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1

ProDA: A Suite of Web-Services for Progressive Data Analysis  

E-print Network

-going collaboration under NASA's GENESIS-II REASON project and partly funded by the Center of Excellence for Research between OLAP and OSA. Generally speaking OSA needs to perform more complex statistical queries on veryDA on a massive atmospheric dataset provided to us by NASA/JPL. 1. INTRODUCTION Following the constant

Shahabi, Cyrus

2

Music Education Suites  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication describes options for designing and equipping middle and high school music education suites, and suggests ways of gaining community support for including full service music suites in new and renovated school facilities. In addition to basic music suites, and practice rooms, other options detailed include: (1) small ensemble…

Kemp, Wayne

2009-01-01

3

Music Education Suites.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication describes options for designing and equipping middle and high school music education suites and suggests means of gaining community support for including full service music suites in new and renovated facilities. It covers the basic music suite, practice rooms, small ensemble rehearsal rooms, recording/MIDI (musical instrument…

Kemp, Wayne

4

Validation suite for MCNP  

SciTech Connect

Two validation suites, one for criticality and another for radiation shielding, have been defined and tested for the MCNP Monte Carlo code. All of the cases in the validation suites are based on experiments so that calculated and measured results can be compared in a meaningful way. The cases in the validation suites are described, and results from those cases are discussed. For several years, the distribution package for the MCNP Monte Carlo code1 has included an installation test suite to verify that MCNP has been installed correctly. However, the cases in that suite have been constructed primarily to test options within the code and to execute quickly. Consequently, they do not produce well-converged answers, and many of them are physically unrealistic. To remedy these deficiencies, sets of validation suites are being defined and tested for specific types of applications. All of the cases in the validation suites are based on benchmark experiments. Consequently, the results from the measurements are reliable and quantifiable, and calculated results can be compared with them in a meaningful way. Currently, validation suites exist for criticality and radiation-shielding applications.

Mosteller, R. D. (Russell D.)

2002-01-01

5

Astronomical Video Suites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomer and visual artist Jose Francisco Salgado has directed two astronomical video suites to accompany live performances of classical music works. The suites feature awe-inspiring images, historical illustrations, and visualizations produced by NASA, ESA, and the Adler Planetarium. By the end of 2009, his video suites Gustav Holst's The Planets and Astronomical Pictures at an Exhibition will have been presented more than 40 times in over 10 countries. Lately Salgado, an avid photographer, has been experimenting with high dynamic range imaging, time-lapse, infrared, and fisheye photography, as well as with stereoscopic photography and video to enhance his multimedia works.

Francisco Salgado, Jose

2010-01-01

6

DSN Data Visualization Suite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The DSN Data Visualization Suite is a set of computer programs and reusable Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) that assist in the visualization and analysis of Deep Space Network (DSN) spacecraft-tracking data, which can include predicted and actual values of downlink frequencies, uplink frequencies, and antenna-pointing angles in various formats that can include tables of values and polynomial coefficients. The data can also include lists of antenna-pointing events, lists of antenna- limit events, and schedules of tracking activities. To date, analysis and correlation of these intricately related data before and after tracking have been difficult and time-consuming. The DSN Data Visualization Suite enables operators to quickly diagnose tracking-data problems before, during, and after tracking. The Suite provides interpolation on demand and plotting of DSN tracking data, correlation of all data on a given temporal point, and display of data with color coding configurable by users. The suite thereby enables rapid analysis of the data prior to transmission of the data to DSN control centers. At the control centers, the same suite enables operators to validate the data before committing the data to DSN subsystems. This software is also Web-enabled to afford its capabilities to international space agencies.

Bui, Bach X.; Malhotra, Mark R.; Kim, Richard M.

2009-01-01

7

HootSuite  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For people with a wide range of social media responsibilities, HootSuite is a great way to stay connected. HootSuite allows individuals and business teams to coordinate social media connections with their easy-to-use interface that includes scheduled updates, one-click message dissemination, and smart-phone capabilities. The basic (and free) option allows for use of two RSS feeds, five social networks, and 30 days of statistical history. This version is compatible with all operating systems, including Linux.

8

Violence in the Suites  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines violence “in the suites” of corporate America. It argues that the magnitude of corporate violence overshadows aggression, and lawbreaking transactions associated with street crime. Specifically, the paper looks at America's Prison Industrial Complex, and privatization as classic examples of the breadth and intensity of corporate malfeasance and structural violence. Suggestions are made on how to humanize the

Letha A. See; Nancy Khashan

2001-01-01

9

Space Suit Spins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space is a hostile environment where astronauts combat extreme temperatures, dangerous radiation, and a near-breathless vacuum. Life support in these unforgiving circumstances is crucial and complex, and failure is not an option for the devices meant to keep astronauts safe in an environment that presents constant opposition. A space suit must meet stringent requirements for life support. The suit has to be made of durable material to withstand the impact of space debris and protect against radiation. It must provide essential oxygen, pressure, heating, and cooling while retaining mobility and dexterity. It is not a simple article of clothing but rather a complex modern armor that the space explorers must don if they are to continue exploring the heavens

2005-01-01

10

Sustainability Learning Suites  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The sustainability learning suites is a set of learning objects created for people with a post-secondary science background, organized in six themes: Systems thinking; Sustainable development; Population; Energy; Water and Materials. The materials are designed on Fink's Taxonomy of Significant Learning and include: learning objectives, editable slides with notes and embedded classroom activities, activities of 1-3 hours, assessments, and a set of 24 videos. These materials were created by Jane Qiong Zhang and Linda Vanasupa in association with Julie B. Zimmerman and James Mihelcic with the assistance of grants from the National Science Foundation.

2012-12-20

11

Air conditioned suit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An environmentally controlled suit is described consisting of an airtight outergarment attached by an airtight bellows to the wall of a sterile chamber, an undergarment providing for circulation of air near the skin of the wearer, and a circulation system comprised of air supply and distribution to the extremities of the undegarment and central collection and exhaust of air from the midsection of the undergarment. A workman wearing the undergarment and attached circulation system enters the outer garment through a tunnel in the chamber wall and the attached bellows to work in the chamber without any danger of spreading bacteria.

Carl, G. R. (inventor)

1973-01-01

12

UC DAVIS FORENSIC SCIENCE CENTER 1909 Galileo Court, Suite B  

E-print Network

UC DAVIS FORENSIC SCIENCE CENTER 1909 Galileo Court, Suite B Davis, CA 95618 Directions to Cowell Blvd. Head south and turn left on Drew Avenue. Turn left on Galileo Court. Enter the driveway 1632 Da Vinci Court Davis, CA 95618 UC Davis Forensic Science Center (FSC) 1909 Galileo Court Suite B

Peisert, Sean

13

20. NBS SUIT LAB. TABLE WITH MISCELLANEOUS SUIT PARTS AND ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. NBS SUIT LAB. TABLE WITH MISCELLANEOUS SUIT PARTS AND TERRY WEST, A SPACE SUIT ASSEMBLY TECHNICIAN LOGGING SUIT PART DATA. PARTS ON THE TABLE ARE A HARD UPPER TORSO (HUT) (REAR LEFT), FULL HELMET (FRONT LEFT), TWO HELMETS WITHOUT PROTECTIVE VISORS, A PAIR OF GLOVES, AND A BACKPACK WITHOUT VOLUMETRIC COVER (REAR RIGHT). THE BACKPACK ATTACHES TO THE HUT TO MAKE-UP THE UPPER TORSO COMPONENTS OF THE SUIT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

14

Nutrition systems for pressure suits.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Nutrition systems were successfully developed in the Apollo Program for astronauts wearing pressure suits during emergency decompression situations and during lunar surface explorations. These nutrition systems consisted of unique dispensers, water, flavored beverages, nutrient-fortified beverages, and intermediate moisture food bars. The emergency decompression system dispensed the nutrition from outside the pressure suit by interfacing with a suit helmet penetration port. The lunar exploration system utilized dispensers stowed within the interior layers of the pressure suit. These systems could be adapted for provision of nutrients in other situations requiring the use of pressure suits.

Huber, C. S.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rapp, R. M.; Smith, M. C., Jr.

1973-01-01

15

Public Access Space Suit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper considers the role a Public Access Space Suit (PASS) could have in the certification of Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs) for use in space tourism and other non-government activities. Two distinct classes of hazards are highlighted. The first class involve hazards which are common with civil aircraft but where the RLV exacerbates the safety issue. The second class of hazard are those unique to RLVs. From consideration of these hazards a specification for the PASS is derived. Also the additional roles the PASS could have on a space station are considered both as a continuation of the safety role and a means by which tourists could experience recreational “spacewalks”. It is shown no significant additional requirements are generated to perform these extra roles. A feasibility design for a PASS is presented showing how these requirements could be met. The PASS concept derived in this paper is intended to be an input into the overall evaluation of costs and approaches to space tourism with the objective of exploring whether it is the best route, not only to meet safety requirements, but also to enhance the marketability of any space tourism venture.

Hempsell, C. M.

16

Orion ECLSS/Suit System Intermediate Pressure Integrated Suit Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Intermediate Pressure Integrated Suit Test (IPIST) phase of the integrated system testing of the Orion Vehicle Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS) technology was conducted for the Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. This test was performed in the eleven-foot human-rated vacuum chamber at the NASA Johnson Space Center by the Crew and Thermal Systems Division. This testing is the second phase of suit loop testing to demonstrate the viability of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) being developed for Orion. The IPIST configuration consisted of development hardware that included the CAMRAS, air revitalization loop fan and suit loop regulator. Two test subjects were in pressure suits at varying suit pressures. Follow-on testing, to be conducted in 2014, will utilize the same hardware with human test subjects in pressure suits at vacuum. This paper will discuss the results and findings of IPIST and will also discuss future testing.

Barido, Richard A.

2014-01-01

17

Orion ECLSS/Suit System - Ambient Pressure Integrated Suit Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Ambient Pressure Integrated Suit Test (APIST) phase of the integrated system testing of the Orion Vehicle Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS) technology was conducted for the Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. Crew and Thermal Systems Division performed this test in the eleven-foot human-rated vacuum chamber at the NASA Johnson Space Center. This testing is the first phase of suit loop testing to demonstrate the viability of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) being developed for Orion. APIST is the first in a series, which will consist of testing development hardware including the Carbon dioxide and Moisture Removal Amine Swing-bed (CAMRAS) and the air revitalization loop fan with human test subjects in pressure suits at varying suit pressures. Follow-on testing, to be conducted in 2013, will utilize the CAMRAS and a development regulator with human test subjects in pressure suits at varying cabin and suit pressures. This paper will discuss the results and findings of APIST and will also discuss future testing.

Barido, Richard A.

2012-01-01

18

Shoulder Joint For Protective Suit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Shoulder joint allows full range of natural motion: wearer senses little or no resisting force or torque. Developed for space suit, joint offers advantages in protective garments for underwater work, firefighting, or cleanup of hazardous materials.

Kosmo, Joseph J.; Smallcombe, Richard D.

1994-01-01

19

Next-Generation Space Suits  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video segment adapted from NOVA scienceNOW, MIT engineer Dava Newman is working to replace today's bulky, inflated space suits with a radical, sleek design that may one day allow astronauts to walk easily on Mars.

Foundation, Wgbh E.

2011-03-31

20

Development of Power Assisting Suit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to realize a wearable power assisting suit for assisting a nurse to carry a patient in her arms, the power supply and control systems of the suit have to be miniaturized, and it has to be wireless and pipeline-less. The new wearable suit consists of shoulders, arms, back, waist and legs units to be fitted on the nurse's body. The arms, waist and legs have new pneumatic rotary actuators driven directly by micro air pumps supplied by portable Ni-Cd batteries. The muscle forces are sensed by a new muscle hardness sensor utilizing a sensing tip mounted on a force sensing film device. An embedded microcomputer is used for the calculations of control signals. The new wearable suit was applied practically to a human body and a series of movement experiments that weights in the arms were held and taken up and down was performed. Each unit of the suit could transmit assisting torque directly to each joint verifying its practicability.

Yamamoto, Keijiro; Ishii, Mineo; Hyodo, Kazuhito; Yoshimitsu, Toshihiro; Matsuo, Takashi

21

Astronauts Conrad and Cooper suiting before launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr. and L. Gordon Cooper Jr. suiting before launch. Views include Conrad seated in a reclined chair before putting his helmet on (46374); Cooper is assisted by a suit technician to don his pressure suit (46375).

1965-01-01

22

Navigation/Prop Software Suite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Navigation (Nav)/Prop software is used to support shuttle mission analysis, production, and some operations tasks. The Nav/Prop suite containing configuration items (CIs) resides on IPS/Linux workstations. It features lifecycle documents, and data files used for shuttle navigation and propellant analysis for all flight segments. This suite also includes trajectory server, archive server, and RAT software residing on MCC/Linux workstations. Navigation/Prop represents tool versions established during or after IPS Equipment Rehost-3 or after the MCC Rehost.

Bruchmiller, Tomas; Tran, Sanh; Lee, Mathew; Bucker, Scott; Bupane, Catherine; Bennett, Charles; Cantu, Sergio; Kwong, Ping; Propst, Carolyn

2012-01-01

23

New CPU benchmark suites from SPEC  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author describes the new CPU benchmark suites from the Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC). The author describes the reasons for the release, and analyzes and compares new suites with the SPEC Release 1 benchmark suite. The new benchmark CPU suites are CINT2.0 (integer) and CFP2.0 (floating-point). CINT2.0 and CFP2.0 replace the SPEC Release 1 benchmark suite. The new suites

Kaivalya M. Dixit

1992-01-01

24

KENWOOD HALL RECEPTION KENWOOD SUITE  

E-print Network

KENWOOD HALL RECEPTION CONFERENCE ORGANISERS OFFICE KENWOOD SUITE LEISURE FACILITIES KENWOOD ROAD Reception Bedrooms #12;KENWOOD HOUSE CONFERENCE CENTRE LAYOUT Toilets THE TERRACE ROOM Poster Session/Exit Door Door Door Door LOUNGE AREA Main Hotel/ Restaurant Bedrooms Conference Organisers Office Bedrooms

Oakley, Jeremy

25

BrainSuite Training Workshop  

E-print Network

BrainSuite Training Workshop Presented at the USC School of Engineering 28$on and Labeling 11.15-11.45am Hands-on Training: Structural Labeling and Analysis 11.45-12.15pm of Diffusion Data 1.15-2.00pm Hands-on Training: Diffusion and Connec$vity Analysis

Leahy, Richard M.

26

The DARPA internet protocol suite  

Microsoft Academic Search

THE MILITARY requirement for computer communications between heterogeneous computers on heterogeneous networks has driven the development of a standard suite of protocols to permit such communications to take place in a robust and flexible manner. These protocols support an architecture consisting of multiple packet switched networks interconnected by gateways. The DARPA experimental internet system consists of satellite, terrestrial, radio, and

B. Leiner; R. Cole; J. Postel; D. Mills

1985-01-01

27

Mars EVA Suit Airlock (MESA)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Astrium Space Infrastructure Division has begun an in-house research activity of an Earth-based simulation facility supporting future manned missions to Mars. This research unit will help to prepare and support planned missions in the following ways: 1) to enable the investigation and analysis of contamination issues in advance of a human visit to Mars; 2) as a design tool to investigate and simulate crew operations; 3) to simulate crew operation during an actual mission; 4) to enable on-surface scientific operations without leaving the shirt-sleeve habitation environment ("glove box principle"). The MESA module is a surface EVA facility attached to the main habitation or laboratory module, or mobile pressurized rover. It will be sealed, but not pressurized, and provide protection against the harsh Martian environment. This module will include a second crew airlock for safety reasons. The compartment can also be used to provide an external working bench and experiment area for the crew. A simpler MESA concept provides only an open shelter against wind and dust. This concept does not incorporate working and experimental areas. The principle idea behind the MESA concept is to tackle the issue of contamination by minimizing the decontamination processes needed to clean surface equipment and crew suit surfaces after an EVA excursion prior to the astronaut re-entering the habitable area. The technical solution envisages the use of a dedicated crew suit airlock. This airlock uses an EVA suit which is externally attached by its back-pack to the EVA compartment area facing the Martian environment. The crew donns the suit from inside the habitable volume through the airlock on the back of the suit. The surface EVA can be accomplished after closing the back-pack and detaching the suit. A special technical design concept foresees an extendable suit back-pack, so that the astronaut can operate outside and in the vincinity of the module. The key driver in the investigation is the problem of contamination of the habitable volume by EVA and sampling activities and the transport of Earth-generated contaminants to Mars.

Ransom, Stephen; Böttcher, Jörg; Steinsiek, Frank

28

Empirical studies of test-suite reduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Test-suite reduction techniques attempt to reduce the costs of saving and reusing test cases during software maintenance by eliminating redundant test cases from test suites. A potential drawback of these techniques is that reducing the size of a test suite might reduce its ability to reveal faults in the software. Previous studies have suggested that test-suite reduction techniques can reduce

Gregg Rothermel; Mary Jean Harrold; Jeffery Von Ronne; Christie Hong

2002-01-01

29

Spinoff From a Moon Suit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Al Gross transferred expertise obtained as an ILC engineer for NASA's Apollo program to the manufacture of athletic shoes. Gross substituted DuPont's Hytrel plastic for foam materials in the shoe's midsole, eliminating cushioning loss caused by body weight. An external pressurized shell applied from space suit technology was incorporated into the shoe. Stiffness and cushioning properties of the midsole were "tuned" by varying material thickness and styling lines. A stress free "blow molding" process adapted from NASA space suit design was also utilized. The resulting compression chamber midsole performed well in tests. It allows AVIA to re-configure for specific sports and is a "first step" toward a durable, foamless, non-fatiguing midsole.

1991-01-01

30

Emergency space-suit helmet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A frusto-conically shaped distensible component is described which inflates to encircle a portion of the wearer's head and carries a collapsible member which automatically extends over the remaining portion of the head. A pulley arrangement secured between the walls of the distensible component automatically extends and retracts the collapsible member. When deflated, the unit is carried on the back of the wearer so as to provide an automatic emergency space suit helmet.

Smith, H. A. (inventor)

1970-01-01

31

uit: Suite Snowstorm Georgy Sviridov  

E-print Network

... I Waltz Gis uit: Suite Snowstorm Georgy Sviridov arr. Paul De BraAllegro Ais5-(Gis) ( of Cisdim holder(s). #12;53 A Waltz I A(Gis) Fism Cism(E) D 58 D(B) A(E) E A Cism(Gis) 63 Fism Fism(E) Bm(D) Bm the composer or other copyright holder(s). #12;106 Gis7 AVANTI I Waltz 376C Cism Cism(E) Cis7 Cis7 111 8a Fism

De Bra, Paul

32

Design of a biomechanically synergistic exotendon suit  

E-print Network

The focus of this thesis is on the design, development, and evaluation of a lightweight, exotendon suit for load carriage. The suit is intended to be worn underneath the wearer's own clothes for use in a military setting, ...

Graves, Carmen Marten-Ellis

2013-01-01

33

New Apparatus Tests Pressure-Suit Joints  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New apparatus measures applied torque and angle-of-flexure in pressurized flexible joints, such as those found in diving suits and flight suits. Torque and flexure are permanently recorded on x-y plotter. Family of curves can be taken as function of suit pressure or other variables. Apparatus could also measure torque-versus-angle in mechanical linkages.

Vykukal, H. C.; Webbon, B.

1982-01-01

34

Ventilation index of helicopter pilot suits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main function of helicopter pilot suits used in offshore flights is to provide thermal protection in the event of cold water immersion and to allow maintenance of thermal comfort during normal use. As part of a larger study to assess the thermal characteristics of helicopter pilot suits, the ventilation index of four suits was determined using the methods outlined

PATRICK J. SULLIVAN; IGOR B. MEKJAVIC; NAOSHI KAKITSUBA

1987-01-01

35

EV space suit gloves (passive)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A pair of pressure and thermal insulating overgloves to be used with an Extravehicular (EV) suit assembly was designed, developed, fabricated, and tested. The design features extensive use of Nomex felt materials in lieu of the multiple layer insulation formerly used with the Apollo thermal glove. The glove theoretically satisfies all of the thermal requirements. The presence of the thermal glove does not degrade pressure glove tactility by more than the acceptable 10% value. On the other hand, the thermal glove generally degrades pressure glove mobility by more than the acceptable 10% value, primarily in the area of the fingers. Life cycling tests were completed with minimal problems. The thermal glove/pressure glove ensemble was also tested for comfort; the test subjects found no problems with the thermal glove although they did report difficulties with pressure points on the pressure glove which were independent of the thermal glove.

Fletcher, E. G.; Dodson, J. D.; Elkins, W.; Tickner, E. G.

1975-01-01

36

Physics Suite Sample Problems: Magnetism  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page contains a series of problems on the topic of magnetism developed for use with The Physics Suite, an activity-based learning project. Each problem was designed to help build qualitative understanding of physics and was built around student acquisition of knowledge as observed in recent studies. The problems vary in format and include estimation, context-based reasoning, multiple choice, short answer, qualitative questions, and essay questions. The topics include magnetic forces and fields, magnetic induction, mass spectrometers, Ampere's Law, inducing current, and Faraday's Law. This item is part of a larger collection of problems, in-class questions, and interactive resources developed by the University of Maryland Physics Education Research Group.

Redish, Edward F.

2008-07-22

37

Z-2 Suit Support Stand and MKIII Suit Center of Gravity Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's next generation spacesuits are the Z-Series suits, made for a range of possible exploration missions in the near future. The prototype Z-1 suit has been developed and assembled to incorporate new technologies that has never been utilized before in the Apollo suits and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). NASA engineers tested the Z-1 suit extensively in order to developed design requirements for the new Z-2 suit. At the end of 2014, NASA will be receiving the new Z-2 suit to perform more testing and to further develop the new technologies of the suit. In order to do so, a suit support stand will be designed and fabricated to support the Z-2 suit during maintenance, sizing, and structural leakage testing. The Z-2 Suit Support Stand (Z2SSS) will be utilized for these purposes in the early testing stages of the Z-2 suit.

Nguyen, Tuan Q.

2014-01-01

38

Z-1 Prototype Space Suit Testing Summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Space Suit team of the NASA-Johnson Space Center performed a series of test with the Z-1 prototype space suit in 2012. This paper discusses, at a summary level, the tests performed and results from those tests. The purpose of the tests were two -fold: 1) characterize the suit performance so that the data could be used in the downselection of components for the Z -2 Space Suit and 2) develop interfaces with the suitport and exploration vehicles through pressurized suit evaluations. Tests performed included isolated and functional range of motion data capture, Z-1 waist and hip testing, joint torque testing, CO2 washout testing, fit checks and subject familiarizations, an exploration vehicle aft deck and suitport controls interface evaluation, delta pressure suitport tests including pressurized suit don and doff, and gross mobility and suitport ingress and egress demonstrations in reduced gravity. Lessons learned specific to the Z -1 prototype and to suit testing techniques will be presented.

Ross, Amy J.

2012-01-01

39

Steam System Tool Suite Introduction Guide  

E-print Network

Steam System Tool Suite Introduction Guide Alternate Text Narratives and Graphic.............................................................................................................................6 Modules Steam System Scoping Tool (SSST)........................................................................................8 Steam System Assessment Tool (SSAT

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

40

Evaluating Suit Fit Using Performance Degradation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mark III planetary technology demonstrator space suit can be tailored to an individual by swapping the modular components of the suit, such as the arms, legs, and gloves, as well as adding or removing sizing inserts in key areas. A method was sought to identify the transition from an ideal suit fit to a bad fit and how to quantify this breakdown using a metric of mobility-based human performance data. To this end, the degradation of the range of motion of the elbow and wrist of the suit as a function of suit sizing modifications was investigated to attempt to improve suit fit. The sizing range tested spanned optimal and poor fit and was adjusted incrementally in order to compare each joint angle across five different sizing configurations. Suited range of motion data were collected using a motion capture system for nine isolated and functional tasks utilizing the elbow and wrist joints. A total of four subjects were tested with motions involving both arms simultaneously as well as the right arm by itself. Findings indicated that no single joint drives the performance of the arm as a function of suit size; instead it is based on the interaction of multiple joints along a limb. To determine a size adjustment range where an individual can operate the suit at an acceptable level, a performance detriment limit was set. This user-selected limit reveals the task-dependent tolerance of the suit fit around optimal size. For example, the isolated joint motion indicated that the suit can deviate from optimal by as little as -0.6 in to -2.6 in before experiencing a 10% performance drop in the wrist or elbow joint. The study identified a preliminary method to quantify the impact of size on performance and developed a new way to gauge tolerances around optimal size.

Margerum, Sarah E.; Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

2012-01-01

41

Published April 2014 Enterprise Mobility Suite  

E-print Network

Published April 2014 Enterprise Mobility Suite Cost-effectively license Microsoft's People- centric IT cloud services for all your users Windows Intune Mobile Device Management Enterprise Mobility Suite The challenges · Users expect to be productive across a variety of device types, with access to the applications

Chaudhuri, Surajit

42

Introduction to the HPC Challenge Benchmark Suite  

Microsoft Academic Search

The HPC Challenge benchmark suite has been released by the DARPA HPCS program to help define the performance boundaries of future Petascale computing systems. HPC Challenge is a suite of tests that examine the performance of HPC architectures using kernels with memory access patterns more challenging than those of the High Performance Linpack (HPL) benchmark used in the Top500 list.

Piotr Luszczek; Jack J. Dongarra; David Koester; Rolf Rabenseifner; Bob Lucas; Jeremy Kepner; John McCalpin; David Bailey; Daisuke Takahashi

2005-01-01

43

Refactoring for TTCN-3 Test Suites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experience with the development and maintenance of test suites has shown that the Testing and Test Control Notation (TTCN-3) provides very good concepts for adequate test specification. However, ex- perience has also demonstrated that during either the migration of legacy test suites to TTCN-3, or the development of large TTCN-3 test speci- fications, users have found it is dicult to

Benjamin Zeiss; Helmut Neukirchen; Jens Grabowski; Dominic Evans; Paul Baker

44

Constellation Space Suit System Development Status  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Constellation Program has initiated the first new flight suit development project since the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed for the Space Shuttle Program in the 1970s. The Constellation suit system represents a significant challenge to designers in that the system is required to address all space suit functions needed through all missions and mission phases. This is in marked contrast to the EMU, which was designed specifically for micro-gravity space walks. The Constellation suit system must serve in all of the following scenarios: launch, entry and abort crew survival; micro-gravity extravehicular activity (EVA); and lunar (1/6th-gravity) surface EVA. This paper discusses technical efforts performed from May 2006 through February 2007 for the Constellation space suit system pressure garment.

Ross, Amy; Aitchison, Lindsay; Daniel, Brian

2007-01-01

45

Evaporation-Cooled Protective Suits for Firefighters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Suits cooled by evaporation of water have been proposed as improved means of temporary protection against high temperatures near fires. When air temperature exceeds 600 F (316 C) or in the presence of radiative heating from nearby sources at temperatures of 1,200 F (649 C) or more, outer suits now used by firefighters afford protection for only a few seconds. The proposed suits would exploit the high latent heat of vaporization of water to satisfy a need to protect against higher air temperatures and against radiant heating for significantly longer times. These suits would be fabricated and operated in conjunction with breathing and cooling systems like those with which firefighting suits are now equipped

Weinstein, Leonard Murray

2007-01-01

46

Evaluating Suit Fit Using Performance Degradation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mark III suit has multiple sizes of suit components (arm, leg, and gloves) as well as sizing inserts to tailor the fit of the suit to an individual. This study sought to determine a way to identify the point an ideal suit fit transforms into a bad fit and how to quantify this breakdown using mobility-based physical performance data. This study examined the changes in human physical performance via degradation of the elbow and wrist range of motion of the planetary suit prototype (Mark III) with respect to changes in sizing and as well as how to apply that knowledge to suit sizing options and improvements in suit fit. The methods implemented in this study focused on changes in elbow and wrist mobility due to incremental suit sizing modifications. This incremental sizing was within a range that included both optimum and poor fit. Suited range of motion data was collected using a motion analysis system for nine isolated and functional tasks encompassing the elbow and wrist joints. A total of four subjects were tested with motions involving both arms simultaneously as well as the right arm only. The results were then compared across sizing configurations. The results of this study indicate that range of motion may be used as a viable parameter to quantify at what stage suit sizing causes a detriment in performance; however the human performance decrement appeared to be based on the interaction of multiple joints along a limb, not a single joint angle. The study was able to identify a preliminary method to quantify the impact of size on performance and to develop a means to gauge tolerances around optimal size. More work is needed to improve the assessment of optimal fit and to compensate for multiple joint interactions.

Margerum, Sarah E.; Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

2011-01-01

47

Product development of a resistive athletic suit  

E-print Network

A preliminary prototype of a new athletic apparel product uses resistive straps, integrated within a suit, to provide muscular resistance. This developing fitness product allows users to exercise both their upper and lower ...

Desrochers, Christopher

2008-01-01

48

AX-5 space suit reliability model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The AX-5 is an all metal Extra-vehicular (EVA) space suit currently under consideration for use on Space Station Freedom. A reliability model was developed based on the suit's unique design and on projected joint cycle requirements. Three AX-5 space suit component joints were cycled under simulated load conditions in accordance with NASA's advanced space suit evaluation plan. This paper will describe the reliability model developed, the results of the cycle testing, and an interpretation of the model and test results in terms of projected Mean Time Between Failure for the AX-5. A discussion of the maintenance implications and life cycle for the AX-5 based on this projection is also included.

Reinhardt, AL; Magistad, John

1990-01-01

49

Complexity of Sizing for Space Suit Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The `fit? of a garment is often considered to be a subjective measure of garment quality. However, some experts attest that a complaint of poor garment fit is a symptom of inadequate or excessive ease, the space between the garment and the wearer. Fit has traditionally been hard to quantify, and space suits are an extreme example, where fit is difficult to measure but crucial for safety and operability. A proper space suit fit is particularly challenging because of NASA?s need to fit an incredibly diverse population (males and females from the 1st to 99th percentile) while developing a minimum number of space suit sizes. Because so few sizes are available, the available space suits must be optimized so that each fits a large segment of the population without compromising the fit of any one wearer.

Rajulu, Sudhakar; Benson, Elizabeth

2009-01-01

50

The ESA's Space Trajectory Analysis software suite  

Microsoft Academic Search

The European Space Agency (ESA) initiated in 2005 an internal activity to develop an open source software suite involving university science departments and research institutions all over the world. This project is called the \\

Guillermo Ortega

2008-01-01

51

An Examination of Luxury Suite Ownership in Professional Sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory study in professional sports luxury suite ownership was conducted to provide professionals in suite sales and facility management an increased understanding of the characteristics of corporate luxury suite owners. The business portion of suite client lists were collected and analyzed through a collaborative effort between the Center for Sports Administration at Ohio University, the Association of Luxury Suite

Heather J. Lawrence; Ron T. Contorno

52

Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit Intravehicular Activity Suit for Extravehicular Activity Mobility Evaluations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of an intravehicular activity (IVA) suit for a spacewalk or extravehicular activity (EVA) was evaluated for mobility and usability in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) environment at the Sonny Carter Training Facility near NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The Space Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Suit was modified to integrate with the Orion spacecraft. The first several missions of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will not have mass available to carry an EVA-specific suit; therefore, any EVA required will have to be performed by the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES). Since the MACES was not designed with EVA in mind, it was unknown what mobility the suit would be able to provide for an EVA or whether a person could perform useful tasks for an extended time inside the pressurized suit. The suit was evaluated in multiple NBL runs by a variety of subjects, including crewmembers with significant EVA experience. Various functional mobility tasks performed included: translation, body positioning, tool carrying, body stabilization, equipment handling, and tool usage. Hardware configurations included with and without Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment, suit with IVA gloves and suit with EVA gloves. Most tasks were completed on International Space Station mock-ups with existing EVA tools. Some limited tasks were completed with prototype tools on a simulated rocky surface. Major findings include: demonstrating the ability to weigh-out the suit, understanding the need to have subjects perform multiple runs prior to getting feedback, determining critical sizing factors, and need for adjusting suit work envelope. Early testing demonstrated the feasibility of EVA's limited duration and limited scope. Further testing is required with more flight-like tasking and constraints to validate these early results. If the suit is used for EVA, it will require mission-specific modifications for umbilical management or Primary Life Support System integration, safety tether attachment, and tool interfaces. These evaluations are continuing through calendar year 2014.

Watson, Richard D.

2014-01-01

53

BioImage Suite: An integrated medical image analysis suite: An update  

PubMed Central

BioImage Suite is an NIH-supported medical image analysis software suite developed at Yale. It leverages both the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) and the Insight Toolkit (ITK) and it includes many additional algorithms for image analysis especially in the areas of segmentation, registration, diffusion weighted image processing and fMRI analysis. BioImage Suite has a user-friendly user interface developed in the Tcl scripting language. A final beta version is freely available for download 1

Papademetris, Xenophon; Jackowski, Marcel P.; Rajeevan, Nallakkandi; DiStasio, Marcello; Okuda, Hirohito; Constable, R. Todd; Staib, Lawrence H.

2010-01-01

54

Suites of Dwarfs around nearby Giant Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog (UNGC) contains the most comprehensive summary of distances, radial velocities, and luminosities for 800 galaxies located within 11 Mpc from us. The high density of observables in the UNGC makes this sample indispensable for checking results of N-body simulations of cosmic structures on a ~1 Mpc scale. The environment of each galaxy in the UNGC was characterized by a tidal index ?1, depending on the separation and mass of the galaxy's main disturber (MD). We grouped UNGC galaxies with a common MD in suites, and ranked suite members according to their ?1. All suite members with positive ?1 are assumed to be physical companions of the MD. About 58% of the sample are members of physical groups. The distribution of suites by the number of members, n, follows a relation N(n) ~ n -2. The 20 most populated suites contain 468 galaxies, i.e., 59% of the UNGC sample. The fraction of MDs among the brightest galaxies is almost 100% and drops to 50% at MB = -18m. We discuss various properties of MDs, as well as galaxies belonging to their suites. The suite abundance practically does not depend on the morphological type, linear diameter, or hydrogen mass of the MD, the tightest correlation being with the MD dynamical mass. Dwarf galaxies around MDs exhibit well-known segregation effects: the population of the outskirts has later morphological types, richer H I contents, and higher rates of star formation activity. Nevertheless, there are some intriguing cases where dwarf spheroidal galaxies occur at the far periphery of the suites, as well as some late-type dwarfs residing close to MDs. Comparing simulation results with galaxy groups, most studies assume the Local Group is fairly typical. However, we recognize that the nearby groups significantly differ from each other and there is considerable variation in their properties. The suites of companions around the Milky Way and M31, consisting of the Local Group, do not quite seem to be a typical nearby group. The multiplicity of nearby groups of the number of their physical members can be described by the Hirsh-like index hg = 9, indicating that the Local Volume contains nine groups with populations exceeding nine companions to their MDs.

Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisina, Elena I.; Makarov, Dmitry I.

2014-01-01

55

[Radiation hygiene in interventional radiology suite].  

PubMed

Exposure of both patients and medical staff to relatively high doses of radiation is one of the features characteristic of interventional radiology (IR). Regulations regarding this kind of therapeutic management can be found in many legal references and recommendations of European Union Law. The purpose of the paper is collection and systematic analysis of activities and procedures associated with the question of radiation hygiene which should be observed in IR suites. Requirements regarding equipment of the IR suite, as well as radiation protection of patients and medical staff, constitute main questions included in the paper, worked out on the basis of valid regulations and occupational experience of the authors. Particular attention is paid to borderline requirements regarding modern IR suite equipment and its organization. Part of the paper is devoted to the understanding of physical laws of ionizing radiation in biological space and its surroundings. Understanding of physical laws, proper utilization of IR suite equipment, and strict compliance with recommendations of radiation protection by both patients and medical staff are critical for limitation of the harmful influence of radiation during interventional therapeutic procedures. An additional role of the paper is to make it easier to take decisions when creating new IR suites, in accordance with valid regulations and the rule of functionality. PMID:24493688

Garcarek, Jerzy; Falkowski, Aleksander; Janczak, Dariusz; Weyde, Wac?aw

2013-01-01

56

Analytical Tools for Space Suit Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As indicated by the implementation of multiple small project teams within the agency, NASA is adopting a lean approach to hardware development that emphasizes quick product realization and rapid response to shifting program and agency goals. Over the past two decades, space suit design has been evolutionary in approach with emphasis on building prototypes then testing with the largest practical range of subjects possible. The results of these efforts show continuous improvement but make scaled design and performance predictions almost impossible with limited budgets and little time. Thus, in an effort to start changing the way NASA approaches space suit design and analysis, the Advanced Space Suit group has initiated the development of an integrated design and analysis tool. It is a multi-year-if not decadal-development effort that, when fully implemented, is envisioned to generate analysis of any given space suit architecture or, conversely, predictions of ideal space suit architectures given specific mission parameters. The master tool will exchange information to and from a set of five sub-tool groups in order to generate the desired output. The basic functions of each sub-tool group, the initial relationships between the sub-tools, and a comparison to state of the art software and tools are discussed.

Aitchison, Lindsay

2011-01-01

57

Z-2 Prototype Space Suit Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit is the highest fidelity pressure garment from both hardware and systems design perspectives since the Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed in the late 1970's. Upon completion it will be tested in the 11' human-rated vacuum chamber and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center to assess the design and to determine applicability of the configuration to micro-, low- (asteroid), and planetary- (surface) gravity missions. This paper discusses the 'firsts' the Z-2 represents. For example, the Z-2 sizes to the smallest suit scye bearing plane distance for at least the last 25 years and is being designed with the most intensive use of human models with the suit model. The paper also provides a discussion of significant Z-2 configuration features, and how these components evolved from proposal concepts to final designs.

Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Graziosi, David

2014-01-01

58

Z-2 Prototype Space Suit Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit is the highest fidelity pressure garment from both hardware and systems design perspectives since the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed in the late 1970's. Upon completion the Z-2 will be tested in the 11 foot human-rated vacuum chamber and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center to assess the design and to determine applicability of the configuration to micro-, low- (asteroid), and planetary- (surface) gravity missions. This paper discusses the 'firsts' that the Z-2 represents. For example, the Z-2 sizes to the smallest suit scye bearing plane distance for at least the last 25 years and is being designed with the most intensive use of human models with the suit model.

Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Graziosi, David; Jones, Bobby; Lee, Ryan; Haque, Bazle Z.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.

2014-01-01

59

Astronaut Charles Conrad recieves help in suiting up before mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr. recieves help in suiting up in the suiting trailer at Launch complex 19 before Gemini 11 mission. He is having the neck ring of his suited adjusted prior to putting on his helmet.

1966-01-01

60

Terrestrial EVA Suit = Fire Fighter's Protective Clothing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Firefighters want to go to work, do their job well, and go home alive and uninjured. For their most important job, saving lives, firefighters want protective equipment that will allow more extended and effective time at fire scenes in order to perform victim search and rescue. A team, including engineers at NASA JSC and firefighters from Houston, has developed a list of problem areas for which NASA technology and know-how can recommend improvements for firefighter suits and gear. Prototypes for solutions have been developed and are being evaluated. This effort will spin back to NASA as improvements for lunar and planetary suits.

Foley, Tico; Brown, Robert G.; Burrell, Eddie; DelRosso, Dominic; Krishen, Kumar; Moffitt, Harold; Orndoff, Evelyne; Santos, Beatrice; Butzer, Melissa; Dasgupta, Rajib

1999-01-01

61

2004-01-2292 RoboSuit: Robotic Augmentations for Future Space Suits  

E-print Network

design has been limited to evolutionary steps since the first pressure suit was developed in 1934. While joints to provide direct human force amplification upon command. This paper covers three evolutionary of a pressure suit by identifying what fraction of shirtsleeve capability it allows. Given sufficient government

Akin, David

62

The EVA space suit development in Europe.  

PubMed

The progress of the European EVA space suit predevelopment activities has resulted in an improved technical reference concept, which will form the basis for a start of the Phase C/D development work in 1992. Technology development work over the last 2 years has resulted in a considerable amount of test data and a better understanding of the characteristics and behaviour of individual parts of the space suit system, in particular in the areas of suits' mobility and life support functions. This information has enabled a consolidation of certain design features on the one hand, but also led to the challenging of some of the design solutions on the other hand. While working towards an improved situation with respect to the main design drivers mass and cost, the technical concept has been improved with respect to functional safety and ease of handling, taking the evolving Hermes spaceplane requirements into consideration. Necessary hardware and functional redundancies have been implemented taking the operational scenario with Hermes and Columbus servicing into consideration. This paper presents the latest design status of the European EVA space suit concept, with particular emphasis on crew safety, comfort and productivity, in the frame of the predevelopment work for the European Space Agency. PMID:11541017

Skoog, A I

1994-01-01

63

Are You Suited for the Job?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was undertaken to examine the impact of different color women's business suits on hiring decisions and perceptions of job applicants for two different types of jobs, one requiring warmth (elementary school teacher) and one requiring power (police officer). It was hypothesized that fictitious job applicants wearing dark, cold colors…

Carter, Celeste M.; And Others

64

What's New with MS Office Suites  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

If one buys a new PC, laptop, or netbook computer today, it probably comes preloaded with Microsoft Office 2010 Starter Edition. This is a significantly limited, advertising-laden version of Microsoft's suite of productivity programs, Microsoft Office. This continues the trend of PC makers providing ever more crippled versions of Microsoft's…

Goldsborough, Reid

2012-01-01

65

Rodinia: A benchmark suite for heterogeneous computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents and characterizes Rodinia, a benchmark suite for heterogeneous computing. To help architects study emerging platforms such as GPUs (Graphics Processing Units), Rodinia includes applications and kernels which target multi-core CPU and GPU platforms. The choice of applications is inspired by Berkeley's dwarf taxonomy. Our characterization shows that the Rodinia benchmarks cover a wide range of parallel communication

Shuai Che; Michael Boyer; Jiayuan Meng; David Tarjan; Jeremy W. Sheaffer; Sang-ha Lee; Kevin Skadron

2009-01-01

66

977 Garfield, Suite 6 Eugene, OR 97402  

E-print Network

977 Garfield, Suite 6 Eugene, OR 97402 541-686-0001 EugeneOR@expresspros.com As a full · Professional Search and Contract · Flexible Staffing EUGENE EXPRESS OFFICE OVERVIEW Pat Murphy began with the first franchise in Lewiston, Idaho in 1974. Seeking new opportunities the Eugene office

Oregon, University of

67

Antigravity Suits For Studies Of Weightlessness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report presents results of research on use of "antigravity" suit, one applying positive pressure to lower body to simulate some effects of microgravity. Research suggests lower-body positive pressure is alternative to bed rest or immersion in water in terrestrial studies of cardioregulatory, renal, electrolyte, and hormonal changes induced in humans by microgravity.

Kravik, Stein E.; Greenleaf, John

1992-01-01

68

Dr. von Braun Discusses 'Bottle Suit' Concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Wernher von Braun (center), then Chief of the Guided Missile Development Division at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, discusses a 'bottle suit' model with Dr. Heinz Haber (left), an expert on aviation medicine, and Willey Ley, a science writer on rocketry and space exploration. The three men were at the Disney studios appearing in the motion picture, entitled 'Man in Space.'

1954-01-01

69

Prioritisation of test suites containing precedence constraints  

E-print Network

1 Prioritisation of test suites containing precedence constraints Tim Miller Department@unimelb.edu.au Abstract--Test case prioritisation is the process of ordering the exe- cution of test cases to achieve a certain goal, such as increasing the rate of fault detection. Many existing test case prioritisation

Miller, Tim

70

Mission configurable threat detection sensor suite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article describes work that has been undertaken at the Defence Research Establishment Valcartier (DREV) to integrate a number of electro-optics sensors into a modular mission configurable threat detection sensor suite (TDSS) demonstrator. The sensor suite is based on a series of plug and play detection heads networked together in the same fashion as a computer network. The architecture allows optimization of the detection capabilities according to a mission requirement. The TDSS demonstrator was developed to study different sensor configuration in order to establish the requirements to improve the protection of the military platforms. It is a good example showing how networking can help in adapting military systems to specific requirements. The paper gives an up to date description of the TDSS demonstrator. To our knowledge, it is the first time that this approach is used in the field of military detection sensors.

Fortin, Jean; Cantin, Andre; Dubois, Jacques; Trudel, Carol

2000-12-01

71

In Outer Space without a Space Suit?  

E-print Network

The author proposes and investigates his old idea - a living human in space without the encumbrance of a complex space suit. Only in this condition can biological humanity seriously attempt to colonize space because all planets of Solar system (except the Earth) do not have suitable atmospheres. Aside from the issue of temperature, a suitable partial pressure of oxygen is lacking. In this case the main problem is how to satiate human blood with oxygen and delete carbonic acid gas (carbon dioxide). The proposed system would enable a person to function in outer space without a space suit and, for a long time, without food. That is useful also in the Earth for sustaining working men in an otherwise deadly atmosphere laden with lethal particulates (in case of nuclear, chemical or biological war), in underground confined spaces without fresh air, under water or a top high mountains above a height that can sustain respiration.

Bolonkin, Alexander

2008-01-01

72

The BTeV Software Tutorial Suite  

SciTech Connect

The BTeV Collaboration is starting to develop its C++ based offline software suite, an integral part of which is a series of tutorials. These tutorials are targeted at a diverse audience, including new graduate students, experienced physicists with little or no C++ experience, those with just enough C++ to be dangerous, and experts who need only an overview of the available tools. The tutorials must both teach C++ in general and the BTeV specific tools in particular. Finally, they must teach physicists how to find and use the detailed documentation. This report will review the status of the BTeV experiment, give an overview of the plans for and the state of the software and will then describe the plans for the tutorial suite.

Robert K. Kutschke

2004-02-20

73

In Outer Space without a Space Suit?  

E-print Network

The author proposes and investigates his old idea - a living human in space without the encumbrance of a complex space suit. Only in this condition can biological humanity seriously attempt to colonize space because all planets of Solar system (except the Earth) do not have suitable atmospheres. Aside from the issue of temperature, a suitable partial pressure of oxygen is lacking. In this case the main problem is how to satiate human blood with oxygen and delete carbonic acid gas (carbon dioxide). The proposed system would enable a person to function in outer space without a space suit and, for a long time, without food. That is useful also in the Earth for sustaining working men in an otherwise deadly atmosphere laden with lethal particulates (in case of nuclear, chemical or biological war), in underground confined spaces without fresh air, under water or a top high mountains above a height that can sustain respiration.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-06-24

74

An MBSE Approach to Space Suit Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The EVA/Space Suit Development Office (ESSD) Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) team has utilized MBSE in multiple programs. After developing operational and architectural models, the MBSE framework was expanded to link the requirements space to the system models through functional analysis and interfaces definitions. By documenting all the connections within the technical baseline, ESSD experienced significant efficiency improvements in analysis and identification of change impacts. One of the biggest challenges presented to the MBSE structure was a program transition and restructuring effort, which was completed successfully in 4 months culminating in the approval of a new EVA Technical Baseline. During this time three requirements sets spanning multiple DRMs were streamlined into one NASA-owned Systems Requirement Document (SRD) that successfully identified requirements relevant to the current hardware development effort while remaining extensible to support future hardware developments. A capability-based hierarchy was established to provide a more flexible framework for future space suit development that can support multiple programs with minimal rework of basic EVA/Space Suit requirements. This MBSE approach was most recently applied for generation of an EMU Demonstrator technical baseline being developed for an ISS DTO. The relatively quick turnaround of operational concepts, architecture definition, and requirements for this new suit development has allowed us to test and evolve the MBSE process and framework in an extremely different setting while still offering extensibility and traceability throughout ESSD projects. The ESSD MBSE framework continues to be evolved in order to support integration of all products associated with the SE&I engine.

Cordova, Lauren; Kovich, Christine; Sargusingh, Miriam

2012-01-01

75

Interoperative efficiency in minimally invasive surgery suites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Performing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in a conventional operating room (OR) requires additional specialized equipment\\u000a otherwise stored outside the OR. Before the procedure, the OR team must collect, prepare, and connect the equipment, then\\u000a take it away afterward. These extra tasks pose a thread to OR efficiency and may lengthen turnover times. The dedicated MIS\\u000a suite has permanently installed laparoscopic

M. J. van Det; W. J. H. J. Meijerink; C. Hoff; J. P. E. N. Pierie

2009-01-01

76

Space suit bioenergetics: framework and analysis of unsuited and suited activity.  

PubMed

Metabolic costs limit the duration and intensity of extravehicular activity (EVA), an essential component of future human missions to the Moon and Mars. Energetics Framework: We present a framework for comparison of energetics data across and between studies. This framework, applied to locomotion, differentiates between muscle efficiency and energy recovery, two concepts often confused in the literature. The human run-walk transition in Earth gravity occurs at the point for which energy recovery is approximately the same for walking and running, suggesting a possible role for recovery in gait transitions. Muscular Energetics: Muscle physiology limits the overall efficiency by which chemical energy is converted through metabolism to useful work. Unsuited Locomotion: Walking and running use different methods of energy storage and release. These differences contribute to the relative changes in the metabolic cost of walking and running as gravity is varied, with the metabolic cost of locomoting at a given velocity changing in proportion to gravity for running and less than in proportion for walking. Space Suits: Major factors affecting the energetic cost of suited movement include suit pressurization, gravity, velocity, surface slope, and space suit configuration. Apollo lunar surface EVA traverse metabolic rates, while unexpectedly low, were higher than other activity categories. The Lunar Roving Vehicle facilitated even lower metabolic rates, thus longer duration EVAs. Muscles and tendons act like springs during running; similarly, longitudinal pressure forces in gas pressure space suits allow spring-like storage and release of energy when suits are self-supporting. PMID:18018432

Carr, Christopher E; Newman, Dava J

2007-11-01

77

Physics Suite Peer Instruction Problems: Dynamics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains a series of peer instruction problems on dynamics, designed to be solved in a classroom setting. The problems are presented with a qualitative (usually multiple choice) question that is carefully constructed to engage student difficulties with fundamental concepts. Students consider the problem individually and contribute their answers using personal response systems (clickers). Students then confer with their cooperative groups and vote again on the correct response. Topics covered include force, acceleration, normal force, friction, tension, and motion in two dimensions. This problem set is part of the Physics Suite collection, containing sample problems, peer instruction problems, and alternative homework sets.

Redish, Edward F.

2008-08-11

78

Reading Like a Historian: Zoot Suit Riots  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: What caused the Zoot Suit Riots? The teacher first provides background information on the incident and then the class looks at their textbook account and answers brief questions. Students then form pairs and analyze 2 documents: 1) a Los Angeles Daily News account of the riots and 2) a letter from the Committee for the Defense of Mexican American Youth, addressed to U.S. Vice President Wallace. For both, students answer guiding questions on a graphic organizer. A final class discussion contextualizes and corroborates the documents: Is one more reliable? What caused the riots?

Group, Stanford H.

2012-10-30

79

Physics Suite Peer Instruction Problems: Gravity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains a series of peer instruction problems on the topic of gravity, designed to be solved in a classroom setting. The problems are presented with a qualitative (usually multiple choice) question that is carefully constructed to engage student difficulties with fundamental concepts. Students consider the problem individually and contribute their answers using personal response systems (clickers). Students then confer with their cooperative groups and vote again on the correct response. Topics covered include orbits, Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation, and circular motion. This is part of the Physics Suite collection, containing sample problems, peer instruction problems, and alternative homework sets.

Redish, Edward F.

2008-08-11

80

Physics Suite Peer Instruction Problems: Rotational Motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains a series of peer instruction problems on rotational motion, designed to be solved in a classroom setting. The problems are presented with a qualitative question (usually multiple choice) that is carefully constructed to engage student difficulties with fundamental concepts. Students consider the problem individually and contribute their answers using personal response systems (clickers). Students then confer with their cooperative groups and vote again on the correct response. Topics covered include centrifugal force, angular speed, torque, rotational energy, and rotational friction. This problem set is part of the Physics Suite collection, containing sample problems, peer instruction problems, and alternative homework sets.

Redish, Edward F.

2008-08-11

81

Data processing suite for GIFTS testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) instrument is a hyperspectral sounder slated to undergo thermal vacuum testing within a year. The University of Wisconsin - Madison is authoring a software suite to answer the requirement of testing the conversion of raw interferogram images into calibrated high-resolution spectra. The software consists of algorithm components that assemble into a processing pipeline as well as a testing harness utilizing a lightweight scripting language. The processing requirements for an imaging FTS are considerable, and necessitate an understanding of maximum achievable accuracy as well as exploration of tradeoffs in the interest of processing efficiency. We present an overview of the design of this testing software.

Smuga-Otto, Maciej J.; Garcia, Raymond K.; Knuteson, Robert O.; Olson, Erik R.

2005-08-01

82

Physics Suite Peer Instruction Problems: Heat & Temperature  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains a series of peer instruction problems on heat and temperature, designed to be solved in a classroom setting. The problems are presented with a qualitative question (usually multiple choice) that is carefully constructed to engage student difficulties with fundamental concepts. Students consider the problem individually and contribute their answers using personal response systems (clickers). Students then confer with their cooperative groups and vote again on the correct response. Topics covered include heat lost to friction, mixing liquids of different temperatures, and thermal energy. This problem set is part of the Physics Suite collection, containing sample problems, peer instruction problems, and alternative homework sets.

Redish, Edward F.

2008-08-11

83

Applications of Suits spectral model to wheat  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Canopy reflectance calculations for a spring type Mexican wheat, Penjamo, are compared with published data on Scout winter wheat. Good agreement exists between model calculations and experimental data in the spectral range, 500 nm to 750 nm, suggesting that the model parameters for wheat can be applied to different cultivars of wheat in the same growth stage. Wheat canopy reflectance is dependent upon surface soil type and this dependency is examined with the Suits' spectral model. In this particular growth stage wheat reflectance is shown to be nearly independent of soil reflectance in the visible wavelengths and progressively dependent at longer wavelengths in the infrared.

Chance, J. E.

1977-01-01

84

DASCAR sensor suite and video data system  

SciTech Connect

A research program oriented toward the development of a portable data acquisition system for crash avoidance research has been conducted. This paper discusses the background to the project and the requirements for the data acquisition system. it also provides a brief system overview and describes two of the system`s five major elements, the sensor suite and the video data system, in detail. Components, functions, and specifications are covered Finally the paper addresses the central data collection/analysis facility which was assembled to manage the sensor and video data, and presents the potential uses of the data acquisition system.

Carter, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Barickman, F.S. [National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, East Liberty, OH (United States). Vehicle Research and Test Center; Goodman, M.J. [National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Crash Avoidance Research

1996-12-31

85

Physics Suite Peer Instruction Problems: Electricity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains a series of peer instruction problems on electricity, designed to be solved in a classroom setting. The problems are presented with a qualitative (usually multiple choice) question that is carefully constructed to engage student difficulties with fundamental concepts. Students consider the problem individually and contribute their answers using personal response systems (clickers). Students then confer with their cooperative groups and vote again on the correct response. Topics covered include superpositioning, electrical potential energy, electric fields, current, Ohm's Law, parallel and series combinations of resistors, and capacitors. This problem set is part of the Physics Suite collection, containing sample problems, peer instruction problems, and alternative homework sets for introductory physics courses.

Redish, Edward F.

2008-08-11

86

Physics Suite Peer Instruction Problems: Kinematics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains a series of peer instruction problems on kinematics, designed to be solved in a classroom setting. The problems are presented with a qualitative (usually multiple choice) question that is carefully constructed to engage student difficulties with fundamental concepts. Students consider the problem individually and contribute their answers using personal response systems (clickers). Students then confer with their cooperative groups and vote again on the correct response. Topics covered include displacement, velocity, average velocity, speed, and interpreting position and velocity graphs. This problem set is part of the Physics Suite collection, containing sample problems, peer instruction problems, and alternative homework sets.

Redish, Edward F.

2008-08-11

87

Your space suit and you - Significance of manloading in pressure suit design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data collection on man-induced loads borne by space suits is discussed, with emphasis on the glove area. The distinction between the 'potential' maximum manload (measured according to the 95 percentile male outside the suit), and the actual manload experienced by the suit or 'limit manload', is stressed. Limit manload data for the glove were collected using a glove with finger and metacarpal joints and a hard shell to support strain gages. Potential manload data are theorized to exceed the limit manload (as corroborated by entire suit limit load data presented for the Apollo and Shuttle suits) because of load sharing within the fabric configuration, test inputs being at values other than 95 percentile values, and the restraint line acting like a spring and preventing the load from being induced. This, however, is not borne out by the glove test data, illustrating the difficulty of measuring the man/machine interface. Design load is determined by adding he pressure load and the limit load after compensations have been made for load splitting. Finally, a method for better testing, used in the design of an improved mobility glove for the Space Shuttle program, is presented.

Rouen, M.; Gray, R.

1985-01-01

88

The bioenergetics of walking and running in space suits  

E-print Network

Space-suited activity is critical for human spaceflight, and is synonymous with human planetary exploration. Space suits impose kinematic and kinetic boundary conditions that affect movement and locomotion, and in doing ...

Carr, Christopher E. (Christopher Edward), 1976-

2005-01-01

89

Defensive aids suite prototype for light armored vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Defence Research Establishment Valcartier has initiated in 1998 R&D work to investigate and to demonstrate key technologies required for future Defensive Aid Suite to protect Light Armoured Vehicles. A basic Defensive Aid Suite demonstrator (Phase I) was built and integrated into the LAV vetronics by Litton Systems Canada and his consortium. The Defensive Aid Suite consisted of a 2-band

Andre Cantin; Jean Fortin; Johan Venter; Brian G. Philip; Russell Hagen; Dietmar Krieger; Mike Greenley

2001-01-01

90

Hormone-mediated suites as adaptations and evolutionary constraints  

E-print Network

Review Hormone-mediated suites as adaptations and evolutionary constraints Joel W. McGlothlin1, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA Hormones mediate the expression of suites of correlated within a hormone-mediated suite may, for example, lead to a change in the strength of the hormone signal

91

Specialized testing and evaluation of space-suit materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The selection of nonmetallic materials used in the Apollo space suits is discussed. The specialized test program to determine the flammability of selected space suit materials is described. Emphasis is placed on the equipment used to test and qualify the space suit materials and subassemblies for operation in the deep space environment.

Ballentine, T. J.

1971-01-01

92

A small evaluation suite for Ada compilers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

After completing a small Ada pilot project (OCC simulator) for the Multi Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) at Goddard last year, the use of Ada to develop OCCs was recommended. To help MSOCC transition toward Ada, a suite of about 100 evaluation programs was developed which can be used to assess Ada compilers. These programs compare the overall quality of the compilation system, compare the relative efficiencies of the compilers and the environments in which they work, and compare the size and execution speed of generated machine code. Another goal of the benchmark software was to provide MSOCC system developers with rough timing estimates for the purpose of predicting performance of future systems written in Ada.

Wilke, Randy; Roy, Daniel M.

1986-01-01

93

Physics Suite Sample Problems: Momentum and Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page contains a series of problems on the topic of momentum developed for use with The Physics Suite, an activity-based learning project. Each problem was designed to help build qualitative understanding of physics and was built around student acquisition of knowledge as observed in recent studies. The problems vary in format and include estimation, context-based reasoning, multiple choice, short answer, qualitative questions, and essay questions. Topics covered include conservation of energy, conservation of momentum, collisions, springs, gravitational potential energy, work, and graphical analysis. This item is part of a larger collection of problems, in-class questions, and interactive resources developed by the University of Maryland Physics Education Research Group.

Redish, Edward F.

2008-07-19

94

A diagnostic suite to assess NWP performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A suite of numerical weather prediction (NWP) verification diagnostics applicable to both scalar and vector variables is developed, highlighting the normalization and successive decomposition of model errors. The normalized root-mean square error (NRMSE) is broken down into contributions from the normalized bias (NBias) and the normalized pattern error (NPE). The square of NPE, or the normalized error variance?, is further analyzed into phase and amplitude errors, measured respectively by the correlation and the variance similarity. The variance similarity diagnostic is introduced to verify variability e.g. under different climates. While centered RMSE can be reduced by under-prediction of variability in the model,?penalizes over- and under-prediction of variability equally. The error decomposition diagram, the correlation-similarity diagram and the anisotropy diagram are introduced. The correlation-similarity diagram was compared with the Taylor diagram: it has the advantage of analyzing the normalized error variance geometrically into contributions from the correlation and variance similarity. Normalization of the error metrics removes the dependence on the inherent variability of a variable and allows comparison among quantities of different physical units and from different regions and seasons. This method was used to assess the Coupled Ocean/Atmospheric Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS). The NWP performance degrades progressively from the midlatitudes through the sub-tropics to the tropics. But similar cold and moist biases are noted and position and timing errors are the main cause of pattern errors. Although the suite of metrics is applied to NWP verification here, it is generally applicable as diagnostics for differences between two data sets.

Koh, T.-Y.; Wang, S.; Bhatt, B. C.

2012-07-01

95

SOLIS: an innovative suite of synoptic instruments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SOLIS (Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun) is a suite of three innovative instruments under construction that will greatly improve ground-based synoptic solar observations. The Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) is a compact, high-throughput vector-polarimeter with an active secondary mirror, an actively controlled grating spectrograph, and two high-speed cameras with silicon-on-CMOS-multiplexer hybrid focal plane arrays. It will measure the magnetic field strength and direction over the full solar disk within 15 minutes. The Full-Disk Patrol (FDP) takes full-disk solar intensity and Doppler images in various spectral lines and in the continuum at a high cadence through liquid-crystal tuned birefringent filters. The Integrated Sunlight Spectrometer (ISS) uses a fiber-fed spectrograph to measure minute changes of the Sun-as-a-star in many spectral lines. A high degree of automation and remote control provides fast user access to data and flexible interaction with the data-collection process. SOLIS is currently in the final assembly phase and will become operational early in 2003.

Keller, Christoph U.; Harvey, John W.; Giampapa, Mark S.

2003-02-01

96

Engineering Software Suite Validates System Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

EDAptive Computing Inc.'s (ECI) EDAstar engineering software tool suite, created to capture and validate system design requirements, was significantly funded by NASA's Ames Research Center through five Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts. These programs specifically developed Syscape, used to capture executable specifications of multi-disciplinary systems, and VectorGen, used to automatically generate tests to ensure system implementations meet specifications. According to the company, the VectorGen tests considerably reduce the time and effort required to validate implementation of components, thereby ensuring their safe and reliable operation. EDASHIELD, an additional product offering from ECI, can be used to diagnose, predict, and correct errors after a system has been deployed using EDASTAR -created models. Initial commercialization for EDASTAR included application by a large prime contractor in a military setting, and customers include various branches within the U.S. Department of Defense, industry giants like the Lockheed Martin Corporation, Science Applications International Corporation, and Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation, as well as NASA's Langley and Glenn Research Centers

2007-01-01

97

The Space Environment Sensor Suite for NPOESS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Space Environment Sensor Suite (SESS) is a set of instruments of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) that takes measurements to produce space environment data products. The SESS includes a complement of instruments that provide in-situ data on particles, fields, aurora, and the ionosphere. The SESS team consists of the NPOESS Integrated Program Office (IPO), Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST) -- the prime contractor for NPOESS, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (BATC) -- lead systems integrator for SESS, key instrument/algorithm suppliers, and the science community advisors who represent the future users of SESS data products. This team has developed a baseline design and constellation that address the NPOESS requirements for the SESS-specific in-situ Environmental Data Records (EDRs). These EDRs are allocated to a Thermal Plasma Sensor (TPS), a Low Energy Particle Sensor (LEPS), a Medium Energy Particle Sensor (MEPS), and a High Energy Particle Sensor (HEPS) that are distributed on the multi-orbit NPOESS system architecture to satisfy the user community's performance and coverage needs. This paper will present details on the SESS sensors, the architecture and its expected performance.

Rodriguez, J. V.; Eastman, K. W.; Eraker, J. H.; Belue, J.; Citrone, P.; Bloom, J. D.; Christensen, T. E.; Talmadge, S.; Ubhayakar, S. K.; Denig, W. F.

2005-12-01

98

Automated Structure Solution with the PHENIX Suite  

SciTech Connect

Significant time and effort are often required to solve and complete a macromolecular crystal structure. The development of automated computational methods for the analysis, solution and completion of crystallographic structures has the potential to produce minimally biased models in a short time without the need for manual intervention. The PHENIX software suite is a highly automated system for macromolecular structure determination that can rapidly arrive at an initial partial model of a structure without significant human intervention, given moderate resolution and good quality data. This achievement has been made possible by the development of new algorithms for structure determination, maximum-likelihood molecular replacement (PHASER), heavy-atom search (HySS), template and pattern-based automated model-building (RESOLVE, TEXTAL), automated macromolecular refinement (phenix.refine), and iterative model-building, density modification and refinement that can operate at moderate resolution (RESOLVE, AutoBuild). These algorithms are based on a highly integrated and comprehensive set of crystallographic libraries that have been built and made available to the community. The algorithms are tightly linked and made easily accessible to users through the PHENIX Wizards and the PHENIX GUI.

Zwart, Peter H.; Zwart, Peter H.; Afonine, Pavel; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Hung, Li-Wei; Ioerger, Tom R.; McCoy, A.J.; McKee, Eric; Moriarty, Nigel; Read, Randy J.; Sacchettini, James C.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Storoni, L.C.; Terwilliger, Tomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

2008-06-09

99

Suited Occupant Injury Potential During Dynamic Spacecraft Flight Phases  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In support of the Constellation Space Suit Element [CSSE], a new space-suit architecture will be created for support of Launch, Entry, Abort, Microgravity Extra- Vehicular Activity [EVA], and post-landing crew operations, safety and, under emergency conditions, survival. The space suit is unique in comparison to previous launch, entry, and abort [LEA] suit architectures in that it utilizes rigid mobility elements in the scye (i.e., shoulder) and the upper arm regions. The suit architecture also utilizes rigid thigh disconnect elements to create a quick disconnect approximately located above the knee. This feature allows commonality of the lower portion of the suit (from the thigh disconnect down), making the lower legs common across two suit configurations. This suit must interface with the Orion vehicle seat subsystem, which includes seat components, lateral supports, and restraints. Due to the unique configuration of spacesuit mobility elements, combined with the need to provide occupant protection during dynamic vehicle events, risks have been identified with potential injury due to the suit characteristics described above. To address the risk concerns, a test series has been developed in coordination with the Injury Biomechanics Research Laboratory [IBRL] to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of these potential issues. Testing includes use of Anthropomorphic Test Devices [ATDs; vernacularly referred to as "crash test dummies"], Post Mortem Human Subjects [PMHS], and representative seat/suit hardware in combination with high linear acceleration events. The ensuing treatment focuses on test purpose and objectives; test hardware, facility, and setup; and preliminary results.

Dub, Mark O.; McFarland, Shane M.

2010-01-01

100

Quantifying Astronaut Tasks: Robotic Technology and Future Space Suit Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary aim of this research effort was to advance the current understanding of astronauts' capabilities and limitations in space-suited EVA by developing models of the constitutive and compatibility relations of a space suit, based on experimental data gained from human test subjects as well as a 12 degree-of-freedom human-sized robot, and utilizing these fundamental relations to estimate a human factors performance metric for space suited EVA work. The three specific objectives are to: 1) Compile a detailed database of torques required to bend the joints of a space suit, using realistic, multi- joint human motions. 2) Develop a mathematical model of the constitutive relations between space suit joint torques and joint angular positions, based on experimental data and compare other investigators' physics-based models to experimental data. 3) Estimate the work envelope of a space suited astronaut, using the constitutive and compatibility relations of the space suit. The body of work that makes up this report includes experimentation, empirical and physics-based modeling, and model applications. A detailed space suit joint torque-angle database was compiled with a novel experimental approach that used space-suited human test subjects to generate realistic, multi-joint motions and an instrumented robot to measure the torques required to accomplish these motions in a space suit. Based on the experimental data, a mathematical model is developed to predict joint torque from the joint angle history. Two physics-based models of pressurized fabric cylinder bending are compared to experimental data, yielding design insights. The mathematical model is applied to EVA operations in an inverse kinematic analysis coupled to the space suit model to calculate the volume in which space-suited astronauts can work with their hands, demonstrating that operational human factors metrics can be predicted from fundamental space suit information.

Newman, Dava

2003-01-01

101

Innovative technology summary report: Sealed-seam sack suits  

SciTech Connect

Sealed-seam sack suits are an improved/innovative safety and industrial hygiene technology designed to protect workers from dermal exposure to contamination. Most of these disposable, synthetic-fabric suits are more protective than cotton suits, and are also water-resistant and gas permeable. Some fabrics provide a filter to aerosols, which is important to protection against contamination, while allowing air to pass, increasing comfort level of workers. It is easier to detect body-moisture breakthrough with the disposable suits than with cotton, which is also important to protecting workers from contamination. These suits present a safe and cost-effective (6% to 17% less expensive than the baseline) alternative to traditional protective clothing. This report covers the period from October 1996 to August 1997. During that time, sealed-seam sack suits were demonstrated during daily activities under normal working conditions at the C Reactor and under environmentally controlled conditions at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

NONE

1998-09-01

102

Newly designed launch and entry suit (LES) modeled by technician  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space shuttle orange launch and entry suit (LES), a partial pressure suit, is modeled by a technician. LES was designed for STS-26, the return to flight mission, and subsequent missions. Included in the crew escape system (CES) package are launch and entry helmet (LEH) with communications carrier (COMM CAP), parachute pack and harness, life raft, life preserver unit (LPU), LES gloves, suit oxygen manifold and valves, boots, and survival gear.

1988-01-01

103

Suit Port Aft Bulkhead Mockup 2008 Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Electric Rover (LER), formerly called the Small Pressurized Rover (SPR), is currently being carried as an integral part of the current Lunar Surface Architectures under consideration in the Constellation program. One element of the LER is the suit port, the means by which the crew performs Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Two suit port deliverables were produced in fiscal year 2008: an aft bulkhead mockup for functional integrated testing with the 1-G LER mockup and a functional and pressurizable Engineering Unit (EU). This paper focuses on the aft bulkhead mockup test results from Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS) October 2008 testing at Black Point Lava Flow (BPLF), Arizona. Refer to 39th International Conference on Environmental Systems (ICES) for test results of the EU. The suit port aft bulkhead mockup was integrated with the mockup of the LER cabin and chassis. It is located on the aft bulkhead of the LER cabin structure and includes hatches, a locking mechanism, seals, interior and exterior suit don/doff aids, and exterior platforms to accommodate different crewmember heights. A lightweight mockup of the Mark III suit was tested with the suit port aft bulkhead mockup. There are several limitations to the suit port and mockup suits, and results of the suit port evaluation are presented and interpreted within the context of the limitations.

Romig, Barbara A.; Allton, Charles S.; Litaker, Harry L.

2009-01-01

104

Use MACES IVA Suit for EVA Mobility Evaluations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of an Intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) suit for a spacewalk or Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) was evaluated for mobility and usability in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) environment. The Space Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) has been modified (MACES) to integrate with the Orion spacecraft. The first several missions of the Orion MPCV spacecraft will not have mass available to carry an EVA specific suit so any EVA required will have to be performed by the MACES. Since the MACES was not designed with EVA in mind, it was unknown what mobility the suit would be able to provide for an EVA or if a person could perform useful tasks for an extended time inside the pressurized suit. The suit was evaluated in multiple NBL runs by a variety of subjects including crewmembers with significant EVA experience. Various functional mobility tasks performed included: translation, body positioning, carrying tools, body stabilization, equipment handling, and use of tools. Hardware configurations included with and without TMG, suit with IVA gloves and suit with EVA gloves. Most tasks were completed on ISS mockups with existing EVA tools. Some limited tasks were completed with prototype tools on a simulated rocky surface. Major findings include: demonstration of the ability to weigh-out the suit, understanding the need to have subjects perform multiple runs prior to getting feedback, determination of critical sizing factors, and need for adjustment of suit work envelop. The early testing has demonstrated the feasibility of EVA's limited duration and limited scope. Further testing is required with more flight like tasking and constraints to validate these early results. If the suit is used for EVA, it will require mission specific modifications for umbilical management or PLSS integration, safety tether attachment, and tool interfaces. These evaluations are continuing through calendar year 2014.

Watson, Richard D.

2014-01-01

105

EVA 2000: A European\\/Russian space suit concept  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the European manned space activities an EVA space suit system was being developed in the frame of the Hermes Space Vehicle Programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The space suit was to serve the needs for all relevant extravehicular activities for the Hermes\\/Columbus operations planned to begin in 2004.For the present Russian manned space programme the relevant EVAs

I. P. Abramov

1995-01-01

106

19. NBS SUIT LAB. STORAGE SHELF WITH LIQUID COOLING VENTILATION ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

19. NBS SUIT LAB. STORAGE SHELF WITH LIQUID COOLING VENTILATION GARMENT (LCVG), SUIT GLOVES, WAIST INSERTS, UPPER AND LOWER ARMS (LEFT, FROM TOP TO BOTTOM), LOWER TORSO ASSEMBLIES (LTA) (MIDDLE RIGHT TO LOWER RIGHT). - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

107

S12 - The HPC Challenge (HPCC) benchmark suite  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2003, the DARPA's High Productivity Computing Systems released the HPCC suite. It examines the performance of HPC architectures using kernels with various memory access patterns of well known computational kernels. Consequently, HPCC results bound the performance of real applications as a function of memory access characteristics and define performance boundaries of HPC architectures. The suite was intended to augment

Piotr R Luszczek; David H. Bailey; Jack J Dongarra; Jeremy Kepner; Robert F. Lucas; Rolf Rabenseifner; Daisuke Takahashi

2006-01-01

108

Enforcement in environmental law: an economic analysis of citizen suits  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous to 1970, state and federal agencies held exclusive enforcement responsibilities over the violation of pollution control standards. However, recognizing that the government had neither the time nor resources to provide full enforcement, Congress created citizen suits. Citizen suits, first amended to the Clean Air Act in 1970, authorize citizens to act as private attorney generals and to sue polluters

Wendy S. Naysnerski

1990-01-01

109

33 CFR 144.20-5 - Exposure suits.  

...Exposure suits. This section applies to each MODU except those operating south of 32 degrees North latitude in the Atlantic Ocean or south of 35 degrees North latitude in all other waters. (a) Each MODU must carry an exposure suit for...

2014-07-01

110

33 CFR 144.20-5 - Exposure suits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Exposure suits. This section applies to each MODU except those operating south of 32 degrees North latitude in the Atlantic Ocean or south of 35 degrees North latitude in all other waters. (a) Each MODU must carry an exposure suit for...

2010-07-01

111

33 CFR 144.20-5 - Exposure suits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Exposure suits. This section applies to each MODU except those operating south of 32 degrees North latitude in the Atlantic Ocean or south of 35 degrees North latitude in all other waters. (a) Each MODU must carry an exposure suit for...

2012-07-01

112

A concept analysis inspired greedy algorithm for test suite minimization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Software testing and retesting occurs continuously during the soft- ware development lifecycle to detect errors as early as possible and to ensure that changes to existing software do not break the soft- ware. Test suites once developed are reused and updated frequently as the software evolves. As a result, some test cases in the te st suite may become redundant

Sriraman Tallam; Neelam Gupta

2005-01-01

113

Refactoring and Metrics for TTCN-3 Test Suites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experience with the development and maintenance of test suites has shown that the Testing and Test Control Notation (TTCN-3) provides very good concepts for adequate test specification. However, ex- perience has also demonstrated that during either the migration of legacy test suites to TTCN-3, or the development of large TTCN-3 test speci- fications, users have found it is dicult to

Benjamin Zeiss; Helmut Neukirchen; Jens Grabowski; Dominic Evans; Paul Baker

2006-01-01

114

Water Optimizer Suite: Tools for Decision Support and Policy Analysis  

E-print Network

1 Water Optimizer Suite: Tools for Decision Support and Policy Analysis Water Optimizer is a suite allocation policies which reduce the amount of irrigation water applied to a crop are small for the first various management strategies or water policy consequences for alternative circumstances. We have

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

115

Community Service and Learning Suite Margaretta Potter and Francesca Huey  

E-print Network

1 Community Service and Learning Suite Margaretta Potter and Francesca Huey OVERVIEW The Living/Learning with these relationships in years to come. We see a vast difference between charity work and service learning. You can and Burlington Community. The Community Service suite has taken this opportunity to remind those around us how

Hayden, Nancy J.

116

A New Ablative Heat Shield Sensor Suite Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new sensor suite is developed to measure performance of ablative thermal protection systems used in planetary entry vehicles for robotic and human exploration. The new sensor suite measures ablation of the thermal protection system under extreme heating encountered during planetary entry. The sensor technology is compatible with a variety of thermal protection materials, and is applicable over a wide range of entry conditions.

Bose, Deepak

2014-01-01

117

Diffusion Modeling in BrainSuite13 Justin P. Haldar  

E-print Network

Diffusion Modeling in BrainSuite13 Justin P. Haldar #12;Outline Introduction Diffusion in BrainSuite13 Diffusion Modeling Tracking Analysis Other Resources Conclusion 2 #12;Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Fractional Anisotropy Anomalous Exponent Kurtosis Motivation 3 Diffusion MRI provides unique

Leahy, Richard M.

118

28 CFR 51.31 - Communications concerning voting suits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Communications concerning voting suits. 51.31 Section 51.31 ...THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED Communications... § 51.31 Communications concerning voting suits. Individuals and groups are...

2011-07-01

119

28 CFR 51.31 - Communications concerning voting suits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Communications concerning voting suits. 51.31 Section 51.31 ...THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED Communications... § 51.31 Communications concerning voting suits. Individuals and groups are...

2013-07-01

120

28 CFR 51.31 - Communications concerning voting suits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Communications concerning voting suits. 51.31 Section 51.31 ...THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED Communications... § 51.31 Communications concerning voting suits. Individuals and groups are...

2010-07-01

121

28 CFR 51.31 - Communications concerning voting suits.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Communications concerning voting suits. 51.31 Section 51.31 ...THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED Communications... § 51.31 Communications concerning voting suits. Individuals and groups are...

2012-07-01

122

Shuttle Space Suit: Fabric/LCVG Model Validation. Chapter 8  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A detailed space suit computational model is being developed at the Langley Research Center for radiation exposure evaluation studies. The details of the construction of the space suit are critical to estimation of exposures and assessing the risk to the astronaut on EVA. Past evaluations of space suit shielding properties assumed the basic fabric layup (Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment, fabric restraints, and pressure envelope) and LCVG could be homogenized as a single layer overestimating the protective properties over 60 percent of the fabric area. The present space suit model represents the inhomogeneous distributions of LCVG materials (mainly the water filled cooling tubes). An experimental test is performed using a 34-MeV proton beam and high-resolution detectors to compare with model-predicted transmission factors. Some suggestions are made on possible improved construction methods to improve the space suit s protection properties.

Wilson, J. W.; Tweed, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Anderson, B. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Ware, J.; Persans, A. E.

2003-01-01

123

Petrologic characteristics of mid-Tertiary volcanic suites, Chihuahua, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three suites of mid-Tertiary volcanic rocks are recognized in the state of Chihuahua in northwestern Mexico: (1) a dominantly silicic calc-alkalic suite that includes moderate-K and high-K. facies, (2) a ferroaugite rhyolite suite, and (3) a mildly alkalic basaltic suite. Subduction-related calc-alkalic volcanism was predominant until ˜28 m.y. ago when it was replaced by basaltic volcanism. The source of the basaltic magmas in western Chihuahua was enriched in lithophile elements relative to that of the calc-alkalic magmas. The ferroaugite rhyolites, which are restricted to eastern Chihuahua, appeared ˜32 m.y. ago. They are genetically unrelated to the calc-alkalic suite and are interpreted to represent a westward expansion of alkalic volcanism from west Texas.

Cameron, Kenneth L.; Cameron, Maryellen; Bagby, William C.; Moll, Elizabeth J.; Drake, Robert E.

1980-02-01

124

Astronaut Performance: Implications for Future Space Suit Design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantified astronaut task performance will lead to enhanced training, more efficient crew operations, and optimized mission planning. In order to systematically address the relationships between the astronaut, tasks to be accomplished, and environment, analytical models were developed in conjunction with pressurized space suit experiments and state of the art robotic technology. A joint angle and torque database was compiled for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU space suit), with a novel measurement technique using both human test subjects and an instrumented robot. Using data collected in the experiment, a mathematical hysteresis modeling technique was used to predict EMU joint torques from joint angular positions. The hysteresis model was then applied to extravehicular activity (EVA) operations by mapping out the reach and work envelopes for the EMU. Suited astronaut range of motion limits and locomotion were also explored, yielding quantifiable results about the limitations astronauts would face if the current EMU, or an EMU-like suit, was used for a planetary exploration mission. With better understanding of astronaut performance we can look ahead to future missions and propose both improvements to the current space suit as well as revolutionary new designs for partial gravity locomotion space suits. Concepts have been developed for a Bio-Suit System that could revolutionize human space exploration by providing enhanced astronaut EVA locomotion and life support based on the concept of providing a `second skin' capability for astronaut performance. The Bio-Suit System would provide life support through mechanical counterpressure where pressure is applied to the entire body through a tight-fitting suit with a pressurized helmet for the head. This ongoing research is aimed at radical advances in our ability to understand, simulate, and predict capabilities of suited astronauts in a variety of scenarios.

Frazer, A. L.; Pitts, B. M.; Hoffman, J. A.; Newman, D. J.

125

Luis Valdez's Zoot Suit: A New Direction for Chicano Theatre?  

E-print Network

to Los Angeles, and Valdez had long been fascinated by the so-called "Zoot Suit Riots" of the early 1940's in that city. He was particularly interested in the events surrounding the infamous Sleepy Lagoon Murder Trial, in which seventeen Chicano youths...), 1. 7. Richard Eder, "Theatre: Zoot Suit, Chicano Music-Drama," New Yor\\ Times (March 26, 1979), C-13. 8. Eder, C-13. 9. Douglas Watt, "Zoot Suit Slithers in at the Winter Garden," New Yor\\ Daily News (March 26, 1979), 21. ...

Huerta, Jorge A.

1980-07-01

126

Inertial motion capture system for biomechanical analysis in pressure suits  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A non-invasive system has been developed at the University of Maryland Space System Laboratory with the goal of providing a new capability for quantifying the motion of the human inside a space suit. Based on an array of six microprocessors and eighteen microelectromechanical (MEMS) inertial measurement units (IMUs), the Body Pose Measurement System (BPMS) allows the monitoring of the kinematics of the suit occupant in an unobtrusive, self-contained, lightweight and compact fashion, without requiring any external equipment such as those necessary with modern optical motion capture systems. BPMS measures and stores the accelerations, angular rates and magnetic fields acting upon each IMU, which are mounted on the head, torso, and each segment of each limb. In order to convert the raw data into a more useful form, such as a set of body segment angles quantifying pose and motion, a series of geometrical models and a non-linear complimentary filter were implemented. The first portion of this works focuses on assessing system performance, which was measured by comparing the BPMS filtered data against rigid body angles measured through an external VICON optical motion capture system. This type of system is the industry standard, and is used here for independent measurement of body pose angles. By comparing the two sets of data, performance metrics such as BPMS system operational conditions, accuracy, and drift were evaluated and correlated against VICON data. After the system and models were verified and their capabilities and limitations assessed, a series of pressure suit evaluations were conducted. Three different pressure suits were used to identify the relationship between usable range of motion and internal suit pressure. In addition to addressing range of motion, a series of exploration tasks were also performed, recorded, and analysed in order to identify different motion patterns and trajectories as suit pressure is increased and overall suit mobility is reduced. The focus of these evaluations was to quantify the reduction in mobility when operating in any of the evaluated pressure suits. This data should be of value in defining new low cost alternatives for pressure suit performance verification and evaluation. This work demonstrates that the BPMS technology is a viable alternative or companion to optical motion capture; while BPMS is the first motion capture system that has been designed specifically to measure the kinematics of a human in a pressure suit, its capabilities are not constrained to just being a measurement tool. The last section of the manuscript is devoted to future possible uses for the system, with a specific focus on pressure suit applications such in the use of BPMS as a master control interface for robot teleoperation, as well as an input interface for future robotically augmented pressure suits.

Di Capua, Massimiliano

127

Mechanical counter-pressure space suit design using active materials  

E-print Network

Mechanical counter-pressure (MCP) space suits have the potential to greatly improve the mobility of astronauts as they conduct planetary exploration activities; however, the underlying technologies required to provide ...

Holschuh, Bradley Thomas

2014-01-01

128

Office of Student Activities Mattin Center, Suite 210  

E-print Network

Office of Student Activities Mattin Center, Suite 210 3400 N. Charles Street Baltimore available to download on the Orientation website: http://web.jhu.edu/orientation. Visit our homepage for instructions on downloading the smartphone application, "Guidebook

129

Overview of the CCP4 suite and current developments.  

PubMed

The CCP4 (Collaborative Computational Project, Number 4) software suite is a collection of programs and associated data and software libraries which can be used for macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography. The suite is designed to be flexible, allowing users a number of methods of achieving their aims. The programs are from a wide variety of sources but are connected by a common infrastructure provided by standard file formats, data objects and graphical interfaces. Structure solution by macromolecular crystallography is becoming increasingly automated and the CCP4 suite includes several automation pipelines. After giving a brief description of the evolution of CCP4 over the last 30 years, an overview of the current suite is given. While detailed descriptions are given in the accompanying articles, here it is shown how the individual programs contribute to a complete software package. PMID:21460441

Winn, Martyn D; Ballard, Charles C; Cowtan, Kevin D; Dodson, Eleanor J; Emsley, Paul; Evans, Phil R; Keegan, Ronan M; Krissinel, Eugene B; Leslie, Andrew G W; McCoy, Airlie; McNicholas, Stuart J; Murshudov, Garib N; Pannu, Navraj S; Potterton, Elizabeth A; Powell, Harold R; Read, Randy J; Vagin, Alexei; Wilson, Keith S

2011-04-01

130

Overview of the CCP4 suite and current developments  

PubMed Central

The CCP4 (Collaborative Computational Project, Number 4) software suite is a collection of programs and associated data and software libraries which can be used for macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography. The suite is designed to be flexible, allowing users a number of methods of achieving their aims. The programs are from a wide variety of sources but are connected by a common infrastructure provided by standard file formats, data objects and graphical interfaces. Structure solution by macromolecular crystallo­graphy is becoming increasingly automated and the CCP4 suite includes several automation pipelines. After giving a brief description of the evolution of CCP4 over the last 30 years, an overview of the current suite is given. While detailed descriptions are given in the accompanying articles, here it is shown how the individual programs contribute to a complete software package. PMID:21460441

Winn, Martyn D.; Ballard, Charles C.; Cowtan, Kevin D.; Dodson, Eleanor J.; Emsley, Paul; Evans, Phil R.; Keegan, Ronan M.; Krissinel, Eugene B.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; McCoy, Airlie; McNicholas, Stuart J.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Pannu, Navraj S.; Potterton, Elizabeth A.; Powell, Harold R.; Read, Randy J.; Vagin, Alexei; Wilson, Keith S.

2011-01-01

131

Potential techniques and development activities in diver suit heating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A prototype compact reactor suitable for combustion of propane with oxygen under shallow as well as submerged deep submergence diving conditions is reported. The device is used to heat the circulating water in a water tube-type diving suit.

Shlosinger, A. P.

1972-01-01

132

33. SOLARIUM AND TERRACE IN EXECUTIVE SUITE LOOKING NORTH PAST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

33. SOLARIUM AND TERRACE IN EXECUTIVE SUITE LOOKING NORTH PAST SLIDING GLASS WALL THAT DIVIDES SOLARIUM FROM EXECUTIVE DINING ROOM - Philadelphia Saving Fund Society, Twelfth & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

133

15. NBS TOP SIDE CONTROL ROOM. THE SUIT SYSTEMS CONSOLE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. NBS TOP SIDE CONTROL ROOM. THE SUIT SYSTEMS CONSOLE IS USED TO CONTROL AIR FLOW AND WATER FLOW TO THE UNDERWATER SPACE SUIT DURING THE TEST. THE SUIT SYSTEMS ENGINEER MONITORS AIR FLOW ON THE PANEL TO THE LEFT, AND SUIT DATA ON THE COMPUTER MONITOR JUST SLIGHTLY TO HIS LEFT. WATER FLOW IS MONITORED ON THE PANEL JUST SLIGHTLY TO HIS RIGHT AND TEST VIDEO TO HIS FAR RIGHT. THE DECK CHIEF MONITORS THE DIVER'S DIVE TIMES ON THE COMPUTER IN THE UPPER RIGHT. THE DECK CHIEF LOGS THEM IN AS THEY ENTER THE WATER, AND LOGS THEM OUT AS THEY EXIT THE WATER. THE COMPUTER CALCULATES TOTAL DIVE TIME. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

134

21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER TORQUE WRENCH FOR ASSEMBLY AND REPAIR OF BOTH. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

135

Cold Water Evaluation of NASA Launch Entry Suit (LES).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the National Aeronautics & Space Administrations (NASA) Launch Entry Suit (LES) with a personal flotation system and raft could provide sufficient anti-exposure protection for Space Shuttle crews to surviv...

J. W. Kaufman, K. Y. Dejneka, S. J. Morrissey

1988-01-01

136

Engineering a robotic exoskeleton for space suit simulation  

E-print Network

Novel methods for assessing space suit designs and human performance capabilities are needed as NASA prepares for manned missions beyond low Earth orbit. Current human performance tests and training are conducted in space ...

Meyen, Forrest Edward

2013-01-01

137

STS-70 Commander Terence 'Tom' Henricks suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-70 Commander Terence 'Tom' Henricks is donning his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with help from a suit technician. Henricks, who is about to make his third trip into space, and four crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Discovery is undergoing final preparations for a liftoff scheduled during a two and a half hour launch window opening at 9:41 a.m. EDT.

1995-01-01

138

MDO TEST SUITE AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NASA Langley Research Center supports a wide variety of multidisciplinary designoptimization (MDO) research and requires a set of standard MDO test problems forevaluating and comparing the products of this research. This paper proposes a WorldWide-Web-based test suite for collecting, distributing, and maintaining the standard testproblems. A prototype suite of 10 test problems, including written problem descriptions,benchmark solution methods, sample

Sharon L. Padula; Natalia Alexandrov; Lawrence L. Green

1996-01-01

139

EVA Suit R and D for Performance Optimization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Designing a planetary suit is very complex and often requires difficult trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. To verify that new suit designs meet requirements, full prototypes must be built and tested with human subjects. However, numerous design iterations will occur before the hardware meets those requirements. Traditional draw-prototype-test paradigms for R&D are prohibitively expensive with today's shrinking Government budgets. Personnel at NASA are developing modern simulation techniques which focus on human-centric designs by creating virtual prototype simulations and fully adjustable physical prototypes of suit hardware. During the R&D design phase, these easily modifiable representations of an EVA suit's hard components will allow designers to think creatively and exhaust design possibilities before they build and test working prototypes with human subjects. It allows scientists to comprehensively benchmark current suit capabilities and limitations for existing suit sizes and sizes that do not exist. This is extremely advantageous and enables comprehensive design down-selections to be made early in the design process, enables the use of human performance as design criteria, and enables designs to target specific populations

Cowley, Matthew S.; Harvill, Lauren; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

2014-01-01

140

30/03/08 1:36 PMFact Sheet NSA Suite B Cryptography Page 1 of 3http://www.nsa.gov/ia/industry/crypto_suite_b.cfm  

E-print Network

30/03/08 1:36 PMFact Sheet NSA Suite B Cryptography Page 1 of 3http://www.nsa.gov/ia/industry/crypto_suite_b.cfm >>Fact Sheet NSA Suite B Cryptography Background: The sustained and rapid advance of information and National Security Information (CNSSP-15), the National Security Agency (NSA) announced Suite B Cryptography

Soltys, Michael

141

An EVA Suit Fatigue, Strength, and Reach Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The number of Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVAs) performed will increase dramatically with the upcoming Space Station assembly missions. It is estimated that up to 900 EVA hours may be required to assemble the Space Station with an additional 200 hours per year for maintenance requirements. Efficient modeling tools will be essential to assist in planning these EVAS. Important components include strength and fatigue parameters, multi-body dynamics and kinematics. This project is focused on building a model of the EVA crew member encompassing all these capabilities. Phase 1, which is currently underway, involves collecting EMU suited and unsuited fatigue, strength and range of motion data, for all major joints of the body. Phase 2 involves processing the data for model input, formulating comparisons between the EMU suits and deriving generalized relationships between suited and unsuited data. Phase 3 will be formulation of a multi-body dynamics model of the EMU capable of predicting mass handling properties and integration of empirical data into the model. Phase 4 will be validation of the model with collected EMU data from the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at NASA/JSC. Engineers and designers will use tie EVA suit database to better understand the capabilities of the suited individuals. This knowledge will lead to better design of tools and planned operations. Mission planners can use the modeling system and view the animations and the visualizations of the various parameters, such as overall fatigue, motion, timelines, reach, and strength to streamline the timing, duration, task arrangement, personnel and overall efficiency of the EVA tasks. Suit designers can use quantifiable data at common biomechanical structure points to better analyze and compare suit performance.

Maida, James C.

1999-01-01

142

Preliminary Shuttle Space Suit Shielding Model. Chapter 9  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are two space suits in current usage within the space program: EMU [2] and Orlan-M Space Suit . The Shuttle space suit components are discussed elsewhere [2,5,6] and serve as a guide to development of the current model. The present model is somewhat simplified in details which are considered to be second order in their effects on exposures. A more systematic approach is ongoing on a part-by-part basis with the most important ones in terms of exposure contributions being addressed first with detailed studies of the relatively thin space suit fabric as the first example . Additional studies to validate the model of the head coverings (bubble, helmet, visors.. .) will be undertaken in the near future. The purpose of this paper is to present the details of the model as it is now and to examine its impact on estimates of astronaut health risks. In this respect, the nonuniform distribution of mass of the space suit provides increased shielding in some directions and some organs. These effects can be most important in terms of health risks and especially critical to evaluation of potential early radiation effects .

Anderson, Brooke M.; Nealy, J. E.; Qualls, G. D.; Staritz, P. J.; Wilson, J. W.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Atwell, W.; DeAngelis, G.; Ware, J.; Persans, A. E.

2003-01-01

143

Web-based Tool Suite for Plasmasphere Information Discovery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A suite of tools that enable discovery of terrestrial plasmasphere characteristics from NASA IMAGE Extreme Ultra Violet (EUV) images is described. The tool suite is web-accessible, allowing easy remote access without the need for any software installation on the user's computer. The features supported by the tool include reconstruction of the plasmasphere plasma density distribution from a short sequence of EUV images, semi-automated selection of the plasmapause boundary in an EUV image, and mapping of the selected boundary to the geomagnetic equatorial plane. EUV image upload and result download is also supported. The tool suite's plasmapause mapping feature is achieved via the Roelof and Skinner (2000) Edge Algorithm. The plasma density reconstruction is achieved through a tomographic technique that exploits physical constraints to allow for a moderate resolution result. The tool suite's software architecture uses Java Server Pages (JSP) and Java Applets on the front side for user-software interaction and Java Servlets on the server side for task execution. The compute-intensive components of the tool suite are implemented in C++ and invoked by the server via Java Native Interface (JNI).

Newman, T. S.; Wang, C.; Gallagher, D. L.

2005-12-01

144

Joe Walker in pressure suit with X-1E  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Joe Walker in a pressure suit beside the X-1E at the NASA High-Speed Flight Station, Edwards,California. The dice and 'Little Joe' are prominently displayed under the cockpit area. (Little Joe is a dice players slang term for two deuces.) Walker is shown in the photo wearing an early Air Force partial pressure suit. This protected the pilot if cockpit pressure was lost above 50,000 feet. Similar suits were used in such aircraft as B-47s, B-52s, F-104s, U-2s, and the X-2 and D-558-II research aircraft. Five years later, Walker reached 354,200 feet in the X-15. Similar artwork - reading 'Little Joe the II' - was applied for the record flight. These cases are two of the few times that research aircraft carried such nose art.

1958-01-01

145

Materials and Textile Architecture Analyses for Mechanical Counter-Pressure Space Suits using Active Materials  

E-print Network

Mechanical counter-pressure (MCP) space suits have the potential to improve the mobility of astronauts as they conduct planetary exploration activities. MCP suits differ from traditional gas-pressurized space suits by ...

Buechley, Leah

146

46 CFR 131.875 - Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. 131.875 Section...VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. (a) Each lifejacket, immersion suit, and ring life buoy must be marked...

2011-10-01

147

46 CFR 131.875 - Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. 131.875 Section...VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. (a) Each lifejacket, immersion suit, and ring life buoy must be marked...

2010-10-01

148

46 CFR 131.875 - Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. 131.875 Section...VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. (a) Each lifejacket, immersion suit, and ring life buoy must be marked...

2012-10-01

149

46 CFR 131.875 - Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. 131.875 Section...VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment...Lifejackets, immersion suits, and ring buoys. (a) Each lifejacket, immersion suit, and ring life buoy must be marked...

2013-10-01

150

Exploration Spacecraft and Space Suit Internal Atmosphere Pressure and Composition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design of habitat atmospheres for future space missions is heavily driven by physiological and safety requirements. Lower EVA prebreathe time and reduced risk of decompression sickness must be balanced against the increased risk of fire and higher cost and mass of materials associated with higher oxygen concentrations. Any proposed increase in space suit pressure must consider impacts on space suit mass and mobility. Future spacecraft designs will likely incorporate more composite and polymeric materials both to reduce structural mass and to optimize crew radiation protection. Narrowed atmosphere design spaces have been identified that can be used as starting points for more detailed design studies and risk assessments.

Lange, Kevin; Duffield, Bruce; Jeng, Frank; Campbell, Paul

2005-01-01

151

STS-72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Looking elated at the prospect of his upcoming spaceflight, STS- 72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry dons his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. The trip into space will be the first for Barry, a medical doctor who also has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. He and five fellow crew members will soon depart for Launch Pad 39, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour is undergoing final preparations for liftoff during an approximately 49-minute window opening at about 4:18 am EST, January 11.

1996-01-01

152

A Suite of Criticality Benchmarks for Validating Nuclear Data  

SciTech Connect

The continuous-energy neutron data library ENDF60 for use with MCNP{trademark} was released in the fall of 1994, and was based on ENDF/B-Vl evaluations through Release 2. As part of the data validation process for this library, a number of criticality benchmark calculations were performed. The original suite of nine criticality benchmarks used to test ENDF60 has now been expanded to 86 benchmarks. This report documents the specifications for the suite of 86 criticality benchmarks that have been developed for validating nuclear data.

Stephanie C. Frankle

1999-04-01

153

Suitport Feasibility: Development and Test of a Suitport and Space Suit for Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a space suit while the space suit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. To date, the first generation suitport has been tested with mockup suits on the rover cabins and pressurized on a bench top engineering unit. The work on the rover cabin has helped define the operational concepts and timelines, and has demonstrated the potential of suitport to save significant amounts of crew time before and after EVAs. The work with the engineering unit has successfully demonstrated the pressurizable seal concept including the ability to seal after the introduction and removal of contamination to the sealing surfaces. Using this experience, a second generation suitport was designed. This second generation suitport has been tested with a space suit prototype on the second generation MMSEV cabin, and testing is planned using the pressure differentials of the spacecraft. Pressurized testing will be performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. This test will include human rated suitports, a suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test will bring these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents the design of a human rated second generation suitport, the design of a suit capable of supporting pressurized human donning through a suitport, ambient pressure testing of the suit with the suitport, and modifications to the JSC human rated chamber B to accept a suitport. Design challenges and solutions, as well as compromises required to develop the system, are presented. Initial human testing results are presented.

Boyle, Robert M.; Mitchell, Kathryn; Allton, Charles; Ju, Hsing

2012-01-01

154

Security problems in the TCP\\/IP protocol suite  

Microsoft Academic Search

The TCP\\/IP protocol suite, which is very widely used today, was developed under the sponsorship of the Department of Defense. Despite that, there are a number of serious security flaws inherent in the protocols, regardless of the correctness of any implementations. We describe a variety of attacks based on these flaws, including sequence number spoofing, routing attacks, source address spoofing,

S. M. Bellovin

1989-01-01

155

The AM-Bench: An Android Multimedia Benchmark Suite  

E-print Network

The AM-Bench: An Android Multimedia Benchmark Suite Chayong Lee Euna Kim Hyesoon Kim School benchmark for Android platforms (AM-Bench). The AM-Bench consists of several multimedia benchmarks running on Android platforms. We explain the characteristics of the AM-Bench and compare performance on four Android

Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

156

The Zoot Suit Riots: Exploring Social Issues in American History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Zoot Suit Riots provide students with a case study of social unrest in American history. The influx of Latinos into the Los Angeles area prior to World War II created high levels of social unrest between Mexican Americans, military servicemen, and local residences. With large numbers of soldiers stationed in the area during the Second World…

Chiodo, John J.

2013-01-01

157

DYNA3D/ParaDyn Regression Test Suite Inventory  

SciTech Connect

The following table constitutes an initial assessment of feature coverage across the regression test suite used for DYNA3D and ParaDyn. It documents the regression test suite at the time of production release 10.1 in September 2010. The columns of the table represent groupings of functionalities, e.g., material models. Each problem in the test suite is represented by a row in the table. All features exercised by the problem are denoted by a check mark in the corresponding column. The definition of ''feature'' has not been subdivided to its smallest unit of user input, e.g., algorithmic parameters specific to a particular type of contact surface. This represents a judgment to provide code developers and users a reasonable impression of feature coverage without expanding the width of the table by several multiples. All regression testing is run in parallel, typically with eight processors. Many are strictly regression tests acting as a check that the codes continue to produce adequately repeatable results as development unfolds, compilers change and platforms are replaced. A subset of the tests represents true verification problems that have been checked against analytical or other benchmark solutions. Users are welcomed to submit documented problems for inclusion in the test suite, especially if they are heavily exercising, and dependent upon, features that are currently underrepresented.

Lin, J I

2011-01-25

158

STS-73 Payload Specialist Fred W. Leslie suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-73 Payload Specialist Fred W. Leslie gets a helping hand from a suit technician during suitup activities in the Operations and Checkout Building. The seven-member crew of Mission STS-73 will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits another liftoff attempt at 9:50 a.m. EDT.

1995-01-01

159

Department of Urology 333 City Blvd. West, Suite 2100  

E-print Network

Department of Urology 333 City Blvd. West, Suite 2100 Orange, CA 92868 714.456.5371 Copyright CENTER Minimally Invasive Urologic Surgery Training Program We welcome your participation. MINI-FELLOWSHIP University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Department of Urology The UC Irvine Surgical Education

Cramer, Karina

160

Astronauts Weitz and Conrad suit up during prelaunch activity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, prime crew pilot of the first manned Skylab mission, is suited up in bldg 5 at JSC during prelaunch training activity. He is assisted by Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., prime crew commander. The man in the left background is wearing a face mask to insure that Conrad, Joseph Kerwin, and Weitz are not exposed to disease prior to launch.

1973-01-01

161

Recent developments in the tmLQCD software suite  

E-print Network

We present an overview of recent developments in the tmLQCD software suite. We summarise the features of the code, including actions and operators implemented. In particular, we discuss the optimisation efforts for modern architectures using the Blue Gene/Q system as an example.

Abdou Abdel-Rehim; Florian Burger; Alber Deuzeman; Karl Jansen; Bartosz Kostrzewa; Luigi Scorzato; Carsten Urbach

2013-11-21

162

The Global Health Group 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200  

E-print Network

The Global Health Group 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200 San Francisco, CA 94105, USA tel: 415.597.4660 fax: 415.597.8299 UCSF Global Health Group Research Assistant (limited hire) The UCSF Global Health Group (http://globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/global-health-group) seeks a candidate with experience

Derisi, Joseph

163

The Global Health Group 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200  

E-print Network

The Global Health Group 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200 San Francisco, CA 94105, USA tel: 415.597.4660 fax: 415.597.8299 UCSF Global Health Group Research Assistant (limited hire) The UCSF Global Health Group (http://globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/global-health-group) seeks

Klein, Ophir

164

Mibench: a free, commercially representative embedded benchmark suite  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines a set of commercially representative embedded programs and compares them to an existing benchmark suite, SPEC2000. A new version of SimpleScalar that has been adapted to the ARM instruction set is used to characterize the performance of the benchmarks using configurations similar to current and next generation embedded processors. Several characteristics distinguish the representative embedded programs from

Matthew R. Guthaus; Jeffrey S. Ringenberg; Dan Ernst; T Mudge; Rb Brown; Todd Austin

2001-01-01

165

409 College Avenue, Suite 211 Ithaca, NY 14850  

E-print Network

. not require you to leave the U.S., return to country of origin, or home country for medical or mental health409 College Avenue, Suite 211 Ithaca, NY 14850 t. 607.255.6363 f. 607 254.5221 e. sicu@cornell.edu www.studentinsurance.cornell.edu 2013­14 Student Health Insurance Requirement APPEAL INFORMATION

Chen, Tsuhan

166

Comparing Non-adequate Test Suites using Coverage Criteria  

E-print Network

suites is impractical or even impossible. We present the first extensive study that evaluates cover- age coverage, as well as stronger criteria used in recent studies. Two criteria perform best: branch cover- age analysis [5]. Researchers also use mutation testing [19, 32, 38] to seed a large number of artificial

Groce, Alex David

167

CBR Fermentation Suite Service Fee Schedule Updated Oct 2011  

E-print Network

CBR Fermentation Suite Service Fee Schedule Updated Oct 2011 Please note that fees can be changed-Mill For yeast cells (volume > 1-L) 30 min 37.50$ BeadBeater For yeast cells (volume : Fermenter user must harvest but CBR can provide bottles for the use of CBR centrifuge 7-L Fermenters

Strynadka, Natalie

168

Surgical suite environmental control system. [using halothane absorbing filter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Theoretical and experimental work for a systems analysis approach to the problem of surgical suit exhaust systems centered on evaluation of halothane absorbing filters. An activated charcoal-alumina-charcoal combination proved to be the best filter for eliminating halothane through multilayer absorption of gas molecules.

Higginbotham, E. J.; Jacobs, M. L.

1974-01-01

169

College of Communication & Information 1345 Circle Park Drive | Suite 302  

E-print Network

OF COMMUNICATION & INFORMATION The four schools of CCI · Advertising and Public Relations · Communication Studies half of the faculty. UTSchoolOfADandPR @UTAdvPR School of Communication Studies (CS) · NationalCollege of Communication & Information 1345 Circle Park Drive | Suite 302 Knoxville, TN 37996

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

170

Towards a metrics suite for object oriented design  

Microsoft Academic Search

While software metrics are a generally desirable feature in the software management functions of project planning and project evaluation, they are of especial importance with a new technology such as the object-oriented approach. This is due to the significant need to train software engineers in generally accepted object-oriented principles. This paper presents theoretical work that builds a suite of metrics

Shyam R. Chidamber; Chris F. Kemerer

1991-01-01

171

Space Suit Environment Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). In three previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center (JSC) testing of this technology. That testing was performed in a sea-level pressure environment with both simulated and real human metabolic loads, and in both open and closed-loop configurations. The Orion ARS is designed to also support space-suited operations in a depressurized cabin, so the next step in developmental testing at JSC was to test the ARS technology in a typical closed space suit-loop environment with low-pressure oxygen inside the process loop and vacuum outside the loop. This was the first instance of low-pressure, high-oxygen, closed-loop testing of the Orion ARS technology, and it was conducted with simulated human metabolic loads in March 2009. The test investigated pressure drops and flow balancing through two different styles of prototype suit umbilical connectors. General swing-bed performance was tested with both umbilical configurations, as well as with a short jumper line installed in place of the umbilicals. Other interesting results include observations on the thermal effects of swing-bed operation in a vacuum environment and a recommendation of cycle time to maintain acceptable suit atmospheric CO2 and moisture levels.

Button, Amy B.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.; Cox, Marlon R.

2010-01-01

172

Scurit Informatique / Numro 11 ////// Mars 2011 >>>> suite page 1  

E-print Network

sphères privée et professionnelle se retrouve aussi dans une simple clef UsB. Isabelle Benoist de la... _8 par Isabelle Benoist >>>> suite page 2 �ditorial Clefs USB : pratiques mais risquées Luc Vallée

Pouyanne, Nicolas

173

Generating Minimal Fault Detecting Test Suites for Boolean Expressions  

Microsoft Academic Search

New coverage criteria for Boolean expressions are regularly introduced with two goals: to detect specific classes of realistic faults and to produce as small as possible test suites. In this paper we investigate whether an approach targeting specific fault classes using several reduction policies can achieve that less test cases are generated than by previously introduced testing criteria. In our

Gordon Fraser; Angelo Gargantini

2010-01-01

174

Human Resource Services 555 S Howes Street, Suite 213  

E-print Network

Human Resource Services 555 S Howes Street, Suite 213 Campus Delivery 6004 Page | 1 www.hrs.colostate.edu 5/2008 Human Resource Services Verification of Student Status at Other Institution DATE: TO: Registrar, Institution FROM: Human Resource Services ­ Records RE: SSN: Name: Department Number & Name

175

Development of Power Assisting Suit for Assisting Nurse Labor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to realize a power assisting suit for assisting a nurse caring a patient in her arm, a hardness sensor of muscle using load cell and a pneumatic rotary actuator utilizing pressure cuffs have been developed. The power assisting suit consists of shoulders, arms, waist and legs made of aluminum, and is fitted on the nurse body. The power assisting suit is originated with the concept of a master and slave system in one body. The arms, waist and legs have the pneumatic rotary actuators. The pneumatic rotary actuators are constructed with pressure cuffs sandwiched between thin plates. The action of the arms, waist and legs of the nurse are sensed with the muscle hardness sensor utilizing load cell with diaphragm mounted on a sensing tip. The dent of the sensing tip corresponds to the hardness of the muscle so that exerting muscle force produces electric signal. This paper gives the design and characteristics of the power assisting suit using the cuff type pneumatic rotary actuators and the muscle hardness sensor verifying its practicability.

Yamamoto, Keijiro; Hyodo, Kazuhito; Ishii, Mineo; Matsuo, Takashi

176

Explanation Closure, Action Closure, and the Sandewall Test Suite  

E-print Network

with action closure (AC) for reasoning about dynamic worlds, by way of Sandewall's test suite of 12-or room" problem, and were intended as a test and challenge for nonmonotonic logics of ac- tion. The EC/AC that are a matter of \\prac- tical certainty" (given our theory of the domain). In view of their potency

177

Office of International Education Savant Building, Suite 211  

E-print Network

's services for citizens in foreign countries. I understand that Georgia Institute of Technology doesOffice of International Education Savant Building, Suite 211 Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0284 PHONE: 404 Participant FROM: Stephanie Bullard Education Abroad Assistant, Office of International Education RE

Li, Mo

178

Biotechnology Industry Organization 1201 Maryland Avenue SW, Suite 900  

E-print Network

Biotechnology Industry Organization 1201 Maryland Avenue SW, Suite 900 Washington DC 20024 Contact, but are manufactured from renewable resources. Recent advances in biotechnology are now making it possible are home to much of the world's leading industrial biotechnology, which enables the creation of a wide

179

Using Dependency Structures for Prioritisation of Functional Test Suites  

E-print Network

1 Using Dependency Structures for Prioritisation of Functional Test Suites Shifa-e-Zehra Haidry, Australia. 3 Abstract--Test case prioritisation is the process of ordering the exe- cution of test cases software delivery. Many existing test case prioritisation techniques consider that tests can be run in any

Miller, Tim

180

Safety Tips: Avoiding Negligence Suits in Chemistry Teaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses various aspects related to negligence on the part of chemistry teachers. Areas addressed include negligence in tort law, avoiding negligence suits, proper instructions, proper supervision, equipment maintenance, and other considerations such as sovereign immunity, and contributory versus comparative negligence. (JN)

Gerlovich, Jack A.

1983-01-01

181

Exploration Space Suit Architecture: Destination Environmental-Based Technology Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper picks up where EVA Space Suit Architecture: Low Earth Orbit Vs. Moon Vs. Mars (Hill, Johnson, IEEEAC paper #1209) left off in the development of a space suit architecture that is modular in design and interfaces and could be reconfigured to meet the mission or during any given mission depending on the tasks or destination. This paper will walk though the continued development of a space suit system architecture, and how it should evolve to meeting the future exploration EVA needs of the United States space program. In looking forward to future US space exploration and determining how the work performed to date in the CxP and how this would map to a future space suit architecture with maximum re-use of technology and functionality, a series of thought exercises and analysis have provided a strong indication that the CxP space suit architecture is well postured to provide a viable solution for future exploration missions. Through the destination environmental analysis that is presented in this paper, the modular architecture approach provides the lowest mass, lowest mission cost for the protection of the crew given any human mission outside of low Earth orbit. Some of the studies presented here provide a look and validation of the non-environmental design drivers that will become every-increasingly important the further away from Earth humans venture and the longer they are away. Additionally, the analysis demonstrates a logical clustering of design environments that allows a very focused approach to technology prioritization, development and design that will maximize the return on investment independent of any particular program and provide architecture and design solutions for space suit systems in time or ahead of being required for any particular manned flight program in the future. The new approach to space suit design and interface definition the discussion will show how the architecture is very adaptable to programmatic and funding changes with minimal redesign effort required such that the modular architecture can be quickly and efficiently honed into a specific mission point solution if required.

Hill, Terry R.

2010-01-01

182

IP Addressing and RoutingIP Addressing and Routing TCP/IP Protocol SuiteTCP/IP Protocol Suite  

E-print Network

implementations still do) #12;7 ICMP Message FormatICMP Message Format 8-bit type of message 8-bit error code 16 Suite TCP UDP ICMP IP IGMP ARP RARP Ethernet #12;3 IP Packet FormatIP Packet Format Version HLen TOS Length Ident Flags Offset TTL Protocol Checksum SourceAddr DestinationAddr Options (variable) Pad

Yeom, Ikjun

183

Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Maturation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability from the Orion spacecraft. For this mission, the pressure garment that was selected, for both functions, is the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) with EVA enhancements and the life support option that was selected is the Exploration Portable Life Support System (PLSS). The proposed architecture was found to meet the mission constraints, but much more work is required to determine the details of the required suit upgrades, the integration with the PLSS, and the rest of the tools and equipment required to accomplish the mission. This work has continued over the last year to better define the operations and hardware maturation of these systems. EVA simulations have been completed in the NBL and interfacing options have been prototyped and analyzed with testing planned for late 2014. For NBL EVA simulations, in 2013, components were procured to allow in-house build up for four new suits with mobility enhancements built into the arms. Boots outfitted with clips that fit into foot restraints have also been added to the suit and analyzed for possible loads. Major suit objectives accomplished this year in testing include: evaluation of mobility enhancements, ingress/egress of foot restraint, use of foot restraint for worksite stability, ingress/egress of Orion hatch with PLSS mockup, and testing with two crew members in the water at one time to evaluate the crew's ability to help one another. Major tool objectives accomplished this year include using various other methods for worksite stability, testing new methods for asteroid geologic sampling and improving the fidelity of the mockups and crew equipment. These tests were completed on a medium fidelity capsule mockup, asteroid vehicle mockup, and asteroid mockups that were more accurate for an asteroid type EVA than previous tests. Another focus was the design and fabrication of the interface between the MACES and the PLSS. The MACES was not designed to interface with a PLSS, hence an interface kit must accommodate the unique design qualities of the MACES and provide the necessary life support function connections to the PLSS. A prototype interface kit for MACES to PLSS has been designed and fabricated. Unmanned and manned testing of the interface will show the usability of the kit while wearing a MACES. The testing shows viability of the kit approach as well as the operations concept. The design will be vetted through suit and PLSS experts and, with the findings from the testing, the best path forward will be determined. As the Asteroid Redirect Mission matures, the suit/life support portion of the mission will mature along with it and EVA Tools & Equipment can be iterated to accommodate the overall mission objectives and compromises inherent in EVA Suit optimization. The goal of the EVA architecture for ARCM is to continue to build on the previously developed technologies and lessons learned, and accomplish the ARCM EVAs while providing a stepping stone to future missions and destinations.

Bowie, Jonathan T.; Kelly, Cody; Buffington, Jesse; Watson, Richard D.

2015-01-01

184

Complexity of Fit, with Application to Space Suits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Although fitting a garment is often considered more of an art than a science, experts suggest that a subjectively poor fit is a symptom of inappropriate ease, the space between the wearer and the garment. The condition of poor suit fit is a unique problem for the space program and it can be attributed primarily to: a) NASA s policy to accommodate a wide variety of people (males and females from 1st to 99th percentile range and with various shapes and sizes) and b) its requirement to deploy a minimum number of suit sizes for logistical reasons. These factors make the space suit fit difficult to assess, where a wide range of people must be fit by the minimum possible number of suits, and yet, fit is crucial for operability and safety. Existing simplistic sizing scheme do not account for wide variations in shape within a diverse population with very limited sizing options. The complex issue of fit has been addressed by a variety of methods, many of which have been developed by the military, which has always had a keen interest in fitting its diverse population but with a multitude of sizing options. The space program has significantly less sizing options, so a combination of these advanced methods should be used to optimize space suit size and assess space suit fit. Multivariate methods can be used to develop sizing schemes that better reflect the wearer population, and integrated sizing systems can form a compromise between fitting men and women. Range of motion and operability testing can be combined with subjective feedback to provide a comprehensive evaluation of fit. The amount of ease can be tailored using these methods, to provide enough extra room where it is needed, without compromising mobility and comfort. This paper discusses the problem of fit in one of its most challenging applications: providing a safe and comfortable spacesuit that will protect its wearer from the extreme environment of space. It will discuss the challenges and necessity of closely fitting its potential wearers, a group of people from a broad spectrum of the population, and will detail some of the methods that can be employed to ensure and validate a good fit.

Rajulu, Sudhakar; Benson, Elizabeth

2009-01-01

185

A Full-Body Tactile Sensor Suit Using Electrically Conductive Fabric and Strings  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present design and implementation of a tactile sensor system, sensor suit, that covers the entire body of a robot. The sensor suit is designed to be soft and flexible and to have a large number of sensing regions. We have built the sensor suit using electrically conductive fabric and string. The current version of the sensor suit has 192

Masayuki Inaba; Yukiko Hoshino; Ken'ichiro Nagasaka; Tatsuo Ninomiya; Satoshi Kagami; Hirochika Inoue

1996-01-01

186

STS-76 Mission Specialist Shannon Lucid suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-76 Mission Specialist Shannon W. Lucid is donning her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. A veteran space traveler who is embarking on her fifth Shuttle flight, Lucid has spent the better part of the last year training in Russia to become the first American woman assigned to fly on the Russian Space Station Mir. She will remain on Mir until August when she returns to Earth with the crew of STS-79. Once suitup activities are completed the six-member STS-76 flight crew will depart for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis is undergoing final preparations for liftoff during an approximately seven- minute launch window opening around 3:13 a.m. EST, March 22.

1996-01-01

187

Suit alleges police officer divulged waiter's HIV status.  

PubMed

A waiter (John Doe) in a Kokomo, IN, restaurant filed suit against city police officer [name removed] for disclosing Doe's HIV status to workers and customers and intentionally inflicting emotional distress. The city is also named in the suit for failing to properly train officers about HIV confidentiality. On several occasions, [name removed] visited the restaurant but would not allow Doe to wait on him because Doe has AIDS. [Name removed]' comments and threats regarding AIDS prompted Doe to leave the restaurant. Doe was fired. Numerous scientific documents, including the U.S. Surgeon General's Report of 1988, state that HIV cannot be transmitted through food handling. Doe filed a complaint with the Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), charging that the restaurant violated the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by firing him. Kokomo is the city where the late Ryan White was denied access to public education because of his HIV status. PMID:11363410

1996-03-01

188

Mission Specialist Nicollier gets help suiting up before launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-103 Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland waves while having his launch and entry suit checked by a suit techician during final launch preparations. Other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 17 at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 8-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Sunday, Dec. 26, at about 6:30 p.m. EST.

1999-01-01

189

Mission Specialist Foale gets help suiting up before launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michel Foale (Ph.D.) smiles as his launch and entry suit is checked by a suit techician during final launch preparations. Other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 17 at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 8-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Sunday, Dec. 26, at about 6:30 p.m. EST.

1999-01-01

190

Mission Specialist Grunsfeld gets help suiting up before launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) is assisted by a suit technician in donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. Other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 17 at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 8-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Sunday, Dec. 26, at about 6:30 p.m. EST.

1999-01-01

191

Enhanced verification test suite for physics simulation codes  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses problems with which to augment, in quantity and in quality, the existing tri-laboratory suite of verification problems used by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of verification analysis is demonstrate whether the numerical results of the discretization algorithms in physics and engineering simulation codes provide correct solutions of the corresponding continuum equations.

Kamm, James R.; Brock, Jerry S.; Brandon, Scott T.; Cotrell, David L.; Johnson, Bryan; Knupp, Patrick; Rider, William J.; Trucano, Timothy G.; Weirs, V. Gregory

2008-09-01

192

The Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Instrument Suite  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer is a suite of three different instruments, a gamma subsystem (GS), a neutron spectrometer,\\u000a and a high-energy neutron detector, working together to collect data that will permit the mapping of elemental concentrations\\u000a on the surface of Mars. The instruments are complimentary in that the neutron instruments have greater sensitivity to low\\u000a amounts of hydrogen, but

W. V. Boynton; W. C. Feldman; I. G. Mitrofanov; L. G. Evans; R. C. Reedy; S. W. Squyres; R. Starr; J. I. Trombka; C. d'Uston; J. R. Arnold; P. A. J. Englert; A. E. Metzger; H. Wänke; J. Brückner; D. M. Drake; C. Shinohara; C. Fellows; D. K. Hamara; K. Harshman; K. Kerry; C. Turner; M. Ward; H. Barthe; K. R. Fuller; S. A. Storms; G. W. Thornton; J. L. Longmire; M. L. Litvak; A. K. Ton'chev

2004-01-01

193

STS-69 Mission Commander David M. Walker suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-69 Mission Commander David M. Walker signals he's ready to fly as he finishes donning his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. Walker, who is embarking on his fourth trip into space, will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A along with four fellow crew members. Awaiting the crew and liftoff at 11:09 a.m. EDT is the Space Shuttle Endeavour.

1995-01-01

194

FRACK: A Freeware Flow and Transport Suite for Fractured Media  

Microsoft Academic Search

FRACK is a fractured media freeware flow and solute transport suite currently under development that is intended to serve as both a pre- and post-processor to MODFLOW. As a pre-processor, FRACK generates and maps networks of deterministic and\\/or stochastic fractures onto a regularly-spaced finite- difference grid, according to a fracture continuum method that closely approximates flow solutions to discrete fracture

Donald M. Reeves; Greg Pohll; David Benson

195

Dedicated minimally invasive surgery suites increase operating room efficiency  

Microsoft Academic Search

  Background: The rapid adoption of laparoscopic surgery since the late 1980s added tremendous complexity into the operating\\u000a room (OR) environment. For each case, a plethora of additional equipment-including monitors, video equipment, wiring, tubing,\\u000a and cords-had to be set up, prolonging OR turnover time and decreasing OR efficiency. In 1993, the concept of designated minimally\\u000a invasive surgery (MIS) suites was introduced.

T. A. G. Kenyon; D. R. Urbach; J. B. Speer; B. Waterman-Hukari; G. F. Foraker; P. D. Hansen; L. L. Swanström

2001-01-01

196

The Antitrust Suits and the Public Understanding of Insurance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social significance of the insurance antitrust suits extends beyond the specific legal issues of McCarran-Ferguson Act interpretation and the economics of boycotts. Few people have forgotten the extraordinary insurance disruptions of 1985-1986. For liability insurance reasons, jails, day care centers, and ski lifts were closed; police patrols were suspended; and playground equipment and diving boards were removed from public

George L. Priest

1989-01-01

197

3D Magnetron simulation with CST STUDIO SUITE  

SciTech Connect

The modeling of magnetrons compared to other tubes is more difficult since it requires 3D modeling rather than a 2D investigation. This is not only due to the geometry which can include complicated details to be modeled in 3D but also due to the interaction process itself. The electric field, magnetic field and particle movement span a 3D space. In this paper 3D simulations of a strapped magnetron with CSTSTUDIO SUITE{sup TM} are presented. (author)

Balk, Monika C., E-mail: monika.balk@cst.com [CST AG, Bad Nauheimerstr. 19, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

2011-07-01

198

A high performance EO small satellite platform & optical sensor suite  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a new high performance cost effective Earth Observation Platform, the SSTL-300 and associated optical sensor suite, offering a 7-year mission lifetime with a very high operational availability, for a mission cost an order of magnitude less than commercial high resolution Earth observation spacecraft. The paper will detail the SSTL-300 main payload, a very high-resolution imager with panchromatic

M. Cutter; P. Davies; A. Baker; M. Sweeting

2007-01-01

199

STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson suits up for TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson completes suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

2002-01-01

200

SynBioSS: the synthetic biology modeling suite  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: SynBioSS is a suite of software for the modeling and simulation of synthetic genetic constructs. SynBioSS utilizes the registry of standard biological parts, a database of kinetic parame- ters, and both graphical and command-line interfaces to multiscale simulation algorithms. Availability: SynBioSS is available under the GNU General Public License at http:\\/\\/synbioss.sourceforge.net.

Anthony D. Hill; Jonathan R. Tomshine; Emma M. B. Weeding; Vassilios Sotiropoulos; Yiannis N. Kaznessis

2008-01-01

201

Revel8or: Model Driven Capacity Planning Tool Suite  

SciTech Connect

Designing complex multi-tier applications that must meet strict performance requirements is a challenging software engineering problem. Ideally, the application architect could derive accurate performance predictions early in the project life-cycle, leveraging initial application design-level models and a description of the target software and hardware platforms. To this end, we have developed a capacity planning tool suite for component-based applications, called Revel8tor. The tool adheres to the model driven development paradigm and supports benchmarking and performance prediction for J2EE, .Net and Web services platforms. The suite is composed of three different tools: MDAPerf, MDABench and DSLBench. MDAPerf allows annotation of design diagrams and derives performance analysis models. MDABench allows a customized benchmark application to be modeled in the UML 2.0 Testing Profile and automatically generates a deployable application, with measurement automatically conducted. DSLBench allows the same benchmark modeling and generation to be conducted using a simple performance engineering Domain Specific Language (DSL) in Microsoft Visual Studio. DSLBench integrates with Visual Studio and reuses its load testing infrastructure. Together, the tool suite can assist capacity planning across platforms in an automated fashion.

Zhu, Liming; Liu, Yan; Bui, Ngoc B.; Gorton, Ian

2007-05-31

202

Defensive aids suite prototype for light armored vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Defence Research Establishment Valcartier has initiated in 1998 R&D work to investigate and to demonstrate key technologies required for future Defensive Aid Suite to protect Light Armoured Vehicles. A basic Defensive Aid Suite demonstrator (Phase I) was built and integrated into the LAV vetronics by Litton Systems Canada and his consortium. The Defensive Aid Suite consisted of a 2-band HARLIDTM-based laser detection head, a processor capable to control and deploy countermeasures and a DAS touch-screen display all integrated in a Light Armored Vehicle. The crew was able to select the operation mode for direct fire or smoke deployment by pushing one of the pair of buttons available at the bottom of the display. This system was successfully demonstrated in October 1999 during an international trial. This article gives an overview of the results obtained in the field as well as some of the lessons learnt. It also describes laboratory and field measurements made on the Laser Warning Receiver unit itself. The results of the DAS tactical use and of Human factor evaluation will illustrate its performance within typical laser threat scenarios. This work will serve as the basis for the recommendation of a future DAS demonstrator (Phase II) integrating more sensors and countermeasures.

Cantin, Andre; Fortin, Jean; Venter, Johan; Philip, Brian G.; Hagen, Russell; Krieger, Dietmar; Greenley, Mike

2001-09-01

203

STS-91 Mission Specialist Ryumin suits up for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-91 Mission Specialist and Russian cosmonaut Valery Victorovitch Ryumin is outfitted with his ascent/reentry flight suit and helmet by two suit technicians in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. The final suit fitting and checkout takes place prior to the crew walkout and transport to Launch Pad 39A. He has been director of the Russian Shuttle-Mir program and flight director for the Salyut-7 and Mir space stations and is a veteran of three space flights with a total of 362 days in space. This will be Ryumin's first visit to Mir. However, his experience with Russian spacecraft in orbit will prove extremely valuable as he helps the crew with Mir equipment transfer operations. He will also be assessing the condition of the station for the Russian space program. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will return to Earth as a STS- 91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir.

1998-01-01

204

The Sample Analysis at Mars Investigation and Instrument Suite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) addresses the chemical and isotopic composition of the atmosphere and volatiles extracted from solid samples. The SAM investigation is designed to contribute substantially to the mission goal of quantitatively assessing the habitability of Mars as an essential step in the search for past or present life on Mars. SAM is a 40 kg instrument suite located in the interior of MSL's Curiosity rover. The SAM instruments are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a tunable laser spectrometer, and a 6-column gas chromatograph all coupled through solid and gas processing systems to provide complementary information on the same samples. The SAM suite is able to measure a suite of light isotopes and to analyze volatiles directly from the atmosphere or thermally released from solid samples. In addition to measurements of simple inorganic compounds and noble gases SAM will conduct a sensitive search for organic compounds with either thermal or chemical extraction from sieved samples delivered by the sample processing system on the Curiosity rover's robotic arm,

Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Christopher R.; Conrad, Pamela G.; Arvey, Robert; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Chalmers, Robert A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Errigo, Therese; Farley, Rodger; Feng, Steven; Frazier, Gregory; Glavin, Daniel P.; Harpold, Daniel N.; Jordan, Partick; Kellogg, James; Lewis, Jesse; Martin, David K.; Maurer, John; McAdam, Amy C.; McLennan, Douglas; Pavlov, Alexander A.; Raaen, Eric; Schinman, Oren

2012-01-01

205

Towards a Unified Test Case Suite for Global Atmospheric Models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The atmospheric dynamical core is the principal component of Earth system models and is responsible for solving the equations of motion in the global domain. The past few years have seen a surge of activity in the dynamical core community as modeling groups from all over the world have adopted new technologies for computational fluid dynamics and adjusted to the software requirements of massively parallel computer systems. It is widely acknowledged that standardized testing of dynamical cores is very important to verify consistency, accuracy and performance of atmospheric models. However, until recently, only a few test cases have been available for dynamical core intercomparison of model results in both the dry and moist formulations. The Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison Project (DCMIP) that has been held at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in August 2012 showcased many next-generation atmospheric models. One consequence of this summer school has been the development of a test case suite for intercomparison of dynamical cores which examined many known issues with numerical models of the atmosphere. With participation from 18 current and upcoming atmospheric models, these test cases gave us the opportunity to compare and contrast differences in several different numerical formulations. The tests examine a variety of problems, including basic advection in 3D, simulations on a reduced planet at non-hydrostatic scales and tests incorporating basic moist processes and simplified physics. Here we will present this test case suite and identify the motivation behind the design of this suite and some preliminary results.

Ullrich, P. A.; Jablonowski, C.; Kent, J.; Reed, K. A.; Taylor, M. A.; Lauritzen, P. H.; Nair, R. D.

2012-12-01

206

The Sample Analysis at Mars Investigation and Instrument Suite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) addresses the chemical and isotopic composition of the atmosphere and volatiles extracted from solid samples. The SAM investigation is designed to contribute substantially to the mission goal of quantitatively assessing the habitability of Mars as an essential step in the search for past or present life on Mars. SAM is a 40 kg instrument suite located in the interior of MSL's Curiosity rover. The SAM instruments are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a tunable laser spectrometer, and a 6-column gas chromatograph all coupled through solid and gas processing systems to provide complementary information on the same samples. The SAM suite is able to measure a suite of light isotopes and to analyze volatiles directly from the atmosphere or thermally released from solid samples. In addition to measurements of simple inorganic compounds and noble gases SAM will conduct a sensitive search for organic compounds with either thermal or chemical extraction from sieved samples delivered by the sample processing system on the Curiosity rover's robotic arm.

Mahaffy, Paul R.; Webster, Christopher R.; Cabane, Michel; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coll, Patrice; Atreya, Sushil K.; Arvey, Robert; Barciniak, Michael; Benna, Mehdi; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Carignan, Daniel; Cascia, Mark; Chalmers, Robert A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Errigo, Therese; Everson, Paula; Franz, Heather; Farley, Rodger; Feng, Steven; Frazier, Gregory; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel P.; Harpold, Daniel N.; Hawk, Douglas; Holmes, Vincent; Johnson, Christopher S.; Jones, Andrea; Jordan, Patrick; Kellogg, James; Lewis, Jesse; Lyness, Eric; Malespin, Charles A.; Martin, David K.; Maurer, John; McAdam, Amy C.; McLennan, Douglas; Nolan, Thomas J.; Noriega, Marvin; Pavlov, Alexander A.; Prats, Benito; Raaen, Eric; Sheinman, Oren; Sheppard, David; Smith, James; Stern, Jennifer C.; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Jones, John; Gundersen, Cindy; Steele, Andrew; Wray, James; Botta, Oliver; Leshin, Laurie A.; Owen, Tobias; Battel, Steve; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Manning, Heidi; Squyres, Steven; Navarro-González, Rafael; McKay, Christopher P.; Raulin, Francois; Sternberg, Robert; Buch, Arnaud; Sorensen, Paul; Kline-Schoder, Robert; Coscia, David; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Baffes, Curt; Feldman, Jason; Flesch, Greg; Forouhar, Siamak; Garcia, Ray; Keymeulen, Didier; Woodward, Steve; Block, Bruce P.; Arnett, Ken; Miller, Ryan; Edmonson, Charles; Gorevan, Stephen; Mumm, Erik

2012-09-01

207

Generation of a vector suite for protein solubility screening  

PubMed Central

Recombinant protein expression has become an invaluable tool for academic and biotechnological projects. With the use of high-throughput screening technologies for soluble protein production, uncountable target proteins have been produced in a soluble and homogeneous state enabling the realization of further studies. Evaluation of hundreds conditions requires the use of high-throughput cloning and screening methods. Here we describe a new versatile vector suite dedicated to the expression improvement of recombinant proteins (RP) with solubility problems. This vector suite allows the parallel cloning of the same PCR product into the 12 different expression vectors evaluating protein expression under different promoter strength, different fusion tags as well as different solubility enhancer proteins. Additionally, we propose the use of a new fusion protein which appears to be a useful solubility enhancer. Above all we propose in this work an economic and useful vector suite to fast track the solubility of different RP. We also propose a new solubility enhancer protein that can be included in the evaluation of the expression of RP that are insoluble in classical expression conditions. PMID:24616717

Correa, Agustin; Ortega, Claudia; Obal, Gonzalo; Alzari, Pedro; Vincentelli, Renaud; Oppezzo, Pablo

2014-01-01

208

Reducing children's psychological stress in the operating suite.  

PubMed

Children often experience extremely high levels of psychological stress in the operating suite because of anxiety associated with the separation from their parents, the unfamiliar and intimidating environment, the presence of strangers in unusual attire (masks, caps, and gowns), the act of being forcibly restrained, and the forceful pressing over the mouth and nose of an anesthetic mask that emits a foul-smelling gas and that seems to restrict breathing in a manner reminiscent of suffocation. The recovery room can be very frightening for children because of the separation from parents and the frequently overpowering scene of human injury and suffering. If the personnel in the operating suite are trained in child development, and if they are encouraged to practice elementary "preventive psychiatry" and to use common sense, then the psychological morbidity resulting from the experience in the operating suite can be minimized. Arrangements ought to be made for children undergoing relatively simple and short operations to go to a place different from the "intensive-care" type of recovery room. PMID:3940132

Jones, S T

1985-01-01

209

The F/5 instrumentation suite for the Clay Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The f/5 instrumentation suite for the Clay telescope was developed to provide the Magellan Consortium observer community with wide field optical imaging and multislit NIR spectroscopy capability. The instrument suite consists of several major subsystems including two focal plane instruments. These instruments are Megacam and MMIRS. Megacam is a panoramic, square format CCD mosaic imager, 0.4° on a side. It is instrumented with a full set of Sloan filters. MMIRS is a multislit NIR spectrograph that operates in Y through K band and has long slit and imaging capability as well. These two instruments can operate both at Magellan and the MMT. Megacam requires a wide field refractive corrector and a Topbox to support shutter and filter selection functions, as well as to perform wavefront sensing for primary mirror figure correction. Both the corrector and Topbox designs were modeled on previous designs for MMT, however features of the Magellan telescope required considerable revision of these designs. In this paper we discuss the optomechanical, electrical, software and structural design of these subsystems, as well as operational considerations that attended delivery of the instrument suite to first light.

Szentgyorgyi, A.; McLeod, B.; Fabricant, D.; Fata, R.; Norton, T.; Ordway, M.; Roll, J.; Bergner, H.; Conroy, M.; Curley, D.; Epps, H.; Gauron, T.; Geary, J.; Mueller, M.; Uomoto, A.; Amato, S.; Barberis, J.; Eng, R.; Furesz, G.; Hertz, E.; Hull, C.; McCracken, K.; Nystrom, G.; Osip, D.; Palunas, P.; Perez, F.; Sanchez, F.; Suc, V.; Weaver, D.; Woods, D.

2012-09-01

210

A Novel Method for Breath Capture Inside a Space Suit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Any non-robotic mission to the Mars surface will need to rely on various life support technologies. The large metabolic generation rate and low tolerance to elevated levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the Mars atmosphere make CO2 removal one of the preeminent tasks in this domain. In addition, these same features provide a strong impetus for using regenerable CO2 removal technologies. In the past, many of these regenerable technologies have relied on the low partial pressure CO2 surrounding the vehicle to provide an ultimate sink for removing this gas contaminant, however any Mars mission will have to overcome the presence of the Mars atmosphere. This paper describes the investigation of methods to capture the exhaled CO2 from a suited crewmember before it becomes diluted with the high volumetric air flow present within the space suit. Typical expired air contains CO2 partial pressures in the range of 20-35 mm Hg. This research investigated methods to capture this high partial pressure CO2 prior to its dilution with the low partial pressure CO2 ventilation flow. Specifically the research looked at potential designs for a collection cup for use inside the space suit helmet. This collection cup should not be considered the same as a breathing mask typical of that worn by firefighters, etc. Instead, the collection cup is a non-contact device that makes use of detailed analyses of the ventilation flow environment within the helmet. The research used a detailed Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) code called Fluent to provide modeling of the various gas species (CO2, water vapor, O2) as they pass through a helmet. This same model was used to numerically evaluate several different collection cup designs for this same CO2 segregation effort.

Paul, Heather; Filburn, Tom

2007-01-01

211

Space Suit Technologies Protect Deep-Sea Divers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Working on NASA missions allows engineers and scientists to hone their skills. Creating devices for the high-stress rigors of space travel pushes designers to their limits, and the results often far exceed the original concepts. The technologies developed for the extreme environment of space are often applicable here on Earth. Some of these NASA technologies, for example, have been applied to the breathing apparatuses worn by firefighters, the fire-resistant suits worn by racecar crews, and, most recently, the deep-sea gear worn by U.S. Navy divers.

2008-01-01

212

The SECO suite of codes for site Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Modeling for Performance Assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP ) has led to development of the SECO suite of codes for groundwater flow, particle tracking, and transport. Algorithm and code developments include the following areas: facilitation of grid convergence tests in multiple domains; correct treatment of transmissivity factors for unconfined aquifers; efficient multigrid algorithms; a formulation of brine Darcy flow equations that uses freshwater head as the dependent able; boundary-fitted coordinates; temporal high order particle tracking; an efficient and accurate implicit Finite Volume TVD algorithm for radionuclide transport in (possibly) fractured porous media; accurate calculation of advection via a flux-based modified method of characteristics; and Quality Assurance procedures.

Roache, P.J. [Ecodynamics Research Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-03-01

213

Alan Shepard in Space Suit before Mercury Launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Profile of astronaut Alan Shepard in his silver pressure suit with the helmet visor closed as he prepares for his upcoming Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) launch. On May 5th 1961, Alan B. Shepard Jr. became the first American to fly into space. His Freedom 7 Mercury capsule flew a suborbital trajectory lasting 15 minutes 22 seconds. His spacecraft splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean where he and Freedom 7 were recovered by helicopter and transported to the awaiting aircraft carrier U.S.S. Lake Champlain.

1961-01-01

214

Physics Suite Peer Instruction Problems: Oscillations and Waves  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains a series of peer instruction problems on waves and oscillations, designed to be solved in a classroom setting. The problems are presented with a qualitative question (usually multiple choice) that is carefully constructed to engage student difficulties with fundamental concepts. Students consider the problem individually and contribute their answers using personal response systems (clickers). Students then confer with their cooperative groups and vote again on the correct response. Topics covered include superpositioning, graph interpretation, wave velocity, and force related to masses on a spring. This problem set is part of the Physics Suite collection, containing sample problems, peer instruction problems, and alternative homework sets.

Redish, Edward F.

2008-08-11

215

Physics Suite Peer Instruction Problems: Momentum and Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains a series of peer instruction problems on momentum and energy, designed to be solved in a classroom setting. The problems are presented with a qualitative question (usually multiple choice) that is carefully constructed to engage student difficulties with fundamental concepts. Students consider the problem individually and contribute their answers using personal response systems (clickers). Students then confer with their cooperative groups and vote again on the correct response. Topics covered include elastic collisions, inelastic collisions, impulse, momentum, work-energy theorem, and conservation of energy. This problem set is part of the Physics Suite collection, containing sample problems, peer instruction problems, and alternative homework sets.

Redish, Edward F.

2008-08-11

216

STS-84 M.S. Elena Kondakova suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova gives a 'thumbs up' as she dons her launch and entry suit during final prelaunch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building. Kondakova is a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency. This is her second trip into space, but her first on the Space Shuttle. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on the Russian Space Station Mir from Oct. 4, 1994, to March 9, 1995. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir.

1997-01-01

217

Physics Suite Sample Problems: Circular and Rotational Motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page contains a series of problems on the topic of circular and rotational motion developed for use with The Physics Suite, an activity-based learning project. Each problem was designed to help build qualitative understanding of physics and was built around student acquisition of knowledge as observed in recent studies. The problems vary in format and include estimation, context-based reasoning, multiple choice, short answer, qualitative questions, and essay questions. Topics covered include rotational energy, torque, angular momentum, and rotational kinematics. This item is part of a larger collection of problems, in-class questions, and interactive resources developed by the University of Maryland Physics Education Research Group.

Redish, Edward F.

2008-07-18

218

STS-107 Mission Specialist David Brown suits up for TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Mission Specialist David Brown waves as he completes suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

2002-01-01

219

Analysis of a Radiation Model of the Shuttle Space Suit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The extravehicular activity (EVA) required to assemble the International Space Station (ISS) will take approximately 1500 hours with 400 hours of EVA per year in operations and maintenance. With the Space Station at an inclination of 51.6 deg the radiation environment is highly variable with solar activity being of great concern. Thus, it is important to study the dose gradients about the body during an EVA to help determine the cancer risk associated with the different environments the ISS will encounter. In this paper we are concerned only with the trapped radiation (electrons and protons). Two different scenarios are looked at: the first is the quiet geomagnetic periods in low Earth orbit (LEO) and the second is during a large solar particle event in the deep space environment. This study includes a description of how the space suit's computer aided design (CAD) model was developed along with a description of the human model. Also included is a brief description of the transport codes used to determine the total integrated dose at several locations within the body. Finally, the results of the transport codes when applied to the space suit and human model and a brief description of the results are presented.

Anderson, Brooke M.; Nealy, John E.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Qualls, Garry D.; Wilson, John W.

2003-01-01

220

Wireless hydrotherapy smart suit for monitoring handicapped people  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a smart suit, water impermeable, containing sensors and electronics for monitoring handicapped people at hydrotherapy sessions in swimming-pools. For integration into textiles, electronic components should be designed in a functional, robust and inexpensive way. Therefore, small-size electronics microsystems are a promising approach. The smart suit allows the monitoring of individual biometric data, such as heart rate, temperature and movement of the body. Two solutions for transmitting the data wirelessly are presented: through a low-voltage (3.0 V), low-power, CMOS RF IC (1.6 mm x 1.5 mm size dimensions) operating at 433 MHz, with ASK modulation and a patch antenna built on lossy substrates compatible with integrated circuits fabrication. Two different substrates were used for antenna implementation: high-resistivity silicon (HRS) and Corning Pyrex #7740 glass. The antenna prototypes were built to operate close to the 5 GHz ISM band. They operate at a center frequency of 5.705 GHz (HRS) and 5.995 GHz (Pyrex). The studied parameters were: substrate thickness, substrate losses, oxide thickness, metal conductivity and thickness. The antenna on HRS uses an area of 8 mm2, providing a 90 MHz bandwidth and ~0.3 dBi of gain. On a glass substrate, the antenna uses 12 mm2, provides 100 MHz bandwidth and ~3 dBi of gain.

Correia, Jose H.; Mendes, Paulo M.

2005-02-01

221

DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY Two Medical Park, Suite 404, Columbia, SC 29203  

E-print Network

and Sports Medicine in advance of your first visit. The Orthopaedic Clinic is located at Two Medical Park, Lower Level, Suite L9/ L10. The Sports Medicine Clinic is located at Two Medical Park, Suite 104

Almor, Amit

222

Space suit simulator for partial gravity extravehicular activity experimentation and training  

E-print Network

During human space exploration, mobility is extremely limited when working inside a pressurized space suit. Astronauts perform extensive training on Earth to become accustomed to space suit-imposed high joint torques and ...

Gilkey, Andrea L. (Andrea Lynn)

2012-01-01

223

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS Suite 1NO1, 2 Huntington Quadrangle  

E-print Network

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS Suite 1NO1, 2 Huntington Quadrangle Melville, NY 11747-4502 USA, American Institute of Physics, Suite 1NO1, 2 Huntington Quadrangle, Melville, NY 11747-4502 USA; Phone: 516

Allen, Jont

224

Minimal Social Weight User Interactions for Wearable Computers in Business Suits Aaron Toney  

E-print Network

fashion. These technologies are not limited to this application, but we wish to demonstrate to be designed to fit the uniform of the business suit. Men's business suits, which include a jacket, shirt, tie

Thomas, Bruce

225

33 CFR 149.338 - What are the requirements for immersion suits?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment Unmanned Deepwater Port Requirements § 149...requirements for immersion suits? (a) Each unmanned deepwater port located north of...an attending vessel is moored to the unmanned deepwater port, the suits may be...

2011-07-01

226

33 CFR 149.338 - What are the requirements for immersion suits?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment Unmanned Deepwater Port Requirements § 149...requirements for immersion suits? (a) Each unmanned deepwater port located north of...an attending vessel is moored to the unmanned deepwater port, the suits may be...

2012-07-01

227

33 CFR 149.338 - What are the requirements for immersion suits?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment Unmanned Deepwater Port Requirements § 149...requirements for immersion suits? (a) Each unmanned deepwater port located north of...an attending vessel is moored to the unmanned deepwater port, the suits may be...

2013-07-01

228

33 CFR 149.338 - What are the requirements for immersion suits?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment Unmanned Deepwater Port Requirements § 149...requirements for immersion suits? (a) Each unmanned deepwater port located north of...an attending vessel is moored to the unmanned deepwater port, the suits may be...

2010-07-01

229

33 CFR 149.338 - What are the requirements for immersion suits?  

...AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment Unmanned Deepwater Port Requirements § 149...requirements for immersion suits? (a) Each unmanned deepwater port located north of...an attending vessel is moored to the unmanned deepwater port, the suits may be...

2014-07-01

230

Robotic Joint Torque Testing: A Critical Tool in the Development of Pressure Suit Mobility Elements  

E-print Network

Pressure suits allow pilots and astronauts to survive in extreme environments at the edge of Earth’s atmosphere and in the vacuum of space. One obstacle that pilots and astronauts face is that gas-pressurized suits stiffen ...

Meyen, Forrest Edward

231

Physiological responses to wearing the space shuttle launch and entry suit and the prototype advanced crew escape suit compared to the unsuited condition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The launch and entry suit (LES) is a life support suit worn during Orbiter ascent and descent. The impact of suit weight and restricted mobility on egress from the Orbiter during an emergency is unknown. An alternate suit - the advanced crew escape suite (ACES) - is being evaluated. The physiological responses to ambulatory exercise of six subjects wearing the LES and ACES were measured and compared to those measurements taken while unsuited. Dependent variables included heart rate and metabolic response to treadmill walking at 5.6 km/h (3.5 mph), and also bilateral concentric muscle strength about the knee, shoulder, and elbow. No significant (p greater than 0.06) differences in heart rate or metabolic variables were measured in either suit while walking at 5.6 km/h. Significant (p less than 0.05) decreases in all metabolic variables were remarked when both suits were compared to the unsuited condition. There were no significant (p greater than 0.05) differences among the three suit conditions at 30 or 180 deg/s for muscles about the elbow and knee; however, about the shoulder, a significant (p = 0.0215) difference between the ACES and the unsuited condition was noted. Therefore, wearing a life support suit while performing Orbiter egress imposes a significant metabolic demand on crewmembers. Selective upper body strength movements may be compromised.

Barrows, Linda H.; Mcbrine, John J.; Hayes, Judith C.; Stricklin, Marcella D.; Greenisen, Michael C.

1993-01-01

232

A suite of RS/1 procedures for chemical laboratory statistical quality control and Shewhart control charting  

SciTech Connect

A suite of RS/1 procedures for Shewhart control charting in chemical laboratories is described. The suite uses the RS series product QCA (Quality Control Analysis) for chart construction and analysis. The suite prompts users for data in a user friendly fashion and adds the data to or creates the control charts. All activities are time stamped. Facilities for generating monthly or contiguous time segment summary charts are included. The suite is currently in use at Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Shanahan, K.L.

1990-09-01

233

Enhanced Verification Test Suite for Physics Simulation Codes  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses problems with which to augment, in quantity and in quality, the existing tri-laboratory suite of verification problems used by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of verification analysis is demonstrate whether the numerical results of the discretization algorithms in physics and engineering simulation codes provide correct solutions of the corresponding continuum equations. The key points of this document are: (1) Verification deals with mathematical correctness of the numerical algorithms in a code, while validation deals with physical correctness of a simulation in a regime of interest. This document is about verification. (2) The current seven-problem Tri-Laboratory Verification Test Suite, which has been used for approximately five years at the DOE WP laboratories, is limited. (3) Both the methodology for and technology used in verification analysis have evolved and been improved since the original test suite was proposed. (4) The proposed test problems are in three basic areas: (a) Hydrodynamics; (b) Transport processes; and (c) Dynamic strength-of-materials. (5) For several of the proposed problems we provide a 'strong sense verification benchmark', consisting of (i) a clear mathematical statement of the problem with sufficient information to run a computer simulation, (ii) an explanation of how the code result and benchmark solution are to be evaluated, and (iii) a description of the acceptance criterion for simulation code results. (6) It is proposed that the set of verification test problems with which any particular code be evaluated include some of the problems described in this document. Analysis of the proposed verification test problems constitutes part of a necessary--but not sufficient--step that builds confidence in physics and engineering simulation codes. More complicated test cases, including physics models of greater sophistication or other physics regimes (e.g., energetic material response, magneto-hydrodynamics), would represent a scientifically desirable complement to the fundamental test cases discussed in this report. The authors believe that this document can be used to enhance the verification analyses undertaken at the DOE WP Laboratories and, thus, to improve the quality, credibility, and usefulness of the simulation codes that are analyzed with these problems.

Kamm, J R; Brock, J S; Brandon, S T; Cotrell, D L; Johnson, B; Knupp, P; Rider, W; Trucano, T; Weirs, V G

2008-10-10

234

Laboratory validation of the IMEEDS nuclear detection suite  

SciTech Connect

There are naturally occurring radionuclides in the ocean that are derived from cosmic ray interaction in the atmosphere and weathering of crustal rocks on land and under the sea. In addition, man-made radioisotopes are present as a consequence of mining, processing, enrichment, re-processing and testing of fissile nuclear material. The distribution of radioisotopes in natural waters is a function of the chemical properties of the elements and the physico-chemical properties of the medium (Harvey et al., 1990; von Gunten and Benes, 1995). To improve analytical detection levels, the sampling system described in this report is capable of processing hundreds of liters of seawater rapidly, and isolating, or pre-concentrating radionuclides found on particle, colloidal and dissolved phases. Results for a variety of trace elements and radiocesium in river and coastal waters processed through this sampler system are described in a companion report (Field Test of the Radionuclide Sampling System). The previous report discussed fraction of elements and radionuclides between the dissolved and solid phases in natural waters that show large salinity and turbidity variation. The following report describes results for laboratory tests using identical natural waters that were spiked with a broad suite of traceable reference gamma-emitting radioisotopes. These isotopes are man-made, and they are found in natural waters only as a consequence of human activity. The spiked water samples were processed through the sampler system, and radionuclides in the solid and dissolved phases were analyzed directly by gamma spectrometry without further extraction using mineral acids and solvents. Radioisotope abundance in the different samples provide additional information on partitioning in the environment, as well as the efficiency, or effective recovery of isotopes in waters processed through the sampler. The objective of this test is to quantify extraction efficiency for a suite of radioisotopes spiked in real water samples. Previous work has described instrument detection levels (IDL) for various isotopes and y-ray detectors, and measurement of low background levels (1 O s femtoCuries/Liter) of radiocesium (Cs-137) in natural waters using this sampler system. This test expands the extraction efficiency and MDL determination for a larger suite of man-made radioisotopes that are typically absent in most natural waters.

Bandong, B. B.; Volpe, A. M.

1998-12-17

235

Introduction to the HPC Challenge Benchmark Suite Jack J. Dongarra Piotr Luszczek  

E-print Network

Introduction to the HPC Challenge Benchmark Suite Jack J. Dongarra Piotr Luszczek December 13, 2004 Abstract The HPC Challenge suite of benchmarks will exam- ine the performance of HPC architectures using) benchmark used in the Top500 list. The HPC Chal- lenge suite is being designed to augment the Top500 list

Luszczek, Piotr

236

TaPAS : The Talence Presburger Arithmetic Suite Jrme Leroux and Grald Point  

E-print Network

TaPAS : The Talence Presburger Arithmetic Suite Jérôme Leroux and Gérald Point LaBRI, Université Bordeaux 1, CNRS. {leroux,point}@labri.fr Abstract. TAPAS is a suite of libraries dedicated to FO (R, Z-logics like the Presburger arithmetic. TAPAS is a suite of libraries dedicated to these logics. The sequel

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

237

Utilising Code Smells to Detect Quality Problems in TTCN-3 Test Suites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today, test suites of several ten thousand lines of code are specified using the Testing and Test Control Notation (TTCN-3). Expe- rience shows that the resulting test suites suer from quality problems with respect to internal quality aspects like usability, maintainability, or reusability. Therefore, a quality assessment of TTCN-3 test suites is de- sirable. A powerful approach to detect quality

Helmut Neukirchen; Martin Bisanz

2007-01-01

238

A Parallel Java Grande Benchmark Suite L. A. Smith and J. M. Bull  

E-print Network

developed from the serial Java Grande benchmark suite, using three parallel programming models: Java native of standardised parallel programming models. The serial Java Grande benchmark suite provides a standard benchmark of the suite, the aim is to provide a means of evaluating the emerging parallel programming paradigms for Java

Bull, Mark

239

The Development of the Mound Laboratory Supplied-Air Bubble Suit  

Microsoft Academic Search

A supplied-air bubble suit was developed to improve the protection of personnel working with radioactive materials and other contaminants. Details of the description, development work, and procedures for proper usage of the bubble suit are presented. The bubble suit was developed primarily for use in operations where the airborne contamination level of certain radionuclides significantly exceeds Radioactive Concentration Guides. The

G. L. PHILLABAUM; P. C. ADAMS

1974-01-01

240

Revolutionary Design for Astronaut Exploration — Beyond the Bio-Suit System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bio-Suit System is designed to revolutionize human space exploration by providing enhanced astronaut extravehicular activity (EVA) locomotion and performance based on the concepts of a ‘second skin’ capability. The novel Bio-Suit concept provides an overall exploration system realized through symbiotic relationships between a suite of advanced technologies, creative design, human modeling and analysis, and new mission operations techniques. By

Dava J. Newman; Marita Canina; Guillermo L. Trotti

2007-01-01

241

Revolutionary Design for Astronaut Exploration - Beyond the Bio-Suit System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bio-Suit System is designed to revolutionize human space exploration by providing enhanced astronaut extravehicular activity (EVA) locomotion and performance based on the concepts of a `second skin' capability. The novel Bio-Suit concept provides an overall exploration system realized through symbiotic relationships between a suite of advanced technologies, creative design, human modeling and analysis, and new mission operations techniques. By

Dava J. Newman; Marita Canina; Guillermo L. Trotti

2007-01-01

242

Test Suite Reduction for Fault Detection and Localization: A Combined Approach  

E-print Network

, we investigate the effect of different test reduction methods on the performance of fault of test suites with various reduction sizes, followed by how reduced test suites perform with actual. But the repetitive use and continuous maintenance of test suites used for regression testing is hard since these test

Beszedes, Árpád

243

Using Hybrid Algorithm For Pareto Efficient Multi-Objective Test Suite Minimisation  

E-print Network

Using Hybrid Algorithm For Pareto Efficient Multi-Objective Test Suite Minimisation Shin Yoo & Mark Harman King's College London, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS, UK Abstract Test suite minimisation techniques seek to reduce the effort required for regression testing by selecting a subset of test suites

Singer, Jeremy

244

Measuring and Improving Latency to Avoid Test Suite Wear Out Shin Yoo & Mark Harman  

E-print Network

Measuring and Improving Latency to Avoid Test Suite Wear Out Shin Yoo & Mark Harman King's College London Centre for Research on Evolution, Search & Testing (CREST) London, UK {shin.yoo, mark introduces the concept of test suite latency. The more latent a test suite, the more it is possible

Singer, Jeremy

245

User Guide for the STAYSL PNNL Suite of Software Tools  

SciTech Connect

The STAYSL PNNL software suite provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist of the reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations.

Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Johnson, Christian D.

2013-02-27

246

Tobacco control implications of the first European product liability suit  

PubMed Central

Objective: To examine tobacco control implication of the first European product liability suit in Finland. Methods: Systematic search of internal tobacco industry documents available on the internet and at the British American Tobacco Guildford Depository. Results: Despite legal loss, the litigation contributed to subsequent tobacco control legislation in Finland. The proceedings revealed that the industry had concealed the health hazards of its products and, despite indisputable evidence, continued to deny them. The positions taken by the industry rocked its reliability as a social actor and thus weakened its chances of influencing tobacco policy. Despite fierce opposition from the tobacco industry, tobacco products were included in the product liability legislation, tobacco was entered on the Finnish list of carcinogens, and an extensive Tobacco Act was passed in Parliament. Conclusions: Tobacco litigation might not stand alone as a tool for public health policymaking but it may well stimulate national debate over the role of smoking in society and influence the policy agenda. PMID:15735296

Hiilamo, H

2005-01-01

247

STS-99 Mission Specialist Voss dons suit for launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Operations and Checkout Building, a smiling STS-99 Mission Specialist Janice Voss holds an inflated map globe of the stars after donning her launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. The globe is being signed by the entire crew as a gift for Delores Abraham, with Crew Quarters. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled for liftoff at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. The mission is expected to last 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour.

2000-01-01

248

Expedition 6 Commander Ken Bowersox during TCDT suit fit check  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Expedition 6 Commander Ken Bowersox adjusts his launch and entry suit during fit check, part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. He and the rest of the crew are preparing for the mission aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, which is scheduled to launch Nov. 10. The TCDT includes emergency egress training and a launch countdown. The Expedition 6 crew will travel on Space Shuttle Endeavour to the International Space Station to replace Expedition 5, returning to Earth after 4 months. The primary payloads on mission STS-113 are the first port truss segment, P1, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1 in 2003 when it will be attached to the central truss segment, S0, on the Space Station. Launch is scheduled for Nov. 10, 2002.

2002-01-01

249

Expedition 6 Commander Ken Bowersox during TCDT suit fit check  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Expedition 6 Commander Ken Bowersox adjusts his gloves during fit check of his launch and entry suit, part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. He and the rest of the crew are preparing for the mission aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, which is scheduled to launch Nov. 10. The TCDT includes emergency egress training and a launch countdown. The Expedition 6 crew will travel on Space Shuttle Endeavour to the International Space Station to replace Expedition 5, returning to Earth after 4 months. The primary payloads on mission STS-113 are the first port truss segment, P1, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart B. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1 in 2003 when it will be attached to the central truss segment, S0, on the Space Station. Launch is scheduled for Nov. 10, 2002.

2002-01-01

250

Elbow and knee joint for hard space suits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An elbow or knee joint for a hard space suit or similar usage is formed of three serially connected rigid sections which have truncated spherical configurations. The ends of each section form solid geometric angles, and the sections are interconnected by hermetically sealed ball bearings. The outer two sections are fixed together for rotation in a direction opposite to rotation of the center section. A preferred means to make the outer sections track each other in rotation comprises a rotatable continuous bead chain which engages sockets circumferentially spaced on the facing sides of the outer races of the bearings. The joint has a single pivot point and the bearing axes are always contained in a single plane for any articulation of the joint. Thus flexure of the joint simulates the coplanar flexure of the knee or elbow and is not susceptible to lockup.

Vykukal, H. C.

1986-01-01

251

STS-78 Mission Specialist Charles E. Brady suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-78 Mission Specialist Charles E. Brady Jr. is donning his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. A spaceflight rookie, Brady was selected by NASA to join the astronaut corps in March 1992; he is a medical doctor who also is a commander in the U.S. Navy. Along with six fellow crew members, he will depart the O&C in a short while and head for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff during a two-and-a-half hour launch window opening at 10:49 a.m. EDT, June 20. STS-78 will be an extended duration flight during which extensive research will be conducted in the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) located in the payload bay.

1996-01-01

252

Prison employees not immune from HIV disclosure suit.  

PubMed

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that people do not lose their right to maintain confidentiality of their HIV status upon being jailed. A case filed by [name removed], an inmate at the Albion Correctional Facility in New York, alleged that a corrections officer gratuitously disclosed her HIV-positive status and transsexual status to a coworker in front of other inmates. The disclosures exposed [name removed] to harassment by guards and prisoners. Although [name removed] died of AIDS-related complications in 1995, her estate continued the suit. Judge Dennis G. Jacobs ruled that while it was permissible to disclose such information for legitimate penological purposes, this revelation was done for gossip with deliberate indifference to the inmate's safety. The judge also found the defendants were entitled to qualified immunity because the right to privacy in a prison setting had not been established at the time of the disclosures. PMID:11366534

1999-04-30

253

STS-111 Pilot Lockhart suits up for TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-111 Paul Lockhart waves after getting into his launch and entry suit. The mission crew, plus the Expedition 5 crew, are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which includes a simulated launch countdown. Mission STS-111 is known as Utilization Flight 2, carrying supplies and equipment in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo to the International Space Station. The payload also includes the Mobile Base System, which will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and a replacement wrist/roll joint for Canadarm 2. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to 'inchworm' from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Expedition 5 will travel to the Station on Endeavour as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard the orbiter. Launch is scheduled for May 30, 2002.

2002-01-01

254

STS-88 Mission Specialist James Newman suits up before launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-88 Mission Specialist James H. Newman takes part in a complete suit check before launch. Newman holds a toy dog, 'Pluto,' representing the crew nickname Dog Crew 3 and Newman's nickname, Pluto. Mission STS-88 is expected to launch at 3:56 a.m. EST with the six-member crew aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Dec. 3. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module, which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is expected to last 11 days, 19 hours and 49 minutes, landing at 10:17 p.m. EST on Dec. 14.

1998-01-01

255

An air bearing fan for EVA suit ventilation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The portable life-support system (PLSS) ventilation requirements are outlined, along with the application of a high-speed axial fan technology for extravehicular-activity (EVA) space-suit ventilation. Focus is placed on a mechanical design employing high-speed gas bearings, permanent magnet rotor, and current-fed chopper/inverter electronics. The operational characteristics of the fan unit and its applicability for use in a pure-oxygen environment are discussed. It delivers a nominal 0.17 cu m/min at 1.24 kPa pressure rise using 13.8 w of input power. It is shown that the overall selection of materials for all major component meets the NASA requirements.

Murry, Roger P.

1990-01-01

256

An overview of suite for automated global electronic biosurveillance (SAGES)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Public health surveillance is undergoing a revolution driven by advances in the field of information technology. Many countries have experienced vast improvements in the collection, ingestion, analysis, visualization, and dissemination of public health data. Resource-limited countries have lagged behind due to challenges in information technology infrastructure, public health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular, flexible, freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings. One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system. The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

Lewis, Sheri L.; Feighner, Brian H.; Loschen, Wayne A.; Wojcik, Richard A.; Skora, Joseph F.; Coberly, Jacqueline S.; Blazes, David L.

2012-06-01

257

STS-99 Commander Kregel suits up before launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Commander Kevin Kregel waves as he suits up during final launch preparations. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, liftoff is scheduled for 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days. Endeavour is expected to land at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m. EST.

2000-01-01

258

Linear Analysis and Verification Suite for Edge Turbulence  

SciTech Connect

The edge and scrape-off-layer region of a tokamak plasma is subject to well known resistive and ideal instabilities that are driven by various curvature- and sheath-related mechanisms. While the boundary plasma is typically strongly turbulent in experiments, it is useful to have computational tools that can analyze the linear eigenmode structure, predict quantitative trends in growth rates and elucidate and the underlying drive mechanisms. Furthermore, measurement of the linear growth rate of unstable modes emerging from a known, established equilibrium configuration provides one of the few quantitative ways of rigorously benchmarking large-scale plasma turbulence codes with each other and with a universal standard. In this report, a suite of codes that can describe linearized, nonlocal (e.g. separatrix-spanning) modes in axisymmetric (realistic divertor), toroidal geometry is discussed. Examples of several benchmark comparisons are given, and future development plans for a new eigenvalue edge code are presented.

Myra, J R; Umansky, M

2008-04-24

259

Advanced Design Heat PumpRadiator for EVA Suits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Absorption cooling using a LiCl/water heat pump can enable lightweight and effective thermal control for EVA suits without venting water to the environment. The key components in the system are an absorber/radiator that rejects heat to space and a flexible evaporation cooling garment that absorbs heat from the crew member. This paper describes progress in the design, development, and testing of the absorber/radiator and evaporation cooling garment. New design concepts and fabrication approaches will significantly reduce the mass of the absorber/radiator. We have also identified materials and demonstrated fabrication approaches for production of a flexible evaporation cooling garment. Data from tests of the absorber/radiator s modular components have validated the design models and allowed predictions of the size and weight of a complete system.

Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Passow, Christian; Phillips, Scott; Trevino, Luis

2009-01-01

260

STS-87 Payload Specialist Leonid K. Kadenyuk suits up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-87 Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine gives a thumbs up in his launch and entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. He and the five other crew members of STS-87will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff on a 16-day mission to perform microgravity and solar research. Kadenyuk will be flying his first mission on STS-87. During the mission, Kadenyuk will pollinate Brassica rapa plants as part of the Collaborative Ukrainian Experiment, or CUE, aboard Columbia. The CUE experiment is a collection of 10 plant space biology experiments that will fly in Columbias middeck and features an educational component that involves evaluating the effects of microgravity on Brassica rapa seedlings.

1997-01-01

261

Mafic rocks of the Adirondack Highlands: One suite or many  

SciTech Connect

Mafic rocks in the granulite facies terrane of the Adirondack Highlands form at least 3 and possibly as many as 6 groups, based on field, petrographic, and geochemical criteria. Most abundant is the olivine metagabbro-amphibolite group (OMA), equivalent to the mafic suite'' of Olson (J. Petrol. 33:471, 1992). OMA occurs in irregular to tabular bodies, locally with intrusive relations, in all major rock types in the E and central Highlands. OMA is strongly olivine normative and forms a continuous differentiation series (Olson, 1992). Plagioclase-two pyroxene-garnet granulites (PGG) form dikes up to several m wide, in anorthositic host rocks. PGG are ferrogabbroic or ferrodioritic and approximately silica saturated. Two subgroups differ sharply in Mg, P, and trace elements. Ferrodiorite and monzodiorite gneisses (FMG), quartz normative and commonly migmatitic, occur in several large bodies in the NE Highlands and as extensive thin sheets in the W and SE Highlands, in association with anorthositic rocks. Three subgroups are distinguishable using Mg/Fe ratios and trace elements. Major element least-squares modeling suggests that both PGG and FMG could be derived by fractionation of gabbroic anorthosite liquids. A differentiation series is not evident, however, and both trace element (Ba, Rb, Sr, Zr and REE) data and normative plagioclase (An [>=] plag. in anorthosite) indicate a more complex origin. One subgroup of FMG may be early cumulates of the mangerite-charnockite suite. The chemistry of OMA, PGG, and FMG reflects their evolved nature and cannot be readily interpreted in terms of magma sources.

Whitney, P.R. (Geological Survey, Albany, NY (United States). New York State Museum)

1993-03-01

262

Active Learning Suite: Simulation-Based E-learning Tools  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Active Learning Suite (ALSuite) is a highly interactive simulation-based online learning system for SMET education and corporate training. It uses real-life situations and objects, such as those related to the home, automobiles, sports, and telecommunications as the context for science and technology investigations. ALSuite is comprised of Simulations, Virtual Experiments, Interactive Lessons, a scriptable and animated Instructor's Assistant, assessment, authoring and ancillary tools, and more. The current version of Active Learning Suite includes the following modules: Thermodynamics Fluid Mechanics Mobile Telephony Wired Telephony Golf Mechanics Fiber Optics Fundamentals of Wireless Communications The problems and virtual experiments in ALSuite are designed to challenge learners to develop effective problem-solving and critical thinking skills. This enables the learner to discover the connections between scientific theory and concepts and their practical applications in technology. ALSuite helps teachers meld advanced emerging technologies with science and inquiry content, processes, and skills to meet the National and State Science Education Standards, and the Benchmarks for Science Literacy.The ALSuite software implements technologies that can provide instructional opportunities in many ways, whether at a campus/school (traditional teaching), at home (warm-ups, post-class tasks, or self-learning), or through distance learning. ALSuite is intended for problem-based learning and "learning-by-doing," however, it can facilitate more traditional learning and teaching strategies as well.Educational software resources for thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, telecommunications, fiber optics, cellular/mobile phone, and wireless fundamentals curricula. As well as for introductory physics and principles of technology.

2009-11-04

263

Philosophies Applied in the Selection of Space Suit Joint Range of Motion Requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space suits are the most important tool for astronauts working in harsh space and planetary environments; suits keep crewmembers alive and allow them to perform exploration, construction, and scientific tasks on a routine basis over a period of several months. The efficiency with which the tasks are performed is largely dictated by the mobility features of the space suit. For previous space suit development programs, the mobility requirements were written as pure functional mobility requirements that did not separate joint ranges of motion from the joint torques. The Constellation Space Suit Element has the goal to make more quantitative mobility requirements that focused on the individual components of mobility to enable future suit designers to build and test systems more effectively. This paper details the test planning and selection process for the Constellation space suit pressure garment range of motion requirements.

Aitchison, Lindsway; Ross, Amy; Matty, Jennifer

2009-01-01

264

20 CFR 30.615 - What type of tort suits filed against beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers may...  

...What type of tort suits filed against beryllium vendors or atomic weapons employers...Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers...What type of tort suits filed against beryllium vendors or atomic weapons...

2014-04-01

265

Using Piezoelectric Ceramics for Dust Mitigation of Space Suits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The particles that make up moon dust and Mars soil can be hazardous to an astronaut s health if not handled properly. In the near future, while exploring outer space, astronauts plan to wander the surfaces of unknown planets. During these explorations, dust and soil will cling to their space suits and become imbedded in the fabric. The astronauts will track moon dust and mars soil back into their living quarters. This not only will create a mess with millions of tiny air-born particles floating around, but will also be dangerous in the case that the fine particles are breathed in and become trapped in an astronaut s lungs. research center are investigating ways to remove these particles from space suits. This problem is very difficult due to the nature of the particles: They are extremely small and have jagged edges which can easily latch onto the fibers of the fabric. For the past summer, I have been involved in researching the potential problems, investigating ways to remove the particles, and conducting experiments to validate the techniques. The current technique under investigation uses piezoelectric ceramics imbedded in the fabric that vibrate and shake the particles free. The particles will be left on the planet s surface or collected a vacuum to be disposed of later. The ceramics vibrate when connected to an AC voltage supply and create a small scale motion similar to what people use at the beach to shake sand off of a beach towel. Because the particles are so small, similar to volcanic ash, caution must be taken to make sure that this technique does not further inbed them in the fabric and make removal more difficult. Only a very precise range of frequency and voltage will produce a suitable vibration. My summer project involved many experiments to determine the correct range. Analysis involved hands on experience with oscilloscopes, amplifiers, piezoelectrics, a high speed camera, microscopes and computers. perfect this technology. Someday, vibration to remove dust may a vital component to the space exploration program. In order to mitigate this problem, engineers and scientists at the NASA-Glenn Further research and experiments are planned to better understand and ultimately

Angel, Heather K.

2004-01-01

266

Heat stress and a countermeasure in the Shuttle rescueman's suit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rescue of the astronaut flight crew from a contingency landing may risk exposure of the rescue crew to toxic propellants spilling from potentially ruptured tanks in the crew module area. An Aquala dry diver's suit has been in service by the rescue team to preclude exposure, especially in the water rescue scenario. Heat stress has become a factor of concern in recent years when older and less physically-fit team members work in this suit. Methods: Field testing was initiated using fully instrumented rescue men in a simulated scenario to determine the extent of heat stress. Two tests were accomplished, one in the normal (N) configuration and one with a proposed cooling countermeasure, the Steele vest (S). Results: Heat stress was high as indicated by average rectal temperatures (Tre) of 38.28 degrees C(100.9 degrees F) after the 45 minute protocol. Slopes of the regression equations describing the increase in Tre with time were greater (P less than 0.05) with N (0.073 plus or minus .008) compared to S (0.060 plus or minus .007). Projection of time to the 38.89 degree C (102 degree F) limit was increased by 15.3 percent with the vest. Mean skin temperature (Tsk) was higher (P less than 0.05) in N (38.33 plus or minus .11 degrees C) compared to S (34.33 plus or minus .39 degrees C). Average heart rate was higher (P less than 0.05 in N than S. Sweat loss, as measured by weight loss, was more (P less than 0.05) for N (1.09 plus or minus .09 kg versus 0.77 plus or minus .06 kg). Air usage, while slightly less for S, was not statistically different. Conclusion: The use of the cool vest provided significant relief from thermal stress in spite of the addition of 3.4 kg (7.5 pounds) weight and some loss in mobility.

Doerr, D. F.; Reed, H.; Convertino, V. A.

1992-01-01

267

The Scalable HeterOgeneous Computing (SHOC) Benchmark Suite  

SciTech Connect

Scalable heterogeneous computing systems, which are composed of a mix of compute devices, such as commodity multicore processors, graphics processors, reconfigurable processors, and others, are gaining attention as one approach to continuing performance improvement while managing the new challenge of energy efficiency. As these systems become more common, it is important to be able to compare and contrast architectural designs and programming systems in a fair and open forum. To this end, we have designed the Scalable HeterOgeneous Computing benchmark suite (SHOC). SHOC's initial focus is on systems containing graphics processing units (GPUs) and multi-core processors, and on the new OpenCL programming standard. SHOC is a spectrum of programs that test the performance and stability of these scalable heterogeneous computing systems. At the lowest level, SHOC uses microbenchmarks to assess architectural features of the system. At higher levels, SHOC uses application kernels to determine system-wide performance including many system features such as intranode and internode communication among devices. SHOC includes benchmark implementations in both OpenCL and CUDA in order to provide a comparison of these programming models.

Danalis, Antonios [ORNL] [ORNL; Marin, Gabriel [ORNL] [ORNL; McCurdy, Collin B [ORNL] [ORNL; Meredith, Jeremy S [ORNL] [ORNL; Roth, Philip C [ORNL] [ORNL; Spafford, Kyle L [ORNL] [ORNL; Tipparaju, Vinod [ORNL] [ORNL; Vetter, Jeffrey S [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01

268

Performance of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) products  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

through the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program, in partnership with the National Aeronautical and Space Administration, launched the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, a risk reduction and data continuity mission, on 28 October 2011. The JPSS program is executing the S-NPP Calibration and Validation program to ensure that the data products comply with the requirements of the sponsoring agencies. The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) consists of two telescopes feeding three detectors measuring solar radiance scattered by the Earth's atmosphere directly and solar irradiance by using diffusers. The measurements are used to generate estimates of total column ozone and vertical ozone profiles for use in near-real-time applications and extension of ozone climate data records. The calibration and validation efforts are progressing well, and both Level 1 (Sensor Data Records) and Level 2 (Ozone Environmental Data Records) have advanced to release at Provisional Maturity. This paper provides information on the product performance over the first 22 months of the mission. The products are evaluated through the use of internal consistency analysis techniques and comparisons to other satellite instrument and ground-based products. The initial performance finds total ozone showing negative bias of 2 to 4% with respect to correlative products and ozone profiles often within ±5% in the middle and upper stratosphere of current operational products. Potential improvements in the measurements and algorithms are identified. These will be implemented in coming months to reduce the differences further.

Flynn, L.; Long, C.; Wu, X.; Evans, R.; Beck, C. T.; Petropavlovskikh, I.; McConville, G.; Yu, W.; Zhang, Z.; Niu, J.; Beach, E.; Hao, Y.; Pan, C.; Sen, B.; Novicki, M.; Zhou, S.; Seftor, C.

2014-05-01

269

Background data collection suite for atmospheric remote sensing applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In developing algorithms for remote sensing of chemical and biological warfare agents, it is imperative to have a good understanding of the background radiance signal and environmental characteristics that influence detection. Factors such as thermal contrast, interferent atmospheric constituents, spatial clutter, and temporal variations should all be investigated for both the development and performance modeling of field sensors. To aid in the investigation of these topics as well as to provide data for current simulation tools, JHU/APL has constructed an automated data collection suite capable of simultaneous radiometric measurements in the longwave IR (8?m - 12?m) and midwave IR (3?m - 5?m) while also measuring a host of relevant atmospheric parameters. The primary radiometric sensor, an ABB Bomem MR304, is mounted on a pan/tilt system that is used to scan regions of interest while periodically generating calibration data. This paper describes the system design requirements, specifications of the individual components, and the overall system performance. In addition, data from field exercises are presented.

Lazarevich, A. K.; Oursler, D. A.; Baldwin, K. C.

2006-05-01

270

A modular suite of hardware enabling spaceflight cell culture research.  

PubMed

BioServe Space Technologies, a NASA Research Partnership Center (RPC), has developed and operated various middeck payloads launched on 23 shuttle missions since 1991 in support of commercial space biotechnology projects. Modular cell culture systems are contained within the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus (CGBA) suite of flight-qualified hardware, compatible with Space Shuttle, SPACEHAB, Spacelab and International Space Station (ISS) EXPRESS Rack interfaces. As part of the CGBA family, the Isothermal Containment Module (ICM) incubator provides thermal control, data acquisition and experiment manipulation capabilities, including accelerometer launch detection for automated activation and thermal profiling for culture incubation and sample preservation. The ICM can accommodate up to 8 individually controlled temperature zones. Command and telemetry capabilities allow real-time downlink of data and video permitting remote payload operation and ground control synchronization. Individual cell culture experiments can be accommodated in a variety of devices ranging from 'microgravity test tubes' or standard 100 mm Petri dishes, to complex, fed-batch bioreactors with automated culture feeding, waste removal and multiple sample draws. Up to 3 levels of containment can be achieved for chemical fixative addition, and passive gas exchange can be provided through hydrophobic membranes. Many additional options exist for designing customized hardware depending on specific science requirements. PMID:16145798

Hoehn, Alexander; Klaus, David M; Stodieck, Louis S

2004-03-01

271

California court says disability benefits do not preclude suit.  

PubMed

A California appeals court reversed a lower court decision barring a worker from pursuing an HIV discrimination claim against his employer. [Name removed] claims that [name removed] violated California's Fair Employment and Housing Act when it rescinded accommodations that the bank had made earlier for HIV-related medical needs. The accommodations included a compressed work week and one day of telecommuting per week, which [name removed] performed well enough to earn a promotion. With a change in management, the accommodations were canceled, ostensibly to control costs. The lower court ruled that [name removed] was barred from suing his former employer because of statements on his disability insurance application. However, the appeals court ruled that [name removed]'s statements on the form were honest and did not preclude him from future litigation. Myron Quon, an attorney with Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund in Los Angeles, noted that [name removed]'s deft handling of the questions was vital to the success of the suit. [Name removed] had made comments and notations on the form, rather than just checking the appropriate yes or no boxes, and noted that he could return to work with a reasonable accommodation. Others applying for disability are cautioned to do the same to preserve their legal rights. PMID:11365322

1998-05-01

272

STS-99 Mission Specialist Thiele suits up during TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agency, suits up in the Operations and Checkout Building, as part of a flight crew equipment fit check, prior to his trip to Launch Pad 39A. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that provide the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot- long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST.

2000-01-01

273

STS-99 Mission Specialist Voss suits up before launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Mission Specialist Janice Voss (Ph.D.) smiles as she dons her launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, liftoff is scheduled for 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days. Endeavour is expected to land at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m. EST.

2000-01-01

274

STS-99 Commander Kregel suits up during TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-99 Mission Commander Kevin Kregel suits up in the Operations and Checkout Building, as part of a flight crew equipment fit check, prior to his trip to Launch Pad 39A. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that provide the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station- derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST.

2000-01-01

275

STS-99 Mission Specialist Thiele suits up before launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele, who is with the European Space Agency, smiles as he dons his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, liftoff is scheduled for 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot- long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days. Endeavour is expected to land at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m. EST.

2000-01-01

276

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mohri suits up during TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri (Ph.D.), who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, suits up in the Operations and Checkout Building, as part of a flight crew equipment fit check, prior to his trip to Launch Pad 39A. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that provide the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST.

2000-01-01

277

MPScope: a versatile software suite for multiphoton microscopy.  

PubMed

MPScope is a software suite to control and analyze data from custom-built multiphoton laser scanning fluorescence microscopes. The acquisition program MPScan acquires, displays and stores movies, linescans, image stacks or arbitrary regions from up to four imaging channels and up to two analog inputs, while plotting the intensity of regions of interest in real-time. Bidirectional linescans allow 256 x 256 pixel frames to be acquired at up to 10 fps with typical galvanometric scanners. A fast stack mode combines movie acquisition with continuous z-focus motion and adjustment of laser intensity for constant image brightness. Fast stacks can be automated by custom programs running in an integrated scripting environment, allowing a 1 mm(3) cortical volume to be sampled in 1 billion voxels in approximately 1 h. The analysis program MPView allows viewing of stored frames, projections, automatic detection of cells and plotting of their average intensity across frames, direct frame transfer to Matlab, AVI movie creation and file export to ImageJ. The combination of optimized code, multithreading and COM (Common Object Model) technologies enables MPScope to fully take advantage of custom-built two-photon microscopes and to simplify their realization. PMID:16621010

Nguyen, Quoc-Thang; Tsai, Philbert S; Kleinfeld, David

2006-09-30

278

Calibration of the Solar Orbiter Energetic Particle Detector Suite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the current status and plans for the calibration of the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) suite on ESA's Solar Orbiter mission. Solar Orbiter is scheduled to launch in January 2017, instrument delivery in January 2015. EPD consists of four sensors: the SupraThermal Electron and Proton (STEP) sensor covers electrons (protons) from 2 (3) keV up to 100 keV, the Electron Proton Telescope (EPT) from 20 to 300 (7000) keV, the Suprathermal Ion Spectrograph (SIS) determines the ionic composition from ~0.05 to ~10 MeV/nuc (species dependent), and the High Energy Telescope (HET) measures electrons and protons (ions) from 0.3 to 30 and 10 to >100 MeV/nuc (20 - 200 MeV/nuc species dependent). EPT, HET, and SIS have two approximately opposite-facing fields of view, EPT, and HET share a common electronics box, two EPT/HET sensors allow the determination of second-order anisotropies (a total of 4 FoVs). Apart from the use of radioactive sources, STEP will be calibrated at the Kiel calibration facilities, EPT both at Kiel (electrons and low-energy protons) as well as at PTB in Braunschweig. SIS will undergo calibration at the LBL 88' cyclotron, HET at HIMAC in Chiba, Japan. Tests of the electron/protons discrimination of EPT show the expected behavior, HET prototypes have already been calibrated and the results will be shown.

Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Rodriguez-Pacheco, J.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Panitzsch, L.; Boettcher, S.; Mason, G. M.; Kohler, J.; Ho, G. C.; Boden, S.; Grunau, J.; Steinhagen, J.; Terasa, C.; Yu, J.; Prieto, M.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Blanco, J.

2013-12-01

279

Don/Doff support stand for use with rear entry space suits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A don/doff support stand for use with rear entry space suits is disclosed. The support stand is designed for use in one-g environments; however, certain features of the stand can be used on future space-craft, lunar or planetary bases. The present invention has a retainer which receives a protruding lug fixed on the torso section of the space suit. When the lug is locked in the retainer, the space suit is held in a generally upright position. In a one-g environment a portable ladder is positioned adjacent to the rear entry of the space suit supported by the stand. The astronaut climbs up the ladder and grasps a hand bar assembly positioned above the rear entry. The astronaut then slips his legs through the open rear entry and down into the abdominal portion of the suit. The astronaut then lowers himself fully into the suit. The portable ladder is then removed and the astronaut can close the rear entry door. The lug is then disengaged from the retainer and the astronaut is free to engage in training exercises in the suit. When suit use is over, the astronaut returns to the stand and inserts the lug into the retainer. A technician repositions the ladder. The astronaut opens the rear entry door, grasps the hand bar assembly and does a chin-up to extricate himself from the suit. The astronaut climbs down the movable ladder while the suit is supported by the stand.

Kosmo, Joseph J. (Inventor); Tri, Terry O. (Inventor); Spenny, William E. (Inventor); West, Philip R. (Inventor)

1989-01-01

280

Interaction of Space Suits with Windblown Soil: Preliminary Mars Wind Tunnel Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experiments in the Mars Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center show that under Mars conditions, spacesuit materials are highly susceptible to dust contamination when exposed to windblown soil. This effect was suspected from knowledge of the interaction of electrostatically adhesive dust with solid surfaces in general. However, it is important to evaluate the respective roles of materials, meteorological and radiation effects, and the character of the soil. The tunnel permits evaluation of dust contamination and sand abrasion of space suits by simulating both pressure and wind conditions on Mars. The long-term function of space suits on Mars will be primarily threatened by dust contamination. Lunar EVA activities caused heavy contamination of space suits, but the problem was never seriously manifest because of the brief utilization of the suits, and the suits were never reused. Electrostatically adhering dust grains have various detrimental effects: (1) penetration and subsequent wear of suit fabrics, (2) viewing obscuration through visors and scratching/pitting of visor surfaces, (3) penetration, wear, and subsequent seizing-up of mechanical suit joints, (4) changes in albedo and therefore of radiation properties of external heat-exchanger systems, (5) changes in electrical conductivity of suit surfaces which may affect tribocharging of suits and create spurious discharge effects detrimental to suit electronics/radio systems. Additional information is contained in the original.

Marshall, J.; Bratton, C.; Kosmo, J.; Trevino, R.

1999-01-01

281

Interaction of Space Suits with Windblown Soil: Preliminary Mars Wind Tunnel Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments in the Mars Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center show that under Mars conditions, spacesuit materials are highly susceptible to dust contamination when exposed to windblown soil. This effect was suspected from knowledge of the interaction of electrostatically adhesive dust with solid surfaces in general. However, it is important to evaluate the respective roles of materials, meteorological and radiation effects, and the character of the soil. The tunnel permits evaluation of dust contamination and sand abrasion of space suits by simulating both pressure and wind conditions on Mars. The long-term function of space suits on Mars will be primarily threatened by dust contamination. Lunar EVA activities caused heavy contamination of space suits, but the problem was never seriously manifest because of the brief utilization of the suits, and the suits were never reused. Electrostatically adhering dust grains have various detrimental effects: (1) penetration and subsequent wear of suit fabrics, (2) viewing obscuration through visors and scratching/pitting of visor surfaces, (3) penetration, wear, and subsequent seizing-up of mechanical suit joints, (4) changes in albedo and therefore of radiation properties of external heat-exchanger systems, (5) changes in electrical conductivity of suit surfaces which may affect tribocharging of suits and create spurious discharge effects detrimental to suit electronics/radio systems. Additional information is contained in the original.

Marshall, J.; Bratton, C.; Kosmo, J.; Trevino, R.

1999-09-01

282

Don/doff support stand for use with rear entry space suits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A don/doff support stand for use with rear entry space suits is disclosed. The support stand is designed for use in one-g environments; however, certain features of the stand can be used on future spacecraft, lunar, or planetary bases. The present invention has a retainer which receives a protrucing lug fixed on the torso section of the space suit. When the lug is locked in the retainer, the space suit is held in a generally upright position. In a one-g environment a portable ladder is positioned adjacent to the rear entry of the space suit supported by the stand. The astronaut climbs up the ladder and grasps a hand bar assembly positioned above the rear entry. The astronaut then slips his legs through the open rear entry and down into the abdominal portion of the suite. The astronaut then lowers himself fully into the suit. The portable ladder is then removed and the astronaut can close the rear entry door. The lug is then disengaged from the retainer and the astronaut is free to engage in training exercises in the suit. When suit use is over, the astronaut returns to the stand and inserts the lug into the retainer. A technician repositions the ladder. The astronaut opens the rear entry door, grasps the hand bar assembly and does a chin-up to extricate himself from the suit. The astronaut climbs down the movable ladder while the suit is supported by the stand.

Kosmo, Joseph J. (inventor); Tri, Terry O. (inventor); Spenny, William E. (inventor); West, Philip R. (inventor)

1988-01-01

283

VOLCWORKS: A suite for optimization of hazards mapping  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Making hazards maps is a process linking basic science, applied science and engineering for the benefit of the society. The methodologies for hazards maps' construction have evolved enormously together with the tools that allow the forecasting of the behavior of the materials produced by different eruptive processes. However, in spite of the development of tools and evolution of methodologies, the utility of hazards maps has not changed: prevention and mitigation of volcanic disasters. Integration of different tools for simulation of different processes for a single volcano is a challenge to be solved using software tools including processing, simulation and visualization techniques, and data structures in order to build up a suit that helps in the construction process starting from the integration of the geological data, simulations and simplification of the output to design a hazards/scenario map. Scientific visualization is a powerful tool to explore and gain insight into complex data from instruments and simulations. The workflow from data collection, quality control and preparation for simulations, to achieve visual and appropriate presentation is a process that is usually disconnected, using in most of the cases different applications for each of the needed processes, because it requires many tools that are not built for the solution of a specific problem, or were developed by research groups to solve particular tasks, but disconnected. In volcanology, due to its complexity, groups typically examine only one aspect of the phenomenon: ash dispersal, laharic flows, pyroclastic flows, lava flows, and ballistic projectile ejection, among others. However, when studying the hazards associated to the activity of a volcano, it is important to analyze all the processes comprehensively, especially for communication of results to the end users: decision makers and planners. In order to solve this problem and connect different parts of a workflow we are developing the suite VOLCWORKS, whose principle is to have a flexible-implementation architecture allowing rapid development of software to the extent specified by the needs including calculations, routines, or algorithms, both new and through redesign of available software in the volcanological community, but especially allowing to include new knowledge, models or software transferring them to software modules. The design is component-oriented platform, which allows incorporating particular solutions (routines, simulations, etc.), which can be concatenated for integration or highlighting information. The platform includes a graphical interface with capabilities for working in different visual environments that can be focused to the particular work of different types of users (researchers, lecturers, students, etc.). This platform aims to integrate simulation and visualization phases, incorporating proven tools (now isolated). VOLCWORKS can be used under different operating systems (Windows, Linux and Mac OS) and fit the context of use automatically and at runtime: in both tasks and their sequence, such as utilization of hardware resources (CPU, GPU, special monitors, etc.). The application has the ability to run on a laptop or even in a virtual reality room with access to supercomputers.

Delgado Granados, H.; Ramírez Guzmán, R.; Villareal Benítez, J. L.; García Sánchez, T.

2012-04-01

284

Micro flame-based detector suite for universal gas sensing.  

SciTech Connect

A microflame-based detector suit has been developed for sensing of a broad range of chemical analytes. This detector combines calorimetry, flame ionization detection (FID), nitrogen-phosphorous detection (NPD) and flame photometric detection (FPD) modes into one convenient platform based on a microcombustor. The microcombustor consists in a micromachined microhotplate with a catalyst or low-work function material added to its surface. For the NPD mode a low work function material selectively ionizes chemical analytes; for all other modes a supported catalyst such as platinum/alumina is used. The microcombustor design permits rapid, efficient heating of the deposited film at low power. To perform calorimetric detection of analytes, the change in power required to maintain the resistive microhotplate heater at a constant temperature is measured. For FID and NPD modes, electrodes are placed around the microcombustor flame zone and an electrometer circuit measures the production of ions. For FPD, the flame zone is optically interrogated to search for light emission indicative of deexcitation of flame-produced analyte compounds. The calorimetric and FID modes respond generally to all hydrocarbons, while sulfur compounds only alarm in the calorimetric mode, providing speciation. The NPD mode provides 10,000:1 selectivity of nitrogen and phosphorous compounds over hydrocarbons. The FPD can distinguish between sulfur and phosphorous compounds. Importantly all detection modes can be established on one convenient microcombustor platform, in fact the calorimetric, FID and FPD modes can be achieved simultaneously on only one microcombustor. Therefore, it is possible to make a very universal chemical detector array with as little as two microcombustor elements. A demonstration of the performance of the microcombustor in each of the detection modes is provided herein.

Hamilton, Thomas Warren; Washburn, Cody M.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Manley, Robert George; Lewis, Patrick Raymond; Miller, James Edward; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Okandan, Murat

2005-11-01

285

A Freezable Heat Exchanger for Space Suit Radiator Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During an ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA), both the heat generated by the astronaut s metabolism and that produced by the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) must be rejected to space. The heat sources include the heat of adsorption of metabolic CO2, the heat of condensation of water, the heat removed from the body by the liquid cooling garment and the load from the electrical components. Although the sublimator hardware to reject this load weighs only 1.58 kg (3.48 lbm), an additional 3.6 kg (8 lbm) of water are loaded into the unit, most of which is sublimated and lost to space, thus becoming the single largest expendable during an eight-hour EVA. Using a radiator to reject heat from the astronaut during an EVA can reduce the amount of expendable water consumed in the sublimator. Radiators have no moving parts and are thus highly reliable. Past freezable radiators have been too heavy, but the weight can be greatly reduced by placing a small and freeze tolerant heat exchanger between the astronaut and radiator, instead of making the very large radiator freeze tolerant. Therefore, the key technological innovation to improve space suit radiator performance was the development of a lightweight and freezable heat exchanger that accommodates the variable heat load generated by the astronaut. Herein, we present the heat transfer performance of a newly designed heat exchanger that endured several freeze / thaw cycles without any apparent damage. The heat exchanger was also able to continuously turn down or turn up the heat rejection to follow the variable load.

Nabity, James A.; Mason, Georgia R.; Copeland, Robert J.; Trevino, Luis a.

2008-01-01

286

Assessing the effectiveness of Defensive Aids Suite technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modern anti-tank weapons and the requirement of rapid deployment have significantly reduced the quantity and effectiveness of passive armor in protecting land vehicles. This new development has led to replacing the main battle tank by a light armored vehicle with at least the same level of survivability achievable by advances in sensor, computer and countermeasure technology to detect, identify and defeat potential threats. The integration of various technologies into a Defensive Aids Suite (DAS) can be designed and analyzed by combining field trials and laboratory data with modeling and simulation. This complementary approach will also make an optimal use of available resources and encourage collaboration with other researchers working towards a common goal. This modeling capability can be easily transferred to other researchers in the field by using a quick prototyping environment such as MATLAB. The code generated from MATLAB will be used for further analysis in an operational research simulator such as ModSAF. Once calibrated with a previous trial, ModSAF will be used to plan future trials. An important feature of ModSAF is the use of scripted input files to plan and implement a fixed battle based on accepted doctrine and tactics. Survivability of a DAS-equipped vehicle can be assessed relative to a basic vehicle without a DAS. In later stages, more complete DAS systems will be analyzed to determine the optimum configuration of the DAS components and the effectiveness of a DAS-equipped vehicle for a particular mission. These concepts and approach will be discussed in the paper.

Rapanotti, John L.; DeMontigny-Leboeuf, Annie; Palmarini, Marc; Cantin, Andre

2001-09-01

287

Navy-developed life support systems for fully enclosed protective suits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development and performance of an environmental control unit capable of supporting a man in an impermeable suit at ambient temperatures up to 140 F for periods of up to two hrs is reported. The basic suit operation consists of cooling by wet ice contained in a suitcase. The system is designed to circulate and cool the air within the suit, to remove excess moisture and carbon dioxide, and to maintain a safe oxygen level.

Orner, G. M.; Audet, N. F.

1972-01-01

288

Efficient Test Suite Reduction by Merging Pairs of Suitable Test Cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a During the development and maintenance of software, the size of a test suite often increases to such an extent that the costs\\u000a allocated for its execution are exceeded. In this case, the test suite needs to be reduced. A number of approaches address\\u000a the problem of test suite reduction. Most of them consider the removal or merging of test cases.

Harald Cichos; Thomas S. Heinze

2010-01-01

289

Injury Potential Testing of Suited Occupants During Dynamic Spacecraft Flight Phases  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In support of the NASA Constellation Program, a space-suit architecture was envisioned for support of Launch, Entry, Abort, Micro-g EVA, Post Landing crew operations, and under emergency conditions, survival. This space suit architecture is unique in comparison to previous launch, entry, and abort (LEA) suit architectures in that it utilized rigid mobility elements in the scye and the upper arm regions. The suit architecture also employed rigid thigh disconnect elements to allow for quick disconnect functionality above the knee which allowed for commonality of the lower portion of the suit across two suit configurations. This suit architecture was designed to interface with the Orion seat subsystem, which includes seat components, lateral supports, and restraints. Due to this unique configuration of spacesuit mobility elements, combined with the need to provide occupant protection during dynamic landing events, risks were identified with potential injury due to the suit characteristics described above. To address the risk concerns, a test series was developed to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of these potential issues. Testing included use of Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs), Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS), and representative seat/suit hardware in combination with high linear acceleration events. The ensuing treatment focuses on detailed results of the testing that has been conducted under this test series thus far.

McFarland, Shane M.

2011-01-01

290

A Method for and Issues Associated with the Determination of Space Suit Joint Requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the design of a new space suit it is necessary to have requirements that define what mobility space suit joints should be capable of achieving in both a system and at the component level. NASA elected to divide mobility into its constituent parts-range of motion (ROM) and torque- in an effort to develop clean design requirements that limit subject performance bias and are easily verified. Unfortunately, the measurement of mobility can be difficult to obtain. Current technologies, such as the Vicon motion capture system, allow for the relatively easy benchmarking of range of motion (ROM) for a wide array of space suit systems. The ROM evaluations require subjects in the suit to accurately evaluate the ranges humans can achieve in the suit. However, when it comes to torque, there are significant challenges for both benchmarking current performance and writing requirements for future suits. This is reflected in the fact that torque definitions have been applied to very few types of space suits and with limited success in defining all the joints accurately. This paper discussed the advantages and disadvantages to historical joint torque evaluation methods, describes more recent efforts directed at benchmarking joint torques of prototype space suits, and provides an outline for how NASA intends to address joint torque in design requirements for the Constellation Space Suit System (CSSS).

Matty, Jennifer E.; Aitchison, Lindsay

2009-01-01

291

Injury Potential Testing of Suited Occupants During Dynamic Spacecraft Flight Phases  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In support of the Constellation Program, a space-suit architecture was envisioned for support of Launch, Entry, Abort, Micro-g EVA, Post Landing crew operations, and under emergency conditions, survival. This space suit architecture is unique in comparison to previous launch, entry, and abort (LEA) suit architectures in that it utilized rigid mobility elements in the scye and the upper arm regions. The suit architecture also employed rigid thigh disconnect elements to allow for quick disconnect functionality above the knee which allowed for commonality of the lower portion of the suit across two suit configurations. This suit architecture was designed to interface with the Orion seat subsystem, which includes seat components, lateral supports, and restraints. Due to this unique configuration of spacesuit mobility elements, combined with the need to provide occupant protection during dynamic landing events, risks were identified with potential injury due to the suit characteristics described above. To address the risk concerns, a test series was developed to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of these potential issues. Testing included use of Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs), Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS), and representative seat/suit hardware in combination with high linear acceleration events. The ensuing treatment focuses o detailed results of the testing that has ben conducted under this test series thus far.

McFarland, Shane M.

2010-01-01

292

Vertical resolution study on the GOES-R Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES)  

E-print Network

Vertical resolution study on the GOES-R Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) Jun Li* , Fang Wang spectral resolution infrared radiances from the Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) on Geostationary soundings that are desired by numerical weather forecast models. An algorithm has been developed to analyze

Li, Jun

293

Towards the integration of textile sensors in a wireless monitoring suit  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present textile sensors for the equipment of a wireless monitoring suit. The suit is intended for the monitoring of electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration rate of children in a hospital environment. Special attention is given to the dedicated sensor interface circuits. The sensors, which are entirely fabricated out of textile, are integrated in a prototype belt of

M. Catrysse; R. Puers; C. Hertleer; L. Van Langenhove; H. van Egmond; D. Matthys

2004-01-01

294

A virtual training suite to enhance the value of Internet resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the development of a virtual training suite for the UK's Resource Discovery Network (RDN) which aims to support lecturers and students in finding and using resources on the Web to support learning and teaching. The RDN Virtual Training Suite comprises a series of tutorials delivered over the World Wide Web. Many people know how to make good

G. Conole; K. Sharp

2000-01-01

295

Evaluation of the operator protection factors offered by positive pressure air suits against airborne microbiological challenge.  

PubMed

Laboratories throughout the world that perform work with Risk Group 4 Pathogens generally adopt one of two approaches within BSL-4 environments: either the use of positive pressure air-fed suits or using Class III microbiological safety cabinets and isolators for animal work. Within the UK at present, all laboratories working with Risk Group 4 agents adopt the use of Class III microbiological safety cabinet lines and isolators. Operator protection factors for the use of microbiological safety cabinets and isolators are available however; there is limited published data on the operator protection factors afforded by the use of positive pressure suits. This study evaluated the operator protection factors provided by positive pressure air suits against a realistic airborne microbiological challenge. The suits were tested, both intact and with their integrity compromised, on an animated mannequin within a stainless steel exposure chamber. The suits gave operator protection in all tests with an intact suit and with a cut in the leg. When compromised by a cut in the glove, a very small ingress of the challenge was seen as far as the wrist. This is likely to be due to the low airflow in the gloves of the suit. In all cases no microbiological penetration of the respiratory tract was observed. These data provide evidence on which to base safety protocols for use of positive pressure suits within high containment laboratories. PMID:23012620

Steward, Jackie A; Lever, Mark S

2012-08-01

296

46 CFR 199.214 - Immersion suits and thermal protective aids.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Immersion suits and thermal protective aids. 199.214 Section...Vessels § 199.214 Immersion suits and thermal protective aids. (a) Each passenger...section, each passenger vessel must carry a thermal protective aid approved under...

2010-10-01

297

The In-Space Propulsion Technology Project Low-Thrust Trajectory Tool Suite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ISPT project released its low-thrust trajectory tool suite in March of 2006. The LTTT suite tools range in capabilities, but represent the state-of-the art in NASA low-thrust trajectory optimization tools. The tools have all received considerable updates following the initial release, and they are available through their respective development centers or the ISPT project website.

Dankanich, John W.

2008-01-01

298

Rare earth element geochemistry of an anorthosite-diorite suite, Namaqua mobile belt, South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

A swarm of small dyke-like plutons, ranging in composition from anorthosite through diorite and norite, to hypersthenite and glimmerite, occurs in the western part of the Namaqua mobile belt, South Africa. Known as the Koperberg Suite, these rocks host important magmatic sulphide deposits. Zircon ages of approximately 1100 Ma suggest that the suite was emplaced after the peak of the

J. A. Conradie; A. E. Schoch

1988-01-01

299

Autism Teaching Suite Jefrey Cochran, Kirill Marants, Simon Sidhom, Jamison Mortimer, Jamison  

E-print Network

Andaluz Senior Design Expo Department of Computer Science Introduction The Autism Teaching Suite (ATSs Autism Teaching Suite Jefrey Cochran, Kirill Marants, Simon Sidhom, Jamison Mortimer, Jamison, multimodal learning environment. s Wheel Organizer ·Used for adding, removing, and reorganizing wheel content

Kamberov, George

300

Evaluation of the Operator Protection Factors Offered by Positive Pressure Air Suits against Airborne Microbiological Challenge  

PubMed Central

Laboratories throughout the world that perform work with Risk Group 4 Pathogens generally adopt one of two approaches within BSL-4 environments: either the use of positive pressure air-fed suits or using Class III microbiological safety cabinets and isolators for animal work. Within the UK at present, all laboratories working with Risk Group 4 agents adopt the use of Class III microbiological safety cabinet lines and isolators. Operator protection factors for the use of microbiological safety cabinets and isolators are available however; there is limited published data on the operator protection factors afforded by the use of positive pressure suits. This study evaluated the operator protection factors provided by positive pressure air suits against a realistic airborne microbiological challenge. The suits were tested, both intact and with their integrity compromised, on an animated mannequin within a stainless steel exposure chamber. The suits gave operator protection in all tests with an intact suit and with a cut in the leg. When compromised by a cut in the glove, a very small ingress of the challenge was seen as far as the wrist. This is likely to be due to the low airflow in the gloves of the suit. In all cases no microbiological penetration of the respiratory tract was observed. These data provide evidence on which to base safety protocols for use of positive pressure suits within high containment laboratories. PMID:23012620

Steward, Jackie A.; Lever, Mark S.

2012-01-01

301

Lithological and paleontological content of the Carboniferous-Jurassic Canterbury Suite, South Island, New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

The late Paleozoic and Mesozoic quartzo-feldspathic Canterbury Suite contains a wide range of detrital lithotypes and facies, representing many depositional environments. The stratification, sedimentary structures, and fossils characteristic of 11 lithotypes are described and interpreted in terms of probable depositional environments.Fifteen recognisable faunal zones represent only part of the total time span of the Canterbury Suite (Carboniferous to late Jurassic).

P. B. Andrews; I. G. Speden; J. D. Bradshaw

1976-01-01

302

Study of the suit inflation effect on crew safety during landing using a full-pressure IVA suit for new-generation reentry space vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, manned space capsules have been recognized as beneficial and reasonable human space vehicles again. The Dragon capsule already achieved several significant successes. The Orion capsule is going to be sent to a high-apogee orbit without crews for experimental purposes in September 2014. For such human-rated space capsules, the study of acceleration impacts against the human body during splashdown is essential to ensure the safety of crews. Moreover, it is also known that wearing a full pressure rescue suit significantly increases safety of a crew, compared to wearing a partial pressure suit. This is mainly because it enables the use of a personal life support system independently in addition to that which installed in the space vehicle. However, it is unclear how the inflation of the full pressure suit due to pressurization affects the crew safety during splashdown, especially in the case of the new generation manned space vehicles. Therefore, the purpose of this work is to investigate the effect of the suit inflation on crew safety against acceleration impact during splashdown. For this objective, the displacements of the safety harness in relation with the suit, a human surrogate, and the crew seats during pressurizing the suit in order to determine if the safety and survivability of a crew can be improved by wearing a full pressure suit. For these tests, the DL/H-1 full pressure IVA suit, developed by Pablo de Leon and Gary L. Harris, will be used. These tests use image analysis techniques to determine the displacements. It is expected, as a result of these tests, that wearing a full pressure suit will help to mitigate the impacts and will increase the safety and survivability of a crew during landing since it works as a buffer to mitigate impact forces during splashdown. This work also proposes a future plan for sled test experiments using a sled facility such as the one in use by the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) for experimental validation of the work presented as part of this thesis.

Wataru, Suzuki

303

Skin Temperatures During Unaided Egress: Unsuited and While Wearing the NASA Launch and Entry or Advanced Crew Escape Suits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The two flight suits currently worn by crew members during Shuttle launch and landing, the Launch and Entry Suit (LES) and the Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES), are designed to protect crew members in the case of emergency. Although the Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG) worn under the flight suits was designed to counteract the heat storage of the suits, the suits may increase thermal stress and limit the astronaut's egress capabilities. The purpose of this study was to assess the thermal loads experienced by crew members during a simulated emergency egress before and after spaceflight. Comparisons of skin temperatures were made between the preflight unsuited and suited conditions. between the pre- and postflight suited conditions, and between the two flight suits.

Woodruff, Kristin K.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Greenisen, Michael C.; Schneider, Suzanne M.

2000-01-01

304

Hazard Analysis for the Mark III Space Suit Assembly (SSA) Used in One-g Operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Hazard Analysis document encompasses the Mark III Space Suit Assembly (SSA) and associated ancillary equipment. It has been prepared using JSC17773, "Preparing Hazard Analyses for JSC Ground Operation", as a guide. The purpose of this document is to present the potential hazards involved in ground (23 % maximum O2, One-g) operations of the Mark III and associated ancillary support equipment system. The hazards listed in this document are specific to suit operations only; each supporting facility (Bldg. 9, etc.) is responsible for test specific Hazard Analyses. A "hazard" is defined as any condition that has the potential for harming personnel or equipment. This analysis was performed to document the safety aspects associated with manned use of the Mark III for pressurized and unpressurized ambient, ground-based, One-g human testing. The hazards identified herein represent generic hazards inherent to all standard JSC test venues for nominal ground test configurations. Non-standard test venues or test specific configurations may warrant consideration of additional hazards analysis prior to test. The cognizant suit engineer is responsible for the safety of the astronaut/test subject, space suit, and suit support personnel. The test requester, for the test supported by the suit test engineer and suited subject, is responsible for overall safety and any necessary Test Readiness Reviews (TRR).

Mitchell, Kate; Ross, Amy; Blanco, Raul; Wood, Art

2012-01-01

305

Work and Fatigue Characteristics of Unsuited and Suited Humans During Isolated, Isokinetic Joint Motions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of a pressurized suit on human performance were investigated. The suit is known as an Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) and is worn by astronauts while working outside of their space craft in low earth orbit. Isolated isokinetic joint torques of three female and three male subjects (all experienced users of the suit) were measured while working at 100% and 80% of their maximum voluntary torque (MVT). It was found that the average decrease in the total amount of work done when the subjects were wearing the EMU was 48% and 41% while working at 100% and 80% MVT, respectively. There is a clear relationship between the MVT and the time and amount of work done until fatigue. In general the stronger joints took longer to fatigue and did more work than the weaker joints. However, it is not clear which joints are most affected by the EMU suit in terms of the amount of work done. The average amount of total work done increased by 5.2% and 20.4% for the unsuited and suited cases, respectively, when the subject went from working at 100% to 80% MVT. Also, the average time to fatigue increased by 9.2% and 25.6% for the unsuited and suited cases, respectively, when the subjects went from working at 100% to 80% MVT. The EMU also decreased the joint range of motion. It was also found that the experimentally measured torque decay could be predicted by a logarithmic equation. The absolute average error in the predictions was found to be 18.3% and 18.9% for the unsuited and suited subject, respectively, working at 100% MVT, and 22.5% and 18.8% for the unsuited and suited subject, respectively, working at 80% MVT. These results could be very useful in the design of future EMU suits, and planning of Extra-Vehicular Activit). (EVA) for the upcoming International Space Station assembly operations.

Gonzalez, L. Javier; Maida, James C.; Miles, Erica H.; Rajulu, S. L.; Pandya, A. K.; Russo, Dane M. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

306

Abrasion Testing of Candidate Outer Layer Fabrics for Lunar EVA Space Suits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the Apollo program, the space suit outer layer fabrics were severely abraded after just a few Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots, which penetrated the outer layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than eight hours of surface operations. Current plans for the Constellation Space Suit Element require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on the Lunar surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last forty years and improve upon the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo program. A test methodology has been developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division for establishing comparative abrasion wear characteristics between various candidate space suit outer layer fabrics. The abrasion test method incorporates a large rotary drum tumbler with rocks and loose lunar simulant material to induce abrasion in fabric test cylinder elements, representative of what might occur during long term planetary surface EVAs. Preliminary materials screening activities were conducted to determine the degree of wear on representative space suit outer layer materials and the corresponding dust permeation encountered between subsequent sub-layers of thermal protective materials when exposed to a simulated worst case eight hour EVA. The test method was used to provide a preliminary evaluation of four candidate outer layer fabrics for future planetary surface space suit applications. This paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details the methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, shares the results of the testing, and provides recommendations for future work.

Mitchell, Kathryn

2009-01-01

307

Argon used as dry suit insulation gas for cold-water diving  

PubMed Central

Background Cold-water diving requires good thermal insulation because hypothermia is a serious risk. Water conducts heat more efficiently compared to air. To stay warm during a dive, the choice of thermal protection should be based on physical activity, the temperature of the water, and the duration of exposure. A dry suit, a diving suit filled with gas, is the most common diving suit in cold water. Air is the traditional dry suit inflation gas, whereas the thermal conductivity of argon is approximately 32% lower compared to that of air. This study evaluates the benefits of argon, compared to air, as a thermal insulation gas for a dry suit during a 1-h cold-water dive by divers of the Royal Netherlands Navy. Methods Seven male Special Forces divers made (in total) 19 dives in a diving basin with water at 13°C at a depth of 3 m for 1 h in upright position. A rubber dry suit and woollen undergarment were used with either argon (n = 13) or air (n = 6) (blinded to the divers) as suit inflation gas. Core temperature was measured with a radio pill during the dive. Before, halfway, and after the dive, subjective thermal comfort was recorded using a thermal comfort score. Results No diver had to abort the test due to cold. No differences in core temperature and thermal comfort score were found between the two groups. Core temperature remained unchanged during the dives. Thermal comfort score showed a significant decrease in both groups after a 60-min dive compared to baseline. Conclusions In these tests the combination of the dry suit and undergarment was sufficient to maintain core temperature and thermal comfort for a dive of 1 h in water at 13°C. The use of argon as a suit inflation gas had no added value for thermal insulation compared to air for these dives. PMID:24438580

2013-01-01

308

The use of antigravity suits in the treatment of idiopathic orthostatic hypotension  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Idiopathic orthostatic hypotension is an uncommon disease characterized by a drop in blood pressure when going from a recumbent to a standing position. Treatment by medication generally produces poor results. Three patients at the Royal Hospital in Oslo were treated with antigravity suits and all were able to maintain adequate blood pressures in the standing position. One patient improved dramatically and was able to take short walks while wearing the suit. The two other patients, however, felt that wearing the suits eventually became uncomfortable. This treatment represents a useful treatment alternative for intractable cases.

Landmark, K.; Kravik, S.

1980-01-01

309

Overview of the Development for a Suite of Low-Thrust Trajectory Analysis Tools  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A NASA intercenter team has developed a suite of low-thrust trajectory analysis tools to make a significant improvement in three major facets of low-thrust trajectory and mission analysis. These are: 1) ease of use, 2) ability to more robustly converge to solutions, and 3) higher fidelity modeling and accuracy of results. Due mostly to the short duration of the development, the team concluded that a suite of tools was preferred over having one integrated tool. This tool-suite, their characteristics, and their applicability will be described. Trajectory analysts can read this paper and determine which tool is most appropriate for their problem.

Kos, Larry D.; Polsgrove, Tara; Hopkins, Randall; Thomas, Dan; Sims, Jon A.

2006-01-01

310

Metabolic and Subjective Results Review of the Integrated Suit Test Series  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Crewmembers will perform a variety of exploration and construction activities on the lunar surface. These activities will be performed while inside an extravehicular activity (EVA) spacesuit. In most cases, human performance is compromised while inside an EVA suit as compared to a crewmember s unsuited performance baseline. Subjects completed different EVA type tasks, ranging from ambulation to geology and construction activities, in different lunar analog environments including overhead suspension, underwater and 1-g lunar-like terrain, in both suited and unsuited conditions. In the suited condition, the Mark III (MKIII) EVA technology demonstrator suit was used and suit pressure and suit weight were parameters tested. In the unsuited conditions, weight, mass, center of gravity (CG), terrain type and navigation were the parameters. To the extent possible, one parameter was varied while all others were held constant. Tests were not fully crossed, but rather one parameter was varied while all others were left in the most nominal setting. Oxygen consumption (VO2), modified Cooper-Harper (CH) ratings of operator compensation and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured for each trial. For each variable, a lower value correlates to more efficient task performance. Due to a low sample size, statistical significance was not attainable. Initial findings indicate that suit weight, CG and the operational environment can have a large impact on human performance during EVA. Systematic, prospective testing series such as those performed to date will enable a better understanding of the crucial interactions of the human and the EVA suit system and their environment. However, work remains to be done to confirm these findings. These data have been collected using only unsuited subjects and one EVA suit prototype that is known to fit poorly on a large demographic of the astronaut population. Key findings need to be retested using an EVA suit prototype better suited to a larger anthropometric portion of the astronaut population, and elements tested only in the unsuited condition need to be evaluated with an EVA suit and appropriate analog environment.

Norcross, J.R.; Stroud, L.C.; Klein, J.; Desantis, L.; Gernhardt, M.L.

2009-01-01

311

Carbon Dioxide Washout Testing Using Various Inlet Vent Configurations in the Mark-III Space Suit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Requirements for using a space suit during ground testing include providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout for the suited subject. Acute CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms including headache, dyspnea, lethargy, and eventually unconsciousness or even death. Symptoms depend on several factors including inspired partial pressure of CO2 (ppCO2), duration of exposure, metabolic rate of the subject, and physiological differences between subjects. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis has predicted that the configuration of the suit inlet vent has a significant effect on oronasal CO2 concentrations. The main objective of this test was to characterize inspired oronasal ppCO2 for a variety of inlet vent configurations in the Mark-III suit across a range of workload and flow rates. Data and trends observed during testing along with refined CFD models will be used to help design an inlet vent configuration for the Z-2 space suit. The testing methodology used in this test builds upon past CO2 washout testing performed on the Z-1 suit, Rear Entry I-Suit, and the Enhanced Mobility Advanced Crew Escape Suit. Three subjects performed two test sessions each in the Mark-III suit to allow for comparison between tests. Six different helmet inlet vent configurations were evaluated during each test session. Suit pressure was maintained at 4.3 psid. Suited test subjects walked on a treadmill to generate metabolic workloads of approximately 2000 and 3000 BTU/hr. Supply airflow rates of 6 and 4 actual cubic feet per minute were tested at each workload. Subjects wore an oronasal mask with an open port in front of the mouth and were allowed to breathe freely. Oronasal ppCO2 was monitored real-time via gas analyzers with sampling tubes connected to the oronasal mask. Metabolic rate was calculated from the CO2 production measured by an additional gas analyzer at the air outlet from the suit. Real-time metabolic rate measurements were used to adjust the treadmill workload to meet target metabolic rates. This paper provides detailed descriptions of the test hardware, methodology and results, as well as implications for future inlet vent designs and ground testing.

Korona, F. Adam; Norcross, Jason; Conger, Bruce; Navarro, Moses

2014-01-01

312

Understanding human-space suit interaction to prevent injury during extravehicular activity  

E-print Network

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is a critical component of human spaceflight. Working in gas-pressurized space suits, however, causes fatigue, unnecessary energy expenditure, and injury. The problem of injury is particularly ...

Anderson, Allison P. (Allison Paige)

2014-01-01

313

78 FR 51186 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...suit filed by Air Alliance Houston, California Communities Against Toxics, Coalition For A Safe Environment, Community In-Power and Development Association, Del Amo Action Committee, Environmental Integrity Project, Louisiana Bucket...

2013-08-20

314

Effects of Anti-G Suit Inflation on Renin and Aldosterone Response Physical Exercise.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In order to verify the stimuli involved in renin secretion and the consequences on aldosterone concentration, six healthy male subjects executed four experimental procedures. Two tests were upright posture with and without anti-g suit. Two tests were arm ...

C. Y. Guezennec, F. Louisy, F. X. Galen, M. Lartigues

1987-01-01

315

NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp  

NASA Video Gallery

The White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp prepares students to deal with normal propellant operations, emergency events, and pre-operation planning by engaging studen...

316

An investigation of space suit mobility with applications to EVA operations  

E-print Network

The primary aim of this thesis is to advance the current understanding of astronauts' capabilities and limitations in space-suited extravehicular activity (EVA) by compiling a detailed database of the torques needed to ...

Schmidt, Patricia Barrett, 1974-

2001-01-01

317

[Physiological basis of human mechanics and its application in the design of pressure suit].  

PubMed

Objective. To discuss the necessity that human mechanics and its physiological basis as applied to the research of human motion in many areas. Method. The motion performance of two aerospace [correction of areospace] pressure suit were studied. Human mechanics and its physiological basis was applied in the design of one suit only. Result. The result showed that good performance was obtained with the suit designed according to this principle which the stipulated actions couldn't be well performanced when wearing the suit not so designed. Conclusion. The research of the application of human mechanics and its physiological basis is necessary and it has better reality and is more scientific than applying biomechanics and robotics. PMID:12434811

Jia, S G; Chen, J S

1999-12-01

318

Astronaut Charles Conrad during suiting up on morning of liftoff of Gemini 5  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr. pulls on a pair of white undergloves and has his temperature taken during suiting up operations on the morning of liftoff of Gemini 5 space flight from Cape Kennedy, Florida.

1965-01-01

319

Results of the Particulate Contamination Control Trade Study for Space Suit Life Support Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the United States plans to return astronauts to the moon and eventually to Mars, designing the most effective, efficient, and robust space suit life support system that will operate successfully in these dusty environments is vital. There is some knowledge of the contaminants and level of infiltration expected from the Lunar and Mars dust, however risk mitigation strategies and filtration designs to prevent contamination within the space suit life support system are still undefined. A trade study was initiated to identify and address these concerns, and to develop new requirements for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support System (PLSS). This trade study investigates historical methods of particulate contamination control in space suits and vehicles, and evaluated the possibility of using commercial technologies for this application. In addition, the trade study examined potential filtration designs. This paper summarizes the results of this trade study.

Cognata, Thomas J.; Conger, Bruce; Paul, Heather L.

2009-01-01

320

Development of a mechanical counter pressure Bio-Suit System for planetary exploration  

E-print Network

Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) is critical for human spaceflight and particularly for human planetary exploration. The MIT Man Vehicle Laboratory is developing a Bio-Suit EVA System, based on mechanical counterpressure ...

Sim, Zhe Liang

2006-01-01

321

NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp  

NASA Video Gallery

The NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp prepares students to deal with normal propellant operations, emergency events, and pre-operation planning by engaging s...

322

Space exploration challenges : characterization and enhancement of space suit mobility and planetary protection policy analysis  

E-print Network

This thesis addresses two challenges associated with advanced space and planetary exploration: characterizing and improving the mobility of current and future gas pressurized space suits; and developing effective domestic ...

Holschuh, Bradley Thomas

2010-01-01

323

Ground-Motion Suite Selection for Eastern North America E. M. Hines, M.ASCE1  

E-print Network

; New York; Memphis, Tennessee; and Charleston, South Carolina, were the only major cities from suite selection for high seismic regions by uncertainty related to earthquake intensity, spectral: Earthquakes; Ground motion; Structural behavior; Seismic effects; North America. Author keywords: Ground

Hines, Eric

324

Designing a Suit to Protect Migrant Farm Workers in California from Pesticide Exposure  

E-print Network

4 Designing a Suit to Protect Migrant Farm Workers in California from Pesticide Exposure By Rupam ..................................................................................................8 1.2 HARMFUL EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES.........................................................................................................19 4.1 PESTICIDE RESISTANCE PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS

Agogino, Alice M.

325

PROPOSED SUITE OF MODELS FOR ESTIMATING DOSE RESULTING FROM EXPOSURES BY THE DERMAL ROUTE  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent risk assessment guidance emphasizes consideration of mechanistic factors for influencing disposition of a toxicant. To incorporate mechanistic information into risk assessment, a suite of models is proposed for use in characterizing and quantifying dosimetry of toxic age...

326

Labeled line drawing of launch and entry suit identifies various components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Line drawings illustrate how a crewmember would be seated during space shuttle launch and entry in the mission specialist seat wearing the launch and entry suit (LES), a partial pressure suit. Front and profile drawings are labeled with numbers. The legend for the views includes: 1) Mission Specialist seat; 2) crewman; 3) helmet; 4) anti-exposure / counter pressure garment; 5) boots; 6) parachute harness; 7) parachute pack; 8) life raft with sea dye marker; 9) suit mounted oxygen (O2) manifold; 10) anti-gravity (anti-g) suit controller; 11) emergency O2 supply; 12) seawars; 13) ventilation fan; 14) orbiter O2 line; 15) headset interface unit (HIU); 16) communication (COMM) line to HIU; 17) flotation device. Crew escape system (CES) and LES was designed for STS-26, the return to flight mission, and subsequent missions.

1988-01-01

327

Requirements and Sizing Investigation for Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System Trace Contaminant Control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS), located within the ventilation loop of the Constellation Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS), is responsible for removing hazardous trace contaminants from the space suit ventilation flow. This paper summarizes the results of a trade study that evaluated if trace contaminant control could be accomplished without a TCCS, relying on suit leakage, ullage loss from the carbon dioxide and humidity control system, and other factors. Trace contaminant generation rates were revisited to verify that values reflect the latest designs for Constellation Space Suit System (CSSS) pressure garment materials and PLSS hardware. Additionally, TCCS sizing calculations were performed and a literature survey was conducted to review the latest developments in trace contaminant technologies.

Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Waguespack, Glenn

2010-01-01

328

Assessment and preliminary model development of shape memory polymers mechanical counter pressure space suits  

E-print Network

This thesis seeks to assess the viability of a space qualified shape memory polymer (SMP) mechanical counter pressure (MCP) suit. A key development objective identified by the International Space Exploration Coordination ...

Wee, Brian (Brian J.)

2013-01-01

329

77 FR 39493 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended...nondiscretionary duties under the Clean Air Act related to the attainment...reasonably available control technology requirements, reasonable...

2012-07-03

330

78 FR 48161 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY...with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (CAA...Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACM/RACT), requirements...Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACM/RACT),...

2013-08-07

331

77 FR 41186 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL-9699-6] Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY: Environmental...SUMMARY: In accordance with the Clean Air Act, as amended ``CAA'' or the...respect to the reasonable area control technology (``RACT'') for NO X ....

2012-07-12

332

77 FR 14785 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL-9646-6] Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY: Environmental...accordance with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...Environmental Defense Center, Inc., and Clean Water Action Council of Northeast...

2012-03-13

333

75 FR 9208 - Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRL-9119-8] Proposed Consent Decree, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit AGENCY: Environmental...accordance with section 113(g) of the Clean Air Act, as amended (``CAA...Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper, Inc., Clean Water Action, and Chesapeake Climate...

2010-03-01

334

33 CFR 150.518 - What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Emergency and Specialty Equipment Personal Safety Gear § 150.518 What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits? (a) All...

2012-07-01

335

33 CFR 150.518 - What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Emergency and Specialty Equipment Personal Safety Gear § 150.518 What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits? (a) All...

2010-07-01

336

33 CFR 150.518 - What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits?  

...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Emergency and Specialty Equipment Personal Safety Gear § 150.518 What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits? (a) All...

2014-07-01

337

33 CFR 150.518 - What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Emergency and Specialty Equipment Personal Safety Gear § 150.518 What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits? (a) All...

2011-07-01

338

33 CFR 150.518 - What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Emergency and Specialty Equipment Personal Safety Gear § 150.518 What are the inspection requirements for work vests and immersion suits? (a) All...

2013-07-01

339

The Apollo Number: space suits, self-support, and the walk-run  

E-print Network

Background: How space suits affect the preferred walk-run transition is an open question with relevance to human biomechanics and planetary extravehicular activity. Walking and running energetics differ; in reduced gravity ...

McGee, Jeremy

340

What was uniform about the fin-de-siècle sailor suit?  

PubMed

The sailor suits widely worn by children in late-nineteenth-century Britain have been interpreted at the time, and since, as expressions of an Imperial ethos. Yet, a closer examination of the ways that these garments were produced by mass manufacturers, mediated by advertisers and fashion advisors and consumed by families makes us question this characterization. Manufacturers interpreted sailor suits not as unchanging uniforms but as fashion items responding to seasonal changes. Consumers used them to assert social identities and social distinctions, selecting from the multiple variants available. Cultural commentators described sailor suits as emulating Royal practice—but also as ‘common’ and to be avoided. A close analysis of large samples of images and texts from the period 1870–1900 reveals how these different meanings overlapped, making the fin-de-siècle sailor suit a garment that undermines many of our assumptions. PMID:21954488

Rose, Clare

2011-01-01

341

Rapid optical beam-steering sensor suite for tactical weapon tracking applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Rapid Optical Beam Steering (ROBS) sensor suite is being developed under the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) to permit precision tracking of long-range missile interceptor events. The sensor suite consists of a very wide field-of-view (FOV) MWIR staring array (28 degrees) for target detection, a narrower FOV (3.5 mrad) MWIR array for acquisition, tracking, and scene viewing, as well

Jack Daugherty; Howard Hyman; John G. McCoy; Charles M. Cason; Lewis F. DeSandre; Albert L. Pardue; R. W. Jones

1994-01-01

342

A suite of objective biomechanical measurement tools for personal load carriage system assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

For application to military and civilian needs, Defence Research and Development Canada—Toronto contracted Queen's University, Kingston to develop a suite of biomechanical assessment and analytical tools to supplement human-based load carriage system assessment methods. This suite of tools permitted efficient objective evaluation of biomechanical aspects of load-bearing webbing, vests, packs and their components, and therefore contributed to early system assessment

JM Stevenson; LL Bossi; JT Bryant; SA Reid; RP Pelot; EL Morin

2004-01-01

343

Refining a Proposal to Build Data-Rich Rock Suites for Learning Petrology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the outcomes from the 2003 Teaching Petrology workshop held in Bozeman, MT was a call for the development of a series of data-rich rocks suites that could be used to help students learn fundamental petrologic processes and concepts such as partial melting, magmatic differentiation, and phase equilibria. These suites would include detailed field, structural, geochemical, and geochronologic data that could be used in short lecture demonstrations, laboratory exercises, multi-week activities or semester-long projects. The motivation behind the development of these suites is the growing understanding in the education community that hands-on, problem-based learning activities that allow students to build their own knowledge are more effective than most traditional lecture formats. In discovery-based environments students learn to pose questions, work with data, manage ambiguity, and synthesize diverse observations. Many existing rocks suites used in petrology courses consist of rocks that were not necessarily selected to facilitate learning of important petrologic processes, or to develop higher order skills in a discovery-based setting. Our proposal is to develop a collection of genetically related rocks that can be used to discover fundamental petrologic concepts through guided data collection, interpretation, and synthesis by students and faculty. The use of suites in this manner helps develop a "community of learners" atmosphere in a course, where the outcome is perhaps not well defined and could change from year to year depending on the interests of the students and faculty involved. In addition, we hope these suites will be developed and used by several institutions, thus modeling the process of modern research by promoting sharing of equipment, data, ideas, and expertise perhaps through the use of a dedicated web site for each suite. This abstract solicits interest in and feedback from the community on the development of a series of data-rich rock suites and curricula for learning petrology.

Wirth, K. R.; Davidson, C.; Creasy, J. W.

2003-12-01

344

TRex - An Open-Source Tool for Quality Assurance of TTCN-3 Test Suites  

Microsoft Academic Search

The comprehensive test of modern communication systems leads to large and complex test suites which have to be maintained throughout the system life-cycle. Experience with those written in the standardised Testing and Test Control Notation (TTCN-3) has shown that the maintenance of test suites is a non-trivial task and its burden can be reduced with appropriate tool support. To this

Benjamin Zeiss; Helmut Neukirchen; Jens Grabowski; Dominic Evans; Paul Baker

345

Designing criteria suites to identify discrete and networked sites of high value across manifestations of biodiversity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Suites of criteria specifying ecological, biological, social, economic, and governance properties enable the systematic identification\\u000a of sites and networks of high biodiversity value, and can support balancing ecological and socioeconomic objectives of biodiversity\\u000a conservation in terrestrial and marine spatial planning. We describe designs of suites of ecological, governance and socioeconomic\\u000a criteria to comprehensively cover manifestations of biodiversity, from genotypes to

Eric Gilman; Daniel Dunn; Andrew Read; K. David Hyrenbach; Robin Warner

346

Time Management in the Operating Room: An Analysis of the Dedicated Minimally Invasive Surgery Suite  

PubMed Central

Background: Dedicated minimally invasive surgery suites are available that contain specialized equipment to facilitate endoscopic surgery. Laparoscopy performed in a general operating room is hampered by the multitude of additional equipment that must be transported into the room. The objective of this study was to compare the preparation times between procedures performed in traditional operating rooms versus dedicated minimally invasive surgery suites to see whether operating room efficiency is improved in the specialized room. Methods: The records of 50 patients who underwent laparoscopic procedures between September 2000 and April 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-three patients underwent surgery in a general operating room and 18 patients in an minimally invasive surgery suite. Nine patients were excluded because of cystoscopic procedures undergone prior to laparoscopy. Various time points were recorded from which various time intervals were derived, such as preanesthesia time, anesthesia induction time, and total preparation time. A 2-tailed, unpaired Student t test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean preanesthesia time was significantly faster in the minimally invasive surgery suite (12.2 minutes) compared with that in the traditional operating room (17.8 minutes) (P=0.013). Mean anesthesia induction time in the minimally invasive surgery suite (47.5 minutes) was similar to time in the traditional operating room (45.7 minutes) (P=0.734). The average total preparation time for the minimally invasive surgery suite (59.6 minutes) was not significantly faster than that in the general operating room (63.5 minutes) (P=0.481). Conclusion: The amount of time that elapses between the patient entering the room and anesthesia induction is statically shorter in a dedicated minimally invasive surgery suite. Laparoscopic surgery is performed more efficiently in a dedicated minimally invasive surgery suite versus a traditional operating room. PMID:15554269

Hsiao, Kenneth C.; Machaidze, Zurab

2004-01-01

347

Human skin in vitro permeation of bentazon and isoproturon formulations with or without protective clothing suit.  

PubMed

Skin exposures to chemicals may lead, through percutaneous permeation, to a significant increase in systemic circulation. Skin is the primary route of entry during some occupational activities, especially in agriculture. To reduce skin exposures, the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) is recommended. PPE efficiency is characterized as the time until products permeate through material (lag time, Tlag). Both skin and PPE permeations are assessed using similar in vitro methods; the diffusion cell system. Flow-through diffusion cells were used in this study to assess the permeation of two herbicides, bentazon and isoproturon, as well as four related commercial formulations (Basagran(®), Basamais(®), Arelon(®) and Matara(®)). Permeation was measured through fresh excised human skin, protective clothing suits (suits) (Microchem(®) 3000, AgriSafe Pro(®), Proshield(®) and Microgard(®) 2000 Plus Green), and a combination of skin and suits. Both herbicides, tested by itself or as an active ingredient in formulations, permeated readily through human skin and tested suits (Tlag < 2 h). High permeation coefficients were obtained regardless of formulations or tested membranes, except for Microchem(®) 3000. Short Tlag, were observed even when skin was covered with suits, except for Microchem(®) 3000. Kp values tended to decrease when suits covered the skin (except when Arelon(®) was applied to skin covered with AgriSafe Pro and Microgard(®) 2000), suggesting that Tlag alone is insufficient in characterizing suits. To better estimate human skin permeations, in vitro experiments should not only use human skin but also consider the intended use of the suit, i.e., the active ingredient concentrations and type of formulations, which significantly affect skin permeation. PMID:23820846

Berthet, Aurélie; Hopf, Nancy B; Miles, Alexandra; Spring, Philipp; Charrière, Nicole; Garrigou, Alain; Baldi, Isabelle; Vernez, David

2014-01-01

348

20 CFR 30.616 - What happens if this type of tort suit was filed prior to October 30, 2000?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...AMENDED Special Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers § 30.616 What...covered Part B employee's employment-related exposure to beryllium or radiation that were included in the tort suit prior to...

2010-04-01

349

20 CFR 30.616 - What happens if this type of tort suit was filed prior to October 30, 2000?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...AMENDED Special Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers § 30.616 What...covered Part B employee's employment-related exposure to beryllium or radiation that were included in the tort suit prior to...

2011-04-01

350

20 CFR 30.616 - What happens if this type of tort suit was filed prior to October 30, 2000?  

...AMENDED Special Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers § 30.616 What...covered Part B employee's employment-related exposure to beryllium or radiation that were included in the tort suit prior to...

2014-04-01

351

20 CFR 30.616 - What happens if this type of tort suit was filed prior to October 30, 2000?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AMENDED Special Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers § 30.616 What...covered Part B employee's employment-related exposure to beryllium or radiation that were included in the tort suit prior to...

2013-04-01

352

20 CFR 30.616 - What happens if this type of tort suit was filed prior to October 30, 2000?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...AMENDED Special Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers § 30.616 What...covered Part B employee's employment-related exposure to beryllium or radiation that were included in the tort suit prior to...

2012-04-01

353

Post-collisional magmatism in the central East African Orogen: The Maevarano Suite of north Madagascar  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Late tectonic, post-collisional granite suites are a feature of many parts of the Late Neoproterozoic to Cambrian East African Orogen (EAO), where they are generally attributed to late extensional collapse of the orogen, accompanied by high heat flow and asthenospheric uprise. The Maevarano Suite comprises voluminous plutons which were emplaced in some of the tectonostratigraphic terranes of northern Madagascar, in the central part of the EAO, following collision and assembly during a major orogeny at ca. 550 Ma. The suite comprises three main magmatic phases: a minor early phase of foliated gabbros, quartz diorites, and granodiorites; a main phase of large batholiths of porphyritic granitoids and charnockites; and a late phase of small-scale plutons and sheets of monzonite, syenite, leucogranite and microgranite. The main phase intrusions tend to be massive, but with variably foliated margins. New U-Pb SHRIMP zircon data show that the whole suite was emplaced between ca. 537 and 522 Ma. Geochemically, all the rocks of the suite are enriched in the LILE, especially K, and the LREE, but are relatively depleted in Nb, Ta and the HREE. These characteristics are typical of post-collisional granitoids in the EAO and many other orogenic belts. It is proposed that the Maevarano Suite magmas were derived by melting of sub-continental lithospheric mantle that had been enriched in the LILE during earlier subduction events. The melting occurred during lithospheric delamination, which was associated with extensional collapse of the East African Orogen. ?? 2009 Natural Environment Research Council.

Goodenough, K.M.; Thomas, R.J.; De Waele, B.; Key, R.M.; Schofield, D.I.; Bauer, W.; Tucker, R.D.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.

2010-01-01

354

The geochemical nature of the Archean Ancient Gneiss Complex and Granodiorite Suite, Swaziland: a preliminary study  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ancient Gneiss Complex (AGC) of Swaziland, an Archean gray gneiss complex, lies southeast and south of the Barberton greenstone belt and includes the most structurally complex and highly metamorphosed portions of the eastern Kaapvaal craton. The AGC is not precisely dated but apparently is older than 3.4 Ga. The AGC consists of three major units: (a) a bimodal suite of closely interlayered siliceous, low-K gneisses and metabasalt; (b) homogeneous tonalite gneiss; and (c) interlayered siliceous microcline gneiss, metabasalt, and minor metasedimentary rocks - termed the metamorphite suite. A geologically younger gabbro-diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite suite, the Granodiorite Suite, is spatially associated with the AGC and intrusive into it. The bimodal suite consists largely of two types of low-K siliceous gneiss: one has SiO2 14%, low Rb/Sr ratios, and depleted heavy rare earth elements (REE's); the other has SiO2 > 75%, Al2O3 < 13%, high Rb/Sr ratios, and relatively abundant REE's except for negative Eu anomalies. The interlayered metabasalt ranges from komatiitic to tholeiitic compositions. Lenses of quartz monzonitic gneiss of K2O/Na2O close to 1 form a minor part of the bimodal suite. Tonalitic to trondhjemitic migmatite locally is abundant and has major-element abundances similar to those of non-migmatitic varieties. The siliceous gneisses of the metamorphic suite show low Al2O, K2O/Na2O ratios of about 1, high Rb/Sr ratios, moderate REE abundances and negative Eu anomalies. K/Rb ratios of siliceous gneisses of the bimodal suite are very low (???130); of the tonalitic gneiss, low (???225); of the siliceous gneiss of the metamorphite suite, moderate (???300); and of the Granodiorite Suite, high (???400). Rocks of the AGC differ geochemically in several ways from the siliceous volcanic and hypabyssal rocks of the Upper Onverwacht Group and from the diapirs of tonalite and trondhjemite that intrude the Swaziland Group. ?? 1978.

Hunter, D. R.; Barker, F.; Millard, Jr. , H. T.

1978-01-01

355

Dressing for Altitude: U.S. Aviation Pressure Suits--Wiley Post to Space Shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since its earliest days, flight has been about pushing the limits of technology and, in many cases, pushing the limits of human endurance. The human body can be the limiting factor in the design of aircraft and spacecraft. Humans cannot survive unaided at high altitudes. There have been a number of books written on the subject of spacesuits, but the literature on the high-altitude pressure suits is lacking. This volume provides a high-level summary of the technological development and operational use of partial- and full-pressure suits, from the earliest models to the current high altitude, full-pressure suits used for modern aviation, as well as those that were used for launch and entry on the Space Shuttle. The goal of this work is to provide a resource on the technology for suits designed to keep humans alive at the edge of space. Hopefully, future generations will learn from the hard-fought lessons of the past. NASA is committed to the future of aerospace, and a key component of that future is the workforce. Without these men and women, technological advancements would not be possible. Dressing for Altitude is designed to provide the history of the technology and to explore the lessons learned through years of research in creating, testing, and utilizing today s high-altitude suits. It is our hope that this information will prove helpful in the development of future suits. Even with the closeout of the Space Shuttle and the planned ending of the U-2 program, pressure suits will be needed for protection as long as humans seek to explore high frontiers. The NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate is committed to the training of the current and future aerospace workforce. This book and the other books published by the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate are in support of this commitment. Hopefully, you will find this book a valuable resource for many years to come.

Jenkins, Dennis R.

2012-01-01

356

Virtual Observatory Publishing with DaCHS  

E-print Network

The Data Center Helper Suite DaCHS is an integrated publication package for building Virtual Observatory (VO) and Web services, supporting the entire workflow from ingestion to data mapping to service definition. It implements all major data discovery, data access, and registry protocols defined by the VO. DaCHS in this sense works as glue between data produced by the data providers and the standard protocols and formats defined by the VO. This paper discusses central elements of the design of the package and gives two case studies of how VO protocols are implemented using DaCHS' concepts.

Demleitner, Markus; Rothmaier, Florian; Wambsganss, Joachim

2014-01-01

357

Virtual observatory publishing with DaCHS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Data Center Helper Suite DaCHS is an integrated publication package for building VO and Web services, supporting the entire workflow from ingestion to data mapping to service definition. It implements all major data discovery, data access, and registry protocols defined by the VO. DaCHS in this sense works as glue between data produced by the data providers and the standard protocols and formats defined by the VO. This paper discusses central elements of the design of the package and gives two case studies of how VO protocols are implemented using DaCHS' concepts.

Demleitner, M.; Neves, M. C.; Rothmaier, F.; Wambsganss, J.

2014-11-01

358

Hepburn intrusive suite: Peraluminous plutonism within a closing back-arc basin, Wopmay orogen, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the Hepburn metamorphic-plutonic internal zone of the Wopmay orogen (Northwest Territories, Canada) there are two chronologically and petrologically distinct plutonic associations. The more voluminous of the two, the older 1.885 Ga Hepburn intrusive suite, includes rocks ranging in composition from gabbro to granite, peraluminous granite dominating. The younger 1.855 Ga neighboring Bishop intrusive suite (also gabbro to granite) represents the waning stages of a well-documented calc-alkaline arc, the Great Bear magmatic zone. The petrological distinctions between the two suites are all late-acquired features imposed primarily by contrasting environments of emplacement. Hepburn magmas were intruded within a closing, dominantly sedimentary, back-arc basin. Magma emplacement was synchronous with crustal imbrication, regional metamorphism, and translation of the basin-fill units onto Archean crust. Significant assimilation of sedimentary host rocks by the rising Hepburn magmas occurred, whereas the postregional metamorphism emplacement of the Bishop magmas precluded similar assimilation. The gabbroic contribution observed in the Hepburn intrusive suite is interpreted to reflect a mantle-derived precursor inherited from the back-arc rifting event that immediately preceded emplacement of the suite.

Lalonde, André E.

1989-03-01

359

Heat strain and heat stress for workers wearing protective suits at a hazardous waste site  

SciTech Connect

In order to evaluate the effects of heat stress when full body protective suits are worn, heart rates, oral temperatures and environmental parameters were measured for five unacclimatized male workers (25-33 years of age) who performed sampling activities during hazardous waste clean-up operations. The protective ensembles included laminated PVC-Tyvec chemical resistant hood suits with rubber boots, gloves, full facepiece dual cartridge respirators and hard hats. For comparison, measurements also were performed when the men worked at a similar level of activity while they wore ordinary work clothes. A comparison of the heart rates for the men working with and without suits indicated that wearing the suits imposed a heat stress equivalent to adding 6/sup 0/ to 11/sup 0/C (11/sup 0/ to 20/sup 0/F) to the ambient WBGT index. A similar result was obtained by calculating the WBGT in the microclimate inside the suits and comparing it to the ambient WBGT. These results indicate the following: 1) there exists a significant risk of heat injury during hazardous waste work when full body protective clothing is worn, and 2) threshold limit values for heat stress established by the ACGIH must be lowered substantially before extending them to cover workers under these conditions.

Paull, J.M.; Rosenthal, F.S.

1987-05-01

360

Apollo 15 Mg- and Fe-norites - A redefinition of the Mg-suite differentiation trend  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Apollo 15 highland rocks from the Apennine Front include clasts of mafic plutonic rocks from deep in the lunar crust that were brought to the surface by the Imbrium and Serenitatis impacts. The Apollo 15 norites exhibit wide variations in mineral and bulk compositions and include Fe-norites that plot between the three major pristine rock fields on a diagram of Mg' in mafic minerals vs An in paglioclase. Based on assemblages and compositions of minerals, and on ratios of elemental abundances, it is concluded that these Apollo 15 Fe-norites are differentiated members of the Mg-norite suite. The Apollo 15 and 17 norites and troctolites form a closely related suite of rocks, whose variations in mineral compositions represent the main differentiation trend of the Mg-suite. This trend in mineral compositions has a steeper slope than the previous Mg-suite field. The parent magmas for these Mg-suite rocks formed by partial melting deep in the lunar mantle. Differentiation by fractional crystallization may also have included assimilation of crustal components as the magmas rose from the mantle and crystallized plutons in the lower crust.

Lindstrom, M. M.; Marvin, U. B.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

1989-01-01

361

Thermal Performance Of Space Suit Elements With Aerogel Insulation For Moon And Mars Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flexible fiber-reinforced aerogel composites were studied for use as insulation materials of a future space suit for Moon and Mars exploration. High flexibility and good thermal insulation properties of fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composites at both high and low vacuum conditions make it a promising insulation candidate for the space suit application. This paper first presents the results of a durability (mechanical cycling) study of these aerogels composites in the context of retaining their thermal performance. The study shows that some of these Aerogels materials retained most of their insulation performance after up to 250,000 cycles of mechanical flex cycling. This paper also examines the problem of integrating these flexible aerogel composites into the current space suit elements. Thermal conductivity evaluations are proposed for different types of aerogels space suit elements to identify the lay-up concept that may have the best overall thermal performance for both Moon and Mars environments. Potential solutions in mitigating the silica dusting issue related to the application of these aerogels materials for the space suit elements are also discussed.

Tang, Henry H.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.; Trevino, Luis A.

2006-01-01

362

An improved air-supplied plastic suit for protection against tritium  

SciTech Connect

A newly developed Saran/CPE plastic suit material is described which offers significantly better protection against HTO penetration and permeation than the 12-mil PVC currently used at SRP and most other DOE and commercial sites where tritium and HTO are exposure hazards. Tritium breakthrough time is an important parameter when evaluating the applicability of protective clothing; previously published tritium permeation tests did not measure this parameter. Future studies should quantify steady-state permeation rate and breakthrough time to more fully evaluate potential tritium protective clothing. Saran/CPE has successfully been fabricated into a plastic suit because, in addition to its superior tritium resistance, it has all the characteristics required to construct a rugged, dependable, and comfortable suit. The use of the Saran/CPE suit at SRP reactor and tritium production facilities should be a major contribution to the site As Low As Reasonably Achievable program. Both Saran/CPE have demonstrated excellent resistance to a wide range of chemical contaminants; therefore, this suit material may have applications in the general chemical industry and hazardous waste site cleanup operations. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Wiernicki, C.

1987-01-01

363

Main problems of the Russian Orlan-M space suit utilization for EVAs on the ISS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the recent years the Russian Orlan-M space suits have been improved as applied to their operational requirements for the ISS. A special attention is paid to enhancement of EVA crew efficiency and safety. The paper considers the main problems regarding specific features of the Russian space suit operation in the ISS, and analyses measures on their solution. In particular, the problems associated with the following are considered: enhancement of the anthropometric range for the EVA crewmembers; use of some US EMU elements and unified NASA equipment elements; Orlan-M operation support in the wide range of the ISS thermal conditions; use of Simplified Aid For Extravehicular activity Rescue (SAFER) designed as a self-rescue device, which will be used for an EVA crewmember return in the event that he (she) breaks away inadvertently from the ISS surface. The paper states the main space suit differences with reference to solution of the above problems. The paper presents briefly the design of space suit arms developed for crewmembers with small anthropometric parameters, as well as peculiarities and test results for the gloves with enhanced thermal protection. Measures on further space suit development with the purpose to improve its performances are considered.

Abramov, I. P.; Pozdnyakov, S. S.; Severin, G. I.; Stoklitsky, A. Yu.

2001-03-01

364

Flexible Packaging Concept for a Space Suit Portable Life Support Subsystem  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Neither the Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), the space suit currently used for space shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) missions, nor the Apollo EMU, the space suit successfully used on previous lunar missions, will satisfy the requirements for the next generation Constellation Program (CxP) lunar suit. The CxP system or Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) must be able to tolerate more severe environmental and use conditions than any previous system. These conditions include missions to the severely cold lunar poles and up to 100 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) excursions without ground maintenance. Much effort is focused on decreasing the mass and volume of the Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) over previous suit designs in order to accommodate the required increase in functionality. This paper documents the progress of a conceptual packaging effort of a flexible backpack for the CSSE PLSS. The flexible backpack concept relies on a foam protection system to absorb, distribute, and dissipate the energy from falls on the lunar surface. Testing and analysis of the foam protection system concept that was conducted during this effort indicates that this method of system packaging is a viable solution.

Thomas, Gretchen; Dillon, Paul; Oliver, Joe; Zapata, Felipe

2009-01-01

365

Radiation Protection Studies of International Space Station Extravehicular Activity Space Suits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This publication describes recent investigations that evaluate radiation shielding characteristics of NASA's and the Russian Space Agency's space suits. The introduction describes the suits and presents goals of several experiments performed with them. The first chapter provides background information about the dynamic radiation environment experienced at ISS and summarized radiation health and protection requirements for activities in low Earth orbit. Supporting studies report the development and application of a computer model of the EMU space suit and the difficulty of shielding EVA crewmembers from high-energy reentrant electrons, a previously unevaluated component of the space radiation environment. Chapters 2 through 6 describe experiments that evaluate the space suits' radiation shielding characteristics. Chapter 7 describes a study of the potential radiological health impact on EVA crewmembers of two virtually unexamined environmental sources of high-energy electrons-reentrant trapped electrons and atmospheric albedo or "splash" electrons. The radiological consequences of those sources have not been evaluated previously and, under closer scrutiny. A detailed computational model of the shielding distribution provided by components of the NASA astronauts' EMU is being developed for exposure evaluation studies. The model is introduced in Chapters 8 and 9 and used in Chapter 10 to investigate how trapped particle anisotropy impacts female organ doses during EVA. Chapter 11 presents a review of issues related to estimating skin cancer risk form space radiation. The final chapter contains conclusions about the protective qualities of the suit brought to light form these studies, as well as recommendations for future operational radiation protection.

Cucinotta, Francis A. (Editor); Shavers, Mark R. (Editor); Saganti, Premkumar B. (Editor); Miller, Jack (Editor)

2003-01-01

366

The DaCHS Multi-protocol VO Server  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

GAVO's Data Center Helper Suite (DaCHS) is a suite of tools for publishing data to the Virtual Observatory. It implements all major VO protocols (SCS, SIAP, SSAP, TAP, OAI-PMH). The integrated management and ingestion component allow defining metadata, structure, and services once and re-use the definition throughout the publication cycle from initial metadata aquisition to registry record generation. It has been driving GAVO's data center since 2008 and is now deployed in multiple locations around the globe. This poster briefly describes the design of the system as well as a bird's-eye view of data publishing with DaCHS.

Demleitner, M.

2014-05-01

367

Use of Aquaporins to Achieve Needed Water Purity On ISS for the EMU Space Suit System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Use of Aquaporins to Achieve Needed Water Purity On ISS for the EMU Space Suit System. With the U.S. Space Shuttle fleet retired, the supply of extremely high-quality water "super-Q" - required for the EMU Space suit cooling on this ISS - will become a significant operational hardware challenge in the very near future. A proposed potential solution is the use of a filtration system consisting of a semi-permeable membrane embedded with aquaporin proteins. Aquaporins are a special class of trans-membrane proteins that facilitate passive transport of water and other substances across a membrane. The specificity of these proteins is such that only water is allowed through the protein structure, and this novel property invites their adaptation for use in water filtration systems, specifically usage on the ISS for the EMU space suit system. These proteins are found in many living systems and have been developed for commercial use today.

Hill, Terry; Taylor ,Brandon W.

2012-01-01

368

An experimental study on the ergonomics indices of partial pressure suits.  

PubMed

Partial pressure suits (PPSs) are used under high altitude, low-pressure conditions to protect the pilots. However, the suit often limits pilot's mobility and work efficiency. The lack of ergonomic data on the effects of PPSs on mobility and performance creates difficulties for human factor engineers and cockpit layout specialists. This study investigated the effects of PPSs on different ergonomic mobility and performance indices in order to evaluate the suit's impact on pilot's body mobility and work efficiency. Three types of ergonomics indices were studied: the manipulative mission, operational reach and operational strength. Research results indicated that a PPS significantly affects the mobility and operational performance of the wearers. The results may provide mission planners and human factors engineers with better insight into the understanding of pilots' operational function, mobility and strength capabilities when wearing PPS. PMID:23102522

Li, Xianxue; Ding, Li; Hedge, Alan; Hu, Huimin; Qin, Zhifeng; Zhou, Qianxiang

2013-05-01

369

Test plan for personnel protective equipment bubble suit decontamination feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

This test plan defines the details for performing a study to determine the feasibility of using a shower based system to decontaminate personnel protective equipment (PPE) bubble (encapsulation) suits worn by personnel as they are egressing a mixed-TRU contamination zone. The testing will be performed using an EPA rated Level A fully encapsulating suit. The person directly involved in the suit contamination and shower processes will be provided with Level A protection. This test plan provides a description of the test apparatus, provides details of the tests to be performed, defines the sampling procedures and controls, and defines the analytical methods for the samples collected. The test plan also discusses the data management and the reporting of the test result and the quality assurance and safety requirements for the study. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Menkhaus, D.E.

1990-08-01

370

Results and applications of a space suit range-of-motion study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The range of motion of space suits has traditionally been described using limited 2-D mapping of limb, torso, or arm movements performed in front of an orthogonal grid. A new technique for recovering extra-vehicular (EVA) space suit range-of-motion data during underwater testing was described in a paper presented by the author at the 1988 conference. The new technique uses digitized data which is automatically acquired from video images of the subject. Three-dimensional trajectories are recovered from these data, and can be displayed using 2-D computer graphics. Results of using this technique for the current shuttle EVA suit during underwater simulated weightlessness testing are discussed. Application of the data for use in animating anthropometric computer models is highlighted.

Reinhardt, AL

1989-01-01

371

Results of the Trace Contaminant Control Trade Study for Space Suit Life Support Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the United States plans to return astronauts to the moon, designing the most effective and efficient life support systems is of extreme importance. The trace contaminant control system (TCCS) will be located within the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) of the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE), and is responsible for removing contaminants, which at increased levels can be hazardous to a crewmember s health. These contaminants come from several sources including metabolic production of the crewmember (breathing, sweating, etc.) and offgassing of the space suit material layers. This paper summarizes the results of a trade study that investigated TCC technologies used in NASA space suits and vehicles as well as commercial and academic applications, to identify the best technology options for the CSSE PLSS. The trade study also looked at the feasibility of regeneration of TCC technologies, specifically to determine the viability of vacuum regeneration for on-back, realtime EVA.

Jennings, Mallory A.; Paul, Heather L.

2008-01-01

372

Results of the Trace Contaminant Control Trade Study for Space Suit Life Support Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the United States plans to return astronauts to the moon, designing the most effective and efficient life support systems is of extreme importance. The trace contaminant control system (TCCS) will be located within the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) of the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE), and is responsible for removing contaminants, which at increased levels can be hazardous to a crewmember's health. These contaminants come from several sources including metabolic production of the crewmember (breathing, sweating, etc.) and offgassing of the space suit material layers. This paper summarizes the results of a trade study that investigated TCC technologies used in NASA space suits and vehicles as well as commercial and academic applications, to identify the best technology options for the CSSE PLSS. The trade study also looked at the feasibility of regeneration of TCC technologies, specifically to determine the viability of vacuum regeneration for on-back, real-time EVA.

Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.

2009-01-01

373

Ventilation Transport Trade Study for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new and advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for space suit surface exploration will require a durable, compact, and energy efficient system to transport the ventilation stream through the space suit. Current space suits used by NASA circulate the ventilation stream via a ball-bearing supported centrifugal fan. As NASA enters the design phase for the next generation PLSS, it is necessary to evaluate available technologies to determine what improvements can be made in mass, volume, power, and reliability for a ventilation transport system. Several air movement devices already designed for commercial, military, and space applications are optimized in these areas and could be adapted for EVA use. This paper summarizes the efforts to identify and compare the latest fan and bearing technologies to determine candidates for the next generation PLSS.

Kempf, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Paul, Heather L.

2008-01-01

374

A suite of software for processing MicroED data of extremely small protein crystals  

PubMed Central

Electron diffraction of extremely small three-dimensional crystals (MicroED) allows for structure determination from crystals orders of magnitude smaller than those used for X-ray crystallography. MicroED patterns, which are collected in a transmission electron microscope, were initially not amenable to indexing and intensity extraction by standard software, which necessitated the development of a suite of programs for data processing. The MicroED suite was developed to accomplish the tasks of unit-cell determination, indexing, background subtraction, intensity measurement and merging, resulting in data that can be carried forward to molecular replacement and structure determination. This ad hoc solution has been modified for more general use to provide a means for processing MicroED data until the technique can be fully implemented into existing crystallographic software packages. The suite is written in Python and the source code is available under a GNU General Public License. PMID:24904248

Iadanza, Matthew G.; Gonen, Tamir

2014-01-01

375

Software Suite to Support In-Flight Characterization of Remote Sensing Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A characterization software suite was developed to facilitate NASA's in-flight characterization of commercial remote sensing systems. Characterization of aerial and satellite systems requires knowledge of ground characteristics, or ground truth. This information is typically obtained with instruments taking measurements prior to or during a remote sensing system overpass. Acquired ground-truth data, which can consist of hundreds of measurements with different data formats, must be processed before it can be used in the characterization. Accurate in-flight characterization of remote sensing systems relies on multiple field data acquisitions that are efficiently processed, with minimal error. To address the need for timely, reproducible ground-truth data, a characterization software suite was developed to automate the data processing methods. The characterization software suite is engineering code, requiring some prior knowledge and expertise to run. The suite consists of component scripts for each of the three main in-flight characterization types: radiometric, geometric, and spatial. The component scripts for the radiometric characterization operate primarily by reading the raw data acquired by the field instruments, combining it with other applicable information, and then reducing it to a format that is appropriate for input into MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric TRANsmission), an Air Force Research Laboratory-developed radiative transport code used to predict at-sensor measurements. The geometric scripts operate by comparing identified target locations from the remote sensing image to known target locations, producing circular error statistics defined by the Federal Geographic Data Committee Standards. The spatial scripts analyze a target edge within the image, and produce estimates of Relative Edge Response and the value of the Modulation Transfer Function at the Nyquist frequency. The software suite enables rapid, efficient, automated processing of ground truth data, which has been used to provide reproducible characterizations on a number of commercial remote sensing systems. Overall, this characterization software suite improves the reliability of ground-truth data processing techniques that are required for remote sensing system in-flight characterizations.

Stanley, Thomas; Holekamp, Kara; Gasser, Gerald; Tabor, Wes; Vaughan, Ronald; Ryan, Robert; Pagnutti, Mary; Blonski, Slawomir; Kenton, Ross

2014-01-01

376

A Comparison of Methods for Assessing Space Suit Joint Ranges of Motion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Through the Advanced Exploration Systems Program, NASA is attempting to use the vast collection of space suit mobility data from 50 years worth of space suit testing to build predictive analysis tools to aid in early architecture decisions for future missions and exploration programs. However, the design engineers must first understand if and how data generated by different methodologies can be compared directly and used in an essentially interchangeable manner. To address this question, the isolated joint range of motion data from two different test series were compared. Both data sets were generated from participants wearing the Mark III Space Suit Technology Demonstrator (MK-III), Waist Entry I-suit (WEI), and minimal clothing. Additionally the two tests shared a common test subject that allowed for within subject comparisons of the methods that greatly reduced the number of variables in play. The tests varied in their methodologies: the Space Suit Comparative Technologies Evaluation used 2D photogrammetry to analyze isolated ranges of motion while the Constellation space suit benchmarking and requirements development used 3D motion capture to evaluate both isolated and functional joint ranges of motion. The isolated data from both test series were compared graphically, as percent differences, and by simple statistical analysis. The results indicated that while the methods generate results that are statistically the same (significance level p= 0.01), the differences are significant enough in the practical sense to make direct comparisons ill advised. The concluding recommendations propose direction for how to bridge the data gaps and address future mobility data collection to allow for backward compatibility.

Aitchison, Lindsay; Rajulu, Sudhakar

2011-01-01

377

A Comparison of Methods for Assessing Space Suit Joint Ranges of Motion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Through the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program, NASA is attempting to use the vast collection of space suit mobility data from 50 years worth of space suit testing to build predictive analysis tools to aid in early architecture decisions for future missions and exploration programs. However, the design engineers must first understand if and how data generated by different methodologies can be compared directly and used in an essentially interchangeable manner. To address this question, the isolated joint range of motion data from two different test series were compared. Both data sets were generated from participants wearing the Mark III Space Suit Technology Demonstrator (MK-III), Waist Entry I-suit (WEI), and minimal clothing. Additionally the two tests shared a common test subject that allowed for within subject comparisons of the methods that greatly reduced the number of variables in play. The tests varied in their methodologies: the Space Suit Comparative Technologies Evaluation used 2-D photogrammetry to analyze isolated ranges of motion while the Constellation space suit benchmarking and requirements development used 3-D motion capture to evaluate both isolated and functional joint ranges of motion. The isolated data from both test series were compared graphically, as percent differences, and by simple statistical analysis. The results indicated that while the methods generate results that are statistically the same (significance level p= 0.01), the differences are significant enough in the practical sense to make direct comparisons ill advised. The concluding recommendations propose direction for how to bridge the data gaps and address future mobility data collection to allow for backward compatibility.

Aitchison, Lindsay T.

2012-01-01

378

Pink Moon: The petrogenesis of pink spinel anorthosites and implications concerning Mg-suite magmatism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA's Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) has identified and characterized a new lunar rock type termed pink spinel anorthosite (PSA) (Pieters et al., 2011). Dominated by anorthitic feldspar and rich in MgAl2O4 spinel, PSA appears to have an unusually low modal abundance of mafic silicates, distinguishing it from known lunar spinel-bearing samples. The interaction between basaltic melts and the lunar crust and/or assimilation of anorthitic plagioclase have been proposed as a possible mechanism for PSA formation (Gross and Treiman, 2011; Prissel et al., 2012). To test these hypotheses, we have performed laboratory experiments exploring magma-wallrock interactions within the lunar crust. Lunar basaltic melts were reacted with anorthite at 1400 °C and pressures between 0.05-1.05 GPa. Results indicate that PSA spinel compositions are best explained via the interaction between Mg-suite parental melts and anorthositic crust. Mare basalts and picritic lunar glasses produce spinels too rich in Fe and Cr to be consistent with the M3 observations. The experiments suggest that PSA represents a new member of the plutonic Mg-suite. If true, PSA can be used as a proxy for spectrally identifying areas of Mg-suite magmatism on the Moon. Moreover, the presence of PSA on both the lunar nearside and farside (Pieters et al., in press) indicates Mg-suite magmatism may have occurred on a global scale. In turn, this implies that KREEP is not required for Mg-suite petrogenesis (as KREEP is constrained to the nearside of the Moon) and is only necessary to explain the chemical make-up of nearside Mg-suite samples.

Prissel, T. C.; Parman, S. W.; Jackson, C. R. M.; Rutherford, M. J.; Hess, P. C.; Head, J. W.; Cheek, L.; Dhingra, D.; Pieters, C. M.

2014-10-01

379

The European space suit, a design for productivity and crew safety  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to fulfil the two major mission objectives, i.e. support planned and unplanned external servicing of the COLUMBUS FFL and support the HERMES vehicle for safety critical operations and emergencies, the European Space Suit System baseline configuration incorporates a number of design features, which shall enhance the productivity and the crew safety of EVA astronauts. The work in EVA is today - and will be for several years - a manual work. Consequently, to improve productivity, the first challenge is to design a suit enclosure which minimizes movement restrictions and crew fatigue. It is covered by the "ergonomic" aspect of the suit design. Furthermore, it is also necessary to help the EVA crewmember in his work, by giving him the right information at the right time. Many solutions exist in this field of Man-Machine Interface, from a very simple system, based on cuff check lists, up to advanced systems, including Head-Up Displays. The design concept for improved productivity encompasses following features: • easy donning/doffing thru rear entry, • suit ergonomy optimisation, • display of operational information in alpha-numerical and graphical from, and • voice processing for operations and safety critical information. Concerning crew safety the major design features are: • a lower R-factor for emergency EVA operations thru incressed suit pressure, • zero prebreath conditions for normal operations, • visual and voice processing of all safety critical functions, and • an autonomous life support system to permit unrestricted operations around HERMES and the CFFL. The paper analyses crew safety and productivity criteria and describes how these features are being built into the design of the European Space Suit System.

Skoog, A. Ingemar; Berthier, S.; Ollivier, Y.

380

Work and fatigue characteristics of unsuited and suited humans during isolated isokinetic joint motions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of a pressurized suit on human performance were investigated. The suit is known as an Extra-Vehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) and is worn by astronauts while working outside their spacecraft in a low earth orbit. Isolated isokinetic joint torques of three female and three male subjects (all experienced users of the suit in 1G gravity) were measured while working at 100% and 80% of their maximum voluntary torque (MVT, which is synonymous with maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)). It was found that the average decrease in the total amount of work (the sum of the work in each repetition until fatigue) done when the subjects were wearing the EMU were 48% and 41% while working at 100% and 80% MVT, respectively. There is a clear relationship between the MVT and the time and amount of work done until fatigue. Here, the time to fatigue is defined as the ending time of the repetition for which the computed work done during that repetition dropped below 50% of the work done during the first repetition. In general the stronger joints took longer to fatigue and did more work than the weaker joints. It was found that the EMU decreases the work output at the wrist and shoulder joints the most, due to the EMU joint geometry. The EMU also decreased the joint range of motion. The average total amount of work done by the test subjects increased by 5.2% (20.4%) for the unsuited (suited) case, when the test subjects decreased the level of effort from 100% to 80% MVT. Also, the average time to fatigue increased by 9.2% (25.6%) for the unsuited (suited) case, when the test subjects decreased the level of effort from 100% to 80% MVT. It was also found that the experimentally measured torque decay could be predicted by a logarithmic equation. The absolute average errors in the predictions were found to be 18.3% and 18.9% for the unsuited and suited subjects, respectively, when working at 100% MVT, and 22.5% and 18.8% for the unsuited and suited subjects, respectively, when working at 80% MVT. These results could be very useful in the design of future EMU suits and the planning of Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the future International Space Station assembly operations.

Gonzalez, L. Javier; Maida, J. C.; Miles, E. H.; Rajulu, S. L.; Pandya, A. K.

2002-01-01

381

Suits reflectance models for wheat and cotton - Theoretical and experimental tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plant canopy reflectance models developed by Suits are tested for cotton and Penjamo winter wheat. Properties of the models are discussed, and the concept of model depth is developed. The models' predicted exchange symmetry for specular irradiance with respect to sun polar angle and observer polar angle agreed with field data for cotton and wheat. Model calculations and experimental data for wheat reflectance vs sun angle disagreed. Specular reflectance from 0.50 to 1.10 micron shows fair agreement between the model and wheat measurements. An Appendix includes the physical and optical parameters for wheat necessary to apply Suits' models.

Chance, J. E.; Lemaster, E. W.

1977-01-01

382

Use of Variable Pressure Suits, Intermittent Recompression and Nitrox Breathing Mixtures during Lunar Extravehicular Activities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the use of variable pressure suits, intermittent recompression and Nitrox breathing mixtures to allow for multiple short extravehicular activities (EVAs) at different locations in a day. This new operational concept of multiple short EVAs requires short purge times and shorter prebreathes to assure rapid egress with a minimal loss of the vehicular air. Preliminary analysis has begun to evaluate the potential benefits of the intermittent recompression, and Nitrox breathing mixtures when used with variable pressure suits to enable reduce purges and prebreathe durations.

Gernhardt, Michael L.; Abercromby, Andrew F.

2009-01-01

383

Apollo/Skylab suit program management systems study. Volume 2: Cost analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The business management methods employed in the performance of the Apollo-Skylab Suit Program are studied. The data accumulated over the span of the contract as well as the methods used to accumulate the data are examined. Management methods associated with the monitoring and control of resources applied towards the performance of the contract are also studied and recommended upon. The primary objective is the compilation, analysis, and presentation of historical cost performance criteria. Cost data are depicted for all phases of the Apollo-Skylab program in common, meaningful terms, whereby the data may be applicable to future suit program planning efforts.

1974-01-01

384

The Swansea Plutonic Suite: Synextensional magmatism in the Buckskin and Rawhide Mountains, west-central Arizona  

SciTech Connect

About 200 km[sup 2] of the crystalline rocks exposed below the Buckskin-Rawhide detachment fault in west-central Arizona consists of gabbro to granite of the 20--30 Ma Swansea Plutonic Suite. Gabbro is only locally mylonitized and is intruded by more felsic rocks of the suite. The felsic rocks have a well-developed mylonitic texture and northeast-trending mineral lineation formed by ductily deformed quartz grains and aggregates. The felsic rocks are generally fine to medium grained except for a distinctive porphyritic phase, in which K-feldspar phenocrysts (now porphyroclasts) are as much as 3 cm in diameter. The suite is calcic to alkali calcic, metaluminous to weakly peraluminous (A/CNK = 0.7--1), and has average Th/U of 4.8 and Rb/Sr of 0.11. It shows a wide range in total rare-earth abundances (REE = 132--393 ppm), light to heavy REE enrichment (chondrite normalized [CN] La/Yb = 3--52), and heavy REE enrichment (CN Yb = 2.6--24.5). Intermediate and silicic members are depleted in HREE compared with mafic members, indicating magmatic control by clinopyroxene with or without amphibole or garnet. The porphyritic phase has the highest total REE and HREE abundances. Lead isotope ratios cluster in tight groups between reference lines for the Mohave and central Arizona crustal provinces. Lead in the porphyritic phase is distinctly less radiogenic than in the other phases. U-Pb zircon age of a granite in the suite is 21 [+-] 1.5 Ma. Upper intercept of the discordia line is 1,420 [+-] 54 Ma, indicating that 1,400-Ma rock dominates the source region for at least the felsic rocks of the suite. The suite was emplaced during the beginning and early phases of crustal extension and was probably pulled southwest out from beneath the Colorado Plateau transition zone as extension progressed. Thus the suite may represent roots of subaerial volcanic centers at the margin of the transition zone, which chemically resemble rocks of the suite in major-element chemistry.

Bryant, B.; Nealey, L.D. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center); Wooden, J.L. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

1993-04-01

385

Labeled line drawing of launch and entry suit identifies various components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Line drawings illustrate the front and back of the space shuttle launch and entry suit (LES) and labels identify various components. LES was designed for STS-26, the return to flight mission, and subsequent missions. Included in the crew escape system (CES) package are launch and entry helmet (LEH) with communications carrier (COMM CAP), parachute pack and harness, life preserver unit (LPU), life raft unit (LRU), LES gloves, suit oxygen manifold and valves, boots, and survival gear. Details of larger components are also identified.

1988-01-01

386

The recovery and utilization of space suit range-of-motion data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A technique for recovering data for the range of motion of a subject wearing a space suit is described along with the validation of this technique on an EVA space suit. Digitized data are automatically acquired from video images of the subject; three-dimensional trajectories are recovered from these data, and can be displayed using three-dimensional computer graphics. Target locations are recovered using a unique video processor and close-range photogrammetry. It is concluded that such data can be used in such applications as the animation of anthropometric computer models.

Reinhardt, AL; Walton, James S.

1988-01-01

387

Describing the NPOESS Preparatory Project Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Environmental Data Records  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is one of the instruments that make up the suite of sensors on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) scheduled to launch in 2010. VIIRS will produce seven Environmental Data Records (EDRs) describing cloud properties. The VIIRS Cloud EDRs include the Cloud Optical Thickness (COT), Cloud Effective Particle Size Parameter (CEPS), Cloud Top Pressure (CTP), Cloud Top Height (CTH), Cloud Top Temperature (CTT), Cloud Cover/Layers (CCL), and Cloud Base Height (CBH). This paper will describe the VIIRS algorithms used to generate these EDRs and provide a current estimate of performance based on pre-Launch test data.

Hoffman, C.; Guenther, B.; Kilcoyne, H.; Mineart, G.; St. Germain, K.; Reed, B.

2008-12-01

388

Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office, Edinburgh EH14 4AP  

E-print Network

1 Minutes of Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office. It was set up several years ago, particularly to support the implementation of constructed farm wetlands be obtained on disk from Neil McLean. Aberdeen Council is applying for funding to implement a wetland

Heal, Kate

389

Commercially available wood-gasification equipment suited for retrofit to a natural-gas space heater  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of an investigation of commercially available wood gasification and wood combustor equipment suited for retrofit to the present space heating system of the headquarters and offices of the Community Action Committee of Pike County, Inc. are summarized. The 21,310 square foot former school facility is presently heated by a dual Series 41 June Air natural gas fired hot

Hoover

1982-01-01

390

PYROLYSIS-MASS SPECTROMETRY/PATTERN RECOGNITION ON A WELL-CHARACTERIZED SUITE OF HUMIC SAMPLES  

EPA Science Inventory

A suite of well-characterized humic and fulvic acids of freshwater, soil and plant origin was subjected to pyrolysis-mass spectrometry and the resulting data were analyzed by pattern recognition and factor analysis. A factor analysis plot of the data shows that the humic acids an...

391

Geochemical processes of oil and gas formation in the Bazhenovo suite of the West Siberian Lowland  

Microsoft Academic Search

The processes of catagenetic transformation of sapropelic disseminated organic matter in the Bazhenovo Suite of the West Siberian Lowland are considered in detail. Serveral distinct stages have been recognized in the MK⁠-MKâ catagenic grades (depth of subsidence from 1.4 to 3.7 km), in each of which definite patterns have been noted, and a synchroneity in the changes in logically

S. G. Neruchev; Y. A. Rogozina; I. A. Zelichenko; P. A. Trushkov

1982-01-01

392

AA BB CC DD EE FF GG TA OFFICE HOURS Fall 2012 Suite B  

E-print Network

Lauren Jones 431 Serena Elber 354L Byungsun Shabbir 67pm Garrett Labrake 301 (6 7:30pm) Rachel McCord 301 Serena Elber 354L Hak Joong Colapret 78pm Garrett Labrake 301 (6 7:30pm) #12; Suite B MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY 89am Amanda Sutcliffe 302 910am Amanda

393

Proton and Electron Threshold Energy Measurements for Extravehicular Activity Space Suits. Chapter 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Construction of ISS will require more than 1000 hours of EVA. Outside of ISS during EVA, astronauts and cosmonauts are likely to be exposed to a large fluence of electrons and protons. Development of radiation protection guidelines requires the determination of the minimum energy of electrons and protons that penetrate the suits at various locations. Measurements of the water-equivalent thickness of both US. and Russian EVA suits were obtained by performing CT scans. Specific regions of interest of the suits were further evaluated using a differential range shift technique. This technique involved measuring thickness ionization curves for 6-MeV electron and 155-MeV proton beams with ionization chambers using a constant source-to-detector distance. The thicknesses were obtained by stacking polystyrene slabs immediately upstream of the detector. The thicknesses of the 50% ionizations relative to the maximum ionizations were determined. The detectors were then placed within the suit and the stack thickness adjusted until the 50% ionization was reestablished. The difference in thickness between the 50% thicknesses was then used with standard range-energy tables to determine the threshold energy for penetration. This report provides a detailed description of the experimental arrangement and results.

Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. D.; Saganti, P. B.

2003-01-01

394

Plastic toy shark drifts through airlock in front of EMU suited MS Lenoir  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plastic toy shark drifts through airlock and around fully extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) suited Mission Specialist (MS) Lenoir. Lenoir watches as shark drifts pass his left hand. Lenoir donned the EMU in preparation for a scheduled extravehicular activity (EVA) which was cancelled due to EMU problems.

1982-01-01

395

Platform independent dynamic Java virtual machine analysis: the Java Grande Forum Benchmark suite  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present a platform independent analysis of the dynamic profiles of Java programs when executing on the Java Virtual Machine. The Java programs selected are taken from the Java Grande Forum benchmark suite, and five different Java-to-bytecode compilers are analysed. The results presented describe the dynamic instruction usage frequencies, as well as the sizes of the local

Charles Daly; Jane Horgan; James F. Power; John Waldron

2001-01-01

396

N-SMARTS: Networked Suite of Mobile Atmospheric Real-time Sensors  

E-print Network

. These traits make the cell-phone ideally suited to track and understand the impact that the environment has By attaching sensors to GPS-enabled cell phones, we can gather the raw data necessary to begin understand how predict that cell phones will become the "next PC," we believe that the cell phone has the power to become

Paulos, Eric

397

Testing and evaluation of the US Navy supplied-air suit  

SciTech Connect

The data evaluating the suit were obtained by following the schedules prescribed in Specifications for Test Procedures for Airline-Type Supplied-Air Suits, (LA-5958-MS). Testing was limited to (a) determining the protection factors provided, (b) evaluating interior sound pressure levels, (c) evaluating integrity of air lines and connectors, and (d) evaluating suit removal procedures. Tests did not consider heat stress, flammability, or material stressing. The testing was performed by the WPSS using a 16-cubic meter test chamber and a polydispersed dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol. Aerosol concentrations were measured with a Los Alamos model 69H light-scattering photometer capable of reliably indicating leakages of 5 parts in 100,000. Protection factors (PFs) were calculated by establishing a ratio of the challenge aerosol concentration divided by the average peak penetration. Using this method, the Navy spunbonded olefin supplied-air suit indicated protection factors in excess of 18K for all subjects tested and in all tests performed.

Bradley, O.D.; DeField, J.D.

1981-02-01

398

Data Analysis and Graphing in an Introductory Physics Laboratory: Spreadsheet versus Statistics Suite  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two methods of data analysis are compared: spreadsheet software and a statistics software suite. Their use is compared analysing data collected in three selected experiments taken from an introductory physics laboratory, which include a linear dependence, a nonlinear dependence and a histogram. The merits of each method are compared. (Contains 7…

Peterlin, Primoz

2010-01-01

399

Suits for Damages and Attorneys' Fees Against School Districts and School Officials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores legal issues that have arisen since the overruling of Monroe v. Pape, a case holding that municipalities were not persons and therefore immune from suit. Monell v. Department of Social Services of City of New York ruled that local governmental bodies, including officials in their official capacities, can be sued directly for…

Frels, Kelly

400

Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite in  

E-print Network

, AER/NCA poses challenging new problems for its formal specification and analysis. Real-Time Maude of the Real-Time Maude tool [14] and the Maude formal methodology [4] to the specification and analysis Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite

Ã?lveczky, Peter Csaba

401

Skylab 2 Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr. suiting up at KSC during prelaunch.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the Skylab 2 mission, is suited up in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building at the Kennedy Space Center during Skylab 2 pre-launch preparations. Skylab 2, with astronauts Conrad, Joseph P. Kerwin, and Paul J. Weitz aboard, was launched from KSC's Pad B, Launch Complex 39, at 9:00 a.m. (EDT), May 25, 1973.

1973-01-01

402

MONTANA PUBLIC EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT ADMINISTRATION 100 North Park Avenue, Suite 200 ~ PO BOX 200131  

E-print Network

MONTANA PUBLIC EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT ADMINISTRATION 100 North Park Avenue, Suite 200 ~ PO BOX 200131 by the Montana Public Employees' Retirement Administration (MPERA) to grow tax deferred until you reach age 70 Retirement Funds If you are leaving employment, you have several choices regarding your retirement funds

Lawrence, Rick L.

403

A Protocol Suite for Cognitive Radios in Dynamic Spectrum Access Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this chapter, a protocol suite is presented for initiating and controlling transmissions among cognitive radios in dynamic spectrum access networks. A framework is provided for the selection of the initial modulation to be used in a session after a frequency band has been selected. During the first few packet transmissions in a new session, a power-adjustment protocol compensates for

Michael B. Pursley; Thomas C. Royster

404

Trajectories in Multiple Group Coordination: A Field Study of Hospital Operating Suites  

E-print Network

Trajectories in Multiple Group Coordination: A Field Study of Hospital Operating Suites Yuqing Ren can conflict. In this paper, we describe a field study of multi-group coordination in the operating room (OR) environment. We studied work trajectories from the perspective of each group involved

Fussell, Susan R.

405

On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing Gregg Rothermel  

E-print Network

On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing Gregg Rothermel , Sebastian Elbaum}@cse.unl.edu August 31, 2004 Abstract Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to re-validate software as it evolves. Various methodologies for improving regression testing processes have been explored, but the cost

Rothermel, Gregg

406

Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand Michael D. Ernst, research advisor  

E-print Network

Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand David Saff Michael D. Ernst, research and Subject Descriptors: D.2.5 (Testing and Debug- ging): Testing tools General Terms: Algorithms, Design, Performance, Verification Keywords: test factoring, mock objects, unit testing 1. Problem: slow, unfocused

Liskov, Barbara

407

On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing. Gregg Rothermel  

E-print Network

On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing. Gregg Rothermel , Sebastian Elbaum}@cse.unl.edu August 30, 2003 Abstract Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to re-validate software as it evolves. Various methodologies for improving regression testing processes have been explored, but the cost

Rothermel, Gregg

408

Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand Michael D. Ernst, research advisor  

E-print Network

Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand David Saff Michael D. Ernst, research and Subject Descriptors: D.2.5 (Testing and Debug� ging): Testing tools General Terms: Algorithms, Design, Performance, Verification Keywords: test factoring, mock objects, unit testing 1. Problem: slow, unfocused

Liskov, Barbara

409

The Impact of Residence Design on Freshman Outcomes: Dormitories versus Suite-Style Residences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to measure affective, behavioral, and cognitive variables in a sample of 3159 first-year students, and to compare these variables by the type of residence building in which the student lived. Students living in suite-style buildings reported a greater sense of belonging, and higher activity levels than students living in…

Rodger, Susan C.; Johnson, Andrew W.

2005-01-01

410

Assessing feasibility of electrochromic space suit radiators for reducing extravehicular activity water consumption  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water consumption for space suit thermal control is a limiting factor on long-term space exploration missions. A concept is proposed for an integrated, flexible suit radiator using infrared electrochromic materials for modulated heat rejection from the suit. Properties of electrochromic materials, the structure of electrochromic devices, and relevant heat transfer processes are presented as background information. Analytical methods are employed to bound theoretical performance and determine required emissivity ranges for lunar surface operations. Case studies are presented incorporating Apollo program and Advanced Walkback Test metabolic and environmental data to estimate sublimator water consumption and hypothetical water savings with the electrochromic radiator. Concepts are presented and analyzed for integrating an electrochromic radiator with existing and future space suit designs. A preliminary systems-level trade analysis is performed with the Equivalent System Mass metric used to compare this technology with the legacy sublimator and other extravehicular activity cooling technologies in development. Experimental objectives, procedures, and results are presented for both bench-top and thermal vacuum testing of electrochromic radiator materials.

Metts, Jonathan Glen

411

BioPerf: a benchmark suite to evaluate high-performance computer architecture on bioinformatics applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The exponential growth in the amount of genomic data has spurred growing interest in large scale analysis of genetic information. Bioinformatics applications, which explore computational methods to allow researchers to sift through the massive biological data and extract useful information, are becoming increasingly important computer workloads. This paper presents BioPerf a benchmark suite of representative bioinformatics applications to facilitate the

David A. Bader; Yue Li; Tao Li; Vipin Sachdeva

2005-01-01

412

Mme si la programmation thmatique de l'Agence nationale de la recherche (ANR) suit  

E-print Network

notables. On rap- pellera juste que le programme Ecotech (suite du Precodd qui complétait depuis plusieurs rappel fait de l'objectif du projet Bio-matières et énergies orienté autour du concept de bio

Sóbester, András

413

OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE The Pennsylvania State University Office of Human Resources 1850 East Park Avenue, Suite 310  

E-print Network

Avenue, Suite 310 State College, PA 16803 Telephone: (814) 863-8492 Fax: (814) 865-5337 WORKABILITY to the Employee for their work unit.(81 A Penn State University Workability Form has been provided to me. I have WORKABILITY 11/11/08 #12;

Yener, Aylin

414

ERO Caught in the Act (Again): Limiting Inclusion to Suit Policy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2010 the Education Review Office (ERO) was tasked with reporting on the progress of New Zealand schools in the inclusion of students with high needs. This paper will explore how ERO limited the concept of inclusion to suit Government policy and limit discussion of inclusion to the parameters set by the resource allocation scheme known as…

McMaster, Christopher

2013-01-01

415

What Whiteboards in a Trauma Center Operating Suite Can Teach Us About Emergency Department Communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods: We took photographs and observed staff's interaction with a whiteboard in a 6-bed surgical suite dedicated to trauma service. We analyzed the integral role of artifacts in cognitive activities as when workers configure and manage visual spaces to simplify their cognitive tasks. We further identified characteristics of the whiteboard as a communicative information artifact in supporting coordination in fast-paced

Yan Xiao; Stephen Schenkel; MPP Samer Faraj; Colin F. Mackenzie

416

Data analysis and graphing in an introductory physics laboratory: spreadsheet versus statistics suite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two methods of data analysis are compared: spreadsheet software and a statistics software suite. Their use is compared analysing data collected in three selected experiments taken from an introductory physics laboratory, which include a linear dependence, a nonlinear dependence and a histogram. The merits of each method are compared.

Peterlin, Primož

2010-07-01

417

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science 1 Park Place, Suite 325 Annapolis, MD 21401  

E-print Network

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science 1 Park Place, Suite 325 · Annapolis, MD. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science unleashes the power of science to transform the way society understands and manages

Weber, David J.

418

Evaluating Test Suites and Adequacy Criteria Using Simulation-Based Models of Distributed Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Test adequacy criteria provide the engineer with guidance on how to populate test suites. While adequacy criteria have long been a focus of research, existing testing methods do not address many of the fundamental characteristics of distributed systems, such as distribution topology, communication failure, and timing. Furthermore, they do not provide the engineer with a means to evaluate the relative

Matthew J. Rutherford; Antonio Carzaniga; Alexander L. Wolf

2008-01-01

419

CORNELL STRAWBERRY VARIETIES COMPARISON CHART 395 Pine Tree Road, Suite 310 Ithaca, NY 14850  

E-print Network

CORNELL STRAWBERRY VARIETIES COMPARISON CHART 395 Pine Tree Road, Suite 310 Ithaca, NY 14850 P Season Growing Qualities Freezing Quality Region Licensing* Exclusive Non-Exclusive Strawberry `Clancy yields of round, dark red fruit with good texture and eating quality. Strawberry `L'Amour' Early Mid Late

Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

420

A Suite of Tools for Debugging Distributed Autonomous Systems David Kortenkamp1  

E-print Network

A Suite of Tools for Debugging Distributed Autonomous Systems David Kortenkamp1 , Reid Simmons2 a developer to instrument an autonomous control system to log data at run-time and then analyze that data implemented. Results are given from a NASA distributed autonomous control system application. 1. INTRODUCTION

Kortenkamp, David

421

1899 McKee Street, Suite 200 San Diego CA 92110  

E-print Network

1899 McKee Street, Suite 200 San Diego CA 92110 From I-5 North Take the Washington Street exit. Turn left (East) on Washington Street.Take the first left onto San Diego Avenue.Turn right on Mc are open, you will need to park on the street. From Hillcrest Take Washington Street (West) to San Diego

Squire, Larry R.

422

The Einstein Suite: A Web-Based Tool for Rapid and Collaborative Engineering Design and Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Taken together the components of the Einstein Suite provide two revolutionary capabilities - they have the potential to change the way engineering and financial engineering are performed by: (1) providing currently unavailable functionality, and (2) providing a 10-100 times improvement over currently available but impractical or costly functionality.

Palmer, Richard S.

1997-01-01

423

Suite102-6190 Agronomy Road Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z3  

E-print Network

Suite102- 6190 Agronomy Road Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z3 Phone: (604) 822-8595 Fax: (604) 822-5093 ADM this completed form to Dean Kuusela, Associate Director, Office of Research Services, #102-6190 Agronomy Road

Michelson, David G.

424

SSST Module Slide 1: Hello, and welcome to this introduction on the Steam System Tool Suite.  

E-print Network

SSST Module 9/30/2009 Slide 1: Hello, and welcome to this introduction on the Steam System Tool Suite. Slide 2: In this tutorial, I will give you a basic overview of each Steam tool, including the Steam System Scoping Tool, the Steam System Assessment Tool, and the 3E Plus Insulation Tool

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

425

SPACE: a suite of tools for protein structure prediction and analysis based on complementarity and environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a suite of SPACE tools for analysis and prediction of structures of biomolecules and their complexes. LPC\\/CSU software provides a common definition of inter-atomic contacts and complement- arity of contacting surfaces to analyze protein struc- ture and complexes. In the current version of LPC\\/ CSU, analyses of water molecules and nucleic acids have been added, together with improved

Vladimir Sobolev; Eran Eyal; Sergey Gerzon; Vladimir Potapov; Mariana Babor; Jaime Prilusky; Marvin Edelman

2005-01-01

426

46 CFR 160.171-19 - Approval testing for child size immersion suit.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...neck and chin fit are evaluated and must be comparable to the fit of the corresponding adult size suit on an adult. (b) The buoyancy test prescribed in § 160.171-17(g). (c) The body strength test prescribed in § 160.171-17(k) except...

2013-10-01

427

Athena Biotechnologies, Inc. 5 Innovation Way, Suite 100, Newark DE 19711 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

E-print Network

Athena Biotechnologies, Inc. 5 Innovation Way, Suite 100, Newark DE 19711 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: CONTACT: Gerald J. Quinn Athena Biotechnologies, Inc. 302-559-3440 quinngj@athenabio.com May 21, 2009 Athena Biotechnologies, Inc. www.athenabio.com Athena Biotechnologies, Inc. Awarded Grant to Study

Weber, David J.

428

Recommendations concerning models and parameters best suited to breeder reactor environmental radiological assessments  

SciTech Connect

Recommendations are presented concerning the models and parameters best suited for assessing the impact of radionuclide releases to the environment by breeder reactor facilities. These recommendations are based on the model and parameter evaluations performed during this project to date. Seven different areas are covered in separate sections.

Miller, C.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

1980-05-01

429

Exploration Space Suit Architecture and Destination Environmental-Based Technology Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper continues forward where EVA Space Suit Architecture: Low Earth Orbit Vs. Moon Vs. Mars1 left off in the development of a space suit architecture that is modular in design and could be reconfigured prior to launch or during any given mission depending on the tasks or destination. This paper addresses the space suit system architecture and technologies required based on human exploration (EVA) destinations, and describes how these systems should evolve to meet the future exploration EVA needs of the US human space flight program. A series of exercises and analyses provided a strong indication that the Constellation Program space suit architecture, with its maximum reuse of technology and functionality across a range of mission profiles and destinations, is postured to provide a viable solution for future space exploration missions. The destination environmental analysis demonstrates that the modular architecture approach could provide the lowest mass and mission cost for the protection of the crew, given any human mission outside of low-Earth orbit. Additionally, some of the high-level trades presented here provide a review of the environmental and non-environmental design drivers that will become increasingly important as humans venture farther from Earth. This paper demonstrates a logical clustering of destination design environments that allows a focused approach to technology prioritization, development, and design that will maximize the return on investment, largely independent of any particular design reference mission.

Hill, Terry R.; McFarland, Shane M.; Korona, F. Adam

2013-01-01

430

VAMPIRE microarray suite: a web-based platform for the interpretation of gene expression data  

E-print Network

VAMPIRE microarray suite: a web-based platform for the interpretation of gene expression data of analysis, collectively known as variance-modeled posterior inference with regional exponentials (VAMPIRE, associate related samples and identify differentially expressed features using the VAMPIRE statistical

431

The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost-Effectiveness of Regression Testing  

E-print Network

The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost-Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modi cations. The cost-e ective- ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris- tics of test

Rothermel, Gregg

432

The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the CostEffectiveness of Regression Testing  

E-print Network

The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost­Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modi#12;cations. The cost-e#11;ective- ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris- tics of test

Rothermel, Gregg

433

The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the CostEffectiveness of Regression Testing  

E-print Network

The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost­Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modifications. The cost­effective­ ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris­ tics of test

Rothermel, Gregg

434

Nickel and Cobalt Partitioning Between Spinel and Basaltic Melt: Applications to Planetary Basalt Suites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New experimental spinel/melt partition coefficients for Ni and Co have been measured in basalt samples with natural levels of Ni and Co, are lower than previous high doping experiments, and are applied to several planetary basalt suites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

Righter, K.

2002-01-01

435

A Benchmark Suite for Evaluating the Performance of the WebODE Ontology Engineering Platform  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ontology tools play a key role in the development and maintenance of the Semantic Web. Hence, we need in one hand to objectively evaluate these tools, in order to analyse whether they can deal with actual and future requirements, and in the other hand to develop benchmark suites for performing these evaluations. In this paper, we describe the method we

Raúl García-Castro; Asunción Gómez-Pérez

436

tmLQCD: a program suite to simulate Wilson Twisted mass Lattice QCD  

E-print Network

We discuss a program suite for simulating Quantum Chromodynamics on a 4-dimensional space-time lattice. The basic Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm is introduced and a number of algorithmic improvements are explained. We then discuss the implementations of these concepts as well as our parallelisation strategy in the actual simulation code. Finally, we provide a user guide to compile and run the program.

K. Jansen; C. Urbach

2009-05-20

437

Geochronology and petrogenesis of the western highlands alkali suite: Radiogenic isotopic evidence from Apollo 14  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several rocks of alkalic affinity, from the western highlands of the Moon, have been analyzed for their Nd and Sr isotopic compositions. One sample yields a Sm-Nd mineral isochron of 4110 = 41 Ma. This age, in conjunction with U-Pb zircon ages on two other alkalic rocks from the Apollo 14 landing site suggests a distinct western highlands 'event' which was approximately 100 Ma in duration. Since the last dregs of the lunar magma ocean likely crystallized prior to 4.3 Ga, this alkalic 'event' may have included the re-melting of evolved plutons or the remobilization of urKREEP trapped liquid from upper mantle cumulates. Alkalic lithologies such as granites and felsites have been known from the Moon since the earliest days of the Apollo lunar sample returns. However, not until 1977 were alkali-rich rocks recognized from typical highlands suites such as ferroan anorthosites (FAN) and norites and Mg-suite rocks. In the intervening years, several other alkali suite samples have been discovered and characterized, mostly through labor-intesive breccia pull-apart studies of clasts and analyses of coarse-fine fractions of soils. We will speculate on the origins of this suite of lunar highlands rocks.

Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Halliday, Alex N.

1993-03-01

438

Exploration Space Suit Architecture and Destination Environmental-Based Technology Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper continues forward where EVA Space Suit Architecture: Low Earth Orbit Vs. Moon Vs. Mars [1] left off in the development of a space suit architecture that is modular in design and could be reconfigured prior to launch or during any given mission depending on the tasks or destination. This paper will address the space suit system architecture and technologies required based upon human exploration extravehicular activity (EVA) destinations, and describe how they should evolve to meet the future exploration EVA needs of the US human space flight program.1, 2, 3 In looking forward to future US space exploration to a space suit architecture with maximum reuse of technology and functionality across a range of mission profiles and destinations, a series of exercises and analyses have provided a strong indication that the Constellation Program (CxP) space suit architecture is postured to provide a viable solution for future exploration missions4. The destination environmental analysis presented in this paper demonstrates that the modular architecture approach could provide the lowest mass and mission cost for the protection of the crew given any human mission outside of low-Earth orbit (LEO). Additionally, some of the high-level trades presented here provide a review of the environmental and non-environmental design drivers that will become increasingly important the farther away from Earth humans venture. This paper demonstrates a logical clustering of destination design environments that allows a focused approach to technology prioritization, development, and design that will maximize the return on investment, independent of any particular program, and provide architecture and design solutions for space suit systems in time or ahead of need dates for any particular crewed flight program in the future. The approach to space suit design and interface definition discussion will show how the architecture is very adaptable to programmatic and funding changes with minimal redesign effort such that the modular architecture can be quickly and efficiently honed into a specific mission point solution if required. Additionally, the modular system will allow for specific technology incorporation and upgrade as required with minimal redesign of the system.

Hill, Terry R.; Korona, F. Adam; McFarland, Shane

2012-01-01

439

Development of a Compact Efficient Cooling Pump for Space Suit Life Support Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the increasing demands placed on extravehicular activity (EVA) for the International Space Station (ISS) assembly and maintenance, along with planned lunar and Martian missions, the need for increased human productivity and capability becomes ever more critical. This is most readily achieved by reduction in space suit weight and volume, and increased hardware reliability, durability, and operating lifetime. Considerable progress has been made with each successive generation of space suit design; from the Apollo A7L suit, to the current Shuttle Extravehicular Mobile Unit (EMU) suit, and the next generation Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE). However, one area of space suit design which has continued to lag is the fluid pump used to drive the water cooling loop of the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The two main types of fluid pumps typically used in space applications are rotodynamic pumps (pumping is achieved through a rotary vaned impeller) and displacement pumps (which includes rotary and diaphragm pumps). The rotating and moving parts found in the pumps and electric motor add significantly to the susceptibility to wear and friction, thermal mismatch, and complexity of the pumps. Electric motor-driven pumps capable of achieving high operational reliability are necessarily large, heavy, and energy inefficient. This report describes a development effort conducted for NASA by Lynntech, Inc., who recently demonstrated the feasibility of an electrochemically-driven fluid cooling pump. With no electric motor and minimal lightweight components, an electrochemically-driven pump is expected to be significantly smaller, lighter and achieve a longer life time than conventional rotodynamic and displacement pumps. By employing sulfonated polystyrene-based proton exchange membranes, rather than conventional Nafion membranes, a significant reduction in the actuator power consumption was demonstrated. It was also demonstrated that these membranes possess the necessary mechanical strength, durability, and temperature range for long life space operation. The preliminary design for a Phase II prototype pump compares very favorably to the fluid cooling pumps currently used in space suit portable life support systems (PLSS). Characteristics of the electrochemically-driven pump are described and the benefits of the technology as a replacement for electric motor pumps in mechanically pumped single-phase fluid loops (MPFLs) is discussed.

vanBoeyen, Roger W.; Reeh, Jonathan A.; Trevino, Luis

2008-01-01

440

Major and trace element geochemistry of ilmenite suites from the Kimberley diamond mines, South Africa  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have undertaken an electron microprobe and LA-ICP-MS study of ilmenites from Kimberley, South Africa, to understand better the mantle sources of ilmenite xenocrysts, key indicator minerals in kimberlite exploration. Among mantle xenoliths from Kimberley mines, ilmenite occurs in the following rock types: MARID (Mica-Amphibole-Rutile-Ilmenite-Diopside), Granny Smith glimmerites (cpx-phlogopite-ilmenite), rutile -ilmenite rocks, dunites (olivine-ilmenite) and phlogopite orthopyroxenites. Using major, minor and trace elements we have created a preliminary classification scheme for Kimberley ilmenites. Our data allow distinction between four broad suites: MARID, Granny Smith/rutile, orthopyroxenites and dunites. MARID ilmenites are generally the lowest in MgO (5.3-15.21 wt %) and Al2O3 (<0.05 wt %) and highest in Fe2O3 (6.6-23.4 wt %) and those from the Granny Smith/rutile suite have high MgO contents in the narrow range (13.0-14.9 wt %), with Al2O3 in the range 0.2-0.6 wt% and low Fe2O3 (4.9-6.7 wt %) values. Ilmenites from orthopyroxenites mostly have intermediate MgO, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 contents (10.8 -13.5 wt%, 0.1-0.4 wt % and 9.8-10.4 wt%, respectively). Ilmenites from dunites range to high MgO and Cr2O3 values (5.01-15.49wt % and 0.07-6.5 wt % respectively). The range of Nb2O5 contents of the Granny Smith/rutile ilmenites is very restricted (0.07-0.14 wt %) whereas those of MARID, orthopyroxenites and dunites are in a much wider range (0.03-1.74 wt% Nb2O5). Ilmenites belonging to the dunite suite cluster in three different groups, based on their Mg, Cr and Nb contents. One of these groups has MgO and Cr2O3 values similar to those of the rutile and Granny Smith suites, while the other have lower MgO contents. The three suites can be somewhat distinguished on the basis of comparison of MgO vs. Cr2O3, Al2O3 vs. Nb2O5, FeO vs. Fe2O3 (calculated from stoichiometry) and Cu/W vs Co/Cu. Distinguishing between the rutile, Granny Smith and part of the dunite suite is extremely difficult due to extensive compositional overlap, suggesting that they have a common genesis perhaps forming in related metasomatic events. Trace element data are consistent with such a hypothesis. All three suites have V values in the 900 - 1200 ppm range, Zr contents that range from 300 to 550 ppm and similar Sn values (6.69 - 9.07 ppm). We have applied these preliminary distinctions to ilmenite xenocrysts fom the Wesselton, Bultfontein, Kampfersdam and Otto's Kopje Mines in Kimberley. For example, we infer that >75% of the ilmenites from Wesselton and Kampfersdam belong to the rutile/dunite/Granny Smith suite compared to Otto's Kopje where the majority belongs to the MARID, orthopyroxenite and dunite suites. Ilmenites from all suites are present in approximately equal proportions at Bultfontein.

Ene, V. V.; Schulze, D. J.

2013-12-01

441

The Extravehicular Suit Impact Load Attenuation Study for Use in Astronaut Bone Fracture Prediction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Integrated Medical Model (IMM) assesses the risk, including likelihood and impact of occurrence, of all credible in-flight medical conditions. Fracture of the proximal femur is a traumatic injury that would likely result in loss of mission if it were to happen during spaceflight. The low gravity exposure causes decreases in bone mineral density which heightens the concern. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have quantified bone fracture probability during spaceflight with a probabilistic model. It was assumed that a pressurized extravehicular activity (EVA) suit would attenuate load during a fall, but no supporting data was available. The suit impact load attenuation study was performed to collect analogous data. METHODS: A pressurized EVA suit analog test bed was used to study how the offset, defined as the gap between the suit and the astronaut s body, impact load magnitude and suit operating pressure affects the attenuation of impact load. The attenuation data was incorporated into the probabilistic model of bone fracture as a function of these factors, replacing a load attenuation value based on commercial hip protectors. RESULTS: Load attenuation was more dependent on offset than on pressurization or load magnitude, especially at small offsets. Load attenuation factors for offsets between 0.1 - 1.5 cm were 0.69 +/- 0.15, 0.49 +/- 0.22 and 0.35 +/- 0.18 for mean impact forces of 4827, 6400 and 8467 N, respectively. Load attenuation factors for offsets of 2.8 - 5.3 cm were 0.93 +/- 0.2, 0.94 +/- 0.1 and 0.84 +/- 0.5, for the same mean impact forces. Reductions were observed in the 95th percentile confidence interval of the bone fracture probability predictions. CONCLUSIONS: The reduction in uncertainty and improved confidence in bone fracture predictions increased the fidelity and credibility of the fracture risk model and its benefit to mission design and operational decisions.

Lewandowski, Beth E.; Gilkey, Kelly M.; Sulkowski, Christina M.; Samorezov, Sergey; Myers, Jerry G.

2011-01-01

442

Isotopic variation in the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite, central Sierra Nevada, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Granitoid rocks of the compositionally zoned Late Cretaceous Toulumne Intrusive Suite in the central Sierra Nevada, California, have initial87Sr/86Sr values (Sri) and143Nd/144Nd values (Ndi) that vary from 0.7057 to 0.7067 and from 0.51239 to 0.51211 respectively. The observed variation of both Sri and Ndi and of chemical composition in rocks of the suite cannot be due to crystal fractionation of magma solely under closed system conditons. The largest variation in chemistry, Ndi, and Sri is present in the outer-most equigranular units of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite. Sri varies positively with SiO2, Na2O, K2O, and Rb concentrations, and negatively with Ndi, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, FeO, CaO, MnO, P2O5, TiO2, and Sr concentrations. This covariation of Sri, Ndi and chemistry can be modeled by a process of simple mixing of basaltic and granitic magmas having weight percent SiO2 of 48.0 and 73.3 respectively. Isotopic characteristic of the mafic magma are Sri=0.7047, Ndi=0.51269 and ??18O=6.0, and of the felsic magma are Sri=0.7068, Ndi=0.51212 and ??18O=8.9. The rocks sampled contain from 50 to 80% of the felsic component. An aplite in the outer equigranular unit of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite apparently was derived by fractional crystallization of plagioclase and hornblende from magma with granudiorite composition that was a product of mixing of the magmas described above. Siliceous magmas derived from the lower crust, having a maximum of 15 percent mantle-derived mafic component, are represented by the inner prophyritic units of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

Kistler, R.W.; Chappell, B.W.; Peck, D.L.; Bateman, P.C.

1986-01-01

443

Clay-mineral suites, sources, and inferred dispersal routes: Southern California continental shelf  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Clay mineralogy is useful in determining the distribution, sources, and dispersal routes of fine-grained sediments. In addition, clay minerals, especially smectite, may control the degree to which contaminants are adsorbed by the sediment. We analyzed 250 shelf sediment samples, 24 river-suspended-sediment samples, and 12 river-bed samples for clay-mineral contents in the Southern California Borderland from Point Conception to the Mexico border. In addition, six samples were analyzed from the Palos Verdes Headland in order to characterize the clay minerals contributed to the offshore from that point source. The <2 ??m-size fraction was isolated, Mg-saturated, and glycolated before analysis by X-ray diffraction. Semi-quantitative percentages of smectite, illite, and kaolinite plus chlorite were calculated using peak areas and standard weighting factors. Most fine-grained sediment is supplied to the shelf by rivers during major winter storms, especially during El Nin??o years. The largest sediment fluxes to the region are from the Santa Ynez and Santa Clara Rivers, which drain the Transverse Ranges. The mean clay-mineral suite for the entire shelf sediment data set (26% smectite, 50% illite, 24% kaolinite+chlorite) is closely comparable to that for the mean of all the rivers (31% smectite, 49% illite, 20% kaolinite+chlorite), indicating that the main source of shelf fine-grained sediments is the adjacent rivers. However, regional variations do exist and the shelf is divided into four provinces with characteristic clay-mineral suites. The means of the clay-mineral suites of the two southernmost provinces are within analytical error of the mineral suites of adjacent rivers. The next province to the north includes Santa Monica Bay and has a suite of clay minerals derived from mixing of fine-grained sediments from several sources, both from the north and south. The northernmost province clay-mineral suite matches moderately well that of the adjacent rivers, but does indicate some mixing from sources in adjacent provinces.

Hein, J.R.; Dowling, J.S.; Schuetze, A.; Lee, H.J.

2003-01-01

444

Design and Development of a Regenerative Blower for EVA Suit Ventilation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ventilation subsystems in future space suits require a dedicated ventilation fan. The unique requirements for the ventilation fan - including stringent safety requirements and the ability to increase output to operate in buddy mode - combine to make a regenerative blower an attractive choice. This paper describes progress in the design, development, and testing of a regenerative blower designed to meet requirements for ventilation subsystems in future space suits. We have developed analysis methods for the blower s complex, internal flows and identified impeller geometries that enable significant improvements in blower efficiency. We verified these predictions by test, measuring aerodynamic efficiencies of 45% at operating conditions that correspond to the ventilation fan s design point. We have developed a compact motor/controller to drive the blower efficiently at low rotating speed (4500 rpm). Finally, we have assembled a low-pressure oxygen test loop to demonstrate the blower s reliability under prototypical conditions.

Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Hill, Roger W.; Phillips, Scott D.; Paul, Heather L.

2011-01-01

445

DDS-Suite - A Dynamic Data Acquisition, Processing, and Analysis System for Wind Tunnel Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind Tunnels have optimized their steady-state data systems for acquisition and analysis and even implemented large dynamic-data acquisition systems, however development of near real-time processing and analysis tools for dynamic-data have lagged. DDS-Suite is a set of tools used to acquire, process, and analyze large amounts of dynamic data. Each phase of the testing process: acquisition, processing, and analysis are handled by separate components so that bottlenecks in one phase of the process do not affect the other, leading to a robust system. DDS-Suite is capable of acquiring 672 channels of dynamic data at rate of 275 MB / s. More than 300 channels of the system use 24-bit analog-to-digital cards and are capable of producing data with less than 0.01 of phase difference at 1 kHz. System architecture, design philosophy, and examples of use during NASA Constellation and Fundamental Aerodynamic tests are discussed.

Burnside, Jathan J.

2012-01-01

446

Solid-solid phase change thermal storage application to space-suit battery pack  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High cell temperatures are seen as the primary safety problem in the Li-BCX space battery. The exothermic heat from the chemical reactions could raise the temperature of the lithium electrode above the melting temperature. Also, high temperature causes the cell efficiency to decrease. Solid-solid phase-change materials were used as a thermal storage medium to lower this battery cell temperature by utilizing their phase-change (latent heat storage) characteristics. Solid-solid phase-change materials focused on in this study are neopentyl glycol and pentaglycerine. Because of their favorable phase-change characteristics, these materials appear appropriate for space-suit battery pack use. The results of testing various materials are reported as thermophysical property values, and the space-suit battery operating temperature is discussed in terms of these property results.

Son, Chang H.; Morehouse, Jeffrey H.

1989-01-01

447

Sedation and Anesthesia Options for Pediatric Patients in the Radiation Oncology Suite  

PubMed Central

External beam radiation therapy (XRT) has become one of the cornerstones in the management of pediatric oncology cases. While the procedure itself is painless, the anxiety it causes may necessitate the provision of sedation or anesthesia for the patient. This review paper will briefly review the XRT procedure itself so that the anesthesia provider has an understanding of what is occurring during the simulation and treatment phases. We will then examine several currently used regimens for the provision of pediatric sedation in the XRT suite as well as a discussion of when and how general anesthesia should be performed if deemed necessary. Standards of care with respect to patient monitoring will be addressed. We will conclude with a survey of the developing field of radiation-based therapy administered outside of the XRT suite. PMID:20490268

Harris, Eric A.

2010-01-01

448

Modeling Active Region Evolution - A New LWS TR and T Strategic Capability Model Suite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 2006 the LWS TR&T Program funded us to develop a strategic capability model of slowly evolving coronal active regions. In this poster we report on the overall design, and status of our new modeling suite. Our design features two coronal field models, a non-linear force free field model and a global 3D MHD code. The suite includes supporting tools and a user friendly GUI which will enable users to query the web for relevant magnetograms, download them, process them to synthesize a sequence of photospheric magnetograms and associated photospheric flow field which can then be applied to drive the coronal model innner boundary, run the coronal models and finally visualize the results.

MacNeice, Peter

2012-01-01

449

Use of Aquaporins to Achieve Needed Water Purity On ISS for the EMU Space Suit System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the U.S. Space Shuttle fleet retired, the supply of extremely high-quality water 'super-Q' - required for the EMU Space suit cooling on this ISS - will become a significant operational hardware challenge in the very near future. A proposed potential solution is the use of a filtration system consisting of a semi-permeable membrane embedded with aquaporin proteins. Aquaporins are a special class of trans-membrane proteins that facilitate passive transport of water and other substances across a membrane. The specificity of these proteins is such that only water is allowed through the protein structure, and this novel property invites their adaptation for use in water filtration systems, specifically usage on the ISS for the EMU space suit system. These proteins are found in many living systems and have been developed for commercial use today.

Hill, Terry R.; Taylor, Brandon W.

2011-01-01

450

[Pitfalls in informed consent: a statistical analysis of malpractice law suits].  

PubMed

In medical malpractice law suits, the notion of informed consent is often relevant in assessing whether negligence can be attributed to the medical practitioner who has caused injury to a patient. Furthermore, it is not rare that courts award damages for a lack of appropriate informed consent alone. In this study, two results were arrived at from a statistical analysis of medical malpractice law suits. One, unexpectedly, was that the severity of a patient's illness made no significant difference to whether damages were awarded. The other was that cases of typical medical treatment that national medical insurance does not cover were involved significantly more often than insured treatment cases. In cases where damages were awarded, the courts required more disclosure and written documents of information by medical practitioners, especially about complications and adverse effects that the patient might suffer. PMID:24946529

Echigo, Junko

2014-05-01

451

Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission Space Suit and EVA System Architecture Trade Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM) requires a Launch/Entry/Abort (LEA) suit capability and short duration Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) capability for Orion. The EVAs will involve a two-person crew for approximately four hours. Currently, two EVAs are planned with one contingency EVA in reserve. Providing this EVA capability is very challenging due to system level constraints and a new and unknown environment. The goal of the EVA architecture for ARCM is one that builds upon previously developed technologies and lessons learned, and that accomplishes the ARCM mission while providing a stepping stone to future missions and destinations. The primary system level constraints are to 1) minimize system mass and volume and 2) minimize the interfacing impacts to the baseline Orion design. In order to minimize the interfacing impacts and to not perturb the baseline Orion schedule, the concept of adding "kits" to the baseline system is proposed. These kits consist of: an EVA kit (converts LEA suit to EVA suit), EVA Servicing and Recharge Kit (provides suit consumables), the EVA Tools, Translation Aids & Sample Container Kit (the tools and mobility aids to complete the tasks), the EVA Communications Kit (interface between the EVA radio and the MPCV), and the Cabin Repress Kit (represses the MPCV between EVAs). This paper will focus on the trade space, analysis, and testing regarding the space suit (pressure garment and life support system). Historical approaches and lessons learned from all past EVA operations were researched. Previous and current, successfully operated EVA hardware and high technology readiness level (TRL) hardware were evaluated, and a trade study was conducted for all possible pressure garment and life support options. Testing and analysis was conducted and a recommended EVA system architecture was proposed. Pressure garment options that were considered for this mission include the currently in-use ISS EVA Mobility Unit (EMU), all variations of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES), and the Exploration Z-suit. For this mission, the pressure garment that was selected is the Modified ACES (MACES) with EVA enhancements. Life support options that were considered included short closed-loop umbilicals, long open-loop umbilicals, the currently in-use ISS EMU Portable Life Support System (PLSS), and the currently in development Exploration PLSS. For this mission, the life support option that was selected is the Exploration PLSS. The greatest risk in the proposed architecture is viewed to be the comfort and mobility of the baseline MACES and the delicate balance between adding more mobility features while not compromising landing safety. Feasibility testing was accomplished in low fidelity analogs and in the JSC Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) to validate the concept before a final recommendation on the architecture was made. The proposed architecture was found to meet the mission constraints, but much more work is required to determine the details of the required suit upgrades, the integration with the PLSS, and the rest of the tools and equipment required to accomplish the mission. This work and further definition of the remaining kits will be conducted in government fiscal year 14.

Blanco, Raul A.; Bowie, Jonathan T.; Watson, Richard D.; Sipila, Stephanie A.

2014-01-01

452

School of Computer Science McConnell Engineering Building, Suite 318  

E-print Network

University Street Montréal, QC H3A 2A7 Ecole d'Informatique Pavillon McConnell, Suite 318 Université Mc University Street Montreal, QC H3A 2A7 Dear Dr. : As discussed in a previous conversation, it gives me much://www.mcgill.ca/gps/postdoc) where you will find and be able to download the necessary form to be completed. You should then bring

Verbrugge, Clark

453

The Architecture of CoralReef: An Internet Trac Monitoring Software Suite  

Microsoft Academic Search

Passive data collection tools have traditionally been designed for specific tasks such as accounting (NeTraMet [1]) or packet capture (tcpdump [2]). The CoralReef suite was designed to provide a uniform interface to passive data for a wide range of applications at many levels, from raw capture to real-time report generation. CoralReef provides a convenient set of passive data tools for

Ken Keys; David Moore; Ryan Koga; Edouard Lagache; Michael Tesch; K. Cla Y

2001-01-01

454

Solid-solid phase change materials as a space-suit battery thermal storage medium  

Microsoft Academic Search

High cell temperatures are the primary safety problem in the Lithium-Bromine Complex space-suit battery. The exthormic heat from the chemical reactions could raise the temperature of the lithium electrode above its melting temperature. Solid-solid phase change materials were used as a thermal storage medium to lower this battery operation temperature by using their phase change characteristics. Neopentyl glycol (CâHââOâ) was

1989-01-01

455

EnviroSuite: An environmentally immersive programming framework for sensor networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

that introduces a new paradigm, called environmentally immersive programming, to abstract distributed interactions with the environment. Environmentally immersive programming,refers to an object-based programming,model in which individual objects represent physical elements in the external environment. It allows the programmer,to think directly in terms of environmental abstractions. EnviroSuite provides language primitives for environmentally immersive programming that map,transparently into a support library of

Liqian Luo; Tarek F. Abdelzaher; Tian He; John A. Stankovic

2006-01-01

456

Assimilation–fractional crystallization origin of Archean Sanukitoid Suites: Western Superior Province, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geochemical and Sm–Nd and Pb–Pb isotopic data are presented for post-tectonic diorites, monzodiorites, granodiorites and granites of late Archean age from the western portion of the Superior Province. These suites possess relatively high Mg numbers (0.43–0.62), high abundances of Cr, Sr, Ba and P2O5, low Rb\\/Sr ratios and steeply fractionated, light rare earth element (REE)-enriched patterns relative to pre-tectonic plutonic

R. Stevenson; P. Henry; C. Gariépy

1999-01-01

457

Isotopic constraints on the origin of AMCG-suite rocks on the Lofoten Islands, N Norway  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary ¶Sm–Nd, Rb–Sr and Pb–Pb isotopic compositions of 34 intrusive AMCG (anorthosite–mangerite–charnockite–granite) suite rocks and spatially related ferrodiorites and gabbros from the Lofoten Islands, northern Norway, suggest that almost all Lofoten intrusive rocks can be modelled as a mixture of mainly two components: Archean lower crustal material and an about 1.8?Ga mantle-derived component. Isotopically, the gabbros and anorthosites overlap the

G. Markl; A. Höhndorf

2003-01-01

458

Lower body positive pressure application with an antigravity suit in acute carotid occlusion.  

PubMed

The challenge in acute stroke is still to reperfuse as early as possible the ischemic territory. Since fibrinolytic therapies have a limited window with potential risk of bleeding, having a nonpharmacologic mean to recruit vessels in area surrounding necrosis might be useful. We propose here to use antigravity suit inflated at "venous" pressure levels to shift blood towards thoracic and brain territories. We report two cases of spectacular clinical recovery after acute carotid occlusion. PMID:20798842

Berthet, Karine; Lukaszewicz, Anne Claire; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Payen, Didier

2010-01-01

459

Stroke Suite: Cad Systems for Acute Ischemic Stroke, Hemorrhagic Stroke, and Stroke in ER  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a suite of computer aided-diagnosis (CAD) systems for acute ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and stroke in\\u000a emergency room. A software architecture common for them is described. The acute ischemic stroke CAD system supports thrombolysis.\\u000a Our approach shifts the paradigm from a 2D visual inspection of individual scans\\/maps to atlas-assisted quantification and\\u000a simultaneous visualization of multiple 2D\\/3D images. The

Wieslaw L. Nowinski; Guoyu Qian; K. N. Bhanu Prakash; Ihar Volkau; Wing Keet Leong; Su Huang; Anand Ananthasubramaniam; Jimin Liu; Ting Ting Ng; Varsha Gupta

2007-01-01

460

Development of an air-bearing fan for space extravehicular activity (EVA) suit ventilation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A high-speed/variable flow fan has been developed for EVA suit ventilation which combines air bearings with a two-pole, toothless permanent-magnet motor. The fan has demonstrated quiet and vibration-free operation and a 2:1 range in flow rate variation. System weight is 0.9 kg, and input powers range from 12.4 to 42 W.

Fukumoto, Paul; Allen, Norman; Stonesifer, Greg

1992-01-01

461

An Overview of the Instrument Suite for the Deep Impact Mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

A suite of three optical instruments has been developed to observe Comet 9P\\/Tempel 1, the impact of a dedicated impactor spacecraft,\\u000a and the resulting crater formation for the Deep Impact mission. The high-resolution instrument (HRI) consists of an f\\/35 telescope with 10.5 m focal length, and a combined filtered CCD camera and IR spectrometer. The medium-resolution instrument\\u000a (MRI) consists of

Donald L. Hampton; James W. Baer; Martin A. Huisjen; Chris C. Varner; Alan Delamere; Dennis D. Wellnitz; Michael F. A’Hearn; Kenneth P. Klaasen

2005-01-01

462

An Overview of the Instrument Suite for the Deep Impact Mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

A suite of three optical instruments has been developed to observe Comet 9P\\/Tempel 1, the impact of a dedicated impactor spacecraft,\\u000a and the resulting crater formation for the Deep Impact mission. The high-resolution instrument (HRI) consists of an f\\/35 telescope with 10.5mfocal length, and a combined filtered CCD camera and IR spectrometer. The medium-resolution instrument\\u000a (MRI) consists of an f\\/17.5

Donald L. Hampton; James W. Baer; Martin A. Huisjen; Chris C. Varner; Alan Delamere; Dennis D. Wellnitz; Michael F. A’Hearn; Kenneth P. Klaasen

463

A Mathematical Model to Predict and Maintain the Neutral Buoyancy of Suited Astronauts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A previous study reported that inadequate weigh outs of suited subjects contribute to fatigue and the risk of injury during training in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL). Another study suggested that shoulder injuries observed in suited subjects who train in the NBL may be attributed to excessive righting moments caused by a non-optimal weigh out. The purpose of this study was to develop a mathematical model to predict and maintain the neutral buoyancy of suited subjects during training operations at the NBL. Due to time constraints, one certified NBL support diver served as a subject (height: 66.54 in; weight: 182 lbs) for this study and only one complete test was conducted. The study was divided into two runs for which the first run required the NBL divers to perform a weigh out similar to a suited astronaut on a scuba diver wearing a mock Portable Life Support System and a Displays and Control Module. For the second run, the same subject and equipment were weighed out according to the mathematical model. The objective of each run was to achieve a neutrally buoyant subject floating 450 to the pool floor. Motion data was collected using two underwater cameras and analyzed using Dartfish video analysis software while force and moment data were recorded using an AMTI force plate. The results from the NBL divers visual run indicate that the subject was floating at an angle of 29.50 while the resultant force and moment data were 1.139 lb and 1.125 ft-lb respectively. The mathematical model s weigh out resulted in the subject floating at an angle of 37.40 and a resultant force of 0.765 lb and resultant moment of 1.248 ft-lb. The mathematical model was better able to orient the subject and reduce resultant moment and force as compared to the NBL divers.

Clowers, Kurt; Jaramillo, Marcos; Nguyen, Daniel; Sweet, Robert; Rajulu, Sudhakar

2006-01-01

464

The Mg-suite and the highland crust: An unsolved enigma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most of the rocks returned from the highlands are polymict breccias, pulverized by the massive bombardment. However, some monomict breccias with low siderophile element contents are considered to be 'pristine' rocks that represent the original igneous components making up the highland crust. Three principal pristine constituents make up the lunar highland crust: ferroan anorthosites, the Mg-suite, and KREEP. A discussion of these three constituents is presented.

Taylor, Stuart Ross; Norman, Marc D.; Esat, Tezer M.

1993-01-01

465

Adapting the SPEC 2000 Benchmark Suite for Simulation-Based Computer Architecture Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The large input datasets in the SPEC 2000 benchmark suite result in unreasonably long simulation times when using detailed\\u000a execution-driven simulators for evaluating future computer architecture ideas. To address this problem, we have an ongoing\\u000a project to reduce the execution times of the SPEC 2000 benchmarks in a quantitatively defensible way. Upon completion of this\\u000a work1, we will have smaller

AJ KleinOsowski; John Flynn; Nancy Meares; David J. Lilja

466

STS-107 M.S. Kalpana Chawla suits up for TCDT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla is helped suiting up for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

2002-01-01

467

The Multi-Agent Simulation Suite Marton Ivanyi, Rajmund Bocsi, Laszlo Gulyas, Vilmos Kozma and Richard Legendi  

E-print Network

for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (www.aaai.org). All rights reserved. Figure 1: The MultiThe Multi-Agent Simulation Suite Marton Ivanyi, Rajmund Bocsi, Laszlo Gulyas, Vilmos Kozma-based modeling is a branch of computer simula- tion, especially suited for studying complex social sys- tems

Tesfatsion, Leigh

468

20 CFR 30.619 - Do all the parties to this type of tort suit have to take these actions?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers...a tort suit may be filed against a beryllium vendor by both a covered Part B employee...Part B employee claiming for chronic beryllium disease and the spouse claiming...

2010-04-01

469

20 CFR 30.619 - Do all the parties to this type of tort suit have to take these actions?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers...a tort suit may be filed against a beryllium vendor by both a covered Part B employee...Part B employee claiming for chronic beryllium disease and the spouse claiming...

2012-04-01

470

20 CFR 30.619 - Do all the parties to this type of tort suit have to take these actions?  

...Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers...a tort suit may be filed against a beryllium vendor by both a covered Part B employee...Part B employee claiming for chronic beryllium disease and the spouse claiming...

2014-04-01

471

20 CFR 30.619 - Do all the parties to this type of tort suit have to take these actions?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers...a tort suit may be filed against a beryllium vendor by both a covered Part B employee...Part B employee claiming for chronic beryllium disease and the spouse claiming...

2011-04-01

472

20 CFR 30.619 - Do all the parties to this type of tort suit have to take these actions?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Provisions Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers...a tort suit may be filed against a beryllium vendor by both a covered Part B employee...Part B employee claiming for chronic beryllium disease and the spouse claiming...

2013-04-01

473

Functional Mobility Testing: A Novel Method to Create Suit Design Requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study was performed to aide in the creation of design requirements for the next generation of space suits that more accurately describe the level of mobility necessary for a suited crewmember through the use of an innovative methodology utilizing functional mobility. A novel method was utilized involving the collection of kinematic data while 20 subjects (10 male, 10 female) performed pertinent functional tasks that will be required of a suited crewmember during various phases of a lunar mission. These tasks were selected based on relevance and criticality from a larger list of tasks that may be carried out by the crew. Kinematic data was processed through Vicon BodyBuilder software to calculate joint angles for the ankle, knee, hip, torso, shoulder, elbow, and wrist. Maximum functional mobility was consistently lower than maximum isolated mobility. This study suggests that conventional methods for establishing design requirements for human-systems interfaces based on maximal isolated joint capabilities may overestimate the required mobility. Additionally, this method provides a valuable means of evaluating systems created from these requirements by comparing the mobility available in a new spacesuit, or the mobility required to use a new piece of hardware, to this newly established database of functional mobility.

England, Scott A.; Benson, Elizabeth A.; Rajulu, Sudhakar L.

2008-01-01