material. The main purpose of genetic toxicology is to investigate the adverse effects of genotoxic molecules such as reduced fitness, changes in gene frequencies and their impact on genetic diversity in populations following genotoxic exposure. However, the ecological effects of many genotoxic compounds remain poorly understood. The aim of this research was to evaluate the genotoxic activity of an artificial musk (musk xylene, MX) and the potential anti-genotoxicity against this chemical compound of two antioxidant substances (α-tocopherol and an anthocyanins enriched extract). The studies were performed both in vivo and in vitro, using the teleost Danio rerio and the DLEC (Dicentrarchus labrax embryonic cells) cell line. We carried out the exposure to these substances at different times. DNA and cell damage and their possible repair were detected by various experimental approaches: DNA strand breaks (Comet Assay), degree of apoptosis (Diffusion Assay) and molecular alterations at the genomic level (RAPD-PCR technique). Data were collected and analyzed for statistical significance using the Student's t test. The results of this study showed that MX exhibited a genotoxic activity even after short exposure times. The anti-genotoxicity experiments evidenced that both α-tocopherol and Anthocyanin were able to contrast the genotoxic effects induced by MX, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26407710

  13. Deoxynivalenol induces cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in animal primary cell culture.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Banerjee, Subham; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Borthakur, Sashin Kumar; Veer, Vijay

    2015-03-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium graminearum, is widely found as a contaminant of food. DON is responsible for a wide range of toxic activities, including gastro-intestinal, lymphoid, bone-marrow and cardiotoxicity. But, the complete explorations of toxicity in terms of hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity as well have not been documented well. Again, the mechanisms through which DON damages the DNA and promotes cellular toxicity are not well established. Considering the above fact, this research article is focused on the effects of DON-induced toxicities on experimental animal model as well as its effects on cellular level via various toxicological investigations. DON treatment showed cytotoxicity and DNA damage. Further, flow cytometric analysis of hepatocytes showed cellular apoptosis, suggesting that DON-induced hepatotoxicity is, may be partly, mediated by apoptosis. Moreover, significant differences were found in each haematology and clinical chemistry value, either (p > 0.05). No abnormality of any organ was found during histopathological examination. Hence, it can be concluded that DON induces oxidative DNA damage and increases the formation of centromere positive micronuclei due to aneugenic activity. PMID:25578892

  14. Application of an in vivo mutagenesis system to assess aminothiol effects on neutron-induced genotoxic damage in mouse spleenocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Basic, I. . Dept. of Animal Physiology); Grdina, D.J.; Lyons, T. )

    1989-01-01

    A cloning technique has been developed to quantitate and study {ital in vivo} somatic mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in human lymphocytes. In this paper we describe a modification of this assay to quantify HGPRT mutations in mouse spleenocytes. In particular, we have investigated the effects of the aminothiol on mutagenesis induced by single doses of whole body exposures to fission-spectrum neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. 7 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer T.; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Huang, Ruili; Teneva, Nedelina; Simmons, Steven O.; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Myung, Kyungjae

    2012-01-01

    Human ATAD5 is a biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATAD5 protein levels increase posttranscriptionally in response to DNA damage. We screened over 4,000 compounds with a cell-based quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-luciferase assay detecting genotoxic compounds. We identified 22 antioxidants, including resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein, that are currently used or investigated for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and chronic hepatitis, as well as for antiaging. Treatment of dividing cells with these compounds induced DNA damage and resulted in cell death. Despite their genotoxic effects, resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein did not cause mutagenesis, which is a major side effect of conventional anticancer drugs. Furthermore, resveratrol and genistein killed multidrug-resistant cancer cells. We therefore propose that resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein are attractive candidates for improved chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22431602

  16. Protective effects of the flavonoid chrysin against methylmercury-induced genotoxicity and alterations of antioxidant status, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Manzolli, Eduardo Scandinari; Serpeloni, Juliana Mara; Grotto, Denise; Bastos, Jairo Kennup; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Barbosa Junior, Fernando; Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron

    2015-01-01

    The use of phytochemicals has been widely used as inexpensive approach for prevention of diseases related to oxidative damage due to its antioxidant properties. One of dietary flavonoids is chrysin (CR), found mainly in passion fruit, honey, and propolis. Methylmercury (MeHg) is a toxic metal whose main toxic mechanism is oxidative damage. Thus, the study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of CR against oxidative damage induced by MeHg in Wistar rats. Animals were treated with MeHg (30 µg/kg/bw) in presence and absence of CR (0.10, 1.0, and 10 mg/kg/bw) by gavage for 45 days. Glutathione (GSH) in blood was quantified spectrophotometrically and for monitoring of DNA damage, comet assay was used in leukocytes and hepatocytes. MeHg led to a significant increase in the formation of comets; when the animals were exposed to the metal in the presence of CR, higher concentrations of CR showed protective effects. Moreover, exposure to MeHg decreased the levels of GSH and GSH levels were restored in the animals that received CR plus MeHg. Taken together the findings of the present work indicate that consumption of flavonoids such as CR may protect humans against the adverse health effects caused by MeHg. PMID:25810809

  17. Quercetin protects human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Ramyaa; Kalal, Iravathy Goud; Krishnaswamy, Rajashree; Viswanadha, VijayaPadma

    2016-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most abundant food-contaminating mycotoxins world wide, and is detrimental to human and animal health. This study evaluated the protective effect of quercetin against OTA-induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and inflammatory response in lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity determined by MTT assay revealed IC20 value of OTA to be 20 µM, which was restored to near control values by pretreatment with quercetin. Oxidative stress parameters such as antioxidant enzymes, LPO and PCC levels indicated that quercetin exerted a protective effect on OTA-induced oxidative stress. Quercetin exerted an antigenotoxic effect on OTA-induced genotoxicity, by significantly reducing the number of structural aberrations in chromosomes and comet parameters like, % olive tail moment from 2.76 ± 0.02 to 0.56 ± 0.02 and % tail DNA from 56.23 ± 2.56 to 12.36 ± 0.56 as determined by comet assay. OTA-induced NO, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were significantly reduced in the quercetin pretreated samples indicating its anti-inflammatory role. Our results demonstrate for the first time that quercetin exerts a cytoprotective effect against OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation in lymphocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 855-865, 2016. PMID:25532488

  18. Genetic Evidence for Genotoxic Effect of Entecavir, an Anti-Hepatitis B Virus Nucleotide Analog

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Hu, Xiaoqing; Takeda, Shunichi; Qing, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoside analogues (NAs) have been the most frequently used treatment option for chronic hepatitis B patients. However, they may have genotoxic potentials due to their interference with nucleic acid metabolism. Entecavir, a deoxyguanosine analog, is one of the most widely used oral antiviral NAs against hepatitis B virus. It has reported that entecavir gave positive responses in both genotoxicity and carcinogenicity assays. However the genotoxic mechanism of entecavir remains elusive. To evaluate the genotoxic mechanisms, we analyzed the effect of entecavir on a panel of chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte isogenic mutant cell line deficient in DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways. Our results showed that Parp1-/- mutant cells defective in single-strand break (SSB) repair were the most sensitive to entecavir. Brca1-/-, Ubc13-/- and translesion-DNA-synthesis deficient cells including Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- were hypersensitive to entecavir. XPA-/- mutant deficient in nucleotide excision repair was also slightly sensitive to entecavir. γ-H2AX foci forming assay confirmed the existence of DNA damage by entecavir in Parp1-/-, Rad18-/- and Brca1-/- mutants. Karyotype assay further showed entecavir-induced chromosomal aberrations, especially the chromosome gaps in Parp1-/-, Brca1-/-, Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- cells when compared with wild-type cells. These genetic comprehensive studies clearly identified the genotoxic potentials of entecavir and suggested that SSB and postreplication repair pathways may suppress entecavir-induced genotoxicity. PMID:26800464

  19. Genetic Evidence for Genotoxic Effect of Entecavir, an Anti-Hepatitis B Virus Nucleotide Analog.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Wu, Xiaohua; He, Fang; Liu, Ying; Hu, Xiaoqing; Takeda, Shunichi; Qing, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoside analogues (NAs) have been the most frequently used treatment option for chronic hepatitis B patients. However, they may have genotoxic potentials due to their interference with nucleic acid metabolism. Entecavir, a deoxyguanosine analog, is one of the most widely used oral antiviral NAs against hepatitis B virus. It has reported that entecavir gave positive responses in both genotoxicity and carcinogenicity assays. However the genotoxic mechanism of entecavir remains elusive. To evaluate the genotoxic mechanisms, we analyzed the effect of entecavir on a panel of chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte isogenic mutant cell line deficient in DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways. Our results showed that Parp1-/- mutant cells defective in single-strand break (SSB) repair were the most sensitive to entecavir. Brca1-/-, Ubc13-/- and translesion-DNA-synthesis deficient cells including Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- were hypersensitive to entecavir. XPA-/- mutant deficient in nucleotide excision repair was also slightly sensitive to entecavir. γ-H2AX foci forming assay confirmed the existence of DNA damage by entecavir in Parp1-/-, Rad18-/- and Brca1-/- mutants. Karyotype assay further showed entecavir-induced chromosomal aberrations, especially the chromosome gaps in Parp1-/-, Brca1-/-, Rad18-/- and Rev3-/- cells when compared with wild-type cells. These genetic comprehensive studies clearly identified the genotoxic potentials of entecavir and suggested that SSB and postreplication repair pathways may suppress entecavir-induced genotoxicity. PMID:26800464

  20. Histopathological and genotoxic effects of chlorpyrifos in rats.

    PubMed

    Ezzi, Lobna; Belhadj Salah, Imen; Haouas, Zohra; Sakly, Amina; Grissa, Intissar; Chakroun, Sana; Kerkeni, Emna; Hassine, Mohsen; Mehdi, Meriem; Ben Cheikh, Hassen

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of chlorpyrifos's sub-acute exposure on male rats. Two groups with six animals each were orally treated, respectively, with 3.1 mg/kg b w and 6.2 mg/kg b w of chlorpyrifos during 4 weeks. The genotoxic effect of chlopyrifos was investigated using the comet assay and the micronucleus test. Some hematological and liver's histopathological changes were also evaluated. Results revealed that chlorpyrifos induced histopathological alterations in liver parenchyma. The lymphoid infiltration observed in liver sections and the increase in white blood cells parameter are signs of inflammation. A significant increase in the platelet' count and in polychromatic erythrocytes/normochromatic erythrocytes (PCE/NCE) ratio was observed in chlorpyrifos-treated groups which could be due to the stimulatory effect of chlorpyrifos on cell formation in the bone marrow at lower doses. In addition, the increase of bone marrow micronucleus percentage and the comet tail length revealed a genotoxic potential of chlorpyrifos in vivo. PMID:26545888

  1. Argentine folk medicine: genotoxic effects of Chenopodiaceae family.

    PubMed

    Gadano, A B; Gurni, A A; Carballo, M A

    2006-01-16

    Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and Chenopodium multifidum L. (Chenopodiaceae), common name: Paico, are medicinal plants. They are aromatic shrubs growing in South America. For centuries, they have been used due to its medicinal properties. However, there are few reports in literature about the genotoxic effects of these plants. There for, the aim of these work is the evaluation of genetic damage induced by decoction and infusion of this plants which were assayed in different concentrations (1, 10, 100, 1,000 microL extract/mL culture), by addition of the extract to human lymphocyte cell cultures, negative controls were included. The endpoints evaluated were chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) and mitotic index (MI). The repeated measure analysis of variance was used for statistic evaluation of the results. The results showed: (a) statistical increase in the percentage of cells with CA and in the frequency of SCE when cultures were exposed to both aromatic plants, (b) a decrease in MI of both Paicos assayed, although no modification in the CPK values was observed, (c) no effect was noticed in the analysis of Chenopodium album L., which was used as negative control of the essential oil. These results suggest a cyto and genotoxic effect of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Chenopodium multifidum aqueous extracts related to the essential oil of the plant (as Chenopodium album did not perform). PMID:16219440

  2. Effect of exposure route, regimen, and duration on benzene-induced genotoxic and cytotoxic bone marrow damage in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, R.R.; Luke, C.A.; Drew, R.T. )

    1989-07-01

    Mice were exposed to benzene for 13 to 14 weeks by inhalation for either 3 or 5 consecutive days per week or by gavage for 5 consecutive days per week. A weekly evaluation of peripheral blood smears for micronucleated (MN) erythrocyte frequencies and for the percentage of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) indicated that the induction of MN-PCE by benzene depended on the sex and strain of mice and on the route of exposure, but not on the inhalation regimen or on the exposure duration. The frequency of MN normochromatic erythrocytes (NCE) not only depended on the sex and strain of mice and on the route of exposure, but directly depended on the inhalation regimen and on the exposure duration. Similarly, the extent of erythropoietic depression in benzene-exposed mice was dependent on sex, mouse strain, exposure duration, and route. However, in contrast to the MN-NCE data, the 3 day/week exposure regimen induced a more persistent depression in erythropoiesis than the 5 day/week exposure regimen. Exposure to benzene also induced in mice a significant depression in packed cell volume (PCV) and bone marrow cellularity, the magnitude of which depended on the sex and strain of mice and on the regimen and route of exposure.

  3. Oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by ketorolac on the common carp Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Galar-Martínez, M; García-Medina, S; Gómez-Olivan, L M; Pérez-Coyotl, I; Mendoza-Monroy, D J; Arrazola-Morgain, R E

    2016-09-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketorolac is extensively used in the treatment of acute postoperative pain. This pharmaceutical has been found at concentrations of 0.2-60 µg/L in diverse water bodies around the world; however, its effects on aquatic organisms remain unknown. The present study, evaluated the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by sublethal concentrations of ketorolac (1 and 60 µg/L) on liver, brain, and blood of the common carp Cyprinus carpio. This toxicant induced oxidative damage (increased lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxide content, and protein carbonyl content) as well as changes in antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activity) in liver and brain of carp. In blood, ketorolac increased the frequency of micronuclei and is therefore genotoxic for the test species. The effects observed were time and concentration dependent. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1035-1043, 2016. PMID:25899151

  4. Glutathione level regulates HNE-induced genotoxicity in human erythroleukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Umesh C.S.; Ramana, Kota V.; Awasthi, Yogesh C.; Srivastava, Satish K.

    2008-03-01

    4-Hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE) is one of the most abundant and toxic lipid aldehydes formed during lipid peroxidation by reactive oxygen species. We have investigated the genotoxic effects of HNE and its regulation by cellular glutathione (GSH) levels in human erythroleukemia (K562) cells. Incubation of K562 cells with HNE (5-10 {mu}M) significantly elicited a 3- to 5-fold increased DNA damage in a time- and dose-dependent manner as measured by comet assay. Depletion of GSH in cells by L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO) significantly increased HNE-induced DNA damage, whereas supplementation of GSH by incubating the cells with GSH-ethyl ester significantly decreased HNE-induced genotoxicity. Further, overexpression of mGSTA4-4, a HNE-detoxifying GST isozyme, significantly prevented HNE-induced DNA damage in cells, and ablation of GSTA4-4 and aldose reductase with respective siRNAs further augmented HNE-induced DNA damage. These results suggest that the genotoxicity of HNE is highly dependent on cellular GSH/GST/AR levels and favorable modulation of the aldehyde detoxification system may help in controlling the oxidative stress-induced complications.

  5. The genotoxic and teratogenic effects of maltitol in rats.

    PubMed

    Canimoglu, Semir; Rencuzogullari, Eyyup

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the low-caloric artificial sweetener maltitol, which is a sugar alcohol (polyol), were investigated in the bone marrow cells of rats using the chromosome aberration (CA) test. In addition, the teratogenicity and embryotoxicity of maltitol was also investigated in rats. To reveal the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of maltitol, rats were intraperitoneally administered 2.5, 5 and 10 g/kg body weight (bw) concentrations of maltitol for 6, 12 and 24 h treatment period. The pregnant females were intraperitoneally treated with 1, 2 and 4 g/kg bw/day concentrations of maltitol during the first 7 days of gestation (first trimester) to investigate the teratogenicity of maltitol. The embryos were collected after killing the dams by cervical dislocation under ether anaesthesia on gestation day 19. Maltitol did not induce the CA and did not decrease the mitotic index in bone marrow cells of rats at all concentrations and treatment periods. In addition, maltitol was not teratogenic; however, it decreased the foetuses weight and at the highest dose (4 g/kg bw) caused growth retardation. PMID:22585934

  6. Viscum album L. extract and quercetin reduce cyclophosphamide-induced cardiotoxicity, urotoxicity and genotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Sekeroğlu, Vedat; Aydin, Birsen; Sekeroğlu, Zülal Atli

    2011-01-01

    Possible protective effects of a methanolic extract of Viscum album (VA) and quercetin (QE) against cyclophosphamide (CP) induced cardiotoxicity, urotoxicity and genotoxicity in mice were evaluated. Mice were administered orally VA (250 mg/kg/day) and QE (50 mg/kg/day) for 10 days alone or in combination with CP. After the same doses of VA and QE given for 7 days, rats were intraperitoneally administered CP (40 mg/kg) on days 8 and 9 of the experiment. Cardiotoxic, urotoxic and genotoxic effects were examined in serum, heart, bladder and bone marrow. Significant decreases in the levels of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase), glutathione-S-transferases, reduced glutathione and mitotic index were observed. QE completely and VA partly ameliorated almost of all the examined parameters when given together with CP. Higher total nitrate/nitrite levels were observed in the myocardial tissue treated with QE and VA in combination with CP. In addition, the pre-treatment with VA and QE together with CP significantly decreased chromosome aberrations and aberrant cells compared to CP alone. Results from the current study suggest that QE and VA supplementation attenuates CP induced cardiotoxicity, urotoxicity and genotoxicity through a mechanism related to their ability to decrease oxidative stress and inflammation, and at least in part to its protective effects on the cardiovascular system. In addition, VA and QE may play a role in reducing cytogenotoxicity induced by anti-neoplastic drugs during cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22393965

  7. Quantum dot-induced epigenetic and genotoxic changes in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Angela O; Brown, Shelley E; Szyf, Moshe; Maysinger, Dusica

    2008-03-01

    The staggering array of nanotechnological products, found in our environment and those applicable in medicine, has stimulated a growing interest in examining their long-term impact on genetic and epigenetic processes. We examined here the epigenomic and genotoxic response to cadmium telluride quantum dots (QDs) in human breast carcinoma cells. QD treatment induced global hypoacetylation implying a global epigenomic response. The ubiquitous responder to genotoxic stress, p53, was activated by QD challenge resulting in translocation of p53, with subsequent upregulation of downstream targets Puma and Noxa. Consequential decrease in cell viability was in part prevented by the p53 inhibitor pifithrin-alpha, suggesting that p53 translocation contributes to QD-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest three levels of nanoparticle-induced cellular changes: non-genomic, genomic and epigenetic. Epigenetic changes may have long-term effects on gene expression programming long after the initial signal has been removed, and if these changes remain undetected, it could lead to long-term untoward effects in biological systems. These studies suggest that aside from genotoxic effects, nanoparticles could cause more subtle epigenetic changes which merit thorough examination of environmental nanoparticles and novel candidate nanomaterials for medical applications. PMID:17965848

  8. Protective role of Lactobacillus plantarum A7 against irinotecan-induced genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sepahi, Soheila; Jafarian-Dehkordi, Abbas; Mirlohi, Maryam; Shirani, Kobra; Etebari, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Irinotecan is a botanical derivative and an anti-cancer drug with cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. The present study evaluated the effect of Lactobacillus plantarum A7 on the genotoxic activity of irinotecan in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) by comet assay. Materials and Methods: HepG2 were incubated with irinotecan (100 µM), heat-killed cells (0.025 µg/ml) + irinotecan (100 µM), and cell-free supernatants (0.5 and 1 µg/ml) of L. plantarum A7 + irinotecan (100 µM). Phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was used as negative control. Results: Irinotecan was shown to induce DNA damage in HepG2 cells. The results showed that heat-killed cells (0.025 µg/ml) and cell-free supernatants (0.5 and 1 µg/ml) of L. plantarum significantly reduce irinotecan- induced DNA damage. Conclusion: Our results indicate that L. plantarum A7 can decrease the genotoxic effects of irinotecan in HepG2 cells, in vitro. This finding may be supportive for the optimization of therapeutic efficacy in irinotecan treatment. PMID:27462556

  9. 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid influence on 2,6-dinitrotoluene-induced urine genotoxicity in Fischer 344 rats: effect on gastrointestinal microflora and enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    George, S E; Chadwick, R W; Chang, J J; Kohan, M J; Allison, J C; Dekker, J P; Hayes, Y

    1992-02-01

    2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT) are hazardous chemicals that have potential harmful effects. 2,6-DNT is recognized as a hepatotoxicant while 2,4,5-T, a component of Agent Orange, is also suspect. 2,6-DNT requires both oxidative and reductive metabolism to elicit genotoxic effects. To determine what effect 2,4,5-T had on 2,6-DNT metabolism, intestinal enzymes, microbial populations, and urine mutagenicity were examined during 2,4,5-T treatment. Weanling Fischer 344 male rats were treated daily with 54.4 mg/kg 2,4,5-T by gavage for 4 weeks. One, two, and four weeks after the initial 2,4,5-T dose, rats were administered (po) 2,6-DNT (75 mg/kg) and urine was collected for 24 hr in metabolism cages. Azo reductase, nitroreductase, beta-glucuronidase, dechlorinase, and dehydrochlorinase activities were examined concurrently. Treatment of rats for 1 week reduced the transformation of 2,6-DNT to mutagenic urinary metabolites. This was accompanied by a decrease in the fecal anaerobic microorganisms. The elimination of Lactobacillus fermentum from the small intestine and cecum of treated animals accompanied a significant increase in oxygen-tolerant lactobacilli and other unidentified aerobic microorganisms. However, there were no significant alterations in the intestinal enzyme activities examined. By 2 weeks of 2,4,5-T treatment, microbiota and urine genotoxicity returned to the levels observed in control animals. This trend continued for the duration of the experiment. After 2 weeks, while cecal nitroreductase and azo reductase activities increased, small intestinal beta-glucuronidase activity decreased. By 4 weeks, treated and untreated animal intestinal enzyme activities were indistinguishable.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1601224

  10. Assessment of phenolic content, free-radical-scavenging capacity genotoxic and anti-genotoxic effect of aqueous extract prepared from Moricandia arvensis leaves.

    PubMed

    Skandrani, I; Limem, I; Neffati, A; Boubaker, J; Ben Sghaier, M; Bhouri, W; Bouhlel, I; Kilani, S; Ghedira, K; Chekir-Ghedira, L

    2010-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to provide a set of data on the safety of an aqueous extract (AQE) from Moricandia arvensis. For this reason, Escherichia coli tested strains PQ35 and PQ37 were used to detect induction of DNA lesions by AQE. The SOS Chromotest showed that AQE induced a marginally genotoxic effect, as expressed by the induction factor (IF) value only with E. coli PQ37 tested strain (IF=1.77 at a dose of 250 microg/assay). The measurement of the anti-genotoxic activity of the AQE was also studied by inhibition of beta-galactosidase induction. A significant anti-genotoxic effect was observed with different tested doses of AQE, which suggests that M. arvensis extract has the potential to protect DNA from the action of nitrofurantoïn (NF) and free radicals generated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In addition to anti-genotoxic activity, AQE showed a free-radical-scavenging capacity towards ABTS+* and DPPH*. Total phenolic content was also evaluated following Folin-Ciocalteu method and results indicated high correlation between total phenol content and anti-genotoxic and antioxidant activities for AQE, but the highest correlation was showed with its capacity to stabilize ABTS+* (R2=0.9944). PMID:19951736

  11. In vitro and in vivo genotoxic effects of straight versus tangled multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Julia; Siivola, Kirsi M; Nymark, Penny; Lindberg, Hanna; Suhonen, Satu; Järventaus, Hilkka; Koivisto, Antti J; Moreno, Carlos; Vanhala, Esa; Wolff, Henrik; Kling, Kirsten I; Jensen, Keld Alstrup; Savolainen, Kai; Norppa, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Some multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) induce mesothelioma in rodents, straight MWCNTs showing a more pronounced effect than tangled MWCNTs. As primary and secondary genotoxicity may play a role in MWCNT carcinogenesis, we used a battery of assays for DNA damage and micronuclei to compare the genotoxicity of straight (MWCNT-S) and tangled MWCNTs (MWCNT-T) in vitro (primary genotoxicity) and in vivo (primary or secondary genotoxicity). C57Bl/6 mice showed a dose-dependent increase in DNA strand breaks, as measured by the comet assay, in lung cells 24 h after a single pharyngeal aspiration of MWCNT-S (1-200 μg/mouse). An increase was also observed for DNA strand breaks in lung and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells and for micronucleated alveolar type II cells in mice exposed to aerosolized MWCNT-S (8.2-10.8 mg/m(3)) for 4 d, 4 h/d. No systemic genotoxic effects, assessed by the γ-H2AX assay in blood mononuclear leukocytes or by micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs) in bone marrow or blood, were observed for MWCNT-S by either exposure technique. MWCNT-T showed a dose-related decrease in DNA damage in BAL and lung cells of mice after a single pharyngeal aspiration (1-200 μg/mouse) and in MNPCEs after inhalation exposure (17.5 mg/m(3)). In vitro in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, MWCNT-S induced DNA strand breaks at low doses (5 and 10 μg/cm(2)), while MWCNT-T increased strand breakage only at 200 μg/cm(2). Neither of the MWCNTs was able to induce micronuclei in vitro. Our findings suggest that both primary and secondary mechanisms may be involved in the genotoxicity of straight MWCNTs. PMID:26674712

  12. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavas, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and Olive tail moment. Genotoxicity was found for BA as concentration-dependent and BX as concentration and time dependent manner. In general, significant effects (P < 0,05) on both concentrations and exposure times were observed in experimental groups. DNA damage was highest at 96 h and 24 h for all BX and BA concentrations, respectively in peripheral blood of D. rerio. For the first time, our study demonstrates the effect of waterborne BA and BX exposure on genotoxicity at the molecular level, which may contribute to understanding the mechanism of boric acid and borax-induced genotoxicity in fish. PMID:26862320

  13. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavas, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and Olive tail moment. Genotoxicity was found for BA as concentration-dependent and BX as concentration and time dependent manner. In general, significant effects (P < 0,05) on both concentrations and exposure times were observed in experimental groups. DNA damage was highest at 96 h and 24 h for all BX and BA concentrations, respectively in peripheral blood of D. rerio. For the first time, our study demonstrates the effect of waterborne BA and BX exposure on genotoxicity at the molecular level, which may contribute to understanding the mechanism of boric acid and borax-induced genotoxicity in fish. PMID:26862320

  14. Chemopreventive effect and lack of genotoxicity and mutagenicity of the exopolysaccharide botryosphaeran on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Malini, M; Camargo, M S; Hernandes, L C; Vargas-Rechia, C G; Varanda, E A; Barbosa, A M; Dekker, R F H; Matsumoto, S T; Antunes, L M G; Cólus, I M S

    2016-10-01

    Carbohydrate biopolymers of fungal-origin are an important natural resource in the search for new bioagents with therapeutic and nutraceutical potential. In this study the mutagenic, genotoxic, antigenotoxic and antioxidant properties of the fungal exopolysaccharide botryosphaeran, a (1→3)(1→6)-β-D-glucan, from Botryosphaeria rhodina MAMB-05, was evaluated. The mutagenicity was assessed at five concentrations in Salmonella typhimurium by the Ames test. Normal and tumor (Jurkat cells) human T lymphocyte cultures were used to evaluate the genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity (Comet assay) of botryosphaeran alone and in combination with the mutagen methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The ability of botryosphaeran to reduce the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated by hydrogen peroxide was assessed using the CM-H2DCFDA probe in lymphocyte cultures under different treatment times. None of the evaluated botryosphaeran concentrations were mutagenic in bacteria, nor induced genotoxicity in normal and tumor lymphocytes. Botryosphaeran protected lymphocyte DNA against damage caused by MMS under simultaneous treatment and post-treatment conditions. However, botryosphaeran was not able to reduce the RONS generated by H2O2. Besides the absence of genotoxicity, botryosphaeran exerted a protective effect on human lymphocytes against genotoxic damage caused by MMS. These results are important in the validation of botryosphaeran as a therapeutic agent targeting health promotion. PMID:27387458

  15. Current Studies into the Genotoxic Effects of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Cheng-Teng; Li, Jasmine J.; Bay, Boon-Huat; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has created opportunities for engineers to manufacture superior and more efficient devices and products. Nanomaterials (NMs) are now widely used in consumer products as well as for research applications. However, while the lists of known toxic effects of nanomaterials and nanoparticles (NPs) continue to grow, there is still a vast gap in our knowledge about the genotoxicity of NMs. In this paper, we highlight some NMs of interest and discuss the current in vivo and in vitro studies into genotoxic effects of NMs. PMID:20936181

  16. Epigenetic alterations induced by genotoxic occupational and environmental human chemical carcinogens: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Grace; Pogribny, Igor P; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations play an important role in chemically-induced carcinogenesis. Although the epigenome and genome may be equally important in carcinogenicity, the genotoxicity of chemical agents and exposure-related transcriptomic responses have been more thoroughly studied and characterized. To better understand the evidence for epigenetic alterations of human carcinogens, and the potential association with genotoxic endpoints, we conducted a systematic review of published studies of genotoxic carcinogens that reported epigenetic endpoints. Specifically, we searched for publications reporting epigenetic effects for the 28 agents and occupations included in Monograph Volume 100F of the International Agency for the Research on Cancer (IARC) that were classified as "carcinogenic to humans" (Group 1) with strong evidence of genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. We identified a total of 158 studies that evaluated epigenetic alterations for 12 of these 28 carcinogenic agents and occupations (1,3-butadiene, 4-aminobiphenyl, aflatoxins, benzene, benzidine, benzo[a]pyrene, coke production, formaldehyde, occupational exposure as a painter, sulfur mustard, and vinyl chloride). Aberrant DNA methylation was most commonly studied, followed by altered expression of non-coding RNAs and histone changes (totaling 85, 59 and 25 studies, respectively). For 3 carcinogens (aflatoxins, benzene and benzo[a]pyrene), 10 or more studies reported epigenetic effects. However, epigenetic studies were sparse for the remaining 9 carcinogens; for 4 agents, only 1 or 2 published reports were identified. While further research is needed to better identify carcinogenesis-associated epigenetic perturbations for many potential carcinogens, published reports on specific epigenetic endpoints can be systematically identified and increasingly incorporated in cancer hazard assessments. PMID:27234561

  17. Cytotoxic, mutagenicity, and genotoxicity effects of guanylhydrazone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Pinhatti, Valéria Rodrigues; da Silva, Juliana; Martins, Tales Leandro Costa; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Rosa, Renato Moreira; Villela, Izabel; Stopiglia, Cheila Denise Ottonelli; da Silva Santos, Selma; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia; Machado, Carlos Renato; Saffi, Jenifer; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have reported that guanylhydrazones display a variety of desirable biological properties, such as antihypertensive, antibacterial, and antimalarial behaviour. They furthermore promote anti-pneumocystosis and anti-trypanosomiasis, exhibit antitumor activity, and show significant cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines. In this work, we have evaluated the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity, and genotoxicity of two guanylhydrazones derivatives, (E)-2-[(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl) methylene] hydrazine carboxymidamide hydrochloride (2,3-DMeB) and (E)-2-[(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl) methylene] hydrazine carboxymidamide hydrochloride (3,4-DMeB), in different biological models. Both 2,3-DMeB and 3,4-DMeB induce weak cytotoxic and mutagenic effects in bacteria and yeast. The genotoxicity of these compounds was determined in a fibroblast cell line (V79) using alkaline comet assay, as well as a modified comet assay with bacterial enzymes formamidopyrimidine DNA-glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (EndoIII). Both guanylhydrazone derivatives induced DNA damage. Treatment of V79 cells with EndoIII and FPG proteins demonstrated a significant effect of 2,3-DMeB and 3,4-DMeB with respect to oxidized bases. In addition, the derivatives induced a significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated cells at high doses. The antifungal and anti-trypanosomal properties of these guanylhydrazone derivatives were also evaluated, and the obtained results suggest that 2,3-DMeB is more effective than 3,4-DMeB. The biological activity of 2,3-DMeB and 3,4-DMeB may thus be related, at least in part, to their oxidative potential, as well as to their ability to interact with DNA. Considering the previously reported in vitro antitumor activity of guanylhydrazone derivatives in combination with the lack of acute toxicity and the fact that DNA damage is only observed at high doses should render both compounds good candidates for in vivo studies on antitumor activity. PMID:27476330

  18. Acute toxicity, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and antigenotoxic effects of a cellulosic exopolysaccharide obtained from sugarcane molasses.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Flávia Cristina Morone; De-Oliveira, Ana Cecília A X; De-Carvalho, Rosangela R; Gomes-Carneiro, Maria Regina; Coelho, Deise R; Lima, Salvador Vilar C; Paumgartten, Francisco José R; Aguiar, José Lamartine A

    2016-02-10

    The acute toxicity, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and antigenotoxic effects of BC were studied. Cytotoxicity of BC was evaluated in cultured C3A hepatoma cells (HepG2/C3A) using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity assay. Acute toxicity was tested in adults Wistar rats treated with a single dose of BC. The genotoxicity of BC was evaluated in vivo by the micronucleus assay. BC (0.33-170 μg/mL) added to C3A cell culture medium caused no elevation in LDH release over the background level recorded in untreated cell wells. The treatment with the BC in a single oral dose (2000 mg/kg body weight) caused no deaths or signs of toxicity. BC attenuated CP-induced and inhibition the incidence of MNPCE (female: 46.94%; male: 22.7%) and increased the ratio of PCE/NCE (female: 46.10%; male: 35.25%). There was no alteration in the LDH release in the wells where C3A cells were treated with increasing concentrations of BC compared to the wells where the cells received the cell culture medium only (background of approximately 20% cell death), indicated that in the dose range tested BC was not cytotoxic. BC was not cytotoxic, genotoxic or acutely toxic. BC attenuated CP-induced genotoxic and myelotoxic effects. PMID:26686163

  19. Genotoxic and developmental effects in sea urchins are sensitive indicators of effects of genotoxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.L. . Energy and Environment Division); Hose, J.E. . Dept. of Biology); Knezovich, J.P. . Health and Ecological Assessment Division)

    1994-07-01

    Purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) gametes and embryos were exposed to three known mutagenic chemicals (phenol, benzidine,and pentachlorophenol) over concentration ranges bracketing the effect levels for fertilization success. Normal development and cytogenetic effects (anaphase aberrations) were assessed after the cultures were allowed to develop for 48 h. Using radiolabeled chemicals, the authors also characterized concentrations in the test water as well as doses in the embryos following 2- and 48-h exposures. The authors observed dose responses for all chemicals and all responses, except for phenol, which showed no significant effect on development. Fertilization success was never the most sensitive end point. anaphase aberrations were the most sensitive response for phenol, with an LOEC of 2.5 mg/L exposure concentration. Anaphase aberrations and development were equivalent in sensitivity for benzidine within the tested dose range, and an LOEC of <0.1 mg/L was observed. Development was the most sensitive reasons for pentachlorophenol (LOEC 1 mg/L). the LOEC values for this study were generally lower than comparable data for aquatic life or human health protection. The authors conclude that genotoxicity and development evaluations should be included in environmental management applications and that tests developed primarily for human health protection do not reliably predict the effects of toxic substances on aquatic life.

  20. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of two hair dyes used in the formulation of black color.

    PubMed

    Tafurt-Cardona, Yaliana; Suares-Rocha, Paula; Fernandes, Thaís Cristina Casimiro; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2015-12-01

    According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), some hair dyes are considered mutagenic and carcinogenic in in vitro assays and exposed human populations. Epidemiological studies indicate that hairdressers occupationally exposed to hair dyes have a higher risk of developing bladder cancer. In Brazil, 26% of the adults use hair dye. In this study, we investigated the toxic effects of two hair dyes, Basic Red 51 (BR51) and Basic Brown 17 (BB17), which are temporary dyes of the azo group (R-N=N-R'), used in the composition of the black hair dye. To this end, MTT and trypan blue assays (cytotoxicity), comet and micronucleus assay (genotoxicity) were applied, with HepG2 cells. For cytotoxic assessment, dyes were tested in serial dilutions, being the highest concentrations those used in the commercial formula for hair dyes. For genotoxic assessment concentrations were selected according to cell viability. Results showed that both dyes induced significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in the cells, in concentrations much lower than those used in the commercial formula. Genotoxic effects could be related to the azo structure present in the composition of the dyes, which is known as mutagenic and carcinogenic. These results point to the hazard of the hair dye exposure to human health. PMID:26404083

  1. Potential genotoxic, mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of coffee: a review.

    PubMed

    Nehlig, A; Debry, G

    1994-04-01

    Coffee and caffeine are mutagenic to bacteria and fungi, and in high concentrations they are also mutagenic to mammalian cells in culture. However, the mutagenic effects of coffee disappear when bacteria or mammalian cells are cultured in the presence of liver extracts which contain detoxifying enzymes. In vivo, coffee and caffeine are devoid of mutagenic effects. Coffee and caffeine are able to interact with many other mutagens and their effects are synergistic with X-rays, ultraviolet light and some chemical agents. Caffeine seems to potentiate rather than to induce chromosomal aberrations and also to transform sublethal damage of mutagenic agents into lethal damage. Conversely, coffee and caffeine are also able to inhibit the mutagenic effects of numerous chemicals. These antimutagenic effects depend on the time of administration of coffee as compared to the acting time of the mutagenic agent. In that case, caffeine seems to be able to restore the normal cycle of mitosis and phosphorylation in irradiated cells. Finally, the potential genotoxic and mutagenic effects of the most important constituents of coffee are reviewed. Mutagenicity of caffeine is mainly attributed to chemically reactive components such as aliphatic dicarbonyls. The latter compounds, formed during the roasting process, are mutagenic to bacteria but less to mammalian cells. Hydrogen peroxide is not very active but seems to considerably enhance mutagenic properties of methylglyoxal. Phenolic compounds are not mutagenic but rather anticarcinogenic. Benzopyrene and mutagens formed during pyrolysis are not mutagenic whereas roasting of coffee beans at high temperature generates mutagenic heterocyclic amines. In conclusion, the mutagenic potential of coffee and caffeine has been demonstrated in lower organisms, but usually at doses several orders of magnitude greater than the estimated lethal dose for caffeine in humans. Therefore, the chances of coffee and caffeine consumption in moderate to

  2. Role of Ocimum sanctum as a Genoprotective Agent on Chlorpyrifos-Induced Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Asha; Shukla, Poonam; Tabassum, Shajiya

    2011-01-01

    Protective effect of Ocimum sanctum was evaluated on chlorpyrifos-induced genotoxicity in in vivo and in vitro models. Two different concentrations of pesticide were taken, i.e., 1/5 and 1/15 of LD50 of chlorpyrifos for the in vivo study. Rats were pre-treated orally with O. sanctum extract (OE) at 50 mg/kg b.wt. For the in vitro studies, human lymphocyte cultures were exposed to 75 μg/ml chlorpyrifos with and without OE. Structural and numerical (both aneuploidy and euploidy types) chromosomal aberrations (CAs) were scored for the assessment of induced genotoxic effects, while the variation in mitotic index (MI) was considered as a monitor for induced cellular toxicity. The same concentration of the pesticide (75 μg/ml) was taken to study the DNA damage by comet assay. Results showed that lymphocytes treated with the pesticide exhibited increased DNA damage but the increase was statistically insignificant (P>0.05). In rats pretreated with OE, a significant (P<0.01) increase in MI was observed and there was a significant decrease in the frequency of aberrant cells as compared to the rats treated with chlorpyrifos alone. A significant (P<0.05) increase in CA was observed in cultures treated with 75 μg/ml chlorpyrifos as compared to controls, which decreased significantly (P<0.05) with OE pretreatment. PMID:21430913

  3. Role of Ocimum sanctum as a Genoprotective Agent on Chlorpyrifos-Induced Genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Asha; Shukla, Poonam; Tabassum, Shajiya

    2011-01-01

    Protective effect of Ocimum sanctum was evaluated on chlorpyrifos-induced genotoxicity in in vivo and in vitro models. Two different concentrations of pesticide were taken, i.e., 1/5 and 1/15 of LD(50) of chlorpyrifos for the in vivo study. Rats were pre-treated orally with O. sanctum extract (OE) at 50 mg/kg b.wt. For the in vitro studies, human lymphocyte cultures were exposed to 75 μg/ml chlorpyrifos with and without OE. Structural and numerical (both aneuploidy and euploidy types) chromosomal aberrations (CAs) were scored for the assessment of induced genotoxic effects, while the variation in mitotic index (MI) was considered as a monitor for induced cellular toxicity. The same concentration of the pesticide (75 μg/ml) was taken to study the DNA damage by comet assay. Results showed that lymphocytes treated with the pesticide exhibited increased DNA damage but the increase was statistically insignificant (P>0.05). In rats pretreated with OE, a significant (P<0.01) increase in MI was observed and there was a significant decrease in the frequency of aberrant cells as compared to the rats treated with chlorpyrifos alone. A significant (P<0.05) increase in CA was observed in cultures treated with 75 μg/ml chlorpyrifos as compared to controls, which decreased significantly (P<0.05) with OE pretreatment. PMID:21430913

  4. Role of DNA repair inhibition in lead- and cadmium-induced genotoxicity: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, A

    1994-01-01

    Compounds of lead and cadmium have been shown to be carcinogenic to humans and experimental animals. However, the underlying mechanisms are still not understood. In mammalian cells in culture, lead(II) is weakly mutagenic after long incubation times and generates DNA strand breaks only after treatment with high, toxic doses. Cadmium(II) induces DNA strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations, but its mutagenic potential is rather weak. However, both metals exert pronounced indirect genotoxic effects. Lead(II) is comutagenic towards UV and N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and enhances the number of UV-induced sister chromatid exchanges in V79 Chinese hamster cells. With regard to DNA repair, lead(II) causes an accumulation of DNA strand breaks after UV-irradiation in HeLa cells, indicating an interference with the polymerization or ligation step in excision repair. Cadmium(II) enhances the mutagenicity of UV light in V79 Chinese hamster cells and an increased sensitivity toward UV light is observed in various rodent and human cell lines. Furthermore, an inhibition of unscheduled DNA synthesis after UV-irradiation and a partial inhibition of the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions has been shown. For both metals, the indirect genotoxic effects are observed at low, nontoxic concentrations, suggesting that an interference with DNA repair processes may be predominant at biologically relevant concentrations. This might also explain the conflicting results of epidemiological studies obtained for both metals. Possible mechanisms of repair inhibition are discussed. PMID:7843136

  5. Early genotoxic response and accumulation induced by waterborne copper, lead, and arsenic in European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax.

    PubMed

    Canalejo, Antonio; Diaz-de-Alba, Margarita; Granado-Castro, M Dolores; Cordoba, Francisco; Espada-Bellido, Estrella; Galindo-Riaño, M Dolores; Torronteras, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    Cu, Pb, and As, which are among the most abundant metals in the aquatic environment, are also among the most health-threatened by causing diverse cellular injuries. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the potential early induction of genotoxic effects after waterborne Cu, Pb, and As exposure in European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax, a commercial widely cultured fish, using the micronucleus (MN) assay in peripheral blood erythrocytes. Fish were exposed under laboratory conditions to nominal solutions ranging 0-10 mg/L for 24 and 96 h. Furthermore, actual metal ion concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) or differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) in water and four fish tissues differentially related to environmental exposition and metal accumulation, i.e. the gills, liver, muscle, and brain. Dose-dependent increases of micronuclei (MNi) frequency were observed after these very short exposures; based on measured metal concentrations in water, the genotoxic effect ordered as Cu > As > Pb. Significant genotoxic effect at 0.009 mg/L Cu, 0.57 mg/L Pb, and 0.01 mg/L As was seen. For Cu and Pb these are only slightly higher, but for As it is notably lower than the USEPA criteria of maximum concentration to prevent acute toxicity in aquatic organisms. Furthermore, genotoxicity was differentially related to metal accumulation. MNi frequency correlated positively with the content of Pb in all the organs, with the content of As in liver and gills and only with the content of Cu in the brain. In conclusion, our findings raised environmental concerns because these depicted a genotoxic potential of Cu, Pb, and As after a very short exposure to low but environmentally relevant concentrations, too close to regulatory thresholds. In addition, the MN test in D. labrax could be considered an early biomarker of genotoxicity induced by these metals in fish. PMID:26490895

  6. Sensitivity to cadmium-induced genotoxicity in rat testicular cells is associated with minimal expression of the metallothionein gene.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, N; Hochadel, J F; Coogan, T P; Koropatnick, J; Waalkes, M P

    1995-02-01

    Cadmium is a carcinogenic metal. Although the mechanism of tumor induction is unknown, DNA/metal interactions may be involved. Metallothionein can protect against cadmium toxicity in our previous work it was shown to reduce cadmium genotoxicity in cultured cells. To extend these results, the genotoxicity of cadmium was studied in R2C cells, a rat testicular Leydig cell line. The R2C cells were very sensitive to cadmium-induced single-strand DNA damage (SSD), as measured by alkaline elution. SSD occurred in R2C cells after treatment with 25 and 50 microM CdCl2 for 2 hr. Prior work showed other cells required much higher levels of cadmium (approximately 500 microM) to induce genotoxicity. The genotoxic levels of cadmium (25-50 microM) were not cytotoxic in R2C cells as assessed by a metabolic activity (MTT) assay. Pretreatment of R2C cells with a low cadmium dose (2 microM, 24 hr) had no effect on cadmium-induced SSD, in contrast to prior work in other cells where such pretreatments reduced SSD through metallothionein gene activation. In fact, cadmium or zinc treatments resulted in little or no increase in metallothionein gene expression in R2C cells as determined by Northern blot analysis for metallothionein mRNA using cDNA or oligonucleotide probes and radioimmunoassay for metallothionein protein production. Basal metallothionein mRNA was essentially nondetectable. Induction of a cadmium-binding protein in R2C cells did occur, as determined by Cd-heme assay, but did not induce tolerance to SSD. In vivo, the Leydig cell is a target for cadmium carcinogenicity and its cadmium-binding protein is thought not to be a true metallothionein. These results indicate that R2C cells are sensitive to cadmium-induced genotoxicity and that this sensitivity is associated with minimal expression of the metallothionein gene. PMID:7871536

  7. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3rd week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P+ AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group. PMID:23055806

  8. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-07-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3(rd) week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P(+) AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group. PMID:23055806

  9. Honey bee is a potential antioxidant against cyclophosphamide-induced genotoxicity in albino male mice.

    PubMed

    Zoheir, Khairy Mohamed Abdallah; Harisa, Gamaleldin Ibrahim; Abo-Salem, Osama Mohamed; Ahmad, Sheikh Fayaz

    2015-05-01

    The protective effects of honey bee (HB) and pollen grains against cyclophosphamide (CPM) -induced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in mice were investigated. This was achieved through study the effects of CPM and HB on oxidative status, chromosomal aberrations and gene expression of the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL1β), interleukin 17A (IL-17A) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in mice. In addition, the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde were determined. The results of this study revealed that CPM decrease in GSH level and increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the liver and kidney tissues. Moreover, CPM induced sperm abnormality, chromosomal aberrations and down regulated the expression of the studied cytokine genes. HB treatment in association with CPM ameliorates GSH, MDA, chromosomal aberrations and regulated the expression of IL-1-β, IL-17A, IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ. Thus, HB inhibits the cytotoxic and genotoxic risks associated with CPM treatment in mice. PMID:26004732

  10. Genotoxicity induced by a shale oil byproduct in Chinese hamster cells following metabolic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Okinaka, R.T.; Nickols, J.W.; Chen, D.J.; Strniste, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    A process water obtained from a holding tank during the surface retorting of oil shale has been shown to induce a linear dose response of 100 histidine revertants/sub ..mu../1 in the Ames/Salmonella test. The complex mixture has also previously been shown to induce genotoxicity in mammalian cells following activation by near ultraviolet light and natural sunlight. This report focuses on the effects of a particular oil shale retort process water on cultured Chinese hamster cells following metabolic activation by either rat liver homogenate or lethally irradiated but metabolically competent Syrian hamster embryonic cells. Cytotoxic and mutagenic responses induced by the process water and a fractionated sample from it containing the majority of the mutagenic activity (as assessed by the Salmonella test) were measured under conditions designed to optimally measure the mutagenic potency of the promutagen, benzo(a)pyrene. These results suggest a possible discrepancy in the genotoxic potential of this complex mixture when various methods are utilized to measure its potential.

  11. Acrolein genotoxicity in Drosophila melanogaster. III. Effects of metabolism modification.

    PubMed

    Barros, A R; Sierra, L M; Comendador, M A

    1994-05-01

    In order to investigate the role of metabolism in acrolein genotoxicity in D. melanogaster, the action of several metabolism modifiers, namely phenobarbital, an inducer of xenobiotic metabolism, phenylimidazole and iproniazid, inhibitors of oxidative activities of cytochrome P450, and diethyl maleate, a glutathione-depleting agent, have been assayed using the sex-linked recessive lethal (SLRL) test, with two different administration routes (feeding and injection). The results support the hypothesis that acrolein is not only a direct mutagen but is also transformed, by oxidative activities of cytochrome P450 after glutathione conjugation, into an active metabolite, possibly glycidaldehyde. Moreover, acrolein is deactivated by an enzymatic activity induced by phenobarbital. PMID:7513061

  12. Tempol prevents genotoxicity induced by vorinostat: role of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar F; Jaber, Aya G; Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Mhaidat, Nizar M; Masadeh, Majed M

    2014-05-01

    Vorinostat is a member of histone deacetylase inhibitors, which represents a new class of anticancer agents for the treatment of solid and hematological malignancies. Studies have shown that these drugs induce DNA damage in blood lymphocytes, which is proposed to be due to the generation of oxidative lesions. The increase in DNA damage is sometimes associated with risk of developing secondary cancer. Thus, finding a treatment that limits DNA damage caused by anticancer drugs would be beneficial. Tempol is a potent antioxidant that was shown to prevent DNA damage induced by radiation. In this study, we aimed to investigate the harmful effects of vorinostat on DNA damage, and the possible protective effects of tempol against this damage. For that, the spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), chromosomal aberrations (CAs), and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy guanosine (8-OHdG) levels were measured in cultured human lymphocytes treated with vorinostat and/or tempol. The results showed that vorinostat significantly increases the frequency of SCEs, CAs and 8-OHdG levels in human lymphocytes as compared to control. These increases were normalized by the treatment of cells with tempol. In conclusion, vorinostat is genotoxic to lymphocytes, and this toxicity is reduced by tempol. Such results could set the stage for future studies investigating the possible usefulness of antioxidants co-treatment in preventing the genotoxicity of vorinostat when used as anticancer in human. PMID:23761013

  13. Genotoxic effects in wild rodents (Rattus rattus and Mus musculus) in an open coal mining area.

    PubMed

    León, Grethel; Pérez, Lyda Espitia; Linares, Juan Carlos; Hartmann, Andreas; Quintana, Milton

    2007-06-15

    Coal is a mixture of a variety of compounds containing mutagenic and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Exposure to coal is considered as an important non-cellular and cellular source of reactive oxygen species that can induce DNA damage. In addition, spontaneous combustion can occur in coal mining areas, further releasing compounds with detrimental effects on the environment. In this study the comet assay was used to investigate potential genotoxic effects of coal mining activities in peripheral blood cells of the wild rodents Rattus rattus and Mus musculus. The study was conducted in a coal mining area of the Municipio de Puerto Libertador, South West of the Departamento de Cordoba, Colombia. Animals from two areas in the coal mining zone and a control area located in the Municipio de Lorica were investigated. The results showed evidence that exposure to coal results in elevated primary DNA lesions in blood cells of rodents. Three different parameters for DNA damage were assessed, namely, DNA damage index, migration length and percentage damaged cells. All parameters showed statistically significantly higher values in mice and rats from the coal mining area in comparison to the animals from the control area. The parameter "DNA Damage Index" was found to be most sensitive and to best indicate a genotoxic hazard. Both species investigated were shown to be sensitive indicators of environmental genotoxicity caused by coal mining activities. In summary, our study constitutes the first investigation of potential genotoxic effects of open coal mining carried out in Puerto Libertador. The investigations provide a guide for measures to evaluate genotoxic hazards, thereby contributing to the development of appropriate measures and regulations for more careful operations during coal mining. PMID:17419090

  14. The efficiency of combined CaO/electrochemical treatment in removal of acid mine drainage induced toxicity and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Radić, Sandra; Vujčić, Valerija; Cvetković, Želimira; Cvjetko, Petra; Oreščanin, Višnja

    2014-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a by-product of the mining industry that has a detrimental effect on aquatic plant and animal life due to high load of heavy metals and sulfates. In the present study, the toxic and genotoxic potential of AMD prior to and following combination of neutralization/electrocoagulation processes was evaluated using several bioassays and selected parameters. Regardless of pH correction of AMD prior to Daphnia bioassay, high acute toxicity was observed in Daphnia magna. The mine leachate also induced strong phyto-, cyto- and genotoxicity to Allium cepa roots. Short term exposure to AMD inhibited duckweed growth and chlorophyll a content and simultaneously promoted lipid peroxidation and DNA damage despite duckweed capability to upregulate antioxidative defense mechanisms. The results show that observed (geno)toxicity could be related to oxidative stress most probably induced by toxic metal action. However, influence of low pH as a contributing factor in the phytotoxicity of AMD cannot be excluded. The application of combined treatment eliminated genotoxicity and was highly efficient in reducing toxicity of AMD. Thus, the method seems to be suitable for treatment of AMD waters enabling their safe discharge to an aquatic environment. PMID:23895778

  15. Evaluation of genotoxic effects of the herbicide dicamba using in vivo and in vitro test systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perocco, P.; Ancora, G.; Rani, P.; Valenti, A.M.; Mazzullo, M.; Colacci, A.; Grilli, S. )

    1990-01-01

    The genotoxic effects of the herbicide dicamba have been studied by measuring (1) the unwinding rate of liver DNA from intraperitoneally treated rats (fluorimetric assay); (2) DNA repair as unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) induced in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL); and (3) sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in HPBL. Results show that dicamba is capable of inducing DNA damage since it significantly increases the unwinding rate of rat liver DNA in vivo and also induces UDS in HPBL in vitro in the presence of exogenous metabolic activation (S-9 mix). Furthermore, dicamba causes a very slight increase in SCE frequency in HPBL in vitro.

  16. Genotoxic effect of ethacrynic acid and impact of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Ward, William M; Hoffman, Jared D; Loo, George

    2015-07-01

    It is known that ethacrynic acid (EA) decreases the intracellular levels of glutathione. Whether the anticipated oxidative stress affects the structural integrity of DNA is unknown. Therefore, DNA damage was assessed in EA-treated HCT116 cells, and the impact of several antioxidants was also determined. EA caused both concentration-dependent and time-dependent DNA damage that eventually resulted in cell death. Unexpectedly, the DNA damage caused by EA was intensified by either ascorbic acid or trolox. In contrast, EA-induced DNA damage was reduced by N-acetylcysteine and by the iron chelator, deferoxamine. In elucidating the DNA damage, it was determined that EA increased the production of reactive oxygen species, which was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine but not by ascorbic acid and trolox. Also, EA decreased glutathione levels, which were inhibited by N-acetylcysteine. But, ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine neither inhibited nor enhanced the capacity of EA to decrease glutathione. Interestingly, the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, buthionine sulfoxime, lowered glutathione to a similar degree as EA, but no noticeable DNA damage was found. Nevertheless, buthionine sulfoxime potentiated the glutathione-lowering effect of EA and intensified the DNA damage caused by EA. Additionally, in examining redox-sensitive stress gene expression, it was found that EA increased HO-1, GADD153, and p21mRNA expression, in association with increased nuclear localization of Nrf-2 and p53 proteins. In contrast to ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine, N-acetylcysteine suppressed the EA-induced upregulation of GADD153, although not of HO-1. Overall, it is concluded that EA has genotoxic properties that can be amplified by certain antioxidants. PMID:25817893

  17. Dry Olive Leaf Extract Counteracts L-Thyroxine-Induced Genotoxicity in Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Žukovec Topalović, Dijana; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger. PMID:25789081

  18. Dry olive leaf extract counteracts L-thyroxine-induced genotoxicity in human peripheral blood leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Topalović, Dijana Žukovec; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger. PMID:25789081

  19. Toxicity and genotoxicity in Astyanax bimaculatus (Characidae) induced by microcystins from a bloom of Microcystis spp

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Studies of genotoxicity in fish caused by cyanobacterial microcystins can be useful both in determining the sensitivity of native species, as well as comparing exposure routes. The genotoxicity caused by the microcystins LR and LA from a bloom collected in a eutrophic lake, was revealed in the fish Astyanaxbimaculatus, a native species from South America. LC50 (72 h) was determined as 242.81 μg L -1 and LD50 (72 h) as 49.19 μg kg -1 bw. There was a significant increase of DNA damage in peripheral erythrocytes, following intraperitoneal injection (ip) with tested concentrations of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg -1 bw, as well as through body exposure to a concentration of 103.72 μg L -1 . Micronucleus (MN) induction was observed after ip injections of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg -1 bw for 72 h, as well as following body exposure for 72 at 103.72 μg L -1 . Thus, both exposure routes resulted in MN induction and DNA damage. Apoptosis-necrosis testing was carried out only by ip injection with concentrations of 24.58 μg kg -1 bw and 36.88 μg kg- 1 bw. Exposure to microcystins at lower concentrations induced more apoptosis than necrosis in peripheral erythrocytes, whereas exposure at higher concentrations gave rise to both conditions. Thus, Astyanax bimaculatus can be considered as a species sensitive to the genotoxic effects caused by microcystins. PMID:21637586

  20. Capsaicin-induced genotoxic stress does not promote apoptosis in A549 human lung and DU145 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Jarosz, Paulina; Czech, Joanna; Rzeszutek, Iwona; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Grabowska, Wioleta; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Capsaicin is the major pungent component of the hot chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, which are consumed worldwide as a food additive. More recently, the selective action of capsaicin against cancer cells has been reported. Capsaicin was found to induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation of a wide range of cancer cells in vitro, whereas being inactive against normal cells. As data on capsaicin-induced genotoxicity are limited and the effects of capsaicin against human lung A549 and DU145 prostate cancer cells were not explored in detail, we were interested in determining whether capsaicin-associated genotoxicity may also provoke A549 and DU145 cell death. Capsaicin-induced decrease in metabolic activity and cell proliferation, and changes in the cell cycle were limited to high concentrations used (≥ 100 μM), whereas, at lower concentrations, capsaicin stimulated both DNA double strand breaks and micronuclei production. Capsaicin was unable to provoke apoptotic cell death when used up to 250 μM concentrations. Capsaicin induced oxidative stress, but was ineffective in provoking the dissipation of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential. A different magnitude of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) recruitment contributed to diverse capsaicin-induced genotoxic effects in DU145 and A549 cells. Capsaicin was also found to be a DNA hypermethylating agent in A549 cells. In summary, we have shown that genotoxic effects of capsaicin may contribute to limited susceptibility of DU145 and A549 cancer cells to apoptosis in vitro, which may question the usefulness of capsaicin-based anticancer therapy, at least in a case of lung and prostate cancer. PMID:25813723

  1. N-Nitrosodiethylamine genotoxicity in primary rat hepatocytes: effects of cytochrome P450 induction by phenobarbital.

    PubMed

    Aiub, Claudia A F; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Oliveira, Izaura; Felzenszwalb, Israel; Ferreira, Fátima; Ribeiro Pinto, Luis Felipe; Eckl, Peter

    2011-10-10

    Primary hepatocytes are widely used in investigating drug metabolism and its toxicological effects. N-Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA)-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity was used in primary cultures of female rat hepatocytes in the presence of phenobarbital (PB). PB pre-treatment (1mM) increased the number of necrotic (2-fold) and apoptotic cells (4-fold) after NDEA treatment (0.21-105 μg/mL). The mitotic indices and the number of micronucleated cells decreased, thus suggesting cytotoxicity. An increased number of chromosomal aberrations were observed after pre-treatment with PB. NDEA-treatment (0.21-21 μg/mL) induced expression of the CYP2B1 and CYP2B2 mRNA and PB treatment alone induced ~6-fold and ~2-fold increases of CYP2B1 and CYP2B2 mRNA, respectively. NDEA treatment following PB exposure increased CYP2B1 mRNA expression under all tested concentrations and also increased CYP2B2 expression at 21 and 105 μg/mL. Our data suggest that the alteration of CYP2B1/2 expression by PB increased the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of NDEA leading to the final genotoxic metabolite. PMID:21763762

  2. Evaluation of genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of hydroalcoholic extracts of Zuccagnia punctata Cav.

    PubMed

    Zampini, Iris Catiana; Villarini, Milena; Moretti, Massimo; Dominici, Luca; Isla, María Inés

    2008-01-17

    Zuccagnia punctata Cav. (Fabaceae), a widely used plant species in Argentine folk medicine, has been shown to have a broad spectrum of antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and cytoprotective activities. In this study, the hydroalcoholic extract of Zuccagnia punctata and 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone isolated from it were investigated for genotoxicity/antigenotoxicity in the in vitro comet assay test on human hepatoma HepG2 cells. No acute toxicity of the extract could be determined. HepG2 cells were treated with three different concentrations (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 microg/mL) or 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone (0.01, 0.10 and 1.00 microg/mL). To explore the potential mechanisms of action, two approaches were followed: co-treatment with 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxyde (4-NQO), a direct genotoxic compound, and a pre-treatment protocol with benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), an indirect genotoxic compound. The natural products neither affected cell viability nor induced DNA damage in the concentration range tested. Zuccagnia punctata tinctures were able to diminish the DNA damage induced in HepG2 cells by 4-NQO and B[a]P in 31% and 10%, respectively at 10 microg/mL. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone was highly effective in decreasing B[a]P-induced DNA damage at a statistically significant level, with an almost clear dose-response relationship. The inhibition values were 28.2-43.9% for the tested concentrations of 0.01-1 microg/mL, respectively. The results clearly indicate that the phytoextract from Zuccagnia punctata, under the experimental conditions tested, is not genotoxic and that 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone contributes to a high degree to the antigenotoxic effects of Zuccagnia punctata tincture. PMID:18023546

  3. Distribution and genotoxic effects after successive exposure to different uranium oxide particles inhaled by rats.

    PubMed

    Monleau, Marjorie; De Méo, Michel; Frelon, Sandrine; Paquet, François; Donnadieu-Claraz, Marie; Duménil, Gérard; Chazel, Valérie

    2006-10-01

    In nuclear fuel cycle facilities, workers may inhale airborne uranium compounds that lead to internal contamination, with various exposure scenarios depending on the workplace. These exposures can be chronic, repeated, or acute, and can involve many different compounds. The effect of uranium after multiple scenarios of exposure is unknown. The aim of this study, therefore, was to investigate the genotoxic and biokinetics consequences of exposure to depleted insoluble uranium dioxide (UO2) by repeated or acute inhalation on subsequent acute inhalation of moderately soluble uranium peroxide (UO4) in rats. The results show that UO2 repeated preexposure by inhalation increases the genotoxic effects of UO4 inhalation, assessed by comet assay, in different cell types, when UO4 exposure alone has no effect. At the same time, the study of UO4 bioaccumulation showed that the UO4 biokinetics in the kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, and excreta, but not in the lungs, were slightly modified by previous UO2 exposures. All these results show that both genotoxic and biokinetics effects of uranium may depend on preexposure and that repeated exposure induces a potentiation effect compared with acute exposure. PMID:16864406

  4. Testing systems for biologic markers of genotoxic exposure and effect

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1986-11-19

    Societal interest in genotoxicity stems from two concerns: the fear of carcinogenesis secondary to somatic mutation; and the fear of birth defects and decreasing genetic fitness secondary to heritable mutation. There is a pressing need to identify agents that can cause these effects, to understand the underlying dose-response relationships, to identify exposed populations, and to estimate both the magnitude of exposure and the risk of adverse health effects in such populations. Biologic markers refer either to evidence in surrogate organisms, or to the expressions of exposure and effect in human populations. 21 refs.

  5. Genotoxic effects of cisplatin in somatic tissue of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster transdihybrid for mwh and flr were exposed to varying concentrations of cisplatin by feeding on dry media wetted with aqueous solutions of the test compound. Larval feeding continued until pupation, and surviving transdihybrid adults were collected seven days following commencement of feeding. Wings of adults were removed and scored under 400X magnification for the presence of twin spots and single spots comprised of clones of cells possessing malformed wing hairs. Cisplatin was found to induce both twin spots and single spots, and significant linear concentration-response relationships were obtained with respect to the induction of all endpoints. This capacity to induce mitotic exchange in the somatic tissue of Drosophila compares well with the compound's reported ability to induce chromosome breaks in Drosophila germ cells. However, not all compounds possess similar genotoxic profiles in the somatic an germ tissue of Drosophila.

  6. Acute effects of a prooxidant herbicide on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints.

    PubMed

    Esperanza, Marta; Cid, Ángeles; Herrero, Concepción; Rioboo, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Since recent evidence has demonstrated that many types of chemicals exhibit oxidative and/or genotoxic potential on living organisms, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and DNA damage are currently the best accepted paradigms to assess the potential hazardous biological effects of a wide range of contaminants. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of different cytotoxicity and genotoxicity responses on the model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to the prooxidant herbicide paraquat. In addition to the growth endpoint, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assayed as potential markers of cytotoxicity using flow cytometry (FCM). To study the effects of paraquat on C. reinhardtii DNA, several genotoxicity approaches were implemented for the first time in an ecotoxicological study on microalgae. Oxidative DNA base damage was analysed by measuring the oxidative DNA lesion 8-OHdG by FCM. DNA fragmentation was analysed by different methods: comet assay, and cell cycle analysis by FCM, with a particular focus on the presence of subG1-nuclei. Finally, effects on morphology of nuclei were monitored through DAPI staining. The evaluation of these endpoints showed that several physiological and biochemical parameters reacted to oxidative stress disturbances with greater sensitivity than integrative parameters such as growth rates or cell viability. The experiments revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity (ROS formation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane), genotoxicity (oxidative DNA damage, DNA strand breakage, alterations in nuclear morphology), and cell cycle disturbances (subG1-nuclei, decrease of 4N population) in paraquat-treated cells. Overall, the genotoxicity results indicate that the production of ROS caused by exposure to paraquat induces oxidative DNA damage followed by DNA single- and double-strand breaks and cell cycle alterations, possibly leading to apoptosis

  7. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of vigabatrin, a γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase inhibitor, in Wistar rats submitted to rotarod task.

    PubMed

    Coelho, V R; Sousa, K; Pires, T R; Papke, Dkm; Vieira, C G; de Souza, L P; Leal, M B; Schunck, Rva; Picada, J N; Pereira, P

    2016-09-01

    Vigabatrin (VGB) is an antiepileptic drug thatincreases brain γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels through irreversible inhibition of GABA transaminase. The aim of this study was to evaluate neurotoxicological effects of VGB measuring motor activity and genotoxic and mutagenic effects after a single and repeated administration. Male Wistar rats received saline, VGB 50, 100, or 250 mg/kg by gavage for acute and subchronic (14 days) treatments and evaluated in the rotarod task. Genotoxicity was evaluated using the alkaline version of the comet assay in samples of blood, liver, hippocampus, and brain cortex after both treatments. Mutagenicity was evaluated using the micronucleus test in bone marrow of the same animals that received subchronic treatment. The groups treated with VGB showed similar performance in rotarod compared with the saline group. Regarding the acute treatment, it was observed that only higher VGB doses induced DNA damage in blood and hippocampus. After the subchronic treatment, VGB did not show genotoxic or mutagenic effects. In brief, VGB did not impair motor activities in rats after acute and subchronic treatments. It showed a repairable genotoxic potential in the central nervous system since genotoxicity was observed in the acute treatment group. PMID:26500220

  8. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Prego-Faraldo, María Verónica; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffon, Blanca; Mendez, Josefina; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1) comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates. PMID:27231936

  9. Early Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima in the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    PubMed Central

    Prego-Faraldo, María Verónica; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffon, Blanca; Mendez, Josefina; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are the main toxins responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) intoxications during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Although the genotoxic and cytotoxic responses to OA have been evaluated in vitro, the in vivo effects of these toxins have not yet been fully explored. The present work fills this gap by evaluating the in vivo effects of the exposure to the DSP-toxin-producing dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima during the simulation of an early HAB episode in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The obtained results revealed that in vivo exposure to this toxic microalgae induced early genotoxicity in hemocytes, as a consequence of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, the DNA damage observed in gill cells seems to be mainly influenced by exposure time and P. lima concentration, similarly to the case of the oxidative damage found in hemocytes exposed in vitro to OA. In both cell types, the absence of DNA damage at low toxin concentrations is consistent with the notion suggesting that this level of toxicity does not disturb the antioxidant balance. Lastly, in vivo exposure to growing P. lima cell densities increased apoptosis but not necrosis, probably due to the presence of a high number of protein apoptosis inhibitors in molluscs. Overall, this work sheds light into the in vivo genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of P. lima. In doing so, it also demonstrates for the first time the potential of the modified (OGG1) comet assay for assessing oxidative DNA damage caused by marine toxins in marine invertebrates. PMID:27231936

  10. Protective effects of a mixture of dietary agents against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Chandra Mohan, K V P; Abraham, S K; Nagini, S

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of pretreatment with tomato, garlic, and turmeric, alone and in combination, against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced genetic damage and oxidative stress in male Swiss mice. Measurement of the incidence of bone marrow micronuclei as well as the extent of lipid peroxidation and the status of the antioxidants reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase in the liver and erythrocytes were used as biomarkers of chemoprotection. In DMBA-treated animals, increased frequency of bone marrow micronuclei was accompanied by enhanced lipid peroxidation and antioxidant depletion. Pretreatment with tomato, garlic, and turmeric alone and a combination of these agents significantly reduced the frequencies of DMBA-induced bone marrow micronuclei as well as the extent of lipid peroxidation. These changes may be mediated by the antioxidant-enhancing effects of the dietary agents. The results of the present study suggest that a diet containing even low levels of different naturally occurring compounds is effective in exerting antigenotoxic effects by inhibiting DMBA-induced oxidative stress. PMID:15117554

  11. Genotoxic effects in bacteria of the light emitted by halogen tungsten lamps having treated quartz bulbs.

    PubMed

    Camoirano, A; Bennicelli, C; Bagnasco, M; De Flora, S

    1999-04-26

    Traditional halogen tungsten lamps, which are extensively used worldwide for the illumination of indoor environments, have a quartz bulb which transmits not only visible light but also ultraviolet (UV) light. Due to the output of far-UV wavelengths, halogen lamps were found in previous studies to be potently genotoxic in bacteria, clastogenic in cultured human cells, and carcinogenic in hairless mice. This discovery prompted the launching of new halogen lamps, known as UV-Stop, UV-Block, or similar trade names, which have the quartz glass treated in such a way to reduce its permeability to UV radiation. Surprisingly, these lamps are advertised for attenuating discolouration of UV-sensitive materials, such as fabrics, paintings, works of art and furniture, whereas protection of the human skin from potential carcinogenic risks is overlooked. We tested forty-seven 12 V-powered lamps with treated quartz bulb, which were made available by five producers as blind-coded samples. After exposure to either 1000 lx for 30 min or 2500 lx for 60 min, the 50 W lamps from two producers were borderline mutagenic in strains TA100 and TA104 of S. typhimurium, and induced an evident and dose-related DNA damage in the E. coli strain CM871 (uvrA- recA- lexA-), as compared to its isogenic, DNA repair-proficient counterpart WP2. The 50 W lamps supplied by the other three producers also induced a significant genotoxic damage, but only after exposure for 60 min at illuminance levels of 2500 lx or higher. In calibration experiments, one of these three lamp brands was found to induce in 60 min a genotoxic damage which was equivalent to the one induced in just 55 s by a traditional halogen lamp. Therefore, the new types of lamps with treated quartz bulbs provide an appreciable step forward in the safety of halogen lamps, but some output of genotoxic UV radiations does still occur. Moreover, the lamps manufactured by different producers are not equally effective to this respect. By comparison

  12. Genotoxic effect of ethacrynic acid and impact of antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, William M.; Hoffman, Jared D.; Loo, George

    2015-07-01

    It is known that ethacrynic acid (EA) decreases the intracellular levels of glutathione. Whether the anticipated oxidative stress affects the structural integrity of DNA is unknown. Therefore, DNA damage was assessed in EA-treated HCT116 cells, and the impact of several antioxidants was also determined. EA caused both concentration-dependent and time-dependent DNA damage that eventually resulted in cell death. Unexpectedly, the DNA damage caused by EA was intensified by either ascorbic acid or trolox. In contrast, EA-induced DNA damage was reduced by N-acetylcysteine and by the iron chelator, deferoxamine. In elucidating the DNA damage, it was determined that EA increased the production of reactive oxygen species, which was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine but not by ascorbic acid and trolox. Also, EA decreased glutathione levels, which were inhibited by N-acetylcysteine. But, ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine neither inhibited nor enhanced the capacity of EA to decrease glutathione. Interestingly, the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, buthionine sulfoxime, lowered glutathione to a similar degree as EA, but no noticeable DNA damage was found. Nevertheless, buthionine sulfoxime potentiated the glutathione-lowering effect of EA and intensified the DNA damage caused by EA. Additionally, in examining redox-sensitive stress gene expression, it was found that EA increased HO-1, GADD153, and p21mRNA expression, in association with increased nuclear localization of Nrf-2 and p53 proteins. In contrast to ascorbic acid, trolox, and deferoxamine, N-acetylcysteine suppressed the EA-induced upregulation of GADD153, although not of HO-1. Overall, it is concluded that EA has genotoxic properties that can be amplified by certain antioxidants. - Highlights: • Ethacrynic acid (EA) caused cellular DNA damage. • EA-induced DNA damage was potentiated by ascorbic acid or trolox. • EA increased ROS production, not inhibited by ascorbic acid or trolox. • EA

  13. Identification of specific mRNA signatures as fingerprints for carcinogenesis in mice induced by genotoxic and nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens.

    PubMed

    Kossler, Nadine; Matheis, Katja A; Ostenfeldt, Nina; Bach Toft, Dorthe; Dhalluin, Stéphane; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkuhl, Arno

    2015-02-01

    Long-term rodent carcinogenicity studies for evaluation of chemicals and pharmaceuticals concerning their carcinogenic potential to humans are currently receiving critical revision. Additional data from mechanistic studies can support cancer risk assessment by clarifying the underlying mode of action. In the course of the IMI MARCAR project, a European consortium of EFPIA partners and academics, which aims to identify biomarkers for nongenotoxic carcinogenesis, a toxicogenomic mouse liver database was generated. CD-1 mice were orally treated for 3 and 14 days with 3 known genotoxic hepatocarcinogens: C.I. Direct Black 38, Dimethylnitrosamine and 4,4'-Methylenedianiline; 3 nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens: 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, Phenobarbital sodium and Piperonyl butoxide; 4 nonhepatocarcinogens: Cefuroxime sodium, Nifedipine, Prazosin hydrochloride and Propranolol hydrochloride; and 3 compounds that show ambiguous results in genotoxicity testing: Cyproterone acetate, Thioacetamide and Wy-14643. By liver mRNA expression analysis using individual animal data, we identified 64 specific biomarker candidates for genotoxic carcinogens and 69 for nongenotoxic carcinogens for male mice at day 15. The majority of genotoxic carcinogen biomarker candidates possess functions in DNA damage response (eg, apoptosis, cell cycle progression, DNA repair). Most of the identified nongenotoxic carcinogen biomarker candidates are involved in regulation of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. The derived biomarker lists were characterized with respect to their dependency on study duration and gender and were successfully used to characterize carcinogens with ambiguous genotoxicity test results, such as Wy-14643. The identified biomarker candidates improve the mechanistic understanding of drug-induced effects on the mouse liver that result in hepatocellular adenomas and/or carcinomas in 2-year mouse carcinogenicity studies. PMID:25410580

  14. Genotoxicity to human cells induced by air particulates isolated during the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, K.T.; Xia, F.; Christiani, D.C.; Liber, H.L.; Spengler, J.D.; Dockery, D.W. ); Bodell, W.J. )

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to examine the potential of exposure to soot from the 1991 oil fires in the Kuwait desert for inducing genetic effects we studied the in vitro genotoxicity of this materials. Air particulates isolated near the Kuwait oil fires were studied using three assays. Dose-dependent increases were observed for both sister chromatid exchanges in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and mutation at the hprt locus in the metabolically competent human lymphoblast cell line AHH-1. Similar magnitudes of response were seen using these two assays when testing a standard air particulate sample which had been isolated from the Washington, DC, area. Using the [sup 32]P-postlabeling assay, no increase in DNA adduct formation was observed in AHH-1 cells treated with particulates isolated from sampling in Kuwait. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  15. High dietborne Cu and Cd induced genotoxicity of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    El-Serafy, Sabry S; Zowail, Mohammed E; Abdel-Hameid, Nassr-Allah H; Awwad, Mohammed H; Nafie, Ebtessam H O

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the effects of fish diet contaminated with Cu, Cd and Cu+Cd on Nile tilapia, was demonstrated by evaluating its bioaccumulation in the muscle and by testing the cytogenetic profile. Fish exposed to diet contaminated with Cu, Cd or their mixture had a significant increase in the number of chromosomal abnormalities and an inhibition of the mitotic index. Our study revealed high muscle Cu or Cd content in fish fed with diet contaminated with high dietborne Cu, Cd, Cu and Cd. It also revealed that the chromosomal abnormalities were higher for fish fed diet Cd contaminated and Cu+Cd contaminated diets than those fed diet Cu contaminated diet. Thus, maybe fish diets contaminated with Cu, Cd, Cu+Cd induced genotoxicity and mutation. Also, maybe high concentrations of Cu and Cd in fish tissue resulted from feeding on Cu and Cd contaminated diets, are dangerous for human consumption. PMID:25917432

  16. Evolved Cellular Mechanisms to Respond to Genotoxic Insults: Implications for Radiation-Induced Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, Courtney J; Higa, Kelly; Weil, Michael M; DeGregori, James

    2015-10-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation is highly associated with adverse health effects, including reduced hematopoietic cell function and increased risk of carcinogenesis. The hematopoietic deficits manifest across blood cell types and persist for years after radiation exposure, suggesting a long-lived and multi-potent cellular reservoir for radiation-induced effects. As such, research has focused on identifying both the immediate and latent hematopoietic stem cell responses to radiation exposure. Radiation-associated effects on hematopoietic function and malignancy development have generally been attributed to the direct induction of mutations resulting from radiation-induced DNA damage. Other studies have illuminated the role of cellular programs that both limit and enhance radiation-induced tissue phenotypes and carcinogenesis. In this review, distinct but collaborative cellular responses to genotoxic insults are highlighted, with an emphasis on how these programmed responses impact hematopoietic cellular fitness and competition. These radiation-induced cellular programs include apoptosis, senescence and impaired self-renewal within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool. In the context of sporadic DNA damage to a cell, these cellular responses act in concert to restore tissue function and prevent selection for adaptive oncogenic mutations. But in the contexts of whole-tissue exposure or whole-body exposure to genotoxins, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, we propose that these programs can contribute to long-lasting tissue impairment and increased carcinogenesis. PMID:26414506

  17. Genotoxic Effect in Autoimmune Diseases Evaluated by the Micronucleus Test Assay: Our Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Macriz Romero, Nicole; Ramos Ibarra, María Luisa; Flores-García, Aurelio; Valdez Aburto, Penélope; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) are classified into organ-specific, systemic, and mixed; all forms of AD share a high risk for cancer development. In AD a destructive immune response induced by autoreactive lymphocytes is started and continues with the production of autoantibodies against different targets; furthermore apoptosis failure and loss of balance in oxidative stress as a consequence of local or systemic inflammation are common features seen in AD as well. Micronucleus (MN) assay can be performed in order to evaluate loss of genetic material in a clear, accurate, fast, simple, and minimally invasive test. The MN formation in the cytoplasm of cells that have undergone proliferation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation during mitosis and the appearance of small additional nuclei during interphase. The MN test, widely accepted for in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity research, provides a sensitive marker of genomic damage associated to diverse conditions. In here, we present a review of our work and other published papers concerning genotoxic effect in AD, identified by means of the MN assay, with the aim of proposing this tool as a possible early biomarker for genotoxic damage, which is a consequence of disease progression. Additionally this biomarker could be used for follow-up, to asses genome damage associated to therapies. PMID:26339592

  18. Evaluation of genotoxic effects caused by extracts of chlorinated drinking water using a combination of three different bioassays.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Liao, Jing; Miao, Dong-Yue; Wang, Xin-Yi; Yang, Pan; Yun, Luo-Jia; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2015-10-15

    Potential genotoxic effects of chlorinated drinking water now are of a great concern. In this study, raw water, finished water, and tap water from a water plant in Wuhan, China were collected in two different sampling times of the year (January and July). Genotoxic effects of water extracts were evaluated using a combination of three different bioassays: SOS/umu test, HGPRT gene mutation assay, and micronucleus assay, which were separately used to detect DNA damage, gene mutation, and chromosome aberration. The results of three different bioassays showed that all water samples in January and July induced at least one types of genotoxic effects, of which the DNA-damage effects were all detectable. The levels of DNA-damage effects and gene-mutation effects of finished water and tap water in January were higher than those in July. Chlorination could increase the DNA-damage effects of drinking water in January and the gene-mutation effects of drinking water in both January and July, but did not increase the chromosome-aberration effects of drinking water in both January and July. Our results highlighted the importance of using a combination of different bioassays to evaluate the genotoxicity of water samples in different seasons. PMID:25910456

  19. Genotoxic effects of two-generational selenium deficiency in mouse somatic and testicular cells

    PubMed Central

    Graupner, Anne; Instanes, Christine; Andersen, Jill M.; Brandt-Kjelsen, Anicke; Dertinger, Stephen D.; Salbu, Brit; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann-Karin

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have investigated genotoxic effects of high Se diets but very few have addressed the genotoxicity of Se deprivation and its consequences in germ cells and none in somatic cells. To address these data gaps, C57BL/6 male mice were subjected to Se deprivation starting in the parental generation, i.e. before conception. Mice were given a diet of either low (0.01mg Se/kg diet) or normal (0.23mg Se/kg diet) Se content. Ogg1-deficient (Ogg1 −/−) mice were used as a sensitive model towards oxidative stress due to their reduced capacity to repair oxidised purines. Ogg1 −/− mice also mimic the repair characteristics of human post-meiotic male germ cells which have a reduced ability to repair such lesions. The genotoxicity of Se deficiency was addressed by measuring DNA lesions with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (+ Fpg to detect oxidised DNA lesions) in somatic cells (nucleated blood cells and lung cells) and male germ cells (testicular cells). Total Se concentration in liver and GPx activity in plasma and testicular cells were measured. Gene mutation was evaluated by an erythrocyte-based Pig-a assay. We found that Se deprivation of F1 from their conception and until early adulthood led to the induction of DNA lesions in testicular and lung cells expressed as significantly increased levels of DNA lesions, irrespective of the mouse genotype. In blood cells, Se levels did not appear to affect DNA lesions or mutant cell frequencies. The results suggest that the testis was the most sensitive tissue. Thus, genotoxicity induced by the low Se diet in the spermatozoal genome has potential implications for the offspring. PMID:25358475

  20. Nanoceria have no genotoxic effect on human lens epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierscionek, Barbara K.; Li, Yuebin; Yasseen, Akeel A.; Colhoun, Liza M.; Schachar, Ronald A.; Chen, Wei

    2010-01-01

    There are no treatments for reversing or halting cataract, a disease of the structural proteins in the eye lens, that has associations with other age-related degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The incidence of cataract and associated conditions is increasing as the average age of the population rises. Protein folding diseases are difficult to assess in vivo as proteins and their age-related changes are assessed after extraction. Nanotechnology can be used to investigate protein changes in the intact lens as well as for a potential means of drug delivery. Nanoparticles, such as cerium oxide (CeO2) which have antioxidant properties, may even be used as a means of treating cataract directly. Prior to use in treatments, nanoparticle genotoxicity must be tested to assess the extent of any DNA or chromosomal damage. Sister chromatid exchanges were measured and DNA damage investigated using the alkaline COMET assay on cultured human lens epithelial cells, exposed to 5 and 10 µg ml-1 of CeO2 nanoparticles (nanoceria). Nanoceria at these dosages did not cause any DNA damage or significant increases in the number of sister chromatid exchanges. The absence of genotoxic effects on lens cells suggests that nanoceria, in the doses and exposures tested in this study, are not deleterious to the eye lens and have the potential for use in studying structural alterations, in developing non-surgical cataract treatments and in investigating other protein folding diseases.

  1. Antiproliferative and genotoxic effects of Mikania glomerata (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Dalla Nora, Gracieli; Pastori, Tamara; Laughinghouse, Haywood Dail; Do Canto-Dorow, Thais Scotti; Tedesco, Solange Bosio

    2010-12-01

    Mikania glomerata is a plant used in Brazilian traditional medicine, known as 'guaco'. It possesses anti-inflammatory properties and the aqueous extracts of its leaves are indicated for the treatment of diseases of the respiratory tract. This study aimed at evaluating the antiproliferative and genotoxic effect of Mikania glomerata leaf infusions on the cell cycle of onion. The material used was collected in the native environment from Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Aqueous extracts through infusions were prepared in two concentrations: 4g/L (usual concentration) and 16g/L (4x more concentrated) of each of the populations. Two groups of four onion bulbs for each plant population were used plus a control group. The rootlets were fixed in ethanol-acetic acid (3:1), conserved in ethanol 70% and slides were prepared using the squashing technique colored with orcein 2%. The cells were observed and analyzed during cell cycle. Per group of bulbs, 2000 cells were analyzed, and the mean values of the cell number of each of the phases of the cell cycle were calculated, determining the mitotic index (MI). Statistic analyses of the data were carried out by the x2 ( p= 0.05) test. We conclude that M. glomerata presents both antiproliferative and genotoxic activity. PMID:21443139

  2. Specific Uptake and Genotoxicity Induced by Polystyrene Nanobeads with Distinct Surface Chemistry on Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kortulewski, Thierry; Grall, Romain; Gamez, Christelle; Blazy, Kelly; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier; Chevillard, Sylvie; Braun, Anne; Rat, Patrice; Lacroix, Ghislaine

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle surface chemistry is known to play a crucial role in interactions with cells and their related cytotoxic effects. As inhalation is a major route of exposure to nanoparticles, we studied specific uptake and damages of well-characterized fluorescent 50 nm polystyrene (PS) nanobeads harboring different functionalized surfaces (non-functionalized, carboxylated and aminated) on pulmonary epithelial cells and macrophages (Calu-3 and THP-1 cell lines respectively). Cytotoxicity of in mass dye-labeled functionalized PS nanobeads was assessed by xCELLigence system and alamarBlue viability assay. Nanobeads-cells interactions were studied by video-microscopy, flow cytometry and also confocal microscopy. Finally ROS generation was assessed by glutathione depletion dosages and genotoxicity was assessed by γ-H2Ax foci detection, which is considered as the most sensitive technique for studying DNA double strand breaks. The uptake kinetic was different for each cell line. All nanobeads were partly adsorbed and internalized, then released by Calu-3 cells, while THP-1 macrophages quickly incorporated all nanobeads which were located in the cytoplasm rather than in the nuclei. In parallel, the genotoxicity study reported that only aminated nanobeads significantly increased DNA damages in association with a strong depletion of reduced glutathione in both cell lines. We showed that for similar nanoparticle concentrations and sizes, aminated polystyrene nanobeads were more cytotoxic and genotoxic than unmodified and carboxylated ones on both cell lines. Interestingly, aminated polystyrene nanobeads induced similar cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on Calu-3 epithelial cells and THP-1 macrophages, for all levels of intracellular nanoparticles tested. Our results strongly support the primordial role of nanoparticles surface chemistry on cellular uptake and related biological effects. Moreover our data clearly show that nanoparticle internalization and observed adverse effects

  3. DNA methyltransferase I is a mediator of doxorubicin-induced genotoxicity in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Hwee Hong; Porter, Alan George

    2009-05-01

    Doxorubicin can induce the formation of extra-nuclear bodies during mitosis termed micronuclei but the underlying causes remain unknown. Here, we show that sub-lethal exposure to doxorubicin-induced micronuclei formation in human cancer cells but not in non-tumorigenic cells. Occurrence of micronuclei coincided with stability of DNMT1 upon doxorubicin assault, and DNMT1 was localized to the micronuclei structures. Furthermore, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-mediated DNMT1 depletion or siDNMT1 knock-down attenuated the frequency of doxorubicin-induced micronucleated cells. Human DNMT1{sup -/-} cells displayed significantly fewer micronuclei compared to DNMT1{sup +/+} cells when challenged with doxorubicin, providing additional evidence for the involvement of DNMT1 in mediating such chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our results demonstrate a role for DNMT1 in promoting DNA damage-induced genotoxicity in human cancer cells. DNMT1, recently identified as a candidate for doxorubicin-mediated cytotoxicity, is over-expressed in various cancer cell types. We propose that DNMT1 levels in tumor cells may determine the effectiveness of doxorubicin in chemotherapy.

  4. Molecular and structural changes induced by essential oils treatments in Vicia faba roots detected by genotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Sturchio, Elena; Boccia, Priscilla; Zanellato, Miriam; Meconi, Claudia; Donnarumma, Lucia; Mercurio, Giuseppe; Mecozzi, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been an increased interest in exploiting allelopathy in organic agriculture. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effects of essential oil mixtures in order to establish their allelopathic use in agriculture. Two mixtures of essential oils consisting respectively of tea tree oil (TTO) and clove plus rosemary (C + R) oils were tested. Phytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests on the root meristems of Vicia faba minor were performed. A phytotoxic influence was particularly relevant for C + R mixture, while genotoxicity tests revealed significant results with both C + R oil mixture and TTO. Phenotypic analysis on Vicia faba minor primary roots following C + R oil mixture treatment resulted in callose production, an early symptom attributed to lipid peroxidation. The approach described in this study, based on genotoxicity bioassays, might identify specific DNA damage induced by essential oil treatments. These tests may represent a powerful method to evaluate potential adverse effects of different mixtures of essential oils that might be useful in alternative agriculture. Future studies are focusing on the positive synergism of more complex mixtures of essential oils in order to reduce concentrations of potentially toxic components while at the same time maintaining efficacy in antimicrobial and antifungal management. PMID:26914511

  5. Diosmin induces genotoxicity and apoptosis in DU145 prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Siwak, Justyna; Rzeszutek, Iwona; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-04-01

    Plant-derived dietary polyphenolic compounds, such as flavonoids, with cancer cell-specific pro-apoptotic activity and chemopreventive potential are thought to be promising anticancer agents. In the present study, we were interested in determining if flavonoid-induced genotoxicity may also provoke cancer cell death. Cyto- and genotoxicity of three selected flavonoid glycosides (naringin, diosmin and hesperidin) in DU145 prostate cancer cell line were investigated. Flavonoid glycosides decreased cancer cell number and proliferative activity in a different manner. Flavonoid glycosides induced oxidative stress: intracellular total ROS and superoxide production were augmented after flavonoid treatment. Flavonoid glycosides stimulated DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and micronuclei production. Diosmin was found the most potent genotoxic agent in DU145 cells, which, in turn, resulted in its pro-apoptotic activity. The more robust recruitment of 53BP1 was correlated with lower DNA and chromosomal damage after naringin and hesperidin treatment compared with diosmin treatment. Flavonoid glycosides were also found to be DNA hypomethylating agents with an ability to modulate cancer cell epigenome leading to changes in the gene expression patterns. Taken together, diosmin, a dietary flavonoid glycoside, was found active against DU145 cells by promoting genotoxic events and a concomitant apoptotic cell death. Thus, a comprehensive analysis of biological activity of diosmin against cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo deserves further investigation. PMID:25499067

  6. Mechanisms of Hg species induced toxicity in cultured human astrocytes: genotoxicity and DNA-damage response.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Imke; Wehe, Christoph A; Bornhorst, Julia; Ebert, Franziska; Leffers, Larissa; Holtkamp, Michael; Höseler, Pia; Weber, Till; Mangerich, Aswin; Bürkle, Alexander; Karst, Uwe; Schwerdtle, Tanja

    2014-03-01

    The toxicologically most relevant mercury (Hg) species for human exposure is methylmercury (MeHg). Thiomersal is a common preservative used in some vaccine formulations. The aim of this study is to get further mechanistic insight into the yet not fully understood neurotoxic modes of action of organic Hg species. Mercury species investigated include MeHgCl and thiomersal. Additionally HgCl2 was studied, since in the brain mercuric Hg can be formed by dealkylation of the organic species. As a cellular system astrocytes were used. In vivo astrocytes provide the environment necessary for neuronal function. In the present study, cytotoxic effects of the respective mercuricals increased with rising alkylation level and correlated with their cellular bioavailability. Further experiments revealed for all species at subcytotoxic concentrations no induction of DNA strand breaks, whereas all species massively increased H2O2-induced DNA strand breaks. This co-genotoxic effect is likely due to a disturbance of the cellular DNA damage response. Thus, at nanomolar, sub-cytotoxic concentrations, all three mercury species strongly disturbed poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, a signalling reaction induced by DNA strand breaks. Interestingly, the molecular mechanism behind this inhibition seems to be different for the species. Since chronic PARP-1 inhibition is also discussed to sacrifice neurogenesis and learning abilities, further experiments on neurons and in vivo studies could be helpful to clarify whether the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation contributes to organic Hg induced neurotoxicity. PMID:24549367

  7. Nitric oxide mitigates arsenic-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pratiksha; Singh, A K

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of nitric oxide (NO) against arsenic (As)-induced structural disturbances in Vicia faba have been investigated. As treatment (0.25, 0.50, and 1 mM) resulted in a declined growth of V. faba seedlings. Arsenic treatment stimulates the activity of SOD and CAT while the activities of APX and GST content were decreased. The oxidative stress markers such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation) contents were enhanced by As. Overall results revealed that significant accumulation of As suppressed growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, APX, and GST activity), mitotic index, and induction of different chromosomal abnormalities, hence led to oxidative stress. The concentration of SNP (0.02 mM) was very effective in counteracting the adverse effect of As toxicity. These abnormalities use partially or fully reversed by a simultaneous application of As and NO donor and sodium nitroprusside and has an ameliorating effect against As-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in V. faba roots. PMID:25943507

  8. Three-Dimensional, Transgenic Cell Models to Quantify Space Genotoxic Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, S. R.; Sognier, M. A.; Wu, H.; Pingerelli, P. L.; Glickman, B. W.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The space environment contains radiation and chemical agents known to be mutagenic and carcinogenic to humans. Additionally, microgravity is a complicating factor that may modify or synergize induced genotoxic effects. Most in vitro models fail to use human cells (making risk extrapolation to humans more difficult), overlook the dynamic effect of tissue intercellular interactions on genotoxic damage, and lack the sensitivity required to measure low-dose effects. Currently a need exists for a model test system that simulates cellular interactions present in tissue, and can be used to quantify genotoxic damage induced by low levels of radiation and chemicals, and extrapolate assessed risk to humans. A state-of-the-art, three-dimensional, multicellular tissue equivalent cell culture model will be presented. It consists of mammalian cells genetically engineered to contain multiple copies of defined target genes for genotoxic assessment,. NASA-designed bioreactors were used to coculture mammalian cells into spheroids, The cells used were human mammary epithelial cells (H184135) and Stratagene's (Austin, Texas) Big Blue(TM) Rat 2 lambda fibroblasts. The fibroblasts were genetically engineered to contain -a high-density target gene for mutagenesis (60 copies of lacl/LacZ per cell). Tissue equivalent spheroids were routinely produced by inoculation of 2 to 7 X 10(exp 5) fibroblasts with Cytodex 3 beads (150 micrometers in diameter). at a 20:1 cell:bead ratio, into 50-ml HARV bioreactors (Synthecon, Inc.). Fibroblasts were cultured for 5 days, an equivalent number of epithelial cells added, and the fibroblast/epithelial cell coculture continued for 21 days. Three-dimensional spheroids with diameters ranging from 400 to 600 micrometers were obtained. Histological and immunohistochemical Characterization revealed i) both cell types present in the spheroids, with fibroblasts located primarily in the center, surrounded by epithelial cells; ii) synthesis of extracellular matrix

  9. ZnO nanoparticles induced inflammatory response and genotoxicity in human blood cells: A mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Violet Aileen; Kumar, Ashutosh; Gupta, Govind Sharan; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-11-01

    The wide application of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in cosmetics, paints, biosensors, drug delivery, food packaging and as anticancerous agents has increased the risk of human exposure to these NPs. Earlier in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated a cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of ZnO NPs. However, there is paucity of data regarding their immunomodulatory effects. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the immunotoxic potential of ZnO NPs using human monocytic cell line (THP-1) as model to understand the underlying molecular mechanism. A significant (p < 0.01) increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) was observed with a concomitant concentration dependent (0.5, 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 μg/mL) decrease in the glutathione (GSH) levels as compared to control. The expression levels of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade proteins such as p-ERK1/2, p-p38 and p-JNK were also significantly (p < 0.05, p < 0.01) induced. Also, at the concentration tested, NPs induced DNA damage as assessed by the Comet and micronucleus assays. Our data demonstrated that ZnO NPs induce oxidative and nitrosative stress in human monocytes, leading to increased inflammatory response via activation of redox sensitive NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathways. PMID:26146191

  10. Prevention of benzene-induced genotoxicity in bone marrow and lung cells: superiority of polyphenolic acetates to polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Sushama, Anupam; Rohil, Vishwajeet; Manral, Sushma; Gangopadhyay, Sukanya; Prasad, Ashok K; Raj, Hanumantharao G; Parmar, Virender S

    2011-09-01

    Previous investigations carried out in our laboratory have highlighted that 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarin demonstrates a mechanism-based inhibition of cytochrome P450 (Cyt-P450) activities such as microsome-mediated aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) epoxidation, dealkylation of alkylated resorufin, and toxicokinetics of benzene. 7,8-Diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarin, quercetin pentaacetate, and ellagic acid peracetate were also found to be effective in giving the protection of AFB1-induced genotoxicity in rat's bone marrow and lung cells possibly due to acetylation of Cyt-P450 apoprotein mediated by acetoxy drug: protein transacetylase. Later, this transacetylase was identified as calreticulin, and the acetyltransferase function of calreticulin was appropriately termed calreticulin transacetylase. In this communication, we have focused on the superiority of several classes of polyphenolic acetates to polyphenols in the modification of Cyt-P450-linked mixed function oxidases (MFOs) such as 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (PROD). Special attention has also been focused on benzene-induced genotoxicity in bone marrow and lung cells. Results clearly indicated that polyphenolic acetates demonstrated time-dependent inhibition of Cyt-P450-linked MFOs, while parent polyphenols failed to demonstrate the same. Polyphenolic acetates were found to be more superior to polyphenols in preventing benzene-induced micronuclei formation. The pattern of inhibition of Cyt-P450-dependent MFOs and benzene-induced micronuclei formation by polyphenolic acetates was found in tune with their specificities to calreticulin transacetylase. These results further substantiated that inhibition of Cyt-P450-linked MFOs and benzene-induced genotoxicity in bone marrow and lung cells by polyphenolic acetates are mediated by the action of calreticulin transacetylase that catalyzes the acetylation of concerned proteins. PMID:21267547

  11. Promising anticancer activity of a lichen, Parmelia sulcata Taylor, against breast cancer cell lines and genotoxic effect on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ari, Ferda; Ulukaya, Engin; Oran, Seyhan; Celikler, Serap; Ozturk, Sule; Ozel, Mustafa Zafer

    2015-05-01

    Plants are still to be explored for new anti-cancer compounds because overall success in cancer treatment is still not satisfactory. As a new possible source for such compounds, the lichens are recently taking a great attention. We, therefore, explored both the genotoxic and anti-growth properties of lichen species Parmelia sulcata Taylor. The chemical composition of P. sulcata was analyzed with comprehensive gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry. Anti-growth effect was tested in human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) by the MTT and ATP viability assays, while the genotoxic activity was studied by assays for micronucleus, chromosomal aberration and DNA fragmentation in human lymphocytes culture. Cell death modes (apoptosis/necrosis) were morphologically assessed. P. sulcata inhibited the growth in a dose-dependent manner up to a dose of 100 μg/ml and induced caspase-independent apoptosis. It also showed genotoxic activity at doses (>125 μg/ml) higher than that required for apoptosis. These results suggest that P. sulcata may induce caspase-independent apoptotic cell death at lower doses, while it may be genotoxic at relatively higher doses. PMID:24676908

  12. Antimicrobial and Genotoxicity Effects of Zero-valent Iron Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Barzan, Elham; Mehrabian, Sedigheh; Irian, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Background: In a world of nanotechnology, the first concern is the potential environmental impact of nanoparticles. An efficient way to estimate nanotoxicity is to monitor the responses of bacteria exposed to these particles. Objectives: The current study explored the antimicrobial properties of nZVI (zero-valent Iron nanoparticles) on the Gram-negative bacterial systems Erwinia amylovora, Xanthomonas oryzae and the Gram-positive bacterial systems Bacillus cereus and Streptomyces spp. The genotoxicity potential of nZVI was also assayed. Materials and Methods: The toxicity of nZVI was tested by two different methods: Growing bacteria in liquid (broth dilution) and agar media (challenge test) containing different nZVI concentrations for 24-72 hours. The genotoxicity of nZVI was assessed using the preincubation version of the Ames test. Results: The lowest concentrations of nZVI that inhibited the visible growth (MIC) of E. amylovora, X. oryzae, B. cereus and Streptomyces spp. were 625, 550, 1250 and 1280 ppm, respectively. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) for E. amylovora and X. oryzae were 10,000 and 5,000 ppm of nZVI, respectively. MBC was not observed for the Gram positive bacteria. No bacteriostatic and bactericidal effects were observed for oxidized nZVI. Mutant frequency did not increase according to the vehicle control at the concentrations assayed, indicating a lack of mutagenicity associated with nZVI. Conclusions: nZVI nanoparticles are not mutagenic at low concentrations, therefore they can be used without detrimental effects on soil bacteria. PMID:25147712

  13. 4-Aminoantipyrine reduces toxic and genotoxic effects of doxorubicin, cisplatin, and cyclophosphamide in male mice.

    PubMed

    Berno, Claudia Rodrigues; Rós, Barbara de Toledo; da Silveira, Ingridhy Ostaciana Maia Freitas; Coelho, Henrique Rodrigues; Antoniolli, Andréia Conceição Milan Brochado; Beatriz, Adilson; de Lima, Dênis Pires; Monreal, Antônio Carlos Duenhas; Sousa, Fabricio Garmus; da Silva Gomes, Roberto; Oliveira, Rodrigo Juliano

    2016-07-01

    The analgesic drug dipyrone is used to treat side effects (including pain and fever) of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Dipyrone is metabolized to 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AA), a PGE2-dependent blocker and inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX). We evaluated the genotoxic, mutagenic, apoptotic, and immunomodulatory activities of 4-AA in vivo and the effects of its combination with the antineoplastic drugs doxorubicin, cisplatin, and cyclophosphamide. 4-AA did not cause genotoxic/mutagenic damage, splenic phagocytosis, or leukocyte alterations. However, when combined with the antineoplastic agents, 4-AA decreased their genotoxic, mutagenic, apoptotic, and phagocytic effects. These results suggest that 4-AA might interfere with DNA damage-mediated chemotherapy. PMID:27402479

  14. Exploring the Molecular Mechanisms of Nickel-Induced Genotoxicity and Carcinogenicity: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Keyuna S.; Buchner, Virginia; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel, a naturally occurring element that exists in various mineral forms, is mainly found in soil and sediment, and its mobilization is influenced by the physicochemical properties of the soil. Industrial sources of nickel include metallurgical processes such as electroplating, alloy production, stainless steel, and nickel-cadmium batteries. Nickel industries, oil- and coal-burning power plants, and trash incinerators have been implicated in its release into the environment. In humans, nickel toxicity is influenced by the route of exposure, dose, and solubility of the nickel compound. Lung inhalation is the major route of exposure for nickel-induced toxicity. Nickel may also be ingested or absorbed through the skin. The primary target organs are the kidneys and lungs. Other organs such as the liver, spleen, heart and testes may also be affected to a lesser extent. Although the most common health effect is an allergic reaction, research has also demonstrated that nickel is carcinogenic to humans. The focus of the present review is on recent research concerning the molecular mechanisms of nickel-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. We first present a background on the occurrence of nickel in the environment, human exposure, and human health effects. PMID:21905451

  15. Reduced LINE-1 methylation is associated with arsenic-induced genotoxic stress in children.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Apurba K; Paul, Somnath; Adak, Shanta; Giri, Ashok K

    2016-08-01

    Early life exposure to arsenic has profound effect towards development of arsenic induced toxic outcomes. Some districts in the state of West Bengal, India are highly affected by arsenic, mainly through ground water. In children, not much of the toxic outcomes like dermatological lesions are observed but it is thought that the exposure leads to transient alteration in their biological processes that leads to various deleterious health effects later on. We evaluated the global methylation status by analyzing the LINE-1 methylation profile in children from arsenic exposed region between the age group 5-15 years along with the cytogenetic stress induced by arsenic as measured by lymphocyte micronucleus (MN) frequency. A total of 52 arsenic exposed and 32 unexposed children were analyzed. Whole blood DNA was used to measure the LINE-1 methylation by qRT-MSP. We found a significant association of MN-frequency in exposed individuals with highly depleted LINE-1 methylation compared to the exposed individuals with near baseline (which was comparable to unexposed control) methylation index as well as with those with the hypermethylated LINE-1 promoters. From our results, we interpret that LINE-1 methylation index may serve as a potent global epigenetic mark to detect the degree of arsenic genotoxicity at a very early age. We propose that this may be utilized to determine the extent of toxic influence exerted by arsenic, from a very early age. PMID:27465741

  16. Substituent effects on the genotoxicity of 4-nitrostilbene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hooberman, B H; Brezzell, M D; Das, S K; You, Z; Sinsheimer, J E

    1994-11-01

    4-Nitrostilbene and twelve of its derivatives (eleven E-stilbenes and two Z-stilbenes) were examined for possible quantitative structure-activity relationships of their in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity. Relative mutagenicity was studied with and without S9 activation in Salmonella strains TA98 and TA100, as well as in the nitroreductase deficient strains TA98/NR and TA100/NR. Chromosomal aberrations in the bone-marrow cells of mice following intraperitoneal administration of the nitrostilbenes were observed as an indicator of in vivo genotoxicity. All of the compounds were active in TA98 and TA100 without S9 activation, with the exception of 4-amino-4'-nitrostilbene in TA100. Mutagenic activity was greatly reduced or eliminated in the NR strains, which is consistent with metabolic activation of the compounds by bacterial reductase. The presence of S9 lowered the activity of most of the nitrostilbenes presumedly by enzymatic detoxication. Hammet values of substituents, partition coefficients and frontier orbital energies (ELUMO and EHOMO) were studied for correlations with mutagenicity of the eleven E-stilbenes. Correlations could be established between mutagenicity in TA98 without S9 activation and the Hammet values. The same mutagenicity could also be correlated to ELUMO. Rationales for these correlations include the concept that electron-withdrawing groups which lower ELUMO should facilitate the reduction of the nitro group, leading to the proximate mutagen hydroxylamine. The correlations are also explained by the concept that electron-withdrawing groups should help stabilize the hydroxylamine intermediate and make the ultimate mutagenic species, the nitrenium ions, more reactive toward DNA. The relationship between mutagenicity and electronic effects of substituent groups found in vitro could not be extended to the in vivo results. However, except for the dinitrostilbenes, where insolubility prevented their testing, all the nitrostilbenes produced a

  17. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity induced by municipal effluent in multiple organs of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Victor Hugo Pereira; de Moura, Carolina Foot Gomes; Ribeiro, Flavia Andressa Pidone; Cesar, Augusto; Pereira, Camilo Dias Seabra; Silva, Marcelo Jose Dias; Vilegas, Wagner; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in multiple organs of rats induced by municipal effluent released by submarine outfall in city of Santos. A total of 20 male Wistar rats were exposed to effluents by drinking water ad libitum at concentrations of 0, 10, 50, and 100 % for 30 days. Microscopic analysis revealed severe lesions such as necrosis and hemorrhagic areas in liver and kidney from animals exposed to effluent at 50 and 100 % concentration. DNA damage in peripheral blood, liver, and kidney cells were detected by comet assay at higher concentrations of effluent. Moreover, a decrease DNA repair capacity was detected in liver cells. Significant statistical differences (p<0.05) for micronucleated cells from liver were noticed at 50 % concentration of effluent. Taken together, our results demonstrate that municipal effluent is able to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in multiple organs of Wistar rats. PMID:24996946

  18. Chemical structure-related mechanisms underlying in vivo genotoxicity induced by nitrofurantoin and its constituent moieties in gpt delta rats.

    PubMed

    Kijima, Aki; Ishii, Yuji; Takasu, Shinji; Matsushita, Kohei; Kuroda, Ken; Hibi, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yuta; Nohmi, Takehiko; Umemura, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Nitrofurans are antimicrobial compounds containing a nitro group at the 5-position of the furan ring and an amine or hydrazide side chain derivative. One member of the nitrofurans, nitrofurantoin (NFT), is a renal carcinogen in male rats despite its still controversial genotoxicity. We investigated chemical structure-related modes of action of NFT, and reporter gene mutation assays for NFT and its constituent moieties were performed. NFT, 5-nitro-2-furaldehyde (NFA), or 1-aminohydantoin (AHD) was administered to male F344 gpt delta rats by gavage for 4 or 13 weeks at a carcinogenic or the maximum tolerated dose. NFT caused a significant increase in gpt mutant frequency (MF) at 13 weeks with G-base substitution mutations. An increase in gpt MF was also observed in the NFA-treated group at 13 weeks, but not in the AHD-treated group. 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in the kidney DNA of NFT-treated rats were significantly increased after 4 weeks. NFT caused accumulation of hyaline droplets indicated by positive immunostaining and western blot analysis for α2u-globulin in the proximal tubules. An additional study, in which female gpt delta rats were given NFT at the same dose used for males, was performed to mitigate the effect of α2u-globulin. NFT exerted the same effects on female rat kidneys to the same extent as males in terms of gpt MF and 8-OHdG level. Thus, it is highly probable that the structure of the nitro furan plays a key role in NFT-induced genotoxicity and genotoxic mechanisms including oxidative DNA damage are involved in NFT-induced renal carcinogenesis. α2u-globulin-mediated nephropathy may be a prerequisite for NFT-induced renal carcinogenesis in male rats, and additionally NFT could be a latent carcinogen in female rats and other animal species. PMID:25772432

  19. Genotoxic damage induced by isopropanol in germinal and somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Ana María; Mudry, Marta Dolores

    2011-12-24

    Isopropanol (isopropyl alcohol, 2-propanol, IPA) is a volatile solvent widely used in domestic or industrial environments and reported as innocuous in various test systems. The aim of this work was to search for in vivo genotoxic effects of IPA in Drosophila melanogaster, studying its ability to induce nondisjunction (ND) in females, sex linked recessive lethals (SLRL) in males, and somatic mutation and/or recombination (SMART) in larvae. Treatments were acute (60min) and were administered via inhalation. IPA had low toxicity in adult flies (75% IPA mortality index, MI=12.7% (females) and 2.6% (males)) and larvae (MI=14.3%, 75% IPA). Female fertility was severely affected during the first 24h (brood I, BI) after treatment, but, afterwards, control values were recovered. IPA induced a 50-fold increase of ND (%) in 24h old females, and a six-fold rise in 4-5 d old BI offspring. Nondisjunction frequencies (%) in the offspring of broods II to V (24h in each case) were similar to control values. IPA doses of 25% and 50% (v/v), tested in 24h old females, showed a significant dose-dependent increase of ND(%)in BI only, with control values in subsequent broods. Flies gave normal offspring when kept in regular media for 24h before mating. The eye spot test (SMART) showed a significant increase at 50% IPA (p<0.05, m=2), but the response was not dose-dependent. IPA failed to induce SLRL in any of the spermatogenesis stages tested. These findings suggest that the main effect of IPA is to induce chromosomal malsegregation; IPA must be present at the resumption of M-phase I after fertilization, to exert these effects. The alcohol does not affect DNA directly, but perturbations of the nuclear membrane may be responsible for induction of ND. PMID:22001194

  20. Pro-oxidant Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells: Homeostatic Mechanisms of Genotoxic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Seager, Anna L.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to many disease etiologies including ageing, neurodegeneration, and cancer, partly through DNA damage induction (genotoxicity). Understanding the i nteractions of free radicals with DNA is fundamental to discern mutation risks. In genetic toxicology, regulatory authorities consider that most genotoxins exhibit a linear relationship between dose and mutagenic response. Yet, homeostatic mechanisms, including DNA repair, that allow cells to tolerate low levels of genotoxic exposure exist. Acceptance of thresholds for genotoxicity has widespread consequences in terms of understanding cancer risk and regulating human exposure to chemicals/drugs. Three pro-oxidant chemicals, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), potassium bromate (KBrO3), and menadione, were examined for low dose-response curves in human lymphoblastoid cells. DNA repair and antioxidant capacity were assessed as possible threshold mechanisms. H2O2 and KBrO3, but not menadione, exhibited thresholded responses, containing a range of nongenotoxic low doses. Levels of the DNA glycosylase 8-oxoguanine glycosylase were unchanged in response to pro- oxidant stress. DNA repair–focused gene expression arrays reported changes in ATM and BRCA1, involved in double-strand break repair, in response to low-dose pro-oxidant exposure; however, these alterations were not substantiated at the protein level. Determination of oxidatively induced DNA damage in H2O2-treated AHH-1 cells reported accumulation of thymine glycol above the genotoxic threshold. Further, the H2O2 dose-response curve was shifted by modulating the antioxidant glutathione. Hence, observed pro- oxidant thresholds were due to protective capacities of base excision repair enzymes and antioxidants against DNA damage, highlighting the importance of homeostatic mechanisms in “genotoxic tolerance.” PMID:22539617

  1. Effect of the nano-bio interface on the genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and associated cellular responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Raju Yashaswi

    Several toxicological studies have shown that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2), one of the most widely produced engineered nanoparticles, can induce genotoxicity; however, potential adverse health effects associated with their physicochemical properties are not fully understood. Proteins in a biological medium can adsorb to the surface of the nanoparticle resulting in the formation of a protein corona that can alter the physicochemical properties of the particle. Furthermore, the protein corona may impact the interaction between nanoparticles and cells, referred to as the nano-bio interface, effecting the uptake, distribution, and toxicity of the particles. Despite the potential influence of the composition of the biological medium on the physicochemical properties and genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, the majority of studies have not examined systematically the influence of medium composition on protein corona, genotoxicity, and cellular responses. In this dissertation we tested the overall hypothesis that titanium dioxide nanoparticles in medium that produces the smallest agglomerates would be taken up into cells and induce genotoxicity, and that exposure would initiate the signaling of key mediators of a DNA damage and inflammation response. Three major findings were shown in this study: 1) Protein corona formation on the surface of nano-TiO2 can impact the nano-bio interface and change cellular interaction. 2) Smaller agglomerates of nano-TiO2 are taken up more by cells without inducing cell cycle arrest, thereby allowing induced DNA damage to be processed into micronuclei in BEAS-2B cells. 3) Nano-TiO 2 in medium that facilitates increased cellular interaction induces the upregulation of the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response (similar to ionizing radiation) and NF-kappaB inflammation pathways. Taken together, our research provides a systematic examination of the physicochemical properties, genotoxicity, and cellular responses induced by

  2. Alternatives to Aroclor 1254-induced S9 in in vitro genotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Elliott, B M; Combes, R D; Elcombe, C R; Gatehouse, D G; Gibson, G G; Mackay, J M; Wolf, R C

    1992-05-01

    A working party was set up by the UK Environmental Mutagen Society to consider alternatives to Aroclor 1254 (Aroclor)-induced S9 in in vitro genotoxicity assays, with the aims of considering whether a replacement for Aroclor in its role in general screening assays could be readily identified. The working party concluded that there was sufficient support in the literature to justify the use of an appropriate phenobarbital/beta-naphthoflavone regime as an acceptable alternative to Aroclor. PMID:1602970

  3. Deltamethrin-induced genotoxicity and testicular injury in rats: comparison with biopesticide.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Manal F; Mohamed, Hanaa M

    2012-10-01

    Deltamethrin is a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide used extensively in pest control. Aim of the current study was to investigate the ability of deltamethrin-based commercial formulation to induce genotoxicity and testicular injury in rats in comparison to the use of the biopesticide; Bacillus thuringiensis. Rats were divided into three groups: Group I (DEL) received deltamethrin, 5 mg/kgb.w./day orally, in corn oil. Group II (Biopesticide, B. thuringiensis) received oral suspension of the biopesticide at daily dose of 8400 mg/kgb.w./day. Group III (Control) received appropriate volume of corn oil. After 4 weeks, deltamethrin-treated rats showed decreased serum testosterone, luteinizing and follicle-stimulating hormone levels. Testicular total oxidant capacity (TOC), poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and DNA damage were significantly increased. Significant increase in bone marrow chromosomal aberrations, induced by deltamethrin, including chromatid breaks, deletions, fragments and gaps was also observed. RT-PCR demonstrated significant up-regulation in testicular mRNA for glutathione-s-transferase and heat-shock protein-70 (HSP-70) whereas steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) mRNA was down-regulated after deltamethrin exposure. Oral administration of the biopesticide, under the condition of our study, was found to be safe when compared to the deleterious effect of deltamethrin in rats. PMID:22889898

  4. Arsenic-induced genotoxicity in Nile tilapia (Orechromis niloticus); the role of Spirulina platensis extract.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Alaa El-Din H; Elbaghdady, Heba Allah M; Zahran, Eman

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is one of the most relevant environmental global single substance toxicants that have long been regarded as a carcinogenic and genotoxic potential. In this respect, we evaluated the cytogenetic effect of arsenic exposure in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), in terms of erythrocyte alteration, apoptosis, and induction of micronuclei. Spirulina platensis (SP) is a filamentous cyanobacterium microalgae with potent dietary phytoantioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancerous properties supplementation. The protective role of Spirulina as supplementary feeds was studied in Nile tilapia (O. niloticus) against arsenic-induced cytogenotoxicity. Four groups were assigned as control group (no SP or As), As group (exposed to water-born As in the form of NaAsO2 at 7 ppm), SP1 (SP at 7.5% + As at the same level of exposure), and SP2 (SP at 10% + As at the same level of exposure). As-treated group had a significant increase in all cytogenetic analyses including erythrocyte alteration, apoptosis, and induction of micronuclei after 2 weeks with continuous increase in response after 3 weeks. The combined treatment of Spirulina at two different concentrations of 7.5 and 10% had significantly declined the induction of erythrocyte alteration, apoptosis, and micronuclei formation induced by arsenic intoxication. PMID:26573688

  5. Proteomic analysis of beryllium-induced genotoxicity in an Escherichia coli mutant model system.

    PubMed

    Taylor-McCabe, Kirsten J; Wang, Zaolin; Sauer, Nancy N; Marrone, Babetta L

    2006-03-01

    Beryllium is the second lightest metal, has a high melting point and high strength-to-weight ratio, and is chemically stable. These unique chemical characteristics make beryllium metal an ideal choice as a component material for a wide variety of applications in aerospace, defense, nuclear weapons, and industry. However, inhalation of beryllium dust or fumes induces significant health effects, including chronic beryllium disease and lung cancer. In this study, the mutagenicity of beryllium sulfate (BeSO(4)) and the comutagenicity of beryllium with a known mutagen 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) were evaluated using a forward mutant detection system developed in Escherichia coli. In this system, BeSO(4) was shown to be weakly mutagenic alone and significantly enhanced the mutagenicity of MNNG up to 3.5-fold over MNNG alone. Based on these results a proteomic study was conducted to identify the proteins regulated by BeSO(4). Using the techniques of 2-DE and oMALDI-TOF MS, we successfully identified 32 proteins being differentially regulated by beryllium and/or MNNG in the E. coli test system. This is the first study to describe the proteins regulated by beryllium in vitro, and the results suggest several potential pathways for the focus of further research into the mechanisms underlying beryllium-induced genotoxicity. PMID:16447159

  6. Comparative efficacy of two microdoses of a potentized homoeopathic drug, Cadmium Sulphoricum, in reducing genotoxic effects produced by cadmium chloride in mice: a time course study

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Swapna S; Mallick, Palash P; Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur AR

    2001-01-01

    Background Cadmium poisoning in the environment has assumed an alarming problem in recent years. Effective antimutagenic agents which can reverse or combat cadmium induced genotoxicity in mice have not yet been reported. Therefore, in the present study, following the homeopathic principle of "like cures like", we tested the efficacy of two potencies of a homeopathic drug, Cadmium Sulphoricum (Cad Sulph), in reducing the genotoxic effects of Cadmium chloride in mice. Another objective was to determine the relative efficacy of three administrative modes, i.e. pre-, post- and combined pre and post-feeding of the homeopathic drugs. For this, healthy mice, Mus musculus, were intraperitoneally injected with 0.008% solution of CdCl2 @ 1 ml/100 gm of body wt (i.e. 0.8 mcg/gm of bw), and assessed for the genotoxic effects through such studies as chromosome aberrations (CA), micronucleated erythrocytes (MNE), mitotic index (MI) and sperm head anomaly (SHA), keeping suitable succussed alcohol fed (positive) and CdCl2 untreated normal (negative) controls. The CdCl2 treated mice were divided into 3 subgroups, which were orally administered with the drug prior to, after and both prior to and after injection of CdCl2 at specific fixation intervals and their genotoxic effects were analyzed. Results While the CA, MNE and SHA were reduced in the drug fed series as compared to their respective controls, the MI showed an apparent increase. The combined pre- and post-feeding of Cad Sulph showed maximum reduction of the genotoxic effects. Conclusions Both Cad Sulph-30 and 200 were able to combat cadmium induced genotoxic effects in mice and that combined pre- and post-feeding mode of administration was found to be most effective in reducing the genotoxic effect of CdCl2 followed by the post-feeding mode. PMID:11737881

  7. Beryllium metal I. experimental results on acute oral toxicity, local skin and eye effects, and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  8. Beryllium Metal I. Experimental Results on Acute Oral Toxicity, Local Skin and Eye Effects, and Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  9. Cyto/Genotoxic Effects of Pistacia atlantica Resin, a Traditional Gum.

    PubMed

    Rahbar Saadat, Yalda; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Saeedi, Nazli; Eskandani, Morteza; Omidi, Yadollah; Barar, Jaleh

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, many researchers have focused on native plants to search for a new source of natural components with medical approach, especially by means of anticancer potential. One of these natural components is Saqez, the resin of Pistacia atlantica sub-kurdica with the local name of Baneh. It has been reported as an anticancer and apoptosis inducer component; therefore, in this research, we aimed to evaluate the solvated resin's possible cyto/genotoxic effects. The cell viability was assessed using MTT assay. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to distinguish the role of apoptosis and necrosis in cell toxicity, which was further confirmed by Comet and DNA ladder assay, and 4,6-diamidino2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Pistacia atlantica's resin decreased the growth of the treated cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and single-strand DNA breaks have been observed through comet assay. Moreover, morphological changes of DAPI-stained cells showed fragmentation in the nucleus of resin-treated cells. In addition, early and late apoptosis in the treated cells was determined by flow cytometry analysis, also DNA ladder assay showed fragmentation in DNA of the treated cells. This study has revealed that the resin has significant cyto/genotoxic effects on cancerous and noncancerous cell lines. Our results show that apoptosis and necrosis are the dominant mechanisms by which the resin affects cell lines. Although the resin of P. atlantica is the main source of mastic gum and has been used for a long time as a natural remedy for different diseases, it is necessary to perform thorough analysis due to its cyto/genotoxicity in vivo. PMID:27196631

  10. Effect of dietary meat and fish on endogenous nitrosation, inflammation and genotoxicity of faecal water.

    PubMed

    Joosen, Annemiek M C P; Lecommandeur, Emmanuelle; Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Aspinall, Sue M; Kap, Lisanne; Rodwell, Sheila A

    2010-05-01

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been associated with reduced colon tumorigenesis. However, their association with colorectal cancer incidence is not conclusive. We investigated the influence of isocaloric replacement of red meat with fatty fish on endogenous nitrosation, inflammation and genotoxicity of faecal water in apparently healthy human volunteers on controlled diets. Fourteen volunteers consumed a high red meat, a combined red meat/fish and a high fish diet for 8 days each. Faecal homogenates were analysed for haem, nitroso compounds (NOC) and calprotectin and associated supernatants for genotoxicity. Both faecal NOC and haem excretion decreased with more fish and less meat in the diet. Nitrosyl iron (FeNO) was the main contributor to total NOC on all diets. The proportion of other NOC increased with more fish and less meat in the diet (P = 0.01), resulting in a non-statistically significant decrease in the proportion of FeNO on the fish diet. There was no statistically significant difference in faecal calprotectin (P = 0.54) and faecal water-induced DNA strand breaks and oxidized purines and pyrimidines between the diets (P > 0.36). Increasing fish intake and reducing the intake of red meat does not seem to have an effect on inflammation and faecal water-induced (oxidative) DNA damage; however, it does reduce the formation of mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic NOC and may as such beneficially affect colorectal risk. PMID:20106932

  11. Cytotoxic, Genotoxic, and Neurotoxic Effects of Mg, Pb, and Fe on Pheochromocytoma (PC-12) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Talia; Liu, Yi-Ming; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Metals such as lead (Pb), magnesium (Mg), and iron (Fe) are ubiquitous in the environment as a result of natural occurrence and anthropogenic activities. Although Mg, Fe and others are considered essential elements, high level of exposure has been associated with severe adverse health effects including cardiovascular, hematological, nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, and neurologic abnormalities in humans. In the present study we hypothesized that Mg, Pb, and Fe are cytotoxic, genotoxic and neurotoxic, and their toxicity is mediated through oxidative stress and alteration in protein expression. To test the hypothesis, we used the pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cell line as a neuro cell model and performed the LDH assay for cell viability, Comet assay for DNA damage, Western blot for oxidative stress, and HPLC-MS to assess the concentration levels of neurological biomarkers such as glutamate, dopamine (DA), and 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT). The results of this study clearly show that Mg, Pb, and Fe, respectively in the form of MgSO4, Pb(NO3)2, FeCl2, and FeCl3 induce cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity in PC-12 cells. In addition, exposure to these metallic compounds caused significant changes in the concentration levels of glutamate, dopamine, and 3-MT in PC-12 cells. Taken together the findings suggest that MgSO4, Pb(NO3)2, FeCl2, and FeCl3 have the potential to induce substantial toxicity to PC-12 cells. PMID:24942330

  12. New ventures in the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of macrocyclic lactones, abamectin and ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Molinari, G; Soloneski, S; Larramendy, M L

    2010-01-01

    Abamectin and Ivermectin are 2 closely related members of the Avermectin family of 16-membered macrocyclic lactones derived from the actinomycete Streptomyces avermectinius which exhibit extraordinary anthelmintic activity. They are used worldwide in veterinary and human medicine as well as in agriculture. In the present review we summarized the results published so far for estimating the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity exerted by both compounds in several cellular systems. Although both compounds do not induce in vitro and in vivo gene mutations in either bacterial or mammalian cells, there is no concrete evidence of a clear clastogenic effect exerted both in vitro and in vivo in mammalian cells. However, reports indicating that both anthelmintic agents are able to induce single DNA-strand breaks in vitro and inhibit cell growth either in vitro or in in vivo bioassays, are scarce. Taking into account the similarity of the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity exerted by both antibiotics, and that only Abamectin has been classified so far as a class II toxicity pesticide by the EPA, the necessity of reconsideration for a further hazard evaluation of Ivermectin by an international regulatory agency(ies) is strongly recommended. PMID:20389039

  13. Genotoxicity induced by Roundup® (Glyphosate) in tegu lizard (Salvator merianae) embryos.

    PubMed

    Schaumburg, Laura G; Siroski, Pablo A; Poletta, Gisela L; Mudry, Marta D

    2016-06-01

    Environmental contaminants produce multiple adverse consequences at individual, population and ecosystem levels. High volumes of agrochemicals applied to great variety of crops, together with agricultural expansion, generate great concerns due to the impact for the environment and large risk implicated for wildlife. The lack of data on these threats is striking. The tegu lizard (Salvator merianae) is one of the species that live in environments under contaminant effects. Several characteristics allow proposing this species as a potential sentinel organism for the monitoring of pesticides in their habitat. The present study is the first report about genotoxicity in tegu lizard neonates after embryonic exposure to Roundup® (glyphosate 66.2%). The micronucleus test (MN), nuclear abnormalities (NAs) assay and comet assay (CA) were used as biomarkers of genotoxic effects induced in erythrocytes by topical exposure of the eggs to the glyphosate commercial formulation Roundup® (RU), in laboratory controlled conditions. A total of 96 eggs were distributed in six groups exposed to RU (50, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600μg/egg), one positive control (PC; 200μg cyclophosphamide/egg) and one negative control (NC; distilled water). No teratogenic effects were observed in any of the exposed or control neonates. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed in all concentrations higher than 100μg/egg with respect to NC (p<0.05). However, no statistical differences were found in the frequencies of MN and NAs in any group exposed to RU compared to the NC. No statistically significant differences were found in the size of the lizards at birth or after six months post-exposure (p>0.05). Our results provide new information about the undesirable effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide formulations RU on this lizard species that inhabits areas permanently exposed to several pesticide formulations. We consider of utmost necessity a strict regulation of the agrochemical application

  14. Chemopreventive effect of cactus Opuntia ficus indica on oxidative stress and genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is potent hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic agent. In aflatoxicosis, oxidative stress is a common mechanism contributing to initiation and progression of hepatic damage. The aim of this work was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of cactus cladode extract (CCE) on aflatoxin B1-induced liver damage in mice by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) level, the protein carbonyls generation and the heat shock proteins Hsp 70 and Hsp 27 expressions in liver. We also looked for an eventual protective effect against AFB1-induced genotoxicity as determined by chromosome aberrations test, SOS Chromotest and DNA fragmentation assay. We further evaluated the modulation of p53, bax and bcl2 protein expressions in liver. Methods Adult, healthy balbC (20-25 g) male mice were pre-treated by intraperitonial administration of CCE (50 mg/Kg.b.w) for 2 weeks. Control animals were treated 3 days a week for 4 weeks by intraperitonial administration of 250 μg/Kg.b.w AFB1. Animals treated by AFB1 and CCE were divided into two groups: the first group was administrated CCE 2 hours before each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The second group was administrated without pre-treatment with CCE but this extract was administrated 24 hours after each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. Results Our results clearly showed that AFB1 induced significant alterations in oxidative stress markers. In addition, it has a genotoxic potential and it increased the expression of pro apoptotic proteins p53 and bax and decreased the expression of bcl2. The treatment of CCE before or after treatment with AFB1, showed (i) a total reduction of AFB1 induced oxidative damage markers, (ii) an anti-genotoxic effect resulting in an efficient prevention of chromosomal aberrations and DNA fragmentation compared to the group treated with AFB1 alone (iii) restriction of the effect of AFB1 by differential modulation of the expression of p53 which decreased as well as its

  15. Chromium oxide nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity and p53-dependent apoptosis in human lung alveolar cells.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Violet Aileen; Jain, Abhishek Kumar; Gupta, Govind Sharan; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-10-01

    Chromium oxide (Cr2 O3 ) nanoparticles (NPs) are being increasingly used as a catalyst for aromatic compound manufacture, abrading agents and as pigments (e.g., Viridian). Owing to increased applications, it is important to study the biological effects of Cr2 O3 NPs on human health. The lung is one of the main exposure routes to nanomaterials; therefore, the present study was designed to determine the genotoxic and apoptotic effect of Cr2 O3 NPs in human lung epithelial cells (A549). The study also elucidated the molecular mechanism of its toxicity. Cr2 O3 NPs led to DNA damage, which was deduced by comet assay and cytokinesis block micronucleus assay. The damage could be mediated by the increased levels of reactive oxygen species. Further, the oxygen species led to a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in the ratio of BAX/Bcl-2 leading to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis induced by Cr2 O3 NPs, which ultimately leads to cell death. Hence, there is a need of regulations to be imposed in NP usage. The study provided insight into the caspase-dependent mechanistic pathway of apoptosis. PMID:26086747

  16. Histopathological, oxidative damage, biochemical, and genotoxicity alterations in hepatic rats exposed to deltamethrin: modulatory effects of garlic (Allium sativum).

    PubMed

    Ncir, Marwa; Ben Salah, Ghada; Kamoun, Hassen; Makni Ayadi, Fatma; Khabir, Abdelmajid; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Saoudi, Mongi

    2016-06-01

    Deltamethrin is a pesticide widely used as a synthetic pyrethroid. The aim of this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of deltamethrin to induce oxidative stress and changes in biochemical parameters, hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity in female rats following a short-term (30 days) oral exposure and attenuation of these effects by Allium sativum extract. Indeed, Allium sativum is known to be a good antioxidant food resource which helps destroy free radical particles. Our results showed that deltamethrin treatment caused an increase in liver enzyme activities of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH); and hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO) level. However, it induced a decrease in activities of hepatic catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (p < 0.01). Allium sativum extract normalized significantly (p < 0.01) the mentioned parameters in deltamethrin-treated rats. For genotoxic evaluation, deltamethrin treatment showed a significant increase in frequencies of micronucleus in bone-marrow cells. Micronucleus formation is an indicator of chromosomal damage which has been increasingly used to detect the genotoxic potential of environmental pests. The present study showed that Allium sativum diminished the adverse effects induced by this synthetic pyrethroid insecticide. PMID:26974685

  17. Genotoxic effects of acrylamide and glycidamide in mouse lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mei, Nan; Hu, Jiaxiang; Churchwell, Mona I; Guo, Lei; Moore, Martha M; Doerge, Daniel R; Chen, Tao

    2008-02-01

    In addition to occupational exposures to acrylamide (AA), concerns about AA health risks for the general population have been recently raised due to the finding of AA in food. In this study, we evaluated the genotoxicity of AA and its metabolite glycidamide (GA) in L5178Y/Tk(+/-) mouse lymphoma cells. The cells were treated with 2-18 mM of AA or 0.125-4 mM of GA for 4 h without metabolic activation. The DNA adducts, mutant frequencies and the types of mutations for the treated cells were examined. Within the dose range tested, GA induced DNA adducts of adenine and guanine [N3-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-adenine and N7-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-guanine] in a linear dose-dependent manner. The levels of guanine adducts were consistently about 60-fold higher across the dose range than those of adenine. In contrast, no GA-derived DNA adducts were found in the cells treated with any concentrations of AA, consistent with a lack of metabolic conversion of AA to GA. However, the mutant frequency was significantly increased by AA at concentrations of 12 mM and higher. GA was mutagenic starting with the 2mM dose, suggesting that GA is much more mutagenic than AA. The mutant frequencies were increased with increasing concentrations of AA and GA, mainly due to an increase of proportion of small colony mutants. To elucidate the underlying mutagenic mechanism, we examined the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at four microsatellite loci spanning the entire chromosome 11 for mutants induced by AA or GA. Compared to GA induced mutations, AA induced more mutants whose LOH extended to D11Mit22 and D11Mit74, an alteration of DNA larger than half of the chromosome. Statistical analysis of the mutational spectra revealed a significant difference between the types of mutations induced by AA and GA treatments (P=0.018). These results suggest that although both AA and GA generate mutations through a clastogenic mode of action in mouse lymphoma cells, GA induces mutations via a DNA adduct

  18. Reduction of chrysotile asbestos-induced genotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by garlic extract.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kunal; Yadava, Santosh; Papp, Thilo; Schiffmann, Dietmar; Rahman, Qamar

    2004-11-28

    Asbestos fibers are well known environmental carcinogen, however, the underlying mechanisms of their action have still not clearly been identified. Asbestos is capable of depleting glutathione and generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are important mediators of damage in biological system. Asbestos-induced mutagenecity, may be mediated by the generation. It is known that a number of scavengers and antioxidants attenuate asbestos-induced ROS release. Furthermore, it is known that garlic, contains numerous sulfur compounds and glutathione precursors which act as antioxidants and also demonstrate anticarcinogenic properties. The aim of this study was to investigate whether garlic extract has any influence on asbestos-mediated genotoxicity. As an assay system, we applied the micronucleus assay, sister chromatid exchanges, and chromosomal aberrations with human peripheral blood lymphocytes, which has already been used to analyze the genotoxicity of asbestos fibers. Our results indicate that garlic extract, when administered to the lymphocytes cell culture simultaneously with chrysotile reduced the rates of micronucleus formation, sister chromatid exchanges, and chromosomal aberrations significantly. We conclude that garlic extract may be an efficient, physiologically tolerable quencher of asbestos-mediated genotoxicity. PMID:15454308

  19. Antigenotoxic effect of green-synthesised silver nanoparticles from Ocimum sanctum leaf extract against cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity in human lymphocytes—in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaya, P. P.; Rekha, B.; Mathew, Anu Thersa; Syed Ali, M.; Yogananth, N.; Anuradha, V.; Kalitha Parveen, P.

    2014-04-01

    The present study was aimed to identify the antigenotoxic effect of bio-synthesised silver nanoparticles (SNP) of Ocimum sanctum leaf extract against cyclophosphamide (CP). We tested the antigenotoxic effect of bio-synthesized silver nanoparticles of O. sanctum leaf extract on human lymphocytes against CP by using chromosomal aberration assay (CAA). Silver nanoparticles was first synthesized from fresh leaf extract of O. sanctum and characterised. Their quality was checked by XRD technique and morphology by SEM. Three different doses of the bio-synthesised SNPs namely, 50, 100 and 200 μl/ml were selected and CP (100 μg/ml) was used as a positive control for CAA. CP administration to human lymphocytes culture caused reduction in mitotic index (MI) and increase in chromosomal damages. The three doses (50, 100 and 200 μl/ml) significantly ( P < 0.005) reduced the chromosomal damages by CP and there was increase in MI. The biological way of synthesising SNPs has advantages like cost effectiveness and eco-friendly. Also the bio-synthesised SNPs of O. sanctum leaf extract was found to be an powerful genoprotectant. Furthermore works are to be carried out in future to find the extract mechanism of its genoprotective nature.

  20. Suppressive effect of post- or pre-treatment of aspirin metabolite on mitomycin C-induced genotoxicity using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, Miki; Shin, Seizai; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2007-01-01

    In our previous paper, we found that aspirin suppressed in a somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of mitomycin C (MMC) in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to reveal the mechanism of bio-antimutagenicity and/or preventive effect of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressive ability of each aspirin metabolite, such as salicylic acid (SA), salicyluric acid (SUA), gentisic acid (GA), gentisuric acid (GUA) and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), in SMART in D. melanogaster using post- and pre-treatments. As for the post-treatment, SA reduced the numbers of large single and twin spots. GA reduced the small single and large single spots, and GUA reduced the single spots, large single and twin spots. The inhibition of GUA is slightly stronger than that of any other metabolites; the inhibition percentage is 49 at the dose of 5 mg/bottle. On the other hand, as for the pre-treatment, aspirin, SUA, GA and DHBA reduced the numbers of small single spots. SUA, GE and DHBA reduced the number of large single spots. Aspirin and its metabolites did not reduce the number of twin spots. The results of the present study suggest that SA, GA and GUA repair or replicate DNA-damage by MMC and SUA, GA, GUA and DHBA prevent DNA-damage by MMC. It is suggested that secondary cancer is prevented by aspirin post-treatment without losing the medicinal effectiveness (anti-tumor activity). Therefore, we consider there are effective doses and/or administration timing of aspirin and MMC to prevent secondary cancer. PMID:17275250

  1. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Exposed In Vitro to Neonicotinoid Insecticides News

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Segura, María Elena; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Martínez-Valenzuela, Carmen; Carbajal-López, Yolanda; Calderón-Ezquerro, María del Carmen; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; García-Martínez, Rocío; Flores-Ramírez, Diana; Rodríguez-Romero, María Isabel; Méndez-Pérez, Patricia; Bañuelos-Ruíz, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calypso (thiacloprid), Poncho (clothianidin), Gaucho (imidacloprid), and Jade (imidacloprid) are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5 × 10−6 to 5.7 × 10−5 M Jade; 2.8 × 10−4 to 1.7 × 10−3 M Gaucho; 0.6 × 10−1 to 1.4 × 10−1 M Calypso; 1.2 × 10−1 to 9.5 × 10−1 M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18 × 10−3 M Jade, 2.0 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.0 × 10−1 M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30 × 10−3 M Jade, 3.3 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.8 × 10−1 M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides. PMID:22545045

  2. Genotoxicity of neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster. Somatic mutation and recombination induced by reactor neutrons.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Rincón, J; Delfín-Loya, A; Ureña-Núñez, F; Paredes, L C; Zambrano-Achirica, F; Graf, U

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the observation of a direct relationship between the absorbed doses of neutrons and the frequencies of somatic mutation and recombination using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of Drosophila melanogaster. This test was used for evaluating the biological effects induced by neutrons from the Triga Mark III reactor of Mexico. Two different reactor power levels were used, 300 and 1000 kW, and two absorbed doses were tested for each power level: 1.6 and 3.2 Gy for 300 kW and 0.84 and 1.7 Gy for 1000 kW. A linear relationship was observed between the absorbed dose and the somatic mutation and recombination frequencies. Furthermore, these frequencies were dependent on larval age: In 96-h-old larvae, the frequencies were increased considerably but the sizes of the spots were smaller than in 72-h-old larvae. The analysis of the balancer-heterozygous progeny showed a linear absorbed dose- response relationship, although the responses were clearly lower than found in the marker-trans-heterozygous flies. Approximately 65% of the genotoxicity observed is due to recombinational events. The results of the study indicate that thermal and fast neutrons are both mutagenic and recombinagenic in the D. melanogaster wing SMART, and that the frequencies are dependent on neutron dose, reactor power, and the age of the treated larvae. PMID:16038586

  3. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Induce Cytotoxicity, Genotoxicity And Apoptosis In Normal Human Dermal Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Knighten, Brionna; Tchounwou, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Multi walled carbon nanotubes [MWCNT's] have won enormous popularity in nanotechnology. Due to their unusual one dimensional, hollow nanostructure and unique physicochemical properties they are highly desirable for use within the commercial, environmental and medical sectors. Despite their wide application, there is a lack of information concerning their impact on human health and the environment. While nanotechnology looms large with commercial promise and potential benefit, an equally large issue is the evaluation of potential effects on humans and other biological systems. Our research is focused on cellular response to purified MWCNT in normal human dermal fibroblast cells (NHDF). Three doses (40, 200, 400 μg/ml) of MWCNT and control (tween-80 + 0.9% saline) were used in this study. Following exposure to MWCNT, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and apoptosis assays were performed using standard protocols. Our results demonstrated a dose-dependent toxicity with MWCNT. It was found to be toxic and induced massive loss of cell viability through DNA damage and programmed cell-death of all doses compared to control. Our results demonstrate that carbon nanotubes indeed can be very toxic at sufficiently high concentrations and that careful monitoring of toxicity studies is essential for risk assessment. PMID:20521388

  4. Genotoxicity Effects in Freshwater Fish from a Brazilian Impacted River.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Isac Silva; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Bezerra, Marcos de Almeida; Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes de Mello

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the incidence of nuclear abnormalities (NA) in four fish species from an impacted river in Northeastern Brazil, characterized by accumulation of heavy metals and organic sewage. Two carnivores (Serrasalmus brandtii and Hoplias malabaricus) and two omnivore species (Oreochromis niloticus and Geophagus brasiliensis), used as food sources by local populations, were collected during the dry and the rainy season along Contas River basin. Nuclear abnormalities (bulbs, binuclei, lobes, micronuclei, notches, and vacuoles) were reported in all fish samples, with high occurrence in S. brandtii and H. malabaricus, species commonly found in local fish markets. This result agrees with previous analyses of accumulation of trace metals in both species, suggesting an association of genotoxic effects and biomagnification. Moreover, native specimens collected near urban areas presented higher frequencies of NA while O. niloticus seems to be more tolerant to environmental contamination. Therefore, effective policies are required to reduce the contamination of Contas River, since pollution by xenobiotics are potential threats to both local biodiversity and human population. PMID:26894492

  5. Studies of the potential genotoxic effects of furoxans: the case of CAS 1609 and of the water-soluble analogue of CHF 2363.

    PubMed

    Balbo, S; Lazzarato, L; Di Stilo, A; Fruttero, R; Lombaert, N; Kirsch-Volders, M

    2008-04-21

    CAS 1609 (compound 1) and CHF 2363 (compound 2) are two furoxan derivatives able to release nitric oxide (NO) under physiological conditions, and display typical NO-dependent vasodilator activity. The potential genotoxic effects of compound 1 and of the water-soluble analogue of CHF 2363 (compound 2a) were investigated. The results show that the two compounds induce genotoxic effects only at concentrations that significantly reduce cell viability. However, in the case of compound 1 this range of concentrations is one order of magnitude higher than the one leading to the beneficial effects, while in the case of compound 2a these ranges partially overlap. In both cases the release of NO plays a key role in the induction of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects, since the non-NO-donating furazan analogues display a different toxicological profile, and since the effects were reduced in the presence of oxyhaemoglobin, a well-known NO-scavenger. PMID:18378101

  6. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of beta-carotene breakdown products on primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Alija, A J; Bresgen, N; Sommerburg, O; Siems, W; Eckl, P M

    2004-05-01

    According to Siems and colleagues, free radical attack on beta-carotene results in the formation of high amounts of cleavage products with prooxidant activities towards subcellular organelles such as mitochondria. This finding may be an explanation for the contradictory results obtained with beta-carotene in clinical efficacy and cancer prevention trials. Since primary hepatocytes proved to be very sensitive indicators of the genotoxic action of suspect mutagens/carcinogens we therefore investigated a beta-carotene cleavage products mixture (CP), apo8'- carotenal (apo8') and beta-carotene utilizing primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. The end-points tested were: the mitotic index, the percentage of necrotic and apoptotic cells, micronucleated cells, chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). Our results indicate a genotoxic potential of both CP and apo8' already at the concentrations 100 nM and 1 microM, i.e. at pathophysiologically relevant levels of beta-carotene and beta-carotene breakdown products. A 3 h treatment with CP induced statistically significant levels of micronuclei at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10 microM and chromosomal aberrations at concentrations of 1, 5 and 10 microM. Apo8' induced statistically significant levels of micronuclei at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 5 microM and chromosomal aberrations at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10 microM. Statistically significant increases in SCE induction were only observed at a concentration of 10 microM CP and apo8'. In contrast, no significant cytotoxic effects of these substances were observed. Since beta-carotene induced neither significant cytotoxic nor genotoxic effects at concentrations ranging from 0.01 up to 10 microM, these observations indicate that most likely beta-carotene breakdown products are responsible for the occurrence of carcinogenic effects found in the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study and the Beta-CArotene and RETinol Efficacy Trial

  7. MWCNT uptake in Allium cepa root cells induces cytotoxic and genotoxic responses and results in DNA hyper-methylation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Manosij; Bhadra, Sreetama; Adegoke, Aremu; Bandyopadhyay, Maumita; Mukherjee, Anita

    2015-04-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have led to the large-scale production of nanoparticles, which, in turn, increases the chances of environmental exposure. While humans (consumers/workers) are primarily at risk of being exposed to the adverse effect of nanoparticles, the effect on plants and other components of the environment cannot be ignored. The present work investigates the cytotoxic, genotoxic, and epigenetic (DNA methylation) effect of MWCNT on the plant system- Allium cepa. MWCNT uptake in root cells significantly altered cellular morphology. Membrane integrity and mitochondrial function were also compromised. The nanotubes induced significant DNA damage, micronucleus formation and chromosome aberration. DNA laddering assay revealed the formation of internucleosomal fragments, which is indicative of apoptotic cell death. This finding was confirmed by an accumulation of cells in the sub-G0 phase of the cell cycle. An increase in CpG methylation was observed using the isoschizomers MspI/HpaII. HPLC analysis of DNA samples revealed a significant increase in the levels of 5-methyl-deoxy-cytidine (5mdC). These results confirm the cyto-genotoxic effect of MWCNT in the plant system and simultaneously highlight the importance of this epigenetic study in nanoparticle toxicity. PMID:25829105

  8. Role of quercetin on mitomycin C induced genotoxicity: analysis of micronucleus and chromosome aberrations in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Mehnaz; Giri, Sarbani; Giri, Anirudha

    2011-04-01

    Quercetin, a flavonol group of plant flavonoid, has generated immense interest because of its potential antioxidant, anti-proliferative, chemoprotective, anti-inflammatory and gene expression modulating properties. However, the pro-oxidant chemistry of quercetin is important as it is related to the generation of mutagenic quinone-type metabolites. In the present study, 25mg/kg, 50mg/kg and 100mg/kg of quercetin given through the intra peritoneal (i.p.) route induced 2.31 ± 0.27%, 4.72 ± 0.58% and 6.38 ± 0.68% (control value=0.67 ± 0.30%) respectively, of cells with micronucleus (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes in bone marrow cells and 10.93 ± 0.98%, 10.00 ± 0.89% and 14.27 ± 3.94% (control 2.61 ± 0.48) of cells with chromosome aberrations (CA) following 24h of the treatments. Higher frequencies of MN and CA were also observed after 48h of the treatments. To verify the effect of route of treatment on the quercetin induced damage, 100mg/kg b.w. was given through oral route which declined frequency of MN (P<0.001) as well as CA (P<0.05) as compared to the i.p. route for the same dose. Quercetin also induced higher frequency of metaphases with sticky chromosomes and C-mitosis. Pre-treatment with quercetin significantly reduced the frequency of mitomycin C (MMC) induced MN as well as CA, but no clear correlation between the dose and effect could be observed. Further studies are required to elucidate the possible interaction of quercetin with DNA as well as with other DNA damaging agents like MMC in vivo. The protective action of quercetin was not enhanced when given orally. Our findings suggest that quercetin may result in genomic instability in the tested dose range and significant reduction in MMC induced genotoxicity in the highest dose tested. These effects of quercetin are to be taken into consideration while evaluating the possible use of quercetin as a therapeutic agent. PMID:21256974

  9. Organic extracts of urban air pollution particulate matter (PM2.5)-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in human lung bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells).

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Min; Kim, Ha Ryong; Park, Yong Joo; Lee, Soo Yeun; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2011-08-16

    Traffic is a major source of particulate matter (PM), and ultrafine particulates and traffic intensity probably contribute significantly to PM-related health effects. As a strong relationship between air pollution and motor vehicle-originated pollutants has been shown to exist, air pollution genotoxicity studies of urban cities are steadily increasing. In Korea, the death rate caused by lung cancer is the most rapidly increased cancer death rate in the past 10 years. In this study, genotoxicity of PM2.5 (<2.5μm in aerodynamic diameter particles) collected from the traffic area in Suwon City, Korea, was studied using cultured human lung bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) as a model system for the potential inhalation health effects. Organic extract of PM2.5 (CE) generated significant DNA breakage and micronucleus formation in a dose-dependent manner (1μg/cm(3)-50μg/cm(3)). In the acid-base-neutral fractionation of PM2.5, neutral samples including the aliphatic (F3), aromatic (F4) and slightly polar (F5) fractions generated significant DNA breakage and micronucleus formation. These genotoxic effects were significantly blocked by scavenging agents [superoxide dismutase (SOD), sodium selenite (SS), mannitol (M), catalase (CAT)]. In addition, in the modified Comet assay using endonucleases (FPG and ENDOIII), CE and its fractions (F3, F4, and F5) increased DNA breakage compared with control groups, indicating that CE and fractions of PM2.5 induced oxidative DNA damage. These results clearly suggest that PM2.5 collected in the Suwon traffic area has genotoxic effects and that reactive oxygen species may play a distinct role in these effects. In addition, aliphatic/chlorinated hydrocarbons, PAH/alkylderivatives, and nitro-PAH/ketones/quinones may be important causative agents of the genotoxic effects. PMID:21524716

  10. Nitroxide TEMPO: a genotoxic and oxidative stress inducer in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A; Guo, Lei; Shaddock, Joseph G; Heflich, Robert H; Bigger, Anita H; Moore, Martha M; Mei, Nan

    2013-08-01

    2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) is a low molecular weight nitroxide and stable free radical. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of TEMPO in mammalian cells using the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and in vitro micronucleus assay. In the absence of metabolic activation (S9), 3mM TEMPO produced significant cytotoxicity and marginal mutagenicity in the MLA; in the presence of S9, treatment of mouse lymphoma cells with 1-2mM TEMPO resulted in dose-dependent decreases of the relative total growth and increases in mutant frequency. Treatment of TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells with 0.9-2.3mM TEMPO increased the frequency of both micronuclei (a marker for clastogenicity) and hypodiploid nuclei (a marker of aneugenicity) in a dose-dependent manner; greater responses were produced in the presence of S9. Within the dose range tested, TEMPO induced reactive oxygen species and decreased glutathione levels in mouse lymphoma cells. In addition, the majority of TEMPO-induced mutants had loss of heterozygosity at the Tk locus, with allele loss of ⩽34Mbp. These results indicate that TEMPO is mutagenic in the MLA and induces micronuclei and hypodiploid nuclei in TK6 cells. Oxidative stress may account for part of the genotoxicity induced by TEMPO in both cell lines. PMID:23517621

  11. Acute and chronic effects of erythromycin exposure on oxidative stress and genotoxicity parameters of Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, S; Antunes, S C; Correia, A T; Nunes, B

    2016-03-01

    Erythromycin (ERY) is a macrolide antibiotic used in human and veterinary medicine, and has been detected in various aquatic compartments. Recent studies have indicated that this compound can exert biological activity on non-target organisms environmentally exposed. The present study aimed to assess the toxic effects of ERY in Oncorhynchus mykiss after acute and chronic exposures. The here adopted strategy involved exposure to three levels of ERY, the first being similar to concentrations reported to occur in the wild, thus ecologically relevant. Catalase (CAT), total glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRed) activities and lipid peroxidation (TBARS levels) were quantified as oxidative stress biomarkers in gills and liver. Genotoxic endpoints, reflecting different types of genetic damage in blood cells, were also determined, by performing analysis of genetic damage (determination of the genetic damage index, GDI, measured by comet assay) and of erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENAs). The results suggest the occurrence of a mild, but significant, oxidative stress scenario in gills. For acutely exposed organisms, significant alterations were observed in CAT and GRed activities, and also in TBARS levels, which however are modifications with uncertain biological interpretation, despite indicating involvement of an oxidative effect and response. After chronic exposure, a significant decrease of CAT activity, increase of GPx activity and TBARS levels in gills was noticed. In liver, significant decrease in TBARS levels were observed in both exposures. Comet and ENAs assays indicated significant increases on genotoxic damage of O. mykiss, after erythromycin exposures. This set of data (acute and chronic) suggests that erythromycin has the potential to induce DNA strand breaks in blood cells, and demonstrate the induction of chromosome breakage and/or segregational abnormalities. Overall results indicate that both DNA damaging effects induced by

  12. Genotoxic effects of two nickel-compounds in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Erico R; Creus, Amadeu; Marcos, R

    2011-01-10

    In view of the scarcely available information on the in vivo mutagenic and co-mutagenic activity of nickel, the genotoxic potential of two nickel-compounds, nickel chloride (NiCl(2)) and nickel sulphate (NiSO(4)), was assessed in Drosophila melanogaster by measuring two different genetic endpoints. On the one hand, we used the wing-spot assay, which is based on the principle that the loss of heterozygosity of two suitable recessive markers, multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare-3 (flr(3)), can lead to the formation of mutant clones in the imaginal disks of larval cells. On the other hand, the in vivo comet assay, which detects single- and double-strand DNA breaks, was also used with larval haemocytes. These cells offer several advantages: they are highly sensitive to genotoxic agents, the sampling and processing methodologies are quite simple and the level of basal DNA damage is relatively low. No significant increases in the frequencies of the three categories of mutant spots (i.e. small single spots, large single spots, and twin spots) were observed in the wing-spot assay; however, NiSO(4) induced significant dose-dependent increases in DNA damage in the comet assay. In addition, the combined treatments with gamma-radiation and NiCl(2) and NiSO(4) showed a slight but significant increase in the frequency of the three categories of mutant spots compared with the frequency induced by gamma-radiation alone, indicating that both nickel compounds have a synergistic interaction. These results support the assumption that both nickel compounds could act as co-mutagens interfering with DNA-repair processes and that the in vivo comet assay is a sensitive and effective method for detecting the DNA damage induced by NiSO(4) in haemocytes of D. melanogaster. PMID:21073980

  13. In vitro genotoxic effects of different combinations of cobalt and metallic carbide particles.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Marlies; Lombaert, Noömi; De Backer, Sofie; Finsy, Robert; Lison, Dominique; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline

    2003-03-01

    Occupational exposure to hard metal dust, consisting of tungsten carbide (WC) and metallic cobalt particles (Co), is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, while no increased risk was observed in workers exposed to Co alone. In vitro, in human peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC), we previously demonstrated that WC-Co is more genotoxic than Co and WC alone. A possible mechanism underlying this higher genotoxicity is a specific physicochemical interaction between Co and WC particles leading to the enhanced short-term formation of active oxygen species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro genotoxicity of other combinations of Co with metal carbide particles in comparison with WC-Co. The ability of Cr(3)C(2), Mo(2)C and NbC and of their powder mixtures with Co to induce DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites was assessed by the alkaline Comet assay and their potential to induce chromosome(/genome) mutations by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus test on human PBMC from two donors. PBMC were treated in vitro for 15 min, 24 h after the onset of PHA stimulation. In the micronucleus test, while the metal carbides alone did not increase the micronucleus frequency, Co alone and the four tested carbide-Co mixtures induced a statistically significant concentration-dependent increase in micronucleated binucleates. In addition to WC, NbC and Cr(3)C(2) particles were able to interact with Co, producing a higher mutagenic effect than the individual metal particles. Mo(2)C particles did not display interactive mutagenicity with Co in the micronucleus test, possibly related to their small specific surface area, compactness and/or spherical shape. With the Comet assay, applied directly at the end of the treatment, less clear results, due to inter-experimental and inter-donor variation, were obtained. These data indicate that particular interaction of a metal carbide with Co leading to enhanced mutagenicity is not specific for WC. PMID:12621074

  14. Lead-induced genotoxicity to Vicia faba L. roots in relation with metal cell uptake and initial speciation.

    PubMed

    Shahid, M; Pinelli, E; Pourrut, B; Silvestre, J; Dumat, C

    2011-01-01

    Formation of organometallic complexes in soil solution strongly influence metals phytoavailability. However, only few studies deal with the influence of metal speciation both on plant uptake and genotoxicity. In the present study, Vicia faba seedlings were exposed for 6h in controlled hydroponic conditions to 5 μM of lead nitrate alone and chelated to varying degrees by different organic ligands. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and citric acid were, respectively, chosen as models of humic substances and low weight organic acids present in natural soil solutions. Visual Minteq software was used to estimate free lead cations concentration and ultimately to design the experimental layout. For all experimental conditions, both micronucleus test and measure of lead uptake by plants were finally performed. Chelation of Pb by EDTA, a strong chelator, dose-dependently increased the uptake in V. faba roots while its genotoxicity was significantly reduced, suggesting a protective role of EDTA. A weak correlation was observed between total lead concentration absorbed by roots and genotoxicity (r(2)=0.65). In contrast, a strong relationship (r(2)=0.93) exists between Pb(2+) concentration in exposure media and genotoxicity in the experiment performed with EDTA. Citric acid induced labile organometallic complexes did not demonstrate any significant changes in lead genotoxicity or uptake. These results demonstrate that metal speciation knowledge could improve the interpretation of V. faba genotoxicity test performed to test soil quality. PMID:20851467

  15. Acute dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence and renders osteosarcoma cells resistant to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ping; Mobasher, Maral E.; Alawi, Faizan

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence in U2OS osteosarcoma cells. • Dyskerin-depleted cells are resistant to apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress. • Chromatin relaxation sensitizes dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. - Abstract: Dyskerin is a conserved, nucleolar RNA-binding protein implicated in an increasing array of fundamental cellular processes. Germline mutation in the dyskerin gene (DKC1) is the cause of X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Conversely, wild-type dyskerin is overexpressed in sporadic cancers, and high-levels may be associated with poor prognosis. It was previously reported that acute loss of dyskerin function via siRNA-mediated depletion slowed the proliferation of transformed cell lines. However, the mechanisms remained unclear. Using human U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we show that siRNA-mediated dyskerin depletion induced cellular senescence as evidenced by proliferative arrest, senescence-associated heterochromatinization and a senescence-associated molecular profile. Senescence can render cells resistant to apoptosis. Conversely, chromatin relaxation can reverse the repressive effects of senescence-associated heterochromatinization on apoptosis. To this end, genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed in dyskerin-depleted cells. In contrast, agents that induce chromatin relaxation, including histone deacetylase inhibitors and the DNA intercalator chloroquine, sensitized dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. Dyskerin is a core component of the telomerase complex and plays an important role in telomere homeostasis. Defective telomere maintenance resulting in premature senescence is thought to primarily underlie the pathogenesis of X-linked DC. Since U2OS cells are telomerase-negative, this leads us to conclude that loss of dyskerin function can also induce cellular senescence via mechanisms independent of telomere shortening.

  16. Biochemical and genotoxic effect of triclosan on earthworms (Eisenia fetida) using contact and soil tests.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dasong; Xie, Xiujie; Zhou, Qixing; Liu, Yao

    2012-07-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum bactericide that is used for a variety of antimicrobial functions. TCS is frequently detected in the terrestrial environment due to application of sewage sludge to agricultural land. In the present study, 48-h paper contact and 28-day spiked soil tests were conducted to examine the toxic effects of TCS on the antioxidative and genetic indices of earthworms (Eisenia fetida). The activity of antioxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT) and the content of the lipid peroxidation product (malondialdehyde, MDA) were determined as biomarkers of oxidative stress in E. fetida. Moreover, single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) was used as a biomarker of genotoxicity. The results showed that triclosan induced a significant increase (P < 0.05) in antioxidative enzyme activities and MDA content. Of all of the biomarkers examined, CAT activity was most sensitive to TCS, and the CAT activity increased significantly (P < 0.05) at bactericidal concentrations of 7.86 ng cm⁻² in the contact test and 10 mg kg⁻¹ in the spiked soil test. The comet assay showed that TCS treatments significantly induced (P < 0.05) DNA damage in E. fetida, and that 78.6 ng cm⁻² caused significant genotoxic effects in the acute test (48 h). Clear dose-dependent DNA damage to E. fetida was observed both in contact and spiked soil tests. These results imply that TCS may have potential biochemical and genetic toxicity toward earthworms (E. fetida). A battery of biomarkers covering multiple molecular targets of acute toxicity can be combined to better understand the impacts of TCS on E. fetida. PMID:22707219

  17. Systematic Protein Level Regulation via Degradation Machinery Induced by Genotoxic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kume, Kohei; Ishida, Kazushige; Ikeda, Miyuki; Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Shimura, Tsutomu; Young, Lynn; Nishizuka, Satoshi S

    2016-01-01

    In this study we monitored protein dynamics in response to cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and irinotecan with different concentrations and administration modes using "reverse-phase" protein arrays (RPPAs) in order to gain comprehensive insight into the protein dynamics induced by genotoxic drugs. Among 666 protein time-courses, 38% exhibited an increasing trend, 32% exhibited a steady decrease, and 30% fluctuated within 24 h after drug exposure. We analyzed almost 12,000 time-course pairs of protein levels based on the geometrical similarity by correlation distance (dCor). Twenty-two percent of the pairs showed dCor > 0.8, which indicates that each protein of the pair had similar dynamics. These trends were disrupted by a proteasome inhibitor, MG132, suggesting that the protein degradation system was activated in response to the drugs. Among the pairs with high dCor, the average dCor of pairs with apoptosis-related protein was significantly higher than those without, indicating that regulation of protein levels was induced by the drugs. These results suggest that the levels of numerous functionally distinct proteins may be regulated by common degradation machinery induced by genotoxic drugs. PMID:26625007

  18. Alkaline comet assay for genotoxic effect detection in neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus (Pisces, Curimatidae).

    PubMed

    Simoniello, M F; Gigena, F; Poletta, G; Loteste, A; Kleinsorge, E; Campana, M; Scagnetti, J; Parma, M J

    2009-08-01

    Toxicants on fish may induce genetic alterations that can be used as genotoxic markers. We evaluated DNA damage using alkaline comet assay applied on erythrocytes after in vivo exposure of Prochilodus lineatus to different concentrations of Cypermethrin (0.300, 0.150, 0.075 and 0.000 microg/L) as a probable chemical mutagen. The results revealed a significantly higher level of DNA damage at all concentrations of Cypermethrin tested compared to control and background level (p < 0.05). We have standardized the technique for one of the most common native fish species that will be useful for biomonitoring genotoxicity in polluted waters of the region. PMID:19466374

  19. The Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects of Bisphenol-A (BPA) in MCF-7 Cell Line and Amniocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aghajanpour-Mir, Seyed Mohsen; Zabihi, Ebrahim; Akhavan-Niaki, Haleh; Keyhani, Elahe; Bagherizadeh, Iman; Biglari, Sajjad; Behjati, Farkhondeh

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is an industrial xenoestrogen used widely in our living environment. Recently, several studies suggested that BPA has destructive effects on DNA and chromosomes in normal body cells via estrogen receptors (ER). Therefore, BPA could be considered as an important mediator in many diseases such as cancer. However, there are still many controversial issues which need clarification. In this study, we investigated the BPA-induced chromosomal damages in MCF-7 cell line, ER-positive and negative amniocyte cells. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects of BPA were also compared between these three cell groups. Expression of estrogen receptors was determined using immunocytochemistry technique. The cell cytotoxicity of BPA was measured by MTT assay. Classic cytogenetic technique was carried out for the investigation of chromosome damage. BPA, in addition to cytotoxicity, had remarkable genotoxicity at concentrations close to the traceable levels in tissues or biological fluids. Although some differences were observed in the amount of damages between ER-positive and negative fetal cells, interestingly, these differences were not significant. The present study showed that BPA could lead to chromosomal aberrations in both ER-dependent and independent pathways at some concentrations or in cell types yet not reported. Also, BPA could probably be considered as a facilitator for some predisposed cells to be cancerous by raising the chromosome instability levels. Finally, estrogen receptor seems to have a different role in cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects. PMID:27386435

  20. Mechanistic evaluation of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract-induced genotoxicity in L5178Y cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haixia; Guo, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Suhui; Dial, Stacey L; Guo, Lei; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Moore, Martha M; Mei, Nan

    2014-06-01

    Ginkgo biloba has been used for many thousand years as a traditional herbal remedy and its extract has been consumed for many decades as a dietary supplement. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract is a complex mixture with many constituents, including flavonol glycosides and terpene lactones. The National Toxicology Program 2-year cancer bioassay found that G. biloba leaf extract targets the liver, thyroid gland, and nose of rodents; however, the mechanism of G. biloba leaf extract-associated carcinogenicity remains unclear. In the current study, the in vitro genotoxicity of G. biloba leaf extract and its eight constituents was evaluated using the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and Comet assay. The underlying mechanisms of G. biloba leaf extract-associated genotoxicity were explored. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the mutant frequency and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Western blot analysis confirmed that G. biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol activated the DNA damage signaling pathway with increased expression of γ-H2AX and phosphorylated Chk2 and Chk1. In addition, G. biloba leaf extract produced reactive oxygen species and decreased glutathione levels in L5178Y cells. Loss of heterozygosity analysis of mutants indicated that G. biloba leaf extract, quercetin, and kaempferol treatments resulted in extensive chromosomal damage. These results indicate that G. biloba leaf extract and its two constituents, quercetin and kaempferol, are mutagenic to the mouse L5178Y cells and induce DSBs. Quercetin and kaempferol likely are major contributors to G. biloba leaf extract-induced genotoxicity. PMID:24595819

  1. FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES ARSENIC-INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Folate deficiency increases background levels of DNA damage and can enhance the mutagenicity of chemical agents. Duplicate experiments were performed to investigate the effect of dietary folate deficiency on arsenic induction of micronuclei (MN) in peripheral blood cells. Male C5...

  2. Effect of organic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) extract on the genotoxicity of doxorubicin in the Drosophila wing spot test

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The consumption of organic tomatoes (ORTs) reduces the risk of harmful effects to humans and the environment caused by exposure to toxic agrochemicals. In this study, we used the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of wing spots in Drosophila melanogaster to evaluate the genotoxicity of ORT and the effect of cotreatment with ORT on the genotoxicity of Doxorubicin® (DXR, a cancer chemotherapeutic agent) that is mediated by free radical formation. Standard (ST) cross larvae were treated chronically with solutions containing 25%, 50% or 100% of an aqueous extract of ORT, in the absence and presence of DXR (0.125 mg/mL), and the number of mutant spots on the wings of emergent flies was counted. ORT alone was not genotoxic but enhanced the toxicity of DXR when administered concomitantly with DXR. The ORT-enhanced frequency of spots induced by DXR may have resulted from the interaction of ORT with the enzymatic systems that catalyze the metabolic detoxification of this drug. PMID:21637658

  3. Genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae).

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Grażyna; Mędrzak, Monika; Augustyniak, Maria; Wilczek, Piotr; Stalmach, Monika

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate (organophosphate insecticide) in female and male wolf spiders Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) exposed to the stressors under laboratory conditions. DNA damage was measured in haemocytes and midgut gland cells using the comet assay. In response to the two stressing factors, both cell types showed %TDNA, tail length (TL) and OTM values higher in males than in females. Level of DNA damage in haemocytes was greater than in midgut gland cells. In both sexes, the strongest genotoxicity was recorded at single application of dimethoate. After five-time exposure to the pesticide, genotoxic effects of a single dose were sustained in males and reduced to the control level in females. Starvation stress was well tolerated by the females, in which neither cell type was affected by DNA damage. However, in male haemocytes food deprivation induced severe DNA damage, what suggests suppression of the defence potential at prolonged starvation periods. PMID:26942684

  4. In Vivo Evaluation of the Genotoxic Effects of Gonadotropins on Rat Reticulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Bulent; Koc, Onder; Ozdemirci, Safak; Topcuoglu, Ata; Ozdemir, Ozturk

    2011-01-01

    Background Gonadotropins, as ovulation-inducing drugs, have been used widely to treat infertility. An epidemiologic correlation between infertility therapy and ovarian cancer development has been reported. However, the effect of gonadotropins in the formation of reproductive tract cancers is controversial. Objective The aim of the study was to determine the in vivo genotoxic effects of gonadotropins on rat reticulocytes. Methods In this prospective, randomized, controlled study, rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 groups. The calculated rat doses of 0.65 human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG), 0.95 hMG, 0.65 follitropin beta (FB), 0.95 FB, or normal saline (control group) were injected, respectively. These calculated rat doses (U/g) are based on average human gonadotropin doses of 150 and 225 IU/d for a 70-kg woman given in 2-mL saline (the control group received 2 mL of saline). Injections were administered once per day for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest. Each treatment was repeated for 6 estrus cycles in the rats for a total of 12 estrus cycles. Six months after the last day of the 12th cycle, the rats were euthanized. Bone marrow tissues were removed, and pluripotent reticulocyte cells with micronuclei, nuclear buds, and binuclear abnormalities were analyzed using an in situ micronuclei assay under light microscopy. The proportion of micronucleated cells, cells with anaphase bridge, nuclear buds, and other nuclear abnormalities were measured. Results The number of cells with nuclear buds and binuclear abnormalities in the hMG 225 and FB 225 groups was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that from the hMG 150, FB 150, and control groups in the cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow stem cells. An increased rate of genotoxicity in all gonadotropin groups versus that of placebo was found. Conclusion In rats, the micronucleus genotoxicity assay suggests a dose-dependent gonadotropin effect on genomic instability in bone marrow stem cells in vivo. PMID:24648576

  5. Mercury heavy-metal-induced physiochemical changes and genotoxic alterations in water hyacinths [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.)].

    PubMed

    Malar, Srinivasan; Sahi, Shivendra Vikram; Favas, Paulo J C; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2015-03-01

    Mercury heavy metal pollution has become an important environmental problem worldwide. Accumulation of mercury ions by plants may disrupt many cellular functions and block normal growth and development. To assess mercury heavy metal toxicity, we performed an experiment focusing on the responses of Eichhornia crassipes to mercury-induced oxidative stress. E. crassipes seedlings were exposed to varying concentrations of mercury to investigate the level of mercury ions accumulation, changes in growth patterns, antioxidant defense mechanisms, and DNA damage under hydroponics system. Results showed that plant growth rate was significantly inhibited (52 %) at 50 mg/L treatment. Accumulation of mercury ion level were 1.99 mg/g dry weight, 1.74 mg/g dry weight, and 1.39 mg/g dry weight in root, leaf, and petiole tissues, respectively. There was a decreasing trend for chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids with increasing the concentration of mercury ions. Both the ascorbate peroxidase and malondialdehyde contents showed increased trend in leaves and roots up to 30 mg/L mercury treatment and slightly decreased at the higher concentrations. There was a positive correlation between heavy metal dose and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase antioxidative enzyme activities which could be used as biomarkers to monitor pollution in E. crassipes. Due to heavy metal stress, some of the normal DNA bands were disappeared and additional bands were amplified compared to the control in the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profile. Random amplified polymorphic DNA results indicated that genomic template stability was significantly affected by mercury heavy metal treatment. We concluded that DNA changes determined by random amplified polymorphic DNA assay evolved a useful molecular marker for detection of genotoxic effects of mercury heavy metal contamination in plant species. PMID:25323404

  6. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce genotoxicity but not mutagenicity in golden mussel Limnoperna fortunei.

    PubMed

    Girardello, Francine; Custódio Leite, Camila; Vianna Villela, Izabel; da Silva Machado, Miriana; Luiz Mendes Juchem, André; Roesch-Ely, Mariana; Neves Fernandes, Andreia; Salvador, Mirian; Antonio Pêgas Henriques, João

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) in consumer products is the cause of its appearance in wastewater and effluents, reaching the aquatic environment. The evaluation of the biological impact of TiO2-NP and the need to understand its ecotoxicological impact to the aquatic ecosystem are of major concern. Bivalve mollusks may represent a target group for nanoparticle toxicity. Limnoperna fortunei (golden mussel), a freshwater bivalve organism that has been employed in biomonitoring environmental conditions. Comet assay, micronucleus test and oxidative damage to lipids and proteins were performed after the golden mussel was exposed to TiO2-NP (1, 5, 10 and 50μgmL(-1)). The results demonstrate that TiO2-NP can damage the DNA of haemocytes after 2h of exposure and the genotoxic activity significantly increased after 4h exposure to TiO2-NP, at all the TiO2-NP concentrations. TiO2-NP was ineffective in causing mutagenicity in the haemolymph cells of golden mussel. The increase in the lipid peroxidation levels and carbonyl proteins after the exposure to TiO2-NP indicates the induction of oxidative stress at 2h exposure with similar results to all TiO2-NP concentrations, but these effects did not occur at 4h exposure. These results demonstrated that, although TiO2-NP is not mutagenic to golden mussel, it does induce DNA damage and oxidative stress in these organisms. PMID:26675368

  7. Effects of phenytoin and carbamazepine on human natural killer cell activity and genotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Margaretten, N C; Hincks, J R; Warren, R P; Coulombe, R A

    1987-01-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from healthy volunteers and exposed in vitro to phenytoin or carbamazepine, two widely used antiepileptic drugs (AED). This study investigated the effects of these drugs on natural killer (NK) cell activity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), which are both thought to protect against developing neoplasms. Also, the genotoxicity of phenytoin on human PBMC was investigated by gravity-flow alkaline elution. Concentrations of phenytoin considered therapeutic (10 and 20 micrograms/ml) and a dose considered acutely toxic (40 micrograms/ml) were used while carbamazepine levels of 8 micrograms/ml (therapeutic) and 10 and 16 micrograms/ml (acutely toxic) were tested. Phenytoin at all three concentrations significantly suppressed NK cell activity in a dose-dependent manner. Carbamazepine had no significant effect on NK cell activity at the dose levels studied. Incubation in propylene glycol, the diluent for carbamazepine, significantly decreased NK cell activity compared to saline. Phenytoin also significantly depressed interferon augmentation of NK cell cytotoxicity in a dose dependent manner. ADCC activity was significantly depressed with 20 and 40 micrograms/ml phenytoin. Alkaline elution showed a slight but significant increase in DNA single-strand breaks of PBMC exposed to 40 micrograms/ml phenytoin for 18 or 72 hr. These results show phenytoin may induce pronounced immunosuppression of NK cell and ADCC activity in patients receiving antiepileptic therapy and that this agent has a potential for genotoxic side effects. Phenytoin may also increase the potential for neoplasm development by a direct interaction with cellular DNA and/or an indirect mechanism by immunosuppression. PMID:3798446

  8. Influence of Mikania laevigata Extract over the Genotoxicity Induced by Alkylating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau, Vanessa; de Aguiar Amaral, Patrícia; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants are still widely used worldwide; yet for some species, little or no information is available concerning their biological activity, specially their genotoxic and antimutagenic potential. Mikania laevigata (Asteraceae) is a native plant from South America, and its extracts are largely used to treat respiratory complaints. The aim of the present work was then to evaluate, in vivo, the potential biological activity of M. laevigata on the genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and cyclophosphamide (CP), using the comet assay. Male CF1 mice were divided into groups of 5-6 animals, received by gavage 0.1 mL/10 g body wt of water, Mikania laevigata extract (MLE), MMS, and CP. Results showed that treatment with 200 mg/kg of the MLE previously to MMS and CP administration, respectively, reduced the damage index (DI) in 52% and 60%, when compared to DI at 24 h. Pretreatment also reduced the damage frequency (DF) in 56% (MMS) and 58% (CP), compared to DF at 24 h. MLE administration has been shown to protect mouse DNA from damage induced by alkylating agents; this corroborates to the biological activities of M. laevigata and points towards the need of plant compounds isolation to proceed with further studies. PMID:23724299

  9. Effects of paving asphalt fume exposure on genotoxic and mutagenic activities in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H W; Yin, X J; Frazer, D; Barger, M W; Siegel, P D; Millecchia, L; Zhong, B Z; Tomblyn, S; Stone, S; Ma, J K H; Castranova, V; Ma, J Y C

    2004-02-14

    Asphalt fumes are complex mixtures of aerosols and vapors containing various organic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Previously, we have demonstrated that inhalation exposure of rats to asphalt fumes resulted in dose-dependent induction of CYP1A1 with concomitant down-regulation of CYP2B1 and increased phase II enzyme quinone reductase activity in the rat lung. In the present study, the potential genotoxic effects of asphalt fume exposure due to altered lung microsomal enzymes were studied. Rats were exposed to air or asphalt fume generated under road paving conditions at various concentrations and sacrificed the next day. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage and examined for DNA damage using the comet assay. To evaluate the systemic genotoxic effect of asphalt fume, micronuclei formation in bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) was monitored. Lung S9 from various exposure groups was isolated from tissue homogenates and characterized for metabolic activity in activating 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) mutagenicity using the Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium YG1024 and YG1029. This study showed that the paving asphalt fumes significantly induced DNA damage in AM, as revealed by DNA migration in the comet assay, in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the micronuclei formation in bone marrow PCEs was not detected even at a very high exposure level (1733 mg h/m3). The conversion of 2-AA to mutagens in the Ames test required lung S9-mediated metabolic activation in a dose-dependent manner. In comparison to the controls, lung S9 from rats exposed to asphalt fume at a total exposure level of 479+/-33 mg h/m3 did not significantly enhance 2-AA mutagenicity with either S. typhimurium YG1024 or YG1029. At a higher total asphalt fume exposure level (1150+/-63 mg h/m3), S9 significantly increased the mutagenicity of 2-AA as compared to the control. However, S9 from asphalt fume-exposed rats

  10. Effect of particle size and dispersion status on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of zinc oxide in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Roszak, Joanna; Catalán, Julia; Järventaus, Hilkka; Lindberg, Hanna K; Suhonen, Satu; Vippola, Minnamari; Stępnik, Maciej; Norppa, Hannu

    2016-07-01

    Data available on the genotoxicity of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) are controversial. Here, we examined the effects of particle size and dispersion status on the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nanosized and fine ZnO, in the presence and absence of bovine serum albumin (BSA; 0.06%) in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells. Dynamic light scattering analysis showed the most homogenous dispersions in water alone for nanosized ZnO and in water with BSA for fine ZnO. After a 48-h treatment, both types of ZnO were cytotoxic within a similar, narrow dose range (1.5-3.0μg/cm(2)) and induced micronuclei at a near toxic dose range (1.25-1.75μg/cm(2)), both with and without BSA. In the comet assay, nanosized ZnO (1.25-1.5μg/cm(2)), in the absence of BSA, caused a statistically significant increase in DNA damage after 3-h and 6-h treatments, while fine ZnO did not. Our findings may be explained by better uptake or faster intracellular dissolution of nanosized ZnO without BSA during short treatments (3-6h; the comet assay), with less differences between the two ZnO forms after longer treatments (>48h; the in vitro micronucleus test). As ZnO is genotoxic within a narrow dose range partly overlapping with cytotoxic doses, small experimental differences e.g. in the dispersion of ZnO particles may have a substantial effect on the genotoxicity of the nominal doses added to the cell culture. PMID:27402478

  11. Genotoxic effect of Lythrum salicaria extract determined by the mussel micronucleus test.

    PubMed

    Eck-Varanka, Bettina; Kováts, Nóra; Hubai, Katalin; Paulovits, Gábor; Ferincz, Árpád; Horváth, Eszter

    2015-12-01

    A wide range of aquatic plants have been proven to release allelochemicals, of them phenolics and tannin are considered rather widely distributed. Tannins, however, have been demonstrated to have genotoxic capacity. In our study genotoxic potential of Lythrum salicaria L. (Purple Loosestrife, family Lythraceae) was assessed by the mussel micronucleus test, using Unio pictorum. In parallel, total and hydrolysable tannin contents were determined. Results clearly show that the extract had a high hydrolysable tannin content and significant mutagenic effect. As L. salicaria has been long used in traditional medicine for chronic diarrhoea, dysentery, leucorrhoea and blood-spitting, genotoxic potential of the plant should be evaluated not only with regard to potential effects in the aquatic ecosystem, but also assessing its safe use as a medicinal herb. PMID:26616377

  12. [Exposure to benzene and genotoxic effects among filling station attendants].

    PubMed

    Carere, A; Antoccia, A; Crebelli, R; Di Chiara, D; Fuselli, S; Iavarone, I; Isacchi, G; Lagorio, S; Leopardi, P; Marcon, F

    1995-03-01

    Exposure to gasoline vapors is classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as possibly carcinogenic to humans, mainly on the basis of the established carcinogenicity of some component chemicals such as benzene. The mechanism of benzene toxicity, particularly its leukemogenic effects, is far from being fully understood. Different studies, aimed at evaluating the risk associated with exposure to benzene through fuels and coordinated by the Istituto Superiore di Sanità, are in progress in Italy. In an environmental monitoring survey on a sample of 111 service stations, conducted in Rome (Italy) in 1992, average yearly personal exposure to benzene, toluene and xylenes were estimated. Chemical determination of benzene and methylbenzene was carried out by GL-gas chromatography. From a sample of 27 service stations 34 fuel samples were collected, and their benzene content was measured by hr-gas chromatography. Subgroups of the filling station attendants undergoing the exposure assessment study, were included in biological monitoring surveys of early indicators of genotoxicity. In particular, 65 subjects were enrolled in a study aimed at evaluating the urinary concentrations of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a biological marker of oxidative DNA damage, and 23 filling station attendants were selected for a survey of the frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and micronuclei (MN) in peripheral T lymphocytes. In the exposure assessment survey levels of 0.53, 0.71 e 0.32 mg/m3 in the average yearly personal exposure to benzene, toluene and xylenes, respectively, were estimated (individual means based on 6.5 repeated samples per employee). The daily quantities of super premium gasoline sold proved to be associated with the average yearly personal exposure to benzene, and current smokers showed a significantly lower exposure intensity compared with non-smokers. Among the latter, an increase of 0.11 ln mg/m3 in benzene exposure per unit increase

  13. Sall2 is required for proapoptotic Noxa expression and genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis by doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, D; Hepp, M I; Farkas, C; Campos, T; Sodir, N M; Morales, M; Álvarez, C I; Swigart, L; Evan, G I; Gutiérrez, J L; Nishinakamura, R; Castro, A F; Pincheira, R

    2015-01-01

    The Sall2 transcription factor is deregulated in several cancers; however, little is known about its cellular functions, including its target genes. Recently, we demonstrated that p53 directly regulates Sall2 expression under genotoxic stress. Here, we investigated the role of Sall2 in the context of cellular response to genotoxic stress. In addition, we further examined the Sall2-p53 relationship during genotoxic stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), which are derived from Sall2 knockout mice separately, or in combination with the p53ERTAM knock-in mice. We found that the levels of Sall2 mRNA and protein are dynamically modulated in response to doxorubicin. At early times of stress, Sall2 is downregulated, but increases under extension of the stress in a p53-independent manner. Based on caspase-3/7 activities, expression of cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, expression of cleaved caspase-3 and induction of proapoptotic proteins, Sall2 expression was correlated with cellular apoptosis. Consequently, Sall2−/− MEFs have decreased apoptosis, which relates with increased cell viability in response to doxorubicin. Importantly, Sall2 was required for apoptosis even in the presence of fully activated p53. Searching for putative Sall2 targets that could mediate its role in apoptosis, we identified proapoptotic NOXA/PMAIP1 (phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1). We demonstrated that Sall2 positively regulates Noxa promoter activity. Conserved putative Sall2-binding sites at the NOXA promoter were validated in vitro by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and in vivo by ChIP experiments, identifying NOXA as a novel Sall2 target. In agreement, induction of Noxa protein and mRNA in response to doxorubicin was significantly decreased in Sall2−/− MEFs. In addition, studies in leukemia Jurkat T cells support the existence of the Sall2/Noxa axis, and the significance of this axis on the apoptotic response to doxorubicin in cancer cells. Our

  14. Methyl-thiophanate increases reactive oxygen species production and induces genotoxicity in rat peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Ben Amara, Ibtissem; Ben Saad, Hajer; Cherif, Boutheina; Elwej, Awatef; Lassoued, Saloua; Kallel, Choumous; Zeghal, Najiba

    2014-12-01

    Methylthiophanate is one of the widely used fungicides to control important fungal diseases of crops. The aim of this study was to elucidate the short-term hematoxicity and genotoxicity effects of methylthiophanate administered by intraperitoneal way at three doses (300, 500 and 700 mg/kg of body weight) after 24, 48 and 72 h. Our results showed, 24 h after methylthiophanate injection, a hematological perturbation such as red blood cells (p < 0.05, p < 0.05 and p < 0.01) and hemoglobin content (p < 0.05), respectively, and a noticeable genotoxic effect in WBC evidenced by a significant increase in the frequency of the micronuclei and a decrease in cell viability. An increase in erythrocyte osmotic fragility was also noted after 24 and 48 h of methylthiophanate treatment at graded doses. A significant increase in hydrogen peroxide, advanced oxidation of protein products and malondialdehyde levels, in erythrocytes of methylthiophanate-treated rats with 300, 500 and 700 mg/kg of body weight, was also observed after 24 h of treatment (p < 0.05, p < 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively), suggesting the implication of oxidative stress in its toxicity. Antioxidants activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in erythrocytes significantly increased (p < 0.001) 24 h after the highest dose injected. While all these parameters were improved after 72 h of methylthiophanate injection (300, 500 and 700 mg/kg body weight). In conclusion, these data showed that the exposure of adult rats to methylthiophanate resulted in oxidative stress leading to hematotoxicity and the impairment of defence system, confirming the pro-oxidant and genotoxic effects of this fungicide. PMID:25179310

  15. New insights in the acute toxic/genotoxic effects of CuO nanoparticles in the in vivo Drosophila model.

    PubMed

    Alaraby, Mohamed; Hernández, Alba; Marcos, Ricard

    2016-08-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are highly reactive from the biological point of view and, for this reason, it exists important reservations in regard human health impact. We used Drosophila as a promising in vivo model to diagnose the biological effects of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs). Due to the potential role of ions release the effects of CuO-NPs were compared with those induced by copper sulfate, CuSO4. A wide battery of approaches has been used including toxicity, cell and body internalization, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as changes in gene expression, related to both general stress and alterations in the intestinal barrier, and genotoxicity. The obtained results show that CuO-NPs have the ability to be distributed inside midgut cells and translocate to the general body compartment (internal hemolymph) interacting with hemocytes. Its exposure leads to reduced larval growth, decreased flies viability, delaying their emergency periods, especially at higher doses (2 and 10 mM). Moreover, deregulation of stress genes including antioxidant genes, and genes involved in wound healing were also observed. In this point it should be emphasized the novelty of using genes such as Duox, Upd3, PPO2, and Hml to determine injury on the intestinal barrier. On the other hand, CuO-NPs had non-genotoxic potential, in agreement with their inability to increase ROS production. In general dissolved copper produced higher toxic/genotoxic effects than those induced by CuO-NPs which would indicate that copper ions alone are more important in inducing harmful effects than copper nanoparticles itself. PMID:26634780

  16. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by glass fibers on human alveolar epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Ledda, Caterina; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Bracci, Massimo; Santarelli, Lory; Renis, Marcella; Ferrante, Margherita; Cardile, Venera

    2015-04-01

    Man-made vitreous fibers have been widely used as insulation material as asbestos substitutes; however their morphology and composition raises concerns. In 1988 the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified fiberglass, rock wool, slag wool, and ceramic fibers as Group 2B, i.e. possibly carcinogenic to humans. In 2002 it reassigned fiberglass, rock and slag wool, and continuous glass filaments to Group 3, not classifiable as carcinogenic to humans. The aim of this study was to verify the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and oxidative stress production induced by in vitro exposure of human alveolar epithelial cells A549 to glass fibers with a predominant diameter <3 μm (97%) and length >5 μm (93%). A549 cells were incubated with 5, 50, or 100 μg/ml (2.1, 21, and 42 μg/cm(2), respectively) of glass fibers for 72 h. Cytotoxicity and DNA damage were tested by the MTT and the Comet assay, respectively. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by Western blotting, production of nitric oxide (NO) with Griess reagent, and concentration of reactive oxygen species by fluorescent quantitative analysis with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). The results showed that glass fiber exposure significantly reduced cell viability and increased DNA damage and oxidative stress production in a concentration-dependent manner, demonstrating that glass fibers exert cytotoxic and genotoxic effects related to increased oxidative stress on the human alveolar cell line A549. PMID:25620604

  17. Deoxynivalenol induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Yu, Miao; Fu, Juan; Bao, Wei; Wang, Di; Hao, Liping; Yao, Ping; Nüssler, Andreas K; Yan, Hong; Liu, Liegang

    2014-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the most common mycotoxins. The aim of this study consists in using diverse cellular and molecular assays to evaluate cytotoxicity, genotoxicity as well as oxidative damage and to investigate their mechanisms in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The human lymphocytes were cultured in eight different doses of DON (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 250 and 500 ng/mL) during 6, 12 and 24 h. DON was able to decrease cell viability and cause damage to the membrane, the chromosomes or the DNA at all times of culture. It was also able to induce lipid peroxidation and raise the levels of 8-OHdG and ROS in 6, 12 and 24 h. The results of the RT-PCR and the Western Blot indicated that DON is able to enhance mRNA or protein expressions of DNA repair genes and HO-1 in 6 h and to inhibit these expressions in 24 h. DON potentially triggers genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. This mechanism is probably related to depletion of antioxidase and oxidative damage to the DNA that reduced expression of HO-1, thereby inhibiting the ability of DNA repair. PMID:24355168

  18. Sam68/KHDRBS1 is critical for colon tumorigenesis by regulating genotoxic stress-induced NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kai; Sun, Xin; Wier, Eric M; Hodgson, Andrea; Liu, Yue; Sears, Cynthia L; Wan, Fengyi

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated transcription is an important mediator for cellular responses to DNA damage. Genotoxic agents trigger a 'nuclear-to-cytoplasmic' NF-κB activation signaling pathway; however, the early nuclear signaling cascade linking DNA damage and NF-κB activation is poorly understood. Here we report that Src-associated-substrate-during-mitosis-of-68kDa/KH domain containing, RNA binding, signal transduction associated 1 (Sam68/KHDRBS1) is a key NF-κB regulator in genotoxic stress-initiated signaling pathway. Sam68 deficiency abolishes DNA damage-stimulated polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR) production and the PAR-dependent NF-κB transactivation of anti-apoptotic genes. Sam68 deleted cells are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA damaging agents. Upregulated Sam68 coincides with elevated PAR production and NF-κB-mediated anti-apoptotic transcription in human and mouse colon cancer. Knockdown of Sam68 sensitizes human colon cancer cells to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis and genetic deletion of Sam68 dampens colon tumor burden in mice. Together our data reveal a novel function of Sam68 in the genotoxic stress-initiated nuclear signaling, which is crucial for colon tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15018.001 PMID:27458801

  19. Sam68/KHDRBS1 is critical for colon tumorigenesis by regulating genotoxic stress-induced NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kai; Sun, Xin; Wier, Eric M; Hodgson, Andrea; Liu, Yue; Sears, Cynthia L; Wan, Fengyi

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated transcription is an important mediator for cellular responses to DNA damage. Genotoxic agents trigger a 'nuclear-to-cytoplasmic' NF-κB activation signaling pathway; however, the early nuclear signaling cascade linking DNA damage and NF-κB activation is poorly understood. Here we report that Src-associated-substrate-during-mitosis-of-68kDa/KH domain containing, RNA binding, signal transduction associated 1 (Sam68/KHDRBS1) is a key NF-κB regulator in genotoxic stress-initiated signaling pathway. Sam68 deficiency abolishes DNA damage-stimulated polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR) production and the PAR-dependent NF-κB transactivation of anti-apoptotic genes. Sam68 deleted cells are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA damaging agents. Upregulated Sam68 coincides with elevated PAR production and NF-κB-mediated anti-apoptotic transcription in human and mouse colon cancer. Knockdown of Sam68 sensitizes human colon cancer cells to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis and genetic deletion of Sam68 dampens colon tumor burden in mice. Together our data reveal a novel function of Sam68 in the genotoxic stress-initiated nuclear signaling, which is crucial for colon tumorigenesis. PMID:27458801

  20. Genotoxic effects of tanshinones from Hyptis martiusii in V79 cell line.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, B C; Moura, D J; Rosa, R M; Moraes, M O; Araujo, E C C; Lima, M A S; Silveira, E R; Saffi, J; Henriques, J A P; Pessoa, C; Costa-Lotufo, L V

    2008-01-01

    The genotoxic effect of two tanshinones isolated from roots of Hyptis martiussi Benth (Labiatae) was studied using V79 (Chinese hamster lung) cells by the alkaline comet assay and micronucleus test. Tanshinones were incubated with the cells at concentrations of 1, 3, 6 and 12 microg/mL for 3 h. Tanshinones were shown to be quite strongly genotoxic against V79 cells at all tested concentrations. The data obtained provide support to the view that tanshinones has DNA damaging activity in cultured V79 cells under the conditions of the assays. PMID:17897764

  1. Genotoxic effects of sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate after chronic exposure of Drosophila melanogaster larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Morales, P.; Ordaz, M.G.; Munoz, A.

    1995-11-01

    Two arsenic compounds, namely: NaAsO{sub 2} (Sodium Arsenite) and Na{sub 2}HAsO{sub 4} (Sodium Arsenate) were tested for its chronic effect in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster. In a previous study in Drosophila we found that both compounds induced SLRL mutations, but failed to induce sex chromosome loss. In the SMART, after acute exposure, only sodium arsenite was positive when cells of the wings were used; however, both were positives in cells of the eyes of Drosophila. The genotoxicity of both compounds localized mainly on somatic cells, in agreement with reports on the carcinogenicity potential of arsenical compounds. The Somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) was run employing cells of the wing imaginal discs from flr{sup 3}/mwh larvae. First instar larvae (24 {plus_minus} 4 h) were treated during 96 hours with sodium arsenite [0.015-4.0 ppm], and sodium arsenate [0.2-10 ppm], negative control was treated with distilled water. The frequency of spots by wing induced by the two arsenic salts were compared with control according with Frei and Wuergler procedure. Data show that sodium arsenite tested negative at all concentrations, but sodium arsenate tested positive at 0.8, 2 and 10 ppm (P<0.05). This results were consistent with the co-mutagenic role of sodium arsenite, but show that sodium arsenate was mutagenic in Drosophila test system under chronic exposure.

  2. Emerging Disinfection Byproducts, Halobenzoquinones: Effects of Isomeric Structure and Halogen Substitution on Cytotoxicity, Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species, and Genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Moe, Birget; Vemula, Sai; Wang, Wei; Li, Xing-Fang

    2016-07-01

    Halobenzoquinones (HBQs) are a structurally diverse class of water disinfection byproducts. Here, we report a systematic study on the effects of isomeric structure and the type and number of halogen substitutions of HBQs on their cytotoxicity, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and genotoxicity. Dynamic responses and IC50 histograms were obtained using real-time cell analysis, clearly ranking the cytotoxicity of the HBQs in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. Strong isomeric structure effects were shown with 2,5-HBQ isomers inducing greater cytotoxicity than their corresponding 2,6-HBQ isomers (P < 0.05). HBQ-halogen substitution groups also influence cytotoxicity, as cytotoxicity increases across the dihalogenated HBQs: iodo- > bromo- > chloro-HBQs (P < 0.05). Determination of HBQ-induced ROS further supports isomeric structure and halogen substitution effects. HBQ-induced genotoxicity was shown as increased levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and p53 protein. Pearson correlation analysis of the HBQ toxicity measurements with their physicochemical parameters demonstrates that dipole moment and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy are two major structural influences on toxicity (r = -0.721 or -0.766, P < 0.05). Dipole moment also correlates with isomer toxicity. This study suggests that formation and occurrence of highly toxic iodo-HBQs and 2,5-HBQs warrant further investigation to fully assess the impact of HBQs in drinking water. PMID:26812484

  3. Curcumin nanoparticles loaded hydrogels protects against aflatoxin B1-induced genotoxicity in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A; Salman, Asmaa S; Ibrahim, Mohamed I M; El-Kady, Ahmed A; Abdel-Aziem, Sekena H; Hassan, Nabila S; Waly, Ahmed I

    2016-08-01

    The current study aimed to evaluate the protective role of curcumin nanoparticles loaded hydrogels (Cur-NPs-Hgs) against AFB1-induced genotoxicity in rat liver. Animals were divided into 7 treatment groups and treated orally for 3 weeks as follow: the control group, the group treated with Hgs alone (0.5 ml/rat), the groups treated with low or high dose of Cur-NPs-Hgs (100 or 200 mg/kg b.w), the group treated with AFB1 (0.125 mg/kg b.w) and the groups treated with AFB1 plus the low or high dose of Cur-NPs-Hgs. Blood ant liver samples were collected for different biochemical, genetical, histological and histochemical analysis. The results revealed that the prepared Cur-NPs have nearly spherical shape with average size of 140 ± 20 nm and negative zeta potential value of 30.7 ± 2.57 mV. The in vivo results showed that treatment with AFB1 decreased the body weight accompanied biochemical, genotoxicity and histological disturbances. The combined treatment with AFB1 and Cur-Nps-Hgs at the two tested doses succeeded to induce a significant protection against AFB1. It could be concluded that Cur-NPs-Hgs is a promise candidate to protect against AFB1-induce liver damage in the high incidence area. Moreover, Hgs are excellent candidates as drug delivery system. PMID:27288928

  4. Assessing genotoxic effects in fish from a marine protected area influenced by former mining activities and other stressors.

    PubMed

    Gusso-Choueri, Paloma Kachel; Choueri, Rodrigo Brasil; Santos, Gustavo Souza; de Araújo, Giuliana Seraphim; Cruz, Ana Carolina Feitosa; Stremel, Tatiana; de Campos, Sandro Xavier; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto Oliveira; de Sousa Abessa, Denis Moledo

    2016-03-15

    The goal of the current study was to evaluate different genotoxicity tools in order to assess a marine protected area (MPA) affected by former mining activities and urban settlements. A catfish (Cathorops spixii) was analyzed for genotoxic effects at the (i) molecular and at the (ii) chromosomal levels. Through factor analysis, genotoxicity was found to be linked to levels of metals bioaccumulated and PAH metabolites in the bile. Micronucleus and nuclear alteration were less vulnerable to the effects of confounding factors in mildly contaminated areas since they were more frequently associated with bioaccumulated metals than the DNA analysis. The different genotoxicity responses allowed for the identification of sources of pollution in the MPA. This approach was important for detecting environmental risks related to genotoxic contaminants in a mildly contaminated MPA. PMID:26822909

  5. Anti-genotoxic effect of the Sargassum dentifolium extracts: prevention of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei, and DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Gamal-Eldeen, Amira M; Abo-Zeid, Mona A M; Ahmed, Eman F

    2013-01-01

    The alga Sargassum dentifolium (Turner) C. Agardh, belongs to Sargassaceae, is a brown seaweed in red sea shores in Egypt. This work aimed to extract different water-soluble polysaccharide extracts (E1, E2, and E3) from S. dentifolium and to investigate their protective effect against cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced genotoxicity. Mice bone marrow cells (BMCs) were collected and analyzed for the chromosomal aberration, micronucleated BMCs (MN-BMCs), the mitotic index, DNA fragmentation by comet assay, and histone deacetylases (HDACs), and radical scavenging capacity of extracts was evaluated by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay. The results indicated that E2 and E3 significantly inhibited CP-induced multiple chromosomal aberrations, where E1 and E3 significantly suppressed the number of CP-induced formation of tetraploidy. The extracts prohibited the cytotoxic effect of CP and recovered the mitotic activity, whereas E1 possessed the highest recovery and mitosis. In absence of MN, CP induced formation of bi- and poly-nucleated BMCs. E1 prohibited CP-induced formation of bi-nucleated BMCs, while E2 and E3 prohibited CP-induced formation of poly-nucleated BMCs. CP-induced MN-BMCs were accompanied with mono-, bi- and poly-nucleated cells. E1 and E3 remarkably suppressed mono-nucleated MN-BMCs, while E2 inhibited bi-nucleated MN-BMCs. All the extracts significantly inhibited the CP-induced formation of poly-nucleated MN-BMCs. CP-induced DNA fragmentation was inhibited by all extracts, where E1 was the strongest inhibitor as concluded from the comet tail moment. All the extracts were strong OH scavengers, while only E3 was ROO scavenger. The results revealed a drastic decline in HDACs activity by E1 and E3. In conclusion, S. dentifolium polysaccharide extracts E1 and E3 possessed a potential anti-genotoxic and a promising anti-mutagenic activity. PMID:21652192

  6. IS THE DOSE-RESPONSE LINEAR OR NONLINEAR FOR GENOTOXIC EFFECTS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    IS THE DOSE-RESPONSE LINEAR OR NONLINEAR FOR GENOTOXIC EFFECTS?
    Preston, RJ. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    For considerations of cancer risk assessment from exposure to environmenta...

  7. Cytostatic and genotoxic effect of temephos in human lymphocytes and HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Benitez-Trinidad, A B; Herrera-Moreno, J F; Vázquez-Estrada, G; Verdín-Betancourt, F A; Sordo, M; Ostrosky-Wegman, P; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Medina-Díaz, I M; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; Robledo-Marenco, M L; Salazar, A M; Rojas-García, A E

    2015-06-01

    Temephos is an organophosphorus pesticide that is used in control campaigns against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which transmit dengue. In spite of the widespread use of temephos, few studies have examined its genotoxic potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic, cytostatic and genotoxic effects of temephos in human lymphocytes and hepatoma cells (HepG2). The cytotoxicity was evaluated with simultaneous staining (FDA/EtBr). The cytostatic and genotoxic effects were evaluated using comet assays and the micronucleus technique. We found that temephos was not cytotoxic in either lymphocytes or HepG2 cells. Regarding the cytostatic effect in human lymphocytes, temephos (10 μM) caused a significant decrease in the percentage of binucleated cells and in the nuclear division index as well as an increase in the apoptotic cell frequency, which was not the case for HepG2 cells. The comet assay showed that temephos increased the DNA damage levels in human lymphocytes, but it did not increase the MN frequency. In contrast, in HepG2 cells, temephos increased the tail length, tail moment and MN frequency in HepG2 cells compared to control cells. In conclusion, temephos causes stable DNA damage in HepG2 cells but not in human lymphocytes. These findings suggest the importance of temephos biotransformation in its genotoxic effect. PMID:25746384

  8. SYNERGISTIC AND ANTAGONISTIC EFFECTS ON GENOTOXICITY OF CHEMICALS COMMONLY FOUND IN HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synergistic and antagonistic effects on genotoxicity of mixtures of four chemicals; i.e., lead tetraacetate (LTA), arsenic trioxide (ATO), dieldrin (DED), and tetrachloroethylene (TCE), were evaluated by the Tradescantia-Micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay. he concentration of stock so...

  9. Soil genotoxicity induced by successive applications of chlorothalonil under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiangxiang; Cui, Ning; Zhou, Wei; Khorram, Mahdi Safaei; Wang, Donghong; Yu, Yunlong

    2014-05-01

    Greenhouse production of vegetables has been developed rapidly in China. High temperature and humidity inside the greenhouse make this environment more suitable for fast reproduction of fungal diseases. Fungicides are among the chemicals used extensively in the greenhouse to prevent crops from invasive infections by phytopathogens; however, little is known about the accumulation of fungicides in soil and their effect on soil quality under greenhouse conditions. In the present study, the accumulation of the fungicide chlorothalonil (CT) and its toxic metabolite hydroxy-chlorothalonil (HCT) in soil as well as their related soil genotoxicity under greenhouse conditions was investigated. The results indicated that both CT and HCT accumulated in soil with repeated applications of CT, and the accumulation level was strongly correlated to application dosage and its frequency. In addition, soil genotoxicity, which was measured by Vicia faba, also increased with the accumulation of CT and HCT, and the main contributor to this phenomenon was CT rather than HCT. The data demonstrated that successive applications of fungicides may result in their accumulation in soil and thus a decline in soil quality. PMID:24478244

  10. Zinc inhibits aflatoxin B1-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human hepatocytes (HepG2 cells).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Lv, Yangjun; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) has strong carcinogenicity. Consumption of AFB1-contaminated agricultural products and the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma have received widespread attention. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplementation could inhibit AFB1-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in HepG2 cells and the mechanism of this inhibition. Our data suggest that zinc sources can relieve a certain degree of AFB1-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity by protecting against apoptotic body formation and DNA strand breaks, affecting S phase cell cycle arrest, reducing 8-OHdG formation, inhibiting global DNA hypomethylation and regulating gene expression in antioxidation, zinc-association and apoptosis processes. Consequently, zinc stabilizes the integrity of DNA and improves cell survival. These data provides new insights into the protective role of zinc in alleviating AFB1-induced cytotoxicity and mediating epigenetic changes in hepatocytes, demonstrating that zinc sources have detoxification properties in mycotoxin-induced toxicity. PMID:27017951

  11. Attenuation of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress by tomato and garlic combination.

    PubMed

    Kumaraguruparan, R; Chandra Mohan, K V P; Abraham, S K; Nagini, S

    2005-03-25

    The protective effect of pretreatment with tomato and garlic against N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress was investigated in male Swiss mice. In vivo bone marrow micronucleus test was performed to assess the antigenotoxic effect of tomato and garlic. Oxidative stress was monitored by estimating the extent of lipid peroxidation and the status of the glutathione redox cycle antioxidants. Increased frequency of bone marrow micronuclei with enhanced lipid peroxidation was associated with compromised antioxidant defenses in MNNG treated animals. Although pretreatment with tomato and garlic significantly reduced the frequencies of MNNG-induced bone marrow micronuclei, the combination of tomato and garlic exerted a greater protective effect. This was associated with modulation of lipid peroxidation as well as reduced glutathione (GSH) and the GSH-dependent enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). These findings suggest that a diet containing even low levels of different naturally occurring compounds is effective in exerting antigenotoxic effects by modulating oxidative stress. PMID:15733939

  12. Potential genotoxic effects of melted snow from an urban area revealed by the Allium cepa test.

    PubMed

    Blagojević, Jelena; Stamenković, Gorana; Vujosević, Mladen

    2009-09-01

    The presence of well-known atmospheric pollutants is regularly screened for in large towns but knowledge about the effects of mixtures of different pollutants and especially their genotoxic potential is largely missing. Since falling snow collects pollutants from the air, melted snow samples could be suitable for evaluating potential genotoxicity. For this purpose the Allium cepa anaphase-telophase test was used to analyse melted snow samples from Belgrade, the capital city of Serbia. Samples of snow were taken at two sites, characterized by differences in pollution intensity, in three successive years. At the more polluted site the analyses showed a very high degree of both toxicity and genotoxicity in the first year of the study corresponding to the effects of the known mutagen used as the positive control. At the other site the situation was much better but not without warning signals. The results showed that standard analyses for the presence of certain contaminants in the air do not give an accurate picture of the possible consequences of urban air pollution because the genotoxic potential remains hidden. The A. cepa test has been demonstrated to be very convenient for evaluation of air pollution through analyses of melted snow samples. PMID:19589556

  13. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid on CHOK1 cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Sarar, Ali S; Abobakr, Yasser; Bayoumi, Alaa E; Hussein, Hamdy I

    2015-11-01

    The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid have been evaluated on the Chinese hamster ovary (CHOK1) cells. Neutral red incorporation (NRI), total cellular protein content (TCP), and methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays were followed to estimate the mid-point cytotoxicity values, NRI50, TCP50, and MTT50, respectively. The effects of the sublethal concentration (NRI25) on glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GRD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and total glutathione content have been evaluated in the presence and absence of reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin C, and vitamin E. The genotoxicity was evaluated using chromosomal aberrations (CA), micronucleus (MN) formation, and DNA fragmentation techniques in the presence and absence of the metabolic activation system, S9 mix. Abamectin was the most cytotoxic pesticide followed by chlorfenapyr, while imidacloprid was the least cytotoxic one. The glutathione redox cycle components were altered by the tested pesticides in the absence and presence of the tested antioxidants. The results of genotoxicity indicate that abamectin, chlorfenapyr, and imidacloprid have potential genotoxic effects on CHOK1 cells under the experimental conditions. PMID:26122579

  14. Sulforaphane inhibits CYP1A1 activity and promotes genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fangxing; Zhuang, Shulin; Zhang, Chao; Dai, Heping; Liu, Weiping

    2013-06-15

    Increasing environmental pollution by carcinogens such as some of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has prompted growing interest in searching for chemopreventive compounds which are readily obtainable. Sulforaphane (SFN) is isolated from cruciferous vegetables and has the potentials to reduce carcinogenesis through various pathways. In this study, we studied the effects of SFN on CYP1A1 activity and genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The results showed that SFN inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells by directly inhibiting CYP1A1 activity, probably through binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1 revealed by molecular docking. However, SFN promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells and reduced the viability of initiated yeast cells. Besides, it is surprising that SFN also failed to reduce genotoxicity induced by other genotoxic reagents which possess different mechanisms to lead to DNA damage. Currently, it is difficult to predict whether SFN has the potentials to reduce the risk of TCDD based on the conflicting observations in the study. Therefore, further studies should be urgent to reveal the function and mechanism of SFN in the stress of such POPs on human health. - Highlights: • Sulforaphane inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells. • Sulforaphane may bind to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1. • Sulforaphane promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells. • Sulforaphane may promote DNA damage by DNA strand breaks or DNA alkylation.

  15. Genotoxic effects of environmental estrogen-like compounds in CHO-K1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tayama, Sumiko; Nakagawa, Yoshio; Tayama, Kuniaki

    2008-01-01

    Some environmental estrogen-like compounds, such as bisphenol A (BPA), 4-nonylphenol (NP), 4-octylphenol (OP), propyl p-hydroxybenzoate (P-PHBA), and butyl p-hydroxybenzoate (B-PHBA), synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), and natural estrogen, 17beta-estradiol (E2), were studied for their genotoxicity in CHO-K1 cells using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE), chromosome aberration (CA), and DNA strand break (comet) assays. Six of the chemicals, excluding E2, caused DNA migration in the comet assay and induced SCEs at one or more of the highest doses. Among the chemicals, OP produced an especially high incidence of SCEs. Structural CA was induced by five of the chemicals, excluding OP and NP, and BPA, E2, and DES also induced aneuploid cells. E2 and DES particularly increased the rate of polyploidy at high doses. The incidence of colchicine-mitosis-like (c-mitotic) figures suggesting spindle disrupting effects was also detected with five of the chemicals, excluding OP and NP, and six of the chemicals, excluding E2, caused endoreduplication (ERD), a form of nuclear polyploidization induced by block of cell cycle at G2 phase, at one or more high doses. Our present results suggest that OP and NP cause repairable DNA damage, including SCEs, and do not result in CA, while the damage caused by DES, BPA, P-PHBA, and B-PHBA results in the induction of CAs together with SCEs probably because of imperfect repair. We are unable to explain the observation that the DNA damage caused by E2 resulted in CA induction but not DNA migration or SCE induction, except for speculating that the DNA damage is different from that caused by DES and the estrogen-like chemicals. Our findings also suggest that E2, DES and BPA have aneuploidogenic properties, and that the former two of chemicals also are polyploidy-inducing agents. PMID:17913570

  16. Evaluation of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of Benodanil by using Allium and Micronucleus assays.

    PubMed

    Akyıl, Dilek; Özkara, Arzu; Erdoğmuş, S Feyza; Eren, Yasin; Konuk, Muhsin; Sağlam, Esra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects of Benodanil fungicide by employing both mitotic index (MI) and mitotic phases on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa and genotoxic effects by using in vitro micronucleus assay (MN) in human peripheral blood lymphocyte. In the Allium root growth inhibition test, the EC50 value was first determined as 25 ppm. Then, 2 × EC50 value (50 ppm), EC50 value (25 ppm), and 1/2 × EC50 value (12.5 ppm) were tested with different treatment periods (24, 48, and 72 h). Both negative and positive controls were also used in parallel experiments. We obtained that mitotic index and prophase index decreased when compared with the control in all concentrations. In the micronucleus assay, lymphocytes were treated with various concentrations (250, 500, 750, and 1000 µg/ml) of Benodanil for 24 and 48 h. The results showed that Benodanil did not induce MN frequency in all concentrations of both treatment periods. Additionally, it was determined that this pesticide decreased nuclear division index (NDI) significantly. It was concluded that Benodanil has a cytotoxic effects depending on decreasing of MI and NDI. PMID:26333298

  17. Calcium channel blockers protect against aluminium-induced DNA damage and block adaptive response to genotoxic stress in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Achary, V Mohan M; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Panda, Brahma B

    2013-03-18

    Calcium is an important second messenger in signal transduction pathways. The role of Ca(2+) signalling in Al-induced DNA damage, cell death, and adaptive response to genotoxic stress caused by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) or methylmercuric chloride (MMCl) in the root cells of Allium cepa was investigated in the current study. Root cells in planta were treated with Al(3+) (800μM of AlCl(3)) for 3h without or with 2h pre-treatment with the Ca(2+) chelator (EGTA) or Ca(2+) channel blockers (lanthanum chloride, verapamil) or CaM/CDPK antagonist (W7). In addition, root cells in planta were conditioned by treatment with Al(3+) (5 or 10μM of AlCl(3)) for 2h followed by the genotoxic challenge with MMCl (1.25μM) or EMS (2.5 or 5mM) for 3h without or with the pre-treatment of the chosen Ca(2+) chelator/channel blockers/antagonist. Following the treatments, cell death and DNA damage were investigated in the root cells by comet assay. Furthermore, genotoxicity in the root meristems was determined after 18-30h of recovery. These results revealed that Al(3+) (800μM) significantly induced DNA damage and cell death in the root cells of A. cepa. On the other hand, conditioning of the root cells with Al(3+) at low concentrations (5 or 10μM) offered adaptive response leading to the protection against genotoxic stress induced by MMCl and EMS. Pre-treatment of root cells with the Ca(2+) chelator/channel blockers/antagonist not only alleviated Al(3+)-induced DNA damage and cell death induced but also blocked the Al(3+)-mediated adaptive response to genotoxic stress induced by MMCl and EMS. For the first time, the results of the present study highlighted the role of Ca(2+) signalling underlying the biphasic mode of action of Al(3+) that induced DNA damage and cell death at high doses and offered adaptation to genotoxic response in plants at low doses. PMID:23313746

  18. Lilium compounds kaempferol and jatropham can modulate cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of radiomimetic zeocin in plants and human lymphocytes In vitro.

    PubMed

    Jovtchev, Gabriele; Gateva, Svetla; Stankov, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Organisms are constantly exposed to the detrimental effect of environmental DNA-damaging agents. The harmful effects of environmental genotoxins could be decreased in a viable way by antimutagenesis. One of the modern approaches to reduce the mutagenic burden is based on exogenous natural and synthetic compounds that possess protective and antimutagenic potential against genotoxins. The natural compounds kaempferol and jatropham isolated from Lilium candidum were tested with respect to their potential to protect cells against the radiomimetic zeocin, as well as to their cytotoxic and genotoxic activities in two types of experimental eukaryotic test systems: Hordeum vulgare and human lymphocytes in vitro. Mitotic index (MI) was used as an endpoint for cytotoxicity; the frequency of chromosome aberrations (MwA) and the number of induced micronuclei (MN), as endpoints for genotoxicity/clastogenicity. Formation of aberration "hot spots" was also used as an indicator for genotoxicity in H. vulgare. Both kaempferol and jatropham were shown to possess a potential to modulate and decrease the cytotoxic and genotoxic/clastogenic effect of zeocin depending on the experimental design and the test system. Our data could be useful for health research programs, particularly in clarifying the pharmacological potential and activity of natural plant compounds. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 751-764, 2016. PMID:25504804

  19. Genotoxic and cytostatic effects of 6-pentadecyl salicylic anacardic acid in transformed cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Alam-Escamilla, David; Estrada-Muñiz, Elizabet; Solís-Villegas, Erik; Elizondo, Guillermo; Vega, Libia

    2015-01-01

    In Mexico, as in many other countries, traditional medicine is used for the treatment of several diseases. In particular, Amphipterygium adstringens infusion is used for gastritis, gastric ulcers, and gastric cancer. Extracts from this tree have microbicidal effects against Helicobacter pylori, an important risk factor for gastric cancer development. Anacardic acids are constituents of A. adstringens, and 6-pentadecyl salicylic acid (6-PSA) is the most abundant. However, there is a lack of information regarding the effects of 6-PSA on cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated whether 6-PSA has differential effects on the induction of genotoxicity, cytostaticity, and apoptosis in normal human peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs), bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes of Balb/c mice, and human transformed cell lines derived from both gastric cancer (AGS cells) and leukaemia (K562 cells). Treatment with 6-PSA (30-150 μM) reduced the viability of AGS and K562 cells together with a moderate, but significant, increase in the frequency of micronucleated cells and the induction of DNA breakage (Comet Assay). Moreover, 6-PSA increased the apoptosis rate in both the AGS and K562 cell lines in a caspase 8-dependent manner. In contrast, neither cytotoxicity nor genotoxicity were observed in PBMCs or bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes of Balb/c mice after treatment with low doses of 6-PSA (0.2-2.0 mg/Kg). Instead, 6-PSA treatment resulted in the inhibition of PBMC proliferation, which was reversible after the compound was removed. Additionally, 6-PSA treatments (2-20 mg/Kg) increased the frequency of mature polychromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow, suggesting a possible effect on the differentiation process of immune cells. The present results indicate that 6-PSA induces cytotoxicity and moderate genotoxicity, together with an increase in the apoptosis rate, in a caspase 8-dependent manner in gastric cancer cells. In contrast, a low toxicity was observed when

  20. Protective effect of lactofermented beetroot juice against aberrant crypt foci formation and genotoxicity of fecal water in rats.

    PubMed

    Klewicka, Elżbieta; Nowak, Adriana; Zduńczyk, Zenon; Cukrowska, Bożena; Błasiak, Janusz

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of beetroot juice fermented by Lactobacillus brevis 0944 and Lactobacillus paracasei 0920 (FBJ) on carcinogen induction of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon. N-Nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU) was used as carcinogen, which was administrated intragastrically at a dose of 50 mg/kg on the 23rd and 26th day of the experiment. Additionally, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of fecal water from experimental animals in the Caco 2 cell line, evaluated by MTT/NRU tests and the comet assay, respectively, as well as by the count of bacteria adhered to colon epithelium assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and DAPI staining. The experimental rats were divided into four groups based on diet type: basal diet, basal diet supplemented with FBJ, basal diet and MNU treatment, and basal diet supplemented with FBJ and MNU treatment. FBJ significantly reduced the number of ACF in MNU-treated rats (from 55±18 to 21±6). Moreover, the number of extensive aberrations (more than 4 crypts in a focus) decreased from 45±21 to 7±4. Fecal water obtained from rats fed with an MNU-containing diet induced pronounced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in Caco 2 cells, but FBJ supplementation of the diet abolished these effects. The presence of FBJ in the diet significantly increased the count of bacteria, including Lactobacillus/Enterococcus, adhered to colonic epithelium. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet with lactofermented beetroot juice may provide protection against precancerous aberrant crypt formation and reduce the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of fecal water. PMID:21185162

  1. BisGMA-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in macrophages are attenuated by wogonin via reduction of intrinsic caspase pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Chang, Yu-Chao; Lee, Shiuan-Shinn; Yeh, Chung-Hsin; Lee, Kevin Gee; Huang, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chun-Jung; Chen, Wen-Ying; Pan, Pin-Ho; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-02-01

    Bisphenol-A-glycidyldimethacrylate (BisGMA) is a frequently used monomer in dental restorative resins. However, BisGMA could leach from dental restorative resins after polymerization leading to inflammation in the peripheral environment. Wogonin, a natural flavone derivative, has several benefits, such as antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties. Pretreatment of macrophage RAW264.7 cells with wogonin inhibited cytotoxicity which is induced by BisGMA in a concentration-dependent manner. BisGMA induced apoptotic responses, such as redistribution of phosphatidylserine from the internal to the external membrane and DNA fragmentation, were decreased by wogonin in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, BisGMA-induced genotoxicity, which detected by cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus and single-cell gel electrophoresis assays, were inhibited by wogonin in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, wogonin suppressed BisGMA-induced activation of intrinsic caspase pathways, such as caspases-3 and -8. Parallel trends were observed in inhibition of caspase-3 and -8 activities, apoptosis, and genotoxicity. These results indicate wogonin suppressed the BisGMA-induced apoptosis and genotoxicity mainly via intrinsic caspase pathway in macrophages. PMID:26756871

  2. Evaluation of titanium dioxide nanocrystal-induced genotoxicity by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and the Drosophila wing spot test.

    PubMed

    Reis, Érica de Melo; Rezende, Alexandre Azenha Alves de; Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli de; Nicolella, Heloiza Diniz; Tavares, Denise Crispim; Silva, Anielle Christine Almeida; Dantas, Noelio Oliveira; Spanó, Mário Antônio

    2016-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanocrystals (TiO2 NCs) crystalline structures include anatase, rutile and brookite. This study evaluated the genotoxic effects of 3.4 and 6.2 nm anatase TiO2 NCs and 78.0 nm predominantly rutile TiO2 NCs through an in vitro micronucleus (MN) assay using V79 cells and an in vivo somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila wings. The MN assay was performed with nontoxic concentrations of TiO2 NCs. Only anatase (3.4 nm) at the highest concentration (120 μM) induced genotoxicity in V79 cells. In the in vivo test, Drosophila melanogaster larvae obtained from standard (ST) or high bioactivation (HB) crosses were treated with TiO2 NCs. In the ST cross, no mutagenic effects were observed. However, in the HB cross, TiO2 NCs (3.4 nm) were mutagenic at 1.5625 and 3.125 mM, while 78.0 nm NCs increased mutant spots at all concentrations tested except 3.125 mM. Only the smallest anatase TiO2 NCs induced mutagenic effects in vitro and in vivo. For rutile TiO2 NCs, no clastogenic/aneugenic effects were observed in the MN assay. However, they were mutagenic in Drosophila. Therefore, both anatase and rutile TiO2 NCs induced mutagenicity. Further research is necessary to clarify the TiO2 NCs genotoxic/mutagenic action mechanisms. PMID:27562929

  3. Environmental effects of dredging: Methods for the assessment of the genotoxic effects of environmental contaminants. Glossary and references. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect

    Honeycutt, M.E.; Jarvis, A.S.; McFarland, V.A.

    1995-07-01

    This technical note is the third in a series of three that outline and describe the principal methods that have been developed to test the potential of environmental contaminants to cause mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects. The first in this series (EEDP-04-24) describes methods used to discern genotoxic effects at the sub cellular level, while the second (EEDP-04-25) describes methods used to discern genotoxic effects at the cellular and organ/organism level. Recent literature citations for each topic referenced in this series of technical notes are provided in this technical note, in addition to a glossary of terms. The information in these technical notes is intended to provide Corps of Engineers personnel with a working knowledge of the terminology and conceptual basis of genotoxicity testing. To develop an improved understanding of the concepts of genotoxicity, readers are encouraged to review A Primer in Genotoxicity (Jarvis, Reilly, and Lutz 1993), presented in Volume D-93-3 of the Environmental Effects of Dredging information exchange bulletin.

  4. Anemia and genotoxicity induced by sub-chronic intragastric treatment of rats with titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Grissa, Intissar; Elghoul, Jaber; Ezzi, Lobna; Chakroun, Sana; Kerkeni, Emna; Hassine, Mohsen; El Mir, Lassaad; Mehdi, Meriem; Ben Cheikh, Hassen; Haouas, Zohra

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely used for their whiteness and opacity. We investigated the hematological effects and genotoxicity of anatase TiO2 NPs following sub-chronic oral gavage treatment. TiO2-NPs were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Wistar rats were treated with anatase TiO2 NPs by intragastric administration for 60 days. Hematological analysis showed a significant decrease in RBC and HCT and a significant increase in MCV, PLT, MPV and WBC at higher doses. Furthermore, abnormally shaped red cells, sometimes containing micronuclei, and hyper-segmented neutrophil nuclei were observed with TiO2 NPs treatment. The micronucleus test revealed damage to chromosomes in rat bone marrow at 100 and 200mg/kg bw; the comet assay showed significant DNA damage at the same doses. PMID:26653980

  5. Assessment of in vitro genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of flurbiprofen on human cultured lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Timocin, Taygun; Ila, Hasan Basri; Dordu, Tuba; Husunet, Mehmet Tahir; Tazehkand, Mostafa Norizadeh; Valipour, Ebrahim; Topaktas, Mehmet

    2016-07-01

    Flurbiprofen is non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which is commonly used for its analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of the study was to explore the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of flurbiprofen in human cultured lymphocytes by sister chromatid exchange, chromosome aberration, and cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus tests. 10, 20, 30, and 40 μg/mL concentrations of flurbiprofen (solvent is DMSO) were used to treatment of human cultured lymphocytes at two different treatment periods (24 and 48 h). Flurbiprofen had no significant genotoxic effect in any of these tests. But exposing to flurbiprofen for 24 and 48 h led to significant decrease on proliferation index, mitotic index, and nuclear division index (NDI). Also, all decreases were concentration-dependent (except NDI at 24 h treatment period). Consequently, the findings of this research showed that flurbiprofen had cytotoxic effects in human blood lymphocytes. PMID:26738809

  6. Aluminium-induced DNA damage and adaptive response to genotoxic stress in plant cells are mediated through reactive oxygen intermediates.

    PubMed

    Murali Achary, V Mohan; Panda, Brahma B

    2010-03-01

    Experiments employing growing root cells of Allium cepa were conducted with a view to elucidate the role of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) in aluminium (Al)-induced DNA damage, cell death and adaptive response to genotoxic challenge imposed by ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) or methyl mercuric chloride (MMCl). In a first set of experiments, root cells in planta were treated with Al at high concentrations (200-800 microM) for 3 h without or with pre-treatments of dihydroxybenzene disulphonic acid (Tiron) and dimethylthiourea (DMTU) for 2 h that trap O(2)(.-)and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), respectively. At the end of treatments, generation of O(2)(.-) and H(2)O(2), cell death and DNA damage were determined. In a second set of experiments, root cells in planta were conditioned by Al at low concentrations (5 or 10 microM) for 2 h and after a 2 h intertreatment interval challenged by MMCl or EMS for 3 h without or with a pre-treatment of Tiron or DMTU. Conditioning treatments, in addition, included two oxidative agents viz rose bengal and H(2)O(2) for comparison. Following treatments, root cells in planta were allowed to recover in tap water. Genotoxicity and DNA damage were evaluated by micronucleus (MN), chromosome aberration (CA) or spindle aberration (SA) and comet assays at different hours (0-30 h) of recovery. The results demonstrated that whereas Al at high concentrations induced DNA damage and cell death, in low concentrations induced adaptive response conferring genomic protection from genotoxic challenge imposed by MMCl, EMS and Al. Pre-treatments of Tiron and DMTU prevented Al-induced DNA damage, cell death, as well as genotoxic adaptation to MMCl and EMS, significantly. The findings underscored the biphasic (hormetic) mode of action of Al that at high doses induced DNA damage and at low non-toxic doses conferred genomic protection, both of which were mediated through ROI but perhaps involving different networks. PMID:19955331

  7. Assessment of genotoxic, cytotoxic, and protective effects of Salacia crassifolia (Mart. Ex. Schult.) G. Don. stem bark fractions in mice.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, C C; Silva, C R; Menezes, A C S; Pérez, C N; Chen-Chen, L

    2013-01-01

    Salacia crassifolia (Mart. Ex. Schult.) G. Don., popularly known in Brazil as "bacupari", "cascudo", and "saputá", is a shrub of the Celastraceae family that is unique to the Brazilian Cerrado region. In folk medicine, this plant has been mainly used to treat skin cancer and gastric ulcers. In the present study, the genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic effects of S. crassifolia stem bark fractions (hexane, ethyl acetate, and hydroalcoholic extracts) were evaluated using the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. Our results showed that none of the S. crassifolia fractions led to a significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE) (P > 0.05), suggesting the absence of genotoxicity. In the antigenotoxicity assessment, a significant decrease in the MNPCE frequency was observed in all fractions of this plant (P < 0.05), demonstrating its protective action against genotoxicity induced by mitomycin C (MMC), which was used as the positive control. Only the hexane fraction of S. crassifolia significantly decreased the poly- and normochromatic erythrocyte ratio (PCE/NCE) in all doses tested (P < 0.05), demonstrating its cytotoxic activity. In association with MMC, both ethyl acetate and hydroalcoholic fractions significantly increased the PCE/NCE ratio in almost all doses tested (P < 0.05), demonstrating the protective action of S. crassifolia against the cytotoxic effect of the positive control. In contrast, the hexane fraction presented a significant decrease in the PCE/NCE ratio in all treatments (P < 0.05), demonstrating an increase in this plant's cytotoxicity in mouse bone marrow cells. PMID:23884760

  8. Determination of genotoxic effects of Imazethapyr herbicide in Allium cepa root cells by mitotic activity, chromosome aberration, and comet assay.

    PubMed

    Liman, Recep; Ciğerci, İbrahim Hakkı; Öztürk, Nur Serap

    2015-02-01

    Imazethapyr (IM) is an imidazolinone herbicide that is currently used for broad-spectrum weed control in soybean and other legume crops. In this study, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of IM were investigated by using mitotic index (MI), mitotic phases, chromosomal abnormalities (CAs) and DNA damage on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa. In Allium root growth inhibition test, EC50 value was determined as 20 ppm, and 0.5xEC50, EC50 and 2xEC50 concentrations of IM herbicide were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS, 10 mg/L) were used as a negative and positive control, respectively. As A. cepa cell cycle is 24 hours, so, application process was carried out for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. All the applied doses decreased MIs compared to control group and these declines were found to be statistically meaningful. Analysis of the chromosomes showed that 10 ppm IM except for 48 h induced CAs but 40 ppm IM except for 72 h decreased CAs. DNA damage was found significantly higher in 20 and 40 ppm of IM compared to the control in comet assay. These results indicated that IM herbicide exhibits cytotoxic activity but not genotoxic activity (except 10 ppm) and induced DNA damage in a dose dependent manner in A. cepa root meristematic cells. PMID:25752428

  9. In-Vitro Carbofuran Induced Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes and Its Mitigation by Vitamins C and E

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ratnesh Kumar; Sharma, Bechan

    2012-01-01

    Various efforts have been made in past in order to predict the underlying mechanism of pesticide-induced toxicity using in vitro and animal models, however, these predictions may or may not be directly correlated with humans. The present study was designed to investigate the carbofuran induced genotoxicity and its amelioration by vitamins C and E by treating human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) with different concentrations (0, 0.5, 1.25, 2.5, 3.75 and 5.0 μM) of this compound. The treatment of PBLs with carbofuran displayed significant DNA damage in concentration dependent manner. The carbofuran induced genotoxicity could be ameliorated to considerable extent by pretreatment of PBLs with equimolar (10 μM) concentration of each of the vitamins C and E; the magnitude of protection by vitamin E being higher than by vitamin C. Also, it was found that the level of protection by these vitamins was higher when PBLs were treated with lower concentrations of pesticide. The significant DNA damage as observed by H2O2, a positive control in the present study, and its amelioration by natural antioxidants (vitamins C and E) lend an evidence to suggest that carbofuran would have caused genotoxicity via pesticide induced oxidative stress. PMID:22377731

  10. Single and combined genotoxicity effects of six pollutants on THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Wang, Haiyan; Han, Daxiong

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the single and combined genotoxic effects of six food pollutants (Chrysoidine G, Sudan I, acid orange II, malachite green, acrylamide, and potassium bromate) on THP-1 cells through comet assay. The results of the single tests indicated that the pollutants increased the percentage of tail DNA (% tail DNA) in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the % tail DNA values induced by synthetic colorants (Chrysoidine G, Sudan I, acid orange II, and malachite green) were significantly higher than those by acrylamide or potassium bromate at most concentrations. In the combined tests, Chrysoidine G (422 μmol/L) or acrylamide (400 μmol/L) was mixed with different concentrations of the other five pollutants respectively. In the first combined tests, most mixtures significantly increased the % tail DNA values with the exception of Chrysoidine G and acid orange II. In the second tests, there were no significant differences in the % tail DNA values between the single and combined tests at most cases. PMID:27375233