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Sample records for geobacillus sp strain

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain Sah69, Isolated from Saharan Soil, Southeast Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Bezuidt, Oliver K. I.; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Gomri, Mohamed A.; Kharroub, Karima

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus spp. are potential sources of novel enzymes, such as those involved in the degradation of recalcitrant polymers. Here, we report a Geobacillus genome that may help reveal genomic differences between this strain and publicly available representatives of the same genus from diverse niches. PMID:26679578

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain Sah69, Isolated from Saharan Soil, Southeast Algeria.

    PubMed

    Bezuidt, Oliver K I; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Gomri, Mohamed A; Kharroub, Karima; Cowan, Don A

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus spp. are potential sources of novel enzymes, such as those involved in the degradation of recalcitrant polymers. Here, we report a Geobacillus genome that may help reveal genomic differences between this strain and publicly available representatives of the same genus from diverse niches. PMID:26679578

  3. Highly Thermostable Xylanase Production from A Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain WSUCF1 Utilizing Lignocellulosic Biomass.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Aditya; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Sani, Rajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Efficient enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars requires a complete repertoire of biomass deconstruction enzymes. Hemicellulases play an important role in hydrolyzing hemicellulose component of lignocellulose to xylooligosaccharides and xylose. Thermostable xylanases have been a focus of attention as industrially important enzymes due to their long shelf life at high temperatures. Geobacillus sp. strain WSUCF1 produced thermostable xylanase activity (crude xylanase cocktail) when grown on xylan or various inexpensive untreated and pretreated lignocellulosic biomasses such as prairie cord grass and corn stover. The optimum pH and temperature for the crude xylanase cocktail were 6.5 and 70°C, respectively. The WSUCF1 crude xylanase was found to be highly thermostable with half-lives of 18 and 12?days at 60 and 70°C, respectively. At 70°C, rates of xylan hydrolysis were also found to be better with the WSUCF1 secretome than those with commercial enzymes, i.e., for WSUCF1 crude xylanase, Cellic-HTec2, and AccelleraseXY, the percent xylan conversions were 68.9, 49.4, and 28.92, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, WSUCF1 crude xylanase cocktail is among the most thermostable xylanases produced by thermophilic Geobacillus spp. and other thermophilic microbes (optimum growth temperature ?70°C). High thermostability, activity over wide range of temperatures, and better xylan hydrolysis than commercial enzymes make WSUCF1 crude xylanase suitable for thermophilic lignocellulose bioconversion processes. PMID:26137456

  4. Highly Thermostable Xylanase Production from A Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain WSUCF1 Utilizing Lignocellulosic Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Aditya; Bischoff, Kenneth M.; Sani, Rajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Efficient enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars requires a complete repertoire of biomass deconstruction enzymes. Hemicellulases play an important role in hydrolyzing hemicellulose component of lignocellulose to xylooligosaccharides and xylose. Thermostable xylanases have been a focus of attention as industrially important enzymes due to their long shelf life at high temperatures. Geobacillus sp. strain WSUCF1 produced thermostable xylanase activity (crude xylanase cocktail) when grown on xylan or various inexpensive untreated and pretreated lignocellulosic biomasses such as prairie cord grass and corn stover. The optimum pH and temperature for the crude xylanase cocktail were 6.5 and 70°C, respectively. The WSUCF1 crude xylanase was found to be highly thermostable with half-lives of 18 and 12?days at 60 and 70°C, respectively. At 70°C, rates of xylan hydrolysis were also found to be better with the WSUCF1 secretome than those with commercial enzymes, i.e., for WSUCF1 crude xylanase, Cellic-HTec2, and AccelleraseXY, the percent xylan conversions were 68.9, 49.4, and 28.92, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, WSUCF1 crude xylanase cocktail is among the most thermostable xylanases produced by thermophilic Geobacillus spp. and other thermophilic microbes (optimum growth temperature ?70°C). High thermostability, activity over wide range of temperatures, and better xylan hydrolysis than commercial enzymes make WSUCF1 crude xylanase suitable for thermophilic lignocellulose bioconversion processes. PMID:26137456

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of alpha-glucosidase from Geobacillus sp strain HTA-462, one of the deepest sea bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Hung, Vo Si; Akita, Masatake; Hatada, Yuji; Ito, Susumu; Horikoshi, Koki

    2003-07-01

    An alpha-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.20) was purified from Geobacillus sp. strain HTA-462 cells and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The Geobacillus strain is a thermophilic and high-pressure-resistant bacterium found at the bottom of the Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench. The crystal was characterized by X-ray diffraction and belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 104.0, b = 91.5, c = 72.9 A, beta = 109.4 degrees. Diffraction data to 2.5 A resolution were collected and processed. PMID:12832785

  6. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52, a xylan-degrading strain isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren J; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Chang, Yun-Juan; Mead, David A

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 was isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). Based on 16S rRNA genes and average nucleotide identity, Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 and the related Geobacillus sp. Y412MC61 appear to be members of a new species of Geobacillus. The genome of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,628,883 bp, an average G?+?C content of 52 % and one circular plasmid of 45,057 bp and an average G?+?C content of 45 %. Y412MC52 possesses arabinan, arabinoglucuronoxylan, and aromatic acid degradation clusters for degradation of hemicellulose from biomass. Transport and utilization clusters are also present for other carbohydrates including starch, cellobiose, and ?- and ?-galactooligosaccharides. PMID:26500717

  7. Geobacillus zalihae sp. nov., a thermophilic lipolytic bacterium isolated from palm oil mill effluent in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Leow, Thean Chor; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2007-01-01

    Background Thermophilic Bacillus strains of phylogenetic Bacillus rRNA group 5 were described as a new genus Geobacillus. Their geographical distribution included oilfields, hay compost, hydrothermal vent or soils. The members from the genus Geobacillus have a growth temperatures ranging from 35 to 78°C and contained iso-branched saturated fatty acids (iso-15:0, iso-16:0 and iso-17:0) as the major fatty acids. The members of Geobacillus have similarity in their 16S rRNA gene sequences (96.5–99.2%). Thermophiles harboring intrinsically stable enzymes are suitable for industrial applications. The quest for intrinsically thermostable lipases from thermophiles is a prominent task due to the laborious processes via genetic modification. Results Twenty-nine putative lipase producers were screened and isolated from palm oil mill effluent in Malaysia. Of these, isolate T1T was chosen for further study as relatively higher lipase activity was detected quantitatively. The crude T1 lipase showed high optimum temperature of 70°C and was also stable up to 60°C without significant loss of crude enzyme activity. Strain T1T was a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, endospore forming bacterium. On the basic of 16S rDNA analysis, strain T1T was shown to belong to the Bacillus rRNA group 5 related to Geobacillus thermoleovorans (DSM 5366T) and Geobacillus kaustophilus (DSM 7263T). Chemotaxonomic data of cellular fatty acids supported the affiliation of strain T1T to the genus Geobacillus. The results of physiological and biochemical tests, DNA/DNA hybridization, RiboPrint analysis, the length of lipase gene and protein pattern allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain T1T from its validly published closest phylogenetic neighbors. Strain T1T therefore represents a novel species, for which the name Geobacillus zalihae sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain T1T (=DSM 18318T; NBRC 101842T). Conclusion Strain T1T was able to secrete extracellular thermostable lipase into culture medium. The strain T1T was identified as Geobacillus zalihae T1T as it differs from its type strains Geobacillus kaustophilus (DSM 7263T) and Geobacillus thermoleovorans (DSM 5366T) on some physiological studies, cellular fatty acids composition, RiboPrint analysis, length of lipase gene and protein profile. PMID:17692114

  8. Taxonomic revision of the genus Geobacillus: emendation of Geobacillus, G. stearothermophilus, G. jurassicus, G. toebii, G. thermodenitrificans and G. thermoglucosidans (nom. corrig., formerly 'thermoglucosidasius'); transfer of Bacillus thermantarcticus to the genus as G. thermantarcticus comb. nov.; proposal of Caldibacillus debilis gen. nov., comb. nov.; transfer of G. tepidamans to Anoxybacillus as A. tepidamans comb. nov.; and proposal of Anoxybacillus caldiproteolyticus sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Coorevits, An; Dinsdale, Anna E; Halket, Gillian; Lebbe, Liesbeth; De Vos, Paul; Van Landschoot, Anita; Logan, Niall A

    2012-07-01

    Sixty-two strains of thermophilic aerobic endospore-forming bacteria were subjected to polyphasic taxonomic study including 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, polar lipid and fatty acid analysis, phenotypic characterization, and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments. Distinct clusters of the species Geobacillus stearothermophilus, Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, Geobacillus toebii and Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius were formed, allowing their descriptions to be emended, and the distinctiveness of the poorly represented species Geobacillus jurassicus, Geobacillus subterraneus and Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus was confirmed. It is proposed that the name Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius be corrected to Geobacillus thermoglucosidans nom. corrig. Bacillus thermantarcticus clustered between Geobacillus species on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and its transfer to the genus Geobacillus as Geobacillus thermantarcticus comb. nov. (type strain LMG 23032(T)=DSM 9572(T)=strain M1(T)=R-35644(T)) is proposed. The above-mentioned species, together with Geobacillus thermoleovorans and Geobacillus thermocatenulatus, form a monophyletic cluster representing the genus Geobacillus. The distinctiveness of 'Geobacillus caldoproteolyticus' was confirmed and it is proposed that it be accommodated, along with Geobacillus tepidamans, in the genus Anoxybacillus as Anoxybacillus caldiproteolyticus sp. nov. (type strain DSM 15730(T)=ATCC BAA-818(T)=LMG 26209(T)=R-35652(T)) and Anoxybacillus tepidamans comb. nov. (type strain LMG 26208(T)=ATCC BAA-942(T)=DSM 16325(T)=R-35643(T)), respectively. The type strain of Geobacillus debilis was not closely related to any members of the genera Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus, and it is proposed that this species be placed in the new genus Caldibacillus as Caldibacillus debilis gen. nov. comb. nov. The type strain of the type species, Caldibacillus debilis, is LMG 23386(T) (=DSM 16016(T)=NCIMB 13995(T)=Tf(T)=R-35653(T)). PMID:21856988

  9. A modeling study by response surface methodology and artificial neural network on culture parameters optimization for thermostable lipase production from a newly isolated thermophilic Geobacillus sp. strain ARM

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Ean Ch'ng, Diana Hooi; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar

    2008-01-01

    Background Thermostable bacterial lipases occupy a place of prominence among biocatalysts owing to their novel, multifold applications and resistance to high temperature and other operational conditions. The capability of lipases to catalyze a variety of novel reactions in both aqueous and nonaqueous media presents a fascinating field for research, creating interest to isolate novel lipase producers and optimize lipase production. The most important stages in a biological process are modeling and optimization to improve a system and increase the efficiency of the process without increasing the cost. Results Different production media were tested for lipase production by a newly isolated thermophilic Geobacillus sp. strain ARM (DSM 21496 = NCIMB 41583). The maximum production was obtained in the presence of peptone and yeast extract as organic nitrogen sources, olive oil as carbon source and lipase production inducer, sodium and calcium as metal ions, and gum arabic as emulsifier and lipase production inducer. The best models for optimization of culture parameters were achieved by multilayer full feedforward incremental back propagation network and modified response surface model using backward elimination, where the optimum condition was: growth temperature (52.3°C), medium volume (50 ml), inoculum size (1%), agitation rate (static condition), incubation period (24 h) and initial pH (5.8). The experimental lipase activity was 0.47 Uml-1 at optimum condition (4.7-fold increase), which compared well to the maximum predicted values by ANN (0.47 Uml-1) and RSM (0.476 Uml-1), whereas R2 and AAD were determined as 0.989 and 0.059% for ANN, and 0.95 and 0.078% for RSM respectively. Conclusion Lipase production is the result of a synergistic combination of effective parameters interactions. These parameters are in equilibrium and the change of one parameter can be compensated by changes of other parameters to give the same results. Though both RSM and ANN models provided good quality predictions in this study, yet the ANN showed a clear superiority over RSM for both data fitting and estimation capabilities. On the other hand, ANN has the disadvantage of requiring large amounts of training data in comparison with RSM. This problem was solved by using statistical experimental design, to reduce the number of experiments. PMID:19105837

  10. Characterization of a thermostable raw-starch hydrolyzing ?-amylase from deep-sea thermophile Geobacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Cai, Menghao; Huang, Mengmeng; He, Hao; Lu, Jian; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-10-01

    A deep-sea thermophile, Geobacillus sp. 4j, was identified to grow on starch and produce thermostable amylase. N-terminally truncated form of Geobacillus sp. 4j ?-amylase (Gs4j-amyA) was fused at its N-terminal end with the signal peptide of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Escherichia coli. The enzyme was over-expressed in E. coli BL21 with a maximum extracellular production of 130U/ml in shake flask. The yield of the transformant increased 22-fold as compared with that of the wild strain. The recombinant enzyme purified to apparent homogeneity by metal-affinity chromatography, exhibited a molecular mass of 62kDa. It displayed the maximal activity at 60-65°C and pH 5.5. Its half-life (t1/2) at 80°C was 4.25h with a temperature deactivation energy of 166.3kJ/mol. Compared to three commonly used commercial ?-amylases, the Gs4j-amyA exhibited similar thermostable performance to BLA but better than BAA and BSA. It also showed a universally efficient raw starch hydrolysis performance superior to commercial ?-amylases at an acidic pH approaching nature of starch slurry. As a new acidic-resistant thermostable ?-amylase, it has the potential to bypass the industrial gelatinization step in raw starch hydrolysis. PMID:26073094

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus kaustophilus GBlys, a Lysogenic Strain with Bacteriophage ?OH2

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kazuki; Martono, Hindra; Nagayoshi, Yuko; Fujino, Yasuhiro; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Geobacillus kaustophilus strain GBlys was isolated along with the bacteriophage ?OH2, which infects G. kaustophilus NBRC 102445T. Here we present a draft sequence of this strain’s genome, which consists of 216 contigs for a total of 3,541,481 bp, 3,679 predicted coding sequences, and a G+C content of 52.1%. PMID:23950135

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Strains of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Isolated from a Milk Powder Manufacturing Plant

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Sara A.; Cox, Murray P.; Flint, Steve H.; Lindsay, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Three strains of Geobacillus stearothermophilus (designated A1, P3, and D1) were isolated from a New Zealand milk powder manufacturing plant. Here, we describe their draft genome sequences. This information provided the first genomic insights into the nature of G. stearothermophilus strains present in the milk powder manufacturing environment. PMID:26472822

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Strains of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Isolated from a Milk Powder Manufacturing Plant.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Sara A; Cox, Murray P; Flint, Steve H; Lindsay, Denise; Biggs, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Three strains of Geobacillus stearothermophilus (designated A1, P3, and D1) were isolated from a New Zealand milk powder manufacturing plant. Here, we describe their draft genome sequences. This information provided the first genomic insights into the nature of G. stearothermophilus strains present in the milk powder manufacturing environment. PMID:26472822

  14. Novel thermostable endo-xylanase cloned and expressed from bacterium Geobacillus sp. WSUCF1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A gene encoding a GH10 endo-xylanase from Geobacillus sp. WSUCF1 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant endo-xylanase (37 kDa) exhibited high specific activity of 461.0 U/ mg of protein. Endo-xylanase was optimally active on birchwood xylan at 70°C and pH 6.5. Zn2+ and Ca2+ ions i...

  15. Genomic analysis of six new Geobacillus strains reveals highly conserved carbohydrate degradation architectures and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brumm, Phillip J.; De Maayer, Pieter; Mead, David A.; Cowan, Don A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we report the whole genome sequences of six new Geobacillus xylanolytic strains along with the genomic analysis of their capability to degrade carbohydrates. The six sequenced Geobacillus strains described here have a range of GC contents from 43.9% to 52.5% and clade with named Geobacillus species throughout the entire genus. We have identified a ~200 kb unique super-cluster in all six strains, containing five to eight distinct carbohydrate degradation clusters in a single genomic region, a feature not seen in other genera. The Geobacillus strains rely on a small number of secreted enzymes located within distinct clusters for carbohydrate utilization, in contrast to most biomass-degrading organisms which contain numerous secreted enzymes located randomly throughout the genomes. All six strains are able to utilize fructose, arabinose, xylose, mannitol, gluconate, xylan, and ?-1,6-glucosides. The gene clusters for utilization of these seven substrates have identical organization and the individual proteins have a high percent identity to their homologs. The strains show significant differences in their ability to utilize inositol, sucrose, lactose, ?-mannosides, ?-1,4-glucosides and arabinan. PMID:26029180

  16. Thermophilic fermentation of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol by a novel Geobacillus strain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acetoin and 2,3-butanediol are two important biorefinery platform chemicals. They are currently fermented below 40°C using mesophilic strains, but the processes often suffer from bacterial contamination. Results This work reports the isolation and identification of a novel aerobic Geobacillus strain XT15 capable of producing both of these chemicals under elevated temperatures, thus reducing the risk of bacterial contamination. The optimum growth temperature was found to be between 45 and 55°C and the medium initial pH to be 8.0. In addition to glucose, galactose, mannitol, arabionose, and xylose were all acceptable substrates, enabling the potential use of cellulosic biomass as the feedstock. XT15 preferred organic nitrogen sources including corn steep liquor powder, a cheap by-product from corn wet-milling. At 55°C, 7.7?g/L of acetoin and 14.5?g/L of 2,3-butanediol could be obtained using corn steep liquor powder as a nitrogen source. Thirteen volatile products from the cultivation broth of XT15 were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, and their derivatives including a novel metabolite 2,3-dihydroxy-3-methylheptan-4-one, accounted for a total of about 96% of all the volatile products. In contrast, organic acids and other products were minor by-products. ?-Acetolactate decarboxylase and acetoin:2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol oxidoreductase in XT15, the two key enzymes in acetoin metabolic pathway, were found to be both moderately thermophilic with the identical optimum temperature of 45°C. Conclusions Geobacillus sp. XT15 is the first naturally occurring thermophile excreting acetoin and/or 2,3-butanediol. This work has demonstrated the attractive prospect of developing it as an industrial strain in the thermophilic fermentation of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol with improved anti-contamination performance. The novel metabolites and enzymes identified in XT15 also indicated its strong promise as a precious biological resource. Thermophilic fermentation also offers great prospect for improving its yields and efficiencies. This remains a core aim for future work. PMID:23217110

  17. Characteristics of Newly Isolated Geobacillus sp. ZY-10 Degrading Hydrocarbons in Crude Oil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yumei; Ning, Zhanguo; Yang, Fan; Li, Xianzhen

    2015-01-01

    An obligately thermophilic strain ZY-10 was isolated from the crude oil in a high-temperature oilfield, which was capable of degrading heavy crude oil. Phenotypic and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the isolate should be grouped in the genus Geobacillus, which shared thd highest similarity (99%) of the 16S rDNA sequence to Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, the major cellular fatty acid iso-15:0 (28.55%), iso-16:0 (24.93%), iso-17:0 (23.53%) and the characteristics including indole production, tolerance to NaN3 and carbohydrate fermentation showed some difference from the recognized species in the genus Geobacillus. The isolate could use tridecane, hexadecane, octacosane and hexatridecane as sole carbon source for cell growth, and the digesting rate of long-chain alkane was lower than that of short-chain alkane. When the isolate was cultured in the heavy crude oil supplement with inorganic salts and trace yeast extract, the concentration of short-chain alkane was significantly increased and the content of long-chain alkane was decreased, suggesting that the larger hydrocarbon components in crude oil were degraded into shorter-chain alkane. Strain ZY-10 would be useful for improving the mobility of crude oil and upgrading heavy crude oil in situ. PMID:26638533

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus sp. Isolate T6, a Thermophilic Bacterium Collected from a Thermal Spring in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Elio M.; Berretta, Marcelo F.; Benintende, Graciela B.; Amadio, Ariel F.; Zandomeni, Rubén O.

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus sp. isolate T6 was collected from a thermal spring in Salta, Argentina. The draft genome sequence (3,767,773 bp) of this isolate is represented by one major scaffold of 3,46 Mbp, a second one of 207 kbp, and 20 scaffolds of <13 kbp. The assembled sequences revealed 3,919 protein-coding genes. PMID:26184933

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus sp. Isolate T6, a Thermophilic Bacterium Collected from a Thermal Spring in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Elio M; Berretta, Marcelo F; Navas, Laura E; Benintende, Graciela B; Amadio, Ariel F; Zandomeni, Rubén O

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus sp. isolate T6 was collected from a thermal spring in Salta, Argentina. The draft genome sequence (3,767,773 bp) of this isolate is represented by one major scaffold of 3,46 Mbp, a second one of 207 kbp, and 20 scaffolds of <13 kbp. The assembled sequences revealed 3,919 protein-coding genes. PMID:26184933

  20. Influence of N- and/or C-terminal regions on activity, expression, characteristics and structure of lipase from Geobacillus sp. 95.

    PubMed

    Gudiukait?, Renata; Gegeckas, Audrius; Kazlauskas, Darius; Citavicius, Donaldas

    2014-01-01

    GD-95 lipase from Geobacillus sp. strain 95 and its modified variants lacking N-terminal signal peptide and/or 10 or 20 C-terminal amino acids were successfully cloned, expressed and purified. To our knowledge, GD-95 lipase precursor (Pre-GD-95) is the first Geobacillus lipase possessing more than 80% lipolytic activity at 5 °C. It has maximum activity at 55 °C and displays a broad pH activity range. GD-95 lipase was shown to hydrolyze p-NP dodecanoate, tricaprylin and canola oil better than other analyzed substrates. Structural and sequence alignments of bacterial lipases and GD-95 lipase revealed that the C-terminus forms an ? helix, which is a conserved structure in lipases from Pseudomonas, Clostridium or Staphylococcus bacteria. This work demonstrates that 10 and 20 C-terminal amino acids of GD-95 lipase significantly affect stability and other physicochemical properties of this enzyme, which has never been reported before and can help create lipases with more specific properties for industrial application. GD-95 lipase and its modified variants GD-95-10 can be successfully applied to biofuel production, in leather and pulp industries, for the production of cosmetics or perfumes. These lipases are potential biocatalysts in processes, which require extreme conditions: low or high temperature, strongly acidic or alkaline environment and various organic solvents. PMID:24287927

  1. Novel thermostable endo-xylanase cloned and expressed from bacterium Geobacillus sp. WSUCF1.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Aditya; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Balan, Venkatesh; Sani, Rajesh K

    2014-08-01

    A gene encoding a GH10 endo-xylanase from Geobacillus sp. WSUCF1 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant endo-xylanase (37kDa) exhibited high specific activity of 461.0U/mg of protein. Endo-xylanase was optimally active on birchwood xylan at 70°C and pH 6.5. The endo-xylanase was found to be highly thermostable at 50 and 60°C, retaining 82% and 50% of its original activity, respectively, after 60h. High xylan conversions (92%) were obtained with oat-spelt xylan hydrolysis. Higher glucan and xylan conversions were obtained on AFEX-treated corn stover with an enzyme cocktail containing WSUCF1 endo-xylanase (71% and 47%) as compared to enzyme cocktail containing commercial fungal endo-xylanase (64% and 41%). High specific activity, active at high pH's, wide substrate specificity, and higher hydrolytic activity on recalcitrant lignocellulose, make this endo-xylanase a suitable candidate for biofuel and bioprocess industries. PMID:24725385

  2. alpha-Glucosidase from a strain of deep-sea Geobacillus: a potential enzyme for the biosynthesis of complex carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Hung, Vo Si; Hatada, Yuji; Goda, Saori; Lu, Jie; Hidaka, Yuko; Li, Zhijun; Akita, Masatake; Ohta, Yukari; Watanabe, Kenji; Matsui, Hirokazu; Ito, Susumu; Horikoshi, Koki

    2005-10-01

    An alpha-glucosidase from Geobacillus sp. strain HTA-462, one of the deepest sea bacteria isolated from the sediment of the Mariana Trench, was purified to homogeneity and estimated to be a 65-kDa protein by SDS-PAGE. At low ion strength, the enzyme exists in the homodimeric form (130 kDa). It is a thermo- and alkaline-stable enzyme with a half-life of 13.4 h and a maximum hydrolytic activity at 60 degrees C and pH 9.0 in 15 mM glycine-NaOH buffer. The enzyme exclusively hydrolyzed alpha-1,4-glycosidic linkages of oligosaccharides in an exo-type manner. The enzyme had an overwhelming transglycosylation activity and glycosylated various non-sugar molecules when maltose was used as a sugar donor. It converted maltose to isomaltose. The gene encoding the enzyme was cloned and sequenced. The recombinant enzyme could be extracellularly overproduced by Bacillus subtilis harboring its gene and preserved the primary properties of the native enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments showed that Asp98 is essential for the enzyme activity in addition to Asp199, Asp326, and Glu256. PMID:15940457

  3. Large Fragment of DNA Polymerase I from Geobacillus sp. 777: Cloning and Comparison with DNA Polymerases I in Practical Applications.

    PubMed

    Oscorbin, Igor P; Boyarskikh, Ulyana A; Filipenko, Maksim L

    2015-10-01

    A truncated gene of DNA polymerase I from the thermophilic bacteria Geobacillus sp. 777 encoding a large fragment of enzyme (LF Gss pol) was cloned and sequenced. The resulting sequence is 1776-bp long and encodes a 592 aa protein with a predicted molecular mass of 69.8 kDa. Enzyme was overexpressed in E. coli, purified by metal-chelate chromatography, and biochemically characterized. The specific activity of LF Gss pol is 104,000 U/mg (one unit of enzyme was defined as the amount of enzyme that incorporated 10 nmol of dNTP into acid insoluble material in 30 min at 65 °C). The properties of LF Gss pol were compared to commercially available large fragments of DNA polymerase I from G. stearothermophilus (LF Bst pol) and Bacillus smithii (LF Bsm pol). Studied enzymes showed maximum activity at similar pH and concentrations of monovalent/divalent ions, whereas LF Gss pol and LF Bst pol were more thermostable than LF Bsm pol. LF Gss pol is more resistant to enzyme inhibitors (SYBR Green I, heparin, ethanol, urea, blood plasma) in comparison with LF Bst pol and LF Bsm pol. LF Gss pol is also suitable for loop-mediated isothermal amplification and whole genome amplification of human genomic DNA. PMID:26289299

  4. Thermophilic Geobacillus galactosidasius sp. nov. loaded ?-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticle for the preconcentrations of Pb and Cd.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Sadin; K?l?nç, Ersin; Okumu?, Veysi; Poli, Annarita; Nicolaus, Barbara; Romano, Ida

    2016-02-01

    Thermophilic bacteria, Geobacillus galactosidasius sp nov. was loaded on ?-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticle for the preconcentrations of Pb and Cd by solid phase extraction before ICP-OES. pH and flow rate of the solution, amounts of biosorbent and magnetic nanoparticle, volume of sample solution, effects of the possible interferic ions were investigated in details. Linear calibration curves were constructed in the concentration ranges of 1.0-60ngmL(-1) for Pb and Cd. The RSDs of the method were lower than 2.8% for Pb and 3.8% for Cd. Certified and standard reference samples of fortified water, wastewater, poplar leaves, and simulated fresh water were used to accurate the method. LOD values were found as 0.07 and 0.06ngmL(-1) respectively for Pb and Cd. The biosorption capacities were found as 34.3mgg(-1) for Pb and 37.1mgg(-1) for Cd. Pb and Cd concentrations in foods were determined. Surface microstructure was investigated by SEM-EDX. PMID:26679049

  5. Genetic engineering of Geobacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Kananavi?i?t?, R?ta; ?itavi?ius, Donaldas

    2015-04-01

    Members of the genus Geobacillus are thermophiles that are of great biotechnological importance, since they are sources of many thermostable enzymes. Because of their metabolic versatility, geobacilli can be used as whole-cell catalysts in processes such as bioconversion and bioremediation. The effective employment of Geobacillus spp. requires the development of reliable methods for genetic engineering of these bacteria. Currently, genetic manipulation tools and protocols are under rapid development. However, there are several convenient cloning vectors, some of which replicate autonomously, while others are suitable for the genetic modification of chromosomal genes. Gene expression systems are also intensively studied. Combining these tools together with proper techniques for DNA transfer, some Geobacillus strains were shown to be valuable producers of recombinant proteins and industrially important biochemicals, such as ethanol or isobutanol. This review encompasses the progress made in the genetic engineering of Geobacillus spp. and surveys the vectors and transformation methods that are available for this genus. PMID:25659824

  6. Functional and Structural Characterization of Thermostable d-Amino Acid Aminotransferases from Geobacillus spp.†

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Goo; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Song, Jae Jun; Kim, Su-Jin; Kwak, Mi-Sun; Sung, Moon-Hee

    2006-01-01

    d-Amino acid aminotransferases (d-AATs) from Geobacillus toebii SK1 and Geobacillus sp. strain KLS1 were cloned and characterized from a genetic, catalytic, and structural aspect. Although the enzymes were highly thermostable, their catalytic capability was approximately one-third of that of highly active Bacilli enzymes, with respective turnover rates of 47 and 55 s?1 at 50°C. The Geobacillus enzymes were unique and shared limited sequence identities of below 45% with d-AATs from mesophilic and thermophilic Bacillus spp., except for a hypothetical protein with a 72% identity from the G. kaustophilus genome. Structural alignments showed that most key residues were conserved in the Geobacillus enzymes, although the conservative residues just before the catalytic lysine were distinctively changed: the 140-LRcD-143 sequence in Bacillus d-AATs was 144-EYcY-147 in the Geobacillus d-AATs. When the EYcY sequence from the SK1 enzyme was mutated into LRcD, a 68% increase in catalytic activity was observed, while the binding affinity toward ?-ketoglutarate decreased by half. The mutant was very close to the wild-type in thermal stability, indicating that the mutations did not disturb the overall structure of the enzyme. Homology modeling also suggested that the two tyrosine residues in the EYcY sequence from the Geobacillus d-AATs had a ?/? interaction that was replaceable with the salt bridge interaction between the arginine and aspartate residues in the LRcD sequence. PMID:16461714

  7. Transformable facultative thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus NUB3621 as a host strain for metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Kristen; Robic, Srebrenka; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2014-08-01

    Metabolic engineers develop inexpensive enantioselective syntheses of high-value compounds, but their designs are sometimes confounded by the misfolding of heterologously expressed proteins. Geobacillus stearothermophilus NUB3621 is a readily transformable facultative thermophile. It could be used to express and properly fold proteins derived from its many mesophilic or thermophilic Bacillaceae relatives or to direct the evolution of thermophilic variants of mesophilic proteins. Moreover, its capacity for high-temperature growth should accelerate chemical transformation rates in accordance with the Arrhenius equation and reduce the risks of microbial contamination. Its tendency to sporulate in response to nutrient depletion lowers the costs of storage and transportation. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of G. stearothermophilus NUB3621 and describe inducible and constitutive expression plasmids that function in this organism. These tools will help us and others to exploit the natural advantages of this system for metabolic engineering applications. PMID:24788326

  8. Transformable facultative thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus NUB3621 as a host strain for metabolic engineering

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Kristen; Robic, Srebrenka

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic engineers develop inexpensive enantioselective syntheses of high-value compounds, but their designs are sometimes confounded by the misfolding of heterologously expressed proteins. Geobacillus stearothermophilus NUB3621 is a readily transformable facultative thermophile. It could be used to express and properly fold proteins derived from its many mesophilic or thermophilic Bacillaceae relatives or to direct the evolution of thermophilic variants of mesophilic proteins. Moreover, its capacity for high-temperature growth should accelerate chemical transformation rates in accordance with the Arrhenius equation and reduce the risks of microbial contamination. Its tendency to sporulate in response to nutrient depletion lowers the costs of storage and transportation. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of G. stearothermophilus NUB3621 and describe inducible and constitutive expression plasmids that function in this organism. These tools will help us and others to exploit the natural advantages of this system for metabolic engineering applications. PMID:24788326

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus icigianus Strain G1w1T Isolated from Hot Springs in the Valley of Geysers, Kamchatka (Russian Federation)

    PubMed Central

    Bryanskaya, Alla V.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Kotenko, Anastasia V.; Peltek, Sergey E.

    2014-01-01

    The Geobacillus icigianus G1w1T strain was isolated from sludge samples of unnamed vaporing hydrothermal (97°?) outlets situated in a geyser in the Troinoy region (Valley of Geysers, Kronotsky Nature Reserve, Kamchatka, Russian Federation; 54°25?51.40?N, 160°7?41.40?E). The sequenced and annotated genome is 3,457,810 bp and encodes 3,342 genes. PMID:25342695

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus icigianus Strain G1w1T Isolated from Hot Springs in the Valley of Geysers, Kamchatka (Russian Federation).

    PubMed

    Bryanskaya, Alla V; Rozanov, Aleksey S; Logacheva, Maria D; Kotenko, Anastasia V; Peltek, Sergey E

    2014-01-01

    The Geobacillus icigianus G1w1(T) strain was isolated from sludge samples of unnamed vaporing hydrothermal (97°?) outlets situated in a geyser in the Troinoy region (Valley of Geysers, Kronotsky Nature Reserve, Kamchatka, Russian Federation; 54°25'51.40?N, 160°7'41.40?E). The sequenced and annotated genome is 3,457,810 bp and encodes 3,342 genes. PMID:25342695

  11. Genome sequencing and annotation of Laceyella sacchari strain GS 1-1, isolated from hot spring, Chumathang, Leh, India

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Navjot; Arora, Amit; Kumar, Narender; Mayilraj, Shanmugam

    2013-01-01

    We report the 3.3-Mb draft genome of Laceyella sacchari strain GS 1-1, isolated from hot spring water sample, Chumathang, Leh, India. Draft genome of strain GS 1-1 consists of 3, 324, 316 bp with a G + C content of 48.8% and 3429 predicted protein coding genes and 75 RNAs. Geobacillus thermodenitrificans strain NG80-2, Geobacillus kaustophilus strain HTA426 and Geobacillus sp. Strain G11MC16 are the closest neighbors of the strain GS 1-1. PMID:26484058

  12. Highly thermostable GH39 ß-xylosidase from a Geobacillus sp. strain WSUCF1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Complete enzymatic hydrolysis of xylan to xylose requires the action of endoxylanase and ß-xylosidase. ß-xylosidases play an important part in hydrolyzing xylo-oligosaccharides to xylose. Thermostable ß-xylosidases have been a focus of attention as industrially important enzymes due to th...

  13. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 8807

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brady D.; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

    2006-12-01

    Precipitation of CaCO3 catalyzed by the growth and physiology of cyanobacteria in the Genus Synechococcus represents a potential mechanism for sequestration of CO2 produced during the burning of coal for power generation. Microcosm experiments were performed in which Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 were tested for their ability to calcify when exposed to a fixed calcium concentration of 3.4 mM and bicarbonate concentrations of 0.5, 1.25 and 2.5 mM. Disappearance of soluble calcium was used as an indicator of CaCO3 formation; results from metabolically active microcosms were compared to controls with no cells or no carbonate added. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 removed calcium continuously over the duration of the experiment with approximately 18.6 mg of calcium in the solid phase. Calcium removal occurred over a two-day time period when Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 was tested and only 8.9 mg of calcium was removed in the solid phase. The ability of the cyanobacteria to create an alkaline growth environment appeared to be the primary factor responsible for CaCO3 precipitation in these experiments. Removal of inorganic carbon by fixation into biomass was insignificant compared to the mass of inorganic carbon removed by incorporation into the growing CaCO3 solid.

  14. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology (2002), 52, 22512255 DOI: 10.1099/ijs.0.02181-0 Geobacillus toebii sp. nov., a novel

    E-print Network

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    2002-01-01

    ; very few of them grew above 60 mC, and only Bacillus coagulans and Geobacillus stearothermophilus were, hay compost The large diversity of the genus Bacillus led to the reclassification of seven., 1993; Heyndrickx et al., 1996), Brevibacillus (Shida et al., 1996), Aneurini- bacillus (Shida et al

  15. Analysis of Metabolic Pathways and Fluxes in a Newly Discovered Thermophilic and Ethanol-Tolerant Geobacillus Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Sapra, Rajat; Joyner, Dominique; Hazen, Terry C.; Myers, Samuel; Reichmuth, David; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-01-20

    A recently discovered thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius M10EXG, ferments a range of C5 (e.g., xylose) and C6 sugars (e.g., glucose) and istolerant to high ethanol concentrations (10percent, v/v). We have investigated the central metabolism of this bacterium using both in vitro enzyme assays and 13C-based flux analysis to provide insights into the physiological properties of this extremophile and explore its metabolism for bio-ethanol or other bioprocess applications. Our findings show that glucose metabolism in G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG proceeds via glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the TCA cycle; the Entner?Doudoroff pathway and transhydrogenase activity were not detected. Anaplerotic reactions (including the glyoxylate shunt, pyruvate carboxylase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) were active, but fluxes through those pathways could not be accuratelydetermined using amino acid labeling. When growth conditions were switched from aerobic to micro-aerobic conditions, fluxes (based on a normalized glucose uptake rate of 100 units (g DCW)-1 h-1) through the TCA cycle and oxidative pentose phosphate pathway were reduced from 64+-3 to 25+-2 and from 30+-2 to 19+-2, respectively. The carbon flux under micro-aerobic growth was directed formate. Under fully anerobic conditions, G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG used a mixed acid fermentation process and exhibited a maximum ethanol yield of 0.38+-0.07 mol mol-1 glucose. In silico flux balance modeling demonstrates that lactate and acetate production from G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG reduces the maximum ethanol yieldby approximately threefold, thus indicating that both pathways should be modified to maximize ethanol production.

  16. Haloalkylphosphorus Hydrolases Purified from Sphingomonas sp. Strain TDK1 and Sphingobium sp. Strain TCM1

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Satoshi; Suzuki, Yuto; Mori, Junichi; Doi, Yuka; Takahashi, Shouji; Kera, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Phosphotriesterases catalyze the first step of organophosphorus triester degradation. The bacterial phosphotriesterases purified and characterized to date hydrolyze mainly aryl dialkyl phosphates, such as parathion, paraoxon, and chlorpyrifos. In this study, we purified and cloned two novel phosphotriesterases from Sphingomonas sp. strain TDK1 and Sphingobium sp. strain TCM1 that hydrolyze tri(haloalkyl)phosphates, and we named these enzymes haloalkylphosphorus hydrolases (TDK-HAD and TCM-HAD, respectively). Both HADs are monomeric proteins with molecular masses of 59.6 (TDK-HAD) and 58.4 kDa (TCM-HAD). The enzyme activities were affected by the addition of divalent cations, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis suggested that zinc is a native cofactor for HADs. These enzymes hydrolyzed not only chlorinated organophosphates but also a brominated organophosphate [tris(2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate], as well as triaryl phosphates (tricresyl and triphenyl phosphates). Paraoxon-methyl and paraoxon were efficiently degraded by TCM-HAD, whereas TDK-HAD showed weak activity toward these substrates. Dichlorvos was degraded only by TCM-HAD. The enzymes displayed weak or no activity against trialkyl phosphates and organophosphorothioates. The TCM-HAD and TDK-HAD genes were cloned and found to encode proteins of 583 and 574 amino acid residues, respectively. The primary structures of TCM-HAD and TDK-HAD were very similar, and the enzymes also shared sequence similarity with fenitrothion hydrolase (FedA) of Burkholderia sp. strain NF100 and organophosphorus hydrolase (OphB) of Burkholderia sp. strain JBA3. However, the substrate specificities and quaternary structures of the HADs were largely different from those of FedA and OphB. These results show that HADs from sphingomonads are novel members of the bacterial phosphotriesterase family. PMID:25038092

  17. Genome sequencing and annotation of Serratia sp. strain TEL.

    PubMed

    Lephoto, Tiisetso E; Gray, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    We present the annotation of the draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. strain TEL (GenBank accession number KP711410). This organism was isolated from entomopathogenic nematode Oscheius sp. strain TEL (GenBank accession number KM492926) collected from grassland soil and has a genome size of 5,000,541 bp and 542 subsystems. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number LDEG00000000. PMID:26697332

  18. Genome sequencing and annotation of Serratia sp. strain TEL

    PubMed Central

    Lephoto, Tiisetso E.; Gray, Vincent M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the annotation of the draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. strain TEL (GenBank accession number KP711410). This organism was isolated from entomopathogenic nematode Oscheius sp. strain TEL (GenBank accession number KM492926) collected from grassland soil and has a genome size of 5,000,541 bp and 542 subsystems. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number LDEG00000000. PMID:26697332

  19. Isolation and Characterization of a Geobacillus thermoleovorans Strain from an Ultra-Deep South African Gold Mine

    SciTech Connect

    Deflaun, Mary F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Dong, Hailiang; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Onstott, T. C.; Balkwill, David L.; Streger, Sheryl H.; Stackebrandt, E.; Knoessen, S.; van Heerden, E.

    2007-03-08

    A thermophilic, facultative bacterium was isolated from a depth of 3.1 km below ground surface in an ultradeep gold mine in South Africa. This isolate, designated GE-7, was cultivated from pH 8.0, 600C fissure water. GE-7 grows optimally at 650C, pH 6.5 on a wide range of carbon substrates including GE-7 is a long rod-shaped bacterium (4-6 µm long x 0.5 wide) with terminal endospores and flagella, in addition to O2, can also utilize nitrate as an electron acceptor. Phylogenetic analysis of GE-7 16S rDNA sequence revealed high sequence similarity with G. thermoleovorans DSM 5366T (99.6%), however, certain phenotypic characteristics of GE-7 were distinct from this and other strains of G. thermoleovorans previously described.

  20. Induced parasexual processes in Claviceps sp. strain SD58.

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, K L; Robbers, J E

    1987-01-01

    A homokaryotic, clavine alkaloid-producing strain of ergot, Claviceps sp. strain SD 58, was used in an attempt to demonstrate parasexuality. Genetically marked auxotrophic strains were produced by mutation with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Protoplast fusion of pairs of unlike doubly auxotrophic strains and isolation of stable prototrophic fusion products were carried out. By growth of the fusion products on complete medium, selective pressure for prototrophy was removed and auxotrophic segregants were allowed to form. Analysis of these and recovery of segregants with nonleaky, non-parent-type combinations of auxotrophic characteristics has provided strong evidence that a parasexual cycle can function in Claviceps sp. strain SD 58. Preliminary work suggests that the genetics of ergot might be studied by mitotic analysis and that protoplast fusion and selection procedures might be useful for the enhancement of favorable characteristics in Claviceps strains. PMID:3827250

  1. Draft Genome of the Arthrobacter sp. Strain Edens01

    PubMed Central

    Couger, M. B.; Hanafy, Radwa A.; Edens, Curtis; Budd, Connie; French, Donald P.; Hoff, Wouter D.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain Edens01, isolated from a leaf surface of a Rosa hybrid plant as part of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute-funded Student Initiated Microbial Discovery (SIMD) project. The genome has a total size of 3,639,179 bp and contig N50 of 454,897 bp. PMID:26679586

  2. Expression of Heterologous Cellulases in Thermotoga sp. Strain RQ2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Han, Dongmei; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Thermotoga spp. to degrade cellulose is limited due to a lack of exoglucanases. To address this deficiency, cellulase genes Csac_1076 (celA) and Csac_1078 (celB) from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus were cloned into T. sp. strain RQ2 for heterologous overexpression. Coding regions of Csac_1076 and Csac_1078 were fused to the signal peptide of TM1840 (amyA) and TM0070 (xynB), resulting in three chimeric enzymes, namely, TM1840-Csac_1078, TM0070-Csac_1078, and TM0070-Csac_1076, which were carried by Thermotoga-E. coli shuttle vectors pHX02, pHX04, and pHX07, respectively. All three recombinant enzymes were successfully expressed in E. coli DH5? and T. sp. strain RQ2, rendering the hosts with increased endo- and/or exoglucanase activities. In E. coli, the recombinant enzymes were mainly bound to the bacterial cells, whereas in T. sp. strain RQ2, about half of the enzyme activities were observed in the culture supernatants. However, the cellulase activities were lost in T. sp. strain RQ2 after three consecutive transfers. Nevertheless, this is the first time heterologous genes bigger than 1?kb (up to 5.3?kb in this study) have ever been expressed in Thermotoga, demonstrating the feasibility of using engineered Thermotoga spp. for efficient cellulose utilization. PMID:26273605

  3. Sequence of ornithine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus sp. strain 30a.

    PubMed Central

    Hackert, M L; Carroll, D W; Davidson, L; Kim, S O; Momany, C; Vaaler, G L; Zhang, L

    1994-01-01

    A gene encoding biodegradative ornithine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus sp. strain 30a was isolated from a genomic DNA library and sequenced. Primer extension analysis revealed two transcription initiation sites. The deduced amino acid sequence is compared with the amino acid sequences of five previously reported bacterial decarboxylases, and conserved pyridoxal phosphate motif residues are identified. PMID:7961515

  4. Effect of salt stress on the physiology of Frankia sp strain CcI6.

    PubMed

    Oshone, Rediet; Mansour, Samira R; Tisa, Louis S

    2013-11-01

    Actinorhizal plants are able to overcome saline soils and reclaim land. Frankia sp strain CcI6 was isolated from nodules of Casuarina cunninghamiana found in Egypt. Phylogenetic analysis of Frankia sp. strain CcI6 revealed that the strain is closely related to Frankia sp. strain CcI3. The strain displays an elevated level of NaCl tolerance. Vesicle production and nitrogenase activity were also influenced by NaCl. PMID:24287648

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of an Alkane Degrader, Alcanivorax sp. Strain NBRC 101098

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Takamasa; Tsuchikane, Keiko; Numata, Mitsuru; Hashimoto, Maiko; Hosoyama, Akira; Ohji, Shoko; Yamazoe, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Alcanivorax sp. strain NBRC 101098 was isolated from seawater in Japan. Strain NBRC 101098 is able to degrade various types of n-alkanes. Here, we report the complete genome of strain NBRC 101098. PMID:25125640

  6. Desulfurization of dibenzothiophene by Corynebacterium sp. strain SY1

    SciTech Connect

    Omori, Toshio; Monna, L.; Saiki, Yuko; Kodama, Tohru )

    1992-03-01

    Strain SY1, identified as a Corynebacterium sp., was isolated on the basis of the ability to utilize dibenzothiophene (DBT) as a sole source of sulfur. Strain SY1 could utilize a wide range of organic and inorganic sulfur compounds, such as DBT sulfone, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfoxide, dimethyl sulfone, CS{sub 2}, FeS{sub 2}, and even elemental sulfur. Strain SY1 metabolized DBT to dibenzothiophene-5-oxide, DBT sulfone, and 2-hydroxybiphenyl, which was subsequently nitrated to produce at least two different hydroxynitrobiphenyls during cultivation. These metabolites were separated by silica gel column chromatography and identified by nuclear magnetic resonance, UV, and mass spectral techniques. Resting cells of SY1 desulfurized toluenesulfonic acid and released sulfite anion. On the basis of these results, a new DBT degradation pathway is proposed.

  7. Efficient Production of Lumichrome by Microbacterium sp. Strain TPU 3598.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazunori; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-11-01

    Lumichrome is a photodegradation product of riboflavin and is available as a photosensitizer and fluorescent dye. To develop new efficient methods of lumichrome production, we isolated bacterial strains with high lumichrome productivity from soil. The strain with highest productivity was identified as Microbacterium sp. strain TPU 3598. Since this strain inductively produced lumichrome when cultivated with riboflavin, we developed two different methods, a cultivation method and a resting cell method, for the production of large amounts of lumichrome using the strain. In the cultivation method, 2.4 g (9.9 mmol) of lumichrome was produced from 3.8 g (10.1 mmol) of riboflavin at the 500-ml scale (98% yield). The strain also produced 4.7 g (19.4 mmol) of lumichrome from 7.6 g (20.2 mmol) of riboflavin (96% yield) by addition of riboflavin during cultivation at the 500-ml scale. In the resting cell method, 20 g of cells (wet weight) in 100 ml of potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, produced 2.4 g of lumichrome from 3.8 g of riboflavin (98% yield). Since the lumichrome production by these methods was carried out in suspension, the resulting lumichrome was easily purified from the cultivation medium or reaction mixture by centrifugation and crystallization. Thus, the biochemical methods we describe here are a significant improvement in terms of simplicity and yield over the existing chemical, photolytic, and other biochemical methods of lumichrome production. PMID:26253661

  8. Efficient Production of Lumichrome by Microbacterium sp. Strain TPU 3598

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Lumichrome is a photodegradation product of riboflavin and is available as a photosensitizer and fluorescent dye. To develop new efficient methods of lumichrome production, we isolated bacterial strains with high lumichrome productivity from soil. The strain with highest productivity was identified as Microbacterium sp. strain TPU 3598. Since this strain inductively produced lumichrome when cultivated with riboflavin, we developed two different methods, a cultivation method and a resting cell method, for the production of large amounts of lumichrome using the strain. In the cultivation method, 2.4 g (9.9 mmol) of lumichrome was produced from 3.8 g (10.1 mmol) of riboflavin at the 500-ml scale (98% yield). The strain also produced 4.7 g (19.4 mmol) of lumichrome from 7.6 g (20.2 mmol) of riboflavin (96% yield) by addition of riboflavin during cultivation at the 500-ml scale. In the resting cell method, 20 g of cells (wet weight) in 100 ml of potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, produced 2.4 g of lumichrome from 3.8 g of riboflavin (98% yield). Since the lumichrome production by these methods was carried out in suspension, the resulting lumichrome was easily purified from the cultivation medium or reaction mixture by centrifugation and crystallization. Thus, the biochemical methods we describe here are a significant improvement in terms of simplicity and yield over the existing chemical, photolytic, and other biochemical methods of lumichrome production. PMID:26253661

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Facultative Methylotrophs, Gemmobacter sp. Strain LW1 and Mesorhizobium sp. Strain 1M-11, Isolated from Movile Cave, Romania

    PubMed Central

    Wischer, Daniela; Hillebrand-Voiculescu, Alexandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Facultative methylotrophs belonging to the genera Gemmobacter and Mesorhizobium were isolated from microbial mat and cave water samples obtained from the Movile Cave ecosystem. Both bacteria can utilize methylated amines as their sole carbon and nitrogen source. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of Gemmobacter sp. strain LW1 and Mesorhizobium sp. strain IM1. PMID:26586870

  10. Complete genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; St. John, Franz J.; Dickstein, Ellen; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Pati, Amrita; Martin, Joel; Copeland, A; Land, Miriam L; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T.; Preston, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium isolated from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) wood, is able to efficiently depolymerize, assimilate and metabolize 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan, the predominant structural component of hardwood hemicelluloses. A basis for this capability was first supported by the identification of genes and characterization of encoded enzymes and has been further defined by the sequencing and annotation of the complete genome, which we describe. In addition to genes implicated in the utilization of -1,4-xylan, genes have also been identified for the utilization of other hemicellulosic polysaccharides. The genome of Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 contains 7,184,930 bp in a single replicon with 6,288 protein-coding and 122 RNA genes. Uniquely prominent are 874 genes encoding proteins involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. The prevalence and organization of these genes support a metabolic potential for bioprocessing of hemicellulose fractions derived from lignocellulosic resources.

  11. Improvement of Thermal Stability via Outer-Loop Ion Pair Interaction of Mutated T1 Lipase from Geobacillus zalihae Strain T1

    PubMed Central

    Ruslan, Rudzanna; Abd. Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja; Leow, Thean Chor; Ali, Mohd Shukuri Mohamad; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar

    2012-01-01

    Mutant D311E and K344R were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis to introduce an additional ion pair at the inter-loop and the intra-loop, respectively, to determine the effect of ion pairs on the stability of T1 lipase isolated from Geobacillus zalihae. A series of purification steps was applied, and the pure lipases of T1, D311E and K344R were obtained. The wild-type and mutant lipases were analyzed using circular dichroism. The Tm for T1 lipase, D311E lipase and K344R lipase were approximately 68.52 °C, 70.59 °C and 68.54 °C, respectively. Mutation at D311 increases the stability of T1 lipase and exhibited higher Tm as compared to the wild-type and K344R. Based on the above, D311E lipase was chosen for further study. D311E lipase was successfully crystallized using the sitting drop vapor diffusion method. The crystal was diffracted at 2.1 Å using an in-house X-ray beam and belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 with the unit cell parameters a = 117.32 Å, b = 81.16 Å and c = 100.14 Å. Structural analysis showed the existence of an additional ion pair around E311 in the structure of D311E. The additional ion pair in D311E may regulate the stability of this mutant lipase at high temperatures as predicted in silico and spectroscopically. PMID:22312296

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Antarctic Polyextremophile Nesterenkonia sp. Strain AN1

    PubMed Central

    Aliyu, Habibu; De Maayer, Pieter; Rees, Jasper; Tuffin, Marla

    2014-01-01

    Nesterenkonia sp. strain AN1 was isolated from Antarctic soil and is a polyextremophile, being tolerant of low temperatures, high salt concentrations, and high alkalinity. Here we report the draft genome sequence of this strain. PMID:24675854

  13. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain RD6.2 DSM 46800, a Methanesulfonate-Degrading Strain

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a methanesulfonate-degrading strain, Rhodococcus sp. strain RD6.2 DSM 46800, which was isolated from a brackish marsh sediment sample, is described here. This is the first reported genome of a nonproteobacterial strain using methanesulfonate (MSA) as a sole source of carbon and energy, which does not possess the conventional MSA-monooxygenase (MSAMO). PMID:26184930

  14. Draft Genome Sequences of Agrobacterium nepotum Strain 39/7T and Agrobacterium sp. Strain KFB 330.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanovi?, Nemanja; Pu?awska, Joanna; Proki?, An?elka; Ivanovi?, Milan; Zlatkovi?, Nevena; Gaši?, Katarina; Obradovi?, Aleksa

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenic strains of Agrobacterium spp. are responsible for crown gall disease of numerous plant species. We present here draft genome sequences of nonpathogenic Agrobacterium nepotum strain 39/7(T) (CFBP 7436(T), LMG 26435(T)), isolated from crown gall tumor on Prunus cerasifera, and tumorigenic Agrobacterium sp. strain KFB 330 (CFBP 8308, LMG 28674), isolated from galls on raspberry. PMID:25908139

  15. Complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsu, C. H.; Barabote, Ravi; Thompson, Sue; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Brettin, T.; Han, Cliff F.; Beasley, Federico; Chen, Weimin; Konopka, Allan; Xie, Gary

    2013-09-30

    Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 is a species in the genus Arthrobacter Conn and Dimmick 1947, in the family Micrococcaceae and class Actinobacteria. A number of Arthrobacter genome sequences have been completed because of their important role in soil, especially bioremediation. This isolate is of special interest because it is tolerant to multiple metals and it is extremely resistant to elevated concentrations of chromate. The genome consists of a 4,698,945 bp circular chromosome and three plasmids (96,488, 115,507, and 159,536 bp, a total of 5,070,478 bp), coding 4,536 proteins of which 1,257 are without known function. This genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsu, Cindy H.; Barabote, Ravi; Thompson, Sue; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Han, Cliff; Beasley, Federico; Chen, Weimin; Konopka, Allan; Xie, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 is a species in the genus Arthrobacter Conn and Dimmick 1947, in the family Micrococcaceae and class Actinobacteria. A number of Arthrobacter genome sequences have been completed because of their important role in soil, especially bioremediation. This isolate is of special interest because it is tolerant to multiple metals and it is extremely resistant to elevated concentrations of chromate. The genome consists of a 4,698,945 bp circular chromosome and three plasmids (96,488, 115,507, and 159,536 bp, a total of 5,070,478 bp), coding 4,536 proteins of which 1,257 are without known function. This genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program. PMID:24501649

  17. First Draft Genome Sequence of the Acidovorax caeni sp. nov. Type Strain R-24608 (DSM 19327)

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Elham; Jauregui, Ruy; Geffers, Robert; Jarek, Michael; Boon, Nico; Pieper, Dietmar H.

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the Acidovorax caeni type strain R-24608 that was isolated from activated sludge of an aerobic-anaerobic wastewater treatment plant. The closest strain to Acidovorax caeni strain R-24608 is Acidovorax sp. strain MR-S7 with a 55.4% (amino-acid sequence) open reading frames (ORFs) average similarity. PMID:26586902

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodovulum sp. Strain NI22, a Naphthalene-Degrading Marine Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.; Bowen, Loryn L.

    2015-01-01

    Rhodovulum sp. strain NI22 is a hydrocarbon-degrading member of the genus Rhodovulum. The draft genome of Rhodovulum sp. NI22 is 3.8 Mb in size, with 3,756 coding sequences and 64.4% G+C content. The catechol and gentisate pathways for naphthalene degradation are predicted to be present in Rhodovulum sp. NI22. PMID:25614575

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Pedobacter sp. Strain Hv1, an Isolate from Medicinal Leech Mucosal Castings

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Brittany M.; Beka, Lidia; Graf, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    The Pedobacter sp. Hv1 strain was isolated from the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, mucosal castings. These mucosal sheds have been demonstrated to play a role in horizontal symbiont transmission. Here, we report the draft 4.9 Mbp genome sequence of Pedobacter sp. strain Hv1. PMID:26679583

  20. Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Bacillus sp. Strain 916

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chuping

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain 916, isolated from the soil, showed strong activity against Rhizoctonia solani. Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. strain 916. Its 3.9-Mb genome reveals a number of genes whose products are possibly involved in promotion of plant growth or antibiosis. PMID:22965091

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Streptothricin-Producing Strain Streptomyces sp. fd2-tb

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Biao; Yu, Yucong; Cen, Xufeng; Zhu, Yongqiang; Dai, Ruixue; Wang, Xianwei

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces sp. fd2-tb can produce streptothricin class antibiotics with broad antimicrobial spectra. To better understand the mechanism of streptothricin biosynthesis and to assess the capacity of this strain in secondary metabolism, we report the draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain fd2-tb. PMID:26514767

  2. Mechanism of algal aggregation by Bacillus sp. strain RP1137.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ryan J; Hill, Russell T

    2014-07-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting. PMID:24771029

  3. Mechanism of Algal Aggregation by Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting. PMID:24771029

  4. Genome sequence of Oceanicaulis sp. strain HTCC2633, isolated from the Western Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Myung; Kang, Ilnam; Vergin, Kevin L; Lee, Kiyoung; Giovannoni, Stephen J; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2011-01-01

    The genus Oceanicaulis represents dimorphic rods that were originally isolated from a marine dinoflagellate. Here, we announce the genome sequence of Oceanicaulis sp. strain HTCC2633, isolated by dilution-to-extinction culturing from the Sargasso Sea. The genome information of strain HTCC2633 indicates a chemoorganotrophic way of life of this strain. PMID:21036991

  5. Dynamics of genome architecture in Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234.

    PubMed

    Mavingui, Patrick; Flores, Margarita; Guo, Xianwu; Dávila, Guillermo; Perret, Xavier; Broughton, William J; Palacios, Rafael

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are usually partitioned in several replicons, which are dynamic structures prone to mutation and genomic rearrangements, thus contributing to genome evolution. Nevertheless, much remains to be learned about the origins and dynamics of the formation of bacterial alternative genomic states and their possible biological consequences. To address these issues, we have studied the dynamics of the genome architecture in Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 and analyzed its biological significance. NGR234 genome consists of three replicons: the symbiotic plasmid pNGR234a (536,165 bp), the megaplasmid pNGR234b (>2,000 kb), and the chromosome (>3,700 kb). Here we report that genome analyses of cell siblings showed the occurrence of large-scale DNA rearrangements consisting of cointegrations and excisions between the three replicons. As a result, four new genomic architectures have emerged. Three consisted of the cointegrates between two replicons: chromosome-pNGR234a, chromosome-pNGR234b, and pNGR234a-pNGR234b. The other consisted of a cointegrate of the three replicons (chromosome-pNGR234a-pNGR234b). Cointegration and excision of pNGR234a with either the chromosome or pNGR234b were studied and found to proceed via a Campbell-type mechanism, mediated by insertion sequence elements. We provide evidence showing that changes in the genome architecture did not alter the growth and symbiotic proficiency of Rhizobium derivatives. PMID:11741857

  6. Dynamics of Genome Architecture in Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234†

    PubMed Central

    Mavingui, Patrick; Flores, Margarita; Guo, Xianwu; Dávila, Guillermo; Perret, Xavier; Broughton, William J.; Palacios, Rafael

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are usually partitioned in several replicons, which are dynamic structures prone to mutation and genomic rearrangements, thus contributing to genome evolution. Nevertheless, much remains to be learned about the origins and dynamics of the formation of bacterial alternative genomic states and their possible biological consequences. To address these issues, we have studied the dynamics of the genome architecture in Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 and analyzed its biological significance. NGR234 genome consists of three replicons: the symbiotic plasmid pNGR234a (536,165 bp), the megaplasmid pNGR234b (>2,000 kb), and the chromosome (>3,700 kb). Here we report that genome analyses of cell siblings showed the occurrence of large-scale DNA rearrangements consisting of cointegrations and excisions between the three replicons. As a result, four new genomic architectures have emerged. Three consisted of the cointegrates between two replicons: chromosome-pNGR234a, chromosome-pNGR234b, and pNGR234a-pNGR234b. The other consisted of a cointegrate of the three replicons (chromosome-pNGR234a-pNGR234b). Cointegration and excision of pNGR234a with either the chromosome or pNGR234b were studied and found to proceed via a Campbell-type mechanism, mediated by insertion sequence elements. We provide evidence showing that changes in the genome architecture did not alter the growth and symbiotic proficiency of Rhizobium derivatives. PMID:11741857

  7. Identification of novel regulatory mechanisms controlling heterocyst development in Anabaena Sp. strain PCC 7120 

    E-print Network

    Aldea, Maria Ramona

    2009-05-15

    The regulatory mechanisms that govern heterocyst development in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 have been continuously refined over the last two decades. In this work, we show that three of the sigma factor genes present in ...

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Versatile Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Aquabacterium sp. Strain NJ1

    PubMed Central

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Zylstra, Gerben J.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Aquabacterium sp. strain NJ1, capable of utilizing both liquid and solid alkanes, was deciphered. This is the first report of an Aquabacterium genome sequence. PMID:25477416

  9. Genome sequence of Pantoea sp. strain Sc 1 an opportunistic cotton pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea is comprised of a broad spectrum of species including plant pathogens. Here, we provide an annotated genome sequence of Pantoea sp. strain Sc 1, which was isolated from a diseased cotton boll. This research provides the first genome sequence of a bona fide Pantoea sp. insect vectored cotton...

  10. Molecular Mechanism of Nicotine Degradation by a Newly Isolated Strain, Ochrobactrum sp. Strain SJY1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Zhu, Xiongyu; Li, Yangyang

    2014-01-01

    A newly isolated strain, SJY1, identified as Ochrobactrum sp., utilizes nicotine as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Strain SJY1 could efficiently degrade nicotine via a variant of the pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways (the VPP pathway), which highlights bacterial metabolic diversity in relation to nicotine degradation. A 97-kbp DNA fragment containing six nicotine degradation-related genes was obtained by gap closing from the genome sequence of strain SJY1. Three genes, designated vppB, vppD, and vppE, in the VPP pathway were cloned and heterologously expressed, and the related proteins were characterized. The vppB gene encodes a flavin-containing amine oxidase converting 6-hydroxynicotine to 6-hydroxy-N-methylmyosmine. Although VppB specifically catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 6-hydroxynicotine rather than nicotine, it shares higher amino acid sequence identity with nicotine oxidase (38%) from the pyrrolidine pathway than with its isoenzyme (6-hydroxy-l-nicotine oxidase, 24%) from the pyridine pathway. The vppD gene encodes an NADH-dependent flavin-containing monooxygenase, which catalyzes the hydroxylation of 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine to 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. VppD shows 62% amino acid sequence identity with the hydroxylase (HspB) from Pseudomonas putida strain S16, whereas the specific activity of VppD is ?10-fold higher than that of HspB. VppE is responsible for the transformation of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the VPP pathway, which evolved independently from nicotinic acid degradation, might have a closer relationship with the pyrrolidine pathway. The proteins and functional pathway identified here provide a sound basis for future studies aimed at a better understanding of molecular principles of nicotine degradation. PMID:25344232

  11. Whole-Genome Sequence of Enterobacter sp. Strain SST3, an Endophyte Isolated from Jamaican Sugarcane (Saccharum sp.) Stalk Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Han Ming; McGroty, Sean E.; Chew, Teong Han; Chan, Kok Gan; Buckley, Larry J.; Savka, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain SST3 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from Saccharum spp. Here we present its annotated draft genome that may shed light on its role as a bacterial endophyte of sugarcane. To our knowledge, this is the first genome announcement of a sugarcane-associated bacterium from the genus Enterobacter. PMID:23045495

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus strain Y4.12MC10, a Novel Paenibacillus lautus strain Isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, David; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Chertkov, Olga; Zhang, Xiaojing; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Woyke, Tanja; Brumm, Catherine; Hochstein, Rebecca; Schoenfeld, Thomas; Brumm, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus speciesY412MC10 was one of a number of organisms initially isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA. The isolate Y412MC10 was initially classified as a Geobacillus sp. based on its isolation conditions and similarity to other organisms isolated from hot springs at Yellowstone National Park. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences within the Bacillales indicated that Geobacillus sp.Y412MC10 clustered with Paenibacillus species and not Geobacillus; the 16S rRNA analysis indicated the organism was a strain of Paenibacillus lautus. Lucigen Corp. prepared genomic DNA and the genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. The genome of Paenibacillus lautus strain Y412MC10 consists of one circular chromosome of 7,121,665 bp with an average G+C content of 51.2%. The Paenibacillus sp.Y412MC10 genome sequence was deposited at the NCBI in October 2009 (NC{_}013406). Comparison to other Paenibacillus species shows the organism lacks nitrogen fixation, antibiotic production and social interaction genes reported in other Paenibacilli. Over 25% of the proteins predicted by the Y412MC10 genome share no identity with the closest sequenced Paenibacillus species; most of these are predicted hypothetical proteins and their specific function in the environment is unknown.

  13. The genus Geobacillus and their biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Ali H; Lisowska, Beata K; Leak, David J

    2015-01-01

    The genus Geobacillus comprises a group of Gram-positive thermophilic bacteria, including obligate aerobes, denitrifiers, and facultative anaerobes that can grow over a range of 45-75°C. Originally classified as group five Bacillus spp., strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus came to prominence as contaminants of canned food and soon became the organism of choice for comparative studies of metabolism and enzymology between mesophiles and thermophiles. More recently, their catabolic versatility, particularly in the degradation of hemicellulose and starch, and rapid growth rates have raised their profile as organisms with potential for second-generation (lignocellulosic) biorefineries for biofuel or chemical production. The continued development of genetic tools to facilitate both fundamental investigation and metabolic engineering is now helping to realize this potential, for both metabolite production and optimized catabolism. In addition, this catabolic versatility provides a range of useful thermostable enzymes for industrial application. A number of genome-sequencing projects have been completed or are underway allowing comparative studies. These reveal a significant amount of genome rearrangement within the genus, the presence of large genomic islands encompassing all the hemicellulose utilization genes and a genomic island incorporating a set of long chain alkane monooxygenase genes. With G+C contents of 45-55%, thermostability appears to derive in part from the ability to synthesize protamine and spermine, which can condense DNA and raise its Tm. PMID:26003932

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Shewanella sp. Strain CP20.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Carla; Martin Tay, Qi Xiang; Sun, Shuyang; McDougald, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella sp. CP20 is a marine bacterium that survives ingestion by Tetrahymena pyriformis and is expelled from the protozoan within membrane-bound vacuoles, where the bacterial cells show long-term survival. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Shewanella sp. CP20 and discuss the potential mechanisms facilitating intraprotozoan survival. PMID:25858840

  15. Functional genomic approaches for understanding the mode of action of Bacillus sp biocontrol strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete genome sequencing of several Bacillus sp. strains has shed new light on the mode of action of these antagonists of plant pathogens. The use of genomic data mining tools provided the ability to quickly determine the potential of these strains to produce bioactive secondary metabolites. Our B...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterobacter sp. Strain UCD-UG_FMILLET (Phylum Proteobacteria).

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Cassandra L; Mousa, Walaa M; Raizada, Manish N; Eisen, Jonathan A

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Enterobacter sp. strain UCD-UG_FMILLET. This strain is an endophyte isolated from the roots of finger millet, an Afro-Indian cereal crop. The genome contains 4,801,411 bp in 53 scaffolds. PMID:25614569

  17. Reduction of Selenite to Elemental Red Selenium by Pseudomonas sp. strain CA5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Pseudomonas sp. that may be useful in bioremediation projects was isolated from soil. The strain is of potential value because it reduces selenite to elemental red selenium and is unusual in that it was resistant to high concentrations of both selenate and selenite. Cell of the strain removed 1....

  18. Production of Oxygenated Fatty Acids from Vegetable Oils by Flavobacterium sp. Strain DS5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium sp. strain DS5 (NRRL B-14859) was used to convert two vegetable oils, olive oil and soybean oil, directly to oxygenated fatty acids such as 10-ketostearic acid (10-KSA) and 10-hydroxystearic acid (10-HSA). Lipase addition to the culture was required because strain DS5 did not induce ...

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingopyxis sp. Strain MWB1, a Crude-Oil-Degrading Marine Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Soo Jung; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Seung Il; Moon, Yoon-Jung; Park, Sung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Sphingopyxis sp. strain MWB1, which is capable of degrading crude oil, diesel, and kerosene, was isolated from crude oil–contaminated seashore in Tae-an, South Korea. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this strain, which comprises 3,118,428 bp with a G+C content of 62.85 mol%. PMID:25477411

  20. Genome sequence and description of Nesterenkonia massiliensis sp. nov. strain NP1T

    PubMed Central

    Edouard, Sophie; Sankar, Senthil; Dangui, Nicole Prisca Makaya; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Michelle, Caroline; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2014-01-01

    Nesterenkonia massiliensis sp. nov., strain NP1T, is the type strain of Nesterenkonia massiliensis sp. nov., a new species within the genus Nesterenkonia. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from the feces of a 32-year-old French woman suffering from AIDS and living in Marseille. Nesterenkonia massiliensis is a Gram-positive aerobic coccus. Here, we describe the features of this bacterium, together with the complete genome sequencing and annotation. The 2,726,371 bp long genome (one chromosome but no plasmid) contains 2,663 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes, including 1 rRNA operon. PMID:25197469

  1. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of Serratia sp. Strain TEL, Associated with Oscheius sp. TEL-2014 (Nematoda: Rhabditidae) Isolated from a Grassland in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Featherston, Jonathan; Gray, Vincent M.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report on the draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. strain TEL, associated with Oscheius sp. TEL-2014 (Nematoda: Rhabditidae, KM492926) isolated from a grassland in Suikerbosrand Nature Reserve near Johannesburg in South Africa. Serratia sp. strain TEL has a genome size of 5,000,541 bp with 4,647 genes and a G+C content of 59.1%. PMID:26159531

  2. Indigoids Biosynthesis from Indole by Two Phenol-Degrading Strains, Pseudomonas sp. PI1 and Acinetobacter sp. PI2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xuwang; Fan, Jiangli; Zhang, Zhaojing; Ma, Qiao; Peng, Xiaojun

    2015-07-01

    In this study, two phenol-degrading bacterial strains, designated as PI1 and PI2, were isolated from activated sludge for the production of indigoids from indole. According to the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence analysis, strains PI1 and PI2 were identified as Pseudomonas sp. and Acinetobacter sp., respectively. Liquid chromatography/time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (LC/TOF/MS) was applied to analyze the metabolites during the biotransformation of indole by the phenol-degrading strains. The results indicated that both strains could catalyze the formation of four indigoids with the same prominent molecular ion (M-H)(-) peak at m/z 261.067 and molecular formula of C16H10N2O2, including indigo and a purple product, 2-(7-oxo-1H-indol-6(7H)-ylidene) indolin-3-one. Isatin and 7-hydroxyindole were detected as the intermediates. Thus, the possible pathways for the production of indigoids from indole were proposed. Subsequently, the optimal conditions for the production of indigo from indole were determined using response surface methodology, and 11.82?±?0.30 and 17.19?±?0.49 mg/L indigo were produced by strains PI1 and PI2, respectively. The present study should provide potential candidates for microbial production of indigoids. PMID:25926013

  3. Isolation of Acetobacterium sp. Strain AG, Which Reductively Debrominates Octa- and Pentabrominated Diphenyl Ether Technical Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chang; Chow, Wai Ling

    2013-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of environmental pollutants that have been classified as persistent organic pollutants since 2009. In this study, a sediment-free enrichment culture (culture G) was found to reductively debrominate octa- and penta-BDE technical mixtures to less-brominated congeners (tetra-, tri-, and di-BDEs) via a para-dominant debromination pattern for the former and a strict para debromination pattern for the latter. Culture G could debrominate 96% of 280 nM PBDEs in an octa-BDE mixture to primarily tetra-BDEs in 21 weeks. Continuous transferring of culture G with octa-/penta-BDEs dissolved in n-nonane or trichloroethene (TCE) yielded two strains (Acetobacterium sp. strain AG and Dehalococcoides sp. strain DG) that retained debromination capabilities. In the presence of lactate but without TCE, strain AG could cometabolically debrominate 75% of 275 nM PBDEs in a penta-BDE mixture in 33 days. Strain AG shows 99% identity to its closest relative, Acetobacterium malicum. In contrast to strain AG, strain DG debrominated PBDEs only in the presence of TCE. In addition, 18 out of 19 unknown PBDE debromination products were successfully identified from octa- and penta-BDE mixtures and revealed, for the first time, a comprehensive microbial PBDE debromination pathway. As an acetogenic autotroph that rapidly debrominates octa- and penta-BDE technical mixtures, Acetobacterium sp. strain AG adds to the still-limited understanding of PBDE debromination by microorganisms. PMID:23204415

  4. Genome characteristics of facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strains reflect host range and host plant biogeography.

    PubMed

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S; Gogarten, Johann Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A; Berry, Alison M; Bickhart, Derek M; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, Maria Pilar; Goltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga R; Labarre, Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez, Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E; Mullin, Beth C; Niemann, James; Pujic, Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt, Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P; Vallenet, David; Valverde, Claudio; Wall, Luis G; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R

    2007-01-01

    Soil bacteria that also form mutualistic symbioses in plants encounter two major levels of selection. One occurs during adaptation to and survival in soil, and the other occurs in concert with host plant speciation and adaptation. Actinobacteria from the genus Frankia are facultative symbionts that form N(2)-fixing root nodules on diverse and globally distributed angiosperms in the "actinorhizal" symbioses. Three closely related clades of Frankia sp. strains are recognized; members of each clade infect a subset of plants from among eight angiosperm families. We sequenced the genomes from three strains; their sizes varied from 5.43 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (Frankia sp. strain HFPCcI3) to 7.50 Mbp for a medium host range strain (Frankia alni strain ACN14a) to 9.04 Mbp for a broad host range strain (Frankia sp. strain EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported for such closely related soil bacteria (97.8%-98.9% identity of 16S rRNA genes). The extent of gene deletion, duplication, and acquisition is in concert with the biogeographic history of the symbioses and host plant speciation. Host plant isolation favored genome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genome expansion. The results support the idea that major genome expansions as well as reductions can occur in facultative symbiotic soil bacteria as they respond to new environments in the context of their symbioses. PMID:17151343

  5. Isolation of Acetobacterium sp. strain AG, which reductively debrominates octa- and pentabrominated diphenyl ether technical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chang; Chow, Wai Ling; He, Jianzhong

    2013-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of environmental pollutants that have been classified as persistent organic pollutants since 2009. In this study, a sediment-free enrichment culture (culture G) was found to reductively debrominate octa- and penta-BDE technical mixtures to less-brominated congeners (tetra-, tri-, and di-BDEs) via a para-dominant debromination pattern for the former and a strict para debromination pattern for the latter. Culture G could debrominate 96% of 280 nM PBDEs in an octa-BDE mixture to primarily tetra-BDEs in 21 weeks. Continuous transferring of culture G with octa-/penta-BDEs dissolved in n-nonane or trichloroethene (TCE) yielded two strains (Acetobacterium sp. strain AG and Dehalococcoides sp. strain DG) that retained debromination capabilities. In the presence of lactate but without TCE, strain AG could cometabolically debrominate 75% of 275 nM PBDEs in a penta-BDE mixture in 33 days. Strain AG shows 99% identity to its closest relative, Acetobacterium malicum. In contrast to strain AG, strain DG debrominated PBDEs only in the presence of TCE. In addition, 18 out of 19 unknown PBDE debromination products were successfully identified from octa- and penta-BDE mixtures and revealed, for the first time, a comprehensive microbial PBDE debromination pathway. As an acetogenic autotroph that rapidly debrominates octa- and penta-BDE technical mixtures, Acetobacterium sp. strain AG adds to the still-limited understanding of PBDE debromination by microorganisms. PMID:23204415

  6. Lactococcus lactis SpOx Spontaneous Mutants: a Family of Oxidative-Stress-Resistant Dairy Strains§

    PubMed Central

    Rochat, Tatiana; Gratadoux, Jean-Jacques; Corthier, Gérard; Coqueran, Bérard; Nader-Macias, Maria-Elena; Gruss, Alexandra; Langella, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Numerous industrial bacteria generate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which may inhibit the growth of other bacteria in mixed ecosystems. We isolated spontaneous oxidative-stress-resistant (SpOx) Lactococcus lactis mutants by using a natural selection method with milk-adapted strains on dairy culture medium containing H2O2. Three SpOx mutants displayed greater H2O2 resistance. One of them, SpOx3, demonstrated better behavior in different oxidative-stress situations: (i) higher long-term survival upon aeration in LM17 and milk and (ii) the ability to grow with H2O2-producing Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii strains. Furthermore, the transit kinetics of the SpOx3 mutant in the digestive tract of a human flora-associated mouse model was not affected. PMID:15870374

  7. [Geobacillus uralicus, a new species of thermophilic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Popova, N A; Nikolaev, Iu A; Turova, T P; Lysenko, A M; Osipov, G A; Verkhovtseva, N V; Panikov, N S

    2002-01-01

    The K2T strain of thermophilic spore-forming bacteria was isolated from a biofilm on the surface of a corroded pipeline in an extremely deep well (4680 m, 40-72 degrees C) in the Ural. The cells are rod-shaped, motile, gram-variable. They grow on a complex medium with tryptone and yeast extract and on a synthetic medium with glucose and mineral salts without additional growth factors. The cells use a wide range of organic substances as carbon and energy sources. They exhibit a respiratory metabolism but are also capable of anaerobic growth on a nitrate-containing medium and of fermentation. Growth occurs within the 40-75 degrees C temperature range (with an optimum of 65 degrees C) and at pH 5-9. The minimum generation time (15 min) was observed at pH 7.5. Ammonium salts and nitrates are used as nitrogen sources. The G + C content of the DNA is 54.5 mol%. From the morphological, physiological, and biochemical properties and the nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene, it was concluded that the isolate K2T represents a new species of the genus Geobacillus, Geobacillus uralicus. PMID:12138763

  8. Discovery of Rare and Highly Toxic Microcystins from Lichen-Associated Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain IO-102-I

    PubMed Central

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P.; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-01-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant microcystin produced by Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I was the highly toxic [ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR, which accounted for ca. 80% of the total microcystins. We assigned a structure of [DMAdda5]microcystin-LR and [d-Asp3,ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR and a partial structure of three new [ADMAdda5]-XR type of microcystin variants. Interestingly, Nostoc spp. strains IO-102-I and 152 synthesized only the rare ADMAdda and DMAdda subfamilies of microcystin variants. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated congruence between genes involved directly in microcystin biosynthesis and the 16S rRNA and rpoC1 genes of Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I. Nostoc sp. strain 152 and the Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I are distantly related, revealing a sporadic distribution of toxin production in the genus Nostoc. Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I is closely related to Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and other symbiotic Nostoc strains and most likely belongs to this species. Together, this suggests that other terrestrial and aquatic strains of the genus Nostoc may have retained the genes necessary for microcystin biosynthesis. PMID:15466511

  9. Interaction of fructose with the glucose permease of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, E.; Schmetterer, G.

    1986-05-01

    Fructose was bactericidal for the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Each of ten independently isolated fructose-resistant mutants had an alteration of the glucose transport system, measured as uptake of glucose or of 3-0-methyl-D-glucose. In the presence of the analog, the wild-type Synechocystis strain was protected against fructose. Two mutants altered in photoautotrophy were also isolated.

  10. Genome Sequence of the Methanotrophic Alphaproteobacterium Methylocystis sp. Strain Rockwell (ATCC 49242) ?

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Lisa Y.; Bringel, Françoise; DiSpirito, Alan A.; Han, Sukkyun; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Kits, K. Dimitri; Klotz, Martin G.; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Semrau, Jeremy D.; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Bruce, David C.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Davenport, Karen W.; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, Shunsheng; Hauser, Loren; Lajus, Aurélie; Land, Miriam L.; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Médigue, Claudine; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Methylocystis sp. strain Rockwell (ATCC 49242) is an aerobic methane-oxidizing alphaproteobacterium isolated from an aquifer in southern California. Unlike most methanotrophs in the Methylocystaceae family, this strain has a single pmo operon encoding particulate methane monooxygenase but no evidence of the genes encoding soluble methane monooxygenase. This is the first reported genome sequence of a member of the Methylocystis species of the Methylocystaceae family in the order Rhizobiales. PMID:21441518

  11. Infection of Amblyomma ovale by Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Londoño, Andrés F; Díaz, Francisco J; Valbuena, Gustavo; Gazi, Michal; Labruna, Marcelo B; Hidalgo, Marylin; Mattar, Salim; Contreras, Verónica; Rodas, Juan D

    2014-10-01

    Our goal was to understand rickettsial spotted fevers' circulation in areas of previous outbreaks reported from 2006 to 2008 in Colombia. We herein present molecular identification and isolation of Rickettsia sp. Atlantic rainforest strain from Amblyomma ovale ticks, a strain shown to be pathogenic to humans. Infected ticks were found on dogs and a rodent in Antioquia and Córdoba Provinces. This is the first report of this rickettsia outside Brazil, which expands its known range considerably. PMID:25090976

  12. Genome Sequence of the Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Alcanivorax sp. Strain 97CO-5

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Xiao; Gao, Wei; Li, Qian; Yin, Xiaofei; Zheng, Li

    2014-01-01

    Alcanivorax sp. strain 97CO-5 was isolated from a crude-oil-degrading consortium, enriched from Yellow Sea sediment of China. Here, we present the draft genome of strain 97CO-5, which comprises 3,251,558 bp with a G+C content of 54.54% and contains 2,962 protein-coding genes and 42 tRNAs. PMID:25502673

  13. Comparison of two multimetal resistant bacterial strains: Enterobacter sp. YSU and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ORO2.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Andrew; Vinayak, Anubhav; Benton, Cherise; Esbenshade, Aaron; Heinselman, Carlisle; Frankland, Daniel; Kulkarni, Samatha; Kurtanich, Adrienne; Caguiat, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    The Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, TN, which manufactured nuclear weapons during World War II and the Cold War, contaminated East Fork Poplar Creek with heavy metals. The multimetal resistant bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Oak Ridge strain O2 (S. maltophilia O2), was isolated from East Fork Poplar Creek. Sequence analysis of 16s rDNA suggested that our working strain of S. maltophilia O2 was a strain of Enterobacter. Phylogenetic tree analysis and biochemical tests confirmed that it belonged to an Enterobacter species. This new strain was named Enterobacter sp. YSU. Using a modified R3A growth medium, R3A-Tris, the Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Au(III), Cr(VI), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV) MICs for a confirmed strain of S. maltophilia O2 were 0.24, 0.33, 5, 5, 0.25, 7, 0.03, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, compared to 0.07, 0.24, 0.8, 3, 0.05, 0.4, 0.08, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, for Enterobacter sp. YSU. Although S. maltophilia O2 was generally more metal resistant than Enterobacter sp. YSU, in comparison to Escherichia coli strain HB101, Enterobacter sp. YSU was resistant to Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Au(III), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV). By studying metal resistances in these two strains, it may be possible to understand what makes one microorganism more metal resistant than another microorganism. This work also provided benchmark MICs that can be used to evaluate the metal resistance properties of other bacterial isolates from East Fork Poplar Creek and other metal contaminated sites. PMID:19688378

  14. Isolation of Rhodococcus sp. Strain ECU0066, a New Sulfide Monooxygenase-Producing Strain for Asymmetric Sulfoxidation? †

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ai-Tao; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Xu, Jian-He; Lu, Wen-Ya; Lin, Guo-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    A new and efficient sulfide monooxygenase-producing strain, ECU0066, was isolated and identified as a Rhodococcus sp. that could transform phenylmethyl sulfide (PMS) to (S)-sulfoxide with 99% enantiomeric excess via two steps of enantioselective oxidations. Its enzyme activity could be effectively induced by adding PMS or phenylmethyl sulfoxide (PMSO) directly to a rich medium at the early log phase (6 h) of fermentation, resulting in over 10-times-higher production of the enzyme. This bacterial strain also displayed fairly good activity and enantioselectivity toward seven other sulfides, indicating a good potential for practical application in asymmetric synthesis of chiral sulfoxides. PMID:18836022

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain M47T1, Carried by Bursaphelenchus xylophilus Isolated from Pinus pinaster

    PubMed Central

    Proença, Diogo Neves; Espírito Santo, Christophe; Grass, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain M47T1, carried by the Bursaphelenchus xylophilus pinewood nematode, the causative agent of pine wilt disease, is presented. In Pseudomonas sp. strain M47T1, genes that make this a plant growth-promoting bacterium, as well as genes potentially involved in nematotoxicity, were identified. PMID:22887683

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Serratia sp. Strain M24T3, Isolated from Pinewood Disease Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus

    PubMed Central

    Proença, Diogo Neves; Espírito Santo, Christophe; Grass, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. strain M24T3, which is associated with pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, the causative agent of pine wilt disease. Serratia sp. strain M24T3 has been identified as a bionematocide for B. xylophilus in vitro, and multiple genes potentially involved in virulence and nematotoxity were identified. PMID:22740681

  17. Draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain M47T1, carried by Bursaphelenchus xylophilus isolated from Pinus pinaster.

    PubMed

    Proença, Diogo Neves; Espírito Santo, Christophe; Grass, Gregor; Morais, Paula V

    2012-09-01

    The draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain M47T1, carried by the Bursaphelenchus xylophilus pinewood nematode, the causative agent of pine wilt disease, is presented. In Pseudomonas sp. strain M47T1, genes that make this a plant growth-promoting bacterium, as well as genes potentially involved in nematotoxicity, were identified. PMID:22887683

  18. Draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. strain M24T3, isolated from pinewood disease nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    PubMed

    Proença, Diogo Neves; Espírito Santo, Christophe; Grass, Gregor; Morais, Paula V

    2012-07-01

    Here we report the draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. strain M24T3, which is associated with pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, the causative agent of pine wilt disease. Serratia sp. strain M24T3 has been identified as a bionematocide for B. xylophilus in vitro, and multiple genes potentially involved in virulence and nematotoxity were identified. PMID:22740681

  19. OXIDATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS BY PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400 AND PSEUDOMONAS PSEUDOALCALIGENES KF707

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biphenyl-grown cells and cell extracts prepared from biphenyl-grown cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 oxidize a much wider range of chlorinated biphenyls than do analogous preparations from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. These results are attributed to differences in th...

  20. OXIDATION OF BIPHENYL BY A MULTICOMPONENT ENZYME SYSTEM FROM PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 grows on biphenyl as the sole carbon and energy source. This organism also cooxidizes several chlorinated biphenyl congeners. Biphenyl dioxygenase activity in cell extract required addition of NAD(P)H as an electron donor for the conversion of bipheny...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Pantoea sp. Strain MBLJ3, Isolated in a Laboratory Environmental Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Lei, Haiyan; Li, Tianwei; Li, Bingjie; Tsai, Shien

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the draft genome sequence of a newly isolated strain, Pantoea sp. MBLJ3. The genome is 4.8 Mb in size, with a G+C content of 54.27%, and it contains 4,522 protein-coding sequences, 69 tRNA genes, and 5 rRNA genes. PMID:25720687

  2. Study of Biochemical Pathways and Enzymes Involved in Pyrene Degradation by Mycobacterium sp. Strain KMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrene degradation is known in bacteria. In this study, Mycobacterium sp. Strain KMS was used to study the metabolites produced during, and enzymes involved in, pyrene degradation. Several key metabolites, including pyrene-4,5-dione, cis-4,5-pyrene-dihydrodiol, phenanthrene-4,5-dicarboxylic acid, ...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Pedobacter sp. Strain NL19, a Producer of Potent Antibacterial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Pedobacter sp. strain NL19. The genome has 5.99 Mbp and a G+C content of 39.0%. NL19 was isolated from sludge from an abandoned uranium mine in the north of Portugal, and it produces potent antibacterials against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25814603

  4. Transformation of dibenzo-p-dioxin by pseudomonas sp. strain HH69

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, H.; Wittich, R.M. ); Sinnwell, V.; Meyer, H.; Fortnagel, P.; Francke, W. )

    1990-04-01

    Dibenzo-p-dioxin was oxidatively cleaved by the dibenzofuran-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain HH69 to produce minor amounts of 1-hydroxydibenzo-p-dioxin and catechol, while a 2-phenoxy derivative of muconic acid was formed as the major product. Upon acidic methylation, the latter yielded the dimethylester of cis,trans-2-(2-hydroxyphenoxy)-muconic acid.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of a Benzo[a]pyrene-Degrading Bacterium, Olleya sp. Strain ITB9.

    PubMed

    Okai, Masahiko; Watanabe, Akihiro; Ishida, Masami; Urano, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Olleya sp. ITB9 is a benzo[a]pyrene-degrading bacterium, isolated from surface water near a waste treatment plant at Tokyo Bay, Japan. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of 58 contigs corresponding to 3.4 Mb and a G+C content of 31.2%. PMID:26564047

  6. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterobacter sp. Strain UCD-UG_FMILLET (Phylum Proteobacteria)

    E-print Network

    Raizada, Manish N.

    is an endophyte isolated from the roots of finger millet, an Afro-Indian cereal crop. The genome contains 4 during August, 2012. Finger millet seeds were planted under semi-hydroponic con- ditions in 22.5 liter- terobacter sp. strain UCD-UG_FMILLET was isolated from the roots of the Afro-Indian cereal crop, finger

  8. Genome Sequence of the Electrogenic Petroleum-Degrading Thalassospira sp. Strain HJ

    PubMed Central

    Kiseleva, Larisa; Garushyants, Sofya K.; Briliute, Justina; Simpson, David J. W.; Goryanin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    We present the draft genome of the petroleum-degrading Thalassospira sp. strain HJ, isolated from tidal marine sediment. Knowledge of this genomic information will inform studies on electrogenesis and means to degrade environmental organic contaminants, including compounds found in petroleum. PMID:25977412

  9. Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon Sequestration Systems

    E-print Network

    Roegner, Matthias

    Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon SequestrationA is the only active inorganic carbon sequestration system showed low activity of HCO3 ­ uptake and grew under the significance of carbon sequestration in dissipating excess light energy. Keywords: CO2 and HCO3 À uptake -- CO2

  10. Genome Sequence of Amycolatopsis sp Strain ATCC 39116, a Plant Biomass-Degrading Actinomycete

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jennifer R.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Shunsheng; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Mikhailova, Natalia; Land, Miriam L; Sello, Jason K.

    2012-01-01

    We announce the availability of a high-quality draft of the genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain 39116, one of few bacterial species that are known to consume the lignin component of plant biomass. This genome sequence will further ongoing efforts to use microorganisms for the conversion of plant biomass into fuels and high-value chemicals.

  11. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Kocuria sp. Strain UCD-OTCP (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Coil, David A.; Doctor, Jessica I.; Lang, Jenna M.; Darling, Aaron E.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Kocuria sp. strain UCD-OTCP, a member of the phylum Actinobacteria, isolated from a restaurant chair cushion. The assembly contains 3,791,485 bp (G+C content of 73%) and is contained in 68 scaffolds. PMID:23661474

  13. Deep Desulfurization of Extensively Hydrodesulfurized Middle Distillate Oil by Rhodococcus sp. Strain ECRD-1

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, M. J.; Lee, M. K.; Prince, R. C.; Minak-Bernero, V.; George, G. N.; Pickering, I. J.

    2001-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), and in particular substituted DBTs, are resistant to hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and can persist in fuels even after aggressive HDS treatment. Treatment by Rhodococcus sp. strain ECRD-1 of a middle distillate oil whose sulfur content was virtually all substituted DBTs produced extensive desulfurization and a sulfur level of 56 ppm. PMID:11282654

  14. Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic Cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus sp. Strain NK55a.

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyar, Sergey; Liu, Zhenfeng; Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Pinel, Nicolas; Nelson, William C.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Romine, Margaret F.; Haruta, Shin; Schuster, Stephan C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2014-01-02

    The genome of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus sp. strain NK55a, isolated from Nakabusa hot spring, comprises a single, circular, 2.5-Mb chromosome. The genome is predicted to encode 2358 protein coding genes, including genes for all typical cyanobacterial photosynthetic and metabolic functions. No genes encoding hydrogenases or nitrogenase were identified.

  15. OXIDATION OF BIPHENYL BY A MULTICOMPONENT ENZYME SYSTEM FROM PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 grows on biphenyl as the sole carbon and energy source. his organism also cooxidizes several chlorinated biphenyl congeners. iphenyl dioxygenase activity in cell extract required addition of NAD(P)H as an electron donor for the conversion of biphenyl ...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Hoeflea sp. Strain BAL378, a Potential Producer of Bioactive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Riemann, Lasse; Gram, Lone

    2014-01-01

    Some phytoplankton-associated marine bacteria produce bioactive compounds. Members of the genus Hoeflea may be examples of such bacteria; however, data describing their metabolisms are scarce. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Hoeflea sp. strain BAL378, a putative producer of bacteriocins, polyketides, and auxins, as demonstrated by genome mining. PMID:25414510

  17. Alkaloids from an algicolous strain of Talaromyces sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haibin; Li, Fang; Ji, Naiyun

    2015-09-01

    Compounds isolated and identified in a culture of the alga-endophytic fungus Talaromyces sp. cf-16 included two naturally occurring alkaloids, 2-[(S)-hydroxy(phenyl)methyl]-3-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one (1a) and 2-[(R)-hydroxy(phenyl)methyl]-3-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one (1b), that were identified for the first time. In addition, seven known compounds (2-8) were obtained from the culture. Following chiral column chromatography, compounds 1a and 1b were identified as enantiomers by spectroscopic analyses and quantum chemical calculations. Bioassay results showed that 5 was more toxic to brine shrimp than the other compounds, and that 3-6 could inhibit Staphylococcus aureus.

  18. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50?g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105?mg/l of butanol, 122?mg/l of acetone, 0.2?g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5?g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80?g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50?g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66?mg/l of butanol, 125?mg/l of acetone, 291?mg/l of ethanol, 5.9?g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2?g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of a Polypropylene Glycol-Degrading Strain, Microbacterium sp. No. 7.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Numata, Mitsuru; Tsuchikane, Kieko; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Tsuda, Masataka; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Kawai, Fusako

    2015-01-01

    Microbacterium (formerly Corynebacterium) sp. No. 7 was isolated from activated sludge as a polypropylene glycol (PPG)-assimilating bacterial strain. Its oxidative PPG degradation has been proposed on the basis of PPG dehydrogenase activity and the metabolic products. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Microbacterium sp. No. 7. The genome of the strain No. 7 is composed of a 4,599,046-bp circular chromosome and two linear plasmids. The whole finishing was conducted in silico with aids of the computational tools GenoFinisher and AceFileViewer. Strain No. 7 is available from the Biological Resource Center, National Institute of Technology and Evaluation (NITE) (Tokyo, Japan). PMID:26659673

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of a Polypropylene Glycol-Degrading Strain, Microbacterium sp. No. 7

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yuji; Numata, Mitsuru; Tsuchikane, Kieko; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Tsuda, Masataka; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Kawai, Fusako

    2015-01-01

    Microbacterium (formerly Corynebacterium) sp. No. 7 was isolated from activated sludge as a polypropylene glycol (PPG)-assimilating bacterial strain. Its oxidative PPG degradation has been proposed on the basis of PPG dehydrogenase activity and the metabolic products. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Microbacterium sp. No. 7. The genome of the strain No. 7 is composed of a 4,599,046-bp circular chromosome and two linear plasmids. The whole finishing was conducted in silico with aids of the computational tools GenoFinisher and AceFileViewer. Strain No. 7 is available from the Biological Resource Center, National Institute of Technology and Evaluation (NITE) (Tokyo, Japan). PMID:26659673

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Organophosphorus-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas sp. Strain 1-7, Isolated from Organophosphorus-Polluted Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jian; Xu, Li; Zhang, Shuangyu; Sun, Wen; Chu, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain 1-7, isolated from organophosphorus-polluted sludge, is able to degrade many organophosphorus compounds. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain 1-7. PMID:25278536

  2. Binding and Agglutination of Streptococcus pneumoniae by Human Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) Vary between Strains, but SP-D Fails To Enhance Killing by Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Jounblat, Rania; Kadioglu, Aras; Iannelli, Francesco; Pozzi, Gianni; Eggleton, Paul; Andrew, Peter W.

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant human surfactant protein D (SP-D) expressed in Escherichia coli, consisting of the head and neck regions of the native molecule, bound to all strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae that were tested, but the extent of binding varied between strains of differing capsular serotypes. The recombinant protein expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris did not bind. Full-length native SP-D aggregated pneumococci in a calcium-dependent manner that was inhibited by maltose acting as a competitive sugar. The ability of SP-D to modulate the uptake and killing of pneumococci by human neutrophils was also addressed. Neither recombinant truncated SP-D nor native full-length SP-D enhanced the killing of pneumococci by human neutrophils. Aggregation of pneumococci varied not only between strains of the same multilocus sequence type and different serotypes but also between strains of the same serotype. However, use of recombinant strains in which the serotype had been changed showed that the degree of aggregation was influenced by the capsular type. Indeed, a 19F serotype strain which was not aggregated by SP-D did exhibit aggregation when the original isogenic strain was capsule switched to capsular serotype 3. However, although our results show that SP-D is capable of aggregating most pneumococci, no correlation between the degree of aggregation and the capsule or multilocus sequence type of the pneumococcus was clearly apparent. Therefore, although the capsule serotype is not the only determinant of aggregation by SP-D, the data presented here indicate that it does have a role to play. PMID:14742512

  3. Submerged culture screening of two strains of Streptomyces sp. with high keratinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Kirchner, O; Bautista-Ramirez, M E; Segura-Granados, M

    1998-01-01

    Keratinases can be used for the production of potentially important hydrolyzed proteins and chemicals. This study investigated the keratinolytic activity of Streptomyces sp on keratinaceous materials like wool. High levels of proteolytic and keratinolytic activity were obtained after 96 h of culture when two Streptomyces sp strains were grown on basal medium containing mineral salts and 3% (w/v) of defatted wool as a source of energy, carbon, and nitrogen. The cell-free culture filtrates exhibited rapid proteolytic digestion of keratin powder. Currently, the authors are testing whether the enzymatic activity obtained is in fact keratinolytic, and not only an alkaline protease activity. PMID:18575997

  4. Transmission Dynamics of Bartonella sp. Strain OE 1-1 in Sundevall's Jirds (Meriones crassus)

    PubMed Central

    Morick, Danny; Krasnov, Boris R.; Khokhlova, Irina S.; Gottlieb, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    A high prevalence of Bartonella infection is found in many natural systems; however, the transmission dynamics leading to observations of these infections is not fully understood. The capability of Xenopsylla ramesis fleas to serve as competent vectors of Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 (a strain closely related to the zoonotic Bartonella elizabethae) to Meriones crassus jirds was investigated. Naïve X. ramesis fleas were placed for 72 h on naïve jirds or jirds that were either experimentally or naturally infected with Bartonella sp. strain OE 1-1, after which they were placed on naïve jirds. Postfeeding, 69 to 100% of the fleas collected from each Bartonella-positive jird contained Bartonella DNA, and all naïve jirds became positive for Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 after infestation with the infected fleas. In addition, maternal transmission of Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 in jirds was tested by mating 5 Bartonella-positive and 5 naïve female jirds with 10 naïve male jirds in the absence of fleas. Fifteen offspring were delivered by each group. Cultures of blood drawn from all offspring on days 35 and 47 postdelivery were found to be negative for Bartonella. A single spleen sample from the offspring of a Bartonella-positive mother was found molecularly positive for Bartonella sp. OE 1-1. This study demonstrates that X. ramesis fleas are competent vectors of Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 to M. crassus jirds and indicates that maternal transmission is probably not the major transmission route from female jirds to their offspring. We suggest that the dynamics of Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 in the M. crassus jird population in nature is mostly dependent on its vectors. PMID:23241972

  5. Actinobacillus succinogenes sp. nov., a novel succinic-acid-producing strain from the bovine rumen.

    PubMed

    Guettler, M V; Rumler, D; Jain, M K

    1999-01-01

    Strain 130ZT was isolated from the bovine rumen. It is a facultatively anaerobic, pleomorphic, Gram-negative rod. It exhibits a 'Morse code' form of morphology, which is characteristic of the genus Actinobacillus. Strain 130ZT is a capnophilic, osmotolerant succinogen that utilizes a broad range of sugars. It accumulates high concentrations of succinic acid (> 70 g l-1). Strain 130ZT is positive for catalase, oxidase, alkaline phosphatase and beta-galactosidase, but does not produce indole or urease. Acid but no gas is produced from D-glucose and D-fructose. 16S rRNA sequence analysis places strain 130ZT within the family Pasteurellaceae; the most closely related members of the family Pasteurellaceae have 16S rRNA similarities of 95.5% or less with strain 130ZT. Strain 130ZT was compared with Actinobacillus lignieresii and the related Bisgaard Taxa 6 and 10. Based upon morphological and biochemical properties, strain 130ZT is most similar to members of the genus Actinobacillus within the family Pasteurellaceae. It is proposed that strain 130ZT be classified as a new species, Actinobacillus succinogenes. The type strain of Actinobacillus succinogenes sp. nov. is ATCC 55618T. PMID:10028265

  6. Physiological characteristics of Thiomicrospira sp. strain L-12 isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, E.G.; Jannasch, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    Growth of the obligately chemolithotrophic Thiomicrospira sp. strain L-12, isolated from a hydrothermal vent at a depth of 2,550 m in the Galapagos Rift region, was optimal at pH 8 and required 200 mM Na/sup +/ and divalent ions (Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg/sup 2 +/). The organism was microaerophilic and tolerated 300 ..mu..M sulfide without a decrease in the rate of CO/sub 2/ incorporation. Growth and CO/sub 2/ incorporation occurred within the temperature range of 10 to 35/sup 0/C, with both optimal at 25/sup 0/C. At the in situ pressure of 250 atm, the rate of CO/sub 2/ incorporation was reduced by 25% relative to that measured at 1 atm; it was entirely suppressed at 500 atm. The results of this physiological characterization suggest that Thiomicrospira sp. strain L-12 can be an active autotroph in the hydrothermal environment.

  7. A New Fungal Isolate, Penidiella sp. Strain T9, Accumulates the Rare Earth Element Dysprosium

    PubMed Central

    Horiike, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    With an aim to develop a highly efficient method for the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) by using microorganisms, we attempted to isolate dysprosium (Dy)-accumulating microorganisms that grow under acidic conditions from environmental samples containing high concentrations of heavy metals. One acidophilic strain, T9, which was isolated from an abandoned mine, decreased the concentration of Dy in medium that contained 100 mg/liter Dy to 53 mg/liter Dy after 3 days of cultivation at pH 2.5. The Dy content in the cell pellet of the T9 strain was 910 ?g/mg of dry cells. The T9 strain also accumulated other REEs. Based on the results of 28S-D1/D2 rRNA gene sequencing and morphological characterization, we designated this fungal strain Penidiella sp. T9. Bioaccumulation of Dy was observed on the cell surface of the T9 strain by elemental mapping using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results indicate that Penidiella sp. T9 has the potential to recover REEs such as Dy from mine drainage and industrial liquid waste under acidic conditions. PMID:25710372

  8. A new fungal isolate, Penidiella sp. strain T9, accumulates the rare earth element dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Horiike, Takumi; Yamashita, Mitsuo

    2015-05-01

    With an aim to develop a highly efficient method for the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) by using microorganisms, we attempted to isolate dysprosium (Dy)-accumulating microorganisms that grow under acidic conditions from environmental samples containing high concentrations of heavy metals. One acidophilic strain, T9, which was isolated from an abandoned mine, decreased the concentration of Dy in medium that contained 100 mg/liter Dy to 53 mg/liter Dy after 3 days of cultivation at pH 2.5. The Dy content in the cell pellet of the T9 strain was 910 ?g/mg of dry cells. The T9 strain also accumulated other REEs. Based on the results of 28S-D1/D2 rRNA gene sequencing and morphological characterization, we designated this fungal strain Penidiella sp. T9. Bioaccumulation of Dy was observed on the cell surface of the T9 strain by elemental mapping using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results indicate that Penidiella sp. T9 has the potential to recover REEs such as Dy from mine drainage and industrial liquid waste under acidic conditions. PMID:25710372

  9. Effect of biotin on alkaloid production during submerged cultivation of Claviceps sp. strain SD-58.

    PubMed Central

    Desai, J D; Desai, A J; Patel, H C

    1983-01-01

    Addition of biotin to culture medium NL-406 significantly increased alkaloid yield during submerged cultivation of Claviceps sp. strain SD-58. Alkaloid yield was further enhanced by incorporating leucine in biotin-supplemented culture medium. Increased alkaloid production was associated with an increase in the lipid content of cells and in the number of chlamydospores. Biotin deficiency caused a reduction in alkaloid yield and a parallel decrease in lipid content and chlamydospore numbers. PMID:6870245

  10. Production and Rheological Properties of the Extracellular Polysaccharide Synthesized by Pseudomonas sp. Strain EPS-5028

    PubMed Central

    Marqués, Ana M.; Estañol, Inmaculada; Alsina, Joan M.; Fusté, Carmen; Simon-Pujol, Dolores; Guinea, Jesús; Congregado, Francisco

    1986-01-01

    During batch aerobic submerged fermentation, the exopolysaccharide synthesis by Pseudomonas sp. strain EPS-5028 occurred in growth- and non-growth-linked processes. Polysaccharide formation increased when the pH was controlled at 7 during fermentation. Exopolysaccharide production depended on the phosphate content of the medium. The polymer exhibited a pseudoplastic nature, had good thermostability, and was affected neither by pH nor by high concentrations of salt. PMID:16347222

  11. Isolation of Regulated Genes of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 by Differential Display†

    PubMed Central

    Bhaya, Devaki; Vaulot, Daniel; Amin, Pinky; Takahashi, Akiko Watanabe; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2000-01-01

    Global identification of differentially regulated genes in prokaryotes is constrained because the mRNA does not have a 3? polyadenylation extension; this precludes specific separation of mRNA from rRNA and tRNA and synthesis of cDNAs from the entire mRNA population. Knowledge of the entire genome sequence of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has enabled us to develop a differential display procedure that takes advantage of a short palindromic sequence that is dispersed throughout the Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 genome. This sequence, designated the HIP (highly iterated palindrome) element, occurs in approximately half of the Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 genes but is absent in rRNA and tRNA genes. To determine the feasibility of exploiting the HIP element, alone or in combination with specific primer subsets, for analyzing differential gene expression, we used HIP-based primers to identify light intensity-regulated genes. Several gene fragments, including those encoding ribosomal proteins and phycobiliprotein subunits, were differentially amplified from RNA templates derived from cells grown in low light or exposed to high light for 3 h. One novel finding was that expression of certain genes of the pho regulon, which are under the control of environmental phosphate levels, were markedly elevated in high light. High-light activation of pho regulon genes correlated with elevated growth rates that occur when the cells are transferred from low to high light. These results suggest that in high light, the rate of growth of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 exceeds its capacity to assimilate phosphate, which, in turn, may trigger a phosphate starvation response and activation of the pho regulon. PMID:11004166

  12. Three Replicons of Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234 Harbor Symbiotic Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Margarita; Mavingui, Patrick; Girard, Lourdes; Perret, Xavier; Broughton, William J.; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Dávila, Guillermo; Palacios, Rafael

    1998-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 contains three replicons: the symbiotic plasmid or pNGR234a, a megaplasmid (pNGR234b), and the chromosome. Symbiotic gene sequences not present in pNGR234a were analyzed by hybridization. DNA sequences homologous to the genes fixLJKNOPQGHIS were found on the chromosome, while sequences homologous to nodPQ and exoBDFLK were found on pNGR234b. PMID:9811668

  13. Three replicons of Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234 harbor symbiotic gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Flores, M; Mavingui, P; Girard, L; Perret, X; Broughton, W J; Martínez-Romero, E; Dávila, G; Palacios, R

    1998-11-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 contains three replicons: the symbiotic plasmid or pNGR234a, a megaplasmid (pNGR234b), and the chromosome. Symbiotic gene sequences not present in pNGR234a were analyzed by hybridization. DNA sequences homologous to the genes fixLJKNOPQGHIS were found on the chromosome, while sequences homologous to nodPQ and exoBDFLK were found on pNGR234b. PMID:9811668

  14. Novel amidases of two Aminobacter sp. strains: Biotransformation experiments and elucidation of gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The amidase activities of two Aminobacter sp. strains (DSM24754 and DSM24755) towards the aryl-substituted substrates phenylhydantoin, indolylmethyl hydantoin, D,L-6-phenyl-5,6-dihydrouracil (PheDU) and para-chloro-D,L-6-phenyl-5,6-dihydrouracil were compared. Both strains showed hydantoinase and dihydropyrimidinase activity by hydrolyzing all substrates to the corresponding N-carbamoyl-?- or N-carbamoyl-?-amino acids. However, carbamoylase activity and thus a further degradation of these products to ?- and ?-amino acids was not detected. Additionally, the genes coding for a dihydropyrimidinase and a carbamoylase of Aminobacter sp. DSM24754 were elucidated. For Aminobacter sp. DSM24755 a dihydropyrimidinase gene flanked by two genes coding for putative ABC transporter proteins was detected. The deduced amino acid sequences of both dihydropyrimidinases are highly similar to the well-studied dihydropyrimidinase of Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114. The latter enzyme is reported to accept substituted hydantoins and dihydropyrimidines as substrates. The deduced amino acid sequence of the carbamoylase gene shows a high similarity to the very thermostable enzyme of Pseudomonas sp. KNK003A. PMID:22738219

  15. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1

    PubMed Central

    Tallur, Preeti N.; Mulla, Sikandar I.; Megadi, Veena B.; Talwar, Manjunatha P.; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF), polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM) than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water. PMID:26413046

  16. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1.

    PubMed

    Tallur, Preeti N; Mulla, Sikandar I; Megadi, Veena B; Talwar, Manjunatha P; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF), polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM) than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water. PMID:26413046

  17. Preliminary characterization of the probiotic properties of Candida famata and Geobacillus thermoleovorans

    PubMed Central

    Mahdhi, A; Hmila, Z; Behi, A; Bakhrouf, A

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective Probiotics are live microbial feed supplements which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance, producing metabolites which inhibit the colonization or growth of other microorganisms or by competing with them for resources such as nutrients or space. The aim of this study was to investigate the probiotic properties of Candida famata and Geobacillus thermoleovorans. Material and Methods In this study, yeast and bacterial strains isolated from pure oil waste were identified using Api 50 CHB and Api Candida Systems and their probiotic properties were studied through antimicrobial activity, biofilm production, adherence assay and enzymatic characterization. Results and Conclusion According to biochemical analyses, these strains corresponded to Geobacillus thermoleovorans and Candida famata. Antagonism assay results showed that the tested strains have an inhibitory effect against tested pathogenic bacteria. The yeast Candida famata was unable to produce biofilm on Congo Red Agar (CRA), while the bacterial strain was a slime producer. Adherence assays to abiotic surfaces revealed that the investigated strains were fairly adhesive to polystyrene with values ranging from 0.18 to 0.34 at 595 nm. The enzymatic characterization revealed that the tested strains expressed enzymes such as phosphatase alkaline, esterase lipase (C8), amylase, lipase, lecitenase and caseinase. The obtained results may allow the isolated strains to be considered as having the potential to be candidate probiotics. PMID:22347595

  18. Hydrogen production of a salt tolerant strain Bacillus sp. B2 from marine intertidal sludge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyan; Wang, Guangce

    2012-01-01

    To isolate a salt tolerant hydrogen-producing bacterium, we used the sludge from the intertidal zone of a bathing beach in Tianjin as inoculum to enrich hydrogen-producing bacteria. The sludge was treated by heat-shock pretreatment with three different temperature (80, 100 and 121°C) respectively. A hydrogen-producing bacterium was isolated from the sludge pretreated at 80°C by sandwich plate technique and identified using microscopic examination and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. The isolated bacterium was named as Bacillus sp. B2. The present study examined the hydrogen-producing ability of Bacillus sp. B2. The strain was able to produce hydrogen over a wide range of initial pH from 5.0 to 10.0, with an optimum at pH 7.0. The level of hydrogen production was also affected by the salt concentration. Strain B2 has unique capability to adapt high salt concentration. It could produce hydrogen at the salt concentration from 4 to 60‰. The maximum of hydrogen-producing yield of strain B2 was 1.65 ± 0.04 mol H(2)/mol glucose (mean ± SE) at an initial pH value of 7.0 in marine culture conditions. Hydrogen production under fresh culture conditions reached a higher level than that in marine ones. As a result, it is likely that Bacillus sp. B2 could be applied to biohydrogen production using both marine and fresh organic waste. PMID:22806777

  19. Tocopherols Protect Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 from Lipid Peroxidation1

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Sakuragi, Yumiko; Bryant, Donald A.; DellaPenna, Dean

    2005-01-01

    Tocopherols (vitamin E) are lipid-soluble antioxidants synthesized only by photosynthetic eukaryotes and some cyanobacteria, and have been assumed to play important roles in protecting photosynthetic membranes from oxidative stress. To test this hypothesis, tocopherol-deficient mutants of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (slr1736 and slr1737 mutants) were challenged with a series of reactive oxygen species-generating and lipid peroxidation-inducing chemicals in combination with high-light (HL) intensity stress. The tocopherol-deficient mutants and wild type were indistinguishable in their growth responses to HL in the presence and absence of superoxide and singlet oxygen-generating chemicals. However, the mutants showed enhanced sensitivity to linoleic or linolenic acid treatments in combination with HL, consistent with tocopherols playing a crucial role in protecting Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 cells from lipid peroxidation. The tocopherol-deficient mutants were also more susceptible to HL treatment in the presence of sublethal levels of norflurazon, an inhibitor of carotenoid synthesis, suggesting carotenoids and tocopherols functionally interact or have complementary or overlapping roles in protecting Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 from lipid peroxidation and HL stress. PMID:15965015

  20. Complete genome sequence of the lignin-degrading bacterium Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to discover anaerobic bacteria capable of lignin degradation, we isolated Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2 on minimal media with alkali lignin as the sole carbon source. This organism was isolated anaerobically from tropical forest soils collected from the Bisley watershed at the Ridge site in the El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico, USA, part of the Luquillo Long-Term Ecological Research Station. At this site, the soils experience strong fluctuations in redox potential and are characterized by cycles of iron oxidation and reduction. Genome sequencing was targeted because of its ability to grow on lignin anaerobically and lignocellulolytic activity via in vitro enzyme assays. The genome of Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2 is 5.80 Mbp with no detected plasmids, and includes a relatively small arsenal of genes encoding lignocellulolytic carbohydrate active enzymes. The genome revealed four putative peroxidases including glutathione and DyP-type peroxidases, and a complete protocatechuate pathway encoded in a single gene cluster. Physiological studies revealed Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2 to be relatively stress tolerant to high ionic strength conditions. It grows in increasing concentrations of ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate) up to 73.44 mM and NaCl up to 1.5 M. PMID:25566348

  1. Conversion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal and Related Alkylhydroxyquinolines by Rhodococcus sp. Strain BG43

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Niewerth, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain, which based on the sequences of its 16S rRNA, gyrB, catA, and qsdA genes, was identified as a Rhodococcus sp. closely related to Rhodococcus erythropolis, was isolated from soil by enrichment on the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone], a quorum sensing signal employed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolate, termed Rhodococcus sp. strain BG43, cometabolically degraded PQS and its biosynthetic precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) to anthranilic acid. HHQ degradation was accompanied by transient formation of PQS, and HHQ hydroxylation by cell extracts required NADH, indicating that strain BG43 has a HHQ monooxygenase isofunctional to the biosynthetic enzyme PqsH of P. aeruginosa. The enzymes catalyzing HHQ hydroxylation and PQS degradation were inducible by PQS, suggesting a specific pathway. Remarkably, Rhodococcus sp. BG43 is also capable of transforming 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide to PQS. It thus converts an antibacterial secondary metabolite of P. aeruginosa to a quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:25239889

  2. Iron corrosion induced by nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1.

    PubMed

    Iino, Takao; Ito, Kimio; Wakai, Satoshi; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ohkuma, Moriya; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2015-03-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of metallic materials imposes a heavy economic burden. The mechanism of MIC of metallic iron (Fe(0)) under anaerobic conditions is usually explained as the consumption of cathodic hydrogen by hydrogenotrophic microorganisms that accelerates anodic Fe(0) oxidation. In this study, we describe Fe(0) corrosion induced by a nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing bacterium called MIC1-1, which was isolated from a crude-oil sample collected at an oil well in Akita, Japan. This strain requires specific electron donor-acceptor combinations and an organic carbon source to grow. For example, the strain grew anaerobically on nitrate as a sole electron acceptor with pyruvate as a carbon source and Fe(0) as the sole electron donor. In addition, ferrous ion and l-cysteine served as electron donors, whereas molecular hydrogen did not. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain MIC1-1 was a member of the genus Prolixibacter in the order Bacteroidales. Thus, Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1 is the first Fe(0)-corroding representative belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Under anaerobic conditions, Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 corroded Fe(0) concomitantly with nitrate reduction, and the amount of iron dissolved by the strain was six times higher than that in an aseptic control. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that microscopic crystals of FePO4 developed on the surface of the Fe(0) foils, and a layer of FeCO3 covered the FePO4 crystals. We propose that cells of Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 accept electrons directly from Fe(0) to reduce nitrate. PMID:25548048

  3. Iron Corrosion Induced by Nonhydrogenotrophic Nitrate-Reducing Prolixibacter sp. Strain MIC1-1

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kimio; Wakai, Satoshi; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ohkuma, Moriya; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2014-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of metallic materials imposes a heavy economic burden. The mechanism of MIC of metallic iron (Fe0) under anaerobic conditions is usually explained as the consumption of cathodic hydrogen by hydrogenotrophic microorganisms that accelerates anodic Fe0 oxidation. In this study, we describe Fe0 corrosion induced by a nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing bacterium called MIC1-1, which was isolated from a crude-oil sample collected at an oil well in Akita, Japan. This strain requires specific electron donor-acceptor combinations and an organic carbon source to grow. For example, the strain grew anaerobically on nitrate as a sole electron acceptor with pyruvate as a carbon source and Fe0 as the sole electron donor. In addition, ferrous ion and l-cysteine served as electron donors, whereas molecular hydrogen did not. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain MIC1-1 was a member of the genus Prolixibacter in the order Bacteroidales. Thus, Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1 is the first Fe0-corroding representative belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Under anaerobic conditions, Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 corroded Fe0 concomitantly with nitrate reduction, and the amount of iron dissolved by the strain was six times higher than that in an aseptic control. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that microscopic crystals of FePO4 developed on the surface of the Fe0 foils, and a layer of FeCO3 covered the FePO4 crystals. We propose that cells of Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 accept electrons directly from Fe0 to reduce nitrate. PMID:25548048

  4. Dynamic metabolic and transcriptional profiling of Rhodococcus sp. strain YYL during the degradation of tetrahydrofuran.

    PubMed

    He, Zhixing; Yao, Yanlai; Lu, Zhenmei; Ye, Yangfang

    2014-05-01

    Although tetrahydrofuran-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain YYL possesses tetrahydrofuran (THF) degradation genes similar to those of other tetrahydrofuran-degrading bacteria, a much higher degradation efficiency has been observed in strain YYL. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics analyses were performed to explore the metabolic profiling response of strain YYL to exposure to THF. Exposure to THF slightly influenced the metabolome of strain YYL when yeast extract was present in the medium. The metabolic profile of strain YYL over time was also investigated using THF as the sole carbon source to identify the metabolites associated with high-efficiency THF degradation. Lactate, alanine, glutarate, glutamate, glutamine, succinate, lysine, trehalose, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), NAD(+), and CTP were significantly altered over time in strain YYL grown in 20 mM THF. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) revealed changes in the transcriptional expression levels of 15 genes involved in THF degradation, suggesting that strain YYL could accumulate several disturbances in osmoregulation (trehalose, glutamate, glutamine, etc.), with reduced glycolysis levels, an accelerated tricarboxylic acid cycle, and enhanced protein synthesis. The findings obtained through (1)H NMR metabolomics analyses and the transcriptional expression of the corresponding genes are complementary for exploring the dynamic metabolic profile in organisms. PMID:24532074

  5. Monooxygenase-mediated 1,2-dichloroethane degradation by Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hage, J.C.; Hartmans, S.

    1999-06-01

    A bacterial strain, designated Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1, was isolated from a 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA)-degrading biofilm. Strain DCA1 utilizes DCA as the sole carbon and energy source and does not require additional organic nutrients, such as vitamins, for optimal growth. The affinity of strain DCA1 for DCA is very high, with a K{sub m} value below the detection limit of 0.5 {micro}M. Instead of a hydrolytic dehalogenation, as in other DCA utilizers, the first step in DCA degradation in strain DCA1 is an oxidation reaction. Oxygen and NAD(P)H are required for this initial step. Propene was converted to 1,2-epoxypropane by DCA-grown cells and competitively inhibited DCA degradation. The authors concluded that a monooxygenase is responsible for the first step in DCA degradation in strain DCA1. Oxidation of DCA probably results in the formation of the unstable intermediate 1,2-dichloroethanol, which spontaneously releases chloride, yielding chloroacetaldehyde. The DCA degradation pathway is strain DCA1 proceeds from chloroacetaldehyde via chloroacetic acid and presumably glycolic acid, which is similar to degradation routes observed in other DCA-utilizing bacteria.

  6. An Entamoeba sp. strain isolated from rhesus monkey is virulent but genetically different from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Pandey, Kishor; Cheng, Xun-Jia; Kobayashi, Seiki; Sherchand, Jeevan B; Kanbara, Hiroji

    2007-06-01

    An Entamoeba sp. strain, P19-061405, was isolated from a rhesus monkey in Nepal and characterized genetically. The strain was initially identified as Entamoeba histolytica using PCR amplification of peroxiredoxin genes. However, sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene showed a 0.8% difference when compared to the reference E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS human strain. Differences were also observed in the 5.8S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions 1 and 2, and analysis of the serine-rich protein gene from the monkey strain showed unique codon usages compared to E. histolytica isolated from humans. The amino acid sequences of two hexokinases and two glucose phosphate isomerases also differed from those of E. histolytica. Isoenzyme analyses of these enzymes in the monkey strain showed different electrophoretic mobility patterns compared with E. histolytica isolates. Analysis of peroxiredoxin genes indicated the presence of at least seven different types of protein, none of which were identical to proteins in E. histolytica. When the trophozoites from the monkey strain were inoculated into the livers of hamsters, formation of amebic abscesses was observed 7 days after the injection. These results demonstrate that the strain is genetically different from E. histolytica and is virulent. Revival of the name Entamoeba nuttalli is proposed for the organism. PMID:17403547

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of the Cyanogenic Phosphate-Solubilizing Pseudomonas sp. Strain CCOS 191, a Close Relative of Pseudomonas mosselii

    PubMed Central

    Pothier, Joël F.; Ruinelli, Michela; Blom, Jochen; Frasson, David; Koechli, Chantal; Fabbri, Carlotta; Brandl, Helmut; Duffy, Brion; Sievers, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced the complete genome of the isolate Pseudomonas sp. CCOS 191. This strain is able to dissolve phosphate minerals and form cyanide. The genome sequence is used to establish the phylogenetic relationship of this species. PMID:26067963

  8. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 - an effective microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. growing in Australia.

    PubMed

    Eshraghi, Leila; De Meyer, Sofie E; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. WSM1743 was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of an Indigofera sp. growing 20 km north of Carnarvon in Australia. It is slow growing, tolerates up to 1 % NaCl and is capable of growth at 37 °C. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 8,341,956 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 163 scaffolds and 167 contigs, contains 7908 protein-coding genes and 75 RNA-only encoding genes and was sequenced as part of the Root Nodule Bacteria chapter of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:26512312

  9. Identification, Purification and Characterization of Laterosporulin, a Novel Bacteriocin Produced by Brevibacillus sp. Strain GI-9

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pradip Kumar; Chittpurna; Ashish; Sharma, Vikas; Patil, Prabhu B.; Korpole, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacteriocins are antimicrobial peptides that are produced by bacteria as a defense mechanism in complex environments. Identification and characterization of novel bacteriocins in novel strains of bacteria is one of the important fields in bacteriology. Methodology/Findings The strain GI-9 was identified as Brevibacillus sp. by 16 S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacteriocin produced by strain GI-9, namely, laterosporulin was purified from supernatant of the culture grown under optimal conditions using hydrophobic interaction chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. The bacteriocin was active against a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. MALDI-TOF experiments determined the precise molecular mass of the peptide to be of 5.6 kDa and N-terminal sequencing of the thermo-stable peptide revealed low similarity with existing antimicrobial peptides. The putative open reading frame (ORF) encoding laterosporulin and its surrounding genomic region was fished out from the draft genome sequence of GI-9. Sequence analysis of the putative bacteriocin gene did not show significant similarity to any reported bacteriocin producing genes in database. Conclusions We have identified a bacteriocin producing strain GI-9, belonging to the genus Brevibacillus sp. Biochemical and genomic characterization of laterosporulin suggests it as a novel bacteriocin with broad spectrum antibacterial activity. PMID:22403615

  10. Nodulation of Lupinus albus by Strains of Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Martha E.; Willems, Anne; Abril, Adriana; Planchuelo, Ana-María; Rivas, Raúl; Ludeña, Dolores; Mateos, Pedro F.; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2005-01-01

    The nodulation of legumes has for more than a century been considered an exclusive capacity of a group of microorganisms commonly known as rhizobia and belonging to the ?-Proteobacteria. However, in the last 3 years four nonrhizobial species, belonging to ? and ? subclasses of the Proteobacteria, have been described as legume-nodulating bacteria. In the present study, two fast-growing strains, LUP21 and LUP23, were isolated from nodules of Lupinus honoratus. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S and 23S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates belong to the genus Ochrobactrum. The strains were able to reinfect Lupinus plants. A plasmid profile analysis showed the presence of three plasmids. The nodD and nifH genes were located on these plasmids, and their sequences were obtained. These sequences showed a close resemblance to the nodD and nifH genes of rhizobial species, suggesting that the nodD and nifH genes carried by strain LUP21T were acquired by horizontal gene transfer. A polyphasic study including phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and molecular features of the strains isolated in this study showed that they belong to a new species of the genus Ochrobactrum for which we propose the name Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov. Strain LUP21T (LMG 20667T) is the type strain. PMID:15746334

  11. Survival of the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A after prolonged air exposure

    PubMed Central

    Struchtemeyer, Christopher G.; Ranganathan, Abhaya; Couger, M. B.; Liggenstoffer, Audra S.; Youssef, Noha H.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic fungi are efficient plant biomass degraders and represent promising agents for a variety of biotechnological applications. We evaluated the tolerance of an anaerobic fungal isolate, Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A, to air exposure in liquid media using soluble (cellobiose) and insoluble (dried switchgrass) substrates. Strain C1A grown on cellobiose survived for 11, and 13.5?hours following air exposure when grown under planktonic, and immobilized conditions, respectively. When grown on switchgrass media, strain C1A exhibited significantly enhanced air tolerance and survived for 168?hours. The genome of strain C1A lacked a catalase gene, but contained superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase genes. Real time PCR analysis indicated that superoxide dismutase, but not glutathione peroxidase, exhibits a transient increase in expression level post aeration. Interestingly, the C1A superoxide dismutase gene of strain C1A appears to be most closely related to bacterial SODs, which implies its acquisition from a bacterial donor via cross kingdom horizontal gene transfer during Neocallimastigomycota evolution. We conclude that strain C1A utilizes multiple mechanisms to minimize the deleterious effects of air exposure such as physical protection and the production of oxidative stress enzymes. PMID:25367149

  12. Effects of nano bamboo charcoal on PAHs-degrading strain Sphingomonas sp. GY2B.

    PubMed

    She, Bojia; Tao, Xueqin; Huang, Ting; Lu, Guining; Zhou, Zhili; Guo, Chuling; Dang, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Nano bamboo charcoal (NBC) has been commonly used in the production of textiles, plastics, paint, etc. However, little is known regarding their effects towards the microorganisms. The effects of NBC on phenanthrene degrading strain Sphingomonas sp. GY2B were investigated in the present study. Results showed that the addition of NBC could improve the phenanthrene removal by Sphingomonas sp. GY2B, with removal efficiencies increased by 10.29-18.56% in comparison to the control at 24h, and phenanthrene was almost completely removed at 48h. With the presence of low dose of NBC (20 and 50mgL(-1)), strain GY2B displayed a better growth at 6h, suggesting that NBC was beneficial to the growth of GY2B and thus resulting in the quick removal of phenanthrene from water. However, the growth of strain GY2B in high dose of NBC (200mgL(-1)) was inhibited at 6h, and the inhibition could be attenuated and eliminated after 12h. NBC-effected phenanthrene solubility experiment suggested that NBC makes a negligible contribution to the solubilization of phenanthrene in water. Results of electronic microscopy analysis (SEM and TEM) indicated NBC may interact with the cell membrane, causing the enhanced membrane permeability and then NBC adsorbed on the membrane would enter into the cells. The findings of this work would provide important information for the future usage and long-term environmental risk assessment of NBC. PMID:26655231

  13. Novel Acetone Metabolism in a Propane-Utilizing Bacterium, Gordonia sp. Strain TY-5?

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Tetsuya; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Kato, Nobuo; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    In the propane-utilizing bacterium Gordonia sp. strain TY-5, propane was shown to be oxidized to 2-propanol and then further oxidized to acetone. In this study, the subsequent metabolism of acetone was studied. Acetone-induced proteins were found in extracts of cells induced by acetone, and a gene cluster designated acmAB was cloned on the basis of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of acetone-induced proteins. The acmA and acmB genes encode a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) and esterase, respectively. The BVMO encoded by acmA was purified from acetone-induced cells of Gordonia sp. strain TY-5 and characterized. The BVMO exhibited NADPH-dependent oxidation activity for linear ketones (C3 to C10) and cyclic ketones (C4 to C8). Escherichia coli expressing the acmA gene oxidized acetone to methyl acetate, and E. coli expressing the acmB gene hydrolyzed methyl acetate. Northern blot analyses revealed that polycistronic transcription of the acmAB gene cluster was induced by propane, 2-propanol, and acetone. These results indicate that the acmAB gene products play an important role in the metabolism of acetone derived from propane oxidation and clarify the propane metabolism pathway of strain TY-5 (propane ? 2-propanol ? acetone ? methyl acetate ? acetic acid + methanol). This paper provides the first evidence for BVMO-dependent acetone metabolism. PMID:17071761

  14. Degradation of sulfonamide antibiotics by Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 - elucidating the downstream pathway.

    PubMed

    Ricken, Benjamin; Fellmann, Oliver; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Schäffer, Andreas; Corvini, Philippe François-Xavier; Kolvenbach, Boris Alexander

    2015-12-25

    Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 is among the first bacterial isolates which were proven to degrade sulfonamide antibiotics. The degradation is initiated by an ipso-substitution, initiating the decay of the molecule into sulfur dioxide, the substrate specific heterocyclic moiety as a stable metabolite and benzoquinone imine. The latter appears to be instantaneously reduced to p-aminophenol, as that in turn was detected as the first stable intermediate. This study investigated the downstream pathway of sulfonamide antibiotics by testing the strain's ability to degrade suspected intermediates of this pathway. While p-aminophenol was degraded, degradation products could not be identified. Benzoquinone was shown to be degraded to hydroquinone and hydroquinone in turn was shown to be degraded to 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene. The latter is assumed to be the potential substrate for aromatic ring cleavage. However, no products from the degradation of 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene could be identified. There are no signs of accumulation of intermediates causing oxidative stress, which makes Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 an interesting candidate for industrial waste water treatment. PMID:25796473

  15. Whole-Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. Strain RPE67, a Bacterial Gut Symbiont of the Bean Bug Riptortus pedestris

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Kazutaka; Shibata, Tomoko F.; Nikoh, Naruo; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Fukatsu, Takema; Shigenobu, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain RPE67 is a bacterial symbiont isolated from a field-collected bean bug, Riptortus pedestris. To understand the genetic basis of the insect-microbe symbiosis, we performed whole-genome sequencing of the Burkholderia strain, revealing an 8.69-Mb genome consisting of three chromosomes and three plasmids. PMID:24948758

  16. Draft genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES, reconstructed from the metagenome of a microbial electrosynthesis system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ross, Daniel E.; Marshall, Christopher W.; May, Harold D.; Norman, R. Sean

    2015-01-15

    A draft genome of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES was isolated through taxonomic binning of a metagenome sequenced from a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) actively producing acetate and hydrogen. The genome contains the nosZDFLY genes, which are involved in nitrous oxide reduction, suggesting the potential role of this strain in denitrification.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of a Sulfur-Oxidizing Autotroph, Sulfuricella sp. Strain T08, Isolated from a Freshwater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Sulfuricella sp. strain T08 is a sulfur-oxidizing autotroph newly isolated from a freshwater lake in Japan. Strain T08 is the second isolate of the genus Sulfuricella. Here, we report the annotated draft genome sequence of the isolate. PMID:25999549

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of a Sulfur-Oxidizing Autotroph, Sulfuricella sp. Strain T08, Isolated from a Freshwater Lake.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomohiro; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Sulfuricella sp. strain T08 is a sulfur-oxidizing autotroph newly isolated from a freshwater lake in Japan. Strain T08 is the second isolate of the genus Sulfuricella. Here, we report the annotated draft genome sequence of the isolate. PMID:25999549

  19. Genome Sequence of an Efficient Indole-Degrading Bacterium, Cupriavidus sp. Strain IDO, with Potential Polyhydroxyalkanoate Production Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiao; Zhang, Zhaojing; Li, Pengpeng

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. strain IDO has been shown to efficiently transform indole, and the genus of Cupriavidus has been described as a promising cell factory for polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis from low-cost wastes. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain IDO, which may provide useful genetic information on indole metabolism and polyhydroxyalkanoate production. PMID:25767238

  20. The Draft Genome Sequence of Nocardioides sp. Strain CF8 Reveals the Scope of Its Metabolic Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Kimbrel, Jeffrey A; Chang, Jeff; Arp, Daniel J; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Nocardioides sp. strain CF8 was isolated from a soil sample collected at the Hanford Department of Energy site, Richland, WA. The strain was identified in microcosms based on its ability to grow on butane and has been characterized for its potential applications in the biodegradation of halogenated hydrocarbons. Here, the draft genome sequence is reported. PMID:23833136

  1. The Draft Genome Sequence of Nocardioides sp. Strain CF8 Reveals the Scope of Its Metabolic Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Kimbrel, Jeffrey A.; Chang, Jeff; Arp, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Nocardioides sp. strain CF8 was isolated from a soil sample collected at the Hanford Department of Energy site, Richland, WA. The strain was identified in microcosms based on its ability to grow on butane and has been characterized for its potential applications in the biodegradation of halogenated hydrocarbons. Here, the draft genome sequence is reported. PMID:23833136

  2. Draft genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES, reconstructed from the metagenome of a microbial electrosynthesis system

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Daniel E.; Marshall, Christopher W.; May, Harold D.; Norman, R. Sean

    2015-01-15

    A draft genome of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES was isolated through taxonomic binning of a metagenome sequenced from a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) actively producing acetate and hydrogen. The genome contains the nosZDFLY genes, which are involved in nitrous oxide reduction, suggesting the potential role of this strain in denitrification.

  3. Draft genome sequence of Paenibacillus algorifonticola sp. nov., an antimicrobial-producing strain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liying; Wu, Qian; Xu, Qing; Xu, Xian; Jiang, Ling; Huang, He

    2015-09-01

    Paenibacillus algorifonticola sp. nov. is isolated from a cold spring sample from Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (China), a novel strain that can produce antimicrobial substance against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, including Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Here we report a 7.60-Mb assembly of its genome sequence and other useful information, including the coding sequences (CDSs) responsible for the biosynthesis of antibacterial factors, anaerobic respiration and several immune-associated reactions. Also, prospective studies on P. algorifonticola sp. nov. in the cold spring might offer a potential source for the discovery of bioactive compounds with medical value. The data repository is deposited on the website http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/LAQO00000000 and the accession number is LAQO00000000. PMID:26484273

  4. Degradation of ethyl mercaptan and its major intermediate diethyl disulfide by Pseudomonas sp. strain WL2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangqian; Wu, Chao; Liu, Nan; Li, Sujing; Li, Wei; Chen, Jianmeng; Chen, Dongzhi

    2015-04-01

    A Pseudomonas sp. strain WL2 that is able to efficiently metabolize ethyl mercaptan (EM) into diethyl disulfide (DEDS) through enzymatic oxidation was isolated from the activated sludge of a pharmaceutical wastewater plant. One hundred percent removal of 113.5 mg L(-1) EM and 110.3 mg L(-1) DEDS were obtained within 14 and 32 h, respectively. A putative EM degradation pathway that involved the catabolism via DEDS was proposed, which indicated DEDS were further mineralized into carbon dioxide (CO2), bacterial cells, and sulfate (SO4 (2-)) through the transformation of element sulfur and ethyl aldehyde. Degradation kinetics for EM and DEDS with different initial concentrations by strain WL2 were evaluated using Haldane-Andrews model with maximum specific degradation rates of 3.13 and 1.33 g g(-1) h(-1), respectively, and maximum degradation rate constants of 0.522 and 0.175 h(-1) using pseudo-first-order kinetic model were obtained. Results obtained that aerobic degradation of EM by strain WL2 was more efficient than those from previous studies. Substrate range studies of strain WL2 demonstrated its ability to degrade several mercaptans, disulfides, aldehydes, and methanol. All the results obtained highlight the potential of strain WL2 for the use in the biodegradation of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs). PMID:25398287

  5. Biodegradation of nitroglycerin in porous media and potential for bioaugmentation with Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1.

    PubMed

    Husserl, Johana; Hughes, Joseph B

    2013-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (NG) is a toxic explosive found as a contaminant of soil and groundwater. Several microbial strains are capable of partially reducing the NG molecule to dinitro or mononitroesters. Recently, a strain capable of growing on NG as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen (Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1) was isolated from contaminated soil. Despite the widespread presence of microbial strains capable of transforming NG in contaminated soils and sediments, the extent of NG biodegradation at contaminated sites is still unknown. In this study column experiments were conducted to investigate the extent of microbial degradation of NG in saturated porous media, specifically after bioaugmentation with JBH1. Initial experiments using sterile, low sorptivity sand, showed mineralization of NG after bioaugmentation with JBH1 in the absence of sources of carbon and nitrogen other than NG. Results could be modeled using a first order degradation rate of 0.14d(-1). Further experiments conducted using contaminated soil with high organic carbon content (highly sorptive) resulted in column effluents that did not contain NG although high dinitroester concentrations were observed. Bioaugmentation with JBH1 in sediments containing strains capable of partial transformation of NG resulted in complete mineralization of NG and faster degradation rates. PMID:23664478

  6. Diversity of exophillic acid derivatives in strains of an endophytic Exophiala sp.

    PubMed

    Cheikh-Ali, Zakaria; Glynou, Kyriaki; Ali, Tahir; Ploch, Sebastian; Kaiser, Marcel; Thines, Marco; Bode, Helge B; Maciá-Vicente, Jose G

    2015-10-01

    Members of the fungal genus Exophiala are common saprobes in soil and water environments, opportunistic pathogens of animals, or endophytes in plant roots. Their ecological versatility could imply a capacity to produce diverse secondary metabolites, but only a few studies have aimed at characterizing their chemical profiles. Here, we assessed the secondary metabolites produced by five Exophiala sp. strains of a particular phylotype, isolated from roots of Microthlaspi perfoliatum growing in different European localities. Exophillic acid and two previously undescribed compounds were isolated from these strains, and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods using MS, 1D and 2D NMR. Bioassays revealed a weak activity of these compounds against disease-causing protozoa and mammalian cells. In addition, 18 related structures were identified by UPLC/MS based on comparisons with the isolated structures. Three Exophiala strains produced derivatives containing a ?-d-glucopyranoside moiety, and their colony morphology was distinct from the other two strains, which produced derivatives lacking ?-d-glucopyranoside. Whether the chemical/morphological strain types represent variants of the same genotype or independent genetic populations within Exophiala remains to be evaluated. PMID:26296744

  7. Effect of pesticides on plant growth promoting traits of greengram-symbiont, Bradyrhizobium sp. strain MRM6.

    PubMed

    Ahemad, Munees; Khan, Mohammad Saghir

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the toxicity of herbicides (metribuzin and glyphosate), insecticides (imidacloprid and thiamethoxam) and fungicides (hexaconazole, metalaxyl and kitazin) at the recommended and the higher dose rates on plant growth promoting activities of Bradyrhizobium sp. under in vitro conditions. The Bradyrhizobium sp. strain MRM6 was isolated from nodules of greengram plants. Pesticide-concentration dependent progressive-decline was observed in plant growth promoting traits of the strain MRM6 apart from exo-polysaccharides which increased consistently on increasing pesticide concentrations. Generally, the highest toxicity to plant growth promoting characteristics of the Bradyrhizobium sp. strain MRM6 was observed when the strain MRM6 was grown with three times the recommended field rates of glyphosate, imidacloprid and hexaconazole. PMID:21359648

  8. Substrate Preferences in Biodesulfurization of Diesel Range Fuels by Rhodococcus sp. Strain ECRD-1

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Roger C.; Grossman, Matthew J.

    2003-01-01

    The range of sulfur compounds in fuel oil and the substrate range and preference of the biocatalytic system determine the maximum extent to which sulfur can be removed by biodesulfurization. We show that the biodesulfurization apparatus in Rhodococcus sp. strain ECRD-1 is able to attack all isomers of dibenzothiophene including those with at least four pendant carbons, with a slight preference for those substituted in the ?-position. With somewhat less avidity, this apparatus is also able to attack substituted benzothiophenes with between two and seven pendant carbons. Some compounds containing sulfidic sulfur are also susceptible to desulfurization, although we have not yet been able to determine their molecular identities. PMID:14532032

  9. Genome Sequence of the Ethene- and Vinyl Chloride-Oxidizing Actinomycete Nocardioides sp Strain JS614

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Nicholas V; Wilson, Neil L; Barry, Kerrie; Bruce, David; Copeland, A; Dalin, Eileen; Detter, J. Chris; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Hammon, Nancy; Han, Shunsheng; Hauser, Loren John; Israni, Sanjay; Kim, Edwin; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Larimer, Frank W; Lucas, Susan; Pitluck, Sam; Richardson, Paul; Schmutz, Jeremy; Tapia, Roxanne; Thompson, Sue; Tice, Hope; Spain, Jim C; Gossett, James G; Mattes, Timothy E

    2011-01-01

    Nocardioides sp. strain JS614 grows on ethene and vinyl chloride (VC) as sole carbon and energy sources and is of interest for bioremediation and biocatalysis. Sequencing of the complete genome of JS614 provides insight into the genetic basis of alkene oxidation, supports ongoing research into the physiology and biochemistry of growth on ethene and VC, and provides biomarkers to facilitate detection of VC/ethene oxidizers in the environment. This is the first genome sequence from the genus Nocardioides and the first genome of a VC/ethene-oxidizing bacterium.

  10. Metabolism of tetralin (1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene) in Corynebacterium sp. strain C125

    SciTech Connect

    Sikkema, J.; Bont, J.A.M. de )

    1993-02-01

    Tetralin, widely used as a solvent in the petrochemical industry and in paints and waxes, degrades slowly in mixed cultures of microorganisms or in the presence of cosubstrates. This study reports on the metabolism of tetralin in the o-xylene-isolated Corynebacterium sp. strain C125. The researchers found that this organism attacks tetralin by an initial oxidation of the aromatic nucleus at positions C-5 and C-6 and they propose a four step inducible degradation pathway for tetralin starting at that point. The presence of the pathway makes this bacteria an excellent catalyst for the specific production of special cis-dihydro diols.

  11. Isolation of Toxigenic Nocardiopsis Strains from Indoor Environments and Description of Two New Nocardiopsis Species, N. exhalans sp. nov. and N. umidischolae sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Joanna S. P.; Andersson, Maria A.; Kämpfer, Peter; Auling, Georg; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M.; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja S.; Rainey, Frederick A.

    2001-01-01

    Nocardiopsis strains were isolated from water-damaged indoor environments. Two strains (N. alba subsp. alba 704a and a strain representing a novel species, ES10.1) as well as strains of N. prasina, N. lucentensis, and N. tropica produced methanol-soluble toxins that paralyzed the motility of boar spermatozoa at <30 ?g of crude extract (dry weight) ml?1. N. prasina, N. lucentensis, N. tropica, and strain ES10.1 caused cessation of motility by dissipating the mitochondrial membrane potential, ??, of the boar spermatozoa. Indoor strain 704a produced a substance that destroyed cell membrane barrier function and depleted the sperm cells of ATP. Indoor strain 64/93 was antagonistic towards Corynebacterium renale. Two indoor Nocardiopsis strains were xerotolerant, and all five utilized a wide range of substrates. This combined with the production of toxic substances suggests good survival and potential hazard to human health in water-damaged indoor environments. Two new species, Nocardiopsis exhalans sp. nov. (ES10.1T) and Nocardiopsis umidischolae sp. nov. (66/93T), are proposed based on morphology, chemotaxonomic and physiological characters, phylogenetic analysis, and DNA-DNA reassociations. PMID:11526036

  12. Genome Sequence of Halomonas sp. Strain MCTG39a, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Exopolymeric Substance-Producing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Halomonas sp. strain MCTG39a was isolated from coastal sea surface water based on its ability to utilize n-hexadecane. During growth in marine medium the strain produces an amphiphilic exopolymeric substance (EPS) amended with glucose, which emulsifies a variety of oil hydrocarbon substrates. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 4,979,193 bp with 4,614 genes and an average G+C content of 55.0%. PMID:26184945

  13. Physiological adaptations involved in alkane assimilation at a low temperature by Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15.

    PubMed

    Whyte, L G; Slagman, S J; Pietrantonio, F; Bourbonnière, L; Koval, S F; Lawrence, J R; Inniss, W E; Greer, C W

    1999-07-01

    We examined physiological adaptations which allow the psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 to assimilate alkanes at a low temperature (alkanes are contaminants which are generally insoluble and/or solid at low temperatures). During growth at 5 degrees C on hexadecane or diesel fuel, strain Q15 produced a cell surface-associated biosurfactant(s) and, compared to glucose-acetate-grown cells, exhibited increased cell surface hydrophobicity. A transmission electron microscopy examination of strain Q15 grown at 5 degrees C revealed the presence of intracellular electron-transparent inclusions and flocs of cells connected by an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) when cells were grown on a hydrocarbon and morphological differences between the EPS of glucose-acetate-grown and diesel fuel-grown cells. A lectin binding analysis performed by using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) showed that the EPS contained a complex mixture of glycoconjugates, depending on both the growth temperature and the carbon source. Two glycoconjugates [beta-D-Gal-(1-3)-D-GlcNAc and alpha-L-fucose] were detected only on the surfaces of cells grown on diesel fuel at 5 degrees C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed strain Q15 cells on the surfaces of octacosane crystals, and using CSLM, we observed strain Q15 cells covering the surfaces of diesel fuel microdroplets; these findings indicate that this organism assimilates both solid and liquid alkane substrates at a low temperature by adhering to the alkane phase. Membrane fatty acid analysis demonstrated that strain Q15 adapted to growth at a low temperature by decreasing the degree of saturation of membrane lipid fatty acids, but it did so to a lesser extent when it was grown on hydrocarbons at 5 degrees C; these findings suggest that strain Q15 modulates membrane fluidity in response to the counteracting influences of low temperature and hydrocarbon toxicity. PMID:10388690

  14. Global Proteomic Analysis of the Chromate Response in Arthrobacter sp strain FB24

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, Kristene L.; Turse, Joshua E.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Lindberg, Carl; Babbnig, Gyorgy; Giometti, Carol S.; Nakatsu, Cindy N.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Konopka, Allan

    2009-04-01

    A global proteomic evaluation of the response of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 to 5 mM and 20 mM Cr(VI) was conducted using both two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS). The changes in protein expression found with 2-DGE indicate alterations in central metabolism and amino acid synthesis. Proteome coverage increased from 22% with 2-DGE to 71% with LC/LC-MS/MS. The proteins exhibiting the highest levels of expression under Cr(VI) stress suggest intracellular sulfur limitation, which could be driven by competition for the sulfate (SO42-) transporter by the chromate (CrO42-) ion. These results are consistent with the growth defects seen with strain FB24 when Cr(VI) concentrations exceed 5 mM.

  15. Global proteomic analysis of the chromate response in Arthrobacter sp strain FB24.

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, K. L.; Turse, J. E.; Nicora, C. D.; Lipton, M. S.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Lindberg, C.; Babnigg, G.; Giometti, C. S.; Nakatsu, C. H.; Thompson, D. K.; Konopka, A. E.; Biosciences Division; Purdue Univ.; PNNL

    2009-04-01

    A global proteomic evaluation of the response of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 to 5 and 20 mM Cr(VI) was conducted using both two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS). The changes in protein expression found with 2-DGE indicate alterations in central metabolism and amino acid synthesis. Proteome coverage increased from 22% with 2-DGE to 71% with LC/LC-MS/MS. The proteins exhibiting the highest levels of expression under Cr(VI) stress suggest intracellular sulfur limitation, which could be driven by competition for the sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) transporter by the chromate (CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) ion. These results are consistent with the growth defects seen with strain FB24 when Cr(VI) concentrations exceeded 5 mM.

  16. Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon Sequestration Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Min; Bernat, Gabor; Singh, Abhay K.; Mi, Hualing; Rogner, Matthias; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ogawa, Teruo

    2008-09-10

    A mutant ( 5) of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 constructed by inactivating five inorganic carbon sequestration systems did not take up CO2 or HCO3– and was unable to grow in air with or without glucose. The 4 mutant in which BicA is the only active inorganic carbon sequestration system showed low activity of HCO3– uptake and grew under these conditions but more slowly than the wild-type strain. The 5 mutant required 1.7% CO2 to attain half the maximal growth rate. Electron transport activity of the mutants was strongly inhibited under high light intensities, with the 5 mutant more susceptible to high light than the 4 mutant. The results implicated the significance of carbon sequestration in dissipating excess light energy.

  17. Cellular Response of Sinorhizobium sp. Strain A2 during Arsenite Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Koh; Huang, He; Hamamura, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widely distributed toxic element in the environment and microorganisms have developed resistance mechanisms in order to tolerate it. The cellular response of the chemoorganotrophic arsenite (As[III])-oxidizing ?-Proteobacteria, Sinorhizobium sp. strain A2, to arsenic was examined in the present study. Several proteins associated with arsenite oxidase and As resistance were shown to be accumulated in the presence of As(III). A shift in central carbon metabolism from the tricarboxylic acid pathway to glyoxylate pathway was also observed in response to oxidative stress. Our results revealed the strategy of the As(III)-oxidizing Sinorhizobium strain to mitigate arsenic toxicity and oxidative damage by multiple metabolic adaptations. PMID:26477790

  18. Degradation of triclocarban by a triclosan-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain YL-JM2C.

    PubMed

    Mulla, Sikandar I; Hu, Anyi; Wang, Yuwen; Sun, Qian; Huang, Shir-Ly; Wang, Han; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial degradation plays a vital role in determining the environmental fate of micropollutants like triclocarban. The mechanism of triclocarban degradation by pure bacterium is not yet explored. The purpose of this study was to identify metabolic pathway that might be involved in bacterial degradation of triclocarban. Triclosan-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain YL-JM2C was first found to degrade up to 35% of triclocarban (4 mg L(-1)) within 5 d. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected 3,4-dichloroaniline, 4-chloroaniline and 4-chlorocatechol as the major metabolites of the triclocarban degradation. Furthermore, total organic carbon results confirmed that the intermediates, 3,4-dichloroaniline (4 mg L(-1)) and 4-chloroaniline (4 mg L(-1)) could be degraded up to 77% and 80% by strain YL-JM2C within 5 d. PMID:26364219

  19. Chemotaxis of Burkholderia sp. Strain SJ98 towards chloronitroaromatic compounds that it can metabolise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98 is known for its chemotaxis towards nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) that are either utilized as sole sources of carbon and energy or co-metabolized in the presence of alternative carbon sources. Here we test for the chemotaxis of this strain towards six chloro-nitroaromatic compounds (CNACs), namely 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C4NP), 2-chloro-3-nitrophenol (2C3NP), 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP), 2-chloro-4-nitrobenzoate (2C4NB), 4-chloro-2-nitrobenzoate (4C2NB) and 5-chloro-2-nitrobenzoate (5C2NB), and examine its relationship to the degradation of such compounds. Results Strain SJ98 could mineralize 2C4NP, 4C2NB and 5C2NB, and co-metabolically transform 2C3NP and 2C4NB in the presence of an alternative carbon source, but was unable to transform 4C2NP under these conditions. Positive chemotaxis was only observed towards the five metabolically transformed CNACs. Moreover, the chemotaxis was induced by growth in the presence of the metabolisable CNAC. It was also competitively inhibited by the presence of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) that it could metabolise but not by succinate or aspartate. Conclusions Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98 exhibits metabolic transformation of, and inducible chemotaxis towards CNACs. Its chemotactic responses towards these compounds are related to its previously demonstrated chemotaxis towards NACs that it can metabolise, but it is independently inducible from its chemotaxis towards succinate or aspartate. PMID:22292983

  20. Glycogen production for biofuels by the euryhaline cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 from an oceanic environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria and microalgae have attracted attention as an alternative carbon source for the next generation of biofuels. Glycogen abundantly accumulated in cyanobacteria is a promising feedstock which can be converted to ethanol through saccharification and fermentation processes. In addition, the utilization of marine cyanobacteria as a glycogen producer can eliminate the need for a freshwater supply. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a fast-growing marine coastal euryhaline cyanobacteria, however, the glycogen yield has not yet been determined. In the present study, the effects of light intensity, CO2 concentration, and salinity on the cell growth and glycogen content were investigated in order to maximize glycogen production in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. Results The optimal culture conditions for glycogen production in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 were investigated. The maximum glycogen production of 3.5 g L?1 for 7 days (a glycogen productivity of 0.5 g L?1 d?1) was obtained under a high light intensity, a high CO2 level, and a nitrogen-depleted condition in brackish water. The glycogen production performance in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 was the best ever reported in the ?-polyglucan (glycogen or starch) production of cyanobacteria and microalgae. In addition, the robustness of glycogen production in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 to salinity was evaluated in seawater and freshwater. The peak of glycogen production of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 in seawater and freshwater were 3.0 and 1.8 g L?1 in 7 days, respectively. Glycogen production in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 maintained the same level in seawater and half of the level in freshwater compared with the optimal result obtained in brackish water. Conclusions We conclude that Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 has high glycogen production activity and glycogen can be provided from coastal water accompanied by a fluctuation of salinity. This work supports Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 as a promising carbohydrate source for biofuel production. PMID:24959200

  1. Localization of polyamine enhancement of protein synthesis to subcellular components of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim.

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, C L; Bunce, S C; Hurwitz, C

    1983-01-01

    At 5 mM Mg2+, spermidine stimulation of polyphenylalanine synthesis by cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli was found to be about 30 times greater than that by extracts of Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim, a unique organism which lacks detectable levels of spermidine. By means of reconstitution experiments, the target of spermidine stimulation was localized to the protein fraction of the highspeed supernatant component (S-100) of E. coli and was absent from, or deficient in, the S-100 fraction of Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim. The spermidine stimulation did not appear to be due to the presence in the E. coli S-100 fraction of ribosomal protein S1, elongation factors, or E. coli aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. The failure to observe spermidine stimulation by the Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim S-100 fraction was also not due to a spermidine-enhanced polyuridylic acid degradation. The synthesis of polyphenylalanine by Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim extracts was stimulated by putrescine and by S-(+)-2-hydroxyputrescine to a greater degree than was synthesis by E. coli extracts. The enhancement by putrescine and by S-(+)-2-hydroxyputrescine with Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim extracts was found to be due to effects on its ribosomes. PMID:6336736

  2. Response of Nitrosospira sp. Strain AF-Like Ammonia Oxidizers to Changes in Temperature, Soil Moisture Content, and Fertilizer Concentration?

    PubMed Central

    Avrahami, Sharon; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Very little is known regarding the ecology of Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like bacteria, a unique group of ammonia oxidizers within the Betaproteobacteria. We studied the response of Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like ammonia oxidizers to changing environmental conditions by applying molecular methods and physiological measurements to Californian grassland soil manipulated in the laboratory. This soil is naturally high in Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like bacteria relative to the much-better-studied Nitrosospira multiformis-like ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Increases in temperature, soil moisture, and fertilizer interacted to reduce the relative abundance of Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like bacteria, although they remained numerically dominant. The overall abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria increased with increasing soil moisture and decreased with increasing temperature. Potential nitrification activity was altered by interactions among temperature, soil moisture, and fertilizer, with activity tending to be higher when soil moisture and temperature were increased. The increase in potential nitrification activity with increased temperature was surprising, given that the overall abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria decreased significantly under these conditions. This observation suggests that (i) Nitrosospira sp. strain AF-like bacteria may respond to increased temperature with an increase in activity, despite a decrease in abundance, or (ii) that potential nitrification activity in these soils may be due to organisms other than bacteria (e.g., archaeal ammonia oxidizers), at least under conditions of increased temperature. PMID:17158615

  3. Karyotype rearrangements and telomere analysis in Myzus persicae (Hemiptera, Aphididae) strains collected on Lavandula sp. plants

    PubMed Central

    Mandrioli, Mauro; Zanasi, Federica; Manicardi, Gian Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Karyotype analysis of nine strains of the peach-potato aphid Myzus persicae (Sulzer, 1776), collected on Lavandula sp. plants, evidenced showed that five of them had a standard 2n = 12 karyotype, one possessed a fragmentation of the X chromosome occurring at the telomere opposite to the NOR-bearing one and three strains had a chromosome number 2n = 11 due to a non-reciprocal translocation of an autosome A3 onto an A1 chromosome. Interestingly, the terminal portion of the autosome A1 involved in the translocation was the same in all the three strains, as evidenced by FISH with the histone cluster as a probe. The study of telomeres in the Myzus persicae strain with the X fission evidenced that telomerase synthesised de novo telomeres at the breakpoints resulting in the stabilization of the chromosomal fragments. Lastly, despite the presence of a conserved telomerase, aphid genome is devoid of genes coding for shelterin, a complex of proteins involved in telomere functioning frequently reported as conserved in eukaryotes. The absence of this complex, also confirmed in the genome of other arthropods, suggests that the shift in the sequence of the telomeric repeats has been accompanied by other changes in the telomere components in arthropods in respect to other metazoans. PMID:25610541

  4. Biodegradation of triazine herbicide metribuzin by the strain Bacillus sp. N1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Yubin; Hou, Zhiguang; Wu, Xian; Gao, Henan; Sun, Fengjie; Pan, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    By enrichment culturing of soil contaminated with metribuzin, a highly efficient metribuzin degrading bacterium, Bacillus sp. N1, was isolated. This strain grows using metribuzin at 5.0% (v/v) as the sole nitrogen source in a liquid medium. Optimal metribuzin degradation occurred at a temperature of 30ºC and at pH 7.0. With an initial concentration of 20 mg L(-1), the degradation rate was 73.5% in 120 h. If the initial concentrations were higher than 50 mg L(-1), the biodegradation rates decreased as the metribuzin concentrations increased. When the concentration was 100 mg L(-1), the degradation rate was only 45%. Degradation followed the pesticide degradation kinetic equation at initial concentrations between 5 mg L(-1) and 50 mg L(-1). When the metribuzin contaminated soil was mixed with strain N1 (with the concentration of metribuzin being 20 mg L(-1) and the inoculation rate of 10(11) g(-1) dry soil), the degradation rate of the metribuzin was 66.4% in 30 days, while the degradation rate of metribuzin was only 19.4% in the control soil without the strain N1. These results indicate that the strain N1 can significantly increase the degradation rate of metribuzin in contaminated soil. PMID:24328539

  5. A novel transformation of polychlorinated biphenyls by Rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, M.; Kimbara, K.; Fukuda, M. |

    1995-09-01

    We have characterized a biphenyl degrader, Rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1. Biphenyl-grown cells of strain RHA1 efficiently transformed 45 components in the 62 major peaks of a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture of Kanechlors 200, 300, 400, and 500 within 3 days, which includes mono- to octachlorobiphenyls. Among the intermediate metabolites of PCB transformation, di- and trichlorobenzoic acids were identified. The gradual decrease of these chlorobenzoic acids during incubation indicated that these chlorobenzoic acids would also be degraded by this strain. The effect of the position of chlorine substitution was determined by using PCB mixtures that have chlorine substitutions mainly at either the ortho or the meta position. This strain transformed both types of congeners, and strong PCB transformation activity of RHA1 was indicated. RHA1 accumulated 4-chlorobenzoic acid temporally during the transformation of 4-chlorobiphenyl. The release of most chloride in the course of 2,2`-dichlorobiphenyl degradation was observed. These results suggested that RHA1 would break down at least some PCB congeners into smaller molecules to a considerable extent. 21 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Metabolism of dibenzofuran by pseudomonas sp. strain HH69 and the mixed culture HH27

    SciTech Connect

    Fortnagel, P.; Harms, H.; Wittich, R.M. ); Krohn, S.; Meyer, H.; Sinnwell, V.; Wilkes, H.; Francke, W. )

    1990-04-01

    A Pseudomonas sp. strain, HH69, and a mixed culture, designated HH27, were isolated by selective enrichment from soil samples. The pure strain and the mixed culture grew aerobically on dibenzofuran as the sole source of carbon and energy. Degradation proceeded via salicylic acid which was branched into the gentisic acid and the catechol pathway. Both salicylic acid and gentisic acid accumulated in the culture medium of strain HH69. The acids were slowly metabolized after growth ceased. The enzymes responsible for their metabolism showed relatively low activities. Besides the above-mentioned acids, 2-hydroxyacetophenone, benzopyran-4-one (chrome), several 2-substituted chroman-4-ones, and traces of the four isomeric monohydroxydibenzofurans were identified in the culture medium. 2,2{prime},3-Trihydroxybiphenyl was isolated from the medium of a dibenzofuran-converting mutant derived from parent strain HH69, which can no longer grow on dibenzofuran. This gives evidence for a novel type of dioxygenases responsible for the attack on the biarylether structure of the dibenzofuran molecule. A meta-fission mechanism for cleavage of the dihydroxylated aromatic nucleus of 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxybiphenyl is suggested as the next enzymatic step in the degradative pathway.

  7. High-Level Chromate Resistance in Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 Requires Previously Uncharacterized Accessory Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, Kristene L.; Nakatsu, Cindy N.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Konopka, Allan

    2009-09-24

    The annotated genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 revealed a chromate resistance determinant (CRD): a cluster of 8 genes located on a 10.6 kb fragment of a 96 kb plasmid. The CRD includes chrA, which encodes a putative chromate efflux protein, and three genes with amino acid similarities to the amino and carboxy termini of ChrB, a putative regulatory protein. There are also three novel genes that have not been previously associated with chromate resistance in other bacteria; they encode an oxidoreductase (most similar to malate:quinone oxidoreductase), a functionally unknown protein with a WD40 repeat domain and a lipoprotein. A chromate-sensitive mutant (strain D11) was generated by curing FB24 of its 96-kb plasmid. Elemental analysis indicated that chromate-exposed cells of strain D11 accumulated three times more chromium than strain FB24. Introduction of the CRD into strain D11 conferred chromate resistance comparable to wild-type levels, whereas deletion of specific regions of the CRD led to decreased resistance. Using real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, we show that expression of each gene within the CRD is specifically induced in response to chromate but not by lead, hydrogen peroxide or arsenate. Higher levels of chrA expression were achieved when the chrB orthologs and the WD40 repeat domain genes were present, suggesting their regulatory roles. Collectively, our findings indicate that chromate resistance in strain FB24 is primarily achieved by plasmid-mediated chromate efflux with the contribution of previously unrecognized accessory genes.

  8. Crystallization of the extracellular rubber oxygenase RoxA from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Maren; Braaz, Reinhard; Jendrossek, Dieter; Einsle, Oliver

    2008-02-01

    The extracellular rubber-degrading enzyme rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y has been crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to high resolution. Rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y is an extracellular dioxygenase that is capable of cleaving the double bonds of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) into short-chain isoprene units with 12-oxo-4,8-dimethyl-trideca-4,8-diene-1-al (ODTD) as the major cleavage product. Crystals of the dihaem c-type cytochrome RoxA were grown by sitting-drop vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. RoxA crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.4, b = 97.1, c = 101.1 Å, ? = 98.39°, resulting in two monomers per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to a limiting resolution of 1.8 Å. Despite a protein weight of 74.1 kDa and only two iron sites per monomer, phasing was successfully carried out by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  9. Achromobacter denitrificans strain SP1 efficiently remediates di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, S; Josh, M K Sarath; Binod, P; Devi, R Sudha; Balachandran, S; Anderson, Robin C; Benjamin, Sailas

    2015-02-01

    This study describes how Achromobacter denitrificans strain SP1, a novel isolate from heavily plastics-contaminated sewage sludge efficiently consumed the hazardous plasticizer, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) as carbon source supplemented in a simple basal salt medium (BSM). Response surface methodology was employed for the statistical optimization of the process parameters such as temperature (32°C), agitation (200 rpm), DEHP concentration (10 mM), time (72 h) and pH (8.0). At these optimized conditions, experimentally observed DEHP degradation was 63%, while the predicted value was 59.2%; and the correlation coefficient between them was 0.998, i.e., highly significant and fit to the predicted model. Employing GC-MS analysis, the degradation pathway was partially deduced with intermediates such as mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate and 2-ethyl hexanol. Briefly, this first report describes A. denitrificans strain SP1 as a highly efficient bacterium for completely remediating the hazardous DEHP (10 mM) in 96 h in BSM (50% consumed in 60 h), which offers great potentials for efficiently cleaning the DEHP-contaminated environments such as soil, sediments and water upon its deployment. PMID:25463861

  10. Biodegradation of crude oil by a newly isolated strain Rhodococcus sp. JZX-01.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Zhou, Zheng-Xi; Jia, Xiao-Qiang; Chen, Yu; Liu, Jiao; Wen, Jian-Ping

    2013-12-01

    A highly efficient oil-degrading bacteria JZX-01 was isolated from the oil-contaminated soil of the seacoast near the Boxi Offshore Oil Field of China. Morphological, physiological, and 16S rDNA gene sequence analyses indicated that JZX-01 was assigned to the genus Rhodococcus sp. This strain decomposed 65.27 ± 5.63 % of the crude oil in 9 days. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that even the long-chain hydrocarbons (C31-C38) and branched alkanes (pristine and phytane), which were regarded as the stubborn ones, could be degraded. Further study showed that the bacteria still has good oil degradation ability at low temperatures as well as under high salt conditions. Moreover, JZX-01 was found to have a biosurfactant-producing capacity, which significantly favors the surface tension reduction and crude oil degradation. The promising isolated strain Rhodococcus sp. JZX-01 could be further used for the bioremediation of oil-polluted soil or seawater in a wide range of temperatures and high salt conditions. PMID:23996118

  11. Composition of the carbohydrate granules of the cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneegurt, M. A.; Sherman, D. M.; Sherman, L. A.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 is an aerobic, unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that temporally separates O2-sensitive N2 fixation from oxygenic photosynthesis. The energy and reducing power needed for N2 fixation appears to be generated by an active respiratory apparatus that utilizes the contents of large interthylakoidal carbohydrate granules. We report here on the carbohydrate and protein composition of the granules of Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142. The carbohydrate component is a glucose homopolymer with branches every nine residues and is chemically identical to glycogen. Granule-associated protein fractions showed temporal changes in the number of proteins and their abundance during the metabolic oscillations observed under diazotrophic conditions. There also were temporal changes in the protein pattern of the granule-depleted supernatant fractions from diazotrophic cultures. None of the granule-associated proteins crossreacted with antisera directed against several glycogen-metabolizing enzymes or nitrogenase, although these proteins were tentatively identified in supernatant fractions. It is suggested that the granule-associated proteins are structural proteins required to maintain a complex granule architecture.

  12. Characterization of the desulfurization genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8.

    PubMed Central

    Denome, S A; Oldfield, C; Nash, L J; Young, K D

    1994-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 possesses an enzymatic pathway that can remove covalently bound sulfur from dibenzothiophene (DBT) without breaking carbon-carbon bonds. The DNA sequence of a 4.0-kb BstBI-BsiWI fragment that carries the genes for this pathway was determined. Frameshift and deletion mutations established that three open reading frames were required for DBT desulfurization, and the genes were designated soxABC (for sulfur oxidation). Each sox gene was subcloned independently and expressed in Escherichia coli MZ1 under control of the inducible lambda pL promoter with a lambda cII ribosomal binding site. SoxC is an approximately 45-kDa protein that oxidizes DBT to DBT-5,5'-dioxide. SoxA is an approximately 50-kDa protein responsible for metabolizing DBT-5,5'-dioxide to an unidentified intermediate. SoxB is an approximately 40-kDa protein that, together with the SoxA protein, completes the desulfurization of DBT-5,5'-dioxide to 2-hydroxybiphenyl. Protein sequence comparisons revealed that the predicted SoxC protein is similar to members of the acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase family but that the SoxA and SoxB proteins have no significant identities to other known proteins. The sox genes are plasmidborne and appear to be expressed as an operon in Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 and in E. coli. Images PMID:7961424

  13. Characterization of the gene cluster involved in isoprene metabolism in Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45.

    PubMed

    van Hylckama Vlieg, J E; Leemhuis, H; Spelberg, J H; Janssen, D B

    2000-04-01

    The genes involved in isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) utilization in Rhodococcus sp. strain AD45 were cloned and characterized. Sequence analysis of an 8.5-kb DNA fragment showed the presence of 10 genes of which 2 encoded enzymes which were previously found to be involved in isoprene degradation: a glutathione S-transferase with activity towards 1,2-epoxy-2-methyl-3-butene (isoI) and a 1-hydroxy-2-glutathionyl-2-methyl-3-butene dehydrogenase (isoH). Furthermore, a gene encoding a second glutathione S-transferase was identified (isoJ). The isoJ gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and was found to have activity with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and 3,4-dichloro-1-nitrobenzene but not with 1, 2-epoxy-2-methyl-3-butene. Downstream of isoJ, six genes (isoABCDEF) were found; these genes encoded a putative alkene monooxygenase that showed high similarity to components of the alkene monooxygenase from Xanthobacter sp. strain Py2 and other multicomponent monooxygenases. The deduced amino acid sequence encoded by an additional gene (isoG) showed significant similarity with that of alpha-methylacyl-coenzyme A racemase. The results are in agreement with a catabolic route for isoprene involving epoxidation by a monooxygenase, conjugation to glutathione, and oxidation of the hydroxyl group to a carboxylate. Metabolism may proceed by fatty acid oxidation after removal of glutathione by a still-unknown mechanism. PMID:10715003

  14. Biodegradation and utilization of dimethylformamide by biofilm forming Paracoccus sp. strains MKU1 and MKU2.

    PubMed

    Nisha, Kamaldeen Nasrin; Devi, Venkatesan; Varalakshmi, Perumal; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem

    2015-07-01

    Two bacterial strains capable of degrading N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) were isolated from the effluent and sludge samples of textile and tyre industries. The 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that bacterial strains belonged to the genera Paracoccus and named as Paracoccus sp. MKU1 and Paracoccus sp. MKU2. The DMF degradation experiments conducted at a DMF concentration of 1% v/v and HPLC analysis revealed that MKU1 and MKU2 degraded 55% and 46% of DMF after 120 h of growth. Biofilm quantification by microtiter plate assay revealed that both the bacterial isolates can form efficient biofilm on during DMF utilization. The presence of secondary carbon sources influenced the DMF degradation and biofilm formation where highest biofilm formation was observed in the presence of acetate and enhanced the DMF degradation to a maximum of 86.59% with MKU1 whereas glucose and acetate enhanced DMF degradation by MKU2 to a maximum of 82.7% and 80% respectively. PMID:25728343

  15. A Gene Cluster Involved in Metal Homeostasis in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    García-Domínguez, Mario; Lopez-Maury, Luis; Florencio, Francisco J.; Reyes, José C.

    2000-01-01

    A gene cluster composed of nine open reading frames (ORFs) involved in Ni2+, Co2+, and Zn2+ sensing and tolerance in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has been identified. The cluster includes an Ni2+ response operon and a Co2+ response system, as well as a Zn2+ response system previously described. Expression of the Ni2+ response operon (nrs) was induced in the presence of Ni2+ and Co2+. Reduced Ni2+ tolerance was observed following disruption of two ORFs of the operon (nrsA and nrsD). We also show that the nrsD gene encodes a putative Ni2+ permease whose carboxy-terminal region is a metal binding domain. The Co2+ response system is composed of two divergently transcribed genes, corR and corT, mutants of which showed decreased Co2+ tolerance. Additionally, corR mutants showed an absence of Co2+-dependent induction of corT, indicating that CorR is a transcriptional activator of corT. To our knowledge, CorR is the first Co2+-sensing transcription factor described. Our data suggest that this region of the Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 genome is involved in sensing and homeostasis of Ni2+, Co2+, and Zn2+. PMID:10692354

  16. Metabolism of dibenzo-p-dioxin by Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1

    SciTech Connect

    Wittich, R.M.; Wilkes, H.; Sinnwell, V.; Francke, W.; Fortnagel, P. )

    1992-03-01

    In the course of screening for dibenzo-p-dioxin-utilizing bacteria, a Sphingomonas sp. strain was isolated from enrichment cultures inoculated with water samples from the river Elbe. The isolate grew with both the biaryl ethers dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (DF) as the sole sources of carbon and energy, showing doubling times of about 8 and 5 h, respectively. Biodegradation of the two aromatic compounds initially proceeded after an oxygenolytic attack at the angular position adjacent to the ether bridge, producing 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxydiphenyl ether or 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxybiphenyl from the initially formed dihydrodiols, which represent extremely unstable hemiacetals. Results obtained from determinations of enzyme activities and oxygen consumption suggest meta cleavage of the trihydroxy compounds. During dibenzofuran degradation, hydrolysis of 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-hexa-2,4-dienoate yielded salicylate, which was branched into the catechol meta cleavage pathway and the gentisate pathway. Catechol obtained from the product of meta ring fission of 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxydiphenyl ether was both ortho and meta cleaved by Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1 when this organism was grown with dibenzo-p-dioxin.

  17. Primary structure of the peptidoglycan from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6714.

    PubMed Central

    Jürgens, U J; Drews, G; Weckesser, J

    1983-01-01

    A peptidoglycan fraction free of non-peptidoglycan components was isolated from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6714. Hydrofluoric acid treatment (48%, 0 degrees C, 48 h) cleaved off from the peptidoglycan non-peptidoglycan glucosamine, mannosamine, and mannose. The purified peptidoglycan consists of N-acetyl muramic acid, N-acetyl glucosamine, L-alanine, D-alanine, D-glutamic acid, and meso-diaminopimelic acid in approximately equimolar amounts. At least partial amidation of carboxy groups in the peptide subunits is indicated. Peptide analyses and 2,4-dinitrophenyl studies of partial acid hydrolysates revealed the structure of the Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6714 peptidoglycan to belong to the A1 gamma type (direct cross-linkage) of peptidoglycan classification. The degree of cross-linkage is about 56% and thus is in the range of that found in gram-positive bacteria. Some of the peptide units are present as tripeptides lacking the carboxy-terminal D-alanine. Images PMID:6131881

  18. Toxicological effects of selective herbicides on plant growth promoting activities of phosphate solubilizing Klebsiella sp. strain PS19.

    PubMed

    Ahemad, Munees; Saghir Khan, Md

    2011-02-01

    This study examines the effect of four herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, clodinafop, metribuzin and glyphosate, on plant growth promoting activities like phosphate solubilization, siderophores, indole acetic acid, exo-polysaccharides, hydrogen cyanide and ammonia production by herbicide tolerant Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. The strain was isolated from mustard rhizosphere. The selected herbicides were applied two to three times at the recommended rates. Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 tolerated a concentration of 1600 ?g/ml each of quizalafop-p-ethyl and clodinafop, and 3200 and 2800 ?g/ml of metribuzin and glyphosate, respectively. The activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 observed under in vitro environment were persistent in the presence of all herbicides at lower rates. The plant growth promoting activities even-though decreased regularly, but was not lost completely, as the concentration of each herbicide was increased from the recommended to three times of higher doses. Among all herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, generally, showed maximum toxicity to plant growth promoting activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. As an example, 40, 80 and 120 ?g/l of quizalafop-p-ethyl added to liquid culture Pikovskaya medium, decreased phosphate solubilizing activity of strain PS19 by 93, 95 and 97%, respectively over untreated control. The study revealed that the higher rates of herbicides though decreased the plant growth promoting activity but it did not completely inhibit the metabolic activities of strain PS19. The herbicide tolerance together with growth promoting activities observed under herbicide stress suggests that Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 could be used as bacterial preparation for facilitating the growth and yields of crops even in soils polluted with herbicides. PMID:20721665

  19. Pathway and evolutionary implications of diphenylamine biodegradation by Burkholderia sp. strain JS667.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kwanghee A; Spain, Jim C

    2009-05-01

    Diphenylamine (DPA) is a common contaminant at munitions-contaminated sites as well as at aniline manufacturing sites. Little is known about the biodegradation of the compound, and bacteria able to use DPA as the growth substrate have not been reported. Burkholderia sp. strain JS667 and Ralstonia sp. strain JS668 were isolated by selective enrichment from DPA-contaminated sediment. The isolates grew aerobically with DPA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. During induction of DPA degradation, stoichiometric amounts of aniline accumulated and then disappeared, which suggested that aniline is on the DPA degradation pathway. Genes encoding the enzymes that catalyze the initial steps in DPA degradation were cloned from the genomic DNA of strain JS667. The Escherichia coli clone catalyzed stoichiometric transformation of DPA to aniline and catechol. Transposon mutagenesis, the sequence similarity of putative open reading frames to those of well-characterized dioxygenases, and (18)O(2) experiments support the conclusion that the initial reaction in DPA degradation is catalyzed by a multicomponent ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase. DPA is converted to aniline and catechol via dioxygenation at the 1,2 position of the aromatic ring and spontaneous rearomatization. Aniline and catechol are further biodegraded by the well-established aniline degradation pathway. Genes that encode the complete aniline degradation pathway were found 12 kb downstream of the genes that encode the initial dioxygenase. Expression of the relevant dioxygenases was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR analysis. Both the sequence similarity and the gene organization suggest that the DPA degradation pathway evolved recently by the recruitment of two gene clusters that encode the DPA dioxygenase and aniline degradation pathway. PMID:19251893

  20. Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Brent Peyton; Viamajala, Sridhar; Robin Gerlach; William Apel; Rajesh Sani; Alice Dohnalkova; Thomas Borch

    2011-02-01

    Removal of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solution was studied using a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe, Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6, under anaerobic, non growth conditions in bicarbonate and PIPES buffers. Inorganic phosphate was released by cells during the experiments providing ligands for formation of insoluble U(VI) phosphates. Phosphate release was most probably the result of anaerobic hydrolysis of intracellular polyphosphates accumulated by ES6 during aerobic growth. Microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was also observed. However, the relative magnitudes of U(VI) removal by abiotic (phosphate-based) precipitation and microbial reduction depended on the buffer chemistry. In bicarbonate buffer, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis showed U precipitates containing nearly equal fractions of U(IV) and U(VI), whereas in PIPES buffer, U precipitates consisted primarily of U(VI). Mass balance calculations for U and P corroborate these observations. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR42TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed both extracellular and intracellular accumulation of U solids. The U(VI)-phosphate precipitates, confirmed by EDS as containing U and P in equimolar concentrations, had nanometer sized lath structure. When anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a known electron shuttle, was added to the experimental reactors, U reduction became the dominant removal mechanism, in contrast to primarily phosphate-mediated precipitation observed in the absence of AQDS. Uranium immobilization by abiotic precipitation or microbial reduction has been extensively reported; however, present work suggests that strain ES6 can remove U(VI) from solution simultaneously through precipitation with phosphate ligands and microbial reduction, depending on the environmental conditions. Cellulomonadaceae are environmentally relevant subsurface bacteria and here, for the first time, t 52 he presence of multiple U immobilization mechanisms within one organism is reported using Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6.

  1. Alkane inducible proteins in Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Initial step of ?-oxidation is catalyzed by acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in prokaryotes and mitochondria, while acyl-CoA oxidase primarily functions in the peroxisomes of eukaryotes. Oxidase reaction accompanies emission of toxic by-product reactive oxygen molecules including superoxide anion, and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities are essential to detoxify them in the peroxisomes. Although there is an argument about whether primitive life was born and evolved under high temperature conditions, thermophilic archaea apparently share living systems with both bacteria and eukaryotes. We hypothesized that alkane degradation pathways in thermophilic microorganisms could be premature and useful to understand their evolution. Results An extremely thermophilic and alkane degrading Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23 was previously isolated from a deep subsurface oil reservoir in Japan. In the present study, we identified novel membrane proteins (P16, P21) and superoxide dismutase (P24) whose production levels were significantly increased upon alkane degradation. Unlike other bacteria acyl-CoA oxidase and catalase activities were also increased in strain B23 by addition of alkane. Conclusion We first suggested that peroxisomal ?-oxidation system exists in bacteria. This eukaryotic-type alkane degradation pathway in thermophilic bacterial cells might be a vestige of primitive living cell systems that had evolved into eukaryotes. PMID:19320977

  2. Metabolism of 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) by the aerobic bacterium Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1.

    PubMed

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth; Hyman, Michael

    2015-03-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h(-1)) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene(-1). Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates. PMID:25576605

  3. Responses to Stress and Nutrient Availability by the Marine Ultramicrobacterium Sphingomonas sp. Strain RB2256

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, M.; Nishikawa, T.; MacDonald, K.; Cavicchioli, R.; Gottschal, J. C.; Kjelleberg, S.

    1996-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain RB2256 was isolated from Resurrection Bay in Alaska and possibly represents the dominant bacterial species in some oligotrophic marine environments. Strain RB2256 has a high-affinity nutrient uptake system when growing under nutrient-limiting conditions, and growing cells are very small (<0.08 (mu)m(sup3)). These characteristics indicate that RB2256 is highly evolved for withstanding nutrient limitations and grazing pressure by heterotrophic nanoflagellates. In this study, strain RB2256 was subjected to nutrient starvation and other stresses (high temperature, ethanol, and hydrogen peroxide). It was found that growing cells were remarkably resistant, being able to survive at a temperature of 56(deg)C, in 25 mM hydrogen peroxide, or in 20% ethanol. In addition, growing cells were generally as resistant as starved cells. The fact that vegetative cells of this strain are inherently resistant to such high levels of stress-inducing agents indicates that they possess stress resistance mechanisms which are different from those of other nondifferentiating bacteria. Only minor changes in cell volume (0.03 to 0.07 (mu)m(sup3)) and maximum specific growth rate (0.13 to 0.16 h(sup-1)) were obtained for cells growing in media with different organic carbon concentrations (0.8 to 800 mg of C per liter). Furthermore, when glucose-limited, chemostat-grown cultures or multiple-nutrient-starved batch cultures were suddenly subjected to excess glucose, maximum growth rates were reached immediately. This immediate response to nutrient upshift suggests that the protein-synthesizing machinery is constitutively regulated. In total, these results are strong evidence that strain RB2256 possesses novel physiological and molecular strategies that allow it to predominant in natural seawater. PMID:16535292

  4. Metabolism of 2-Methylpropene (Isobutylene) by the Aerobic Bacterium Mycobacterium sp. Strain ELW1

    PubMed Central

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h?1) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene?1. Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates. PMID:25576605

  5. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida collected at the Angico plantation, Mandiyu, Uruguay, in December 2006. A survey of symbionts of P. rigida in Uruguay demonstrated that this species is nodulated predominantly by Burkholderia microsymbionts. Moreover, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is a highly efficient nitrogen fixing symbiont with this host. Currently, the only other sequenced isolate to fix with this host is Cupriavidus sp. UYPR2.512. Therefore, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 was selected for sequencing on the basis of its environmental and agricultural relevance to issues in global carbon cycling, alternative energy production, and biogeochemical importance, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413, together with sequence and annotation. The 10,373,764 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 336 scaffolds of 342 contigs, contains 9759 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes. PMID:26203342

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the amidase domain of allophanate hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP

    SciTech Connect

    Balotra, Sahil; Newman, Janet; French, Nigel G.; Briggs, Lyndall J.; Peat, Thomas S.; Scott, Colin

    2014-02-19

    The amidase domain of the allophanate hydrolase AtzF from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP has been crystallized and preliminary X-ray diffraction data have been collected. The allophanate hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP was expressed and purified, and a tryptic digest fragment was subsequently identified, expressed and purified. This 50 kDa construct retained amidase activity and was crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and adopted space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.4, b = 179.2, c = 112.6 Å, ? = 106.6°.

  7. High Production of Squalene Using a Newly Isolated Yeast-like Strain Pseudozyma sp. SD301.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojin; Wang, Xiaolong; Tan, Yanzhen; Feng, Yingang; Li, Wenli; Cui, Qiu

    2015-09-30

    A yeast-like fungus, termed strain SD301, with the ability to produce a high concentration of squalene, was isolated from Shuidong Bay, China. The nucleotide sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of SD301 indicated the strain belonged to Pseudozyma species. The highest biomass and squalene production of SD301 were obtained when glucose and yeast extracts were used as the carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively, with a C/N ratio of 3. The optimal pH and temperature were 6 and 25 °C, with 15 g L(-1) of supplemented sea salt. The maximum squalene productivity reached 0.039 g L(-1) h(-1) in batch fermentation, while the maximum squalene yield of 2.445 g L(-1) was obtained in fed-batch fermentation. According to our knowledge, this is the highest squalene yield produced thus far using fermentation technology, and the newly isolated strain Pseudozyma sp. SD301 is a promising candidate for commercial squalene production. PMID:26350291

  8. Biosynthesis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Oleaginous Marine Diatom Fistulifera sp. Strain JPCC DA0580

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yue; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Muto, Masaki; Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Studies of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis in microalgae are of great importance for many reasons, including the production of biofuel and variable omega 3-long chain PUFAs. The elucidation of the PUFA biosynthesis pathway is necessary for bioengineering to increase or decrease PUFA content in certain microalgae. In this study, we identified the PUFA synthesis pathway in the oleaginous marine diatom, Fistulifera sp. strain JPCC DA0580, a promising candidate for biodiesel production. The data revealed not only the presence of the desaturases and elongases involved in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) synthesis, but also the unexpected localization of ?3-desaturase expression in the chloroplast. This suggests that this microalga might perform the final step of EPA synthesis in the chloroplast and not in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) like other diatoms. The detailed fatty acid profile suggests that the EPA was synthesized only through the ?6-pathway in this strain, which was also different from other diatoms. Finally, the transcriptome analysis demonstrated an overall down-regulation of desaturases and elongases over incubation time. These genetic features might explain the decrease of PUFA percentage over incubation time in this strain. The important insights into metabolite synthesis acquired here will be useful for future metabolic engineering to control PUFA content in this diatom. PMID:24335525

  9. Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov. isolated from alpine glaciers and reclassification of Glaciimonas immobilis Cr9-12 as the type strain of Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Frasson, David; Udovi?i?, Matije; Frey, Beat; Lapanje, Aleš; Zhang, De-Chao; Margesin, Rosa; Sievers, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Psychrophilic bacterial strains were isolated from alpine glaciers in Switzerland and characterized taxonomically. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S rRNA and rpoB genes, three of those strains, strain 79 (?= CCOS 247), strain 4/58 (?=?CCOS 250) and strain 4/56 (?= CCOS 258) clustered together with strain Cr9-12T and separately from the type strains Glaciimonas immobilis Cr9-30T and Glaciimonas singularis LMG 27070T. Strain Cr9-12T has been previously described as a strain of G. immobilis. The three newly isolated strains were compared phenotypically with strain Cr9-12T and with the type strains of the species G. immobilis and G. singularis. Cr9-12T and the three novel strains from an alpine glacier in Switzerland were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped and psychrophilic and showed good growth throughout a temperature range of 1-20 °C and characteristically oxidized d-mannitol, l-fucose and bromosuccinic acid. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain Cr9-12T and the three novel strains were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1?7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH), C16 : 0 and C18 : 1?7c. The respiratory quinone of these strains was ubiquinone 8 (UQ-8). The genomic DNA G+C content of Cr9-12T was 49.2 mol%. The combined data from phenotypic, phylogenetic and DNA-DNA relatedness studies strongly support the reclassification of strain Cr9-12T as representing a novel species. This strain and the isolates 79 (?= CCOS 247), 4/58 (?= CCOS 250) and 4/56 (?= CCOS 258) are representatives of a novel species of the genus Glaciimonas, for which the name Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Glaciimonas alpina is Cr9-12T (?= CCOS 761T = DSM 22814T). PMID:26184665

  10. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain PML026, a Trehalolipid Biosurfactant Producer and Biodegrader of Oil and Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sambles, C M; White, D A

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain PML026 produces an array of trehalolipid biosurfactant compounds in order to utilize hydrophobic carbon sources, such as oils and alkanes. Here, we report the high-quality draft genome sequence of this strain, which has a total length of 5,168,404 bp containing 4,835 protein-coding sequences, 12 rRNAs, and 45 tRNAs. PMID:25953162

  11. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain PML026, a Trehalolipid Biosurfactant Producer and Biodegrader of Oil and Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain PML026 produces an array of trehalolipid biosurfactant compounds in order to utilize hydrophobic carbon sources, such as oils and alkanes. Here, we report the high-quality draft genome sequence of this strain, which has a total length of 5,168,404 bp containing 4,835 protein-coding sequences, 12 rRNAs, and 45 tRNAs. PMID:25953162

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermophilic Exiguobacterium sp. Strain JLM-2, Isolated from Deep-Sea Ferromanganese Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, De-Chao; Liu, Yan-Xia; Huo, Ying-Yi; Xu, Xue-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Exiguobacterium sp. strain JLM-2 is a thermophilic bacterium isolated from deep-sea ferromanganese (FeMn) nodules. The estimated genome of this strain is 2.9 Mb, with a G+C content of 48.32%. It has a novel circular 15,570-bp plasmid. The draft genome sequence may provide useful information about Mn-microbe interactions and the genetic basis for tolerance to environment stresses. PMID:26205856

  13. A trans-unsaturated fatty acid in a psychrophilic bacterium, Vibrio sp. strain ABE-1.

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama, H; Sasaki, S; Higashi, S; Murata, N

    1990-01-01

    A high level of a trans-unsaturated fatty acid was found in the phospholipids of a psychrophilic bacterium, Vibrio sp. strain ABE-1. This fatty acid was identified as 9-trans-hexadecenoic acid (C16:19t) by gas-liquid chromatography and infrared absorption spectrometry. C16:1(9)t accounted for less than 1% of the total fatty acids in cells grown at 5 degrees C and reached 12% of the total at 20 degrees C. We suggest that the increase in the level of the trans-unsaturated fatty acid is related to the high growth rate of this bacterium at elevated temperatures. Possible biological roles of the trans-unsaturated fatty acid in the adaptation of the microorganism to the ambient temperature are discussed. PMID:2345157

  14. Xanthan Lyase of Bacillus sp. Strain GL1 Liberates Pyruvylated Mannose from Xanthan Side Chains

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Wataru; Miki, Hikaru; Tsuchiya, Noriaki; Nankai, Hirokazu; Murata, Kousaku

    1998-01-01

    When the bacterium Bacillus sp. strain GL1 was grown in a medium containing xanthan as the carbon source, the viscosity of the medium decreased in association with growth, showing that the bacterium had xanthan-depolymerizing enzymes. One of the xanthan-depolymerizing enzymes (xanthan lyase) was present in the medium and was found to be induced by xanthan. The xanthan lyase purified from the culture fluid was a monomer with a molecular mass of 75 kDa, and was most active at pH 5.5 and 50°C. The enzyme was highly specific for xanthan and produced pyruvylated mannose. The result indicates that the enzyme cleaved the linkage between the terminal pyruvylated mannosyl and glucuronyl residues in the side chain of xanthan. PMID:9758797

  15. Synthetic Biology Toolbox for Controlling Gene Expression in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The application of synthetic biology requires characterized tools to precisely control gene expression. This toolbox of genetic parts previously did not exist for the industrially promising cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. To address this gap, two orthogonal constitutive promoter libraries, one based on a cyanobacterial promoter and the other ported from Escherichia coli, were built and tested in PCC 7002. The libraries demonstrated 3 and 2.5 log dynamic ranges, respectively, but correlated poorly with E. coli expression levels. These promoter libraries were then combined to create and optimize a series of IPTG inducible cassettes. The resultant induction system had a 48-fold dynamic range and was shown to out-perform Ptrc constructs. Finally, a RBS library was designed and tested in PCC 7002. The presented synthetic biology toolbox will enable accelerated engineering of PCC 7002. PMID:25216157

  16. Oxidation of biphenyl by a multicomponent enzyme system from pseudomonas sp. strain LB400

    SciTech Connect

    Haddock, J.D.; Nadim, L.M.; Gibson, D.T.

    1993-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 grows on biphenyl as the sole carbon and energy source. The organism also cooxidizes several chlorinated biphenyl congeners. Biphenyl dioxygenase activity in cell extract required addition of NAD(P)H as an electron donor for the conversion of biphenyl to cis-2,3-dihydroxy-2,3-dihydrobiphenyl. Incorporation of both atoms of molecular oxygen into the substrate was shown with (18)O2. The nonlinear relationship between enzyme activity and protein concentration suggested that the enzyme is composed of multiple protein components. Ion-exchange chromatography of the cell extract gave three protein fractions that were required together to restore enzymatic activity. Similarities with other multicomponent aromatic hydrocarbon dioxygenases indicated that biphenyl dioxygenase may consist of a flavoprotein and iron-sulfur proteins that constitute a short electron transport chain involved in catalyzing the incorporation of both atoms of molecular oxygen into the aromatic ring.

  17. Antifungal activity of violacein purified from a novel strain of Chromobacterium sp. NIIST (MTCC 5522).

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Anju; Sasidharan, Nishanth Kumar; Amma, Dileepkumar Bhaskaran Nair Saraswathy; Vasu, Radhakrishnan Kokkuvayil; Nataraja, Anupama Vijaya; Bhaskaran, Krishnakumar

    2015-10-01

    A novel strain of Chromobacterium sp. NIIST (MTCC 5522) producing high level of purple blue bioactive compound violacein was isolated from clay mine acidic sediment. During 24 h aerobic incubation in modified Luria Bertani medium, around 0.6 g crude violacein was produced per gram of dry weight biomass. An inexpensive method for preparing crystalline, pure violacein from crude pigment was developed (12.8 mg violacein/L) and the pure compound was characterized by different spectrometric methods. The violacein prepared was found effective against a number of plant and human pathogenic fungi and yeast species such as Cryptococcus gastricus, Trichophyton rubrum, Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium expansum, and Candida albicans. The best activity was recorded against Trichophyton rubrum (2 -g/ml), a human pathogen responsible for causing athlete-s foot infection. This is the first report of antifungal activity of purified violacein against pathogenic fungi and yeast. PMID:26428920

  18. Saccharification of corn fiber using enzymes from Aureobasidium sp. strain NRRL Y-2311-1

    SciTech Connect

    Leathers, T.D.; Gupta, S.C.

    1996-06-01

    Crude enzyme preparations from Aureobasidium sp. strain NRRL Y-2311-1 were characterized and tested for the capacity to saccharify corn fiber. Cultures grown on xylan, corn fiber, and alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP)-pretreated corn fiber produced specific levels of endoxylanase, amylase, protease, cellulose, and other activities. Using equal units of endoxylanase activity, crude enzymes from AHP-pretreated corn fiber cultures were most effective in saccharification. Multiple enzyme activities were implicated in this process. Pretreatment of corn fiber with AHP nearly doubled the susceptibility of hemicellulose to enzymatic digestion. Up to 138 mg xylose, 125 mg arabinose, and 490 mg glucose were obtained per g pretreated corn fiber under conditions tested. 31 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Metabolism of hydroxydibenzofurans, methoxydibenzofurans, acetoxydibenzofurans, and nitrodibenzofurans by Sphingomonas sp. strain HH69

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, H. |; Wittich, R.M.; Fortnagel, P.

    1995-07-01

    The metabolism of 11 substituted dibenzofurans by the dibenzofuran-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain HH69 was investigated. Strain HH69 utilizes 2-, 3-, and 4-acetoxydibenzofuran as well as 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxydibenzofuran as sole sources of carbon and energy. The degradation of acetoxydibenzofurans is initiated by hydrolysis of the ester bonds, yielding the corresponding hydroxydibenzofurans and acetate. Strain HH69 grew on 2-methoxydibenzofuran only after it was adapted to the utilization of 5-methoxysalicylic acid, whereas 3- and 4-methoxydibenzofuran as well as 2- and 3-nitrodibenzofuran were only cooxidized. During the breakdown of all eight hydroxy-, methoxy-, and nitrodibenzofurans studied here, the corresponding substituted salicylic acids accumulated in the culture broth. In the cases of 2- and 3-hydroxydibenzofuran as well as 2- and 3-nitrodibenzofuran, salicylic acid was also formed. Those four dibenzofurans which did not serve as carbon sources for strain HH69 were converted to a nonutilizable salicylic acid derivative. From turnover experiments with the mutant HH69/II, which is deficient in meta-cleavage, 2,2{prime}, 3,4{prime}-tetrahydroxybiphenyl, 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxy-5{prime}-methoxybiphenyl, 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxy-5{prime}-nitrobiphenyl, and 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxy-4{prime}-nitrobiphenyl were isolated as the main products formed from 3-hydroxydibenzofuran, 2-methoxydibenzofuran, and 2- and 3-nitrodibenzo-furan, respectively. These results indicate significant regioselectivity for the dioxygenolytic cleavage of the ether bond of these monosubstituted dibenzofurans, with a preference for the nonsubstituted aromatic nucleus. Substituted trihydroxybiphenyls are converted further by meta-cleavage followed by the removal of the side chain of the resulting product. A stepwise degradation of this side chain was found to be involved in the metabolism of 2-hydroxydibenzofuran. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. DL-7-azatryptophan and citrulline metabolism in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 1F

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Van Baalen, C.; Tabita, F.R.

    1987-03-01

    An alternative route for the primary assimilation of ammonia proceeds via glutamine synthetase-carbamyl phosphate synthetase and its inherent glutaminase activity in Anabaena sp. strain 1F, a marine filamentous, heterocystous cyanobacterium. Evidence for the presence of this possible alternative route to glutamate was provided by the use of amino acid analogs as specific enzyme inhibitors, enzymological studies, and radioistopic labeling experiments. The amino acid pool patterns of continuous cultures of Anabaena sp. strain 1F were markedly influenced by the nitrogen source. A relatively high concentration of glutamate was maintained in the amino acid pools of all cultures irrespective of the nitrogen source, reflecting the central role of glutamate in nitrogen metabolism. The addition of 1.0 microM azaserine increased the intracellular pools of glutamate and glutamine. All attempts to detect any enzymatic activity for glutamate synthase by measuring the formation of L-(/sup 14/C)glutamate from 2-keto-(1-/sup 14/C)glutarate and glutamine failed. The addition of 10 microM DL-7-azatryptophan caused a transient accumulation of intracellular citrulline and alanine which was not affected by the presence of chloramphenicol. The in vitro activity of carbamyl phosphate synthetase and glutaminase increased severalfold in the presence of azatryptophan. Results from radioisotopic labeling experiments with (/sup 14/C)bicarbonate and L-(1-/sup 14/C)ornithine also indicated that citrulline was formed via carbamyl phosphate synthetase and ornithine transcarbamylase. In addition to its effects on nitrogen metabolism, azatryptophan also affected carbon metabolism by inhibiting photosynthetic carbon assimilation and photosynthetic oxygen evolution.

  1. Structure of the detoxification catalyst mercuric ion reductase from Bacillus sp. strain RC607

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiering, N.; Kabsch, W.; Moore, M. J.; Distefano, M. D.; Walsh, C. T.; Pai, E. F.

    1991-07-01

    SEVERAL hundred million tons of toxic mercurials are dispersed in the biosphere1. Microbes can detoxify organo-mercurials and mercury salts through sequential action of two enzymes, organomercury lyase2 and mercuric ion reductase (MerA) 3-5. The latter, a homodimer with homology to the FAD-dependent disulphide oxidoreductases6, catalyses the reaction NADPH + Hg(II) --> NADP+ + H+Hg(0), one of the very rare enzymic reactions with metal substrates. Human glutathione reductase7,8 serves as a reference molecule for FAD-dependent disulphide reductases and between its primary structure9 and that of MerA from Tn501 (Pseudomonas), Tn21 (Shigella), pI258 (Staphylococcus) and Bacillus, 25-30% of the residues have been conserved10,11. All MerAs have a C-terminal extension about 15 residues long but have very varied N termini. Although the enzyme from Streptomyces lividans has no addition, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Tn5Ol and Bacillus sp. strain RC607 it has one and two copies respectively of a domain of 80-85 residues, highly homologous to MerP, the periplasmic component of proteins encoded by the mer operon11. These domains can be proteolytically cleaved off without changing the catalytic efficiency3. We report here the crystal structure of MerA from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus sp. strain RC607. Analysis of its complexes with nicotinamide dinucleotide substrates and the inhibitor Cd(II) reveals how limited structural changes enable an enzyme to accept as substrate what used to be a dangerous inhibitor. Knowledge of the mode of mercury ligation is a prerequisite for understanding this unique detoxification mechanism.

  2. Distinct Actions by Paenibacillus sp. Strain E18 ?-l-Arabinofuranosidases and Xylanase in Xylan Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Pengjun; Chen, Xiaoyan; Meng, Kun; Huang, Huoqing; Bai, Yingguo; Luo, Huiying; Yang, Peilong

    2013-01-01

    We cloned a Paenibacillus sp. strain E18 5.3-kb xylanolytic gene cluster that contains three open reading frames encoding two family 43 ?-l-arabinofuranosidases (Abf43A and Abf43B) and one family 10 xylanase (XynBE18). The deduced amino acid sequences of Abf43A and Abf43B were at most 68% and 63% identical to those of two putative family 43 proteins from Clostridium sp. strain DL-VIII (EHI98634.1 and EHI98635.1), respectively, but were only 11% identical to each other. Recombinant Abf43A and Abf43B had similar activities at 45°C and pH 6.0 but varied in thermostabilities and substrate specificities. Abf43B was active against only 4-nitrophenyl ?-l-arabinofuranoside, whereas Abf43A acted on 4-nitrophenyl ?-l-arabinofuranoside, wheat arabinoxylan, 4-nitrophenyl ?-d-xylopyranoside, and sugar beet arabinan. The sequential and combined effects on xylan degradation by XynBE18, Abf43A, and Abf43B were characterized. For beechwood, birchwood, and oat spelt xylans as the substrates, synergistic effects were found when XynBE18 and Abf43A or Abf43B were incubated together and when the substrates were first incubated with Abf43A or Abf43B and then with XynBE18. Further high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that the amounts of xylobiose and xylose increased sharply in the aforementioned reactions. For water-soluble wheat arabinoxylan as the substrate, Abf43A not only released arabinose but also had a synergistic effect with XynBE18. Synergy may arise as the result of removal of arabinose residues from xylans by ?-l-arabinofuranosidases, which eliminates steric hindrance caused by the arabinose side chains and which allows xylanases to then degrade the xylan backbone, producing short xylooligosaccharides. PMID:23335774

  3. Coregulated Genes Link Sulfide:Quinone Oxidoreductase and Arsenic Metabolism in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC6803

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Csaba I.; Vass, Imre; Rákhely, Gábor; Vass, István Zoltán; Tóth, András; Duzs, Ágnes; Peca, Loredana; Kruk, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Although the biogeochemistry of the two environmentally hazardous compounds arsenic and sulfide has been extensively investigated, the biological interference of these two toxic but potentially energy-rich compounds has only been hypothesized and indirectly proven. Here we provide direct evidence for the first time that in the photosynthetic model organism Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 the two metabolic pathways are linked by coregulated genes that are involved in arsenic transport, sulfide oxidation, and probably in sulfide-based alternative photosynthesis. Although Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 is an obligate photoautotrophic cyanobacterium that grows via oxygenic photosynthesis, we discovered that specific genes are activated in the presence of sulfide or arsenite to exploit the energy potentials of these chemicals. These genes form an operon that we termed suoRSCT, located on a transposable element of type IS4 on the plasmid pSYSM of the cyanobacterium. suoS (sll5036) encodes a light-dependent, type I sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase. The suoR (sll5035) gene downstream of suoS encodes a regulatory protein that belongs to the ArsR-type repressors that are normally involved in arsenic resistance. We found that this repressor has dual specificity, resulting in 200-fold induction of the operon upon either arsenite or sulfide exposure. The suoT gene encodes a transmembrane protein similar to chromate transporters but in fact functioning as an arsenite importer at permissive concentrations. We propose that the proteins encoded by the suoRSCT operon might have played an important role under anaerobic, reducing conditions on primordial Earth and that the operon was acquired by the cyanobacterium via horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25022856

  4. Photoheterotrophic Fluxome in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 and Its Implications for Cyanobacterial Bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    You, Le; He, Lian

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated metabolic responses in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 to photosynthetic impairment. We used 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU; a photosystem II inhibitor) to block O2 evolution and ATP/NADPH generation by linear electron flow. Based on 13C-metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) and RNA sequencing, we have found that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 employs a unique photoheterotrophic metabolism. First, glucose catabolism forms a cyclic route that includes the oxidative pentose phosphate (OPP) pathway and the glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (PGI) reaction. Glucose-6-phosphate is extensively degraded by the OPP pathway for NADPH production and is replenished by the reversed PGI reaction. Second, the Calvin cycle is not fully functional, but RubisCO continues to fix CO2 and synthesize 3-phosphoglycerate. Third, the relative flux through the complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and succinate dehydrogenase is small under heterotrophic conditions, indicating that the newly discovered cyanobacterial TCA cycle (via the ?-aminobutyric acid pathway or ?-ketoglutarate decarboxylase/succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase) plays a minimal role in energy metabolism. Fourth, NAD(P)H oxidation and the cyclic electron flow (CEF) around photosystem I are the two main ATP sources, and the CEF accounts for at least 40% of total ATP generation from photoheterotrophic metabolism (without considering maintenance loss). This study not only demonstrates a new topology for carbohydrate oxidation but also provides quantitative insights into metabolic bioenergetics in cyanobacteria. PMID:25535269

  5. Compositional and toxicological evaluation of the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneegurt, M. A.; Arieli, B.; McKeehen, J. D.; Stephens, S. D.; Nielsen, S. S.; Saha, P. R.; Trumbo, P. R.; Sherman, L. A.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Compositional analyses of Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 showed high protein (50-60%) and low fat (0.4-1%) content, and the ability to synthesize vitamin B12. The amino acid profile indicated that Cyanothece sp. was a balanced protein source. Fatty acids of the 18:3n-3 type were also present. Mineral analyses indicated that the cellular biomass may be a good source of Fe, Zn and Na. Caloric content was 4.5 to 5.1 kcal g dry weight-1 and the carbon content was approximately 40% on a dry weight basis. Nitrogen content was 8 to 9% on a dry weight basis and total nucleic acids were 1.3% on a dry weight basis. Short-term feeding studies in rats followed by histopathology found no toxicity or dietary incompatibility problems. The level of uric acid and allantoin in urine and tissues was low, suggesting no excess of nucleic acids, as sometimes reported in the past for a cyanobacteria-containing diet. The current work discusses the potential implications of these results for human nutrition applications.

  6. Hfq Is Required for Optimal Nitrate Assimilation in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 ?

    PubMed Central

    Puerta-Fernández, Elena; Vioque, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    Hfq is an RNA binding protein involved in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression in bacteria. It acts by binding to regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs), which confer specificity for the regulation. Recently, orthologues of the Hfq protein were annotated in cyanobacterial genomes, although its capacity to regulate gene expression by interacting with sRNAs has not been yet demonstrated. Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that, in the absence of combined nitrogen, is able to fix atmospheric nitrogen by differentiating specialized cells called heterocysts. We have generated an hfq knockout mutant of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Deletion of this gene results in differentiation of heterocysts in the presence of nitrate, suggesting a defect in nitrate assimilation. We show that hfq mutant cells are affected in transport and use of nitrate and nitrite. An analysis of the expression of several genes in the nir operon, encoding different elements of the nitrate assimilation pathway, demonstrates a downregulation of their transcription in mutant cells. We also observed that genes ntcB and cnaT, involved in the regulation of the nir operon, show a lower expression in cells lacking Hfq. Finally, when hfq was reintroduced in the mutant, heterocyst differentiation was no longer observed in the presence of nitrate. Therefore, our results indicate that the RNA chaperone Hfq is involved in the regulation of the nir operon, although the mechanism for this regulation is still unknown. PMID:21602329

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Frankia sp. Strain FaC1 Genes Involved in Nitrogen Fixation.

    PubMed

    Ligon, J M; Nakas, J P

    1987-10-01

    Genomic DNA was isolated from Frankia sp. strain FaC1, an Alnus root nodule endophyte, and used to construct a genomic library in the cosmid vector pHC79. The genomic library was screened by in situ colony hybridization to identify clones of Frankia nitrogenase (nif) genes based on DNA sequence homology to structural nitrogenase genes from Klebsiella pneumoniae. Several Frankia nif clones were isolated, and hybridization with individual structural nitrogenase gene fragments (nifH, nifD, and nifK) from K. pneumoniae revealed that they all contain the nifD and nifK genes, but lack the nifH gene. Restriction endonuclease mapping of the nifD and nifK hybridizing region from one clone revealed that the nifD and nifK genes in Frankia sp. are contiguous, while the nifH gene is absent from a large region of DNA on either side of the nifDK gene cluster. Additional hybridizations with gene fragments derived from K. pneumoniae as probes and containing other genes involved in nitrogen fixation demonstrated that the Frankia nifE and nifN genes, which play a role in the biosynthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor, are located adjacent to the nifDK gene cluster. PMID:16347453

  8. Photoheterotrophic fluxome in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 and its implications for cyanobacterial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    You, Le; He, Lian; Tang, Yinjie J

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated metabolic responses in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 to photosynthetic impairment. We used 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU; a photosystem II inhibitor) to block O2 evolution and ATP/NADPH generation by linear electron flow. Based on (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) and RNA sequencing, we have found that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 employs a unique photoheterotrophic metabolism. First, glucose catabolism forms a cyclic route that includes the oxidative pentose phosphate (OPP) pathway and the glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (PGI) reaction. Glucose-6-phosphate is extensively degraded by the OPP pathway for NADPH production and is replenished by the reversed PGI reaction. Second, the Calvin cycle is not fully functional, but RubisCO continues to fix CO2 and synthesize 3-phosphoglycerate. Third, the relative flux through the complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and succinate dehydrogenase is small under heterotrophic conditions, indicating that the newly discovered cyanobacterial TCA cycle (via the ?-aminobutyric acid pathway or ?-ketoglutarate decarboxylase/succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase) plays a minimal role in energy metabolism. Fourth, NAD(P)H oxidation and the cyclic electron flow (CEF) around photosystem I are the two main ATP sources, and the CEF accounts for at least 40% of total ATP generation from photoheterotrophic metabolism (without considering maintenance loss). This study not only demonstrates a new topology for carbohydrate oxidation but also provides quantitative insights into metabolic bioenergetics in cyanobacteria. PMID:25535269

  9. Paired cloning vectors for complementation of mutations in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, C. Peter Wolk; Fan, Qing; Zhou, Ruanbao; Huang, Guocun; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; Kuritz, Tanya; Wojciuch, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The clones generated in a sequencing project represent a resource for subsequent analysis of the organism whose genome has been sequenced. We describe an interrelated group of cloning vectors that either integrate into the genome or replicate, and that enhance the utility, for developmental and other studies, of the clones used to determine the genomic sequence of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. One integrating vector is a mobilizable BAC vector that was used both to generate bridging clones and to complement transposon mutations. Upon addition of a cassette that permits mobilization and selection, pUC-based sequencing clones can also integrate into the genome and thereupon complement transposon mutations. The replicating vectors are based on cyanobacterial plasmid pDU1, whose sequence we report, and on broad-host-range plasmid RSF1010. The RSF1010- and pDU1-based vectors provide the opportunity to express different genes from either cell-type-specific or -generalist promoters, simultaneously from different plasmids in the same cyanobacterial cells. We show that pDU1 ORF4 and its upstream region play an essential role in the replication and copy number of pDU1, and that ORFs alr2887 and alr3546 (hetF{sub A}) of Anabaena sp. are required specifically for fixation of dinitrogen under oxic conditions.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Thalassotalea sp. Strain ND16A Isolated from Eastern Mediterranean Sea Water Collected from a Depth of 1,055 Meters

    PubMed Central

    Stelling, Savannah C.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Alshibli, Noor K.; Brown, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Thalassotalea sp. strain ND16A belongs to the family Colwelliaceae and was isolated from eastern Mediterranean Sea water at a depth of 1,055 m. Members of Colwelliaceae are ubiquitous marine heterotrophs. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Thalassotalea sp. strain ND16A, a member of the newly described genus Thalassotalea. PMID:25428976

  11. The Draft Genome Sequence of Xanthomonas sp. Strain Mitacek01 Expands the Pangenome of a Genus of Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Couger, M B; Hanafy, Radwa A; Mitacek, Rachel M; Budd, Connie; French, Donald P; Hoff, Wouter D; Elshahed, Mostafa S; Youssef, Noha H

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Xanthomonas sp. strain Mitacek01, isolated from an indoor environment vending machine surface with frequent human use in Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA, as part of the Student-Initiated Microbial Discovery project. The genome has a total size of 3,617,426 bp and a contig N50 of 1,906,967 bp. PMID:26659686

  12. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain CFMR 7, a natural rubber degrading actinomycete isolated from Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nanthini, Jayaram; Chia, Kim-Hou; Thottathil, Gincy P; Taylor, Todd D; Kondo, Shinji; Najimudin, Nazalan; Baybayan, Primo; Singh, Siddharth; Sudesh, Kumar

    2015-11-20

    Streptomyces sp. strain CFMR 7, which naturally degrades rubber, was isolated from a rubber plantation. Whole genome sequencing and assembly resulted in 2 contigs with total genome size of 8.248Mb. Two latex clearing protein (lcp) genes which are responsible for rubber degrading activities were identified. PMID:26376470

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Massilia sp. Strain BSC265, Isolated from Biological Soil Crust of Moab, Utah

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Alexis C.; Kellom, Matthew; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Noonan, Kathryn; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2014-01-01

    Massilia sp. BSC265 was isolated from a biological soil crust near Moab, Utah. The strain appears to be capable of chemotaxis and exopolysaccharide synthesis for biofilm adhesion. The BSC265 genome contains a complete dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathway as well as a TCA cycle, making it a facultative anaerobe. PMID:25395652

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus sp. Strain BSC154, Isolated from Biological Soil Crust of Moab, Utah

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Alexis C.; Kellom, Matthew; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Noonan, Kathryn; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus sp. BSC154 was isolated from a biological soil crust near Moab, Utah. The strain appears to be capable of chemotaxis and biofilm production. The BSC154 genome contains iron siderophore production, nitrate reduction, mixed acid-butanediol fermentation, and assimilatory and dissimilatory sulfate metabolism pathways. PMID:25395651

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Microvirga sp. Strain BSC39, Isolated from Biological Soil Crust of Moab, Utah

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Alexis C.; Kellom, Matthew; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Noonan, Kathryn; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2014-01-01

    Microvirga sp. BSC39 was isolated from a biological soil crust near Moab, Utah. The strain appears to be capable of chemotaxis and exopolysaccharide synthesis for biofilm adhesion. The BSC39 genome contains iron siderophore uptake and hydrolysis enzymes; however, it lacks siderophore synthesis pathways, suggesting the uptake of siderophores produced by neighboring microbes. PMID:25395650

  16. Whole-Genome Sequence of Aquamicrobium sp. Strain SK-2, a Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Utilizing Bacterium Isolated from Sewage Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Ken; Kim, Eun-Sook; Jung, Kweon; Kikuchi, Shintaro

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of Aquamicrobium sp. strain SK-2, a bacterium which can use 2,2?,4,4?,5,5?-hexachlorobiphenyl as the sole carbon source for its growth. An approximately 9.23-Mb genome sequence of SK-2 will greatly facilitate research efforts regarding the study of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degradation mechanism. PMID:25977427

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polyextremophilic Halorubrum sp. Strain AJ67, Isolated from Hyperarsenic Lakes in the Argentinian Puna

    PubMed Central

    Burguener, Germán F.; Maldonado, Marcos J.; Revale, Santiago; Fernández Do Porto, Darío; Rascován, Nicolás; Vázquez, Martín; Farías, María Eugenia; Marti, Marcelo A.

    2014-01-01

    Halorubrum sp. strain AJ67, an extreme halophilic UV-resistant archaeon, was isolated from Laguna Antofalla in the Argentinian Puna. The draft genome sequence suggests the presence of potent enzyme candidates that are essential for survival under multiple environmental extreme conditions, such as high UV radiation, elevated salinity, and the presence of critical arsenic concentrations. PMID:24503991

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polyextremophilic Halorubrum sp. Strain AJ67, Isolated from Hyperarsenic Lakes in the Argentinian Puna.

    PubMed

    Burguener, Germán F; Maldonado, Marcos J; Revale, Santiago; Fernández Do Porto, Darío; Rascován, Nicolás; Vázquez, Martín; Farías, María Eugenia; Marti, Marcelo A; Turjanski, Adrián Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Halorubrum sp. strain AJ67, an extreme halophilic UV-resistant archaeon, was isolated from Laguna Antofalla in the Argentinian Puna. The draft genome sequence suggests the presence of potent enzyme candidates that are essential for survival under multiple environmental extreme conditions, such as high UV radiation, elevated salinity, and the presence of critical arsenic concentrations. PMID:24503991

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Picocyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain GFB01, Isolated from a Freshwater Lagoon in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Tiago Ferreira; de Melo, Aline Grasielle Costa; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Silva, Artur; Fiore, Marli Fatima; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz

    2015-01-01

    We present the draft genome of the cyanobacterium strain Synechococcus sp. GFB01, the first genome sequencing of this genus isolated from South America. This draft genome consists of 125 contigs with a total size of 2,339,812 bp. Automatic annotation identified several genes involved with heavy metal resistance and natural transformation. PMID:26272565

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Exiguobacterium sp. Strain BMC-KP, an Environmental Isolate from Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Hyson, Peter; Shapiro, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Exiguobacterium sp. strain BMC-KP was isolated as part of a student environmental sampling project at Bryn Mawr College, PA. Sequencing of bacterial DNA assembled a 3.32-Mb draft genome. Analysis suggests the presence of genes for tolerance to cold and toxic metals, broad carbohydrate metabolism, and genes derived from phage. PMID:26450734

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain 10-1B, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degrader in Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Bello-Akinosho, Maryam; Swanevelder, Dirk; Thantsha, Mapitsi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain 10-1B was isolated from artificially polluted soil after selective enrichment. Its draft genome consists of several predicted genes that are involved in the hydroxylation of the aromatic ring, which is the rate-limiting step in the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:25953172

  2. Involvement of nitric oxide synthase in sucrose-enhanced hydrogen peroxide tolerance of Rhodococcus sp. strain APG1,

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Michael F.

    Involvement of nitric oxide synthase in sucrose-enhanced hydrogen peroxide tolerance of Rhodococcus Lancaster, Jr. Abstract Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) tolerance of Rhodococcus sp. strain APG1, previously; Hydrogen peroxide tolerance; Plant­microorganism interaction; Endophytic colonization Bacteria colonize

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio sp. Strain Vb278, an Antagonistic Bacterium Isolated from the Marine Sponge Sarcotragus spinosulus

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Ana C. S.; Franco, Telma; Califano, Gianmaria; Dowd, Scot E.; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Vibrio sp. Vb278, a biofilm-producing strain isolated from the marine sponge Sarcotragus spinosulus, showing in vitro antibacterial activity. The annotated genome displays a range of symbiotic factors and the potential for the biosynthesis of several biologically active natural products. PMID:26021918

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain DC12, an Atypical, Noninfective, Ineffective Isolate from Datisca cannabina

    PubMed Central

    Beauchemin, Nicholas; Cantor, Michael N.; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne; Copeland, Alex; Gtari, Maher; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nouioui, Imen; Oshone, Rediet; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Pati, Amrita; Sen, Arnab; Shapiro, Nicole; Szeto, Ernest; Wall, Luis; Wishart, Jessie; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Frankia sp. strain DC12, isolated from root nodules of Datisca cannabina, is a member of the fourth lineage of Frankia, which is unable to reinfect actinorhizal plants. Here, we report its 6.88-Mbp high-quality draft genome sequence, with a G+C content of 71.92% and 5,858 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26251504

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Strain PSR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Arsenic-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Tonomura, Mimori; Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. strain PSR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil. It contained three distinct arsenic resistance gene clusters (ars operons), while no respiratory arsenate reductase gene (arr) was identified. PMID:25977440

  6. Genome Sequence of the Deep-Sea Denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. Strain MT-1, Isolated from the Mariana Trench

    PubMed Central

    Fujinami, Shun; Oikawa, Yuji; Araki, Takuma; Shinmura, Yui; Midorikawa, Ryota; Ishizaka, Hikari; Kato, Chiaki; Horikoshi, Koki; Ito, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain MT-1 was the first deep-sea denitrifier isolated and characterized from mud recovered from a depth of 11,000 m in the Mariana Trench. We report here the genome sequence of this bacterium, which contributes to our understanding of denitrification and bioenergetics in the deep sea. PMID:25523772

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Chryseobacterium sp. Strain P1-3, a Keratinolytic Bacterium Isolated from Poultry Waste

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gun-Seok; Hong, Sung-Jun; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Ullah, Ihsan; Jung, Byung Kwon; Choi, JungBae; Kwak, Yunyoung; Back, Chang-Gi; Jung, Hee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Chryseobacterium sp. strain P1-3, harboring keratin degrading activity, has recently been isolated from poultry waste. Here, we report the 4.6-Mbp draft genome sequence of the keratinolytic bacterium with a G+C content of 37.0% and 4,087 protein-coding genes. PMID:25428979

  8. The Draft Genome Sequence of Xanthomonas sp. Strain Mitacek01 Expands the Pangenome of a Genus of Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Couger, M. B.; Hanafy, Radwa A.; Mitacek, Rachel M.; Budd, Connie; French, Donald P.; Hoff, Wouter D.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Xanthomonas sp. strain Mitacek01, isolated from an indoor environment vending machine surface with frequent human use in Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA, as part of the Student-Initiated Microbial Discovery project. The genome has a total size of 3,617,426 bp and a contig N50 of 1,906,967 bp. PMID:26659686

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain In5 Isolated from a Greenlandic Disease Suppressive Soil with Potent Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Rosanna C.; Glaring, Mikkel A.; Michelsen, Charlotte F.; Olsson, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. In5 is an isolate of disease suppressive soil with potent activity against pathogens. Its antifungal activity has been linked to a gene cluster encoding nonribosomal peptide synthetases producing the peptides nunamycin and nunapeptin. The genome sequence will provide insight into the genetics behind the antimicrobial activity of this strain. PMID:26607883

  10. Initial Reactions in Anaerobic Oxidation of m-Xylene by the Denitrifying Bacterium Azoarcus sp. Strain T

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Cynthia J.; Beller, Harry R.; Reinhard, Martin; Spormann, Alfred M.

    1999-01-01

    The initial enzymatic steps in anaerobic m-xylene oxidation were studied in Azoarcus sp. strain T, a denitrifying bacterium capable of mineralizing m-xylene via 3-methylbenzoate. Permeabilized cells of m-xylene-grown Azoarcus sp. strain T catalyzed the addition of m-xylene to fumarate to form (3-methylbenzyl)succinate. In the presence of succinyl coenzyme A (CoA) and nitrate, (3-methylbenzyl)succinate was oxidized to E-(3-methylphenyl)itaconate (or a closely related isomer) and 3-methylbenzoate. Kinetic studies conducted with permeabilized cells and whole-cell suspensions of m-xylene-grown Azoarcus sp. strain T demonstrated that the specific rate of in vitro (3-methylbenzyl)succinate formation accounts for at least 15% of the specific rate of in vivo m-xylene consumption. Based on these findings, we propose that Azoarcus sp. strain T anaerobically oxidizes m-xylene to 3-methylbenzoate (or its CoA thioester) via (3-methylbenzyl)succinate and E-(3-methylphenyl)itaconate (or its CoA thioester) in a series of reactions that are analogous to those recently proposed for anaerobic toluene oxidation to benzoyl-CoA. A deuterium kinetic isotope effect was observed in the (3-methylbenzyl)succinate synthase reaction (and the benzylsuccinate synthase reaction), suggesting that a rate-determining step in this novel fumarate addition reaction involves breaking a C-H bond. PMID:10515931

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Thauera sp. Strain SWB20, Isolated from a Singapore Wastewater Treatment Facility Using Gel Microdroplets

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Karen W.; Li, Po-E; Ahmed, Sanaa A.; Daligault, Hajnalka; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Kunde, Yuliya; McMurry, Kim; Lo, Chien-Chi; Reitenga, Krista G.; Daughton, Ashlynn R.; Shen, Xiaohong; Frietze, Seth; Wang, Dongping; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Schuster, Stephan; Chain, Patrick S.; Han, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of Thauera sp. strain SWB20, isolated from a Singaporean wastewater treatment facility using gel microdroplets (GMDs) and single-cell genomics (SCG). This approach provided a single clonal microcolony that was sufficient to obtain a 4.9-Mbp genome assembly of an ecologically relevant Thauera species. PMID:25792053

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Rahnella sp Strain Y9602, a Gammaproteobacterium Isolate from Metal- and Radionuclide-Contaminated Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Robert J; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Held, Brittany; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nolan, Matt; Pennacchio, Len; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Sobeckya, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Rahnella sp. strain Y9602 is a gammaproteobacterium isolated from contaminated subsurface soils that is capable of promoting uranium phosphate mineralization as a result of constitutive phosphatase activity. Here we report the first complete genome sequence of an isolate belonging to the genus Rahnella.

  13. Genome Sequence of the Deep-Sea Denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. Strain MT-1, Isolated from the Mariana Trench.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, Shun; Oikawa, Yuji; Araki, Takuma; Shinmura, Yui; Midorikawa, Ryota; Ishizaka, Hikari; Kato, Chiaki; Horikoshi, Koki; Ito, Masahiro; Tamegai, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain MT-1 was the first deep-sea denitrifier isolated and characterized from mud recovered from a depth of 11,000 m in the Mariana Trench. We report here the genome sequence of this bacterium, which contributes to our understanding of denitrification and bioenergetics in the deep sea. PMID:25523772

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingomonas sp. Strain Ant20, Isolated from Oil-Contaminated Soil on Ross Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Ronca, Sandra; Frossard, Aline; Guerrero, Leandro D; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Aislabie, Jackie M; Cowan, Don A

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Sphingomonas sp. strain Ant20, isolated from oil-polluted soil near Scott Base, Ross Island, Antarctica. The genome of this aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium provides valuable information on the microbially mediated biodegradation of aromatic compounds in cold-climate systems. PMID:25573925

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of MCPA-Degrading Sphingomonas sp. Strain ERG5, Isolated from a Groundwater Aquifer in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard; Kot, Witold; Sørensen, Sebastian R; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain ERG5 was isolated from a bacterial community, originating from a groundwater aquifer polluted with low pesticide concentrations. This bacterium degrades 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in a wide spectrum of concentrations and has been shown to function in bioaugmented sand filters. Genes associated with MCPA degradation are situated on a putative conjugative plasmid. PMID:25676756

  16. HIGH LEVEL EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CYCLOPHILIN B GENE FROM THE ANAEROBIC FUNGUS ORPINOMYCES SP. STRAIN PC-2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclophilins are an evolutionarily conserved family of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases). A cyclophilin B (CyPB) gene from anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. It was expressed as amino terminal 6 x His-tagged recombinant prote...

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Novosphingobium sp. Strain MBES04, Isolated from Sunken Wood from Suruga Bay, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Yukari; Kobayashi, Kiwa; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Iida, Kagami; Tanizaki, Akiko; Kurosawa, Kanako; Adachi, Akiko; Nishihara, Mizue; Sato, Reona; Hasegawa, Ryoichi; Hatada, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the draft genome sequence of Novosphingobium sp. strain MBES04, isolated from sunken wood from Suruga Bay, Japan, which is capable of degrading a wide range of lignin-related aromatic monomers. The draft genome sequence contains 5,361,448 bp, with a G+C content of 65.4%. PMID:25593249

  18. Draft Genome Sequence and Description of Janthinobacterium sp. Strain CG3, a Psychrotolerant Antarctic Supraglacial Stream Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heidi; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Franklin, Michael; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen; Daligault, Hajnalka; Erkkila, Tracy; Goodwin, Lynne; Gu, Wei; Xu, Yan; Chain, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Here we present the draft genome sequence of Janthinobacterium sp. strain CG3, a psychrotolerant non-violacein-producing bacterium that was isolated from the Cotton Glacier supraglacial stream. The genome sequence of this organism will provide insight as to the mechanisms necessary for bacteria to survive in UV-stressed icy environments. PMID:24265494

  19. Pandoraea sp. Strain E26: Discovery of Its Quorum-Sensing Properties via Whole-Genome Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Yin, Wai-Fong; Tee, Kok Keng; Chang, Chien-Yi; Priya, Kumutha

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Pandoraea sp. strain E26 isolated from a former landfill site, sequenced by the Illumina MiSeq platform. This genome sequence will be useful to further understand the quorum-sensing system of this isolate. PMID:26021935

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Nesterenkonia sp. Strain F, Isolated From Aran-Bidgol Salt Lake in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sarikhan, Sajjad; Azarbaijani, Reza; Yeganeh, Laleh Parsa; Fazeli, Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2011-01-01

    The draft genome of the aerobic, Gram-positive, halophilic chemoorganotroph Nesterenkonia sp. strain F consists of a 2,812,133-bp chromosome. This study is the first to report the shotgun-sequenced draft genome of a member of the genus Nesterenkonia. PMID:21914888

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Pelosinus sp. Strain UFO1 Assembled Using Single-Molecule Real-Time DNA Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Steven D.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Magnuson, Timothy S.; Ray, Allison E.; Poole, Farris L.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Pelosinus species can reduce metals such as Fe(III), U(VI), and Cr(VI) and have been isolated from diverse geographical regions. Five draft genome sequences have been published. We report the complete genome sequence for Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 using only PacBio DNA sequence data and without manual finishing. PMID:25189589

  2. Rhizobium sp. strain BN4 (a selenium oxyanion-reducing bacterium) 16S rRNA gene complete sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used 1482 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence methods in conjunction with other biochemical and morphological studies to confirm the identification of a bacterium (refer to as the BN4 strain) as a Rhizobium sp. The 16S rRNA gene sequence places it with the Rhizobium clade that includes R. d...

  3. Premethylation of Foreign DNA Improves Integrative Transformation Efficiency in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Yu, Jianping; Zhang, Weiwen; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2015-12-15

    Restriction digestion of foreign DNA is one of the key biological barriers against genetic transformation in microorganisms. To establish a high-efficiency transformation protocol in the model cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (Synechocystis 6803), we investigated the effects of premethylation of foreign DNA on the integrative transformation of this strain. In this study, two type II methyltransferase-encoding genes, i.e., sll0729 (gene M) and slr0214 (gene C), were cloned from the chromosome of Synechocystis 6803 and expressed in Escherichia coli harboring an integration plasmid. After premethylation treatment in E. coli, the integration plasmid was extracted and used for transformation of Synechocystis 6803. The results showed that although expression of methyltransferase M had little impact on the transformation of Synechocystis 6803, expression of methyltransferase C resulted in 11- to 161-fold-higher efficiency in the subsequent integrative transformation of Synechocystis 6803. Effective expression of methyltransferase C, which could be achieved by optimizing the 5' untranslated region, was critical to efficient premethylation of the donor DNA and thus high transformation efficiency in Synechocystis 6803. Since premethylating foreign DNA prior to transforming Synechocystis avoids changing the host genetic background, the study thus provides an improved method for high-efficiency integrative transformation of Synechocystis 6803. PMID:26452551

  4. Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Peyton, Brent M.; Viamajala, Sridhar; Gerlach, Robin; Apel, William; Sani, Rajesh K.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Borch, Thomas

    2011-02-24

    Removal of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solution was studied using a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe, Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6, under anaerobic, non-growth conditions in bicarbonate and PIPES buffers. Inorganic phosphate was released by cells during the experiments providing ligands for formation of insoluble U(VI) phosphates. Phosphate release was most probably the result of anaerobic hydrolysis of intracellular polyphosphates accumulated by ES6 during aerobic growth. Microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was also observed. However, the relative magnitudes of U(VI) removal by abiotic (phosphate-based) precipitation and microbial reduction depended on the buffer chemistry. In bicarbonate buffer, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy showed that U in the solid phase was present primarily as a non-uraninite U(IV) phase, whereas in PIPES buffer, U precipitates consisted primarily of U(VI)-phosphate. In both bicarbonate and PIPES buffer, net release of cellular phosphate was measured to be lower than that observed in U-free controls suggesting simultaneous precipitation of U and PO3-4 . In PIPES, U(VI) phosphates formed a significant portion of U precipitates and mass balance estimates of U and P along with XAFS data corroborate this hypothesis. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of samples from PIPES treatments indeed showed both extracellular and intracellular accumulation of U solids with nanometer sized lath structures that contained U and P. In bicarbonate, however, more phosphate was removed than required to stoichiometrically balance the U(VI)/U(IV) fraction determined by XAFS, suggesting that U(IV) precipitated together with phosphate in this system. When anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a known electron shuttle, was added to the experimental reactors, the dominant removal mechanism in both buffers was reduction to a non-uraninite U(IV) phase. Uranium immobilization by abiotic precipitation or microbial reduction has been extensively reported; however, the present work suggests that strain ES6 can remove U(VI) from solution simultaneously through precipitation with phosphate ligands and microbial reduction, depending on the environmental conditions. Cellulomonadaceae are environmentally relevant subsurface bacteria and here, for the first time, the presence of multiple U immobilization mechanisms within one organism is reported using Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6.

  5. Lauric Acid Production in a Glycogen-Less Strain of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Work, Victoria H; Melnicki, Matthew R; Hill, Eric A; Davies, Fiona K; Kucek, Leo A; Beliaev, Alexander S; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Pasteur culture collection 7002 was genetically engineered to synthesize biofuel-compatible medium-chain fatty acids (FAs) during photoautotrophic growth. Expression of a heterologous lauroyl-acyl carrier protein (C12:0-ACP) thioesterase with concurrent deletion of the endogenous putative acyl-ACP synthetase led to secretion of transesterifiable C12:0 FA in CO2-supplemented batch cultures. When grown at steady state over a range of light intensities in a light-emitting diode turbidostat photobioreactor, the C12-secreting mutant exhibited a modest reduction in growth rate and increased O2 evolution relative to the wild-type (WT). Inhibition of (i) glycogen synthesis by deletion of the glgC-encoded ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and (ii) protein synthesis by nitrogen deprivation were investigated as potential mechanisms for metabolite redistribution to increase FA synthesis. Deletion of AGPase led to a 10-fold decrease in reducing carbohydrates and secretion of organic acids during nitrogen deprivation consistent with an energy spilling phenotype. When the carbohydrate-deficient background (?glgC) was modified for C12 secretion, no increase in C12 was achieved during nutrient replete growth, and no C12 was recovered from any strain upon nitrogen deprivation under the conditions used. At steady state, the growth rate of the ?glgC strain saturated at a lower light intensity than the WT, but O2 evolution was not compromised and became increasingly decoupled from growth rate with rising irradiance. Photophysiological properties of the ?glgC strain suggest energy dissipation from photosystem II and reconfiguration of electron flow at the level of the plastoquinone pool. PMID:25964950

  6. Alginate-Dependent Gene Expression Mechanism in Sphingomonas sp. Strain A1

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Chie; Takase, Ryuichi; Momma, Keiko; Maruyama, Yukie; Murata, Kousaku

    2014-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain A1, a Gram-negative bacterium, directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm through a periplasmic alginate-binding protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette transporter. The polysaccharide is degraded to monosaccharides via the formation of oligosaccharides by endo- and exotype alginate lyases. The strain A1 proteins for alginate uptake and degradation are encoded in both strands of a genetic cluster in the bacterial genome and inducibly expressed in the presence of alginate. Here we show the function of the alginate-dependent transcription factor AlgO and its mode of action on the genetic cluster and alginate oligosaccharides. A putative gene within the genetic cluster seems to encode a transcription factor-like protein (AlgO). Mutant strain A1 (?AlgO mutant) cells with a disrupted algO gene constitutively produced alginate-related proteins. DNA microarray analysis indicated that wild-type cells inducibly transcribed the genetic cluster only in the presence of alginate, while ?AlgO mutant cells constitutively expressed the genetic cluster. A gel mobility shift assay showed that AlgO binds to the specific intergenic region between algO and algS (algO-algS). Binding of AlgO to the algO-algS intergenic region diminished with increasing alginate oligosaccharides. These results demonstrated a novel alginate-dependent gene expression mechanism. In the absence of alginate, AlgO binds to the algO-algS intergenic region and represses the expression of both strands of the genetic cluster, while in the presence of alginate, AlgO dissociates from the algO-algS intergenic region via binding to alginate oligosaccharides produced through the lyase reaction and subsequently initiates transcription of the genetic cluster. This is the first report on the mechanism by which alginate regulates the expression of the gene cluster. PMID:24816607

  7. Alginate-dependent gene expression mechanism in Sphingomonas sp. strain A1.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Chie; Takase, Ryuichi; Momma, Keiko; Maruyama, Yukie; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2014-07-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain A1, a Gram-negative bacterium, directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm through a periplasmic alginate-binding protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette transporter. The polysaccharide is degraded to monosaccharides via the formation of oligosaccharides by endo- and exotype alginate lyases. The strain A1 proteins for alginate uptake and degradation are encoded in both strands of a genetic cluster in the bacterial genome and inducibly expressed in the presence of alginate. Here we show the function of the alginate-dependent transcription factor AlgO and its mode of action on the genetic cluster and alginate oligosaccharides. A putative gene within the genetic cluster seems to encode a transcription factor-like protein (AlgO). Mutant strain A1 (?AlgO mutant) cells with a disrupted algO gene constitutively produced alginate-related proteins. DNA microarray analysis indicated that wild-type cells inducibly transcribed the genetic cluster only in the presence of alginate, while ?AlgO mutant cells constitutively expressed the genetic cluster. A gel mobility shift assay showed that AlgO binds to the specific intergenic region between algO and algS (algO-algS). Binding of AlgO to the algO-algS intergenic region diminished with increasing alginate oligosaccharides. These results demonstrated a novel alginate-dependent gene expression mechanism. In the absence of alginate, AlgO binds to the algO-algS intergenic region and represses the expression of both strands of the genetic cluster, while in the presence of alginate, AlgO dissociates from the algO-algS intergenic region via binding to alginate oligosaccharides produced through the lyase reaction and subsequently initiates transcription of the genetic cluster. This is the first report on the mechanism by which alginate regulates the expression of the gene cluster. PMID:24816607

  8. Characterization of Amphora sp., a newly isolated diatom wild strain, potentially usable for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Chtourou, Haifa; Dahmen, Ines; Jebali, Ahlem; Karray, Fatma; Hassairi, Ilem; Abdelkafi, Slim; Ayadi, Habib; Sayadi, Sami; Dhouib, Abdelhafidh

    2015-07-01

    Microalgae as feedstock for biofuel production have attracted serious consideration as an important sustainable source of energy. For biodiesel production with microalgae, a series of consecutive processes should be performed as selection of adequate microalgal strains, mass culture, cell harvesting, oil extraction and transesterification. The aim of this study was to investigate the growth and lipid accumulation of a new isolated marine microalgal strain by optimizing culture medium composition and applying different stressful culture conditions. Microalga CTM 20023 was isolated from the evaporating salt-ponds at Sfax, Tunisia, using serial-dilution technique from enriched cultures. Phylogenetic analysis based on SSU rDNA and rbcL-3P sequences attributed this isolate to a new species of the Amphora genus. This wild strain possesses rapid gravity sedimentation of 2.91 m h(-1), suitable for an easy and low-cost biomass harvest. The optimization of the composition of the culture medium through statistical experimental designs improved the specific growth rate of Amphora sp. from 0.149 to 0.262 day(-1) and increased its 15-day culture biomass production from 465 to 2200 mg L(-1) (dw) and its lipid content from 140 to 370 mg g(-1) (dw). Highest biomass productivity of 178 mg L(-1) day(-1) was achieved at the 10th day of culture. Highest lipid content of 530 mg g(-1) (dw) was obtained under phosphorus starvation and 64.34% of these lipids were saturated fatty acids. A first growth stage, in optimized condition, would thus offer the maximum productivity for an algal biomass feed stream, followed by second stressful stage for lipid accumulation, thus suitable for biodiesel production. PMID:25716001

  9. Activation of Dormant Bacterial Genes by Nonomuraea sp. Strain ATCC 39727 Mutant-Type RNA Polymerase? †

    PubMed Central

    Talà, Adelfia; Wang, Guojun; Zemanova, Martina; Okamoto, Susumu; Ochi, Kozo; Alifano, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the ability of actinomycetes to produce antibiotics and other bioactive secondary metabolites has been underestimated due to the presence of cryptic gene clusters. The activation of dormant genes is therefore one of the most important areas of experimental research for the discovery of drugs in these organisms. The recent observation that several actinomycetes possess two RNA polymerase ?-chain genes (rpoB) has opened up the possibility, explored in this study, of developing a new strategy to activate dormant gene expression in bacteria. Two rpoB paralogs, rpoB(S) and rpoB(R), provide Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 with two functionally distinct and developmentally regulated RNA polymerases. The product of rpoB(R), the expression of which increases after transition to stationary phase, is characterized by five amino acid substitutions located within or close to the so-called rifampin resistance clusters that play a key role in fundamental activities of RNA polymerase. Here, we report that rpoB(R) markedly activated antibiotic biosynthesis in the wild-type Streptomyces lividans strain 1326 and also in strain KO-421, a relaxed (rel) mutant unable to produce ppGpp. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the rpoB(R)-specific missense H426N mutation was essential for the activation of secondary metabolism. Our observations also indicated that mutant-type or duplicated, rpoB often exists in nature among rare actinomycetes and will thus provide a basis for further basic and applied research. PMID:19047343

  10. Lauric Acid Production in a Glycogen-Less Strain of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Work, Victoria H.; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Hill, Eric A.; Davies, Fiona K.; Kucek, Leo A.; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Pasteur culture collection 7002 was genetically engineered to synthesize biofuel-compatible medium-chain fatty acids (FAs) during photoautotrophic growth. Expression of a heterologous lauroyl-acyl carrier protein (C12:0-ACP) thioesterase with concurrent deletion of the endogenous putative acyl-ACP synthetase led to secretion of transesterifiable C12:0 FA in CO2-supplemented batch cultures. When grown at steady state over a range of light intensities in a light-emitting diode turbidostat photobioreactor, the C12-secreting mutant exhibited a modest reduction in growth rate and increased O2 evolution relative to the wild-type (WT). Inhibition of (i) glycogen synthesis by deletion of the glgC-encoded ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and (ii) protein synthesis by nitrogen deprivation were investigated as potential mechanisms for metabolite redistribution to increase FA synthesis. Deletion of AGPase led to a 10-fold decrease in reducing carbohydrates and secretion of organic acids during nitrogen deprivation consistent with an energy spilling phenotype. When the carbohydrate-deficient background (?glgC) was modified for C12 secretion, no increase in C12 was achieved during nutrient replete growth, and no C12 was recovered from any strain upon nitrogen deprivation under the conditions used. At steady state, the growth rate of the ?glgC strain saturated at a lower light intensity than the WT, but O2 evolution was not compromised and became increasingly decoupled from growth rate with rising irradiance. Photophysiological properties of the ?glgC strain suggest energy dissipation from photosystem II and reconfiguration of electron flow at the level of the plastoquinone pool. PMID:25964950

  11. Cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase production by new Bacillus sp. strains isolated from brazilian soil

    PubMed Central

    Menocci, Vivian; Goulart, Antonio José; Adalberto, Paulo Roberto; Tavano, Olga Luisa; Marques, Daniela Parreira; Contiero, Jonas; Monti, Rubens

    2008-01-01

    Three strains of Bacillus sp. (BACRP, BACNC-1 and BACAR) were isolated from soil adhered to cassava husk. CGTase specific activity for the three isolated strains was higher when cultivated at 40°C. Potato starch, cassava starch, maltodextrin and glucose were used as carbon source and growth temperatures varied from 25 to 55°C. The three isolates presented higher CGTase specific activity when cultivated with potato starch at 40°C. Isolated BACRP and BACAR presented specific activity of 4.0×10–3 and 2.2×10–3 U/mg prot at pH 7.0, respectively, when cultivated in mediums added with NaCl 2%; at pH 10,0 their activities were of 3.4×10–3 and 3.0×10–3 U/mg prot, respectively, in the same concentration of NaCl. On the other hand, the isolated BACNC-1 presented activity specific of 2.4×10–3 U/mg prot when cultivated at pH 7.0 added of NaCl 1%, and at pH 10.0 the specific activity was of 3.4×10–3 U/mg prot without NaCl addition. This work also showed the presence of cyclodextrins formed during fermentation process and that precipitation with acetone or lyophilization followed by dialysis was efficient at removing CDs (cyclodextrins), thus, eliminating interference in the activity assays. The enzyme produced by the BACAR strain was partially purified and ?-CD was liberated as a reaction product. PMID:24031289

  12. Geobacter lovleyi sp. nov. Strain SZ, a Novel Metal-Reducing and Tetrachloroethene-Dechlorinating Bacterium†

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Youlboong; Fletcher, Kelly E.; Ritalahti, Kirsti M.; Apkarian, Robert P.; Ramos-Hernández, Natalia; Sanford, Robert A.; Mesbah, Noha M.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2006-01-01

    A bacterial isolate, designated strain SZ, was obtained from noncontaminated creek sediment microcosms based on its ability to derive energy from acetate oxidation coupled to tetrachloroethene (PCE)-to-cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) dechlorination (i.e., chlororespiration). Hydrogen and pyruvate served as alternate electron donors for strain SZ, and the range of electron acceptors included (reduced products are given in brackets) PCE and trichloroethene [cis-DCE], nitrate [ammonium], fumarate [succinate], Fe(III) [Fe(II)], malate [succinate], Mn(IV) [Mn(II)], U(VI) [U(IV)], and elemental sulfur [sulfide]. PCE and soluble Fe(III) (as ferric citrate) were reduced at rates of 56.5 and 164 nmol min?1 mg of protein?1, respectively, with acetate as the electron donor. Alternate electron acceptors, such as U(VI) and nitrate, did not inhibit PCE dechlorination and were consumed concomitantly. With PCE, Fe(III) (as ferric citrate), and nitrate as electron acceptors, H2 was consumed to threshold concentrations of 0.08 ± 0.03 nM, 0.16 ± 0.07 nM, and 0.5 ± 0.06 nM, respectively, and acetate was consumed to 3.0 ± 2.1 nM, 1.2 ± 0.5 nM, and 3.6 ± 0.25 nM, respectively. Apparently, electron acceptor-specific acetate consumption threshold concentrations exist, suggesting that similar to the hydrogen threshold model, the measurement of acetate threshold concentrations offers an additional diagnostic tool to delineate terminal electron-accepting processes in anaerobic subsurface environments. Genetic and phenotypic analyses classify strain SZ as the type strain of the new species, Geobacter lovleyi sp. nov., with Geobacter (formerly Trichlorobacter) thiogenes as the closest relative. Furthermore, the analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from PCE-dechlorinating consortia and chloroethene-contaminated subsurface environments suggests that Geobacter lovleyi belongs to a distinct, dechlorinating clade within the metal-reducing Geobacter group. Substrate versatility, consumption of electron donors to low threshold concentrations, and simultaneous reduction of electron acceptors suggest that strain SZ-type organisms have desirable characteristics for bioremediation applications. PMID:16597982

  13. Nitric Oxide Mediates Biofilm Formation and Symbiosis in Silicibacter sp. Strain TrichCH4B

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Minxi; Smith, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important signaling role in all domains of life. Many bacteria contain a heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) protein that selectively binds NO. These H-NOX proteins often act as sensors that regulate histidine kinase (HK) activity, forming part of a bacterial two-component signaling system that also involves one or more response regulators. In several organisms, NO binding to the H-NOX protein governs bacterial biofilm formation; however, the source of NO exposure for these bacteria is unknown. In mammals, NO is generated by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and signals through binding the H-NOX domain of soluble guanylate cyclase. Recently, several bacterial NOS proteins have also been reported, but the corresponding bacteria do not also encode an H-NOX protein. Here, we report the first characterization of a bacterium that encodes both a NOS and H-NOX, thus resembling the mammalian system capable of both synthesizing and sensing NO. We characterized the NO signaling pathway of the marine alphaproteobacterium Silicibacter sp. strain TrichCH4B, determining that the NOS is activated by an algal symbiont, Trichodesmium erythraeum. NO signaling through a histidine kinase-response regulator two-component signaling pathway results in increased concentrations of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate, a key bacterial second messenger molecule that controls cellular adhesion and biofilm formation. Silicibacter sp. TrichCH4B biofilm formation, activated by T. erythraeum, may be an important mechanism for symbiosis between the two organisms, revealing that NO plays a previously unknown key role in bacterial communication and symbiosis. PMID:25944856

  14. Staurosporine from the endophytic Streptomyces sp. strain CNS-42 acts as a potential biocontrol agent and growth elicitor in cucumber.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolin; Huang, Pei; Wang, Qian; Xiao, Lie; Liu, Miaomiao; Bolla, Krishna; Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Linyong; Gan, Bingcheng; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Lixin; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2014-09-01

    Chinese medicinal plants and their surrounding rhizospheric soil serve as promising sources of actinobacteria. A total of 180 actinobacteria strains were isolated from the rhizosphere soil, leaves, stems, and roots of nine selected plants and have been identified as potential biocontrol agents against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum. An endophytic strain CNS-42 isolated from Alisma orientale showed the largest zone of inhibition demonstrating a potent effect against F. oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum and a broad antimicrobial activity against bacteria, yeasts, and other pathogenic fungi. The in vivo biocontrol assays showed that the disease severity index was significantly reduced (P < 0.05), and plant shoot fresh weight and height increased greatly (P < 0.05) in plantlets treated with strain CNS-42 compared to the negative control. This isolate was identified as Streptomyces sp. based on cultural, physiological, morphological characteristics, and 16S rRNA gene analysis. Further bioassay-guided isolation and purification revealed that staurosporine was responsible for its antifungal and plant growth promoting activities and the latter property of staurosporine is reported for the first time. The in vivo assay was further performed and indicated that staurosporine showed good growth promoting effect on the plant shoot biomass of cucumber. This is the first critical evidence identifying CNS-42 as a biocontrol agent for the soil borne pathogen, F. oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum. PMID:25035061

  15. Improvement of Fish Sauce Quality by Strain CMC5-3-1: A Novel Species of Staphylococcus sp.

    PubMed

    Udomsil, Natteewan; Rodtong, Sureelak; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 and CMS5-7-5 isolated from fermented fish sauce at 3 to 7 mo, respectively, showed different characteristics on protein hydrolysis and volatile formation. These Gram-positive cocci were able to grow in up to 15% NaCl with the optimum at 0.5% to 5% NaCl in tryptic soy broth. Based on ribosomal 16S rRNA gene sequences, Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 and CMS5-7-5 showed 99.0% similarity to that of Staphylococcus piscifermentans JCM 6057(T) , but DNA-DNA relatedness was <30%, indicating that they were likely to be new species. DNA relatedness between these 2 strains was only 65%, suggesting that they also belonged to different species. The ?-amino group content of 6-month-old fish sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 was 740.5 mM, which was higher than that inoculated by the strain CMS5-7-5 (662.14 mM, P < 0.05). Histamine was not produced during fermentations with both strains. Fish sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 showed the highest content of total glutamic acid (P < 0.05). The major volatile compound detected in fish sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 was 2-methypropanal, contributing to the desirable dark chocolate note. Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 could be applied as a starter culture to improve the umami and aroma of fish sauce. PMID:26256665

  16. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Imidacloprid-Degrading Mycobacterium sp. Strain MK6 from an Egyptian Soil.

    PubMed

    Kandil, Mahrous M; Trigo, Carmen; Koskinen, William C; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-05-20

    Thus far, only a small number and types of bacteria with limited ability in degrading imidacloprid have been reported. Also, genes regulating imidacloprid (IMDA) degradation have yet to be discovered. To study this in more detail, an enrichment technique was used to isolate consortia and pure cultures of IMDA-degrading bacteria. Through this approach, we successfully isolated a novel bacterium capable of completely degrading IMDA as a sole nitrogen source. The bacterium was subsequently identified as Mycobacterium sp. strain MK6 by sequence analysis of its 16S rRNA gene (Genbank accession number KR052814 ). BLASTn searches indicated that 16S rRNA gene from Mycobacterium sp. strain MK6 was 99% identical to several Mycobacterium spp. Mycobacterium sp. strain MK6 transformed 99.7% added IMDA (150 ?g mL(-1)) in <2 weeks (t1/2 = 1.6 days) to 6-chloronicotinic acid (6-CNA) as its major metabolite. Although the isolated strain and mixed bacterial consortia were able to degrade IMDA, they failed to grow further on 6-CNA, indicating a lack of IMDA mineralization to carbon dioxide. Small amounts of the desnitro-olefin and desnitro-degradates of IMDA were observed during the incubation but did not accumulate in culture medium. PMID:25932751

  17. Biotransformation of Direct Blue 1 by a moderately halophilic bacterium Marinobacter sp. strain HBRA and toxicity assessment of degraded metabolites.

    PubMed

    Arun Prasad, A S; Satyanarayana, V S V; Bhaskara Rao, K V

    2013-11-15

    The ability of halophiles to survive in the extreme salt concentrations has gained them the importance of being used in the treatment of industrial waste waters. A moderately halophilic bacterial strain with the ability to degrade the complex azo dye Direct Blue-1 (DB-1) was isolated from sea water and identified as Marinobacter sp. strain HBRA. Complete decolorization of DB-1 (100 mg L(-1)) was achieved in 6h at 37 °C, pH 8 and with 70 g L(-1) NaCl. Decolorization was analyzed by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The FT-IR spectrum revealed that Marinobacter sp. strain HBRA specifically targeted azo bond (NN) at 1631 cm(-1) to break down Direct Blue-1. Formation of metabolites at different retention times in HPLC indicated degradation. Biotransformation pathway for DB-1 was proposed based on LC-MS. Phytotoxicity study revealed the less toxic nature of the metabolites compared to the dye. Genotoxicity with Allium cepa confirmed the cytotoxic nature of DB-1 by inducing several chromosomal abnormalities compared to the negligible effects of degraded metabolites. The current study is the first report on the detoxification of DB-1 by Marinobacter sp. strain HBRA. PMID:24121630

  18. Genomic and Transcriptomic Analyses of the Facultative Methanotroph Methylocystis sp. Strain SB2 Grown on Methane or Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Vorobev, Alexey; Jagadevan, Sheeja; Jain, Sunit; Anantharaman, Karthik; Dick, Gregory J.; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    A minority of methanotrophs are able to utilize multicarbon compounds as growth substrates in addition to methane. The pathways utilized by these microorganisms for assimilation of multicarbon compounds, however, have not been explicitly examined. Here, we report the draft genome of the facultative methanotroph Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 and perform a detailed transcriptomic analysis of cultures grown with either methane or ethanol. Evidence for use of the canonical methane oxidation pathway and the serine cycle for carbon assimilation from methane was obtained, as well as for operation of the complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the ethylmalonyl-coenzyme A (EMC) pathway. Experiments with Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 grown on methane revealed that genes responsible for the first step of methane oxidation, the conversion of methane to methanol, were expressed at a significantly higher level than those for downstream oxidative transformations, suggesting that this step may be rate limiting for growth of this strain with methane. Further, transcriptomic analyses of Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 grown with ethanol compared to methane revealed that on ethanol (i) expression of the pathway of methane oxidation and the serine cycle was significantly reduced, (ii) expression of the TCA cycle dramatically increased, and (iii) expression of the EMC pathway was similar. Based on these data, it appears that Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 converts ethanol to acetyl-coenzyme A, which is then funneled into the TCA cycle for energy generation or incorporated into biomass via the EMC pathway. This suggests that some methanotrophs have greater metabolic flexibility than previously thought and that operation of multiple pathways in these microorganisms is highly controlled and integrated. PMID:24610846

  19. Transcriptomic Analysis of Xylan Utilization Systems in Paenibacillus sp. Strain JDR-2

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Neha; Crooks, Casey; St. John, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Xylans, including methylglucuronoxylans (MeGXn) and methylglucuronoarabinoxylans (MeGAXn), are the predominant polysaccharides in hemicellulose fractions of dicots and monocots available for conversion to biofuels and chemicals. Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 (Pjdr2) efficiently depolymerizes MeGXn and MeGAXn and assimilates the generated oligosaccharides, resulting in efficient saccharification and subsequent metabolism of these polysaccharides. A xylan utilization regulon encoding a cell-associated GH10 (glycoside hydrolase family 10) endoxylanase, transcriptional regulators, ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporters, an intracellular GH67 ?-glucuronidase, and other glycoside hydrolases contributes to complete metabolism. This GH10/GH67 system has been proposed to account for preferential utilization of xylans compared to free oligo- and monosaccharides. To identify additional genes contributing to MeGXn and MeGAXn utilization, the transcriptome of Pjdr2 has been sequenced following growth on each of these substrates as well as xylose and arabinose. Increased expression of genes with different substrates identified pathways common or unique to the utilization of MeGXn or MeGAXn. Coordinate upregulation of genes comprising the GH10/GH67 xylan utilization regulon is accompanied with upregulation of genes encoding a GH11 endoxylanase and a GH115 ?-glucuronidase, providing evidence for a novel complementary pathway for processing xylans. Elevated expression of genes encoding a GH43 arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase and an arabinose ABC transporter on MeGAXn but not on MeGXn supports a process in which arabinose may be removed extracellularly followed by its rapid assimilation. Further development of Pjdr2 for direct conversion of xylans to targeted products or introduction of these systems into fermentative strains of related bacteria may lead to biocatalysts for consolidated bioprocessing of hemicelluloses released from lignocellulose. PMID:25527555

  20. A Novel (S)-6-Hydroxynicotine Oxidase Gene from Shinella sp. Strain HZN7

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jiguo; Wei, Yin; Ma, Yun; Wen, Rongti; Wen, Yuezhong

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine is an important environmental toxicant in tobacco waste. Shinella sp. strain HZN7 can metabolize nicotine into nontoxic compounds via variations of the pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways. However, the catabolic mechanism of this variant pathway at the gene or enzyme level is still unknown. In this study, two 6-hydroxynicotine degradation-deficient mutants, N7-M9 and N7-W3, were generated by transposon mutagenesis. The corresponding mutant genes, designated nctB and tnp2, were cloned and analyzed. The nctB gene encodes a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing (S)-6-hydroxynicotine oxidase that converts (S)-6-hydroxynicotine into 6-hydroxy-N-methylmyosmine and then spontaneously hydrolyzes into 6-hydroxypseudooxynicotine. The deletion and complementation of the nctB gene showed that this enzyme is essential for nicotine or (S)-6-hydroxynicotine degradation. Purified NctB could also convert (S)-nicotine into N-methylmyosmine, which spontaneously hydrolyzed into pseudooxynicotine. The kinetic constants of NctB toward (S)-6-hydroxynicotine (Km = 0.019 mM, kcat = 7.3 s?1) and nicotine (Km = 2.03 mM, kcat = 0.396 s?1) indicated that (S)-6-hydroxynicotine is the preferred substrate in vivo. NctB showed no activities toward the R enantiomer of nicotine or 6-hydroxynicotine. Strain HZN7 could degrade (R)-nicotine into (R)-6-hydroxynicotine without any further degradation. The tnp2 gene from mutant N7-W3 encodes a putative transposase, and its deletion did not abolish the nicotine degradation activity. This study advances the understanding of the microbial diversity of nicotine biodegradation. PMID:25002425

  1. NolL of Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234 Is Required for O-Acetyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Berck, S.; Perret, X.; Quesada-Vincens, D.; Promé, J.-C.; Broughton, W. J.; Jabbouri, S.

    1999-01-01

    Following (iso)flavonoid induction, nodulation genes of the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 elaborate a large family of lipooligosaccharidic Nod factors (NodNGR factors). When secreted into the rhizosphere of compatible legumes, these signal molecules initiate root hair deformation and nodule development. The nonreducing glucosamine residue of NodNGR factors are N acylated, N methylated, and mono- or biscarbamoylated, while position C-6 of the reducing extremity is fucosylated. This fucose residue is normally 2-O methylated and either sulfated or acetylated. Here we present an analysis of all acetylated NodNGR factors, which clearly shows that the acetate group may occupy position C-3 or C-4 of the fucose moiety. Disruption of the flavonoid-inducible nolL gene, which is preceded by a nod box, results in the synthesis of NodNGR factors that lack the 3-O- or 4-O-acetate groups. Interestingly, the nodulation capacity of the mutant NGR?nolL is not impaired, whereas introduction of the nod box::nolL construct into the related strain Rhizobium fredii USDA257 extends the host range of this bacterium to Calopogonium caeruleum, Leucaena leucocephala, and Lotus halophilus. Nod factors produced by a USDA257(pnolL) transconjugant were also acetylated. The nod box::nolL construct was also introduced into ANU265 (NGR234 cured of its symbiotic plasmid), along with extra copies of the nodD1 gene. When permeabilized, these cells possessed acetyltransferase activity, although crude extracts did not. PMID:9922261

  2. Atrazine chlorohydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP: gene sequence, enzyme purification, and protein characterization.

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, M L; Sadowsky, M J; Wackett, L P

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP metabolizes atrazine to carbon dioxide and ammonia via the intermediate hydroxyatrazine. The genetic potential to produce hydroxyatrazine was previously attributed to a 1.9-kb AvaI DNA fragment from strain ADP (M. L. de Souza, L. P. Wackett, K. L. Boundy-Mills, R. T. Mandelbaum, and M. J. Sadowsky, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 61:3373-3378, 1995). In this study, sequence analysis of the 1.9-kb AvaI fragment indicated that a single open reading frame, atzA, encoded an activity transforming atrazine to hydroxyatrazine. The open reading frame for the chlorohydrolase was determined by sequencing to be 1,419 nucleotides and encodes a 473-amino-acid protein with a predicted subunit molecular weight of 52,421. The deduced amino acid sequence matched the first 10 amino acids determined by protein microsequencing. The protein AtzA was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and anion-exchange chromatography. The subunit and holoenzyme molecular weights were 60,000 and 245,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration chromatography, respectively. The purified enzyme in H2(18)O yielded [18O]hydroxyatrazine, indicating that AtzA is a chlorohydrolase and not an oxygenase. The most related protein sequence in GenBank was that of TrzA, 41% identity, from Rhodococcus corallinus NRRL B-15444R. TrzA catalyzes the deamination of melamine and the dechlorination of deethylatrazine and desisopropylatrazine but is not active with atrazine. AtzA catalyzes the dechlorination of atrazine, simazine, and desethylatrazine but is not active with melamine, terbutylazine, or desethyldesisopropylatrazine. Our results indicate that AtzA is a novel atrazine-dechlorinating enzyme with fairly restricted substrate specificity and contributes to the microbial hydrolysis of atrazine to hydroxyatrazine in soils and groundwater. PMID:8759853

  3. Phenylacetate catabolism in Rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1: a central pathway for degradation of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Llorens, Juana María; Patrauchan, Marianna A; Stewart, Gordon R; Davies, Julian E; Eltis, Lindsay D; Mohn, William W

    2005-07-01

    In gram-negative bacteria, a pathway for aerobic degradation of phenylacetic acid (PAA) that proceeds via phenylacetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and hydrolytic ring fission plays a central role in the degradation of a range of aromatic compounds. In contrast, the PAA pathway and its role are not well characterized in gram-positive bacteria. A cluster including 13 paa genes encoding enzymes orthologous to those of gram-negative bacteria was identified on the chromosome of Rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1. These genes were transcribed during growth on PAA, with 11 of the genes apparently in an operon yielding a single transcript. Quantitative proteomic analyses revealed that at least 146 proteins were more than twice as abundant in PAA-grown cells of RHA1 than in pyruvate-grown cells. Of these proteins, 29 were identified, including 8 encoded by the paa genes. Knockout mutagenesis indicated that paaN, encoding a putative ring-opening enzyme, was essential for growth on PAA. However, paaF, encoding phenylacetyl-CoA ligase, and paaR, encoding a putative regulator, were not essential. paaN was also essential for growth of RHA1 on phenylacetaldehyde, phenylpyruvate, 4-phenylbutyrate, 2-phenylethanol, 2-phenylethylamine, and l-phenylalanine. In contrast, growth on 3-hydroxyphenylacetate, ethylbenzene, and styrene was unaffected. These results suggest that the range of substrates degraded via the PAA pathway in RHA1 is somewhat limited relative to the range in previously characterized gram-negative bacteria. PMID:15968060

  4. Kinetics of Molybdenum Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by Bacillus sp. Strain A.rzi

    PubMed Central

    Othman, A. R.; Bakar, N. A.; Halmi, M. I. E.; Johari, W. L. W.; Ahmad, S. A.; Jirangon, H.; Syed, M. A.; Shukor, M. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum is very toxic to agricultural animals. Mo-reducing bacterium can be used to immobilize soluble molybdenum to insoluble forms, reducing its toxicity in the process. In this work the isolation of a novel molybdate-reducing Gram positive bacterium tentatively identified as Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi from a metal-contaminated soil is reported. The cellular reduction of molybdate to molybdenum blue occurred optimally at 4?mM phosphate, using 1% (w/v) glucose, 50?mM molybdate, between 28 and 30°C and at pH 7.3. The spectrum of the Mo-blue product showed a maximum peak at 865?nm and a shoulder at 700?nm. Inhibitors of bacterial electron transport system (ETS) such as rotenone, sodium azide, antimycin A, and potassium cyanide could not inhibit the molybdenum-reducing activity. At 0.1?mM, mercury, copper, cadmium, arsenic, lead, chromium, cobalt, and zinc showed strong inhibition on molybdate reduction by crude enzyme. The best model that fitted the experimental data well was Luong followed by Haldane and Monod. The calculated value for Luong's constants pmax, Ks, Sm, and n was 5.88??mole Mo-blue hr?1, 70.36?mM, 108.22?mM, and 0.74, respectively. The characteristics of this bacterium make it an ideal tool for bioremediation of molybdenum pollution. PMID:24369531

  5. Isolation of a Paenibacillus sp. Strain and Structural Elucidation of Its Broad-Spectrum Lipopeptide Antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yaoqi; Huang, En; Yuan, Chunhua; Zhang, Liwen

    2012-01-01

    This research was initiated to search for novel antimicrobial compounds produced by food or environmental microorganisms. A new bacterial strain, designated OSY-SE, which produces a unique and potent antimicrobial agent was isolated from soil. The isolate was identified as a Paenibacillus sp. through cultural, biochemical, and genetic analyses. An antimicrobial compound was extracted from Paenibacillus OSY-SE with acetonitrile and purified using liquid chromatography. After analyses by mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the antimicrobial compound was determined to be a cyclic lipopeptide consisting of a C15 fatty acyl (FA) chain and 13 amino acids. The deduced sequence is FA-Orn-Val-Thr-Orn-Ser-Val-Lys-Ser-Ile-Pro-Val-Lys-Ile. The carboxyl-terminal Ile is connected to Thr by ester linkage. The new compound, designated paenibacterin, showed antagonistic activities against most Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria tested, including Listeria monocytogenes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Paenibacterin is resistant to trypsin, lipase, ?-glucosidase, and lysozyme. Its antimicrobial activity was lost after digestion by pronase and polymyxin acylase. Paenibacterin is readily soluble in water and fairly stable to exposure to heat and a wide range of pH values. The new isolate and its antimicrobial agent are being investigated for usefulness in food and medical applications. PMID:22367082

  6. Emulsification potential of a newly isolated biosurfactant-producing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain TA6.

    PubMed

    Shavandi, Mahmoud; Mohebali, Ghasemali; Haddadi, Azam; Shakarami, Heidar; Nuhi, Ashrafossadat

    2011-02-01

    An indigenous biosurfactant producing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain TA6 was isolated from Iranian oil contaminated soil using an efficient enrichment and screening method. During growth on sucrose and several hydrocarbon substrates as sole carbon source, the bacterium could produce biosurfactants. As a result of biosurfactant synthesis, the surface tension of the growth medium was reduced from 68mNm(-1) to values below 30mNm(-1). The biosurfactant was capable of forming stable emulsions with various hydrocarbons ranging from pentane to light motor oil. Preliminary chemical characterization revealed that the TA6 biosurfactant consisted of extracellular lipids and glycolipids. The biosurfactant was stable during exposure to high salinity (10% NaCl), elevated temperatures (120°C for 15min) and within a wide pH range (4.0-10.0). The culture broth was effective in recovering up to 70% of the residual oil from oil-saturated sand packs which indicates the potential value of the biosurfactant in enhanced oil recovery. PMID:21030223

  7. Crystallization of the extracellular rubber oxygenase RoxA from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Maren; Braaz, Reinhard; Jendrossek, Dieter; Einsle, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y is an extracellular dioxygenase that is capable of cleaving the double bonds of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) into short-chain isoprene units with 12-oxo-4,8-dimethyl-trideca-4,8-diene-1-al (ODTD) as the major cleavage product. Crystals of the dihaem c-type cytochrome RoxA were grown by sitting-drop vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. RoxA crystallized in space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.4, b = 97.1, c = 101.1?Å, ? = 98.39°, resulting in two monomers per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to a limiting resolution of 1.8?Å. Despite a protein weight of 74.1?kDa and only two iron sites per monomer, phasing was successfully carried out by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion. PMID:18259065

  8. Aerobic Biodegradation of 2,4-Dinitroanisole by Nocardioides sp. Strain JS1661

    PubMed Central

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Palamuru, Shannu; Pandey, Gunjan

    2014-01-01

    2,4-Dinitroanisole (DNAN) is an insensitive munition ingredient used in explosive formulations as a replacement for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Little is known about the environmental behavior of DNAN. There are reports of microbial transformation to dead-end products, but no bacteria with complete biodegradation capability have been reported. Nocardioides sp. strain JS1661 was isolated from activated sludge based on its ability to grow on DNAN as the sole source of carbon and energy. Enzyme assays indicated that the first reaction involves hydrolytic release of methanol to form 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP). Growth yield and enzyme assays indicated that 2,4-DNP underwent subsequent degradation by a previously established pathway involving formation of a hydride-Meisenheimer complex and release of nitrite. Identification of the genes encoding the key enzymes suggested recent evolution of the pathway by recruitment of a novel hydrolase to extend the well-characterized 2,4-DNP pathway. PMID:25281383

  9. Oxidative pathway for the biodegradation of nitrobenzene by Comamonas sp. strain JS765

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, S.F.; Spain, J.C.

    1995-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the biodegradation of nitrobenzene by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes JS45 proceeds by the reduction of nitrobenzene through nitrosobenzene and hydroxylaminobenzene, followed by rearrangement to 2-aminophenol, which then undergoes meta ring cleavage. We report here the isolation of a Comamonas sp. that uses an oxidative pathway for the complete mineralization of nitrobenzene. The isolate, designated strain JS765, uses nitrobenzene as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Nitrobenzene-grown cells oxidized nitrobenzene, with the stoichiometric release of nitrite. Extracts of nitrobenzene-grown JS765 showed high levels of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity that were not abolished by heating the cell extracts to 60{degrees}C for 10 min. The ring cleavage product had an absorbance maximum at 375 nm, consistent with that of 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. Both NAD-dependent dehydrogenase and NAD-indipendent hydrolase activities towards 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde were induced in extracts of nitrobenzene-grown cells. Catechol accumulated in the reaction mixture when cells preincubated with 3-chloracatechol were incubated with nitrobenzene. Conversion of nitrobenzene to catechol by induced cells in the presence of 3-chlorocatechol and {sup 13}O{sub 2} demonstrated the simultaneous incorporation of two atoms of oxygen, which indicated that the initial reaction was dioxygenation. Their results indicate that the catabolic pathway involves an initial dioxygenase attack on nitrobenzene with the release of nitrite and formation of catechol, which is subsequently degraded by a meta cleavage pathway. 37 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Isomaltulose Synthase from Klebsiella sp. Strain LX3: Gene Cloning and Characterization and Engineering of Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daohai; Li, Xianzhen; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2002-01-01

    The gene (palI) encoding isomaltulose synthase (PalI) from a soil bacterial isolate, Klebsiella sp. strain LX3, was cloned and characterized. PalI converts sucrose into isomaltulose, trehalulose, and trace amounts of glucose and fructose. Sequence domain analysis showed that PalI contains an ?-amylase domain and (?/?)8-barrel structures, suggesting that it belongs to the ?-amylase family. Sequence alignment indicated that the five amino acid residues of catalytic importance in ?-amylases and glucosyltransferases (Asp241, Glu295, Asp369, His145, and His368) are conserved in PalI. Purified recombinant PalI displayed high catalytic efficiency, with a Km of 54.6 ± 1.7 mM for sucrose, and maximum activity (approximately 328.0 ± 2.5 U/mg) at pH 6.0 and 35°C. PalI activity was strongly inhibited by Fe3+ and Hg2+ and was enhanced by Mn2+ and Mg2+. The half-life of PalI was 1.8 min at 50°C. Replacement of selected amino acid residues by proline significantly increased the thermostability of PalI. Simultaneous replacement of Glu498 and Arg310 with proline resulted in an 11-fold increase in the half-life of PalI at 50°C. PMID:12039719

  11. Isomaltulose synthase from Klebsiella sp. strain LX3: gene cloning and characterization and engineering of thermostability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daohai; Li, Xianzhen; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2002-06-01

    The gene (palI) encoding isomaltulose synthase (PalI) from a soil bacterial isolate, Klebsiella sp. strain LX3, was cloned and characterized. PalI converts sucrose into isomaltulose, trehalulose, and trace amounts of glucose and fructose. Sequence domain analysis showed that PalI contains an alpha-amylase domain and (beta/alpha)(8)-barrel structures, suggesting that it belongs to the alpha-amylase family. Sequence alignment indicated that the five amino acid residues of catalytic importance in alpha-amylases and glucosyltransferases (Asp(241), Glu(295), Asp(369), His(145), and His(368)) are conserved in PalI. Purified recombinant PalI displayed high catalytic efficiency, with a Km of 54.6 +/- 1.7 mM for sucrose, and maximum activity (approximately 328.0 +/- 2.5 U/mg) at pH 6.0 and 35 degrees C. PalI activity was strongly inhibited by Fe3+ and Hg2+ and was enhanced by Mn2+ and Mg2+. The half-life of PalI was 1.8 min at 50 degrees C. Replacement of selected amino acid residues by proline significantly increased the thermostability of PalI. Simultaneous replacement of Glu(498) and Arg(310) with proline resulted in an 11-fold increase in the half-life of PalI at 50 degrees C. PMID:12039719

  12. Isolation and nitrogenase activity of vesicles from Frankia sp. strain EAN1pec.

    PubMed

    Tisa, L S; Ensign, J C

    1987-11-01

    Vesicles, specialized cell structures thought to be the site of nitrogen fixation in the actinorhizal bacteria, were isolated from Frankia sp. strain EAN1pec by using French pressure disruption of mycelia followed by differential and isopycnic gradient centrifugation. The isolated vesicles reduced acetylene when incubated anaerobically with Mg2+ ions, ATP, and dithionite. No nitrogenase activity was detected in the disrupted mycelial fractions. Vesicles permeabilized by freeze-thaw or detergents showed increased rates of acetylene reduction due to increased permeability of dithionite. The effect on nitrogenase activity of different ATP concentrations was the same in normal and permeabilized vesicles. The endogenous respiratory rate of vesicles was significantly lower than that of mycelia, and the respiration rate of vesicles did not increase following the addition of succinate. The low respiratory activity of vesicles and their apparent dependence on externally supplied ATP for acetylene reduction suggest that the energy and reducing power for nitrogen fixation may be supplied from the mycelia to which they are attached. PMID:3478333

  13. Response surface optimization for efficient dye removal by isolated strain Pseudomonas sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, Shanmugam; Perumalsamy, Muthiah; Prabhuy, Harinarayan; AhmedBasha, Chiya; Anantharaman, Narayan

    2012-09-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) involving the central composite design (CCD) was employed to optimize three important process variables for the decolourization of synthetic dye solutions containing Remazol Turquoise Blue (RTB) and Reactive Black 5 (RB5) with isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas sp. The interaction between three variables i.e. Initial concentration of dye, carbon source and nitrogen source were studied and modeled. According to the Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results the predicted results were found to be in good agreement with experimental results (R 2: 0.9726; Adj R 2: 0.9480 for RTB and R 2: 0.9789; Adj R 2: 0.9750 for RB5) which indicated excellent evaluation of experimental data from the second order polynomial regression model. Mathematical models were developed by the proposed system, for each process variable showed the effect of each factor and their interactions on biodecolourization process. The optimum concentrations of Dye, Carbon source, and Nitrogen source were found to be 20 mgL-1, 1.5 g/L and 1.5 g/L, respectively for RTB and RB5 to obtain maximum dye removing capacity. Predicted values were validated with experimental results, which indicated appropriateness of the employed model and the success of RSM.

  14. Response surface optimization for efficient dye removal by isolated strain Pseudomonas sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, Shanmugam; Perumalsamy, Muthiah; Prabhuy, Harinarayan Janardhana; AhmedBasha, Chiya; Anantharaman, Narayan

    2012-09-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) involving the central composite design (CCD) was employed to optimize three important process variables for the decolourization of synthetic dye solutions containing Remazol Turquoise Blue (RTB) and Reactive Black 5 (RB5) with isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas sp. The interaction between three variables i.e. Initial concentration of dye, carbon source and nitrogen source were studied and modeled. According to the Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results the predicted results were found to be in good agreement with experimental results ( R 2: 0.9726; Adj R 2: 0.9480 for RTB and R 2: 0.9789; Adj R 2: 0.9750 for RB5) which indicated excellent evaluation of experimental data from the second order polynomial regression model. Mathematical models were developed by the proposed system, for each process variable showed the effect of each factor and their interactions on biodecolourization process. The optimum concentrations of Dye, Carbon source, and Nitrogen source were found to be 20 mgL-1, 1.5 g/L and 1.5 g/L, respectively for RTB and RB5 to obtain maximum dye removing capacity. Predicted values were validated with experimental results, which indicated appropriateness of the employed model and the success of RSM.

  15. Kinetics of molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue by Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi.

    PubMed

    Othman, A R; Bakar, N A; Halmi, M I E; Johari, W L W; Ahmad, S A; Jirangon, H; Syed, M A; Shukor, M Y

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum is very toxic to agricultural animals. Mo-reducing bacterium can be used to immobilize soluble molybdenum to insoluble forms, reducing its toxicity in the process. In this work the isolation of a novel molybdate-reducing Gram positive bacterium tentatively identified as Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi from a metal-contaminated soil is reported. The cellular reduction of molybdate to molybdenum blue occurred optimally at 4 mM phosphate, using 1% (w/v) glucose, 50 mM molybdate, between 28 and 30 °C and at pH 7.3. The spectrum of the Mo-blue product showed a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. Inhibitors of bacterial electron transport system (ETS) such as rotenone, sodium azide, antimycin A, and potassium cyanide could not inhibit the molybdenum-reducing activity. At 0.1 mM, mercury, copper, cadmium, arsenic, lead, chromium, cobalt, and zinc showed strong inhibition on molybdate reduction by crude enzyme. The best model that fitted the experimental data well was Luong followed by Haldane and Monod. The calculated value for Luong's constants p max, K(s), S(m), and n was 5.88 ?mole Mo-blue hr(-1), 70.36 mM, 108.22 mM, and 0.74, respectively. The characteristics of this bacterium make it an ideal tool for bioremediation of molybdenum pollution. PMID:24369531

  16. Stability and chemical modification of xylanase from Aspergillus sp. (2M1 strain).

    PubMed

    Angelo, R; Aguirre, C; Curotto, E; Esposito, E; Fontana, J D; Baron, M; Milagres, A M; Durán, N

    1997-02-01

    The 2M1 strain of Aspergillus sp., which showed high extracellular xylanolytic activities in a pre-screening, was studied. Oat-spelt, birch, eucalyptus and pine xylans were used as xylanolytic inductors. The following activities were found at 50 degrees C in the presence of 1% xylan: 120 units/ml (oat-spelt xylan), 132 units/ml (birch xylan), 107 units/ml (eucalyptus xylan), 67 units/ml (pine xylan) and 137 units/ml (larch-wood xylan). Xylanase induced by pine xylan exhibited a higher stability than those induced by the other xylans. The stability was improved by addition of glycerol. In the crude extract, reagents which were found to affect xylanase activity were 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodi-imide for amidation of carboxylic groups and N-bromosuccinimide at a concentration of 0.5 mM for indole oxidation. Methylene Blue, butane-2,3-dione, N-acetylimidazole, chloramine-T and iodoacetate had little effect on the enzyme activity (more than 97% of the original activity remained). PMID:9032934

  17. Trehalose promotes Rhodococcus sp. strain YYL colonization in activated sludge under tetrahydrofuran (THF) stress

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhixing; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Haixia; Lv, Zhenmei

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the role of compatible solutes in changing the microbial community structure in bioaugmentation systems. In this study, we investigated the influence of trehalose as a biostimulant on the microbial community in tetrahydrofuran (THF)-treated wastewater bioaugmentation systems with Rhodococcus sp. YYL. Functional gene profile changes were used to study the variation in the microbial community. Soluble di-iron monooxygenases (SDIMO), particularly group-5 SDIMOs (i.e., tetrahydrofuran and propane monooxygenases), play a significant role in the initiation of the ring cleavage of tetrahydrofuran. Group-5 SDIMOs genes are enriched upon trehalose addition, and exogenous tetrahydrofuran monooxygenase (thmA) genes can successfully colonize bioaugmentation systems. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) have a significant role in catalyzing the region- and stereospecific oxidation of non-activated hydrocarbons, and THF was reported to inhibit P450s in the environment. The CYP153 family was chosen as a representative P450 to study the inhibitory effects of THF. The results demonstrated that CYP153 family genes exhibited significant changes upon THF treatment and that trehalose helped maintain a rich diversity and high abundance of CYP153 family genes. Biostimulation with trehalose could alleviate the negative effects of THF stress on microbial diversity in bioaugmentation systems. Our results indicated that trehalose as a compatible solute plays a significant role for environmental strains under extreme conditions. PMID:26029182

  18. Multiple fission in Allogromia sp., strain NF (Foraminiferida): release, dispersal, and ultrastructure of offspring.

    PubMed

    Bowser, S S; McGee-Russell, S M; Rieder, C L

    1984-05-01

    The release, dispersal, and ultrastructure of juveniles arising through multiple fission in the benthic foraminiferan Allogromia sp., strain NF (Lee & Pierce, 1963) has been examined by light and electron microscopy. An extensive reticulopodial network participates in the dispersal of fully differentiated young as they emerge from the fragmented parental test. During the earliest stages of release, offspring are of two classes--aroused and unaroused. Unaroused juveniles, which have not extended pseudopods, attach externally to the network and are transported bidirectionally along its surface. Aroused juveniles, which have extended pseudopods and are in protoplasmic continuity with the network, move quickly to the periphery of the network. Within 24 h, juveniles establish a communal "feeding reticulum" in which dispersed individuals are in protoplasmic continuity with neighbors via a common reticulopodial network. At the ultrastructural level, the cell body cytoplasm of unaroused juveniles contains numerous patches of a paracrystalline material, which disappears as their pseudopodia are extended to join the communal feeding reticulum. This paracrystalline material therefore appears to be a temporary reservoir of precursors required for pseudopod construction. PMID:6470986

  19. Isolation of Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. strains from decaying woods and characterization of their potential for cellulose deconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Silvina; Lorenzo, Gonzalo Sabarís Di; Lia, Verónica; Talia, Paola; Cataldi, Angel; Grasso, Daniel; Campos, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Prospection of cellulose-degrading bacteria in natural environments allows the identification of novel cellulases and hemicellulases that could be useful in second-generation bioethanol production. In this work, cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from decaying native forest soils by enrichment on cellulose as sole carbon source. There was a predominance of Gram positive isolates that belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Many primary isolates with cellulolytic activity were not pure cultures. From these consortia, isolation of pure constituents was attempted in order to test the hypothesis whether microbial consortia are needed for full degradation of complex substrates. Two isolates, CB1-2-A-5 and VG-4-A-2, were obtained as the pure constituents of CB1-2 and VG-4 consortia, respectively. Based on 16S RNA sequence, they could be classified as Variovorax paradoxus and Paenibacillus alvei. Noteworthy, only VG-4 consortium showed measurable xylan degrading capacity and signs of filter paper degradation. However, no xylan or filter paper degrading capacities were observed for the pure cultures isolated from it, suggesting that other members of this consortium were necessary for these hydrolyzing activities. Our results indicated that Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. as well as VG-4 consortium, might be a useful source of hydrolytic enzymes. Moreover, although Variovorax sp. had been previously identified in metagenomic studies of cellulolytic communities, this is the first report on the isolation and characterization of this microorganism as a cellulolytic genus. PMID:23301200

  20. Isolation of Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. strains from decaying woods and characterization of their potential for cellulose deconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ghio, Silvina; Lorenzo, Gonzalo Sabarís Di; Lia, Verónica; Talia, Paola; Cataldi, Angel; Grasso, Daniel; Campos, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Prospection of cellulose-degrading bacteria in natural environments allows the identification of novel cellulases and hemicellulases that could be useful in second-generation bioethanol production. In this work, cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from decaying native forest soils by enrichment on cellulose as sole carbon source. There was a predominance of Gram positive isolates that belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Many primary isolates with cellulolytic activity were not pure cultures. From these consortia, isolation of pure constituents was attempted in order to test the hypothesis whether microbial consortia are needed for full degradation of complex substrates. Two isolates, CB1-2-A-5 and VG-4-A-2, were obtained as the pure constituents of CB1-2 and VG-4 consortia, respectively. Based on 16S RNA sequence, they could be classified as Variovorax paradoxus and Paenibacillus alvei. Noteworthy, only VG-4 consortium showed measurable xylan degrading capacity and signs of filter paper degradation. However, no xylan or filter paper degrading capacities were observed for the pure cultures isolated from it, suggesting that other members of this consortium were necessary for these hydrolyzing activities. Our results indicated that Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. as well as VG-4 consortium, might be a useful source of hydrolytic enzymes. Moreover, although Variovorax sp. had been previously identified in metagenomic studies of cellulolytic communities, this is the first report on the isolation and characterization of this microorganism as a cellulolytic genus. PMID:23301200

  1. Cloning and expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene in Burkholderia sp. strain DNT for enhancement of 2,4-dinitrotoluene degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.M.; Stark, B.C.; Hwang, K.W.; Dikshit, K.L.; Webster, D.A.

    2000-02-01

    The gene (vgb) encoding the hemoglobin (VHb) of Vitreoscilla sp. was cloned into a broad host range vector and stably transformed into Burkholderia (formerly Pseudomonas) sp. strain DNT, which is able to degrade and metabolize 1,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT). Vgb was stably maintained and expressed in functional form in this recombinant strain (YV1). When growth of YV1, in both tryptic soy broth and minimal salts broth containing DNT and yeast extract, was compared with that of the untransformed strain, YV1 grew significantly better on a cell mass basis (A{sub 600}) and reached slightly higher maximum viable cell numbers. YV1 also had roughly twice the respiration as strain DNT on a cell mass basis, and in DNT-containing medium, YV1 degraded DNT faster than the untransformed strain. YV1 cells pregrown in medium containing DNT plus succinate showed the fastest degradation: 100% of the initial 200 ppm DNT was removed from the medium within 3 days.

  2. Isolation, purification and partial characterization of antibacterial activities produced by a newly isolated Streptomyces sp. US24 strain.

    PubMed

    Mellouli, Lotfi; Ben Ameur-Mehdi, Raoudha; Sioud, Samiha; Salem, Mansour; Bejar, Samir

    2003-06-01

    A new actinomycete strain designated US24 producing antibacterial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was isolated from Tunisian soil. Culture characteristic studies strongly suggested that the US24 strain belonged to the genus Streptomyces. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene of the Streptomyces sp. US24 strain showed high similarity (98%) with the 16S rRNA gene of Streptomyces caelestis which produces two antibiotics, niddamycin and celesticetin. Study of the influence of different nutritional compounds on antibiotic biosynthesis showed that the highest antibacterial activities were obtained when starch at 1% (w/v) was used as sole carbon source in the presence of traces of mineral oligoelements. Application to the supernatant culture of the Streptomyces sp. US24 strain of various separation steps led to isolation of two pure active molecules having a retention time of 34 and 37.26 min, respectively. P(34 min) possessed antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, whereas P(37.26 min) inhibited only Gram-positive bacteria. Partial characterization of the P(34 min) molecule using spectroscopic studies showed that this active molecule is different from the two antibiotics produced by the S. caelestis strain. PMID:12837510

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of a Sulfide-Oxidizing, Autotrophic Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium, Chloroflexus sp. Strain MS-G (Chloroflexi)

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Vera; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Ward, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus sp. strain MS-G (Chloroflexi), isolated from Mushroom Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) was sequenced and comprises 4,784,183 bp in 251 contigs. The draft genome is predicted to encode 4,059 protein coding genes, 49 tRNA encoding genes, and 3 rRNA operons. PMID:25189583

  4. Molecular Cloning, Nucleotide Sequence, and Expression of Genes Encoding a Polycyclic Aromatic Ring Dioxygenase from Mycobacterium sp. Strain PYR-1

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ashraf A.; Wang, Rong-Fu; Cao, Wei-Wen; Doerge, Daniel R.; Wennerstrom, David; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 degrades high-molecular-weight polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAHs) primarily through the introduction of both atoms of molecular oxygen by a dioxygenase. To clone the dioxygenase genes involved in PAH degradation, two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis of PAH-induced proteins from cultures of Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 was used to detect proteins that increased after phenanthrene, dibenzothiophene, and pyrene exposure. Comparison of proteins from induced and uninduced cultures on 2D gels indicated that at least six major proteins were expressed (105, 81, 52, 50, 43, and 13 kDa). The N-terminal sequence of the 50-kDa protein was similar to those of other dioxygenases. A digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probe designed from this protein sequence was used to screen dioxygenase-positive clones from a genomic library of Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1. Three clones, each containing a 5,288-bp DNA insert with three genes of the dioxygenase system, were obtained. The genes in the DNA insert, from the 5? to the 3? direction, were a dehydrogenase, the dioxygenase small (?)-subunit, and the dioxygenase large (?)-subunit genes, arranged in a sequence different from those of genes encoding other bacterial dioxygenase systems. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the large ? subunit did not cluster with most of the known ?-subunit sequences but rather with three newly described ? subunits of dioxygenases from Rhodococcus spp. and Nocardioides spp. The genes from Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 were subcloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli with the pBAD/ThioFusion system. The functionality of the genes for PAH degradation was confirmed in a phagemid clone containing all three genes, as well as in plasmid subclones containing the two genes encoding the dioxygenase subunits. PMID:11472934

  5. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain P482, a Tomato Rhizosphere Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowska, Dorota M.; Ossowicki, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The tomato rhizosphere isolate Pseudomonas sp. strain P482 is a member of a diverse group of fluorescent pseudomonads. P482 produces a yet unidentified broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound(s), active inter alia (i.a.) against Dickeya spp. Here, we present a nearly complete genome of P482 obtained by a hybrid assembly of Illumina and PacBio sequencing data. PMID:24970823

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of a Sulfide-Oxidizing, Autotrophic Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium, Chloroflexus sp. Strain MS-G (Chloroflexi).

    PubMed

    Thiel, Vera; Hamilton, Trinity L; Tomsho, Lynn P; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E; Schuster, Stephan C; Ward, David M; Bryant, Donald A

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus sp. strain MS-G (Chloroflexi), isolated from Mushroom Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) was sequenced and comprises 4,784,183 bp in 251 contigs. The draft genome is predicted to encode 4,059 protein coding genes, 49 tRNA encoding genes, and 3 rRNA operons. PMID:25189583

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Salinarchaeum sp. Strain HArcht-Bsk1T, Isolated from Hypersaline Lake Baskunchak, Russia.

    PubMed

    Dominova, I N; Sorokin, D Y; Kublanov, I V; Patrushev, M V; Toshchakov, S V

    2013-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a novel halophilic archaeon, Salinarchaeum sp. strain HArcht-Bsk1(T), was determined using next-generation sequencing. The genome comprises a 3,255,260-bp circular chromosome with a G+C content of 66.7%. Automatic annotation of the genome revealed a single rRNA operon, 45 tRNAs, and 3,013 protein-coding gene sequences. PMID:23868130

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Salinarchaeum sp. Strain HArcht-Bsk1T, Isolated from Hypersaline Lake Baskunchak, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Dominova, I. N.; Sorokin, D. Y.; Kublanov, I. V.; Patrushev, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a novel halophilic archaeon, Salinarchaeum sp. strain HArcht-Bsk1T, was determined using next-generation sequencing. The genome comprises a 3,255,260-bp circular chromosome with a G+C content of 66.7%. Automatic annotation of the genome revealed a single rRNA operon, 45 tRNAs, and 3,013 protein-coding gene sequences. PMID:23868130

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus sp. Strain VT 400, Isolated from the Saliva of a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tetz, Victor; Vecherkovskaya, Maria

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of spore-forming Paenibacillus sp. strain VT 400, isolated from the saliva of a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The genome consists of 6,986,122 bp, with a G+C content of 45.8%. It possesses 5,777 predicted protein-coding genes encoding multidrug resistance transporters, virulence factors, and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26272571

  10. Isolation of an alkane-degrading Alcanivorax sp. strain 2B5 and cloning of the alkB gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Chen; Li, Ling-Zhi; Wu, Ying; Tian, Wei; Zhang, Li-Ping; Xu, Lian; Shen, Qi-Rong; Shen, Biao

    2010-01-01

    A Gram-negative coccus, strain 2B5, was isolated from the sea mud of the crude oil-polluted Donghai area in China and identified as Alcanivorax sp. based on its physiological characteristics and analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. Strain 2B5 was able to degrade C(13)-C(30)n-alkanes and branched alkanes (pristane and phytane) from crude oil as the sole carbon source. The optimal temperature and pH for strain 2B5 growth and octadecane degradation were 30-37 degrees C and pH 6.0-7.0, respectively. NaCl is required for strain 2B5 growth and octadecane degradation were highest at NaCl concentrations of 20 to 90 g L(-1). A novel alkane hydroxylase gene (alkB), obtained by self-formed adaptor PCR (SEFA-PCR), displays 41.9% deduced amino acid sequence identity with alkB1 of Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2. Functional heterologous expression of the alkB gene was achieved in Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2delta1. Recombinant Pseudomonas containing the alkB gene of Alcanivorax sp. strain 2B5 recovered the ability to grow on C(14) and C(16)n-alkanes. RT-PCR analysis showed that expression of the alkB gene was induced by octadecane. There could be other alkane hydroxylases in Alcanivorax sp. 2B5 that could be involved in the degradation of short- and long-chain alkanes. PMID:19733061

  11. Characterization of an acetyl xylan esterase from the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, D.L.; Li, X.L.; Chen, H.; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1999-09-01

    A 1,067-bp cDNA, designated axeA, coding for an acetyl xylan esterase (AxeA) was cloned from the anaerobic rumen fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2. The gene had an open reading frame of 939 bp encoding a polypeptide of 313 amino acid residues with a calculated mass of 34,845 Da. An active esterase using the original start codon of the cDNA was synthesized in Escherichia coli. Two active forms of the esterase were purified from recombinant E. coli cultures. The size difference of 8 amino acids was a result of cleavages at two different sites within the signal peptide. The enzyme released acetate from several acetylated substrates, including acetylated xylan. The activity toward acetylated xylan was tripled in the presence of recombinant xylanase A from the same fungus. Using p-nitrophenyl acetate as a substrate, the enzyme had a K{sub m} of 0.9 mM and a V{sub max} of 785 {micro}mol min{sup {minus}} mg{sup {minus}1}. It had temperature and pH optima of 30 C and 9.0, respectively. AxeA had 56% amino acid identity with BnaA, an acetyl xylan esterase of Neocallimastix patriciarum, but the Orpinomyces AxeA was devoid of a noncatalytic repeated peptide domain (NCRPD) found at the carboxy terminus of the Neocallimastix BnaA. The NCRPD found in many glycosyl hydrolases and esterases of anaerobic fungi has been postulated to function as a docking domain for cellulase-hemicellulase complexes, similar to the dockerin of the cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum.

  12. Characterization of the Response to Zinc Deficiency in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Mauro; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2012-01-01

    Zur regulators control zinc homeostasis by repressing target genes under zinc-sufficient conditions in a wide variety of bacteria. This paper describes how part of a survey of duplicated genes led to the identification of the open reading frame all2473 as the gene encoding the Zur regulator of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. All2473 binds to DNA in a zinc-dependent manner, and its DNA-binding sequence was characterized, which allowed us to determine the relative contribution of particular nucleotides to Zur binding. A zur mutant was found to be impaired in the regulation of zinc homeostasis, showing sensitivity to elevated concentrations of zinc but not other metals. In an effort to characterize the Zur regulon in Anabaena, 23 genes containing upstream putative Zur-binding sequences were identified and found to be regulated by Zur. These genes are organized in six single transcriptional units and six operons, some of them containing multiple Zur-regulated promoters. The identities of genes of the Zur regulon indicate that Anabaena adapts to conditions of zinc deficiency by replacing zinc metalloproteins with paralogues that fulfill the same function but presumably with a lower zinc demand, and with inducing putative metallochaperones and membrane transport systems likely being involved in the scavenging of extracellular zinc, including plasma membrane ABC transport systems and outer membrane TonB-dependent receptors. Among the Zur-regulated genes, the ones showing the highest induction level encode proteins of the outer membrane, suggesting a primary role for components of this cell compartment in the capture of zinc cations from the extracellular medium. PMID:22389488

  13. AmyM, a Novel Maltohexaose-Forming ?-Amylase from Corallococcus sp. Strain EGB

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhoukun; Wu, Jiale; Zhang, Biying; Wang, Fei; Ye, Xianfeng; Huang, Yan; Huang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel ?-amylase, AmyM, was purified from the culture supernatant of Corallococcus sp. strain EGB. AmyM is a maltohexaose-forming exoamylase with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa. Based on the results of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry and peptide mass fingerprinting of AmyM and by comparison to the genome sequence of Corallococcus coralloides DSM 2259, the AmyM gene was identified and cloned into Escherichia coli. amyM encodes a secretory amylase with a predicted signal peptide of 23 amino acid residues, which showed no significant identity with known and functionally verified amylases. amyM was expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) cells with a hexahistidine tag. The signal peptide efficiently induced the secretion of mature AmyM in E. coli. Recombinant AmyM (rAmyM) was purified by Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) affinity chromatography, with a specific activity of up to 14,000 U/mg. rAmyM was optimally active at 50°C in Tris-HCl buffer (50 mM; pH 7.0) and stable at temperatures of <50°C. rAmyM was stable over a wide range of pH values (from pH 5.0 to 10.0) and highly tolerant to high concentrations of salts, detergents, and various organic solvents. Its activity toward starch was independent of calcium ions. The Km and Vmax of recombinant AmyM for soluble starch were 6.61 mg ml?1 and 44,301.5 ?mol min?1 mg?1, respectively. End product analysis showed that maltohexaose accounted for 59.4% of the maltooligosaccharides produced. These characteristics indicate that AmyM has great potential in industrial applications. PMID:25576603

  14. Characterization of an Acetyl Xylan Esterase from the Anaerobic Fungus Orpinomyces sp. Strain PC-2

    PubMed Central

    Blum, David L.; Li, Xin-Liang; Chen, Huizhong; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    1999-01-01

    A 1,067-bp cDNA, designated axeA, coding for an acetyl xylan esterase (AxeA) was cloned from the anaerobic rumen fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2. The gene had an open reading frame of 939 bp encoding a polypeptide of 313 amino acid residues with a calculated mass of 34,845 Da. An active esterase using the original start codon of the cDNA was synthesized in Escherichia coli. Two active forms of the esterase were purified from recombinant E. coli cultures. The size difference of 8 amino acids was a result of cleavages at two different sites within the signal peptide. The enzyme released acetate from several acetylated substrates, including acetylated xylan. The activity toward acetylated xylan was tripled in the presence of recombinant xylanase A from the same fungus. Using p-nitrophenyl acetate as a substrate, the enzyme had a Km of 0.9 mM and a Vmax of 785 ?mol min?1 mg?1. It had temperature and pH optima of 30°C and 9.0, respectively. AxeA had 56% amino acid identity with BnaA, an acetyl xylan esterase of Neocallimastix patriciarum, but the Orpinomyces AxeA was devoid of a noncatalytic repeated peptide domain (NCRPD) found at the carboxy terminus of the Neocallimastix BnaA. The NCRPD found in many glycosyl hydrolases and esterases of anaerobic fungi has been postulated to function as a docking domain for cellulase-hemicellulase complexes, similar to the dockerin of the cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum. The difference in domain structures indicated that the two highly similar esterases of Orpinomyces and Neocallimastix may be differently located, the former being a free enzyme and the latter being a component of a cellulase-hemicellulase complex. Sequence data indicate that AxeA and BnaA might represent a new family of hydrolases. PMID:10473406

  15. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 nifJ mutant lacking pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    McNeely, Kelsey; Xu, Yu; Ananyev, Gennady; Bennette, Nicholas; Bryant, Donald A; Dismukes, G Charles

    2011-04-01

    The nifJ gene codes for pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), which reduces ferredoxin during fermentative catabolism of pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). A nifJ knockout mutant was constructed that lacks one of two pathways for the oxidation of pyruvate in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. Remarkably, the photoautotrophic growth rate of this mutant increased by 20% relative to the wild-type (WT) rate under conditions of light-dark cycling. This result is attributed to an increase in the quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) charge separation as measured by photosynthetic electron turnover efficiency determined using fast-repetition-rate fluorometry (F(v)/F(m)). During autofermentation, the excretion of acetate and lactate products by nifJ mutant cells decreased 2-fold and 1.2-fold, respectively. Although nifJ cells displayed higher in vitro hydrogenase activity than WT cells, H(2) production in vivo was 1.3-fold lower than the WT level. Inhibition of acetate-CoA ligase and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by glycerol eliminated acetate production, with a resulting loss of reductant and a 3-fold decrease in H(2) production by nifJ cells compared to WT cells. Continuous electrochemical detection of dissolved H(2) revealed two temporally resolved phases of H(2) production during autofermentation, a minor first phase and a major second phase. The first phase was attributed to reduction of ferredoxin, because its level decreased 2-fold in nifJ cells. The second phase was attributed to glycolytic NADH production and decreased 20% in nifJ cells. Measurement of the intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio revealed that the reductant generated by PFOR contributing to the first phase of H(2) production was not in equilibrium with bulk NADH/NAD(+) and that the second phase corresponded to the equilibrium NADH-mediated process. PMID:21317262

  16. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2230 from Karijini National Park, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert; Watkin, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; O’Hara, Graham; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Lobos, Elizabeth; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2230 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming acid-tolerant rod isolated from acidic soil collected in 2001 from Karijini National Park, Western Australia, using Kennedia coccinea (Coral Vine) as a host. WSM2230 was initially effective in nitrogen-fixation with K. coccinea, but subsequently lost symbiotic competence. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2230, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,309,801 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 33 scaffolds of 33 contigs containing 5,590 protein-coding genes and 63 RNA-only encoding genes. The genome sequence of WSM2230 failed to identify nodulation genes and provides an explanation for the observed failure of the laboratory grown strain to nodulate. The genome of this strain is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197440

  17. Characterization of a cypermethrin-degrading Methylobacterium sp. strain A-1 and molecular cloning of its carboxylesterase gene.

    PubMed

    Diegelmann, Corinna; Weber, Joachim; Heinzel-Wieland, Regina; Kemme, Michael

    2015-11-01

    A novel mesophilic bacterial strain, designated A-1, was isolated from microbially contaminated biopolymer microcapsules. The bacterium was able to withstand and grow in liquid cultures supplemented with the pyrethroid cypermethrin in concentrations up to 400?mg?L(-1) . Furthermore, strain A-1 could use cypermethrin as sole carbon source and could degrade >50% of it in 12?h. Based on phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization, and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence, the strain A-1 was identified as Methylobacterium sp., which is the first reported cypermethrin degrader of methylotrophic bacteria. A role for esterase activity in cypermethrin biodegradation was presumed. Therefore, the carboxylesterase gene mse1 was amplified from the Methylobacterium sp. strain A-1 genome and the resulting 1?kb amplicon cloned into E. coli. Sequence analysis of the mse1-DNA insert revealed an open reading frame of 633?bp encoding for a putative carboxylesterase of 210 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 22?kDa. The amino acid sequence of the deduced enzyme MsE1 with the catalytic triad Ser106 , Asp156 , and His187 was found to be similar to that of ?/?-hydrolase fold proteins. The active site Ser106 residue is located in the consensus pentapeptide motif Gly-X-Ser-X-Gly that is typical of esterases. PMID:26131623

  18. Genomic characterization of thermophilic Geobacillus species isolated from the deepest sea mud of the Mariana Trench.

    PubMed

    Takami, Hideto; Nishi, Shinro; Lu, Jei; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro

    2004-10-01

    The thermophilic strains HTA426 and HTA462 isolated from the Mariana Trench were identified as Geobacillus kaustophilus and G. stearothermophilus, respectively, based on physiologic and phylogenetic analyses using 16S rDNA sequences and DNA-DNA relatedness. The genome size of HTA426 and HTA462 was estimated at 3.23-3.49 Mb and 3.7-4.49 Mb, respectively. The nucleotide sequences of three independent lambda-phage inserts of G. stearothermophilus HTA462 have been determined. The organization of protein coding sequences (CDSs) in the two lambda-phage inserts was found to differ from that in the contigs corresponding to each lambda insert assembled by the shotgun clones of the G. kaustophilus HTA426 genome, although the CDS organization in another lambda insert is identical to that in the HTA426 genome. PMID:15168170

  19. Strain and culture medium optimization for production enhancement of prodiginines from marine-derived Streptomyces sp. GQQ-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xueping; Zhang, Guojian; Zhu, Tianjiao; Li, Dehai; Gu, Qianqun

    2012-09-01

    A mutant (GQQ-M6) of a Sponge-Derived streptomyces sp. GQQ-10 obtained by UV-induced mutation was used for producing prodiginines (PGs). Single factor experiments and orthogonal array design (OAD) methods were employed for medium optimization. In the single factor method, the effects of soluble starch, glucose, soybean flour, yeast extract and sodium acetate on PGs production were investigated individually. In the subsequent OAD experiments, the concentrations of these 5 key nutritional components combined with salinity were further adjusted. The mutant strain GQQ-M6 gave a 2.2-fold higher PGs production than that of the parent strain; OAD experiments offered a PGs yield of 61mg L-1, which was 10 times higher than that of the initial GQQ-10 strain under the original cultivation mode.

  20. Identification and biochemical characterization of a novel endo-type ?-agarase AgaW from Cohnella sp. strain LGH.

    PubMed

    Li, Gen; Sun, Mingming; Wu, Jun; Ye, Mao; Ge, Xincheng; Wei, Wei; Li, Huixin; Hu, Feng

    2015-12-01

    An agar-degrading bacterium, strain LGH, was isolated and identified as Cohnella sp. This strain had a capability of utilizing agar as a sole carbon source for growth and showed a strong agarolytic activity. A novel endo-type ?-agarase gene agaW, encoding a primary translation product of 891 amino acids, including a 26 amino acid signal peptide, was cloned and identified from a genomic library of strain LGH. The AgaW belonged to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) GH50 family, with less than 39 % amino acid sequence similarity with any known protein, and hydrolyzed agarose into neoagarotetraose as the major end product and neoagarobiose as the minor end product through other neoagarooligosaccharide intermediates, such as neoagarohexaose. PMID:26245684

  1. Degradation of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) by metabolic cooperative activity of Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357and Rhodococcus imtechensis strain RKJ300.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pal, Deepika; Ghosh, Anuradha; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-11-01

    2,4-Dinitroanisole (DNAN) is an insensitive explosive ingredient used by many defense agencies as a replacement for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. Although the biotransformation of DNAN under anaerobic condition has been reported, aerobic microbial degradation pathway has not been elucidated. An n-methyl-4-nitroaniline degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357 transformed DNAN into 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) as an end product. Interestingly, when strain FK357 was co-cultured with a 2,4-DNP degrading Rhodococcus imtechensis strain RKJ300, complete and high rate of DNAN degradation was observed with no accumulation of intermediates. Enzyme assay using cell extracts of strain FK357 demonstrated that O-demethylation reaction is the first step of DNAN degradation with formation of 2,4-DNP and formaldehyde as intermediates. Subsequently, 2,4-DNP was degraded by strain RKJ300 via the formation of hydride-Meisenheimer complex. The present study clearly demonstrates that complete degradation of DNAN occurs as a result of the metabolic cooperative activity of two members within a bacterial consortium. PMID:24075532

  2. Complete Genome Sequences of Caldicellulosiruptor sp. Strain Rt8.B8, Caldicellulosiruptor sp. Strain Wai35.B1, and “Thermoanaerobacter cellulolyticus”

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Laura L.; Izquierdo, Javier A.; Blumer-Schuette, Sara E.; Zurawski, Jeffrey V.; Conway, Jonathan M.; Cottingham, Robert W.; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, I-Min A.; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T.B.K.; Shapiro, Nicole; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Cantor, Michael N.; Hua, Susan X.; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacteria capable of lignocellulose deconstruction. Currently, complete genome sequences for eleven Caldicellulosiruptor species are available. Here, we report genome sequences for three additional Caldicellulosiruptor species: Rt8.B8 DSM 8990 (New Zealand), Wai35.B1 DSM 8977 (New Zealand), and “Thermoanaerobacter cellulolyticus” strain NA10 DSM 8991 (Japan). PMID:25977428

  3. Formation of a single polar flagellum by two distinct flagellar gene sets in Sphingomonas sp. strain A1.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yukie; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2015-08-01

    Gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. strain A1, originally identified as a non-motile and aflagellate bacterium, possesses two sets of genes required for flagellar formation. In this study, we characterized the flagellar genes and flagellum formation in strain A1. Flagellar gene cluster set I contained 35 flagellar genes, including one flagellin gene (p6), where the gene assembly structure resembled that required for the formation of lateral flagella in gammaproteobacteria. The set II flagellar genes were arranged in eight shorter clusters with 46 flagellar genes, including two flagellin genes (p5 and p5') and flhF, which is required for polar flagella. Our molecular phylogenetic analysis of the bacterial flagellins also demonstrated that, in contrast to p5 and p5', p6 was categorized as a lateral flagellin group. The motile phenotype appeared in strain A1 cells when they were subcultured on semisolid media. The motile strain A1 cells produced a single flagellum at the cell pole. DNA microarray analyses using non-motile and motile strain A1 cells indicated that flagellar formation was accompanied by increased transcription of both flagellar gene sets. The two flagellins p5 and p6 were major components of the flagellar filaments isolated from motile strain A1 cells, indicating that the polar flagellum is formed by lateral and non-lateral flagellins. PMID:26018545

  4. Metabolic Engineering and Comparative Performance Studies of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Strains for Effective Utilization of Xylose

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Saurabh; Zhang, Yan; Kaplan, Mecit; Majeed, Waqar; He, Qingfang

    2015-01-01

    Wood sugars such as xylose can be used as an inexpensive carbon source for biotechnological applications. The model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks the ability to catabolize wood sugars as an energy source. Here, we generated four Synechocystis strains that heterologously expressed XylAB enzymes, which mediate xylose catabolism, either in combination with or without one of three xylose transporters, namely XylE, GalP, or Glf. Except for glf, which is derived from the bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4, the heterologous genes were sourced from Escherichia coli K-12. All of the recombinant strains were able to utilize xylose in the absence of catabolite repression. When xylose was the lone source of organic carbon, strains possessing the XylE and Glf transporters were most efficient in terms of dry biomass production and xylose consumption and the strain lacking a heterologous transporter was the least efficient. However, in the presence of a xylose-glucose mixed sugar source, the strains exhibited similar levels of growth and xylose consumption. This study demonstrates that various bacterial xylose transporters can boost xylose catabolism in transgenic Synechocystis strains, and paves the way for the sustainable production of bio-compounds and green fuels from lignocellulosic biomass.

  5. Characterization of Transcriptional Regulatory Genes for Biphenyl Degradation in Rhodococcus sp. Strain RHA1

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Hisashi; Yamada, Akihiro; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Masai, Eiji; Fukuda, Masao

    2004-01-01

    Transcription of the bphA1A2A3A4C1B genes, which are responsible for the conversion of biphenyl and polychlorinated biphenyl to the meta-cleavage products in Rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1, was examined. The bphA1 promoter (PbphA1) was identified and was shown to promote transcription induction by biphenyl and ethylbenzene. An 8.8-kb HindIII fragment that promotes transcription induction of PbphA1 in Rhodococcus erythropolis IAM1399 was isolated from the region downstream of bphB by using a reporter plasmid containing PbphA1. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of this fragment revealed a set of putative two-component regulatory system genes, which were designated bphS and bphT. Deletion analysis of the 8.8-kb HindIII fragment indicated that bphT is responsible for the basal activation of PbphA1 and that both bphS and bphT are required for the elevated basal activation of and transcriptional induction by biphenyl of PbphA1. These results support the notion that bphS and bphT encode a sensor kinase and a response regulator, respectively, of a two-component regulatory system. The bphS and bphT genes promote transcriptional induction by a variety of aromatic compounds, including biphenyl, benzene, alkylbenzenes, and chlorinated benzenes. A promoter activity assay and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis revealed a weak constitutive promoter in the adjacent region upstream of bphS. RT-PCR analysis indicated that there is induced transcription of bphA1 through bphT, in which PbphA1 is thought to take part. An insertionally inactivated bphS mutant, SDR1, did not grow on biphenyl. Growth was restored by introduction of an intact bphS gene into SDR1. These results indicate that at least bphS is indispensably responsible for the growth of RHA1 on biphenyl. PMID:15028699

  6. Isolation and complementation of mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 unable to grow aerobically on dinitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, C.P.; Cai, Y.; Cardemil, L.; Flores, E.; Hohn, B.; Murry, M.; Schmetterer, G.; Schrautemeier, B.; Wilson, R.

    1988-03-01

    Mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 unable to grow aerobically on dinitrogen were isolated by mutagenesis with UV irradiation, followed by a period of incubation in yellow light and then by penicillin enrichment. A cosmid vector, pRL25C, containing replicons functional in Escherichia coli and in Anabaena species was constructed. DNA from wild-type Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 was partially digested with Sau3AI, and size-fractionated fragments about 40 kilobases (kb) in length were ligated into the phosphatase-treated unique BamHI site of pRL25C. A library of 1054 cosmid clones was generated in E. coli DH1 bearing helper plasmid pDS4101. A derivative of conjugative plasmid RP-4 was transferred to this library by conjugation, and the library was replicated to lawns of mutant Anabaena strains with defects in the polysaccharide layer of the envelopes of the heterocysts. Mutant EF116 was complemented by five cosmids, three of which were subjected to detailed restriction mapping; a 2.8-kb fragment of DNA derived from one of the cosmids was found to complement EF116. Mutant EF113 was complemented by a single cosmid, which was also restriction mapped, and was shown to be complemented by a 4.8-kb fragment of DNA derived from this cosmid.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Strain YZS-X1-1, a Denitrifying Bacterium Isolated from Freshwater Pond Sludge in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Honggang; Li, Xinzhi; Zhang, Bingzhao

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain YZS-X1-1 was isolated from freshwater pond sludge in China. Here, we present the draft genome of strain YZS-X1-1, which consists of 3,278,660 bases, with a G+C content of 42.1%. PMID:25676772

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium sp. Strain L2-4, a Leaf-Associated Endophytic N-Fixing Bacterium Isolated from Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed Central

    Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Chan, Kam Lock

    2014-01-01

    Methylobacterium sp. strain L2-4 is an efficient nitrogen-fixing leaf colonizer of biofuel crop Jatropha curcas. This strain is able to greatly improve the growth and seed yield of Jatropha curcas and is the second reported genome sequence of plant growth-promoting bacteria isolated from Jatropha curcas. PMID:25502683

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain R3, a Red-Pigmented l-Amino Acid Oxidase-Producing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Minyan; Qiu, Juanping

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft 5.58-Mb genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain R3, isolated from an intertidal-zone sludge sample, which has l-amino acid oxidase activity. The genomics information of this strain will facilitate the study of l-amino acid oxidase, quorum sensing, and the relationship of the two. PMID:26586885

  10. Genome Sequence of Novosphingobium sp. Strain Rr 2-17, a Nopaline Crown Gall-Associated Bacterium Isolated from Vitis vinifera L. Grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Han Ming; Chew, Teong Han; Hudson, André O.

    2012-01-01

    Novosphingobium sp. strain Rr 2-17 is an N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing bacterium isolated from the crown gall tumor of a grapevine. To our knowledge, this is the first draft genome announcement of a plant-associated strain from the genus Novosphingobium. PMID:22933764

  11. Draft genome sequence of Flavobacterium sp. strain F52, isolated from the rhizosphere of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Maccabi).

    PubMed

    Kolton, Max; Green, Stefan J; Harel, Yael Meller; Sela, Noa; Elad, Yigal; Cytryn, Eddie

    2012-10-01

    Here we report the draft genome sequence of Flavobacterium sp. strain F52, isolated from the rhizosphere of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Maccabi). Flavobacterium spp. are ubiquitous in the rhizospheres of agricultural crops; however, little is known about their physiology. To our knowledge, this is the first published genome of a root-associated Flavobacterium strain. PMID:22965088

  12. Genome Sequence of Halomonas sp. Strain KO116, an Ionic Liquid-Tolerant Marine Bacterium Isolated from a Lignin-Enriched Seawater Microcosm

    PubMed Central

    O’Dell, Kaela B.; Woo, Hannah L.; Utturkar, Sagar; Klingeman, Dawn; Brown, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Halomonas sp. strain KO116 was isolated from Nile Delta Mediterranean Sea surface water enriched with insoluble organosolv lignin. It was further screened for growth on alkali lignin minimal salts medium agar. The strain tolerates the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Its complete genome sequence is presented in this report. PMID:25953187

  13. High-yield production of lipoglycopeptide antibiotic A40926 using a mutant strain Nonomuraea sp. DP-13 in optimized medium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Guanghao; Zhao, Jing; Gao, Ziqing; Zhang, Chunzhi

    2016-02-17

    The lipoglycopeptide antibiotic A40926 produced by Nonomuraea sp. is a complex of structurally related components differing in the fatty acid moiety. Besides showing an intrinsic antibacterial activity, A40926 is the precursor of the semisynthetic antibiotic Dalvance. In this work, A40926 production by a mutant strain Nonomuraea sp. DP-13 was investigated. It was found that A40926 production was markedly promoted by using poorly assimilated carbon source maltodextrin and nitrogen source soybean meal. Addition of Cu(2+) resulted in a stimulation of A40926 production, but Co(2+) had an inhibitory effect. L-Leucine addition greatly improved total A40926 production and modified the complex composition toward factor B0. An optimized production medium IM-3 was developed and a maximum A40926 production of 1096 mg/L was obtained in the 10-L fermenter. This was the highest A40926 productivity so far reported. PMID:25831044

  14. Endophytic colonization of Vitis vinifera L. by plant growth-promoting bacterium Burkholderia sp. strain PsJN.

    PubMed

    Compant, Stéphane; Reiter, Birgit; Sessitsch, Angela; Nowak, Jerzy; Clément, Christophe; Ait Barka, Essaïd

    2005-04-01

    Patterns of colonization of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chardonnay plantlets by a plant growth-promoting bacterium, Burkholderia sp. strain PsJN, were studied under gnotobiotic conditions. Wild-type strain PsJN and genetically engineered derivatives of this strain tagged with gfp (PsJN::gfp2x) or gusA (PsJN::gusA11) genes were used to enumerate and visualize tissue colonization. The rhizospheres of 4- to 5-week-old plantlets with five developed leaves were inoculated with bacterial suspensions. Epiphytic and endophytic colonization patterns were then monitored by dilution plating assays and microscopic observation of organ sections. Bacteria were chronologically detected first on root surfaces, then in root internal tissues, and finally in the fifth internode and the tissues of the fifth leaf. Analysis of the PsJN colonization patterns showed that this strain colonizes grapevine root surfaces, as well as cell walls and the whole surface of some rhizodermal cells. Cells were also abundant at lateral root emergence sites and root tips. Furthermore, cell wall-degrading endoglucanase and endopolygalacturonase secreted by PsJN explained how the bacterium gains entry into root internal tissues. Host defense reactions were observed in the exodermis and in several cortical cell layers. Bacteria were not observed on stem and leaf surfaces but were found in xylem vessels of the fifth internode and the fifth leaf of plantlets. Moreover, bacteria were more abundant in the fifth leaf than in the fifth internode and were found in substomatal chambers. Thus, it seems that Burkholderia sp. strain PsJN induces a local host defense reaction and systemically spreads to aerial parts through the transpiration stream. PMID:15811990

  15. Metabolism of the Aliphatic Nitramine 4-Nitro-2,4-Diazabutanal by Methylobacterium sp. Strain JS178

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Diane; Trott, Sandra; Hawari, Jalal; Spain, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The aliphatic nitramine 4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal (NDAB; C2H5N3O3) is a ring cleavage metabolite that accumulates during the aerobic degradation of the energetic compound hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) by various Rhodococcus spp. NDAB is also produced during the alkaline hydrolysis of either RDX or octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) and during the photolysis of RDX. Traces of NDAB were observed in a soil sampled from an ammunition-manufacturing facility contaminated with both HMX and RDX, suggesting natural attenuation. In this study, we report the isolation of a soil bacterium that is able to degrade NDAB under aerobic conditions. The isolate is a pink-pigmented facultative methylotroph affiliated with the genus Methylobacterium. The strain, named Methylobacterium sp. strain JS178, degrades NDAB as a sole nitrogen source, with concomitant growth and formation of 1 molar equivalent of nitrous oxide (N2O). Comparison of the growth yield of strain JS178 grown on NDAB, nitrite (NO2?), or ammonium (NH4+) as a nitrogen source revealed that 1 N equivalent is assimilated from each mole of NDAB, which completes the nitrogen mass balance. In radiotracer experiments, strain JS178 mineralized 1 C of the [14C]NDAB produced in situ from [14C]RDX by Rhodococcus sp. strain DN22. Studies on the regulation of NDAB degradation indicated that allantoin, an intermediate in the purine catabolic pathway and a central molecule in the storage and transport of nitrogen in plants, up-regulated the enzyme(s) involved in the degradation of the nitramine. The results reveal the potential for the sequential participation of rhodococci and methylobacteria to effect the complete degradation of RDX. PMID:16085803

  16. Identification of a Third Sulfate Activation System in Sinorhizobium sp. Strain BR816: the CysDN Sulfate Activation Complex

    PubMed Central

    Snoeck, Carla; Verreth, Christel; Hernández-Lucas, Ismael; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Vanderleyden, Jos

    2003-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. strain BR816 possesses two nodPQ copies, providing activated sulfate (3?-phosphoadenosine-5?-phosphosulfate [PAPS]) needed for the biosynthesis of sulfated Nod factors. It was previously shown that the Nod factors synthesized by a nodPQ double mutant are not structurally different from those of the wild-type strain. In this study, we describe the characterization of a third sulfate activation locus. Two open reading frames were fully characterized and displayed the highest similarity with the Sinorhizobium meliloti housekeeping ATP sulfurylase subunits, encoded by the cysDN genes. The growth characteristics as well as the levels of Nod factor sulfation of a cysD mutant (FAJ1600) and a nodP1 nodQ2 cysD triple mutant (FAJ1604) were determined. FAJ1600 shows a prolonged lag phase only with inorganic sulfate as the sole sulfur source, compared to the wild-type parent. On the other hand, FAJ1604 requires cysteine for growth and produces sulfate-free Nod factors. Apigenin-induced nod gene expression for Nod factor synthesis does not influence the growth characteristics of any of the strains studied in the presence of different sulfur sources. In this way, it could be demonstrated that the “household” CysDN sulfate activation complex of Sinorhizobium sp. strain BR816 can additionally ensure Nod factor sulfation, whereas the symbiotic PAPS pool, generated by the nodPQ sulfate activation loci, can be engaged for sulfation of amino acids. Finally, our results show that rhizobial growth defects are likely the reason for a decreased nitrogen fixation capacity of bean plants inoculated with cysD mutant strains, which can be restored by adding methionine to the plant nutrient solution. PMID:12676676

  17. Molecular Characterization of Protease Activity in Serratia sp. Strain SCBI and Its Importance in Cytotoxicity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Lauren M.

    2014-01-01

    A newly recognized Serratia species, termed South African Caenorhabditis briggsae isolate (SCBI), is both a mutualist of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001 and a pathogen of lepidopteran insects. Serratia sp. strain SCBI displays high proteolytic activity, and because secreted proteases are known virulence factors for many pathogens, the purpose of this study was to identify genes essential for extracellular protease activity in Serratia sp. strain SCBI and to determine what role proteases play in insect pathogenesis and cytotoxicity. A bank of 2,100 transposon mutants was generated, and six SCBI mutants with defective proteolytic activity were identified. These mutants were also defective in cytotoxicity. The mutants were found defective in genes encoding the following proteins: alkaline metalloprotease secretion protein AprE, a BglB family transcriptional antiterminator, an inosine/xanthosine triphosphatase, GidA, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, and a PIN domain protein. Gene expression analysis on these six mutants showed significant downregulation in mRNA levels of several different types of predicted protease genes. In addition, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis provided insight into how inactivation of AprE, GidA, and a PIN domain protein influences motility and virulence, as well as protease activity. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) to further characterize expression of predicted protease genes in wild-type Serratia sp. SCBI, the highest mRNA levels for the alkaline metalloprotease genes (termed prtA1 to prtA4) occurred following the death of an insect host, while two serine protease and two metalloprotease genes had their highest mRNA levels during active infection. Overall, these results indicate that proteolytic activity is essential for cytotoxicity in Serratia sp. SCBI and that its regulation appears to be highly complex. PMID:25182493

  18. Polysaccharide Lyase: Molecular Cloning, Sequencing, and Overexpression of the Xanthan Lyase Gene of Bacillus sp. Strain GL1

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Wataru; Miki, Hikaru; Tsuchiya, Noriaki; Nankai, Hirokazu; Murata, Kousaku

    2001-01-01

    When grown on xanthan as a carbon source, the bacterium Bacillus sp. strain GL1 produces extracellular xanthan lyase (75 kDa), catalyzing the first step of xanthan depolymerization (H. Nankai, W. Hashimoto, H. Miki, S. Kawai, and K. Murata, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65:2520–2526, 1999). A gene for the lyase was cloned, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene contained an open reading frame consisting of 2,793 bp coding for a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 99,308. The polypeptide had a signal peptide (2 kDa) consisting of 25 amino acid residues preceding the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the enzyme and exhibited significant homology with hyaluronidase of Streptomyces griseus (identity score, 37.7%). Escherichia coli transformed with the gene without the signal peptide sequence showed a xanthan lyase activity and produced intracellularly a large amount of the enzyme (400 mg/liter of culture) with a molecular mass of 97 kDa. During storage at 4°C, the purified enzyme (97 kDa) from E. coli was converted to a low-molecular-mass (75-kDa) enzyme with properties closely similar to those of the enzyme (75 kDa) from Bacillus sp. strain GL1, specifically in optimum pH and temperature for activity, substrate specificity, and mode of action. Logarithmically growing cells of Bacillus sp. strain GL1 on the medium with xanthan were also found to secrete not only xanthan lyase (75 kDa) but also a 97-kDa protein with the same N-terminal amino acid sequence as that of xanthan lyase (75 kDa). These results suggest that, in Bacillus sp. strain GL1, xanthan lyase is first synthesized as a preproform (99 kDa), secreted as a precursor (97 kDa) by a signal peptide-dependent mechanism, and then processed into a mature form (75 kDa) through excision of a C-terminal protein fragment with a molecular mass of 22 kDa. PMID:11157235

  19. Draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, a moderately halophilic bacterium that produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate).

    PubMed

    Kawata, Yoshikazu; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2012-05-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, which was isolated in Ikeda City, Osaka, Japan, and which produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). The total length of the assembled genome is 4,992,811 bp, and 4,220 coding sequences were predicted within the genome. Genes encoding proteins that are involved in the production and depolymerization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) were identified. The identification of these genes might be of use in the production of the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and its monomer 3-hydroxybutyrate. PMID:22535927

  20. Mode of action of metabolites from Bacillus sp. strain IBA 33 on Geotrichum citri-aurantii arthroconidia.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, María Antonieta; Navarro, Antonio R; Maldonado, María Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Geotrichum citri-aurantii is a postharvest phytopathogenic fungus of lemons. We studied the mode of action of antifungal metabolites from Bacillus sp. strain IBA 33 on arthroconidia of G. citri-aurantii. These metabolites are lipopeptides belonging to the iturin family. Membrane permeabilization of G. citri-aurantii was analyzed and mitochondrial respiratory rate was evaluated. Disturbance of the plasma membrane promotes the leakage of many cellular components into the surrounding media, and mitochondrial membrane disorganization promotes the inhibition of the respiratory rate. Our findings provide insights into the ability of lipopeptides to suppress plant fungal pathogens and their possible agronomical applications. PMID:26394707

  1. GH51 Arabinofuranosidase and Its Role in the Methylglucuronoarabinoxylan Utilization System in Paenibacillus sp. Strain JDR-2

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Methylglucuronoarabinoxylan (MeGAXn) from agricultural residues and energy crops is a significant yet underutilized biomass resource for production of biofuels and chemicals. Mild thermochemical pretreatment of bagasse yields MeGAXn requiring saccharifying enzymes for conversion to fermentable sugars. A xylanolytic bacterium, Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, produces an extracellular cell-associated GH10 endoxylanse (XynA1) which efficiently depolymerizes methylglucuronoxylan (MeGXn) from hardwoods coupled with assimilation of oligosaccharides for further processing by intracellular GH67 ?-glucuronidase, GH10 endoxylanase, and GH43 ?-xylosidase. This process has been ascribed to genes that comprise a xylan utilization regulon that encodes XynA1 and includes a gene cluster encoding transcriptional regulators, ABC transporters, and intracellular enzymes that convert assimilated oligosaccharides to fermentable sugars. Here we show that Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 utilized MeGAXn without accumulation of oligosaccharides in the medium. The Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 growth rate on MeGAXn was 3.1-fold greater than that on oligosaccharides generated from MeGAXn by XynA1. Candidate genes encoding GH51 arabinofuranosidases with potential roles were identified. Following growth on MeGAXn, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR identified a cluster of genes encoding a GH51 arabinofuranosidase (AbfB) and transcriptional regulators which were coordinately expressed along with the genes comprising the xylan utilization regulon. The action of XynA1 on MeGAXn generated arabinoxylobiose, arabinoxylotriose, xylobiose, xylotriose, and methylglucuronoxylotriose. Recombinant AbfB processed arabinoxylooligosaccharides to xylooligosaccharides and arabinose. MeGAXn processing by Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 may be achieved by extracellular depolymerization by XynA1 coupled to assimilation of oligosaccharides and further processing by intracellular enzymes, including AbfB. Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 provides a GH10/GH67 system complemented with genes encoding intracellular GH51 arabinofuranosidases for efficient utilization of MeGAXn. PMID:25063665

  2. Investigation of the Amycolatopsis sp. Strain ATCC 39116 Vanillin Dehydrogenase and Its Impact on the Biotechnical Production of Vanillin

    PubMed Central

    Fleige, Christian; Hansen, Gunda; Kroll, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The actinomycete Amycolatopsis sp. strain ATCC 39116 is capable of synthesizing large amounts of vanillin from ferulic acid, which is a natural cell wall component of higher plants. The desired intermediate vanillin is subject to undesired catabolism caused by the metabolic activity of a hitherto unknown vanillin dehydrogenase (VDHATCC 39116). In order to prevent the oxidation of vanillin to vanillic acid and thereby to obtain higher yields and concentrations of vanillin, the responsible vanillin dehydrogenase in Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 was investigated for the first time by using data from our genome sequence analysis and further bioinformatic approaches. The vdh gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the encoded vanillin dehydrogenase was characterized in detail. VDHATCC 39116 was purified to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity and exhibited NAD+-dependent activity toward vanillin, coniferylaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, and benzaldehyde. The enzyme showed its highest level of activity toward vanillin at pH 8.0 and at a temperature of 44°C. In a next step, a precise vdh deletion mutant of Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 was generated. The mutant lost its ability to grow on vanillin and did not show vanillin dehydrogenase activity. A 2.3-times-higher vanillin concentration and a substantially reduced amount of vanillic acid occurred with the Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 ?vdh::Kmr mutant when ferulic acid was provided for biotransformation in a cultivation experiment on a 2-liter-bioreactor scale. Based on these results and taking further metabolic engineering into account, the Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 ?vdh::Kmr mutant represents an optimized and industrially applicable platform for the biotechnological production of natural vanillin. PMID:23064333

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Lactobacillus equicursoris CIP 110162T and Lactobacillus sp. Strain CRBIP 24.137, Isolated from Thoroughbred Racehorse Feces and Human Urine, Respectively

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, Sylvie; Loux, Valentin; Ma, Laurence; Creno, Sophie; Clermont, Dominique; Bizet, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequences of strain Lactobacillus equicursoris CIP 110162T, isolated from racehorse breed feces, and Lactobacillus sp. strain CRBIP 24.137, isolated from human urine; the two strains are closely related. The total lengths of the 116 and 62 scaffolds are about 2.157 and 2.358 Mb, with G+C contents of 46 and 45% and 2,279 and 2,342 coding sequences (CDSs), respectively. PMID:23969063

  4. Gene Transfer in Leptolyngbya sp. Strain BL0902, a Cyanobacterium Suitable for Production of Biomass and Bioproducts

    PubMed Central

    Taton, Arnaud; Lis, Ewa; Adin, Dawn M.; Dong, Guogang; Cookson, Scott; Kay, Steve A.; Golden, Susan S.; Golden, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Current cyanobacterial model organisms were not selected for their growth traits or potential for the production of renewable biomass, biofuels, or other products. The cyanobacterium strain BL0902 emerged from a search for strains with superior growth traits. Morphology and 16S rRNA sequence placed strain BL0902 in the genus Leptolyngbya. Leptolyngbya sp. strain BL0902 (hereafter Leptolyngbya BL0902) showed robust growth at temperatures from 22°C to 40°C and tolerated up to 0.5 M NaCl, 32 mM urea, high pH, and high solar irradiance. Its growth rate under outdoor conditions rivaled Arthrospira (“pirulina” strains. Leptolyngbya BL0902 accumulated higher lipid content and a higher proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids than Arthrospira strains. In addition to these desirable qualities, Leptolyngbya BL0902 is amenable to genetic engineering that is reliable, efficient, and stable. We demonstrated conjugal transfer from Escherichia coli of a plasmid based on RSF1010 and expression of spectinomycin/streptomycin resistance and yemGFP reporter transgenes. Conjugation efficiency was investigated in biparental and triparental matings with and without a “elper”plasmid that carries DNA methyltransferase genes, and with two different conjugal plasmids. We also showed that Leptolyngbya BL0902 is amenable to transposon mutagenesis with a Tn5 derivative. To facilitate genetic manipulation of Leptolyngbya BL0902, a conjugal plasmid vector was engineered to carry a trc promoter upstream of a Gateway recombination cassette. These growth properties and genetic tools position Leptolyngbya BL0902 as a model cyanobacterial production strain. PMID:22292073

  5. Growth and Chromatic Adaptation of Nostoc sp. Strain MAC and the Pigment Mutant R-MAC 1

    PubMed Central

    Kipe-Nolt, Judith A.; Stevens, S. Edward; Bryant, Donald A.

    1982-01-01

    A spontaneous, stable, pigmentation mutant of Nostoc sp. strain MAC was isolated. Under various growth conditions, this mutant, R-MAC, had similar phycoerythrin contents (relative to allophycocyanin) but significantly lower phycocyanin contents (relative to allophycocyanin) than the parent strain. In saturating white light, the mutant grew more slowly than the parent strain. In nonsaturating red light, MAC grew with a shorter generation time than the mutant; however, R-MAC grew more quickly in nonsaturating green light. When the parental and mutant strains were grown in green light, the phycoerythrin contents, relative to allophycocyanin, were significantly higher than the phycoerythrin contents of cells grown in red light. For both strains, the relative phycocyanin contents were only slightly higher for cells grown in red light than for cells grown in green light. These changes characterize both MAC and R-MAC as belonging to chromatic adaptation group II: phycoerythrin synthesis alone photocontrolled. A comparative analysis of the phycobilisomes, isolated from cultures of MAC and R-MAC grown in both red and green light, was performed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of 8.0 molar urea or sodium dodecyl sulfate. Consistent with the assignment of MAC and R-MAC to chromatic adaptation group II, no evidence for the synthesis of red light-inducible phycocyanin subunits was found in either strain. Phycobilisomes isolated from MAC and R-MAC contained linker polypeptides with relative molecular masses of 95, 34.5, 34, 32, and 29 kilodaltons. When grown in red light, phycobilisomes of the mutant R-MAC appeared to contain a slightly higher amount of the 32-kilodalton linker polypeptide than did the phycobilisomes isolated from the parental strain under the same conditions. The 34.5-kilodalton linker polypeptide was totally absent from phycobilisomes isolated from cells of either MAC or R-MAC grown in green light. Images Fig. 4 PMID:16662715

  6. Biodegradation and transformation of 4,4'- and 2,4-dihalodiphenyl ethers by Sphingomonas sp. strain SS33.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, S; Fortnagel, P; Wittich, R M

    1993-01-01

    The bacterium Sphingomonas sp. strain SS33, obtained from parent diphenyl ether-mineralizing strain SS3 (S. Schmidt, R.-M. Wittich, D. Erdmann, H. Wilkes, W. Francke, and P. Fortnagel, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:2744-2750, 1992) after several weeks of adaptation on 4,4'-difluorodiphenyl ether as the new target compound, also utilized 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyl ether for growth. Intermediary halocatechols were also mineralized via the ortho pathway by type I enzymes. 4,4'-Dibromodiphenyl ether was not used as a carbon source although transformation by resting cells yielded mononuclear haloaromatic compounds, such as 4-bromophenol and 4-bromocatechol. The same was true for the conversion of 2,4-dichlorodiphenyl ether, which yielded the respective (halo-) phenols and (halo-) catechols. PMID:8285696

  7. Mutations that affect structure and assembly of light-harvesting proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain 6701

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.K.; Rayner, M.C.; Eiserling, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain 6701 was mutagenized with UV irradiation and screened for pigment changes that indicated genetic lesions involving the light-harvesting proteins of the phycobilisome. A previous examination of the pigment mutant UV16 showed an assembly defect in the phycocyanin component of the phycobilisome. Mutagenesis of UV16 produced an additional double mutant, UV16-40, with decreased phycoerythrin content. Phycocyanin and phycoerythrin were isolated from UV16-40 and compared with normal biliproteins. The results suggested that the UV16 mutation affected the alpha subunit of phycocyanin, while the phycoerythrin beta subunit from UV16-40 had lost one of its three chromophores. Characterization of the unassembled phycobilisome components in these mutants suggests that these strains will be useful for probing in vivo the regulated expression and assembly of phycobilisomes.

  8. Draft whole-genome sequence of the antibiotic-producing soil isolate Pseudomonas sp. strain 250J.

    PubMed

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Udaondo, Zulema; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas are becoming increasing well known for their ability to produce a wide range of antimicrobial compounds. In a large-scale screening for antibiotic producers, we identified a soil isolate that uses 4-hydroxyphenylacetate as the sole carbon source, Pseudomonas sp. strain 250J, which produces cyclic lipodepsipeptides of the xantholysin family during the stationary phase of growth. The closest relatives of this strain are Pseudomonas mosselii, Pseudomonas soli and Pseudomonas entomophila. Sequencing of the 250J genome allowed us to find the genes relevant to antibiotic production, those which allow utilization of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate as a sole carbon source and a set of genes potentially involved in biocontrol. PMID:25403737

  9. First description of small proteins encoded by spRNAs in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1.

    PubMed

    Prasse, Daniela; Thomsen, Jens; De Santis, Rebecca; Muntel, Jan; Becher, Dörte; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2015-10-01

    In Methanosarcina mazei several small RNAs have been identified containing a small putative open reading frame (sORF) and thus classified as spRNAs. Here, we report on the first detection of three small proteins in M. mazei encoded by spRNAs using LC-MS/MS analysis of total protein extracts of cells grown under various stress conditions. Each spRNA shows high conservation in Methanosarcina species with regard to the sORF and the flanking non-coding RNA regions, moreover the predicted RNA structures are as well highly conserved. Characterizing the respective transcript levels in response to several stress conditions by northern blots demonstrated an enormous decrease of spRNA36 and spRNA44 during stationary growth (to less than 5%), and a significant increase of spRNA36 (2.5-fold) in response to nitrogen limitation. spRNA41, however, was only detected by RNA-Seq approaches. Quantification of the small proteins by LC-MS/MS using synthetic stable isotope labeled oligopeptides as standards indicated that the concentration of oligopetide36 and 41 in mid exponential phase is induced under nitrogen limitation, which in case of oligopeptide36 is in accordance with its transcript level. The relative amount of the three oligopeptides did not change upon entering stationary growth phase, even though the transcript levels decreased dramatically. Additional production of the oligopeptides in M. mazei did not result in any evident phenotype under standard or nitrogen limiting growth conditions. However, overall the transcript levels of several genes involved in carbon metabolism or in heat shock response were reduced 2-3 fold due to the overproduction, though no sORF specific change was observed. Based on our findings we hypothesize that oligopeptide36 might have a regulatory function in nitrogen metabolism by modulating the activity of a yet unknown target protein involved in the central nitrogen metabolism. PMID:25890157

  10. The Uptake Hydrogenase in the Unicellular Diazotrophic Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. Strain PCC 7822 Protects Nitrogenase from Oxygen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Sherman, Debra M.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7822 is a unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that can produce large quantities of H2 when grown diazotrophically. This strain is also capable of genetic manipulations and can represent a good model for improving H2 production from cyanobacteria. To this end, a knockout mutation was made in the hupL gene (?hupL), and we determined how this would affect the amount of H2 produced. The ?hupL mutant demonstrated virtually no nitrogenase activity or H2 production when grown under N2-fixing conditions. To ensure that this mutation only affected the hupL gene, a complementation strain was constructed readily with wild-type properties; this indicated that the original insertion was only in hupL. The mutant had no uptake hydrogenase activity but had increased bidirectional hydrogenase (Hox) activity. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry under the electron microscope indicated that the mutant had neither HupL nor NifHDK, although the nif genes were transcribed. Interestingly, biochemical analysis demonstrated that both HupL and NifH could be membrane associated. The results indicated that the nif genes were transcribed but that NifHDK was either not translated or was translated but rapidly degraded. We hypothesized that the Nif proteins were made but were unusually susceptible to O2 damage. Thus, we grew the mutant cells under anaerobic conditions and found that they grew well under N2-fixing conditions. We conclude that in unicellular diazotrophs, like Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7822, the HupLS complex helps remove oxygen from the nitrogenase, and that this is a more important function than merely oxidizing the H2 produced by the nitrogenase. PMID:24317398

  11. [Isolation and characteristics of an antibacterial substance produced by a strain of Streptococcus sp. Thom-1606. A study of the biological activity of the metabolic products of Streptococcus sp. Thom-1606].

    PubMed

    Eremin, V I; Savranskaia, S Ia; Tabachnik, A L; Esipov, S E; Sibrikov, Iu I

    1986-07-01

    The data on the biological properties of the culture fluid of Streptococcus strain sp. TOM-1606 are presented. The native preparation has been shown to possess the capacity for stimulating the rate of the clearance of the peritoneal cavity of mice from Staphylococcus aureus cells, strain MT-1, rif. r., found to be insensitive to the action of the above-mentioned preparation in vitro. The crude preparation produces a transitory bacteriostatic effect on the streptococcal and staphylococcal strains under study. The preparation produces a prolonged bacteriostatic effect only on Micrococcus luteus test strain. All these data suggest that the crude preparation contains at least two active principles. PMID:3529764

  12. Yeast extract promotes decolorization of azo dyes by stimulating azoreductase activity in Shewanella sp. strain IFN4.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad; Negm, Fayek; Khalid, Azeem; Shaharoona, Baby; Hussain, Sabir; Mahmood Nadeem, Sajid; Crowley, David E

    2016-02-01

    Biological treatment of azo dyes commonly requires a combined anaerobic-aerobic process in which initial decolorization is achieved by reductive cleavage of azo bonds on the parent molecule. The present study was conducted to examine the relative importance of co-substrates for driving reductive decolorization of azo dyes by Shewanella sp. strain IFN4 using whole cells and enzyme assays. Results showed that the dye decolorization by strain IFN4 was faster in medium containing 1gL(-1) yeast extract (YE) as compared to nine other co-substrates. Moreover, only YE stimulated azoreductase activity (increased from 1.32 to 4.19U/mg protein). Increasing the level of YE up to 8gL(-)(1) resulted into 81% decolorization of the dye in 1h along with an increase in azoreductase activity up to 6.16U/mg protein. Among the components of YE, only riboflavin stimulated the decolorization process as well as enzyme activity. Moreover, strain IFN4 demonstrated flavin reductase activity, and a significant correlation (r(2)=0.98) between flavin reduction and dye reduction by this strain emphasized the involvement of flavin compounds in the decolorization process. The results of this study show that YE serves both as a source of reducing equivalents and an electron shuttle for catalyzing dye reduction. PMID:26454074

  13. Microbial Community Dynamics during the Bioremediation Process of Chlorimuron-Ethyl-Contaminated Soil by Hansschlegelia sp. Strain CHL1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liqiang; Li, Xinyu; Li, Xu; Su, Zhencheng; Zhang, Chenggang; Zhang, Huiwen

    2015-01-01

    Long-term and excessive application of chlorimuron-ethyl has led to a series of environmental problems. Strain Hansschlegelia sp. CHL1, a highly efficient chlorimuron-ethyl degrading bacterium isolated in our previous study, was employed in the current soil bioremediation study. The residues of chlorimuron-ethyl in soils were detected, and the changes of soil microbial communities were investigated by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. The results showed that strain CHL1 exhibited significant chlorimuron-ethyl degradation ability at wide range of concentrations between 10?g kg-1 and 1000?g kg-1. High concentrations of chlorimuron-ethyl significantly decreased the total concentration of PLFAs and the Shannon-Wiener indices and increased the stress level of microbes in soils. The inoculation with strain CHL1, however, reduced the inhibition on soil microbes caused by chlorimuron-ethyl. The results demonstrated that strain CHL1 is effective in the remediation of chlorimuron-ethyl-contaminated soil, and has the potential to remediate chlorimuron-ethyl contaminated soils in situ. PMID:25689050

  14. Orally Administered Thermostable N-Acyl Homoserine Lactonase from Bacillus sp. Strain AI96 Attenuates Aeromonas hydrophila Infection in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanan; He, Suxu; Zhang, Meichao; Mao, Wei; Zhang, Huitu

    2012-01-01

    N-Acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) lactonases are capable of degrading signal molecules involved in bacterial quorum sensing and therefore represent a new approach to control bacterial infection. Here a gene responsible for the AHL lactonase activity of Bacillus sp. strain AI96, 753 bp in length, was cloned and then expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence of Bacillus sp. AI96 AiiA (AiiAAI96) is most similar to those of other Bacillus sp. AHL lactonases (?80% sequence identity) and was consequently categorized as a member of the metallo-?-lactamase superfamily. AiiAAI96 maintains ?100% of its activity at 10°C to 40°C at pH 8.0, and it is very stable at 70°C at pH 8.0 for at least 1 h; no other Bacillus AHL lactonase has been found to be stable under these conditions. AiiAAI96 resists digestion by proteases and carp intestinal juice, and it has broad-spectrum substrate specificity. The supplementation of AiiAAI96 into fish feed by oral administration significantly attenuated Aeromonas hydrophila infection in zebrafish. This is the first report of the oral administration of an AHL lactonase for the efficient control of A. hydrophila. PMID:22247159

  15. Efficient production of laccases by Trametes sp. AH28-2 in cocultivation with a Trichoderma strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Hong, Y Z; Xiao, Y Z; Yuan, J; Tu, X M; Zhang, X Q

    2006-11-01

    A biocontrol fungus isolated from rotting wood was identified as a Trichoderma strain (named as Trichoderma sp. ZH1) by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of rRNA genes. The laccase yield of Trametes sp. AH28-2 in cocultivation with Trichoderma sp. ZH1 reached 6,210 U l(-1), approximately identical to those induced by toxic aromatic inducers. Cocultures maintained 60-70 % of their highest laccase activity obtained at 5 days after inoculation of the biocontrol fungus, at least for 20 days. Furthermore, a novel laccase isozyme (LacC) was obtained through the fungal interactions. The molecular weight of LacC is about 64 kDa, and its isoelectric point is 6.6. The temperature and pH optimum for LacC to oxidize guaiacol are 55 degrees C and 5.0, respectively. LacC is stable both at 60 degrees C and pH 4.0-8.0. Furthermore, the K (m) values of LacC for various substrates were also determined. Our work demonstrates a safe strategy for the production of industrial laccases, instead of the traditional method of chemical induction. PMID:16622678

  16. Oscillating behavior of carbohydrate granule formation and dinitrogen fixation in the cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneegurt, M. A.; Sherman, D. M.; Nayar, S.; Sherman, L. A.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown that some aerobic, unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacteria temporally separate photosynthetic O2 evolution and oxygen-sensitive N2 fixation. Cyanothece sp. ATCC strain 51142 is an aerobic, unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that fixes N2 during discrete periods of its cell cycle. When the bacteria are maintained under diurnal light-dark cycles, N2 fixation occurs in the dark. Similar cycling is observed in continuous light, implicating a circadian rhythm. Under N2-fixing conditions, large inclusion granules form between the thylakoid membranes. Maximum granulation, as observed by electron microscopy, occurs before the onset of N2 fixation, and the granules decrease in number during the period of N2 fixation. The granules can be purified from cell homogenates by differential centrifugation. Biochemical analyses of the granules indicate that these structures are primarily carbohydrate, with some protein. Further analyses of the carbohydrate have shown that it is a glucose polymer with some characteristics of glycogen. It is proposed that N2 fixation is driven by energy and reducing power stored in these inclusion granules. Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 represents an excellent experimental organism for the study of the protective mechanisms of nitrogenase, metabolic events in cyanobacteria under normal and stress conditions, the partitioning of resources between growth and storage, and biological rhythms.

  17. Sequence and molecular characterization of a DNA region encoding the dibenzothiophene desulfurization operon of Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8.

    PubMed Central

    Piddington, C S; Kovacevich, B R; Rambosek, J

    1995-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model compound for sulfur-containing organic molecules found in fossil fuels, can be desulfurized to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) by Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8. Complementation of a desulfurization (dsz) mutant provided the genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 responsible for desulfurization. A 6.7-kb TaqI fragment cloned in Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vector pRR-6 was found to both complement this mutation and confer desulfurization to Rhodococcus fascians, which normally is not able to desulfurize DBT. Expression of this fragment in E. coli also conferred the ability to desulfurize DBT. A molecular analysis of the cloned fragment revealed a single operon containing three open reading frames involved in the conversion of DBT to 2-HBP. The three genes were designated dszA, dszB, and dszC. Neither the nucleotide sequences nor the deduced amino acid sequences of the enzymes exhibited significant similarity to sequences obtained from the GenBank, EMBL, and Swiss-Prot databases, indicating that these enzymes are novel enzymes. Subclone analyses revealed that the gene product of dszC converts DBT directly to DBT-sulfone and that the gene products of dszA and dszB act in concert to convert DBT-sulfone to 2-HBP. PMID:7574582

  18. Purification and characterization of NAD+ -dependent salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase from carbaryl-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain C6.

    PubMed

    Singh, Randhir; Trivedi, Vikas D; Phale, Prashant S

    2014-01-01

    NAD+-dependent salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase (SALDH) which catalyzes the oxidation of salicylaldehyde to salicylate was purified form carbaryl-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain C6. The enzyme was found to be a functional homotrimer (150 kDa) with subunit molecular mass of 50 kDa and contained calcium (1.8 mol/mol of enzyme). These properties were found to be unique. External addition of metal ions showed no effect on the activity and addition of chelators showed moderate inhibition of the activity. Potassium ions were found to enhance the activity significantly. SALDH showed higher affinity for salicylaldehyde (Km?=?4.5 ?M) and accepts mono- as well as di-aromatic aldehydes; however it showed poor activity on aliphatic aldehydes. Chloro-/nitro-substituted benzaldehydes were potent substrate inhibitors as compared to benzaldehyde and 3-hydroxybenzaldehyde, while 2-naphthaldehyde and salicylaldehyde were moderate. The kinetic data revealed that SALDH, though having broad specificity, is more efficient for the oxidation of salicylaldehyde as compared to other aromatic aldehyde dehydrogenases which gives an advantage for Pseudomonas sp. strain C6 to bioremediate carbaryl and other aromatic aldehydes efficiently. PMID:24122667

  19. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 from Karijini National Park, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert; Watkin, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; O’Hara, Graham; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming acid-tolerant rod that was trapped in 2001 from acidic soil collected from Karijini National Park (Australia) using Gastrolobium capitatum as a host. WSM2232 was effective in nitrogen fixation with G. capitatum but subsequently lost symbiotic competence during long-term storage. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 7,208,311 bp standard-draft genome is arranged into 72 scaffolds of 72 contigs containing 6,322 protein-coding genes and 61 RNA-only encoding genes. The loss of symbiotic capability can now be attributed to the loss of nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes from the genome. This rhizobial genome is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197442

  20. Propane Monooxygenase and NAD+-Dependent Secondary Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Propane Metabolism by Gordonia sp. Strain TY-5

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Tazuko; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Kato, Nobuo

    2003-01-01

    A new isolate, Gordonia sp. strain TY-5, is capable of growth on propane and n-alkanes with C13 to C22 carbon chains as the sole source of carbon. In whole-cell reactions, significant propane oxidation to 2-propanol was detected. A gene cluster designated prmABCD, which encodes the components of a putative dinuclear-iron-containing multicomponent monooxygenase, including the large and small subunits of the hydroxylase, an NADH-dependent acceptor oxidoreductase, and a coupling protein, was cloned and sequenced. A mutant with prmB disrupted (prmB::Kanr) lost the ability to grow on propane, and Northern blot analysis revealed that polycistronic transcription of the prm genes was induced during its growth on propane. These results indicate that the prmABCD gene products play an essential role in propane oxidation by the bacterium. Downstream of the prm genes, an open reading frame (adh1) encoding an NAD+-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase was identified, and the protein was purified and characterized. The Northern blot analysis results and growth properties of a disrupted mutant (adh1::Kanr) indicate that Adh1 plays a major role in propane metabolism. Two additional NAD+-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenases (Adh2 and Adh3) were also found to be involved in 2-propanol oxidation. On the basis of these results, we conclude that Gordonia sp. strain TY-5 oxidizes propane by monooxygenase-mediated subterminal oxidation via 2-propanol. PMID:14645271

  1. Influence of growth medium on cometabolic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Sphingomonas sp. strain PheB4.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Zhong Y; Luan T; Wang X; Lan C; Tam NF

    2007-05-01

    The influence of growth medium on cometabolic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated when Sphingomonas sp. strain PheB4 isolated from surface mangrove sediments was grown in either phenanthrene-containing mineral salts medium (PMSM) or nutrient broth (NB). The NB-grown culture exhibited a more rapid cometabolic degradation of single and mixed non-growth substrate PAHs compared to the PMSM-grown culture. The concentrations of PAH metabolites were also lower in NB-grown culture than in PMSM-grown culture, suggesting that NB-grown culture removed metabolites at a faster rate, particularly, for metabolites produced from cometabolic degradation of a binary mixture of PAHs. Cometabolic pathways of single PAH (anthracene, fluorene, or fluoranthene) in NB-grown culture showed similarity to that in PMSM-grown culture. However, cometabolic pathways of mixed PAHs were more diverse in NB-grown culture than that in PMSM-grown culture. These results indicated that nutrient rich medium was effective in enhancing cometabolic degradation of mixed PAHs concomitant with a rapid removal of metabolites, which could be useful for the bioremediation of mixed PAHs contaminated sites using Sphingomonas sp. strain PheB4.

  2. Influence of growth medium on cometabolic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Sphingomonas sp. strain PheB4.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yin; Luan, Tiangang; Wang, Xiaowei; Lan, Chongyu; Tam, Nora F Y

    2007-05-01

    The influence of growth medium on cometabolic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated when Sphingomonas sp. strain PheB4 isolated from surface mangrove sediments was grown in either phenanthrene-containing mineral salts medium (PMSM) or nutrient broth (NB). The NB-grown culture exhibited a more rapid cometabolic degradation of single and mixed non-growth substrate PAHs compared to the PMSM-grown culture. The concentrations of PAH metabolites were also lower in NB-grown culture than in PMSM-grown culture, suggesting that NB-grown culture removed metabolites at a faster rate, particularly, for metabolites produced from cometabolic degradation of a binary mixture of PAHs. Cometabolic pathways of single PAH (anthracene, fluorene, or fluoranthene) in NB-grown culture showed similarity to that in PMSM-grown culture. However, cometabolic pathways of mixed PAHs were more diverse in NB-grown culture than that in PMSM-grown culture. These results indicated that nutrient rich medium was effective in enhancing cometabolic degradation of mixed PAHs concomitant with a rapid removal of metabolites, which could be useful for the bioremediation of mixed PAHs contaminated sites using Sphingomonas sp. strain PheB4. PMID:17216444

  3. MapA, an iron-regulated, cytoplasmic membrane protein in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC7942.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, R; Troyan, T; Sherman, D; Sherman, L A

    1994-01-01

    Growth of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 in iron-deficient media leads to the accumulation of an approximately 34-kDa protein. The gene encoding this protein, mapA (membrane-associated protein A), has been cloned and sequenced (GenBank accession number, L01621). The mapA transcript is not detectable in normally grown cultures but is stably accumulated by cells grown in iron-deficient media. However, the promoter sequence for this gene does not resemble other bacterial iron-regulated promoters described to date. The carboxyl-terminal region of the derived amino acid sequence of MapA resembles bacterial proteins involved in iron acquisition, whereas the amino-terminal end of MapA has a high degree of amino acid identity with the abundant, chloroplast envelope protein E37. An approach employing improved cellular fractionation techniques as well as electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry was essential in localizing MapA protein to the cytoplasmic membrane of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. When these cells were grown under iron-deficient conditions, a significant fraction of MapA could also be localized to the thylakoid membranes. Images PMID:8051004

  4. Expression of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Genes in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Katrin; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; Cornish, Adam J.; Wolk, C. Peter

    2012-01-01

    H2 generated from renewable resources holds promise as an environmentally innocuous fuel that releases only energy and water when consumed. In biotechnology, photoautotrophic oxygenic diazotrophs could produce H2 from water and sunlight using the cells' endogenous nitrogenases. However, nitrogenases have low turnover numbers and require large amounts of ATP. [FeFe]-hydrogenases found in other organisms can have 1,000-fold higher turnover numbers and no specific requirement for ATP but are very O2 sensitive. Certain filamentous cyanobacteria protect nitrogenase from O2 by sequestering the enzyme within internally micro-oxic, differentiated cells called heterocysts. We heterologously expressed the [FeFe]-hydrogenase operon from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 using the heterocyst-specific promoter PhetN. Active [FeFe]-hydrogenase was detected in and could be purified from aerobically grown Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, but only when the organism was grown under nitrate-depleted conditions that elicited heterocyst formation. These results suggest that the heterocysts protected the [FeFe]-hydrogenase against inactivation by O2. PMID:23023750

  5. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate biodegradation and denitrification by a Pseudoxanthomonas sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xuezheng; Niu, Guilong; Yang, Weiming; Cao, Xiangsheng

    2015-03-01

    A bacterial strain (designated as N4) of Pseudoxanthomonas was isolated from a denitrification biofilter reactor. This study examined its degradation capability of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and its denitrification ability. All results showed that, strain N4 could use DEHP as a carbon and energy source. Strain N4 demonstrated good DEHP degradation ability over a broad pH and temperature range. The optimal temperature and pH for DEHP degradation were 32°C and 6.0, respectively. The kinetics of DEHP degradation by strain N4 were exponential in nature. Strain N4 showed denitrification ability and could reduce nitrate and nitrite but not with DEHP as its carbon source. PMID:25596917

  6. Cloning and recombinant expression of a cellulase from the cellulolytic strain Streptomyces sp. G12 isolated from compost

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of lignocellulosic materials for second generation ethanol production would give several advantages such as minimizing the conflict between land use for food and fuel production, providing less expensive raw materials than conventional agricultural feedstock, allowing lower greenhouse gas emissions than those of first generation ethanol. However, cellulosic biofuels are not produced at a competitive level yet, mainly because of the high production costs of the cellulolytic enzymes. Therefore, this study was aimed at discovering new cellulolytic microorganisms and enzymes. Results Different bacteria isolated from raw composting materials obtained from vegetable processing industry wastes were screened for their cellulolytic activity on solid medium containing carboxymethylcellulose. Four strains belonging to the actinomycetes group were selected on the basis of their phenotypic traits and cellulolytic activity on solid medium containing carboxymethylcellulose. The strain showing the highest cellulolytic activity was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as belonging to Streptomyces genus and it was designated as Streptomyces sp. strain G12. Investigating the enzymes responsible for cellulase activity produced by Streptomyces G12 by proteomic analyses, two endoglucanases were identified. Gene coding for one of these enzymes, named CelStrep, was cloned and sequenced. Molecular analysis showed that the celstrep gene has an open reading frame encoding a protein of 379 amino acid residues, including a signal peptide of 37 amino acid residues. Comparison of deduced aminoacidic sequence to the other cellulases indicated that the enzyme CelStrep can be classified as a family 12 glycoside hydrolase. Heterologous recombinant expression of CelStrep was carried out in Escherichia coli, and the active recombinant enzyme was purified from culture supernatant and characterized. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of carboxymethylcellulose following a Michaelis–Menten kinetics with a KM of 9.13?mg/ml and a vmax of 3469??M?min-1. The enzyme exhibits a half life of around 24?h and 96?h at 60°C and 50°C, respectively and shows a retention of around 80% of activity after 96?h at 40°C. Conclusions In this manuscript, we describe the isolation of a new cellulolytic strain, Streptomyces sp. G12, from industrial waste based compost, the identification of the enzymes putatively responsible for its cellulolytic activity, the cloning and the recombinant expression of the gene coding for the Streptomyces sp. G12 cellulase CelStrep, that was characterized showing to exhibit a relevant thermoresistance increasing its potential for cellulose conversion. PMID:23267666

  7. Reduction of Selenite to Elemental Red Selenium by Rhizobium sp. strain B1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    bacterium that reduces the soluble and toxic selenite anion to insoluble elemental red selenium (Se0) was isolated from a laboratory bioreactor. Biochemical, morphological, and 16S rRNA gene sequence alignment identify the isolate as a Rhizobium sp. that is related to but is genetically divergent ...

  8. Daily expression pattern of protein-encoding genes and small noncoding RNAs in synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian; Hertel, Stefanie; Rediger, Anne; Lehmann, Robert; Wiegard, Anika; Kölsch, Adrian; Heilmann, Beate; Georg, Jens; Hess, Wolfgang R; Axmann, Ilka M

    2014-09-01

    Many organisms harbor circadian clocks with periods close to 24 h. These cellular clocks allow organisms to anticipate the environmental cycles of day and night by synchronizing circadian rhythms with the rising and setting of the sun. These rhythms originate from the oscillator components of circadian clocks and control global gene expression and various cellular processes. The oscillator of photosynthetic cyanobacteria is composed of three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, linked to a complex regulatory network. Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 possesses the standard cyanobacterial kaiABC gene cluster plus multiple kaiB and kaiC gene copies and antisense RNAs for almost every kai transcript. However, there is no clear evidence of circadian rhythms in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under various experimental conditions. It is also still unknown if and to what extent the multiple kai gene copies and kai antisense RNAs affect circadian timing. Moreover, a large number of small noncoding RNAs whose accumulation dynamics over time have not yet been monitored are known for Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Here we performed a 48-h time series transcriptome analysis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, taking into account periodic light-dark phases, continuous light, and continuous darkness. We found that expression of functionally related genes occurred in different phases of day and night. Moreover, we found day-peaking and night-peaking transcripts among the small RNAs; in particular, the amounts of kai antisense RNAs correlated or anticorrelated with those of their respective kai target mRNAs, pointing toward the regulatory relevance of these antisense RNAs. Surprisingly, we observed that the amounts of 16S and 23S rRNAs in this cyanobacterium fluctuated in light-dark periods, showing maximum accumulation in the dark phase. Importantly, the amounts of all transcripts, including small noncoding RNAs, did not show any rhythm under continuous light or darkness, indicating the absence of circadian rhythms in Synechocystis. PMID:24928881

  9. Genome Sequence of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Cronobacter sp. Strain DJ34 Isolated from Crude Oil-Containing Sludge from the Duliajan Oil Fields, Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Pal, Siddhartha; Das Banerjee, Tirtha; Roy, Ajoy; Sar, Pinaki; Kazy, Sufia K

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 4,856,096-bp draft genome sequence of hydrocarbon-degrading Cronobacter sp. strain DJ34 isolated from crude oil-containing sludge from the Duliajan oil fields, India. DJ34 contains genes that mediate hydrocarbon degradation, metal resistance, and biosurfactant production. This is the first report of the genome sequence of Cronobacter sp. inhabiting an oil-contaminated environment. PMID:26564043

  10. Myxoxanthophyll Is Required for Normal Cell Wall Structure and Thylakoid Organization in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Hatem E.; van de Meene, Allison M. L.; Roberson, Robert W.; Vermaas, Wim F. J.

    2005-01-01

    Myxoxanthophyll is a carotenoid glycoside in cyanobacteria that is of unknown biological significance. The sugar moiety of myxoxanthophyll in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was identified as dimethyl fucose. The open reading frame sll1213 encoding a fucose synthetase orthologue was deleted to probe the role of fucose and to determine the biological significance of myxoxanthophyll in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Upon deletion of sll1213, a pleiotropic phenotype was obtained: when propagated at 0.5 ?mol photons m?2 s?1, photomixotrophic growth of cells lacking sll1213 was poor. When grown at 40 ?mol photons m?2 s?1, growth was comparable to that of the wild type, but cells showed a severe reduction in or loss of the glycocalyx (S-layer). As a consequence, cells aggregated in liquid as well as on plates. At both light intensities, new carotenoid glycosides accumulated, but myxoxanthophyll was absent. New carotenoid glycosides may be a consequence of less-specific glycosylation reactions that gained prominence upon the disappearance of the native sugar moiety (fucose) of myxoxanthophyll. In the mutant, the N-storage compound cyanophycin accumulated, and the organization of thylakoid membranes was altered. Altered cell wall structure and thylakoid membrane organization and increased cyanophycin accumulation were also observed for ?slr0940K, a strain lacking ?-carotene desaturase and thereby all carotenoids but retaining fucose. Therefore, lack of myxoxanthophyll and not simply of fucose results in most of the phenotypic effects described here. It is concluded that myxoxanthophyll contributes significantly to the vigor of cyanobacteria, as it stabilizes thylakoid membranes and is critical for S-layer formation. PMID:16199557

  11. Purification and Characterization of Phosphonoglycans from Glycomyces sp. Strain NRRL B-16210 and Stackebrandtia nassauensis NRRL B-16338

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaomin; Price, Neil P. J.; Evans, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    Two related actinomycetes, Glycomyces sp. strain NRRL B-16210 and Stackebrandtia nassauensis NRRL B-16338, were identified as potential phosphonic acid producers by screening for the gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) mutase, which is required for the biosynthesis of most phosphonates. Using a variety of analytical techniques, both strains were subsequently shown to produce phosphonate-containing exopolysaccharides (EPS), also known as phosphonoglycans. The phosphonoglycans were purified by sequential organic solvent extractions, methanol precipitation, and ultrafiltration. The EPS from the Glycomyces strain has a mass of 40 to 50 kDa and is composed of galactose, xylose, and five distinct partially O-methylated galactose residues. Per-deutero-methylation analysis indicated that galactosyl residues in the polysaccharide backbone are 3,4-linked Gal, 2,4-linked 3-MeGal, 2,3-linked Gal, 3,6-linked 2-MeGal, and 4,6-linked 2,3-diMeGal. The EPS from the Stackebrandtia strain is comprised of glucose, galactose, xylose, and four partially O-methylated galactose residues. Isotopic labeling indicated that the O-methyl groups in the Stackebrandtia phosphonoglycan arise from S-adenosylmethionine. The phosphonate moiety in both phosphonoglycans was shown to be 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate (2-HEP) by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry following strong acid hydrolysis of the purified molecules. Partial acid hydrolysis of the purified EPS from Glycomyces yielded 2-HEP in ester linkage to the O-5 or O-6 position of a hexose and a 2-HEP mono(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)ester. Partial acid hydrolysis of Stackebrandtia EPS also revealed the presence of 2-HEP mono(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)ester. Examination of the genome sequences of the two strains revealed similar pepM-containing gene clusters that are likely to be required for phosphonoglycan synthesis. PMID:24584498

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus sp. Strain ST04, Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimney on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Holden, James F.; Seo, Dong-Ho; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Wooki; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-01-01

    Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and heterotrophic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. To further understand the distinct characteristics of this archaeon at the genome level (polysaccharide utilization at high temperature and ATP generation by a Na+ gradient), the genome of strain ST04 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Here, we present the complete genome sequence analysis results of Pyrococcus sp. ST04 and report the major findings from the genome annotation, with a focus on its saccharolytic and metabolite production potential. PMID:22843576

  13. A putative multicopper oxidase, IoxA, is involved in iodide oxidation by Roseovarius sp. strain A-2.

    PubMed

    Shiroyama, Kanna; Kawasaki, Yasutaka; Unno, Yusuke; Amachi, Seigo

    2015-11-01

    Roseovarius sp. strain A-2 is an aerobic heterotrophic bacterium with a capacity for oxidizing iodide ion (I(-)) to form molecular iodine (I2). In this study, iodide-oxidizing enzyme of strain A-2 was characterized. The enzyme was an extracellular protein, and Cu(2+) ion significantly enhanced the enzyme activity in the culture supernatant. When iodide was used as the substrate, the crude enzyme showed Km and Vmax values of 4.78 mM and 25.1 U mg(-1), respectively. The enzyme was inhibited by NaN3, EDTA, KCN, and o-phenanthroline, and also had significant activities toward p-phenylenediamine and hydroquinone. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of an active band excised from SDS-PAGE gel revealed that at least two proteins are involved in the enzyme. One of these proteins was closely related with IoxA, a multicopper oxidase previously found as a component of iodide-oxidizing enzyme of Alphaproteobacterium strain Q-1. Furthermore, a terrestrial bacterium Rhodanobacter denitrificans 116-2, which possesses an ioxA-like gene in its genome, was found to oxidize iodide. These results suggest that IoxA catalyzes the oxidation of iodide in phylogenetically distinct bacteria. PMID:26041311

  14. Genomic and Physiological Characterization of the Chromate-Reducing, Aquifer-Derived Firmicute Pelosinus sp. Strain HCF1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Han, R.; Karaoz, U.; Lim, H.; Brodie, E. L.

    2012-12-01

    Pelosinus species are fermentative firmicutes that were recently reported to be prominent members of microbial communities at contaminated subsurface sites in multiple locations. Here we report metabolic characteristics and their putative genetic basis in Pelosinus sp. strain HCF1, an isolate that predominated anaerobic, Cr(VI)-reducing columns constructed with Hanford 100H aquifer sediment (constituting 80% of the total bacterial population in the columns). Strain HCF1 ferments lactate to propionate and acetate (a complete fermentation pathway was identified in the genome) and its genome encodes both [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenases for H2 cycling. This bacterium has unexpected capabilities and gene content associated with reduction of nitrogen oxides. In this strain, either H2 or lactate can act as a sole electron donor for nitrate, Cr(VI), and Fe(III) reduction. Transcriptional studies demonstrated differential expression of nitrate reductases and hydrogenases. Overall, the unexpected metabolic capabilities and gene content reported here broaden our perspective on what biogeochemical and ecological roles this species might play as a prominent member of microbial communities in subsurface environments.

  15. Isolation, characterization, and survival strategies of Thermotoga sp. strain PD524, a hyperthermophile from a hot spring in Northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kanoksilapatham, Wirojne; Keawram, Porranee; Gonzalez, Juan M; Robb, Frank T

    2015-07-01

    A hyperthermophilic Thermotoga sp. strain PD524 was isolated from a hot spring in Northern Thailand. Cells were long-curved rods (0.5-0.6 × 2.5-10 ?m) surrounded by a typical outer membrane toga. Strain PD524 is aero-tolerant at 4 °C but is aero-sensitive at 80 °C. A heat resistant subpopulation was observed in late-stationary phase. Cells from late-stationary phase were revealed remarkably less sensitive to 0.001 % SDS treatment than cells from exponential phase. The temperature range for growth was 70-85 °C (opt. temp. 80 °C), pH range was 6-8.5 (opt. pH 7.5-8.0), and NaCl range of 0 to <10 g/L (opt. 0.5 g/L). Glucose, sucrose, maltose, fructose, xylose, mannose, arabinose, trehalose, starch, and cellobiose were utilized as growth substrates. Growth was inhibited by S(o). Growth yield was stimulated by SO 4 (=) but not by S2O 3 (=) and NO3 (-). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence (KF164213) of strain PD524 revealed closest similarity (96 %) to Thermotoga maritima MSB8(T), T. neapolitana NES(T), T. petrophila RKU-1(T), and T. naphthophila RKU-10(T). PMID:26101016

  16. Denitrification by a soil bacterium with phthalate and other aromatic compounds as substrates. [Pseudomonas sp. strain P136

    SciTech Connect

    Nozawa, T.; Maruyama, Y.

    1988-06-01

    A soil bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain P136, was isolated by selective enrichment for anaerobic utilization of o-phthalate through nitrate respiration. o-Phthalate, m-phthalate, p-phthalate, benzoate, cyclohex-1-ene-carboxylate, and cyclohex-3-ene-carboxylate were utilized by this strain under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. m-Hydroxybenzoate and p-hydroxybenzoate were utilized only under anaerobic conditions. Cells grown anaerobically on one of these aromatic compounds also utilized all other aromatic compounds as substrates for denitrification without a lag period. On the other hand, cells grown on succinate utilized aromatic compounds after a lag period. Anaerobic growth on these substrates was dependent on the presence of nitrate and accompanied by the production of molecular nitrogen. The reduction of nitrite to nitrous oxide and the reduction of nitrous oxide to molecular nitrogen were also supported by anaerobic utilization of these aromatic compounds in this strain. Aerobically grown cells showed a lag period in denitrification with all substrates tested. Cells grown anaerobically on aromatic compounds also consumed oxygen. No lag period was observed for oxygen consumption during the transition period from anaerobic to aerobic conditions. Cells grown aerobically on one of these aromatic compounds were also adapted to utilize other aromatic compounds as substrates for respiration. However, cells grown on succinate showed a lag period during respiration with aromatic compounds.

  17. Isolation of Streptomyces sp. strain capable of butyltin compounds degradation with high efficiency.

    PubMed

    Bernat, Przemys?aw; D?ugo?ski, Jerzy

    2009-11-15

    Dibutyltin (DBT), a widely used plastic stabilizer, has been detected in the environment as well as in human tissues. DBT is considered to be highly neurotoxic and immunotoxic. Hence, DBT needs to be considered as a potential toxic chemical. Degradation of butyltin compounds by Streptomyces sp. isolated from plant waste composting heaps was studied. Glucose grown cells degraded organotin from 10 to 40 mg l(-1). After 1 day of incubation 90% of DBT (added at 20 mg l(-1)) was converted to less toxic derivative--monobutyltin (MBT). DBT metabolism was inhibited by metyrapone addition, a known cytochrome P-450 inhibitor. It could provide evidence that cytochrome P-450 system is involved in DBT metabolism in Streptomyces sp. IM P102. Moreover, according to our knowledge, the degradation of DBT by actinobacterium has not been previously described. PMID:19592163

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermoanaerobacter sp. Strain YS13, a Novel Thermophilic Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tingting; Pan, Siyi; Christopher, Lew; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David B

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Thermoanerobacter sp. YS13, isolated from a geothermal hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, which consists of 2,713,030 bp with a mean G+C content of 34.05%. A total of 2,779 genes, including 2,707 protein-coding genes, 12 rRNAs, and 59 tRNAs were identified. PMID:26044430

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermoanaerobacter sp. Strain YS13, a Novel Thermophilic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Tingting; Pan, Siyi; Christopher, Lew; Sparling, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Thermoanerobacter sp. YS13, isolated from a geothermal hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, which consists of 2,713,030 bp with a mean G+C content of 34.05%. A total of 2,779 genes, including 2,707 protein-coding genes, 12 rRNAs, and 59 tRNAs were identified. PMID:26044430

  20. Direct fermentation of potato starch and potato residues to lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus under non-sterile conditions

    PubMed Central

    Smerilli, Marina; Neureiter, Markus; Wurz, Stefan; Haas, Cornelia; Frühauf, Sabine; Fuchs, Werner

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lactic acid is an important biorefinery platform chemical. The use of thermophilic amylolytic microorganisms to produce lactic acid by fermentation constitutes an efficient strategy to reduce operating costs, including raw materials and sterilization costs. RESULTS A process for the thermophilic production of lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus directly from potato starch was characterized and optimized. Geobacillus stearothermophilus DSM 494 was selected out of 12 strains screened for amylolytic activity and the ability to form lactic acid as the major product of the anaerobic metabolism. In total more than 30 batches at 3–l scale were run at 60 °C under non-sterile conditions. The process developed produced 37 g L?1 optically pure (98%) L-lactic acid in 20 h from 50 g L?1 raw potato starch. As co-metabolites smaller amounts (<7% w/v) of acetate, formate and ethanol were formed. Yields of lactic acid increased from 66% to 81% when potato residues from food processing were used as a starchy substrate in place of raw potato starch. CONCLUSIONS Potato starch and residues were successfully converted to lactic acid by G. stearothermophilus. The process described in this study provides major benefits in industrial applications and for the valorization of starch-rich waste streams. © 2015 The Authors.Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25937690

  1. Kinetics and Mechanism of Fenpropathrin Biodegradation by a Newly Isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa sp. Strain JQ-41.

    PubMed

    Song, Haihai; Zhou, Zhiren; Liu, Yuanxiu; Deng, Si; Xu, Heng

    2015-09-01

    A soil bacterium designated strain JQ-41, capable of growth on fenpropathrin as the sole carbon source and energy source, was isolated from a long-term pyrethroid insecticide-treated orchard. Based on the morphology, physio-biochemical characteristics, and 16S rDNA gene analysis, as well as the G+C content of the genomic DNA, the strain JQ-41 was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Up to 92.3% of 50 mg l(-1) fenpropathrin was degraded by P. aeruginosa strain at 30°C and pH 7 within 7 days. The kinetic parameters q max, K s, and K i were established to be 1.14 day(-1), 38.41 mg l(-1), and 137.67 mg l(-1), respectively, and the critical inhibitor concentration was determined to be 72.72 mg l(-1). Cell surface hydrophobicity of P. aeruginosa strain was enhanced during growth on fenpropathrin. Three metabolites from fenpropathrin degradation were identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry, and then a possible degradation pathway was proposed. In addition, this isolate was also able to degrade a wide range of synthetic pyrethroid insecticides including cypermethrin, deltamethrin, bifenthrin, and cyhalothrin with the degradation process following the first-order kinetic model. Taken together, our results provide insights into the kinetics and mechanism of fenpropathrin degradation by P. aeruginosa strain and also highlight its promising potential in bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated environment. PMID:26068594

  2. Substrate dependent in vitro antifungal activity of Bacillus sp strain AR2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biosurfactants are a structurally diverse group of secondary metabolites with lots of potential to serve mankind. Depending upon the structure and composition they may exhibit properties that make them suitable for a particular application. Structural and compositional diversity of biosurfactant is unambiguously substrate dependent. The present study investigates the qualitative and quantitative effect of different water soluble carbon source on the biosurfactant produced by Bacillus amylofaciens strain AR2. Results Strain AR2 produced lipopeptide type biosurfactant while growing on water soluble carbon sources. Maximum biosurfactant production was observed in the sucrose supplemented minimal salt medium (MSM). Strain AR2 exhibited carbon source dependent surface tension reduction in the range of 30-37 mN/m, critical micelle concentration (CMC) in the range 80-110 mg/l and emulsification index (EI24 kerosene) in the range of 32-66%. In dextrose, sucrose and glycerol supplemented MSM, strain AR2 produced lipopeptides as a mixture of surfactin, iturin and fengycin. However, in the presence of maltose, lactose and sorbitol only iturin was produced. This substrate dependent compositional variation in the lipopeptides significantly influenced antifungal activity. Lipopeptides produced by strain AR2 while growing on sucrose and dextrose based MSM was observed to be most efficient as an antifungal agent. Conclusions These results suggest that carbon source provided for the growth and biosurfactant production not only influences the yield but also the type of biosurfactant. Sucrose is the most suitable carbon source for production of lipopeptide biosurfactant with antifungal activity. PMID:24885467

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Polyvinyl Alcohol-Degrading Strain Sphingopyxis sp. 113P3 (NBRC 111507)

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yuji; Numata, Mitsuru; Tsuchikane, Kieko; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Tsuda, Masataka; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Kawai, Fusako

    2015-01-01

    Strain 113P3 was isolated from activated sludge and identified as a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-degrading Pseudomonas species; it was later reidentified as Sphingopyxis species. Only three genes are directly relevant to the metabolism of PVA and comprise the pva operon, which was deposited as accession no. AB190228. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of strain 113P3, which has been conserved as a stock culture (NBRC 111507) at the Biological Resource Center, National Institute of Technology and Evaluation (NITE) (Tokyo, Japan). The genome of strain 113P3 is composed of a 4.4-Mb circular chromosome and a 243-kb plasmid. The whole finishing was conducted in silico except for four PCRs. The sequence corresponding to AB190288 exists on the chromosome. PMID:26472829

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Polyvinyl Alcohol-Degrading Strain Sphingopyxis sp. 113P3 (NBRC 111507).

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Numata, Mitsuru; Tsuchikane, Kieko; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Tsuda, Masataka; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Kawai, Fusako

    2015-01-01

    Strain 113P3 was isolated from activated sludge and identified as a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-degrading Pseudomonas species; it was later reidentified as Sphingopyxis species. Only three genes are directly relevant to the metabolism of PVA and comprise the pva operon, which was deposited as accession no. AB190228. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of strain 113P3, which has been conserved as a stock culture (NBRC 111507) at the Biological Resource Center, National Institute of Technology and Evaluation (NITE) (Tokyo, Japan). The genome of strain 113P3 is composed of a 4.4-Mb circular chromosome and a 243-kb plasmid. The whole finishing was conducted in silico except for four PCRs. The sequence corresponding to AB190288 exists on the chromosome. PMID:26472829

  5. Role of Nitrogen Limitation in Transformation of RDX (Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine) by Gordonia sp. Strain KTR9

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Dawn E.; Jung, Carina M.; Eberly, Jed O.; Mohn, William W.; Eltis, Lindsay D.; Crocker, Fiona H.

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptome of RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine)-degrading strain Gordonia sp. strain KTR9 and its glnR mutant were studied as a function of nitrogen availability to further investigate the observed ammonium-mediated inhibition of RDX degradation. The results indicate that nitrogen availability is a major determinant of RDX degradation and xplA gene expression in KTR9. PMID:23275513

  6. Transformation of Thermoanaerobacterium sp. strain JW/SL-YS485 with plasmid pIKM1 conferring kanamycin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, V.; Lorenz, W.W.; Wiegel, J.

    1997-12-31

    The industrial application of thermophilic (eu)bacteria is hampered by the lack of genetic systems for these bacteria. We report here the first unequivocal transformation of a Gram-positive, thermophilic, anaerobic microorganism, Thermoanaerobacterium, with the kanamycin resistance-mediating plasmid pIKM1. The construct pIKM1 is based on the Escherichia coli-Clostridium acetobutylicum shuttle vector pIMP1 and contains the thermostable kanamycin cassette from S. faecalis plasmid pKD102. Using electrotransformation, plasmid pIKM1 mediated kanamycin resistance in Thermoanaerobacterium sp. strain JW/SL-YS485 up to 400 {mu}g ml{sup -1} at 48{degrees}C and 200 {mu}g ml{sup -1} at 60{degrees}C.

  7. Localized Induction of the ntcA Regulatory Gene in Developing Heterocysts of Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M.; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2006-01-01

    The ntcA gene encodes an N-control transcriptional regulator in cyanobacteria. In the N2-fixing, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, ntcA is an autoregulatory gene that is transcribed from a complex promoter region that includes a constitutive promoter (P2) and promoters that are induced upon N step-down (P1 and P3). Expression of ntcA was investigated with the use of an ntcA-gfp translational fusion, which was introduced both in the natural ntcA locus and in a heterologous genomic place. Induction of ntcA-gfp took place after N step-down in all the cells of the filament, but at especially high levels in developing heterocysts. Localized induction could be driven independently by P3 and P1. PMID:16952962

  8. Localized induction of the ntcA regulatory gene in developing heterocysts of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2006-09-01

    The ntcA gene encodes an N-control transcriptional regulator in cyanobacteria. In the N(2)-fixing, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, ntcA is an autoregulatory gene that is transcribed from a complex promoter region that includes a constitutive promoter (P(2)) and promoters that are induced upon N step-down (P(1) and P(3)). Expression of ntcA was investigated with the use of an ntcA-gfp translational fusion, which was introduced both in the natural ntcA locus and in a heterologous genomic place. Induction of ntcA-gfp took place after N step-down in all the cells of the filament, but at especially high levels in developing heterocysts. Localized induction could be driven independently by P(3) and P(1). PMID:16952962

  9. Factors affecting the photoproduction of ammonia from dinitrogen and water by the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain ATCC 33047

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, J.L.; Guerrero, M.G.; Losada, M.

    1987-04-01

    Synthesis of ammonia from dinitrogen and water by suspensions of Anabaena sp. strain ATCC 33047 treated with the glutamine synthetase inhibitor L-methionine-D,L-sulfoximine is strictly dependent on light. Under otherwise optimal conditions, the yield of ammonia production is influenced by irradiance, as well as by the density, depth, and turbulence of the cell suspension. The interaction among these factors seems to determine the actual amount of light available to each single cell or filament in the suspension for the photoproduction process. Under convenient illumination, the limiting factor in the synthesis of ammonia seems to be the cellular nitrogenase activity level, but under limiting light conditions the limiting factor could, however, be the assimilatory power required for nitrogen fixation. Photosynthetic ammonia production from atmospheric nitrogen and water can operate with an efficiency of ca. 10% of its theoretical maximum, representing a remarkable process for the conversion of light energy into chemical energy.

  10. Characterization of Macromolecular Flocculants Produced by Phormidium sp. Strain J-1 and by Anabaenopsis circularis PCC 6720

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Or, Y.; Shilo, M.

    1987-01-01

    Several benthic cyanobacteria were found to produce significant amounts of extracellular flocculants. The macromolecular flocculants produced by Phormidium sp. strain J-1 and Anabaenopsis circularis PCC 6720 were characterized. The Phormidium flocculant is a sulfated heteropolysaccharide to which fatty acids and protein are bound. The polysaccharide backbone is composed of uronic acids, rhamnose, mannose, and galactose. The A. circularis flocculant is also an acidic polysaccharide containing keto acid residues and neutral sugars, but to which no fatty acids, proteins, or sulfates are linked. Both flocculants could be recovered from growth medium by precipitation with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and were found to bind the cationic dye Alcian-blue in a linear proportion to their concentration in solution. The latter property was used to quantify flocculant concentrations in culture supernatants and natural water samples and to compute their anion densities. PMID:16347442

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of maleylacetate reductase from Rhizobium sp. strain MTP-10005

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Tomomi; Goda, Yuko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Oikawa, Tadao; Hata, Yasuo

    2008-08-01

    Maleylacetate reductase from Rhizobium sp. strain MTP-10005 has been crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and microseeding. The crystals contained one dimeric molecule per asymmetric unit and diffracted to 1.79 Å resolution. Maleylacetate reductase (EC 1.3.1.32), which catalyzes the reduction of maleylacetate to 3-oxoadipate, plays an important role in the aerobic microbial catabolism of resorcinol. The enzyme has been crystallized at 293 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method supplemented with a microseeding technique, using ammonium sulfate as the precipitating agent. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.85, b = 121.13, c = 94.09 Å, ? = 101.48°, and contained one dimeric molecule in the asymmetric unit. It diffracted to 1.79 Å resolution.

  12. High-Throughput Screen for Poly-3-Hydroxybutyrate in Escherichia coli and Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC6803

    PubMed Central

    Tyo, Keith E.; Zhou, Hang; Stephanopoulos, Gregory N.

    2006-01-01

    A novel, quantitative method for detecting poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) amounts in viable cells was developed to allow for high-throughput screening of mutant libraries. The staining technique was demonstrated and optimized for the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 and the eubacterium Escherichia coli to maximize the fluorescence difference between PHB-accumulating and control cells by flow cytometry. In Synechocystis, the level of nonspecific dye binding was reduced by using nonionic stain buffer that allowed quantitation of fluorescence levels. In E. coli, the use of a mild sucrose shock facilitated uptake of Nile red without significant loss of viability. The optimized staining protocols yielded a linear response for the mean fluorescence against (chemically measured) PHB. The staining protocols are novel methods useful in the high-throughput evaluation of combinatorial libraries of Synechocystis and E. coli using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to identify mutants with increased PHB-accumulating properties. PMID:16672485

  13. New isocoumarins from a cold-adapted fungal strain mucor sp. and their developmental toxicity to zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chun-Chi; Chen, Guo-Dong; Zhao, Yan-Qiu; Xin, Sheng-Chang; Li, Song; Tang, Jin-Shan; Li, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Dan; Liu, Xing-Zhong; Gao, Hao

    2014-07-01

    Three new isocoumarin derivatives, mucorisocoumarins A-C (1-3, resp.), together with seven known compounds, 4-10, were isolated from the cold-adapted fungal strain Mucor sp. (No.?XJ07027-5). The structures of the new compounds were identified by detailed IR, MS, and 1D- and 2D-NMR analyses. It was noteworthy that compounds 1, 2, 4, and 5 were successfully resolved by chiral HPLC, indicating that 1-7 should exist as enantiomers. In an embryonic developmental toxicity assay using a zebrafish model, compound 3 produced developmental abnormalities in the zebrafish embryos. This is the first report of isocoumarins with developmental toxicity to zebrafish embryos. PMID:25044595

  14. Biodegradation of methyl red by Bacillus sp. strain UN2: decolorization capacity, metabolites characterization, and enzyme analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Sun, Peng-Fei; Du, Lin-Na; Wang, Guan; Jia, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yu-Hua

    2014-05-01

    Azo dyes are recalcitrant and refractory pollutants that constitute a significant menace to the environment. The present study is focused on exploring the capability of Bacillus sp. strain UN2 for application in methyl red (MR) degradation. Effects of physicochemical parameters (pH of medium, temperature, initial concentration of dye, and composition of the medium) were studied in detail. The suitable pH and temperature range for MR degradation by strain UN2 were respectively 7.0-9.0 and 30-40 °C, and the optimal pH value and temperature were respectively 8.0 and 35 °C. Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) (1 mM) were found to significantly accelerate the MR removal rate, while the enhancement by either Fe(3+) or Fe(2+) was slight. Under the optimal degradation conditions, strain UN2 exhibited greater than 98 % degradation of the toxic azo dye MR (100 ppm) within 30 min. Analysis of samples from decolorized culture flasks confirmed biodegradation of MR into two prime metabolites: N,N'dimethyl-p-phenyle-nediamine and 2-aminobenzoic acid. A study of the enzymes responsible for the biodegradation of MR, in the control and cells obtained during (10 min) and after (30 min) degradation, showed a significant increase in the activities of azoreductase, laccase, and NADH-DCIP reductase. Furthermore, a phytotoxicity analysis demonstrated that the germination inhibition was almost eliminated for both the plants Triticum aestivum and Sorghum bicolor by MR metabolites at 100 mg/L concentration, yet the germination inhibition of parent dye was significant. Consequently, the high efficiency of MR degradation enables this strain to be a potential candidate for bioremediation of wastewater containing MR. PMID:24474566

  15. Group 3 sigma factors in the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 are required for growth at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Sakamoto, Kaori; Gruber, Tanja M; Christensen, Suzanne K; Arima, Hiromi; Sakamoto, Toshio; Bryant, Donald A

    2007-04-01

    Three genes, sigF, sigG and sigH, encoding group 3 sigma factors have been cloned and characterized in the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. The sigF gene product was similar to sigma factors involved in general stress response and sporulation in other organisms, and the sigG and sigH gene products were similar to extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors. The sigG and sigH genes were associated with the putative regulatory genes and the sizes of transcripts for sigG and sigH genes were large enough to be cotranscribed with the associated downstream genes. The sigG downstream gene was designated sapG (sigG-associated protein), and yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that SigG and SapG interact when produced in yeast cells. Null mutants of these three group 3 sigma factor genes were created by interposon mutagenesis. The growth of the sigF mutant strain was much slower than the wild-type strain at 15 degrees C, although the growth rates at 22 degrees C and 38 degrees C were identical to those of the wild-type strain. The sigG mutant could not grow continuously at 22 degrees C, and no growth occurred at 15 degrees C. Since SigG and SapG interact in yeast cells and the sigG and sapG mutants showed a similar growth phenotype, SapG is likely to be a regulatory protein for SigG involved in the same pathway in transcriptional regulation in this cyanobacterium. PMID:17575449

  16. A Novel Hydrolase Identified by Genomic-Proteomic Analysis of Phenylurea Herbicide Mineralization by Variovorax sp. Strain SRS16?†

    PubMed Central

    Bers, Karolien; Leroy, Baptiste; Breugelmans, Philip; Albers, Pieter; Lavigne, Rob; Sørensen, Sebastian R.; Aamand, Jens; De Mot, René; Wattiez, Ruddy; Springael, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The soil bacterial isolate Variovorax sp. strain SRS16 mineralizes the phenylurea herbicide linuron. The proposed pathway initiates with hydrolysis of linuron to 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) and N,O-dimethylhydroxylamine, followed by conversion of DCA to Krebs cycle intermediates. Differential proteomic analysis showed a linuron-dependent upregulation of several enzymes that fit into this pathway, including an amidase (LibA), a multicomponent chloroaniline dioxygenase, and enzymes associated with a modified chlorocatechol ortho-cleavage pathway. Purified LibA is a monomeric linuron hydrolase of ?55 kDa with a Km and a Vmax for linuron of 5.8 ?M and 0.16 nmol min?1, respectively. This novel member of the amidase signature family is unrelated to phenylurea-hydrolyzing enzymes from Gram-positive bacteria and lacks activity toward other tested phenylurea herbicides. Orthologues of libA are present in all other tested linuron-degrading Variovorax strains with the exception of Variovorax strains WDL1 and PBS-H4, suggesting divergent evolution of the linuron catabolic pathway in different Variovorax strains. The organization of the linuron degradation genes identified in the draft SRS16 genome sequence indicates that gene patchwork assembly is at the origin of the pathway. Transcription analysis suggests that a catabolic intermediate, rather than linuron itself, acts as effector in activation of the pathway. Our study provides the first report on the genetic organization of a bacterial pathway for complete mineralization of a phenylurea herbicide and the first report on a linuron hydrolase in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:22003008

  17. Nucleotide sequence analysis of genes encoding a toluene/benzene-2-monooxygenase from pseudomonas sp. strain JS150

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.R.; Olsen, R.H.

    1995-09-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain JS150 metabolizes benzene and alkyl- and chloro-substituted benzenes by using dioxygenase-initiated pathways coupled with multiple downstream metabolic pathways to accommodate catechol metabolism. By cloning genes encoding benzene-degradative enzymes, strain JS150 was also found to carry genes for a toluene/benzene-2-monooxygenase. The gene cluster encoding a 2-monooxygenase and its cognate regulator was cloned from a plasmid carried by strain JS150. Oxygen ({sup 18}O{sub 2}) incorporation experiments using Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains carrying the cloned genes confirmed toluene hydroxylation was catalyzed through an authentic monooxygenase reaction to yield ortho-cresol. Encoding the toluene-2-monooxygenase and regulatory gene product was localized in two regions of the cloned fragment. The nucleotide sequence of the toluene/benzene-2-monooxygenase locus was determined, revealing six open reading frames that were then designated tbmA, tbmB, tbmC, tbmD, tbmE, and tbmF. The deduced amino acid sequences for these genes showed the presence of motifs similar to well-conserved functional domains of multicomponent oxygenases. This analysis allowed the tentative identification of two terminal oxygenase subunits (TbmB and TbmD) and an electron transport protein (TbmF) for the monooxygenase enzyme. All the tbm polypeptides shared significant homology with protein components from other bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases. Overall, the tbm gene products shared greater similarity with polypeptides from the phenol hydroxylases of Pseudomo-KR1 and Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) picketti PKO1. The relationship found between the phenol hydroxlases and a toluene-2-monooxygenase, characterized in this study for the first time at the nucleotide sequence level, suggested DNA probes used for surveys of environmental populations should be carefully selected to reflect DNA sequences corresponding to the metabolic pathway of interest. 58 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Effects of medium and trace metals on kinetics of carbon tetrachloride transformation by Pseudomonas sp. strain KC.

    PubMed Central

    Tatara, G M; Dybas, M J; Criddle, C S

    1993-01-01

    Under denitrifying conditions, Pseudomonas sp. strain KC transforms carbon tetrachloride (CT) to carbon dioxide via a complex but as yet undetermined mechanism. Transformation rates were first order with respect to CT concentration over the CT concentration range examined (0 to 100 micrograms/liter) and proportional to protein concentration, giving pseudo-second-order kinetics overall. Addition of ferric iron (1 to 20 microM) to an actively transforming culture inhibited CT transformation, and the degree of inhibition increased with increasing iron concentration. By removing iron from the trace metals solution or by removing iron-containing precipitate from the growth medium, higher second-order rate coefficients were obtained. Copper also plays a role in CT transformation. Copper was toxic at neutral pH. By adjusting the medium pH to 8.2, soluble iron and copper levels decreased as a precipitate formed, and CT transformation rates increased. However, cultures grown at high pH without any added trace copper (1 microM) exhibited slower growth rates and greatly reduced rates of CT transformation, indicating that copper is required for CT transformation. The use of pH adjustment to decrease iron solubility, to avoid copper toxicity, and to provide a selective advantage for strain KC was evaluated by using soil slurries and groundwater containing high levels of iron. In samples adjusted to pH 8.2 and inoculated with strain KC, CT disappeared rapidly in the absence or presence of acetate or nitrate supplements. CT did not disappear in pH-adjusted controls that were not inoculated with strain KC. PMID:8357248

  19. An Evolutionary Hot Spot: the pNGR234b Replicon of Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234

    PubMed Central

    Streit, W. R.; Schmitz, R. A.; Perret, X.; Staehelin, C.; Deakin, W. J.; Raasch, C.; Liesegang, H.; Broughton, W. J.

    2004-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 has an exceptionally broad host range and is able to nodulate more than 112 genera of legumes. Since the overall organization of the NGR234 genome is strikingly similar to that of the narrow-host-range symbiont Rhizobium meliloti strain 1021 (also known as Sinorhizobium meliloti), the obvious question is why are the spectra of hosts so different? Study of the early symbiotic genes of both bacteria (carried by the SymA plasmids) did not provide obvious answers. Yet, both rhizobia also possess second megaplasmids that bear, among many other genes, those that are involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs). EPSs are involved in fine-tuning symbiotic interactions and thus may help answer the broad- versus narrow-host-range question. Accordingly, we sequenced two fragments (total, 594 kb) that encode 575 open reading frames (ORFs). Comparisons revealed 19 conserved gene clusters with high similarity to R. meliloti, suggesting that a minimum of 28% (158 ORFs) of the genetic information may have been acquired from a common ancestor. The largest conserved cluster carried the exo and exs genes and contained 31 ORFs. In addition, nine highly conserved regions with high similarity to Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110, and Mesorhizobium loti strain MAFF303099, as well as two conserved clusters that are highly homologous to similar regions in the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora, were identified. Altogether, these findings suggest that ?40% of the pNGR234b genes are not strain specific and were probably acquired from a wide variety of other microbes. The presence of 26 ORFs coding for transposases and site-specific integrases supports this contention. Surprisingly, several genes involved in the degradation of aromatic carbon sources and genes coding for a type IV pilus were also found. PMID:14702322

  20. Three Types of Taxis Used in the Response of Acidovorax sp. Strain JS42 to 2-Nitrotoluene

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovitch-Deere, Christine A.

    2012-01-01

    Acidovorax sp. strain JS42 is able to utilize 2-nitrotoluene (2NT) as its sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. We report here that strain JS42 is chemotactic to 2NT and that the response is increased when cells are grown on compounds such as 2NT that are known to induce the first step of 2NT degradation. Assays with JS42 mutants unable to oxidize 2NT showed that the first step of 2NT metabolism was required for the induced response, but not for a portion of the constitutive response, indicating that 2NT itself is an attractant. The 2NT metabolite nitrite was shown to be a strong attractant for strain JS42, and sufficient nitrite was produced during the taxis assay to account for a large part of the induced response. A mutant with an inactivated ntdY gene, which is located adjacent to the 2NT degradation genes and codes for a putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, showed a defect in taxis toward 2NT that may involve a reduced response to nitrite. Responses of a mutant defective for the energy-taxis receptor, Aer, indicated that a functional aer gene is required for a substantial part of the wild-type induced response to 2NT. In summary, strain JS42 utilizes three types of taxis to sense and respond to 2NT: constitutive 2NT-specific chemotaxis to directly sense 2NT, metabolism-dependent nitrite-specific chemotaxis that may be mediated by NtdY, and energy taxis mediated by Aer. PMID:22286989

  1. Physicochemical effects on sulfite transformation in a lipid-rich Chlorella sp. strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Fang; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2014-11-01

    SO2 is very rapidly hydrated to sulfurous acid in water solution at pH value above 6.0, whereby sulfite is yielded from the disassociation of protons. We aimed to improve the sulfite transformation efficiency and provide a basis for the direct utilization of SO2 from flue gas by a microalgal suspension. Chlorella sp. XQ-20044 was cultured in a medium with 20 mmol/L sodium sulfite under different physicochemical conditions. Under light conditions, sulfite concentration in the algal suspension reduced linearly over time, and was completely converted into sulfate within 8 h. The highest sulfite transformation rate (3.25 mmol/(L·h)) was obtained under the following conditions: 35°C, light intensity of 300 ?mol/(m2·s), NaHCO3 concentration of 6 g/L, initial cell density (OD540) of 0.8 and pH of 9-10. There was a positive correlation between sulfite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella, with the conditions favorable to algal growth giving better sulfite transformation. Although oxygen in the air plays a role in the transformation of SO2- 3 to SO2- 4, the transformation is mainly dependent on the metabolic activity of algal cells. Chlorella sp. XQ-20044 is capable of tolerating high sulfite concentration, and can utilize sulfite as the sole sulfur source for maintaining healthy growth. We found that sulfite ?20 mmol/L had no obvious effect on the total lipid content and fatty acid profiles of the algae. Thus, the results suggest it is feasible to use flue gas for the mass production of feedstock for biodiesel using Chlorella sp. XQ-20044, without preliminary removal of SO2, assuming there is adequate control of the pH.

  2. Cloning and expression analysis of genes encoding lytic endopeptidases L1 and L5 from Lysobacter sp. strain XL1.

    PubMed

    Lapteva, Y S; Zolova, O E; Shlyapnikov, M G; Tsfasman, I M; Muranova, T A; Stepnaya, O A; Kulaev, I S; Granovsky, I E

    2012-10-01

    Lytic enzymes are the group of hydrolases that break down structural polymers of the cell walls of various microorganisms. In this work, we determined the nucleotide sequences of the Lysobacter sp. strain XL1 alpA and alpB genes, which code for, respectively, secreted lytic endopeptidases L1 (AlpA) and L5 (AlpB). In silico analysis of their amino acid sequences showed these endopeptidases to be homologous proteins synthesized as precursors similar in structural organization: the mature enzyme sequence is preceded by an N-terminal signal peptide and a pro region. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, endopeptidases AlpA and AlpB were assigned to the S1E family [clan PA(S)] of serine peptidases. Expression of the alpA and alpB open reading frames (ORFs) in Escherichia coli confirmed that they code for functionally active lytic enzymes. Each ORF was predicted to have the Shine-Dalgarno sequence located at a canonical distance from the start codon and a potential Rho-independent transcription terminator immediately after the stop codon. The alpA and alpB mRNAs were experimentally found to be monocistronic; transcription start points were determined for both mRNAs. The synthesis of the alpA and alpB mRNAs was shown to occur predominantly in the late logarithmic growth phase. The amount of alpA mRNA in cells of Lysobacter sp. strain XL1 was much higher, which correlates with greater production of endopeptidase L1 than of L5. PMID:22865082

  3. Purification and Characterization of the Coniferyl Aldehyde Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain HR199 and Molecular Characterization of the Gene

    PubMed Central

    Achterholt, Sandra; Priefert, Horst; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    The coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase (CALDH) of Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 (DSM7063), which catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of coniferyl aldehyde to ferulic acid and which is induced during growth with eugenol as the carbon source, was purified and characterized. The native protein exhibited an apparent molecular mass of 86,000 ± 5,000 Da, and the subunit mass was 49.5 ± 2.5 kDa, indicating an ?2 structure of the native enzyme. The optimal oxidation of coniferyl aldehyde to ferulic acid was obtained at a pH of 8.8 and a temperature of 26°C. The Km values for coniferyl aldehyde and NAD+ were about 7 to 12 ?M and 334 ?M, respectively. The enzyme also accepted other aromatic aldehydes as substrates, whereas aliphatic aldehydes were not accepted. The NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of CALDH was determined in order to clone the encoding gene (calB). The corresponding nucleotide sequence was localized on a 9.4-kbp EcoRI fragment (E94), which was subcloned from a Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 genomic library in the cosmid pVK100. The partial sequencing of this fragment revealed an open reading frame of 1,446 bp encoding a protein with a relative molecular weight of 51,822. The deduced amino acid sequence, which is reported for the first time for a structural gene of a CALDH, exhibited up to 38.5% amino acid identity (60% similarity) to NAD+-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenases from different sources. PMID:9721273

  4. Safety and persistence of orally administered human Lactobacillus sp. strains in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hütt, P; Kõll, P; Stsepetova, J; Alvarez, B; Mändar, R; Krogh-Andersen, K; Marcotte, H; Hammarström, L; Mikelsaar, M

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the safety and persistence of selected Lactobacillus strains in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of healthy adult volunteers after oral consumption of high doses of lactobacilli to identify potential candidates for probiotic and biotechnological applications. In the first phase of the study, nine individuals consumed capsules containing Lactobacillus gasseri 177 and E16B7, Lactobacillus acidophilus 821-3, Lactobacillus paracasei 317 and Lactobacillus fermentum 338-1-1 (each daily dose 1×1010 cfu) for 5 consecutive days. Data on gut health, blood parameters, and liver and kidney function were collected. The persistence of Lactobacillus strains was assessed by culturing combined with arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) on days 0, 5, 8, 10 and 20 from faecal samples. All strains survived gastrointestinal passage and were detected on the 5th day. L. acidophilus 821-3 was detected in four volunteers on the 8th day (4.3 to 7.0 log10 cfu/g) and in two on the 10th day (8.3 and 3.9 log10 cfu/g, respectively). In the second phase of the study, five additional volunteers consumed L. acidophilus 821-3 (daily 1×1010 cfu) for 5 consecutive days. The strain was subsequently detected in faeces of all individuals using real-time PCR on the 10th day (range 4.6-6.7; median 6.0 log10 cell/g) in both phases of the study for at least 5 days after discontinuation of consumption. The administration of high doses of different Lactobacillus strains did not result in any severe adverse effects in GIT and/or abnormal values of blood indices. Thus, the strain L. acidophilus 821-3 is a promising candidate for probiotic and biotechnological applications. Further studies will be performed to confirm the strain persistence and safety in a larger number of individuals. PMID:21831792

  5. Isolation and characterization of a furfural-degrading bacterium Bacillus cereus sp. strain DS1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dan; Bao, Jianguo; Lu, Jueming; Gao, Chunlei

    2015-02-01

    Furfural was found to be the main organic pollutant in the wastewater coming from the Diosgenin factory. This substance is derived from acidic pentosan in Dioscorea zingiberensis and is also found in a variety of agricultural byproducts, including corncobs, oat, wheat bran, and sawdust. It is regarded as a toxicant and an inhibitor to the growth of microorganism in both sewage disposal and biological fermentation. A furfural-degrading strain (DS1) was isolated from activated sludge of wastewater treatment plant in a diosgenin factory by continuous enrichment culture. The strain was identified as Bacillus cereus based on morphological, physiological tests, as well as on 16S rDNA sequence and Biolog analyses. The capacity of this strain to grow on a mineral salt medium, utilizing furfural as the sole carbon and energy source to degrade furfural, was investigated in this study. Under the condition of pH 9.0, temperature 35 °C, with rotating speed of 150 rpm, and an inoculum of 6 %, the strain showed that the furfural degradation capacity reaches 35 % in 7 days, as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The addition of inorganic carbon sources could bring down the biodegradation efficiency of the furfural. The strain DS1 showed better furfural removal capacity, as compared to other inorganic carbon sources in the media. Furthermore, a furfural concentration of as high as 4,000 mg L(-1) was tolerated by the culture. The capacity to degrade furfural was demonstrated for the first time by using the genus B. cereus. This study suggests the possible application in biodegradation strategies. PMID:25274411

  6. Characterization of the wzc gene from Pantoea sp. strain PPE7 and its influence on extracellular polysaccharide production and virulence on Pleurotus eryngii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Keun; Lee, Young Han; Kim, Hyeran; Lee, Jeongyeo; Ryu, Jae San

    2015-01-01

    To characterize of the pathogenicity gene from the soft rot pathogen Pantoea sp. PPE7 in Pleurotus eryngii, we constructed over 10,000 kanamycin-resistant transposon mutants of Pantoea sp. strain PPE7 by transposon mutagenesis. One mutant, Pantoea sp. NPPE9535, did not cause a soft rot disease on Pleurotus eryngii was confirmed by the pathogenicity test. The transposon was inserted into the wzc gene and the disruption of the wzc gene resulted in the reduction of polysaccharide production and abolished the virulence of Pantoea sp. strain PPE7 in P. eryngii. Analysis of the hydropathic profile of this protein indicated that it is composed of two main domains: an N-terminal domain including two transmembrane ?-helices and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain consisting of a tyrosine-rich region. Comparative analysis indicated that the amino acid sequence of Wzc is similar to that of a number of proteins involved in the synthesis or export of polysaccharides in other bacterial species. Purified GST-Wzc was found to affect the phosphorylation of tyrosine residue in vivo. These results showed that the wzc gene might play an important role in the virulence of Pantoea sp. strain PPE7 in P. eryngii. PMID:25183654

  7. Comprehensive Analysis of a Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strain Extracellular Serine Protease VpSP37

    PubMed Central

    Bennici, Carmelo; Quatrini, Paola; Catania, Valentina; Mazzola, Salvatore; Ghersi, Giulio; Cuttitta, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Proteases play an important role in the field of tissue dissociation combined with regenerative medicine. During the years new sources of proteolytic enzymes have been studied including proteases from different marine organisms both eukaryotic and prokaryotic. Herein we have purified a secreted component of an isolate of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, with electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to 36 kDa, belonging to the serine proteases family. Sequencing of the N-terminus enabled the in silico identification of the whole primary structure consisting of 345 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 37.4 KDa. The purified enzyme, named VpSP37, contains a Serine protease domain between residues 35 and 276 and a canonical Trypsin/Chimotrypsin 3D structure. Functional assays were performed to evaluate protease activity of purified enzyme. Additionally the performance of VpSP37 was evaluated in tissue dissociations experiments and the use of such enzyme as a component of enzyme blend for tissue dissociation procedures is strongly recommended. PMID:26162075

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Hymenobacter sp. Strain IS2118, Isolated from a Freshwater Lake in Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica, Reveals Diverse Genes for Adaptation to Cold Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Ptacek, Travis; Crowley, Michael; Swain, Ashit K.; Osborne, John D.; Bej, Asim K.; Andersen, Dale T.

    2014-01-01

    Hymenobacter sp. IS2118, isolated from a freshwater lake in Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica, produces extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and manifests tolerance to cold, UV radiation (UVR), and oxidative stress. We report the 5.26-Mb draft genome of strain IS2118, which will help us to understand its adaptation and survival mechanisms in Antarctic extreme ecosystems. PMID:25103756

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Cupriavidus sp. Strain SK-4, a di-ortho-Substituted Biphenyl-Utilizing Bacterium Isolated from Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Contaminated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Vilo, Claudia; Benedik, Michael J.; Ilori, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. strain SK-4 is a bacterium capable of growing aerobically on monochlorobiphenyls and dichlorobiphenyls as the sole carbon sources for growth. Here, we report its draft genome sequence with the aim of facilitating an understanding of polychlorinated biphenyl biodegradation mechanisms. PMID:24855306

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  12. EXPRESSION OF AN AT-RICH XYLANASE GENE FROM THE ANAEROBIC FUNGUS ORPINOMYCES SP. STRAIN PC-2 IN AND SECRETION OF THE HETEROLOGOUS ENZYME BY HYPOCREA JECORINA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AT-rich xylanase A gene (xynA) of the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2 codes for a polypeptide comprising a glycoside hydrolase family 11 catalytic domain linked by a hinge to two docking domains. The catalytic domain-coding region was used for the heterologous production of a xylan...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus sp. Strain DMB20, Isolated from Alang Ship-Breaking Yard, Which Harbors Genes for Xenobiotic Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Binal; Jain, Kunal; Patel, Namrata; Pandit, Ramesh; Patel, Anand; Joshi, Chaitanya G.

    2015-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain DMB20, in cometabolism with other Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, exhibits azoreduction of textile dyes. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, consisting of 6,647,181 bp with 7,668 coding sequences (CDSs). The data presented highlight multiple sets of functional genes associated with xenobiotic compound degradation. PMID:26067950

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Achromobacter sp. Strain DMS1, Capable of Degrading Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons Isolated from the Industrially Perturbed Environment of Amlakhadi Canal, India

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shivani; Shah, Binal; Jain, Kunal; Patel, Anand; Patel, Namrata

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Achromobacter sp. strain DMS1, which is 4.9 Mbp and has 3,727 coding sequences (CDSs), and is capable of degrading xenobiotic compounds and harboring genes for aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism. Its genome will unravel the basic mechanism involved in bioremediation of anthropogens. PMID:26494688

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Spiroplasma turonicum Strain Tab4cT, a Parasite of a Horse Fly, Haematopota sp. (Diptera: Tabanidae)

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jonathan; Zhao, Yan; Gasparich, Gail E.; Gaynor, Brady J.; Donofrio, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Spiroplasma turonicum was isolated from a Haematopota sp. fly in France. We report the nucleotide sequence of the circular chromosome of strain Tab4cT. The genome information will facilitate evolutionary studies of spiroplasmas, including symbionts of insects and ticks and pathogens of plants, insects, crustaceans, and humans. PMID:26586899

  16. Growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in acetate-free medium when co-cultured with alginate-encapsulated, acetate-producing strains of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Therien, Jesse B.; Zadvornyy, Oleg A.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Peters, John W.

    2014-10-18

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires acetate as a co-substrate for optimal production of lipids, and the addition of acetate to culture media has practical and economic implications for algal biofuel production. We demonstrate the growth of C. reinhardtii on acetate provided by mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7002.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Hymenobacter sp. Strain IS2118, Isolated from a Freshwater Lake in Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica, Reveals Diverse Genes for Adaptation to Cold Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyunmin; Ptacek, Travis; Crowley, Michael; Swain, Ashit K; Osborne, John D; Bej, Asim K; Andersen, Dale T

    2014-01-01

    Hymenobacter sp. IS2118, isolated from a freshwater lake in Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica, produces extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and manifests tolerance to cold, UV radiation (UVR), and oxidative stress. We report the 5.26-Mb draft genome of strain IS2118, which will help us to understand its adaptation and survival mechanisms in Antarctic extreme ecosystems. PMID:25103756

  18. Draft Genome sequence of Frankia sp. strains CN3 , an atypical, non-infective (Nod-) ineffective (Fix-) isolate from Coriaria nepalensis

    SciTech Connect

    Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Bruce, David; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Chen, Amy; Davenport, Karen W.; Deshpande, Shweta; Detter, J. Chris; Furnholm, Teal; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Gtari, Maher; Han, Cliff; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, N; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Land, Miriam L; Markowitz, Victor; Mavromatis, K; Nolan, Matt; Nouioui, Imen; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Pitluck, Sam; Santos, Catarina; Sen, Arnab; Sur, Saubashya; Szeto, Ernest; Tavares, Fernando; Hazuki, Teshima; Thakur, Subarna; Wall, Luis; Woyke, Tanja; Tisa, Louis S.

    2013-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of Frankia sp. strain CN3, which was isolated from Coriaria nepalensis. This genome sequence is the first from the fourth lineage of Frankia, that are unable to re-infect actinorhizal plants. At 10 Mb, it represents the largest Frankia genome sequenced to date.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants. PMID:26251492

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus sp. Strain IHBB 10380 Using PacBio Single-Molecule Real-Time Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Mohinder; Swarnkar, Mohit K.; Thakur, Rishu; Kiran, Shashi; Chhibber, Sanjay; Singh, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of 5.77 Mb is reported for Paenibacillus sp. strain IHBB 10380, isolated from the cold desert area of the northwestern Himalayas and exhibiting amylase and cellulase activities. The gene-coding clusters predicted the presence of genes for hydrolytic enzymes in the genome. PMID:25908145

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus sp. Strain DMB20, Isolated from Alang Ship-Breaking Yard, Which Harbors Genes for Xenobiotic Degradation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Binal; Jain, Kunal; Patel, Namrata; Pandit, Ramesh; Patel, Anand; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain DMB20, in cometabolism with other Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, exhibits azoreduction of textile dyes. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, consisting of 6,647,181 bp with 7,668 coding sequences (CDSs). The data presented highlight multiple sets of functional genes associated with xenobiotic compound degradation. PMID:26067950

  2. Characterization of protein binding to the psbAII promoter region in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 and its role in light regulated gene expression 

    E-print Network

    Dickerson, Naoma Suzanne

    1994-01-01

    ne PsbAII gene Of Synechococcus Sp. strain PCC 7942 is a member of a small gene family encoding the DI Protein found in the photosystem R reaction center. Previous studies have shown that expression of the psbAII gene is regulated in response...

  3. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain Chol1, a Model Organism for the Degradation of Bile Salts and Other Steroid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Holert, Johannes; Alam, Intikhab; Larsen, Michael; Antunes, André; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Stingl, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial degradation of steroid compounds is of high ecological and biotechnological relevance. Pseudomonas sp. strain Chol1 is a model organism for studying the degradation of the steroid compound cholate. Its draft genome sequence is presented and reveals one gene cluster responsible for the metabolism of steroid compounds. PMID:23405354

  4. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain Chol1, a Model Organism for the Degradation of Bile Salts and Other Steroid Compounds.

    PubMed

    Holert, Johannes; Alam, Intikhab; Larsen, Michael; Antunes, André; Bajic, Vladimir B; Stingl, Ulrich; Philipp, Bodo

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial degradation of steroid compounds is of high ecological and biotechnological relevance. Pseudomonas sp. strain Chol1 is a model organism for studying the degradation of the steroid compound cholate. Its draft genome sequence is presented and reveals one gene cluster responsible for the metabolism of steroid compounds. PMID:23405354

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium sp. Strain Ade.TY, a New Biohydrogen- and Biochemical-Producing Bacterium Isolated from Landfill Leachate Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Y. M.; Ting, Adeline; Wu, T. Y.; Gan, H. M.; Austin, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium sp. strain Ade.TY is potentially a new biohydrogen-producing species isolated from landfill leachate sludge. Here we present the assembly and annotation of its genome, which may provide further insights into its gene interactions for efficient biohydrogen production. PMID:24604640

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium sp. Strain Ade.TY, a New Biohydrogen- and Biochemical-Producing Bacterium Isolated from Landfill Leachate Sludge.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y M; Juan, J C; Ting, Adeline; Wu, T Y; Gan, H M; Austin, C M

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium sp. strain Ade.TY is potentially a new biohydrogen-producing species isolated from landfill leachate sludge. Here we present the assembly and annotation of its genome, which may provide further insights into its gene interactions for efficient biohydrogen production. PMID:24604640

  7. Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Arthromitus" sp. Strain SFB-Mouse-NL, a Commensal Bacterium with a Key Role in Postnatal Maturation of Gut Immune Functions.

    PubMed

    Bolotin, Alexander; de Wouters, Tomas; Schnupf, Pamela; Bouchier, Christiane; Loux, Valentin; Rhimi, Moez; Jamet, Alexandre; Dervyn, Rozenn; Boudebbouze, Samira; Blottière, Hervé M; Sorokin, Alexei; Snel, Johannes; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valérie; van de Guchte, Maarten; Maguin, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    "Candidatus Arthromitus" sp. strain SFB-mouse-NL (SFB, segmented filamentous bacteria) is a commensal bacterium necessary for inducing the postnatal maturation of homeostatic innate and adaptive immune responses in the mouse gut. Here, we report the genome sequence of this bacterium, which sets it apart from earlier sequenced mouse SFB isolates. PMID:25035333

  8. Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Arthromitus” sp. Strain SFB-Mouse-NL, a Commensal Bacterium with a Key Role in Postnatal Maturation of Gut Immune Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; de Wouters, Tomas; Schnupf, Pamela; Bouchier, Christiane; Loux, Valentin; Rhimi, Moez; Jamet, Alexandre; Dervyn, Rozenn; Boudebbouze, Samira; Blottière, Hervé M.; Sorokin, Alexei; Snel, Johannes; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valérie; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    “Candidatus Arthromitus” sp. strain SFB-mouse-NL (SFB, segmented filamentous bacteria) is a commensal bacterium necessary for inducing the postnatal maturation of homeostatic innate and adaptive immune responses in the mouse gut. Here, we report the genome sequence of this bacterium, which sets it apart from earlier sequenced mouse SFB isolates. PMID:25035333

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Achromobacter sp. Strain DMS1, Capable of Degrading Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons Isolated from the Industrially Perturbed Environment of Amlakhadi Canal, India.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shivani; Shah, Binal; Jain, Kunal; Patel, Anand; Patel, Namrata; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Achromobacter sp. strain DMS1, which is 4.9 Mbp and has 3,727 coding sequences (CDSs), and is capable of degrading xenobiotic compounds and harboring genes for aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism. Its genome will unravel the basic mechanism involved in bioremediation of anthropogens. PMID:26494688

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobacterium sp. Strain PM2-P1-29, a Tetracycline-Degrading TetX-Expressing Aerobic Bacterium Isolated from Agricultural Soil.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; LaPara, Timothy M; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The genome of Sphingobacterium sp. strain PM2-P1-29 was sequenced. The bacterium contains a physiologically active tet(X) gene, encoding a tetracycline-degrading monooxygenase. To our knowledge, this is the only bacterium naturally harboring tet(X) for which tetracycline degradation has been demonstrated. PMID:25301646

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F; Jansson, Janet K; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants. PMID:26251492

  12. Development of a Multiplex-PCR assay for the rapid identification of Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Anoxybacillus flavithermus.

    PubMed

    Pennacchia, Carmela; Breeuwer, Pieter; Meyer, Rolf

    2014-10-01

    The presence of thermophilic bacilli in dairy products is indicator of poor hygiene. Their rapid detection and identification is fundamental to improve the industrial reactivity in the implementation of corrective and preventive actions. In this study a rapid and reliable identification of Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Anoxybacillus flavithermus was achieved by species-specific PCR assays. Two primer sets, targeting the ITS 16S-23S rRNA region and the rpoB gene sequence of the target species respectively, were employed. Species-specificity of both primer sets was evaluated by using 53 reference strains of DSMZ collection; among them, 13 species of the genus Geobacillus and 15 of the genus Anoxybacillus were represented. Moreover, 99 wild strains and 23 bulk cells collected from 24 infant formula powders gathered from several countries worldwide were included in the analyses. Both primer sets were highly specific and the expected PCR fragments were obtained only when DNA from G. stearothermophilus or A. flavithermus was used. After testing their specificity, they were combined in a Multiplex-PCR assay for the simultaneous identification of the two target species. The specificity of the Multiplex-PCR was evaluated by using both wild strains and bulk cells. Every analysis confirmed the reliable identification results provided by the single species-specific PCR methodology. The easiness, the rapidity (about 4 h from DNA isolation to results) and the reliability of the PCR procedures developed in this study highlight the advantage of their application for the specific detection and identification of the thermophilic species G. stearothermophilus and A. flavithermus. PMID:24929881

  13. Genome of betaproteobacterium Caenimonas sp. strain SL110 contains a coenzyme F420 biosynthesis gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuling; Feng, Fuying; Zeng, Yonghui

    2014-11-28

    To probe the genomic properties of microbes thriving in desert lakes, we sequenced the full genome of a betaproteobacterial strain (SL110) belonging to the understudied genus Caenimonas of the family Comamonadaceae. This strain was isolated from a freshwater lake in the western Gobi Desert, Northern China. Its genome contains genes encoding carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, nitric oxide reductase, and sulfur oxidation enzymes, highlighting the potentially important contribution of this group of bacteria to the cycling of inorganic elements in nature. Unexpectedly, a coenzyme F420 biosynthesis gene cluster was identified. A further search for F420 biosynthesis gene homologs in genomic databases suggests the possible widespread presence of F420 biosynthesis gene clusters in proteobacterial genomes. PMID:25394509

  14. Complete Sequence Analysis of Two Methanotroph-Specific repABC-Containing Plasmids from Methylocystis sp. Strain SC2

    PubMed Central

    Dam, Bomba; Kube, Michael; Dam, Somasri; Reinhardt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of two large, low-copy-number plasmids of 229.6 kb (pBSC2-1) and 143.5 kb (pBSC2-2) were determined during assembly of the whole-genome shotgun sequences of the methane-oxidizing bacterium Methylocystis sp. strain SC2. The physical existence of the two plasmids in strain SC2 was confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis followed by Southern hybridization. Both plasmids have a conserved replication module of the repABC system and carry genes involved in their faithful maintenance and conjugation. In addition, they contain genes that might be involved in essential metabolic processes. These include several heavy metal resistance genes and copper transport genes in pBSC2-1 and a complete nitrous oxide reductase operon and a pmoC singleton in pBSC2-2, the latter encoding the PmoC subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase. PMID:22504811

  15. Catabolic Function of Compartmentalized Alanine Dehydrogenase in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120?

    PubMed Central

    Pernil, Rafael; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    In the diazotrophic filaments of heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, an exchange of metabolites takes place between vegetative cells and heterocysts that results in a net transfer of reduced carbon to the heterocysts and of fixed nitrogen to the vegetative cells. Open reading frame alr2355 of the genome of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is the ald gene encoding alanine dehydrogenase. A strain carrying a green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion to the N terminus of Ald (Ald-N-GFP) showed that the ald gene is expressed in differentiating and mature heterocysts. Inactivation of ald resulted in a lack of alanine dehydrogenase activity, a substantially decreased nitrogenase activity, and a 50% reduction in the rate of diazotrophic growth. Whereas production of alanine was not affected in the ald mutant, in vivo labeling with [14C]alanine (in whole filaments and isolated heterocysts) or [14C]pyruvate (in whole filaments) showed that alanine catabolism was hampered. Thus, alanine catabolism in the heterocysts is needed for normal diazotrophic growth. Our results extend the significance of a previous work that suggested that alanine is transported from vegetative cells into heterocysts in the diazotrophic Anabaena filament. PMID:20675483

  16. Ecological physiology of Synechococcus sp. strain SH-94-5, a naturally occurring cyanobacterium deficient in nitrate assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. R.; Castenholz, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain SH-94-5 is a nitrate assimilation-deficient cyanobacterium which was isolated from an ammonium-replete hot spring in central Oregon. While this clone could grow on ammonium and some forms of organic nitrogen as sole nitrogen sources, it could not grow on either nitrate or nitrite, even under conditions favoring passive diffusion. It was determined that this clone does not express functional nitrate reductase or nitrite reductase and that the lack of activity of either enzyme is not due to inactivation of the cyanobacterial nitrogen control protein NtcA. A few other naturally occurring cyanobacterial strains are also nitrate assimilation deficient, and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the ability to utilize nitrate has been independently lost at least four times during the evolutionary history of the cyanobacteria. This phenotype is associated with the presence of environmental ammonium, a negative regulator of nitrate assimilation gene expression, which may indicate that natural selection to maintain functional copies of nitrate assimilation genes has been relaxed in these habitats. These results suggest how the evolutionary fates of conditionally expressed genes might differ between environments and thereby effect ecological divergence and biogeographical structure in the microbial world.

  17. Ecological Physiology of Synechococcus sp. Strain SH-94-5, a Naturally Occurring Cyanobacterium Deficient in Nitrate Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Scott R.; Castenholz, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain SH-94-5 is a nitrate assimilation-deficient cyanobacterium which was isolated from an ammonium-replete hot spring in central Oregon. While this clone could grow on ammonium and some forms of organic nitrogen as sole nitrogen sources, it could not grow on either nitrate or nitrite, even under conditions favoring passive diffusion. It was determined that this clone does not express functional nitrate reductase or nitrite reductase and that the lack of activity of either enzyme is not due to inactivation of the cyanobacterial nitrogen control protein NtcA. A few other naturally occurring cyanobacterial strains are also nitrate assimilation deficient, and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the ability to utilize nitrate has been independently lost at least four times during the evolutionary history of the cyanobacteria. This phenotype is associated with the presence of environmental ammonium, a negative regulator of nitrate assimilation gene expression, which may indicate that natural selection to maintain functional copies of nitrate assimilation genes has been relaxed in these habitats. These results suggest how the evolutionary fates of conditionally expressed genes might differ between environments and thereby effect ecological divergence and biogeographical structure in the microbial world. PMID:11425713

  18. Azaphilones from an Acid Mine Extremophile Strain of a Pleurostomophora sp.

    PubMed

    Stierle, Andrea A; Stierle, Donald B; Girtsman, Teri; Mou, T C; Antczak, Christophe; Djaballah, Hakim

    2015-12-24

    An extremophilic fungus identified as a Pleurostomophora sp. was isolated from the Berkeley Pit, an acid mine waste lake. When grown in liquid culture, the fungus produced berkchaetoazaphilones A-C (1, 2, and 5), the red pigment berkchaetorubramine (6), and the known compound 4-(hydroxymethyl)quinoline. These compounds were evaluated as inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase-3, caspase-1, and proinflammatory cytokine production in induced THP-1 cells. Berkchaetoazaphilone B (2) inhibited IL-1?, TNF?, and IL-6 production in the induced inflammasome assay and was cytotoxic toward human retinoblastoma cell line Y79 (IC50 = 1.1 ?M), leukemia cell lines CCRF-CEM and SR, and the melanoma cell line LOX IMVI (IC50 = 10 ?M). PMID:26641525

  19. The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 contains a second alkaline phosphatase encoded by phoV.

    PubMed

    Wagner, K U; Masepohl, B; Pistorius, E K

    1995-12-01

    A gene (phoV) encoding an alkaline phosphatase from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was isolated by screening a plasmid gene bank for expression of alkaline phosphatase activity in Escherichia coli JM103. Two independent clones carrying the same alkaline-phosphatase-encoding gene were isolated. One of these clones (pKW1) was further analysed and the nucleotide sequence of a contiguous 3234 bp DNA fragment was determined. Two complete open reading frames (ORF1 and phoV) and an incomplete ORF3 were identified reading in the same direction. The deduced phoV gene product showed 34% identity to the alkaline phosphatase PhoA from Zymomonas mobilis, and the N-terminal part of the putative ORF3 protein exhibited 57% identity to a protein of unknown function from Frankia sp. Insertional inactivation of the Synechococcus PCC 7942 phoV gene failed, indicating an essential role for either the phoV or the ORF3 gene product. PhoV consists of 550 amino acid residues, resulting in a molecular mass of 61.3 kDa. To overexpress the Synechococcus PCC 7942 phoV gene in E. coli, plasmid pKW1 was transformed into a phoA mutant of E. coli (CC118). In E. coli strain CC118(pKW1) PhoV was expressed constitutively with high rates of activity, and was shown to be membrane associated in the periplasmic space. After partial purification of the recombinant PhoV, it was shown that, like other alkaline phosphatases, the Synechococcus PhoV had a broad pH optimum in the alkaline region and a broad substrate specificity for phosphomonoesters, required Zn2+ for activity, and was inhibited by phosphate. In contrast to several other alkaline phosphatases, PhoV was inhibited by Mn2+. Due to the lack of a Synechococcus PCC 7942 phoV mutant strain, the function of PhoV remains uncertain. However, the present results show that Synechococcus PCC 7942 has a second, probably phosphate-irrepressible, alkaline phosphatase (PhoV, 61.3 kDa) in addition to the phosphate-repressible enzyme (PhoA, 145 kDa) already described. PMID:8574398

  20. Cell Envelope Components Influencing Filament Length in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Burnat, Mireia; Schleiff, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria grow as chains of cells (known as trichomes or filaments) that can be hundreds of cells long. The filament consists of individual cells surrounded by a cytoplasmic membrane and peptidoglycan layers. The cells, however, share a continuous outer membrane, and septal proteins, such as SepJ, are important for cell-cell contact and filament formation. Here, we addressed a possible role of cell envelope components in filamentation, the process of producing and maintaining filaments, in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. We studied filament length and the response of the filaments to mechanical fragmentation in a number of strains with mutations in genes encoding cell envelope components. Previously published peptidoglycan- and outer membrane-related gene mutants and strains with mutations in two genes (all5045 and alr0718) encoding class B penicillin-binding proteins isolated in this work were used. Our results show that filament length is affected in most cell envelope mutants, but the filaments of alr5045 and alr2270 gene mutants were particularly fragmented. All5045 is a dd-transpeptidase involved in peptidoglycan elongation during cell growth, and Alr2270 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of lipid A, a key component of lipopolysaccharide. These results indicate that both components of the cell envelope, the murein sacculus and the outer membrane, influence filamentation. As deduced from the filament fragmentation phenotypes of their mutants, however, none of these elements is as important for filamentation as the septal protein SepJ. PMID:25201945

  1. Cell envelope components influencing filament length in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Burnat, Mireia; Schleiff, Enrico; Flores, Enrique

    2014-12-01

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria grow as chains of cells (known as trichomes or filaments) that can be hundreds of cells long. The filament consists of individual cells surrounded by a cytoplasmic membrane and peptidoglycan layers. The cells, however, share a continuous outer membrane, and septal proteins, such as SepJ, are important for cell-cell contact and filament formation. Here, we addressed a possible role of cell envelope components in filamentation, the process of producing and maintaining filaments, in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. We studied filament length and the response of the filaments to mechanical fragmentation in a number of strains with mutations in genes encoding cell envelope components. Previously published peptidoglycan- and outer membrane-related gene mutants and strains with mutations in two genes (all5045 and alr0718) encoding class B penicillin-binding proteins isolated in this work were used. Our results show that filament length is affected in most cell envelope mutants, but the filaments of alr5045 and alr2270 gene mutants were particularly fragmented. All5045 is a dd-transpeptidase involved in peptidoglycan elongation during cell growth, and Alr2270 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of lipid A, a key component of lipopolysaccharide. These results indicate that both components of the cell envelope, the murein sacculus and the outer membrane, influence filamentation. As deduced from the filament fragmentation phenotypes of their mutants, however, none of these elements is as important for filamentation as the septal protein SepJ. PMID:25201945

  2. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Erin K. Field; Robin Gerlach; Sridhar Viamajala; Laura K. Jennings; Alfred B. Cunningham; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel

    2011-09-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), to trivalent chromium, Cr(III), can be an important aspect of remediation processes at Department of Energy (DOE) and other contaminated sites. Cellulomonas species are found at several Cr(VI) contaminated and uncontaminated locations at the DOE site in Hanford, Washington. Members of this genus have demonstrated the ability to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) fermentatively and therefore play a potential role in hexavalent chromium remediation at this site. Batch studies were conducted with Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to assess the influence of various carbon sources, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds on Cr(VI) reduction. These chemical species are likely to be present in these terrestrial environments during in situ bioremediation. Results indicated that there were a number of interactions between these compounds that influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. The type of carbon source as well as the type of electron shuttle present influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. When an electron shuttle, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was present in the system, reduction rates increased significantly. Biologically reduced AQDS (AHDS) reduced Cr(VI) almost instantaneously. The presence of iron minerals and their concentrations did not significantly influence Cr(VI) reduction rates. However, strain ES6 or AQDS could directly reduce surface-associated Fe(III) to Fe(II) which was capable of reducing Cr(VI) at a near instantaneous rate. These results suggest the rate limiting step in these systems is the transfer of electrons from strain ES6 to the intermediate or terminal electron acceptor whether that is Cr(VI), Fe(III), or AQDS.

  3. Metabolism of 2-Chloro-4-Nitroaniline via Novel Aerobic Degradation Pathway by Rhodococcus sp. Strain MB-P1

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pal, Deepika; Vikram, Surendra; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    2-chloro-4-nitroaniline (2-C-4-NA) is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitor and also used in the synthesis of niclosamide, a molluscicide. It is marked as a black-listed substance due to its poor biodegradability. We report biodegradation of 2-C-4-NA and its pathway characterization by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1 under aerobic conditions. The strain MB-P1 utilizes 2-C-4-NA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In the growth medium, the degradation of 2-C-4-NA occurs with the release of nitrite ions, chloride ions, and ammonia. During the resting cell studies, the 2-C-4-NA-induced cells of strain MB-P1 transformed 2-C-4-NA stoichiometrically to 4-amino-3-chlorophenol (4-A-3-CP), which subsequently gets transformed to 6-chlorohydroxyquinol (6-CHQ) metabolite. Enzyme assays by cell-free lysates prepared from 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells, demonstrated that the first enzyme in the 2-C-4-NA degradation pathway is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the stoichiometric removal of nitro group and production of 4-A-3-CP. Oxygen uptake studies on 4-A-3-CP and related anilines by 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells demonstrated the involvement of aniline dioxygenase in the second step of 2-C-4-NA degradation. This is the first report showing 2-C-4-NA degradation and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway by an aerobic bacterium. PMID:23614030

  4. Hexavalent chromium reduction by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6: the influence of carbon source, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds.

    PubMed

    Field, Erin K; Gerlach, Robin; Viamajala, Sridhar; Jennings, Laura K; Peyton, Brent M; Apel, William A

    2013-06-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), to trivalent chromium, Cr(III), can be an important aspect of remediation processes at contaminated sites. Cellulomonas species are found at several Cr(VI) contaminated and uncontaminated locations at the Department of Energy site in Hanford, Washington. Members of this genus have demonstrated the ability to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) fermentatively and therefore play a potential role in Cr(VI) remediation at this site. Batch studies were conducted with Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to assess the influence of various carbon sources, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds on Cr(VI) reduction rates as these chemical species are likely to be present in, or added to, the environment during in situ bioremediation. Results indicated that the type of carbon source as well as the type of electron shuttle present influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. Molasses stimulated Cr(VI) reduction more effectively than pure sucrose, presumably due to presence of more easily utilizable sugars, electron shuttling compounds or compounds with direct Cr(VI) reduction capabilities. Cr(VI) reduction rates increased with increasing concentration of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) regardless of the carbon source. The presence of iron minerals and their concentrations did not significantly influence Cr(VI) reduction rates. However, strain ES6 or AQDS could directly reduce surface-associated Fe(III) to Fe(II), which was capable of reducing Cr(VI) at a near instantaneous rate. These results suggest the rate limiting step in these systems was the transfer of electrons from strain ES6 to the intermediate or terminal electron acceptor whether that was Cr(VI), Fe(III), or AQDS. PMID:23135488

  5. Downward vascular translocation of a green fluorescent protein-tagged strain of Dickeya sp. (Biovar 3) from stem and leaf inoculation sites on potato.

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Robert; de Boer, Waldo J; van Veen, Johannes A; van der Wolf, Jan M

    2010-11-01

    Translocation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Dickeya sp. from stems or from leaves to underground parts of potato plants was studied in greenhouse experiments. Thirty days after stem inoculation, 90% of plants expressed symptoms at the stem base and 95% of plants showed browning of internal stem tissue. The GFP-tagged Dickeya sp. was detected by dilution plating in extracts of the stem interiors (100%), stem bases (90%), roots (80%), stolons (55%), and progeny tubers (24%). In roots, the GFP-tagged Dickeya sp. was found inside and between parenchyma cells whereas, in stems and stolons, the GFP-tagged Dickeya sp. was found in the xylem vessels and protoxylem cells. In progeny tubers, this strain was detected in the stolon end. Thirty days after leaf inoculation, the GFP-tagged Dickeya sp. was detected in extracts of 75% of the leaves, 88% of the petioles, 63% of the axils, and inside 25% of the stems taken 15 cm above the ground level. UV microscopy confirmed the presence of the GFP-tagged Dickeya sp. inside petioles and in the main leaf veins. No blackleg or aerial stem rot and no translocation of the GFP-tagged Dickeya sp. to underground plant parts was observed. The implications for contamination of progeny tubers are discussed. PMID:20932162

  6. Ecotoxicological assessment of pesticides towards the plant growth promoting activities of Lentil (Lens esculentus)-specific Rhizobium sp. strain MRL3.

    PubMed

    Ahemad, Munees; Khan, Mohammad Saghir

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of the selected pesticides [herbicides (metribuzin and glyphosate), insecticides (imidacloprid and thiamethoxam) and fungicides (hexaconazole, metalaxyl and kitazin)] at the recommended and the higher dose rates on plant growth promoting traits of Rhizobium sp. strain MRL3 isolated from lentil-nodules. Strain MRL3 was explicitly selected owing to its high pesticide-tolerance ability and substantial production of indole acetic acid, siderophores (salicylic acid and 2, 3 dihydroxy benzoic acid), exo-polysaccharides, HCN and ammonia. A trend of pesticide-concentration dependent progressive-decline for plant growth promoting properties of Rhizobium sp. strain MRL3 was observed excluding exo-polysaccharides which was regularly augmented on exceeding the concentration of each tested pesticide from the recommended dose. Commonly, the maximum toxicity to plant growth promoting traits of Rhizobium was shown by glyphosate, imidacloprid and hexaconazole at three times the recommended rate among herbicides, insecticides and fungicides, respectively. PMID:21318390

  7. Identification and characterization of a novel Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius bacteriophage, GVE3.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Leonardo Joaquim; Sunda, Falone; Taylor, Mark Paul; Cowan, Don Arthur; Trindade, Marla Iris

    2015-09-01

    The study of extremophilic phages may reveal new phage families as well as different mechanisms of infection, propagation and lysis to those found in phages from temperate environments. We describe a novel siphovirus, GVE3, which infects the thermophile Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius. The genome size is 141,298 bp (G+C 29.6%), making it the largest Geobacillus spp-infecting phage known. GVE3 appears to be most closely related to the recently described Bacillus anthracis phage vB_BanS_Tsamsa, rather than Geobacillus-infecting phages described thus far. Tetranucleotide usage deviation analysis supports this relationship, showing that the GVE3 genome sequence correlates best with B. anthracis and Bacillus cereus genome sequences, rather than Geobacillus spp genome sequences. PMID:26123922

  8. FORMALDEHYDE GAS INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACE MATERIALS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research evaluated the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface material using formaldehyde gas. Spores were dried on seven types of indoor surfaces and exposed to 1100 ppm formaldehyde gas for 10 hr. Fo...

  9. Elucidation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl effect on dibenzothiophene desulfurization by Microbacterium sp. strain ZD-M2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Cai, Yu-Bei; Zhang, Ying; Li, Wei

    2008-10-01

    The effect of 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP), the end product of dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization via 4S pathway, on cell growth and desulfurization activity was investigated by Microbacterium sp. The experimental results indicate that 2-HBP would inhibit the desulfurization activity. Providing 2-HBP was added in the reaction media, the DBT degradation rate decreased along with the increase of 2-HBP addition. By contrast, cell growth would be promoted in the addition of 2-HBP at a low concentration (<0.1mM). At high concentration of 2-HBP, the inhibition on the cell growth occurred. Meanwhile, the inhibitory effect of 2-HBP on DBT desulfurization activity was tested both in the oil/aqueous two-phase system and the aqueous system. A mathematical model was developed to explain the product formation kinetics with DBT as the sole sulfur source. The predicted results were close to the experimental data, it elucidated that along with the 2-HBP accumulation, the inhibitory effect of 2-HBP on DBT desulfurization and cell growth was enhanced. PMID:18296046

  10. Optimization and characterization of biosurfactant production from marine Vibrio sp. strain 3B-2

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoke; Wang, Caixia; Wang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    A biosurfactant-producing bacterium, designated 3B-2, was isolated from marine sediment and identified as Vibrio sp. by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The culture medium composition was optimized to increase the capability of 3B-2 for producing biosurfactant. The produced biosurfactant was characterized in terms of protein concentration, surface tension, and oil-displacement efficiency. The optimal medium for biosurfactant production contained: 0.5% lactose, 1.1% yeast extract, 2% sodium chloride, and 0.1% disodium hydrogen phosphate. Under optimal conditions (28°C), the surface tension of crude biosurfactant could be reduced to 41 from 71.5 mN/m (water), while its protein concentration was increased to up to 6.5 g/L and the oil displacement efficiency was improved dramatically at 6.5 cm. Two glycoprotein fractions with the molecular masses of 22 and 40 kDa were purified from the biosurfactant, which held great potential for applications in microbial enhanced oil recovery and bioremediation. PMID:26441908

  11. Structural properties of the tubular appendage spinae from marine bacterium Roseobacter sp. strain YSCB

    PubMed Central

    Bernadac, A.; Wu, L.-F.; Santini, C.-L.; Vidaud, C.; Sturgis, J. N.; Menguy, N.; Bergam, P.; Nicoletti, C.; Xiao, T.

    2012-01-01

    Spinae are tubular surface appendages broadly found in Gram-negative bacteria. Little is known about their architecture, function or origin. Here, we report structural characterization of the spinae from marine bacteria Roseobacter sp. YSCB. Electron cryo-tomography revealed that a single filament winds into a hollow flared base with progressive change to a cylinder. Proteinase K unwound the spinae into proteolysis-resistant filaments. Thermal treatment ripped the spinae into ribbons that were melted with prolonged heating. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed a dominant beta-structure of the spinae. Differential scanning calorimetry analyses showed three endothermic transformations at 50–85°C, 98°C and 123°C, respectively. The heating almost completely disintegrated the spinae, abolished the 98°C transition and destroyed the beta-structure. Infrared spectroscopy identified the amide I spectrum maximum at a position similar to that of amyloid fibrils. Therefore, the spinae distinguish from other bacterial appendages, e.g. flagella and stalks, in both the structure and mechanism of assembly. PMID:23230515

  12. [EFFICIENCY OF INTRODUCING CAROTENE PRODUCING STRAINS BACILLUS SP. 1.1 AND B. AMYLOLIQUEFACIENS UCM B-5113 INTO THE CHIKENS DIET].

    PubMed

    Nechypurenko, O O; Kharhota M A; Avdeeva, L V

    2015-01-01

    It was shown the efficiency of carotene producing strains Bacillus sp. 1.1 and B. amyloliquefaciens UCM B-5113 in the diet of chickens. Also it was detected the lowering of the quantitative content of bacterial genera Enterococcus, Staphylococcus, family Enterobacteriaceae in the gut after eating by chickens cross "H&N Brown Nick" fodder with strains Bacillus sp. 1.1 and B. amyloliquefaciens UCM B-5113 alone and in composition in quantities 1 x 10(10) CFU per 1 g of feed. On the 18th day after introduction of cultures Bacillus sp. 1.1, B. amyloliquefaciens UCM B-5113 and their composition in the diet of poultry we revealed the increasing of body weight by 21.6, 7.6 and 22.0%, respectively, comparesing to controls. Also due to Bacillus sp. 1.1 it was detected the restore of intestinal villous structures, tissues of spleen, liver and heart. We found the additive effect of the composition of the investigated strains of bacteria genus Bacillus to the chickens. PMID:26214892

  13. A new lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Arthrobacter sp. strain MIS38.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, M; Daido, H; Takao, T; Murata, S; Shimonishi, Y; Imanaka, T

    1993-10-01

    A biosurfactant termed arthrofactin produced by Arthrobacter species strain MIS38 was purified and chemically characterized as 3-hydroxydecanoyl-D-leucyl-D-asparagyl-D-threonyl-D- leucyl-D-leucyl-D-seryl-L-leucyl-D-seryl-L-isoleucyl-L-isoleucyl-L-as paragyl lactone. Surface activity of arthrofactin was examined, with surfactin as a control. Critical micelle concentration values of arthrofactin and surfactin were around 1.0 x 10(-5) M and 7.0 x 10(-5) M at 25 degrees C, respectively. Arthrofactin was found to be five to seven times more effective than surfactin. The minimum surface tension value of arthrofactin was 24 mN/m at a concentration higher than the critical micelle concentration. According to the oil displacement assay, arthrofactin was a better oil remover than synthetic surfactants, such as Triton X-100 and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Arthrofactin is one of the most effective lipopeptide biosurfactants. PMID:8407822

  14. Halobacterium noricense sp. nov., an archaeal isolate from a bore core of an alpine Permian salt deposit, classification of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 as a strain of H. salinarum and emended description of H. salinarum.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Claudia; Legat, Andrea; Pfaffenhuemer, Marion; Radax, Christian; Weidler, Gerhard; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2004-12-01

    Two rod-shaped haloarchaeal strains, A1 and A2, were isolated from a bore core from a salt mine in Austria. The deposition of the salt is thought to have occurred during the Permian period (225-280 million years ago). The 16S rDNA sequences of the strains were 97.1% similar to that of the type species of the genus Halobacterium, which was also determined in this work. Polar lipids consisted of C20-C20 derivatives of phosphatidylglycerol, methylated phosphatidylglycerol phosphate, phosphatidylglycerol sulfate, triglycosyl diether and sulfated tetraglycosyl diether. Optimal salinity for growth was 15-17.5% NaCl; Mg++ was tolerated up to a concentration of 1 M. The DNA-DNA reassociation value of strain A1T was 25% with H. salinarum DSM 3754T and 41% with Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, respectively. Based on these results and other properties, e.g. whole cell protein patterns, menaquinone content and restriction patterns of DNA, strains A1 and A2 are members of a single species, for which we propose the name H. noricense. The type strain is A1 (DSM 15987T, ATCC BAA-852T, NCIMB 13967T). Since we present evidence that Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 is a member of H. salinarum, an emended description of H. salinarum is provided. PMID:15290323

  15. Aldouronate utilization in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2: Physiological and enzymatic evidence for coupling of extracellular depolymerization and intracellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nong, Guang; Rice, John D; Chow, Virginia; Preston, James F

    2009-07-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium isolated from decaying sweet gum wood, secretes a multimodular glycohydrolase family GH10 endoxylanase (XynA1) anchored to the cell surface. The gene encoding XynA1 is part of a xylan utilization regulon that includes an aldouronate utilization gene cluster with genes encoding a GH67 alpha-glucuronidase (AguA), a GH10 endoxylanase (XynA2), and a GH43 arabinofuranosidase/beta-xylosidase (XynB). Here we show that this Paenibacillus sp. strain is able to utilize methylglucuronoxylose (MeGAX(1)), an aldobiuronate product that accumulates during acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, and methylglucuronoxylotriose (MeGAX(3)), the product of the extracellular XynA1 acting on methylglucuronoxylan (MeGAX(n)). The average rates of utilization of MeGAX(n), MeGAX(1), and MeGAX(3) were 149.8, 59.4, and 54.3 microg xylose equivalents.ml(-1).h(-1), respectively, and were proportional to the specific growth rates on the substrates. AguA was active with MeGAX(1) and MeGAX(3), releasing 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronate alpha-1,2 linked to a nonreducing terminal xylose residue. XynA2 converted xylotriose, generated by the action of AguA on MeGAX(3), to xylose and xylobiose. The ability to utilize MeGAX(1) provides a novel metabolic potential for bioconversion of acid hydrolysates of lignocellulosics. The 2.8-fold-greater rate of utilization of polymeric MeGAX(n) than that of MeGAX(3) indicates that there is coupling of extracellular depolymerization, assimilation, and intracellular metabolism, allowing utilization of lignocellulosics with minimal pretreatment. Along with adjacent genes encoding transcriptional regulators and ABC transporter proteins, the aguA and xynA2 genes in the cluster described above contribute to the efficient utilization of aldouronates derived from dilute acid and/or enzyme pretreatment protocols applied to the conversion of hemicellulose to biofuels and chemicals. PMID:19395566

  16. Polysaccharide-Degrading Thermophiles Generated by Heterologous Gene Expression in Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Thermophiles have important advantages over mesophiles as host organisms for high-temperature bioprocesses, functional production of thermostable enzymes, and efficient expression of enzymatic activities in vivo. To capitalize on these advantages of thermophiles, we describe here a new inducible gene expression system in the thermophile Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426. Six promoter regions in the HTA426 genome were identified and analyzed for expression profiles using ?-galactosidase reporter assay. This analysis identified a promoter region upstream of a putative amylose-metabolizing gene cluster that directed high-level expression of the reporter gene. The expression was >280-fold that without a promoter and was further enhanced 12-fold by maltose addition. In association with a multicopy plasmid, this promoter region was used to express heterologous genes. Several genes, including a gene whose product was insoluble when expressed in Escherichia coli, were successfully expressed as soluble proteins, with yields of 0.16 to 59 mg/liter, and conferred new functions to G. kaustophilus strains. Remarkably, cellulase and ?-amylase genes conferred the ability to degrade cellulose paper and insoluble starch at high temperatures, respectively, generating thermophiles with the potential to degrade plant biomass. Our results demonstrate that this novel expression system expands the potential applications of G. kaustophilus. PMID:23793634

  17. Expression and Characterization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 Recombinant ?-Amylase in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Sivasangkary; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Chor Leow, Thean; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 is a locally isolated thermophilic bacteria producing thermostable and thermoactive ?-amylase. Increased production and commercialization of thermostable ?-amylase strongly warrant the need of a suitable expression system. In this study, the gene encoding the thermostable ?-amylase in G. stearothermophilus SR74 was amplified, sequenced, and subcloned into P. pastoris GS115 strain under the control of a methanol inducible promoter, alcohol oxidase (AOX). Methanol induced recombinant expression and secretion of the protein resulted in high levels of extracellular amylase production. YPTM medium supplemented with methanol (1% v/v) was the best medium and once optimized, the maximum recombinant ?-amylase SR74 achieved in shake flask was 28.6?U?mL?1 at 120?h after induction. The recombinant 59?kDa ?-amylase SR74 was purified 1.9-fold using affinity chromatography with a product yield of 52.6% and a specific activity of 151.8?U?mg?1. The optimum pH of ?-amylase SR74 was 7.0 and the enzyme was stable between pH 6.0–8.0. The purified enzyme was thermostable and thermoactive, exhibiting maximum activity at 65°C with a half-life (t1/2) of 88?min at 60°C. In conclusion, thermostable ?-amylase SR74 from G. stearothermophilus SR74 would be beneficial for industrial applications, especially in liquefying saccrification. PMID:26090417

  18. Arhodomonas sp. strain Seminole and its genetic potential to degrade aromatic compounds under high-salinity conditions.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, Sonal; Nicholson, Carla; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce A; Canaan, Patricia; Hartson, Steven D; Fathepure, Babu Z

    2014-11-01

    Arhodomonas sp. strain Seminole was isolated from a crude oil-impacted brine soil and shown to degrade benzene, toluene, phenol, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA), protocatechuic acid (PCA), and phenylacetic acid (PAA) as the sole sources of carbon at high salinity. Seminole is a member of the genus Arhodomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria, sharing 96% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Arhodomonas aquaeolei HA-1. Analysis of the genome predicted a number of catabolic genes for the metabolism of benzene, toluene, 4-HBA, and PAA. The predicted pathways were corroborated by identification of enzymes present in the cytosolic proteomes of cells grown on aromatic compounds using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Genome analysis predicted a cluster of 19 genes necessary for the breakdown of benzene or toluene to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and pyruvate. Of these, 12 enzymes were identified in the proteome of toluene-grown cells compared to lactate-grown cells. Genomic analysis predicted 11 genes required for 4-HBA degradation to form the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Of these, proteomic analysis of 4-HBA-grown cells identified 6 key enzymes involved in the 4-HBA degradation pathway. Similarly, 15 genes needed for the degradation of PAA to the TCA cycle intermediates were predicted. Of these, 9 enzymes of the PAA degradation pathway were identified only in PAA-grown cells and not in lactate-grown cells. Overall, we were able to reconstruct catabolic steps for the breakdown of a variety of aromatic compounds in an extreme halophile, strain Seminole. Such knowledge is important for understanding the role of Arhodomonas spp. in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbon-impacted hypersaline environments. PMID:25149520

  19. Characterization of a purified thermostable xylanase from Caldicoprobacter algeriensis sp. nov. strain TH7C1(T).

    PubMed

    Amel, Bouanane-Darenfed; Nawel, Boucherba; Khelifa, Bouacem; Mohammed, Gagaoua; Manon, Joseph; Salima, Kebbouche-Gana; Farida, Nateche; Hocine, Hacene; Bernard, Ollivier; Jean-Luc, Cayol; Marie-Laure, Fardeau

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the purification and biochemical characterization of an extracellular thermostable xylanase (called XYN35) from Caldicoprobacter algeriensis sp. nov., strain TH7C1(T), a thermophilic, anaerobic strain isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma (Algeria). The maximum xylanase activity recorded after 24?h of incubation at 70?°C and in an optimized medium containing 10?g/L mix birchwood- and oats spelt-xylan was 250?U/mL. The pure protein was obtained after heat treatment (1?h at 70?°C), followed by sequential column chromatographies on Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration and Mono-S Sepharose anion-exchange. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis indicated that the purified enzyme is a monomer with a molecular mass of 35,075.10?Da. The results from amino-acid sequence analysis revealed high homology between the 21 NH2-terminal residues of XYN35 and those of bacterial xylanases. The enzyme showed optimum activity at pH 11 and 70?°C. While XYN35 was activated by Ca(2+), Mn(2+), and Mg(2+), it was completely inhibited by Hg(2+) and Cd(2+). The xylanase showed higher specific activity on soluble oat-spelt xylan, followed by beechwood xylan. This enzyme was also noted to obey the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with Km and kcat values on oat-spelt xylan being 1.33?mg/mL and 400?min(-1), respectively. Thin-layer chromatography soluble oat-spelt xylan (TLC) analysis showed that the final hydrolyzed products of the enzyme from birchwood xylan were xylose, xylobiose, and xylotriose. Taken together, the results indicated that the XYN35 enzyme has a number of attractive biochemical properties that make it a potential promising candidate for future application in the pulp bleaching industry. PMID:26687892

  20. Hydrogen production from organic substrates in an aerobic nitrogen-fixing marine unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain Miami BG 043511

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.H.; Mitsui, A. )

    1994-11-20

    Synechococcus sp. strain Miami BG 043511 exhibits very high H[sub 2] photoproduction from water, but the H[sub 2] photo-production capability is lost rapidly with the age of the batch culture. The decrease of the capability coincides with the decrease of cellular glucose content. However, H[sub 2] photoproduction capability can be restored by the addition of organic substrates. Among 40 organic compounds tested, carbohydrates such as glucose, fructose, maltose, and sucrose were effective electron donors. Among organic acids tested, only pyruvate was an effective electron donor. Among alcohols tested, glycerol was a good electron donor, whereas ethanol was a poor but positive electron donor. These results demonstrate that this unicellular cyanobacterium exhibits a wide substrate specificity for H[sub 2] photoproduction but has a different substrate specificity compared to photosynthetic bacteria. The maximum rates of H[sub 2] photoproduction from a 6-day-old batch culture with 25 mmol of pyruvate, glucose, maltose, sucrose, fructose, and glycerol were 1.11, 0.62, 0.05, 0.47, 0.30, and 0.39 [mu]moles per mg cell dry weight per hour respectively. Therefore, this cyanobacterial strain may have a potential significance in removing organic materials from the wastewater and simultaneously transforming them to H[sub 2] gas, a pollution-free energy. The activity of nitrogenase, which catalyzes hydrogen production, completely disappeared when intracellular glucose was used up, but it could be restored by the addition of organic substrates such as glucose and pyruvate.

  1. Arhodomonas sp. Strain Seminole and Its Genetic Potential To Degrade Aromatic Compounds under High-Salinity Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dalvi, Sonal; Nicholson, Carla; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce A.; Canaan, Patricia; Hartson, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Arhodomonas sp. strain Seminole was isolated from a crude oil-impacted brine soil and shown to degrade benzene, toluene, phenol, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA), protocatechuic acid (PCA), and phenylacetic acid (PAA) as the sole sources of carbon at high salinity. Seminole is a member of the genus Arhodomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria, sharing 96% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Arhodomonas aquaeolei HA-1. Analysis of the genome predicted a number of catabolic genes for the metabolism of benzene, toluene, 4-HBA, and PAA. The predicted pathways were corroborated by identification of enzymes present in the cytosolic proteomes of cells grown on aromatic compounds using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Genome analysis predicted a cluster of 19 genes necessary for the breakdown of benzene or toluene to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and pyruvate. Of these, 12 enzymes were identified in the proteome of toluene-grown cells compared to lactate-grown cells. Genomic analysis predicted 11 genes required for 4-HBA degradation to form the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Of these, proteomic analysis of 4-HBA-grown cells identified 6 key enzymes involved in the 4-HBA degradation pathway. Similarly, 15 genes needed for the degradation of PAA to the TCA cycle intermediates were predicted. Of these, 9 enzymes of the PAA degradation pathway were identified only in PAA-grown cells and not in lactate-grown cells. Overall, we were able to reconstruct catabolic steps for the breakdown of a variety of aromatic compounds in an extreme halophile, strain Seminole. Such knowledge is important for understanding the role of Arhodomonas spp. in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbon-impacted hypersaline environments. PMID:25149520

  2. Methanobactin from Methylocystis sp. Strain SB2 Affects Gene Expression and Methane Monooxygenase Activity in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    PubMed Central

    Farhan Ul-Haque, Muhammad; Kalidass, Bhagyalakshmi; Vorobev, Alexey; Baral, Bipin S.; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2015-01-01

    Methanotrophs can express a cytoplasmic (soluble) methane monooxygenase (sMMO) or membrane-bound (particulate) methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Expression of these MMOs is strongly regulated by the availability of copper. Many methanotrophs have been found to synthesize a novel compound, methanobactin (Mb), that is responsible for the uptake of copper, and methanobactin produced by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b plays a key role in controlling expression of MMO genes in this strain. As all known forms of methanobactin are structurally similar, it was hypothesized that methanobactin from one methanotroph may alter gene expression in another. When Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was grown in the presence of 1 ?M CuCl2, expression of mmoX, encoding a subunit of the hydroxylase component of sMMO, was very low. mmoX expression increased, however, when methanobactin from Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 (SB2-Mb) was added, as did whole-cell sMMO activity, but there was no significant change in the amount of copper associated with M. trichosporium OB3b. If M. trichosporium OB3b was grown in the absence of CuCl2, the mmoX expression level was high but decreased by several orders of magnitude if copper prebound to SB2-Mb (Cu-SB2-Mb) was added, and biomass-associated copper was increased. Exposure of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b to SB2-Mb had no effect on expression of mbnA, encoding the polypeptide precursor of methanobactin in either the presence or absence of CuCl2. mbnA expression, however, was reduced when Cu-SB2-Mb was added in both the absence and presence of CuCl2. These data suggest that methanobactin acts as a general signaling molecule in methanotrophs and that methanobactin “piracy” may be commonplace. PMID:25616801

  3. Genome-derived insights into the biology of the hepatotoxic bloom-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 90

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria can form massive toxic blooms in fresh and brackish bodies of water and are frequently responsible for the poisoning of animals and pose a health risk for humans. Anabaena is a genus of filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria commonly implicated as a toxin producer in blooms in aquatic ecosystems throughout the world. The biology of bloom-forming cyanobacteria is poorly understood at the genome level. Results Here, we report the complete sequence and comprehensive annotation of the bloom-forming Anabaena sp. strain 90 genome. It comprises two circular chromosomes and three plasmids with a total size of 5.3 Mb, encoding a total of 4,738 genes. The genome is replete with mobile genetic elements. Detailed manual annotation demonstrated that almost 5% of the gene repertoire consists of pseudogenes. A further 5% of the genome is dedicated to the synthesis of small peptides that are the products of both ribosomal and nonribosomal biosynthetic pathways. Inactivation of the hassallidin (an antifungal cyclic peptide) biosynthetic gene cluster through a deletion event and a natural mutation of the buoyancy-permitting gvpG gas vesicle gene were documented. The genome contains a large number of genes encoding restriction-modification systems. Two novel excision elements were found in the nifH gene that is required for nitrogen fixation. Conclusions Genome analysis demonstrated that this strain invests heavily in the production of bioactive compounds and restriction-modification systems. This well-annotated genome provides a platform for future studies on the ecology and biology of these important bloom-forming cyanobacteria. PMID:23148582

  4. Characterization of the 16S rRNA genes from Mycoplasma sp. strain F38 and development of an identification system based on PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Bascuñana, C R; Mattsson, J G; Bölske, G; Johansson, K E

    1994-01-01

    Mycoplasma sp. (strain F38) is the causative agent of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia, which is a goat disease of great global concern. Strain F38 belongs to the so-called "Mycoplasma mycoides cluster," and the members of this cluster have many biochemical and serological properties in common, which makes it difficult to differentiate between them by conventional methods. Their phylogenetic interrelationship are thus uncertain. The 16S rRNA gene of the rrnB operon from strain F38 was cloned and sequenced. The sequence was compared with the 16S rRNA sequences of related mycoplasmas, and phylogenetic trees were constructed by parsimony analysis. A three-way ambiguity among strain F38, Mycoplasma capricolum, and Mycoplasma sp. strain PG50 was observed in the trees. This observation is in agreement with a recent proposal to reclassify strain F38 and M. capricolum. A primer set was designed for in vitro amplification by PCR of a fragment of the 16S rRNA genes from the M. mycoides cluster. The amplimers of strain F38 could be distinguished easily from the corresponding amplimers from other members of the M. mycoides cluster by restriction enzyme analysis with PstI. This observation was utilized to design an identification system for strain F38. Part of the 16S rRNA gene of the rrnA operon from strain F38 was also cloned, and several sequence differences between the two rRNA operons were discovered, revealing microheterogeneity between the two 16S rRNA genes of this organism. Images PMID:8169205

  5. Structure and evolution of NGRRS-1, a complex, repeated element in the genome of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Perret X; Viprey V; Freiberg C; Broughton WJ

    1997-12-01

    Much of the remarkable ability of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 to nodulate at least 110 genera of legumes, as well as the nonlegume Parasponia andersonii, stems from the more than 80 different Nod factors it secretes. Except for nodE, nodG, and nodPQ, which are on the chromosome, most Nod factor biosynthesis genes are dispersed over the 536,165-bp symbiotic plasmid, pNGR234a. Mosaic sequences and insertion sequences (ISs) comprise 18% of pNGR234a. Many of them are clustered, and these IS islands divide the replicon into large blocks of functionally related genes. At 6 kb, NGRRS-1 is a striking example: there is one copy on pNGR234a and three others on the chromosome. DNA sequence comparisons of two NGRRS-1 elements identified three types of IS, NGRIS-2, NGRIS-4, and NGRIS-10. Here we show that all four copies of NGRRS-1 probably originated from transposition of NGRIS-4 into a more ancient IS-like sequence, NGRIS-10. Remarkably, all nine copies of NGRIS-4 have transposed into other ISs. It is unclear whether the accumulation of potentially mutagenic sequences in large clusters is due to the nature of the IS involved or to some selection process. Nevertheless, a direct consequence of the preferential targeting of transposons into such IS islands is to minimize the likelihood of disrupting vital functions.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Enterobacter sp. IIT-BT 08: A potential microbial strain for high rate hydrogen production

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Namita; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar; Huntemann, Marcel; Deshpande, Shweta; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Szeto, Ernest; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Chertkov, Olga; Daligault, Hajnalka; Davenport, Karen; Gu, Wei; Munk, Christine; Zhang, Xiaojing; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Xu, Yan; Quintana, Beverly; Reitenga, Krista; Kunde, Yulia; Green, Lance; Erkkila, Tracy; Han, Cliff; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Lang, Elke; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; Das, Debabrata

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. IIT-BT 08 belongs to Phylum: Proteobacteria, Class: Gammaproteobacteria, Order: Enterobacteriales, Family: Enterobacteriaceae. The organism was isolated from the leaves of a local plant near the Kharagpur railway station, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India. It has been extensively studied for fermentative hydrogen production because of its high hydrogen yield. For further enhancement of hydrogen production by strain development, complete genome sequence analysis was carried out. Sequence analysis revealed that the genome was linear, 4.67 Mbp long and had a GC content of 56.01%. The genome properties encode 4,393 protein-coding and 179 RNA genes. Additionally, a putative pathway of hydrogen production was suggested based on the presence of formate hydrogen lyase complex and other related genes identified in the genome. Thus, in the present study we describe the specific properties of the organism and the generation, annotation and analysis of its genome sequence as well as discuss the putative pathway of hydrogen production by this organism. PMID:24976892

  7. Direct starch fermentation to L-lactic acid by a newly isolated thermophilic strain, Bacillus sp. MC-07.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Pramod; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Miyamoto, Hirokuni; Miyamoto, Hisashi; Okugawa, Yuki; Sakai, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    A newly isolated Bacillus sp. MC-07 showed 99.2 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the Bacillus thermoamylovorans LMG 18084(T). It demonstrated optimum and maximum growth temperatures of 50 and 62 °C, respectively. The ability of MC-07 to produce optically pure L-lactic acid via direct fermentation of starch without enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated at different pH values (6.0-8.0) by intermittent adjustments every 12 h. During batch fermentation in mineral salt medium containing 0.001 % yeast extract at pH 7.0, 20 g/L of soluble starch was utilized to produce 16.6 g/L L-lactic acid at 50 °C within 24 h of fermentation, with 100 % optical purity, 92.1 % lactic acid selectivity, and an L-lactic acid yield of 0.977 g/g. Direct starch fermentation at pHs 6.0, 6.5, 7.5, and 8.0 resulted in considerably lower concentrations of lactic acid than did at pH 7.0. Compared with B. thermoamylovorans LMG 18084(T), the ability of strain MC-07 to produce L-lactic acid was superior. PMID:25407945

  8. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue ?-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  9. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue ?-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  10. Sustained photoproduction of ammonia from dinitrogen and water by the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain ATCC33047

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, J.L.; Guerrero, M.G.; Losada, M.

    1984-07-01

    Conditions have been developed that lengthen the time during which photosynthetic dinitrogen fixation by filaments of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain ATCC 33047 proceeds freely, whereas the subsequent conversion of ammonia into organic nitrogen remains blocked, with the resulting ammonia released to the outer medium. When L-methionine-DL-sulfoximine was added every 20 h, maximal rates of ammonia production (25 to 30 ..mu..mol/mg of chlorophyll per h) were maintained for about 50 h. After this time, ammonia production ceased due to a deficiency of glutamine and other nitrogenous compounds in the filaments, conditions which finally led to cell lysis. The effective ammonia production period could be further extended to about 7 days by adding a small amount of glutamine at the end of a 40-h production period or by allowing the cells to recover for 8 h in the absence of L-methionine-DL-sulfoximine after every 40-h period in the presence of the inhibitor. A more prolonged steady production of ammonia, lasting for longer than 2 weeks, was achieved by alternating treatments with the glutamine synthetase inhibitors L-methionine-DL-sulfoximine and phosphinothricin, provided that 8-h recovery periods in the absence of either compound were also alternated throughout. The biochemically manipulated cyanobacterial filaments thus represent a system that is relatively stable with time for the conversion of light energy into chemical energy, with the net generation of a valuable fuel and fertilizer through the photoreduction of dinitrogen to ammonia.

  11. Physiological Regulation of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase and the Role of 2-Oxoglutarate in Prochlorococcus sp. Strain PCC 9511

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Jesús; Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Rangel-Zúñiga, Oriol Alberto; García-Fernández, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH; EC 1.1.1.42) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate, to produce 2-oxoglutarate. The incompleteness of the tricarboxylic acids cycle in marine cyanobacteria confers a special importance to isocitrate dehydrogenase in the C/N balance, since 2-oxoglutarate can only be metabolized through the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase pathway. The physiological regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase was studied in cultures of Prochlorococcus sp. strain PCC 9511, by measuring enzyme activity and concentration using the NADPH production assay and Western blotting, respectively. The enzyme activity showed little changes under nitrogen or phosphorus starvation, or upon addition of the inhibitors DCMU, DBMIB and MSX. Azaserine, an inhibitor of glutamate synthase, induced clear increases in the isocitrate dehydrogenase activity and icd gene expression after 24 h, and also in the 2-oxoglutarate concentration. Iron starvation had the most significant effect, inducing a complete loss of isocitrate dehydrogenase activity, possibly mediated by a process of oxidative inactivation, while its concentration was unaffected. Our results suggest that isocitrate dehydrogenase responds to changes in the intracellular concentration of 2-oxoglutarate and to the redox status of the cells in Prochlorococcus. PMID:25061751

  12. Contrasted Reactivity to Oxygen Tensions in Frankia sp. Strain CcI3 throughout Nitrogen Fixation and Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Hezbri, Karima; Ktari, Amir; Sbissi, Imed; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Gtari, Maher; Tisa, Louis S.

    2014-01-01

    Reconciling the irreconcilable is a primary struggle in aerobic nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Although nitrogenase is oxygen and reactive oxygen species-labile, oxygen tension is required to sustain respiration. In the nitrogen-fixing Frankia, various strategies have been developed through evolution to control the respiration and nitrogen-fixation balance. Here, we assessed the effect of different oxygen tensions on Frankia sp. strain CcI3 growth, vesicle production, and gene expression under different oxygen tensions. Both biomass and vesicle production were correlated with elevated oxygen levels under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-deficient conditions. The mRNA levels for the nitrogenase structural genes (nifHDK) were high under hypoxic and hyperoxic conditions compared to oxic conditions. The mRNA level for the hopanoid biosynthesis genes (sqhC and hpnC) was also elevated under hyperoxic conditions suggesting an increase in the vesicle envelope. Under nitrogen-deficient conditions, the hup2 mRNA levels increased with hyperoxic environment, while hup1 mRNA levels remained relatively constant. Taken together, these results indicate that Frankia protects nitrogenase by the use of multiple mechanisms including the vesicle-hopanoid barrier and increased respiratory protection. PMID:24987692

  13. Cloning and Characterization of the Pyrrolomycin Biosynthetic Gene Clusters from Actinosporangium vitaminophilum ATCC 31673 and Streptomyces sp. Strain UC 11065?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiujun; Parry, Ronald J.

    2007-01-01

    The pyrrolomycins are a family of polyketide antibiotics, some of which contain a nitro group. To gain insight into the nitration mechanism associated with the formation of these antibiotics, the pyrrolomycin biosynthetic gene cluster from Actinosporangium vitaminophilum was cloned. Sequencing of ca. 56 kb of A. vitaminophilum DNA revealed 35 open reading frames (ORFs). Sequence analysis revealed a clear relationship between some of these ORFs and the biosynthetic gene cluster for pyoluteorin, a structurally related antibiotic. Since a gene transfer system could not be devised for A. vitaminophilum, additional proof for the identity of the cloned gene cluster was sought by cloning the pyrrolomycin gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. strain UC 11065, a transformable pyrrolomycin producer. Sequencing of ca. 26 kb of UC 11065 DNA revealed the presence of 17 ORFs, 15 of which exhibit strong similarity to ORFs in the A. vitaminophilum cluster as well as a nearly identical organization. Single-crossover disruption of two genes in the UC 11065 cluster abolished pyrrolomycin production in both cases. These results confirm that the genetic locus cloned from UC 11065 is essential for pyrrolomycin production, and they also confirm that the highly similar locus in A. vitaminophilum encodes pyrrolomycin biosynthetic genes. Sequence analysis revealed that both clusters contain genes encoding the two components of an assimilatory nitrate reductase. This finding suggests that nitrite is required for the formation of the nitrated pyrrolomycins. However, sequence analysis did not provide additional insights into the nitration process, suggesting the operation of a novel nitration mechanism. PMID:17158935

  14. Acclimation of the Global Transcriptome of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 to Nutrient Limitations and Different Nitrogen Sources

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    The unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a model organism for laboratory-based studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and is a potential platform for biotechnological applications. Two of its most notable properties are its exceptional tolerance of high-light intensity and very rapid growth under optimal conditions. In this study, transcription profiling by RNAseq has been used to perform an integrated study of global changes in transcript levels in cells subjected to limitation for the major nutrients CO2, nitrogen, sulfate, phosphate, and iron. Transcriptional patterns for cells grown on nitrate, ammonia, and urea were also studied. Nutrient limitation caused strong decreases of transcript levels of the genes encoding major metabolic pathways, especially for components of the photosynthetic apparatus, CO2 fixation, and protein biosynthesis. Uptake mechanisms for the respective nutrients were strongly up-regulated. The transcription data further suggest that major changes in the composition of the NADH dehydrogenase complex occur upon nutrient limitation. Transcripts for flavoproteins increased strongly when CO2 was limiting. Genes involved in protection from oxidative stress generally showed high, constitutive transcript levels, which possibly explains the high-light tolerance of this organism. The transcriptomes of cells grown with ammonia or urea as nitrogen source showed increased transcript levels for components of the CO2 fixation machinery compared to cells grown with nitrate, but in general transcription differences in cells grown on different N-sources exhibited surprisingly minor differences. PMID:22514553

  15. Casuarina Root Exudates Alter the Physiology, Surface Properties, and Plant Infectivity of Frankia sp. Strain CcI3

    PubMed Central

    Beauchemin, Nicholas J.; Furnholm, Teal; Lavenus, Julien; Svistoonoff, Sergio; Doumas, Patrick; Bogusz, Didier; Laplaze, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The actinomycete genus Frankia forms nitrogen-fixing symbioses with 8 different families of actinorhizal plants, representing more than 200 different species. Very little is known about the initial molecular interactions between Frankia and host plants in the rhizosphere. Root exudates are important in Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, especially for initiating Nod factor synthesis. We measured differences in Frankia physiology after exposure to host aqueous root exudates to assess their effects on actinorhizal symbioses. Casuarina cunninghamiana root exudates were collected from plants under nitrogen-sufficient and -deficient conditions and tested on Frankia sp. strain CcI3. Root exudates increased the growth yield of Frankia in the presence of a carbon source, but Frankia was unable to use the root exudates as a sole carbon or energy source. Exposure to root exudates caused hyphal “curling” in Frankia cells, suggesting a chemotrophic response or surface property change. Exposure to root exudates altered Congo red dye binding, which indicated changes in the bacterial surface properties at the fatty acid level. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed fatty acid changes and revealed further carbohydrate changes. Frankia cells preexposed to C. cunninghamiana root exudates for 6 days formed nodules on the host plant significantly earlier than control cells. These data support the hypothesis of early chemical signaling between actinorhizal host plants and Frankia in the rhizosphere. PMID:22101047

  16. Photoautotrophic Polyhydroxybutyrate Granule Formation Is Regulated by Cyanobacterial Phasin PhaP in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Hauf, Waldemar; Watzer, Björn; Roos, Nora; Klotz, Alexander; Forchhammer, Karl

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophic microorganisms which fix atmospheric carbon dioxide via the Calvin-Benson cycle to produce carbon backbones for primary metabolism. Fixed carbon can also be stored as intracellular glycogen, and in some cyanobacterial species like Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulates when major nutrients like phosphorus or nitrogen are absent. So far only three enzymes which participate in PHB metabolism have been identified in this organism, namely, PhaA, PhaB, and the heterodimeric PHB synthase PhaEC. In this work, we describe the cyanobacterial PHA surface-coating protein (phasin), which we term PhaP, encoded by ssl2501. Translational fusion of Ssl2501 with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) showed a clear colocalization to PHB granules. A deletion of ssl2501 reduced the number of PHB granules per cell, whereas the mean PHB granule size increased as expected for a typical phasin. Although deletion of ssl2501 had almost no effect on the amount of PHB, the biosynthetic activity of PHB synthase was negatively affected. Secondary-structure prediction and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of PhaP revealed that the protein consists of two ?-helices, both of them associating with PHB granules. Purified PhaP forms oligomeric structures in solution, and both ?-helices of PhaP contribute to oligomerization. Together, these results support the idea that Ssl2501 encodes a cyanobacterial phasin, PhaP, which regulates the surface-to-volume ratio of PHB granules. PMID:25911471

  17. Structure and evolution of NGRRS-1, a complex, repeated element in the genome of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234.

    PubMed Central

    Perret, X; Viprey, V; Freiberg, C; Broughton, W J

    1997-01-01

    Much of the remarkable ability of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 to nodulate at least 110 genera of legumes, as well as the nonlegume Parasponia andersonii, stems from the more than 80 different Nod factors it secretes. Except for nodE, nodG, and nodPQ, which are on the chromosome, most Nod factor biosynthesis genes are dispersed over the 536,165-bp symbiotic plasmid, pNGR234a. Mosaic sequences and insertion sequences (ISs) comprise 18% of pNGR234a. Many of them are clustered, and these IS islands divide the replicon into large blocks of functionally related genes. At 6 kb, NGRRS-1 is a striking example: there is one copy on pNGR234a and three others on the chromosome. DNA sequence comparisons of two NGRRS-1 elements identified three types of IS, NGRIS-2, NGRIS-4, and NGRIS-10. Here we show that all four copies of NGRRS-1 probably originated from transposition of NGRIS-4 into a more ancient IS-like sequence, NGRIS-10. Remarkably, all nine copies of NGRIS-4 have transposed into other ISs. It is unclear whether the accumulation of potentially mutagenic sequences in large clusters is due to the nature of the IS involved or to some selection process. Nevertheless, a direct consequence of the preferential targeting of transposons into such IS islands is to minimize the likelihood of disrupting vital functions. PMID:9393715

  18. Characterization of a Novel Rieske-Type Alkane Monooxygenase System in Pusillimonas sp. Strain T7-7

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    The cold-tolerant bacterium Pusillimonas sp. strain T7-7 is able to utilize diesel oils (C5 to C30 alkanes) as a sole carbon and energy source. In the present study, bioinformatics, proteomics, and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR approaches were used to identify the alkane hydroxylation system present in this bacterium. This system is composed of a Rieske-type monooxygenase, a ferredoxin, and an NADH-dependent reductase. The function of the monooxygenase, which consists of one large (46.711 kDa) and one small (15.355 kDa) subunit, was further studied using in vitro biochemical analysis and in vivo heterologous functional complementation tests. The purified large subunit of the monooxygenase was able to oxidize alkanes ranging from pentane (C5) to tetracosane (C24) using NADH as a cofactor, with greatest activity on the C15 substrate. The large subunit also showed activity on several alkane derivatives, including nitromethane and methane sulfonic acid, but it did not act on any aromatic hydrocarbons. The optimal reaction condition of the large subunit is pH 7.5 at 30°C. Fe2+ can enhance the activity of the enzyme evidently. This is the first time that an alkane monooxygenase system belonging to the Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase family has been identified in a bacterium. PMID:23417490

  19. Biochemical properties of a new cold-active mono- and diacylglycerol lipase from marine member Janibacter sp. strain HTCC2649.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongjuan; Lan, Dongming; Xin, Ruipu; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2014-01-01

    Mono- and di-acylglycerol lipase has been applied to industrial usage in oil modification for its special substrate selectivity. Until now, the reported mono- and di-acylglycerol lipases from microorganism are limited, and there is no report on the mono- and di-acylglycerol lipase from bacteria. A predicted lipase (named MAJ1) from marine Janibacter sp. strain HTCC2649 was purified and biochemical characterized. MAJ1 was clustered in the family I.7 of esterase/lipase. The optimum activity of the purified MAJ1 occurred at pH 7.0 and 30 °C. The enzyme retained 50% of the optimum activity at 5 °C, indicating that MAJ1 is a cold-active lipase. The enzyme activity was stable in the presence of various metal ions, and inhibited in EDTA. MAJ1 was resistant to detergents. MAJ1 preferentially hydrolyzed mono- and di-acylglycerols, but did not show activity to triacylglycerols of camellia oil substrates. Further, MAJ1 is low homologous to that of the reported fungal diacylglycerol lipases, including Malassezia globosa lipase 1 (SMG1), Penicillium camembertii lipase U-150 (PCL), and Aspergillus oryzae lipase (AOL). Thus, we identified a novel cold-active bacterial lipase with a sn-1/3 preference towards mono- and di-acylglycerides for the first time. Moreover, it has the potential, in oil modification, for special substrate selectivity. PMID:24927145

  20. Characterization of a family 43 ?-xylosidase from the xylooligosaccharide utilizing putative probiotic Weissella sp. strain 92

    PubMed Central

    Falck, Peter; Linares-Pastén, Javier A; Adlercreutz, Patrick; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present the first XOS degrading glycoside hydrolase from Weissella, WXyn43, a two-domain enzyme from GH43. The gene was amplified from genomic DNA of the XOS utilizing Weissella strain 92, classified under the species-pair Weissella cibaria/W.confusa, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme is lacking a putative signal peptide and is, from a homology model, shown to be composed of an N-terminal 5-fold ?-propeller catalytic domain and a C-terminal ?-sandwich domain of unknown function. WXyn43 hydrolyzed short (1–4)-?-d-xylooligosaccharides, with similar kcat/KM for xylobiose (X2) and xylotriose (X3) and clearly lower efficiency in xylotetraose (X4) conversion. WXyn43 displays the highest reported kcat for conversion of X3 (900 s?1 at 37°C) and X4 (770 s?1), and kcat for hydrolysis of X2 (907 s?1) is comparable with or greater than the highest previously reported. The purified enzyme adopted a homotetrameric state in solution, while a truncated form with isolated N-terminal catalytic domain adopted a mixture of oligomeric states and lacked detectable activity. The homology model shows that residues from both domains are involved in monomer–monomer hydrogen bonds, while the bonds creating dimer–dimer interactions only involved residues from the N-terminal domain. Docking of X2 and X3 in the active site shows interactions corresponding to subsites ?1 and +1, while presence of a third subsite is unclear, but interactions between a loop and the reducing-end xylose of X3 may be present. PMID:26494804

  1. Characterization of a family 43 ?-xylosidase from the xylooligosaccharide utilizing putative probiotic Weissella sp. strain 92.

    PubMed

    Falck, Peter; Linares-Pastén, Javier A; Adlercreutz, Patrick; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we present the first XOS degrading glycoside hydrolase from Weissella, WXyn43, a two-domain enzyme from GH43. The gene was amplified from genomic DNA of the XOS utilizing Weissella strain 92, classified under the species-pair Weissella cibaria/W.confusa, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme is lacking a putative signal peptide and is, from a homology model, shown to be composed of an N-terminal 5-fold ?-propeller catalytic domain and a C-terminal ?-sandwich domain of unknown function. WXyn43 hydrolyzed short (1-4)-?-d-xylooligosaccharides, with similar kcat/KM for xylobiose (X2) and xylotriose (X3) and clearly lower efficiency in xylotetraose (X4) conversion. WXyn43 displays the highest reported kcat for conversion of X3 (900 s(-1) at 37°C) and X4 (770 s(-1)), and kcat for hydrolysis of X2 (907 s(-1)) is comparable with or greater than the highest previously reported. The purified enzyme adopted a homotetrameric state in solution, while a truncated form with isolated N-terminal catalytic domain adopted a mixture of oligomeric states and lacked detectable activity. The homology model shows that residues from both domains are involved in monomer-monomer hydrogen bonds, while the bonds creating dimer-dimer interactions only involved residues from the N-terminal domain. Docking of X2 and X3 in the active site shows interactions corresponding to subsites -1 and +1, while presence of a third subsite is unclear, but interactions between a loop and the reducing-end xylose of X3 may be present. PMID:26494804

  2. Maximum activity of recombinant ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of Anabaena sp. strain CA requires the product of the rbcX gene.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L A; Tabita, F R

    1997-01-01

    Filamentous cyanobacteria of the genus Anabaena contain a unique open reading frame, rbcX, which is juxtaposed and cotranscribed with the genes (rbcL and rbcS) encoding form I ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). Plasmid constructions containing the genes from Anabaena sp. strain CA were prepared, and expression studies in Escherichia coli indicated that the product of the rbcX gene mimicked the ability of chaperonin proteins to facilitate the proper folding of recombinant RubisCO proteins. The purified recombinant Anabaena sp. strain CA RubisCO, much like the RubisCO enzymes from other cyanobacteria, was shown not to undergo inhibition of activity during a time course experiment, and the properties of this chaperoned recombinant protein appear to be consistent with those of the enzyme isolated from the native organism. PMID:9171433

  3. Rapid Mineralization of the Phenylurea Herbicide Diuron by Variovorax sp. Strain SRS16 in Pure Culture and within a Two-Member Consortium?

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Sebastian R.; Albers, Christian N.; Aamand, Jens

    2008-01-01

    The phenylurea herbicide diuron [N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-N,N-dimethylurea] is widely used in a broad range of herbicide formulations, and consequently, it is frequently detected as a major water contaminant in areas where there is extensive use. We constructed a linuron [N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-methoxy-N-methylurea]- and diuron-mineralizing two-member consortium by combining the cooperative degradation capacities of the diuron-degrading organism Arthrobacter globiformis strain D47 and the linuron-mineralizing organism Variovorax sp. strain SRS16. Neither of the strains mineralized diuron alone in a mineral medium, but combined, the two strains mineralized 31 to 62% of the added [ring-U-14C]diuron to 14CO2, depending on the initial diuron concentration and the cultivation conditions. The constructed consortium was used to initiate the degradation and mineralization of diuron in soil without natural attenuation potential. This approach led to the unexpected finding that Variovorax sp. strain SRS16 was able to mineralize diuron in a pure culture when it was supplemented with appropriate growth substrates, making this strain the first known bacterium capable of mineralizing diuron and representatives of both the N,N-dimethyl- and N-methoxy-N-methyl-substituted phenylurea herbicides. The ability of the coculture to mineralize microgram-per-liter levels of diuron was compared to the ability of strain SRS16 alone, which revealed the greater extent of mineralization by the two-member consortium (31 to 33% of the added [ring-U-14C]diuron was mineralized to 14CO2 when 15.5 to 38.9 ?g liter?1 diuron was used). These results suggest that the consortium consisting of strains SRS16 and D47 could be a promising candidate for remediation of soil and water contaminated with diuron and linuron and their shared metabolite 3,4-dichloroaniline. PMID:18296530

  4. Re-examination of strains formerly assigned to Hyphopichia burtonii, the phylogeny of the genus Hyphopichia, and the description of Hyphopichia pseudoburtonii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Marizeth; Smith, Maudy Th

    2010-11-01

    On the basis of the nucleotide divergence in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domain of the rRNA gene and the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene, species of the genus Hyphopichia can be divided into different phylogenetic groups. In this study, three distinct phylogenetic clusters as well as a novel species, Hyphopichia pseudoburtonii sp. nov. with type strain CBS 2455(T) (=JCM 16346(T)), are introduced. Mating studies indicate that strains belonging to Hyphopichia pseudoburtonii are heterothallic. PMID:19965989

  5. AmiE, a Novel N-Acylhomoserine Lactone Acylase Belonging to the Amidase Family, from the Activated-Sludge Isolate Acinetobacter sp. Strain Ooi24

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Seiji; Yasumoto, Sera; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2014-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum-sensing signal molecules. We have reported that Acinetobacter strains isolated from activated sludge have AHL-degrading activity. In this study, we cloned the amiE gene as an AHL-degradative gene from the genomic library of Acinetobacter sp. strain Ooi24. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that AmiE functions as an AHL acylase, which hydrolyzes the amide bond of AHL. AmiE showed a high level of degrading activity against AHLs with long acyl chains but no activity against AHLs with acyl chains shorter than eight carbons. AmiE showed homology with a member of the amidases (EC 3.5.1.4) but not with any known AHL acylase enzymes. An amino acid sequence of AmiE from Ooi24 showed greater than 99% identities with uncharacterized proteins from Acinetobacter ursingii CIP 107286 and Acinetobacter sp. strain CIP 102129, but it was not found in the draft or complete genome sequences of other Acinetobacter strains. The presence of transposase-like genes around the amiE genes of these three Acinetobacter strains suggests that amiE is transferred by a putative transposon. Furthermore, the expression of AmiE in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 reduced AHL accumulation and elastase activity, which were regulated by AHL-mediated quorum sensing. PMID:25172868

  6. Evaluation of Streptomyces sp. strain g10 for suppression of Fusarium wilt and rhizosphere colonization in pot-grown banana plantlets.

    PubMed

    Getha, K; Vikineswary, S; Wong, W H; Seki, T; Ward, A; Goodfellow, M

    2005-01-01

    Streptomyces sp. strain g10 exhibited strong antagonism towards Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense (Foc) races 1, 2 and 4 in plate assays by producing extracellular antifungal metabolites. Treating the planting hole and roots of 4-week-old tissue-culture-derived 'Novaria' banana plantlets with strain g10 suspension (10(8) cfu/ml), significantly (P < 0.05) reduced wilt severity when the plantlets were inoculated with 10(4) spores/ml Foc race 4. The final disease severity index for leaf symptom (LSI) and rhizome discoloration (RDI) was reduced about 47 and 53%, respectively, in strain g10-treated plantlets compared to untreated plantlets. Reduction in disease incidence was not significant (P < 0.05) when plantlets were inoculated with a higher concentration (10(6) spores/ml) of Foc race 4. Rhizosphere population of strain g10 showed significant (P = 0.05) increase of more than 2-fold at the end of the 3rd week compared to the 2nd week after soil amendment with the antagonist. Although the level dropped, the rhizosphere population at the end of the 6th week was still nearly 2-fold higher than the level detected after 2 weeks. In contrast, the root-free population declined significantly (P = 0.05), nearly 4-fold after 6 weeks when compared to the level detected after 2 weeks. Neither growth-inhibiting nor growth-stimulating effects were observed in plantlets grown in strain g10-amended soil. PMID:15650871

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Triclosan-Degrading Bacterium Sphingomonas sp. Strain YL-JM2C, Isolated from a Wastewater Treatment Plant in China

    PubMed Central

    Mulla, Sikandar I.; Xu, Haili

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain YL-JM2C was isolated from a wastewater treatment plant in Xiamen, China, by enrichment on triclosan. The bacterium is of special interest because of its ability to degrade triclosan. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of the microorganism and its functional annotation. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of a draft genome sequence of a triclosan-degrading bacterium PMID:26044437

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Triclosan-Degrading Bacterium Sphingomonas sp. Strain YL-JM2C, Isolated from a Wastewater Treatment Plant in China.

    PubMed

    Mulla, Sikandar I; Hu, Anyi; Xu, Haili; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain YL-JM2C was isolated from a wastewater treatment plant in Xiamen, China, by enrichment on triclosan. The bacterium is of special interest because of its ability to degrade triclosan. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of the microorganism and its functional annotation. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of a draft genome sequence of a triclosan-degrading bacterium. PMID:26044437

  9. Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain GS3372, an Endospore-Forming Bacterium Isolated in a Deep Geothermal Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Jeanneret, Nicole; Regenspurg, Simona; Li, Po-E; Lo, Chien-Chi; Johnson, Shannon; McMurry, Kim; Gleasner, Cheryl D; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Chain, Patrick S; Junier, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The genome of strain GS3372 is the first publicly available strain of Aeribacillus pallidus. This endospore-forming thermophilic strain was isolated from a deep geothermal reservoir. The availability of this genome can contribute to the clarification of the taxonomy of the closely related Anoxybacillus, Geobacillus, and Aeribacillus genera. PMID:26316637

  10. Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain GS3372, an Endospore-Forming Bacterium Isolated in a Deep Geothermal Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Jeanneret, Nicole; Regenspurg, Simona; Li, Po-E; Lo, Chien-Chi; Johnson, Shannon; McMurry, Kim; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Chain, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    The genome of strain GS3372 is the first publicly available strain of Aeribacillus pallidus. This endospore-forming thermophilic strain was isolated from a deep geothermal reservoir. The availability of this genome can contribute to the clarification of the taxonomy of the closely related Anoxybacillus, Geobacillus, and Aeribacillus genera. PMID:26316637

  11. Cattleya sp. sp. or hybrid (Cultivated) 

    E-print Network

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    The regulatory mechanisms that govern heterocyst development in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 have been continuously refined over the last two decades. In this work, we show that three of the sigma factor genes present in the Anabaena sp. strain PCC...

  12. Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, B.; Cao, B.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-07

    A facultative iron-reducing (Fe(III)-reducing) Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes (Fe(III)-NTA and Fe(III)-citrate) but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 µM) of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 µM) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A also could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ~7:3 in PIPES and ~1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments.

  13. Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Bulbul; Cao, Bin; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-01-01

    A facultative iron-reducing [Fe(III)-reducing] Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes [Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid and Fe(III)-citrate] but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 ?M) of either of the electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 ?M) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We also found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ?7:3 in PIPES [piperazine-N,N?-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid)] and ?1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments. PMID:22961903

  14. Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. strain 300A, isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Bulbul; Cao, Bin; McLean, Jeffrey S; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-01

    A facultative iron-reducing [Fe(III)-reducing] Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes [Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid and Fe(III)-citrate] but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 ?M) of either of the electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 ?M) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We also found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ?7:3 in PIPES [piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid)] and ?1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments. PMID:22961903

  15. Metabolic engineering of Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120 as platform biocatalyst for the production of isobutyric acid and other secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the recent years the production of Ehrlich pathway derived chemicals was shown in a variety of hosts such as Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and yeast. Exemplarily the production of isobutyric acid was demonstrated in Escherichia coli with remarkable titers and yields. However, these examples suffer from byproduct formation due to the fermentative growth mode of the respective organism. We aim at establishing a new aerobic, chassis for the synthesis of isobutyric acid and other interesting metabolites using Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120, an obligate aerobe organism, as host strain. Results The overexpression of kivd, coding for a 2-ketoacid decarboxylase from Lactococcus lactis in Ps. sp. strain VLB120 enabled for the production of isobutyric acid and isobutanol via the valine synthesis route (Ehrlich pathway). This indicates the existence of chromosomally encoded alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases catalyzing the reduction and oxidation of isobutyraldehyde. In addition we showed that the strain possesses a complete pathway for isobutyric acid metabolization, channeling the compound via isobutyryl-CoA into valine degradation. Three key issues were addressed to allow and optimize isobutyric acid synthesis: i) minimizing isobutyric acid degradation by host intrinsic enzymes, ii) construction of suitable expression systems and iii) streamlining of central carbon metabolism finally leading to production of up to 26.8?±?1.5 mM isobutyric acid with a carbon yield of 0.12?±?0.01 g gglc-1. Conclusion The combination of an increased flux towards isobutyric acid using a tailor-made expression system and the prevention of precursor and product degradation allowed efficient production of isobutyric acid in Ps. sp. strain VLB120. This will be the basis for the development of a continuous reaction process for this bulk chemicals. PMID:24397404

  16. Plasmids in Frankia sp.

    PubMed

    Normand, P; Simonet, P; Butour, J L; Rosenberg, C; Moiroud, A; Lalonde, M

    1983-07-01

    A method to achieve cell lysis and isolate Frankia sp. plasmid DNA was developed. A screening of Frankia sp. strains belonging to different host compatibility groups (Alnus sp., Elaeagnus sp., Ceanothus sp.) showed that, of 39 strains tested, 4 (strains Cp11, ARgN22d, ArI3, and EUN1f) possessed plasmids ranging in size from 7.1 to 32.2 kilobase pairs as estimated from agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. A total of 11 plasmids were detected. PMID:6863219

  17. Glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) inhibition and anti-inflammation activity of the ethyl acetate extract of Streptomyces sp. strain MJM 8637

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Kwon; Lee, Dong-Ryung; Choi, Bong-Keun; Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the anti-cancer properties of soil-borne actinobacteria, MJM 8637, the glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) assay, anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? assay, the level of antioxidant potential by DPPH radical scavenging activity, NO scavenging activity, and ABTS radical scavenging activity in ethyl acetate extract were determined. The 16S rDNA sequencing analysis revealed that Streptomyces sp. strain MJM 8637, which was isolated from Hambak Mountain, Korea, has 99.5% similarity to Streptomyces atratus strain NBRC 3897. The physiological and the morphological characteristics of the strain MJM 8637 were also identified. The ethyl acetate extract of MJM 8637 inhibited TNF-? production approximately 61.8% at concentration 100 ?g/ml. The IC50 value of the strain MJM 8637 extract on GST-pi was identified to be 120.2 ± 1.6 ?g/ml. In DPPH, NO, and ABTS radical scavenging assays, the IC50 values of the strain MJM 8637 extract were found to be 977.2 ?g/ml, 1143.7 ?g/ml, and 454.4 ?g/ml, respectively. The ethyl acetate extract of the strain MJM 8637 showed 97.2 ± 1.3% of cell viability at 100 ?g/ml in RAW 264.7 cell viability assay. The results obtained from this study suggest that the ethyl acetate extract of Streptomyces sp. strain MJM 8637 could be considered as a potential source of drug for the cancers that have multidrug resistance with its GST-pi inhibition and anti-inflammation activities, and low cytotoxicity. PMID:26587003

  18. Biodegradation of phenanthrene by Alcaligenes sp. strain PPH: partial purification and characterization of 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Deveryshetty, Jaigeeth; Phale, Prashant S

    2010-10-01

    Alcaligenes sp. strain PPH degrades phenanthrene via 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (1-H2NA), 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene (1,2-DHN), salicylic acid and catechol. Enzyme activity versus growth profile and heat stability studies suggested the presence of two distinct hydroxylases, namely 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid hydroxylase and salicylate hydroxylase. 1-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid hydroxylase was partially purified (yield 48%, fold 81) and found to be a homodimer with a subunit molecular weight of ?34 kDa. The enzyme was yellow in color, showed UV-visible absorption maxima at 274, 375 and 445 nm, and fluorescence emission maxima at 527 nm suggested it to be a flavoprotein. The apoenzyme prepared by the acid-ammonium sulfate (2 M) dialysis method was colorless, inactive and lost the characteristic flavin absorption spectra but regained ?90% activity when reconstituted with FAD. Extraction of the prosthetic group and its analysis by HPLC suggests that the holoenzyme contained FAD. The enzyme was specific for 1-H2NA and failed to show activity with any other hydroxynaphthoic acid analogs or salicylic acid. The K(m) for 1-H2NA in the presence of either NADPH or NADH remained unaltered (72 and 75 ?M, respectively), suggesting dual specificity for the coenzyme. The K(m) for FAD was determined to be 4.7 ?M. The enzyme catalyzed the conversion of 1-H2NA to 1,2-DHN only under aerobic conditions. These results suggested that 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid hydroxylase is a flavoprotein monooxygenase specific for 1-H2NA and different from salicylate-1-hydroxylase. PMID:20727010

  19. Enzymology of oxidation of tropic acid to phenylacetic acid in metabolism of atropine by Pseudomonas sp. strain AT3.

    PubMed Central

    Long, M T; Bartholomew, B A; Smith, M J; Trudgill, P W; Hopper, D J

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain AT3 grew with dl-tropic acid, the aromatic component of the alkaloid atropine, as the sole source of carbon and energy. Tropic acid-grown cells rapidly oxidized the growth substrate, phenylacetaldehyde, and phenylacetic acid. Crude cell extracts, prepared from dl-tropic acid-grown cells, contained two NAD+-linked dehydrogenases which were separated by ion-exchange chromatography and shown to be specific for their respective substrates, dl-tropic acid and phenylacetaldehyde. Phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase was relatively unstable. The stable tropic acid dehydrogenase was purified to homogeneity by a combination of ion-exchange, molecular-sieve, and affinity chromatography. It had a pH optimum of 9.5 and was equally active with both enantiomers of tropic acid, and at this pH, phenylacetaldehyde was the only detectable product of tropic acid oxidation. The formation of phenylacetaldehyde from tropic acid requires, in addition to dehydrogenation, a decarboxylation step. By analogy with NAD+-specific isocitrate and malate dehydrogenases, phenylmalonic semialdehyde, a 3-oxoacid, would be expected to be the precursor of phenylacetaldehyde. Other workers have established that isocitrate and malate dehydrogenases catalyze the decarboxylation of enzyme-bound or added 3-oxoacid intermediates, a reaction that requires Mn2+ or Mg2+ ions. Studies with tropic acid dehydrogenase were hampered by lack of availability of phenylmalonic semialdehyde, but in the absence of added divalent metal ions, both enantiomers of tropic acid were completely oxidized and we have not, by a number of approaches, found any evidence for the transient accumulation of phenylmalonic semialdehyde. PMID:9023182

  20. Molecular Characterization and Substrate Preference of a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Dioxygenase from Cycloclasticus sp. Strain A5

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Yuki; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Harayama, Shigeaki; Misawa, Norihiko

    2003-01-01

    Cycloclasticus sp. strain A5 is able to grow with petroleum polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including unsubstituted and substituted naphthalenes, dibenzothiophenes, phenanthrenes, and fluorenes. A set of genes responsible for the degradation of petroleum PAHs was isolated by using the ability of the organism to oxidize indole to indigo. This 10.5-kb DNA fragment was sequenced and found to contain 10 open reading frames (ORFs). Seven ORFs showed homology to previously characterized genes for PAH degradation and were designated phn genes, although the sequence and order of these phn genes were significantly different from the sequence and order of the known PAH-degrading genes. The phnA1, phnA2, phnA3, and phnA4 genes, which encode the ? and ? subunits of an iron-sulfur protein, a ferredoxin, and a ferredoxin reductase, respectively, were identified as the genes coding for PAH dioxygenase. The phnA4A3 gene cluster was located 3.7 kb downstream of the phnA2 gene. PhnA1 and PhnA2 exhibited moderate (less than 62%) sequence identity to the ? and ? subunits of other aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases, but motifs such as the Fe(II)-binding site and the [2Fe-2S] cluster ligands were conserved. Escherichia coli cells possessing the phnA1A2A3A4 genes were able to convert phenanthrene, naphthalene, and methylnaphthalene in addition to the tricyclic heterocycles dibenzofuran and dibenzothiophene to their hydroxylated forms. Significantly, the E. coli cells also transformed biphenyl and diphenylmethane, which are ordinarily the substrates of biphenyl dioxygenases. PMID:14602629