Sample records for geocronologia da suite

  1. Suiting Up

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson is about cleanroom technology and the importance of contamination control. Learners will discover the different types of industries that use cleanrooms. The activity centers on drawing a parallel between suiting up for the Genesis cleanroom and dressing to do a certain job or activity, and presenting the findings to the class. Includes a teacher's guide and students handouts. Video and audio clips are provided. This lesson 3 of 10 from the Dynamic Design: The Cleanroom module.

  2. Music Education Suites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Wayne

    This publication describes options for designing and equipping middle and high school music education suites and suggests means of gaining community support for including full service music suites in new and renovated facilities. It covers the basic music suite, practice rooms, small ensemble rehearsal rooms, recording/MIDI (musical instrument…

  3. Estimation Program Interface Suite

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPI (Estimation Program Interface) SuiteTM is a Windows based suite of physical/chemical property and environmental fate estimation models developed by the EPA's Office of Pollution Prevention Toxics and Syracuse Research Corporation (SRC). EPI SuiteT...

  4. Space Suit Thermal Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Anthony B.; Nair, Satish S.; Miles, John B.; Iovine, John V.; Lin, Chin H.

    1998-01-01

    The present NASA space suit (the Shuttle EMU) is a self-contained environmental control system, providing life support, environmental protection, earth-like mobility, and communications. This study considers the thermal dynamics of the space suit as they relate to astronaut thermal comfort control. A detailed dynamic lumped capacitance thermal model of the present space suit is used to analyze the thermal dynamics of the suit with observations verified using experimental and flight data. Prior to using the model to define performance characteristics and limitations for the space suit, the model is first evaluated and improved. This evaluation includes determining the effect of various model parameters on model performance and quantifying various temperature prediction errors in terms of heat transfer and heat storage. The observations from this study are being utilized in two future design efforts, automatic thermal comfort control design for the present space suit and design of future space suit systems for Space Station, Lunar, and Martian missions.

  5. The MEME Suite

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Timothy L.; Johnson, James; Grant, Charles E.; Noble, William S.

    2015-01-01

    The MEME Suite is a powerful, integrated set of web-based tools for studying sequence motifs in proteins, DNA and RNA. Such motifs encode many biological functions, and their detection and characterization is important in the study of molecular interactions in the cell, including the regulation of gene expression. Since the previous description of the MEME Suite in the 2009 Nucleic Acids Research Web Server Issue, we have added six new tools. Here we describe the capabilities of all the tools within the suite, give advice on their best use and provide several case studies to illustrate how to combine the results of various MEME Suite tools for successful motif-based analyses. The MEME Suite is freely available for academic use at http://meme-suite.org, and source code is also available for download and local installation. PMID:25953851

  6. An emergency survival suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    A thermally insulative inflatable garment designed specifically as a lightweight low storage volume emergency suit for subzero weather survival is reported. Testing confirms that the inflatable suit design satisfies the objectives for a subject standing at rest with environmental temperatures down to -450 F if the garment is inflated with Freon.

  7. Suite versus composite statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balsillie, J.H.; Tanner, W.F.

    1999-01-01

    Suite and composite methodologies, two statistically valid approaches for producing statistical descriptive measures, are investigated for sample groups representing a probability distribution where, in addition, each sample is probability distribution. Suite and composite means (first moment measures) are always equivalent. Composite standard deviations (second moment measures) are always larger than suite standard deviations. Suite and composite values for higher moment measures have more complex relationships. Very seldom, however, are they equivalent, and they normally yield statistically significant but different results. Multiple samples are preferable to single samples (including composites) because they permit the investigator to examine sample-to-sample variability. These and other relationships for suite and composite probability distribution analyses are investigated and reported using granulometric data.

  8. Suited crewmember productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barer, A. S.; Filipenkov, S. N.

    Analysis of the extravehicular activity (EVA) sortie experience gained in the former Soviet Union and physiologic hygienic aspect of space suit design and development shows that crewmember productivity is related to the following main factors: —space suit microclimate (gas composition, pressure and temperature); —limitation of motion activity and perception, imposed by the space suit; —good crewmember training in the ground training program; —level of crewmember general physical performance capabilities in connection with mission duration and intervals between sorties; —individual EVA experience (with accumulation) at which workmanship improves, while metabolism, physical and emotional stress decreases; —concrete EVA duration and work rate; —EVA bioengineering, including selection of tools, work station, EVA technology and mechanization.

  9. Astronomical Video Suites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco Salgado, Jose

    2010-01-01

    Astronomer and visual artist Jose Francisco Salgado has directed two astronomical video suites to accompany live performances of classical music works. The suites feature awe-inspiring images, historical illustrations, and visualizations produced by NASA, ESA, and the Adler Planetarium. By the end of 2009, his video suites Gustav Holst's The Planets and Astronomical Pictures at an Exhibition will have been presented more than 40 times in over 10 countries. Lately Salgado, an avid photographer, has been experimenting with high dynamic range imaging, time-lapse, infrared, and fisheye photography, as well as with stereoscopic photography and video to enhance his multimedia works.

  10. Designing the Operative Suite

    PubMed Central

    Agnew, G. Harvey

    1965-01-01

    The planning of an operative suite involves many considerations, often of a highly technical nature. Requirements have become so diversified and have been elaborated so rapidly that standardization of requirements cannot be anticipated. The concept of grouping interdependent departments has brought the suite down to lower floors. Rooms have become larger to accommodate more monitoring and other equipment, and many more ancillary rooms have been found necessary. A wide wing with double or peripheral corridors is preferable. Air sterilization can be achieved by several methods. The doctors' dressing room is often a danger point in bacterial control and needs redesigning. Patient monitoring is increasing and some features can be built in. TV observation and teaching have tremendous potential but have not been adopted as widely as was anticipated some years ago. If a department needs extensive enlargement, it is much more satisfactory and usually cheaper to construct a new suite in another location. PMID:5843868

  11. Suited crewmember productivity.

    PubMed

    Barer, A S; Filipenkov, S N

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of the extravehicular activity (EVA) sortie experience gained in the former Soviet Union and physiologic hygienic aspect of space suit design and development shows that crewmember productivity is related to the following main factors: -space suit microclimate (gas composition, pressure and temperature); -limitation of motion activity and perception, imposed by the space suit; -good crewmember training in the ground training program; -level of crewmember general physical performance capabilities in connection with mission duration and intervals between sorties; -individual EVA experience (with accumulation) at which workmanship improves, while metabolism, physical and emotional stress decreases; -concrete EVA duration and work rate; -EVA bioengineering, including selection of tools, work station, EVA technology and mechanization. PMID:11541020

  12. The Aslan Suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Marlow Cowan

    2001-01-01

    The Aslan Suite is a seven movement original composition for large jazz ensemble, auxiliary percussion and narrator. The thematic material presented in the various movements is programmatic in design, tracing events found in The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis. Narration accompanied by incidental music is presented before pairs of movements providing the listener with a

  13. Verification of Test Suites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claude Jard; Thierry Jéron; Pierre Morel

    2000-01-01

    We present a formal approach to check the correctness and to propose corrections of hand-written test suites with respect to a formal specific ation of the protocol implementations to test. It is shown that this requires in ge neral a complex algorithmic comparable to model-checking. The principles of a prototype tool, called VTS, and based on the synthesis algorithms of

  14. PLANNING THE MUSIC SUITE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HICK, BASIL L.; SAETVEIT, JOSEPH G.

    A PUBLICATION DESIGNED TO IMPROVE THE PLANNING OF MUSIC SUITES IN SCHOOLS. THE INFORMATION CAN BE USED IN THE PREPARATION OF PLANS FOR NEW BUILDINGS AND IMPROVING FACILITIES FOR MUSIC EDUCATION IN EXISTING BUILDINGS. SECTIONS INCLUDED DEAL WITH--(1) THE MUSIC PROGRAM AND SPECIAL NEEDS OF THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT, (2) LOCATION OF MUSIC ROOMS, (3) TYPES…

  15. Space Suit Spins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Space is a hostile environment where astronauts combat extreme temperatures, dangerous radiation, and a near-breathless vacuum. Life support in these unforgiving circumstances is crucial and complex, and failure is not an option for the devices meant to keep astronauts safe in an environment that presents constant opposition. A space suit must meet stringent requirements for life support. The suit has to be made of durable material to withstand the impact of space debris and protect against radiation. It must provide essential oxygen, pressure, heating, and cooling while retaining mobility and dexterity. It is not a simple article of clothing but rather a complex modern armor that the space explorers must don if they are to continue exploring the heavens

  16. 20. NBS SUIT LAB. TABLE WITH MISCELLANEOUS SUIT PARTS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. NBS SUIT LAB. TABLE WITH MISCELLANEOUS SUIT PARTS AND TERRY WEST, A SPACE SUIT ASSEMBLY TECHNICIAN LOGGING SUIT PART DATA. PARTS ON THE TABLE ARE A HARD UPPER TORSO (HUT) (REAR LEFT), FULL HELMET (FRONT LEFT), TWO HELMETS WITHOUT PROTECTIVE VISORS, A PAIR OF GLOVES, AND A BACKPACK WITHOUT VOLUMETRIC COVER (REAR RIGHT). THE BACKPACK ATTACHES TO THE HUT TO MAKE-UP THE UPPER TORSO COMPONENTS OF THE SUIT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  17. Clementine sensor suite

    SciTech Connect

    Ledebuhr, A.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    LLNL designed and built the suite of six miniaturized light-weight space-qualified sensors utilized in the Clementine mission. A major goal of the Clementine program was to demonstrate technologies originally developed for Ballistic Missile Defense Organization Programs. These sensors were modified to gather data from the moon. This overview presents each of these sensors and some preliminary on-orbit performance estimates. The basic subsystems of these sensors include optical baffles to reject off-axis stray light, light-weight ruggedized optical systems, filter wheel assemblies, radiation tolerant focal plane arrays, radiation hardened control and readout electronics and low mass and power mechanical cryogenic coolers for the infrared sensors. Descriptions of each sensor type are given along with design specifications, photographs and on-orbit data collected.

  18. Plasma Sensor Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlis, Eric; Bowles, Patrick; Corke, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Progress has been made towards the development of a new class of sensors which have the potential to overcome the temperature limitations found in conventional sensors, thus addressing an important measurement challenge faced in the measurement of high speed flows. The new approach is based on the a.c.-driven mass-flow laboratory plasma anemometer developed by Matlis et al. and uses a weakly ionized glow discharge encapsulated between two electrodes as the sensing element. These sensors will feature proven elements of the technology used in the plasma anemometer, but will be extended for high-temperature, multiparameter operation. The sensitivity to different parameters can be provided by the design and orientation of the electrodes. The objective is to replace conventional sensors which provide diagnostics in the laboratory but are known to fail in real-world applications with a suite of rugged sensors optimized to measure wall shear-stress, pressure, temperature, heat flux, mass-flow, strain, and gas species. The advantages of the plasma sensor are that it has no mechanical parts (like a pressure transducer diaphragm) to fatigue or break, its operation is insensitive to temperature, it has a very high frequency response (2MHz +), and its output can be received wirelessly. These advantages over other sensors makes it ideal for use in high speed flows.

  19. Establishing an interventional nephrology suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randall L. Rasmussen

    2002-01-01

    Procedures related to dialysis access are best performed in a center or suite designated specifically for that purpose. The facility can either be within a hospital or be a free-standing unit. Feasibility depends largely on the size of the end-stage renal disease population. Alternatives include existing interventional radiology or cardiac catheterization suites. Success of a dialysis access center requires attention

  20. Orion Suit Loop Variable Pressure Regulator Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Michael; Lewis, John F.; Campbell, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) integrates the cabin and pressure suits with the core life support systems to provide life support during contingency depressurized cabin operations. To provide the multiple suit pressures between nominal pressurized cabin suited operations, suit leak checks, depressurized cabin suited operations, and elevated suit pressure for denitrification, a variable pressure regulator is needed. This paper documents the development of the suit loop regulator for Orion.

  1. Orion Suit Loop Variable Pressure Regulator Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Michael; Vassallo, Andrew; Lewis, John F.; Campbell, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) integrates the cabin and pressure suits with the core life support systems to provide life support during contingency depressurized cabin operations. To provide the multipule suit pressures between nominal pressurized cabin suited operations, suit leak checks, depressurized cabin suited operations, and elevated suit pressure for denitrification, a variable pressure regulator is needed. This paper documents the development and integrated testing of the suit loop regulator for Orion.

  2. Next-Generation Space Suits

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    WGBH Educational Foundation

    2011-03-31

    In this video segment adapted from NOVA scienceNOW, MIT engineer Dava Newman is working to replace today's bulky, inflated space suits with a radical, sleek design that may one day allow astronauts to walk easily on Mars.

  3. Compositional Diversity in Volcanic Suites

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kent Ratajeski

    In this exercise, students use whole-rock major- and trace-element compositions of volcanic rocks to explore the origins of compositional variation in igneous suites. With the help of detailed step-by-step instructions, datasets from the Yellowstone and Crater Lake calderas are downloaded from the GEOROC database, imported into Excel spreadsheets, and graphed in the form of "Harker" diagrams to learn about the different petrogeneses of these two volcanic suites.

  4. Development of Power Assisting Suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Keijiro; Ishii, Mineo; Hyodo, Kazuhito; Yoshimitsu, Toshihiro; Matsuo, Takashi

    In order to realize a wearable power assisting suit for assisting a nurse to carry a patient in her arms, the power supply and control systems of the suit have to be miniaturized, and it has to be wireless and pipeline-less. The new wearable suit consists of shoulders, arms, back, waist and legs units to be fitted on the nurse's body. The arms, waist and legs have new pneumatic rotary actuators driven directly by micro air pumps supplied by portable Ni-Cd batteries. The muscle forces are sensed by a new muscle hardness sensor utilizing a sensing tip mounted on a force sensing film device. An embedded microcomputer is used for the calculations of control signals. The new wearable suit was applied practically to a human body and a series of movement experiments that weights in the arms were held and taken up and down was performed. Each unit of the suit could transmit assisting torque directly to each joint verifying its practicability.

  5. Space Suit (Mobil Biological Isolation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A Houston five-year-old known as David is getting a "space suit," a vitally important gift that will give him mobility he has never known. David suffers from a rare malady called severe combined immune deficiency, which means that be was born without natural body defenses against disease; germs that would have little or no effect on most people could cause his death. As a result, he has spent his entire life in germ-free isolation rooms, one at Houston's Texas Children's hospital, another at his home. The "space suit" David is getting will allow him to spend four hours ata a time in a mobile sterile environment outside his isolation rooms. Built by NASA's Johnson Space Center, it is a specially-designed by product of Space Suit technology known as the mobile biological isolation system.

  6. Medical negligence suits: risk management.

    PubMed

    Elango, S

    2003-10-01

    Medical negligence suits have become an issue of concern for doctors as well as for the health service departments. The main objectives of medical malpractice law are to compensate patients who are injured by negligence and to improve the quality of medical care. The amount of money and time spent on these cases may not be an effective allocation of social resources to minimize patient safety. Though physicians generally win more malpractice suits, much time and money are spent and results in much stress to those concerned. There are certain controllable events in practice that render a physician more or less vulnerable to malpractice claims. Attempts by physicians to understand and prevent unwanted situations that can lead to litigation is important. The risk factors for medical negligence suits are discussed. The practice of good medicine will be the best form of risk management. PMID:15190644

  7. Astronaut space suit communication antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, J. F., III; Nason, G. H.

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut space suit communication antenna consists of a spring steel monopole in a blade-type configuration. This antenna is mounted in a copper cup filled with a potting compound that is recessed in the center to facilitate bending the blade flat for stowing when not in use.

  8. Trends in Personal Injury Suits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Smissen, Betty

    1985-01-01

    Professional competence becomes more important as personal injury suits against recreation enterprises and parks focus increasingly on the professional responsible for facility safety. All professionals should be aware of and educated in risk management. Trends in liability awards and providers' legal responsibilities in various situations are…

  9. The DARPA internet protocol suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Leiner; R. Cole; J. Postel; D. Mills

    1985-01-01

    THE MILITARY requirement for computer communications between heterogeneous computers on heterogeneous networks has driven the development of a standard suite of protocols to permit such communications to take place in a robust and flexible manner. These protocols support an architecture consisting of multiple packet switched networks interconnected by gateways. The DARPA experimental internet system consists of satellite, terrestrial, radio, and

  10. Suited Contingency Ops Food - 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, J. W.; Leong, M. L.; Douglas, G. L.

    2014-01-01

    The contingency scenario for an emergency cabin depressurization event may require crewmembers to subsist in a pressurized suit for up to 144 hours. This scenario requires the capability for safe nutrition delivery through a helmet feed port against a 4 psi pressure differential to enable crewmembers to maintain strength and cognition to perform critical tasks. Two nutritional delivery prototypes were developed and analyzed for compatibility with the helmet feed port interface and for operational effectiveness against the pressure differential. The bag-in-bag (BiB) prototype, designed to equalize the suit pressure with the beverage pouch and enable a crewmember to drink normally, delivered water successfully to three different subjects in suits pressurized to 4 psi. The Boa restrainer pouch, designed to provide mechanical leverage to overcome the pressure differential, did not operate sufficiently. Guidelines were developed and compiled for contingency beverages that provide macro-nutritional requirements, a minimum one-year shelf life, and compatibility with the delivery hardware. Evaluation results and food product parameters have the potential to be used to improve future prototype designs and develop complete nutritional beverages for contingency events. These feeding capabilities would have additional use on extended surface mission EVAs, where the current in-suit drinking device may be insufficient.

  11. Mars EVA Suit Airlock (MESA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, Stephen; Böttcher, Jörg; Steinsiek, Frank

    The Astrium Space Infrastructure Division has begun an in-house research activity of an Earth-based simulation facility supporting future manned missions to Mars. This research unit will help to prepare and support planned missions in the following ways: 1) to enable the investigation and analysis of contamination issues in advance of a human visit to Mars; 2) as a design tool to investigate and simulate crew operations; 3) to simulate crew operation during an actual mission; 4) to enable on-surface scientific operations without leaving the shirt-sleeve habitation environment ("glove box principle"). The MESA module is a surface EVA facility attached to the main habitation or laboratory module, or mobile pressurized rover. It will be sealed, but not pressurized, and provide protection against the harsh Martian environment. This module will include a second crew airlock for safety reasons. The compartment can also be used to provide an external working bench and experiment area for the crew. A simpler MESA concept provides only an open shelter against wind and dust. This concept does not incorporate working and experimental areas. The principle idea behind the MESA concept is to tackle the issue of contamination by minimizing the decontamination processes needed to clean surface equipment and crew suit surfaces after an EVA excursion prior to the astronaut re-entering the habitable area. The technical solution envisages the use of a dedicated crew suit airlock. This airlock uses an EVA suit which is externally attached by its back-pack to the EVA compartment area facing the Martian environment. The crew donns the suit from inside the habitable volume through the airlock on the back of the suit. The surface EVA can be accomplished after closing the back-pack and detaching the suit. A special technical design concept foresees an extendable suit back-pack, so that the astronaut can operate outside and in the vincinity of the module. The key driver in the investigation is the problem of contamination of the habitable volume by EVA and sampling activities and the transport of Earth-generated contaminants to Mars.

  12. Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) for Space Habitation and Exploration

    E-print Network

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) for Space Habitation and Exploration The V2Suit, operational system The V2Suit is an enabler for space exploration mission technologies, including human THAT WILL REVOLUTIONIZE SPACE MISSIONS AND BENEFIT LIFE ON EARTH 2011 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 30 2050 V2Suit

  13. Spinoff From a Moon Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Al Gross transferred expertise obtained as an ILC engineer for NASA's Apollo program to the manufacture of athletic shoes. Gross substituted DuPont's Hytrel plastic for foam materials in the shoe's midsole, eliminating cushioning loss caused by body weight. An external pressurized shell applied from space suit technology was incorporated into the shoe. Stiffness and cushioning properties of the midsole were "tuned" by varying material thickness and styling lines. A stress free "blow molding" process adapted from NASA space suit design was also utilized. The resulting compression chamber midsole performed well in tests. It allows AVIA to re-configure for specific sports and is a "first step" toward a durable, foamless, non-fatiguing midsole.

  14. Design of a biomechanically synergistic exotendon suit

    E-print Network

    Graves, Carmen Marten-Ellis

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on the design, development, and evaluation of a lightweight, exotendon suit for load carriage. The suit is intended to be worn underneath the wearer's own clothes for use in a military setting, ...

  15. Z-2 Suit Support Stand and MKIII Suit Center of Gravity Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tuan Q.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's next generation spacesuits are the Z-Series suits, made for a range of possible exploration missions in the near future. The prototype Z-1 suit has been developed and assembled to incorporate new technologies that has never been utilized before in the Apollo suits and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). NASA engineers tested the Z-1 suit extensively in order to developed design requirements for the new Z-2 suit. At the end of 2014, NASA will be receiving the new Z-2 suit to perform more testing and to further develop the new technologies of the suit. In order to do so, a suit support stand will be designed and fabricated to support the Z-2 suit during maintenance, sizing, and structural leakage testing. The Z-2 Suit Support Stand (Z2SSS) will be utilized for these purposes in the early testing stages of the Z-2 suit.

  16. New Apparatus Tests Pressure-Suit Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Webbon, B.

    1982-01-01

    New apparatus measures applied torque and angle-of-flexure in pressurized flexible joints, such as those found in diving suits and flight suits. Torque and flexure are permanently recorded on x-y plotter. Family of curves can be taken as function of suit pressure or other variables. Apparatus could also measure torque-versus-angle in mechanical linkages.

  17. Satellite ultraquiet isolation technology experiment (SUITE)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. H. Anderson; J. P. Fumo; R. S. Erwin

    2000-01-01

    An experimental active vibration isolation called Satellite Ultraquiet Isolation Technology Experiment (SUITE) is described in detail. SUITE is a piezoelectric-based technology demonstration scheduled to fly in 2000 or 2001 on board the PICOSat spacecraft. SUITE is designed to show that the effect of small vibrations on spacecraft instrument effectiveness can be reduced significantly. Control from the ground station is planned

  18. High pressure space suit glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, W.

    1973-01-01

    The High Pressure Space Suit Glove Program yielded one prototype glove assembly with an operating pressure of 8.0 psi. The following developments are reported: (1) A new layup technique for incorporation of the mini-convolute systems; (2) modification in the mini-convolute construction to assure cycle life at 8.0 psi in excess of 100,000 cycles; (3) the development of a unique non-orthogonal low torque wrist joint; (4) the development of a low torque single axis joint for use in the thumb and finger first metacarpal joints; and (5) a number of approaches to 1st metacarpal joints were fabricated and tested to establish the joint technqiues.

  19. Steam System Tool Suite Introduction Guide

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Steam System Tool Suite Introduction Guide Alternate Text Narratives and Graphic.............................................................................................................................6 Modules Steam System Scoping Tool (SSST)........................................................................................8 Steam System Assessment Tool (SSAT

  20. Evaluating Suit Fit Using Performance Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margerum, Sarah E.; Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2012-01-01

    The Mark III planetary technology demonstrator space suit can be tailored to an individual by swapping the modular components of the suit, such as the arms, legs, and gloves, as well as adding or removing sizing inserts in key areas. A method was sought to identify the transition from an ideal suit fit to a bad fit and how to quantify this breakdown using a metric of mobility-based human performance data. To this end, the degradation of the range of motion of the elbow and wrist of the suit as a function of suit sizing modifications was investigated to attempt to improve suit fit. The sizing range tested spanned optimal and poor fit and was adjusted incrementally in order to compare each joint angle across five different sizing configurations. Suited range of motion data were collected using a motion capture system for nine isolated and functional tasks utilizing the elbow and wrist joints. A total of four subjects were tested with motions involving both arms simultaneously as well as the right arm by itself. Findings indicated that no single joint drives the performance of the arm as a function of suit size; instead it is based on the interaction of multiple joints along a limb. To determine a size adjustment range where an individual can operate the suit at an acceptable level, a performance detriment limit was set. This user-selected limit reveals the task-dependent tolerance of the suit fit around optimal size. For example, the isolated joint motion indicated that the suit can deviate from optimal by as little as -0.6 in to -2.6 in before experiencing a 10% performance drop in the wrist or elbow joint. The study identified a preliminary method to quantify the impact of size on performance and developed a new way to gauge tolerances around optimal size.

  1. The Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) for space habitation and exploration

    E-print Network

    Duda, Kevin R.

    The “Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) for Space Habitation and Exploration” is a novel system concept that provides a platform for integrating sensors and actuators with daily astronaut intravehicular activities ...

  2. Introduction to the HPC Challenge Benchmark Suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Piotr Luszczek; Jack J. Dongarra; David Koester; Rolf Rabenseifner; Bob Lucas; Jeremy Kepner; John McCalpin; David Bailey; Daisuke Takahashi

    2005-01-01

    The HPC Challenge benchmark suite has been released by the DARPA HPCS program to help define the performance boundaries of future Petascale computing systems. HPC Challenge is a suite of tests that examine the performance of HPC architectures using kernels with memory access patterns more challenging than those of the High Performance Linpack (HPL) benchmark used in the Top500 list.

  3. Evaluating Suit Fit Using Performance Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margerum, Sarah E.; Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    The Mark III suit has multiple sizes of suit components (arm, leg, and gloves) as well as sizing inserts to tailor the fit of the suit to an individual. This study sought to determine a way to identify the point an ideal suit fit transforms into a bad fit and how to quantify this breakdown using mobility-based physical performance data. This study examined the changes in human physical performance via degradation of the elbow and wrist range of motion of the planetary suit prototype (Mark III) with respect to changes in sizing and as well as how to apply that knowledge to suit sizing options and improvements in suit fit. The methods implemented in this study focused on changes in elbow and wrist mobility due to incremental suit sizing modifications. This incremental sizing was within a range that included both optimum and poor fit. Suited range of motion data was collected using a motion analysis system for nine isolated and functional tasks encompassing the elbow and wrist joints. A total of four subjects were tested with motions involving both arms simultaneously as well as the right arm only. The results were then compared across sizing configurations. The results of this study indicate that range of motion may be used as a viable parameter to quantify at what stage suit sizing causes a detriment in performance; however the human performance decrement appeared to be based on the interaction of multiple joints along a limb, not a single joint angle. The study was able to identify a preliminary method to quantify the impact of size on performance and to develop a means to gauge tolerances around optimal size. More work is needed to improve the assessment of optimal fit and to compensate for multiple joint interactions.

  4. Safety limits for a firefighter proximity suit.

    PubMed

    Reischl, U; Reischl, P

    1978-07-01

    A standard one-piece firefighter proximity suit (jumpsuit style) was tested for heat accumulation and hood compartment ventilation. Large increases in temperature of the skin and hood compartmental air were recorded. Oxygen and carbon dioxide were monitored and hypoxic conditions found. Using the O2 and CO2 data, mathematical regression analyses were performed to predict the time exposures allowed for firemen entering various ambient atmospheric conditions. The short permissible exposure periods predicted for the proximity suit suggests limited usefulness and the need for immediate improvements in the design of the suit. PMID:696611

  5. AX-5 space suit reliability model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, AL; Magistad, John

    1990-01-01

    The AX-5 is an all metal Extra-vehicular (EVA) space suit currently under consideration for use on Space Station Freedom. A reliability model was developed based on the suit's unique design and on projected joint cycle requirements. Three AX-5 space suit component joints were cycled under simulated load conditions in accordance with NASA's advanced space suit evaluation plan. This paper will describe the reliability model developed, the results of the cycle testing, and an interpretation of the model and test results in terms of projected Mean Time Between Failure for the AX-5. A discussion of the maintenance implications and life cycle for the AX-5 based on this projection is also included.

  6. Product development of a resistive athletic suit

    E-print Network

    Desrochers, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary prototype of a new athletic apparel product uses resistive straps, integrated within a suit, to provide muscular resistance. This developing fitness product allows users to exercise both their upper and lower ...

  7. Complexity of Sizing for Space Suit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar; Benson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The `fit? of a garment is often considered to be a subjective measure of garment quality. However, some experts attest that a complaint of poor garment fit is a symptom of inadequate or excessive ease, the space between the garment and the wearer. Fit has traditionally been hard to quantify, and space suits are an extreme example, where fit is difficult to measure but crucial for safety and operability. A proper space suit fit is particularly challenging because of NASA?s need to fit an incredibly diverse population (males and females from the 1st to 99th percentile) while developing a minimum number of space suit sizes. Because so few sizes are available, the available space suits must be optimized so that each fits a large segment of the population without compromising the fit of any one wearer.

  8. Zimbra Collaboration Suite 6.0.3

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Zimbra Collaboration Suite is designed to be used in settings such as higher education, government offices, and various enterprising types. The main part of the Suite is an interactive email and calendar server that allows users in many different physical locations coordinate meetings, conferences, and even lets people link-up different email accounts. This particular version is compatible with computers running Linux or Mac OS X 10.5 and newer.

  9. STS-86 Pilot Michael Bloomfield suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield relaxes for a moment while donning his launch and entry suit with the assistance of a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout Building. This will be Bloomfields first spaceflight. He and the six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on a 10-day mission slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir.

  10. Astronaut Thomas Stafford sits in Launch Complex 16 suiting trailer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, command pilot of the Gemini 9 space flight, sits in Launch Complex 16 suiting trailer while suiting up for a Gemini 9 / Agena Simultaneous Launch Demonstration. A suit technician assists.

  11. Suites of dwarfs around Nearby giant galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisina, Elena I.; Makarov, Dmitry I., E-mail: ikar@sao.ru, E-mail: kei@sao.ru, E-mail: dim@sao.ru [Special Astrophysical Observatory RAS, Nizhnij Arkhyz, Karachai-Cherkessian Republic 369167 (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-01

    The Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog (UNGC) contains the most comprehensive summary of distances, radial velocities, and luminosities for 800 galaxies located within 11 Mpc from us. The high density of observables in the UNGC makes this sample indispensable for checking results of N-body simulations of cosmic structures on a ?1 Mpc scale. The environment of each galaxy in the UNGC was characterized by a tidal index ?{sub 1}, depending on the separation and mass of the galaxy's main disturber (MD). We grouped UNGC galaxies with a common MD in suites, and ranked suite members according to their ?{sub 1}. All suite members with positive ?{sub 1} are assumed to be physical companions of the MD. About 58% of the sample are members of physical groups. The distribution of suites by the number of members, n, follows a relation N(n) ? n {sup –2}. The 20 most populated suites contain 468 galaxies, i.e., 59% of the UNGC sample. The fraction of MDs among the brightest galaxies is almost 100% and drops to 50% at M{sub B} = –18{sup m}. We discuss various properties of MDs, as well as galaxies belonging to their suites. The suite abundance practically does not depend on the morphological type, linear diameter, or hydrogen mass of the MD, the tightest correlation being with the MD dynamical mass. Dwarf galaxies around MDs exhibit well-known segregation effects: the population of the outskirts has later morphological types, richer H I contents, and higher rates of star formation activity. Nevertheless, there are some intriguing cases where dwarf spheroidal galaxies occur at the far periphery of the suites, as well as some late-type dwarfs residing close to MDs. Comparing simulation results with galaxy groups, most studies assume the Local Group is fairly typical. However, we recognize that the nearby groups significantly differ from each other and there is considerable variation in their properties. The suites of companions around the Milky Way and M31, consisting of the Local Group, do not quite seem to be a typical nearby group. The multiplicity of nearby groups of the number of their physical members can be described by the Hirsh-like index h{sub g} = 9, indicating that the Local Volume contains nine groups with populations exceeding nine companions to their MDs.

  12. [Radiation hygiene in interventional radiology suite].

    PubMed

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Falkowski, Aleksander; Janczak, Dariusz; Weyde, Wac?aw

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of both patients and medical staff to relatively high doses of radiation is one of the features characteristic of interventional radiology (IR). Regulations regarding this kind of therapeutic management can be found in many legal references and recommendations of European Union Law. The purpose of the paper is collection and systematic analysis of activities and procedures associated with the question of radiation hygiene which should be observed in IR suites. Requirements regarding equipment of the IR suite, as well as radiation protection of patients and medical staff, constitute main questions included in the paper, worked out on the basis of valid regulations and occupational experience of the authors. Particular attention is paid to borderline requirements regarding modern IR suite equipment and its organization. Part of the paper is devoted to the understanding of physical laws of ionizing radiation in biological space and its surroundings. Understanding of physical laws, proper utilization of IR suite equipment, and strict compliance with recommendations of radiation protection by both patients and medical staff are critical for limitation of the harmful influence of radiation during interventional therapeutic procedures. An additional role of the paper is to make it easier to take decisions when creating new IR suites, in accordance with valid regulations and the rule of functionality. PMID:24493688

  13. Z-2 Prototype Space Suit Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Graziosi, David; Jones, Bobby; Lee, Ryan; Haque, Bazle Z.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit is the highest fidelity pressure garment from both hardware and systems design perspectives since the Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed in the late 1970's. Upon completion it will be tested in the 11' humanrated vacuum chamber and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center to assess the design and to determine applicability of the configuration to micro-, low- (asteroid), and planetary- (surface) gravity missions. This paper discusses the 'firsts' the Z-2 represents. For example, the Z-2 sizes to the smallest suit scye bearing plane distance for at least the last 25 years and is being designed with the most intensive use of human models with the suit model. The paper also provides a discussion of significant Z-2 configuration features, and how these components evolved from proposal concepts to final designs.

  14. Z-2 Prototype Space Suit Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Graziosi, David; Jones, Bobby; Lee, Ryan; Haque, Bazle Z.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit is the highest fidelity pressure garment from both hardware and systems design perspectives since the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed in the late 1970's. Upon completion the Z-2 will be tested in the 11 foot human-rated vacuum chamber and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center to assess the design and to determine applicability of the configuration to micro-, low- (asteroid), and planetary- (surface) gravity missions. This paper discusses the 'firsts' that the Z-2 represents. For example, the Z-2 sizes to the smallest suit scye bearing plane distance for at least the last 25 years and is being designed with the most intensive use of human models with the suit model.

  15. Space suit extravehicular hazards protection development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is an overview of the development of the integral thermal/micrometeoroid garment (ITMG) used for protection of a space-suited crewmember from hazards of various extravehicular environments. These hazard conditions can range from thermal extremes, meteoroid and debris particles, and radiation conditions in near-earth orbits and free space to sand and dust environments encountered on lunar and planetary surfaces. Representative ITMG materials cross-section layups are identified and described for various space suit configurations ranging from the Gemini program to planned protective requirements and considerations for anticipated Space Station EV operations.

  16. Space suit extravehicular hazards protection development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is an overview of the development of the integral thermal/micrometeoroid garment (ITMG) used for protection of a space-suited crewmember from hazards of various extravehicular environments. These hazard conditions can range from thermal extremes, meteoroid and debris particles, and radiation conditions in near-earth orbits and free space to sand and dust environments encountered on lunar or planetary surfaces. Representative ITMG materials cross-section layups are identified and described for various space-suit configurations ranging from the Gemini Program to planned protective requirements and considerations for anticipated Space Station EV operations.

  17. Terrestrial EVA Suit = Fire Fighter's Protective Clothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, Tico; Brown, Robert G.; Burrell, Eddie; DelRosso, Dominic; Krishen, Kumar; Moffitt, Harold; Orndoff, Evelyne; Santos, Beatrice; Butzer, Melissa; Dasgupta, Rajib

    1999-01-01

    Firefighters want to go to work, do their job well, and go home alive and uninjured. For their most important job, saving lives, firefighters want protective equipment that will allow more extended and effective time at fire scenes in order to perform victim search and rescue. A team, including engineers at NASA JSC and firefighters from Houston, has developed a list of problem areas for which NASA technology and know-how can recommend improvements for firefighter suits and gear. Prototypes for solutions have been developed and are being evaluated. This effort will spin back to NASA as improvements for lunar and planetary suits.

  18. Vehicle-network defensive aids suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Rapanotti

    2005-01-01

    Defensive Aids Suites (DAS) developed for vehicles can be extended to the vehicle network level. The vehicle network, typically comprising four platoon vehicles, will benefit from improved communications and automation based on low latency response to threats from a flexible, dynamic, self-healing network environment. Improved DAS performance and reliability relies on four complementary sensor technologies including: acoustics, visible and infrared

  19. Collaboration Suite Advanced Web Client User Guide

    E-print Network

    Shepp, Larry

    ZimbraTM Collaboration Suite Advanced Web Client User Guide Version 5.0 #12;Zimbra Web Client User Guide Copyright Notice Copyright © 2008 Zimbra, Inc. All rights reserved materials, onscreen publication, or Web documentation--is expressly forbidden. Zimbra and the Zimbra logo

  20. BDP: BrainSuite Diffusion Pipeline

    E-print Network

    Leahy, Richard M.

    BDP: BrainSuite Diffusion Pipeline Chitresh Bhushan #12; Quantify microstructural tissue ROI Connectivity ROI Statistics MPRAGE Diffusion #12;Diffusion Pipeline Dicom to NIfTI Co ROIs Custom ROIs #12;Diffusion Pipeline Dicom to NIfTI Co-registration Diffusion Modeling Tractography

  1. Published April 2014 Enterprise Mobility Suite

    E-print Network

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    of devices. · Manage a variety of device types, from Windows, Windows RT, and Windows Phone 8 to Apple iOS IT cloud services for all your users Windows Intune Mobile Device Management Enterprise Mobility Suite for Hybrid Identity management · Windows Intune for mobile device and PC management · Azure Rights Management

  2. Rodinia: A benchmark suite for heterogeneous computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shuai Che; Michael Boyer; Jiayuan Meng; David Tarjan; Jeremy W. Sheaffer; Sang-ha Lee; Kevin Skadron

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents and characterizes Rodinia, a benchmark suite for heterogeneous computing. To help architects study emerging platforms such as GPUs (Graphics Processing Units), Rodinia includes applications and kernels which target multi-core CPU and GPU platforms. The choice of applications is inspired by Berkeley's dwarf taxonomy. Our characterization shows that the Rodinia benchmarks cover a wide range of parallel communication

  3. Prioritisation of test suites containing precedence constraints

    E-print Network

    Miller, Tim

    1 Prioritisation of test suites containing precedence constraints Tim Miller Department@unimelb.edu.au Abstract--Test case prioritisation is the process of ordering the exe- cution of test cases to achieve a certain goal, such as increasing the rate of fault detection. Many existing test case prioritisation

  4. Introduction to the HPC Challenge Benchmark Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Luszczek, Piotr; Dongarra, Jack J.; Koester, David; Rabenseifner,Rolf; Lucas, Bob; Kepner, Jeremy; McCalpin, John; Bailey, David; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2005-04-25

    The HPC Challenge benchmark suite has been released by the DARPA HPCS program to help define the performance boundaries of future Petascale computing systems. HPC Challenge is a suite of tests that examine the performance of HPC architectures using kernels with memory access patterns more challenging than those of the High Performance Linpack (HPL) benchmark used in the Top500 list. Thus, the suite is designed to augment the Top500 list, providing benchmarks that bound the performance of many real applications as a function of memory access characteristics e.g., spatial and temporal locality, and providing a framework for including additional tests. In particular, the suite is composed of several well known computational kernels (STREAM, HPL, matrix multiply--DGEMM, parallel matrix transpose--PTRANS, FFT, RandomAccess, and bandwidth/latency tests--b{sub eff}) that attempt to span high and low spatial and temporal locality space. By design, the HPC Challenge tests are scalable with the size of data sets being a function of the largest HPL matrix for the tested system.

  5. 977 Garfield, Suite 6 Eugene, OR 97402

    E-print Network

    Oregon, University of

    977 Garfield, Suite 6 Eugene, OR 97402 541-686-0001 EugeneOR@expresspros.com As a full · Professional Search and Contract · Flexible Staffing EUGENE EXPRESS OFFICE OVERVIEW Pat Murphy began with the first franchise in Lewiston, Idaho in 1974. Seeking new opportunities the Eugene office

  6. Automated structure solution with the PHENIX suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas C Terwilliger; Peter H Zwart; Pavel V Afonine; Ralf W Grosse

    2008-01-01

    Significant time and effort are often required to solve and complete a macromolecular crystal structure. The development of automated computational methods for the analysis, solution, and completion of crystallographic structures has the potential to produce minimally biased models in a short time without the need for manual intervention. The PHENIX software suite is a highly automated system for macromolecular structure

  7. Automated Structure Solution with the PHENIX Suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter H. Zwart; Pavel Afonine; Ralf W. Grosse-Kunstleve; Li-Wei Hung; Tom R. Ioerger; A. J. McCoy; Eric McKee; Nigel Moriarty; Randy J. Read; James C. Sacchettini; Nicholas K. Sauter; L. C. Storoni; Tomas C. Terwilliger; Paul D. Adams

    2008-01-01

    Significant time and effort are often required to solve and complete a macromolecular crystal structure. The development of automated computational methods for the analysis, solution and completion of crystallographic structures has the potential to produce minimally biased models in a short time without the need for manual intervention. The PHENIX software suite is a highly automated system for macromolecular structure

  8. The Joint Airborne Network Services Suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Trafton; S. V. Pizzi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present an approach for enabling the formation of a Joint Service, heterogeneous Airborne Network. Central to this approach will be the definition of a Joint Airborne Network Services Suite (JANSS). The JANSS will consist of a common set of integrated features and functions that can be implemented on all airborne platforms to enable those platforms to

  9. Development of a space activity suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, J. F.; Webb, P.

    1971-01-01

    The development of a series of prototype space activity suit (SAS) assemblies is discussed. The SAS is a new type of pressure suit designed especially for extravehicular activity. It consists of a set of carefully tailored elastic fabric garments which have been engineered to supply sufficient counterpressure to the body to permit subjects to breath O2 at pressures up to 200 mm Hg without circulatory difficulty. A closed, positive pressure breathing system (PPBS) and a full bubble helmet were also developed to complete the system. The ultimate goal of the SAS is to improve the range of activity and decrease the energy cost of work associated with wearing conventional gas filled pressure suits. Results are presented from both laboratory (1 atmosphere) and altitude chamber tests with subjects wearing various SAS assemblies. In laboratory tests lasting up to three hours, the SAS was worn while subjects breathed O2 at pressures up to 170 mm Hg without developing physiological problems. The only physiological symptoms apparent were a moderate tachycardia related to breathing pressures above 130 mm Hg, and a small collection of edema fluid in the hands. Both problems were considered to be related to areas of under-pressurization by the garments. These problems, it is suggested, can ultimately be corrected by the development of new elastic fabrics and tailoring techniques. Energy cost of activity, and mobility and dexterity of subjects in the SAS, were found to be superior to those in comparable tests on subjects in full pressure suits.

  10. XTCE GOVSAT Tool Suite 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, J. Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The XTCE GOVSAT software suite contains three tools: validation, search, and reporting. The Extensible Markup Language (XML) Telemetric and Command Exchange (XTCE) GOVSAT Tool Suite is written in Java for manipulating XTCE XML files. XTCE is a Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) and Object Management Group (OMG) specification for describing the format and information in telemetry and command packet streams. These descriptions are files that are used to configure real-time telemetry and command systems for mission operations. XTCE s purpose is to exchange database information between different systems. XTCE GOVSAT consists of rules for narrowing the use of XTCE for missions. The Validation Tool is used to syntax check GOVSAT XML files. The Search Tool is used to search (i.e. command and telemetry mnemonics) the GOVSAT XML files and view the results. Finally, the Reporting Tool is used to create command and telemetry reports. These reports can be displayed or printed for use by the operations team.

  11. AX-5 space suit bearing torque investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, Stuart; Vykukal, Vic; Mackendrick, Robert; Culbertson, Philip, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The symptoms and eventual resolution of a torque increase problem occurring with ball bearings in the joints of the AX-5 space suit are described. Starting torques that rose 5 to 10 times initial levels were observed in crew evaluation tests of the suit in a zero-g water tank. This bearing problem was identified as a blocking torque anomaly, observed previously in oscillatory gimbal bearings. A large matrix of lubricants, ball separator designs and materials were evaluated. None of these combinations showed sufficient tolerance to lubricant washout when repeatedly cycled in water. The problem was resolved by retrofitting a pressure compensated, water exclusion seal to the outboard side of the bearing cavity. The symptoms and possible remedies to blocking are discussed.

  12. Leading Edge of Cybernics: Robot Suit HAL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshiyuki Sankai

    2006-01-01

    Robot Suit HAL (Hybrid Assistive Limb) is one of the realization\\/accomplishments of the Cybernoid Project. Cybernoids are the enhanced human-machine-information hybrid systems based on Cybernics technologies. Cybernics is a new academic research field which fused Information Technology (IT), cranial nerve science, behavioral science, robotics, system integration technology, physiology, psychology, MEMS-Technology, neuroscience, bio-system theory and so on, focusing on Cybernetics, Mechatronics,

  13. Advanced Space Suit Insulation Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.

    2000-01-01

    For planetary applications, the space suit insulation has unique requirements because it must perform in a dynamic mode to protect humans in the harsh dust, pressure and temperature environments. Since the presence of a gaseous planetary atmosphere adds significant thermal conductance to the suit insulation, the current multi-layer flexible insulation designed for vacuum applications is not suitable in reduced pressure planetary environments such as that of Mars. Therefore a feasibility study has been conducted at NASA to identify the most promising insulation concepts that can be developed to provide an acceptable suit insulation. Insulation concepts surveyed include foams, microspheres, microfibers, and vacuum jackets. The feasibility study includes a literature survey of potential concepts, an evaluation of test results for initial insulation concepts, and a development philosophy to be pursued as a result of the initial testing and conceptual surveys. The recommended focus is on microfibers due to the versatility of fiber structure configurations, the wide choice of fiber materials available, the maturity of the fiber processing industry, and past experience with fibers in insulation applications

  14. Cave Microbe-Mineral Suites: Best Model for Extraterrestrial Biosignatures!

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. J. Boston; M. N. Spilde; D. E. Northup; L. A. Melim

    2001-01-01

    Microbial\\/mineral biosignature suites derived from cave microorganism and mineral associations provide an excellent model for developing extraterrestrial life search strategies. These suites combine macroscopic, microscopic, and chemical signatures.

  15. The bioenergetics of walking and running in space suits

    E-print Network

    Carr, Christopher E. (Christopher Edward), 1976-

    2005-01-01

    Space-suited activity is critical for human spaceflight, and is synonymous with human planetary exploration. Space suits impose kinematic and kinetic boundary conditions that affect movement and locomotion, and in doing ...

  16. Gemini 9 astronauts leave suiting trailer for launch pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Prime crew for the Gemini 9-A space flight, Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford (front), command pilot, and Eugene A. Cernan, pilot, leave the suiting trailer at Launch Complex 16 in full space suits during prelaunch countdown.

  17. 18. NBS SUIT LAB. OVERALL VIEW. ALL WORK TABLES WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. NBS SUIT LAB. OVERALL VIEW. ALL WORK TABLES WITH MISCELLANEOUS SUIT COMPONENTS AND SUPPLIES. TERRY WEST TO LEFT, AND PAUL DUMBACHER TO RIGHT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  18. Edinburgh Research Explorer The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite Citation for published version: Ciocchetta, F, Duguid, A, Gilmore, S, Guerriero, ML & Hillston, J 2009, 'The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite'. in Quantitative to the work immediately and investigate your claim. Download date: 16. Jun. 2014 #12;The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite

  19. Gemini 11 prime crew in Launch Complex 16 suiting trailer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., pilot of the Gemini 11 mission, reclines on a couch as he adjusts his spacesuit in the Launch Complex 16 suiting trailer during the Gemini 11 prelaunch countdown. He is already wearing the full suit and helmet (50725); Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., command pilot of the Gemini 11 space flight, relaxes in suiting trailer during prelaunch countdown (50726).

  20. Reading Like a Historian: Zoot Suit Riots

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stanford History Education Group

    2012-10-30

    In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: What caused the Zoot Suit Riots? The teacher first provides background information on the incident and then the class looks at their textbook account and answers brief questions. Students then form pairs and analyze 2 documents: 1) a Los Angeles Daily News account of the riots and 2) a letter from the Committee for the Defense of Mexican American Youth, addressed to U.S. Vice President Wallace. For both, students answer guiding questions on a graphic organizer. A final class discussion contextualizes and corroborates the documents: Is one more reliable? What caused the riots?

  1. STS-77 MS Marc Garneau suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 Mission Specialist Marc Garneau finishes donning his launch/entry suit during suitup activities in the Operations and Checkout Building. Garneau, who represents the Canadian Space Agency, flew as a payload specialist on his first Shuttle flight in 1984, and began astronaut candidate training in 1992. The six- member crew of Mission STS-77 will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour is undergoing final preparations for liftoff during a two-and-a-half hour launch window opening at 6:30 a.m. EDT, May 19.

  2. Applications of Suits spectral model to wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Canopy reflectance calculations for a spring type Mexican wheat, Penjamo, are compared with published data on Scout winter wheat. Good agreement exists between model calculations and experimental data in the spectral range, 500 nm to 750 nm, suggesting that the model parameters for wheat can be applied to different cultivars of wheat in the same growth stage. Wheat canopy reflectance is dependent upon surface soil type and this dependency is examined with the Suits' spectral model. In this particular growth stage wheat reflectance is shown to be nearly independent of soil reflectance in the visible wavelengths and progressively dependent at longer wavelengths in the infrared.

  3. STS-84 Commander Charles Precourt suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt adjusts the helmet of his launch and entry suit during final prelaunch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building. This is Precourts third space flight, but his first as commander. Precourt and six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff during an approximate 7-minute launch window which opens at about 4:08 a.m. This will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The exact liftoff time will be determined about 90 minutes prior to launch, based on the most current location of Mir.

  4. Thermal Analysis and Design of an Advanced Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin H.; Campbell, Anthony B.; French, Jonathan D.; French, D.; Nair, Satish S.; Miles, John B.

    2000-01-01

    The thermal dynamics and design of an Advanced Space Suit are considered. A transient model of the Advanced Space Suit has been developed and implemented using MATLAB/Simulink to help with sizing, with design evaluation, and with the development of an automatic thermal comfort control strategy. The model is described and the thermal characteristics of the Advanced Space suit are investigated including various parametric design studies. The steady state performance envelope for the Advanced Space Suit is defined in terms of the thermal environment and human metabolic rate and the transient response of the human-suit-MPLSS system is analyzed.

  5. [In-hospitaltraumamanagement - trauma suite diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Wolfschmidt, Franziska; Dierks, Alexander; Wurmb, Thomas; Kickuth, Ralph; Kenn, Werner

    2014-09-01

    Whole-body CT is considered gold standard for diagnosis of the multiple injured patient in the trauma suite. So far, no guidelines exist concerning its indication. The trauma team (Trauma Surgery/Visceral Surgery, Anaesthesiology, Radiology) should use standardized triage-criteria for the indication of whole-body CT. The radiologist is responsible for its individual planning, taking clinical and morphological imaging results into consideration, embedding its implementation between assessment and treatment stage. Fast image analysis by an experienced radiologist (specialist or at least 3 years professional experience) as well as interdisciplinary discussion of all findings is essential. The increased importance of endovascular minimally invasive therapy strategies in the treatment of active bleeding or laceration of solid organs may require the consultation of an interventional radiologist as part of the extended trauma team. In addition to CT, a modern trauma suite should be equipped with conventional x-rays and ultrasound in order to comply with a conventional algorithm consisting of sonography, plain film radiography and region specific CT for diagnosis of less severely injured patients. In children, specific attention must be paid to radiation protection. In these cases, modalities without radiation exposure (ultrasound, MRI) play a major role. Detecting all relevant injuries and evolving a therapy strategy in compliance with aspects of radiation protection (ALARA-principle) and legal guidelines (justifiying indication) during the 'golden hour of shock' should be the aim. PMID:25238013

  6. Code suite for ion beam plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganovich, Igor; Startsev, Edward; Shvets, Gennady; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2001-06-01

    The propagation of a high-current finite-length ion beam in a plasma is of interests for many applications including heavy ion fusion, plasma lenses, cosmic rays, etc.. The suite of codes has been created for the calculation of the degree of charge and current neutralization of the ion beam pulse by the background plasma. Code suite consists of two different codes: fully electro-magnetic relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) code and non-relativistic Darwin model for long beams. A two-dimensional electromagnetic PIC code uses a leap-frog, finite-difference scheme to solve Maxwell's equations on a two-dimensional rectangular grid in the frame moving with the beam. The current deposition scheme is designed to conserve charge exactly, so there is no need to solve Poisson's equation. The other code uses approximation of long beams: beam length is much longer than beam radius; therefore beam can be described by a number of weakly interacting slices. The electron motion is described in the quasi- stationary approximation, assuming that the ion beam evolution time is much longer than the electron plasma period. The electric field is found from Poisson's equation. As a result of the simplification the second code is hundreds times faster than the first one and can be used for most cases, while the first code provides benchmarking for the second.

  7. Integrated Instrument Simulator Suites for Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Matsui, Toshihisa; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, Johnathan; Butler, Carolyn; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Niamsuwan, Noppasin; Johnson, Michael P.; Jacob, Joseph C.; Tsang, Leung; Shams, Khawaja; Jaruwatanadilok, Sermsak; Oveisgharan, Shadi; Simard, Marc; Turk, Francis J.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Earth Observing System Simulators Suite (NEOS3) is a modular framework of forward simulations tools for remote sensing of Earth's Atmosphere from space. It was initiated as the Instrument Simulator Suite for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (ISSARS) under the NASA Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program of the Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) to enable science users to perform simulations based on advanced atmospheric and simple land surface models, and to rapidly integrate in a broad framework any experimental or innovative tools that they may have developed in this context. The name was changed to NEOS3 when the project was expanded to include more advanced modeling tools for the surface contributions, accounting for scattering and emission properties of layered surface (e.g., soil moisture, vegetation, snow and ice, subsurface layers). NEOS3 relies on a web-based graphic user interface, and a three-stage processing strategy to generate simulated measurements. The user has full control over a wide range of customizations both in terms of a priori assumptions and in terms of specific solvers or models used to calculate the measured signals.This presentation will demonstrate the general architecture, the configuration procedures and illustrate some sample products and the fundamental interface requirements for modules candidate for integration.

  8. GenePattern flow cytometry suite

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional flow cytometry data analysis is largely based on interactive and time consuming analysis of series two dimensional representations of up to 20 dimensional data. Recent technological advances have increased the amount of data generated by the technology and outpaced the development of data analysis approaches. While there are advanced tools available, including many R/BioConductor packages, these are only accessible programmatically and therefore out of reach for most experimentalists. GenePattern is a powerful genomic analysis platform with over 200 tools for analysis of gene expression, proteomics, and other data. A web-based interface provides easy access to these tools and allows the creation of automated analysis pipelines enabling reproducible research. Results In order to bring advanced flow cytometry data analysis tools to experimentalists without programmatic skills, we developed the GenePattern Flow Cytometry Suite. It contains 34 open source GenePattern flow cytometry modules covering methods from basic processing of flow cytometry standard (i.e., FCS) files to advanced algorithms for automated identification of cell populations, normalization and quality assessment. Internally, these modules leverage from functionality developed in R/BioConductor. Using the GenePattern web-based interface, they can be connected to build analytical pipelines. Conclusions GenePattern Flow Cytometry Suite brings advanced flow cytometry data analysis capabilities to users with minimal computer skills. Functionality previously available only to skilled bioinformaticians is now easily accessible from a web browser. PMID:23822732

  9. Suited Occupant Injury Potential During Dynamic Spacecraft Flight Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dub, Mark O.; McFarland, Shane M.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Constellation Space Suit Element [CSSE], a new space-suit architecture will be created for support of Launch, Entry, Abort, Microgravity Extra- Vehicular Activity [EVA], and post-landing crew operations, safety and, under emergency conditions, survival. The space suit is unique in comparison to previous launch, entry, and abort [LEA] suit architectures in that it utilizes rigid mobility elements in the scye (i.e., shoulder) and the upper arm regions. The suit architecture also utilizes rigid thigh disconnect elements to create a quick disconnect approximately located above the knee. This feature allows commonality of the lower portion of the suit (from the thigh disconnect down), making the lower legs common across two suit configurations. This suit must interface with the Orion vehicle seat subsystem, which includes seat components, lateral supports, and restraints. Due to the unique configuration of spacesuit mobility elements, combined with the need to provide occupant protection during dynamic vehicle events, risks have been identified with potential injury due to the suit characteristics described above. To address the risk concerns, a test series has been developed in coordination with the Injury Biomechanics Research Laboratory [IBRL] to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of these potential issues. Testing includes use of Anthropomorphic Test Devices [ATDs; vernacularly referred to as "crash test dummies"], Post Mortem Human Subjects [PMHS], and representative seat/suit hardware in combination with high linear acceleration events. The ensuing treatment focuses on test purpose and objectives; test hardware, facility, and setup; and preliminary results.

  10. Quantifying Astronaut Tasks: Robotic Technology and Future Space Suit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Dava

    2003-01-01

    The primary aim of this research effort was to advance the current understanding of astronauts' capabilities and limitations in space-suited EVA by developing models of the constitutive and compatibility relations of a space suit, based on experimental data gained from human test subjects as well as a 12 degree-of-freedom human-sized robot, and utilizing these fundamental relations to estimate a human factors performance metric for space suited EVA work. The three specific objectives are to: 1) Compile a detailed database of torques required to bend the joints of a space suit, using realistic, multi- joint human motions. 2) Develop a mathematical model of the constitutive relations between space suit joint torques and joint angular positions, based on experimental data and compare other investigators' physics-based models to experimental data. 3) Estimate the work envelope of a space suited astronaut, using the constitutive and compatibility relations of the space suit. The body of work that makes up this report includes experimentation, empirical and physics-based modeling, and model applications. A detailed space suit joint torque-angle database was compiled with a novel experimental approach that used space-suited human test subjects to generate realistic, multi-joint motions and an instrumented robot to measure the torques required to accomplish these motions in a space suit. Based on the experimental data, a mathematical model is developed to predict joint torque from the joint angle history. Two physics-based models of pressurized fabric cylinder bending are compared to experimental data, yielding design insights. The mathematical model is applied to EVA operations in an inverse kinematic analysis coupled to the space suit model to calculate the volume in which space-suited astronauts can work with their hands, demonstrating that operational human factors metrics can be predicted from fundamental space suit information.

  11. Supporting tool suite for production proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ze-Qiang; Tabb, David L.; Burden, Joseph; Chambers, Matthew C.; Cox, Matthew B.; Cantrell, Michael J.; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Litton, Michael D.; Oreto, Michael R.; Schultz, William C.; Sobecki, Scott M.; Tsui, Tina Y.; Wernke, Gregory R.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The large amount of data produced by proteomics experiments requires effective bioinformatics tools for the integration of data management and data analysis. Here we introduce a suite of tools developed at Vanderbilt University to support production proteomics. We present the Backup Utility Service tool for automated instrument file backup and the ScanSifter tool for data conversion. We also describe a queuing system to coordinate identification pipelines and the File Collector tool for batch copying analytical results. These tools are individually useful but collectively reinforce each other. They are particularly valuable for proteomics core facilities or research institutions that need to manage multiple mass spectrometers. With minor changes, they could support other types of biomolecular resource facilities. Availability and Implementation: Source code and executable versions are available under Apache 2.0 License at http://www.vicc.org/jimayersinstitute/data/ Contact: daniel.liebler@vanderbilt.edu PMID:21965817

  12. Supreme Court Rejects Federal Suits against HMOs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Charbonneau, David D.

    The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that patients cannot sue HMOs in Federal court for giving doctors financial incentives to hold down treatment costs. Reversing a Federal Appeals Court decision that argued such suits could be allowed, Justice Souter, writing for a unanimous Court, concluded that Congress's intent in passing a 1973 law paving the way for HMOs was to affirm the entire concept of managed care, including its emphasis on creating profitability by keeping costs down. The court ruled that an Illinois woman could not sue her HMO under federal law for putting in place incentives that encouraged her doctor to delay diagnostic treatment of what would eventually become a ruptured appendix. The High Court was not swayed by the Court of Appeals's argument that one could distinguish between financial incentives that resulted in inappropriate or inadequate care and those that did not.

  13. STS-81 Commander Mike Baker suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-81 Mission Commander Michael A. Baker is assisted into his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. Baker is on his fourth space flight and will have responsibility for the 10-day mission, including the intricate docking and undocking maneuvers with the Russian Mir space station. He will also be in charge of two in-flight Risk Mitigation experiments and be the subject of a Human Life Sciences experiment. He and five crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis will lift off during a 7-minute window that opens at 4:27 a.m. EST, January 12.

  14. Eddy parameterization challenge suite I: Eady spindown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, S.; Fox-Kemper, B.

    2013-04-01

    The first set of results in a suite of eddy-resolving Boussinesq, hydrostatic simulations is presented. Each set member consists of an initially linear stratification and shear as in the Eady problem, but this profile occupies only a limited region of a channel and is allowed to spin-down via baroclinic instability. The diagnostic focus is on the spatial structure and scaling of the eddy transport tensor, which is the array of coefficients in a linear flux-gradient relationship. The advective (antisymmetric) and diffusive (symmetric) components of the tensor are diagnosed using passive tracers, and the resulting diagnosed tensor reproduces the horizontal transport of the active tracer (buoyancy) to within ± 7% and the vertical transport to within ± 12%. The derived scalings are shown to be close in form to the standard Gent-McWilliams (antisymmetric) and Redi diffusivity (symmetric) tensors with a magnitude that varies in space (concentrated in the horizontal and vertical near the center of the frontal shear) and time as the eddies energize. The Gent-McWilliams eddy coefficient is equal to the Redi isopycnal diffusivity to within ± 6%, even as these coefficients vary with depth. The scaling for the magnitude of simulation parameters is determined empirically to within ± 28%. To achieve this accuracy, the eddy velocities are diagnosed directly and used in the tensor scalings, rather than assuming a correlation between eddy velocity and the mean flow velocity where ± 97% is the best accuracy achievable. Plans for the next set of models in the challenge suite are described.

  15. Test subject models uprated Apollo A6L pressure suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Test subject models the uprated Apollo A6L pressure suit manufactured by International Latex Corporation, under contract to NASA. The suit incorporates changes recommended by the Apollo Review Board. The outer surface is of Beta fabric. The patches on shoulders, elbows, knees and back are of metal fiber cloth. The Beta fabric is made by Owens-Corning Fiberglass Corporation. The nylon fabric used in the suit was made by Dupont.

  16. A CAD Suite for High-Performance FPGA Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brad L. Hutchings; Peter Bellows; Joseph Hawkins; K. Scott Hemmert; Brent E. Nelson; Mike Rytting

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the current status of a suite of CADtools designed specifically for use by designers who aredeveloping high-performance configurable-computing applications.The basis of this tool suite is JHDL [1], a designtool originally conceived as a way to experiment withRun-Time Reconfigured (RTR) designs. However, whatbegan as a limited experiment to model RTR designs withJava has evolved into a comprehensive suite

  17. The Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) for space habitation and exploration

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Kevin R.; Vasquez, Rebecca A.; Middleton, Akil J.; Hansberry, Mitchell L.; Newman, Dava J.; Jacobs, Shane E.; West, John J.

    2015-01-01

    The “Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) for Space Habitation and Exploration” is a novel system concept that provides a platform for integrating sensors and actuators with daily astronaut intravehicular activities to improve health and performance, while reducing the mass and volume of the physiologic adaptation countermeasure systems, as well as the required exercise time during long-duration space exploration missions. The V2Suit system leverages wearable kinematic monitoring technology and uses inertial measurement units (IMUs) and control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) within miniaturized modules placed on body segments to provide a “viscous resistance” during movements against a specified direction of “down”—initially as a countermeasure to the sensorimotor adaptation performance decrements that manifest themselves while living and working in microgravity and during gravitational transitions during long-duration spaceflight, including post-flight recovery and rehabilitation. Several aspects of the V2Suit system concept were explored and simulated prior to developing a brassboard prototype for technology demonstration. This included a system architecture for identifying the key components and their interconnects, initial identification of key human-system integration challenges, development of a simulation architecture for CMG selection and parameter sizing, and the detailed mechanical design and fabrication of a module. The brassboard prototype demonstrates closed-loop control from “down” initialization through CMG actuation, and provides a research platform for human performance evaluations to mitigate sensorimotor adaptation, as well as a tool for determining the performance requirements when used as a musculoskeletal deconditioning countermeasure. This type of countermeasure system also has Earth benefits, particularly in gait or movement stabilization and rehabilitation. PMID:25914631

  18. Utilizing a Suited Manikin Test Apparatus and Space Suit Ventilation Loop to Evaluate Carbon Dioxide Washout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Conger, Bruce; Korona, Adam; Kanne, Bryan; McMillin, Summer; Paul, Thomas; Norcross, Jason; Alonso, Jesus Delgado; Swickrath, Mike

    2015-01-01

    NASA is pursuing technology development of an Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) which is an integrated assembly made up of primarily a pressure garment system and a portable life support subsystem (PLSS). The PLSS is further composed of an oxygen subsystem, a ventilation subsystem, and a thermal subsystem. One of the key functions of the ventilation system is to remove and control the carbon dioxide (CO2) delivered to the crewmember. Carbon dioxide washout is the mechanism by which CO2 levels are controlled within the space suit helmet to limit the concentration of CO2 inhaled by the crew member. CO2 washout performance is a critical parameter needed to ensure proper and robust designs that are insensitive to human variabilities in a space suit. A suited manikin test apparatus (SMTA) was developed to augment testing of the PLSS ventilation loop in order to provide a lower cost and more controlled alternative to human testing. The CO2 removal function is performed by the regenerative Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) within the PLSS ventilation loop and its performance is evaluated within the integrated SMTA and Ventilation Loop test system. This paper will provide a detailed description of the schematics, test configurations, and hardware components of this integrated system. Results and analysis of testing performed with this integrated system will be presented within this paper.

  19. Morphing: A Novel Approach to Astronaut Suit Sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margerum, Sarah; Clowers, Kurt; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2006-01-01

    The fitting of a spacesuit to an astronaut is an iterative process consisting of two parts. The first uses anthropometric data to provide an approximation of the suit components that will fit the astronaut. The second part is the subjective fitting, where small adjustments are made based on the astronaut s preference. By providing a better approximation of the correct suit components, the entire fit process time can be reduced significantly. The goals of this project are twofold: (1) To evaluate the effectiveness of the existing sizing algorithm for the Mark III Hybrid suit and (2) to determine what additional components are needed in order to provide adequate sizing for the existing astronaut population. A single subject was scanned using a 3D whole-body scanner (VITUS 3D) in the Mark III suit in eight different poses and four subjects in minimal clothing were also scanned in similar poses. The 3D external body scans of the suit and the subject are overlaid and visually aligned in a customized MATLAB program. The suit components were contracted or expanded linearly along the subjects limbs to match the subjects segmental lengths. Two independent measures were obtained from the morphing program on four subjects and compared with the existing sizing information. Two of the four subjects were in correspondence with the sizing algorithm and morphing results. The morphing outcome for a third subject, incompatible with the suit, suggested that an additional arm element at least 6 inches smaller than the existing smallest suit component would need to be acquired. The morphing result of the fourth subject, deemed incompatible with the suit using the sizing algorithm, indicated a different suit configuration which would be compatible. This configuration matched with the existing suit fit check data.

  20. STS-94 Pilot Susan Still suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-94 Pilot Susan L. Still waves as she is assisted into her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. She is the second woman to fly in this capacity on a Space Shuttle. Still is a lieutenant colonel in the Navy and has more than 2,000 flight hours in 30 different types of aircraft. She also holds a masters degree in aerospace engineering. Still will assist Halsell with all phases of the space flight and will have primary responsibility to take action in the event of an emergency. After Columbia reaches orbit, Still will be busy with the many and varied tasks associated with monitoring and maintaining the orbiter. She and six fellow crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off during a launch window that opens at 1:50 a.m. EDT, July 1. The launch window was opened 47 minutes early to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center.

  1. STS-83 Pilot Susan Still suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-83 Pilot Susan L. Still gives a thumbs-up as she is assisted into her launch/entry suit in the Operations and checkout (O&C) Building. She is the second woman to fly in this capacity on a Space Shuttle. Still is a lieutenant colonel in the Navy and has more than 2,000 flight hours in 30 different types of aircraft. She also holds a master's degree in aerospace engineering. Still will assist Halsell with all phases of the space flight and will have primary responsibility to take action in the event of an emergency. After Columbia reaches orbit, Still will be busy with the many and varied tasks associated with monitoring and maintaining the orbiter. She and six fellow crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off during a launch window that opens at 2:00 p.m. EST, April 4.

  2. Resource Discovery Network (RDN) Virtual Training Suite

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2000-01-01

    A collaboration between 30 universities, this Virtual Training Suite provides 40 tutorials designed to help students, lecturers, and researchers improve their Internet information skills. Based on a United Kingdom initiative to offer free online training, these tutorials cover specific web skills for those in disciplines such as math, the history and philosophy of science, geography, bioresearch, earth science, and others. Each tutorial provides expert "tour guides" developed by universities, libraries, museums, and research institutes across the UK. Representative web-based resources are showcased, but the main objective is to teach users how to find the resources that match their particular needs and interests. The tutorials also focus on the critical and evaluative skills required to judge the merits of specific web resources. There is a glossary, a section for teacher resources, downloadable workbooks, and a discussion on how to cite Internet resources. Each tutorial includes quizzes and interactive exercises. Five hubs for tutorial development include: SOSIG (The Social Science Information Gateway), EEVL (The Internet Guide for Engineering, Mathematics and Computing), BIOME (Internet Resources in Health and Life Sciences), PSIgate (The Physical Sciences Information Gateway) and HUMBUL (The Humanities Hub).

  3. An advanced missile warning processing suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Joel B.; Sanderson, Richard B.; McCalmont, John F.; Johnson, R. S.; McDermott, D. J.; Taylor, M. J.

    2008-04-01

    Effective missile warning and countermeasures remain an unfulfilled goal for the Air Force and others in the DOD community. To make the expectations a reality, newer sensors exhibiting the required sensitivity, field of regard, and spatial resolution are being developed and transitioned. The largest concern is in the first stage of a missile warning system: detection, in which all targets need to be detected with a high confidence and with very few false alarms. Typical fielded sensors are limited in their detection capability by either lack of sensitivity or by the presence of heavy background clutter, sun glints, and inherent sensor noise. Many threat environments include false alarm sources like burning fuels, flares, exploding ordinance, arc welders, and industrial emitters. Multicolor discrimination has been shown as one of the effective ways to improve the performance of missile warning sensors, particularly for heavy clutter situations. Its utility has been demonstrated in multiple demonstration and fielded systems. New exploitations of background and clutter spectral contents, coupled with advanced spatial and temporal filtering techniques, have resulted in a need to have a new baseline algorithm on which future processing advances may be judged against. This paper describes the AFRL Suite IIIc algorithm chain and its performance against long-range dim targets in clutter.

  4. Knowledge-based interactive design for men's suit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hong Lu; Yan Chen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, The design knowledge and sensory knowledge related to men's suit were elicited and acquired from designers by interviewing, laddering and card sorting etc.. The former included design elements and design rules, and the latter referred to the sensory image and semantic space. Design elements of Men's suit were discussed and divided into nine parts: silhouette, style line

  5. S12 - The HPC Challenge (HPCC) benchmark suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Piotr R Luszczek; David H. Bailey; Jack J Dongarra; Jeremy Kepner; Robert F. Lucas; Rolf Rabenseifner; Daisuke Takahashi

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, the DARPA's High Productivity Computing Systems released the HPCC suite. It examines the performance of HPC architectures using kernels with various memory access patterns of well known computational kernels. Consequently, HPCC results bound the performance of real applications as a function of memory access characteristics and define performance boundaries of HPC architectures. The suite was intended to augment

  6. Binghamton University Startup Suite Application Form TTIP-3

    E-print Network

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Binghamton University Startup Suite Application Form TTIP-3 After careful review of eligibility requirements, this form should be used by principals to request space in the ITC Startup Suite. Completed forms: Current address Street City/State Zip Current Telephone Number Business Start-up: Yes No Existing Business

  7. 33 CFR 144.20-5 - Exposure suits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Exposure suits. This section applies to each MODU except those operating south of 32 degrees North latitude in the Atlantic Ocean or south of 35 degrees North latitude in all other waters. (a) Each MODU must carry an exposure suit for...

  8. 33 CFR 144.20-5 - Exposure suits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Exposure suits. This section applies to each MODU except those operating south of 32 degrees North latitude in the Atlantic Ocean or south of 35 degrees North latitude in all other waters. (a) Each MODU must carry an exposure suit for...

  9. 33 CFR 144.20-5 - Exposure suits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Exposure suits. This section applies to each MODU except those operating south of 32 degrees North latitude in the Atlantic Ocean or south of 35 degrees North latitude in all other waters. (a) Each MODU must carry an exposure suit for...

  10. Diffusion Modeling in BrainSuite13 Justin P. Haldar

    E-print Network

    Leahy, Richard M.

    Diffusion Modeling in BrainSuite13 Justin P. Haldar #12;Outline Introduction Diffusion in BrainSuite13 Diffusion Modeling Tracking Analysis Other Resources Conclusion 2 #12;Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Fractional Anisotropy Anomalous Exponent Kurtosis Motivation 3 Diffusion MRI provides unique

  11. A New Ablative Heat Shield Sensor Suite Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    A new sensor suite is developed to measure performance of ablative thermal protection systems used in planetary entry vehicles for robotic and human exploration. The new sensor suite measures ablation of the thermal protection system under extreme heating encountered during planetary entry. The sensor technology is compatible with a variety of thermal protection materials, and is applicable over a wide range of entry conditions.

  12. Wireless hydrotherapy smart suit for monitoring handicapped people

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jose H. Correia; Paulo M. Mendes

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a smart suit, water impermeable, containing sensors and electronics for monitoring handicapped people at hydrotherapy sessions in swimming-pools. For integration into textiles, electronic components should be designed in a functional, robust and inexpensive way. Therefore, small-size electronics microsystems are a promising approach. The smart suit allows the monitoring of individual biometric data, such as heart rate, temperature

  13. Astronaut C. Gordon Fullerton in suit donning/doffing exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Astronaut C. Gordon Fullerton, STS-3 pilot, takes part in a suit donning/doffing exercise aboard a KC-135 'zero-gravity' aircraft. Mission Specialist William F. Fisher, far left, holds a mirror to assist Fullerton with hose and cable linkups to his suit. Fullerton is wearing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) minus gloves and helmet.

  14. Satellite ultraquiet isolation technology experiment (SUITE): electromechanical subsystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric H. Anderson; Michael E. Evert; Roger M. Glaese; James C. Goodding; Scott C. Pendleton; Donald Camp; John Fumo; Marty Jessen; Richard G. Cobb; R. S. Erwin; Jonathon Jensen

    1999-01-01

    Spacecraft carry instruments and sensors that gather information from distant points, for example, from the Earth's surface several hundred kilometers away. Small vibrations on the spacecraft can reduce instrument effectiveness significantly. Vibration isolation system are one means of minimizing the jitter of sensitive instruments. This paper describes one such system, the Satellite Ultraquiet Isolation Technology Experiment (SUITE). SUITE is a

  15. Water Optimizer Suite: Tools for Decision Support and Policy Analysis

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    , irrigation system options, well and pump characteristics and water supply. Irrigation options include center costs and crop prices. One of the strengths of Water Optimizer is that it can be easily used to evaluate1 Water Optimizer Suite: Tools for Decision Support and Policy Analysis Water Optimizer is a suite

  16. Of public interest: How courts handle rape victims' privacy suits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle Johnson

    1999-01-01

    In spite of a string of unfavorable court decisions, rape victims continue to bring privacy suits against news organizations that identify the victims. Based on case history, journalists have little to fear from such privacy suits because appellate courts usually find victims' names add credibility to stories and, therefore, are of public interest. Most judges seem to believe that they

  17. Planetary Suit Hip Bearing Model for Predicting Design vs. Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew S.; Margerum, Sarah; Harvil, Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    Designing a planetary suit is very complex and often requires difficult trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. In order to verifying that new suit designs meet requirements, full prototypes must eventually be built and tested with human subjects. Using computer models early in the design phase of new hardware development can be advantageous, allowing virtual prototyping to take place. Having easily modifiable models of the suit hard sections may reduce the time it takes to make changes to the hardware designs and then to understand their impact on suit and human performance. A virtual design environment gives designers the ability to think outside the box and exhaust design possibilities before building and testing physical prototypes with human subjects. Reductions in prototyping and testing may eventually reduce development costs. This study is an attempt to develop computer models of the hard components of the suit with known physical characteristics, supplemented with human subject performance data. Objectives: The primary objective was to develop an articulating solid model of the Mark III hip bearings to be used for evaluating suit design performance of the hip joint. Methods: Solid models of a planetary prototype (Mark III) suit s hip bearings and brief section were reverse-engineered from the prototype. The performance of the models was then compared by evaluating the mobility performance differences between the nominal hardware configuration and hardware modifications. This was accomplished by gathering data from specific suited tasks. Subjects performed maximum flexion and abduction tasks while in a nominal suit bearing configuration and in three off-nominal configurations. Performance data for the hip were recorded using state-of-the-art motion capture technology. Results: The results demonstrate that solid models of planetary suit hard segments for use as a performance design tool is feasible. From a general trend perspective, the suited performance trends were comparable between the model and the suited subjects. With the three off-nominal bearing configurations compared to the nominal bearing configurations, human subjects showed decreases in hip flexion of 64%, 6%, and 13% and in hip abduction of 59%, 2%, and 20%. Likewise the solid model showed decreases in hip flexion of 58%, 1%, and 25% and in hip abduction of 56%, 0%, and 30%, under the same condition changes from the nominal configuration. Differences seen between the model predictions and the human subject performance data could be attributed to the model lacking dynamic elements and performing kinematic analysis only, the level of fit of the subjects with the suit, the levels of the subject s suit experience.

  18. A highly integrated payload suite for Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M.; Kraft, S.; Steiger, R.; Varlet, F.; Voigt, D.; Falkner, P.; Peacock, A.

    The four Galilean moons have always held a public and scientific fascination due to their diverse and dynamic nature. Amongst the moons, Europa holds a special place for its potential liquid water ocean, beneath its icy crust. This prospect of water places Europa on a par with Mars in terms of its viability for harbouring life. The first hints of Europa's icy surface came from early telescopic observations, which noted an unusually high albedo. Ground based spectroscopy then demonstrated absorption features of relatively pure water ice. Imagery from Pioneer, Voyager, and more recently Galileo confirm this, with the kilometre scale resolution of Galileo showing what appear to be ice flows. The lack of cratering, pointing to a geologically recent surface, furthermore suggests that liquid water could well exist today. The Galileo Europa Mission (GEM) provided much more extensive data during its 8 close orbits, including limited areas of extremely high resolution imaging (6 m), and radio science that confirmed the differentiated nature of Europa. However, many fundamental questions remain that can best be answered by a dedicated orbiter. For example: - Does a liquid water ocean exist? What it its extent vertically and laterally? - What is the composition of the crust? - What are the geological processes operating? The importance of these most basic questions have inspired mission proposals from all of the major space agencies. In Europe, ESA have performed a study into a mission called the "Jupiter Minisat Explorer" in order to identify the key technologies that would have to be developed [1]. The key technological challenges are caused by the harsh Jovian radiation environment, the lack of solar energy available and the thermal problems of such a cold environment. Last, but not least, a payload must be designed that satisfies these requirements and is both low power and low mass. All of these factors dictate the use of a Highly Integrated Payload Suite (HIPS). Such a concept ensure that commonalities in the optics, electronics, data processing etc. are exploited to the maximum degree. The HIPS concept was proposed for BepiColombo payload and although not selected in the end for this mission, a limited subset of this payload is being developed to breadboard level, paving the way for similar instrument sets to be proposed for upcoming Cosmic Vision missions. The instrument suite presented here is designed to address the key science questions above and comprises two primary instruments. SILAT is an integrated high resolution camera and laser altimeter, sharing common optics. This will perform global high resolution imaging of the Europan surface, as well as providing detailed topography. The utility of such mapping for understanding the geological features and processes operating has been demonstrated unequivocally by exploiting the combined datasets of the MOLA instrument onboard MGS and HRSC on Mars Express. HIBRIS is a combined near infrared and thermal infrared spectrometer, including a radiometer mode. These imaging spectrometers again share common optics, and an uncooled microbolometer array is foreseen for the TIR and radiometer modes. In addition to these instruments, a radar sounder similar to the MARSIS instrument on Mars Express should be included for probing the subsurface properties. Each of these instruments is presented in more detail, including their mechanical design, development status and performance models at Europa. In addition, the calibration, test and programmatic issues that arise from both the HIPS philosophy and the Jovian environment are also addressed. References [1] Atzei, A.C. et al (2006), "The Jupiter Minisat Explorer, a Technology Reference Study", Acta Astronautica, In Press 2

  19. Enabling interoperability in Geoscience with GI-suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, Enrico; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Santoro, Mattia; Nativi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    GI-suite is a brokering framework targeting interoperability of heterogeneous systems in the Geoscience domain. The framework is composed by different brokers each one focusing on a specific functionality: discovery, access and semantics (i.e. GI-cat, GI-axe, GI-sem). The brokering takes place between a set of heterogeneous publishing services and a set of heterogeneous consumer applications: the brokering target is represented by resources (e.g. coverages, features, or metadata information) required to seamlessly flow from the providers to the consumers. Different international and community standards are now supported by GI-suite, making possible the successful deployment of GI-suite in many international projects and initiatives (such as GEOSS, NSF BCube and several EU funded projects). As for the publisher side more than 40 standards and implementations are supported (e.g. Dublin Core, OAI-PMH, OGC W*S, Geonetwork, THREDDS Data Server, Hyrax Server, etc.). The support for each individual standard is provided by means of specific GI-suite components, called accessors. As for the consumer applications side more than 15 standards and implementations are supported (e.g. ESRI ArcGIS, Openlayers, OGC W*S, OAI-PMH clients, etc.). The support for each individual standard is provided by means of specific profiler components. The GI-suite can be used in different scenarios by different actors: - A data provider having a pre-existent data repository can deploy and configure GI-suite to broker it and making thus available its data resources through different protocols to many different users (e.g. for data discovery and/or data access) - A data consumer can use GI-suite to discover and/or access resources from a variety of publishing services that are already publishing data according to well-known standards. - A community can deploy and configure GI-suite to build a community (or project-specific) broker: GI-suite can broker a set of community related repositories and make their content available (for discovery and/or access) through specific service interfaces. The GI-conf web tool can be used to easily configure GI-suite. By enabling specific accessors and profilers, as well as many other settings, GI-suite can be tailored to the desired use scenario. Moreover, thanks to its flexible architecture, GI-suite can be easily extended to support a new standard or implementation: a Java Development Kit is available to help development of new extensions (e.g. a new accessor component).

  20. The physiology of spacecraft and space suit atmosphere selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J.; Nicogossian, A.

    1991-01-01

    Factors which are considered in arriving at control values and control ranges of the parameters established for spacecraft and space suit environments include physiological, engineering, operational cost, and safety considerations. A number of physiological considerations are discussed, including hypoxia and hyperoxia, hypercapnia, temperature regulation, and decompression sickness. The impact of these considerations on space craft and space suit atmosphere selection is considered. The past experience in controlling these parameters in the U.S. and Soviet spacecraft and space suits and the associated physical responses are also reviewed. Physiological factors currently under investigation are discussed, including decompression sickness.

  1. A secure communication suite for underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Dini, Gianluca; Lo Duca, Angelica

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a security suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks comprising both fixed and mobile nodes. The security suite is composed of a secure routing protocol and a set of cryptographic primitives aimed at protecting the confidentiality and the integrity of underwater communication while taking into account the unique characteristics and constraints of the acoustic channel. By means of experiments and simulations based on real data, we show that the suite is suitable for an underwater networking environment as it introduces limited, and sometimes negligible, communication and power consumption overhead. PMID:23202204

  2. 30/03/08 1:36 PMFact Sheet NSA Suite B Cryptography Page 1 of 3http://www.nsa.gov/ia/industry/crypto_suite_b.cfm

    E-print Network

    Soltys, Michael

    30/03/08 1:36 PMFact Sheet NSA Suite B Cryptography Page 1 of 3http://www.nsa.gov/ia/industry/crypto_suite_b.cfm >>Fact Sheet NSA Suite B Cryptography Background: The sustained and rapid advance of information and National Security Information (CNSSP-15), the National Security Agency (NSA) announced Suite B Cryptography

  3. 14. View west, east facade of Agora Suites, Agora Auditorium ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View west, east facade of Agora Suites, Agora Auditorium and Forest Hall, shown right to left - Lake Placid Club, Forest Wing, East side of Mirror Lake Drive, North of State Route 86 & Main, North Elba, Essex County, NY

  4. 16. View northwest, south facade of Agora Suites, west facade ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View northwest, south facade of Agora Suites, west facade of Agora Auditorium. - Lake Placid Club, Forest Wing, East side of Mirror Lake Drive, North of State Route 86 & Main, North Elba, Essex County, NY

  5. 15. NBS TOP SIDE CONTROL ROOM. THE SUIT SYSTEMS CONSOLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. NBS TOP SIDE CONTROL ROOM. THE SUIT SYSTEMS CONSOLE IS USED TO CONTROL AIR FLOW AND WATER FLOW TO THE UNDERWATER SPACE SUIT DURING THE TEST. THE SUIT SYSTEMS ENGINEER MONITORS AIR FLOW ON THE PANEL TO THE LEFT, AND SUIT DATA ON THE COMPUTER MONITOR JUST SLIGHTLY TO HIS LEFT. WATER FLOW IS MONITORED ON THE PANEL JUST SLIGHTLY TO HIS RIGHT AND TEST VIDEO TO HIS FAR RIGHT. THE DECK CHIEF MONITORS THE DIVER'S DIVE TIMES ON THE COMPUTER IN THE UPPER RIGHT. THE DECK CHIEF LOGS THEM IN AS THEY ENTER THE WATER, AND LOGS THEM OUT AS THEY EXIT THE WATER. THE COMPUTER CALCULATES TOTAL DIVE TIME. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  6. Potential techniques and development activities in diver suit heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlosinger, A. P.

    1972-01-01

    A prototype compact reactor suitable for combustion of propane with oxygen under shallow as well as submerged deep submergence diving conditions is reported. The device is used to heat the circulating water in a water tube-type diving suit.

  7. PREVENTIVE CONSERVATION: A CONCEPT SUITED TO THE CONSERVATION OF EARTHEN

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PREVENTIVE CONSERVATION: A CONCEPT SUITED TO THE CONSERVATION OF EARTHEN ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE and Construction Key words: Preventive conservation, traditional conservation practices, risk reduction, heritage management Abstract The concept of "preventive conservation" is relatively old as it has already been

  8. College of Communication & Information 1345 Circle Park Drive | Suite 302

    E-print Network

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    standing especially in focused communication niche areas: organizational, interpersonal and healthCollege of Communication & Information 1345 Circle Park Drive | Suite 302 Knoxville, TN 37996 & Communication Studies (CICS) - Awarded grants total $7 million +, NSF, IMLS, Sloan Foundation and more - 2

  9. Engineering a robotic exoskeleton for space suit simulation

    E-print Network

    Meyen, Forrest Edward

    2013-01-01

    Novel methods for assessing space suit designs and human performance capabilities are needed as NASA prepares for manned missions beyond low Earth orbit. Current human performance tests and training are conducted in space ...

  10. Astronaut Frank Borman in suiting trailer during prelaunch countdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronaut Frank Borman, command pilot of the Gemini 7 space flight, talks with Astronaut Alan Shepard, Chief, MSC Astronaut Office, in the suiting up trailer at Launch Complex 16, during the Gemini 7 prelaunch countdown.

  11. Astronauts Young and Collins beside suiting trailer during preflight activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts John W. Young (right), command pilot, and Michael Collins, pilot, the Gemini 10 prime crew, stand beside the Launch Complex 16 suiting trailer during preflight activity at the Kennedy Space Center.

  12. The Extreme Benchmark Suite : measuring high-performance embedded systems

    E-print Network

    Gerding, Steven (Steven Bradley)

    2005-01-01

    The Extreme Benchmark Suite (XBS) is designed to support performance measurement of highly parallel "extreme" processors, many of which are designed to replace custom hardware implementations. XBS is designed to avoid many ...

  13. Mechanical counter-pressure space suit design using active materials

    E-print Network

    Holschuh, Bradley Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical counter-pressure (MCP) space suits have the potential to greatly improve the mobility of astronauts as they conduct planetary exploration activities; however, the underlying technologies required to provide ...

  14. The use of underwater dynamometry to evaluate two space suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, W. G.

    1989-01-01

    Four Astronauts were instrumented and donned one of three extravehicular activity (EVA) suits: the currently in use shuttle suit (STS), the Mark III (MK3), and the AX5. The STS was used as the comparison suit because of approved status. Each subject performed ten different exercises in each suit in three different manners (static, dynamic and fatigue) in two different environments, WETF and KC-135 (KC-135 not completed as of this report). Data were recorded from a flight qualified underwater dynamometer (Cybex power head) with a TEAC multichannel recorder/tape and downloaded into the VAX computer system for analysis. Also direct hard copy strip chart recordings were made for backup comparisons. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA procedure and results were graphed and reported without interpretation to the NASA/JSC ABL manager.

  15. The MAST suit in the treatment of cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Wayne, M A

    1978-03-01

    Based on initial success using the medical antishock trouser (MAST) suit in treating 150 patients in traumatic, hypovolemic shock in the city of Bellingham and Whatcom County, Washington, at St. Luke's Hospital, the indications for its use have been expanded to include certain types of cardiogenic shock. The rationale was based on the frequent inability to differentiate hypo-, hyper-, and normovolemia in patients in cardiogenic shock and the need for a safe, reversible fluid challenge to differentiate these conditions. Changes in the condition of 14 patients in cardiogenic shock after application of the MAST suit were evaluated. Six patients responded with improved cardiac output and blood pressure. Four had no significant change in their condition and four became worse. In all patients whose condition was unchanged or worsened, the fluid challenge was reversed by deflating the suit. Based on these preliminary findings, it would seem that extended indications exist for using the MAST suit. PMID:633673

  16. Thermal modeling, analysis and control of a space suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Anthony Bruce

    The thermal dynamics of two space suits, the Space Shuttle EMU and the MPLSS Advanced Space Suit, are considered as they relate to astronaut thermal comfort control. The activities documented in this dissertation cover three related areas, modeling, analysis, and control. A detailed dynamic lumped capacitance thermal model of the operational Space Shuttle EMU is used to analyze the thermal dynamics of the system with observations verified using experimental and flight data. Prior to using the model to define performance characteristics and limitations for the space suit, the model is first evaluated and improved. This evaluation includes determining the effect of various model parameters on model performance and quantifying various temperature prediction errors in terms of heat transfer and heat storage. The thermal dynamics and design of an Advanced Space Suit are next considered. A transient model of the MPLSS Advanced Space Suit design is developed and implemented using MATLAB/Simulink, to help with sizing, with design evaluation, and with the development of an automatic thermal comfort control strategy. The model is described and the thermal characteristics of the Advanced Space Suit are investigated including various parametric design studies. The steady state performance envelope for the Advanced Space Suit is defined in terms of the thermal environment and human metabolic rate and the transient response of the human-suit-MPLSS system is analyzed. The observations and insights about the thermal dynamics of a space suit are then applied to the automatic thermal comfort control of the MPLSS Advanced Space Suit. Automatic thermal comfort control for the Advanced Space Suit is investigated using three proposed strategies. These strategies use a transient thermal comfort definition based on body heat storage. The first strategy is measurement based using a proposed body heat storage estimation method to determine the astronaut's thermal state. The second strategy is model based using a model to determine the desired liquid cooling garment inlet temperature to provide thermal comfort. The third strategy is a hybrid strategy combining the measurement based and model based approach using the Generalized Predictive Control framework. Each strategy then uses a resource allocation decision logic to determine which of three control mechanisms to use so that thermal comfort can be provided while minimizing the use of consumables. Accuracy and performance of the strategies are evaluated using simulations, highlighting their advantages and limitations.

  17. STS-73 MS Michael E. Lopez-Alegria suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-73 Mission Specialist Michael E. Lopez-Alegria finishes donning his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building as a suit technician lends a helping hand. The seven crew members assigned to Mission STS-73 will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits them and a liftoff scheduled to occur no earlier than 10:46 a.m. EDT.

  18. 46 CFR 131.875 - Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. 131.875 Section...VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. (a) Each lifejacket, immersion suit, and ring life buoy must be marked...

  19. 46 CFR 131.875 - Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. 131.875 Section...VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. (a) Each lifejacket, immersion suit, and ring life buoy must be marked...

  20. 46 CFR 131.875 - Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. 131.875 Section...VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. (a) Each lifejacket, immersion suit, and ring life buoy must be marked...

  1. 46 CFR 131.875 - Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. 131.875 Section...VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. (a) Each lifejacket, immersion suit, and ring life buoy must be marked...

  2. 46 CFR 131.875 - Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. 131.875 Section...VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. (a) Each lifejacket, immersion suit, and ring life buoy must be marked...

  3. EVA Suit R and D for Performance Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew S.; Harvill, Lauren; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    Designing a planetary suit is very complex and often requires difficult trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. To verify that new suit designs meet requirements, full prototypes must be built and tested with human subjects. However, numerous design iterations will occur before the hardware meets those requirements. Traditional draw-prototype-test paradigms for R&D are prohibitively expensive with today's shrinking Government budgets. Personnel at NASA are developing modern simulation techniques which focus on human-centric designs by creating virtual prototype simulations and fully adjustable physical prototypes of suit hardware. During the R&D design phase, these easily modifiable representations of an EVA suit's hard components will allow designers to think creatively and exhaust design possibilities before they build and test working prototypes with human subjects. It allows scientists to comprehensively benchmark current suit capabilities and limitations for existing suit sizes and sizes that do not exist. This is extremely advantageous and enables comprehensive design down-selections to be made early in the design process, enables the use of human performance as design criteria, and enables designs to target specific populations

  4. Distance-Adaptive Routing and Spectrum Assignment (DA-RSA) in Rings

    E-print Network

    Distance-Adaptive Routing and Spectrum Assignment (DA-RSA) in Rings Sahar Talebi, Iyad Katib that the the distance- adaptive routing and spectrum assignment (DA-RSA) problem in mesh networks is a special case of a multiprocessor scheduling problem. We then develop a suite of efficient and effective DA-RSA algorithms

  5. Age and genesis of Mansurovo suite, Southern Urals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsov, N. B.; Stepanova, M. M.; Slavikova, N. V.; Kouznetsova, T. N.

    2003-04-01

    A summer 2002 student field camp was placed in the Southern Urals, Uchaly region, Mansurovo village, (54deg29`33``N, 59deg30`30``E). It is common adopted to consider that a typical Early Devonian sequence of south part of the Eastern Uralides (eastward of the Main Uralian Fault) is outcropped here. This sequence is named here Mansurovo suite. A large scale detailed geological map of area 2kmx2km and stratigraphic sequences were done. The Mansurovo sequence (1750m) was subdivided into 5 units: 1) large-scale olistoplaks of pillow-basalt, 2) olistolits and olistoplaks of black aleurolites with llandovery graptolites, 3) olistolits and olistoplaks of gray silicites, 4) sandstone, 5) mixture of silicites, limestone, tuffs, lava, etc. The rock bodies of 1, 2, 3, 5 units are buried into unsorted sand-gravel matrix. Late Ordovician Conodonts [Hamarodus brevirameus (Walliser), Periodon grandis Ethington, Scabbardella altipes (Henningsmoen), Periodon cf. grandis (Ethington), Belodina cf. confluence Sweet identification by S.Dubinina, GIN RAS] were firstly found into the olistolits of gray silicites, unit 3. The Mansurovo suit is covered by the Late Emsian Early Eifelian Irendik suit consisting of andesit-basaltic lava and tuffs. The next considerations allow us to reconsider the age and genesis of Mansurovo suite. (1) Fauna inversion: Ordovician silicites, unit 3 lay above Silurian aleurolites, unit 2. (2) Mansurovo suite is characterized by olistostrom structure. (3) Volcano-sedimentary rocks of Irendik suite are found into unit 5. All these imply that the age of Mansurovo olistostrom suit is not Early Devonian age, but is younger straton. The investigations are supported by RFBI (grant N 02-05-64283) and Federal Program “INTEGRATION”.

  6. Space Suit CO2 Washout During Intravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustine, Phillip M.; Navarro, Moses; Conger, Bruce; Sargusingh, Miriam M.

    2010-01-01

    Space suit carbon dioxide (CO2) washout refers to the removal of CO2 gas from the oral-nasal area of a suited astronaut's (or crewmember's) helmet using the suit's ventilation system. Inadequate washout of gases can result in diminished mental/cognitive abilities as well as headaches and light headedness. In addition to general discomfort, these ailments can impair an astronaut s ability to perform mission-critical tasks ranging from flying the space vehicle to performing lunar extravehicular activities (EVAs). During design development for NASA s Constellation Program (CxP), conflicting requirements arose between the volume of air flow that the new Orion manned space vehicle is allocated to provide to the suited crewmember and the amount of air required to achieve CO2 washout in a space suit. Historically, space suits receive 6.0 actual cubic feet per minute (acfm) of air flow, which has adequately washed out CO2 for EVAs. For CxP, the Orion vehicle will provide 4.5 acfm of air flow to the suit. A group of subject matter experts (SM Es) among the EVA Systems community came to an early consensus that 4.5 acfm may be acceptable for low metabolic rate activities. However, this value appears very risky for high metabolic rates, hence the need for further analysis and testing. An analysis was performed to validate the 4.5 acfm value and to determine if adequate CO2 washout can be achieved with the new suit helmet design concepts. The analysis included computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling cases, which modeled the air flow and breathing characteristics of a human wearing suit helmets. Helmet testing was performed at the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to provide a gross-level validation of the CFD models. Although there was not a direct data correlation between the helmet testing and the CFD modeling, the testing data showed trends that are very similar to the CFD modeling. Overall, the analysis yielded results that were better than anticipated, with a few unexpected findings that could not easily be explained. Results indicate that 4.5 acfm is acceptable for CO2 washout and helmet design. This paper summarizes the results of this CO2 washout study.

  7. Multifunctional Cooling Garment for Space Suit Environmental Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael; Chen, Weibo; Phillips, Scott; Chepko, Ariane; Bue, Grant; Ferl, Janet; Cencer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Future manned space exploration missions will require space suits with capabilities beyond the current state of the art. Portable Life Support Systems for these future space suits face daunting challenges, since they must maintain healthy and comfortable conditions inside the suit for long-duration missions while minimizing weight and water venting. We have demonstrated the feasibility of an innovative, multipurpose garment for thermal and humidity control inside a space suit pressure garment that is simple, rugged, compact, and lightweight. The garment is a based on a conventional liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) that has been modified to directly absorb latent heat as well as sensible heat. This hybrid garment will prevent buildup of condensation inside the pressure garment, prevent loss of water by absorption in regenerable CO2 removal beds, and conserve water through use of advanced lithium chloride absorber/radiator (LCAR) technology for nonventing heat rejection. We have shown the feasibility of this approach by sizing the critical components for the hybrid garment, developing fabrication methods, building and testing a proof-of-concept system, and demonstrating by test that its performance is suitable for use in space suit life support systems.

  8. Satellite ultraquiet isolation technology experiment (SUITE): electromechanical subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eric H.; Evert, Michael E.; Glaese, Roger M.; Goodding, James C.; Pendleton, Scott C.; Camp, Donald; Fumo, John; Jessen, Marty; Cobb, Richard G.; Erwin, R. Scott; Jensen, Jonathon

    1999-07-01

    Spacecraft carry instruments and sensors that gather information from distant points, for example, from the Earth's surface several hundred kilometers away. Small vibrations on the spacecraft can reduce instrument effectiveness significantly. Vibration isolation system are one means of minimizing the jitter of sensitive instruments. This paper describes one such system, the Satellite Ultraquiet Isolation Technology Experiment (SUITE). SUITE is a piezoelectric-based technology demonstration scheduled to fly in 2000 on PICOSat, a microsatellite fabricated by Surrey Satellite Technology, Ltd. Control from the ground station is planned for the first year after launch. SUITE draws on technology from previous research programs as well as a commercial piezoelectric vibration isolation system. The paper details the features of SUITE, with particular emphasis on the active hexapod assembly. A description of the PICOSat spacecraft and the other considerations preceding the development of the flight hardware begins the paper. Experimental goals are listed. The mechanical and electromechanical construction of the SUITE hexapod assembly is described, including the piezoelectric actuators, motion sensors, and electromagnetic actuators. The data control system is also described briefly, including the digital signal processor and spacecraft communication. The main features of the software used for real-time control and the supporting Matlab software used for control system development and data processing are summarized.

  9. Auto-calibration system of EMG sensor suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yousuke; Tanaka, Takayuki; Feng, Maria Q.

    2005-12-01

    Biogenic measurement has been studied as a robot's interface. We have studied the wearable sensor suit as a robot's interface. Some kinds of sensor disks are embedded the sensor suit to the wet suit-like material. The sensor suit measures a wearing person's joint, and muscular activity. In this report, we aim to establish an auto-calibration system for measuring joint torques by using EMG sensors based on neural network and sensor disks of a lattice. The Torque presumption was performed using the share neural network, which learned the data that formed the whole subject's teacher data. Additional training of the share neural network was carried out using the individual teaching data. As a result, that was able to do the neural network training in short time, high probability and high accuracy to training of initial neural network. Moreover, high-presumed accuracy was able to be acquired by this method Next, Sensor disks of a lattice was developed. EMG is measurable, checking the state of an electrode by that can measure biogenic impedance. That was able to measure EMG by sensor disks which has low impedance We measured EMG and joint torque by trial production sensor suit and torque measuring instrument. The predominancy of the torque presumption using the share neural network was check. We proposed Measurement system, which consists sensor disk of lattice. Experimental results show the proposed method is effective for the auto-calibration.

  10. Defining Operational Space Suit Requirements for Commercial Orbital Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    As the commercial spaceflight industry transitions from suborbital brevity to orbital outposts, spacewalking will become a major consideration for tourists, scientists, and hardware providers. The challenge exists to develop a space suit designed for the orbital commercial spaceflight industry. The unique needs and requirements of this industry will drive space suit designs and costs that are unlike any existing product. Commercial space tourists will pay for the experience of a lifetime, while scientists may not be able to rely on robotics for all operations and external hardware repairs. This study was aimed at defining space suit operational and functional needs across the spectrum of spacewalk elements, identifying technical design drivers and establishing appropriate options. Recommendations from the analysis are offered for consideration

  11. A Full-Body Tactile Sensor Suit Using Electrically Conductive Fabric and Strings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masayuki Inaba; Yukiko Hoshino; Ken'ichiro Nagasaka; Tatsuo Ninomiya; Satoshi Kagami; Hirochika Inoue

    1996-01-01

    We present design and implementation of a tactile sensor system, sensor suit, that covers the entire body of a robot. The sensor suit is designed to be soft and flexible and to have a large number of sensing regions. We have built the sensor suit using electrically conductive fabric and string. The current version of the sensor suit has 192

  12. The impact of test suite granularity on the cost-effectiveness of regression testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregg Rothermelt; Sebastian G. Elbaum; Alexey G. Malishevsky; Praveen Kallakurit; Brian Daviat

    2002-01-01

    Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modifications. The cost-effectiveness of regression testing techniques varies with characteristics of test suites. One such characteristic, test suite granularity, involves the way in which test inputs are grouped into test cases within a test suite. Various cost-benefits tradeoffs have been attributed to choices of test suite granularity, but

  13. Extending the GI Brokering Suite to Support New Interoperability Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, E.; Papeschi, F.; Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    The GI brokering suite provides the discovery, access, and semantic Brokers (i.e. GI-cat, GI-axe, GI-sem) that empower a Brokering framework for multi-disciplinary and multi-organizational interoperability. GI suite has been successfully deployed in the framework of several programmes and initiatives, such as European Union funded projects, NSF BCube, and the intergovernmental coordinated effort Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Each GI suite Broker facilitates interoperability for a particular functionality (i.e. discovery, access, semantic extension) among a set of brokered resources published by autonomous providers (e.g. data repositories, web services, semantic assets) and a set of heterogeneous consumers (e.g. client applications, portals, apps). A wide set of data models, encoding formats, and service protocols are already supported by the GI suite, such as the ones defined by international standardizing organizations like OGC and ISO (e.g. WxS, CSW, SWE, GML, netCDF) and by Community specifications (e.g. THREDDS, OpenSearch, OPeNDAP, ESRI APIs). Using GI suite, resources published by a particular Community or organization through their specific technology (e.g. OPeNDAP/netCDF) can be transparently discovered, accessed, and used by different Communities utilizing their preferred tools (e.g. a GIS visualizing WMS layers). Since Information Technology is a moving target, new standards and technologies continuously emerge and are adopted in the Earth Science context too. Therefore, GI Brokering suite was conceived to be flexible and accommodate new interoperability protocols and data models. For example, GI suite has recently added support to well-used specifications, introduced to implement Linked data, Semantic Web and precise community needs. Amongst the others, they included: DCAT: a RDF vocabulary designed to facilitate interoperability between Web data catalogs. CKAN: a data management system for data distribution, particularly used by public administrations. CERIF: used by CRIS (Current Research Information System) instances. HYRAX Server: a scientific dataset publishing component. This presentation will discuss these and other latest GI suite extensions implemented to support new interoperability protocols in use by the Earth Science Communities.

  14. Benefits of advanced space suits for supporting routine extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alton, L. R.; Bauer, E. H.; Patrick, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Technology is available to produce space suits providing a quick-reaction, safe, much more mobile extravehicular activity (EVA) capability than before. Such a capability may be needed during the shuttle era because the great variety of missions and payloads complicates the development of totally automated methods of conducting operations and maintenance and resolving contingencies. Routine EVA now promises to become a cost-effective tool as less complex, serviceable, lower-cost payload designs utilizing this capability become feasible. Adoption of certain advanced space suit technologies is encouraged for reasons of economics as well as performance.

  15. STS-80 Mission Specialist Tom Jones suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-80 Mission Specialist Thomas D. Jones finishes donning his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. Jones is flying in space for the third time, and will participate in two space walks on STS-80 to continue testing tools and techniques for International Space Station construction. He and four crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff during a two-and-a-half hour window opening at 2:53 p.m. EST, Nov. 19.

  16. Exploration Spacecraft and Space Suit Internal Atmosphere Pressure and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin; Duffield, Bruce; Jeng, Frank; Campbell, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The design of habitat atmospheres for future space missions is heavily driven by physiological and safety requirements. Lower EVA prebreathe time and reduced risk of decompression sickness must be balanced against the increased risk of fire and higher cost and mass of materials associated with higher oxygen concentrations. Any proposed increase in space suit pressure must consider impacts on space suit mass and mobility. Future spacecraft designs will likely incorporate more composite and polymeric materials both to reduce structural mass and to optimize crew radiation protection. Narrowed atmosphere design spaces have been identified that can be used as starting points for more detailed design studies and risk assessments.

  17. STS-75 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz dons his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with the assistance of a suit technician. STS-75 will be the first trip into space for Horowitz, who was selected by NASA in 1992 to join the astronaut corps. Horowitz and an international crew will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff during a two-and-a-half-hour launch window opening at 3:18 p.m. EST.

  18. STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz Suit Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-82 Pilot Scott J. 'Doc' Horowitz puts on a glove of his launch and entry suit with assistance from a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout Building. This is Horowitz''';s second space flight. He and the six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Discovery awaits liftoff on a 10-day mission to service the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This will be the second HST servicing mission. Four back-to-back spacewalks are planned.

  19. STS-73 MS Michael E. Lopez-Alegria suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-73 Mission Specialist Michael E. Lopez-Alegria dons his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. STS-73 will be the first trip into space for Lopez-Alegria, who considers both Madrid, Spain, and Mission Viejo, California, to be his hometowns. Lopez-Alegria and six fellow crew members will departly shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia is undergoing final preparations for liftoff during a two and a half launch window opening at 9:41 a.m. EDT, Oct. 7.

  20. STS-69 Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-69 Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt dons his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. STS-69 will be the first spaceflight for Gernhardt, who is scheduled to perform an extravehicular activity, or spacewalk, during the course of the mission. He and four fellow crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour awaits liftoff during a two and a half hour window opening at 11:09 a.m. EDT.

  1. SEED: A Suite of Instructional Laboratories for Computer Security Education

    E-print Network

    Du, Wenliang "Kevin"

    SEED: A Suite of Instructional Laboratories for Computer Security Education WENLIANG DU and RONGHUA a national priority. To address this priority, higher education has gradually incorporated the principles of computer and information security into the mainstream undergraduate and graduate computer science curric

  2. Damage averaging and the formation of class action suits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolas Marceau; Steeve Mongrain

    2003-01-01

    Within a class action suit, similarly injured individuals can collectively obtain compensation through the justice system. Damage averaging occurs when the compensation awarded by the court to individual members is partly or completely determined by the average damage of the class. The key role of damage averaging in influencing the identity of the individual that will initiate the class action

  3. Deterring Nuisance Suits through Employee Indemnification Wallace P. Mullin

    E-print Network

    Lotko, William

    . Indemnification deters meritless civil suits by strengthening employees' resolve to fight them. Keywords Conference for helpful comments. #12;1. Introduction Litigation against corporations and their officers their bargaining position against such plaintiffs in the settlement negotiations. According to a recent survey, 98

  4. Situational awareness and its application in the delivery suite.

    PubMed

    Edozien, Leroy C

    2015-01-01

    The delivery suite is a high-risk environment. Transitions between low-risk and high-risk can be swift, and sentinel events can occur without warning. The prevention of accidents in this environment rests on the vigilance of the individual practitioner at the frontline. It is, therefore, important that the individual practitioner should develop and maintain the cognitive skills to anticipate, recognize, and intercept unfolding error chains. This commentary gives an overview of a nontechnical skill that is essential for safe practice in a delivery suite: situational awareness. A basic description of situational awareness is provided, using examples of loss of situational awareness in the delivery suite and examples of simple interventions that could promote situational awareness. Involuntary automaticity readily creeps in during performance of routine tasks, and cognitive overload could deplete attentional resources that are, by nature, limited. Strategies and tactics for maintaining situational awareness include proactively seeking and managing information on unfolding events, continually updating individual and team mental models, mindful use of checklists and scoreboards, and avoidance of attentional blindness. These simple interventions require minimal financial resources but could immensely enhance clinical performance and patient safety. Situational awareness should be included in the training of obstetrician-gynecologists and other staff working in a delivery suite. PMID:25560106

  5. Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) formulation and implementation overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gene Martin; Gus Comeyne; Ghassem Asrar; Granville Paules; Edward C. Grigsby; Marvin S. Maxwell; Joe Criscione; Monica M. Coakley; Sandra A. Cauffman; Martin A. Davis

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the requirements, methodologies, and implementation approach for development of the NOAA\\/NASA GOES-R Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES), which is scheduled to fly in the 2012 timeframe. The HES is currently being developed within the framework of the GOES Program to fulfill the future needs and requirements flowed down through the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS).

  6. Space suit and extravehicular equipment planned for Astronaut David Scott

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Test subject Fred Spress, Crew Systems Division, wears the space suit and extravehicular equipment planned for use by Astronaut David R. Scott. The helmet is equipped with a gold-plated viser to shield the astronauts face from unfiltered sun rays. The system is composed of a life support pack worn on the chest and a support pack worn on the back.

  7. THE AGWA – KINEROS2 SUITE OF MODELING TOOLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A suite of modeling tools ranging from the event-based KINEROS2 flash-flood forecasting tool to the continuous (K2-O2) KINEROS-OPUS biogeochemistry tool. The KINEROS2 flash flood forecasting tool is being tested with the National Weather Service (NEW) is described. Tne NWS version assimilates Dig...

  8. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Abdallah, J., Jr.; Clark, R. E. H.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Cunningham, R. T.; Hakel, P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-07-01

    The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suite can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.

  9. A Tool Suite for Multi-paradigm Specification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynne Blair; Trevor Jones; Gordon S. Blair

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we present a tool suite developed t o facilitate the use of a multi-paradigm specification technique. By adopti ng such a technique, different aspects (or components) of a system can b e specified using different formal languages. Using FC2 as our common file format, we can load in different (partial) specifications, compose them an d then view

  10. Using Dependency Structures for Prioritisation of Functional Test Suites

    E-print Network

    Miller, Tim

    1 Using Dependency Structures for Prioritisation of Functional Test Suites Shifa-e-Zehra Haidry, Australia. 3 Abstract--Test case prioritisation is the process of ordering the exe- cution of test cases software delivery. Many existing test case prioritisation techniques consider that tests can be run in any

  11. 71. Historic American Buildings Survey COURT BETWEEN OWNER'S SUITE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. Historic American Buildings Survey COURT BETWEEN OWNER'S SUITE AND BABY HOUSE PHOTOCOPY OF PLATE FROM IRVIN L. SCOTT, 'MARALAGO', THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT (JUNE 20, 1928), P. 807 - Mar-a-Lago, 1100 South Ocean Boulevard, Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, FL

  12. Development of Power Assisting Suit for Assisting Nurse Labor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Keijiro; Hyodo, Kazuhito; Ishii, Mineo; Matsuo, Takashi

    In order to realize a power assisting suit for assisting a nurse caring a patient in her arm, a hardness sensor of muscle using load cell and a pneumatic rotary actuator utilizing pressure cuffs have been developed. The power assisting suit consists of shoulders, arms, waist and legs made of aluminum, and is fitted on the nurse body. The power assisting suit is originated with the concept of a master and slave system in one body. The arms, waist and legs have the pneumatic rotary actuators. The pneumatic rotary actuators are constructed with pressure cuffs sandwiched between thin plates. The action of the arms, waist and legs of the nurse are sensed with the muscle hardness sensor utilizing load cell with diaphragm mounted on a sensing tip. The dent of the sensing tip corresponds to the hardness of the muscle so that exerting muscle force produces electric signal. This paper gives the design and characteristics of the power assisting suit using the cuff type pneumatic rotary actuators and the muscle hardness sensor verifying its practicability.

  13. An integrated workspace for a MATLAB finite elements educational suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giacomo Guarnieri; Giuseppe Pelosi; S. Selleri

    2005-01-01

    An integrated workspace for a Matlab-based suite of codes aimed at an educational use of finite elements is presented. The codes present several classical FEM applications, ranging from guiding structure characterization, to microwave devices and radiation problems and fully exploit Matlab's graphical capabilities to enhance the ease of use and optimize the learning curve.

  14. Department of Urology 333 City Blvd. West, Suite 2100

    E-print Network

    Cramer, Karina

    Department of Urology 333 City Blvd. West, Suite 2100 Orange, CA 92868 714.456.5371 Copyright CENTER Minimally Invasive Urologic Surgery Training Program We welcome your participation. MINI-FELLOWSHIP University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Department of Urology The UC Irvine Surgical Education

  15. Security problems in the TCP\\/IP protocol suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. M. Bellovin

    1989-01-01

    The TCP\\/IP protocol suite, which is very widely used today, was developed under the sponsorship of the Department of Defense. Despite that, there are a number of serious security flaws inherent in the protocols, regardless of the correctness of any implementations. We describe a variety of attacks based on these flaws, including sequence number spoofing, routing attacks, source address spoofing,

  16. Space Suit Environment Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy B.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.; Cox, Marlon R.

    2010-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). In three previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center (JSC) testing of this technology. That testing was performed in a sea-level pressure environment with both simulated and real human metabolic loads, and in both open and closed-loop configurations. The Orion ARS is designed to also support space-suited operations in a depressurized cabin, so the next step in developmental testing at JSC was to test the ARS technology in a typical closed space suit-loop environment with low-pressure oxygen inside the process loop and vacuum outside the loop. This was the first instance of low-pressure, high-oxygen, closed-loop testing of the Orion ARS technology, and it was conducted with simulated human metabolic loads in March 2009. The test investigated pressure drops and flow balancing through two different styles of prototype suit umbilical connectors. General swing-bed performance was tested with both umbilical configurations, as well as with a short jumper line installed in place of the umbilicals. Other interesting results include observations on the thermal effects of swing-bed operation in a vacuum environment and a recommendation of cycle time to maintain acceptable suit atmospheric CO2 and moisture levels.

  17. Solutions to Surgical Suite Temperature and Humidity Control 

    E-print Network

    Crooks, K. W.

    1996-01-01

    to low temperature coolug systems. PSYCHROMETRIC CHART, j:K.R.) Fi,we 1 Surgery Suite Dew Points, Old and New (69 Gr - 46 Gr) / 69 GT = 0.333 Equation (1) INTRODUCTION With the introduction of human .immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the resurgence...

  18. UPPER COLUMBIA UNITED TRIBES 910 N. Washington, Suite 107

    E-print Network

    UPPER COLUMBIA UNITED TRIBES 910 N. Washington, Suite 107 Spokane, Washington 99201 (509) 838-1057 Colville * Coeur d'Alene * Kalispel * Kootenai * Spokane May 27, 2004 Judi Danielson, Chair Northwest Power, and Spokane) is contingent upon the NPCC's adoption of the measures submitted with this letter. This letter

  19. Surgical suite environmental control system. [using halothane absorbing filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginbotham, E. J.; Jacobs, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental work for a systems analysis approach to the problem of surgical suit exhaust systems centered on evaluation of halothane absorbing filters. An activated charcoal-alumina-charcoal combination proved to be the best filter for eliminating halothane through multilayer absorption of gas molecules.

  20. Test Suite for Evaluating Performance of MPI Implementations That Support

    E-print Network

    Thakur, Rajeev

    Test Suite for Evaluating Performance of MPI Implementations That Support MPI THREAD MULTIPLE Argonne, IL 60439, USA {thakur, gropp}@mcs.anl.gov Abstract. MPI implementations that support the highest level of thread safety for user programs, MPI THREAD MULTIPLE, are becoming widely available. Users

  1. Test Suite for Evaluating Performance of Multithreaded MPI Communication

    E-print Network

    Thakur, Rajeev

    Test Suite for Evaluating Performance of Multithreaded MPI Communication Rajeev Thakur a, application programmers are exploring the use of hybrid programming models combining MPI across nodes and multithreading within a node. Many MPI implementations, however, are just starting to support multithreaded MPI

  2. Allvivo Vascular, Inc. 20914 Bake Parkway, Suite 100

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    Allvivo Vascular, Inc. 20914 Bake Parkway, Suite 100 Lake Forest, CA 92630 Phone: 949 of antimicrobial coatings and treatment formulations. · Conduct cell based assays using fibroblasts and keratinocytes. · Develop assays and use existing methods to measuring effects of actives and formulations

  3. Extravehicular Mobility Unit Training Suit Symptom Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Samuel

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the symptoms and injuries experienced by NASA astronauts during extravehicular activity (space walk) spacesuit training at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at Ellington Field, Houston, Texas. We identified the frequency and incidence rates of symptoms by each general body location and characterized mechanisms of injury and effective countermeasures. Based on these findings a comprehensive list of recommendations was made to improve training, test preparation, and current spacesuit components, and to design the next -generation spacesuit. At completion of each test event a comprehensive questionnaire was produced that documented suit symptom comments, identified mechanisms of injury, and recommended countermeasures. As we completed our study we found that most extravehicular mobility unit suit symptoms were mild, self-limited, and controlled by available countermeasures. Some symptoms represented the potential for significant injury with short- and long-term consequences regarding astronaut health and interference with mission objectives. The location of symptoms and injuries that were most clinically significant was in the hands, shoulders, and feet. Correction of suit symptoms issues will require a multidisciplinary approach to improve prevention, early medical intervention, astronaut training, test planning, and suit engineering.

  4. The PROMPT suite: interactive tools for ontology merging and mapping

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natalya F. Noy; Mark A. Musen

    2003-01-01

    Researchers in the ontology-design field have developed the content for ontologies in many domain areas. This distributed nature of ontology development has led to a large number of ontologies covering overlapping domains. In order for these ontologies to be reused, they first need to be merged or aligned to one another. We developed a suite of tools for managing multiple

  5. Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowie, Jonathan; Buffington, Jesse; Hood, Drew; Kelly, Cody; Naids, Adam; Watson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability from the Orion spacecraft. For this mission, the pressure garment selected for both functions is the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) with EVA enhancements and the life support option that was selected is the Exploration Portable Life Support System (PLSS) currently under development for Advanced Exploration Systems (AES). The proposed architecture meets the ARCM constraints, but much more work is required to determine the details of the suit upgrades, the integration with the PLSS, and the tools and equipment necessary to accomplish the mission. This work has continued over the last year to better define the operations and hardware maturation of these systems. EVA simulations were completed in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) and interfacing options were prototyped and analyzed with testing planned for late 2014. This paper discusses the work done over the last year on the MACES enhancements, the use of tools while using the suit, and the integration of the PLSS with the MACES.

  6. Astronaut James Lovel in suiting trailer during prelaunch countdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., pilot of the Gemini 7 space flight, relaxes in the suiting up trailer at Launch Complex 16, during the Gemini 7 prelaunch countdown. Lovell wears the new lightweight spacesuit specially designed for long-duration flights.

  7. Astronaut Thomas Stafford in suiting trailer during Gemini 6 prelaunch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford (foreground), Gemini 6 prime crew pilot, and Alan B. Shepard Jr., Chief, Astronaut Office, Manned Spacecraft Center, look over a Gemini mission chart in the suiting trailer at Launch Complex 16 during the Gemini 6 prelaunch countdown.

  8. SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY THE GRADUATE SCHOOL Suite 220 BOWNE HALL

    E-print Network

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    Organization with support from the Graduate School. Free food, beverages and music. Families are welcome. DateSYRACUSE UNIVERSITY THE GRADUATE SCHOOL · Suite 220 BOWNE HALL ORIENTATION SCHEDULE UNIVERSITY in their individual health care processes. Services include: · Allergy injections · Laboratory · Pharmacy · Ambulance

  9. Implementing a Visualization System suited to Localized Documents

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Implementing a Visualization System suited to Localized Documents Christophe Marquesuzaà DESI Team--Local cultural heritage documents are characterized by contents strongly connected with a territory and its land documents to be retrieved and visualized according to geographic criteria. The paper presents an approach

  10. CBR Fermentation Suite Service Fee Schedule Updated Oct 2011

    E-print Network

    Strynadka, Natalie

    CBR Fermentation Suite Service Fee Schedule Updated Oct 2011 Please note that fees can be changed: Fermenter user must harvest but CBR can provide bottles for the use of CBR centrifuge 7-L Fermenters (Working volume: 5.0 - 5.5 L) Harvest: Fermenter user must harvest but CBR can provide bottles for the use

  11. CBR Fermenter Suite Frequently asked questions: Updated Jun 2011

    E-print Network

    Strynadka, Natalie

    CBR Fermenter Suite Frequently asked questions: Updated Jun 2011 What kind of fermentation Yes Yes Yes No No No No Bacterial Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Pichia Yes Yes Yes Yes No No NoFermentations Insect/Animal Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes For Number of fermenters 3-L Rushton impeller x 3 Bacterial

  12. Changes in Law-School Accrediting Resolve Federal Antitrust Suit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Patrick

    1995-01-01

    The American Bar Association has agreed to change its law school accrediting requirements concerning faculty salaries. The antitrust suit was the first concerning law schools. The bar association also agreed that at least half of accrediting team members must work full time outside legal education. Some are concerned that the changes weaken the…

  13. Human Resource Services 555 S Howes Street, Suite 213

    E-print Network

    Human Resource Services 555 S Howes Street, Suite 213 Campus Delivery 6004 Page | 1 www.hrs.colostate.edu 5/2008 Human Resource Services Verification of Student Status at Other Institution DATE: TO: Registrar, Institution FROM: Human Resource Services ­ Records RE: SSN: Name: Department Number & Name

  14. STS-73 MS Michael E. Lopez-Alegria suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-73 Mission Specialist Michael E. Lopez-Alegria is donning his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. The seven-member crew of Mission STS-73 will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits another liftoff attempt at 9:50 a.m. EDT.

  15. A Benchmark Suite for Distributed Publish/Subscribe Systems

    E-print Network

    Carzaniga, Antonio

    A Benchmark Suite for Distributed Publish/Subscribe Systems Antonio Carzaniga and Alexander L. Wolf Abstract Building a distributed publish/subscribe infrastructure amounts to defining a service model (or in for distributed publish/subscribe services, and we outline its primary components. The ideas proposed

  16. Environmental Health & Safety 395 Pine Tree Road, Suite 210

    E-print Network

    Manning, Sturt

    , vapors, or very small solid particles of fumes and smoke. 4. Keep track of your respirator so that you doEnvironmental Health & Safety 395 Pine Tree Road, Suite 210 Ithaca, New York 14850 t. 607. 255 Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, certifies

  17. Biotechnology Industry Organization 1201 Maryland Avenue SW, Suite 900

    E-print Network

    Biotechnology Industry Organization 1201 Maryland Avenue SW, Suite 900 Washington DC 20024 Contact, but are manufactured from renewable resources. Recent advances in biotechnology are now making it possible are home to much of the world's leading industrial biotechnology, which enables the creation of a wide

  18. Well-Suited Partners: Psychoanalytic Research and Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Janet

    2006-01-01

    Research is a "core activity" of "central importance in improving mental health and social care" (NIME, CAMHS National Conference, 2005). This paper examines the philosophical issues confronted when considering psychoanalytic clinical research. It is argued that a well-suited partnership can be formed between psychoanalytic clinical research and…

  19. Exploration Space Suit Architecture: Destination Environmental-Based Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Terry R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper picks up where EVA Space Suit Architecture: Low Earth Orbit Vs. Moon Vs. Mars (Hill, Johnson, IEEEAC paper #1209) left off in the development of a space suit architecture that is modular in design and interfaces and could be reconfigured to meet the mission or during any given mission depending on the tasks or destination. This paper will walk though the continued development of a space suit system architecture, and how it should evolve to meeting the future exploration EVA needs of the United States space program. In looking forward to future US space exploration and determining how the work performed to date in the CxP and how this would map to a future space suit architecture with maximum re-use of technology and functionality, a series of thought exercises and analysis have provided a strong indication that the CxP space suit architecture is well postured to provide a viable solution for future exploration missions. Through the destination environmental analysis that is presented in this paper, the modular architecture approach provides the lowest mass, lowest mission cost for the protection of the crew given any human mission outside of low Earth orbit. Some of the studies presented here provide a look and validation of the non-environmental design drivers that will become every-increasingly important the further away from Earth humans venture and the longer they are away. Additionally, the analysis demonstrates a logical clustering of design environments that allows a very focused approach to technology prioritization, development and design that will maximize the return on investment independent of any particular program and provide architecture and design solutions for space suit systems in time or ahead of being required for any particular manned flight program in the future. The new approach to space suit design and interface definition the discussion will show how the architecture is very adaptable to programmatic and funding changes with minimal redesign effort required such that the modular architecture can be quickly and efficiently honed into a specific mission point solution if required.

  20. Biomechanical comparison of the current army chemical, biological and radiological protection suit and two prototype suits. Technical report, October 1984-September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Styer, D.J.; Tamura, L.; Pepper, S.; Bachrach, A.J.

    1986-12-01

    This study compares the biomechanical characteristics of the current U. S. Army CBR suit, Overgarment 84, and two prototypes, C and D, developed by the Naval Surface Warfare Center and the Marine Corps Research and Development Command. This study assessed the range of motion in the three CBR suits using a biomechanical analysis. Fourteen anthropometric measurements were used representing gross body movement. Measurements on each of the CBR suits and on a swim suit baseline were compared using a repeated measure ANOVA to determine which CBR suit was least restrictive as measured by the fourteen movements assessed. While the three CBR suits demonstrated a restriction in movement when compared to baseline measures, neither of the CBR suits differ significantly for each other. Implication of the data are discussed.

  1. Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowie, Jonathan T.; Kelly, Cody; Buffington, Jesse; Watson, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability from the Orion spacecraft. For this mission, the pressure garment that was selected, for both functions, is the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) with EVA enhancements and the life support option that was selected is the Exploration Portable Life Support System (PLSS). The proposed architecture was found to meet the mission constraints, but much more work is required to determine the details of the required suit upgrades, the integration with the PLSS, and the rest of the tools and equipment required to accomplish the mission. This work has continued over the last year to better define the operations and hardware maturation of these systems. EVA simulations have been completed in the NBL and interfacing options have been prototyped and analyzed with testing planned for late 2014. For NBL EVA simulations, in 2013, components were procured to allow in-house build up for four new suits with mobility enhancements built into the arms. Boots outfitted with clips that fit into foot restraints have also been added to the suit and analyzed for possible loads. Major suit objectives accomplished this year in testing include: evaluation of mobility enhancements, ingress/egress of foot restraint, use of foot restraint for worksite stability, ingress/egress of Orion hatch with PLSS mockup, and testing with two crew members in the water at one time to evaluate the crew's ability to help one another. Major tool objectives accomplished this year include using various other methods for worksite stability, testing new methods for asteroid geologic sampling and improving the fidelity of the mockups and crew equipment. These tests were completed on a medium fidelity capsule mockup, asteroid vehicle mockup, and asteroid mockups that were more accurate for an asteroid type EVA than previous tests. Another focus was the design and fabrication of the interface between the MACES and the PLSS. The MACES was not designed to interface with a PLSS, hence an interface kit must accommodate the unique design qualities of the MACES and provide the necessary life support function connections to the PLSS. A prototype interface kit for MACES to PLSS has been designed and fabricated. Unmanned and manned testing of the interface will show the usability of the kit while wearing a MACES. The testing shows viability of the kit approach as well as the operations concept. The design will be vetted through suit and PLSS experts and, with the findings from the testing, the best path forward will be determined. As the Asteroid Redirect Mission matures, the suit/life support portion of the mission will mature along with it and EVA Tools & Equipment can be iterated to accommodate the overall mission objectives and compromises inherent in EVA Suit optimization. The goal of the EVA architecture for ARCM is to continue to build on the previously developed technologies and lessons learned, and accomplish the ARCM EVAs while providing a stepping stone to future missions and destinations.

  2. [A dynamic model of the extravehicular (correction of extravehicuar) activity space suit].

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Yuan, Xiu-gan

    2002-12-01

    Objective. To establish a dynamic model of the space suit base on the particular configuration of the space suit. Method. The mass of the space suit components, moment of inertia, mobility of the joints of space suit, as well as the suit-generated torques, were considered in this model. The expressions to calculate the moment of inertia were developed by simplifying the geometry of the space suit. A modified Preisach model was used to mathematically describe the hysteretic torque characteristics of joints in a pressurized space suit, and it was implemented numerically basing on the observed suit parameters. Result. A dynamic model considering mass, moment of inertia and suit-generated torques was established. Conclusion. This dynamic model provides some elements for the dynamic simulation of the astronaut extravehicular activity. PMID:12622094

  3. STS-85 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-85 Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson smiles as he is assisted with his ascent/reentry flight suit by a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. He has been a NASA employee since 1975 and has worked at Ames and Langley Research Centers. Robinson holds a doctorate in mechanical engineering and is a licensed pilot. He will assist Mission Specialist Robert L. Curbeam, Jr. with the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-Shuttle Pallet Satellite-2 (CRISTA- SPAS-2) free-flyer and conduct Comet Hale-Bopp observations with the Southwest Ultraviolet Imaging System. Robinson will also coordinate photo and television data operations during the mission. The primary payload aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery is the CRISTA-SPAS- 2. Other payloads on the 11-day mission include the Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD), and Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker-2 (IEH-2) experiments.

  4. STS-95 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson gives a thumbs up as he dons his flight suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with the help of suit tech George Brittingham (lower right). The final fitting takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39B. Targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, the mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  5. Citizen suits against private industry under the Clean Water Act

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.E.; Hackett, D.P.

    1984-01-01

    Citizens suits against industrial dischargers have become an important way to enforce the Clean Water Act (CWA) since the 1977 amendments were passed. Most of the recent notices of intent to sue were submitted by environmental organizations which reviewed discharge monitoring reports (DMRs) to identify noncomplying companies. A review of legislative history indicates that the most widely debated issue concerns the constitutional requirements and statutory elements of standing to sue. Other aspects of citizen suits are the potential for multiple lawsuits and the awarding of attornies' fees. A respectable body of case law already exists, and if recent notices of intent result in judicial decisions, there will be precedents regarding claims and defenses. 320 references.

  6. STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    After donning her launch and entry suit, STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence gives a 'thumbs up' to show shes ready to fly in a few hours on the Space Shuttle Atlantis. This will be Lawrences second spaceflight. She and the six other crew members will depart shortly from the Operations and Checkout Building for Launch Pad 39A, where Atlantis awaits liftoff on a 10-day mission slated to be the seventh docking of the Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Lawrence was given the nickname 'too short,' as shown on her orange spacesuit, because she was withdrawn from training for an extended stay aboard the Mir when it was determined that she was too short to fit into the Russian spacewalk suit. Lawrence remains a member of the STS-86 crew, but fellow Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will take her place for an approximate four-month stay aboard the Russian space station.

  7. STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman is suited up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-90 Pilot Scott Altman is assisted during suit-up activities by Lockheed Suit Technician Valerie McNeil from Johnson Space Center in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Altman and the rest of the STS-90 crew will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits a second liftoff attempt at 2:19 p.m. EDT. His first trip into space, Altman is participating in a life sciences research flight that will focus on the most complex and least understood part of the human body - - the nervous system. Neurolab will examine the effects of spaceflight on the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and sensory organs in the human body.

  8. Failure to exercise due diligence costs plaintiff her suit.

    PubMed

    1997-11-28

    The Mississippi State Supreme Court affirmed a lower court ruling dismissing a last-minute suit filed by a plaintiff against United Blood Services of Mississippi and the American Association of Blood Banks. A woman known as D. Doe was a recipient of a tainted transfusion. She contracted HIV in 1983 and died of AIDS-related causes in 1991. Her daughter, the plaintiff, filed a contaminated blood transfusion lawsuit just five days before the statute of limitations ran out but failed to ascertain the correct identity of the blood bank. She named two blood banks in her suit because she was unable to determine the source of the blood. The Supreme Court ruled that waiting until five days before the statute elapsed indicated that the plaintiff did not exercise reasonable diligence within a specific time frame. PMID:11364874

  9. STS-84 Pilot Eileen Marie Collins suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    With the assistance of a suit technician, STS-84 Pilot Eileen Marie Collins finishes donning her launch and entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building in preparation for her second Space Shuttle flight. She was the first woman Shuttle pilot on STS-63 in 1995, which was the first approach and flyaround of the Russian Space Station Mir by the Space Shuttle. Collins and six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff during an approximate 7-minute launch window which opens at about 4:08 a.m. This will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. The exact liftoff time will be determined about 90 minutes prior to launch, based on the most current location of Mir.

  10. STS-94 Mission Specialist Michael Gernhardt suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-94 Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt is assisted into his launch/entry suit by a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. He first flew in this capacity on STS- 69. He has been a professional deep sea diver and engineer and holds a doctorate in bioengineering. Gernhardt will be in charge of the Blue shift and as flight engineer will operate and maintain the orbiter while Halsell and Still are asleep as members of the Red shift. He will also back them up on the flight deck during the ascent and re-entry phases of the mission. Gernhardt and six fellow crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off during a launch window that opens at 1:50 a.m. EDT, July opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center.

  11. Mission Specialist Grunsfeld gets help suiting up before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) is assisted by a suit technician in donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. Other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 17 at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 8-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Sunday, Dec. 26, at about 6:30 p.m. EST.

  12. Mission Specialist Nicollier gets help suiting up before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-103 Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland waves while having his launch and entry suit checked by a suit techician during final launch preparations. Other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 17 at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 8-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Sunday, Dec. 26, at about 6:30 p.m. EST.

  13. Mission Specialist Foale gets help suiting up before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michel Foale (Ph.D.) smiles as his launch and entry suit is checked by a suit techician during final launch preparations. Other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 17 at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 8-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Sunday, Dec. 26, at about 6:30 p.m. EST.

  14. FRACK: A Freeware Flow and Transport Suite for Fractured Media

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald M. Reeves; Greg Pohll; David Benson

    FRACK is a fractured media freeware flow and solute transport suite currently under development that is intended to serve as both a pre- and post-processor to MODFLOW. As a pre-processor, FRACK generates and maps networks of deterministic and\\/or stochastic fractures onto a regularly-spaced finite- difference grid, according to a fracture continuum method that closely approximates flow solutions to discrete fracture

  15. A general purpose suite for Grid resources exploitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Armando Fella; Eleonora Luppi; Matteo Manzali; Luca Tomassetti

    2011-01-01

    We present a general-purpose software framework, which allows different multi-disciplinary communities to take advantage of a distributed computational infrastructure. The ultimate goal is to provide organizations that need to exploit resources with CPU-intensive loose-parallel tasks with a software service capable to offer a user-friendly, standard and highly customizable access to the Grid. The software suite we developed has been designed

  16. Theory and Design of Microwave-Tube Simulator Suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bin Li; Zhong Hai Yang; Jian Qing Li; Xiao Fang Zhu; Tao Huang; Quan Hu; Yu Lu Hu; Li Xu; Jun Jian Ma; Li Liao; Li Xiao; Guo Xian He

    2009-01-01

    The development of microwave-tube simulator suite (MTSS) is reported. MTSS is an integrated full-featured software package for microwave-tube analysis and design. It includes a friendly user-interface module and three physics simulators. Microwave-tube design environment is the user-interface module, which provides a powerful solid-modeling front end and graphical and computational postprocessing functionality. Electron optics simulator (EOS) is a fully 3-D finite-element

  17. Enhanced verification test suite for physics simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R.; Brock, Jerry S.; Brandon, Scott T.; Cotrell, David L.; Johnson, Bryan; Knupp, Patrick; Rider, William J.; Trucano, Timothy G.; Weirs, V. Gregory

    2008-09-01

    This document discusses problems with which to augment, in quantity and in quality, the existing tri-laboratory suite of verification problems used by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of verification analysis is demonstrate whether the numerical results of the discretization algorithms in physics and engineering simulation codes provide correct solutions of the corresponding continuum equations.

  18. STS-107 Mission Specialist David Brown suits up for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Mission Specialist David Brown happily submits to suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

  19. Astronaut Bio-Suit for Exploration Class Missions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bradley Pitts; Cam Brensinger; Joseph Saleh; Chris Carr; Dava Newman

    Abstract A Bio-Suit Systemstands to revolutionizehuman,space exploration by providing enhanced astronaut extravehicular activity (EVA) locomotion and life support based on the,con- cept of providing ,a ‘second skin’ capability ,for astronaut performance. The novel design concept is realized through symbiotic relationships in the areas of wearable tech- nologies; information systems and evolutionary space systems design; and biomedical breakthroughs,in skin ,replacement ,and

  20. Compression under a mechanical counter pressure space suit glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldie, James M A.; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Tourbier, Dietmar; Webb, Paul; Jarvis, Christine W.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Current gas-pressurized space suits are bulky stiff shells severely limiting astronaut function and capability. A mechanical counter pressure (MCP) space suit in the form of a tight elastic garment could dramatically improve extravehicular activity (EVA) dexterity, but also be advantageous in safety, cost, mass and volume. The purpose of this study was to verify that a prototype MCP glove exerts the design compression of 200 mmHg, a pressure similar to the current NASA EVA suit. Methods: Seven male subjects donned a pressure measurement array and MCP glove on the right hand, which was placed into a partial vacuum chamber. Average compression was recorded on the palm, the bottom of the middle finger, the top of the middle finger and the dorsum of the hand at pressures of 760 (ambient), 660 and 580 mmHg. The vacuum chamber was used to simulate the pressure difference between the low breathing pressure of the current NASA space suits (approximately 200 mmHg) and an unprotected hand in space. Results: At ambient conditions, the MCP glove compressed the dorsum of the hand at 203.5 +/- 22.7 mmHg, the bottom of the middle finger at 179.4 +/- 16.0 mmHg, and the top of the middle finger at 183.8 +/- 22.6 mmHg. The palm compression was significantly lower (59.6 +/- 18.8 mmHg, p<0.001). There was no significant change in glove compression with the chamber pressure reductions. Conclusions: The MCP glove compressed the dorsum of the hand and middle finger at the design pressure.

  1. Evaluation of sensors for use inside chemical protective suits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Derrick A.; Duncan, E. J. S.; Hunt, Stephen; Gudgin Dickson, Eva F.; Weagle, Glenn E.

    1999-11-01

    Organizations such as the military, hazardous materials units, first responders and industries involved in the processing and manufacture of chemicals all have requirements for specialized whole body protection for those people in their organizations whose job it is to work with toxic chemicals on a day to day basis or in emergency situations. Currently, excluding chemical biological (CB) challenge scenarios, there is no routine monitoring of the possible ingress of toxic chemicals within chemical protective suits. Under existing national standards, swatches of the protective suit fabric are usually tested for chemical breakthrough and if they meet certain criteria, the suit is considered to provide adequate protection to the individual. Despite advances in protection level research provided by full system protective clothing tests, inexpensive, real-time, sensitive and robust chemical monitoring systems for use both under protective clothing and within a challenge environment, remains a technologically deficient area. This paper presents the results of a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of miniature detectors for monitoring real-time volatile organic chemical (VOC) challenges under chemical protective clothing and in closed environments where such suits are used. Nine gas sensors of n-type semiconductor design (Figaro Engineering Inc) were assessed for their response to a dichloromethane concentration of 560 ppm at a temperature of 23 degrees Celsius and relative humidity of 20%. Absolute voltage output, speed of response to dichloromethane exposure, and time required to return to zero, were considered. The top ranked sensor was further evaluated for its calibration response to a range of dichloromethane concentrations up to 560 ppm. Variables that were considered include effect of temperature and relative humidity, hysteresis and repeatability. Increasing RH causes an increase in the zero output of the sensor with an approximate linear relationship. The sensor response was characterized by minimal hysteresis, indicating that calibration values over the short term are very stable. Calibration responses measured on different days were in excellent agreement.

  2. Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong suits up before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong prepares to put on his helmet with the assistance of a spacesuit technician during suiting operations in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building (MSOB) prior to the astronauts' departure to Launch Pad 39A. The three astronauts, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Neil A Armstrong and Michael Collins, will then board the Saturn V launch vehicle, scheduled for a 9:32 a.m. EDT liftoff, for the first manned lunar landing mission.

  3. Non-Venting Thermal and Humidity Control for EVA Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo; Bue, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Future EVA suits need processes and systems to control internal temperature and humidity without venting water to the environment. This paper describes an absorption-based cooling and dehumidification system as well as laboratory demonstrations of the key processes. There are two main components in the system: an evaporation cooling and dehumidification garment (ECDG) that removes both sensible heat and latent heat from the pressure garment, and an absorber radiator that absorbs moisture and rejects heat to space by thermal radiation. This paper discusses the overall design of both components, and presents recent data demonstrating their operation. We developed a design and fabrication approach to produce prototypical heat/water absorbing elements for the ECDG, and demonstrated by test that these elements could absorb heat and moisture at a high flux. Proof-of-concept tests showed that an ECDG prototype absorbs heat and moisture at a rate of 85 W/ft under conditions that simulate operation in an EVA suit. The heat absorption was primarily due to direct absorption of water vapor. It is possible to construct large, flexible, durable cooling patches that can be incorporated into a cooling garment with this system. The proof-of-concept test data was scaled to calculate area needed for full metabolic loads, thus showing that it is feasible to use this technology in an EVA suit. Full-scale, lightweight absorber/radiator modules have also been built and tested. They can reject heat at a flux of 33 W/ft while maintaining ECDG operation at conditions that will provide a cool and dry environment inside the EVA suit.

  4. The Sample Analysis at Mars Investigation and Instrument Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Christopher R.; Conrad, Pamela G.; Arvey, Robert; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Chalmers, Robert A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Errigo, Therese; Farley, Rodger; Feng, Steven; Frazier, Gregory; Glavin, Daniel P.; Harpold, Daniel N.; Jordan, Partick; Kellogg, James; Lewis, Jesse; Martin, David K.; Maurer, John; McAdam, Amy C.; McLennan, Douglas; Pavlov, Alexander A.; Raaen, Eric; Schinman, Oren

    2012-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) addresses the chemical and isotopic composition of the atmosphere and volatiles extracted from solid samples. The SAM investigation is designed to contribute substantially to the mission goal of quantitatively assessing the habitability of Mars as an essential step in the search for past or present life on Mars. SAM is a 40 kg instrument suite located in the interior of MSL's Curiosity rover. The SAM instruments are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a tunable laser spectrometer, and a 6-column gas chromatograph all coupled through solid and gas processing systems to provide complementary information on the same samples. The SAM suite is able to measure a suite of light isotopes and to analyze volatiles directly from the atmosphere or thermally released from solid samples. In addition to measurements of simple inorganic compounds and noble gases SAM will conduct a sensitive search for organic compounds with either thermal or chemical extraction from sieved samples delivered by the sample processing system on the Curiosity rover's robotic arm,

  5. An Ultrafast X-ray Diagnostic Suite for Burning Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin; Stewart, Richard; Steele, Paul; Vernon, Steve; Hsing, Warren; Haynes, Susan

    2011-10-01

    Ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility predict ~1019 neutrons in a time of 15-20 ps. The very short burn time and small size of the burning plasma will require x-ray diagnostics with time resolutions of a few ps and high spatial resolution which can function in extremely large neutron fluxes. One promising solution to this challenge is to perform an ultrafast conversion of the x-ray signals into the optical regime, <100 fs, and to relay image the signal out of the chamber and into a shielded bunker. A diagnostic suite, Grating Actuated Transient Optical Recorder (GATOR), has been developed which uses the ultrafast near-band-edge change in the optical index of refraction of semiconductors caused by x-ray generated free carriers to achieve this goal. The GATOR diagnostic suite has been tested on a laser-produced x-ray source at the Jupiter Laser Facility and the performance of this diagnostic suite, which includes a multi-temporal frame 2-D imager, a continuous-time 1-D imager and a single channel continuous-time recorder, is presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. STS-91 Mission Specialist Ryumin suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-91 Mission Specialist and Russian cosmonaut Valery Victorovitch Ryumin is outfitted with his ascent/reentry flight suit and helmet by two suit technicians in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. The final suit fitting and checkout takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39A. He has been director of the Russian Shuttle-Mir program and flight director for the Salyut-7 and Mir space stations and is a veteran of three space flights with a total of 362 days in space. This will be Ryumin's first visit to Mir. However, his experience with Russian spacecraft in orbit will prove extremely valuable as he helps the crew with Mir equipment transfer operations. He will also be assessing the condition of the station for the Russian space program. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will return to Earth as a STS- 91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir.

  7. The Sample Analysis at Mars Investigation and Instrument Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Chris R.; Cabane, M.; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coll, Patrice; Atreya, Sushil K.; Arvey, Robert; Barciniak, Michael; Benna, Mehdi; Bleacher, L.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Carignan, Daniel; Cascia, Mark; Chalmers, Robert A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Errigo, Therese; Everson, Paula; Franz, Heather; Farley, Rodger; Feng, Steven; Frazier, Gregory; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel P.; Harpold, Daniel N.

    2012-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation of the Mars Science Laboratory(MSL) addresses the chemical and isotopic composition of the atmosphere and volatilesextracted from solid samples. The SAM investigation is designed to contribute substantiallyto the mission goal of quantitatively assessing the habitability of Mars as an essentialstep in the search for past or present life on Mars. SAM is a 40 kg instrument suite locatedin the interior of MSLs Curiosity rover. The SAM instruments are a quadrupole massspectrometer, a tunable laser spectrometer, and a 6-column gas chromatograph all coupledthrough solid and gas processing systems to provide complementary information on thesame samples. The SAM suite is able to measure a suite of light isotopes and to analyzevolatiles directly from the atmosphere or thermally released from solid samples. In additionto measurements of simple inorganic compounds and noble gases SAM will conducta sensitive search for organic compounds with either thermal or chemical extraction fromsieved samples delivered by the sample processing system on the Curiosity rovers roboticarm.

  8. Space suit simulator for partial gravity extravehicular activity experimentation and training

    E-print Network

    Gilkey, Andrea L. (Andrea Lynn)

    2012-01-01

    During human space exploration, mobility is extremely limited when working inside a pressurized space suit. Astronauts perform extensive training on Earth to become accustomed to space suit-imposed high joint torques and ...

  9. son tat molculaire primitif, par suite de l'existence de ce frotte-ment interne ;

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    décrément logarithmique et par suite le frottement interne subissent des accroissements très rapides vers 55443 son état moléculaire primitif, par suite de l'existence de ce frotte- ment interne ; 2° Que le

  10. Astronaut David R. Scott in Launch Complex 16 trailer during suiting up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut David R. Scott, pilot of the Gemini 8 space flight, in the Launch Complex 16 trailer during suiting up operations for the Gemini 8 mission. NASA suit technician Joe Schmitt helps the Astronaut put on his gloves.

  11. Astronaut Neil Armstrong in Launch Complex 16 trailer during suiting up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, command pilot of the Gemini 8 space flight, sits in the Launch Complex 16 trailer during suiting up operations for the Gemini 8 mission. Suit technician Jim Garrepy assists.

  12. A Comparison of FEBio, ABAQUS, and NIKE3D Results for a Suite of Verification Problems

    E-print Network

    Utah, University of

    A Comparison of FEBio, ABAQUS, and NIKE3D Results for a Suite of Verification Problems Steve A, ABAQUS, and NIKE3D for representative problems from the test suite are presented here, showing the nearly

  13. Gemini 7 prime crew during suiting up procedures at Launch Complex 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr. (left), Gemini 7 prime crew pilot, talks with NASA space suit technician Clyde Teague during suiting up procedures at Launch Complex 16, Kennedy Space Center. Lovell wears the new lightweight space suit planned for use during the Gemini 7 mission (61756); Astronaut Frank Borman, comand pilot of the Gemini 7 space flight, undergoes suiting up operations in Launch Complex 16 during prelaunch countdown. Medical biosensors are attached to his scalp (61757).

  14. Introduction to the HPC Challenge Benchmark Suite Jack J. Dongarra Piotr Luszczek

    E-print Network

    Luszczek, Piotr

    Introduction to the HPC Challenge Benchmark Suite Jack J. Dongarra Piotr Luszczek December 13, 2004 Abstract The HPC Challenge suite of benchmarks will exam- ine the performance of HPC architectures using) benchmark used in the Top500 list. The HPC Chal- lenge suite is being designed to augment the Top500 list

  15. Using Hybrid Algorithm For Pareto Efficient Multi-Objective Test Suite Minimisation

    E-print Network

    Singer, Jeremy

    Using Hybrid Algorithm For Pareto Efficient Multi-Objective Test Suite Minimisation Shin Yoo & Mark Harman King's College London, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS, UK Abstract Test suite minimisation techniques seek to reduce the effort required for regression testing by selecting a subset of test suites

  16. Measuring and Improving Latency to Avoid Test Suite Wear Out Shin Yoo & Mark Harman

    E-print Network

    Singer, Jeremy

    Measuring and Improving Latency to Avoid Test Suite Wear Out Shin Yoo & Mark Harman King's College London Centre for Research on Evolution, Search & Testing (CREST) London, UK {shin.yoo, mark introduces the concept of test suite latency. The more latent a test suite, the more it is possible

  17. The Soviet-Russian space suits a historical overview of the 1960's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoog, A. Ingemar; Abramov, Isaac P.; Stoklitsky, Anatoly Y.; Doodnik, Michail N.

    2002-07-01

    The development of protective suits for space use started with the Vostok-suit SK-1, first used by Yu. Gagarin on April 12, 1961, and then used on all subsequent Vostok-flights. The technical background for the design of these suits was the work on full pressure protective suits for military pilots and stratospheric flights in the 1930's through 50's. The Soviet-Russian space programme contains a large number of 'firsts', and one of the most well known is the first EVA by Leonov in 1965. This event is also the starting point for a long series of space suit development for Extravehicular Activities over the last 35 years. The next step to come was the transfer in void space of crew members between the two spacecraft Soyuz 4 and 5 in 1969. As has later become known this was an essential element in the planned Soviet lunar exploration programme, which in itself required a new space suit After the termination of the lunar programme in 1972, the space suit development concentrated on suits applicable to zero-gravity work around the manned space stations Salyut 6, Salyut 7 and MIR. These suits have become known as the ORLAN-family of suits, and an advanced version of this suit (ORLAN-M) will be used on the International Space Station together with the American EMU. This paper covers the space suit development in the Soviet Union in the 1960's and the experience used from the pre-space era.

  18. 46 CFR 160.171-17 - Approval testing for adult size immersion suit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...beginning and end of this period, the basket and suit are weighed underwater. The measured buoyancy of the suit is the difference between...oil is then wiped off and the immersion suit subjected to the leak test prescribed in § 160.171-17(c)(10). The...

  19. 46 CFR 160.171-17 - Approval testing for adult size immersion suit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...beginning and end of this period, the basket and suit are weighed underwater. The measured buoyancy of the suit is the difference between...oil is then wiped off and the immersion suit subjected to the leak test prescribed in § 160.171- 17(c)(10). The...

  20. 46 CFR 160.171-17 - Approval testing for adult size immersion suit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...beginning and end of this period, the basket and suit are weighed underwater. The measured buoyancy of the suit is the difference between...oil is then wiped off and the immersion suit subjected to the leak test prescribed in § 160.171-17(c)(10). The...

  1. NASA CONNECT(TradeMark): Space Suit Science in the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, William B.; Giersch, Chris; Bensen, William E.; Holland, Susan M.

    2003-01-01

    NASA CONNECT's(TradeMark) program titled Functions and Statistics: Dressed for Space initially aired on Public Broadcasting Stations (PBS) nationwide on May 9, 2002. The program traces the evolution of past space suit technologies in the design of space suits for future flight. It serves as the stage to provide educators, parents, and students "space suit science" in the classroom.

  2. 46 CFR 160.171-17 - Approval testing for adult size immersion suit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Approval testing for adult size immersion suit. 160.171-17...160.171-17 Approval testing for adult size immersion suit. Caution: During...subject in the water. (a) General. An adult size immersion suit must be tested...

  3. 46 CFR 160.171-17 - Approval testing for adult size immersion suit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Approval testing for adult size immersion suit. 160.171-17...160.171-17 Approval testing for adult size immersion suit. Caution: During...subject in the water. (a) General. An adult size immersion suit must be tested...

  4. A Novel Method for Breath Capture Inside a Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather; Filburn, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Any non-robotic mission to the Mars surface will need to rely on various life support technologies. The large metabolic generation rate and low tolerance to elevated levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the Mars atmosphere make CO2 removal one of the preeminent tasks in this domain. In addition, these same features provide a strong impetus for using regenerable CO2 removal technologies. In the past, many of these regenerable technologies have relied on the low partial pressure CO2 surrounding the vehicle to provide an ultimate sink for removing this gas contaminant, however any Mars mission will have to overcome the presence of the Mars atmosphere. This paper describes the investigation of methods to capture the exhaled CO2 from a suited crewmember before it becomes diluted with the high volumetric air flow present within the space suit. Typical expired air contains CO2 partial pressures in the range of 20-35 mm Hg. This research investigated methods to capture this high partial pressure CO2 prior to its dilution with the low partial pressure CO2 ventilation flow. Specifically the research looked at potential designs for a collection cup for use inside the space suit helmet. This collection cup should not be considered the same as a breathing mask typical of that worn by firefighters, etc. Instead, the collection cup is a non-contact device that makes use of detailed analyses of the ventilation flow environment within the helmet. The research used a detailed Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) code called Fluent to provide modeling of the various gas species (CO2, water vapor, O2) as they pass through a helmet. This same model was used to numerically evaluate several different collection cup designs for this same CO2 segregation effort.

  5. STS-87 Pilot Steven W. Lindsey suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-87 Pilot Steven Lindsey dons his launch and entry suit with the help of two assistants in the Operations and Checkout Building. Shortly, he and the five other crew members of STS-87 will depart for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff on a 16-day mission to perform microgravity and solar research. Although this is his first Shuttle flight, Lindsey has logged more than 2,700 hours of flying time in 49 different types of aircraft.

  6. STS-104 Commander Lindsey suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-104 Commander Steven W. Lindsey gets help donning his launch and entry suit before heading to the launch pad. This launch will be his third space flight. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-104 is targeted for 5:04 a.m., July 12, from Launch Pad 39B. The primary payload on the mission is the joint airlock module, which will be added to the International Space Station. The airlock will be the primary path for Space Station spacewalk entry and departure for U.S. spacesuits, and will also support the Russian Orlan spacesuit for EVA activity.

  7. STS-107 Mission Specialist David Brown suits up for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Mission Specialist David Brown waves as he completes suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

  8. The SECO suite of codes for site Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Roache, P.J. [Ecodynamics Research Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Modeling for Performance Assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP ) has led to development of the SECO suite of codes for groundwater flow, particle tracking, and transport. Algorithm and code developments include the following areas: facilitation of grid convergence tests in multiple domains; correct treatment of transmissivity factors for unconfined aquifers; efficient multigrid algorithms; a formulation of brine Darcy flow equations that uses freshwater head as the dependent able; boundary-fitted coordinates; temporal high order particle tracking; an efficient and accurate implicit Finite Volume TVD algorithm for radionuclide transport in (possibly) fractured porous media; accurate calculation of advection via a flux-based modified method of characteristics; and Quality Assurance procedures.

  9. STS-110 M.S. Smith suits up for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-110 Mission Specialist Steven Smith relaxes during suit fit, which is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide flight crews an opportunity to participate in simulated launch countdown activities. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day mission will feature Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet.

  10. Space Suit Technologies Protect Deep-Sea Divers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Working on NASA missions allows engineers and scientists to hone their skills. Creating devices for the high-stress rigors of space travel pushes designers to their limits, and the results often far exceed the original concepts. The technologies developed for the extreme environment of space are often applicable here on Earth. Some of these NASA technologies, for example, have been applied to the breathing apparatuses worn by firefighters, the fire-resistant suits worn by racecar crews, and, most recently, the deep-sea gear worn by U.S. Navy divers.

  11. STS-105 Commander Horowitz has launch suit fitted during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-105 Commander Scott Horowitz finishes with suit check before heading to Launch Pad 39A. The STS-105 and Expedition Three crews are at Kennedy Space Center participating in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, a dress rehearsal for launch. The activities includes emergency egress training, a simulated launch countdown and familiarization with the payload. Mission STS-105 will be transporting the Expedition Three crew, several payloads and scientific experiments to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. The Expedition Two crew members currently on the Station will return to Earth on Discovery. The mission is scheduled to launch no earlier than Aug. 9, 2001

  12. STS-101 Pilot Horowitz suits up before launch.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-101 Pilot Scott J. Horowitz gets help suiting up before heading to Launch Pad 39A and launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station.

  13. STS-87 Commander Kevin R. Kregel suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-87 Commander Kevin Kregel sits in his launch and entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building holding a cap of his sons soccer team of which Kregel is the coach. Shortly, he and the five other crew members of STS-87 will depart for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff on a 16-day mission to perform microgravity and solar research. A veteran of two space flights (STS-70 and -78), Kregel has logged more than 618 hours in space.

  14. STS-110 M.S. Ochoa suits up for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-110 Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa relaxes during suit fit, part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide flight crews an opportunity to participate in simulated launch countdown activities. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day mission will feature Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet.

  15. Analysis of a Radiation Model of the Shuttle Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brooke M.; Nealy, John E.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Qualls, Garry D.; Wilson, John W.

    2003-01-01

    The extravehicular activity (EVA) required to assemble the International Space Station (ISS) will take approximately 1500 hours with 400 hours of EVA per year in operations and maintenance. With the Space Station at an inclination of 51.6 deg the radiation environment is highly variable with solar activity being of great concern. Thus, it is important to study the dose gradients about the body during an EVA to help determine the cancer risk associated with the different environments the ISS will encounter. In this paper we are concerned only with the trapped radiation (electrons and protons). Two different scenarios are looked at: the first is the quiet geomagnetic periods in low Earth orbit (LEO) and the second is during a large solar particle event in the deep space environment. This study includes a description of how the space suit's computer aided design (CAD) model was developed along with a description of the human model. Also included is a brief description of the transport codes used to determine the total integrated dose at several locations within the body. Finally, the results of the transport codes when applied to the space suit and human model and a brief description of the results are presented.

  16. A new angle on lunar ferroan-suite differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    Small fragments of rock found among soil particles in sample 67513 from Station 11 on the southern rim of North Ray Crater at Apollo 16 yield information regarding the mafic, ferroan rocks from which they drive. We have identified a set of particles that have distinctive trace element geochemistry and whose bulk and mineral compositions indicate a genetic relationship to one another. These include polymict as well as monomict lithologies. Igneous members range from fragments with abundant anorthite to some with abundant exsolved pigeonite and augite. Consideration of this set of rock fragments, combined with mafic ferroan clasts from large breccias and from lunar-highlands meteorites suggests that there may be separate differentiation trends within the ferroan suite which are subparallel and which are less steem in Fe-Mg vs. An fractionation that the vertical trend obtained when the entire ferroan suite is taken together. This may result from a complex magma system with isolated reservoirs or separate, independently evolving magmas. Mineral compositional and textural variations are consistent with a model set forth by Longhi and Boudreau wherein the anorthite-rich samples reflect adcumulus growth with mafic crystals forming only from trapped liquid, and the more mafic samples by anorthite and pyroxene orthocumulate development.

  17. STS-93 M.S. Hawley suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.)gets help donning his launch and entry suit from a suit tech. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X- ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Hawley, Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission.

  18. Species differentiation of a diverse suite of Bacillus spores by mass spectrometry-based protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Danielle N; La Duc, Myron T; Haskins, William E; Gornushkin, Igor; Winefordner, James D; Powell, David H; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the versatility of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) protein profiling for the species differentiation of a diverse suite of Bacillus spores. MALDI-TOFMS protein profiles of 11 different strains of Bacillus spores, encompassing nine different species, were evaluated. Bacillus species selected for MALDI-TOFMS analysis represented the spore-forming bacterial diversity of typical class 100K clean room spacecraft assembly facilities. A one-step sample treatment and MALDI-TOFMS preparation were used to minimize the sample preparation time. A library of MALDI-TOFMS spectra was created from these nine Bacillus species, the most diverse protein profiling study of the genus reported to date. Linear correlation analysis was used to successfully differentiate the MALDI-TOFMS protein profiles from all strains evaluated in this study. The MALDI-TOFMS protein profiles were compared with 16S rDNA sequences for their bacterial systematics and molecular phylogenetic affiliations. The MALDI-TOFMS profiles were found to be complementary to the 16S rDNA analysis. Proteomic studies of Bacillus subtilis 168 were pursued to identify proteins represented by the biomarker peaks in the MALDI-TOFMS spectrum. Four small, acid-soluble proteins (A, B, C, and D), one DNA binding protein, hypothetical protein ymf J, and four proteins associated with the spore coat and spore coat formation (coat JB, coat F, coat T, and spoIVA) were identified. The ability to visualize higher-molecular-mass coat proteins (10 to 25 kDa) as well as smaller proteins (<10 kDa) with MALDI-TOFMS profiling is critical for the complete and effective species differentiation of the Bacillus genus. PMID:14711677

  19. Species Differentiation of a Diverse Suite of Bacillus Spores by Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Danielle N.; La Duc, Myron T.; Haskins, William E.; Gornushkin, Igor; Winefordner, James D.; Powell, David H.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the versatility of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) protein profiling for the species differentiation of a diverse suite of Bacillus spores. MALDI-TOFMS protein profiles of 11 different strains of Bacillus spores, encompassing nine different species, were evaluated. Bacillus species selected for MALDI-TOFMS analysis represented the spore-forming bacterial diversity of typical class 100K clean room spacecraft assembly facilities. A one-step sample treatment and MALDI-TOFMS preparation were used to minimize the sample preparation time. A library of MALDI-TOFMS spectra was created from these nine Bacillus species, the most diverse protein profiling study of the genus reported to date. Linear correlation analysis was used to successfully differentiate the MALDI-TOFMS protein profiles from all strains evaluated in this study. The MALDI-TOFMS protein profiles were compared with 16S rDNA sequences for their bacterial systematics and molecular phylogenetic affiliations. The MALDI-TOFMS profiles were found to be complementary to the 16S rDNA analysis. Proteomic studies of Bacillus subtilis 168 were pursued to identify proteins represented by the biomarker peaks in the MALDI-TOFMS spectrum. Four small, acid-soluble proteins (A, B, C, and D), one DNA binding protein, hypothetical protein ymf J, and four proteins associated with the spore coat and spore coat formation (coat JB, coat F, coat T, and spoIVA) were identified. The ability to visualize higher-molecular-mass coat proteins (10 to 25 kDa) as well as smaller proteins (<10 kDa) with MALDI-TOFMS profiling is critical for the complete and effective species differentiation of the Bacillus genus. PMID:14711677

  20. Enhanced Verification Test Suite for Physics Simulation Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, J R; Brock, J S; Brandon, S T; Cotrell, D L; Johnson, B; Knupp, P; Rider, W; Trucano, T; Weirs, V G

    2008-10-10

    This document discusses problems with which to augment, in quantity and in quality, the existing tri-laboratory suite of verification problems used by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of verification analysis is demonstrate whether the numerical results of the discretization algorithms in physics and engineering simulation codes provide correct solutions of the corresponding continuum equations. The key points of this document are: (1) Verification deals with mathematical correctness of the numerical algorithms in a code, while validation deals with physical correctness of a simulation in a regime of interest. This document is about verification. (2) The current seven-problem Tri-Laboratory Verification Test Suite, which has been used for approximately five years at the DOE WP laboratories, is limited. (3) Both the methodology for and technology used in verification analysis have evolved and been improved since the original test suite was proposed. (4) The proposed test problems are in three basic areas: (a) Hydrodynamics; (b) Transport processes; and (c) Dynamic strength-of-materials. (5) For several of the proposed problems we provide a 'strong sense verification benchmark', consisting of (i) a clear mathematical statement of the problem with sufficient information to run a computer simulation, (ii) an explanation of how the code result and benchmark solution are to be evaluated, and (iii) a description of the acceptance criterion for simulation code results. (6) It is proposed that the set of verification test problems with which any particular code be evaluated include some of the problems described in this document. Analysis of the proposed verification test problems constitutes part of a necessary--but not sufficient--step that builds confidence in physics and engineering simulation codes. More complicated test cases, including physics models of greater sophistication or other physics regimes (e.g., energetic material response, magneto-hydrodynamics), would represent a scientifically desirable complement to the fundamental test cases discussed in this report. The authors believe that this document can be used to enhance the verification analyses undertaken at the DOE WP Laboratories and, thus, to improve the quality, credibility, and usefulness of the simulation codes that are analyzed with these problems.

  1. Laboratory validation of the IMEEDS nuclear detection suite

    SciTech Connect

    Bandong, B. B.; Volpe, A. M.

    1998-12-17

    There are naturally occurring radionuclides in the ocean that are derived from cosmic ray interaction in the atmosphere and weathering of crustal rocks on land and under the sea. In addition, man-made radioisotopes are present as a consequence of mining, processing, enrichment, re-processing and testing of fissile nuclear material. The distribution of radioisotopes in natural waters is a function of the chemical properties of the elements and the physico-chemical properties of the medium (Harvey et al., 1990; von Gunten and Benes, 1995). To improve analytical detection levels, the sampling system described in this report is capable of processing hundreds of liters of seawater rapidly, and isolating, or pre-concentrating radionuclides found on particle, colloidal and dissolved phases. Results for a variety of trace elements and radiocesium in river and coastal waters processed through this sampler system are described in a companion report (Field Test of the Radionuclide Sampling System). The previous report discussed fraction of elements and radionuclides between the dissolved and solid phases in natural waters that show large salinity and turbidity variation. The following report describes results for laboratory tests using identical natural waters that were spiked with a broad suite of traceable reference gamma-emitting radioisotopes. These isotopes are man-made, and they are found in natural waters only as a consequence of human activity. The spiked water samples were processed through the sampler system, and radionuclides in the solid and dissolved phases were analyzed directly by gamma spectrometry without further extraction using mineral acids and solvents. Radioisotope abundance in the different samples provide additional information on partitioning in the environment, as well as the efficiency, or effective recovery of isotopes in waters processed through the sampler. The objective of this test is to quantify extraction efficiency for a suite of radioisotopes spiked in real water samples. Previous work has described instrument detection levels (IDL) for various isotopes and y-ray detectors, and measurement of low background levels (1 O s femtoCuries/Liter) of radiocesium (Cs-137) in natural waters using this sampler system. This test expands the extraction efficiency and MDL determination for a larger suite of man-made radioisotopes that are typically absent in most natural waters.

  2. Interaction of Space Suits with Windblown Soil: Preliminary Mars Wind Tunnel Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Bratton, C.; Kosmo, J.; Trevino, R.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments in the Mars Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center show that under Mars conditions, spacesuit materials are highly susceptible to dust contamination when exposed to windblown soil. This effect was suspected from knowledge of the interaction of electrostatically adhesive dust with solid surfaces in general. However, it is important to evaluate the respective roles of materials, meteorological and radiation effects, and the character of the soil. The tunnel permits evaluation of dust contamination and sand abrasion of space suits by simulating both pressure and wind conditions on Mars. The long-term function of space suits on Mars will be primarily threatened by dust contamination. Lunar EVA activities caused heavy contamination of space suits, but the problem was never seriously manifest because of the brief utilization of the suits, and the suits were never reused. Electrostatically adhering dust grains have various detrimental effects: (1) penetration and subsequent wear of suit fabrics, (2) viewing obscuration through visors and scratching/pitting of visor surfaces, (3) penetration, wear, and subsequent seizing-up of mechanical suit joints, (4) changes in albedo and therefore of radiation properties of external heat-exchanger systems, (5) changes in electrical conductivity of suit surfaces which may affect tribocharging of suits and create spurious discharge effects detrimental to suit electronics/radio systems. Additional information is contained in the original.

  3. Don/Doff support stand for use with rear entry space suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J. (Inventor); Tri, Terry O. (Inventor); Spenny, William E. (Inventor); West, Philip R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A don/doff support stand for use with rear entry space suits is disclosed. The support stand is designed for use in one-g environments; however, certain features of the stand can be used on future space-craft, lunar or planetary bases. The present invention has a retainer which receives a protruding lug fixed on the torso section of the space suit. When the lug is locked in the retainer, the space suit is held in a generally upright position. In a one-g environment a portable ladder is positioned adjacent to the rear entry of the space suit supported by the stand. The astronaut climbs up the ladder and grasps a hand bar assembly positioned above the rear entry. The astronaut then slips his legs through the open rear entry and down into the abdominal portion of the suit. The astronaut then lowers himself fully into the suit. The portable ladder is then removed and the astronaut can close the rear entry door. The lug is then disengaged from the retainer and the astronaut is free to engage in training exercises in the suit. When suit use is over, the astronaut returns to the stand and inserts the lug into the retainer. A technician repositions the ladder. The astronaut opens the rear entry door, grasps the hand bar assembly and does a chin-up to extricate himself from the suit. The astronaut climbs down the movable ladder while the suit is supported by the stand.

  4. Model for Predicting the Performance of Planetary Suit Hip Bearing Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew S.; Margerum, Sarah; Hharvill, Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2012-01-01

    Designing a space suit is very complex and often requires difficult trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. During the development period of the suit numerous design iterations need to occur before the hardware meets human performance requirements. Using computer models early in the design phase of hardware development is advantageous, by allowing virtual prototyping to take place. A virtual design environment allows designers to think creatively, exhaust design possibilities, and study design impacts on suit and human performance. A model of the rigid components of the Mark III Technology Demonstrator Suit (planetary-type space suit) and a human manikin were created and tested in a virtual environment. The performance of the Mark III hip bearing model was first developed and evaluated virtually by comparing the differences in mobility performance between the nominal bearing configurations and modified bearing configurations. Suited human performance was then simulated with the model and compared to actual suited human performance data using the same bearing configurations. The Mark III hip bearing model was able to visually represent complex bearing rotations and the theoretical volumetric ranges of motion in three dimensions. The model was also able to predict suited human hip flexion and abduction maximums to within 10% of the actual suited human subject data, except for one modified bearing condition in hip flexion which was off by 24%. Differences between the model predictions and the human subject performance data were attributed to the lack of joint moment limits in the model, human subject fitting issues, and the limited suit experience of some of the subjects. The results demonstrate that modeling space suit rigid segments is a feasible design tool for evaluating and optimizing suited human performance. Keywords: space suit, design, modeling, performance

  5. Is the Weibull distribution really suited for wind statistics modeling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobinski, Philippe; Coulais, Corentin; Jourdier, Bénédicte

    2014-05-01

    Wind speed statistics is generally modeled using the Weibull distribution. This distribution is convenient since it fully characterizes analytically with only two parameters (the shape and scale parameters) the shape of distribution and the different moments of the wind speed. However, the Weibull distribution is based on empirical rather than physical justification and might display strong limitations for its applications. In this article, we analyze wind speed distributions of meteorological stations and report that they deviate from the Weibull distribution. We further investigate wind components rather than the wind speed statistic. This approach provides more physical insights on the validity domain of the Weibull distribution as a possible relevant model for wind statistics and the quantification of the error made by using such a distribution. We thereby propose alternative expressions of more suited wind speed distribution by using super-statistical distributions.

  6. STS-95 Pilot Steve Lindsey suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Pilot Steven W. Lindsey tests his flight suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. The final fitting takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39B. Targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, the mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  7. STS-98 MS Jones suits up before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- While donning his launch and entry suit, STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas Jones holds a reminder that the crew will be in space on Valentine'''s Day during the 11-day mission. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle'''s robotic arm. Three spacewalks, by Curbeam and Jones, are required to complete the planned construction work during the mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA'''s Space Shuttle program.

  8. Court rules against failed viatical firm in investor suit.

    PubMed

    1999-10-01

    A Federal appeals court has revived a claim against Dignity Partners Inc., a viatical business, and offshoot of a financial-services firm. Dignity Partners operated by buying the life insurance policies of terminally ill people. The company was charged with making false and misleading statements in its prospectus for an initial public stock offering. Five months later, the company announced that it would not accept new customers with AIDS, a group which represented 95 percent of its accounts at that time. The company had information from researchers and clinicians that the introduction of protease inhibitors would greatly increase life expectancy for its customers and would reduce company profits. This information was not generally available to potential investors. The suit against the company alleges violations of the Securities Act of 1933 and the Exchange Act of 1934, both which govern stock trading. PMID:11367028

  9. STS-89 Commander Terrence W. Wilcutt suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-89 Commander Terrence Wilcutt smiles as he completes the donning of his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. A veteran of two space flights, he has logged more than 512 hours in space. He served as pilot on STS-68 and STS-79. He and six fellow crew members will soon depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour will lift off during a launch window that opens at 9:43 p.m. EST, Jan. 22. STS-89 is the eighth of nine planned missions to dock the Space Shuttle with Russia's Mir space station.

  10. Cycle life machine for AX-5 space suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenberger, Deborah S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to accurately test the AX-5 space suit, a complex series of motions needed to be performed which provided a unique opportunity for mechanism design. The cycle life machine design showed how 3-D computer images can enhance mechanical design as well as help in visualizing mechanisms before manufacturing them. In the early stages of the design, potential problems in the motion of the joint and in the four bar linkage system were resolved using CAD. Since these problems would have been very difficult and tedious to solve on a drawing board, they would probably not have been addressed prior to fabrication, thus limiting the final design or requiring design modification after fabrication.

  11. STS-93 Mission Specialist Cady Coleman suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    For the third time, during final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) dons her launch and entry suit. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 and 22 launch attempts were scrubbed, the launch was again rescheduled for Friday, July 23, at 12:24 a.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Coleman, and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission.

  12. Development of an optical fiber engine sensor suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mark S.; Spillman, William B., Jr.

    1996-10-01

    For many years, programs have focused on single optical fiber sensors for each measurement required on an engine. Sensor systems therefore required signal processing for each of these individual sensors. While this approach provided the best individual sensor for each measurement, the system cost and complexity suffered. BFGoodrich has begun a new program focused on developing an optical fiber engine sensor suite based on one single sensing mechanism to monitor the majority of the measurements on an engine. The sensors will be optically multiplexed to a single signal processing unit thereby reducing cost, weight and size for the overall system. This program is a joint effort among three BFGoodrich divisions: Aircraft Sensors Division (Rosemount Aerospace), Aircraft Integrated Systems Division and Engine Electrical Systems Division. The program is described and results to date on choosing and developing the single sensing mechanism are presented.

  13. STS-81 Mission Specialist Peter Wisoff suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-81 Mission Specialist Peter J. K. 'Jeff' Wisoff prepares for the fifth Shuttle- Mir docking as he waits in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building for the operation to fit him into his launch/entry suit to be completed. He conducted a spacewalk on his on his first Shuttle mission, STS- 57 and holds a doctorate degree in applied physics with an emphasis on lasers and semiconductor materials. He and five crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis will lift off during a 7-minute window that opens at 4:27 a.m. EST, January 12.

  14. PGTools: A Software Suite for Proteogenomic Data Analysis and Visualization.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Shivashankar H; Waddell, Nicola; Madugundu, Anil K; Wood, Scott; Jones, Alun; Mandyam, Ramya A; Nones, Katia; Pearson, John V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2015-05-01

    We describe PGTools, an open source software suite for analysis and visualization of proteogenomic data. PGTools comprises applications, libraries, customized databases, and visualization tools for analysis of mass-spectrometry data using combined proteomic and genomic backgrounds. A single command is sufficient to search databases, calculate false discovery rates, group and annotate proteins, generate peptide databases from RNA-Seq transcripts, identify altered proteins associated with cancer, and visualize genome scale peptide data sets using sophisticated visualization tools. We experimentally confirm a subset of proteogenomic peptides in human PANC-1 cells and demonstrate the utility of PGTools using a colorectal cancer data set that led to the identification of 203 novel protein coding regions missed by conventional proteomic approaches. PGTools should be equally useful for individual proteogenomic investigations as well as international initiatives such as chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP). PGTools is available at http://qcmg.org/bioinformatics/PGTools . PMID:25760677

  15. User Guide for the STAYSL PNNL Suite of Software Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2013-02-27

    The STAYSL PNNL software suite provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist of the reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations.

  16. Advanced Design Heat PumpRadiator for EVA Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Passow, Christian; Phillips, Scott; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Absorption cooling using a LiCl/water heat pump can enable lightweight and effective thermal control for EVA suits without venting water to the environment. The key components in the system are an absorber/radiator that rejects heat to space and a flexible evaporation cooling garment that absorbs heat from the crew member. This paper describes progress in the design, development, and testing of the absorber/radiator and evaporation cooling garment. New design concepts and fabrication approaches will significantly reduce the mass of the absorber/radiator. We have also identified materials and demonstrated fabrication approaches for production of a flexible evaporation cooling garment. Data from tests of the absorber/radiator s modular components have validated the design models and allowed predictions of the size and weight of a complete system.

  17. Test suite for evaluating performance of multithreaded MPI communication.

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, R.; Gropp, W.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Illinois

    2009-12-01

    As parallel systems are commonly being built out of increasingly large multicore chips, application programmers are exploring the use of hybrid programming models combining MPI across nodes and multithreading within a node. Many MPI implementations, however, are just starting to support multithreaded MPI communication, often focussing on correctness first and performance later. As a result, both users and implementers need some measure for evaluating the multithreaded performance of an MPI implementation. In this paper, we propose a number of performance tests that are motivated by typical application scenarios. These tests cover the overhead of providing the MPI-THREAD-MULTIPLE level of thread safety for user programs, the amount of concurrency in different threads making MPI calls, the ability to overlap communication with computation, and other features. We present performance results with this test suite on several platforms (Linux cluster, Sun and IBM SMPs) and MPI implementations (MPICH2, Open MPI, IBM, and Sun).

  18. STS-88 Mission Specialist James Newman suits up before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-88 Mission Specialist James H. Newman takes part in a complete suit check before launch. Newman holds a toy dog, 'Pluto,' representing the crew nickname Dog Crew 3 and Newman's nickname, Pluto. Mission STS-88 is expected to launch at 3:56 a.m. EST with the six-member crew aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Dec. 3. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module, which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is expected to last 11 days, 19 hours and 49 minutes, landing at 10:17 p.m. EST on Dec. 14.

  19. Occupational exposure of midwives to nitrous oxide on delivery suites

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, K; Matthews, I; Adisesh, A; Hutchings, A

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To compare environmental and biological monitoring of midwives for nitrous oxide in a delivery suite environment. Methods: Environmental samples were taken over a period of four hours using passive diffusion tubes. Urine measurements were taken at the start of the shift and after four hours. Results: Environmental levels exceeded the legal occupational exposure standards for nitrous oxide (100 ppm over an 8 hour time weighted average) in 35 of 46 midwife shifts monitored. There was a high correlation between personal environmental concentrations and biological uptake of nitrous oxide for those midwives with no body burden of nitrous oxide at the start of a shift, but not for others. Conclusions: Greater engineering control measures are needed to reduce daily exposure to midwives to below the occupational exposure standard. Further investigation of the toxicokinetics of nitrous oxide is needed. PMID:14634189

  20. Obstructive sleep apnea and sedation in the endoscopy suite.

    PubMed

    Moos, Daniel D

    2006-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at risk of mortality and morbidity related to the administration of sedatives, anesthetics, and opioids. Commonly employed sedatives and analgesics promote pharyngeal collapse and alter normal respiratory responses to obstruction and apnea. Literature concerning patients with obstructive sleep apnea undergoing moderate and deep sedation in the endoscopy suite is lacking. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a review of normal airway patency, the effects of obstructive sleep apnea on airway patency, and the impact that analgesics and sedatives may impart on the airway of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The goal of this article is to increase awareness, stimulate discussions within the gastroenterological community, and encourage research regarding sedation in this at-risk population. PMID:17273012

  1. Scalable sensing electronics towards a motion capture suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Daniel; Gisby, Todd A.; Xie, Shane; Anderson, Iain A.

    2013-04-01

    Being able to accurately record body motion allows complex movements to be characterised and studied. This is especially important in the film or sport coaching industry. Unfortunately, the human body has over 600 skeletal muscles, giving rise to multiple degrees of freedom. In order to accurately capture motion such as hand gestures, elbow or knee flexion and extension, vast numbers of sensors are required. Dielectric elastomer (DE) sensors are an emerging class of electroactive polymer (EAP) that is soft, lightweight and compliant. These characteristics are ideal for a motion capture suit. One challenge is to design sensing electronics that can simultaneously measure multiple sensors. This paper describes a scalable capacitive sensing device that can measure up to 8 different sensors with an update rate of 20Hz.

  2. Elbow and knee joint for hard space suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    An elbow or knee joint for a hard space suit or similar usage is formed of three serially connected rigid sections which have truncated spherical configurations. The ends of each section form solid geometric angles, and the sections are interconnected by hermetically sealed ball bearings. The outer two sections are fixed together for rotation in a direction opposite to rotation of the center section. A preferred means to make the outer sections track each other in rotation comprises a rotatable continuous bead chain which engages sockets circumferentially spaced on the facing sides of the outer races of the bearings. The joint has a single pivot point and the bearing axes are always contained in a single plane for any articulation of the joint. Thus flexure of the joint simulates the coplanar flexure of the knee or elbow and is not susceptible to lockup.

  3. STS-101 Pilot Horowitz suits up for second launch attempt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-101 Pilot Scott J. Horowitz smiles while he finishes suiting up before heading a second time to Launch Pad 39A for launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis. The previous day's launch attempt was scrubbed due to high cross winds at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. Liftoff is targeted for 3:52 p.m. EDT. The mission is expected to last about 10 days, with Atlantis landing at KSC Saturday, May 6, about 11:53 a.m. EDT.

  4. STS-101 Pilot Horowitz suits up for third launch attempt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-101 Pilot Scott J. Horowitz gets help suiting up before heading a third time to Launch Pad 39A and launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis. The previous two launch attempts were scrubbed due to high cross winds at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This is the third assembly flight to the Space Station. After the 10-day mission, Atlantis is expected to land at KSC May 6 at about 12:03 p.m. EDT.

  5. STS-102 MS Voss suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - -- While suiting up in the Operations and Checkout Building, Mission Specialist James Voss shows his support of International Women'''s Day, March 8, with a sign in both Cyrillic and English. Voss is also part of a crew, known as Expedition One, who will be replacing Expedition One on the International Space Station. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. The primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment, Leonardo will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. Discovery is set to launch March 8 at 6:42 a.m. EST. The 12-day mission is expected to end with a landing at KSC on March 20.

  6. STS-84 M.S. Michael Foale suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale laughs during a rare moment of relaxation just a few hours before the scheduled launch. Foale is donning his launch and entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. This will be Foales fourth space flight. Foale and six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on a mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir. Foale will transfer to Mir for an approximate four- month stay, replacing U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger will return to Earth on Atlantis.

  7. STS-83 Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-83 Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt is assisted into his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. He first flew in this capacity on STS-69. He has been a professional deep sea diver and engineer and holds a doctorate in bioengineering. Gernhardt will be in charge of the Blue shift and as flight engineer will operate and maintain the orbiter while Halsell and Still are asleep as members of the Red shift. He will also back them up on the flight deck during the ascent and re- entry phases of the mission. Gernhardt and six fellow crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off during a launch window that opens at 2:00 p.m. EST, April 4.

  8. Development of a Fan for Future Space Suit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul. Heather L.; Converse, David; Dionne, Steven; Moser, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    NASA's next generation space suit system will place new demands on the fan used to circulate breathing gas through the ventilation loop of the portable life support system. Long duration missions with frequent extravehicular activities (EVAs), the requirement for significant increases in reliability and durability, and a mission profile that imposes strict limits on weight, volume and power create the basis for a set of requirements that demand more performance than is available from existing fan designs. This paper describes the development of a new fan to meet these needs. A centrifugal fan was designed with a normal operating speed of approximately 39,400 rpm to meet the ventilation flow requirements while also meeting the aggressive minimal packaging, weight and power requirements. The prototype fan also operates at 56,000 rpm to satisfy a second operating condition associated with a single fan providing ventilation flow to two spacesuits connected in series. This fan incorporates a novel nonmetallic "can" to keep the oxygen flow separate from the motor electronics, thus eliminating ignition potential. The nonmetallic can enables a small package size and low power consumption. To keep cost and schedule within project bounds a commercial motor controller was used. The fan design has been detailed and implemented using materials and approaches selected to address anticipated mission needs. Test data is presented to show how this fan performs relative to anticipated ventilation requirements for the EVA portable life support system. Additionally, data is presented to show tolerance to anticipated environmental factors such as acoustics, shock, and vibration. Recommendations for forward work to progress the technology readiness level and prepare the fan for the next EVA space suit system are also discussed.

  9. Mafic rocks of the Adirondack Highlands: One suite or many

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, P.R. (Geological Survey, Albany, NY (United States). New York State Museum)

    1993-03-01

    Mafic rocks in the granulite facies terrane of the Adirondack Highlands form at least 3 and possibly as many as 6 groups, based on field, petrographic, and geochemical criteria. Most abundant is the olivine metagabbro-amphibolite group (OMA), equivalent to the mafic suite'' of Olson (J. Petrol. 33:471, 1992). OMA occurs in irregular to tabular bodies, locally with intrusive relations, in all major rock types in the E and central Highlands. OMA is strongly olivine normative and forms a continuous differentiation series (Olson, 1992). Plagioclase-two pyroxene-garnet granulites (PGG) form dikes up to several m wide, in anorthositic host rocks. PGG are ferrogabbroic or ferrodioritic and approximately silica saturated. Two subgroups differ sharply in Mg, P, and trace elements. Ferrodiorite and monzodiorite gneisses (FMG), quartz normative and commonly migmatitic, occur in several large bodies in the NE Highlands and as extensive thin sheets in the W and SE Highlands, in association with anorthositic rocks. Three subgroups are distinguishable using Mg/Fe ratios and trace elements. Major element least-squares modeling suggests that both PGG and FMG could be derived by fractionation of gabbroic anorthosite liquids. A differentiation series is not evident, however, and both trace element (Ba, Rb, Sr, Zr and REE) data and normative plagioclase (An [>=] plag. in anorthosite) indicate a more complex origin. One subgroup of FMG may be early cumulates of the mangerite-charnockite suite. The chemistry of OMA, PGG, and FMG reflects their evolved nature and cannot be readily interpreted in terms of magma sources.

  10. An Integrated Suite of Tools to support Human Factors Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques V Hugo

    2001-08-01

    Human Factors Engineering (HFE) work for the nuclear industry imposes special demands on the practitioner in terms of the scope, complexity and safety requirements for humans in nuclear installations. Unfortunately HFE lags behind other engineering disciplines in the development and use of modern, powerful tools for the full range of analysis and design processes. HFE does not appear to be an attractive market for software and hardware developers and as a result, HFE practitioners usually have to rely on inefficient general-purpose tools like standard office software, or they have to use expensive special-purpose tools that offer only part of the solution they require and which also do not easily integrate with other tools. There have been attempts to develop generic software tools to support the HFE analyst and also to achieve some order and consistency in format and presentation. However, in spite of many years of development, very few tools have emerged that have achieved these goals. This would suggest the need for special tools, but existing commercial products have been found inadequate and to date not a single tool has been developed that adequately supports the special requirements of HFE work for the nuclear industry. This paper describes an integrated suite of generic as well as purpose-built tools that facilitate information solicitation, issues tracking, work domain analysis, functional requirements analysis, function allocation, operational sequence analysis, task analysis and development of HSI design requirements. In combination, this suite of tools supports the analytical as well as the representational aspects of key HFE activities primarily for new NPPs, including capturing information from subject matter experts and various source documents directly into the appropriate tool and then linking, analyzing and extending that information further to represent detailed functional and task information, and ultimately HSI design requirements. The paper also describes a tool developed especially for functional requirements analysis, function allocation, and task analysis.

  11. Heat stress of helicopter aircrew wearing immersion suit.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Michel B

    2006-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were to define the lowest ambient air and cabin temperatures at which aircrews wearing immersion protection are starting to experience thermal discomfort and heat stress during flight operations, and to characterize during a flight simulation in laboratory, the severity of the heat stress during exposure to a typical northern summer ambient condition (25 degrees C, 40% RH). Twenty male helicopter aircrews wearing immersion suits (insulation of 2.2 Clo in air) performed 26 flights within an 8-month period at ambient temperatures ranging between -15 and 25 degrees C, and cabin temperatures ranging between 3 and 28 degrees C. It was observed based on thermal comfort ratings that the aircrews were starting to experience thermal discomfort and heat stress at ambient and cabin air conditions above 18 degrees C and at a WBGT index of 16 degrees C. In a subsequent study, seven aircrews dressed with the same clothing were exposed for 140 min to 25 degrees C and 40% RH in a climatic chamber. During the exposure, the aircrews simulated pilot flight maneuvers for 80 min followed with backender/flight engineer activities for 60 min. By the end of the 140 min exposure, the skin temperature, rectal temperature and heart rate had increased significantly to 35.7 +/- 0.2 degrees C, 38.4 +/- 0.2 degrees C and between 110 and 160 beats/min depending on the level of physical activity. The body sweat rate averaged 0.58 kg/h and the relative humidity inside the clothing was at saturation by the end of the exposure. It was concluded that aircrews wearing immersion suits during the summer months in northern climates might experience thermal discomfort and heat stress at ambient or cabin air temperature as low as 18 degrees C. PMID:16922187

  12. Comparing apples and oranges: the Community Intercomparison Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip; Kershaw, Philip; Pascoe, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Visual representation and comparison of geoscientific datasets presents a huge challenge due to the large variety of file formats and spatio-temporal sampling of data (be they observations or simulations). The Community Intercomparison Suite attempts to greatly simplify these tasks for users by offering an intelligent but simple command line tool for visualisation and colocation of diverse datasets. In addition, CIS can subset and aggregate large datasets into smaller more manageable datasets. Our philosophy is to remove as much as possible the need for specialist knowledge by the user of the structure of a dataset. The colocation of observations with model data is as simple as: "cis col ::" which will resample the simulation data to the spatio-temporal sampling of the observations, contingent on a few user-defined options that specify a resampling kernel. As an example, we apply CIS to a case study of biomass burning aerosol from the Congo. Remote sensing observations, in-situe observations and model data are shown in various plots, with the purpose of either comparing different datasets or integrating them into a single comprehensive picture. CIS can deal with both gridded and ungridded datasets of 2, 3 or 4 spatio-temporal dimensions. It can handle different spatial coordinates (e.g. longitude or distance, altitude or pressure level). CIS supports both HDF, netCDF and ASCII file formats. The suite is written in Python with entirely publicly available open source dependencies. Plug-ins allow a high degree of user-moddability. A web-based developer hub includes a manual and simple examples. CIS is developed as open source code by a specialist IT company under supervision of scientists from the University of Oxford and the Centre of Environmental Data Archival as part of investment in the JASMIN superdatacluster facility.

  13. Comparing apples and oranges: the Community Intercomparison Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip; Pascoe, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Visual representation and comparison of geoscientific datasets presents a huge challenge due to the large variety of file formats and spatio-temporal sampling of data (be they observations or simulations). The Community Intercomparison Suite attempts to greatly simplify these tasks for users by offering an intelligent but simple command line tool for visualisation and colocation of diverse datasets. In addition, CIS can subset and aggregate large datasets into smaller more manageable datasets. Our philosophy is to remove as much as possible the need for specialist knowledge by the user of the structure of a dataset. The colocation of observations with model data is as simple as: "cis col ::" which will resample the simulation data to the spatio-temporal sampling of the observations, contingent on a few user-defined options that specify a resampling kernel. CIS can deal with both gridded and ungridded datasets of 2, 3 or 4 spatio-temporal dimensions. It can handle different spatial coordinates (e.g. longitude or distance, altitude or pressure level). CIS supports both HDF, netCDF and ASCII file formats. The suite is written in Python with entirely publicly available open source dependencies. Plug-ins allow a high degree of user-moddability. A web-based developer hub includes a manual and simple examples. CIS is developed as open source code by a specialist IT company under supervision of scientists from the University of Oxford as part of investment in the JASMIN superdatacluster facility at the Centre of Environmental Data Archival.

  14. Shoulder Injuries in US Astronauts Related to EVA Suit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, R. A.; McCulloch, P.; Van Baalen, Mary; Minard, Charles; Watson, Richard; Blatt, T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: For every one hour spent performing extravehicular activity (EVA) in space, astronauts in the US space program spend approximately six to ten hours training in the EVA spacesuit at NASA-Johnson Space Center's Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL). In 1997, NASA introduced the planar hard upper torso (HUT) EVA spacesuit which subsequently replaced the existing pivoted HUT. An extra joint in the pivoted shoulder allows increased mobility but also increased complexity. Over the next decade a number of astronauts developed shoulder problems requiring surgical intervention, many of whom performed EVA training in the NBL. This study investigated whether changing HUT designs led to shoulder injuries requiring surgical repair. Methods: US astronaut EVA training data and spacesuit design employed were analyzed from the NBL data. Shoulder surgery data was acquired from the medical record database, and causal mechanisms were obtained from personal interviews Analysis of the individual HUT designs was performed as it related to normal shoulder biomechanics. Results: To date, 23 US astronauts have required 25 shoulder surgeries. Approximately 48% (11/23) directly attributed their injury to training in the planar HUT, whereas none attributed their injury to training in the pivoted HUT. The planar HUT design limits shoulder abduction to 90 degrees compared to approximately 120 degrees in the pivoted HUT. The planar HUT also forces the shoulder into a forward flexed position requiring active retraction and extension to increase abduction beyond 90 degrees. Discussion: Multiple factors are associated with mechanisms leading to shoulder injury requiring surgical repair. Limitations to normal shoulder mechanics, suit fit, donning/doffing, body position, pre-existing injury, tool weight and configuration, age, in-suit activity, and HUT design have all been identified as potential sources of injury. Conclusion: Crewmembers with pre-existing or current shoulder injuries or certain anthropometric body types should conduct NBL EVA training in the pivoted HUT.

  15. A full-pressure space suit with bailout capabilities for experimental suborbital vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de León, Pablo; Williamson, Mark R.

    2007-02-01

    This paper discusses the development of a full-pressure space suit to be used in the Argentine Gauchito suborbital space vehicle. Rationales for providing full-pressure suits with bailout capabilities for both crew and passengers are first discussed. Mishaps during past US and Russian space missions are also presented to show how the hazards of reentry and landing can be mitigated by a robust space suit with bailout capabilities. Results from the testing of the suit's helmet, enclosure mechanisms, gloves, cooling system, thermal garment, and mobility range are presented followed by a description of the suit's emergency operating procedures. Testing of the suit culminated in an altitude chamber and a high-altitude glider flight.

  16. Characterization of a lower-body exoskeleton for simulation of space-suited locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Christopher E.; Newman, Dava J.

    2008-02-01

    In a previous analysis of suited and unsuited locomotion energetics, we found evidence that space suits act as springs during running. Video images from the lunar surface suggest that knee torques create, in large part, this spring effect. We hypothesized that a lower-body exoskeleton, properly constructed, could be used to simulate the knee torques of a range of space suits. Here we report characterization of a lower-body exoskeleton. Equivalent spring stiffness of each exoskeleton leg varies as a function of exoskeleton knee angle and load, and the exoskeleton joint-torque relationship closely matches the current NASA space suit, or Extravehicular Mobility Unit, knee torques in form and magnitude. We have built an exoskeleton with two physical non-linear springs, which achieve space-suit like joint-torques. Therefore space-suit legs act as springs, with this effect most pronounced when locomotion requires large changes in knee flexion such as during running.

  17. The Soviet-Russian space suits a historical overview of the 1960's.

    PubMed

    Skoog, A Ingemar; Abramov, Isaac P; Stoklitsky, Anatoly Y; Doodnik, Michail N

    2002-01-01

    The development of protective suits for space use started with the Vostok-suit SK-1, first used by Yu. Gagarin on April 12, 1961, and then used on all subsequent Vostok-flights. The technical background for the design of these suits was the work on full pressure protective suits for military pilots and stratospheric flights in the 1930's through 50's. The Soviet-Russian space programme contains a large number of 'firsts', and one of the most well known is the first EVA by Leonov in 1965. This event is also the starting point for a long series of space suit development for Extravehicular Activities over the last 35 years. The next step to come was the transfer in void space of crew members between the two spacecraft Soyuz 4 and 5 in 1969. As has later become known this was an essential element in the planned Soviet lunar exploration programme, which in itself required a new space suit. After the termination of the lunar programme in 1972, the space suit development concentrated on suits applicable to zero-gravity work around the manned space stations Salyut 6, Salyut 7 and MIR. These suits have become known as the ORLAN-family of suits, and an advanced version of this suit (ORLAN-M) will be used on the International Space Station together with the American EMU. This paper covers the space suit development in the Soviet Union in the 1960's and the experience used from the pre-space era. PMID:12583369

  18. Back view of test subject modeling uprated Apollo A6L pressure suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Back view of test subject modeling the uprated Apollo A6L pressure suit manufactured by International Latex Corporation, under contract to NASA. The suit incorporates changes recommended by the Apollo Review Board. The outer surface is of Beta fabric. The patches on shoulders, elbows, knees and back are of metal fiber cloth. The Beta fabric is made by Owens-Corning Fiberglass Corporation. The nylon fabric used in the suit was made by Dupont.

  19. Designing for the Future: The New Open Suite of Programs and Peer

    E-print Network

    Charette, André

    1 Designing for the Future: The New Open Suite of Programs and Peer Review Process Table.................................................................................................................... 9 Overview of the Architecture ...........................................................................................................15 Overview of the Architecture

  20. Heat stress and a countermeasure in the Shuttle rescueman's suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerr, D. F.; Reed, H.; Convertino, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    Rescue of the astronaut flight crew from a contingency landing may risk exposure of the rescue crew to toxic propellants spilling from potentially ruptured tanks in the crew module area. An Aquala dry diver's suit has been in service by the rescue team to preclude exposure, especially in the water rescue scenario. Heat stress has become a factor of concern in recent years when older and less physically-fit team members work in this suit. Methods: Field testing was initiated using fully instrumented rescue men in a simulated scenario to determine the extent of heat stress. Two tests were accomplished, one in the normal (N) configuration and one with a proposed cooling countermeasure, the Steele vest (S). Results: Heat stress was high as indicated by average rectal temperatures (Tre) of 38.28 degrees C(100.9 degrees F) after the 45 minute protocol. Slopes of the regression equations describing the increase in Tre with time were greater (P less than 0.05) with N (0.073 plus or minus .008) compared to S (0.060 plus or minus .007). Projection of time to the 38.89 degree C (102 degree F) limit was increased by 15.3 percent with the vest. Mean skin temperature (Tsk) was higher (P less than 0.05) in N (38.33 plus or minus .11 degrees C) compared to S (34.33 plus or minus .39 degrees C). Average heart rate was higher (P less than 0.05 in N than S. Sweat loss, as measured by weight loss, was more (P less than 0.05) for N (1.09 plus or minus .09 kg versus 0.77 plus or minus .06 kg). Air usage, while slightly less for S, was not statistically different. Conclusion: The use of the cool vest provided significant relief from thermal stress in spite of the addition of 3.4 kg (7.5 pounds) weight and some loss in mobility.

  1. STS-95 Pilot Lindsey suits up during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Pilot Steven W. Lindsey suits up in the Operations and Checkout Building prior to his trip to Launch Pad 39-B. Lindsey and the rest of the STS-95 crew are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) which includes mission familiarization activities, emergency egress training, and a simulated main engine cutoff. The other crew members are Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai (M.D., Ph.D.), representing the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, representing the European Space Agency (ESA), Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, and Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown. The STS-95 mission, targeted for liftoff on Oct. 29, includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process. Following the TCDT, the crew will be returning to Houston for final flight preparations.

  2. STS-97 MS Marc Garneau suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-97 Mission Specialist Marc Garneau, who is with the Canadian Space Agency, waves after donning his launch and entry suit. This is his third Shuttle flight. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. It is transporting the P6 Integrated Truss Structure that comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The solar arrays are mounted on a '''blanket''' that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. The 11-day mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. The Station'''s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity.. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST.

  3. STS-95 Mission Specialist Robinson suits up during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, with the help of Carlos Gillis, of Lockheed Martin, suits up in the Operations and Checkout Building prior to his trip to Launch Pad 39-B. Robinson and the rest of the STS-95 crew are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) which includes mission familiarization activities, emergency egress training, and a simulated main engine cutoff. The other crew members are Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai (M.D., Ph.D.), representing the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, representing the European Space Agency (ESA), Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, and Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown. The STS-95 mission, targeted for liftoff on Oct. 29, includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process. Following the TCDT, the crew will be returning to Houston for final flight preparations.

  4. Comprehensive pharmaceutical services in the surgical suite and recovery room.

    PubMed

    Keicher, P A; McAllister, J C

    1985-11-01

    The operation of a pharmacy satellite located within the operating suite of a large university hospital is described. The satellite provides comprehensive services 24 hours a day, seven days a week to the staff of the operating room (OR), recovery room, and anesthesia department. Kits of anesthetic agents and other drugs used by the anesthetist and surgeon are prepared for each surgical procedure. The pharmacy staff also prepares i.v. admixtures, cardioplegic solutions, and specialized preparations as needed for surgery and provides drugs and i.v. admixture services to the recovery room for postoperative patients. Controlled substances are signed out to the anesthetist as needed in the particular kits and are issued as single doses upon request to the recovery room. All pharmacy charges to patients in the OR are done directly from the pharmacy satellite using a computer charging system. The decentralized pharmacy satellite has substantially reduced drug loss and waste, improved drug delivery to patients, increased revenue for the institution, reduced drug inventory, improved controlled-drug distribution and accountability, improved clinical services, and eased the nursing workload by reassigning drug-related responsibilities to the pharmacy department. The OR pharmacy satellite is a viable cost-effective operation. PMID:4073062

  5. A modular suite of hardware enabling spaceflight cell culture research.

    PubMed

    Hoehn, Alexander; Klaus, David M; Stodieck, Louis S

    2004-03-01

    BioServe Space Technologies, a NASA Research Partnership Center (RPC), has developed and operated various middeck payloads launched on 23 shuttle missions since 1991 in support of commercial space biotechnology projects. Modular cell culture systems are contained within the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA) suite of flight-qualified hardware, compatible with Space Shuttle, SPACEHAB, Spacelab and International Space Station (ISS) EXPRESS Rack interfaces. As part of the CGBA family, the Isothermal Containment Module (ICM) incubator provides thermal control, data acquisition and experiment manipulation capabilities, including accelerometer launch detection for automated activation and thermal profiling for culture incubation and sample preservation. The ICM can accommodate up to 8 individually controlled temperature zones. Command and telemetry capabilities allow real-time downlink of data and video permitting remote payload operation and ground control synchronization. Individual cell culture experiments can be accommodated in a variety of devices ranging from 'microgravity test tubes' or standard 100 mm Petri dishes, to complex, fed-batch bioreactors with automated culture feeding, waste removal and multiple sample draws. Up to 3 levels of containment can be achieved for chemical fixative addition, and passive gas exchange can be provided through hydrophobic membranes. Many additional options exist for designing customized hardware depending on specific science requirements. PMID:16145798

  6. Performance of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, L.; Long, C.; Wu, X.; Evans, R.; Beck, C. T.; Petropavlovskikh, I.; McConville, G.; Yu, W.; Zhang, Z.; Niu, J.; Beach, E.; Hao, Y.; Pan, C.; Sen, B.; Novicki, M.; Zhou, S.; Seftor, C.

    2014-05-01

    NOAA, through the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program, in partnership with the National Aeronautical and Space Administration, launched the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, a risk reduction and data continuity mission, on 28 October 2011. The JPSS program is executing the S-NPP Calibration and Validation program to ensure that the data products comply with the requirements of the sponsoring agencies. The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) consists of two telescopes feeding three detectors measuring solar radiance scattered by the Earth's atmosphere directly and solar irradiance by using diffusers. The measurements are used to generate estimates of total column ozone and vertical ozone profiles for use in near-real-time applications and extension of ozone climate data records. The calibration and validation efforts are progressing well, and both Level 1 (Sensor Data Records) and Level 2 (Ozone Environmental Data Records) have advanced to release at Provisional Maturity. This paper provides information on the product performance over the first 22 months of the mission. The products are evaluated through the use of internal consistency analysis techniques and comparisons to other satellite instrument and ground-based products. The initial performance finds total ozone showing negative bias of 2 to 4% with respect to correlative products and ozone profiles often within ±5% in the middle and upper stratosphere of current operational products. Potential improvements in the measurements and algorithms are identified. These will be implemented in coming months to reduce the differences further.

  7. STS-105 Commander Horowitz suits up for another launch attempt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-105 Commander Scott Horowitz is helped with his launch and entry suit for the second launch attempt after a 24-hour weather delay. Launch countdown activities for the 12-day mission were called off at about 5:12 p.m. Aug. 9 during the T-9 minute hold due to the high potential for lightning, a thick cloud cover and the potential for showers. Launch is currently scheduled for 5:15 p.m. EDT Aug. 10. Highlighting the mission will be the rotation of the International Space Station crew, the third flight of an Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module delivering additional scientific racks, equipment and supplies for the Space Station, and two spacewalks. Included in the payload is the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) tank, which will be attached to the Station during the spacewalks. The EAS will be installed on the P6 truss, which holds the Station'''s giant U.S. solar arrays, batteries and the cooling radiators. The EAS contains spare ammonia for the Station'''s cooling system. The three-member Expedition Two crew will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery after a five-month stay on the Station.

  8. Torso sizing ring construction for hard space suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    A hard suit for use in space or diving applications having an adjustable length torso covering that will fit a large variety of wearers is described. The torso covering comprises an upper section and a lower section which interconnect so that the covering will fit wearers with short torsos. One or more sizing rings may be inserted between the upper and lower sections to accommodate larger torso sizes as required. Since access of the astronaut to the torso covering is preferably through an opening in the back of the upper section (which is closed off by the backpack), the rings slant upward-forward from the lower edge of the opening. The lower edge of the upper covering section has a coupler which slants upward-forward from the lower edge of the back opening. The lower torso section has a similarly slanted coupler which may interfit with the upper section coupler to accommodate the smallest torso size. One or more sizing rings may be inserted between the coupler sections of the upper and lower torso sections to accommodate larger torsos. Each ring has an upper coupler which may interfit with the upper section coupler and a lower coupler which may interfit with the lower section coupler.

  9. Advanced Space Suit Portable Life Support Subsystem Packaging Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Robert; Diep, Chuong; Barnett, Bob; Thomas, Gretchen; Rouen, Michael; Kobus, Jack

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) packaging design work done by the NASA and Hamilton Sundstrand in support of the 3 future space missions; Lunar, Mars and zero-g. The goal is to seek ways to reduce the weight of PLSS packaging, and at the same time, develop a packaging scheme that would make PLSS technology changes less costly than the current packaging methods. This study builds on the results of NASA s in-house 1998 study, which resulted in the "Flex PLSS" concept. For this study the present EMU schematic (low earth orbit) was used so that the work team could concentrate on the packaging. The Flex PLSS packaging is required to: protect, connect, and hold the PLSS and its components together internally and externally while providing access to PLSS components internally for maintenance and for technology change without extensive redesign impact. The goal of this study was two fold: 1. Bring the advanced space suit integrated Flex PLSS concept from its current state of development to a preliminary design level and build a proof of concept mockup of the proposed design, and; 2. "Design" a Design Process, which accommodates both the initial Flex PLSS design and the package modifications, required to accommodate new technology.

  10. Model and Processing of Whole-body Tactile Sensor Suit for Human-Robot Contact Interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yukiko Hoshino; Masayuki Inaba; Hirochika Inoue

    1998-01-01

    The function that enables a robot to react when touched by a human is indispensable for a robot which enters our daily life. This paper describes the model and processing of full-body humanoid's tactile sensor suit for the human-robot interaction. The tactile sensor suit is first modeled to make a symbolized tactile data structure. Then conversion and compensation process is

  11. Investigation of equilibria in solution. Determination of equilibrium constants with the HYPERQUAD suite of programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Gans; Antonio Sabatini; Alberto Vacca

    1996-01-01

    A new suite of 10 programs concerned with equilibrium constants and solution equilibria is described. The suite includes data preparation programs, pretreatment programs, equilibrium constant refinement and post-run analysis. Data preparation is facilitated by a customized data editor. The pretreatment programs include manual trial and error data fitting, speciation diagrams, end-point determination, absorbance error determination, spectral baseline corrections, factor analysis

  12. 46 CFR 199.214 - Immersion suits and thermal protective aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Immersion suits and thermal protective aids. 199.214 Section...Vessels § 199.214 Immersion suits and thermal protective aids. (a) Each passenger...section, each passenger vessel must carry a thermal protective aid approved under...

  13. 46 CFR 199.214 - Immersion suits and thermal protective aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Immersion suits and thermal protective aids. 199.214 Section...Vessels § 199.214 Immersion suits and thermal protective aids. (a) Each passenger...section, each passenger vessel must carry a thermal protective aid approved under...

  14. 46 CFR 199.214 - Immersion suits and thermal protective aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Immersion suits and thermal protective aids. 199.214 Section...Vessels § 199.214 Immersion suits and thermal protective aids. (a) Each passenger...section, each passenger vessel must carry a thermal protective aid approved under...

  15. 46 CFR 199.214 - Immersion suits and thermal protective aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Immersion suits and thermal protective aids. 199.214 Section...Vessels § 199.214 Immersion suits and thermal protective aids. (a) Each passenger...section, each passenger vessel must carry a thermal protective aid approved under...

  16. A deterministic electrons and protons transport suite for the study of the Jovian system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francis Badavi; John Nealy; Ryan Norman

    2010-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) developed deterministic suite of transport codes for describing the transport of electrons, photons and protons in condensed media is used to simulate the effects and exposures from spectral distributions typical of electrons and protons trapped in planetary magnetic fields. The suite is made of a coupled electrons\\/ photons deterministic transport procedure (CEPTRN) and a light\\/heavy ions

  17. Information Professionals Stay Free in the MarcEdit Metadata Suite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Terry

    2004-01-01

    This article features MarcEdit, a free, Windows-based, metadata editing software suite that is developed and supported by the author as part of his contribution to the library profession. MarcEdit Suite is a tool that helps one with MARC coding and conversion and to perform database cleanups, to generate temporary electronic journal holdings, or…

  18. The design of temperature control system on air-condition suit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chunlin Tian; Lin Fu

    2010-01-01

    With the development of technology, air-condition suits have been gradually put into practice as a convenient, comfortable clothes. This paper designs a kind of temperature controllable air-condition suit, which uses PID method to control the internal temperature and TEC as endothermic and exothermic components. It is very convenient and good in controlling, which has a good application prospects.

  19. An Experiment in Automatic Generation of Test Suites for Protocols with Verification Technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-claude Fernandez; Claude Jard; Thierry Jéron; César Viho

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe an experiment in automatic generation of test suites for protocol testing. We report the results gained with generation of test suites based on advanced verification techniques applied to a real industrial protocol. In this experiment, several tools have been used: the commercial tool GEODE (VERILOG) was used for the generation of finite state graph models

  20. Evaluating a Suite of Developer Activity Metrics as Measures of Security Vulnerabilities

    E-print Network

    Young, R. Michael

    Evaluating a Suite of Developer Activity Metrics as Measures of Security Vulnerabilities Andrew of developer activity metrics for the purpose of predicting security vulnerabilities. Our suite includes software, including security problems. One can gather information about people and the code they work

  1. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Project Low-Thrust Trajectory Tool Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John W.

    2008-01-01

    The ISPT project released its low-thrust trajectory tool suite in March of 2006. The LTTT suite tools range in capabilities, but represent the state-of-the art in NASA low-thrust trajectory optimization tools. The tools have all received considerable updates following the initial release, and they are available through their respective development centers or the ISPT project website.

  2. Representative Benchmark Suites for Barrier Heights of Diverse Reaction Types and Assessment of Electronic

    E-print Network

    Truhlar, Donald G

    Representative Benchmark Suites for Barrier Heights of Diverse Reaction Types and Assessment #12;Abstract We propose three small sets of barrier heights for heavy-atom transfer, nucleophilic. Each data set consists of 6 barrier heights; we call these small benchmark suites HATBH6, NSBH6

  3. Physiological and engineering study of advanced thermoregulatory systems for extravehicular space suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, J. C.; Hertig, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations of thermal control for extravehicular space suits are reported. The characteristics of independent cooling of temperature and removal of excess heat from separate regions of the body, and the applications of heat pipes in protective suits are discussed along with modeling of the human thermal system.

  4. Development of the DL\\/H-1 full pressure suit for private spaceflight

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pablo de León; Gary L. Harris

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to detail the need for full pressure suits to protect spaceflight participants during the experimental phases of flight testing of new space vehicles. It also details the objectives, historical background, basis for design, problems encountered by the designers and final development of the DL\\/H-1 full pressure suit. It will include justification for its use

  5. 46 CFR 199.214 - Immersion suits and thermal protective aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Immersion suits and thermal protective aids. 199.214 Section...Vessels § 199.214 Immersion suits and thermal protective aids. (a) Each passenger...section, each passenger vessel must carry a thermal protective aid approved under...

  6. 46 CFR 160.171-19 - Approval testing for child size immersion suit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...171-19 Approval testing for child size immersion suit. A child size suit must pass the following...c)(8), except that only six children need be used as test subjects and they can be of either sex. The subjects must be...

  7. 46 CFR 160.171-19 - Approval testing for child size immersion suit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...171-19 Approval testing for child size immersion suit. A child size suit must pass the following...c)(8), except that only six children need be used as test subjects and they can be of either sex. The subjects must be...

  8. 46 CFR 160.171-19 - Approval testing for child size immersion suit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...171-19 Approval testing for child size immersion suit. A child size suit must pass the following...c)(8), except that only six children need be used as test subjects and they can be of either sex. The subjects must be...

  9. 46 CFR 160.171-19 - Approval testing for child size immersion suit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...171-19 Approval testing for child size immersion suit. A child size suit must pass the following...c)(8), except that only six children need be used as test subjects and they can be of either sex. The subjects must be...

  10. 46 CFR 160.171-19 - Approval testing for child size immersion suit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...171-19 Approval testing for child size immersion suit. A child size suit must pass the following...c)(8), except that only six children need be used as test subjects and they can be of either sex. The subjects must be...

  11. Skin Temperatures During Unaided Egress: Unsuited and While Wearing the NASA Launch and Entry or Advanced Crew Escape Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Kristin K.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Greenisen, Michael C.; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2000-01-01

    The two flight suits currently worn by crew members during Shuttle launch and landing, the Launch and Entry Suit (LES) and the Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES), are designed to protect crew members in the case of emergency. Although the Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG) worn under the flight suits was designed to counteract the heat storage of the suits, the suits may increase thermal stress and limit the astronaut's egress capabilities. The purpose of this study was to assess the thermal loads experienced by crew members during a simulated emergency egress before and after spaceflight. Comparisons of skin temperatures were made between the preflight unsuited and suited conditions. between the pre- and postflight suited conditions, and between the two flight suits.

  12. An AOTF-LDTOF Spectrometer Suite for In Situ Organic Detection and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, Nancy J.; Glenar, D.; Voelz, D.; Xiao, X.; Tawalbeh, R.; Boston, P.; Brinckerhoff, W.; Mahaffy, P.; Getty, S.

    2010-10-01

    On future surface missions to Mars, small bodies, and outer solar system satellites, increasingly robust sample screening and selection may be essential for achieving the maximum scientific benefit within limited payload resources. One approach to defining a sequence of analysis steps for a variety of missions is the identification of key organic functional groups by a spectroscopic prescreening tool, followed by organic compound analysis with mass spectrometric methods. We discuss the development of a miniature near-infrared point spectrometer, operating in the 1.7-4 micron region, based on acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) technology. This instrument may be used to screen and corroborate analyses of samples containing organic biomarkers or mineralogical signatures suggestive of extant or extinct organic material collected in situ from planetary surfaces. The AOTF point spectrometer will be paired with a laser desorption time-of-flight (LDTOF) mass spectrometer and will prescreen samples for evidence of volatile or refractory organics before the laser desorption step and subsequent mass spectrometer measurement. AOTF systems provide great flexibility, being very compact, electronically programmable, with low power requirements. The LDTOF mass spectrometer provides pulsed-laser desorption and analysis of refractory organic compounds up to > 5,000 Da on a spatial scale of 10-30 mm, determined by the laser spot size at the target. We describe the prototype AOTF point spectrometer instrument and present laboratory analysis of geological samples of known astrobiological importance. An initial mineral and rock sample suite of planetary relevance was used in the laboratory for baseline testing. To this, we added a complement of astrobiologically relevant biosignatures from a variety of well characterized geomicrobial study sites. This work is supported by NASA's ASTID and EPSCoR programs through grant numbers NNX08AY44G and NNX08AV85A, respectively.

  13. Mineralogy, petrology and chemistry of ANT-suite rocks from the lunar highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinz, M.; Keil, K.

    1977-01-01

    Anorthositic-noritic-troctolitic (ANT) rocks are the oldest and most abundant rocks of the lunar surface, and comprise about 90% of the suite of the lunar highlands. Consideration is given to the mineralogy, petrology, bulk chemistry, and origin of ANT-suite rocks. Problems associated in classifying and labeling lunar highland rocks because of textural complexities occurring from impact modifications are discussed. The mineralogy of ANT-suite rocks, dominated by plagioclase, olivine and pyrozene, and containing various minor minerals, is outlined. The petrology of ANT-suite rocks is reviewed along with the major element bulk composition of these rocks, noting that they are extremely depleted in K2O and P2O5. Various models describing the origin of ANT-suite rocks are summarized, and it is suggested that this origin involves a parental liquid of high-alumina basalt with low Fe/Fe+Mg.

  14. A methodology for choosing candidate materials for the fabrication of planetary space suit structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Gilda

    1990-01-01

    A study of space suit structures and materials is under way at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA. The study was initiated by the need for a generation of lightweight space suits to be used in future planetary Exploration Missions. This paper provides a brief description of the Lunar and Mars environments and reviews what has been done in the past in the design and development of fabric, metal, and composite suit components in order to establish criteria for comparison of promising candidate materials and space suit structures. Environmental factors and mission scenarios will present challenging material and structural requirements; thus, a program is planned to outline the methodology used to identify materials and processes for producing candidate space suit structures which meet those requirements.

  15. Micro flame-based detector suite for universal gas sensing.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Thomas Warren; Washburn, Cody M.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Manley, Robert George; Lewis, Patrick Raymond; Miller, James Edward; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Okandan, Murat

    2005-11-01

    A microflame-based detector suit has been developed for sensing of a broad range of chemical analytes. This detector combines calorimetry, flame ionization detection (FID), nitrogen-phosphorous detection (NPD) and flame photometric detection (FPD) modes into one convenient platform based on a microcombustor. The microcombustor consists in a micromachined microhotplate with a catalyst or low-work function material added to its surface. For the NPD mode a low work function material selectively ionizes chemical analytes; for all other modes a supported catalyst such as platinum/alumina is used. The microcombustor design permits rapid, efficient heating of the deposited film at low power. To perform calorimetric detection of analytes, the change in power required to maintain the resistive microhotplate heater at a constant temperature is measured. For FID and NPD modes, electrodes are placed around the microcombustor flame zone and an electrometer circuit measures the production of ions. For FPD, the flame zone is optically interrogated to search for light emission indicative of deexcitation of flame-produced analyte compounds. The calorimetric and FID modes respond generally to all hydrocarbons, while sulfur compounds only alarm in the calorimetric mode, providing speciation. The NPD mode provides 10,000:1 selectivity of nitrogen and phosphorous compounds over hydrocarbons. The FPD can distinguish between sulfur and phosphorous compounds. Importantly all detection modes can be established on one convenient microcombustor platform, in fact the calorimetric, FID and FPD modes can be achieved simultaneously on only one microcombustor. Therefore, it is possible to make a very universal chemical detector array with as little as two microcombustor elements. A demonstration of the performance of the microcombustor in each of the detection modes is provided herein.

  16. EXOFAST: A Fast Exoplanetary Fitting Suite in IDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastman, Jason; Gaudi, B. Scott; Agol, Eric

    2013-01-01

    We present EXOFAST, a fast, robust suite of routines written in IDL that is designed to fit exoplanetary transits and radial velocity variations simultaneously or separately and characterize the parameter uncertainties and covariances with a differential evolution Markov chain Monte Carlo method. We describe how our code incorporates both data sets to derive simultaneously stellar parameters along with the transit and RV parameters, resulting in more self-consistent results on an example fit of the discovery data of HAT-P-3b that is well-mixed in under 5 minutes on a standard desktop computer. We describe in detail how our code works and outline ways in which the code can be extended to include additional effects or generalized for the characterization of other data sets - including non-planetary data sets. We discuss the pros and cons of several common ways to parameterize eccentricity, highlight a subtle mistake in the implementation of MCMC that could bias the inferred eccentricity of intrinsically circular orbits to significantly non-zero results, discuss a problem with IDL''s built-in random number generator in its application to large MCMC fits, and derive a method to analytically fit the linear and quadratic limb darkening coefficients of a planetary transit. Finally, we explain how we achieved improved accuracy and over a factor of 100 improvement in the execution time of the transit model calculation. Our entire source code, along with an easy-to-use online interface for several basic features of our transit and radial velocity fitting, are available online at http://astroutils.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/exofast.

  17. Hazard Analysis for the Mark III Space Suit Assembly (SSA) Used in One-g Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kate; Ross, Amy; Blanco, Raul; Wood, Art

    2012-01-01

    This Hazard Analysis document encompasses the Mark III Space Suit Assembly (SSA) and associated ancillary equipment. It has been prepared using JSC17773, "Preparing Hazard Analyses for JSC Ground Operation", as a guide. The purpose of this document is to present the potential hazards involved in ground (23 % maximum O2, One-g) operations of the Mark III and associated ancillary support equipment system. The hazards listed in this document are specific to suit operations only; each supporting facility (Bldg. 9, etc.) is responsible for test specific Hazard Analyses. A "hazard" is defined as any condition that has the potential for harming personnel or equipment. This analysis was performed to document the safety aspects associated with manned use of the Mark III for pressurized and unpressurized ambient, ground-based, One-g human testing. The hazards identified herein represent generic hazards inherent to all standard JSC test venues for nominal ground test configurations. Non-standard test venues or test specific configurations may warrant consideration of additional hazards analysis prior to test. The cognizant suit engineer is responsible for the safety of the astronaut/test subject, space suit, and suit support personnel. The test requester, for the test supported by the suit test engineer and suited subject, is responsible for overall safety and any necessary Test Readiness Reviews (TRR).

  18. Development of an advanced rocket propellant handler's suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, DonaldF.

    2001-08-01

    Most launch vehicles and satellites in the US inventory rely upon the use of hypergolic rocket propellants, many of which are toxic to humans. These fuels and oxidizers, such as hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide have threshold limit values as low as 0.01 PPM. It is essential to provide space workers handling these agents whole body protection as they are universally hazardous not only to the respiratory system, but the skin as well. This paper describes a new method for powering a whole body protective garment to assure the safety of ground servicing crews. A new technology has been developed through the small business innovative research program at the Kennedy Space Center. Currently, liquid air is used in the environmental control unit (ECU) that powers the propellant handlers suit (PHE). However, liquid air exhibits problems with attitude dependence, oxygen enrichment, and difficulty with reliable quantity measurement. The new technology employs the storage of the supply air as a supercritical gas. This method of air storage overcomes all of three problems above while maintaining high density storage at relatively low vessel pressures (<7000 kPa or ˜1000 psi). A one hour prototype ECU was developed and tested to prove the feasibility of this concept. This was upgraded by the design of a larger supercritical dewar capable of holding 7 Kg of air, a supply which provides a 2 hour duration to the PHE. A third version is being developed to test the feasibility of replacing existing air cooling methodology with a liquid cooled garment for relief of heat stress in this warm Florida environment. Testing of the first one hour prototype yielded data comprobable to the liquid air powered predecessor, but enjoyed advantages of attitude independence and oxygen level stability. Thermal data revealed heat stress relief at least as good as liquid air supplied units. The application of supercritical air technology to this whole body protective ensemble marked an advancement in the state-of-the-art in personal protective equipment. Not only was long duration environmental control provided, but it was done without a high pressure vessel. The unit met human performance needs for attitude independence, oxygen stability, and relief of heat stress. This supercritical air (and oxygen) technology is suggested for microgravity applications in life support such as the Extravehicular Mobility Unit.

  19. Development of an advanced rocket propellant handler's suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerr, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    Most launch vehicles and satellites in the US inventory rely upon the use of hypergolic rocket propellants, many of which are toxic to humans. These fuels and oxidizers, such as hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide have threshold limit values as low as 0.01 PPM. It is essential to provide space workers handling these agents whole body protection as they are universally hazardous not only to the respiratory system, but the skin as well. This paper describes a new method for powering a whole body protective garment to assure the safety of ground servicing crews. A new technology has been developed through the small business innovative research program at the Kennedy Space Center. Currently, liquid air is used in the environmental control unit (ECU) that powers the propellant handlers suit (PHE). However, liquid air exhibits problems with attitude dependence, oxygen enrichment, and difficulty with reliable quantity measurement. The new technology employs the storage of the supply air as a supercritical gas. This method of air storage overcomes all of three problems above while maintaining high density storage at relatively low vessel pressures (<7000 kPa or approximately 1000 psi). A one hour prototype ECU was developed and tested to prove the feasibility of this concept. This was upgraded by the design of a larger supercritical dewar capable of holding 7 Kg of air, a supply which provides a 2 hour duration to the PHE. A third version is being developed to test the feasibility of replacing existing air cooling methodology with a liquid cooled garment for relief of heat stress in this warm Florida environment. Testing of the first one hour prototype yielded data comparable to the liquid air powered predecessor, but enjoyed advantages of attitude independence and oxygen level stability. Thermal data revealed heat stress relief at least as good as liquid air supplied units. The application of supercritical air technology to this whole body protective ensemble marked an advancement in the state-of-the-art in personal protective equipment. Not only was long duration environmental control provided, but it was done without a high pressure vessel. The unit met human performance needs for attitude independence, oxygen stability and relief of heat stress. This supercritical air (and oxygen) technology is suggested for microgravity applications in life support such as the Extravehicular Mobility Unit. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Remelting and Remobilization in a Magmatic Arc: the St Peter Suite, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symington, Neil; Weinberg, Roberto; Hasalová, Pavlina

    2014-05-01

    Thermo-mechanical models of magmatic arcs suggest that intermittent intrusion of magma batches should lead to remelting and remobilization of earlier intrusive rocks as a result of fluctuations in temperature and water content. However, examples of remelting and remobilization of earlier intrusive rocks, formed during arc-building, are surprisingly rare. We investigate the evolution of magmatic rocks of the Palaeoproterozoic St Peter Suite, in the Gawler Craton, South Australia. This suite records multiple intrusions, magma hybridization, and the remelting and remobilization of these intrusions to form migmatites and newly-formed leucocratic magmas. In this paper we detail first how multiple magma batches interact with one another as liquids and mushes during syn-magmatic deformation phases, and then detail the nature of migmatites resulting from anatexis of these same magmatic rocks and the resulting channel ways that allowed for magma remobilization. LA-ICP/MS U/Pb zircon dating yielded crystallization ages of 1647±12 Ma for an early diorite-to-granite suite, and 1604±12 Ma for a later magmatic suite of broadly similar composition. Both these suites underwent anatectic events. Titanite from late-formed leucosomes found within D2 shear zones in the older suite, yielded SHRIMP U/Pb age of 1605±7 Ma, within error of the age of the younger suite. We therefore infer that intrusion, crystallization and remelting/remobilization of this younger suite of rocks occurred within 10-15 M.yr. Thus, the St Peter Suite exposures record many of the key processes expected in arcs, including the prediction that early intrusive arc rocks remelt to form younger more fractionated magmas.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Washout Testing Using Various Inlet Vent Configurations in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korona, F. Adam; Norcross, Jason; Conger, Bruce; Navarro, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Requirements for using a space suit during ground testing include providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout for the suited subject. Acute CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms including headache, dyspnea, lethargy, and eventually unconsciousness or even death. Symptoms depend on several factors including inspired partial pressure of CO2 (ppCO2), duration of exposure, metabolic rate of the subject, and physiological differences between subjects. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis has predicted that the configuration of the suit inlet vent has a significant effect on oronasal CO2 concentrations. The main objective of this test was to characterize inspired oronasal ppCO2 for a variety of inlet vent configurations in the Mark-III suit across a range of workload and flow rates. Data and trends observed during testing along with refined CFD models will be used to help design an inlet vent configuration for the Z-2 space suit. The testing methodology used in this test builds upon past CO2 washout testing performed on the Z-1 suit, Rear Entry I-Suit, and the Enhanced Mobility Advanced Crew Escape Suit. Three subjects performed two test sessions each in the Mark-III suit to allow for comparison between tests. Six different helmet inlet vent configurations were evaluated during each test session. Suit pressure was maintained at 4.3 psid. Suited test subjects walked on a treadmill to generate metabolic workloads of approximately 2000 and 3000 BTU/hr. Supply airflow rates of 6 and 4 actual cubic feet per minute were tested at each workload. Subjects wore an oronasal mask with an open port in front of the mouth and were allowed to breathe freely. Oronasal ppCO2 was monitored real-time via gas analyzers with sampling tubes connected to the oronasal mask. Metabolic rate was calculated from the CO2 production measured by an additional gas analyzer at the air outlet from the suit. Real-time metabolic rate measurements were used to adjust the treadmill workload to meet target metabolic rates. This paper provides detailed descriptions of the test hardware, methodology and results, as well as implications for future inlet vent designs and ground testing.

  2. Overview of the Development for a Suite of Low-Thrust Trajectory Analysis Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kos, Larry D.; Polsgrove, Tara; Hopkins, Randall; Thomas, Dan; Sims, Jon A.

    2006-01-01

    A NASA intercenter team has developed a suite of low-thrust trajectory analysis tools to make a significant improvement in three major facets of low-thrust trajectory and mission analysis. These are: 1) ease of use, 2) ability to more robustly converge to solutions, and 3) higher fidelity modeling and accuracy of results. Due mostly to the short duration of the development, the team concluded that a suite of tools was preferred over having one integrated tool. This tool-suite, their characteristics, and their applicability will be described. Trajectory analysts can read this paper and determine which tool is most appropriate for their problem.

  3. The 2004 knowledge base parametric grid data software suite.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkening, Lisa K.; Simons, Randall W.; Ballard, Sandy; Jensen, Lee A.; Chang, Marcus C.; Hipp, James Richard

    2004-08-01

    One of the most important types of data in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (GNEM R&E) Knowledge Base (KB) is parametric grid (PG) data. PG data can be used to improve signal detection, signal association, and event discrimination, but so far their greatest use has been for improving event location by providing ground-truth-based corrections to travel-time base models. In this presentation we discuss the latest versions of the complete suite of Knowledge Base PG tools developed by NNSA to create, access, manage, and view PG data. The primary PG population tool is the Knowledge Base calibration integration tool (KBCIT). KBCIT is an interactive computer application to produce interpolated calibration-based information that can be used to improve monitoring performance by improving precision of model predictions and by providing proper characterizations of uncertainty. It is used to analyze raw data and produce kriged correction surfaces that can be included in the Knowledge Base. KBCIT not only produces the surfaces but also records all steps in the analysis for later review and possible revision. New features in KBCIT include a new variogram autofit algorithm; the storage of database identifiers with a surface; the ability to merge surfaces; and improved surface-smoothing algorithms. The Parametric Grid Library (PGL) provides the interface to access the data and models stored in a PGL file database. The PGL represents the core software library used by all the GNEM R&E tools that read or write PGL data (e.g., KBCIT and LocOO). The library provides data representations and software models to support accurate and efficient seismic phase association and event location. Recent improvements include conversion of the flat-file database (FDB) to an Oracle database representation; automatic access of station/phase tagged models from the FDB during location; modification of the core geometric data representations; a new multimodel representation for combining separate seismic data models that partially overlap; and a port of PGL to the Microsoft Windows platform. The Data Manager (DM) tool provides access to PG data for purposes of managing the organization of the generated PGL file database, or for perusing the data for visualization and informational purposes. It is written as a graphical user interface (GUI) that can directly access objects stored in any PGL file database and display it in an easily interpreted textual or visual format. New features include enhanced station object processing; low-level conversion to a new core graphics visualization library, the visualization toolkit (VTK); additional visualization support for most of the PGL geometric objects; and support for the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) shape files (which are used to enhance the geographical context during visualization). The Location Object-Oriented (LocOO) tool computes seismic event locations and associated uncertainty based on travel time, azimuth, and slowness observations. It uses a linearized least-squares inversion algorithm (the Geiger method), enhanced with Levenberg-Marquardt damping to improve performance in highly nonlinear regions of model space. LocOO relies on PGL for all predicted quantities and is designed to fully exploit all the capabilities of PGL that are relevant to seismic event location. New features in LocOO include a redesigned internal architecture implemented to enhance flexibility and to support simultaneous multiple event location. Database communication has been rewritten using new object-relational features available in Oracle 9i.

  4. A methodology for assessing blast protection in explosive ordnance disposal bomb suits.

    PubMed

    Bass, Cameron R Dale; Bass, Cameron Dale; Davis, Martin; Rafaels, Karin; Rountree, Mark Steve; Harris, Robert M; Sanderson, Ellory; Andrefsky, Walter; DiMarco, Gina; Zielinski, Michael

    2005-01-01

    To reduce human casualties associated with explosive ordnance disposal, a wide range of protective wear has been designed to shield against the blast effects of improvised explosive devices and munitions. In this study, 4 commercially available bomb suits, representing a range of materials and armor masses, were evaluated against 0.227 and 0.567 kg of spherical C-4 explosives to determine the level of protection offered to the head, neck, and thorax. A Hybrid III dummy, an instrumented human surrogate [1], was tested with and without protection from the 4 commercially available bomb suits. 20 tests with the dummy torso mounted to simulate a kneeling position were performed to confirm repeatability and robustness of the dummies, as well as to evaluate the 4 suits. Correlations between injury risk assessments based on past human or animal injury model data and various parameters such as bomb suit mass, projected area, and dummy coverage area were drawn. PMID:16329779

  5. STUDIES ON THE GOES-R HYPERSPECTRAL ENVIRONMENTAL SUITE (HES) ON , Timothy, J. Schmit

    E-print Network

    Li, Jun

    P1.11 STUDIES ON THE GOES-R HYPERSPECTRAL ENVIRONMENTAL SUITE (HES) ON GOES-R Jun Li * , Timothy, J Environmental Satellite (GOES-R and beyond) will allow for monitoring the evolution of atmospheric profiles

  6. Results of the Particulate Contamination Control Trade Study for Space Suit Life Support Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cognata, Thomas J.; Conger, Bruce; Paul, Heather L.

    2009-01-01

    As the United States plans to return astronauts to the moon and eventually to Mars, designing the most effective, efficient, and robust space suit life support system that will operate successfully in these dusty environments is vital. There is some knowledge of the contaminants and level of infiltration expected from the Lunar and Mars dust, however risk mitigation strategies and filtration designs to prevent contamination within the space suit life support system are still undefined. A trade study was initiated to identify and address these concerns, and to develop new requirements for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support System (PLSS). This trade study investigates historical methods of particulate contamination control in space suits and vehicles, and evaluated the possibility of using commercial technologies for this application. In addition, the trade study examined potential filtration designs. This paper summarizes the results of this trade study.

  7. Evaluation of orientation and environmental factors on the blast hazards to bomb suit wearers.

    PubMed

    Mathis, James T; Clutter, J Keith

    2007-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software for simulation of explosive detonations against the wearer of a typical bomb suit. The focus is to demonstrate the utility of the model to assess the differential overpressure loads on the various bomb suit components protecting critical body parts. Since overpressures can vary significantly depending on the position and orientation of the wearer, simulations are performed for a range of orientations including kneeling and standing at common standoff distances. Overpressure loads on the head, neck, and torso regions are predicted for each orientation, capturing ground and other surface reflections that can enhance effects of the blast. This is not normally observed during tests of individual bomb suit components. Direct correlations between the suit orientation and environmental factors to load enhancements are documented, and an effort to address probable injury is made. PMID:17078920

  8. NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp - Duration: 65 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp prepares students to deal with normal propellant operations, emergency events, and pre-operation planning by engaging studen...

  9. NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp - Duration: 71 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp prepares students to deal with normal propellant operations, emergency events, and pre-operation planning by engaging s...

  10. Rescue Simulation - NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp - Duration: 70 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp prepares students to deal with normal propellant operations, emergency events, and pre-operation planning by engaging studen...

  11. Carlotti Administration Bldg., Suite 001, Kingston, RI 02881 401-874-4576 OF RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Carlotti Administration Bldg., Suite 001, Kingston, RI 02881 401-874-4576 THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND DIVISION OF RESEARCH AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT January 15, 2010 TO: The University Community FROM

  12. Carlotti Administration Bldg., Suite 001, Kingston, RI 02881 401-874-4576 OF RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Carlotti Administration Bldg., Suite 001, Kingston, RI 02881 401-874-4576 THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND DIVISION OF RESEARCH AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT January 5, 2010 TO: The University Community FROM

  13. Requirements and Sizing Investigation for Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System Trace Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Waguespack, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    The Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS), located within the ventilation loop of the Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS), is responsible for removing hazardous trace contaminants from the space suit ventilation flow. This paper summarizes the results of a trade study that evaluated if trace contaminant control could be accomplished without a TCCS, relying on suit leakage, ullage loss from the carbon dioxide and humidity control system, and other factors. Trace contaminant generation rates were revisited to verify that values reflect the latest designs for Constellation Space Suit System (CSSS) pressure garment materials and PLSS hardware. Additionally, TCCS sizing calculations were performed and a literature survey was conducted to review the latest developments in trace contaminant technologies.

  14. Teacher is Space participant Christa McAuliffe during suite/hygiene briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Teacher is Space participant Christa McAuliffe (right) is briefed on her suit and on personal hygiene equipment to be used on the STS 51-L mission. The briefing was conducted by Laura Louviere (center).

  15. An investigation of space suit mobility with applications to EVA operations

    E-print Network

    Schmidt, Patricia Barrett, 1974-

    2001-01-01

    The primary aim of this thesis is to advance the current understanding of astronauts' capabilities and limitations in space-suited extravehicular activity (EVA) by compiling a detailed database of the torques needed to ...

  16. Designing a Suit to Protect Migrant Farm Workers in California from Pesticide Exposure

    E-print Network

    Agogino, Alice M.

    4 Designing a Suit to Protect Migrant Farm Workers in California from Pesticide Exposure By Rupam ..................................................................................................8 1.2 HARMFUL EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES.........................................................................................................19 4.1 PESTICIDE RESISTANCE PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS

  17. available freely to all at bigbangonline.org! new online suite of cosmology codes!

    E-print Network

    available freely to all at bigbangonline.org! new online suite of cosmology codes! Michael Smith in cosmology to explore the details of big bang element synthesis for themselves Community Building - file

  18. Gemini 10 prime crew in suiting trailer during Gemini 10 prelaunch countdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Gemini 10 prime crew, Astronauts John W. Young (background), command pilot, and Michael Collins (foreground), pilot, relax in Launch Complex 16 suiting trailer during the Gemini 10 prelaunch countdown.

  19. Space Suited Crew Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Array A-Z PSE Decoupled

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Shroud (Crew Engineering Mockup) NO. REV. NO. ATM-973 PAGE 1 OF 8 rtems Division DATE Z/9/71 A. INTRCDUC of the shroud with velcro, 8 #12;NO. REV. NO. .-.~ rtems Division Space Suited Crew Engineering Evaluation

  20. Assessment and preliminary model development of shape memory polymers mechanical counter pressure space suits

    E-print Network

    Wee, Brian (Brian J.)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis seeks to assess the viability of a space qualified shape memory polymer (SMP) mechanical counter pressure (MCP) suit. A key development objective identified by the International Space Exploration Coordination ...

  1. 33 CFR 150.518 - What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Emergency and Specialty Equipment Personal Safety Gear § 150.518 What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits? (a) All...

  2. 33 CFR 150.518 - What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Emergency and Specialty Equipment Personal Safety Gear § 150.518 What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits? (a) All...

  3. 33 CFR 150.518 - What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Emergency and Specialty Equipment Personal Safety Gear § 150.518 What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits? (a) All...

  4. 33 CFR 150.518 - What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Emergency and Specialty Equipment Personal Safety Gear § 150.518 What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits? (a) All...

  5. Maximum acceptable inherent buoyancy limit for aircrew/passenger helicopter immersion suit systems.

    PubMed

    Brooks, C J

    1988-12-01

    Helicopter crew and passengers flying over cold water wear immersion suits to provide hypothermic protection in case of ditching in cold water. The suits and linings have trapped air in the material to provide the necessary insulation and are thus very buoyant. By paradox, this buoyancy may be too much for a survivor to overcome in escaping from the cabin of a rapidly sinking inverted helicopter. The Canadian General Standard Board requested that research be conducted to investigate what should be the maximum inherent buoyancy in an immersion suit that would not inhibit escape, yet would provide adequate thermal insulation. This experiment reports on 12 subjects who safely escaped with 146N (33 lbf) of added buoyancy from a helicopter underwater escape trainer. It discusses the logic for and recommendation that the inherent buoyancy in a helicopter crew/passenger immersion suit system should not exceed this figure. PMID:15676666

  6. THE NATIONAL LAWYERS GUILD, LOS ANGELES 3916 SEPULVEDA BLVD., SUITE 105

    E-print Network

    Klein, David

    1 THE NATIONAL LAWYERS GUILD, LOS ANGELES 3916 SEPULVEDA BLVD., SUITE the law, are incorrect. Not only is AMCHA's argument frivolous and legally statute before reaching their decision, but only AMCHA did. It is an astonishing

  7. Understanding human-space suit interaction to prevent injury during extravehicular activity

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Allison P. (Allison Paige)

    2014-01-01

    Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is a critical component of human spaceflight. Working in gas-pressurized space suits, however, causes fatigue, unnecessary energy expenditure, and injury. The problem of injury is particularly ...

  8. The Carmen-Suite: Maya Plisetskaya Challenging Soviet Culture and Policy 

    E-print Network

    Kalashnikova, Anna

    2014-04-24

    On April 20 1967, the Carmen-Suite ballet, starring Maya Plisetskaya in the leading role, premiered in Moscow’s Bolshoi Ballet Theatre. The production was immediately banned by the Soviet Ministry of Culture for perceived ...

  9. Enable an IMS application as a Web service running in IMS Enterprise Suite SOAP

    E-print Network

    the XML converter from COBOL copybooks to be used by the IMS Connect XML adapter. The IMS Enterprise Suite. Checklist for first-time implementation Information or resource Your environment For this tutorial COBOL

  10. Labeled line drawing of launch and entry suit identifies various components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Line drawings illustrate how a crewmember would be seated during space shuttle launch and entry in the mission specialist seat wearing the launch and entry suit (LES), a partial pressure suit. Front and profile drawings are labeled with numbers. The legend for the views includes: 1) Mission Specialist seat; 2) crewman; 3) helmet; 4) anti-exposure / counter pressure garment; 5) boots; 6) parachute harness; 7) parachute pack; 8) life raft with sea dye marker; 9) suit mounted oxygen (O2) manifold; 10) anti-gravity (anti-g) suit controller; 11) emergency O2 supply; 12) seawars; 13) ventilation fan; 14) orbiter O2 line; 15) headset interface unit (HIU); 16) communication (COMM) line to HIU; 17) flotation device. Crew escape system (CES) and LES was designed for STS-26, the return to flight mission, and subsequent missions.

  11. Ediacaran to Cambrian magmatic suites in the Rio Grande do Norte domain, extreme Northeastern Borborema Province (NE of Brazil): Current knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Marcos Antonio Leite; Galindo, Antonio Carlos; de Medeiros, Vladimir Cruz

    2015-03-01

    The Ediacaran-Cambrian plutonic activity is one of the most important geological features of the Rio Grande do Norte Domain (Borborema Province, NE Brazil). It is represented by several batholiths, stocks and dykes. Based on the petrographic, geochemical and geochronological characteristic of different rocks, this plutonic activity can be grouped in six separate suites: shoshonitic (Shos), porphyritic high-K calc-alkaline (PHKCalcAlk), equigranular high K calc-alkaline (EHKCalcAlk), calc-alkaline (CalcAlk), alkaline (Alk) and charnockitic alkaline (ChAlk). Geochemically, the Shos, CalcAlk and Alk suites are differentiated from the others, while ChAlc can be distinguished from the others in some diagrams. The greatest difficulty lies in distinguishing between the chemically similar PHKCalcAlk and EHKCalcAlk. To this end, existing geochronological data as well as related petrographic and textural field aspects may be used to distinguish the two mentioned suites (PHKCalcAlk and EHKCalcAlk). Petrographically, the Shos suite has composition between gabbro/diorite and quartz monzonite. Monzogranites (with subordinate granodiorites and quartz monzonites) predominate in both PHKCalcAlk and EHKCalcAlk. Calc is composed of granodiorites to tonalites. Alc is formed by alkali feldspar granites (with subordinate alkali feldspar quartz syenites and syenogranites), whereas ChAlc has quartz mangerites and charnockites. The suites were emplaced between the Ediacaran (635-541 Ma) and Cambrian (541-485 Ma), predominantly in the Ediacaran, based on 34 U-Pb datings (zircon, titanite, monazite and columbite-tantalite), 17 Rb-Sr (whole rock) and 1 Sm-Nd (total rock and mineral) internal isochrons. The Shos suite has U-Pb ages varying from 599 ± 16 (Poço Verde pluton) to 579 ± 7 (Acari and São João do Sabugi plutons), slightly older than those of the PHKCalcAlk suite, which ranges between 591 ± 4 Ma (Totoró pluton) and 544 ± 7 Ma (São José de Espinharas pluton). The CalcAlk Suite has only one dated body, aged 598 ± 3 Ma (Serra da Garganta pluton). The EHKCalcAlk suite U-Pb dating is younger than the aforementioned suites, ranging from 582 ± 5 Ma (dykes in Dona Inês pluton) and 527 ± 8 (Cerro Corá pluton). The Alk suite was dated at 578 ± 14 Ma (Caxexa pluton, Sm-Nd internal isochron) and at 597 ± 4 Ma (Japi pluton, U-Pb zircon), while ChAlc U-Pb zircon ages of 601 ± 10 Ma and 593 ± 5 Ma (Umarizal pluton). The magmatism of Cambrian age in the Rio Grande do Norte Domain is represented by pegmatite dykes with U-Pb dating between 515 and 510 Ma. Petrograficamente, a Suíte Shos possui composição entre gabros/dioritos e quartzo monzonitos. Na CalcAlcAKP predomina monzogranitos (com granodioritos e quartzo monzonitos, subordinados), semelhante a CalcAlcAKE. A CalcAlc é formada por granodioritos a tonalitos. A Alc é formada por álcali-feldspato granitos (com quartzo álcali-feldspato sienitos e sienogranitos, subordinados), enquanto que a AlcCh tem quartzo mangeritos e charnoquitos. As suítes foram alojadas entre o Ediacarano (635-541 Ma) e o Cambriano (541-485 Ma), predominando no Ediacarano, com base em 34 idades U-Pb (zircão, titanita, monazita e columbita-tantalita), 17 Rb-Sr (rocha total) e 1 isócrona interna Sm-Nd (rocha total e mineral). A Suíte Shos tem idades U-Pb variando de 599 ± 16 (Plúton Poço Verde) a 579 ± 7 (plútons Acari e São João do Sabugi). Esses valores são um pouco mais velhos do que as idades da Suíte CalcAlcAKP que possui valores entre 591 ± 4 Ma (Plúton Totoró) e 544 ± 7 Ma (Plúton São José de Espinharas). A Suíte CalcAlc possui apenas um corpo datado, com idade de 598 ± 3 Ma (Plúton Serra da Garganta). A Suíte CalcAlcAKE possui idades U-Pb mais jovens que as suítes anteriores, com valores entre 582 ± 5 Ma (diques no Plúton Dona Inês) e 527 ± 8 (Plúton Cerro Corá). A Suíte Alc foi datada em 578 ± 14 Ma (Plúton Caxexa, isócrona interna Sm-Nd) e 597 ± 4 Ma (Plúton Japi, U-Pb em zircão), enquanto que a AlcCh foi datada, U-Pb em zircão, em 601 ± 10 Ma e 593 ± 5 Ma (P

  12. PupaSuite: finding functional single nucleotide polymorphisms for large-scale genotyping purposes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucía Conde; Juan M. Vaquerizas; Hernán Dopazo; Leonardo Arbiza; Joke Reumers; Frederic Rousseau; Joost Schymkowitz; Joaquín Dopazo

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a web tool, PupaSuite, for the selection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with potential phenotypic effect, specifically oriented to help in the design of large-scale geno- typing projects. PupaSuite uses a collection of data on SNPs from heterogeneous sources and a large number of pre-calculated predictions to offer a flexi- ble and intuitive interface for selecting an

  13. Ages and petrogenetic significance of igneous mangerite-charnockite suites associated with massif anorthosites, Grenville Province

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald F. Emslie; Patricia A. Hunt

    1990-01-01

    U-Pb ages of zircon fractions of major anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite (AMCG) igneous suites imply that this magmatism inaugurated what is widely regarded as the Grenvillian event between about 1.16 and 1.12 Ga ago over about two-thirds of the Grenville Province east, northeast, and southeast of the Central Metasedimentary Belt. Pre-Grenvillian AMCG suites about 1.36 and 1.64 Ga old have much more restricted

  14. Astronauts Schirra and Stafford in suiting trailer during Gemini 6 prelaunch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr. (leading), command pilot, and Thomas P. Stafford, pilot, leave the suiting trailer at Launch Complex 16 during the Gemini 6 prelaunch countdown (59974); Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr. (seated), command pilot of the Gemini 6 space flight, relaxes in the suiting trailer at Launch Complex 16 during the Gemini 6 prelaunch countdown. He is talking to Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., Chief, Astronaut Office, Manned Spacecraft Center (59975).

  15. Developing a new, passive diffusion sampler suite to detect helium anomalies associated with volcanic unrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, Brittany E.; Solomon, D. Kip; Evans, William C.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.

    2015-03-01

    Helium (He) concentration and 3He/4He anomalies in soil gas and spring water are potentially powerful tools for investigating hydrothermal circulation associated with volcanism and could perhaps serve as part of a hazards warning system. However, in operational practice, He and other gases are often sampled only after volcanic unrest is detected by other means. A new passive diffusion sampler suite, intended to be collected after the onset of unrest, has been developed and tested as a relatively low-cost method of determining He-isotope composition pre- and post-unrest. The samplers, each with a distinct equilibration time, passively record He concentration and isotope ratio in springs and soil gas. Once collected and analyzed, the He concentrations in the samplers are used to deconvolve the time history of the He concentration and the 3He/4He ratio at the collection site. The current suite consisting of three samplers is sufficient to deconvolve both the magnitude and the timing of a step change in in situ concentration if the suite is collected within 100 h of the change. The effects of temperature and prolonged deployment on the suite's capability of recording He anomalies have also been evaluated. The suite has captured a significant 3He/4He soil gas anomaly at Horseshoe Lake near Mammoth Lakes, California. The passive diffusion sampler suite appears to be an accurate and affordable alternative for determining He anomalies associated with volcanic unrest.

  16. Post-collisional magmatism in the central East African Orogen: The Maevarano Suite of north Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodenough, K.M.; Thomas, Ronald J.; De Waele, B.; Key, R.M.; Schofield, D.I.; Bauer, W.; Tucker, R.D.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2010-01-01

    Late tectonic, post-collisional granite suites are a feature of many parts of the Late Neoproterozoic to Cambrian East African Orogen (EAO), where they are generally attributed to late extensional collapse of the orogen, accompanied by high heat flow and asthenospheric uprise. The Maevarano Suite comprises voluminous plutons which were emplaced in some of the tectonostratigraphic terranes of northern Madagascar, in the central part of the EAO, following collision and assembly during a major orogeny at ca. 550 Ma. The suite comprises three main magmatic phases: a minor early phase of foliated gabbros, quartz diorites, and granodiorites; a main phase of large batholiths of porphyritic granitoids and charnockites; and a late phase of small-scale plutons and sheets of monzonite, syenite, leucogranite and microgranite. The main phase intrusions tend to be massive, but with variably foliated margins. New U-Pb SHRIMP zircon data show that the whole suite was emplaced between ca. 537 and 522 Ma. Geochemically, all the rocks of the suite are enriched in the LILE, especially K, and the LREE, but are relatively depleted in Nb, Ta and the HREE. These characteristics are typical of post-collisional granitoids in the EAO and many other orogenic belts. It is proposed that the Maevarano Suite magmas were derived by melting of sub-continental lithospheric mantle that had been enriched in the LILE during earlier subduction events. The melting occurred during lithospheric delamination, which was associated with extensional collapse of the East African Orogen. ?? 2009 Natural Environment Research Council.

  17. Relation of heavy mineral suites to Pleistocene to Holocene shoreline sequences in Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Cocker, M.D. (Georgia Geologic Survey, Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1993-03-01

    The major Pleistocene paleobarrier island complexes recognized on the Georgia coastal plain may represent two distinct shoreline sequences. This is suggested by differences in geomorphology and in heavy mineral suites. The higher and older Talbot, Penholoway, Wicomico, Okefenokee and Waycross complexes are characterized by large, linear, undissected sand bodies. The younger Pamlico, Princess Anne and Silver Bluff complexes consist of small, stubby and complexly dissected sand bodies and are similar to those developed on the Holocene shoreline. The average labile (1.88), ilmenite/leucoxene (1.28), and ZTR (22.07) indices of the three older complexes indicate distinctly more mature heavy mineral suites than the average labile, (8.88) ilmenite/leucoxene (4.54), and ZTR (18.42) indices in the younger complexes. The heavy mineral suites of the older shoreline sequence exhibit little variation in mineralogy. The heavy mineral suites in the younger sequence exhibit a greater range in mineralogy, and the suites change progressively from the Pamlico through the Silver Bluff complexes. Continuation of these trends is evident in the heavy mineral suite of the Holocene deposits. The increasing range in composition also indicates the relatively immaturity of the younger complexes. The difference in heavy mineral content between the older (0.53 wt. %) and the younger (1.33 wt. %) shoreline sequences may result from increased weathering and removal of the labile components during a warm inter-glacial period.

  18. The geochemical nature of the Archean Ancient Gneiss Complex and Granodiorite Suite, Swaziland: a preliminary study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, D.R.; Barker, F.; Millard, H.T., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The Ancient Gneiss Complex (AGC) of Swaziland, an Archean gray gneiss complex, lies southeast and south of the Barberton greenstone belt and includes the most structurally complex and highly metamorphosed portions of the eastern Kaapvaal craton. The AGC is not precisely dated but apparently is older than 3.4 Ga. The AGC consists of three major units: (a) a bimodal suite of closely interlayered siliceous, low-K gneisses and metabasalt; (b) homogeneous tonalite gneiss; and (c) interlayered siliceous microcline gneiss, metabasalt, and minor metasedimentary rocks - termed the metamorphite suite. A geologically younger gabbro-diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite suite, the Granodiorite Suite, is spatially associated with the AGC and intrusive into it. The bimodal suite consists largely of two types of low-K siliceous gneiss: one has SiO2 14%, low Rb/Sr ratios, and depleted heavy rare earth elements (REE's); the other has SiO2 > 75%, Al2O3 < 13%, high Rb/Sr ratios, and relatively abundant REE's except for negative Eu anomalies. The interlayered metabasalt ranges from komatiitic to tholeiitic compositions. Lenses of quartz monzonitic gneiss of K2O/Na2O close to 1 form a minor part of the bimodal suite. Tonalitic to trondhjemitic migmatite locally is abundant and has major-element abundances similar to those of non-migmatitic varieties. The siliceous gneisses of the metamorphic suite show low Al2O, K2O/Na2O ratios of about 1, high Rb/Sr ratios, moderate REE abundances and negative Eu anomalies. K/Rb ratios of siliceous gneisses of the bimodal suite are very low (???130); of the tonalitic gneiss, low (???225); of the siliceous gneiss of the metamorphite suite, moderate (???300); and of the Granodiorite Suite, high (???400). Rocks of the AGC differ geochemically in several ways from the siliceous volcanic and hypabyssal rocks of the Upper Onverwacht Group and from the diapirs of tonalite and trondhjemite that intrude the Swaziland Group. ?? 1978.

  19. Dressing for Altitude: U.S. Aviation Pressure Suits--Wiley Post to Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    Since its earliest days, flight has been about pushing the limits of technology and, in many cases, pushing the limits of human endurance. The human body can be the limiting factor in the design of aircraft and spacecraft. Humans cannot survive unaided at high altitudes. There have been a number of books written on the subject of spacesuits, but the literature on the high-altitude pressure suits is lacking. This volume provides a high-level summary of the technological development and operational use of partial- and full-pressure suits, from the earliest models to the current high altitude, full-pressure suits used for modern aviation, as well as those that were used for launch and entry on the Space Shuttle. The goal of this work is to provide a resource on the technology for suits designed to keep humans alive at the edge of space. Hopefully, future generations will learn from the hard-fought lessons of the past. NASA is committed to the future of aerospace, and a key component of that future is the workforce. Without these men and women, technological advancements would not be possible. Dressing for Altitude is designed to provide the history of the technology and to explore the lessons learned through years of research in creating, testing, and utilizing today s high-altitude suits. It is our hope that this information will prove helpful in the development of future suits. Even with the closeout of the Space Shuttle and the planned ending of the U-2 program, pressure suits will be needed for protection as long as humans seek to explore high frontiers. The NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate is committed to the training of the current and future aerospace workforce. This book and the other books published by the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate are in support of this commitment. Hopefully, you will find this book a valuable resource for many years to come.

  20. Heavy-mineral suites in unconsolidated Paleocene and younger sands, western Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blankenship, Reginald R.

    1956-01-01

    Heavy-mineral suites from unconsolidated sands of Wilcox and Claiborne age (Eocene) in the subsurface of western Tennessee were tabulated and compared with heavy-mineral suites obtained from outcropping sands known to be of Midway (Paleocene) and Wilcox age and younger. In the subsurface at Memphis, both pink and colorless garnet are relatively abundant in the Claiborne but rare in the Wilcox. Garnet, however, is very rare in both the Claiborne and the Wilcox in the subsurface 35 miles northeast of Memphis. The mineral is very rare also in the terrace sands of western Tennessee and in samples of the Pliocene(?) and Pleistocene deposits of the Tennessee River in eastern and western Tennessee. It is possible, therefore, that the relative abundance of the mineral garnet is related to the quantity of sediment received from differing source areas in Wilcox and Claiborne times, but that, owing to the shifting of the axis of the embayment, no one source area furnished all the sediment for any formation. Heavy-mineral suites from Pliocene(?) and Pleistocene terrace deposits of the Tennessee River in both eastern and western Tennessee, and heavy-mineral suites from Pliocene(?) deposits of the Mississippi River are much alike, and the only isotropic mineral noted in these sediments was a very rare green mineral. Heavy-mineral suites from Recent deposits of the Mississippi River at Memphis and reported heavy-mineral suites from Cambrian sandstones of Wisconsin and Minnesota differ greatly from heavy-mineral suites of Pliocene(?) terrace deposits of the Tennessee and Mississippi Rivers and include much pink and colorless garnet. The possibility, therefore, is suggested that the Pliocene(?) terrace deposits of the Mississippi River in western Tennessee were derived largely from the basin of the Tennessee River.

  1. V-SUIT Model Validation Using PLSS 1.0 Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olthoff, Claas

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic portable life support system (PLSS) simulation software Virtual Space Suit (V-SUIT) has been under development at the Technische Universitat Munchen since 2011 as a spin-off from the Virtual Habitat (V-HAB) project. The MATLAB(trademark)-based V-SUIT simulates space suit portable life support systems and their interaction with a detailed and also dynamic human model, as well as the dynamic external environment of a space suit moving on a planetary surface. To demonstrate the feasibility of a large, system level simulation like V-SUIT, a model of NASA's PLSS 1.0 prototype was created. This prototype was run through an extensive series of tests in 2011. Since the test setup was heavily instrumented, it produced a wealth of data making it ideal for model validation. The implemented model includes all components of the PLSS in both the ventilation and thermal loops. The major components are modeled in greater detail, while smaller and ancillary components are low fidelity black box models. The major components include the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) CO2 removal system, the Primary and Secondary Oxygen Assembly (POS/SOA), the Pressure Garment System Volume Simulator (PGSVS), the Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS), the heat exchanger between the ventilation and thermal loops, the Space Suit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) and finally the Liquid Cooling Garment Simulator (LCGS). Using the created model, dynamic simulations were performed using same test points also used during PLSS 1.0 testing. The results of the simulation were then compared to the test data with special focus on absolute values during the steady state phases and dynamic behavior during the transition between test points. Quantified simulation results are presented that demonstrate which areas of the V-SUIT model are in need of further refinement and those that are sufficiently close to the test results. Finally, lessons learned from the modelling and validation process are given in combination with implications for the future development of other PLSS models in V-SUIT.

  2. A deterministic electrons and protons transport suite for the study of the Jovian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis; Nealy, John; Norman, Ryan

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) developed deterministic suite of transport codes for describing the transport of electrons, photons and protons in condensed media is used to simulate the effects and exposures from spectral distributions typical of electrons and protons trapped in planetary magnetic fields. The suite is made of a coupled electrons/ photons deterministic transport procedure (CEPTRN) and a light/heavy ions deterministic transport procedure (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means for rapidly forming numerous repetitive calculations essential for electrons/protons radiation exposure assessments of complex space structures. Several favorable comparisons have been made with statistically oriented Monte Carlo calculations for typical space environment spectra which have indicated that the transport accuracy has not been compromised at the expense of computational speed. For this presentation the radiation environments of the Galilean satellites Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto are used as representative boundary conditions to show the capabilities of the transport suite. The Jovian radiation environment is simulated using the Jet Propulsion Lab. (JPL) GIRE model of 2003. For a limited number of candidate shielding materials, the GIRE produced electrons/protons environments are used as boundary condition to the CEPTRN and HZETRN transport suite to evaluate the particle flux and dose due to electrons and protons at various distances from the planet as a function of latitude, longitude, and altitude.

  3. Flexible Packaging Concept for a Space Suit Portable Life Support Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Gretchen; Dillon, Paul; Oliver, Joe; Zapata, Felipe

    2009-01-01

    Neither the Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), the space suit currently used for space shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) missions, nor the Apollo EMU, the space suit successfully used on previous lunar missions, will satisfy the requirements for the next generation Constellation Program (CxP) lunar suit. The CxP system or Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) must be able to tolerate more severe environmental and use conditions than any previous system. These conditions include missions to the severely cold lunar poles and up to 100 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) excursions without ground maintenance. Much effort is focused on decreasing the mass and volume of the Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) over previous suit designs in order to accommodate the required increase in functionality. This paper documents the progress of a conceptual packaging effort of a flexible backpack for the CSSE PLSS. The flexible backpack concept relies on a foam protection system to absorb, distribute, and dissipate the energy from falls on the lunar surface. Testing and analysis of the foam protection system concept that was conducted during this effort indicates that this method of system packaging is a viable solution.

  4. Radiation Protection Studies of International Space Station Extravehicular Activity Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A. (Editor); Shavers, Mark R. (Editor); Saganti, Premkumar B. (Editor); Miller, Jack (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This publication describes recent investigations that evaluate radiation shielding characteristics of NASA's and the Russian Space Agency's space suits. The introduction describes the suits and presents goals of several experiments performed with them. The first chapter provides background information about the dynamic radiation environment experienced at ISS and summarized radiation health and protection requirements for activities in low Earth orbit. Supporting studies report the development and application of a computer model of the EMU space suit and the difficulty of shielding EVA crewmembers from high-energy reentrant electrons, a previously unevaluated component of the space radiation environment. Chapters 2 through 6 describe experiments that evaluate the space suits' radiation shielding characteristics. Chapter 7 describes a study of the potential radiological health impact on EVA crewmembers of two virtually unexamined environmental sources of high-energy electrons-reentrant trapped electrons and atmospheric albedo or "splash" electrons. The radiological consequences of those sources have not been evaluated previously and, under closer scrutiny. A detailed computational model of the shielding distribution provided by components of the NASA astronauts' EMU is being developed for exposure evaluation studies. The model is introduced in Chapters 8 and 9 and used in Chapter 10 to investigate how trapped particle anisotropy impacts female organ doses during EVA. Chapter 11 presents a review of issues related to estimating skin cancer risk form space radiation. The final chapter contains conclusions about the protective qualities of the suit brought to light form these studies, as well as recommendations for future operational radiation protection.

  5. Thermal Performance Of Space Suit Elements With Aerogel Insulation For Moon And Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Henry H.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.; Trevino, Luis A.

    2006-01-01

    Flexible fiber-reinforced aerogel composites were studied for use as insulation materials of a future space suit for Moon and Mars exploration. High flexibility and good thermal insulation properties of fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composites at both high and low vacuum conditions make it a promising insulation candidate for the space suit application. This paper first presents the results of a durability (mechanical cycling) study of these aerogels composites in the context of retaining their thermal performance. The study shows that some of these Aerogels materials retained most of their insulation performance after up to 250,000 cycles of mechanical flex cycling. This paper also examines the problem of integrating these flexible aerogel composites into the current space suit elements. Thermal conductivity evaluations are proposed for different types of aerogels space suit elements to identify the lay-up concept that may have the best overall thermal performance for both Moon and Mars environments. Potential solutions in mitigating the silica dusting issue related to the application of these aerogels materials for the space suit elements are also discussed.

  6. Main problems of the Russian Orlan-M space suit utilization for EVAs on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, I. P.; Pozdnyakov, S. S.; Severin, G. I.; Stoklitsky, A. Yu.

    2001-03-01

    In the recent years the Russian Orlan-M space suits have been improved as applied to their operational requirements for the ISS. A special attention is paid to enhancement of EVA crew efficiency and safety. The paper considers the main problems regarding specific features of the Russian space suit operation in the ISS, and analyses measures on their solution. In particular, the problems associated with the following are considered: enhancement of the anthropometric range for the EVA crewmembers; use of some US EMU elements and unified NASA equipment elements; Orlan-M operation support in the wide range of the ISS thermal conditions; use of Simplified Aid For Extravehicular activity Rescue (SAFER) designed as a self-rescue device, which will be used for an EVA crewmember return in the event that he (she) breaks away inadvertently from the ISS surface. The paper states the main space suit differences with reference to solution of the above problems. The paper presents briefly the design of space suit arms developed for crewmembers with small anthropometric parameters, as well as peculiarities and test results for the gloves with enhanced thermal protection. Measures on further space suit development with the purpose to improve its performances are considered.

  7. Apollo 15 Mg- and Fe-norites - A redefinition of the Mg-suite differentiation trend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, M. M.; Marvin, U. B.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Apollo 15 highland rocks from the Apennine Front include clasts of mafic plutonic rocks from deep in the lunar crust that were brought to the surface by the Imbrium and Serenitatis impacts. The Apollo 15 norites exhibit wide variations in mineral and bulk compositions and include Fe-norites that plot between the three major pristine rock fields on a diagram of Mg' in mafic minerals vs An in paglioclase. Based on assemblages and compositions of minerals, and on ratios of elemental abundances, it is concluded that these Apollo 15 Fe-norites are differentiated members of the Mg-norite suite. The Apollo 15 and 17 norites and troctolites form a closely related suite of rocks, whose variations in mineral compositions represent the main differentiation trend of the Mg-suite. This trend in mineral compositions has a steeper slope than the previous Mg-suite field. The parent magmas for these Mg-suite rocks formed by partial melting deep in the lunar mantle. Differentiation by fractional crystallization may also have included assimilation of crustal components as the magmas rose from the mantle and crystallized plutons in the lower crust.

  8. Improvement of the extravehicular activity suit for the MIR orbiting station program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severin, G.; Abramov, I.; Svertshek, V.; Stoklitsky, A.

    1996-09-01

    Since 1977, EVA suits of the semi-rigid type have been used to support sorties from Russian orbiting stations. Currently, within the MIR station program, the Orlan-DMA, the latest modification of the Orlan semi-rigid EVA suit is used by crewmembers. Quite some experience has been gained by Russia in operations of the Orlan type suits. It has proved the advantages of the EVA suit of a semi-rigid configuration, featuring donning/doffing through a hinged backpack door with a built-in life support system. Meanwhile there were some wishes and comments from the crewmembers addressed to the enclosure design and some LSS components. Currently a number of ways and methods are being developed to improve operational characteristics of the suit as well as to enhance its reliability and lifetime. The forthcoming EVAs to be performed by the STS-MIR crewmembers and future EVAs from the common airlock of the International Space Station Alpha make implementation of the planned improvements even more consistent. The paper analyzes the experience gained in the Orlan-DMA operation and discusses planned improvements in light of the forthcoming activities. In particular the Orlan enhancement program is aimed to make the donning/doffing easier, enhance enclosure mobility, improve the condensate removal unit, increase the CCC (Contamination Control Cartridge) operation time and simplify the onboard subsystem design concept.

  9. Heat strain and heat stress for workers wearing protective suits at a hazardous waste site.

    PubMed

    Paull, J M; Rosenthal, F S

    1987-05-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of heat stress when full body protective suits are worn, heart rates, oral temperatures and environmental parameters were measured for five unacclimatized male workers (25-33 years of age) who performed sampling activities during hazardous waste clean-up operations. The protective ensembles included laminated PVC-Tyvec chemical resistant hood suits with rubber boots, gloves full facepiece dual cartridge respirators and hard hats. For comparison, measurements also were performed when the men worked at a similar level of activity while they wore ordinary work clothes. A comparison of the heart rates for the men working with and without suits indicated that wearing the suits imposed a heat stress equivalent to adding 6 degrees to 11 degrees C (11 degrees to 20 degrees F) to the ambient WBGT index. A similar result was obtained by calculating the WBGT in the microclimate inside the suits and comparing it to the ambient WBGT. These results indicate the following: 1) there exists a significant risk of heat injury during hazardous waste work when full body protective clothing is worn, and 2) threshold limit values for heat stress established by the ACGIH must be lowered substantially before extending them to cover workers under these conditions. PMID:3591668

  10. Fabrication and performance analysis of a DEA cuff designed for dry-suit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, S.; Camacho Mattos, A.; Barbazza, A.; Soleimani, M.; Boscariol, P.; Menon, C.

    2013-03-01

    A method for manufacturing a cylindrical dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) is presented. The cylindrical DEA can be used in fabricating the cuff area of dry-suits where the garment is very tight and wearing the suit is difficult. When electrically actuated, the DEA expands radially and the suit can be worn more comfortably. In order to study the performance of the DEA, a customized testing setup was designed, and silicone-made cuff samples with different material stiffnesses were tested. Analytical and FEM modeling were considered to evaluate the experimental output. The results revealed that although the stiffness of the DEA material has a direct relationship with the radial constrictive pressure caused by mechanically stretching the DEA, it has a minor effect on the actuation pressure. It was also found that stacking multiple layers of the DEA to fabricate a laminated structure enabled the attainment of a desired variation of pressure required for the implementation of an electrically tunable cuff.

  11. Use of Aquaporins to Achieve Needed Water Purity On ISS for the EMU Space Suit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Terry; Taylor ,Brandon W.

    2012-01-01

    Use of Aquaporins to Achieve Needed Water Purity On ISS for the EMU Space Suit System. With the U.S. Space Shuttle fleet retired, the supply of extremely high-quality water "super-Q" - required for the EMU Space suit cooling on this ISS - will become a significant operational hardware challenge in the very near future. A proposed potential solution is the use of a filtration system consisting of a semi-permeable membrane embedded with aquaporin proteins. Aquaporins are a special class of trans-membrane proteins that facilitate passive transport of water and other substances across a membrane. The specificity of these proteins is such that only water is allowed through the protein structure, and this novel property invites their adaptation for use in water filtration systems, specifically usage on the ISS for the EMU space suit system. These proteins are found in many living systems and have been developed for commercial use today.

  12. Test plan for personnel protective equipment bubble suit decontamination feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Menkhaus, D.E.

    1990-08-01

    This test plan defines the details for performing a study to determine the feasibility of using a shower based system to decontaminate personnel protective equipment (PPE) bubble (encapsulation) suits worn by personnel as they are egressing a mixed-TRU contamination zone. The testing will be performed using an EPA rated Level A fully encapsulating suit. The person directly involved in the suit contamination and shower processes will be provided with Level A protection. This test plan provides a description of the test apparatus, provides details of the tests to be performed, defines the sampling procedures and controls, and defines the analytical methods for the samples collected. The test plan also discusses the data management and the reporting of the test result and the quality assurance and safety requirements for the study. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Defining Constellation Suit Helmet Field of View Requirements Employing a Mission Segment Based Reduction Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane

    2009-01-01

    Field of view has always been a design feature paramount to helmets, and in particular space suits, where the helmet must provide an adequate field of view for a large range of activities, environments, and body positions. For Project Constellation, a different approach to helmet requirement maturation was utilized; one that was less a direct function of body position and suit pressure and more a function of the mission segment in which the field of view will be required. Through taxonimization of various parameters that affect suited field of view, as well as consideration for possible nominal and contingency operations during that mission segment, a reduction process was employed to condense the large number of possible outcomes to only six unique field of view angle requirements that still captured all necessary variables while sacrificing minimal fidelity.

  14. Results and applications of a space suit range-of-motion study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, AL

    1989-01-01

    The range of motion of space suits has traditionally been described using limited 2-D mapping of limb, torso, or arm movements performed in front of an orthogonal grid. A new technique for recovering extra-vehicular (EVA) space suit range-of-motion data during underwater testing was described in a paper presented by the author at the 1988 conference. The new technique uses digitized data which is automatically acquired from video images of the subject. Three-dimensional trajectories are recovered from these data, and can be displayed using 2-D computer graphics. Results of using this technique for the current shuttle EVA suit during underwater simulated weightlessness testing are discussed. Application of the data for use in animating anthropometric computer models is highlighted.

  15. Reach Envelope and Field of Vision Quantification in Mark III Space Suit using Delaunay Triangulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, Andrew F. J.; Thaxton, Sherry S.; Onady, Elizabeth A.; Rajulu, Sudhakar L.

    2006-01-01

    The Science Crew Operations and Utility Testbed (SCOUT) project is focused on the development of a rover vehicle that can be utilized by two crewmembers during extra vehicular activities (EVAs) on the moon and Mars. The current SCOUT vehicle can transport two suited astronauts riding in open cockpit seats. Among the aspects currently being developed is the cockpit design and layout. This process includes the identification of possible locations for a socket to which a crewmember could connect a portable life support system (PLSS) for recharging power, air, and cooling while seated in the vehicle. The spaces in which controls and connectors may be situated within the vehicle are constrained by the reach and vision capabilities of the suited crewmembers. Accordingly, quantification of the volumes within which suited crewmembers can both see and reach relative to the vehicle represents important information during the design process.

  16. Results of the Trace Contaminant Control Trade Study for Space Suit Life Support Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory A.; Paul, Heather L.

    2008-01-01

    As the United States plans to return astronauts to the moon, designing the most effective and efficient life support systems is of extreme importance. The trace contaminant control system (TCCS) will be located within the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) of the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE), and is responsible for removing contaminants, which at increased levels can be hazardous to a crewmember s health. These contaminants come from several sources including metabolic production of the crewmember (breathing, sweating, etc.) and offgassing of the space suit material layers. This paper summarizes the results of a trade study that investigated TCC technologies used in NASA space suits and vehicles as well as commercial and academic applications, to identify the best technology options for the CSSE PLSS. The trade study also looked at the feasibility of regeneration of TCC technologies, specifically to determine the viability of vacuum regeneration for on-back, realtime EVA.

  17. Results of the Trace Contaminant Control Trade Study for Space Suit Life Support Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.

    2009-01-01

    As the United States plans to return astronauts to the moon, designing the most effective and efficient life support systems is of extreme importance. The trace contaminant control system (TCCS) will be located within the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) of the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE), and is responsible for removing contaminants, which at increased levels can be hazardous to a crewmember's health. These contaminants come from several sources including metabolic production of the crewmember (breathing, sweating, etc.) and offgassing of the space suit material layers. This paper summarizes the results of a trade study that investigated TCC technologies used in NASA space suits and vehicles as well as commercial and academic applications, to identify the best technology options for the CSSE PLSS. The trade study also looked at the feasibility of regeneration of TCC technologies, specifically to determine the viability of vacuum regeneration for on-back, real-time EVA.

  18. Pose Measurement Performance of the Argon Relative Navigation Sensor Suite in Simulated Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galante, Joseph M.; Eepoel, John Van; Strube, Matt; Gill, Nat; Gonzalez, Marcelo; Hyslop, Andrew; Patrick, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Argon is a flight-ready sensor suite with two visual cameras, a flash LIDAR, an on- board flight computer, and associated electronics. Argon was designed to provide sensing capabilities for relative navigation during proximity, rendezvous, and docking operations between spacecraft. A rigorous ground test campaign assessed the performance capability of the Argon navigation suite to measure the relative pose of high-fidelity satellite mock-ups during a variety of simulated rendezvous and proximity maneuvers facilitated by robot manipulators in a variety of lighting conditions representative of the orbital environment. A brief description of the Argon suite and test setup are given as well as an analysis of the performance of the system in simulated proximity and rendezvous operations.

  19. A Comparison of Methods for Assessing Space Suit Joint Ranges of Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitchison, Lindsay T.

    2012-01-01

    Through the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program, NASA is attempting to use the vast collection of space suit mobility data from 50 years worth of space suit testing to build predictive analysis tools to aid in early architecture decisions for future missions and exploration programs. However, the design engineers must first understand if and how data generated by different methodologies can be compared directly and used in an essentially interchangeable manner. To address this question, the isolated joint range of motion data from two different test series were compared. Both data sets were generated from participants wearing the Mark III Space Suit Technology Demonstrator (MK-III), Waist Entry I-suit (WEI), and minimal clothing. Additionally the two tests shared a common test subject that allowed for within subject comparisons of the methods that greatly reduced the number of variables in play. The tests varied in their methodologies: the Space Suit Comparative Technologies Evaluation used 2-D photogrammetry to analyze isolated ranges of motion while the Constellation space suit benchmarking and requirements development used 3-D motion capture to evaluate both isolated and functional joint ranges of motion. The isolated data from both test series were compared graphically, as percent differences, and by simple statistical analysis. The results indicated that while the methods generate results that are statistically the same (significance level p= 0.01), the differences are significant enough in the practical sense to make direct comparisons ill advised. The concluding recommendations propose direction for how to bridge the data gaps and address future mobility data collection to allow for backward compatibility.

  20. A Comparison of Methods for Assessing Space Suit Joint Ranges of Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitchison, Lindsay; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    Through the Advanced Exploration Systems Program, NASA is attempting to use the vast collection of space suit mobility data from 50 years worth of space suit testing to build predictive analysis tools to aid in early architecture decisions for future missions and exploration programs. However, the design engineers must first understand if and how data generated by different methodologies can be compared directly and used in an essentially interchangeable manner. To address this question, the isolated joint range of motion data from two different test series were compared. Both data sets were generated from participants wearing the Mark III Space Suit Technology Demonstrator (MK-III), Waist Entry I-suit (WEI), and minimal clothing. Additionally the two tests shared a common test subject that allowed for within subject comparisons of the methods that greatly reduced the number of variables in play. The tests varied in their methodologies: the Space Suit Comparative Technologies Evaluation used 2D photogrammetry to analyze isolated ranges of motion while the Constellation space suit benchmarking and requirements development used 3D motion capture to evaluate both isolated and functional joint ranges of motion. The isolated data from both test series were compared graphically, as percent differences, and by simple statistical analysis. The results indicated that while the methods generate results that are statistically the same (significance level p= 0.01), the differences are significant enough in the practical sense to make direct comparisons ill advised. The concluding recommendations propose direction for how to bridge the data gaps and address future mobility data collection to allow for backward compatibility.

  1. The European space suit, a design for productivity and crew safety.

    PubMed

    Skoog, A I; Berthier, S; Ollivier, Y

    1991-01-01

    In order to fulfill the two major mission objectives, i.e. support planned and unplanned external servicing of the COLUMBUS FFL and support the HERMES vehicle for safety critical operations and emergencies, the European Space Suit System baseline configuration incorporates a number of design features, which shall enhance the productivity and the crew safety of EVA astronauts. The work in EVA is today--and will be for several years--a manual work. Consequently, to improve productivity, the first challenge is to design a suit enclosure which minimizes movement restrictions and crew fatigue. It is covered by the "ergonomic" aspect of the suit design. Furthermore, it is also necessary to help the EVA crewmember in his work, by giving him the right information at the right time. Many solutions exist in this field of Man-Machine Interface, from a very simple system, based on cuff check lists, up to advanced systems, including Head-Up Displays. The design concept for improved productivity encompasses following features: easy donning/doffing thru rear entry, suit ergonomy optimisation, display of operational information in alpha-numerical and graphical form, and voice processing for operations and safety critical information. Concerning crew safety the major design features are: a lower R-factor for emergency EVA operations thru increased suit pressure, zero prebreath conditions for normal operations, visual and voice processing of all safety critical functions, and an autonomous life support system to permit unrestricted operations around HERMES and the CFFL. The paper analyses crew safety and productivity criteria and describes how these features are being built into the design of the European Space Suit System. PMID:11537126

  2. Monitoring Human Performance During Suited Operations: A Technology Feasibility Study Using EMU Gloves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekdash, Omar; Norcross, Jason; McFarland, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Mobility tracking of human subjects while conducting suited operations still remains focused on the external movement of the suit and little is known about the human movement within it. For this study, accelerometers and bend sensitive resistors were integrated into a custom carrier glove to quantify range of motion and dexterity from within the pressurized glove environment as a first stage feasibility study of sensor hardware, integration, and reporting capabilities. Sensors were also placed on the exterior of the pressurized glove to determine if it was possible to compare a glove joint angle to the anatomical joint angle of the subject during tasks. Quantifying human movement within the suit was feasible, with accelerometers clearly detecting movements in the wrist and reporting expected joint angles at maximum flexion or extension postures with repeatability of plus or minus 5 degrees between trials. Bend sensors placed on the proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints performed less well. It was not possible to accurately determine the actual joint angle using these bend sensors, but these sensors could be used to determine when the joint was flexed to its maximum and provide a general range of mobility needed to complete a task. Further work includes additional testing with accelerometers and the possible inclusion of hardware such as magnetometers or gyroscopes to more precisely locate the joint in 3D space. We hope to eventually expand beyond the hand and glove and develop a more comprehensive suit sensor suite to characterize motion across more joints (knee, elbow, shoulder, etc.) and fully monitor the human body operating within the suit environment.

  3. Pink Moon: The petrogenesis of pink spinel anorthosites and implications concerning Mg-suite magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prissel, T. C.; Parman, S. W.; Jackson, C. R. M.; Rutherford, M. J.; Hess, P. C.; Head, J. W.; Cheek, L.; Dhingra, D.; Pieters, C. M.

    2014-10-01

    NASA's Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) has identified and characterized a new lunar rock type termed pink spinel anorthosite (PSA) (Pieters et al., 2011). Dominated by anorthitic feldspar and rich in MgAl2O4 spinel, PSA appears to have an unusually low modal abundance of mafic silicates, distinguishing it from known lunar spinel-bearing samples. The interaction between basaltic melts and the lunar crust and/or assimilation of anorthitic plagioclase have been proposed as a possible mechanism for PSA formation (Gross and Treiman, 2011; Prissel et al., 2012). To test these hypotheses, we have performed laboratory experiments exploring magma-wallrock interactions within the lunar crust. Lunar basaltic melts were reacted with anorthite at 1400 °C and pressures between 0.05-1.05 GPa. Results indicate that PSA spinel compositions are best explained via the interaction between Mg-suite parental melts and anorthositic crust. Mare basalts and picritic lunar glasses produce spinels too rich in Fe and Cr to be consistent with the M3 observations. The experiments suggest that PSA represents a new member of the plutonic Mg-suite. If true, PSA can be used as a proxy for spectrally identifying areas of Mg-suite magmatism on the Moon. Moreover, the presence of PSA on both the lunar nearside and farside (Pieters et al., in press) indicates Mg-suite magmatism may have occurred on a global scale. In turn, this implies that KREEP is not required for Mg-suite petrogenesis (as KREEP is constrained to the nearside of the Moon) and is only necessary to explain the chemical make-up of nearside Mg-suite samples.

  4. A flight-rated liquid-cooled garment for use within a full-pressure suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, R.; Winter, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    A flight rated liquid cooled garment system for use inside a full pressure suit has been designed, fabricated, and tested. High temperature tests with this system have indicated that heat is absorbed at a rate decreasing from 224 kg-cal/hr to 143 kg-cal/hr over a 40-min period. The first 30 min are very comfortable; thereafter a gradual heat load builds that results in mild sweating at the end of the 40-min period. In flight tests during hot weather when this cooling system was worn under a regulation flight suit, the pilot reported that temperatures were comfortable and that the garment prevented sweating.

  5. Suits reflectance models for wheat and cotton - Theoretical and experimental tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, J. E.; Lemaster, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    Plant canopy reflectance models developed by Suits are tested for cotton and Penjamo winter wheat. Properties of the models are discussed, and the concept of model depth is developed. The models' predicted exchange symmetry for specular irradiance with respect to sun polar angle and observer polar angle agreed with field data for cotton and wheat. Model calculations and experimental data for wheat reflectance vs sun angle disagreed. Specular reflectance from 0.50 to 1.10 micron shows fair agreement between the model and wheat measurements. An Appendix includes the physical and optical parameters for wheat necessary to apply Suits' models.

  6. The recovery and utilization of space suit range-of-motion data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, AL; Walton, James S.

    1988-01-01

    A technique for recovering data for the range of motion of a subject wearing a space suit is described along with the validation of this technique on an EVA space suit. Digitized data are automatically acquired from video images of the subject; three-dimensional trajectories are recovered from these data, and can be displayed using three-dimensional computer graphics. Target locations are recovered using a unique video processor and close-range photogrammetry. It is concluded that such data can be used in such applications as the animation of anthropometric computer models.

  7. The origin of garnet in the anorthosite-charnockite suite of the Adirondacks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James M. McLelland; Philip R. Whitney

    1977-01-01

    Detailed analysis of textural and chemical criteria in rocks of the anorthosite-charnockite suite of the Adirondack Highlands suggests that development of garnet in silica-saturated rocks of the suite occurs according to the reaction: \\u000a$$\\\\begin{gathered} {\\\\text{Anorthite}} {\\\\text{Orthopyroxene}} {\\\\text{Quartz}} \\\\hfill \\\\\\\\ {\\\\text{2CaAl}}_{\\\\text{2}} {\\\\text{Si}}_{\\\\text{2}} {\\\\text{O}}_{\\\\text{8}} + (6 - \\\\alpha )({\\\\text{Fe,Mg}}){\\\\text{SiO}}_{\\\\text{3}} + \\\\alpha {\\\\text{Fe - Oxide + (}}\\\\alpha {\\\\text{ - 2)SiO}}_{\\\\text{2}} \\\\hfill \\\\\\\\ {\\\\text{Garnet}}

  8. Describing the NPOESS Preparatory Project Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Environmental Data Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, C.; Guenther, B.; Kilcoyne, H.; Mineart, G.; St. Germain, K.; Reed, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is one of the instruments that make up the suite of sensors on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) scheduled to launch in 2010. VIIRS will produce seven Environmental Data Records (EDRs) describing cloud properties. The VIIRS Cloud EDRs include the Cloud Optical Thickness (COT), Cloud Effective Particle Size Parameter (CEPS), Cloud Top Pressure (CTP), Cloud Top Height (CTH), Cloud Top Temperature (CTT), Cloud Cover/Layers (CCL), and Cloud Base Height (CBH). This paper will describe the VIIRS algorithms used to generate these EDRs and provide a current estimate of performance based on pre-Launch test data.

  9. Work and fatigue characteristics of unsuited and suited humans during isolated isokinetic joint motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, L. Javier; Maida, J. C.; Miles, E. H.; Rajulu, S. L.; Pandya, A. K.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of a pressurized suit on human performance were investigated. The suit is known as an Extra-Vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) and is worn by astronauts while working outside their spacecraft in a low earth orbit. Isolated isokinetic joint torques of three female and three male subjects (all experienced users of the suit in 1G gravity) were measured while working at 100% and 80% of their maximum voluntary torque (MVT, which is synonymous with maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)). It was found that the average decrease in the total amount of work (the sum of the work in each repetition until fatigue) done when the subjects were wearing the EMU were 48% and 41% while working at 100% and 80% MVT, respectively. There is a clear relationship between the MVT and the time and amount of work done until fatigue. Here, the time to fatigue is defined as the ending time of the repetition for which the computed work done during that repetition dropped below 50% of the work done during the first repetition. In general the stronger joints took longer to fatigue and did more work than the weaker joints. It was found that the EMU decreases the work output at the wrist and shoulder joints the most, due to the EMU joint geometry. The EMU also decreased the joint range of motion. The average total amount of work done by the test subjects increased by 5.2% (20.4%) for the unsuited (suited) case, when the test subjects decreased the level of effort from 100% to 80% MVT. Also, the average time to fatigue increased by 9.2% (25.6%) for the unsuited (suited) case, when the test subjects decreased the level of effort from 100% to 80% MVT. It was also found that the experimentally measured torque decay could be predicted by a logarithmic equation. The absolute average errors in the predictions were found to be 18.3% and 18.9% for the unsuited and suited subjects, respectively, when working at 100% MVT, and 22.5% and 18.8% for the unsuited and suited subjects, respectively, when working at 80% MVT. These results could be very useful in the design of future EMU suits and the planning of Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the future International Space Station assembly operations.

  10. Use of Variable Pressure Suits, Intermittent Recompression and Nitrox Breathing Mixtures during Lunar Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Abercromby, Andrew F.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of variable pressure suits, intermittent recompression and Nitrox breathing mixtures to allow for multiple short extravehicular activities (EVAs) at different locations in a day. This new operational concept of multiple short EVAs requires short purge times and shorter prebreathes to assure rapid egress with a minimal loss of the vehicular air. Preliminary analysis has begun to evaluate the potential benefits of the intermittent recompression, and Nitrox breathing mixtures when used with variable pressure suits to enable reduce purges and prebreathe durations.

  11. Apollo/Skylab suit program management systems study. Volume 2: Cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The business management methods employed in the performance of the Apollo-Skylab Suit Program are studied. The data accumulated over the span of the contract as well as the methods used to accumulate the data are examined. Management methods associated with the monitoring and control of resources applied towards the performance of the contract are also studied and recommended upon. The primary objective is the compilation, analysis, and presentation of historical cost performance criteria. Cost data are depicted for all phases of the Apollo-Skylab program in common, meaningful terms, whereby the data may be applicable to future suit program planning efforts.

  12. Labeled line drawing of launch and entry suit identifies various components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Line drawings illustrate the front and back of the space shuttle launch and entry suit (LES) and labels identify various components. LES was designed for STS-26, the return to flight mission, and subsequent missions. Included in the crew escape system (CES) package are launch and entry helmet (LEH) with communications carrier (COMM CAP), parachute pack and harness, life preserver unit (LPU), life raft unit (LRU), LES gloves, suit oxygen manifold and valves, boots, and survival gear. Details of larger components are also identified.

  13. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF ICE AND FREON®BASED PERSONAL COOLING SYSTEMS DURING WORK IN FULLY ENCAPSULATING SUITS IN THE HEAT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Kay White; S. Phillip Glenn; Judith Hudnall; Carol Rice; Scott Clark

    1991-01-01

    The use of cooling garments in conjunction with fully encapsulating suits offers the potential for reducing the heat strain for workers at hazardous waste sites and chemical emergencies. This study examined the use of ice- and Freon®-based cooling garments during exercise in the heat while wearing a U.S. Coast Guard chemical response suit (CRS), a fully encapsulating, Telfon®-coatted, Nomex® suit.

  14. A Parallel Java Grande Benchmark Suite L. A. Smith and J. M. Bull

    E-print Network

    Bull, Mark

    A Parallel Java Grande Benchmark Suite L. A. Smith and J. M. Bull EPCC, The King's Buildings Republic. email: xobdrzal@fi.muni.cz Abstract Increasing interest is being shown in the use of Java for large scale or Grande applications. This new use of Java places specific demands on the Java execution

  15. TypingSuite: Integrated Software for Presenting Stimuli, and Collecting and Analyzing Typing Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Erin L.; Marchand, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Research into typing patterns has broad applications in both psycholinguistics and biometrics (i.e., improving security of computer access via each user's unique typing patterns). We present a new software package, TypingSuite, which can be used for presenting visual and auditory stimuli, collecting typing data, and summarizing and analyzing the…

  16. Discussion! Measurements on these suites of L and LL chondrites show that internal variation in Ti

    E-print Network

    Grossman, Lawrence

    Discussion! Measurements on these suites of L and LL chondrites show that internal variation in Ti. These results and analyses of chondrules [6] show that the Ti valence of olivine and pyroxene is not easily reset. ! In forsterite, high proportions of tetrahedral Ti4+ have been associated with formation under

  17. 2001 Mars Odyssey payload suite - The long, arduous journey to launch

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. J. Girard; G. Heinsohn; C. K. Schulz

    2002-01-01

    The 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft was successfully launched from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) on April 7, 2001. The payload suite consists of a gamma-ray spectrometer, a thermal emission imaging system, a Martian radiation environment experiment, and a high energy neutron spectrometer. The payload development model was based on the \\

  18. Vertical resolution study on the GOES-R Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES)

    E-print Network

    Li, Jun

    Vertical resolution study on the GOES-R Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) Jun Li* , Fang Wang Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R and beyond) will allow for monitoring the evolution of atmospheric and AMSU is also investigated. Keywords: HES, GOES-R, spectral resolution, vertical resolution 1

  19. Possible scanning scenarios of the GOES-R HES (Hyperspectral Environmental Suite)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy J. Schmit; James Gurka; W. P. Menzel; Monica M. Coakley; Anthony Mostek; Kevin Schrab; Mathew M. Gunshor; Anthony Wimmers

    2005-01-01

    With increased spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution, the Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-R Series will contribute to a significant improvement in the GOES products, including an increase in the number of products over the current GOES Imager and Sounder, especially when combined with the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). The planned capabilities of the

  20. Introduction of the Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) on GOES-R and beyond

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy J. Schmit; Jun Li; James Gurka

    The Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES), scheduled for implementation on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-R, will be launched in approximately 2013. This is the next generation operational geostationary sounder. Presently in formulation phase, it will replace the filter-wheel sounder that flies on the current GOES satellites. The HES will provide dramatic improvements over current sounder data and products, including better

  1. Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES): R series hyperspectral environmental suite (HES) overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gene Martin; Joseph C. Criscione; Sandra A. Cauffman; Martin A. Davis

    2004-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) instrument is currently under development by the NASA GOES-R Project team within the framework of the GOES Program to fulfill the future needs and requirements of the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) Office. As part of the GOES-R instrument complement, HES will provide measurements of the traditional temperature and water vapor vertical

  2. Astronaut John Young during final suiting operations for Apollo 10 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 10 command module pilot, jokes with Donald K. Slayton (standing left), Director of Flight Crew Operations, Manned Spacecraft Center, during Apollo 10 suiting up operations. On couch in background is Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot.

  3. A Suite of Tools for Debugging Distributed Autonomous Systems David Kortenkamp1

    E-print Network

    Kortenkamp, David

    A Suite of Tools for Debugging Distributed Autonomous Systems David Kortenkamp1 , Reid Simmons2 implemented. Results are given from a NASA distributed autonomous control system application. 1. INTRODUCTION as they code their systems. Traditional software debugging tools are not designed for distributed autonomous

  4. Exploration Space Suit Architecture and Destination Environmental-Based Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Terry R.; McFarland, Shane M.; Korona, F. Adam

    2013-01-01

    This paper continues forward where EVA Space Suit Architecture: Low Earth Orbit Vs. Moon Vs. Mars left off in the development of a space suit architecture that is modular in design and could be reconfigured prior to launch or during any given mission depending on the tasks or destination. This space suit system architecture and technologies required based on human exploration (EVA) destinations will be discussed, and how these systems should evolve to meet the future exploration EVA needs of the US human space flight program. A series of exercises and analyses provided a strong indication that the Constellation Program space suit architecture, with its maximum reuse of technology and functionality across a range of mission profiles and destinations, is postured to provide a viable solution for future space exploration missions. The destination environmental analysis demonstrates that the modular architecture approach could provide the lowest mass and mission cost for the protection of the crew, given any human mission outside of low-Earth orbit. Additionally, some of the high-level trades presented here provide a review of the environmental and nonenvironmental design drivers that will become increasingly important as humans venture farther from Earth. The presentation of destination environmental data demonstrates a logical clustering of destination design environments that allows a focused approach to technology prioritization, development, and design that will maximize the return on investment, largely independent of any particular design reference mission.

  5. SSST Module Slide 1: Hello, and welcome to this introduction on the Steam System Tool Suite.

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    , SSST. It comes in two versions, a Visual Basic program and an Excel program. The Excel program Suite. Slide 2: In this tutorial, I will give you a basic overview of each Steam tool, including section of the tool, `2', Steam System Basic Data. SSST 1 #12;SSST 2 Begin Tab 2 Steam System Basic

  6. Apollo/Skylab suit program-management systems study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcniff, M.

    1974-01-01

    A management systems study for future spacesuit programs was conducted to assess past suit program requirements and management systems in addition to new and modified systems in order to identify the most cost effective methods for use during future spacesuit programs. The effort and its findings concerned the development and production of all hardware ranging from crew protective gear to total launch vehicles.

  7. The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite Federica Ciocchetta, Adam Duguid, Stephen Gilmore,

    E-print Network

    Hillston, Jane

    The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite Federica Ciocchetta, Adam Duguid, Stephen Gilmore, Maria Luisa Guerriero of Edinburgh, Scotland 1 Introduction Bio-PEPA [1, 2] is a timed process algebra designed specifically simulation and probabilistic model-checking. The context of application we consider is that of bio- chemical

  8. The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite Federica Ciocchetta, Adam Duguid, Stephen Gilmore,

    E-print Network

    Gilmore, Stephen

    The Bio-PEPA Tool Suite Federica Ciocchetta, Adam Duguid, Stephen Gilmore, Maria Luisa Guerriero of Edinburgh, Scotland I. INTRODUCTION Bio-PEPA [1], [2] is a timed process algebra designed specifically simulation and probabilistic model-checking. The context of application we consider is that of bio- chemical

  9. Experiments with the tenet real-time protocol suite on the Sequoia 2000 wide area network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anindo Banerjea; Edward W. Knightly; Fred L. Templin; Hui Zhang

    1994-01-01

    Emerging distributed multimedia applications have stringent performance requirements in terms of bandwidth, delay, delay-jitter, and loss rate. The Tenet real-time protocol suite provides the services and mechanisms for delivering such performance guarantees, even during periods of high network load and congestion. The protocols achieve this by using resource management, connection admission control, and appropriate packet service disciplines inside the network.

  10. Grapes COMPARISON CHART 395 Pine Tree Road, Suite 310 Ithaca, NY 14850

    E-print Network

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    CornellTM Grapes COMPARISON CHART 395 Pine Tree Road, Suite 310 Ithaca, NY 14850 P: 607 Wine Region* Licensing Season Qualities Exclusive** Non-Exclusive Red Wine Grape `Geneva Red' Early Mid in the Finger Lakes. In vineyards, the grape is high yielding, very winter hardy, and virus resistant

  11. Vanguard: a protocol suite and OS kernel for distributed object-oriented environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ross S. Finlayson; Mark D. Hennecke; Steven L. Goldberg

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of Vanguard, an experimental object-oriented distributed operating system kernel currently under development. Vanguard is defined by a protocol suite and object model, independent of any particular programming language. The Vanguard protocols and object model are implemented by a distributed kernel that is also structured as an object-oriented Vanguard application. Although object oriented, Vanguard is not based

  12. The Impact of Residence Design on Freshman Outcomes: Dormitories versus Suite-Style Residences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodger, Susan C.; Johnson, Andrew W.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to measure affective, behavioral, and cognitive variables in a sample of 3159 first-year students, and to compare these variables by the type of residence building in which the student lived. Students living in suite-style buildings reported a greater sense of belonging, and higher activity levels than students living in…

  13. Analytical modeling of a diver dry suit enhanced with micro-encapsulated phase change materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. Nuckols

    1999-01-01

    Over the years, various forms of phase change materials (PCMs) have been utilized as thermal storage mediums for cooling and heating applications. Recently, the U.S. Navy has investigated using phase change materials inside divers' dry suits to enhance thermal protection in extremely cold water applications. The thermal performance of optional types of insulative Comfortemp1Comfortemp is a trade name used by

  14. A new methane control and prediction software suite for longwall mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, Heather N.; Özgen Karacan, C.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents technical and application aspects of a new software suite, MCP (Methane Control and Prediction), developed for addressing some of the methane and methane control issues in longwall coal mines. The software suite consists of dynamic link library (DLL) extensions to MS-Access TM, written in C++. In order to create the DLLs, various statistical, mathematical approaches, prediction and classification artificial neural network (ANN) methods were used. The current version of MCP suite (version 1.3) discussed in this paper has four separate modules that (a) predict the dynamic elastic properties of coal-measure rocks, (b) predict ventilation emissions from longwall mines, (c) determine the type of degasification system that needs to be utilized for given situations and (d) assess the production performance of gob gas ventholes that are used to extract methane from longwall gobs. These modules can be used with the data from basic logs, mining, longwall panel, productivity, and coal bed characteristics. The applications of these modules separately or in combination for methane capture and control related problems will help improve the safety of mines. The software suite's version 1.3 is discussed in this paper. Currently, it's new version 2.0 is available and can be downloaded from http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/products/product180.htm free of charge. The models discussed in this paper can be found under "ancillary models" and under "methane prediction models" for specific U.S. conditions in the new version.

  15. Benefits Office Contacts Address: 7 Lebanon, Street, Suite 203, Hanover, NH 03755

    E-print Network

    Benefits Office Contacts Address: 7 Lebanon, Street, Suite 203, Hanover, NH 03755 Hinman Mail: HB 6042 Phone: 603-646-3588 / Fax: 603-646-1108 E-mail: Human.Resources.Benefits@dartmouth.edu Website: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~hrs/benefits/ Alice Tanguay, Director of Benefits Alice

  16. Effectiveness comparison of partially executed t-way test suite based generated by existing strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Rozmie R.; Ahmad, Mohd Zamri Zahir; Ali, Mohd Shaiful Aziz Rashid; Zakaria, Hasneeza Liza; Rahman, Md. Mostafijur

    2015-05-01

    Consuming 40 to 50 percent of software development cost, software testing is one of the most resource consuming activities in software development lifecycle. To ensure an acceptable level of quality and reliability of a typical software product, it is desirable to test every possible combination of input data under various configurations. Due to combinatorial explosion problem, considering all exhaustive testing is practically impossible. Resource constraints, costing factors as well as strict time-to-market deadlines are amongst the main factors that inhibit such consideration. Earlier work suggests that sampling strategy (i.e. based on t-way parameter interaction or called as t-way testing) can be effective to reduce number of test cases without effecting the fault detection capability. However, for a very large system, even t-way strategy will produce a large test suite that need to be executed. In the end, only part of the planned test suite can be executed in order to meet the aforementioned constraints. Here, there is a need for test engineers to measure the effectiveness of partially executed test suite in order for them to assess the risk they have to take. Motivated by the abovementioned problem, this paper presents the effectiveness comparison of partially executed t-way test suite generated by existing strategies using tuples coverage method. Here, test engineers can predict the effectiveness of the testing process if only part of the original test cases is executed.

  17. A la poursuite du signal de parole : suite et fin Bernard Teston

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    electric devices, around the technology of the telephone.The galvanometric recorders, the tape recorders précédent exposé [1] nous avons montré qu'au cours du dix neuvième siècle, la quête de l'image du signal de sans suites car ce dernier disparut prématurément après être devenu un des plus importants acteurs et

  18. CORNELL STRAWBERRY VARIETIES COMPARISON CHART 395 Pine Tree Road, Suite 310 Ithaca, NY 14850

    E-print Network

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    CORNELL STRAWBERRY VARIETIES COMPARISON CHART 395 Pine Tree Road, Suite 310 Ithaca, NY 14850 P Season Growing Qualities Freezing Quality Region Licensing* Exclusive Non-Exclusive Strawberry `Clancy yields of round, dark red fruit with good texture and eating quality. Strawberry `L'Amour' Early Mid Late

  19. Adaptation of Two Family Therapy Training Instruments toCulturally Suit the Indian Context

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rajeswari Natrajan; Nithyakala Karuppaswamy; Volker Thomas; Kamala Ramadoss

    2005-01-01

    Two family therapy training instruments, the Family Concept Assessment (FCA) and Rating Scale and Family Therapy Assessment Exercise (FTE), developed in the United States were adapted to suit the Indian cultural context. Several changes were made to the instruments while at the same time maintaining the equivalency of the scales to the original. Both the instruments were tested for face

  20. 76 FR 54465 - Proposed Settlement Agreement, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ...Proposed Settlement Agreement, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  1. 78 FR 40140 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  2. 77 FR 48980 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  3. 76 FR 58507 - Proposed Settlement Agreement, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ...Proposed Settlement Agreement, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  4. 75 FR 38519 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  5. 76 FR 56757 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  6. 78 FR 26028 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, [[Page 26029

  7. 77 FR 47381 - Proposed Settlement Agreement, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ...Proposed Settlement Agreement, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``Act...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  8. 78 FR 23560 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...SUMMARY: In accordance with the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...certain mandatory duties under the Clean Air Act. The proposed...

  9. 77 FR 66978 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  10. 77 FR 46756 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  11. 76 FR 45564 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  12. 76 FR 45562 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  13. 77 FR 14784 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  14. 77 FR 56840 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  15. 75 FR 67967 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  16. 77 FR 45605 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  17. 78 FR 43200 - Proposed Settlement Agreement, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ...Proposed Settlement Agreement, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  18. 75 FR 71125 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  19. 77 FR 46757 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  20. 78 FR 30919 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  1. 75 FR 9208 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...Harbor Waterkeeper, Inc., Clean Water Action, and Chesapeake...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  2. 75 FR 16461 - Proposed Settlement Agreement, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ...Proposed Settlement Agreement, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  3. 76 FR 51030 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  4. 76 FR 56756 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  5. 75 FR 39014 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  6. 77 FR 14785 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...Defense Center, Inc., and Clean Water Action Council of Northeast...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  7. 77 FR 41186 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...SUMMARY: In accordance with the Clean Air Act, as amended ``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  8. 75 FR 80809 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  9. On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing Gregg Rothermel

    E-print Network

    Rothermel, Gregg

    On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing Gregg Rothermel , Sebastian Elbaum}@cse.unl.edu August 31, 2004 Abstract Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to re-validate software as it evolves. Various methodologies for improving regression testing processes have been explored, but the cost

  10. Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand Michael D. Ernst, research advisor

    E-print Network

    Liskov, Barbara

    Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand David Saff Michael D. Ernst, research and Subject Descriptors: D.2.5 (Testing and Debug- ging): Testing tools General Terms: Algorithms, Design, Performance, Verification Keywords: test factoring, mock objects, unit testing 1. Problem: slow, unfocused

  11. The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the CostEffectiveness of Regression Testing

    E-print Network

    Rothermel, Gregg

    The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost­Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modifications. The cost­effective­ ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris­ tics of test

  12. The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost-Effectiveness of Regression Testing

    E-print Network

    Rothermel, Gregg

    The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost-Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modi cations. The cost-e ective- ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris- tics of test

  13. The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the CostEffectiveness of Regression Testing

    E-print Network

    Rothermel, Gregg

    The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost­Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modi#12;cations. The cost-e#11;ective- ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris- tics of test

  14. On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing. Gregg Rothermel

    E-print Network

    Rothermel, Gregg

    On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing. Gregg Rothermel , Sebastian Elbaum}@cse.unl.edu August 30, 2003 Abstract Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to re-validate software as it evolves. Various methodologies for improving regression testing processes have been explored, but the cost

  15. Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand Michael D. Ernst, research advisor

    E-print Network

    Liskov, Barbara

    Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand David Saff Michael D. Ernst, research and Subject Descriptors: D.2.5 (Testing and Debug­ ging): Testing tools General Terms: Algorithms, Design, Performance, Verification Keywords: test factoring, mock objects, unit testing 1. Problem: slow, unfocused

  16. Design of a suite of visual languages for supply chain specification Rick Zhang1

    E-print Network

    Grundy, John

    in complex collaborative supply chain network modelling. It is also to enable them to share their knowledgeDesign of a suite of visual languages for supply chain specification Rick Zhang1 , John Hosking1. This is due both to complexity of the supply chain models required and the lack of required expertise among

  17. NpBench: A Benchmark Suite for Control plane and Data plane Applications for Network Processors

    E-print Network

    John, Lizy Kurian

    NpBench: A Benchmark Suite for Control plane and Data plane Applications for Network Processors intelligent traffic management in addition to the basic requirement of wire speed packet forwarding. Several be classified into data plane and control plane workloads, however most network processors are optimized

  18. Working posture control of Robot Suit HAL for reducing structural stress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomoyoshi Kawabata; Hozumi Satoh; Yoshiyuki Sankai

    2009-01-01

    The advent of the super aged society and decline in earning power makes it critical to develop technologies that can support the limitations of our human abilities. We have developed Robot Suit HAL to support human physical capabilities. A wearable robot expected to work in human society is required to have a high structural safety, with a tough and compact

  19. Designing for the Future: The New Open Suite of Programs and Peer Review Process

    E-print Network

    Charette, André

    the efficiency and effectiveness of CIHR's funding and peer review processes by: - Reducing funding program, what will CIHR have achieved? Our goal in designing the new Open Suite of Programs and peer review. It also includes an expert peer review system that is well-managed, fair, and transparent in the selection

  20. 76 FR 58808 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave...EPA Docket Center, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution...

  1. Nickel and Cobalt Partitioning Between Spinel and Basaltic Melt: Applications to Planetary Basalt Suites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.

    2002-01-01

    New experimental spinel/melt partition coefficients for Ni and Co have been measured in basalt samples with natural levels of Ni and Co, are lower than previous high doping experiments, and are applied to several planetary basalt suites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Relation of heavy mineral suites to Pleistocene to Holocene shoreline sequences in Georgia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cocker

    1993-01-01

    The major Pleistocene paleobarrier island complexes recognized on the Georgia coastal plain may represent two distinct shoreline sequences. This is suggested by differences in geomorphology and in heavy mineral suites. The higher and older Talbot, Penholoway, Wicomico, Okefenokee and Waycross complexes are characterized by large, linear, undissected sand bodies. The younger Pamlico, Princess Anne and Silver Bluff complexes consist of

  3. New Student Account Suite Instructions Students and Authorized Users Login Page

    E-print Network

    Li, Mo

    New Student Account Suite Instructions Students and Authorized Users Login Page Students please login with your Georgia Tech ID (gtID) and PIN or you can access Parents and other authorized users, use the e-mail address and password from the login instructions that were e-mailed to you. Immediately after

  4. Teacher is Space participant Christa McAuliffe during suite/hygiene briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Teacher is Space participant Christa McAuliffe is briefed on her suit and on personal hygiene equipment to be used on the STS 51-L mission. She is standing in front of a table with several of the items to be used on the flight, including one can labeled DIAL and one can labeled BAN.

  5. A Novel Mask-Coding Representation for Set Cover Problems with Applications in Test Suite Minimisation

    E-print Network

    Singer, Jeremy

    A Novel Mask-Coding Representation for Set Cover Problems with Applications in Test Suite Email: shin.yoo@kcl.ac.uk Abstract--Multi-Objective Set Cover problem forms the ba- sis of many. This paper presents Mask-Coding, a novel representation of solutions for set cover optimisation problems

  6. Proton and Electron Threshold Energy Measurements for Extravehicular Activity Space Suits. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. D.; Saganti, P. B.

    2003-01-01

    Construction of ISS will require more than 1000 hours of EVA. Outside of ISS during EVA, astronauts and cosmonauts are likely to be exposed to a large fluence of electrons and protons. Development of radiation protection guidelines requires the determination of the minimum energy of electrons and protons that penetrate the suits at various locations. Measurements of the water-equivalent thickness of both US. and Russian EVA suits were obtained by performing CT scans. Specific regions of interest of the suits were further evaluated using a differential range shift technique. This technique involved measuring thickness ionization curves for 6-MeV electron and 155-MeV proton beams with ionization chambers using a constant source-to-detector distance. The thicknesses were obtained by stacking polystyrene slabs immediately upstream of the detector. The thicknesses of the 50% ionizations relative to the maximum ionizations were determined. The detectors were then placed within the suit and the stack thickness adjusted until the 50% ionization was reestablished. The difference in thickness between the 50% thicknesses was then used with standard range-energy tables to determine the threshold energy for penetration. This report provides a detailed description of the experimental arrangement and results.

  7. Design of a test suite for NCAP-to-NCAP communication based on IEEE 1451

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anshul Singla; H. Liu; H. Ma; R. Franzl; D. Gurkan; D. Benhaddou; X. Yuan; J. Morris; M. Turowski; F. Figueroa

    2008-01-01

    IEEE 1451 is an emerging standard that facilitates the communication between smart sensors with network communications for an interoperable sensor network. Moreover, it provides plug-and-play capability through standardization of the transducer interfaces. This paper is on the creation of a test suite that specifies tests such as conformance and functionality. Test cases have been developed to check the communication between

  8. 2013 STAFF DISCOUNT FORM 1995 University Avenue, Suite 130 (MC 1080)

    E-print Network

    Militzer, Burkhard

    this form and send it to Berkeley Summer Sessions, 1995 University Ave., Suite 130 (campus mail code 1080 a transcript address by August 16, 2013, one will be mailed to your permanent address. do not provide an address below) Send to a new address (fill out a different address below) Will add an address later (do so

  9. 75 FR 38520 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ...Plaintiffs filed a deadline suit to compel the Administrator to take final action under section 110(k)(2) of the CAA on the ``MAG 2007 Five Percent Plan for PM-10 for the Maricopa County Nonattainment Area,'' Maricopa Association of Governments,...

  10. How kelp produce blade shapes suited to different flow regimes: A new wrinkle

    E-print Network

    Mahadevan, L.

    can change, and the whole blade can twist into left- and right-handed helicoidal shapes), which mayHow kelp produce blade shapes suited to different flow regimes: A new wrinkle M. A. R. Koehl,1,Ã W 02138, USA Synopsis Many species of macroalgae have flat, strap-like blades in habitats exposed

  11. N-SMARTS: Networked Suite of Mobile Atmospheric Real-time Sensors

    E-print Network

    Paulos, Eric

    . These traits make the cell-phone ideally suited to track and understand the impact that the environment has By attaching sensors to GPS-enabled cell phones, we can gather the raw data necessary to begin understand how predict that cell phones will become the "next PC," we believe that the cell phone has the power to become

  12. Recommendations concerning models and parameters best suited to breeder reactor environmental radiological assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Recommendations are presented concerning the models and parameters best suited for assessing the impact of radionuclide releases to the environment by breeder reactor facilities. These recommendations are based on the model and parameter evaluations performed during this project to date. Seven different areas are covered in separate sections.

  13. On the model of autonomous english learning based on Blackboard Academic Suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhang Jian; Qin Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Autonomous learning has been widely applied nearly in all courses due to the great contribution of constructivist learning. Blackboard Academic Suite (Bb) is under use in many universities nowadays throughout the world, due to its marvelous functions as to provide rich recourses for study, to create context, to establish collaboration between students, and that between students and teachers etc., which

  14. Extravehicular Activity Suit Systems Design: How to Walk, Talk, and Breathe on Mars

    E-print Network

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    Extravehicular Activity Suit Systems Design: How to Walk, Talk, and Breathe on Mars Cornell Contributors: Kevin Reigeluth Robert Shydo, Jr. Abstract Design parameters for a Mars Extravehicular Mobility functional requirements for the life support, communication, and power subsystems of a Mars EMU from the HEDS

  15. PIGMENT SUITES AND TAXONOMIC GROUPS IN PRASINOPHYCEAE1 Mikel Latasa,2

    E-print Network

    PIGMENT SUITES AND TAXONOMIC GROUPS IN PRASINOPHYCEAE1 Mikel Latasa,2 Renate Scharek3 Institut de 29682 Roscoff, France Pigment analysis performed on 30 Prasinophy- ceae strains revealed two main groups, and the pigment Uniden- tified M1 as characteristic pigments. Prasinococc- ales and Pseudoscourfieldiales

  16. Analysis of a benchmark suite to evaluate mixed numeric and symbolic processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragharan, Bharathi; Galant, David

    1992-01-01

    The suite of programs that formed the benchmark for a proposed advanced computer is described and analyzed. The features of the processor and its operating system that are tested by the benchmark are discussed. The computer codes and the supporting data for the analysis are given as appendices.

  17. National Concrete PavementTechnology Center 2711 South Loop Drive, Suite 4700

    E-print Network

    National Concrete PavementTechnology Center 2711 South Loop Drive, Suite 4700 Ames, IA 50010, National Concrete Pavement Technology Center, Iowa State University Co-Principal Investigators Theodore Group, Inc. Project Manager Paul Wiegand Research Engineer, National Concrete Pavement Technology Center

  18. Aviation Safety Reporting System 625 Ellis St. Suite 305 Mountain View California 94043

    E-print Network

    Aviation Safety Reporting System 625 Ellis St. Suite 305 Mountain View California 94043 Cabin Crew Connell Director, NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System March 7, 2000 Los Angeles, CA NASA ASRS (Pub. 59) #12;1 Cabin Crew Safety Information and The NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System By Linda J. Connell

  19. UCSF tomography: An integrated software suite for real-time electron microscopic tomographic

    E-print Network

    Agard, David

    UCSF tomography: An integrated software suite for real-time electron microscopic tomographic data Abstract A real-time alignment and reconstruction scheme for electron microscopic tomography (EMT) has been collection; Reconstruction; Cryo microscopy 1. Introduction Electron microscopic tomography (EMT) generates

  20. Exploration Space Suit Architecture and Destination Environmental-Based Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Terry R.; McFarland, Shane M.; Korona, F. Adam

    2013-01-01

    This paper continues forward where EVA Space Suit Architecture: Low Earth Orbit Vs. Moon Vs. Mars1 left off in the development of a space suit architecture that is modular in design and could be reconfigured prior to launch or during any given mission depending on the tasks or destination. This paper addresses the space suit system architecture and technologies required based on human exploration (EVA) destinations, and describes how these systems should evolve to meet the future exploration EVA needs of the US human space flight program. A series of exercises and analyses provided a strong indication that the Constellation Program space suit architecture, with its maximum reuse of technology and functionality across a range of mission profiles and destinations, is postured to provide a viable solution for future space exploration missions. The destination environmental analysis demonstrates that the modular architecture approach could provide the lowest mass and mission cost for the protection of the crew, given any human mission outside of low-Earth orbit. Additionally, some of the high-level trades presented here provide a review of the environmental and non-environmental design drivers that will become increasingly important as humans venture farther from Earth. This paper demonstrates a logical clustering of destination design environments that allows a focused approach to technology prioritization, development, and design that will maximize the return on investment, largely independent of any particular design reference mission.