Science.gov

Sample records for geometry solid oxide

  1. Making Solid Geometry Solid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Viggo

    1981-01-01

    Allowing students to use a polystyrene cutter to fashion their own three-dimensional models is suggested as a means of allowing individuals to experience problems and develop ideas related to solid geometry. A list of ideas that can lead to mathematical discovery is provided. (MP)

  2. Advanced alternate planar geometry solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, S.; Prouse, D.; Khandkar, A.; Donelson, R.; Marianowski, L. )

    1992-11-01

    The potential of high temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells as high performance, high efficiency energy conversion device is well known. Investigation of several cell designs have been undertaken by various researchers to derive the maximum performance benefit from the device while maintaining a lower cost of production to meet the commercialization cost target. The present investigation focused on the planar SOFC design which allows for the use of mature low cost production processes to be employed. A novel design concept was investigated which allows for improvements in performance through increased interface stability, and lowering of cost through enhanced structural integrity and the use of low cost metal interconnects. The new cell design consisted of a co-sintered porous/dense/porous zirconia layer with the electrode material infiltrated into the porous layers. The two year program conducted by a team involving Ceramatec and the Institute of Gas Technology, culminated in a multi-cell stack test that exhibited high performance. Considerable progress was achieved in the selection of cell components, and establishing and optimizing the cell and stack fabrication parameters. It was shown that the stack components exhibited high conductivities and low creep at the operating temperature. The inter-cell resistive losses were shown to be small through out-of-cell characterization. The source of performance loss was identified to be the anode electrolyte interface. This loss however can be minimized by improving the anode infiltration technique. Manifolding and sealing of the planar devices posed considerable challenge. Even though the open circuit voltage was 250 mV/cell lower than theoretical, the two cell stack had a performance of 300 mA/cm[sup 2] at 0.4V/cell with an area specific resistance of 1 [Omega]-cm[sup 2]/cell. improvements in manifolding are expected to provide much higher performance.

  3. Advanced alternate planar geometry solid oxide fuel cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, S.; Prouse, D.; Khandkar, A.; Donelson, R.; Marianowski, L.

    1992-11-01

    The potential of high temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells as high performance, high efficiency energy conversion device is well known. Investigation of several cell designs have been undertaken by various researchers to derive the maximum performance benefit from the device while maintaining a lower cost of production to meet the commercialization cost target. The present investigation focused on the planar SOFC design which allows for the use of mature low cost production processes to be employed. A novel design concept was investigated which allows for improvements in performance through increased interface stability, and lowering of cost through enhanced structural integrity and the use of low cost metal interconnects. The new cell design consisted of a co-sintered porous/dense/porous zirconia layer with the electrode material infiltrated into the porous layers. The two year program conducted by a team involving Ceramatec and the Institute of Gas Technology, culminated in a multi-cell stack test that exhibited high performance. Considerable progress was achieved in the selection of cell components, and establishing and optimizing the cell and stack fabrication parameters. It was shown that the stack components exhibited high conductivities and low creep at the operating temperature. The inter-cell resistive losses were shown to be small through out-of-cell characterization. The source of performance loss was identified to be the anode electrolyte interface. This loss however can be minimized by improving the anode infiltration technique. Manifolding and sealing of the planar devices posed considerable challenge. Even though the open circuit voltage was 250 mV/cell lower than theoretical, the two cell stack had a performance of 300 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0.4V/cell with an area specific resistance of 1 {Omega}-cm{sup 2}/cell. improvements in manifolding are expected to provide much higher performance.

  4. Quadric solids and computational geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, J.D.

    1980-07-25

    As part of the CAD-CAM development project, this report discusses the mathematics underlying the program QUADRIC, which does computations on objects modeled as Boolean combinations of quadric half-spaces. Topics considered include projective space, quadric surfaces, polars, affine transformations, the construction of solids, shaded image, the inertia tensor, moments, volume, surface integrals, Monte Carlo integration, and stratified sampling. 1 figure.

  5. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott; Wang, Ruiping; Derouane, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  6. Laws of granular solids: geometry and topology.

    PubMed

    DeGiuli, Eric; McElwaine, Jim

    2011-10-01

    In a granular solid, mechanical equilibrium requires a delicate balance of forces at the disordered grain scale. To understand how macroscopic rigidity can emerge in this amorphous solid, it is crucial that we understand how Newton's laws pass from the disordered grain scale to the laboratory scale. In this work, we introduce an exact discrete calculus, in which Newton's laws appear as differential relations at the scale of a single grain. Using this calculus, we introduce gauge variables that describe identically force- and torque-balanced configurations. In a first, intrinsic formulation, we use the topology of the contact network, but not its geometry. In a second, extrinsic formulation, we introduce geometry with the Delaunay triangulation. These formulations show, with exact methods, how topology and geometry in a disordered medium are related by constraints. In particular, we derive Airy's expression for a divergence-free, symmetric stress tensor in two and three dimensions. PMID:22181138

  7. Tips on Creating Complex Geometry Using Solid Modeling Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gow, George

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer-aided drafting (CAD) software, sometimes referred to as "solid modeling" software, is easy to learn, fun to use, and becoming the standard in industry. However, many users have difficulty creating complex geometry with the solid modeling software. And the problem is not entirely a student problem. Even some teachers and…

  8. Solid oxide electrochemical reactor science.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Neal P.; Stechel, Ellen Beth; Moyer, Connor J.; Ambrosini, Andrea; Key, Robert J.

    2010-09-01

    Solid-oxide electrochemical cells are an exciting new technology. Development of solid-oxide cells (SOCs) has advanced considerable in recent years and continues to progress rapidly. This thesis studies several aspects of SOCs and contributes useful information to their continued development. This LDRD involved a collaboration between Sandia and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) ins solid-oxide electrochemical reactors targeted at solid oxide electrolyzer cells (SOEC), which are the reverse of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC). SOECs complement Sandia's efforts in thermochemical production of alternative fuels. An SOEC technology would co-electrolyze carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with steam at temperatures around 800 C to form synthesis gas (H{sub 2} and CO), which forms the building blocks for a petrochemical substitutes that can be used to power vehicles or in distributed energy platforms. The effort described here concentrates on research concerning catalytic chemistry, charge-transfer chemistry, and optimal cell-architecture. technical scope included computational modeling, materials development, and experimental evaluation. The project engaged the Colorado Fuel Cell Center at CSM through the support of a graduate student (Connor Moyer) at CSM and his advisors (Profs. Robert Kee and Neal Sullivan) in collaboration with Sandia.

  9. Thermal analysis of combinatorial solid geometry models using SINDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerencser, Diane; Radke, George; Introne, Rob; Klosterman, John; Miklosovic, Dave

    1993-01-01

    Algorithms have been developed using Monte Carlo techniques to determine the thermal network parameters necessary to perform a finite difference analysis on Combinatorial Solid Geometry (CSG) models. Orbital and laser fluxes as well as internal heat generation are modeled to facilitate satellite modeling. The results of the thermal calculations are used to model the infrared (IR) images of targets and assess target vulnerability. Sample analyses and validation are presented which demonstrate code products.

  10. Intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Brett, Daniel J L; Atkinson, Alan; Brandon, Nigel P; Skinner, Stephen J

    2008-08-01

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), typified by developers such as Siemens Westinghouse and Rolls-Royce, operate in the temperature region of 850-1000 degrees C. For such systems, very high efficiencies can be achieved from integration with gas turbines for large-scale stationary applications. However, high temperature operation means that the components of the stack need to be predominantly ceramic and high temperature metal alloys are needed for many balance-of-plant components. For smaller scale applications, where integration with a heat engine is not appropriate, there is a trend to move to lower temperatures of operation, into the so-called intermediate temperature (IT) range of 500-750 degrees C. This expands the choice of materials and stack geometries that can be used, offering reduced system cost and, in principle, reducing the corrosion rate of stack and system components. This review introduces the IT-SOFC and explains the advantages of operation in this temperature regime. The main advances made in materials chemistry that have made IT operation possible are described and some of the engineering issues and the new opportunities that reduced temperature operation affords are discussed. This tutorial review examines the advances being made in materials and engineering that are allowing solid oxide fuel cells to operate at lower temperature. The challenges and advantages of operating in the so-called 'intermediate temperature' range of 500-750 degrees C are discussed and the opportunities for applications not traditionally associated with solid oxide fuel cells are highlighted. This article serves as an introduction for scientists and engineers interested in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells and the challenges and opportunities of reduced temperature operation. PMID:18648682

  11. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; George, Raymond A.; Shockling, Larry A.

    1993-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Draper, R.; George, R.A.; Shockling, L.A.

    1993-04-06

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  13. Reverse engineering: algebraic boundary representations to constructive solid geometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchele, S. F.; Ellingson, W. A.

    1997-12-17

    Recent advances in reverse engineering have focused on recovering a boundary representation (b-rep) of an object, often for integration with rapid prototyping. This boundary representation may be a 3-D point cloud, a triangulation of points, or piecewise algebraic or parametric surfaces. This paper presents work in progress to develop an algorithm to extend the current state of the art in reverse engineering of mechanical parts. This algorithm will take algebraic surface representations as input and will produce a constructive solid geometry (CSG) description that uses solid primitives such as rectangular block, pyramid, sphere, cylinder, and cone. The proposed algorithm will automatically generate a CSG solid model of a part given its algebraic b-rep, thus allowing direct input into a CAD system and subsequent CSG model generation.

  14. Solid-oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fee, D. C.; Ackerman, J. P.

    Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) systems offer significant advantages for a variety of fuels and applications. The simplicity and high efficiency of a direct reforming, contaminant-tolerant power system is advantageous for small natural gas or volatile liquid-fueled utility and industrial congeneration plants, as well as residential use. The further gain in efficiency from the incorporation of a bottoming cycle in large-scale plants is advantageous for coal-fueled utility baseload or industrial cogeneration facilities. Development of SOFC components is well advanced. The present effort focuses on improving cell life and performance as well as integration of cells into an array.

  15. Solid-oxide fuel cell electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Ira D.; Hash, Mark C.; Krumpelt, Michael

    1993-01-01

    A solid-oxide electrolyte operable at between 600.degree. C. and 800.degree. C. and a method of producing the solid-oxide electrolyte are provided. The solid-oxide electrolyte comprises a combination of a compound having weak metal-oxygen interactions with a compound having stronger metal-oxygen interactions whereby the resulting combination has both strong and weak metal-oxygen interaction properties.

  16. Solid oxide electrolysis: Concluding remarks.

    PubMed

    Jun, Areum; Ju, Young-Wan; Kim, Guntae

    2015-01-01

    Renewable energy resources such as solar energy, wind energy, hydropower or geothermal energy have attracted significant attention in recent years. Renewable energy sources have to match supply with demand, therefore it is essential that energy storage devices (e.g., secondary batteries) are developed. However, secondary batteries are accompanied with critical problems such as high cost for the limited energy storage capacity and loss of charge over time. Energy storage in the form of chemical species, such as H2 or CO2, have no constraints on energy storage capacity and will also be essential. When plentiful renewable energy exists, for example, it could be used to convert H2O into hydrogen via water electrolysis. Also, renewable energy resources could be used to reduce CO2 into CO and recycle CO2 and H2O into sustainable hydrocarbon fuels in solid oxide electrolysis (SOE). PMID:26470860

  17. SABRINA: an interactive solid geometry modeling program for Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    West, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    SABRINA is a fully interactive three-dimensional geometry modeling program for MCNP. In SABRINA, a user interactively constructs either body geometry, or surface geometry models, and interactively debugs spatial descriptions for the resulting objects. This enhanced capability significantly reduces the effort in constructing and debugging complicated three-dimensional geometry models for Monte Carlo Analysis.

  18. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  19. Interfacial material for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  20. An analytical approach for solid oxide cell electrode geometric design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, George J.

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model for gas distributions in porous solid oxide cell electrodes is applied to develop dimensionless metrics that describe electrode performance. These metrics include two forms of a dimensionless reactant depletion current density and a geometry sensitive Damköhler number used to assess electrode catalytic effectiveness. The first dimensionless depletion current density defines when reducing electrode thickness no longer benefits mass transfer performance for a given cell geometry. The second dimensionless depletion current density provides a gage of deviation from the limiting current behavior predicted using button-cell experimental and modeling approaches. The Damköhler number and related catalytic effectiveness quantify two-dimensional transport effects under non-depleted operating conditions, providing a means of generalizing insights from reactant depletion behavior for typical cell operating conditions. A finite element solution for gas transport based on the dusty-gas model is used as a benchmark for the analytical model and dimensionless metrics. Estimates of concentration polarization based on analytical and numerical models compare well to published experimental data. Analytical performance predictions provide clear demonstration of the influence of two-dimensional electrode geometry on solid oxide cell performance. These results agree with finite element predictions and suggest that reduction of electrode thickness does not exclusively benefit cell performance.

  1. Supercritical water oxidation - Microgravity solids separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killilea, William R.; Hong, Glenn T.; Swallow, Kathleen C.; Thomason, Terry B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) waste treatment and water recycling technology to the problem of waste disposal in-long term manned space missions. As inorganic constituents present in the waste are not soluble in supercritical water, they must be removed from the organic-free supercritical fluid reactor effluent. Supercritical water reactor/solids separator designs capable of removing precipitated solids from the process' supercritical fluid in zero- and low- gravity environments are developed and evaluated. Preliminary experiments are then conducted to test the concepts. Feed materials for the experiments are urine, feces, and wipes with the addition of reverse osmosis brine, the rejected portion of processed hygiene water. The solid properties and their influence on the design of several oxidation-reactor/solids-separator configurations under study are presented.

  2. Thin-film solid-oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.

    1997-05-01

    Fuel cells are energy conversion devices that would save billions of dollars in fuel costs alone each year in the United States if they could be implemented today for stationary and transportation applications (1-5). There are a wide variety of fuel cells available, e.g. molten carbonate, phosphoric acid, proton exchange membrane and solid-oxide. However, solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCS) are potentially more efficient and less expensive per kilowatt of power in comparison to other fuel cells. For transportation applications, the energy efficiency of a conventional internal combustion engine would be increased two-fold as replaced with a zero-emission SOFC. The basic unit of a SOFC consists of an anode and cathode separated by an oxygen-ion conducting, electrolyte layer. Manifolded stacks of fuel cells, with electrical interconnects, enable the transport and combination of a fuel and oxidant at elevated temperature to generate electrical current. Fuel cell development has proceeded along different paths based on the configuration of the anode-electrolyte-cathode. Various configurations include the tubular, monolithic and planar geometries. A planar geometry for the anode-electrolyte-cathode accompanied by a reduction in layer thickness offers the potential for high power density. Maximum power densities will require yet additional innovations in the assembly of fuel cell stacks with all of the manifolding stipulations for gas flow and electrical interconnects.

  3. Stability of solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Chick, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    Interconnection materials in a solid oxide fuel cell are exposed to both highly oxidizing conditions at the cathode and to highly reducing conditions at the anode. The thermal expansion characteristics of substituted lanthanum and yttrium chromite interconnect materials were evaluated by dilatometry as a function of oxygen partial pressures from 1 atm to 10{sup -18} atm, controlled using a carbon dioxide/hydrogen buffer.

  4. The solid angle (geometry factor) for a spherical surface source and an arbitrary detector aperture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-13

    It is proven that the solid angle (or geometry factor, also called the geometrical efficiency) for a spherically symmetric outward-directed surface source with an arbitrary radius and polar angle distribution and an arbitrary detector aperture is equal to the solid angle for an isotropic point source located at the center of the spherical surface source and the same detector aperture.

  5. Thin-Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Xin; Wu, Nai-Juan; Ignatiev, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The development of thin-film solid oxide fuel cells (TFSOFCs) and a method of fabricating them have progressed to the prototype stage. This can result in the reduction of mass, volume, and the cost of materials for a given power level.

  6. Oxidation-reduction capacities of aquifer solids

    SciTech Connect

    Barcelona, M.J.; Holm, T.R.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation-reduction processes play a major role in the mobility, transport, and fate of inorganic and organic chemical constituents in natural waters. Therefore, the manipulation of redox conditions in natural and treated water systems is assumed to be a common option for the control of contaminant concentrations. Measurements of the oxidation (i.e., of aqueous Cr(2+)) and reduction (i.e., of aqueous Cr2O7(2-) and H2O2) capacities of aquifer solids and groundwater have been made on samples from a sand-and-gravel aquifer. The groundwater contributed less than 1% of the system oxidation or reduction poising capacity. Reduction capacities averaged 0.095, 0.111, and 0.136 mequiv/g of dry solids for oxic, transitional, and reducing Eh conditions, respectively. Measured oxidation capacities averaged 0.4 mequiv/g of dry solids over the range of redox intensity conditions. These capacities represent considerable resistance to the adjustment of redox conditions even at uncontaminated sites. Hydrogen peroxide reduction by aquifer solid samples proceeds rapidly relative to microbially mediated decomposition. The study indicates the need for closer scrutiny of the predictability and cost effectiveness of attempts to manipulate redox conditions in poorly poised aquifer systems.

  7. Nanocrystalline cerium oxide materials for solid fuel cell systems

    DOEpatents

    Brinkman, Kyle S

    2015-05-05

    Disclosed are solid fuel cells, including solid oxide fuel cells and PEM fuel cells that include nanocrystalline cerium oxide materials as a component of the fuel cells. A solid oxide fuel cell can include nanocrystalline cerium oxide as a cathode component and microcrystalline cerium oxide as an electrolyte component, which can prevent mechanical failure and interdiffusion common in other fuel cells. A solid oxide fuel cell can also include nanocrystalline cerium oxide in the anode. A PEM fuel cell can include cerium oxide as a catalyst support in the cathode and optionally also in the anode.

  8. Solid oxide MEMS-based fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Jankowksi, Alan F.; Morse, Jeffrey D.

    2007-03-13

    A micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based thin-film fuel cells for electrical power applications. The MEMS-based fuel cell may be of a solid oxide type (SOFC), a solid polymer type (SPFC), or a proton exchange membrane type (PEMFC), and each fuel cell basically consists of an anode and a cathode separated by an electrolyte layer. The electrolyte layer can consist of either a solid oxide or solid polymer material, or proton exchange membrane electrolyte materials may be used. Additionally catalyst layers can also separate the electrodes (cathode and anode) from the electrolyte. Gas manifolds are utilized to transport the fuel and oxidant to each cell and provide a path for exhaust gases. The electrical current generated from each cell is drawn away with an interconnect and support structure integrated with the gas manifold. The fuel cells utilize integrated resistive heaters for efficient heating of the materials. By combining MEMS technology with thin-film deposition technology, thin-film fuel cells having microflow channels and full-integrated circuitry can be produced that will lower the operating temperature an will yield an order of magnitude greater power density than the currently known fuel cells.

  9. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; Gail Geiger; Kevin Keegan; John Noetzel; Larry Chick

    2003-12-08

    The objective of Phase I under this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with the option of piped-in water (Demonstration System A). Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from January 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003, under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks: Task 1 System Design and Integration; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5 Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6 System Fabrication; Task 7 System Testing; Task 8 Program Management; and Task 9 Stack Testing with Coal-Based Reformate.

  10. Generator configuration for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Disclosed are improvements in a solid oxide fuel cell generator 1 having a multiplicity of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells 2, where a fuel gas is passed over one side of said cells and an oxygen-containing gas is passed over the other side of said cells resulting in the generation of heat and electricity. The improvements comprise arranging the cells in the configuration of a circle, a spiral, or folded rows within a cylindrical generator, and modifying the flow rate, oxygen concentration, and/or temperature of the oxygen-containing gases that flow to those cells that are at the periphery of the generator relative to those cells that are at the center of the generator. In these ways, a more uniform temperature is obtained throughout the generator.

  11. Solid-oxide fuel-cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fee, D.C.; Zwick, S.A.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    Two models have been developed to describe the performance of solid-oxide fuel cells: (1) a cell model which calculates cell performance for various conditions of temperature, current density, and gas composition; and (2) a systems model which performs detailed heat and mass balances around each component in a power plant. The cell model provides insight into the performance tradeoffs in cell design. Further, the cell model provides the basis for predicting fuel cell performance in a power plant environment as necessary for the systems code. Using these two tools, analysis of an atmospheric pressure, natural gas fueled, internally reforming power plant confirms the simplicity and increased efficiency of a solid oxide fuel cell system compared to existing plants.

  12. Sintered electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Warner, Kathryn A.

    1999-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell fuel electrode is produced by a sintering process. An underlayer is applied to the electrolyte of a solid oxide fuel cell in the form of a slurry, which is then dried. An overlayer is applied to the underlayer and then dried. The dried underlayer and overlayer are then sintered to form a fuel electrode. Both the underlayer and the overlayer comprise a combination of electrode metal such as nickel, and stabilized zirconia such as yttria-stabilized zirconia, with the overlayer comprising a greater percentage of electrode metal. The use of more stabilized zirconia in the underlayer provides good adhesion to the electrolyte of the fuel cell, while the use of more electrode metal in the overlayer provides good electrical conductivity. The sintered fuel electrode is less expensive to produce compared with conventional electrodes made by electrochemical vapor deposition processes. The sintered electrodes exhibit favorable performance characteristics, including good porosity, adhesion, electrical conductivity and freedom from degradation.

  13. OXIDATION-REDUCTION CAPACITIES OF AQUIFER SOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of the oxidation (i.e., of aqueous Cr2+) and reduction (i.e., of aqueous Cr2O72- and H202) capacities of aquifer solids and groundwater have been made on samples from a sand-and-gravel aquifer. The gro...

  14. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myles, K. M.; Mcpheeters, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of the monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) concept has been proven, and the performance has been dramatically improved. The differences in thermal expansion coefficients and firing shrinkages among the fuel cell materials have been minimized, thus allowing successful fabrication of the MSOFC with few defects. The MSOFC shows excellent promise for development into a practical power source for many applications from stationary power, to automobile propulsion, to space pulsed power.

  15. Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core

    DOEpatents

    McPheeters, Charles C.; Mrazek, Franklin C.

    1988-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700.degree. C. and 1100.degree. C.

  16. Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core

    DOEpatents

    McPheeters, C.C.; Mrazek, F.C.

    1988-08-02

    A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700 C and 1,100 C. 8 figs.

  17. A Study of Oxides for Solid Oxide Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comets, Olivier

    As the world energy consumption increases, it is a question of global health to increase energy production efficiency and to reduce CO2 emissions. In that respect, solid oxide cells are solid state devices that convert directly fuel into electricity, or vice versa. In fact, when run in fuel cell mode, such devices produce electricity with efficiency up to twice that of current natural gas power plants. However, systems equipped with them have only seen limited commercialization owing to issues of cost, durability, and performance. In this thesis, three different aspects of solid oxide cells are studied. First, the effects of stress on the properties of mixed ionic electronic conducting oxides are considered. Such oxides can be used as electrode materials, where they are often subject to large stresses, which can, in turn, affect their performance. Hence, understanding the relationship between stress and properties in such materials is crucial. Non-stoichiometry in strontium substituted lanthanum cobaltite is found to increase under tension and to decrease under compression. Then, degradation taking place when the cell is run in electrolysis mode is discussed. A high current allows for a high production rate of hydrogen gas. However, this can also lead to oxygen bubble nucleating in the electrolyte and subsequent degradation of the cell. The analysis conducted here shows that such nucleation phenomenon can be avoided by keeping the overpotential at the oxygen electrode below a critical value. Finally, the growth and coarsening of catalyst nanoparticles at the surface of an oxide is studied. Scientists have developed new oxides for anodes in which a catalyst material is dissolved and exsolves under operating conditions. As the performance of the cell is controlled by the surface area of the catalyst phase, understanding the kinetics of the growth is critical to predict the performance of the cell. An approach is developed to study the growth of one particle, in the

  18. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; Gail Geiger; Kevin Keegan; Larry Chick

    2004-05-07

    The objective of this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with the option of piped-in water (Demonstration System A). Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from July 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003, under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks: Task 1 System Design and Integration; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5 Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6 System Fabrication; Task 7 System Testing; Task 8 Program Management; Task 9 Stack Testing with Coal-Based Reformate; and Task 10 Technology Transfer from SECA CORE Technology Program. In this reporting period, unless otherwise noted Task 6--System Fabrication and Task 7--System Testing will be reported within Task 1 System Design and Integration. Task 8--Program Management, Task 9--Stack Testing with Coal Based Reformate, and Task 10--Technology Transfer from SECA CORE Technology Program will be reported on in the Executive Summary section of this report.

  19. Comparative Effects of Two Modes of Computer-Assisted Instructional Package on Solid Geometry Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambari, Isiaka Amosa; Ezenwa, Victoria Ifeoma; Anyanwu, Romanus Chogozie

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the effects of two modes of computer-assisted instructional package on solid geometry achievement amongst senior secondary school students in Minna, Niger State, Nigeria. Also, the influence of gender on the performance of students exposed to CAI(AT) and CAI(AN) packages were examined. This study adopted a pretest-posttest…

  20. Assessing the Effectiveness of Learning Solid Geometry by Using an Augmented Reality-Assisted Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Hao-Chiang Koong; Chen, Mei-Chi; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2015-01-01

    This study integrates augmented reality (AR) technology into teaching activities to design a learning system that assists junior high-school students in learning solid geometry. The following issues are addressed: (1) the relationship between achievements in mathematics and performance in spatial perception; (2) whether system-assisted learning…

  1. TEACHERS' GUIDE. NINTH GRADE PLANE AND SOLID GEOMETRY FOR THE ACADEMICALLY TALENTED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HORN, R.A.

    MATERIALS ARE INTENDED FOR A UNIFIED AND ACCELERATED PLANE AND SOLID GEOMETRY COURSE AND FOR EASY MODIFICATION AND ADAPTATION BY EXPERIENCED OR INEXPERIENCED TEACHER. TEXTBOOKS TO WHICH THE GUIDE HAS BEEN KEYED ARE LISTED. UNITS ARE GIVEN FOR BOTH SEMESTERS WITH TIME ALLOTMENTS RECOMMENDED. EACH UNIT IS SUBDIVIDED INTO TOPICS AND OBJECTIVES,…

  2. Graphene oxide film as solid lubricant.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongyu; Bu, Yongfeng; Zhang, Junyan; Cao, Zhongyue; Liang, Aimin

    2013-07-10

    As a layered material, graphene oxide (GO) film is a good candidate for improving friction and antiwear performance of silicon-based MEMS devices. Via a green electrophoretic deposition (EPD) approach, GO films with tunable thickness in nanoscale are fabricated onto silicon wafer in a water solution. The morphology, microstructure, and mechanical properties as well as the friction coefficient and wear resistance of the films were investigated. The results indicated that the friction coefficient of silicon wafer was reduced to 1/6 its value, and the wear volume was reduced to 1/24 when using GO film as solid lubricant. These distinguished tribology performances suggest that GO films are expected to be good solid lubricants for silicon-based MEMS/NEMS devices. PMID:23786494

  3. The TMI regenerable solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Thomas L.

    1995-01-01

    Energy storage and production in space requires rugged, reliable hardware which minimizes weight, volume, and maintenance while maximizing power output and usable energy storage. These systems generally consist of photovoltaic solar arrays which operate during sunlight cycles to provide system power and regenerate fuel (hydrogen) via water electrolysis; during dark cycles, hydrogen is converted by the fuel cell into system. The currently preferred configuration uses two separate systems (fuel cell and electrolyzer) in conjunction with photovoltaic cells. Fuel cell/electrolyzer system simplicity, reliability, and power-to-weight and power-to-volume ratios could be greatly improved if both power production (fuel cell) and power storage (electrolysis) functions can be integrated into a single unit. The Technology Management, Inc. (TMI), solid oxide fuel cell-based system offers the opportunity to both integrate fuel cell and electrolyzer functions into one unit and potentially simplify system requirements. Based an the TMI solid oxide fuel cell (SOPC) technology, the TMI integrated fuel cell/electrolyzer utilizes innovative gas storage and operational concepts and operates like a rechargeable 'hydrogen-oxygen battery'. Preliminary research has been completed on improved H2/H2O electrode (SOFC anode/electrolyzer cathode) materials for solid oxide, regenerative fuel cells. Improved H2/H2O electrode materials showed improved cell performance in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes in reversible cell tests. ln reversible fuel cell/electrolyzer mode, regenerative fuel cell efficiencies (ratio of power out (fuel cell mode) to power in (electrolyzer model)) improved from 50 percent (using conventional electrode materials) to over 80 percent. The new materials will allow the TMI SOFC system to operate as both the electrolyzer and fuel cell in a single unit. Preliminary system designs have also been developed which indicate the technical feasibility of using the TMI SOFC

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell combined cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Bevc, F.P.; Lundberg, W.L.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    The integration of the solid oxide fuel cell and combustion turbine technologies can result in combined-cycle power plants, fueled with natural gas, that have high efficiencies and clean gaseous emissions. Results of a study are presented in which conceptual designs were developed for 3 power plants based upon such an integration, and ranging in rating from 3 to 10 MW net ac. The plant cycles are described and characteristics of key components summarized. Also, plant design-point efficiency estimates are presented as well as values of other plant performance parameters.

  5. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell current collector

    DOEpatents

    Bischoff, Brian L.; Sutton, Theodore G.; Armstrong, Timothy R.

    2010-07-20

    An internal current collector for use inside a tubular solid oxide fuel cell (TSOFC) electrode comprises a tubular coil spring disposed concentrically within a TSOFC electrode and in firm uniform tangential electrical contact with the electrode inner surface. The current collector maximizes the contact area between the current collector and the electrode. The current collector is made of a metal that is electrically conductive and able to survive under the operational conditions of the fuel cell, i.e., the cathode in air, and the anode in fuel such as hydrogen, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2O or H.sub.2S.

  6. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell development program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) development activities and current program status. The Westinghouse goal is to develop a cost effective cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 hours. Progress toward this goal will be discussed and test results presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 56,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Results of development efforts to reduce cost and increase power output of tubular SOFCs are described.

  7. Sealant materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this work is to complete the development of soft glass-ceramic sealants for the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Among other requirements, the materials must soften at the operation temperature of the fuel cell (600-1000{degrees}C) to relieve stresses between stack components, and their thermal expansions must be tailored to match those of the stack materials. Specific objectives included addressing the needs of industrial fuel cell developers, based on their evaluation of samples we supply, as well as working with commercial glass producers to achieve scaled-up production of the materials without changing their properties.

  8. Mathematical modeling of solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Cheng-Yi; Maloney, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    Development of predictive techniques, with regard to cell behavior, under various operating conditions is needed to improve cell performance, increase energy density, reduce manufacturing cost, and to broaden utilization of various fuels. Such technology would be especially beneficial for the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) at it early demonstration stage. The development of computer models to calculate the temperature, CD, reactant distributions in the tubular and monolithic SOFCs. Results indicate that problems of nonuniform heat generation and fuel gas depletion in the tubular cell module, and of size limitions in the monolithic (MOD 0) design may be encountered during FC operation.

  9. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit

    SciTech Connect

    J. Weber

    2001-12-12

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) is an attractive, efficient, clean source of power for transportation, military, and stationary applications. Delphi has pioneered its application as an auxiliary Power Unit (APU) for transportation. Delphi is also interested in marketing this technology for stationary applications. Its key advantages are high efficiency and compatibility with gasoline, natural gas and diesel fuel. It's consistent with mechanizations that support the trend to low emissions. Delphi is committed to working with customers and partners to bring this novel technology to market.

  10. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

    1983-10-12

    A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

  11. Sintered electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, R.J.; Warner, K.A.

    1999-06-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell fuel electrode is produced by a sintering process. An underlayer is applied to the electrolyte of a solid oxide fuel cell in the form of a slurry, which is then dried. An overlayer is applied to the underlayer and then dried. The dried underlayer and overlayer are then sintered to form a fuel electrode. Both the underlayer and the overlayer comprise a combination of electrode metal such as nickel, and stabilized zirconia such as yttria-stabilized zirconia, with the overlayer comprising a greater percentage of electrode metal. The use of more stabilized zirconia in the underlayer provides good adhesion to the electrolyte of the fuel cell, while the use of more electrode metal in the overlayer provides good electrical conductivity. The sintered fuel electrode is less expensive to produce compared with conventional electrodes made by electrochemical vapor deposition processes. The sintered electrodes exhibit favorable performance characteristics, including good porosity, adhesion, electrical conductivity and freedom from degradation. 4 figs.

  12. Three-dimensional elastic stress and displacement analysis of finite geometry solids containing cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kring, J.; Gyekenyesi, J.; Mendelson, A.

    1977-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement fields in finite geometry bars containing central, surface, and double-edge cracks under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Normal stresses and the stress intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated using the obtained displacement field. The reported results demonstrate the usefulness of this method in calculating stress intensity factors for commonly encountered crack geometries in finite solids.

  13. Advanced alternate planar geometry solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Prouse, D.; Elangovan, S.; Khandkar, A. ); Donelson, R.; Marianowski, L. )

    1989-01-01

    During this quarter, progress was made at Ceramatec in seal development and conductivity measurements of YIG compositions. A creep test was completed on the porous/dense/porous triilayer. IGT provided a discussion on possible interconnect materials. The following tasks are reported on: cell design analysis, program liaison and test facility preparation, cell component fabrication/development, out-of-cell tests. 9 figs, 2 tabs.

  14. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, John P.; Young, John E.

    1984-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween, and each interconnect wall consists of thin layers of the cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of interconnect material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002-0.05 cm thick.

  15. Cartesian grid simulations of gas-solids flow systems with complex geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dietiker, Jean-Francois; Li, Tingwen; Garg, Rahul; Shahnam, Mehrdad

    2013-02-01

    Complex geometries encountered in many applications of gas–solids flow need special treatment in most legacy multiphase flow solvers with Cartesian numerical grid. This paper briefly outlines the implementation of a cut cell technique in the open-source multiphase flow solver—MFIX for accurate representation of complex geometries. Specifically, applications of the Cartesian cut cell method to different gas–solids fluidization systems including a small scale bubbling fluidized bed with submerged tube bundle and a complete pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed will be presented. In addition to qualitative predictions on the general flow behaviors inside each system, quantitative comparison with the available experimental data will be presented. Furthermore, some results on extending the current cut-cell technique to Lagrangian–Eulerian simulations will be presented.

  16. Stability of solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.

    1996-08-01

    Chromite interconnection materials in an SOFC are exposed to both highly oxidizing conditions at the cathode and to highly reducing conditions at the anode. Because such conditions could lead to component failure, the authors have evaluated thermal, electrical, chemical, and structural stabilities of these materials as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. The crystal lattice of the chromites was shown to expand for oxygen partial pressures smaller than 10{sup {minus}10} atm, which could lead to cracking and debonding in an SOFC. Highly substituted lanthanum chromite compositions were the most susceptible to lattice expansion; yttrium chromites showed better dimensional stability by more than a factor of two. New chromite compositions were developed that showed little tendency for lattice expansion under strongly reducing conditions, yet provided a good thermal expansion match to other fuel cell components. Use of these new chromite interconnect compositions should improve long-term SOFC performance, particularly for planar cell configurations. Thermodynamic properties of substituted lanthanum manganite cathode compositions have been determined through measurement of electromotive force as a function of temperature. Critical oxygen decomposition pressures for Sr and Ca-substituted lanthanum manganites were established using cells based on a zirconia electrolyte. Strontium oxide and calcium oxide activities in a lanthanum manganite matrix were determined using cells based on strontium fluoride and calcium fluoride electrolytes, respectively. The compositional range of single-phase behavior of these ABO{sub 3}-type perovskites was established as a function of A/B cation ratios and the extent of acceptor doping. Before this work, very little thermodynamic information was in existence for substituted manganite compositions. Such information is needed to predict the long-term stability of solid oxide fuel cell assemblies.

  17. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  18. Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules

    DOEpatents

    Riley, B.

    1988-04-22

    Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs. 11 figs.

  19. Solid oxide fuel cell process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Matthew Ellis; Bayless, David J.; Trembly, Jason P.

    2011-11-15

    Conveying gas containing sulfur through a sulfur tolerant planar solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC) stack for sulfur scrubbing, followed by conveying the gas through a non-sulfur tolerant PSOFC stack. The sulfur tolerant PSOFC stack utilizes anode materials, such as LSV, that selectively convert H.sub.2S present in the fuel stream to other non-poisoning sulfur compounds. The remaining balance of gases remaining in the completely or near H.sub.2S-free exhaust fuel stream is then used as the fuel for the conventional PSOFC stack that is downstream of the sulfur-tolerant PSOFC. A broad range of fuels such as gasified coal, natural gas and reformed hydrocarbons are used to produce electricity.

  20. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell demonstration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Veyo, S.E.

    1995-08-01

    The development of a viable fuel cell driven electrical power generation system involves not only the development of cell and stack technology, but also the development of the overall system concept, the strategy for control, and the ancillary subsystems. The design requirements used to guide system development must reflect a customer focus in order to evolve a commercial product. In order to obtain useful customer feedback, Westinghouse has practiced the deployment with customers of fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems. These field units have served to demonstrate to customers first hand the beneficial attributes of the SOFC, to expose deficiencies through experience in order to guide continued development, and to garner real world feedback and data concerning not only cell and stack parameters, but also transportation, installation, permitting and licensing, start-up and shutdown, system alarming, fault detection, fault response, and operator interaction.

  1. Interconnection of bundled solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael; Bessette, II, Norman F; Litka, Anthony F; Schmidt, Douglas S

    2014-01-14

    A system and method for electrically interconnecting a plurality of fuel cells to provide dense packing of the fuel cells. Each one of the plurality of fuel cells has a plurality of discrete electrical connection points along an outer surface. Electrical connections are made directly between the discrete electrical connection points of adjacent fuel cells so that the fuel cells can be packed more densely. Fuel cells have at least one outer electrode and at least one discrete interconnection to an inner electrode, wherein the outer electrode is one of a cathode and and anode and wherein the inner electrode is the other of the cathode and the anode. In tubular solid oxide fuel cells the discrete electrical connection points are spaced along the length of the fuel cell.

  2. Solid oxide fuel cell power system development

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, Rick; Wall, Mark; Sullivan, Neal

    2015-06-26

    This report summarizes the progress made during this contractual period in achieving the goal of developing the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cell and stack technology to be suitable for use in highly-efficient, economically-competitive, commercially deployed electrical power systems. Progress was made in further understanding cell and stack degradation mechanisms in order to increase stack reliability toward achieving a 4+ year lifetime, in cost reduction developments to meet the SECA stack cost target of $175/kW (in 2007 dollars), and in operating the SOFC technology in a multi-stack system in a real-world environment to understand the requirements for reliably designing and operating a large, stationary power system.

  3. Computational modeling of solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penmetsa, Satish Kumar

    In the ongoing search for alternative and environmentally friendly power generation facilities, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is considered one of the prime candidates for the next generation of energy conversion devices due to its capability to provide environmentally friendly and highly efficient power generation. Moreover, SOFCs are less sensitive to composition of fuel as compared to other types of fuel cells, and internal reforming of the hydrocarbon fuel cell can be performed because of higher operating temperature range of 700°C--1000°C. This allows us to use different types of hydrocarbon fuels in SOFCs. The objective of this study is to develop a three-dimensional computational model for the simulation of a solid oxide fuel cell unit to analyze the complex internal transport mechanisms and sensitivity of the cell with different operating conditions, and also to develop SOFC with higher operating current density with a more uniform gas distributions in the electrodes and with lower ohmic losses. This model includes mass transfer processes due to convection and diffusion in the gas flow channels based on the Navier-Stokes equations as well as combined diffusion and advection in electrodes using Brinkman's hydrodynamic equation and associated electrochemical reactions in the trilayer of the SOFC. Gas transport characteristics in terms of three-dimensional spatial distributions of reactant gases and their effects on electrochemical reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface, and in the resulting polarizations, are evaluated for varying pressure conditions. Results show the significance of the Brinkman's hydrodynamic model in electrodes to achieve more uniform gas concentration distributions while using a higher operating pressure and over a higher range of operating current densities.

  4. SPH-DCDEM model for arbitrary geometries in free surface solid-fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canelas, Ricardo B.; Crespo, Alejandro J. C.; Domínguez, Jose M.; Ferreira, Rui M. L.; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho

    2016-05-01

    A unified discretization of rigid solids and fluids is introduced, allowing for resolved simulations of fluid-solid phases within a meshless framework. The numerical solution, attained by Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) and a variation of Discrete Element Method (DEM), the Distributed Contact Discrete Element Method (DCDEM) discretization, is achieved by directly considering solid-solid and solid-fluid interactions. The novelty of the work is centred on the generalization of the coupling of the DEM and SPH methodologies for resolved simulations, allowing for state-of-the-art contact mechanics theories to be used in arbitrary geometries, while fluid to solid and vice versa momentum transfers are accurately described. The methods are introduced, analysed and discussed. Initial validations on the DCDEM and the fluid coupling are presented, drawing from test cases in the literature. An experimental campaign serves as a validation point for complex, large scale solid-fluid flows, where a set of blocks in several configurations is subjected to a dam-break wave. Blocks are tracked and positions are then compared between experimental data and the numerical solutions. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique allows for the quantification of the flow field and direct comparison with numerical data. The results show that the model is accurate and is capable of treating highly complex interactions, such as transport of debris or hydrodynamic actions on structures, if relevant scales are reproduced.

  5. Alternative materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop alternative materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnections and electrodes with improved electrical, thermal, and electrochemical properties. A second objective is to develop synthesis and fabrication methods for these materials whereby they can be processed in air into SOFCs. The approach is to (1) develop modifications of the current, state-of-the-art materials used in SOFCs, (2) minimize the number of cations used in the SOFC materials to reduce potential deleterious interactions, (3) improve thermal, electrical, and electrochemical properties, (4) develop methods to synthesize both state-of-the-art and alternative materials for the simultaneous fabrication and consolidation in air of the interconnections and electrodes with the solid electrolyte, and (5) understand electrochemical reactions at materials interfaces and the effects of component composition and processing on those reactions. This paper summarizes a comprehensive study that assessed the effect of ambient oxygen partial pressure on the stability of air-sinterable chromites and the sintering behavior of doped lanthanum manganites.

  6. Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Stevenson, J.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to improve the properties of the current state-of-the-art materials used for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The objectives are to: (1) develop materials based on modifications of the state-of-the-art materials; (2) minimize or eliminate stability problems in the cathode, anode, and interconnect; (3) Electrochemically evaluate (in reproducible and controlled laboratory tests) the current state-of-the-art air electrode materials and cathode/electrolyte interfacial properties; (4) Develop accelerated electrochemical test methods to evaluate the performance of SOFCs under controlled and reproducible conditions; and (5) Develop and test materials for use in low-temperature SOFCs. The goal is to modify and improve the current state-of-the-art materials and minimize the total number of cations in each material to avoid negative effects on the materials properties. Materials to reduce potential deleterious interactions, (3) improve thermal, electrical, and electrochemical properties, (4) develop methods to synthesize both state-of-the-art and alternative materials for the simultaneous fabricatoin and consolidation in air of the interconnections and electrodes with the solid electrolyte, and (5) understand electrochemical reactions at materials interfaces and the effects of component composition and processing on those reactions.

  7. Reactive vaporization of oxides in solid oxide fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Camas Fought

    Metals such as chromium, aluminum and silicon are of extreme technological and industrial importance due to the corrosion resistance they offer in oxidizing environments at high temperature. Much of this robustness is based on the formation of a thin, well-adhered metal-oxide (MO) layer on the surface of the metal. In particularly corrosive environments or at high-enough temperatures and or pressures, the MO will chemically react with constituents in the surrounding gas, removing atoms from the solid. For many systems, material loss and subsequent mechanical failure is the foremost concern. However, in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems, the presence of gaseous metal species leads to severe degradation in electrochemical performance well before mechanical limits are reached. Reactive vaporization from ferritic stainless steels, chromia, aluminosilicates and a candidate electrode material (Sr2VMoO6), was investigated using the transpiration method. Two novel collection methods were employed: condensation of vapors on wafer collectors analyzed with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS); and, condensation of vapors on quartz wool analyzed via inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Identification and quantification of vapor species provided assessment of material performance in SOFC environments. Experiments demonstrated that Cr vapor species from ferritic stainless steels used for SOFC interconnect applications could be reduced by as much as one order of magnitude through the application of barrier coatings. Base alloys were compared and exhibited a variety of Cr vaporization rates despite being similar in composition, thus illustrating the importance of minor elemental constituents in the alloy. Measurements identified Si as the primary volatile element in aluminosilicate materials when Si concentrations in the bulk material were as low as one percent. Aluminosilicate materials demonstrated a burn out phase during the first hundred hours at

  8. Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar Sohal

    2009-05-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells. One goal of that project is to address the technical and degradation issues associated with solid oxide electrolysis cells. This report covers a variety of these degradation issues, which were discussed during a workshop on “Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Strategies for its Mitigation,” held in Phoenix, AZ on October 27, 2008. Three major degradation issues related to solid oxide electrolysis cells discussed at the workshop are: • Delamination of O2-electrode and bond layer on steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple-phase boundary) • Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte. This list is not all inclusive, but the workshop summary can be useful in providing a direction for future research related to the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells.

  9. Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myles, K. M.; Mcpheeters, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (MSOFC) is an oxide-ceramic structure in which appropriate electronic and ionic conductors are fabricated in a honeycomb shape similar to a block of corrugated paperboard. These electronic and ionic conductors are arranged to provide short conduction paths to minimize resistive losses. The power density achievable with the MSOFC is expected to be about 8 kW/kg or 4 kW/L, at fuel efficienceis over 50 percent, because of small cell size and low resistive losses in the materials. The MSOFC operates in the range of 700 to 1000 C, at which temperatures rapid reform of hydrocarbon fuels is expected within the nickel-YSZ fuel channels. Tape casting and hot roll calendering are used to fabricate the MSOFC structure. The performance of the MSOFC has improved significantly during the course of development. The limitation of this system, based on materials resistance alone without interfacial resistances, is 0.093 ohm-sq cm area-specific resistance (ASR). The current typical performance of MSOFC single cells is characterized by ASRs of about 0.4 to 0.5 ohm-sq cm. With further development the ASR is expected to be reduced below 0.2 ohm-sq cm, which will result in power levels greater than 1.4 W/sq cm. The feasibility of the MSOFC concept was proven, and the performance was dramatically improved. The differences in thermal expansion coefficients and firing shrinkages among the fuel cell materials were minimized. As a result of good matching of these properties, the MSOFC structure was successfully fabricated with few defects, and the system shows excellent promise for development into a practical power source.

  10. Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, K. M.; McPheeters, C. C.

    1989-12-01

    The Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (MSOFC) is an oxide-ceramic structure in which appropriate electronic and ionic conductors are fabricated in a honeycomb shape similar to a block of corrugated paperboard. These electronic and ionic conductors are arranged to provide short conduction paths to minimize resistive losses. The power density achievable with the MSOFC is expected to be about 8 kW/kg or 4 kW/L, at fuel efficienceis over 50 percent, because of small cell size and low resistive losses in the materials. The MSOFC operates in the range of 700 to 1000 C, at which temperatures rapid reform of hydrocarbon fuels is expected within the nickel-YSZ fuel channels. Tape casting and hot roll calendering are used to fabricate the MSOFC structure. The performance of the MSOFC has improved significantly during the course of development. The limitation of this system, based on materials resistance alone without interfacial resistances, is 0.093 ohm-sq cm area-specific resistance (ASR). The current typical performance of MSOFC single cells is characterized by ASRs of about 0.4 to 0.5 ohm-sq cm. With further development the ASR is expected to be reduced below 0.2 ohm-sq cm, which will result in power levels greater than 1.4 W/sq cm. The feasibility of the MSOFC concept was proven, and the performance was dramatically improved. The differences in thermal expansion coefficients and firing shrinkages among the fuel cell materials were minimized. As a result of good matching of these properties, the MSOFC structure was successfully fabricated with few defects, and the system shows excellent promise for development into a practical power source.

  11. Domain Decomposition of a Constructive Solid Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M J; Joy, K I; Procassini, R J; Greenman, G M

    2008-12-07

    Domain decomposition has been implemented in a Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) Monte Carlo neutron transport code. Previous methods to parallelize a CSG code relied entirely on particle parallelism; but in our approach we distribute the geometry as well as the particles across processors. This enables calculations whose geometric description is larger than what could fit in memory of a single processor, thus it must be distributed across processors. In addition to enabling very large calculations, we show that domain decomposition can speed up calculations compared to particle parallelism alone. We also show results of a calculation of the proposed Laser Inertial-Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) facility, which has 5.6 million CSG parts.

  12. Stress analysis and stress-intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1977-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses, and the stress-intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress-intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center-cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress-intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids

  13. Stress analysis and stress intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses and the stress intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids.

  14. Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules

    DOEpatents

    Riley, Brian

    1990-01-01

    Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Each of the blocks includes a square center channel which forms a vertical shaft when the blocks are arranged in a stacked array. Positioned within the channel is a SOFC unit cell such that a plurality of such SOFC units disposed within a vertical shaft form a string of SOFC units coupled in series. A first pair of facing inner walls of each of the blocks each include an interconnecting channel hole cut horizontally and vertically into the block walls to form gas exit channels. A second pair of facing lateral walls of each block further include a pair of inner half circular grooves which form sleeves to accommodate anode fuel and cathode air tubes. The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs.

  15. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar S. Sohal; Anil V. Virkar; Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic no equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, , within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, no equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  16. Durability Evaluation of Reversible Solid Oxide Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoyu Zhang; James E. O'Brien; Robert C. O'Brien; Gregory K. Housley

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide cells (SOCs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. Reversible operation of SOCs includes electricity generation in the fuel cell mode and hydrogen generation in the electrolysis mode. Degradation is a more significant issue when operating SOCs in the electrolysis mode. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOCs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. A new test apparatus for single cell and small stack tests has been developed for this purpose. Cells were obtained from four industrial partners. Cells from Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) showed improved durability in electrolysis mode compared to previous stack tests. Cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials Inc. (St. Gobain) and SOFCPower Inc. demonstrated stable performance in the fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode, especially at high current density. Electrolyte-electrode delamination was found to have a significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the electrode microstructure helped to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements were performed during the tests to characterize cell performance and degradation.

  17. Nanostructured Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sholklapper, Tal Zvi

    2007-12-15

    The ability of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to directly and efficiently convert the chemical energy in hydrocarbon fuels to electricity places the technology in a unique and exciting position to play a significant role in the clean energy revolution. In order to make SOFC technology cost competitive with existing technologies, the operating temperatures have been decreased to the range where costly ceramic components may be substituted with inexpensive metal components within the cell and stack design. However, a number of issues have arisen due to this decrease in temperature: decreased electrolyte ionic conductivity, cathode reaction rate limitations, and a decrease in anode contaminant tolerance. While the decrease in electrolyte ionic conductivities has been countered by decreasing the electrolyte thickness, the electrode limitations have remained a more difficult problem. Nanostructuring SOFC electrodes addresses the major electrode issues. The infiltration method used in this dissertation to produce nanostructure SOFC electrodes creates a connected network of nanoparticles; since the method allows for the incorporation of the nanoparticles after electrode backbone formation, previously incompatible advanced electrocatalysts can be infiltrated providing electronic conductivity and electrocatalysis within well-formed electrolyte backbones. Furthermore, the method is used to significantly enhance the conventional electrode design by adding secondary electrocatalysts. Performance enhancement and improved anode contamination tolerance are demonstrated in each of the electrodes. Additionally, cell processing and the infiltration method developed in conjunction with this dissertation are reviewed.

  18. Nanotubular array solid oxide fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Munekazu; Chao, Cheng-Chieh; An, Jihwan; Jung, Hee Joon; Gür, Turgut M; Prinz, Friedrich B

    2014-01-28

    This report presents a demonstration and characterization of a nanotubular array of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) made of one-end-closed hollow tube Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia/Pt membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The tubular MEAs are nominally ∼5 μm long and have <500 nm outside diameter with total MEA thickness of nearly 50 nm. Open circuit voltages up to 660 mV (vs air) and power densities up to 1.3 μW cm(-2) were measured at 550 °C using H2 as fuel. The paper also introduces a fabrication methodology primarily based on a template process involving atomic layer deposition and electrodeposition for building the nanotubular MEA architecture as an important step toward achieving high surface area ultrathin SOFCs operating in the intermediate to low-temperature regime. A fabricated nanotubular SOFC theoretically attains a 20-fold increase in the effective surface, while projections indicate the possibility of achieving up to 40-fold. PMID:24266776

  19. Durability evaluation of reversible solid oxide cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; O'Brien, James E.; O'Brien, Robert C.; Housley, Gregory K.

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide cells (SOCs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. Reversible operation of SOCs includes electricity generation in the fuel cell mode and hydrogen generation in the electrolysis mode. Degradation is a more significant issue when operating SOCs in the electrolysis mode. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOCs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. Cells were obtained from four industrial partners. Cells from Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) showed improved durability in electrolysis mode compared to previous stack tests. Cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials Inc. (St. Gobain) and SOFCPower Inc. demonstrated stable performance in the fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode, especially at high current density. Electrolyte-electrode delamination was found to have a significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the electrode microstructure helped to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements were performed during the tests to characterize cell performance and degradation.

  20. Method of electrode fabrication for solid oxide electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Russell R.

    1990-01-01

    A process for fabricating cermet electrodes for solid oxide electrochemical cells by sintering is disclosed. First, a porous metal electrode is fabricated on a solid oxide cell, such as a fuel cell by, for example, sintering, and is then infiltrated with a high volume fraction stabilized zirconia suspension. A second sintering step is used to sinter the infiltrated zirconia to a high density in order to more securely attach the electrode to the solid oxide electrolyte of the cell. High performance fuel electrodes can be obtained with this process. Further electrode performance enhancement may be achieved if stabilized zirconia doped with cerium oxide, chromium oxide, titanium oxide, and/or praseodymium oxide for electronic conduction is used.

  1. Method of electrode fabrication for solid oxide electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.R.

    1990-11-20

    A process for fabricating cermet electrodes for solid oxide electrochemical cells by sintering is disclosed. First, a porous metal electrode is fabricated on a solid oxide cell, such as a fuel cell by, for example, sintering, and is then infiltrated with a high volume fraction stabilized zirconia suspension. A second sintering step is used to sinter the infiltrated zirconia to a high density in order to more securely attach the electrode to the solid oxide electrolyte of the cell. High performance fuel electrodes can be obtained with this process. Further electrode performance enhancement may be achieved if stabilized zirconia doped with cerium oxide, chromium oxide, titanium oxide, and/or praseodymium oxide for electronic conduction is used. 5 figs.

  2. Energy storage in ultrathin solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Van Overmeere, Quentin; Kerman, Kian; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2012-07-11

    The power output of hydrogen fuel cells quickly decreases to zero if the fuel supply is interrupted. We demonstrate thin film solid oxide fuel cells with nanostructured vanadium oxide anodes that generate power for significantly longer time than reference porous platinum anode thin film solid oxide fuel cells when the fuel supply is interrupted. The charge storage mechanism was investigated quantitatively with likely identified contributions from the oxidation of the vanadium oxide anode, its hydrogen storage properties, and different oxygen concentration at the electrodes. Fuel cells capable of storing charge even for short periods of time could contribute to ultraminiaturization of power sources for mobile energy. PMID:22712483

  3. Solids flow pattern in the exit region of a CFB -- Furnace influence of exit geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, F.; Leckner, B.; Vrager, A.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of the exit geometry on the flow pattern in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser was studied in a cold 1/9 scale model of the Chalmers 12 MW CFB boiler. The model, which is made of transparent perspex, was operated according to the simplified scaling laws proposed by Glicksman et al. (1993). 12 different exit configurations were compared at different fluidization velocities. Two bed materials were used: iron and steel. In order to verify the scaling laws, vertical pressure and density profiles, net solids flux and pressure fluctuations measured in the model were compared with corresponding results from the 12 MW boiler. The exit configurations were evaluated by comparing the net solids fluxes and the vertical pressure and density profiles of the riser. The overall flow behavior of the scale-model was found to be similar to that of the boiler: A dense bottom bed, a splash zone and a transport zone could be identified. The dynamics (in-bed pressure fluctuations) of the bottom bed were in agreement with those of the boiler. Differences between net solids fluxes during operation with different exits were in some cases of an order of magnitude. However, there were almost no difference in solids flux between an abrupt exit, an extended exit (such as that of the boiler) and an enhanced extension. A decrease in the net solids flux (increase in the internal back-mixing) could be obtained by inserting obstacles in the upper part of the riser, and an increase in the net solids flux was achieved by narrowing the duct from the riser to the cyclone inlet (increasing the average velocity in the duct). The original configuration of the duct with an inclined bottom results in back-mixing from the duct to the furnace, thereby reducing the net (external) solids flux.

  4. Neutralization Of Multiply Charged Rydberg Ions Interacting With Solid Surfaces Under The Grazing Incidence Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majkic, M. D.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.; Galijas, S. M. D.

    2010-07-01

    We elaborated the time-symmetric, two-state vector model to investigate the intermediate stages of the electron capture into the Rydberg states of multiply charged ions interacting with solid surface under the grazing incidence geometry. The neutralization distances for the ions XeZ+ interacting with Al-surface are calculated, for core charges Z ?[5,30]. The corresponding mean neutralization distances are in agreement with the data deduced from the measured kinetic energy gain due to the image acceleration of the ions.

  5. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems PVL Line

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Shearer - Stark State College; Gregory Rush - Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems

    2012-05-01

    In July 2010, Stark State College (SSC), received Grant DE-EE0003229 from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Golden Field Office, for the development of the electrical and control systems, and mechanical commissioning of a unique 20kW scale high-pressure, high temperature, natural gas fueled Stack Block Test System (SBTS). SSC worked closely with subcontractor, Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) over a 13 month period to successfully complete the project activities. This system will be utilized by RRFCS for pre-commercial technology development and training of SSC student interns. In the longer term, when RRFCS is producing commercial products, SSC will utilize the equipment for workforce training. In addition to DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies program funding, RRFCS internal funds, funds from the state of Ohio, and funding from the DOE Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program have been utilized to design, develop and commission this equipment. Construction of the SBTS (mechanical components) was performed under a Grant from the State of Ohio through Ohio's Third Frontier program (Grant TECH 08-053). This Ohio program supported development of a system that uses natural gas as a fuel. Funding was provided under the Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program for modifications required to test on coal synthesis gas. The subject DOE program provided funding for the electrical build, control system development and mechanical commissioning. Performance testing, which includes electrical commissioning, was subsequently performed under the DOE SECA program. Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems is developing a megawatt-scale solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stationary power generation system. This system, based on RRFCS proprietary technology, is fueled with natural gas, and operates at elevated pressure. A critical success factor for development of the full scale system is the capability to

  6. Modeling for CVD of Solid Oxide Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.

    2002-09-18

    Because of its low thermal conductivity, high thermal expansion and high oxygen ion conductivity yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the material of choice for high temperature electrolyte applications. Current coating fabrication methods have their drawbacks, however. Air plasma spray (APS) is a relatively low-cost process and is suitable for large and relatively complex shapes. it is difficult to produce uniform, relatively thin coatings with this process, however, and the coatings do not exhibit the columnar microstructure that is needed for reliable, long-term performance. The electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process does produce the desirable microstructure, however, the capital cost of these systems is very high and the line-of-sight nature of the process limits coating uniformity and the ability to coat large and complex shapes. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process also produces the desirable columnar microstructure and--under proper conditions--can produce uniform coatings over complex shapes. CVD has been used for many materials but is relatively undeveloped for oxides, in general, and for zirconia, in particular. The overall goal of this project--a joint effort of the University of Louisville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)--is to develop the YSZ CVD process for high temperature electrolyte applications. This report describes the modeling effort at the University of Louisville, which supports the experimental work at ORNL. Early work on CVD of zirconia and yttria used metal chlorides, which react with water vapor to form solid oxide. Because of this rapid gas-phase reaction the water generally is formed in-situ using the reverse water-gas-shift reaction or a microwave plasma. Even with these arrangements gas-phase nucleation and powder formation are problems when using these precursors. Recent efforts on CVD of zirconia and YSZ have focused on use of metal-organic precursors (MOCVD). These are more stable in the gas

  7. The TMI Regenerative Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Thomas L.; Ruhl, Robert C.; Petrik, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Energy storage and production in space requires rugged, reliable hardware which minimizes weight, volume, and maintenance while maximizing power output and usable energy storage. Systems generally consist of photovoltaic solar arrays which operate (during sunlight cycles) to provide system power and regenerate fuel (hydrogen) via water electrolysis and (during dark cycles) fuel cells convert hydrogen into electricity. Common configurations use two separate systems (fuel cell and electrolyzer) in conjunction with photovoltaic cells. Reliability, power to weight and power to volume ratios could be greatly improved if both power production (fuel cells) and power storage (electrolysis) functions can be integrated into a single unit. The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) based design integrates fuel cell and electrolyzer functions and potentially simplifies system requirements. The integrated fuel cell/electrolyzer design also utilizes innovative gas storage concepts and operates like a rechargeable 'hydrogen-oxygen battery'. Preliminary research has been completed on improved H2/H20 electrode (SOFC anode/electrolyzer cathode) materials for regenerative fuel cells. Tests have shown improved cell performance in both fuel and electrolysis modes in reversible fuel cell tests. Regenerative fuel cell efficiencies, ratio of power out (fuel cell mode) to power in (electrolyzer mode), improved from 50 percent using conventional electrode materials to over 80 percent. The new materials will allow a single SOFC system to operate as both the electolyzer and fuel cell. Preliminary system designs have also been developed to show the technical feasibility of using the design for space applications requiring high energy storage efficiencies and high specific energy. Small space systems also have potential for dual-use, terrestrial applications.

  8. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    SciTech Connect

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600

  9. Glass/BNNT Composite for Sealing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

    2007-01-01

    A material consisting of a barium calcium aluminosilicate glass reinforced with 4 weight percent of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) has shown promise for use as a sealant in planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs).

  10. Solid oxide fuel cell operable over wide temperature range

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    2001-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  11. Symmetrical, bi-electrode supported solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Thomas L. (Inventor); Sofie, Stephen W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is a symmetrical bi-electrode supported solid oxide fuel cell comprising a sintered monolithic framework having graded pore electrode scaffolds that, upon treatment with metal solutions and heat subsequent to sintering, acquire respective anodic and cathodic catalytic activity. The invention is also a method for making such a solid oxide fuel cell. The graded pore structure of the graded pore electrode scaffolds in achieved by a novel freeze casting for YSZ tape.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell steam reforming power system

    DOEpatents

    Chick, Lawrence A.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Whyatt, Greg A.

    2013-03-12

    The present invention is a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Reforming Power System that utilizes adiabatic reforming of reformate within this system. By utilizing adiabatic reforming of reformate within the system the system operates at a significantly higher efficiency than other Solid Oxide Reforming Power Systems that exist in the prior art. This is because energy is not lost while materials are cooled and reheated, instead the device operates at a higher temperature. This allows efficiencies higher than 65%.

  13. Delivery system for molten salt oxidation of solid waste

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, William A.; Squire, Dwight V.; Robinson, Jeffrey A.; House, Palmer A.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a delivery system for safety injecting solid waste particles, including mixed wastes, into a molten salt bath for destruction by the process of molten salt oxidation. The delivery system includes a feeder system and an injector that allow the solid waste stream to be accurately metered, evenly dispersed in the oxidant gas, and maintained at a temperature below incineration temperature while entering the molten salt reactor.

  14. Materials for Intermediate-Temperature Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilner, John A.; Burriel, Mónica

    2014-07-01

    Solid-oxide fuel cells are devices for the efficient conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy and heat. Research efforts are currently addressed toward the optimization of cells operating at temperatures in the region of 600°C, known as intermediate-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells, for which materials requirements are very stringent. In addition to the requirements of mechanical and chemical compatibility, the materials must show a high degree of oxide ion mobility and electrochemical activity at this low temperature. Here we mainly examine the criteria for the development of two key components of intermediate-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells: the electrolyte and the cathode. We limit the discussion to novel approaches to materials optimization and focus on the fluorite oxide for electrolytes, principally those based on ceria and zirconia, and on perovskites and perovskite-related families in the case of cathodes.

  15. Effects of Humidity on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar; Mahapatra, Manoj K.; Wachsman, E. D.; Liu, Meilin; Gerdes, Kirk R.

    2015-03-17

    This report summarizes results from experimental studies performed by a team of researchers assembled on behalf of the Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program. Team participants employed a variety of techniques to evaluate and mitigate the effects of humidity in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode air streams on cathode chemistry, microstructure, and electrochemical performance.

  16. System for conversion between the boundary representation model and a constructive solid geometry model of an object

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, N.C.; Emery, J.D.; Smith, M.L.

    1985-04-29

    A system converts from the boundary representation of an object to the constructive solid geometry representation thereof. The system converts the boundary representation of the object into elemental atomic geometrical units or I-bodies which are in the shape of stock primitives or regularized intersections of stock primitives. These elemental atomic geometrical units are then represented in symbolic form. The symbolic representations of the elemental atomic geometrical units are then assembled heuristically to form a constructive solid geometry representation of the object usable for manufacturing thereof. Artificial intelligence is used to determine the best constructive solid geometry representation from the boundary representation of the object. Heuristic criteria are adapted to the manufacturing environment for which the device is to be utilized. The surface finish, tolerance, and other information associated with each surface of the boundary representation of the object are mapped onto the constructive solid geometry representation of the object to produce an enhanced solid geometry representation, particularly useful for computer-aided manufacture of the object. 19 figs.

  17. System for conversion between the boundary representation model and a constructive solid geometry model of an object

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Noel C.; Emery, James D.; Smith, Maurice L.

    1988-04-05

    A system converts from the boundary representation of an object to the constructive solid geometry representation thereof. The system converts the boundary representation of the object into elemental atomic geometrical units or I-bodies which are in the shape of stock primitives or regularized intersections of stock primitives. These elemental atomic geometrical units are then represented in symbolic form. The symbolic representations of the elemental atomic geometrical units are then assembled heuristically to form a constructive solid geometry representation of the object usable for manufacturing thereof. Artificial intelligence is used to determine the best constructive solid geometry representation from the boundary representation of the object. Heuristic criteria are adapted to the manufacturing environment for which the device is to be utilized. The surface finish, tolerance, and other information associated with each surface of the boundary representation of the object are mapped onto the constructive solid geometry representation of the object to produce an enhanced solid geometry representation, particularly useful for computer-aided manufacture of the object.

  18. Boundary to Constructive Solid Geometry Mappings: a Focus on 2-D Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of converting boundary representation (B-rep) to constructive solid geometry representation (CSG-rep) (and vice versa) is discussed in two phases. The first phase entails finding a CSG-rep that defines the region bounded by a polygonal profile curve. The second phase utilizes the results of the first phase to find a CSG-rep for many non-polygonal profile curves. A mathematically concise representation of a region bounded by a polygonal is presented. Namely, any polygonal region bounded by an n sided polygon may be represented by a binary tree which has at most n planar halfspaces as leaves. A structure for this representation and an algorithm for calculating is discussed.

  19. Three-dimensional elastic stress and displacement analysis of finite geometry solids containing cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1974-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement distributions in various bodies containing cracks. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. When decoupling the equations and their boundary conditions is not possible, the use of a successive approximation procedure permits the analytical solution of the resulting ordinary differential equations. The results obtained show a considerable potential for using this method in the three-dimensional analysis of finite geometry solids and suggest a possible extension of this technique to nonlinear material behavior.

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW The physics of solid-state neutron detector materials and geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, A. N.

    2010-10-01

    Detection of neutrons, at high total efficiency, with greater resolution in kinetic energy, time and/or real-space position, is fundamental to the advance of subfields within nuclear medicine, high-energy physics, non-proliferation of special nuclear materials, astrophysics, structural biology and chemistry, magnetism and nuclear energy. Clever indirect-conversion geometries, interaction/transport calculations and modern processing methods for silicon and gallium arsenide allow for the realization of moderate- to high-efficiency neutron detectors as a result of low defect concentrations, tuned reaction product ranges, enhanced effective omnidirectional cross sections and reduced electron-hole pair recombination from more physically abrupt and electronically engineered interfaces. Conversely, semiconductors with high neutron cross sections and unique transduction mechanisms capable of achieving very high total efficiency are gaining greater recognition despite the relative immaturity of their growth, lithographic processing and electronic structure understanding. This review focuses on advances and challenges in charged-particle-based device geometries, materials and associated mechanisms for direct and indirect transduction of thermal to fast neutrons within the context of application. Calorimetry- and radioluminescence-based intermediate processes in the solid state are not included.

  1. Electrochemically Deposited Ceria Structures for Advanced Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Evan C.

    As the pursuit towards emissions reduction intensifies with growing interest and nascent technologies, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) remain an illustrious candidate for achieving our goals. Despite myriad advantages, SOFCs are still too costly for widespread deployment, even as unprecedented materials developments have recently emerged. This suggests that, in addition to informed materials selection, the necessary power output--and, thereby, cost-savings--gains must come from the fuel cell architecture. The work presented in this manuscript primarily investigates cathodic electrochemical deposition (CELD) as a scalable micro-/nanoscale fabrication tool for engineering ceria-based components in a SOFC assembly. Also, polymer sphere lithography was utilized to deposit fully connected, yet fully porous anti-dot metal films on yttira-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with specific and knowable geometries, useful for mechanistic studies. Particular attention was given to anode structures, for which anti-dot metal films on YSZ served as composite substrates for subsequent CELD of doped ceria. By tuning the applied potential, a wide range of microstructures from high surface area coatings to planar, thin films was possible. In addition, definitive deposition was shown to occur on the electronically insulating YSZ surfaces, producing quality YSZ|ceria interfaces. These CELD ceria deposits exhibited promising electrochemical activity, as probed by A.C. Impedance Spectroscopy. In an effort to extend its usefulness as a SOFC fabrication tool, the CELD of ceria directly onto common SOFC cathode materials without a metallic phase was developed, as well as templated deposition schemes producing ceria nanowires and inverse opals.

  2. Flow and Geometry Control the Onset of Jamming in Fractures with High Solid-Fraction Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, R.; Elkhoury, J. E.; Shannon, L. J.; Detwiler, R. L.; Morris, J.; Prioul, R.; Desroches, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fluids containing a large fraction of suspended solids are common in the subsurface. Examples include fluids used for environmental remediation, hydraulic fracturing fluids and magma. These fluid-solid mixtures behave as non-Newtonian fluids where interactions between fluid, suspended solids, and pore walls can lead to jamming of the suspended solids. Jamming causes the velocity of the solid to decrease locally to zero causing a rapid decrease in permeability as the fluid is forced to flow through the pore space within the immobilized solid. Here we present results from experiments that quantify the flow of non-Newtonian suspensions in an analog parallel-plate fracture (transparent 15cm x 15cm with ~3-mm aperture) and explore the dependence of jamming on flow conditions, fracture geometry, and the action of gravity. We used guar gum mixed with water (0.75%) as the fluid and added 50% by volume of crushed silica (< 300μm). Flow rates ranged from 0.2ml/min to 6.0ml/min, cell orientation varied from horizontal to vertical (bottom to top) flow and a transducer provided continuous measurement of differential pressure across the cell. A strobed LED panel backlit the cell and a high-resolution CCD camera captured frequent (0.2 Hz) images during all experiments. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) yielded measurements of the evolving velocity field during experiments (see Figure). In the vertical orientation during the initial period of high flow rate, outflow decreased rapidly and the differential pressure increased indicating jamming within the cell. Subsequent efforts to flush solids from the cell suggested that jamming occurred at the inlet of the cell. This was likely due to settling of solids within the flow field indicating that the time scale associated with settling was shorter than the time scale of advection through the cell. In the horizontal orientation, localized jamming occurred at the lowest flow rate in a region near the outlet. This suggests that when

  3. Stack configurations for tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Timothy R.; Trammell, Michael P.; Marasco, Joseph A.

    2010-08-31

    A fuel cell unit includes an array of solid oxide fuel cell tubes having porous metallic exterior surfaces, interior fuel cell layers, and interior surfaces, each of the tubes having at least one open end; and, at least one header in operable communication with the array of solid oxide fuel cell tubes for directing a first reactive gas into contact with the porous metallic exterior surfaces and for directing a second reactive gas into contact with the interior surfaces, the header further including at least one busbar disposed in electrical contact with at least one surface selected from the group consisting of the porous metallic exterior surfaces and the interior surfaces.

  4. Application of Vacuum Deposition Methods to Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, Larry R.; Singh, Prabhakar; Zhou, Xiao Dong

    2006-07-01

    The application of vacuum deposition techniques to the fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell materials and structures are reviewed, focusing on magnetron sputtering, vacuum plasma methods, laser ablation, and electrochemical vapor deposition. A description of each method and examples of use to produce electrolyte, electrode, and/or electrical interconnects are given. Generally high equipment costs and relatively low deposition rates have limited the use of vacuum deposition methods in solid oxide fuel cell manufacture, with a few notable exceptions. Vacuum methods are particularly promising in the fabrication of micro fuel cells, where thin films of high quality and unusual configuration are desired.

  5. Ionic conductors for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, Michael; Bloom, Ira D.; Pullockaran, Jose D.; Myles, Kevin M.

    1993-01-01

    An electrolyte that operates at temperatures ranging from 600.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. is provided. The electrolyte conducts charge ionically as well as electronically. The ionic conductors include molecular framework structures having planes or channels large enough to transport oxides or hydrated protons and having net-positive or net-negative charges. Representative molecular framework structures include substituted aluminum phosphates, orthosilicates, silicoaluminates, cordierites, apatites, sodalites, and hollandites.

  6. Ionic conductors for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.; Bloom, I.D.; Pullockaran, J.D.; Myles, K.M.

    1991-12-31

    An electrolyte that operates at temperatures ranging from 600{degree}C to 800{degree}C is discussed. The electrolyte conducts charge ionically as well as electronically. The ionic conductors include molecular framework structures having planes or channels large enough to transport oxides or hydrated protons and having net-positive or net-negative charges. Representative molecular framework structures include substituted aluminum phosphates, orthosilicates, silicoaluminates, cordierites, apatites, sodalites, and hollandites.

  7. Low temperature ozone oxidation of solid waste surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabity, James A.; Lee, Jeffrey M.

    2015-09-01

    Solid waste management presents a significant challenge to human spaceflight and especially, long-term missions beyond Earth orbit. A six-month mission will generate over 300 kg of solid wastes per crewmember that must be dealt with to eliminate the need for storage and prevent it from becoming a biological hazard to the crew. There are several methods for the treatment of wastes that include oxidation via ozone, incineration, microbial oxidation or pyrolysis and physical methods such as microwave drying and compaction. In recent years, a low temperature oxidation process using ozonated water has been developed for the chemical conversion of organic wastes to CO2 and H2O. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the rate and effectiveness with which ozone oxidized several different waste materials. Increasing the surface area by chopping or shredding the solids into small pieces more than doubled the rate of oxidation. A greater flow of ozone and agitation of the ozonated water system also increased processing rates. Of the materials investigated, plastics have proven the most difficult to oxidize. The processing of plastics above the glass transition temperatures caused the plastics to clump together which reduced the exposed surface area, while processing at lower temperatures reduced surface reaction kinetics.

  8. Drying of solids with irregular geometry: numerical study and application using a three-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, Vera S. O.; da Silva, Wilton Pereira; e Silva, Cleide M. D. P. S.; Rocha, Vicente P. T.; Lima, Antonio G. B.

    2013-05-01

    This article proposes a numerical solution for the diffusion equation applied to solids with arbitrary geometry using non-orthogonal structured grids for the boundary condition of the first kind. A transient three-dimensional mathematical formulation written in boundary fitted coordinates and numerical formalism to discretize the diffusion equation by using the finite volume method, including numerical analysis of the computational solution are presented. To validate the proposed solution, the results obtained in this work were compared with well-known numerical solution available in literature and good agreement was observed. In order to verify the potential of the proposed numerical solution, it was applied to describe mass transfer inside ceramic roof tiles during drying. For that, it was used experimental data of the drying kinetics at the following temperatures: 55.6; 69.7; 82.7 and 98.6 °C. An optimization technique using experimental dataset has been presented to estimation of transport properties. The obtained statistical indicators enable to conclude that the numerical solution satisfactorily describes the drying processes.

  9. Electronic properties of corrugated graphene: the Heisenberg principle and wormhole geometry in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Victor; Saxena, Avadh

    2011-05-01

    Adopting a purely two-dimensional relativistic equation for graphene's carriers contradicts the Heisenberg uncertainty principle since it requires setting the off-the-surface coordinate of a three-dimensional wavefunction to zero. Here we present a theoretical framework for describing graphene's massless relativistic carriers in accordance with this most fundamental of all quantum principles. A gradual confining procedure is used to restrict the dynamics onto a surface and normal to the surface parts, and in the process the embedding of this surface into the three-dimensional world is accounted for. As a result an invariant geometric potential arises in the surface part which scales linearly with the mean curvature and shifts the Fermi energy of the material proportional to bending. Strain induced modification of the electronic properties or 'straintronics' is clearly an important field of study in graphene. This opens an avenue to producing electronic devices: micro- and nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), where the electronic properties are controlled by geometric means and no additional alteration of graphene is necessary. The appearance of this geometric potential also provides us with clues as to how quantum dynamics looks in the curved space-time of general relativity. In this context we explore a two-dimensional cross-section of the wormhole geometry, realized with graphene as a solid state thought experiment. PMID:21474883

  10. Robust volume calculations for Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) components in Monte Carlo transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Millman, D. L.; Griesheimer, D. P.; Nease, B. R.; Snoeyink, J.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we consider a new generalized algorithm for the efficient calculation of component object volumes given their equivalent constructive solid geometry (CSG) definition. The new method relies on domain decomposition to recursively subdivide the original component into smaller pieces with volumes that can be computed analytically or stochastically, if needed. Unlike simpler brute-force approaches, the proposed decomposition scheme is guaranteed to be robust and accurate to within a user-defined tolerance. The new algorithm is also fully general and can handle any valid CSG component definition, without the need for additional input from the user. The new technique has been specifically optimized to calculate volumes of component definitions commonly found in models used for Monte Carlo particle transport simulations for criticality safety and reactor analysis applications. However, the algorithm can be easily extended to any application which uses CSG representations for component objects. The paper provides a complete description of the novel volume calculation algorithm, along with a discussion of the conjectured error bounds on volumes calculated within the method. In addition, numerical results comparing the new algorithm with a standard stochastic volume calculation algorithm are presented for a series of problems spanning a range of representative component sizes and complexities. (authors)

  11. Solid oxide electrochemical cell fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Dollard, Walter J.; Folser, George R.; Pal, Uday B.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1992-01-01

    A method to form an electrochemical cell (12) is characterized by the steps of thermal spraying stabilized zirconia over a doped lanthanum manganite air electrode tube (14) to provide an electrolyte layer (15), coating conductive particles over the electrolyte, pressurizing the outside of the electrolyte layer, feeding halide vapors of yttrium and zirconium to the outside of the electrolyte layer and feeding a source of oxygen to the inside of the electrolyte layer, heating to cause oxygen reaction with the halide vapors to close electrolyte pores if there are any and to form a metal oxide coating on and between the particles and provide a fuel electrode (16).

  12. Solid state potentiometric gaseous oxide sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wachsman, Eric D. (Inventor); Azad, Abdul Majeed (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A solid state electrochemical cell (10a) for measuring the concentration of a component of a gas mixture (12) includes first semiconductor electrode (14) and second semiconductor electrode (16) formed from first and second semiconductor materials, respectively. The materials are selected so as to undergo a change in resistivity upon contacting a gas component, such as CO or NO. An electrolyte (18) is provided in contact with the first and second semiconductor electrodes. A reference cell can be included in contact with the electrolyte. Preferably, a voltage response of the first semiconductor electrode is opposite in slope direction to that of the second semiconductor electrode to produce a voltage response equal to the sum of the absolute values of the control system uses measured pollutant concentrations to direct adjustment of engine combustion conditions.

  13. Modified cermet fuel electrodes for solid oxide electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Spengler, Charles J.

    1991-01-01

    An exterior porous electrode (10), bonded to a solid oxygen ion conducting electrolyte (13) which is in contact with an interior electrode (14), contains coarse metal particles (12) of nickel and/or cobalt, having diameters from 3 micrometers to 35 micrometers, where the coarse particles are coated with a separate, porous, multiphase layer (17) containing fine metal particles of nickel and/or cobalt (18), having diameters from 0.05 micrometers to 1.75 micrometers and conductive oxide (19) selected from cerium oxide, doped cerium oxide, strontium titanate, doped strontium titanate and mixtures thereof.

  14. Method of fabricating a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Horne, Craig R.

    1994-01-01

    In a two-step densifying process of making a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell, a limited number of anode-electrolyte-cathode cells separated by an interconnect layer are formed and partially densified. Subsequently, the partially densified cells are stacked and further densified to form a monolithic array.

  15. Nanofiber Scaffold for Cathode of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi, Mingjia; Mariani, Nicholas; Gemmen, Randall; Gerdes, Kirk; Wu, Nianqiang

    2010-10-01

    A high performance solid oxide fuel cell cathode using the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanofibers scaffold with the infiltrated La1-xSrxMnO3 (LSM) shows an enhanced catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction. Such a cathode offers a continuous path for charge transport and an increased number of triple-phase boundary sites.

  16. Method of fabricating a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Minh, N.Q.; Horne, C.R.

    1994-03-01

    In a two-step densifying process of making a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell, a limited number of anode-electrolyte-cathode cells separated by an interconnect layer are formed and partially densified. Subsequently, the partially densified cells are stacked and further densified to form a monolithic array. 10 figures.

  17. A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method for domains with arbitrary-geometry solid boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos A.; Potami, Raffaele; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method with dynamic virtual particle allocation (SDPD-DV) for modeling and simulation of mesoscopic fluids in wall-bounded domains is presented. The physical domain in SDPD-DV may contain external and internal solid boundaries of arbitrary geometries, periodic inlets and outlets, and the fluid region. The SDPD-DV method is realized with fluid particles, boundary particles, and dynamically allocated virtual particles. The internal or external solid boundaries of the domain can be of arbitrary geometry and are discretized with a surface grid. These boundaries are represented by boundary particles with assigned properties. The fluid domain is discretized with fluid particles of constant mass and variable volume. Conservative and dissipative force models due to virtual particles exerted on a fluid particle in the proximity of a solid boundary supplement the original SDPD formulation. The dynamic virtual particle allocation approach provides the density and the forces due to virtual particles. The integration of the SDPD equations is accomplished with a velocity-Verlet algorithm for the momentum and a Runge-Kutta for the entropy equation. The velocity integrator is supplemented by a bounce-forward algorithm in cases where the virtual particle force model is not able to prevent particle penetration. For the incompressible isothermal systems considered in this work, the pressure of a fluid particle is obtained by an artificial compressibility formulation for liquids and the ideal gas law for gases. The self-diffusion coefficient is obtained by an implementation of the generalized Einstein and the Green-Kubo relations. Field properties are obtained by sampling SDPD-DV outputs on a post-processing grid that allows harnessing the particle information on desired spatiotemporal scales. The SDPD-DV method is verified and validated with simulations in bounded and periodic domains that cover the hydrodynamic and mesoscopic regimes for

  18. A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method for domains with arbitrary-geometry solid boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos A.; Potami, Raffaele; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method with dynamic virtual particle allocation (SDPD-DV) for modeling and simulation of mesoscopic fluids in wall-bounded domains is presented. The physical domain in SDPD-DV may contain external and internal solid boundaries of arbitrary geometries, periodic inlets and outlets, and the fluid region. The SDPD-DV method is realized with fluid particles, boundary particles, and dynamically allocated virtual particles. The internal or external solid boundaries of the domain can be of arbitrary geometry and are discretized with a surface grid. These boundaries are represented by boundary particles with assigned properties. The fluid domain is discretized with fluid particles of constant mass and variable volume. Conservative and dissipative force models due to virtual particles exerted on a fluid particle in the proximity of a solid boundary supplement the original SDPD formulation. The dynamic virtual particle allocation approach provides the density and the forces due to virtual particles. The integration of the SDPD equations is accomplished with a velocity-Verlet algorithm for the momentum and a Runge-Kutta for the entropy equation. The velocity integrator is supplemented by a bounce-forward algorithm in cases where the virtual particle force model is not able to prevent particle penetration. For the incompressible isothermal systems considered in this work, the pressure of a fluid particle is obtained by an artificial compressibility formulation for liquids and the ideal gas law for gases. The self-diffusion coefficient is obtained by an implementation of the generalized Einstein and the Green-Kubo relations. Field properties are obtained by sampling SDPD-DV outputs on a post-processing grid that allows harnessing the particle information on desired spatiotemporal scales. The SDPD-DV method is verified and validated with simulations in bounded and periodic domains that cover the hydrodynamic and mesoscopic regimes for

  19. Oxidation of Haynes 230 alloy in reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cell environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Li; Jian, Pu; Jianzhong, Xiao; Xiaoliang, Qian

    Haynes 230 alloy was exposed to reducing and oxidizing environments at 750 °C for 1000 h, simulating the conditions in a reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The oxidized specimens were characterized in terms of the oxide morphology, composition and crystal structure. The oxide scale in each environment was identified as Cr 2O 3 with the existence of Cr 2MnO 4. Ni remained metallic in the reducing atmosphere, and NiO was detected in the sample exposed to air. The oxide scale is around 1 μm thick after 1000 h of oxidation in both situations. The area specific resistance (ASR) contributed by the oxide scale is expected less than 0.1 Ω cm 2 after 40,000 h of exposure when a parabolic oxide growth rate is assumed, demonstrating the suitability of the interconnect application of this alloy in the reduced temperature SOFCs.

  20. Jet fuel based high pressure solid oxide fuel cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummalla, Mallika (Inventor); Yamanis, Jean (Inventor); Olsommer, Benoit (Inventor); Dardas, Zissis (Inventor); Bayt, Robert (Inventor); Srinivasan, Hari (Inventor); Dasgupta, Arindam (Inventor); Hardin, Larry (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A power system for an aircraft includes a solid oxide fuel cell system which generates electric power for the aircraft and an exhaust stream; and a heat exchanger for transferring heat from the exhaust stream of the solid oxide fuel cell to a heat requiring system or component of the aircraft. The heat can be transferred to fuel for the primary engine of the aircraft. Further, the same fuel can be used to power both the primary engine and the SOFC. A heat exchanger is positioned to cool reformate before feeding to the fuel cell. SOFC exhaust is treated and used as inerting gas. Finally, oxidant to the SOFC can be obtained from the aircraft cabin, or exterior, or both.

  1. Jet Fuel Based High Pressure Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummalla, Mallika (Inventor); Yamanis, Jean (Inventor); Olsommer, Benoit (Inventor); Dardas, Zissis (Inventor); Bayt, Robert (Inventor); Srinivasan, Hari (Inventor); Dasgupta, Arindam (Inventor); Hardin, Larry (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A power system for an aircraft includes a solid oxide fuel cell system which generates electric power for the aircraft and an exhaust stream; and a heat exchanger for transferring heat from the exhaust stream of the solid oxide fuel cell to a heat requiring system or component of the aircraft. The heat can be transferred to fuel for the primary engine of the aircraft. Further, the same fuel can be used to power both the primary engine and the SOFC. A heat exchanger is positioned to cool reformate before feeding to the fuel cell. SOFC exhaust is treated and used as inerting gas. Finally, oxidant to the SOFC can be obtained from the aircraft cabin, or exterior, or both.

  2. Recent anode advances in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chunwen; Stimming, Ulrich

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrochemical reactors that can directly convert the chemical energy of a fuel gas into electrical energy with high efficiency and in an environment-friendly way. The recent trends in the research of solid oxide fuel cells concern the use of available hydrocarbon fuels, such as natural gas. The most commonly used anode material Ni/YSZ cermet exhibits some disadvantages when hydrocarbons were used as fuels. Thus it is necessary to develop alternative anode materials which display mixed conductivity under fuel conditions. This article reviews the recent developments of anode in SOFCs with principal emphasis on the material aspects. In addition, the mechanism and kinetics of fuel oxidation reactions are also addressed. Various processes used for the cost-effective fabrication of anode have also been summarized. Finally, this review will be concluded with personal perspectives on the future research directions of this area.

  3. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for elastic-plastic solids in converging geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ortega, A.; Lombardini, M.; Barton, P. T.; Pullin, D. I.; Meiron, D. I.

    2015-03-01

    for capturing the state of solid and fluid materials close to the origin is achieved by making use of adaptive mesh refinement techniques. Rigid-body rotations contained in the deformation tensor have been shown to have a negative effect on the accuracy of the method in extreme compression conditions and are removed by transforming the deformation tensor into a stretch tensor at each time step. With this methodology, the evolution of the interface can be tracked up to a point at which numerical convergence cannot be achieved due to the inception of numerical Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities caused by slip between materials. From that point, only qualitative conclusions can be extracted from this analysis. The influence of different geometrical parameters, initial conditions, and material properties on the motion of the interface are investigated. Some major differences are found with respect to the better understood fluid-fluid case. For example, increasing the wave number of the interface perturbations leads to a second phase reversal of the interface (i.e., the first phase reversal of the interface naturally occurs due to the initial negative growth-rate of the instability as the shock wave transitions from the high-density material to the low-density one). This phenomenon is caused by the compressive effect of the converging geometry and the low density of the gas with respect to the solid, which allows for the formation of an incipient spike in the center of an already existing bubble. Multiple solid-gas density ratios are also considered. Results show that the motion of the interface asymptotically converges to the solid-vacuum case. When a higher initial density for the gas is considered, the growth rate of interface perturbations decreases and, in some situations, its sign may reverse, as the fluid becomes more dense than the solid due to having higher compressibility. Finally, the influence of the Mach number of the driving shock and the yield stress on the

  4. Functionally Graded Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    YongMan Choi; Meilin Liu

    2006-09-30

    This DOE SECA project focused on both experimental and theoretical understanding of oxygen reduction processes in a porous mixed-conducting cathode in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Elucidation of the detailed oxygen reduction mechanism, especially the rate-limiting step(s), is critical to the development of low-temperature SOFCs (400 C to 700 C) and to cost reduction since much less expensive materials may be used for cell components. However, cell performance at low temperatures is limited primarily by the interfacial polarization resistances, specifically by those associated with oxygen reduction at the cathode, including transport of oxygen gas through the porous cathode, the adsorption of oxygen onto the cathode surface, the reduction and dissociation of the oxygen molecule (O{sub 2}) into the oxygen ion (O{sup 2-}), and the incorporation of the oxygen ion into the electrolyte. In order to most effectively enhance the performance of the cathode at low temperatures, we must understand the mechanism and kinetics of the elementary processes at the interfaces. Under the support of this DOE SECA project, our accomplishments included: (1) Experimental determination of the rate-limiting step in the oxygen reduction mechanism at the cathode using in situ FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, including surface- and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS and TERS). (2) Fabrication and testing of micro-patterned cathodes to compare the relative activity of the TPB to the rest of the cathode surface. (3) Construction of a mathematical model to predict cathode performance based on different geometries and microstructures and analyze the kinetics of oxygen-reduction reactions occurring at charged mixed ionic-electronic conductors (MIECs) using two-dimensional finite volume models with ab initio calculations. (4) Fabrication of cathodes that are graded in composition and microstructure to generate large amounts of active surface area near the cathode/electrolyte interface using a

  5. Novel, benign, solid catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ratnasamy, Paul; Raja, Robert; Srinivas, Darbha

    2005-04-15

    The catalytic properties of two classes of solid catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons in the liquid phase are discussed: (i) microporous solids, encapsulating transition metal complexes in their cavities and (ii) titanosilicate molecular sieves. Copper acetate dimers encapsulated in molecular sieves Y, MCM-22 and VPI-5 use dioxygen to regioselectively ortho-hydroxylate L-tyrosine to L-dopa, phenol to catechol and cresols to the corresponding o-dihydroxy and o-quinone compounds. Monomeric copper phthalocyanine and salen complexes entrapped in zeolite-Y oxidize methane to methanol, toluene to cresols, naphthalene to naphthols, xylene to xylenols and phenol to diphenols. Trimeric mu3-oxo-bridged Co/Mn cluster complexes, encapsulated inside Y-zeolite, oxidize para-xylene, almost quantitatively, to terephthalic acid. In almost all cases, the intrinsic catalytic activity (turnover frequency) of the metal complex is enhanced very significantly, upon encapsulation in the porous solids. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies suggest that the geometric distortions of the complex on encapsulation change the electron density at the metal ion site and its redox behaviour, thereby influencing its catalytic activity and selectivity in oxidation reactions. Titanosilicate molecular sieves can oxidize hydrocarbons using dioxygen when loaded with transition metals like Pd, Au or Ag. The structure of surface Ti ions and the type of oxo-Ti species generated on contact with oxidants depend on several factors including the method of zeolite synthesis, zeolite structure, solvent, temperature and oxidant. Although, similar oxo-Ti species are present on all the titanosilicates, their relative concentrations vary among different structures and determine the product selectivity. PMID:15901549

  6. Specimen geometry effects on graphite/PMR-15 composites during thermo-oxidative aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.; Meyers, A.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted to establish the effects of specimen geometry on the thermo-oxidative stability and the mechanical properties retention of unidirectional Celion 12000 graphite fiber reinforced PMR-15 polyimide composites. Weight loss, flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength are measured at isothermal aging times as long as 1639 hr at a temperature of 316 C for three different specimen geometries. It is found that the three different types of specimen surfaces exhibit different values of weight loss/unit area. The mechanical properties retention is also found to be dependent on geometry for these composites. The interlaminar shear strength decreases significantly over the complete range of aging times. The flexural strength retention starts showing geometric dependency after about 1000 hr of aging at 316C. Weight loss fluxes, associated with the three different types of exposed surfaces, are calculated and used to develop an empirical mathematical model for predicting the weight loss behavior of unidirectional composites of arbitrary geometries. Data are presented comparing experimentally determined weight loss with weight loss values predicted using the empirical model.

  7. Realistic prediction of solid pharmaceutical oxidation products by using a novel forced oxidation system.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Eiji; Tamura, Kousuke; Mizukawa, Kousei; Kano, Kenji

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated a novel solid-state-based forced oxidation system to enable a realistic prediction of pharmaceutical product oxidation, a key consideration in drug development and manufacture. Polysorbate 80 and ferric(III) acetylacetonate were used as an organic hydroperoxide source and a transition metal catalyst, respectively. Homogeneous solutions of target compounds and these reagents were prepared in a mixed organic solvent. The organic solvent was removed rapidly under reduced pressure, and the oxidation of the resulting dried solid was investigated. Analysis of the oxidation products generated in test compounds by this proposed forced oxidation system using HPLC showed a high similarity with those generated during more prolonged naturalistic drug oxidation. The proposed system provided a better predictive performance in prediction of realistic oxidative degradants of the drugs tested than did other established methods. Another advantage of this system was that the generation of undesired products of hydrolysis, solvolysis, and thermolysis was prevented because efficient oxidation was achieved under mild conditions. The results of this study suggest that this system is suitable for a realistic prediction of oxidative degradation of solid pharmaceuticals. PMID:24497072

  8. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE (SECA) SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2003-06-01

    This report summarizes the progress made during the September 2001-March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program''. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate a modular SOFC system that can be configured to create highly efficient, cost-competitive, and environmentally benign power plants tailored to specific markets. When fully developed, the system will meet the efficiency, performance, life, and cost goals for future commercial power plants.

  9. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE (SECA) SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Minh; Jim Powers

    2003-10-01

    This report summarizes the work performed for April 2003--September 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid oxide Fuel Cell Program''. During this reporting period, the conceptual system design activity was completed. The system design, including strategies for startup, normal operation and shutdown, was defined. Sealant and stack materials for the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack were identified which are capable of meeting the thermal cycling and degradation requirements. A cell module was tested which achieved a stable performance of 0.238 W/cm{sup 2} at 95% fuel utilization. The external fuel processor design was completed and fabrication begun. Several other advances were made on various aspects of the SOFC system, which are detailed in this report.

  10. The effect of chromium oxyhydroxide on solid oxide fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.; Cruse, T. A.; Ingram, B. J.; Routbort, J. L.; Wang, S.; Salvador, P. A.; Chen, G.; Carnegie Mellon Univ.; NETL; Ohio Univ.

    2010-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium species like the oxyhydroxide, CrO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}, or hexoxide, CrO{sub 3}, are electrochemically reduced to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in solid oxide fuel cells and adversely affect the cell operating potentials. Using a narrowly focused beam from the Advanced Photon Source, such chromium oxide deposits were unequivocally identified in the active region of the cathode by X-ray diffraction, suggesting that the triple phase boundaries were partially blocked. Under fuel cell operating conditions, the reaction has an equilibrium potential of about 0.9 V and the rate of chromium oxide deposition is therefore dependent on the operating potential of the cell. It becomes diffusion limited after several hours of steady operation. At low operating potentials, lanthanum manganite cathodes begin to be reduced to MnO, which reacts with the chromium oxide to form the MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel.

  11. Are scaling laws on strength of solids related to mechanics or to geometry?

    PubMed

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Pugno, Nicola

    2005-06-01

    One of the largest controversial issues of the materials science community is the interpretation of scaling laws on material strength. In spite of the prevailing view, which considers mechanics as the real cause of such effects, here, we propose a different argument, purely based on geometry. Thus, as happened for relativity, geometry could again hold an unexpected and fundamental role. PMID:15928689

  12. Review on anode material development in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siong @ Mahmud, Lily; Muchtar, Andanastuti; Somalu, Mahendra Rao

    2015-05-01

    New developments in technology require highly efficient, affordable, and green electrical energy. The materials to be used must also be reusable and environment friendly. These characteristics are among the major factors that may lead to the production of new and highly efficient power generation systems. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have become major devices in producing electricity that emphasize the advance usage of material science and technological development. As part of the key elements of SOFCs, anodes have the primary function of stimulating the electrochemical oxidation of fuel. In this review, the progress in developing anode materials for SOFCs is briefly discussed.

  13. Sulfur tolerant composite cermet electrodes for solid oxide electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1987-01-01

    An electrochemical apparatus is made containing an exterior electrode bonded to the exterior of a tubular, solid, oxygen ion conducting electrolyte where the electrolyte is also in contact with an interior electrode, said exterior electrode comprising particles of an electronic conductor contacting the electrolyte, where a ceramic metal oxide coating partially surrounds the particles and is bonded to the electrolyte, and where a coating of an ionic-electronic conductive material is attached to the ceramic metal oxide coating and to the exposed portions of the particles.

  14. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Minh

    2002-03-31

    This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the January 2002 to March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. For this reporting period the following activities have been carried out: {lg_bullet} Conceptual system design trade studies were performed {lg_bullet} System-level performance model was created {lg_bullet} Dynamic control models are being developed {lg_bullet} Mechanical properties of candidate heat exchanger materials were investigated {lg_bullet} SOFC performance mapping as a function of flow rate and pressure was completed

  15. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2004-01-04

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  16. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Minh

    2004-07-04

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the January to June 2004 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  17. Open end protection for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, Paolo R.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Tomlins, Gregory W.; Toms, James M.; Folser, George R.; Schmidt, Douglas S.; Singh, Prabhakar; Hager, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell (40) having a closed end (44) and an open end (42) operates in a fuel cell generator (10) where the fuel cell open end (42) of each fuel cell contains a sleeve (60, 64) fitted over the open end (42), where the sleeve (60, 64) extends beyond the open end (42) of the fuel cell (40) to prevent degradation of the interior air electrode of the fuel cell by fuel gas during operation of the generator (10).

  18. Rigorous Definition of Oxidation States of Ions in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lai; Levchenko, Sergey V.; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2012-04-01

    We present justification and a rigorous procedure for electron partitioning among atoms in extended systems. The method is based on wave-function topology and the modern theory of polarization, rather than charge density partitioning or wave-function projection, and, as such, reformulates the concept of oxidation state without assuming real-space charge transfer between atoms. This formulation provides rigorous electrostatics of finite-extent solids, including films and nanowires.

  19. Finite element analysis of monolithic solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saigal, A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Majumdar, S. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the stress and fracture behavior of a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) currently under joint development by Allied Signal Corporation and Argonne National Laboratory. The MSOFC is an all-ceramic fuel cell capable of high power density and tolerant of a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, making it potentially attractive for stationary utility and mobile transportation systems. The monolithic design eliminates inactive structural supports, increases active surface area, and lowers voltage losses caused by internal resistance.

  20. Finite element analysis of monolithic solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saigal, A.; Majumdar, S.

    1992-04-01

    This paper investigates the stress and fracture behavior of a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) currently under joint development by Allied Signal Corporation and Argonne National Laboratory. The MSOFC is an all-ceramic fuel cell capable of high power density and tolerant of a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, making it potentially attractive for stationary utility and mobile transportation systems. The monolithic design eliminates inactive structural supports, increases active surface area, and lowers voltage losses caused by internal resistance.

  1. Tubular screen electrical connection support for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Tomlins, Gregory W.; Jaszcar, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel assembly is made of fuel cells (16, 16', 18, 24, 24', 26), each having an outer interconnection layer (36) and an outer electrode (28), which are disposed next to each other with rolled, porous, hollow, electrically conducting metal mesh conductors (20, 20') between the fuel cells, connecting the fuel cells at least in series along columns (15, 15') and where there are no metal felt connections between any fuel cells.

  2. Method to fabricate high performance tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Fanglin; Yang, Chenghao; Jin, Chao

    2013-06-18

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a method for fabricating a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The method includes forming an asymmetric porous ceramic tube by using a phase inversion process. The method further includes forming an asymmetric porous ceramic layer on a surface of the asymmetric porous ceramic tube by using a phase inversion process. The tube is co-sintered to form a structure having a first porous layer, a second porous layer, and a dense layer positioned therebetween.

  3. Current status of Westinghouse tubular solid oxide fuel cell program

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W.G.

    1996-04-01

    In the last ten years the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) development program at Westinghouse has evolved from a focus on basic material science to the engineering of fully integrated electric power systems. Our endurance for this cell is 5 to 10 years. To date we have successfully operated at power for over six years. For power plants it is our goal to have operated before the end of this decade a MW class power plant. Progress toward these goals is described.

  4. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    David Deangelis; Rich Depuy; Debashis Dey; Georgia Karvountzi; Nguyen Minh; Max Peter; Faress Rahman; Pavel Sokolov; Deliang Yang

    2004-09-30

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the April to October 2004 reporting period in Task 2.3 (SOFC Scaleup for Hybrid and Fuel Cell Systems) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems for central power generation application based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by natural gas. The main objective of this task is to develop credible scale up strategies for large solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems. System concepts that integrate a SOFC with a gas turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 20 MW. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

  5. Lowering the temperature of solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wachsman, Eric D; Lee, Kang Taek

    2011-11-18

    Fuel cells are uniquely capable of overcoming combustion efficiency limitations (e.g., the Carnot cycle). However, the linking of fuel cells (an energy conversion device) and hydrogen (an energy carrier) has emphasized investment in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells as part of a larger hydrogen economy and thus relegated fuel cells to a future technology. In contrast, solid oxide fuel cells are capable of operating on conventional fuels (as well as hydrogen) today. The main issue for solid oxide fuel cells is high operating temperature (about 800°C) and the resulting materials and cost limitations and operating complexities (e.g., thermal cycling). Recent solid oxide fuel cells results have demonstrated extremely high power densities of about 2 watts per square centimeter at 650°C along with flexible fueling, thus enabling higher efficiency within the current fuel infrastructure. Newly developed, high-conductivity electrolytes and nanostructured electrode designs provide a path for further performance improvement at much lower temperatures, down to ~350°C, thus providing opportunity to transform the way we convert and store energy. PMID:22096189

  6. Energetics of Rare Earth Doped Uranium Oxide Solid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei

    The physical and chemical properties of UO2 nuclear fuels are affected as fission products accumulate during irradiation. The lanthanides, a main group of fission products, form extensive solid solutions with uranium oxide in the fluorite structure. Thermodynamic studies of such solid solutions had been performed to obtain partial molar free energies of oxygen as a function of dopant concentration and temperature; however, direct measurement of formation enthalpies was hampered by the refractory nature of these oxides. In this work, high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry was utilized to study the thermochemistry of various rare earth doped uranium oxide LnxU 1-xO2-0.5x+y (Ln = La, Y, Nd) over a wide range of dopant concentrations and oxygen contents. The sintered solid solutions were carefully characterized to determine their phase purity, chemical composition, and uranium oxidation state, with most of the materials in the oxygen excess regime. The enthalpies of formation of LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y were calculated from the calorimetric data. The oxidation enthalpies of these solid solutions are similar to that of UO2. The formation enthalpies from constituent oxides (LnO1.5, UO2, and UO3) become increasingly negative with addition of dopant cations and appear relatively independent of the uranium oxidation state (oxygen content) when the type and concentration of the dopants are the same. This is valid in the oxygen excess regime; thus an estimation of formation enthalpies of LnxU1-xO2 materials can be made. The formation enthalpies from elements of hyperstoichiometric LnxU1-xO 2-0.5x+y materials obtained from calorimetric measurements are in good agreement with those calculated from free energy data. A direct comparison between the formation enthalpies from calorimetric study and computational research using density functional theory was also performed. The experimental and computational energies of LnxU 1-xO2 (Ln = La, Y, Nd) generally agree within 10 k

  7. Stationary market applications potential of solid oxide and solid polymer fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.N.; Fletcher, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    The UK DTI`s Advanced Fuel Cells Programme currently focuses on two main fuel cell technologies, namely the solid oxide and solid polymer systems (SOFC and SPFC), respectively. The provision of accurate and timely market data is regarded as an important part of the overall programme objectives, such as to assist both Government and industry in their appraisals of the technologies. The present study was therefore commissioned against this background, with a complementary study addressing transportation and mobile applications. The results reported herein relate to the stationary market applications potential of both SOFC and SPFC systems.

  8. Ultra-thin solid oxide fuel cells: Materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerman, Kian

    Solid oxide fuel cells are electrochemical energy conversion devices utilizing solid electrolytes transporting O2- that typically operate in the 800 -- 1000 °C temperature range due to the large activation barrier for ionic transport. Reducing electrolyte thickness or increasing ionic conductivity can enable lower temperature operation for both stationary and portable applications. This thesis is focused on the fabrication of free standing ultrathin (<100 nm) oxide membranes of prototypical O 2- conducting electrolytes, namely Y2O3-doped ZrO2 and Gd2O3-doped CeO2. Fabrication of such membranes requires an understanding of thin plate mechanics coupled with controllable thin film deposition processes. Integration of free standing membranes into proof-of-concept fuel cell devices necessitates ideal electrode assemblies as well as creative processing schemes to experimentally test devices in a high temperature dual environment chamber. We present a simple elastic model to determine stable buckling configurations for free standing oxide membranes. This guides the experimental methodology for Y 2O3-doped ZrO2 film processing, which enables tunable internal stress in the films. Using these criteria, we fabricate robust Y2O3-doped ZrO2 membranes on Si and composite polymeric substrates by semiconductor and micro-machining processes, respectively. Fuel cell devices integrating these membranes with metallic electrodes are demonstrated to operate in the 300 -- 500 °C range, exhibiting record performance at such temperatures. A model combining physical transport of electronic carriers in an insulating film and electrochemical aspects of transport is developed to determine the limits of performance enhancement expected via electrolyte thickness reduction. Free standing oxide heterostructures, i.e. electrolyte membrane and oxide electrodes, are demonstrated. Lastly, using Y2O3-doped ZrO2 and Gd2O 3-doped CeO2, novel electrolyte fabrication schemes are explored to develop oxide

  9. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

    1988-04-26

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  10. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Brian, Riley; Szreders, Bernard E.

    1989-01-01

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  11. Solid oxide fuel cell having a glass composite seal

    DOEpatents

    De Rose, Anthony J.; Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl Jacob

    2013-04-16

    A solid oxide fuel cell stack having a plurality of cassettes and a glass composite seal disposed between the sealing surfaces of adjacent cassettes, thereby joining the cassettes and providing a hermetic seal therebetween. The glass composite seal includes an alkaline earth aluminosilicate (AEAS) glass disposed about a viscous glass such that the AEAS glass retains the viscous glass in a predetermined position between the first and second sealing surfaces. The AEAS glass provides geometric stability to the glass composite seal to maintain the proper distance between the adjacent cassettes while the viscous glass provides for a compliant and self-healing seal. The glass composite seal may include fibers, powders, and/or beads of zirconium oxide, aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), or mixtures thereof, to enhance the desirable properties of the glass composite seal.

  12. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Brian; Szreders, Bernard E.

    1988-04-01

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approx. 1100 to 1300 C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20 and 50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  13. Nondestructive characterization methods for monolithic solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Monolithic solid oxide fuel cells (MSOFCS) represent a potential breakthrough in fuel cell technology, provided that reliable fabrication methods can be developed. Fabrication difficulties arise in several steps of the processing: First is the fabrication of uniform thin (305 {mu}m) single-layer and trilayer green tapes (the trilayer tapes of anode/electrolyte/cathode and anode/interconnect/cathode must have similar coefficients of thermal expansion to sinter uniformly and to have the necessary electrochemical properties); Second is the development of fuel and oxidant channels in which residual stresses are likely to develop in the tapes; Third is the fabrication of a ``complete`` cell for which the bond quality between layers and the quality of the trilayers must be established; and Last, attachment of fuel and oxidant manifolds and verification of seal integrity. Purpose of this report is to assess nondestructive characterization methods that could be developed for application to laboratory, prototype, and full-scale MSOFCs.

  14. Serially connected solid oxide fuel cells having monolithic cores

    DOEpatents

    Herceg, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of cell segments electrically serially connected in the flow direction, each segment consisting of electrolyte walls and interconnect that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageways; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte composite materials is of the order of 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002-0.05 cm thick. Between 2 and 50 cell segments may be connected in series.

  15. Ultrasonic approach for formation of erbium oxide nanoparticles with variable geometries.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Skirtach, André; Gessner, Andre; Kumke, Michael U; Zhang, Wei; Möhwald, Helmuth; Shchukin, Dmitry

    2011-12-01

    Ultrasound (20 kHz, 29 W·cm(-2)) is employed to form three types of erbium oxide nanoparticles in the presence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a template material in water. The nanoparticles are (i) erbium carboxioxide nanoparticles deposited on the external walls of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and Er(2)O(3) in the bulk with (ii) hexagonal and (iii) spherical geometries. Each type of ultrasonically formed nanoparticle reveals Er(3+) photoluminescence from crystal lattice. The main advantage of the erbium carboxioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes is the electromagnetic emission in the visible region, which is new and not examined up to the present date. On the other hand, the photoluminescence of hexagonal erbium oxide nanoparticles is long-lived (μs) and enables the higher energy transition ((4)S(3/2)-(4)I(15/2)), which is not observed for spherical nanoparticles. Our work is unique because it combines for the first time spectroscopy of Er(3+) electronic transitions in the host crystal lattices of nanoparticles with the geometry established by ultrasound in aqueous solution of carbon nanotubes employed as a template material. The work can be of great interest for "green" chemistry synthesis of photoluminescent nanoparticles in water. PMID:22022886

  16. DEGRADATION ISSUES IN SOLID OXIDE CELLS DURING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; V. I. Sharma; B. Yildiz; A. Virkar

    2012-02-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is performing high-temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). The project goals are to address the technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs. This paper provides a summary of various ongoing INL and INL sponsored activities aimed at addressing SOEC degradation. These activities include stack testing, post-test examination, degradation modeling, and a list of issues that need to be addressed in future. Major degradation issues relating to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are relatively better understood than those for SOECs. Some of the degradation mechanisms in SOFCs include contact problems between adjacent cell components, microstructural deterioration (coarsening) of the porous electrodes, and blocking of the reaction sites within the electrodes. Contact problems include delamination of an electrode from the electrolyte, growth of a poorly (electronically) conducting oxide layer between the metallic interconnect plates and the electrodes, and lack of contact between the interconnect and the electrode. INL's test results on high temperature electrolysis (HTE) using solid oxide cells do not provide a clear evidence whether different events lead to similar or drastically different electrochemical degradation mechanisms. Post-test examination of the solid oxide electrolysis cells showed that the hydrogen electrode and interconnect get partially oxidized and become non-conductive. This is most likely caused by the hydrogen stream composition and flow rate during cool down. The oxygen electrode side of the stacks seemed to be responsible for the observed degradation due to large areas of electrode delamination. Based on the oxygen electrode appearance, the degradation of these stacks was largely controlled by the oxygen electrode delamination rate. University of Utah (Virkar) has developed a SOEC model based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems

  17. DEGRADATION ISSUES IN SOLID OXIDE CELLS DURING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; V. I. Sharma; B. Yildiz; A. V. Virkar

    2010-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is performing high-temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). The project goals are to address the technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs. This paper provides a summary of various ongoing INL and INL sponsored activities aimed at addressing SOEC degradation. These activities include stack testing, post-test examination, degradation modeling, and a list of issues that need to be addressed in future. Major degradation issues relating to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are relatively better understood than those for SOECs. Some of the degradation mechanisms in SOFCs include contact problems between adjacent cell components, microstructural deterioration (coarsening) of the porous electrodes, and blocking of the reaction sites within the electrodes. Contact problems include delamination of an electrode from the electrolyte, growth of a poorly (electronically) conducting oxide layer between the metallic interconnect plates and the electrodes, and lack of contact between the interconnect and the electrode. INL’s test results on high temperature electrolysis (HTE) using solid oxide cells do not provide a clear evidence whether different events lead to similar or drastically different electrochemical degradation mechanisms. Post-test examination of the solid oxide electrolysis cells showed that the hydrogen electrode and interconnect get partially oxidized and become non-conductive. This is most likely caused by the hydrogen stream composition and flow rate during cool down. The oxygen electrode side of the stacks seemed to be responsible for the observed degradation due to large areas of electrode delamination. Based on the oxygen electrode appearance, the degradation of these stacks was largely controlled by the oxygen electrode delamination rate. University of Utah (Virkar) has developed a SOEC model based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in

  18. Why solid oxide cells can be reversibly operated in solid oxide electrolysis cell and fuel cell modes?

    PubMed

    Chen, Kongfa; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Ai, Na; Koyama, Michihisa; Jiang, San Ping

    2015-12-14

    High temperature solid oxide cells (SOCs) are attractive for storage and regeneration of renewable energy by operating reversibly in solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) modes. However, the stability of SOCs, particularly the deterioration of the performance of oxygen electrodes in the SOEC operation mode, is the most critical issue in the development of high performance and durable SOCs. In this study, we investigate in detail the electrochemical activity and stability of La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 (LSM) oxygen electrodes in cyclic SOEC and SOFC modes. The results show that the deterioration of LSM oxygen electrodes caused by anodic polarization can be partially or completely recovered by subsequent cathodic polarization. Using in situ assembled LSM electrodes without pre-sintering, we demonstrate that the deteriorated LSM/YSZ interface can be repaired and regenerated by operating the cells under cathodic polarization conditions. This study for the first time establishes the foundation for the development of truly reversible and stable SOCs for hydrogen fuel production and electricity generation in cyclic SOEC and SOFC operation modes. PMID:26548929

  19. Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells: Hafnium-Praseodymium-Indium Oxide System

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.L.; Griffin, C.W.; Weber, W.J.

    1988-06-01

    The HfO/sub 2/-PrO/sub 1.83/-In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system has been studied at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop alternative, highly electrically conducting oxides as electrode and interconnection materials for solid oxide fuel cells. A coprecipitation process was developed for synthesizing single-phase, mixed oxide powders necessary to fabricate powders and dense oxides. A ternary phase diagram was developed, and the phases and structures were related to electrical transport properties. Two new phases, an orthorhombic PrInO/sub 3/ and a rhombohedral Hf/sub 2/In/sub 2/O/sub 7/ phase, were identified. The highest electronic conductivity is related to the presence of a bcc, In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ solid solution (ss) containing HfO/sub 2/ and PrO/sub 1.83/. Compositions containing more than 35 mol % of the In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ ss have electrical conductivities greater than 10/sup /minus/1/ (ohm-cm)/sup /minus/1/, and the two or three phase structures that contain this phase appear to exhibit mixed electronic-ionic conduction. The high electrical conductivities and structures similar to the Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-stabilized ZrO/sub 2/(HfO/sub 2/) electrolyte give these oxides potential for use as cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells. 21 refs.

  20. Dynamics of the Rydberg state population of slow highly charged ions impinging a solid surface at arbitrary collision geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedeljković, N. N.; Majkić, M. D.; Božanić, D. K.; Dojčilović, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the population dynamics of the intermediate Rydberg states of highly charged ions (core charge Z\\gg 1, principal quantum number {n}{{A}}\\gg 1) interacting with solid surfaces at arbitrary collision geometry. The recently developed resonant two-state vector model for the grazing incidence (2012 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 45 215202) is extended to the quasi-resonant case and arbitrary angle of incidence. According to the model, the population probabilities depend both on the projectile parallel and perpendicular velocity components, in a complementary way. A cascade neutralization process for {{{Xe}}}Z+ ions, for Z=15{--}45, interacting with a conductive-surface is considered by taking into account the population dynamics. For an arbitrary collision geometry and given range of ionic velocities, a micro-staircase model for the simultaneous calculation of the kinetic energy gain and the charge state of the ion in front of the surface is proposed. The relevance of the obtained results for the explanation of the formation of nanostructures on solid surfaces by slow highly charged ions for normal incidence geometry is briefly discussed.

  1. The Effects of Geometry and Stability of Solid-state Nanopores on Detecting Single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Rollings, Ryan; Graef, Edward; Walsh, Nathan; Nandivada, Santoshi; Benamara, Mourad

    2014-01-01

    In this work we use a combination of 3D-TEM tomography, energy filtered TEM, single molecule DNA translocation experiments, and numerical modeling to show a more precise relationship between nanopore shape and ionic conductance and show that changes in geometry while in solution can account for most deviations between predicted and measured conductance. We compare the structural stability of Ion Beam Sculpted (IBS), IBS-annealed, and TEM drilled nanopores. We demonstrate that annealing can significantly improve the stability of IBS made pores. Furthermore, the methods developed in this work can be used to predict pore conductance and current drop amplitudes of DNA translocation events for a wide variety of pore geometries. We discuss that chemical dissolution is one mechanism of the geometry change for SiNx nanopores and show that small modification in fabrication procedure can significantly increase the stability of IBS nanopores. PMID:25556317

  2. Scalable nanostructured membranes for solid-oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Masaru; Lai, Bo-Kuai; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2011-05-01

    The use of oxide fuel cells and other solid-state ionic devices in energy applications is limited by their requirement for elevated operating temperatures, typically above 800 °C (ref. 1). Thin-film membranes allow low-temperature operation by reducing the ohmic resistance of the electrolytes. However, although proof-of-concept thin-film devices have been demonstrated, scaling up remains a significant challenge because large-area membranes less than ~100 nm thick are susceptible to mechanical failure. Here, we report that nanoscale yttria-stabilized zirconia membranes with lateral dimensions on the scale of millimetres or centimetres can be made thermomechanically stable by depositing metallic grids on them to function as mechanical supports. We combine such a membrane with a nanostructured dense oxide cathode to make a thin-film solid-oxide fuel cell that can achieve a power density of 155 mW cm-2 at 510 °C. We also report a total power output of more than 20 mW from a single fuel-cell chip. Our large-area membranes could also be relevant to electrochemical energy applications such as gas separation, hydrogen production and permeation membranes.

  3. Electrode Design for Low Temperature Direct-Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Fanglin (Inventor); Zhao, Fei (Inventor); Liu, Qiang (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  4. Electrode design for low temperature direct-hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Fanglin; Zhao, Fei; Liu, Qiang

    2015-10-06

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  5. Solid propellant exhausted aluminum oxide and hydrogen chloride - Environmental considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Winstead, E. L.; Purgold, G. C.; Edahl, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of gaseous hydrogen chloride (HCl) and particulate aluminum oxide (Al2O3) were made during penetrations of five Space Shuttle exhaust clouds and one static ground test firing of a shuttle booster. Instrumented aircraft were used to penetrate exhaust clouds and to measure and/or collect samples of exhaust for subsequent analyses. The focus was on the primary solid rocket motor exhaust products, HCl and Al2O3, from the Space Shuttle's solid boosters. Time-dependent behavior of HCl was determined for the exhaust clouds. Composition, morphology, surface chemistry, and particle size distributions were determined for the exhausted Al2O3. Results determined for the exhaust cloud from the static test firing were complicated by having large amounts of entrained alkaline ground debris (soil) in the lofted cloud. The entrained debris may have contributed to neutralization of in-cloud HCl.

  6. Corner heating in rectangular solid oxide electrochemical cell generators

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Disclosed is an improvement in a solid oxide electrochemical cell generator 1 having a rectangular design with four sides that meet at corners, and containing multiplicity of electrically connected fuel cells 11, where a fuel gas is passed over one side of said cells and an oxygen containing gas is passed into said cells, and said fuel is burned to form heat, electricity, and an exhaust gas. The improvement comprises passing the exhaust gases over the multiplicity of cells 11 in such a way that more of the heat in said exhaust gases flows at the corners of the generator, such as through channels 19.

  7. Dynamic Modeling in Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells Controller Design

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Li, Qinghe; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-06-28

    In this paper, a dynamic model of the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power unit is developed for the purpose of designing a controller to regulate fuel flow rate, fuel temperature, air flow rate, and air temperature to maintain the SOFC stack temperature, fuel utilization rate, and voltage within operation limits. A lumped model is used to consider the thermal dynamics and the electro-chemial dynamics inside an SOFC power unit. The fluid dynamics at the fuel and air inlets are considered by using the in-flow ramp-rates.

  8. Oxygen Production on Mars Using Solid Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.

    1997-01-01

    If oxygen for propulsion and life support needs were to be extracted from martian resources, significant savings in launch mass and costs could be attained for both manned and unmanned missions. In addition to reduced cost the ability to produce oxygen from martian resources would decrease the risks associated with long duration stays on the surface of Mars. One method of producing the oxygen from the carbon dioxide rich atmosphere of Mars involves solid oxide electrolysis. A brief summary of the theory of operation will be presented followed by a schematic description of a Mars oxygen production pland and a discussion of its power consumption characteristics.

  9. Glass Mica Composite Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2005-07-20

    A novel glass-mica composite seal was developed based on the previous concept of ''infiltrated'' mica seals for solid oxide fuel cells. A Ba-Al-Ca silicate sealing glass was mixed with mica flakes to form the glass-mica composite seals. The glass-mica composite seals were tested thermal cycle stability in terms of the high temperature leakage and compressive stresses. Post mortem analyses were used to characterize the fracture and leak path of the glass-mica composite seals.

  10. Thermal imaging of solid oxide cells operating under electrolysis conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, D. J.; Elder, R. H.

    2015-04-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells remain at the forefront of research into electrochemical energy conversion technology. More recent interest has focused on operating in electrolyser mode to convert steam or carbon dioxide into hydrogen or carbon monoxide, respectively. The mechanism of these reactions is not fully understood, particularly when operated in co-electrolysis mode using both steam and CO2. This contribution reports the use of a thermal camera to directly observe changes in the cell temperature during operation, providing a remote, non-contact and highly sensitive method for monitoring an operational cell.

  11. Lanthanum oxide-coated stainless steel for bipolar plates in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jong Seol; Lee, Jun; Hwang, Hae Jin; Whang, Chin Myung; Moon, Ji-Woong; Kim, Do-Hyeong

    Solid oxide fuel cells typically operate at temperatures of about 1000 °C. At these temperatures only ceramic interconnects such as LaCrO 3 can be employed. The development of intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) can potentially bring about reduced manufacturing costs as it makes possible the use of an inexpensive ferritic stainless steel (STS) interconnector. However, the STS suffers from Cr 2O 3 scale formation and a peeling-off phenomenon at the IT-SOFC operating temperature in an oxidizing atmosphere. Application of an oxidation protective coating is an effective means of providing oxidation resistance. In this study, we coated an oxidation protective layer on ferritic stainless steel using a precursor solution prepared from lanthanum nitrate, ethylene glycol, and nitric acid. Heating the precursor solution at 80 °C yielded a spinable solution for coating. A gel film was coated on a STS substrate by a dip coating technique. At the early stage of the heat-treatment, lanthanum-containing oxides such as La 2O 3 and La 2CrO 6 formed, and as the heat-treatment temperature was increased, an oxidation protective perovskite-type LaCrO 3 layer was produced by the reaction between the lanthanum-containing oxide and the Cr 2O 3 scale on the SUS substrate. As the concentration of La-containing precursor solution was increased, the amount of La 2O 3 and La 2CrO 6 phases was gradually increased. The coating layer, which was prepared from a precursor solution of 0.8 M, was composed of LaCrO 3 and small amounts of (Mn,Cr)O 4 spinel. A relatively dense coating layer without pin-holes was obtained by heating the gel coating layer at 1073 K for 2 h. Microstructures and oxidation behavior of the La 2O 3-coated STS444 were investigated.

  12. Spatial Control of Cell-Nanosurface Interactions by Tantalum Oxide Nanodots for Improved Implant Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Udesh; Pan, Hsu An; Lee, Chia Hui; Chu, Ying Hao; Huang, Guewha Steven; Lin, Yan Ren

    2016-01-01

    Nanotopological cues can be exploited to understand the nature of interactions between cells and their microenvironment to generate superior implant geometries. Nanosurface parameters which modulate the cell behavior and characteristics such as focal adhesions, cell morphology are not clearly understood. Here, we studied the role of different nanotopographic dimensions in modulating the cell behavior, characteristics and ultimately the cell fate and accordingly, a methodology to improve implant surface geometry is proposed. Tantalum oxide nanodots of 50, 100nm dot diameter with an inter-dot spacing of 20, 70nm and heights 40, 100nm respectively, were engineered on Silicon substrates. MG63 cells were cultured for 72 hours and the modulation in morphology, focal adhesions, cell extensible area, cell viability, transcription factors and genes responsible for bone protein secretion as a function of the nanodot diameter, inter-dot distance and nanodot height were evaluated. Nanodots of 50nm diameter with a 20nm inter-dot spacing and 40nm height enhanced cell spreading area by 40%, promoted cell viability by 70% and upregulated transcription factors and genes twice as much, as compared to the 100nm nanodots with 70nm inter-dot spacing and 100nm height. Favorable interactions between cells and all dimensions of 50nm nanodot diameter were observed, determined with Scanning electron microscopy and Immunofluorescence staining. Nanodot height played a vital role in controlling the cell fate. Dimensions of nanodot features which triggered a transition in cell characteristics or behavior was also defined through statistical analysis. The findings of this study provide insights in the parameters of nanotopographic features which can vitally control the cell fate and should therefore be taken into account when designing implant geometries. PMID:27362432

  13. Spatial Control of Cell-Nanosurface Interactions by Tantalum Oxide Nanodots for Improved Implant Geometry.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Udesh; Pan, Hsu An; Lee, Chia Hui; Chu, Ying Hao; Huang, Guewha Steven; Lin, Yan Ren; Chen, Wen Liang

    2016-01-01

    Nanotopological cues can be exploited to understand the nature of interactions between cells and their microenvironment to generate superior implant geometries. Nanosurface parameters which modulate the cell behavior and characteristics such as focal adhesions, cell morphology are not clearly understood. Here, we studied the role of different nanotopographic dimensions in modulating the cell behavior, characteristics and ultimately the cell fate and accordingly, a methodology to improve implant surface geometry is proposed. Tantalum oxide nanodots of 50, 100nm dot diameter with an inter-dot spacing of 20, 70nm and heights 40, 100nm respectively, were engineered on Silicon substrates. MG63 cells were cultured for 72 hours and the modulation in morphology, focal adhesions, cell extensible area, cell viability, transcription factors and genes responsible for bone protein secretion as a function of the nanodot diameter, inter-dot distance and nanodot height were evaluated. Nanodots of 50nm diameter with a 20nm inter-dot spacing and 40nm height enhanced cell spreading area by 40%, promoted cell viability by 70% and upregulated transcription factors and genes twice as much, as compared to the 100nm nanodots with 70nm inter-dot spacing and 100nm height. Favorable interactions between cells and all dimensions of 50nm nanodot diameter were observed, determined with Scanning electron microscopy and Immunofluorescence staining. Nanodot height played a vital role in controlling the cell fate. Dimensions of nanodot features which triggered a transition in cell characteristics or behavior was also defined through statistical analysis. The findings of this study provide insights in the parameters of nanotopographic features which can vitally control the cell fate and should therefore be taken into account when designing implant geometries. PMID:27362432

  14. Iron aluminide alloy container for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie Reagan; Singh, Prabhakar; Sikka, Vinod Kumar

    2000-01-01

    A container for fuel cells is made from an iron aluminide alloy. The container alloy preferably includes from about 13 to about 22 weight percent Al, from about 2 to about 8 weight percent Cr, from about 0.1 to about 4 weight percent M selected from Zr and Hf, from about 0.005 to about 0.5 weight percent B or from about 0.001 to about 1 weight percent C, and the balance Fe and incidental impurities. The iron aluminide container alloy is extremely resistant to corrosion and metal loss when exposed to dual reducing and oxidizing atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The alloy is particularly useful for containment vessels for solid oxide fuel cells, as a replacement for stainless steel alloys which are currently used.

  15. Molten-Metal Electrodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, A.; Vohs, J. M.; Gorte, R. J.

    2010-11-03

    Molten In, Pb, and Sb were examined as anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) that operate between 973 and 1173 K. The results for these metals were compared with those reported previously for molten Sn electrodes. Cells were operated under “battery” conditions, with dry He or N2 flow in the anode compartment, to characterize the electrochemical oxidation of the metals at the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-electrolyte interface. In most cases, the open-circuit voltages (OCVs) were close to that based on equilibrium between the metals and their oxides. With Sn and In, the cell impedances increased dramatically at all temperatures after drawing current due to formation of insulating, oxide barriers at the electrolyte interface. Similar results were observed for Pb at 973 and 1073 K, but the impedance remained low even after PbO formation at 1173 K because this is above the melting temperature of PbO. Similarly, the impedances of molten Sb electrodes at 973 K were low and unaffected by current flow because of the low melting temperature of Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The potential of using molten-metal electrodes for direct-carbon fuel cells and for energy-storage systems is discussed.

  16. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL CATHODES: Polarization Mechanisms and Modeling of the Electrochemical Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleig, Jurgen

    2003-08-01

    Several recent experimental and numerical investigations have contributed to the improved understanding of the electrochemical mechanisms taking place at solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes and yielded valuable information on the relationships between alterable parameters (geometry/material) and the cathodic polarization resistance. Efforts to reduce the polarization resistance in SOFCs can benefit from these results, and some important aspects of the corresponding studies are reviewed. Experimental results, particularly measurements using geometrically well-defined Sr-doped LaMnO3 (LSM) cathodes, are discussed. In regard to simulations, the different levels of sophistication used in SOFC electrode modeling studies are summarized and compared. Exemplary simulations of mixed conducting cathodes that show the capabilities and limits of different modeling levels are described.

  17. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Minh

    2006-07-31

    This report summarizes the work performed for Phase I (October 2001 - August 2006) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled 'Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program'. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. During Phase I of the program significant progress has been made in the area of SOFC technology. A high-efficiency low-cost system was designed and supporting technology developed such as fuel processing, controls, thermal management, and power electronics. Phase I culminated in the successful demonstration of a prototype system that achieved a peak efficiency of 41%, a high-volume cost of $724/kW, a peak power of 5.4 kW, and a degradation rate of 1.8% per 500 hours. . An improved prototype system was designed, assembled, and delivered to DOE/NETL at the end of the program. This prototype achieved an extraordinary peak efficiency of 49.6%.

  18. THERMAL AND ELECTROCHEMICAL THREE DIMENSIONAL CFD MODEL OF A PLANAR SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Hawkes; Jim O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Steve Herring; Mehrdad Shahnam

    2005-07-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high-temperature steam electrolysis in a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model represents a single cell, as it would exist in an electrolysis stack. Details of the model geometry are specific to a stack that was fabricated by Ceramatec , Inc. and tested at the Idaho National Laboratory. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT2. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean model results are shown to compare favorably with experimental results obtained from an actual ten-cell stack tested at INL.

  19. CFD Model Of A Planar Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell For Hydrogen Production From Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Grant L. Hawkes; James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

    2005-10-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model hightemperature steam electrolysis in a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model represents a single cell as it would exist in an electrolysis stack. Details of the model geometry are specific to a stack that was fabricated by Ceramatec2, Inc. and tested at the Idaho National Laboratory. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT2. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean model results are shown to compare favorably with experimental results obtained from an actual ten-cell stack tested at INL.

  20. Oxidation behaviour and electrical properties of cobalt/cerium oxide composite coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Møller, Per

    2015-05-01

    This work evaluates the performance of cobalt/cerium oxide (Co/CeO2) composite coatings and pure Co coatings to be used for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnects. The coatings are electroplated on the ferritic stainless steels Crofer 22 APU and Crofer 22H. Coated and uncoated samples are exposed in air at 800 °C for 3000 h and oxidation rates are measured and oxide scale microstructures are investigated. Area-specific resistances (ASR) in air at 850 °C of coated and uncoated samples are also measured. A dual layered oxide scale formed on all coated samples. The outer layer consisted of Co, Mn, Fe and Cr oxide and the inner layer consisted of Cr oxide. The CeO2 was present as discrete particles in the outer oxide layer after exposure. The Cr oxide layer thicknesses and oxidations rates were significantly reduced for Co/CeO2 coated samples compared to for Co coated and uncoated samples. The ASR of all Crofer 22H samples increased significantly faster than of Crofer 22 APU samples which was likely due to the presence of SiO2 in the oxide/metal interface of Crofer 22H.

  1. A metallic interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Diane Mildred

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrochemically converts the chemical energy of reaction into electrical energy. The commercial success of planar, SOFC stack technology has a number of challenges, one of which is the interconnect that electrically and physically connects the cathode of one cell to the anode of an adjacent cell in the SOFC stack and in addition, separates the anodic and cathodic gases. An SOFC stack operating at intermediate temperatures, between 600°C and 800°C, can utilize a metallic alloy as an interconnect material. Since the interconnect of an SOFC stack must operate in both air and fuel environments, the oxidation kinetics, adherence and electronic resistance of the oxide scales formed on commercial alloys were investigated in air and wet hydrogen under thermal cycling conditions to 800°C. The alloy, Haynes 230, exhibited the slowest oxidation kinetics and the lowest area-specific resistance as a function of oxidation time of all the alloys in air at 800°C. However, the area-specific resistance of the oxide scale formed on Haynes 230 in wet hydrogen was unacceptably high after only 500 hours of oxidation, which was attributed to the high resistivity of Cr2O3 in a reducing atmosphere. A study of the electrical conductivity of the minor phase manganese chromite, MnXCr3-XO4, in the oxide scale of Haynes 230, revealed that a composition closer to Mn2CrO4 had significantly higher electrical conductivity than that closer to MnCr 2O4. Haynes 230 was coated with Mn to form a phase closer to the Mn2CrO4 composition for application on the fuel side of the interconnect. U.S. Patent No. 6,054,231 is pending. Although coating a metallic alloy is inexpensive, the stringent economic requirements of SOFC stack technology required an alloy without coating for production applications. As no commercially available alloy, among the 41 alloys investigated, performed to the specifications required, a new alloy was created and designated DME-A2. The oxide scale

  2. A fine organization method of spatial geometry data about three-dimensional geographic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-wen; Xue, Long-li; Wang, Fang; Wang, Ke

    2015-12-01

    With the rise of the wisdom of urban construction, the intelligent city requirements expression to fine the geometric structure of spatial entity, so as to realize the refined analysis of urban geographic information, to achieve the purpose of intelligent management. But the traditional geographic entity geometric data organization method ignores the express geographic entity's internal geometry information,, and can not meet the requirements of the fine analysis. Therefore, it is a problem to be solved that how to make a thorough physical and geometrical data of its spatial geometry. In this paper, we propose a method of organizing the Tetrahedral Network in the geographic entity and combining with hierarchical representation for B-rep model to solve the problem.

  3. Three-dimensional elastic stress and displacement analysis of finite circular geometry solids containing cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.; Kring, J.

    1973-01-01

    A seminumerical method is presented for solving a set of coupled partial differential equations subject to mixed and coupled boundary conditions. The use of this method is illustrated by obtaining solutions for two circular geometry and mixed boundary value problems in three-dimensional elasticity. Stress and displacement distributions are calculated in an axisymmetric, circular bar of finite dimensions containing a penny-shaped crack. Approximate results for an annular plate containing internal surface cracks are also presented.

  4. LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Haberman, Ben; Martinez-Baca, Carlos; Rush, Greg

    2013-05-31

    This report presents a summary of the work performed by LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. during the project LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development (DOE Award Number: DE-FE0000773) which commenced on October 1, 2009 and was completed on March 31, 2013. The aim of this project is for LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (formerly known as Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc.) (LGFCS) to develop a multi-physics solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) computer code (MPC) for performance calculations of the LGFCS fuel cell structure to support fuel cell product design and development. A summary of the initial stages of the project is provided which describes the MPC requirements that were developed and the selection of a candidate code, STAR-CCM+ (CD-adapco). This is followed by a detailed description of the subsequent work program including code enhancement and model verification and validation activities. Details of the code enhancements that were implemented to facilitate MPC SOFC simulations are provided along with a description of the models that were built using the MPC and validated against experimental data. The modeling work described in this report represents a level of calculation detail that has not been previously available within LGFCS.

  5. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Alternative and Renewable Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoxing; Quan, Wenying; Xiao, Jing; Peduzzi, Emanuela; Fujii, Mamoru; Sun, Funxia; Shalaby, Cigdem; Li, Yan; Xie, Chao; Ma, Xiaoliang; Johnson, David; Lee, Jeong; Fedkin, Mark; LaBarbera, Mark; Das, Debanjan; Thompson, David; Lvov, Serguei; Song, Chunshan

    2014-09-30

    This DOE project at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) initially involved Siemens Energy, Inc. to (1) develop new fuel processing approaches for using selected alternative and renewable fuels – anaerobic digester gas (ADG) and commercial diesel fuel (with 15 ppm sulfur) – in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generation systems; and (2) conduct integrated fuel processor – SOFC system tests to evaluate the performance of the fuel processors and overall systems. Siemens Energy Inc. was to provide SOFC system to Penn State for testing. The Siemens work was carried out at Siemens Energy Inc. in Pittsburgh, PA. The unexpected restructuring in Siemens organization, however, led to the elimination of the Siemens Stationary Fuel Cell Division within the company. Unfortunately, this led to the Siemens subcontract with Penn State ending on September 23rd, 2010. SOFC system was never delivered to Penn State. With the assistance of NETL project manager, the Penn State team has since developed a collaborative research with Delphi as the new subcontractor and this work involved the testing of a stack of planar solid oxide fuel cells from Delphi.

  6. Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Mitlitsky; Sara Mulhauser; David Chien; Deepak Shukla; David Weingaertner

    2009-11-14

    The Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (PSOFC) project demonstrated the technical viability of pre-commercial PSOFC technology at the County 911 Communications headquarters, as well as the input fuel flexibility of the PSOFC. PSOFC operation was demonstrated on natural gas and denatured ethanol. The Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (PSOFC) project goals were to acquire, site, and demonstrate the technical viability of a pre-commercial PSOFC technology at the County 911 Communications headquarters. Additional goals included educating local permit approval authorities, and other governmental entities about PSOFC technology, existing fuel cell standards and specific code requirements. The project demonstrated the Bloom Energy (BE) PSOFC technology in grid parallel mode, delivering a minimum 15 kW over 8760 operational hours. The PSOFC system demonstrated greater than 81% electricity availability and 41% electrical efficiency (LHV net AC), providing reliable, stable power to a critical, sensitive 911 communications system that serves geographical boundaries of the entire Santa Clara County. The project also demonstrated input fuel flexibility. BE developed and demonstrated the capability to run its prototype PSOFC system on ethanol. BE designed the hardware necessary to deliver ethanol into its existing PSOFC system. Operational parameters were determined for running the system on ethanol, natural gas (NG), and a combination of both. Required modeling was performed to determine viable operational regimes and regimes where coking could occur.

  7. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2003-07-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC during the January 2003 to June 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. This report summarizes the results obtained to date on: System performance analysis and model optimization; Reliability and cost model development; System control including dynamic model development; Heat exchanger material tests and life analysis; Pressurized SOFC evaluation; and Pre-baseline system definition for coal gasification fuel cell system concept.

  8. Compressive Mica Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2006-08-01

    Sealing technology is currently considered a top priority task for planar solid oxide fuel cell stack development. Compressive mica seals are among the major candidates for sealing materials due to their thermal, chemical, and electrical properties. In this paper, a comprehensive study of mica seals will be presented. Two natural micas, Muscovite and Phlogopite, were investigated in either a monolithic single crystal sheet form or a paper form composed of discrete mica flakes. A ''hybrid'' mica seal, developed after identification of the major leak paths in compressive mica seals, demonstrated leak rates which were hundreds to thousands times lower than leak rates for conventional mica seals. The hybrid mica seals were further modified by infiltration with wetting materials; these ''infiltrated'' micas showed excellent thermal cycle stability with very low leak rates (10-3 sccm/cm). The micas were also subjected to studies to evaluate thermal stability in a reducing environment as well as the effect of compressive stresses on leak rates. In addition, long-term open circuit voltage measurements versus thermal cycling showed constant voltages over 1000 cycles. The comprehensive study clearly demonstrated the potential of compressive mica seals as sealing candidates for solid oxide fuel cells.

  9. Air electrode composition for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.; Ruka, R.J.; Singhal, S.C.

    1999-08-03

    An air electrode composition for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The air electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO{sub 3}. The A-site of the air electrode composition comprises a mixed lanthanide in combination with rare earth and alkaline earth dopants. The B-site of the composition comprises Mn in combination with dopants such as Mg, Al, Cr and Ni. The mixed lanthanide comprises La, Ce, Pr and, optionally, Nd. The rare earth A-site dopants preferably comprise La, Nd or a combination thereof, while the alkaline earth A-site dopant preferably comprises Ca. The use of a mixed lanthanide substantially reduces raw material costs in comparison with compositions made from high purity lanthanum starting materials. The amount of the A-site and B-site dopants is controlled in order to provide an air electrode composition having a coefficient of thermal expansion which closely matches that of the other components of the solid oxide fuel cell. 3 figs.

  10. Air electrode composition for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    An air electrode composition for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The air electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO.sub.3. The A-site of the air electrode composition comprises a mixed lanthanide in combination with rare earth and alkaline earth dopants. The B-site of the composition comprises Mn in combination with dopants such as Mg, Al, Cr and Ni. The mixed lanthanide comprises La, Ce, Pr and, optionally, Nd. The rare earth A-site dopants preferably comprise La, Nd or a combination thereof, while the alkaline earth A-site dopant preferably comprises Ca. The use of a mixed lanthanide substantially reduces raw material costs in comparison with compositions made from high purity lanthanum starting materials. The amount of the A-site and B-site dopants is controlled in order to provide an air electrode composition having a coefficient of thermal expansion which closely matches that of the other components of the solid oxide fuel cell.

  11. Effect of Substrate Thickness on Oxide Scale Spallation for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the effect of the ferritic substrate's thickness on the delamination/spallation of the oxide scale was investigated experimentally and numerically. At the high-temperature oxidation environment of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a combination of growth stress with thermal stresses may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation during SOFC stack cooling, even leading to serious degradation of cell performance. The growth stress is induced by the growth of the oxide scale on the scale/substrate interface, and thermal stress is induced by a mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide scale and the substrate. The numerical results show that the interfacial shear stresses, which are the driving force of scale delamination between the oxide scale and the ferritic substrate, increase with the growth of the oxide scale and also with the thickness of the ferritic substrate; i.e., the thick ferritic substrate can easily lead to scale delamination and spallation. Experimental observation confirmed the predicted results of the delamination and spallation of the oxide scale on the ferritic substrate.

  12. High temperature seals for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parihar, Shailendra S.

    Solid Oxide Fuel cells (SOFCs) represent a clean and efficient alternative to existing methods of energy production. But, they need hermetic seals to prevent fuel-oxidant mixing within the stack. Glasses are attractive options for fabrication of these high temperature seals but suffer from their inherent brittleness and tend to crack during thermal cycling. In this study, an innovative concept of self-healing glass seals is developed to solve the problem of cracking of glasses in a SOFC seal. Rationale behind this concept is that a glass of suitable viscosity characteristics can flow and heal cracks at SOFC operating temperatures and thus can provide seals which can self-repair. A novel method, based on in-situ video imaging of cracks on the glass surface during high temperature treatment is developed and used to select and evaluate the suitability of different glasses for making self-healing seals. Promising glasses are studied experimentally to determine kinetics of healing of Vickers indented cracks at various temperatures. In addition, the effect of crystallization of glass on its healing kinetics is studied. A model is developed for crack healing behavior and is used to validate the experimental data. Studies on Cracks healing and crystallization of glasses showed that glasses with no crystallization tendency show fast crack healing response, whereas glasses which crystallize display sluggish healing. A glass displaying fast healing kinetics and good stability against crystallization is used to fabricate self healing glass seals for SOFCs. Seals fabricated using this glass not only remained hermetic but also maintained their self i healing ability for as long as 3000 hours at 800°C and 300 thermal cycles between room temperature and 800°C. These results clearly indicated that self-healing glasses are promising candidates for SOFC seals. Key words. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, Glass Seals, Self-Healing Glasses, Seal Leak Testing.

  13. Versatile Side-Illumination Geometry for Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy at Solid/Liquid Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Martín Sabanés, Natalia; Driessen, Leonie M A; Domke, Katrin F

    2016-07-19

    In situ characterization of surfaces with tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) provides chemical and topographic information with high spatial resolution and submonolayer chemical sensitivity. To further the versatility of the TERS approach toward more complex systems such as biological membranes or energy conversion devices, adaptation of the technique to solid/liquid working conditions is essential. Here, we present a home-built side-illumination TERS setup design based on a commercial scanning tunneling microscope (STM) as a versatile, cost-efficient solution for TERS at solid/liquid interfaces. Interestingly, the results obtained from showcase resonant dye and nonresonant thiophenol monolayers adsorbed on Au single crystals suggest that excitation beam aberrations due to the presence of the aqueous phase are small enough not to limit TER signal detection. The STM parameters are found to play a crucial role for solid/liquid TERS sensitivity. Raman enhancement factors of 10(5) at μW laser power demonstrate the great potential the presented experimental configuration holds for solid/liquid interfacial spectroscopic studies. PMID:27299508

  14. Ablation and geometry change study of solid armature in a railgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya-Dong; Ruan, Jiang-Jun; Hu, Yuan-Chao; Gong, Ruo-Han; Wen, Wu

    2013-08-01

    Armature plays an important role in the electromagnetic launch process. Due to the skin effect, the current density distribution is neither uniform on the rail, nor on the armature. High current density centralization in one part could lead to a partial high temperature and make the armature material melt down and be ablated, especially at low velocity. In this paper we try to change the geometry of a Cshaped armature to improve the current density distribution and reduce the ablation. Four variants of C-shaped armatures are designed to study the specific features, including a conventional C-shaped armature (CCA), a rounded leading edge C-shaped armature (LCA), a rounded trailing edge C-shaped armature (TCA), and a rounded incorporate edge C-shaped armature (ICA). A novel low-speed experiment is constructed and tested. The armatures are ablated and recovered to compare the improved effects. Then finite element simulations according to the experimental results are performed to further analyze the experimental results. It is proved that the current density and hence the temperature distribution can be immensely improved by simply changing the armature geometry. LCA and ICA show that the erosion is more uniform on the contact surface due to the rounded leading edge. The curved trailing edge could improve the uniformity of the current on the interface. ICA which combines the effects of LCA and TCA is the best option in the four armatures. How much the leading edge and the trailing edge should be curved involves the geometry of CCA and the posture of the interface on the rail. A saddle shape is a good option to improve the current density and temperature distribution in the throat. Erosion mechanism is analyzed finally. The experiments and simulations support the erosion and transition mechanism. A detailed description of the experiments and simulations is also presented in this paper.

  15. Modeling of thermal expansion coefficient of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, F.; Maghsoudipour, A.; Alizadeh, M.; Khakpour, Z.; Javaheri, M.

    2015-09-01

    Artificial intelligence models have the capacity to eliminate the need for expensive experimental investigation in various areas of manufacturing processes, including the material science. This study investigates the applicability of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) approach for modeling the performance parameters of thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode. Oxides (Ln = La, Nd, Sm and M = Fe, Ni, Mn) have been prepared and characterized to study the influence of the different cations on TEC. Experimental results have shown TEC decreases favorably with substitution of Nd3+ and Mn3+ ions in the lattice. Structural parameters of compounds have been determined by X-ray diffraction, and field emission scanning electron microscopy has been used for the morphological study. Comparison results indicated that the ANFIS technique could be employed successfully in modeling thermal expansion coefficient of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode, and considerable savings in terms of cost and time could be obtained by using ANFIS technique.

  16. Fuel oxidation efficiencies and exhaust composition in solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Pomfret, Michael B; Demircan, Oktay; Sukeshini, A Mary; Walker, Robert A

    2006-09-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrochemical devices that rely on ion migration through a solid-state electrolyte to oxidize fuel and produce electricity. The present study employs Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to quantify the exhaust of an SOFC operating with fuel flows of methane over Ni/YSZ cermet anodes and butane over Ni/YSZ and Cu/CeO2/YSZ cermet anodes. Data show that hydrocarbon fuels can participate in a variety of different reactions including direct electrochemical oxidation, various reforming processes, and surface-catalyzed carbon deposition. These findings have direct consequences for assessing the environmental impact of SOFCs in terms of the exhaust discharged from devices operating with common hydrocarbon fuel feeds. In the work presented below, a measure of fuel oxidation efficiency is found by comparing the partial pressure of CO2 (P(CO2)) in the SOFC exhaust to the partial pressure of CO (P(CO)). The fuel anode combination with the largest P(CO2)/P(CO) ratio is the C4H10 over Cu/CeO2 combination (0.628 +/- 0.016). The CH4 over Ni cell type has the second highest ratio (0.486 +/- 0.023). The C4H10 over Ni cell type gives a ratio of 0.224 +/- 0.001. Attempts to balance the carbon content of the fuel feed and exhaust lead to predictions of SOFC fuel oxidation mechanisms. PMID:16999142

  17. Strength of an electrolyte supported solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischhauer, Felix; Bermejo, Raul; Danzer, Robert; Mai, Andreas; Graule, Thomas; Kuebler, Jakob

    2015-11-01

    For the proper function of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) their structural integrity must be maintained during their whole lifetime. Any cell fracture would cause leakage and partial oxidization of the anode, leading to a reduced performance, if not catastrophic failure of the whole stack. In this study, the mechanical strength of a state of the art SOFC, developed and produced by Hexis AG/Switzerland, was investigated with respect to the influence of temperature and ageing, whilst for the anode side of the cell the strength was measured under reducing and oxidizing atmospheres. Ball-on-3-Ball bending strength tests and fractography conducted on anode and cathode half-cells revealed the underlying mechanisms, which lead to cell fracture. They were found to be different for the cathode and the anode side and that they change with temperature and ageing. Both anode and cathode sides exhibit the lowest strength at T = 850 °C, which is greatly reduced to the initial strength of the bare electrolyte. This reduction is the consequence of the formation of cracks in the electrode layer which either directly penetrate into the electrolyte (anode side) or locally increase the stress intensity level of pre-existing flaws of the electrolytes at the interface (cathode side).

  18. Serially connected solid oxide fuel cells having monolithic cores

    DOEpatents

    Herceg, J.E.

    1985-05-20

    Disclosed is a solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output. The cell core has an array of cell segments electrically serially connected in the flow direction, each segment consisting of electrolyte walls and interconnect that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageways; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte composite materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick. Between 2 and 50 cell segments may be connected in series.

  19. Direct oxidation of waste vegetable oil in solid-oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. F.; Kumar, R.; Thakur, S. T.; Rudnick, L. R.; Schobert, H.; Lvov, S. N.

    Solid-oxide fuel cells with ceria, ceria-Cu, and ceria-Rh anode were demonstrated to generate stable electric power with waste vegetable oil through direct oxidation of the fuel. The only pre-treatment to the fuel was a filtration to remove particulates. The performance of the fuel cell was stable over 100 h for the waste vegetable oil without dilution. The generated power was up to 0.25 W cm -2 for ceria-Rh fuel cell. This compares favorably with previously studied hydrocarbon fuels including jet fuels and Pennsylvania crude oil.

  20. Extension of the Test-Area methodology for calculating solid-fluid interfacial tensions in cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Felipe J.; Mendiboure, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    We extend the well-known Test-Area methodology of Gloor et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 134703 (2005)], 10.1063/1.2038827, originally proposed to evaluate the surface tension of planar fluid-fluid interfaces along a computer simulation in the canonical ensemble, to deal with the solid-fluid interfacial tension of systems adsorbed on cylindrical pores. The common method used to evaluate the solid-fluid interfacial tension invokes the mechanical relation in terms of the tangential and normal components of the pressure tensor relative to the interface. Unfortunately, this procedure is difficult to implement in the case of cylindrical geometry, and particularly complex in case of nonspherical molecules. Following the original work of Gloor et al., we perform free-energy perturbations due to virtual changes in the solid-fluid surface. In this particular case, the radius and length of the cylindrical pore are varied to ensure constant-volume virtual changes of the solid-fluid surface area along the simulation. We apply the modified methodology for determining the interfacial tension of a system of spherical Lennard-Jones molecules adsorbed inside cylindrical pores that interact with fluid molecules through the generalized 10-4-3 Steele potential recently proposed by Siderius and Gelb [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 084703 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3626804. We analyze the effect of pore diameter, density of adsorbed molecules, and fluid-fluid cutoff distance of the Lennard-Jones intermolecular potential on the solid-fluid interfacial tension. This extension, as the original Test-Area formulation, offers clear advantages over the classical mechanical route of computational efficiency, easy of implementation, and generality.

  1. In situ studies of fuel oxidation in solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Pomfret, Michael B; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C; Walker, Robert A

    2007-03-15

    Existing electrochemical experiments and models of fuel oxidation postulate about the importance of different oxidation pathways and relative fuel conversion efficiencies, but specific information is often lacking. Experiments described below present the first direct, in situ measurements of relevant chemical species formed on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cermet anodes operating with both butane and CO fuel feeds. Raman spectroscopy is used to acquire vibrational spectra from SOFC anodes at 715 degrees C during operation. Both C4H10 and CO form graphitic intermediates. In the limit of a large oxide flux, excess butane forms ordered graphite but only transiently. At higher cell potentials (e.g., less current being drawn) ordered and disordered graphite form on the Ni cermet anode following exposure to butane, and under open circuit voltage (OCV) conditions the graphite persists indefinitely. The chemistry of CO oxidation is such that ordered graphite and a Ni-COO intermediate form only at intermediate cell potentials. Concurrent voltammetry studies show that the formation of graphite with butane at OCV leads first to decreased cell performance after exposure to 25 cm3 butane, then recovered performance after 75 cm3. CO voltammetry data show that at lower potentials the oxide flux through the YSZ electrolyte is sufficient to oxidize the Ni in the anode especially near the interface with the electrolyte. PMID:17295449

  2. Molten metal electrodes in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadekar, Ashay Dileep

    Molten metal electrodes in solid oxide fuel cells are electrochemically characterized for their possible use in direct carbon oxidation and energy storage. The cells were operated in the battery mode at 973 K, without added fuel, in order to understand the oxidation characteristics of Sb alloys as anodes at electrolyte interfaces. The cells using 50-mol% In-Sb and Sn-Sb mixtures exhibited open-circuit voltages (OCV) of 1.0 and 0.93 V, values similar to those of cells with pure In and Sn anodes respectively, and insulating In2O3 and SnO2 layers formed at the electrolyte interface. The 50-mol% Sb-Bi cell had an OCV of 0.73 V initially, close to that with pure Sb anode. The OCV remained constant until all of the Sb had been oxidized, after which it dropped to 0.43 V, similar to the value for pure Bi. SEM analysis of the spent cell showed two distinct phases, with metallic Bi at the bottom and Sb2O3 at the top. The cell with 50-mol% Sb-Pb anode exhibited an OCV that changed continuously with conversion, from 0.73 V initially to 0.67 V following the addition of charge equivalent to oxidation of 120% the Sb. The total cell impedance remained low for this entire period. EDS measurements on the sectioned Sb-Pb cell suggested formation of a mixed oxide of Pb and Sb. An energy-storage concept using molten Sb as the fuel in a reversible solid-oxide electrochemical cell was tested using a button cell with a Sc-stabilized zirconia electrolyte at 973 K, by measuring the impedances under fuel-cell and electrolyzer conditions for a range of stirred Sb-Sb2O 3 compositions. The Sb-Sb2O3 electrode impedances were found to be on the order of 0.15 ohm.cm2 for both fuel-cell and electrolyzer conditions, for compositions up to 30% Sb and 70% Sb2O3. The OCVs were 0.75 V, independent of conversion. The use of molten neat Ag and alloyed Ag-Sb for direct-carbon anodes in SOFCs has been examined at 1273 K. For Ag, an OCV typical of that expected for carbon oxidation, 1.12 V, was observed when

  3. Metal Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    S. Elangovan

    2006-04-01

    Interconnect development is identified by the US Department of energy as a key technical area requiring focused research to meet the performance and cost goals under the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance initiative. In the Phase I SECA Core Technology Program, Ceramatec investigated a commercial ferritic stainless steel composition for oxidation resistance properties by measuring the weight gain when exposed to air at the fuel cell operating temperature. A pre-treatment process that results in a dense, adherent scale was found to reduce the oxide scale growth rate significantly. A process for coating the surface of the alloy in order to reduce the in-plane resistance and potentially inhibit chromium oxide evaporation was also identified. The combination of treatments provided a very low resistance through the scale. The resistance measured was as low as 10 milliohm-cm2 at 750 C in air. The oxide scale was also found to be stable in humidified air at 750 C. The resistance value was stable over several thermal cycles. A similar treatment and coating for the fuel side of the interconnect also showed an exceptionally low resistance of one milliohm-cm2 in humidified hydrogen at 750 c, and was stable through multiple thermal cycles. Measurement of interconnect resistance when it was exposed to both air and humidified hydrogen on opposite sides also showed low, stable resistance after additional modification to the pre-treatment process. Resistance stacks, using an interconnect stack with realistic gas flows, also provided favorable results. Chromium evaporation issue however requires testing of fuel stacks and was outside of the scope of this project. based on results to-date, the alloy selection and the treatment processes appear to be well suited for SOFC interconnect application.

  4. Two-Dimensional Iron Tungstate: A Ternary Oxide Layer With Honeycomb Geometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The exceptional physical properties of graphene have sparked tremendous interests toward two-dimensional (2D) materials with honeycomb structure. We report here the successful fabrication of 2D iron tungstate (FeWOx) layers with honeycomb geometry on a Pt(111) surface, using the solid-state reaction of (WO3)3 clusters with a FeO(111) monolayer on Pt(111). The formation process and the atomic structure of two commensurate FeWOx phases, with (2 × 2) and (6 × 6) periodicities, have been characterized experimentally by combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and understood theoretically by density functional theory (DFT) modeling. The thermodynamically most stable (2 × 2) phase has a formal FeWO3 stoichiometry and corresponds to a buckled Fe2+/W4+ layer arranged in a honeycomb lattice, terminated by oxygen atoms in Fe–W bridging positions. This 2D FeWO3 layer has a novel structure and stoichiometry and has no analogues to known bulk iron tungstate phases. It is theoretically predicted to exhibit a ferromagnetic electronic ground state with a Curie temperature of 95 K, as opposed to the antiferromagnetic behavior of bulk FeWO4 materials. PMID:27110319

  5. Interconnects for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenhua

    Presently, one of the principal goals of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) research is to reduce the stack operating temperature to between 600 and 800°C. However, one of the principal technological barriers is the non-availability of a suitable material satisfying all of the stability requirements for the interconnect. In this work two approaches for intermediate temperature SOFC interconnects have been explored. The first approach comprises an interconnect consisting of a bi-layer structure, a p-type oxide (La0.96Sr0.08MnO 2.001/LSM) layer exposed to a cathodic environment, and an n-type oxide (Y0.08Sr0.88Ti0.95Al0.05O 3-delta/YSTA) layer exposed to anodic conditions. Theoretical analysis based on the bi-layer structure has established design criteria to implement this approach. The analysis shows that the interfacial oxygen partial pressure, which determines the interconnect stability, is independent of the electronic conductivities of both layers but dependent on the oxygen ion layer interconnects, the oxygen ion conductivities of LSM and YSTA were measured as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Based on the measured data, it has been determined that if the thickness of YSTA layer is around 0.1cm, the thickness of LSM layer should be around 0.6 mum in order to maintain the stability of LSM. In a second approach, a less expensive stainless steel interconnect has been studied. However, one of the major concerns associated with the use of metallic interconnects is the development of a semi-conducting or insulating oxide scale and chromium volatility during extended exposure to the SOFC operating environment. Dense and well adhered Mn-Cu spinet oxide coatings were successfully deposited on stainless steel by an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique. It was found that the Mn-Cu-O coating significantly reduced the oxidation rate of the stainless steel and the volatility of chromium. The area specific resistance (ASR) of coated Crofer 22 APU is

  6. AlliedSignal solid oxide fuel cell technology

    SciTech Connect

    Minh, N.; Barr, K.; Kelly, P.; Montgomery, K.

    1996-12-31

    AlliedSignal has been developing high-performance, lightweight solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology for a broad spectrum of electric power generation applications. This technology is well suited for use in a variety of power systems, ranging from commercial cogeneration to military mobile power sources. The AlliedSignal SOFC is based on stacking high-performance thin-electrolyte cells with lightweight metallic interconnect assemblies to form a compact structure. The fuel cell can be operated at reduced temperatures (600{degrees} to 800{degrees}C). SOFC stacks based on this design has the potential of producing 1 kW/kg and 1 ML. This paper summarizes the technical status of the design, manufacture, and operation of AlliedSignal SOFCs.

  7. Wet air oxidation of solid waste made of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Krisner, E.; Ambrosio, M.; Massiani, C.

    2000-03-01

    Wet air oxidation was attempted on synthetic (mixture of plastics of various compositions) and natural (cellulose substances) solid polymers. The temperature was maintained at 270 C and the oxygen pressure varied from 0 to 2 MPa (from understoichiometric conditions to oxygen excess). No valorizable compounds were found, even in runs carried out under an oxygen deficit. Suitable conditions for the total destruction of the initial polymers were temperatures above 270 C, an excess of oxygen, and a residence time of less than 1 h. Only such degradable compounds as acetic and benzoic acids are found at low concentrations. Formation of chlorine and gaseous hydrochloric acid can be limited by adding CaCO{sub 3} as a neutralizing agent.

  8. Functionally graded composite cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, N. T.; Brandon, N. P.; Day, M. J.; Lapeña-Rey, N.

    Functionally graded solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes have been prepared from mixtures of strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) and gadolinia-doped ceria (CGO) using slurry spraying techniques. Similar samples were also prepared from mixtures of LSM and ytrria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ). A current collector comprising a mixture of LSM and strontium-doped lanthanum cobaltite (LSCO) was then applied to both cathode types. Samples were characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Characterisation using EIS techniques showed that cathodes incorporating CGO into the structure gave improved performance over those fabricated using YSZ. These performance gains were most noticeable as the temperature was decreased towards 700 °C, and were maintained during the testing of three cell membrane electrode assemblies fabricated to the Rolls-Royce design.

  9. Electrical contact structures for solid oxide electrolyte fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1984-01-01

    An improved electrical output connection means is provided for a high temperature solid oxide electrolyte type fuel cell generator. The electrical connection of the fuel cell electrodes to the electrical output bus, which is brought through the generator housing to be connected to an electrical load line maintains a highly uniform temperature distribution. The electrical connection means includes an electrode bus which is spaced parallel to the output bus with a plurality of symmetrically spaced transversely extending conductors extending between the electrode bus and the output bus, with thermal insulation means provided about the transverse conductors between the spaced apart buses. Single or plural stages of the insulated transversely extending conductors can be provided within the high temperatures regions of the fuel cell generator to provide highly homogeneous temperature distribution over the contacting surfaces.

  10. Resilient Sealing Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Signo T. Reis; Richard K. Brow

    2006-09-30

    This report describes the development of ''invert'' glass compositions designed for hermetic seals in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Upon sealing at temperatures compatible with other SOFC materials (generally {le}900 C), these glasses transform to glass-ceramics with desirable thermo-mechanical properties, including coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) over 11 x 10{sup -6}/C. The long-term (>four months) stability of CTE under SOFC operational conditions (e.g., 800 C in wet forming gas or in air) has been evaluated, as have weight losses under similar conditions. The dependence of sealant properties on glass composition are described in this report, as are experiments to develop glass-matrix composites by adding second phases, including Ni and YSZ. This information provides design-guidance to produce desirable sealing materials.

  11. Failure analysis of electrolyte-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischhauer, Felix; Tiefenauer, Andreas; Graule, Thomas; Danzer, Robert; Mai, Andreas; Kuebler, Jakob

    2014-07-01

    For solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) one key aspect is the structural integrity of the cell and hence its thermo mechanical long term behaviour. The present study investigates the failure mechanisms and the actual causes for fracture of electrolyte supported SOFCs which were run using the current μ-CHP system of Hexis AG, Winterthur - Switzerland under lab conditions or at customer sites for up to 40,000 h. In a first step several operated stacks were demounted for post-mortem inspection, followed by a fractographic evaluation of the failed cells. The respective findings are then set into a larger picture including an analysis of the present stresses acting on the cell like thermal and residual stresses and the measurements regarding the temperature dependent electrolyte strength. For all investigated stacks, the mechanical failure of individual cells can be attributed to locally acting bending loads, which rise due to an inhomogeneous and uneven contact between the metallic interconnect and the cell.

  12. Planar solid oxide fuel cells: the Australian experience and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Bruce; Föger, Karl; Gillespie, Rohan; Bolden, Roger; Badwal, S. P. S.

    Since 1992, Ceramic Fuel Cells (CFCL) has grown to what is now the largest focussed program globally for development of planar ceramic (solid oxide) fuel cell, SOFC, technology. A significant intellectual property position in know-how and patents has been developed, with over 80 people involved in the venture. Over $A60 million in funding for the activities of the company has been raised from private companies, government-owned corporations and government business-support programs, including from energy — particularly electricity — industry shareholders that can facilitate access to local markets for our products. CFCL has established state-of-the-art facilities for planar SOFC R&D, with their expansion and scaling-up to pilot manufacturing capability underway. We expect to achieve commercial introduction of our market-entry products in 2002, with prototype systems expected to be available from early 2001.

  13. Improved solid oxide fuel cell performance with nanostructured electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Chao, Cheng-Chieh; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Cui, Yi; Prinz, Fritz B

    2011-07-26

    Considerable attention has been focused on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) due to their potential for providing clean and reliable electric power. However, the high operating temperatures of current SOFCs limit their adoption in mobile applications. To lower the SOFC operating temperature, we fabricated a corrugated thin-film electrolyte membrane by nanosphere lithography and atomic layer deposition to reduce the polarization and ohmic losses at low temperatures. The resulting micro-SOFC electrolyte membrane showed a hexagonal-pyramid array nanostructure and achieved a power density of 1.34 W/cm(2) at 500 °C. In the future, arrays of micro-SOFCs with high power density may enable a range of mobile and portable power applications. PMID:21657222

  14. A review of integration strategies for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiongwen; Chan, S. H.; Li, Guojun; Ho, H. K.; Li, Jun; Feng, Zhenping

    Due to increasing oil and gas demand, the depletion of fossil resources, serious global warming, efficient energy systems and new energy conversion processes are urgently needed. Fuel cells and hybrid systems have emerged as advanced thermodynamic systems with great promise in achieving high energy/power efficiency with reduced environmental loads. In particular, due to the synergistic effect of using integrated solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and classical thermodynamic cycle technologies, the efficiency of the integrated system can be significantly improved. This paper reviews different concepts/strategies for SOFC-based integration systems, which are timely transformational energy-related technologies available to overcome the threats posed by climate change and energy security.

  15. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Seal Glass - BN Nanotubes Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.; Hurst, Janet B.; Garg, Anita

    2005-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell seal glass G18 composites reinforced with approx.4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated via hot pressing. Room temperature strength and fracture toughness of the composite were determined by four-point flexure and single edge V-notch beam methods, respectively. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90% and 35%, respectively, than those of the glass G18. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces using SEM and TEM showed pullout of the BN nanotubes, similar in feature to fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with weak interfaces. Other mechanical and physical properties of the composite will also be presented.

  16. Cost projections for planar solid oxide fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Krist, K.; Wright, J.D.; Romero, C.; Chen, Tan Ping

    1996-12-31

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) is funding fundamental research on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that operate at reduced temperature. As part of this effort, we have carried out engineering analysis to determine what areas of research can have the greatest effect on the commercialization of SOFCs. Previous papers have evaluated the markets for SOFCs and the amount which a customer will be willing to pay for fuel cell systems or stacks in these markets, the contribution of materials costs to the total stack cost, and the benefits and design requirements associated with reduced temperature operation. In this paper, we describe the cost of fabricating SOFC stacks by different methods. The complete analysis is available in report form.

  17. Five Kilowatt Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Diesel Reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson

    2008-12-31

    Reducing fossil fuel consumption both for energy security and for reduction in global greenhouse emissions has been a major goal of energy research in the US for many years. Fuel cells have been proposed as a technology that can address both these issues--as devices that convert the energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy, they offer low emissions and high efficiencies. These advantages are of particular interest to remote power users, where grid connected power is unavailable, and most electrical power comes from diesel electric generators. Diesel fuel is the fuel of choice because it can be easily transported and stored in quantities large enough to supply energy for small communities for extended periods of time. This projected aimed to demonstrate the operation of a solid oxide fuel cell on diesel fuel, and to measure the resulting efficiency. Results from this project have been somewhat encouraging, with a laboratory breadboard integration of a small scale diesel reformer and a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell demonstrated in the first 18 months of the project. This initial demonstration was conducted at INEEL in the spring of 2005 using a small scale diesel reformer provided by SOFCo and a fuel cell provided by Acumentrics. However, attempts to integrate and automate the available technology have not proved successful as yet. This is due both to the lack of movement on the fuel processing side as well as the rather poor stack lifetimes exhibited by the fuel cells. Commercial product is still unavailable, and precommercial devices are both extremely expensive and require extensive field support.

  18. Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    The nature of solid earth tidal strain and surface load deformation due to the influence of gravitational forces and barometric pressure loading are discussed. The pore pressure response to these types of deformation is investigated in detail, including the cases of a confined aquifer intersected by a well and a discrete fracture intersected by a well. The integration of the tidal response method with conventional pump tests in order to independently calculate the hydraulic parameters of the fracture-formation system is discussed. How advanced spectral analysis methods, coupled with correlation analysis can be used to extract the tidal response signals from the pressure record is shown. Uncertainties in the signals are estimated using various information-theoretic methods in order to place a confidence level at which we can safely assume that the measured signal is indeed of tidal origin. A detailed case study of the method carried out at the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir in Idaho is presented. All of the analyzed tidal data is presented and the results of the computed fracture orientation using the solid earth tidal strain approach are compared with the extensive field work carried out at Raft River over the past decade. The direction that future work in the continuing development of this technology should take is discussed, including: (1) the present need for an expanded data base for the confirmation of present tidal strain response models, and (2) improvement in response models.

  19. Ammonium nitrate as an oxidizer in solid composite propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manelis, G. B.; Lempert, D. B.

    2009-09-01

    Despite the fact that ammonium nitrate (AN) has the highest hydrogen content and fairly high oxygen balance (compared to other oxidizers), its extremely low formation enthalpy and relatively low density makes it one of the worst power oxidizers in solid composite propellants (SCP). Nevertheless, AN has certain advantages - the combustion of the compositions containing AN is virtually safe, its combustion products are ecologically clean, it is very accessible and cheap, and also very thermostable (far more stable than ammonium dinitramide (ADN)). Besides, its low density stops being a disadvantage if the propellant has to be used in deep space and therefore, must be carried there with other rocket carriers. The low cost of AN may also become a serious advantage in the AN application even in lower stages of multistage space launchers as well as in one-stage space launchers with low mass fraction of the propellant. The main specific features relevant to the creation of AN-based SCPs with the optimal energetic characteristics are discussed. The use of metals and their hydrides and proper fuel-binders as well as the recent successes in phase stabilization of AN are described.

  20. Modifying zirconia solid electrolyte surface property to enhance oxide transport

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, B.Y.; Song, S.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper oxide (Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}, BSCCO) is known for its high T{sub c} superconducting behavior and mixed conducting property. The applicability of similar high T{sub c} cuprates for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application has been studied recently. We investigated the electrochemical behavior of several Ag{vert_bar}BSCCO{vert_bar}10 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ){vert_bar}Ag and Ag{vert_bar}YSZ{vert_bar}Ag cells using complex impedance spectroscopy. A highly uniform and porous microstructure was observed at the interface of the YSZ and BSCCO. The ionic conductivity determined from the Nyquest plots in the temperature range of 200-700{degrees}C agrees with the values reported in the literature. The specific resistance of the BSCCO{vert_bar}YSZ interface was also determined to be lower than those of the conventional manganite electrode, suggesting that BSCCO seems attractive for cathode applications in SOFC.

  1. Thermal Plasma Spraying Applied on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soysal, D.; Arnold, J.; Szabo, P.; Henne, R.; Ansar, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), attractive for diverse applications in a broad range from small portable and auxiliary power units, up to central power systems, are conventionally produced by sintering methods. However, plasma spraying promises some advantages particularly for cells with metal support. In the present paper, research activities conducted in recent years at DLR as well as latest developments on plasma sprayed functional layers for SOFC as cathodes, electrolytes, and anodes are reported. Power densities of more than 800 mW/cm2 were achieved for plasma sprayed single cells of 12.56 cm2 size, and 300 mW/cm2, respectively, with a 250 W stack made of 10 cells. These values were attained at 0.7 V and 800 °C, with H2:N2 = 1:1 as fuel gas and air as oxidizing gas. Furthermore, continuous operation of more than 5000 h was attained with a plasma sprayed metal-supported SOFC stack which could also withstand more than 30 redox and thermal cycles.

  2. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.

    1985-01-01

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  3. Robust Joining Technology for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shpargel, Tarah P.; Needham, Robert J.; Singh, M.; Kung, S. C.

    2004-01-01

    Recently there has been a great deal of interest in research development and commercialization of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Joining and sealing are critical issues that will need to be addressed before SOFCs can truly perform as expected. Ceramics and metals can be difficult to join together, especially when the joint must withstand up to 900 C operating temperature of the SOFCs. The goal of the present study is to find the most suitable braze material for joining of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to stainless steel. A number of commercially available braze materials TiCuSil, TiCuNi, Copper-ABA, Gold-ABA and Gold-ABA-V have been evaluated. The oxidation behavior of the braze materials and steel substrates in air was also examined through thermogravimetric analysis. The microstructure and composition of the brazed regions have been examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and eDS analysis. Effect of braze composition and processing conditions on the interfacial microstructure and composition of the joint regions will be presented.

  4. High-temperature seals for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raj N.

    2006-08-01

    A functioning solid oxide fuel-cell (SOFC) may require all types of seals, such as metal-metal, metal-ceramic, and ceramic-ceramic. These seals must function at high temperatures between 600 and 900 °C and in the oxidizing and reducing environments of fuels and air. Among the different types of seals, the metal-metal seals can be readily fabricated using metal joining, soldering, and brazing techniques. However, metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic seals require significant research and development because the brittle nature of ceramics/glasses can lead to fracture and loss of seal integrity and functionality. Consequently, any seals involving ceramics/glasses also require significant attention and technology development for reliable SOFC operation. This paper is prepared to primarily address the needs and possible approaches for high-temperature seals for SOFC and seals fabricated using some of these approaches. A new concept of self-healing glass seals is proposed for making seals among material combinations with a significant expansion mismatches.

  5. Integrating catalytic coal gasifiers with solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Siefert, N.; Shamsi, A.; Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.

    2010-01-01

    A review was conducted for coal gasification technologies that integrate with solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) to achieve system efficiencies near 60% while capturing and sequestering >90% of the carbon dioxide [1-2]. The overall system efficiency can reach 60% when a) the coal gasifier produces a syngas with a methane composition of roughly 25% on a dry volume basis, b) the carbon dioxide is separated from the methane-rich synthesis gas, c) the methane-rich syngas is sent to a SOFC, and d) the off-gases from the SOFC are recycled back to coal gasifier. The thermodynamics of this process will be reviewed and compared to conventional processes in order to highlight where available work (i.e. exergy) is lost in entrained-flow, high-temperature gasification, and where exergy is lost in hydrogen oxidation within the SOFC. The main advantage of steam gasification of coal to methane and carbon dioxide is that the amount of exergy consumed in the gasifier is small compared to conventional, high temperature, oxygen-blown gasifiers. However, the goal of limiting the amount of exergy destruction in the gasifier has the effect of limiting the rates of chemical reactions. Thus, one of the main advantages of steam gasification leads to one of its main problems: slow reaction kinetics. While conventional entrained-flow, high-temperature gasifiers consume a sizable portion of the available work in the coal oxidation, the consumed exergy speeds up the rates of reactions. And while the rates of steam gasification reactions can be increased through the use of catalysts, only a few catalysts can meet cost requirements because there is often significant deactivation due to chemical reactions between the inorganic species in the coal and the catalyst. Previous research into increasing the kinetics of steam gasification will be reviewed. The goal of this paper is to highlight both the challenges and advantages of integrating catalytic coal gasifiers with SOFCs.

  6. New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allan J. Jacobson

    2005-11-17

    Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode--electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. In this report, the oxygen exchange kinetics of a P2 composition are described in detail. The oxygen exchange kinetics of the oxygen deficient double perovskite LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (Ln=Pr and Nd) have been determined by electrical conductivity relaxation. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

  7. Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, J. M.

    1984-09-01

    The nature of solid earth tidal strain and surface load deformation due to the influence of gravitational forces and barometric pressure loading are discussed. The pore pressure response to these types of deformation is investigated in detail, including the cases of a confined aquifer intersected by a well and a discrete fracture intersected by a well. The integration of the tidal response method with conventional pump tests in order to independently calculate the hydraulic parameters of the fracture formation system is discussed. How advanced spectral analysis methods, coupled with correlation analysis can be used to extract the tidal response signals from the pressure record is shown. Uncertainties in the signals are estimated using various information theoretic methods in order to place a confidence level at which we can safely assume that the measured signal is indeed of tidal origin. A detailed case study of the method carried out at the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir in Idaho is presented.

  8. A Review of Sealing Technologies Applicable to Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Lessing

    2007-05-01

    This article reviews designs and materials investigated for various seals in high temperature solid oxide fuel cell “stacks” and how they might be implemented in solid oxide electrolysis cells that decompose steam into hydrogen and oxygen. Materials include metals, glasses, glass–ceramics, cements, and composites. Sealing designs include rigid seals, compressive seals, and compliant seals.

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell with single material for electrodes and interconnect

    DOEpatents

    McPheeters, C.C.; Nelson, P.A.; Dees, D.W.

    1994-07-19

    A solid oxide fuel cell is described having a plurality of individual cells. A solid oxide fuel cell has an anode and a cathode with electrolyte disposed there between, and the anode, cathode and interconnect elements are comprised of substantially one material. 9 figs.

  10. 46 CFR 194.05-11 - Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 CFR parts 172, 173, and 176. ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-11 Flammable solids and oxidizing materials—Detail requirements. (a)...

  11. 46 CFR 194.05-11 - Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 CFR parts 172, 173, and 176. ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-11 Flammable solids and oxidizing materials—Detail requirements. (a)...

  12. 46 CFR 194.05-11 - Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 CFR parts 172, 173, and 176. ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-11 Flammable solids and oxidizing materials—Detail requirements. (a)...

  13. 46 CFR 194.05-11 - Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 CFR parts 172, 173, and 176. ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-11 Flammable solids and oxidizing materials—Detail requirements. (a)...

  14. 46 CFR 194.05-11 - Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 CFR parts 172, 173, and 176. ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flammable solids and oxidizing materials-Detail... and Marking § 194.05-11 Flammable solids and oxidizing materials—Detail requirements. (a)...

  15. Development of planar solid oxide fuel cells for power generation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Minh, N.Q.

    1996-04-01

    Planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are presently being developed for a variety of electric power generation application. The planar design offers simple cell geometry, high power density, and multiple fabrication and gas manifolding options. Planar SOFC technology has received much attention recently, and significant progress has been made in this area. Recent effort at AlliedSignal has focused on the development of high-performance, lightweight planar SOFCs, having thin-electrolyte films, that can be operated efficiently at reduced temperatures (< 1000{degrees}C). The advantages of reduced-temperature operation include wider material choice (including use of metallic interconnects), expected longer cell life, reduced thermal stress, improved reliability, and reduced fuel cell cost. The key aspect in the development of thin-film SIFCs is to incorporate the thin electrolyte layer into the desired structure of cells in a manner that yields the required characteristics. AlliedSignal has developed a simple and cost-effective method based on tape calendering for the fabrication of thin-electrolyte SOFCs. Thin-electrolyte cells made by tape calendering have shown extraordinary performance, e.g., producing more than 500mW/cm{sup 2} at 700{degrees}C and 800mW/cm{sup 2} at 800{degrees}C with hydrogen as fuel and air is oxidant. thin-electrolyte single cells have been incorporated into a compliant metallic stack structure and operated at reduced and operated at reduced-temperature conditions.

  16. Probing molecular geometry of solids by nuclear magnetic resonance spin exchange at the n=0 rotational-resonance condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekely, Piotr; Gardiennet, Carole; Potrzebowski, Marek J.; Sebald, Angelika; Reichert, Detlef; Luz, Zeev

    2002-05-01

    Exploration of the molecular geometry in rotating powder solids on the basis of magnetization exchange between spins with identical isotropic chemical shifts but differing chemical shielding tensor orientations is demonstrated experimentally. For this we take advantage of the potential of the ODESSA (one-dimensional exchange spectroscopy by sidebands alternation) experiment for the accurate measurement of spin exchange rate constants. We also report the observation of oscillatory behavior of the rotor-driven magnetization exchange at this so-called n=0 rotational-resonance condition which, in contrast to n=1,2,3,… rotational-resonance conditions, takes place at nearly arbitrary magic-angle spinning frequencies. The sensitivity of the longitudinal exchange decays to the relevant physical parameters of the spin system under conditions of rotor-driven and proton-driven magnetization exchange is discussed theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. Several 13C and 31P spin-exchange measurements have been performed on a series of model compounds covering a broad range of internuclear distances between carboxyl carbon atoms, and on a series of phosphorylated amino acids with different internuclear distances between phosphorus sites. The capacity of the ODESSA experiment for an unambiguous recognition of distinct internuclear distances is demonstrated. Potential applications of such measurements involve the exploration of intermolecular distances and the determination of the mutual orientation of neighboring molecular fragments in polycrystalline and noncrystalline solids.

  17. The 3SPACE digitizer: A new input device for solid geometry modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, J.

    1984-01-01

    The 3SPACE Digitizer is a derivation of SPASYN, which is a patented magnetic transducing system offering an accurate method of calculating the location of one object relative to another. SPASYN uses low-frequency magnetic fields to measure both the position and orientation of its sensor relative to its transmitter. The 3SPACE Digitizer unit consists of a system's electronics unit, a model table, a stylus, and a keypad. In operation, the 3SPACE Digitizer determines the X, Y, Z coordinates of any point located on a low-conductive, three-dimensional model. This data, along with the orientation of the Digitizer's stylus, is immediately available for transmission to a host computer or graphics terminal. Digitization is effected by touching the point to be measured with the tip of a handheld stylus. The 3SPACE Digitizer presents new opportunities for interacting with computers in a large number of engineering and scientific applications. Developed from proven military technology, the 3SPACE Digitizer significantly simplifies three-dimensional digitization and overcomes many of the problems that once plagued such procedures. Its ability to digitize solid objects makes it a valuable new tool for computer-aided design and manufacturing.

  18. Solid-state thin-film supercapacitor with ruthenium oxide and solid electrolyte thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Y. S.; Cho, W. I.; Lim, J. H.; Choi, D. J.

    Direct current reactive sputtering deposition of ruthenium oxide thin films (bottom and top electrodes) at 400°C are performed to produce a solid-state thin-film supercapacitor (TFSC). The supercapacitor has a cell structure of RuO 2/Li 2.94PO 2.37N 0.75 (Lipon)/RuO 2/Pt. Radio frequency, reactive sputtering deposition of an Li 2.94PO 2.37N 0.75 electrolyte film is performed on the bottom RuO 2 film at room temperature to separate the bottom and top RuO 2 electrodes electrically. The stoichiometry of the RuO 2 thin film is investigated by Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry (RBS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the as-deposited RuO 2 thin film is an amorphous phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements reveal that the RuO 2/Lipon/RuO 2 hetero-interfaces have no inter-diffusion problems. Charge-discharge measurements with constant current at room temperature clearly reveal typical supercapacitor behaviour for a RuO 2/Lipon/RuO 2/Pt cell structure. Since the electrolyte thin film has low ionic mobility, the capacity and cycle performance are inferior to those of a bulk type of supercapacitor. These results indicate that a high performance, TFSC can be fabricated by a solid electrolyte thin film with high ionic conductivity.

  19. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2006-01-12

    The objective of this work was to obtain a stable materials system for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density greater than 0.2 W/cm{sup 2}. The solid electrolyte chosen for this system was La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}, (LSGM). To select the right electrode materials from a group of possible candidate materials, AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed the LSGM electrolyte. Based on the results of the investigation, LSGM electrolyte supported SOFCs were fabricated with La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSCF-LSGM) composite cathode and Nickel-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (Ni-LDC) composite anode having a barrier layer of Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (LDC) between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-LDC anode. Electrical performance and stability of these cells were determined and the electrode polarization behavior as a function of cell current was modeled between 600-800 C. The electrical performance of the anode-supported SOFC was simulated assuming an electrode polarization behavior identical to the LSGM-electrolyte-supported SOFC. The simulated electrical performance indicated that the selected material system would provide a stable cell capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density between 0.2 to 1 W/cm{sup 2}.

  20. Formulations for Stronger Solid Oxide Fuel-Cell Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Goldsby, John C.; Choi, Sung R.

    2004-01-01

    Tests have shown that modification of chemical compositions can increase the strengths and fracture toughnesses of solid oxide fuel-cell (SOFC) electrolytes. Heretofore, these solid electrolytes have been made of yttria-stabilized zirconia, which is highly conductive for oxygen ions at high temperatures, as needed for operation of fuel cells. Unfortunately yttria-stabilized zirconia has a high coefficient of thermal expansion, low resistance to thermal shock, low fracture toughness, and low mechanical strength. The lack of strength and toughness are especially problematic for fabrication of thin SOFC electrolyte membranes needed for contemplated aeronautical, automotive, and stationary power-generation applications. The modifications of chemical composition that lead to increased strength and fracture toughness consist in addition of alumina to the basic yttria-stabilized zirconia formulations. Techniques for processing of yttria-stabilized zirconia/alumina composites containing as much as 30 mole percent of alumina have been developed. The composite panels fabricated by these techniques have been found to be dense and free of cracks. The only material phases detected in these composites has been cubic zirconia and a alumina: this finding signifies that no undesired chemical reactions between the constituents occurred during processing at elevated temperatures. The flexural strengths and fracture toughnesses of the various zirconia-alumina composites were measured in air at room temperature as well as at a temperature of 1,000 C (a typical SOFC operating temperature). The measurements showed that both flexural strength and fracture toughness increased with increasing alumina content at both temperatures. In addition, the modulus of elasticity and the thermal conductivity were found to increase and the density to decrease with increasing alumina content. The oxygen-ion conductivity at 1,000 C was found to be unchanged by the addition of alumina.

  1. Filled glass composites for sealing of solid oxide fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, Rajan; Widgeon, Scarlett Joyce; Garino, Terry J.; Brochu, Mathieu; Gauntt, Bryan D.; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.

    2009-04-01

    Glasses filled with ceramic or metallic powders have been developed for use as seals for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC's) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Program. The composites of glass (alkaline earth-alumina-borate) and powders ({approx}20 vol% of yttria-stabilized zirconia or silver) were shown to form seals with SOFC materials at or below 900 C. The type and amount of powder were adjusted to optimize thermal expansion to match the SOFC materials and viscosity. Wetting studies indicated good wetting was achieved on the micro-scale and reaction studies indicated that the degree of reaction between the filled glasses and SOFC materials, including spinel-coated 441 stainless steel, at 750 C is acceptable. A test rig was developed for measuring strengths of seals cycled between room temperature and typical SOFC operating temperatures. Our measurements showed that many of the 410 SS to 410 SS seals, made using silver-filled glass composites, were hermetic at 0.2 MPa (2 atm.) of pressure and that seals that leaked could be resealed by briefly heating them to 900 C. Seal strength measurements at elevated temperature (up to 950 C), measured using a second apparatus that we developed, indicated that seals maintained 0.02 MPa (0.2 atm.) overpressures for 30 min at 750 C with no leakage. Finally, the volatility of the borate component of sealing glasses under SOFC operational conditions was studied using weight loss measurements and found by extrapolation to be less than 5% for the projected SOFC lifetime.

  2. Solid oxidized fuel cells seals leakage setup and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastrzyk, Marta B.

    2004-01-01

    As the world s reserves of fossil fuels are depleted, the U.S. Government, as well as other countries and private industries, is researching solutions for obtaining power, answers that would be more efficient and environmentally friendly. For a long time engineers have been trying to obtain the benefits of clean electric power without heavy batteries or pollution-producing engines. While some of the inventions proved to be effective (i.e. solar panels or windmills) their applications are limited due to dependency on the energy source (i.e. sun or wind). Currently, as energy concerns increase, research is being carried out on the development of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC). The United States government is taking a proactive role in expanding the technology through the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Program, which is coordinated by the Department of Energy. into an electrical energy. This occurs by the means of natural tendency of oxygen and hydrogen to chemically react. While controlling the process, it is possible to harvest the energy given off by the reaction. SOFCs use currently available fossil fuels and convert a variety of those fuels with very high efficiency (about 40% more efficient than modem thermal power plants). At the same time they are almost entirely nonpolluting and due to their size they can be placed in remote areas. The main fields where the application of the fuel cells appears to be the most useful for are stationary energy sources, transportation, and military applications. structure and materials must be resolved. All the components must be operational in harsh environments including temperatures reaching 800 C and cyclic thermal- mechanical loading. Under these conditions, the main concern is the requirement for hermetic seals to: (1) prevent mixing of the fuel and oxidant within the stack, (2) prevent parasitic leakage of the fuel from the stack, (3) prevent contamination of the anode by air leaking into the stack, (4

  3. CFD Model of a Planar Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell: Base Case and Variations

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; R. W. Jones

    2007-07-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high-temperature steam electrolysis in a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model represents a single cell, as it would exist in an electrolysis stack. Details of the model geometry are specific to a stack that was fabricated by Ceramatec, Inc. and tested at the Idaho National Laboratory. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean model results are shown to compare favorably with experimental results obtained from an actual ten-cell stack tested at INL. Mean per-cell area-specific-resistance (ASR) values decrease with increasing current density, consistent with experimental data. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, cathode and anode exchange current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicated the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal efficiency, cell electrical efficiency, and Gibbs free energy are discussed and reported herein.

  4. Oxidation of encapsulated oil in tailor-made cellular solid.

    PubMed

    Rassis, D; Nussinovitch, A; Saguy, I S

    2000-05-01

    A cellular alginate solid containing oil was prepared by freeze-drying. The oil was incorporated in the matrix by emulsification in the pre-gel state. The alginate-oil gels were immersed in 60 degrees Brix sucrose solution for various periods, before freeze-drying. The extent of the collapse expressing the reduction in sample volume was affected by immersion duration and freeze-drying conditions. Sucrose diffusion during immersion followed an exponential pattern. Effective diffusivity calculated using nonlinear regression gave a value of 3.64 x 10(-)(10) m(2)/s. The effect of relative humidity on water content calculated on a dry basis excluding sucrose showed a significant increase in water content at 75% RH. Image analysis was utilized to quantify the area of the encapsulated oil droplets. The area of the droplets was divided into four subregions defined as (0.02-0.1) x 10(-)(12), (0. 1-1.0) x 10(-)(12), (1-10) x 10(-)(12), and (10-100) x 10(-)(12) m(2). A distribution resembling a Gaussian bell distribution with a maximum of 54% for the (1-10) x 10(-)(12) m(2) area range was found. The number of oil droplets was almost constant for the first three area regions, and then decreased markedly. Oxidation index was not effected by porosity at 0 and 22% RH. A 75% RH and porosity above a critical value of ca. 0.45 was found to increase oxidation significantly. Samples immersed for less than 5.5 h in sucrose solution were mechanically stronger after equilibration at 0 and 22% RH when compared to their counterpart equilibrated at 75% RH. Immersion for more than 24 h resulted in similar mechanical strength irrespective of the RH. PMID:10820103

  5. The thermomechanical stability of micro-solid oxide fuel cells fabricated on anodized aluminum oxide membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Chang-Woo; Lee, Jae-Il; Kim, Ki-Bum; Lee, Hae-Weon; Lee, Jong-Ho; Son, Ji-Won

    2012-07-01

    The thermomechanical stability of micro-solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) fabricated on an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane template is investigated. The full structure consists of the following layers: AAO membrane (600 nm)/Pt anode/YSZ electrolyte (900 nm)/porous Pt cathode. The utilization of a 600-nm-thick AAO membrane significantly improves the thermomechanical stability due to its well-known honeycomb-shaped nanopore structure. Moreover, the Pt anode layer deposited in between the AAO membrane and the YSZ electrolyte preserves its integrity in terms of maintaining the triple-phase boundary (TPB) and electrical conductivity during high-temperature operation. Both of these results guarantee thermomechanical stability of the micro-SOFC and extend the cell lifetime, which is one of the most critical issues in the fabrication of freestanding membrane-type micro-SOFCs.

  6. Protactinium distribution in a fluoride melt in the presence of solid oxide phases

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, V.A.; Ziv, V.S.; Morozova, Z.E.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements have been made on protactinium distributions between molten lithium and sodium fluorides and solid lanthanum or zirconium oxides as affected by time, amount of solid, and amount of gas (air of argon) at 1023 K. Protactinium can be extracted quantitatively from LiF-NaF melts by the two oxides. It is found that all the regularities previously reported for actinoid distributions in halide liquids in the presence of oxides apply to protactinium.

  7. Lateral solid-phase epitaxy of oxide thin films on glass substrate seeded with oxide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Taira, Kenji; Hirose, Yasushi; Nakao, Shoichiro; Yamada, Naoomi; Kogure, Toshihiro; Shibata, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2014-06-24

    We developed a technique to fabricate oxide thin films with uniaxially controlled crystallographic orientation and lateral size of more than micrometers on amorphous substrates. This technique is lateral solid-phase epitaxy, where epitaxial crystallization of amorphous precursor is seeded with ultrathin oxide nanosheets sparsely (≈10% coverage) deposited on the substrate. Transparent conducting Nb-doped anatase TiO2 thin films were fabricated on glass substrates by this technique. Perfect (001) orientation and large grains with lateral sizes up to 10 μm were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and electron beam backscattering diffraction measurements. As a consequence of these features, the obtained film exhibited excellent electrical transport properties comparable to those of epitaxial thin films on single-crystalline substrates. This technique is a versatile method for fabricating high-quality oxide thin films other than anatase TiO2 and would increase the possible applications of oxide-based thin film devices. PMID:24867286

  8. Solid oxide fuel cell application in district cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qattan, Ayman; ElSherbini, Abdelrahman; Al-Ajmi, Kholoud

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents analysis of the performance of a combined cooling and power (CCP) system for district cooling. The cogeneration system is designed to provide cooling for a low-rise residential district of 27,300 RT (96 MWc). A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generates electric power to operate chillers, and the exhaust fuel and heat from the SOFC run gas turbines and absorption chillers. Thermal energy storage is utilized to reduce system capacity. Part-load operation strategies target maximizing energy efficiency. The operation of the system is compared through an hourly simulation to that of packaged air-conditioning units typically used to cool homes. The CCP system with the district cooling arrangement improves the cooling-to-fuel efficiency by 346%. The peak power requirement is reduced by 57% (24 MW) and the total fuel energy is reduced by 54% (750 TJ y-1). The system cuts annual carbon dioxide emissions to less than half and reduces other harmful emissions. A cost analysis of the system components and operation resulted in a 53% reduction in the cost per ton-hour of cooling over traditional systems.

  9. Recent progress in tubular solid oxide fuel cell technology

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, S.C.

    1997-12-31

    The tubular design of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and the materials used therein have been validated by successful, continuous electrical testing over 69,000 h of early technology cells built on a calcia-stabilized zirconia porous support tube (PST). In the latest technology cells, the PST has been eliminated and replaced by a doped lanthanum manganite air electrode tube. These air electrode supported (AES) cells have shown a power density increase of about 33% with a significantly improved performance stability over the previously used PST type cells. These cells have also demonstrated the ability to thermally cycle over 100 times without any mechanical damage or performance loss. In addition, recent changes in processes used to fabricate these cells have resulted in significant cost reduction. This paper reviews the fabrication and performance of the state-of-the-art AES tubular cells. It also describes the materials and processing studies that are underway to further reduce the cell cost, and summarizes the recently built power generation systems that employed state-of-the-art AES cells.

  10. Challenge for lowering concentration polarization in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Toshiaki; Sumi, Hirofumi; Hamamoto, Koichi; Fujishiro, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    In the scope of electrochemical phenomena, concentration polarization at electrodes is theoretically inevitable, and lowering the concentration overpotential to improve the performance of electrochemical cells has been a continuing challenge. Electrodes with highly controlled microstructure, i.e., high porosity and uniform large pores are therefore essential to achieve high performance electrochemical cells. In this study, state-of-the-art technology for controlling the microstructure of electrodes has been developed for realizing high performance support electrodes of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The key is controlling the porosity and pore size distribution to improve gas diffusion, while maintaining the integrity of the electrolyte and the structural strength of actual sized electrode supports needed for the target application. Planar anode-supported SOFCs developed in this study realize 5 μm thick dense electrolyte (yttria-stabilized zirconia: YSZ) and the anode substrate (Ni-YSZ) of 53.6 vol.% porosity with a large median pore diameter of 0.911 μm. Electrochemical measurements reveal that the performance of the anode-supported SOFCs improves with increasing anode porosity. This Ni-YSZ anode minimizes the concentration polarization, resulting in a maximum power density of 3.09 W cm-2 at 800 °C using humidified hydrogen fuel without any electrode functional layers.

  11. Method and apparatus for assembling solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Szreders, Bernard E.; Campanella, Nicholas

    1989-01-01

    A plurality of jet air tubes are supported and maintained in a spaced matrix array by a positioning/insertion assembly for insertion in respective tubes of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) in the assembly of an SOFC module. The positioning/insertion assembly includes a plurality of generally planar, elongated, linear vanes which are pivotally mounted at each end thereof to a support frame. The vanes, which each include a plurality of spaced slots along the facing edges thereof, may be pivotally displaced from a generally vertical orientation, wherein each jet air tube is positioned within and engaged by the aligned slots of a plurality of paired upper and lower vanes to facilitate their insertion in respective aligned SOFC tubes arranged in a matrix array, to an inclined orientation, wherein the jet air tubes may be removed from the positioning/insertion assembly after being inserted in the SOFC tubes. A rectangular compression assembly of adjustable size is adapted to receive and squeeze a matrix of SOFC tubes so as to compress the inter-tube nickel felt conductive pads which provide series/parallel electrical connection between adjacent SOFCs, with a series of increasingly larger retainer frames used to maintain larger matrices of SOFC tubes in position. Expansion of the SOFC module housing at the high operating temperatures of the SOFC is accommodated by conductive, flexible, resilient expansion, connector bars which provide support and electrical coupling at the top and bottom of the SOFC module housing.

  12. Eliminating degradation in solid oxide electrochemical cells by reversible operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Christopher; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Jensen, Søren Højgaard; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-02-01

    One promising energy storage technology is the solid oxide electrochemical cell (SOC), which can both store electricity as chemical fuels (electrolysis mode) and convert fuels to electricity (fuel-cell mode). The widespread use of SOCs has been hindered by insufficient long-term stability, in particular at high current densities. Here we demonstrate that severe electrolysis-induced degradation, which was previously believed to be irreversible, can be completely eliminated by reversibly cycling between electrolysis and fuel-cell modes, similar to a rechargeable battery. Performing steam electrolysis continuously at high current density (1 A cm-2), initially at 1.33 V (97% energy efficiency), led to severe microstructure deterioration near the oxygen-electrode/electrolyte interface and a corresponding large increase in ohmic resistance. After 4,000 h of reversible cycling, however, no microstructural damage was observed and the ohmic resistance even slightly improved. The results demonstrate the viability of applying SOCs for renewable electricity storage at previously unattainable reaction rates, and have implications for our fundamental understanding of degradation mechanisms that are usually assumed to be irreversible.

  13. Impacts of environmental product legislation on solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, E. I.; Rahimifard, S.; Clegg, A. J.

    Ongoing development of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology coincides with a rapid increase in legislation aiming to control the environmental impacts of products across their life cycle. A risk-based method is used to explore the potential future impacts of this body of legislation on the technology. Legislation controlling the use of hazardous materials is one area of significance. Under the new European REACH Regulation some nickel compounds, used widely throughout general industry but also in the fabrication of anode structures, may fall under the classification of a substance of very high concern (SVHC) in future, which presents a risk of restrictions being placed on their continued use. This risk must drive the development of alternative anode materials, or requires the SOFC industry to identify a socio-economic argument justifying exemption from any future restrictions. A legislative trend establishing recycling requirements for end-of-life products is also identified as having a potential future impact on the technology. Recycling strategies for SOFC products must be considered, prior to commercialisation. It is proposed that failure to meet these future environmental requirements may be detrimental to the perception of SOFC technology, the demand for which is substantially driven by the environmental benefits offered over incumbent power generation technologies. The consideration of these issues in the design of commercial products will mitigate this risk.

  14. Impact of anode microstructure on solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshio; Hasan, Zahir; Funahashi, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Toshiaki; Fujishiro, Yoshinobu; Awano, Masanobu

    2009-08-14

    We report a correlation between the microstructure of the anode electrode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and its electrochemical performance for a tubular design. It was shown that the electrochemical performance of the cell was extensively improved when the size of constituent particles was reduced so as to yield a highly porous microstructure. The SOFC had a power density of greater than 1 watt per square centimeter at an operating temperature as low as 600 degrees C with a conventional zirconia-based electrolyte, a nickel cermet anode, and a lanthanum ferrite perovskite cathode material. The effect of the hydrogen fuel flow rate (linear velocity) was also examined for the optimization of operating conditions. Higher linear fuel velocity led to better cell performance for the cell with higher anode porosity. A zirconia-based cell could be used for a low-temperature SOFC system under 600 degrees C just by optimizing the microstructure of the anode electrode and operating conditions. PMID:19679808

  15. HIGH-TEMPERATURE TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Veyo

    1998-09-01

    During the Westinghouse/USDOE Cooperative Agreement period of November 1, 1990 through November 30, 1997, the Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell has evolved from a 16 mm diameter, 50 cm length cell with a peak power of 1.27 watts/cm to the 22 mm diameter, 150 cm length dimensions of today's commercial prototype cell with a peak power of 1.40 watts/cm. Accompanying the increase in size and power density was the elimination of an expensive EVD step in the manufacturing process. Demonstrated performance of Westinghouse's tubular SOFC includes a lifetime cell test which ran for a period in excess of 69,000 hours, and a fully integrated 25 kWe-class system field test which operated for over 13,000 hours at 90% availability with less than 2% performance degradation over the entire period. Concluding the agreement period, a 100 kW SOFC system successfully passed its factory acceptance test in October 1997 and was delivered in November to its demonstration site in Westervoort, The Netherlands.

  16. Formation of thin walled ceramic solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Claar, Terry D.; Busch, Donald E.; Picciolo, John J.

    1989-01-01

    To reduce thermal stress and improve bonding in a high temperature monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), intermediate layers are provided between the SOFC's electrodes and electrolyte which are of different compositions. The intermediate layers are comprised of a blend of some of the materials used in the electrode and electrolyte compositions. Particle size is controlled to reduce problems involving differential shrinkage rates of the various layers when the entire structure is fired at a single temperature, while pore formers are provided in the electrolyte layers to be removed during firing for the formation of desired pores in the electrode layers. Each layer includes a binder in the form of a thermosetting acrylic which during initial processing is cured to provide a self-supporting structure with the ceramic components in the green state. A self-supporting corrugated structure is thus formed prior to firing, which the organic components of the binder and plasticizer removed during firing to provide a high strength, high temperature resistant ceramic structure of low weight and density.

  17. Electrochemical reduction of CO 2 in solid oxide electrolysis cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Zhongliang; Zhao, Lin

    This paper describes results on the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide using the same device as the typical planar nickel-YSZ cermet electrode supported solid oxide fuel cells (H 2-CO 2, Ni-YSZ|YSZ|LSCF-GDC, LSCF, air). Operation in both the fuel cell and the electrolysis mode indicates that the electrodes could work reversibly for the charge transfer processes. An electrolysis current density of ≈1 A cm -2 is observed at 800 °C and 1.3 V for an inlet mixtures of 25% H 2-75% CO 2. Mass spectra measurement suggests that the nickel-YSZ cermet electrode is highly effective for reduction of CO 2 to CO. Analysis of the gas transport in the porous electrode and the adsorption/desorption process over the nickel surface indicates that the cathodic reactions are probably dominated by the reduction of steam to hydrogen, whereas carbon monoxide is mainly produced via the reverse water gas shift reaction.

  18. Glass coated compressible solid oxide fuel cell seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautanen, M.; Thomann, O.; Himanen, O.; Tallgren, J.; Kiviaho, J.

    2014-02-01

    With the growing footprint of solid oxide fuel cell stacks, there is a need to extend the operating range of compressible gaskets towards lower stress levels. This article describes a method to manufacture SOFC seals by coating a compressible sealing material (Thermiculite 866) with glass to obtain good sealing performance even at compression stresses as low as 0.1 MPa. Glass layer can be coated using an organic carrier consisting of terpineol, ethanol and ethyl cellulose. The coated seals can be heat treated by simply ramping the temperature up to operating temperature at 60 Kh-1 and therefore no extra steps, which are typical to glass seals, are required. Coated seals were manufactured using this route and evaluated both ex-situ and in a real stack. Leak rates of 0.1-0.3 ml (m min)-1 were measured at 2-25 mbar overpressure using 50/50 H2/N2. A 30-cell stack was manufactured and tested using coated seals. At nominal operating conditions of 0.25 A cm-2 and 650 °C average cathode temperature, 46% fuel utilization and 20% air utilization the stack had a total hydrogen cross leak of 60 ml min-1 corresponding to 0.7% of the inlet hydrogen flow rate.

  19. Electrochemical characterisation of solid oxide cell electrodes for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernuy-Lopez, Carlos; Knibbe, Ruth; He, Zeming; Mao, Xiaojian; Hauch, Anne; Nielsen, Karsten A.

    Oxygen electrodes and steam electrodes are designed and tested to develop improved solid oxide electrolysis cells for H 2 production with the cell support on the oxygen electrode. The electrode performance is evaluated by impedance spectroscopy testing of symmetric cells at open circuit voltage (OCV) in a one-atmosphere set-up. For the oxygen electrode, nano-structured La 0.75Sr 0.25MnO 3 (LSM25) is impregnated into a LSM25/yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) composite, whereas for the steam electrode, nano-structured Ni and Ce 0.8Gd 0.2O 2- δ (CGO) is impregnated into a Sr 0.94Ti 0.9Nb 0.10O 3- δ (STN) backbone. In the present study, the best performing oxygen electrode is a LSM25-YSZ composite with 20% porosity and impregnated with a LSM25 solution measuring a polarisation resistance (R p) of 0.12 Ω cm 2 at 850 °C in oxygen. For the steam electrode, the best performance is obtained for a STN backbone, sintered at 1200 °C and impregnated with CGO/Ni, with an R p of 0.08 Ω cm 2 at 850 °C in 3% H 2O/H 2.

  20. Indium tin oxide for solid-state image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijtens, Christianus Hermanus L.

    Solid State Image Sensors (SSIS) which convert light into an electrical signal are introduced and transparent conductive materials and their deposition methods are reviewed as a solution to imager problems. The development of basic tools to enable replacement of poly-Si by Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) in SSIS is addressed. The installation and optimization of deposition equipment, the development of deposition and process technology of ITO, and the implementation and application of ITO in an image sensor are studied. Deposition rate and homogeneity and morphology and parameters like gas composition, power, pressure and substrate temperature are considered. Scope is limited to a first generation frame transfer imager with only one ITO layer although some concepts of an all ITO imager are discussed. The sensor used is a redesign of the accordion imager. All requirements imposed on ITO were met and the usefulness of the developed technology was demonstrated by implementing ITO in an imager. The characteristics of a constructed frame-transfer image sensor in which half the gates in the light sensitive part were replaced by ITO gates are discussed.

  1. Glass/Ceramic Composites for Sealing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2007-01-01

    A family of glass/ceramic composite materials has been investigated for use as sealants in planar solid oxide fuel cells. These materials are modified versions of a barium calcium aluminosilicate glass developed previously for the same purpose. The composition of the glass in mole percentages is 35BaO + 15CaO + 5Al2O3 + 10B2O3 + 35SiO2. The glass seal was found to be susceptible to cracking during thermal cycling of the fuel cells. The goal in formulating the glass/ ceramic composite materials was to (1) retain the physical and chemical advantages that led to the prior selection of the barium calcium aluminosilicate glass as the sealant while (2) increasing strength and fracture toughness so as to reduce the tendency toward cracking. Each of the composite formulations consists of the glass plus either of two ceramic reinforcements in a proportion between 0 and 30 mole percent. One of the ceramic reinforcements consists of alumina platelets; the other one consists of particles of yttria-stabilized zirconia wherein the yttria content is 3 mole percent (3YSZ). In preparation for experiments, panels of the glass/ceramic composites were hot-pressed and machined into test bars.

  2. Electrode Performance in Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Williams, Mark C.; Coffey, Greg W.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Nguyen, Carolyn D.; Thomsen, Ed C.

    2007-03-22

    The performance of several negative (fuel) and positive (air) electrode compositions for use in reversible solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) that are capable of operating both as a fuel cell and as an electrolyzer was investigated in half-cell and full-cell tests. Negative electrode compositions studied were a nickel/zirconia cermet (Ni/YSZ) and lanthanum-substituted strontium titanate/ceria composite, whereas positive electrode compositions examined included mixed ion and electron-conducting lanthanum strontium ferrite (LSF), lanthanum strontium copper ferrite (LSCuF), lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCoF), and lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM). While titanate/ceria and Ni/YSZ electrodes performed similarly in the fuel cell mode in half-cell tests, losses associated with electrolysis were lower for the titanate/ceria electrode. Positive electrodes all gave higher losses in the electrolysis mode when compared to the fuel cell mode. This behavior was most apparent for mixed-conducting LSF, LSCuF, and LSCoF electrodes, and discernible but smaller for LSM; observations are consistent with expected trends in the interfacial oxygen vacancy concentration under anodic and cathodic polarization. Full-cell tests conducted for cells with a thin electrolyte (7 um YSZ) similarly showed higher polarization losses in the electrolysis than fuel cell direction.

  3. Internal reforming development for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A. L.

    1987-02-01

    Internal reforming of natural gas within a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) should simplify the overall system design and make the SOFC an attractive means for producing electrical power. This program was undertaken to investigate the catalytic properties of nickel cermets, which are prime candidates for SOFC anodes. The initial task in this program was an extensive literature search for information on steam reforming of light hydrocarbons. The second task was to modify and calibrate the reactor systems that were used in the experimental kinetic studies. Two systems were used in this investigation; a continuously stirred tank reactor system (CSTR) and a plug flow reactor system (PFR). In the third task, 16 nickel-zirconia cermets were prepared using four procedures, tape casting, Westinghouse slurry, incorporation of performers, and granulation. The catalytic behavior of three cermets was determined in the fourth task. The reaction was first order with respect to methane and -1.25 for steam. Ethane and propane in the feed did not affect the methane conversion rate. The cermet has a higher initial tolerance for sulfur than standard nickel reforming catalysts. The final task was a mechanistic study of the steam reforming reaction on nickel and nickel-zirconia catalysts.

  4. PRESSURIZED SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL/GAS TURBINE POWER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; R.R. Moritz; S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann

    2000-02-01

    Power systems based on the simplest direct integration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generator and a gas turbine (GT) are capable of converting natural gas fuel energy to electric power with efficiencies of approximately 60% (net AC/LHV), and more complex SOFC and gas turbine arrangements can be devised for achieving even higher efficiencies. The results of a project are discussed that focused on the development of a conceptual design for a pressurized SOFC/GT power system that was intended to generate 20 MWe with at least 70% efficiency. The power system operates baseloaded in a distributed-generation application. To achieve high efficiency, the system integrates an intercooled, recuperated, reheated gas turbine with two SOFC generator stages--one operating at high pressure, and generating power, as well as providing all heat needed by the high-pressure turbine, while the second SOFC generator operates at a lower pressure, generates power, and provides all heat for the low-pressure reheat turbine. The system cycle is described, major system components are sized, the system installed-cost is estimated, and the physical arrangement of system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the design point are also presented, and the system cost of electricity estimate is developed.

  5. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  6. Fault diagnosis and prognostic of solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, XiaoJuan; Ye, Qianwen

    2016-07-01

    One of the major hurdles for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) commercialization is poor long-term performance and durability. Accurate fault diagnostic and prognostic technologies are two important tools to improve SOFC durability. In literature, plenty of diagnosis techniques for SOFC systems have been successfully designed. However, no literature studies SOFC fault prognosis approaches. In this paper a unified fault diagnosis and prognosis strategy is presented to identify faults (anode poisoning, cathode humidification or normal) and predict the remaining useful life for SOFC systems. Using a squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) classifier, a diagnosis model is built to identify SOFC different types of faults. After fault detection, two hidden semi-Mark models (HSMMs) are respectively employed to estimate SOFC remaining useful life in the case of anode poisoning and cathode humidification. The simulation results show that the fault recognition rates with the LS-SVM model are at best 97%, and the predicted error of the remaining useful life is within ±20%.

  7. Reinforced composite sealants for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Sonja M.; Federmann, Dirk; Remmel, Josef; Pap, Michael

    Glass-ceramic sealants are commonly used as joining materials for planar solid oxide fuel cells stacks. Several requirements need to be fulfilled by these materials: beside of electrical insulation and appropriate thermal expansion, a good adhesion on the ceramic and metallic components of a SOFC stack is necessary to form a gas-tight joint. Even though the joining process might have been successful, failures and leaks often occur during the stack operation due to fracture of the brittle material under thermal stresses or during thermal cycling of the components. This study focusses on composite materials consisting of a glass matrix based on the system of BaO-CaO-SiO 2 and various filler materials, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia fibres or particles and silver particles. In order to evaluate a possible reinforcing influence of the filler material of the composite, tensile strength tests were carried out on circular butt joints. The highest strength values were found for the composite material with addition of silver particles, followed by the glass matrix itself without any filler addition and the lowest values were measured for the composite with YSZ particles. SEM investigations of cross-sections of the joints elucidated these results by the microstructure of the glass-ceramic sealants.

  8. Testing of a Catalytic Partial Oxidation Diesel Reformer with a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman Frost; Bob Carrington; Rodger McKain; Dennis Witmer

    2005-03-01

    Rural Alaska currently uses diesel generator sets to produce much of its power. The high energy content of diesel (i.e. ~140,000 BTU per gallon) makes it the fuel of choice because this reduces the volume of fuel that must be transported, stored, and consumed in generating the power. There is an existing investment in infrastructure for the distribution and use of diesel fuel. Problems do exist, however, in that diesel generators are not very efficient in their use of diesel, maintenance levels can be rather high as systems age, and the environmental issues related to present diesel generators are of concern. The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory at the University of Alaska -- Fairbanks is sponsoring a project to address the issues mentioned above. The project takes two successful systems, a diesel reformer and a tubular solid oxide fuel cell unit, and jointly tests those systems with the objective of producing a for-purpose diesel fueled solid oxide fuel cell system that can be deployed in rural Alaska. The reformer will convert the diesel to a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can be used as a fuel by the fuel cell. The high temperature nature of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC is capable of using this mixture to generate electricity and provide usable heat with higher efficiency and lower emissions. The high temperature nature of the SOFC is more compatible with the arctic climate than are low temperature technologies such as the proton exchange membrane fuel cells. This paper will look at the interaction of a SOFC system that is designed to internally reform methane and a catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) diesel reformer. The diesel reformer produces a reformate that is approximately 140 BTU per scf (after removal of much of the reformate water) as compared to a methane based reformate that is over twice that value in BTU content. The project also considers the effect of altitude since the test location will be at 4800 feet with the

  9. Ionic conductivity studies of solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes and theoretical modeling of an entire solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pornprasertsuk, Rojana

    Because of the steep increase in oil prices, the global warming effect and the drive for energy independence, alternative energy research has been encouraged worldwide. The sustainable fuels such as hydrogen, biofuel, natural gas, and solar energy have attracted the attention of researchers. To convert these fuels into a useful energy source, an energy conversion device is required. Fuel cells are one of the energy conversion devices which convert chemical potentials into electricity. Due to their high efficiency, the ease to scale from 1 W range to megawatts range, no recharging requirement and the lack of CO2 and NOx emission (if H2 and air/O 2 are used), fuel cells have become a potential candidate for both stationary power generators and portable applications. This thesis has been focused primarily on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) studies due to its high efficiency, varieties of fuel choices, and no water management problem. At the present, however, practical applications of SOFCs are limited by high operating temperatures that are needed to create the necessary oxide-ion vacancy mobility in the electrolyte and to create sufficient electrode reactivities. This thesis introduces several experimental and theoretical approaches to lower losses both in the electrolyte and the electrodes. Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is commonly used as a solid electrolyte for SOFCs due to its high oxygen-ion conductivity. To improve the ionic conductivity for low temperature applications, an approach that involves dilating the structure by irradiation and introducing edge dislocations into the electrolyte was studied. Secondly, to understand the activation loss in SOFC, the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) technique was implemented to model the SOFC operation to determining the rate-limiting step due to the electrodes on different sizes of Pt catalysts. The isotope exchange depth profiling technique was employed to investigate the irradiation effect on the ionic transport in different

  10. Effects of ion irradiation on solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jeremy

    The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is an electrochemical device that converts chemical to electrical energy. It is usually based around an oxide conducting ceramic electrolyte that requires temperatures above 800°C to operate. There are many advantages to lowering this operation temperature such as more gas sealing options and more efficient startup. One of the key limitations is in the transport of ions across the electrolyte. The most common electrolyte material used is Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ). The ionic conductivity can be greatly affected by grain boundaries, dislocations, and point defects. In this study, dislocations were introduced by heavy ion irradiation. Irradiation with Xe+ or Ar+ produced a large number of point defects and dislocations via a mechanism similar to Frank partial dislocation formation. The dislocation density was on the order of 1012/cm2 and the Burgers vector was 1/2<110>. Heat treatment at temperatures from 800-1400°C changed the defect structure, eliminated point defects, and allowed dislocations to react and grow. Thin films of YSZ were deposited on silicon substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Films deposited on a metallized substrate were polycrystalline while films deposited directly onto conductive silicon could be epitaxially grown. Ion irradiation caused the film conductivity to drop by a factor of 2-3 due to additional point defects in the film. Heat treatment removed these point defects allowing the conductivity to recover. A novel method was developed to produce freestanding YSZ membranes without a silicon substrate by using the Focused Ion Beam (FIB). Thick, single-crystal YSZ pieces were thinned using in-situ X-Ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) for end point detection. The final membranes were single crystal, less than 350nm thick, and pinhole free. IV curves and impedance measurements were made after irradiation and heat treatment. The conductivity showed similar trends to the PLD deposited thin

  11. A NOVEL INTEGRATED STACK APPROACH FOR REALIZING MECHANICALLY ROBUST SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Scott A. Barnett; Tammy Lai; Jiang Liu

    2001-11-01

    SOFCs are a very promising energy conversion technology for utilization of fossil fuels. The proposed project is to improve the viability of SOFCs by introducing a novel stacking geometry. The geometry involved has all active SOFC components and the interconnect deposited as thin layers on an electrically insulating support. This allows the choice of a support material that provides optimal mechanical toughness and thermal shock resistance. The supports are in the form of flattened tubes, providing relatively high strength, high packing densities, and minimizing the number of seals required. The integration of SOFCs and interconnects on the same support has several other advantages including the reduction of electrical resistances associated with pressure contacts between the cells and interconnects, relaxation of fabrication tolerances required for pressure contacts, reduction of ohmic losses, and reduction of interconnect conductivity requirements. In this report, we describe the processing methodologies that have been developed for fabricating the integrated solid oxide fuel cell (ISOFC), along with results on characterization of the component materials: support, electrolyte, anode, cathode, and interconnect. Screen printing was the primary processing method developed. A centrifugal casting technique was also developed for depositing thin 8 mol % yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte layers on porous NiO-YSZ anode substrates. Dense pinhole-free YSZ coatings were obtained by co-sintering the bi-layers at 1400 C. After depositing La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM)-YSZ cathodes, single SOFCs produced near-theoretical open-circuit voltages and power densities of 0.55 W/cm{sup 2} at 800 C. Initial stack operation results are also described.

  12. Oxidation Resistance of Low Carbon Stainless Steel for Applications in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Matthes, Steven A.; Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.; Singh, P.

    2003-10-01

    Alloys protected from corrosion by Cr2O3 (chromia) are recognized as potential replacements for LaCrO3–based ceramic materials currently used as bipolar separators (interconnects) in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Stainless steels gain their corrosion resistance from the formation of chromia, when exposed to oxygen at elevated temperatures. Materials for interconnect applications must form uniform conductive oxide scales at 600–800o C while simultaneously exposed to air on the cathode side and mixtures of H2 - H2O, and, possibly, CHx and CO - CO2 on the anode side. In addition, they must possess good physical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Type 316L stainless steel was selected for the baseline study and development of an understanding of corrosion processes in complex gas environments. This paper discusses the oxidation resistance of 316L stainless steel exposed to dual SOFC environment for ~100 hours at ~900oK. The dual environment consisted of dry air on the cathode side of the specimen and a mixture of H2 and 3% H2O on the anode side. Post - corrosion surface evaluation involved the use of optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyses.

  13. A cell-centered Lagrangian finite volume approach for computing elasto-plastic response of solids in cylindrical axisymmetric geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar; Shashkov, Mikhail J.; Burton, Donald E.

    2013-03-01

    A finite volume cell-centered Lagrangian formulation is presented for solving large deformation problems in cylindrical axisymmetric geometries. Since solid materials can sustain significant shear deformation, evolution equations for stress and strain fields are solved in addition to mass, momentum and energy conservation laws. The total strain-rate realized in the material is split into an elastic and plastic response. The elastic and plastic components in turn are modeled using hypo-elastic theory. In accordance with the hypo-elastic model, a predictor-corrector algorithm is employed for evolving the deviatoric component of the stress tensor. A trial elastic deviatoric stress state is obtained by integrating a rate equation, cast in the form of an objective (Jaumann) derivative, based on Hooke's law. The dilatational response of the material is modeled using an equation of state of the Mie-Grüneisen form. The plastic deformation is accounted for via an iterative radial return algorithm constructed from the J2 von Mises yield condition. Several benchmark example problems with non-linear strain hardening and thermal softening yield models are presented. Extensive comparisons with representative Eulerian and Lagrangian hydrocodes in addition to analytical and experimental results are made to validate the current approach.

  14. Functionally Graded Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Abernathy; Meilin Liu

    2006-12-31

    One primary suspected cause of long-term performance degradation of solid oxide fuels (SOFCs) is the accumulation of chromium (Cr) species at or near the cathode/electrolyte interface due to reactive Cr molecules originating from Cr-containing components (such as the interconnect) in fuel cell stacks. To date, considerable efforts have been devoted to the characterization of cathodes exposed to Cr sources; however, little progress has been made because a detailed understanding of the chemistry and electrochemistry relevant to the Cr-poisoning processes is still lacking. This project applied multiple characterization methods - including various Raman spectroscopic techniques and various electrochemical performance measurement techniques - to elucidate and quantify the effect of Cr-related electrochemical degradation at the cathode/electrolyte interface. Using Raman microspectroscopy the identity and location of Cr contaminants (SrCrO{sub 4}, (Mn/Cr){sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel) have been observed in situ on an LSM cathode. These Cr contaminants were shown to form chemically (in the absence of current flowing through the cell) at temperatures as low as 625 C. While SrCrO{sub 4} and (Mn/Cr){sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel must preferentially form on LSM, since the LSM supplies the Sr and Mn cations necessary for these compounds, LSM was also shown to be an active site for the deposition of Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} for samples that also contained silver. In contrast, Pt and YSZ do not appear to be active for formation of Cr-containing phases. The work presented here supports the theory that Cr contamination is predominantly chemically-driven and that in order to minimize the effect, cathode materials should be chosen that are free of cations/elements that could preferentially react with chromium, including silver, strontium, and manganese.

  15. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2005-01-24

    AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed strontium-and-magnesium-doped lanthanum gallate electrolyte, La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSGM). The objective of the study was to identify the materials system for fabrication and evaluation of intermediate temperature (600-800 C) solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The slurry-coated electrode materials had fine porosity to enhance catalytic activity. Cathode materials investigated include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM-doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF-LSGM. The anode materials were Ni-Ce{sub 0.85}Gd{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} (Ni-GDC) and Ni-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 2} (Ni-LDC) composites. Experiments conducted with the anode materials investigated the effect of having a barrier layer of GDC or LDC in between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-composite anode to prevent adverse reaction of the Ni with lanthanum in LSGM. For proper interpretation of the beneficial effects of the barrier layer, similar measurements were performed without the barrier layer. The ohmic and the polarization resistances of the system were obtained over time as a function of temperature (600-800 C), firing temperature, thickness, and the composition of the electrodes. The study revealed important details pertaining to the ohmic and the polarization resistances of the electrode as they relate to stability and the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrode structures.

  16. Nanoparticle scaffolds for syngas-fed solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boldrin, Paul; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Yu, Jingwen; Gruar, Robert I.; Tighe, Christopher J.; Chang, Kee-Chul; Ilavsky, Jan; Darr, Jawwad A.; Brandon, Nigel

    2014-12-17

    Incorporation of nanoparticles into devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) may provide benefits such as higher surface areas or finer control over microstructure. However, their use with traditional fabrication techniques such as screen-printing is problematic. Here, we show that mixing larger commercial particles with nanoparticles allows traditional ink formulation and screen-printing to be used while still providing benefits of nanoparticles such as increased porosity and lower sintering temperatures. SOFC anodes were produced by impregnating ceria–gadolinia (CGO) scaffolds with nickel nitrate solution. The scaffolds were produced from inks containing a mixture of hydrothermally-synthesised nanoparticle CGO, commercial CGO and polymeric pore formers. The scaffolds were heat-treated at either 1000 or 1300 °C, and were mechanically stable. In situ ultra-small X-ray scattering (USAXS) shows that the nanoparticles begin sintering around 900–1000 °C. Analysis by USAXS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the low temperature heat-treated scaffolds possessed higher porosity. Impregnated scaffolds were used to produce symmetrical cells, with the lower temperature heat-treated scaffolds showing improved gas diffusion, but poorer charge transfer. Using these scaffolds, lower temperature heat-treated cells of Ni–CGO/200 μm YSZ/CGO-LSCF performed better at 700 °C (and below) in hydrogen, and performed better at all temperatures using syngas, with power densities of up to 0.15 W cm-2 at 800 °C. This approach has the potential to allow the use of a wider range of materials and finer control over microstructure.

  17. Nanoparticle scaffolds for syngas-fed solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boldrin, Paul; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Yu, Jingwen; Gruar, Robert I.; Tighe, Christopher J.; Chang, Kee-Chul; Ilavsky, Jan; Darr, Jawwad A.; Brandon, Nigel

    2014-12-17

    Incorporation of nanoparticles into devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) may provide benefits such as higher surface areas or finer control over microstructure. However, their use with traditional fabrication techniques such as screen-printing is problematic. Here, we show that mixing larger commercial particles with nanoparticles allows traditional ink formulation and screen-printing to be used while still providing benefits of nanoparticles such as increased porosity and lower sintering temperatures. SOFC anodes were produced by impregnating ceria–gadolinia (CGO) scaffolds with nickel nitrate solution. The scaffolds were produced from inks containing a mixture of hydrothermally-synthesised nanoparticle CGO, commercial CGO and polymericmore » pore formers. The scaffolds were heat-treated at either 1000 or 1300 °C, and were mechanically stable. In situ ultra-small X-ray scattering (USAXS) shows that the nanoparticles begin sintering around 900–1000 °C. Analysis by USAXS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the low temperature heat-treated scaffolds possessed higher porosity. Impregnated scaffolds were used to produce symmetrical cells, with the lower temperature heat-treated scaffolds showing improved gas diffusion, but poorer charge transfer. Using these scaffolds, lower temperature heat-treated cells of Ni–CGO/200 μm YSZ/CGO-LSCF performed better at 700 °C (and below) in hydrogen, and performed better at all temperatures using syngas, with power densities of up to 0.15 W cm-2 at 800 °C. This approach has the potential to allow the use of a wider range of materials and finer control over microstructure.« less

  18. CRACK GROWTH ANALYSIS OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-10-01

    Defects and Flaws control the structural and functional property of ceramics. In determining the reliability and lifetime of ceramics structures it is very important to quantify the crack growth behavior of the ceramics. In addition, because of the high variability of the strength and the relatively low toughness of ceramics, a statistical design approach is necessary. The statistical nature of the strength of ceramics is currently well recognized, and is usually accounted for by utilizing Weibull or similar statistical distributions. Design tools such as CARES using a combination of strength measurements, stress analysis, and statistics are available and reasonably well developed. These design codes also incorporate material data such as elastic constants as well as flaw distributions and time-dependent properties. The fast fracture reliability for ceramics is often different from their time-dependent reliability. Further confounding the design complexity, the time-dependent reliability varies with the environment/temperature/stress combination. Therefore, it becomes important to be able to accurately determine the behavior of ceramics under simulated application conditions to provide a better prediction of the lifetime and reliability for a given component. In the present study, Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) of 9.6 mol% Yttria composition was procured in the form of tubes of length 100 mm. The composition is of interest as tubular electrolytes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. Rings cut from the tubes were characterized for microstructure, phase stability, mechanical strength (Weibull modulus) and fracture mechanisms. The strength at operating condition of SOFCs (1000 C) decreased to 95 MPa as compared to room temperature strength of 230 MPa. However, the Weibull modulus remains relatively unchanged. Slow crack growth (SCG) parameter, n = 17 evaluated at room temperature in air was representative of well studied brittle materials. Based on the results, further work

  19. Direct oxidation solid oxide fuel cell: Aspects of anode performance optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Nunes, Olga

    I have examined the impact of high fuel utilization and anode catalyst stability for Cu-based anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). First, the performance of SOFC with Cu-ceria-YSZ anodes was studied in n-butane at 973 K as a function of fuel conversion. Conversion led to dilution of the fuel which resulted in a significant decrease in performance at higher fuel conversions. I demonstrated that the inclusion of a steam-reforming catalyst within the anode compartment of direct-oxidation SOFC improved performance at high fuel utilization. The performance of a Cu-CeO2-YSZ SOFC was compared to a conventional SOFC with Ni-YSZ anode while operating on H2, CO, and syngas fuels. Cells with Cu-CeO2-YSZ anodes exhibit similar performance when operating on H2 or CO fuels, while cells with Ni-YSZ anodes exhibited substantially lower performance when operating on CO compared to H2. My work demonstrated that dilution of H2 by H2O has little effect on the kinetics of H2 oxidation on both the Cu-CeO 2-YSZ and Ni-YSZ anodes. In addition, I have investigated the thermal stability of the anode catalyst, ceria, was using thin ceria films supported on YSZ. Special attention was given to the interactions between ceria and YSZ under high temperature treatments in reducing and oxidizing environments. My results have shown that ceria films on YSZ are highly mobile at relatively moderate temperatures and their morphology depends on the gas environment to which they have been exposed. Studies with alpha-Al2O3 assisted in clarifying the role of the substrate in the treatment effects on ceria.

  20. System Design and New Materials for Reversible, Solid-Oxide, High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, J.A.

    2007-12-20

    High temperature solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) offer high electrical efficiency and a potential path to large scale hydrogen production. Solid oxide technology is capable of both power generation and hydrogen production. That makes it possible for the development of a reversible solid-oxide system that can respond to market conditions to produce electricity or hydrogen on demand. New high-temperature electrolyzer cell materials are needed to enable cost-effective hydrogen production system designs based on reversible steam electrolysis. Two test methods were established for the eventual development of the reversible, durable electrode materials: the button cell test and the oxygen electrode test. The button cell test is capable of evaluating the performance and degradation of full solid oxide cells with dual atmosphere of air and hydrogen-steam. The oxygen electrode test is capable of isolating the performance and degradation of the oxygen electrode. It has higher throughput and sensitivity than the button cell test.

  1. Solid oxide membrane (SOM) process for ytterbium and silicon production from their oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yihong

    The Solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis is an innovative green technology that produces technologically important metals directly from their respective oxides. A yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) tube, closed at one end is employed to separate the molten salt containing dissolved metal oxides from the anode inside the YSZ tube. When the applied electric potential between the cathode in the molten salt and the anode exceeds the dissociation potential of the desired metal oxides, oxygen ions in the molten salt migrate through the YSZ membrane and are oxidized at the anode while the dissolved metal cations in the flux are reduced to the desired metal at the cathode. Compared with existing metal production processes, the SOM process has many advantages such as one unit operation, less energy consumption, lower capital costs and zero carbon emission. Successful implementation of the SOM electrolysis process would provide a way to mitigate the negative environmental impact of the metal industry. Successful demonstration of producing ytterbium (Yb) and silicon (Si) directly from their respective oxides utilizing the SOM electrolysis process is presented in this dissertation. During the SOM electrolysis process, Yb2O3 was reduced to Yb metal on an inert cathode. The melting point of the supporting electrolyte (LiF-YbF3-Yb2O3) was determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA). Static stability testing confirmed that the YSZ tube was stable with the flux at operating temperature. Yb metal deposit on the cathode was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). During the SOM electrolysis process for silicon production, a fluoride based flux based on BaF2, MgF2, and YF3 was engineered to serve as the liquid electrolyte for dissolving silicon dioxide. YSZ tube was used to separate the molten salt from an anode current collector in the liquid silver. Liquid tin was chosen as cathode to dissolve the reduced silicon during

  2. Comparative study on ammonia oxidation over Ni-based cermet anodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molouk, Ahmed Fathi Salem; Yang, Jun; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Matsui, Toshiaki; Eguchi, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    In the current work, we investigate the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with Ni‒yttria-stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) and Ni‒gadolinia-dope ceria (Ni-GDC) cermet anodes fueled with H2 or NH3 in terms of the catalytic activity of ammonia decomposition. The cermet of Ni-GDC shows higher catalytic activity for ammonia decomposition than Ni-YSZ. In response to this, the performance of direct NH3-fueled SOFC improved by using Ni-GDC anode. Moreover, we observe further enhancement in the cell performance and the catalytic activity for ammonia decomposition with applying Ni-GDC anode synthesised by the glycine-nitrate combustion process. These results reveal that the high performance of Ni-GDC anode for the direct NH3-fueled SOFC results from its mixed ionic-electronic conductivity as well as high catalytic activity for ammonia decomposition.

  3. Bipolar plating of metal contacts onto oxide interconnection for solid oxide electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1987-03-10

    Disclosed is a method of forming an adherent metal deposit on a conducting layer of a tube sealed at one end. The tube is immersed with the sealed end down into an aqueous solution containing ions of the metal to be deposited. An ionically conducting aqueous fluid is placed inside the tube and a direct current is passed from a cathode inside the tube to an anode outside the tube. Also disclosed is a multi-layered solid oxide fuel cell tube which consists of an inner porous ceramic support tube, a porous air electrode covering the support tube, a non-porous electrolyte covering a portion of the air electrode, a non-porous conducting interconnection covering the remaining portion of the electrode, and a metal deposit on the interconnection. 1 fig.

  4. Bipolar plating of metal contacts onto oxide interconnection for solid oxide electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of forming an adherent metal deposit on a conducting layer of a tube sealed at one end. The tube is immersed with the sealed end down into an aqueous solution containing ions of the metal to be deposited. An ionically conducting aqueous fluid is placed inside the tube and a direct current is passed from a cathode inside the tube to an anode outside the tube. Also disclosed is a multi-layered solid oxide fuel cell tube which consists of an inner porous ceramic support tube, a porous air electrode covering the support tube, a non-porous electrolyte covering a portion of the air electrode, a non-porous conducting interconnection covering the remaining portion of the electrode, and a metal deposit on the interconnection.

  5. LOW-TEMPERATURE, ANODE-SUPPORTED HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS WITH NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRODES

    SciTech Connect

    Anil V. Virkar

    2001-06-21

    A simple, approximate analysis of the effect of differing cathode and anode areas on the measurement of cell performance on anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells, wherein the cathode area is smaller than the anode area, is presented. It is shown that the effect of cathode area on cathode polarization, on electrolyte contribution, and on anode resistance, as normalized on the basis of the cathode area, is negligible. There is a small but measurable effect on anode polarization, which results from concentration polarization. Effectively, it is the result of a greater amount of fuel transported to the anode/electrolyte interface in cases wherein the anode area is larger than the cathode area. Experiments were performed on cells made with differing cathode areas and geometries. Cathodic and anodic overpotentials measured using reference electrodes, and the measured ohmic area specific resistances by current interruption, were in good agreement with expectations based on the analysis presented. At 800 C, the maximum power density measured with a cathode area of {approx}1.1 cm{sup 2} was {approx}1.65 W/cm{sup 2} compared to {approx}1.45 W/cm{sup 2} for cathode area of {approx}2 cm{sup 2}, for anode thickness of {approx}1.3 mm, with hydrogen as the fuel and air as the oxidant. At 750 C, the measured maximum power densities were {approx}1.3 W/cm{sup 2} for the cell with cathode area {approx}1.1 cm{sup 2}, and {approx}1.25 W/cm{sup 2} for the cell with cathode area {approx}2 cm{sup 2}.

  6. Detailed Multi‐dimensional Modeling of Direct Internal Reforming Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tseronis, K.; Fragkopoulos, I.S.; Bonis, I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fuel flexibility is a significant advantage of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and can be attributed to their high operating temperature. Here we consider a direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell setup in which a separate fuel reformer is not required. We construct a multidimensional, detailed model of a planar solid oxide fuel cell, where mass transport in the fuel channel is modeled using the Stefan‐Maxwell model, whereas the mass transport within the porous electrodes is simulated using the Dusty‐Gas model. The resulting highly nonlinear model is built into COMSOL Multiphysics, a commercial computational fluid dynamics software, and is validated against experimental data from the literature. A number of parametric studies is performed to obtain insights on the direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell system behavior and efficiency, to aid the design procedure. It is shown that internal reforming results in temperature drop close to the inlet and that the direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell performance can be enhanced by increasing the operating temperature. It is also observed that decreases in the inlet temperature result in smoother temperature profiles and in the formation of reduced thermal gradients. Furthermore, the direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell performance was found to be affected by the thickness of the electrochemically‐active anode catalyst layer, although not always substantially, due to the counter‐balancing behavior of the activation and ohmic overpotentials. PMID:27570502

  7. Probing and Mapping Electrode Surfaces in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blinn, Kevin S.; Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Bottomley, Lawrence A.; Liu, Meilin

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are potentially the most efficient and cost-effective solution to utilization of a wide variety of fuels beyond hydrogen 1-7. The performance of SOFCs and the rates of many chemical and energy transformation processes in energy storage and conversion devices in general are limited primarily by charge and mass transfer along electrode surfaces and across interfaces. Unfortunately, the mechanistic understanding of these processes is still lacking, due largely to the difficulty of characterizing these processes under in situ conditions. This knowledge gap is a chief obstacle to SOFC commercialization. The development of tools for probing and mapping surface chemistries relevant to electrode reactions is vital to unraveling the mechanisms of surface processes and to achieving rational design of new electrode materials for more efficient energy storage and conversion2. Among the relatively few in situ surface analysis methods, Raman spectroscopy can be performed even with high temperatures and harsh atmospheres, making it ideal for characterizing chemical processes relevant to SOFC anode performance and degradation8-12. It can also be used alongside electrochemical measurements, potentially allowing direct correlation of electrochemistry to surface chemistry in an operating cell. Proper in situ Raman mapping measurements would be useful for pin-pointing important anode reaction mechanisms because of its sensitivity to the relevant species, including anode performance degradation through carbon deposition8, 10, 13, 14 ("coking") and sulfur poisoning11, 15 and the manner in which surface modifications stave off this degradation16. The current work demonstrates significant progress towards this capability. In addition, the family of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques provides a special approach to interrogate the electrode surface with nanoscale resolution. Besides the surface topography that is routinely collected by AFM and STM

  8. High performance zirconia-bismuth oxide nanocomposite electrolytes for lower temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Dong Woo; Park, Jeong Hwa; Kim, Do Yeub; Yun, Byung-Hyun; Lee, Kang Taek

    2016-07-01

    We develop a novel nanocomposite electrolyte, consisting of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and erbia-stabilized bismuth oxide (ESB). The 20 mol% ESB-incorporated YSZ composite (20ESB-YSZ) achieves the high density (>97%) at the low sintering temperature of 800 °C. The microstructural analysis of 20ESB-YSZ reveals the characteristic nanocomposite structure of the highly percolated ESB phase at the YSZ grain boundaries (a few ∼ nm thick). The ionic conductivity of 20ESB-YSZ is increased by 5 times compared to that of the conventional YSZ due to the fast oxygen ion transport along the ESB phase. Moreover, this high conductivity is maintained up to 580 h, indicating high stability of the ESB-YSZ nanocomposite. In addition, the oxygen reduction reaction at the composite electrolyte/cathode interface is effectively enhanced (∼70%) at the temperature below 650 °C, mainly due to the fast dissociative oxygen adsorption on the ESB surface as well as the rapid oxygen ion incorporation into the ESB lattice. Thus, we believe this ESB-YSZ nanocomposite is a promising electrolyte for high performance solid oxide fuel cells at reduced temperatures.

  9. Steam electrolysis by solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) with proton-conducting oxides.

    PubMed

    Bi, Lei; Boulfrad, Samir; Traversa, Enrico

    2014-12-21

    Energy crisis and environmental problems caused by the conventional combustion of fossil fuels boost the development of renewable and sustainable energies. H2 is regarded as a clean fuel for many applications and it also serves as an energy carrier for many renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind power. Among all the technologies for H2 production, steam electrolysis by solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency and low environmental impact, provided that the needed electrical power is generated from renewable sources. However, the deployment of SOECs based on conventional oxygen-ion conductors is limited by several issues, such as high operating temperature, hydrogen purification from water, and electrode stability. To avoid these problems, proton-conducting oxides are proposed as electrolyte materials for SOECs. This review paper provides a broad overview of the research progresses made for proton-conducting SOECs, summarizing the past work and finding the problems for the development of proton-conducting SOECs, as well as pointing out potential development directions. PMID:25134016

  10. Operation of a solid oxide fuel cell on biodiesel with a partial oxidation reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Siefert, N, Shekhawat, D.; Gemmen, R.; Berry, D.

    2010-01-01

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory’s Office of Research & Development (NETL/ORD) has successfully demonstrated the operation of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) using reformed biodiesel. The biodiesel for the project was produced and characterized by West Virginia State University (WVSU). This project had two main aspects: 1) demonstrate a catalyst formulation on monolith for biodiesel fuel reforming; and 2) establish SOFC stack test stand capabilities. Both aspects have been completed successfully. For the first aspect, in–house patented catalyst specifications were developed, fabricated and tested. Parametric reforming studies of biofuels provided data on fuel composition, catalyst degradation, syngas composition, and operating parameters required for successful reforming and integration with the SOFC test stand. For the second aspect, a stack test fixture (STF) for standardized testing, developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the Solid Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Program, was engineered and constructed at NETL. To facilitate the demonstration of the STF, NETL employed H.C. Starck Ceramics GmbH & Co. (Germany) anode supported solid oxide cells. In addition, anode supported cells, SS441 end plates, and cell frames were transferred from PNNL to NETL. The stack assembly and conditioning procedures, including stack welding and sealing, contact paste application, binder burn-out, seal-setting, hot standby, and other stack assembly and conditioning methods were transferred to NETL. In the future, fuel cell stacks provided by SECA or other developers could be tested at the STF to validate SOFC performance on various fuels. The STF operated on hydrogen for over 1000 hrs before switching over to reformed biodiesel for 100 hrs of operation. Combining these first two aspects led to demonstrating the biodiesel syngas in the STF. A reformer was built and used to convert 0.5 ml/min of

  11. New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allan J. Jacobson

    2006-09-30

    the perovskite compositions that were being investigated at PNNL, in order to assess the relative importance of the intrinsic properties such as oxygen ion diffusion and surface exchange rates as predictors of performance in cell tests. We then used these measurements to select new materials for scaled up synthesis and performance evaluation in single cell tests. The results of the single cell tests than provided feedback to the materials synthesis and selection steps. In this summary, the following studies are reported: (1) Synthesis, characterization, and DC conductivity measurements of the P1 compositions La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3-x} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}FeO{sub 3-x} were completed. A combinational approach for preparing a range P1 (La,Sr)FeO{sub 3} compositions as thin films was investigated. Synthesis and heat treatment of amorphous SrFeO{sub 3-x} and LaFeO{sub 3-x} films prepared by pulsed laser deposition are described. (2) Oxygen transport properties of K1 compositions La{sub x}Pr{sub 2-x}NiO{sub 4+d} (x =2.0, 1.9, 1.2, 1.0 and 0) measured by electrical conductivity relaxation are presented in this report. Area specific resistances determined by ac impedance measurements for La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+{delta}} and Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+{delta}} on CGO are encouraging and suggest that further optimization of the electrode microstructure will enable the target to be reached. (3) The oxygen exchange kinetics of the oxygen deficient double perovskite LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (Ln=Pr and Nd) were determined by electrical conductivity relaxation. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells. The first complete cell measurements were performed on Ni/CGO/CGO/PBCO/CGO cells. (4) The oxygen exchange kinetics of highly epitaxial thin films of PrBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (PBCO) has been determined by electrical conductivity

  12. Low Temperature Constrained Sintering of Cerium Gadolinium OxideFilms for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, Jason.D.

    2007-06-30

    Cerium gadolinium oxide (CGO) has been identified as an acceptable solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrolyte at temperatures (500-700 C) where cheap, rigid, stainless steel interconnect substrates can be used. Unfortunately, both the high sintering temperature of pure CGO, >1200 C, and the fact that constraint during sintering often results in cracked, low density ceramic films, have complicated development of metal supported CGO SOFCs. The aim of this work was to find new sintering aids for Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 1.95}, and to evaluate whether they could be used to produce dense, constrained Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 1.95} films at temperatures below 1000 C. To find the optimal sintering aid, Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 1.95} was doped with a variety of elements, of which lithium was found to be the most effective. Dilatometric studies indicated that by doping CGO with 3mol% lithium nitrate, it was possible to sinter pellets to a relative density of 98.5% at 800 C--a full one hundred degrees below the previous low temperature sintering record for CGO. Further, it was also found that a sintering aid's effectiveness could be explained in terms of its size, charge and high temperature mobility. A closer examination of lithium doped Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 indicated that lithium affects sintering by producing a Li{sub 2}O-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CeO{sub 2} liquid at the CGO grain boundaries. Due to this liquid phase sintering, it was possible to produce dense, crack-free constrained films of CGO at the record low temperature of 950 C using cheap, colloidal spray deposition processes. This is the first time dense constrained CGO films have been produced below 1000 C and could help commercialize metal supported ceria based solid oxide fuel cells.

  13. Cathode and electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Allan J; Wang, Shuangyan; Kim, Gun Tae

    2014-01-28

    Novel cathode, electrolyte and oxygen separation materials are disclosed that operate at intermediate temperatures for use in solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes based on oxides with perovskite related structures and an ordered arrangement of A site cations. The materials have significantly faster oxygen kinetics than in corresponding disordered perovskites.

  14. Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Singh, P.; George, R.A.

    1999-07-27

    A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell. 4 figs.

  15. Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; George, Raymond A.

    1999-01-01

    A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell.

  16. Air feed tube support system for a solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Doshi, Vinod B.; Ruka, Roswell J.; Hager, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator (12), containing tubular fuel cells (36) with interior air electrodes (18), where a supporting member (82) containing a plurality of holes (26) supports oxidant feed tubes (51), which pass from an oxidant plenum (52") into the center of the fuel cells, through the holes (26) in the supporting member (82), where a compliant gasket (86) around the top of the oxidant feed tubes and on top (28) of the supporting member (82) helps support the oxidant feed tubes and center them within the fuel cells, and loosen the tolerance for centering the air feed tubes.

  17. Alloy Films Deposited by Electroplating as Precursors for Protective Oxide Coatings on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Metallic Interconnect Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christopher; Gemmen, R.S.; Cross, Caleb

    2006-10-01

    The successful development of stainless steel interconnects for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) may be the materials breakthrough that makes SOFC technology truly commercial. Many of the ferritic stainless steels, however, suffer from a relatively high area specific resistance (ASR) after long exposure times at temperature and the Cr in the native oxide can evaporate and contaminate other cell components. Conductive coatings that resist oxide scale growth and chromium evaporation may prevent both of these problems. In the present study electrochemical deposition of binary alloys followed by oxidation of the alloy to form protective and conductive oxide layers is examined. Results are presented for the deposition of Mn/Co and Fe/Ni alloys via electroplating to form a precursor for spinel oxide coating formation. Analysis of the alloy coatings is done by SEM, EDS and XRD.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of all-ceramic solid oxide fuel cells based on composite oxide anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeonghee; Shin, Dongwook; Son, Ji-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Byung-Kook; Je, Hae-June; Lee, Hae-Weon; Yoon, Kyung Joong

    2013-11-01

    All-ceramic solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), which offer advantages in carbon tolerance, sulfur resistance and redox stability, are fabricated and evaluated. The electrolyte-supported cells are composed of a La0.75Sr0.25Cr0.5Mn0.5O3-δ (LSCM)-Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95-δ (GDC) anode, an Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) electrolyte, a GDC interdiffusion barrier layer, and a La0.8Sr0.2Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF)-GDC cathode. A particle-dispersed glycine-nitrate process is developed to synthesize extremely fine and homogeneous LSCM-GDC ceramic composite powders. The electrochemical performance of the LSCM-GDC anode is comparable to that of conventional Ni-based anodes. The impedance spectra of the all-ceramic SOFCs are successfully interpreted by the independent characterization of the individual electrodes via half-cell measurements. The impedance of the LSCM-GDC anode is dominated by a low-frequency arc originating from the “chemical capacitance”, which is associated with the variation of the oxygen nonstoichiometry in the mixed conducting ceramic electrode. In addition, the impedance arc associated with the electrode-gas interaction is observed in the LSCM-GDC anode. The rate-limiting processes for the LSCF-GDC cathode are observed to be solid-state oxygen diffusion and surface chemical exchange. Herein, the reaction mechanisms and rate-limiting processes of the all-ceramic SOFCs are discussed in detail and compared with those of conventional Ni-based SOFCs.

  19. Solid State, Surface and Catalytic Studies of Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. H.

    2004-11-23

    This project investigates the catalytic properties of oxides for the selective oxidative dehydrogenation of light alkanes and for hydrocarbon reduction of NO{sub x}. Various vanadium oxide based catalysts were investigated to elucidate the relationship between the chemical and structural properties of the catalysts and their selectivity for the formation of alkenes. It was found that vanadium oxide units that are less reducible give higher selectivities. For hydrocarbon reduction of NO{sub x}, it was found that alumina-based catalysts can be effective at higher temperatures than the corresponding zeolite-based catalysts. On some catalysts, such as SnO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Ag/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the alumina participates directly in the reaction, making the catalyst bifunctional. These results are useful in research to improve the performance of this stress of catalysts.

  20. A Reversible Planar Solid Oxide Fuel-Fed Electrolysis Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Hydrogen and Electricity Production Operating on Natural Gas/Biomass Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Greg, G.

    2007-03-31

    A solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis technique was developed to co-generate hydrogen and electricity directly from a fuel at a reduced cost of electricity. Solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs), which were comprised of 8YSZ electrolytes sandwiched between thick anode supports and thin cathodes, were constructed and experimentally evaluated at various operation conditions on lab-level button cells with 2 cm2 per-cell active areas as well as on bench-scale stacks with 30 cm2 and 100 cm2 per-cell active areas. To reduce the concentration overpotentials, pore former systems were developed and engineered to optimize the microstructure and morphology of the Ni+8YSZ-based anodes. Chemically stable cathode materials, which possess good electronic and ionic conductivity and exhibit good electrocatalytic properties in both oxidizing and reducing gas atmospheres, were developed and materials properties were investigated. In order to increase the specific hydrogen production rate and thereby reduce the system volume and capital cost for commercial applications, a hybrid system that integrates the technologies of the SOFEC and the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC), was developed and successfully demonstrated at a 1kW scale, co-generating hydrogen and electricity directly from chemical fuels.

  1. Spinel coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects and crystal structure of copper manganese oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ping

    Long-term stability and chromium (Cr) contamination are two major concerns for application of chromium-bearing metallic materials as interconnects of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) at intermediate temperature (˜800°C). Copper-manganese (Cu-Mn) and cobalt-manganese (Co-Mn) spinel can be promising coating materials for the metallic interconnects as they show high electrical conductivities. The first objective of this research is to develop an economical and convenient method through which the spinel coatings can be applied to the metallic substrates. The investigations on the crystal structure of Cu xMn3-xO4 spinel, e.g., structure symmetry and cation distributions, have always been controversial, which hinders the total understanding of the detailed structure of the material. In order to resolve the inconsistency, in-situ neutron and X-ray diffraction were employed to determine the structure of the spinel. A novel method was developed to obtain high quality manganese coating without any additives (sulphur or selenium compounds). Cu-Mn and Co-Mn spinel coatings were applied to metallic coupons by electrodeposition and subsequent annealing. The method is convenient and easy to control. The performance testing showed that the area specific resistances (ASRs) of the coated samples (0.003 O·cm 2) are much lower than that of the uncoated UNS 430 (0.189 O·cm 2) after oxidation at 750°C for 1500 hours. Moreover, both spinel coatings can effectively suppress the outward diffusion of Cr, which resulted in reduction of Cr contamination significantly. The oxidation studies of Cu-Mn coating revealed the transformation mechanisms of Cu-Mn coating to the spinel. In-situ neutron and X-ray diffraction analysis clarified the crystal symmetry of CuxMn3-xO4 spinel and CuMnO2 at high temperatures. Rietveld refinement revealed the cation distribution of Cu and Mn ions on tetrahedral and octrahedral sites of CuxMn 3-xO4 spinel, which was compared to values in the literatures.

  2. Laser induced densification of cerium gadolinium oxide: Application to single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariño, Mariana; Rieu, Mathilde; Viricelle, Jean-Paul; Garrelie, Florence

    2016-06-01

    In single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFC), anode and cathode are placed in a gas chamber where they are exposed to a fuel/air mixture. Similarly to conventional dual-chamber SOFC, the anode and the cathode are separated by an electrolyte. However, as in the SC-SOFC configuration the electrolyte does not play tightness role between compartments, this one can be a porous layer. Nevertheless, it is necessary to have a diffusion barrier to prevent the transportation of hydrogen produced locally at the anode to the cathode that reduces fuel cell performances. This study aims to obtain directly a diffusion barrier through the surface densification of the electrolyte Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) by a laser treatment. KrF excimer laser and Yb fiber laser irradiations were used at different fluences and number of pulses to modify the density of the electrolyte coating. Microstructural characterizations confirmed the modifications on the surface of the electrolyte for appropriate experimental conditions showing either grain growth or densified but cracked surfaces. Gas permeation and electrical conductivities of the modified electrolyte were evaluated. Finally SC-SOFC performances were improved for the cells presenting grain growth at the electrolyte surface.

  3. Long term high temperature oxidation characteristics of La and Cu alloyed ferritic stainless steels for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Lee, Young-Su; Kim, Dong-Ik

    2016-09-01

    To ensure the best performance of solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects, the Fe-22 wt.% Cr ferritic stainless steels with various La contents (0.006-0.6 wt.%) and Cu addition (1.57 wt.%), are developed. Long-term isothermal oxidation behavior of these steels is investigated in air at 800 °C, for 2700 h. Chemistry, morphology, and microstructure of the thermally grown oxide scale are examined using XPS, SEM-EDX, and XRD techniques. Broadly, all the steels show a double layer consisting of an inner Cr2O3 and outer (Mn, Cr)3O4. Distinctly, in the La-added steels, binary oxides of Cr, Mn and Ti are found at the oxide scale surface together with (Mn, Cr)3O4. Furthermore, all La-varied steels possess the metallic Fe protrusions along with discontinuous (Mn, Cr)3O4 spinel zones at the oxide scale/metal interface and isolated precipitates of Ti-oxides in the underlying matrix. Increase of La content to 0.6 wt.% is detrimental to the oxidation resistance. For the Cu-added steel, Cu is found to segregate strongly at the oxide scale/metal interface which inhibits the ingress of oxygen thereby suppressing the subscale formation of (Mn, Cr)3O4. Thus, Cu addition to the Fe-22Cr ferritic stainless steels benefits the oxidation resistance.

  4. Evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell systems for electricity generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, E. V.; Vidt, E. J.; Grimble, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Air blown (low BTU) gasification with atmospheric pressure Solid Electrolyte Fuel Cells (SOFC) and Rankine bottoming cycle, oxygen blown (medium BTU) gasification with atmospheric pressure SOFC and Rankine bottoming cycle, air blown gasification with pressurized SOFC and combined Brayton/Rankine bottoming cycle, oxygen blown gasification with pressurized SOFC and combined Brayton/Rankine bottoming cycle were evaluated.

  5. Regenerative Performance of the NASA Symmetrical Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Thomas L.; Setlock, John A.; Farmer, Serene C.; Eckel, Andy J.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing both a novel cell design (BSC) and a novel ceramic fabrication technique to produce fuel cells predicted to exceed a specific power density of 1.0 kW/kg. The NASA Glenn cell design has taken a completely different approach among planar designs by removing the metal interconnect and returning to the use of a thin, doped LaCrO3 interconnect. The cell is structurally symmetrical. Both electrodes support the thin electrolyte and contain micro-channels for gas flow-- a geometry referred to as a bi-electrode supported cell or BSC. The cell characteristics have been demonstrated under both SOFC and SOE conditions. Electrolysis tests verify that this cell design operates at very high electrochemical voltage efficiencies (EVE) and high H2O conversion percentages, even at the low flow rates predicted for closed loop systems encountered in unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) applications. For UAVs the volume, weight and the efficiency are critical as they determine the size of the water tank, the solar panel size, and other system requirements. For UAVs, regenerative solid oxide fuel cell stacks (RSOFC) use solar panels during daylight to generate power for electrolysis and then operate in fuel cell mode during the night to power the UAV and electronics. Recent studies, performed by NASA for a more electric commercial aircraft, evaluated SOFCs for auxiliary power units (APUs). System studies were also conducted for regenerative RSOFC systems. One common requirement for aerospace SOFCs and RSOFCs, determined independently in each application study, was the need for high specific power density and volume density, on the order of 1.0 kW/kg and greater than 1.0 kW/L. Until recently the best reported performance for SOFCs was 0.2 kW/kg or less for stacks. NASA Glenn is working to prototype the light weight, low volume BSC design for such high specific power aerospace applications.

  6. Magnesium Recycling of Partially Oxidized, Mixed Magnesium-Aluminum Scrap through Combined Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane Electrolysis Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaofei Guan; Peter A. Zink; Uday B. Pal; Adam C. Powell

    2012-01-01

    Pure magnesium (Mg) is recycled from 19g of partially oxidized 50.5wt.% Mg-Aluminum (Al) alloy. During the refining process, potentiodynamic scans (PDS) were performed to determine the electrorefining potential for magnesium. The PDS show that the electrorefining potential increases over time as the magnesium content inside the Mg-Al scrap decreases. Up to 100% percent of magnesium is refined from the Mg-Al scrap by a novel refining process of dissolving magnesium and its oxide into a flux followed by vapor phase removal of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapor. The solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis process is employed in the refining system to enable additional recycling of magnesium from magnesium oxide (MgO) in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. The combination of the refining and SOM processes yields 7.4g of pure magnesium.

  7. Magnesium Recycling of Partially Oxidized, Mixed Magnesium-Aluminum Scrap Through Combined Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaofei; Zink, Peter; Pal, Uday

    2012-03-11

    Pure magnesium (Mg) is recycled from 19g of partially oxidized 50.5wt.%Mg-Aluminum (Al) alloy. During the refining process, potentiodynamic scans (PDS) were performed to determine the electrorefining potential for magnesium. The PDS show that the electrorefining potential increases over time as the Mg content inside the Mg-Al scrap decreases. Up to 100% percent of magnesium is refined from the Mg-Al scrap by a novel refining process of dissolving magnesium and its oxide into a flux followed by vapor phase removal of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapors in a separate condenser. The solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis process is employed in the refining system to enable additional recycling of magnesium from magnesium oxide (MgO) in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. The combination of the refining and SOM processes yields 7.4g of pure magnesium; could not collect and weigh all of the magnesium recovered.

  8. Electronic structure and binding geometry of tetraphenylporphyrin-derived molecules adsorbed on metal and metal oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coh, Senia

    Tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP)-derived molecules have been studied extensively as efficient photosensitizers when chemisorbed on the metal oxide substrates in dye-sensitized solar cells. Still, many fundamental electronic properties of the dye/oxide interface are not understood and need careful consideration. In this thesis we present a comprehensive study of the electronic structure, energy level alignment and the adsorption geometry of the TPP-derived dye molecules adsorbed on TiO2(110), ZnO(1120) and Ag(100) single crystal surfaces using ultra-high vacuum (UHV) based surface sensitive techniques. The alignment of the molecular energy levels with respect to the TiO 2 and ZnO band edges for all TPP-derived molecules we studied was found to be insensitive to either the nature of the functional groups located on the phenyl rings, presence of zinc as a central metal ion and different binding geometry of the molecules. Binding geometry, molecule-molecule interaction and the aggregation effects in the adsorbed layer, that were observed in the UV-visible spectra of the molecules adsorbed on ZnO substrate were not observed in the ultraviolet photoemission (UPS) and inverse photoemission (IPS) spectra of the occupied and unoccupied molecular states. Using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), binding geometry of the two representative TPP-derivatives was directly determined to be upright, with the porphyrin ring under large angle with respect to the surface for the p-ZnTCPP molecules and with the porphyrin ring parallel to the surface for the m-ZnTCPP molecules. We observe that the energies and the energy level alignment of the ZnTPP molecular levels measured in UPS and IPS depend on the substrate on which the molecules are adsorbed (Ag(100) or TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces). The differences are attributed to different charge screening properties of these two materials. Image charges created in the substrates during

  9. Solid-electrolyte oxide-ion electrode for molten nitrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, D.A.

    1981-10-01

    An oxide ion sensitive electrode of the type Pb, PbO/ZrO/sub 2/(Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/)// was constructed and its performance tested in the binary, equimolar molten salt NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ over the temperature range 336 to 350/sup 0/C. The response of this electrode to oxide ion concentrations over the range 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -10/ moles/kg is linearly dependent upon log (0/sup =/), and dE/dlog(0/sup =/) corresponds to a two-electron process.

  10. Copper-substituted perovskite compositions for solid oxide fuel cell cathodes and oxygen reduction electrodes in other electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Rieke, Peter C.; Coffey, Gregory W.; Pederson, Larry R.; Marina, Olga A.; Hardy, John S.; Singh, Prabhaker; Thomsen, Edwin C.

    2010-07-20

    The present invention provides novel compositions that find advantageous use in making electrodes for electrochemical cells. Also provided are electrochemical devices that include active oxygen reduction electrodes, such as solid oxide fuel cells, sensors, pumps and the like. The compositions comprises a copper-substituted ferrite perovskite material. The invention also provides novel methods for making and using the electrode compositions and solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cell assemblies having cathodes comprising the compositions.

  11. Cerium-modified doped strontium titanate compositions for solid oxide fuel cell anodes and electrodes for other electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Marina, Olga A [Richland, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-03-02

    The present invention provides novel compositions that find advantageous use in making electrodes for electrochemical cells and electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, electrolyzers, sensors, pumps and the like, the compositions comprising cerium-modified doped strontium titanate. The invention also provides novel methods for making and using anode material compositions and solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cell assemblies having anodes comprising the compositions.

  12. Cerium-modified doped strontium titanate compositions for solid oxide fuel cell anodes and electrodes for other electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Marina, Olga A [Richland, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-11-23

    The present invention provides novel compositions that find advantageous use in making electrodes for electrochemical cells and electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, electrolyzers, sensors, pumps and the like, the compositions comprising cerium-modified doped strontium titanate. The invention also provides novel methods for making and using anode material compositions and solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cell assemblies having anodes comprising the compositions.

  13. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of major and minor oxides in steel slags: Influence of detection geometry and signal normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamer, C. M.; Eschlböck-Fuchs, S.; Kolmhofer, P. J.; Rössler, R.; Huber, N.; Pedarnig, J. D.

    2016-08-01

    Slag from secondary metallurgy in industrial steel production is analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The major oxides CaO, Al2O3, MgO, SiO2, FeO, MnO, and TiO2 are determined by calibration-free LIBS (CF-LIBS) method. For the minor oxide P2O5 calibration curves are established and the limits of detection (LOD) and the root-mean squared errors of prediction (RMSEP) are determined. The optical emission of the laser-induced plasma is measured for different detection geometries and varying sample position relative to the focal plane of the laser beam. LIBS spectra, plasma parameters, and analytical results are very similar for light collection with optical fibres close to the plasma ("direct detection") and at remote position ("collinear detection"). With collinear detection, the CF-LIBS calculated oxide concentrations are insensitive to sample position along the optical axis over wide range. The detection limits and the prediction errors of minor P2O5 depend on the major slag element used for signal normalization. With Mg and Si as internal reference elements the LOD values are 0.31 wt% and 0.07 wt%, respectively. The RMSEP values are lowest for signal normalization to Si. Calculations of the optical emission of ideal plasma support the experimental preference for Si as reference element in the phosphorous calibration.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of Direct Urea Solid Oxide Fuel Cell in combined heat and power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, F.; Dincer, I.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive steady state modelling and thermodynamic analysis of Direct Urea Solid Oxide Fuel Cell integrated with Gas Turbine power cycle (DU-SOFC/GT). The use of urea as direct fuel mitigates public health and safety risks associated with the use of hydrogen and ammonia. The integration scheme in this study covers both oxygen ion-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC-O) and hydrogen proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC-H). Parametric case studies are carried out to investigate the effects of design and operating parameters on the overall performance of the system. The results reveal that the fuel cell exhibited the highest level of exergy destruction among other system components. Furthermore, the SOFC-O based system offers better overall performance than that with the SOFC-H option mainly due to the detrimental reverse water-gas shift reaction at the SOFC anode as well as the unique configuration of the system.

  15. Solid oxide fuel cells, and air electrode and electrical interconnection materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J.L.

    1992-09-01

    In one aspect of the invention, an air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y[sub 1[minus]a]Q[sub a]MnO[sub 3], where Q is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and a' is from 0.1 to 0.8. Preferably, a' is from 0.4 to 0.7. In another aspect of the invention, an electrical interconnection material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y[sub 1[minus]b]Ca[sub b]Cr[sub 1[minus]c]Al[sub c]O[sub 3], where b' is from 0.1 to 0.6 and c' is from 0 to 9.3. Preferably, b' is from 0.3 to 0.5 and c' is from 0.05 to 0.1. A composite solid oxide electrochemical fuel cell incorporating these materials comprises: a solid oxide air electrode and an adjacent solid oxide electrical interconnection which commonly include the cation Y, the air electrode comprising Y[sub 1[minus]a]Q[sub a]MnO[sub 3], where Q is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and a' is from 0.1 to 0.8, the electrical interconnection comprising Y[sub 1[minus]b]Ca[sub b]Cr[sub 1[minus]c]Al[sub c]O[sub 3], where b' is from 0.1 to 0.6 and c' is from 0.0 to 0.3; a yttrium stabilized solid electrolyte comprising (1[minus]d)ZrO[sub 2]-(d)Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] where d' is from 0.06 to 0.5; and a solid fuel electrode comprising X-ZrO[sub 2], where X' is an elemental metal. 5 figs.

  16. Solid oxide fuel cells, and air electrode and electrical interconnection materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J. Lambert

    1992-01-01

    In one aspect of the invention, an air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y.sub.1-a Q.sub.a MnO.sub.3, where "Q" is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and "a" is from 0.1 to 0.8. Preferably, "a" is from 0.4 to 0.7. In another aspect of the invention, an electrical interconnection material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y.sub.1-b Ca.sub.b Cr.sub.1-c Al.sub.c O.sub.3, where "b" is from 0.1 to 0.6 and "c" is from 0 to 9.3. Preferably, "b" is from 0.3 to 0.5 and "c" is from 0.05 to 0.1. A composite solid oxide electrochemical fuel cell incorporating these materials comprises: a solid oxide air electrode and an adjacent solid oxide electrical interconnection which commonly include the cation Y, the air electrode comprising Y.sub.1-a Q.sub.a MnO.sub.3, where "Q" is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and "a" is from 0.1 to 0.8, the electrical interconnection comprising Y.sub.1-b Ca.sub.b Cr.sub.1-c Al.sub.c O.sub.3, where "b" is from 0.1 to 0.6 and "c" is from 0.0 to 0.3; a yttrium stabilized solid electrolyte comprising (1-d)ZrO.sub.2 -(d)Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 where "d" is from 0.06 to 0.5; and a solid fuel electrode comprising X-ZrO.sub.2, where "X" is an elemental metal.

  17. Thermal contact resistance in solid oxide fuel cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillig, Marius; Biedermann, Thomas; Karl, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    For detailed thermal modelling of SOFC stacks, in particular research of improved thermal management, start-up and shut-down processes, thermal contact resistances (TCR) are required input parameters. These parameters are difficult to access analytically and strongly depend on temperature, geometry and material properties of the contact. Therefore, this work presents an experimental study of thermal contact resistance between different components of one SOFC stack repeating unit at varying temperatures up to typical operating temperatures (800 °C). Heat transfer rates are obtained for full repeating units, cell only, contact mesh only and sealing set-ups. Thermal interface resistances between interconnector and Ni-mesh, Ni-mesh and anode, cathode and interconnector as well as between interconnector and sealing are computed based on the measured data and provide information for numerical SOFC stack modelling.

  18. Oxygen scrubbing and sensing in plant growth chambers using solid oxide electrolyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; MacElroy, Robert D.

    1997-01-01

    The maintenance of optimal levels of oxygen in the gaseous environment of a plant growth chamber during light and dark periods is an essential criterion for the correct growth of plants. The use of solid oxide electrolyzers to control the oxygen levels by removing the excess gaseous oxygen during periods of illumination and full-scale photosynthesis is described. A part of the oxygen removed can be stored and supplied back to the plants during dark periods. The excess oxygen can be used by the crew. The electrolizer can be additionally used in its open circuit mode, to sense the oxygen concentrations in the plant chamber. The solid oxide electrolysis process is described.

  19. Simple Electrolyzer Model Development for High-Temperature Electrolysis System Analysis Using Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell

    SciTech Connect

    JaeHwa Koh; DuckJoo Yoon; Chang H. Oh

    2010-07-01

    An electrolyzer model for the analysis of a hydrogen-production system using a solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) has been developed, and the effects for principal parameters have been estimated by sensitivity studies based on the developed model. The main parameters considered are current density, area specific resistance, temperature, pressure, and molar fraction and flow rates in the inlet and outlet. Finally, a simple model for a high-temperature hydrogen-production system using the solid oxide electrolysis cell integrated with very high temperature reactors is estimated.

  20. Coated oxidizers for combustion stability in solid-propellant rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmy, A. M.; Ramohalli, K. N. R.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in a laboratory-scale (6.25-cm diameter) end-burning rocket motor with state-of-the-art, ammonium perchlorate hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), nonmetallized propellants. The concept of tailoring the stability characteristics with a small amount (less than 1 percent by weight) of COATING on the oxidizer is explored. The thermal degradation characteristics of the coat chemical are deduced through theoretical arguments on thermal diffusivity of the composite material (propellant). Several candidate coats are selected and propellants are cast. These propellants (with coated oxidizers) are fired in a laboratory-scale end-burning rocket motor, and real-time pressure histories are recorded. The control propellant (with no coating) is also tested for comparison. The uniformity of the coating, confirmed by SEM pictures and BET adsorption measurements, is thought to be an advance in technology. The frequency of bulk mode instability (BMI), the pressure fluctuation amplitudes, and stability boundaries are correlated with parameters related to the characteristic length (L-asterisk) of the rocket motor. The coated oxidizer propellants, in general, display greater combustion stability than the control (state-of-the-art). The correlations of the various parameters are thought to be new to a field filled with much uncertainty.

  1. Oxidation and frictional performance of solid lubricants used in weapon stronglinks

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, M.T.; Peebles, D.E.; Ohlhausen, J.A.; Varga, K.S.; Steinhoff, R.

    1996-05-01

    The oxidation and performance of the solid film lubricant used in a majority of the surety devices in the enduring stockpile have been investigated. Oxidation of this lubricant in air at 150 C produces a significant increase in the molybdenum oxide to sulfide ratio, indicative of degradation of the primary lubricating constituent of the composite lubricant. Oxidation is more extensive on samples that were burnished such that the substrate is exposed over a fraction of the surface, relative to those which were only lightly burnished. Friction results indicate that oxidation in air did not increase the initial or steady-state friction coefficient for lightly burnished surfaces. However, surfaces burnished to expose substrate material experienced a significant increase in both initial and steady-state friction. Oxidation of lubricated parts retrieved from aged stronglinks has also been demonstrated.

  2. Aging model for solid lubricants used in weapon stronglinks: Oxidation chemistry and hardware review

    SciTech Connect

    Peebles, D.E.; Ohlhausen, J.A.; Dugger, M.T.; Varga, K.S.; Bryan, R.M.

    1997-09-01

    In support of efforts to model the performance of the MC2969 strong link for stockpile life extension, the kinetics of oxidation of the MoS{sub 2} based solid lubricant coating have been determined. The lubricant oxidation is primarily influenced by the extent of burnishing of the coating after application and curing. The activation energy for lubricant oxidation is low and agrees well with reported values for MoS{sub 2} coatings and particles. The type of substrate material and the amount of H{sub 2}O vapor present have little influence on the oxidation kinetics, but do affect the chemical species found on the surface, including sulfate species which enhance substrate corrosion. The analysis of field returned hardware shows oxidation levels within the range of those obtained throughout the oxidation study.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant with an anode recycle loop turbocharger

    DOEpatents

    Saito, Kazuo; Skiba, Tommy; Patel, Kirtikumar H.

    2015-07-14

    An anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) has a turbocharger turbine (102) secured in fluid communication with a compressed oxidant stream within an oxidant inlet line (218) downstream from a compressed oxidant supply (104), and the anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) also includes a turbocharger compressor (106) mechanically linked to the turbocharger turbine (102) and secured in fluid communication with a flow of anode exhaust passing through an anode exhaust recycle loop (238) of the solid oxide fuel cell power plant (200). All or a portion of compressed oxidant within an oxidant inlet line (218) drives the turbocharger turbine (102) to thereby compress the anode exhaust stream in the recycle loop (238). A high-temperature, automotive-type turbocharger (100) replaces a recycle loop blower-compressor (52).

  4. Development of Mixed Ion-Electron Conducting Metal Oxides for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Wang Hay

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is an energy conversion device, which directly converts chemical fuels (e.g., H2, C xHy) into electricity and heat with high efficiency up to 90%. The by-product of CO2 can be safely sequestrated or subsequently chemically transformed back into fuels (e.g., CO, CH 4) by electrolysis using renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. The state-of-the-art Ni-YSZ anode is de-activated in the presence of ppm level of H2S and forming coke in hydrocarbons. Currently, mixed ion and electron conductors (MIECs) are considered as alternatives for Ni-YSZ in SOFCs. The key goal of the research was to develop mixed ion-electron conducting metal oxides based on B-site disordered perovskite-type Ba(Ca,Nb)1-x MxO3-delta (M = Mn, Fe, Co), the B-site 1:1 ordered perovskite-type (M = Mn, Fe, Co) and the Sr2PbO4-type Sr2Ce1-xPrxO4 for SOFCs. Ba2(Ca,Nb)2-xMxO6-delta was chemically stable in 30 ppm levels of H2S at 600 °C for 24 h and in pure CO2 at 800 °C for 24 h. The thermal expansion coefficients (TEC) of the as-prepared ordered perovskites was found to be comparable to Zr0.84Y0.16O1.92 (YSZ). The near-surface concentration of Fe2+ in Ba2Ca 0.67Fe0.33NbO6-delta was found to be about 3 times higher than that in the bulk sample. The electrochemical performance of Ba2Ca0.67M0.33NbO6-delta was assessed by ac impedance spectroscopy using a YSZ supported half-cell. The area specific polarization resistance (ASR) of all samples was found to decrease with increasing temperature. The ASR for H2 gas oxidation can be correlated to the higher concentration of low valence Fe2+ species near-surface (nano-scale). BaCa0.335M0.165Nb0.5O3-delta crystallizes in the B-site disordered primitive perovskite (space group Pm-3m) at 900 °C in air, which can be converted into the B-site 1:2 ordered perovskite (space group P-3m1) at 1200 °C and the B-site 1:1 ordered double perovskite phase (space group Fm-3m ) at 1300 °C. The chemical stability of the perovskites in CO

  5. Self-organized iron-oxide cementation geometry as an indicator of paleo-flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifeng; Chan, Marjorie A.; Merino, Enrique

    2015-06-30

    Widespread iron oxide precipitation from groundwater in fine-grained red beds displays various patterns, including nodulation, banding and scallops and fingers. Hematite nodules have been reported also from the Meridiani Planum site on Mars and interpreted as evidence for the ancient presence of water on the red planet. Here we show that such patterns can autonomously emerge from a previously unrecognized Ostwald ripening mechanism and they capture rich information regarding ancient chemical and hydrologic environments. A linear instability analysis of the reaction-transport equations suggests that a pattern transition from nodules to bands may result from a symmetry breaking of mineral dissolution and precipitation triggered by groundwater advection. Round nodules tend to develop under nearly stagnant hydrologic conditions, while repetitive bands form in the presence of persistent water flows. Since water circulation is a prerequisite for a sustainable subsurface life, a Martian site with iron oxide precipitation bands, if one were found, may offer a better chance for detecting extraterrestrial biosignatures on Mars than would sites with nodules.

  6. Self-organized iron-oxide cementation geometry as an indicator of paleo-flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Yifeng; Chan, Marjorie A.; Merino, Enrique

    2015-06-30

    Widespread iron oxide precipitation from groundwater in fine-grained red beds displays various patterns, including nodulation, banding and scallops and fingers. Hematite nodules have been reported also from the Meridiani Planum site on Mars and interpreted as evidence for the ancient presence of water on the red planet. Here we show that such patterns can autonomously emerge from a previously unrecognized Ostwald ripening mechanism and they capture rich information regarding ancient chemical and hydrologic environments. A linear instability analysis of the reaction-transport equations suggests that a pattern transition from nodules to bands may result from a symmetry breaking of mineral dissolutionmore » and precipitation triggered by groundwater advection. Round nodules tend to develop under nearly stagnant hydrologic conditions, while repetitive bands form in the presence of persistent water flows. Since water circulation is a prerequisite for a sustainable subsurface life, a Martian site with iron oxide precipitation bands, if one were found, may offer a better chance for detecting extraterrestrial biosignatures on Mars than would sites with nodules.« less

  7. Self-organized iron-oxide cementation geometry as an indicator of paleo-flows.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifeng; Chan, Marjorie A; Merino, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Widespread iron oxide precipitation from groundwater in fine-grained red beds displays various patterns, including nodulation, banding and scallops and fingers. Hematite nodules have been reported also from the Meridiani Planum site on Mars and interpreted as evidence for the ancient presence of water on the red planet. Here we show that such patterns can autonomously emerge from a previously unrecognized Ostwald ripening mechanism and they capture rich information regarding ancient chemical and hydrologic environments. A linear instability analysis of the reaction-transport equations suggests that a pattern transition from nodules to bands may result from a symmetry breaking of mineral dissolution and precipitation triggered by groundwater advection. Round nodules tend to develop under nearly stagnant hydrologic conditions, while repetitive bands form in the presence of persistent water flows. Since water circulation is a prerequisite for a sustainable subsurface life, a Martian site with iron oxide precipitation bands, if one were found, may offer a better chance for detecting extraterrestrial biosignatures on Mars than would sites with nodules. PMID:26123788

  8. Self-organized iron-oxide cementation geometry as an indicator of paleo-flows

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifeng; Chan, Marjorie A.; Merino, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Widespread iron oxide precipitation from groundwater in fine-grained red beds displays various patterns, including nodulation, banding and scallops and fingers. Hematite nodules have been reported also from the Meridiani Planum site on Mars and interpreted as evidence for the ancient presence of water on the red planet. Here we show that such patterns can autonomously emerge from a previously unrecognized Ostwald ripening mechanism and they capture rich information regarding ancient chemical and hydrologic environments. A linear instability analysis of the reaction-transport equations suggests that a pattern transition from nodules to bands may result from a symmetry breaking of mineral dissolution and precipitation triggered by groundwater advection. Round nodules tend to develop under nearly stagnant hydrologic conditions, while repetitive bands form in the presence of persistent water flows. Since water circulation is a prerequisite for a sustainable subsurface life, a Martian site with iron oxide precipitation bands, if one were found, may offer a better chance for detecting extraterrestrial biosignatures on Mars than would sites with nodules. PMID:26123788

  9. Biomineralization associated with microbial reduction of Fe3+ and oxidation of Fe2+ in solid minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, G.; Dong, H.; Jiang, H.; Kukkadapu, R.K.; Kim, J.; Eberl, D.; Xu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Iron-reducing and oxidizing microorganisms gain energy through reduction or oxidation of iron, and by doing so play an important role in the geochemical cycling of iron. This study was undertaken to investigate mineral transformations associated with microbial reduction of Fe3+ and oxidation of Fe2+ in solid minerals. A fluid sample from the 2450 m depth of the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling project was collected, and Fe3+-reducing and Fe2+-oxidizing microorganisms were enriched. The enrichment cultures displayed reduction of Fe3+ in nontronite and ferric citrate, and oxidation of Fe2+ in vivianite, siderite, and monosulfide (FeS). Additional experiments verified that the iron reduction and oxidation was biological. Oxidation of FeS resulted in the formation of goethite, lepidocrocite, and ferrihydrite as products. Although our molecular microbiological analyses detected Thermoan-aerobacter ethanolicus as a predominant organism in the enrichment culture, Fe3+ reduction and Fe2+ oxidation may be accomplished by a consortia of organisms. Our results have important environmental and ecological implications for iron redox cycling in solid minerals in natural environments, where iron mineral transformations may be related to the mobility and solubility of inorganic and organic contaminants.

  10. The effect of temperature on chromium vaporization and oxide scale growth on interconnect steels for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk-Windisch, Hannes; Svensson, Jan Erik; Froitzheim, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Chromium vaporization and oxide scale growth are probably the two most important degradation mechanisms associated with the interconnect in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) when Cr2O3-forming alloys are used as the interconnect material. This study examines the influence of temperature on both mechanisms. Two commercially available steels; Crofer 22 H and Sanergy HT, were isothermally exposed at 650, 750 and 850 °C in an air-3% H2O atmosphere with a high flow rate. Volatile chromium species were collected using the denuder technique. The microstructure of thermally grown oxide scales was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDX) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The findings of this study show that although Cr evaporation is reduced with lower temperature, its relative importance compared to oxide scale growth is greater.

  11. Using CrAlN multilayer coatings to improve oxidation resistance of steel interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. J.; Tripp, C.; Knospe, A.; Ramana, C. V.; Kayani, A.; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir; Shutthanandan, V.; Gelles, D. S.

    2004-06-01

    The requirements of low-cost and high-temperature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. The performance of steel plates with multilayer coatings, consisting of CrN for electrical conductivity and CrAlN for oxidation resistance, was investigated. The coatings were deposited using large area filtered arc deposition technology, and subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 °C. The composition, structure, and morphology of the coated plates were characterized using Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reaction analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. By altering the architecture of the layers within the coatings, the rate of oxidation was reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Electrical resistance was measured at room temperature.

  12. Inhibition of plasmonically enhanced interdot energy transfer in quantum dot solids via photo-oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, S. M.; Nejat, A.; West, R. G.

    2012-11-15

    We studied the impact of photophysical and photochemical processes on the interdot Forster energy transfer in monodisperse CdSe/ZnS quantum dot solids. For this, we investigated emission spectra of CdSe/ZnS quantum dot solids in the vicinity of gold metallic nanoparticles coated with chromium oxide. The metallic nanoparticles were used to enhance the rate of the energy transfer between the quantum dots, while the chromium oxide coating led to significant increase of their photo-oxidation rates. Our results showed that irradiation of such solids with a laser beam can lead to unique spectral changes, including narrowing and blue shift. We investigate these effects in terms of inhibition of the plasmonically enhanced interdot energy transfer between quantum dots via the chromium-oxide accelerated photo-oxidation process. We demonstrate this considering energy-dependent rate of the interdot energy transfer process, plasmonic effects, and the way photo-oxidation enhances non-radiative decay rates of quantum dots with different sizes.

  13. Advances in tubular solid oxide fuel cell technology

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, S.C.

    1996-12-31

    The design, materials and fabrication processes for the earlier technology Westinghouse tubular geometry cell have been described in detail previously. In that design, the active cell components were deposited in the form of thin layers on a ceramic porous support tube (PST). The tubular design of these cells and the materials used therein have been validated by successful electrical testing for over 65,000 h (>7 years). In these early technology PST cells, the support tube, although sufficiently porous, presented an inherent impedance to air flow toward air electrode. In order to reduce such impedance to air flow, the wall thickness of the PST was first decreased from the original 2 mm (the thick-wall PST) to 1.2 mm (the thin-wall PST). The calcia-stabilized zirconia support tube has now been completely eliminated and replaced by a doped lanthanum manganite tube in state-of-the-art SOFCs. This doped lanthanum manganite tube is extruded and sintered to about 30 to 35 percent porosity, and serves as the air electrode onto which the other cell components are fabricated in thin layer form. These latest technology cells are designated as air electrode supported (AES) cells.

  14. Efficient reversible electrodes for solid oxide electrolyzer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, S.; Hartvigsen, Joseph J.; Zhao, Feng

    2013-01-15

    An electrolyzer cell is disclosed which includes a cathode to reduce an oxygen-containing molecule, such as H2O, CO.sub.2, or a combination thereof, to produce an oxygen ion and a fuel molecule, such as H.sub.2, CO, or a combination thereof. An electrolyte is coupled to the cathode to transport the oxygen ion to an anode. The anode is coupled to the electrolyte to receive the oxygen ion and produce oxygen gas therewith. In one embodiment, the anode may be fabricated to include an electron-conducting phase having a perovskite crystalline structure or structure similar thereto. This perovskite may have a chemical formula of substantially (Pr(.sub.1-x)La.sub.x)(z-y)A'.sub.yBO(3-.differential.), wherein 0oxide intermixed with magnesium oxide.

  15. Efficient reversible electrodes for solid oxide electrolyzer cells

    DOEpatents

    Elangovan, Singaravelu; Hartvigsen, Joseph J.

    2011-07-12

    An electrolyzer cell is disclosed which includes a cathode to reduce an oxygen-containing molecule, such as H2O, CO2, or a combination thereof, to produce an oxygen ion and a fuel molecule, such as H2, CO, or a combination thereof. An electrolyte is coupled to the cathode to transport the oxygen ion to an anode. The anode is coupled to the electrolyte to receive the oxygen ion and produce oxygen gas therewith. In one embodiment, the anode may be fabricated to include an electron-conducting phase having a perovskite crystalline structure or structure similar thereto. This perovskite may have a chemical formula of substantially (Pr(1-x)Lax)(z-y)A'yBO(3-.differential.), wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.0.5, and 0.8.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.1.1. In another embodiment, the cathode includes an electron-conducting phase that contains nickel oxide intermixed with magnesium oxide.

  16. Development of an advanced bond coat for solid oxide fuel cell interconnector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, An-Chou; Chen, Yu-Ming; Liu, Chien-Kuo; Shong, Wei-Ja

    2015-11-01

    An advanced bond coat has been developed for solid oxide fuel cell interconnector applications; a low thermal expansion superalloy has been selected as the substrate, and the newly developed bond coat is applied between the substrate and the LSM top coat. The bond coat composition is designed to be near thermodynamic equilibrium with the substrate to minimize interdiffusion with the substrate while providing oxidation protection for the substrate. The bond coat exhibits good oxidation resistance, a low area specific resistance, and a low thermal expansion coefficient at 800 °C; experimental results indicate that interdiffusion between the bond coat and the substrate can be hindered.

  17. Study of catalysis for solid oxide fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xirong

    Fuel cells offer the enticing promise of cleaner electricity with lower environmental impact than traditional energy conversion technologies. Driven by the interest in power sources for portable electronics, and distributed generation and automotive propulsion markets, active development efforts in the technologies of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) devices have achieved significant progress. However, current catalysts for fuel cells are either of low catalytic activity or extremely expensive, presenting a key barrier toward the widespread commercialization of fuel cell devices. In this thesis work, atomic layer deposition (ALD), a novel thin film deposition technique, was employed to apply catalytic Pt to SOFC, and investigate both Pt skin catalysts and Pt-Ru catalysts for methanol oxidation, a very important reaction for DMFC, to increase the activity and utilization levels of the catalysts while simultaneously reducing the catalyst loading. For SOFCs, we explored the use of ALD for the fabrication of electrode components, including an ultra-thin Pt film for use as the electrocatalyst, and a Pt mesh structure for a current collector for SOFCs, aiming for precise control over the catalyst loading and catalyst geometry, and enhancement in the current collect efficiency. We choose Pt since it has high chemical stability and excellent catalytic activity for the O2 reduction reaction and the H2 oxidation reaction even at low operating temperatures. Working SOFC fuel cells were fabricated with ALD-deposited Pt thin films as an electrode/catalyst layer. The measured fuel cell performance reveals that comparable peak power densities were achieved for ALD-deposited Pt anodes with only one-fifth of the Pt loading relative to a DC-sputtered counterpart. In addition to the continuous electrocatalyst layer, a micro-patterned Pt structure was developed via the technique of area selective ALD. By coating yttria-stabilized zirconia, a

  18. Ni modified ceramic anodes for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Xiao, Guoliang; Chen, Fanglin

    2016-01-19

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for fabricating a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The method includes synthesizing a composition having a perovskite present therein. The method further includes applying the composition on an electrolyte support to form an anode and applying Ni to the composition on the anode.

  19. Recovery Act. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Gail E.

    2013-09-30

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration Project. Summarizing development of Delphi’s next generation SOFC system as the core power plant to prove the viability of the market opportunity for a 3-5 kW diesel SOFC system. Report includes test and demonstration results from testing the diesel APU in a high visibility fleet customer vehicle application.

  20. A techno-economic model of a solid oxide electrolysis system.

    PubMed

    Milobar, Daniel G; Hartvigsen, Joseph J; Elangovan, S

    2015-01-01

    Solid oxide cells can play a vital role in addressing energy and environmental issues. In fuel cell mode they are capable of producing electric energy at high efficiency using hydrocarbon fuels and in the electrolysis mode can produce hydrogen from steam or synthesis gas from a mixture of steam and carbon dioxide. The solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) can operate at a wide range of conditions. A capable means by which to select operating conditions in the application of solid oxide electrolyzers is a necessity for successful commercial operation. Power and efficiency can be determined over a wide range of operating conditions by applying fundamental electrochemical principles to a SOEC system. Operating conditions may be selected based on power requirements or with efficiency as a priority. Operating cost for electricity which is a function of both power and efficiency can also be used to determine optimal operating conditions. Performance maps based on closed form isothermal parametric models for both hydrogen and natural gas fueled SOFC stacks have been demonstrated previously. This approach applied to a SOEC stack is shown. This model was applied to generate performance maps for a solid oxide cell stack operated in the electrolysis mode. The functional form of the model and the boundaries of the operating envelope provide useful insight into the SOEC operating characteristics and a simple means of selecting conditions for electrolysis operation. PMID:26222446

  1. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Seal Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Dynys, Fred W.; Lang, Jerry; Daniels, Christopher C.; Palko, Joeseph L.; Choi, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    Researchers at NASA GRC are confronting the seal durability challenges of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells by pursuing an integrated and multidisciplinary development effort incorporating thermo-structural analyses, advanced materials, experimentation, and novel seal design concepts. The successful development of durable hermetic SOFC seals is essential to reliably producing the high power densities required for aerospace applications.

  2. Polypyrrole-polyoxometalate/reduced graphene oxide ternary nanohybrids for flexible, all-solid-state supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuyun; Han, Min; Tang, Yujia; Bao, Jianchun; Li, Shunli; Lan, Yaqian; Dai, Zhihui

    2015-08-11

    Novel polypyrrole-polyoxometalate/reduced graphene oxide ternary nanohybrids (TNHs) are synthesized via a one-pot redox relay strategy. The TNHs exhibit high areal specific capacitance (2.61 mF cm(-2)), and the fabricated solid device also exhibits good rate capability, excellent flexibility and mechanical stability. PMID:26140676

  3. Silicon nanoprofiling with the use of a solid aluminum oxide mask and combined 'dry' etching

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A. N.; Demidov, Yu. A.; Putrya, M. G.; Golishnikov, A. A.; Vasilyev, A. A.

    2009-12-15

    Technological features of nanoprofiling of silicon protected by a solid mask based on porous aluminum oxide are considered. It is shown that, for a nanoprofiled silicon surface to be formed, it is advisable that combined dry etching be used including preliminary bombardment of structures with accelerated neutral atoms of an inert gas followed by reactive ion etching.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOEpatents

    Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

    2016-05-17

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  5. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOEpatents

    Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

    2012-11-06

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  6. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    DOEpatents

    Poshusta, Joseph C; Booten, Charles W; Martin, Jerry L

    2013-12-24

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  7. Synthesis and Stability of a Nanoparticle-Infiltrated Solid OxideFuel Cell Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Sholklapper, Tal Z.; Radmilovic, Velimir; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2006-11-20

    Nanoparticulate catalysts infiltrated into SOFC (Solid OxideFUel Cell) electrodes can significantly enhance the cell performance, butthe stability of these electrodes has been an open issue. An infiltrationprocedure is reported that leads to a stable scandia-stablized zirconia(SSZ) cathode electrode performance.

  8. Development Of A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack By Delphi And Battelle

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerjee, Subhasish; Shaffer, Steven J.; Zizelman, James; Chick, Lawrence A.; Baskaran, Suresh; Chou, Y. S.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Deibler, John E.; Maupin, Gary D.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Paxton, Dean M.; Peters, Timothy J.; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Weil, K. Scott; Williford, Rick E.

    2003-01-20

    Delphi and Battelle are developing a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stack for transportation and residential applications. This paper describes the status of development of the Generation 2 stack and key progress made in addressing some of the challenges in this technology.

  9. Theory of the electronic and structural properties of solid state oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Chelikowsky, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Studies on electronic and structural properties of solid state oxides continued. This quarter, studies have concentrated on silica. Progress is discussed in the following sections: interatomic potentials and the structural properties of silica; chemical reactivity and covalent/metallic bonding on Si clusters; and surface and thermodynamic interatomic forces fields for silicon. 64 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs. (CBS)

  10. Reaction between nitric oxide and ozone in solid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, D.; Pimentel, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide, NO2, is produced when nitric oxide, NO, and ozone, O3, are suspended in a nitrogen matrix at 11-20 K. The NO2 is formed with first-order kinetics, a 12 K rate constant of (1.4 + or - 0.2) x 0.00001/sec, and an apparent activation energy of 106 + or - 10 cal/mol. Isotopic labeling, variation of concentrations, and cold shield experiments show that the growth of NO2 is due to reaction between ozone molecules and NO monomers, and that the reaction is neither infrared-induced nor does it seem to be a heavy atom tunneling process. Reaction is attributed to nearest-neighbor NO.O3 pairs probably held in a specific orientational relationship that affects the kinetic behavior. When the temperature is raised, more such reactive pairs are generated, presumably by local diffusion. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Microstructure Sensitive Design and Processing in Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Hamid Garmestani; Dr. Stephen Herring

    2009-06-12

    The aim of this study was to develop and inexpensive manufacturing process for deposition of functionally graded thin films of LSM oxides with porosity graded microstructures for use as IT-SOFCs cathode. The spray pyrolysis method was chosen as a low-temperature processing technique for deposition of porous LSM films onto dense YXZ substrates. The effort was directed toward the optimization of the processing conditions for deposition of high quality LSM films with variety of morphologies in the range of dense to porous microstructures. Results of optimization studies of spray parameters revealed that the substrate surface temperature is the most critical parameter influencing the roughness and morphology, porosity, cracking and crystallinity of the film.

  12. Fracture toughness of solid oxide fuel cell anode substrates determined by a double-torsion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pećanac, G.; Wei, J.; Malzbender, J.

    2016-09-01

    Planar solid oxide fuel cell anode substrates are exposed to high mechanical loads during assembly, start-up, steady-state operation and thermal cycling. Hence, characterization of mechanical stability of anode substrates under different oxidation states and at relevant temperatures is essential to warrant a reliable operation of solid oxide fuel cells. As a basis for mechanical assessment of brittle supports, two most common anode substrate material variants, NiO-3YSZ and NiO-8YSZ, were analyzed in this study with respect to their fracture toughness at room temperature and at a typical stack operation temperature of 800 °C. The study considered both, oxidized and reduced materials' states, where also an outlook is given on the behavior of the re-oxidized state that might be induced by malfunctions of sealants or other functional components. Aiming at the improvement of material's production, different types of warm pressed and tape cast NiO-8YSZ substrates were characterized in oxidized and reduced states. Overall, the results confirmed superior fracture toughness of 3YSZ compared to 8YSZ based composites in the oxidized state, whereas in the reduced state 3YSZ based composites showed similar fracture toughness at room temperature, but a higher value at 800 °C compared to 8YSZ based composites. Complementary microstructural analysis aided the interpretation of mechanical characterization.

  13. High-power high-T0 native oxide stripe-geometry 980-nm laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, Herbert; Piataev, Valeri; Schlapp, Winfried

    1996-04-01

    We present results of an experimental investigation of the temperature sensitivity of separate confinement strained InGaAs/GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum well single-mode and multimode high power laser diodes (HPLDs). The HPLDs have been fabricated by use of MBE material and a 'wet' thermal oxidation process. Due to the high carrier confinement in the structure with two quantum wells (DQW) and Al-content x greater than 0.7 in the cladding layers an extremely high characteristic temperature T0 equals 350 K for broad area and T0 of 400 K around room temperature for single mode HPLDs with extremely low threshold current density were obtained. In spite of the high Al-content in the cladding layers (0.5 less than x less than 0.8) a very high catastrophic optical damage (COD) level (greater than 10 MW/cm2) and lifetimes of more than 10 kh at 100 mW (T equals 50 degrees Celsius) have been observed.

  14. CHALLENGES IN GENERATING HYDROGEN BY HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS USING SOLID OXIDE CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; J. S. Herring; E. A. Harvego

    2008-03-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) high temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells is presented in this paper. The research results reported here have been obtained in a laboratory-scale apparatus. These results and common scale-up issues also indicate that for the technology to be successful in a large industrial setting, several technical, economical, and manufacturing issues have to be resolved. Some of the issues related to solid oxide cells are stack design and performance optimization, identification and evaluation of cell performance degradation parameters and processes, integrity and reliability of the solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC) stacks, life-time prediction and extension of the SOEC stack, and cost reduction and economic manufacturing of the SOEC stacks. Besides the solid oxide cells, balance of the hydrogen generating plant also needs significant development. These issues are process and ohmic heat source needed for maintaining the reaction temperature (~830°C), high temperature heat exchangers and recuperators, equal distribution of the reactants into each cell, system analysis of hydrogen and associated energy generating plant, and cost optimization. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. These issues need interdisciplinary research effort of federal laboratories, solid oxide cell manufacturers, hydrogen consumers, and other such stakeholders. This paper discusses research and development accomplished by INL on such issues and highlights associated challenges that need to

  15. Functionally Graded Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Yang; Ze Liu; Shizhone Wang; Jaewung Lee; Meilin Liu

    2008-04-30

    The main objective of this DOE project is to demonstrate that the performance and long-term stability of the state-of-the-art LSCF cathode can be enhanced by a catalytically active coating (e.g., LSM or SSC). We have successfully developed a methodology for reliably evaluating the intrinsic surface catalytic properties of cathode materials. One of the key components of the test cell is a dense LSCF film, which will function as the current collector for the electrode material under evaluation to eliminate the effect of ionic and electronic transport. Since it is dense, the effect of geometry would be eliminated as well. From the dependence of the electrode polarization resistance on the thickness of a dense LSCF electrode and on partial pressure of oxygen, we have confirmed that the surface catalytic activity of LSCF limits the performances of LSCF-based cathodes. Further, we have demonstrated, using test cells of different configurations, that the performance of LSCF-based electrodes can be significantly enhanced by infiltration of a thin film of LSM or SSC. In addition, the stability of LSCF-based cathodes was also improved by infiltration of LSM or SSC. While the concept feasibility of the electrode architecture is demonstrated, many details are yet to be determined. For example, it is not clear how the surface morphology, composition, and thickness of the coatings change under operating conditions over time, how these changes influence the electrochemical behavior of the cathodes, and how to control the microscopic details of the coatings in order to optimize the performance. The selection of the catalytic materials as well as the detailed microstructures of the porous LSCF and the catalyst layer may critically impact the performance of the proposed cathodes. Further, other fundamental questions still remain; it is not clear why the degradation rates of LSCF cathodes are relatively high, why a LSM coating improves the stability of LSCF cathodes, which catalysts

  16. Hybrid deposition of thin film solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzers

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, A.F.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Rambach, G.D.; Randich, E.

    1998-05-19

    The use of vapor deposition techniques enables synthesis of the basic components of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); namely, the electrolyte layer, the two electrodes, and the electrolyte-electrode interfaces. Such vapor deposition techniques provide solutions to each of the three critical steps of material synthesis to produce a thin film solid oxide fuel cell (TFSOFC). The electrolyte is formed by reactive deposition of essentially any ion conducting oxide, such as defect free, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by planar magnetron sputtering. The electrodes are formed from ceramic powders sputter coated with an appropriate metal and sintered to a porous compact. The electrolyte-electrode interface is formed by chemical vapor deposition of zirconia compounds onto the porous electrodes to provide a dense, smooth surface on which to continue the growth of the defect-free electrolyte, whereby a single fuel cell or multiple cells may be fabricated. 8 figs.

  17. Hybrid deposition of thin film solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzers

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rambach, Glenn D.; Randich, Erik

    1998-01-01

    The use of vapor deposition techniques enables synthesis of the basic components of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); namely, the electrolyte layer, the two electrodes, and the electrolyte-electrode interfaces. Such vapor deposition techniques provide solutions to each of the three critical steps of material synthesis to produce a thin film solid oxide fuel cell (TFSOFC). The electrolyte is formed by reactive deposition of essentially any ion conducting oxide, such as defect free, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by planar magnetron sputtering. The electrodes are formed from ceramic powders sputter coated with an appropriate metal and sintered to a porous compact. The electrolyte-electrode interface is formed by chemical vapor deposition of zirconia compounds onto the porous electrodes to provide a dense, smooth surface on which to continue the growth of the defect-free electrolyte, whereby a single fuel cell or multiple cells may be fabricated.

  18. Hybrid deposition of thin film solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzers

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rambach, Glenn D.; Randich, Erik

    1999-01-01

    The use of vapor deposition techniques enables synthesis of the basic components of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); namely, the electrolyte layer, the two electrodes, and the electrolyte-electrode interfaces. Such vapor deposition techniques provide solutions to each of the three critical steps of material synthesis to produce a thin film solid oxide fuel cell (TFSOFC). The electrolyte is formed by reactive deposition of essentially any ion conducting oxide, such as defect free, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by planar magnetron sputtering. The electrodes are formed from ceramic powders sputter coated with an appropriate metal and sintered to a porous compact. The electrolyte-electrode interface is formed by chemical vapor deposition of zirconia compounds onto the porous electrodes to provide a dense, smooth surface on which to continue the growth of the defect-free electrolyte, whereby a single fuel cell or multiple cells may be fabricated.

  19. Innovative Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC)

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Raj

    2008-06-30

    A functioning SOFC requires different type of seals such as metal-metal, metal-ceramic, and ceramic-ceramic. These seals must function at high temperatures between 600--900{sup o}C and in oxidizing and reducing environments of the fuels and air. Among the different type of seals, the metal-metal seals can be readily fabricated using metal joining, soldering, and brazing techniques. However, the metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic seals require significant research and development because the brittle nature of ceramics/glasses can lead to fracture and loss of seal integrity and functionality. Consequently, any seals involving ceramics/glasses require a significant attention and technology development for reliable SOFC operation. This final report is prepared to describe the progress made in the program on the needs, approaches, and performance of high temperature seals for SOFC. In particular, a new concept of self-healing glass seals is pursued for making seals between metal-ceramic material combinations, including some with a significant expansion mismatch.

  20. High-temperature temporal stability of selected oxidizers as solids and in aqueous solutions. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Pellenbarg, R.E.; Smiroldo

    1986-08-08

    Various potential decontamination agents were examined as solids and in aqueous solutions for long-term stability at high temperatures. The following oxidizers were assayed iodometrically: the hypochlorite salts of calcium and lithium, sodium dischloroisocyanurate (PACE) and the preoxygen compounds sodium perborate, sodium peroxydisulfate, sodium percarbonate, and magnesium monoperoxyphthalate (H-48). The inorganic peroxide solids and the solid sodium dischloroisoyanurate were stable at 80 C, while the organic peroxide solids and the hypochlorite salts deteriorated markedly within 72 hours. In freshwater solutions of 0.01 N or less, the inorganic hypochlorite and peroxide salts decomposed slowly at 60 c. Conversely, the sodium dischloroisocyanurate, magnesium monoperoxyphthalate, and sodium percarbonate solutions exhibited near complete decomposition in 24 hours.

  1. An Aurivillius Oxide Based Cathode with Excellent CO2 Tolerance for Intermediate-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yinlong; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Yubo; Shao, Zongping

    2016-07-25

    The Aurivillius oxide Bi2 Sr2 Nb2 MnO12-δ (BSNM) was used as a cobalt-free cathode for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). To the best of our knowledge, the BSNM oxide is the only alkaline-earth-containing cathode material with complete CO2 tolerance that has been reported thus far. BSNM not only shows favorable activity in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at intermediate temperatures but also exhibits a low thermal expansion coefficient, excellent structural stability, and good chemical compatibility with the electrolyte. These features highlight the potential of the new BSNM material as a highly promising cathode material for IT-SOFCs. PMID:27294808

  2. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology Stationary Power Application Project

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Pierre

    2009-03-05

    The objectives of this program were to: (1) Develop a reliable, cost-effective, and production-friendly technique to apply the power-enhancing layer at the interface of the air electrode and electrolyte of the Siemens SOFC; (2) Design, build, install, and operate in the field two 5 kWe SOFC systems fabricated with the state-of-the-art cylindrical, tubular cell and bundle technology and incorporating advanced module design features. Siemens successfully demonstrated, first in a number of single cell tests and subsequently in a 48-cell bundle test, a significant power enhancement by employing a power-enhancing composite interlayer at the interface between the air electrode and electrolyte. While successful from a cell power enhancement perspective, the interlayer application process was not suitable for mass manufacturing. The application process was of inconsistent quality, labor intensive, and did not have an acceptable yield. This program evaluated the technical feasibility of four interlayer application techniques. The candidate techniques were selected based on their potential to achieve the technical requirements of the interlayer, to minimize costs (both labor and material), and suitably for large-scale manufacturing. Preliminary screening, utilizing lessons learned in manufacturing tubular cells, narrowed the candidate processes to two, ink-roller coating (IRC) and dip coating (DC). Prototype fixtures were successfully built and utilized to further evaluate the two candidate processes for applying the interlayer to the high power density Delta8 cell geometry. The electrical performance of interlayer cells manufactured via the candidate processes was validated. Dip coating was eventually selected as the application technique of choice for applying the interlayer to the high power Delta8 cell. The technical readiness of the DC process and product quality was successfully and repeatedly demonstrated, and its throughput and cost are amenable to large scale

  3. Solid-liquid separation of oxidized americium from fission product lanthanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehee, T. C.; Martin, L. R.; Nash, K. L.

    2010-03-01

    The separation of americium from the lanthanides and curium is a requirement if transmutation of americium is to be performed in advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Oxidation of Am3+ to AmO2+ or AmO22+ may allow separation of Am from Ln and Cm in one step, since the lanthanides and curium do not have higher oxidation states as accessible. Two possible solid-liquid separation methods have been developed to address this difficult separation. Under acidic conditions using oxone or persulfate, the oxidation and retention of tracer Am in the aqueous phase has been observed with a separation factor of 11 ± 1. Most of these studies have been conducted using 237NpO2(NO3), 233UO2(NO3)2, 238Pu(NO3)4 and 241Am(NO3)3 at radiotracer concentrations. Lanthanides precipitate as the sodium or potassium europium double sulfate salt. Under basic conditions, ozone oxidation of Am(CO3)OH(s) solubilizes Am from a lanthanide carbonate hydroxide solid phase to the aqueous phase as the AmO2(CO3)34-or AmO2(CO3)35- species. For the ozone oxidation of the americium tracer a separation factor of 1.6 ± 0.8 and 47 ± 2 for the oxidation/separation in Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 respectively.

  4. Analysis of gas products from direct utilization of carbon in a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siengchum, Tritti; Guzman, Felipe; Chuang, Steven S. C.

    2012-09-01

    The evolution of gases from direct utilization of carbon in a solid oxide fuel cell (C-SOFC) was studied by potentiostatic/galvanostatic discharge of a fuel cell with coconut carbon, a carbonaceous material with low ash and sulfur content. Operation of C-SOFC at 750 °C produced less CO and more CO2 than those predicted by thermodynamic calculation using total Gibbs free energy minimization method. The addition of CO2 to the anode chamber increased CO formation and maximum power density from 0.09 W cm-2 to 0.13 W cm-2, indicating the occurrence of Boudouard reaction (CO2 + C ⇔ 2CO) coupling with CO electrochemical oxidation on the C-SOFC. Analysis of CO and CO2 concentration as a function of current and voltage revealed that electricity was mainly produced from the electrochemical oxidation of carbon at low current density and produced from the electrochemical oxidation of CO at high current density. The results suggest the electrochemical oxidation of solid carbon is more mass transfer limited than electrochemical oxidation of CO.

  5. Process for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase of catalytically active material

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Dale L.; Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei

    1995-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase reaction product of catalytically active material comprising one or more alkali metals, one or more alkaline earth metals, and one or more Group VIII transition metals. The process comprises reacting together one or more alkali metal oxides and/or salts, one or more alkaline earth metal oxides and/or salts, one or more Group VIII transition metal oxides and/or salts, capable of forming a catalytically active reaction product, in the optional presence of an additional source of oxygen, using a laser beam to ablate from a target such metal compound reactants in the form of a vapor in a deposition chamber, resulting in the deposition, on a heated substrate in the chamber, of the desired oxide phase reaction product. The resulting product may be formed in variable, but reproducible, stoichiometric ratios. The homogeneous oxide solid phase product is useful as a catalyst, and can be produced in many physical forms, including thin films, particulate forms, coatings on catalyst support structures, and coatings on structures used in reaction apparatus in which the reaction product of the invention will serve as a catalyst.

  6. Mechanistic studies of water electrolysis and hydrogen electro-oxidation on high temperature ceria-based solid oxide electrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunjuan; Yu, Yi; Grass, Michael E; Dejoie, Catherine; Ding, Wuchen; Gaskell, Karen; Jabeen, Naila; Hong, Young Pyo; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Bluhm, Hendrik; Li, Wei-Xue; Jackson, Gregory S; Hussain, Zahid; Liu, Zhi; Eichhorn, Bryan W

    2013-08-01

    Through the use of ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) and a single-sided solid oxide electrochemical cell (SOC), we have studied the mechanism of electrocatalytic splitting of water (H2O + 2e(-) → H2 + O(2-)) and electro-oxidation of hydrogen (H2 + O(2-) → H2O + 2e(-)) at ∼700 °C in 0.5 Torr of H2/H2O on ceria (CeO2-x) electrodes. The experiments reveal a transient build-up of surface intermediates (OH(-) and Ce(3+)) and show the separation of charge at the gas-solid interface exclusively in the electrochemically active region of the SOC. During water electrolysis on ceria, the increase in surface potentials of the adsorbed OH(-) and incorporated O(2-) differ by 0.25 eV in the active regions. For hydrogen electro-oxidation on ceria, the surface concentrations of OH(-) and O(2-) shift significantly from their equilibrium values. These data suggest that the same charge transfer step (H2O + Ce(3+) <-> Ce(4+) + OH(-) + H(•)) is rate limiting in both the forward (water electrolysis) and reverse (H2 electro-oxidation) reactions. This separation of potentials reflects an induced surface dipole layer on the ceria surface and represents the effective electrochemical double layer at a gas-solid interface. The in situ XPS data and DFT calculations show that the chemical origin of the OH(-)/O(2-) potential separation resides in the reduced polarization of the Ce-OH bond due to the increase of Ce(3+) on the electrode surface. These results provide a graphical illustration of the electrochemically driven surface charge transfer processes under relevant and nonultrahigh vacuum conditions. PMID:23822749

  7. Solid oxide fuel cell bi-layer anode with gadolinia-doped ceria for utilization of solid carbon fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, Isaiah D.; Koylu, Umit O.; Dogan, Fatih

    Pyrolytic carbon was used as fuel in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and a bi-layer anode composed of nickel oxide gadolinia-doped ceria (NiO-GDC) and NiO-YSZ. The common problems of bulk shrinkage and emergent porosity in the YSZ layer adjacent to the GDC/YSZ interface were avoided by using an interlayer of porous NiO-YSZ as a buffer anode layer between the electrolyte and the NiO-GDC primary anode. Cells were fabricated from commercially available component powders so that unconventional production methods suggested in the literature were avoided, that is, the necessity of glycine-nitrate combustion synthesis, specialty multicomponent oxide powders, sputtering, or chemical vapor deposition. The easily-fabricated cell was successfully utilized with hydrogen and propane fuels as well as carbon deposited on the anode during the cyclic operation with the propane. A cell of similar construction could be used in the exhaust stream of a diesel engine to capture and utilize soot for secondary power generation and decreased particulate pollution without the need for filter regeneration.

  8. Studies in new materials for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Alex W.

    Ceramic materials have historically been of interest for their thermal and mechanical properties. However, certain ceramic materials can have very interesting electrical, magnetic and optical properties, leading to a new subclass, the electroceramics. Perovskites, in particular, have become the subject of intense research in this field. Specifically, doped barium zirconates have shown high proton conductivity in the intermediate temperature range (600--800°C), making them advantageous for use in solid oxide fuel cells. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrochemical devices that convert chemical energy into electricity using ion-conducting oxide ceramics as electrolytes. The anode component of the cell is also of interest. Cermets or ceramic metals can serve a dual role as substrates for thin film electrolytes and anodes in the cell. Thin films of gadolinium and ytterbium doped barium zirconate were deposited using pulsed laser deposition (KrF; 1--3 J/cm2) on several substrates, including cermets developed in our lab, in a 10--400 mTorr oxygen environment with various substrate temperatures. Crystalline structure and chemical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis, respectively. Preliminary electrical measurements of the electrolyte/cermet structure were taken using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Keywords: solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), perovskites, proton conductors, electroceramics, gadolinium-doped barium zirconate (BZG).

  9. A Perspective on Diagenetic Geometries and Patterns of Iron Oxide Cement and Coloration: Understanding Challenges and Complexities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. A.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Diagenetic records of fluid flow are underutilized proxies of water and environmental conditions in sedimentary rocks on Earth as well as Mars. The terrestrial iron-oxide records can be highly varied from faint wisps of coloration, to heavily cemented masses and layers. Other than vein cements, concretionary forms are some of the most prominent, yet enigmatic records. Concretions can have various mineral cement compositions with sizes that can span three orders of magnitude from mm, to cm, and m scales, in remarkably consistent, common spheroidal forms. Concretion geometries and banding may indicate directions and timings of fluid flow and precipitation, but deciphering the origins can be difficult with limited analytical tools. Definite complexities are the possibilities of: 1) overprinted events in an open system; 2) the role of organics in the nucleation and precipitation of authigenic minerals; and 3) multiple fluids, pathways, or processes that may produce similar-looking end products. In near-surface environments, likely any water since the Proterozoic has contained microbial life, and thus it seems highly probable that microbes play a significant role in the precipitation of diagenetic minerals due to the interactions of the biosphere and geosphere. However, recognition of ancient biosignatures that may have poor preservation potential remains a challenge. Iron oxides are particularly common, valuable indicators of near-surface iron cycling and are recognizable because the visual coloration. Our recent studies in Jurassic sandstones indicate preserved records of fingering at the interface of two immiscible fluids. The integration of geochemical self-organization models and field data provides new insights to understanding diagenetic fluid compositions, their relative densities, and flow direction flux and movement. These studies can have valuable implications and applications for understanding past fluid flow history, and reservoir characterization for CO2

  10. Promising alloys for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell interconnect application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Shujiang; Zhu, Jiahong

    The formation of a low Cr-volatility and electrically conductive oxide outer layer atop an inner chromia layer via thermal oxidation is highly desirable for preventing chromium evaporation from solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) metallic interconnects at the SOFC operation temperatures. In this paper, a number of ferritic Fe-22Cr alloys with different levels of Mn and Ti as well as a Ni-based alloy Haynes 242 were cyclically oxidized in air at 800 °C for twenty 100-h cycles. No oxide scale spallation was observed during thermal cycling for any of these alloys. A mixed Mn 2O 3/TiO 2 surface layer and/or a (Mn, Cr) 3O 4 spinel outer layer atop a Cr 2O 3 inner layer was formed for the Fe-22Cr series alloys, while an NiO outer layer with a Cr 2O 3 inner layer was developed for Haynes 242 after cyclic oxidation. For the Fe-22Cr series alloys, the effects of Mn and Ti contents as well as alloy purity on the oxidation resistance and scale area specific resistance were evaluated. The performance of the ferritic alloys was compared with that of Haynes 242. The mismatch in thermal expansion coefficient between the different layers in the oxide scale was identified as a potential concern for these otherwise promising alloys.

  11. Evaluation of nickel-titanium oxide-niobium pentoxide metal ceramic composite as interconnect for solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budur, Abhijith

    With increasing importance for clean energy, fuel cells have gained great significance in recent decades. Solid oxide fuel cells are easy to transport due to presence of solid electrolyte and also have requisite electrical properties,but have been obstructed by their limitation to be used at only temperatures greater than 6000C and less than 8000C. To construct a stack of cells, materials that are good electrical conductors and having necessary mechanical strengths at that temperatures are being considered as interconnects between the cells. Evaluation of Nickel-Titanium dioxide-Niobium pentoxide (NTN) as interconnect and comparison to Stainless Steel 441 alloy has been made in this research. The criteria for evaluation are the resistance, long-term stability and the power density characteristics of the cell for each interconnect. Electrical measurements by impedance spectroscopy techniques were conducted at variousworking temperatures using a gas mixture of 10 % hydrogen and 90% nitrogen to evaluate both interconnect materials in the working range of fuel cells. Scanning Electron Microscopy images of Lanthanum Strontium Manganite paste before and after the fuel cell measurements are shown.The results showed that both NTN and Stainless Steel 441 interconnects exhibit similar electrical properties under operating conditions of the fuel cell. Since theNTN interconnect is less prone to corrosion and does not have the effect of chromium poisoning, it can be considered as a viable interconnect material for solid oxide fuel cells.

  12. Rational Concept for Designing Vapor-Liquid-Solid Growth of Single Crystalline Metal Oxide Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Klamchuen, Annop; Suzuki, Masaru; Nagashima, Kazuki; Yoshida, Hideto; Kanai, Masaki; Zhuge, Fuwei; He, Yong; Meng, Gang; Kai, Shoichi; Takeda, Seiji; Kawai, Tomoji; Yanagida, Takeshi

    2015-10-14

    Metal oxide nanowires hold great promise for various device applications due to their unique and robust physical properties in air and/or water and also due to their abundance on Earth. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of metal oxide nanowires offers the high controllability of their diameters and spatial positions. In addition, VLS growth has applicability to axial and/or radial heterostructures, which are not attainable by other nanowire growth methods. However, material species available for the VLS growth of metal oxide nanowires are substantially limited even though the variety of material species, which has fascinating physical properties, is the most interesting feature of metal oxides. Here we demonstrate a rational design for the VLS growth of various metal oxide nanowires, based on the "material flux window". This material flux window describes the concept of VLS nanowire growth within a limited material flux range, where nucleation preferentially occurs only at a liquid-solid interface. Although the material flux was previously thought to affect primarily the growth rate, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrate that the material flux is the important experimental variable for the VLS growth of metal oxide nanowires. On the basis of the material flux window concept, we discover novel metal oxide nanowires, composed of MnO, CaO, Sm2O3, NiO, and Eu2O3, which were previously impossible to form via the VLS route. The newly grown NiO nanowires exhibited stable memristive properties superior to conventional polycrystalline devices due to the single crystallinity. Thus, this VLS design route offers a useful guideline for the discovery of single crystalline nanowires that are composed of functional metal oxide materials. PMID:26372675

  13. Geometry of ionic arrangements and magnetic interactions in ordered ferri-ilmenite solid solutions and its effect on low-T magnetic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter; Fabian, Karl; McEnroe, Suzanne A.

    2010-05-01

    The magnetic properties of metastable chemically ordered ilmenite-rich Fe2O3-FeTiO3 solid solutions in the temperature range 500-0 K represent a complex amalgam of the incompatible properties of the end-members. While hematite is controlled by adjacent layer antiferromagnetic interactions, ilmenite is controlled by double-layer antiferromagnetic interactions. The complex geometry of the exchange-coupled ions is visualized, and tentative explanations of property changes with temperature are provided by schematic 2-D ionic images along a common (1 1 -2 0) plane showing the exchange interactions in the end-members and in Ilm 90, 80, and 70 solid solutions, accompanied by parallel temperature- and frequency-dependent susceptibility diagrams. To provide a larger-scale visualization of the extent of exchange clusters and networks, 3-D images of Ilm 95, 90, 85, 80, 75, and 70 containing 2592 atomic positions were also constructed. Both types of images together provide a conceptual overview of the physical mechanisms governing this complex solid-solution system and its low-temperature magnetic behavior. Even though the geometric approach does not in itself provide a quantitative model of physical properties, it is an indispensable prerequisite for designing realistic quantitative models, judging their validity, and interpreting model results. It also supplies information on the distributions, numbers, and orientations of magnetic exchange interactions, which can become guidelines for more sophisticated calculations.

  14. Operational characteristics of thin film solid oxide fuel cells with ruthenium anode in natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Yuto; Kerman, Kian; Ko, Changhyun; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2013-12-01

    Direct utilization of hydrocarbons in low temperature solid oxide fuel cells is of growing interest in the landscape of alternative energy technologies. Here, we report on performance of self-supported micro-solid oxide fuel cells (μSOFCs) with ruthenium (Ru) nano-porous thin film anodes operating in natural gas and methane. The μSOFCs consist of 8 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia thin film electrolytes, porous platinum cathodes and porous Ru anodes, and were tested with dry natural gas and methane as fuels and air as the oxidant. At 500 °C, comparable power densities of 410 mW cm-2 and 440 mW cm-2 were obtained with dry natural gas and methane, respectively. In weakly humidified natural gas, open circuit voltage of 0.95 V at 530 °C with peak power density of 800 mW cm-2 was realized. The μSOFC was continuously operated at constant voltage of 0.7 V with methane, where quasi-periodic oscillatory behavior of the performance was observed. Through post-operation XPS studies it was found that the oxidation state of Ru anode surfaces significantly differs depending on the fuel used, oxidation being enhanced with methane or natural gas. The nature of the oscillation is discussed based on the transition in surface oxygen coverage states and electro-catalytic activity of Ru anodes.

  15. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.; Collie, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack. 8 figs.

  16. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Zafred, Paolo R.; Collie, Jeffrey C.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack.

  17. Uranium Isotope Fractionation during Oxidation of Dissolved U(iv) and Synthetic Solid UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Johnson, T. M.; Lundstrom, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    U isotopes (238U/235U) show promise as a tool for environmental monitoring of U contamination as well as a proxy for paleo-redox conditions. However, the isotopic fractionation mechanisms of U are still poorly understood. In groundwater systems, U(VI), a mobile contaminant, can be reduced to immobile U(IV) and thus remediated. Previous work shows that 238U/235U of the remaining U(VI) changes with the extent of reduction. Therefore, U(VI) isotope composition in groundwater can potentially be used to detect and perhaps quantify the extent of reduction. However, knowing if isotopic fractionation occurs during U(IV) oxidation is equally important. First, the reduced U(IV) (either solid or as dissolved organic complexes) potentially can be reoxidized to U(VI). If isotope fractionation occurs during oxidation, it would complicate the use of U isotope composition as a monitoring technique. Further, in natural weathering processes, U(IV) minerals are oxidized to form dissolved U(VI), which is carried to rivers and eventually to the ocean and deposited in marine sediments. The weathering cycle is thus sensitive to redox conditions, meaning the sedimentary U isotope record may serve as a paleoredox indicator, provided U isotope fractionation during oxidation and reduction are well known. We conducted experiments oxidizing 2 different U(IV) species by O2 and measuring isotopic fractionation factors. In one experiment, dissolved U(IV) in 0.1 N HCl (pH 1) was oxidized by entrained air. As oxidation proceeds at pH 1, the remaining dissolved U(IV) becomes progressively enriched in 238U in a linear trend, while the product U(VI) paralleled, but was offset to 1.0‰ lighter in 238U/235U. This linear progression of both remaining reactant and product suggests equilibrium fractionation during oxidation of dissolved U(IV) by O2. A second experiment oxidized synthetic, solid UO2 (in 20 mM NaHCO3, pH 7) with entrained air. The oxidative fractionation is very weak in this case with

  18. Surface engineering of nanoporous substrate for solid oxide fuel cells with atomic layer-deposited electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Sanghoon; Tanveer, Waqas Hassan; Yu, Wonjong; Kang, Sungmin; Cho, Gu Young; Kim, Sung Han

    2015-01-01

    Summary Solid oxide fuel cells with atomic layer-deposited thin film electrolytes supported on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) are electrochemically characterized with varying thickness of bottom electrode catalyst (BEC); BECs which are 0.5 and 4 times thicker than the size of AAO pores are tested. The thicker BEC ensures far more active mass transport on the BEC side and resultantly the thicker BEC cell generates ≈11 times higher peak power density than the thinner BEC cell at 500 °C. PMID:26425432

  19. Direct observation of charge mediated lattice distortions in complex oxide solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sang, Xiahan; Grimley, Everett D.; Niu, Changning; Irving, Douglas L.; LeBeau, James M.

    2015-02-09

    Using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with advanced imaging methods, we directly observe atom column specific, picometer-scale displacements induced by local chemistry in a complex oxide solid solution. Displacements predicted from density functional theory were found to correlate with the observed experimental trends. Further analysis of bonding and charge distribution was used to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the detected structural behavior. By extending the experimental electron microscopy measurements to previously inaccessible length scales, we identified correlated atomic displacements linked to bond differences within the complex oxide structure.

  20. Method of making sulfur tolerant composite cermet electrodes for solid oxide electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1989-01-01

    An electrochemical apparatus is made containing an exterior electorde bonded to the exterior of a tubular, solid, oxygen ion conducting electrolyte where the electrolyte is also in contact with an interior electrode, said exterior electrode comprising particles of an electronic conductor contacting the electrolyte, where a ceramic metal oxide coating partially surrounds the particles and is bonded to the electrolyte, and where a coating of an ionic-electronic conductive material is attached to the ceramic metal oxide coating and to the exposed portions of the particles.

  1. Surface engineering of nanoporous substrate for solid oxide fuel cells with atomic layer-deposited electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Ji, Sanghoon; Tanveer, Waqas Hassan; Yu, Wonjong; Kang, Sungmin; Cho, Gu Young; Kim, Sung Han; An, Jihwan; Cha, Suk Won

    2015-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells with atomic layer-deposited thin film electrolytes supported on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) are electrochemically characterized with varying thickness of bottom electrode catalyst (BEC); BECs which are 0.5 and 4 times thicker than the size of AAO pores are tested. The thicker BEC ensures far more active mass transport on the BEC side and resultantly the thicker BEC cell generates ≈11 times higher peak power density than the thinner BEC cell at 500 °C. PMID:26425432

  2. Direct ethanol solid oxide fuel cell operating in gradual internal reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobrega, S. D.; Galesco, M. V.; Girona, K.; de Florio, D. Z.; Steil, M. C.; Georges, S.; Fonseca, F. C.

    2012-09-01

    An electrolyte supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) using standard electrodes, doped-lanthanum manganite cathode and Ni-cermet anode, was operated with direct (anhydrous) ethanol for more than 100 h, delivering essentially the same power output as running on hydrogen. A ceria-based layer provides the catalytic activity for the gradual internal reforming, which uses the steam formed by the electrochemical oxidation of hydrogen for the decomposition of ethanol. Such a concept opens up the way for multi-fuel SOFCs using standard components and a catalytic layer.

  3. Solid electrolyte potentiometry study of butene oxidation over vanadium phosphate catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Breckner, E.M.; Sundaresan, S.; Benziger, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    A system which includes a solid state electrochemical cell has been used to study the complex behavior of a vanadium phosphate (VPO) catalyst during hydrocarbon oxidation. Under reaction conditions of high temperature (750 K) and near-atmosphere pressure, the open circuit voltage of the cell is indicative of the oxygen activity in the catalyst. Oxygen activity changes in the catalyst due to changes in flowrate and feed composition have been examined. It was found that as the relative degree of reduction of the catalyst increased, the selectivity to partial oxidation products also increased, while catalytic activity decreased.

  4. Generation and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Carbon Sequestration in Northwest Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Peavey; Norm Bessette

    2007-09-30

    The objective of the project is to develop the technology capable of capturing all carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from natural gas fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system. In addition, the technology to electrochemically oxidize any remaining carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide will be developed. Success of this R&D program would allow for the generation of electrical power and thermal power from a fossil fuel driven SOFC system without the carbon emissions resulting from any other fossil fueled power generationg system.

  5. Fuel electrode containing pre-sintered nickel/zirconia for a solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Vora, Shailesh D.

    2001-01-01

    A fuel cell structure (2) is provided, having a pre-sintered nickel-zirconia fuel electrode (6) and an air electrode (4), with a ceramic electrolyte (5) disposed between the electrodes, where the pre-sintered fuel electrode (6) contains particles selected from the group consisting of nickel oxide, cobalt and cerium dioxide particles and mixtures thereof, and titanium dioxide particles, within a matrix of yttria-stabilized zirconia and spaced-apart filamentary nickel strings having a chain structure, and where the fuel electrode can be sintered to provide an active solid oxide fuel cell.

  6. Solid-to-solid oxidation of a vanadium(IV) to a vanadium(V) compound: chemisty of a sulfur-containing siderophore.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Pabitra B; Crans, Debbie C

    2012-09-01

    Visible light facilitates a solid-to-solid photochemical aerobic oxidation of a hunter-green microcrystalline oxidovanadium(IV) compound (1) to form a black powder of cis-dioxidovanadium(V) (2) at ambient temperature. The siderophore ligand pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylic acid), H(2)L, is secreted by a microorganism from the Pseudomonas genus. This irreversible transformation of a metal monooxo to a metal dioxo complex in the solid state in the absence of solvent is unprecedented. It serves as a proof-of-concept reaction for green chemistry occurring in solid matrixes. PMID:22880634

  7. Tubular solid oxide fuel cells with porous metal supports and ceramic interconnections

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Kevin; Ruka, Roswell J.

    2012-05-08

    An intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell structure capable of operating at from 600.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. having a very thin porous hollow elongated metallic support tube having a thickness from 0.10 mm to 1.0 mm, preferably 0.10 mm to 0.35 mm, a porosity of from 25 vol. % to 50 vol. % and a tensile strength from 700 GPa to 900 GPa, which metallic tube supports a reduced thickness air electrode having a thickness from 0.010 mm to 0.2 mm, a solid oxide electrolyte, a cermet fuel electrode, a ceramic interconnection and an electrically conductive cell to cell contact layer.

  8. Characterization of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Components Using Electromagnetic Model-Based Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Zilberstein, Vladimir; Craven, Chris; Goldfine, Neil

    2004-12-28

    In this Phase I SBIR, the contractor demonstrated a number of capabilities of model-based sensors such as MWM sensors and MWM-Arrays. The key results include (1) porosity/microstructure characterization for anodes, (2) potential for cathode material characterization, (3) stress measurements in nickel and cobalt, and (4) potential for stress measurements in non-magnetic materials with a ferromagnetic layer. In addition, potential applications for manufacturing quality control of nonconductive layers using interdigitated electrode dielectrometers have been identified. The results indicate that JENTEK's MWM technology can be used to significantly reduce solid oxide fuel cell production and operating costs in a number of ways. Preliminary investigations of solid oxide fuel cell health monitoring and scale-up issues to address industry needs have also been performed.

  9. Temporal stability of solid oxidizers at high temperature and humidity. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Pellenbarg, R.E.; Dotson, D.A.

    1985-09-30

    Chemical Warfare/Biological Warfare (CW/BW) decontamination operations may rely on aqueous solutions prepared from stored solid oxidizers. Needed are data defining the shipboard storage stability of candidate oxidizers. Therefore, the stability of a series of potential decontaminants has been examined at high temperature (90 + C) and humidity (95 + % R.H.). The loss of oxidizing capacity in aliquots of the oxidizers was followed with time by iodometric titration. Calcium hypochlorite lost over 99% of its oxidizing capacity in less than two days, whereas lithium hypochlorite retained one-third oxidizing capacity for approximately twenty days. Sodium perborate, and sodium persulfate were very hygroscopic and unstable with time. H-48 decomposed in approximately two days, while sodium isocyanurate lost about 80% of its oxidizing capacity in two weeks. The data presented documents severe stability problems of one sort or another with all the materials tested, although overall the sodium isocyanurate appeared to be the more stable candidate undr extreme conditions. In any case, packaging and storage considerations are shown to be important for any potential decontaminant to be stored under environmentally severe conditions.

  10. Numerical Simulations and Experiments about Contamination Mechanism of Solid Immersion Lens System Concerning Hole and Geometries of Lens Holder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Moon-Ho; Yang, Tae-Man; Rhim, Yoon-Chul; Seo, Jeong-Kyo; Choi, In-Ho; Min, Byung-Hoon

    2008-07-01

    The air flow field around a conical type solid immersion lens (SIL) system is simulated numerically and confirmed with experiment using a micro-particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. It is found that the back-flow from the downstream of the SIL is a major candidate for the contamination of the SIL. Five modifications are proposed to suppress the particle conveying mechanism, the back-flow. Among these modifications a method using two flow-bypasses reduces the back-flow most effectively, which connects the top surface of the SIL system and two side-holes of the lens holder where the static pressure is the minimum.

  11. A direct numerical simulation study on the possibility of macroscopic turbulence in porous media: Effects of different solid matrix geometries, solid boundaries, and two porosity scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uth, M.-F.; Jin, Y.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Herwig, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we address the question of whether turbulent structures in a porous medium are restricted in size by the pore scale or whether the size of eddies may exceed the pore scale, leading to the formation of macroscopic coherent structures. Based on direct numerical simulations in porous media, we conclude that the size of turbulent eddies is restricted by the pore size, leading to the pore scale prevalence hypothesis (PSPH). We prove this hypothesis by considering four different porous matrices. In particular, we simulated turbulent flow in a two-dimensional matrix, a three-dimensional unbounded matrix, a three-dimensional matrix bounded by two parallel solid walls, and a three-dimensional matrix with two characteristic pore scales. The obtained results for the four simulated porous matrices support the PSPH. However, there is a partly open question of whether turbulent structures can reach the size of the largest pore scale if the solid matrix is characterized by more than one length scale.

  12. Design and performance of tubular flat-plate solid oxide fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushima, T.; Ikeda, D.; Kanagawa, H.

    1996-12-31

    With the growing interest in conserving the environmental conditions, much attention is being paid to Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC), which has high energy-conversion efficiency. Many organizations have conducted studies on tubular and flat type SOFCs. Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) has studied a combined tubular flat-plate SOFC, and already presented the I-V characteristics of a single cell. Here, we report the construction of a stack of this SOFC cell and successful generation tests results.

  13. High temperature solid oxide regenerative fuel cell for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    1987-01-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell (RFC) energy storage system based on high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is described. The reactants are stored as gases in lightweight insulated pressure vessels. The product water is stored as a liquid in saturated equilibrium with the fuel gas. The system functions as a secondary battery and is applicable to darkside energy storage for solar photovoltaics.

  14. Processing of LaCrO{sub 3} for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, W.; Nasrallah, M.M.; Anderson, H.U.

    1993-11-01

    Objectives of this project is to produce LaCrO{sub 3} for the interconnect in solid oxide fuel cells. The project is divided into three areas: reproducible powder synthesis, sintering of LaCrO{sub 3}-based powders, and co-sintering of LaCrO{sub 3}-based powders with cathode and electrolyte materials. The project has been in place for 3 months; construction is underway for the spray pyrolysis system and studies initiated on the organometallic precursor.

  15. Scalable solid-template reduction for designed reduced graphene oxide architectures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Shepherd, Roderick L; Razal, Joselito M; Huang, Xiao; Zhang, Weimin; Zhao, Jie; Harris, Andrew T; Wang, Shu; Minett, Andrew I; Zhang, Hua

    2013-08-28

    Herein, we report a solid-state reduction process (in contrast to solution-based approach) by using an environmentally friendly reductant, such as vitamin C (denoted VC), to be directly employed to solid-state graphene oxide (GO) templates to give the highly active rGO architecture with a sheet resistance of as low as 10 Ω sq(-1). In addition, predesigned rGO patterns/tracks with tunable resistivity can be directly "written" on a preprepared solid GO film via the inkjet-printing technique using VC/H2O as the printing-ink. This advanced reduction process allows foreign active materials to be preincorporated into the GO matrix to form quality active composite architectures. PMID:23790146

  16. Solid flexible electrochemical supercapacitor using Tobacco mosaic virus nanostructures and ALD ruthenium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnerlich, M.; Pomerantseva, E.; Gregorczyk, K.; Ketchum, D.; Rubloff, G.; Ghodssi, R.

    2013-11-01

    An all-solid electrochemical supercapacitor has been developed using a nanostructured nickel and titanium nitride template that is coated with ruthenium oxide by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The electrode morphology was based on a high surface area biotemplate of genetically modified Tobacco mosaic virus. The biotemplate automatically self-assembles at room temperature in aqueous solution. Nafion® perfluorosulfonate ionomer dispersion was cast on the electrodes and used as a solid proton-conducting electrolyte. A 5.8 F g-1 gravimetric capacity (578 µF cm-2 based on footprint) was achieved in Nafion electrolyte, and the device retained 80% of its capacity after 25 000 cycles. The technology presented here will enable thin, solid, flexible supercapacitors that are compatible with standard microfabrication techniques.

  17. The use of coal in a solid phase reduction of iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhihina, I. D.; Hodosov, I. E.

    2015-09-01

    The results of the research process of producing metalized products by solid-phase reduction of iron using solid carbonaceous reducing agents. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out on the model of the unit the Fe-C-O and system with iron ore and coal. As a result of modeling the thermodynamic boundary reducing, oxidizing, and transition areas and the value of the ratio of carbon and oxygen in the system. Simulation of real systems carried out with the gas phase obtained in the pyrolys of coal. The simulation results allow to determine the optimal cost of coal required for complete reduction of iron ore from a given composition. The kinetics of the processes of solid-phase reduction of iron using coal of various technological brands.

  18. [Fenton technique for oxidation treatment of solid-waste containing aniline].

    PubMed

    Hu, Li-Fang; Yao, Jun; Lou, Bin; He, Ruo; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of aniline was evaluated to provide the foundation for risk-based treatment of aniline-contaminated solid-waste using Fenton reagent (catalyzed hydrogen peroxide). The operating conditions of Fenton reaction were investigated and the factors of the chemical treatment were analyzed. The optimal conditions were following: 1.1 mL H2O2 per gram of dried solid waste, V (H2O2) 0.5-1.0 mL x min(-1), addition of Fenton reagent twice or three times at pH = 3.0 in 50 grams of waste, and the aniline removal rate is over 99.86% for 30 min reaction after reagent addition. Furthermore, mechanisms of affecting factors in solid-waste were analyzed; the key and controlling steps of reactions were expounded in the system, which provided safeguard for further treatment ranging from stabilization and solidification to landfill. PMID:18441925

  19. Short time proton dynamics in bulk ice and in porous anode solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect

    Basoli, Francesco; Senesi, Roberto; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Licoccia, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen reduction and incorporation into solid electrolytes and the reverse reaction of oxygen evolution play a cru-cial role in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) applications. However a detailed un derstanding of the kinetics of the cor-responding reactions, i.e. on reaction mechanisms, rate limiting steps, reaction paths, electrocatalytic role of materials, is still missing. These include a thorough characterization of the binding potentials experienced by protons in the lattice. We report results of Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS) measurements of the vibrational state of the protons in Ni- YSZ highly porous composites (75% to 90% ), a ceramic-metal material showing a high electrical conductivity and ther mal stability, which is known to be most effectively used as anodes for solid ox ide fuel cells. The results are compared with INS and Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) experiments on the proton binding states in bulk ice.

  20. Effect of Creep of Ferritic Interconnect on Long-Term Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-08-01

    High-temperature ferritic alloys are potential candidates as interconnect (IC) materials and spacers due to their low cost and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) compatibility with other components for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . However, creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature exceeds or even is less than half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the SOFCs under development are around 1,073 K. With around 1,800 K of the melting temperature for most stainless steel, possible creep deformation of ferritic IC under the typical cell operating temperature should not be neglected. In this paper, the effects of IC creep behavior on stack geometry change and the stress redistribution of different cell components are predicted and summarized. The goal of the study is to investigate the performance of the fuel cell stack by obtaining the changes in fuel- and air-channel geometry due to creep of the ferritic stainless steel IC, therefore indicating possible changes in SOFC performance under long-term operations. The ferritic IC creep model was incorporated into software SOFC-MP and Mentat-FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the deformed configuration of the SOFC stack under the long-term steady-state operating temperature. It was found that the creep behavior of the ferritic stainless steel IC contributes to narrowing of both the fuel- and the air-flow channels. In addition, stress re-distribution of the cell components suggests the need for a compliant sealing material that also relaxes at operating temperature.

  1. Mathematical model of a plate fin heat exchanger operating under solid oxide fuel cell working conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniowski, Robert; Poniewski, Mieczysław

    2013-12-01

    Heat exchangers of different types find application in power systems based on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Compact plate fin heat exchangers are typically found to perfectly fit systems with power output under 5 kWel. Micro-combined heat and power (micro-CHP) units with solid oxide fuel cells can exhibit high electrical and overall efficiencies, exceeding 85%, respectively. These values can be achieved only when high thermal integration of a system is assured. Selection and sizing of heat exchangers play a crucial role and should be done with caution. Moreover, performance of heat exchangers under variable operating conditions can strongly influence efficiency of the complete system. For that reason, it becomes important to develop high fidelity mathematical models allowing evaluation of heat exchangers under modified operating conditions, in high temperature regimes. Prediction of pressure and temperatures drops at the exit of cold and hot sides are important for system-level studies. Paper presents dedicated mathematical model used for evaluation of a plate fin heat exchanger, operating as a part of micro-CHP unit with solid oxide fuel cells.

  2. A novel thin film solid oxide fuel cell for microscale energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiski, A F; Morse, J D

    1999-05-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication and assembly of a solid oxide fuel cell system is described which enables effective scaling of the fuel delivery, mainfold, and fuel cell stack components for applications in miniature and microscale energy conversion. Electrode materials for solid oxide fuel cells are developed using sputter deposition techniques. A thin film anode is formed by codeposition of nickel and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). This approach provides a mixed conducting interfacial layer between the nickel electrode and electrolyte layer. Similarly, a thin film cathode is formed by co-deposition of silver and yttria-stabilized zirconia. Additionally, sputter deposition of yttria-stabilized zirconia thin film electrolyte enables high quality, continuous films to be formed having thickness on the order of 1-2 {micro}m. This will effectively lower the temperature of operation for the fuel cell stack significantly below the traditional ranges at which solid oxide electrolyte systems are operated (600--1000 C), thereby rendering this fuel cell system suitable for miniaturization. Scaling towards miniaturization is accomplished by utilizing novel micromaching approaches which allow manifold channels and fuel delivery system to be formed within the substrate which the thin film fuel cell stack is fabricated on, thereby circumventing the need for bulky manifold components which are not directly scalable.

  3. System for operating solid oxide fuel cell generator on diesel fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Prabhu (Inventor); George, Raymond A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A system is provided for operating a solid oxide fuel cell generator on diesel fuel. The system includes a hydrodesulfurizer which reduces the sulfur content of commercial and military grade diesel fuel to an acceptable level. Hydrogen which has been previously separated from the process stream is mixed with diesel fuel at low pressure. The diesel/hydrogen mixture is then pressurized and introduced into the hydrodesulfurizer. The hydrodesulfurizer comprises a metal oxide such as ZnO which reacts with hydrogen sulfide in the presence of a metal catalyst to form a metal sulfide and water. After desulfurization, the diesel fuel is reformed and delivered to a hydrogen separator which removes most of the hydrogen from the reformed fuel prior to introduction into a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The separated hydrogen is then selectively delivered to the diesel/hydrogen mixer or to a hydrogen storage unit. The hydrogen storage unit preferably comprises a metal hydride which stores hydrogen in solid form at low pressure. Hydrogen may be discharged from the metal hydride to the diesel/hydrogen mixture at low pressure upon demand, particularly during start-up and shut-down of the system.

  4. A solid oxide fuel cell system fed with hydrogen sulfide and natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yixin; Schaefer, Laura

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) occurs naturally in crude petroleum, natural gas, volcanic gases, hot springs, and some lakes. Hydrogen sulfide can also result as a by-product from industrial activities, such as food processing, coke ovens, paper mills, tanneries, and petroleum refineries. Sometimes, it is considered to be an industrial pollutant. However, hydrogen can be decomposed from H 2S and then used as fuel for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). This paper presents an examination of a simple hydrogen sulfide and natural gas-fed solid oxide fuel cell system. The possibility of utilization of hydrogen sulfide as a feedstock in a solid oxide fuel cell is discussed. A system configuration of an SOFC combined with an external H 2S decomposition device is proposed, where a certain amount of natural gas is supplied to the SOFC. The exhaust fuel gas of the SOFC is after-burned with exhaust air from the SOFC, and the heat of the combustion gas is utilized in the decomposition of H 2S in a decomposition reactor (DR) to produce hydrogen to feed the SOFC. The products are electricity and industry-usable sulfur. Through a mass and energy balance, a preliminary thermodynamic analysis of this system is performed, and the system efficiency is calculated. Also in this paper, the challenges in creating the proposed configuration are discussed, and the direction of future work is presented.

  5. Structure and high temperature physical properties of glass seal materials in solid oxide electrolysis cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jie; Zan, Qingfeng; Ai, Desheng; Ma, Jingtao; Deng, Changsheng; Xu, Jingming

    2012-09-01

    Three series of BaO-CaO-SiO2-Al2O3, SrO-SiO2-Al2O3, and SrO-CaO-SiO2-Al2O3 glasses are prepared. Their basic physical properties are measured using dilatometry and differential scanning calorimetry from room temperature to the softening temperature. Their structures are characterized with infrared spectroscopy. The wetting characteristics of all glasses are examined by monitoring the change in shape of a cube specimen on crofer22 substrates from room temperature to flow temperature with a high temperature shape microscope. Five main absorption bands can be distinguished in the infrared absorption spectra of the three systems. The optimum ranges of sealing temperature of the glasses are determined. The 24SrO-16CaO-25SiO2-8Al2O3 glass is found to be the best sealant for the solid oxide electrolyzer/fuel cells under low loading without leakage. SrO improves the wetting ability of the glass by decreasing the contact angle between the glass and crofer22 substrates. The thermal properties of all the glasses fulfill the requirements for sealing solid oxide electrolysis/fuel cells. In terms of air tightness, the SrO-containing glass shows the best wetting ability among other glasses, and is the most suitable sealant for planar solid oxide electrolyzers/fuel cells.

  6. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen oxidation reaction in solid oxide fuel cell anode based on species territory adsorption model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Tsuyoshi; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2015-09-01

    A modified reaction model of hydrogen oxidation around a triple phase boundary (TPB) is proposed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with a Ni/oxide ion conductor cermet anode containing proton conductor particles in order to describe the mechanism of anode overpotential reduction. In this model, three kinds of TPBs consisting of nickel metal, oxide ion conductors, proton conductors, and gas phases were considered. It was assumed that the chemical species could be adsorbed within a finite narrow area on each material around the TPB. The reaction rate in the anode was controlled by the surface reaction between the adsorbed hydrogen and adsorbed oxygen; all other reactions took place under chemical equilibrium. Based on the reaction model, analytical expressions of current density with oxygen activity and anode overpotential with current density could be obtained. The latter could combine the anode overpotential at low- and high-current-density regions, which were conventionally expressed independently. The analytical results were in good agreement with the experimental results for both the conventional anode and the new anode incorporating a proton conductor. Especially, the anode overpotential reduction could be explained by the additional supply of adsorbed hydrogen from the proton conductor to the TPB.

  7. Anodic Oxidation in Aluminum Electrode by Using Hydrated Amorphous Aluminum Oxide Film as Solid Electrolyte under High Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Yao, Manwen; Chen, Jianwen; Su, Zhen; Peng, Yong; Zou, Pei; Yao, Xi

    2016-05-01

    Dense and nonporous amorphous aluminum oxide (AmAO) film was deposited onto platinized silicon substrate by sol-gel and spin coating technology. The evaporated aluminum film was deposited onto the AmAO film as top electrode. The hydrated AmAO film was utilized as a solid electrolyte for anodic oxidation of the aluminum electrode (Al) film under high electric field. The hydrated AmAO film was a high efficiency electrolyte, where a 45 nm thick Al film was anodized completely on a 210 nm thick hydrated AmAO film. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and breakdown phenomena of a dry and hydrated 210 nm thick AmAO film with a 150 nm thick Al electrode pad were studied in this work. Breakdown voltage of the dry and hydrated 210 nm thick AmAO film were 85 ± 3 V (405 ± 14 MV m(-1)) and 160 ± 5 V (762 ± 24 MV m(-1)), respectively. The breakdown voltage of the hydrated AmAO film increased about twice, owing to the self-healing behavior (anodic oxidation reaction). As an intuitive phenomenon of the self-healing behavior, priority anodic oxidation phenomena was observed in a 210 nm thick hydrated AmAO film with a 65 nm thick Al electrode pad. The results suggested that self-healing behavior (anodic oxidation reaction) was occurring nearby the defect regions of the films during I-V test. It was an effective electrical self-healing method, which would be able to extend to many other simple and complex oxide dielectrics and various composite structures. PMID:27070754

  8. 6-Aminouracil: Geometries and spectra in the isolated state and in the solid state simulation. A comparison with 5-aminouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palafox, M. Alcolea; Rastogi, V. K.

    2016-03-01

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 6-aminouracil were recorded in the solid state in the regions 3500-0 cm-1 and 4000-400 cm-1, respectively. The unit cell reported by X-ray in the crystal was reproduced theoretically by density functional theoretical calculations as a tetramer form. To correct the overestimation of the theoretical wavenumbers of 6-aminouracil were used specific scaling equations determined from the molecule of uracil. These scaled frequencies obtained were employed in the reassignment of several Raman and Infrared experimental bands. In the comparison of these experimental values the percentage of error is very small in most of the wavenumbers. A correlation between the geometric parameters, charge distribution and vibrational spectra of 6-aminouracil and 5-aminouracil molecules was shown.

  9. Manganese Triazacyclononane Oxidation Catalysts Grafted under Reaction Conditions on Solid Co-Catalytic Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeldt, Nicholas J.; Ni, Zhenjuan; Korinda, Andrew W.; Meyer, Randall J.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-01-23

    Manganese complexes of 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (tmtacn) are highly active and selective alkene oxidation catalysts with aqueous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Here, carboxylic acid-functionalized SiO{sub 2} simultaneously immobilizes and activates these complexes under oxidation reaction conditions. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the functionalized support are both necessary to transform the inactive [(tmtacn)Mn{sup IV}({mu}-O)3Mn{sup IV}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+} into the active, dicarboxylate-bridged [(tmtacn)Mn{sup III}({mu}-O)({mu}-RCOO){sub 2}Mn{sup III}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+}. This transformation is assigned on the basis of comparison of diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectra to known soluble models, assignment of oxidation state by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy, the dependence of rates on the acid/Mn ratios, and comparison of the surface structures derived from density functional theory with extended X-ray absorption fine structure. Productivity in cis-cyclooctene oxidation to epoxide and cis-diol with 2-10 equiv of solid cocatalytic supports is superior to that obtained with analogous soluble valeric acid cocatalysts, which require 1000-fold excess to reach similar levels at comparable times. Cyclooctene oxidation rates are near first order in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and near zero order in all other species, including H{sub 2}O. These observations are consistent with a mechanism of substrate oxidation following rate-limiting H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation on the hydrated, supported complex. This general mechanism and the observed alkene oxidation activation energy of 38 {+-} 6 kJ/mol are comparable to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation by related soluble catalysts. Undesired decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not a limiting factor for these solid catalysts, and as such, productivity remains high up to 25 C and initial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration of 0.5 M, increasing reactor throughput. These results show that immobilized carboxylic acids can be utilized and understood

  10. Variable valence of praseodymium in rare-earth oxide solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchinskaya, M.V.; Merezhinskii, K.Y.; Tikhonov, P.A.

    1986-06-01

    Solid solutions of elevated praseodymium oxide content have interesting electrical properties, making them the basis for the manufacture of high-temperature electrically conducting materials. Establishment of the composition-structure-valence state relationships enables control of the material properties. The authors performed investigations using a thermogravimetric apparatus with an electronic microbalance of type EM-5-3M, and using x-ray phase analysis of powders (DRON-1 diffractometer, CuK /SUB alpha/ -radiation). The authors also studied the kinetics of praseodymium oxidation with a thermogravimetric apparatus under isothermal conditions. Evaluation of the results with the equation of Kolmogorov, Erofeev, and Avraam indicates that the process is limited by the chemical oxidation of praseodymium and not by diffusion.

  11. Thermodynamics of solid electrolytes and related oxide ceramics based on the fluorite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Oxides based on the fluorite structure are important as electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells, thermal barrier coatings, gate dielectrics, catalysts, and nuclear materials. Though the parent fluorite structure is simple, the substitution of trivalent for tetravalent cations, coupled with the presence of charge-balancing oxygen vacancies, leads to a wealth of short-range and long-range ordered structures and complex thermodynamic properties. The location of vacancies and the nature of clusters affect the energetics of mixing in rare earth doped zirconia, hafnia, ceria, urania, and thoria, with systematic trends in energetics as a function of cation radius. High temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry has provided direct measurement of formation enthalpies of these refractory materials. Surface and interfacial energies have also been measured in yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanomaterials. Other ionic conductors having perovskite, apatite, and mellilite structures are discussed briefly.

  12. Chemical stability of glass seal interfaces in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeff W.

    2004-06-01

    In intermediate temperature planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, the interconnect, which is typically made from cost-effective, oxidation-resistant, high-temperature alloys, is typically sealed to the ceramic positive electrode-electrolyte-negative electrode (PEN) by a sealing glass. To maintain the structural stability and minimize the degradation of stack performance, the sealing glass has to be chemically compatible with the PEN and alloy interconnects. In the present study, the chemical compatibility of a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic (specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks) with a number of selected oxidation resistant high temperature alloys (and the yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte) was evaluated. This paper reports the results of that study, with a particular focus on Crofer22 APU, a new ferritic stainless steel that was developed specifically for SOFC interconnect applications.

  13. Vapour phase approach for iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis from solid precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Mandeep; Ulbrich, Pavel; Prokopec, Vadym; Svoboda, Pavel; Šantavá, Eva; Štěpánek, František

    2013-04-15

    A new non-solution mediated approach to the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles directly from solid FeCl{sub 2} salt precursors has been developed. The method is rapid, simple and scalable. The structural properties and the phase of the resulting iron oxide particles has been determined by a range of methods including XRD, FT-IR and Mössbauer spectroscopy, and the phase is shown to be maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The magnetic properties of the iron oxide particles have been measured using SQUID, confirming superparamagnetic behaviour of the powder and a saturation magnetization of 53.0 emu g{sup −1} at 300 K. Aqueous dispersions at increasing concentrations were prepared and their heating rate under a 400 kHz alternating magnetic field measured. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of the iron oxide was found to be 84.8 W g{sup −1}, which makes the material suitable for the formulation of ferrofluids or ferrogels with RF heating properties. - Graphical Abstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles obtained by a novel vapour phase approach. Highlights: ► Novel vapour phase (non-solvent) approach for iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis. ► Attractive alternative approach to the present co-precipitation method. ► Better magnetic properties with high coercivity of nanoparticles. ► A high specific absorption rate (SAR) for hyperthermia applications.

  14. Life prediction of coated and uncoated metallic interconnect for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. N.; Sun, X.; Stephens, E.; Khaleel, M. A.

    In this paper, we present an integrated experimental and modeling methodology in predicting the life of coated and uncoated metallic interconnect (IC) for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The ultimate goal is to provide cell designer and manufacture with a predictive methodology such that the life of the IC system can be managed and optimized through different coating thickness to meet the overall cell designed life. Crofer 22 APU is used as the example IC material system. The life of coated and uncoated Crofer 22 APU under isothermal cooling was predicted by comparing the predicted interfacial strength and the interfacial stresses induced by the cooling process from the operating temperature to room temperature, together with the measured oxide scale growth kinetics. It was found that the interfacial strength between the oxide scale and the Crofer 22 APU substrate decreases with the growth of the oxide scale, and that the interfacial strength for the oxide scale/spinel coating interface is much higher than that of the oxide scale/Crofer 22 APU substrate interface. As expected, the predicted life of the coated Crofer 22 APU is significantly longer than that of the uncoated Crofer 22 APU.

  15. Neptunium(V) partitioning to uranium(VI) oxide and peroxide solids.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Matthew; Clark, Sue B; Friese, Judah I; Arey, Bruce W; Buck, Edgar C; Hanson, Brady D

    2005-06-01

    Metaschoepite, [(UO2)8O2(OH)12] x 10H2O, and metastudtite, UO4 x 4H2O, are alteration phases anticipated in a spent nuclear fuel repository following the moist oxidation of UO2 on a geologic time scale. Dissolved concentrations and hence potential mobility of other radionuclides in the fuel, such as the neptunyl cation (NpO2+), will likely be determined by the extent of their partitioning into these U(VI) solids. 237Np is of particular interest due to its potential high mobility and long half-life (2.1 x 10(6) years.) In this study, metaschoepite has been precipitated and subsequently transformed to studtite in the presence of dissolved Np. The metaschoepite and studtite solids that formed initially contained <10 and 6500 ppm Np, respectively. Batch dissolution studies of these solids at pH 6 demonstrate release of Np that exceeds congruent dissolution of U from metastudtite; furthermore, the released Np cation remains in solution. Thus, although the Np partitions into the metastudtite solid initially, it is released to solution over time, indicating that metastudtite is not likely to serve as a host solid for Np incorporation or sorption of the neptunyl cation on long time scales. PMID:15984790

  16. Solid oxide fuel cell with transitioned cross-section for improved anode gas management at the open end

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, Paolo R.; Draper, Robert

    2012-01-17

    A solid oxide fuel cell (400) is made having a tubular, elongated, hollow, active section (445) which has a cross-section containing an air electrode (452) a fuel electrode (454) and solid oxide electrolyte (456) between them, where the fuel cell transitions into at least one inactive section (460) with a flattened parallel sided cross-section (462, 468) each cross-section having channels (472, 474, 476) in them which smoothly communicate with each other at an interface section (458).

  17. Common Geometry Module

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-01-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and onmore » top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also indudes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.« less

  18. Promotion of water-mediated carbon removal by nanostructured barium oxide/nickel interfaces in solid oxide fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Choi, YongMan; Qin, Wentao; Chen, Haiyan; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Ping; Bai, Jianming; Tyson, Trevor A.; Liu, Meilin

    2011-01-01

    The existing Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) perform poorly in carbon-containing fuels because of coking and deactivation at desired operating temperatures. Here we report a new anode with nanostructured barium oxide/nickel (BaO/Ni) interfaces for low-cost SOFCs, demonstrating high power density and stability in C3H8, CO and gasified carbon fuels at 750°C. Synchrotron-based X-ray analyses and microscopy reveal that nanosized BaO islands grow on the Ni surface, creating numerous nanostructured BaO/Ni interfaces that readily adsorb water and facilitate water-mediated carbon removal reactions. Density functional theory calculations predict that the dissociated OH from H2O on BaO reacts with C on Ni near the BaO/Ni interface to produce CO and H species, which are then electrochemically oxidized at the triple-phase boundaries of the anode. This anode offers potential for ushering in a new generation of SOFCs for efficient, low-emission conversion of readily available fuels to electricity. PMID:21694705

  19. A micro-nano porous oxide hybrid for efficient oxygen reduction in reduced-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Da Han; Liu, Xuejiao; Zeng, Fanrong; Qian, Jiqin; Wu, Tianzhi; Zhan, Zhongliang

    2012-01-01

    Tremendous efforts to develop high-efficiency reduced-temperature (≤ 600°C) solid oxide fuel cells are motivated by their potentials for reduced materials cost, less engineering challenge, and better performance durability. A key obstacle to such fuel cells arises from sluggish oxygen reduction reaction kinetics on the cathodes. Here we reported that an oxide hybrid, featuring a nanoporous Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3−δ (SSC) catalyst coating bonded onto the internal surface of a high-porosity La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O3−δ (LSGM) backbone, exhibited superior catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reactions and thereby yielded low interfacial resistances in air, e.g., 0.021 Ω cm2 at 650°C and 0.043 Ω cm2 at 600°C. We further demonstrated that such a micro-nano porous hybrid, adopted as the cathode in a thin LSGM electrolyte fuel cell, produced impressive power densities of 2.02 W cm−2 at 650°C and 1.46 W cm−2 at 600°C when operated on humidified hydrogen fuel and air oxidant. PMID:22708057

  20. High temperature oxidation behavior of interconnect coated with LSCF and LSM for solid oxide fuel cell by screen printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shyong; Chu, Chun-Lin; Tsai, Ming-Jui; Lee, Jye

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the effect of La 0.6Sr 0.4Co 0.2Fe 0.8O 3 (LSCF) and La 0.7Sr 0.3MnO 3 (LSM) coatings on the electrical properties and oxidation resistance of Crofer22 APU at 800 °C hot air. LSCF and LSM were coated on Crofer22 APU by screen printing and sintered over temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1100 °C in N 2. The coated alloy was first checked for compositions, morphology and interface conditions and then treated in a simulated oxidizing environment at 800 °C for 200 h. After measuring the long-term electrical resistance, the area specific resistance (ASR) at 800 °C for the alloy coated with LSCF was less than its counterpart coated with LSM. This work used LSCF coating as a metallic interconnect to reduce working temperature for the solid oxide fuel cell.

  1. Recycling of Magnesium Alloy Employing Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Zink, Peter A.; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

    2013-04-01

    Pure magnesium was recycled from partially oxidized 50.5 wt pct Mg-Al scrap alloy and AZ91 Mg alloy (9 wt pct Al, 1 wt pct Zn). Refining experiments were performed using a eutectic mixture of MgF2-CaF2 molten salt (flux). During the experiments, potentiodynamic scans were performed to determine the electrorefining potentials for magnesium dissolution and magnesium bubble nucleation in the flux. The measured electrorefining potential for magnesium bubble nucleation increased over time as the magnesium content inside the magnesium alloy decreased. Potentiostatic holds and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were employed to measure the electronic and ionic resistances of the flux. The electronic resistivity of the flux varied inversely with the magnesium solubility. Up to 100 pct of the magnesium was refined from the Mg-Al scrap alloy by dissolving magnesium and its oxide into the flux followed by argon-assisted evaporation of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapor. Solid oxide membrane electrolysis was also employed in the system to enable additional magnesium recovery from magnesium oxide in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. In an experiment employing AZ91 Mg alloy, only the refining step was carried out. The calculated refining yield of magnesium from the AZ91 alloy was near 100 pct.

  2. FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF THE DURABILITY OF MATERIALS FOR INTERCONNECTS IN SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick S. Pettit; Gerald H. Meier

    2003-06-30

    This report describes the result of the first eight months of effort on a project directed at improving metallic interconnect materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The results include cyclic oxidation studies of a group of ferritic alloys, which are candidate interconnect materials. The exposures have been carried out in simulated fuel cell atmospheres. The oxidation morphologies have been characterized and the ASR has been measured for the oxide scales. The effect of fuel cell electric current density on chromia growth rates has been considered The thermomechanical behavior of the scales has been investigated by stress measurements using x-ray diffraction and interfacial fracture toughness measurements using indentation. The ultimate goal of this thrust is to use knowledge of changes in oxide thickness, stress and adhesion to develop accelerated testing methods for evaluating SOFC interconnect alloys. Finally a theoretical assessment of the potential for use of ''new'' metallic materials as interconnect materials has been conducted and is presented in this report. Alloys being considered include materials based on pure nickel, materials based on the ''Invar'' concept, and coated materials to optimize properties in both the anode and cathode gases.

  3. High-Temperature, Dual-Atmosphere Corrosion of Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, Paul; Amendola, Roberta

    2012-12-01

    High-temperature corrosion of ferritic stainless steel (FSS) surfaces can be accelerated and anomalous when it is simultaneously subjected to different gaseous environments, e.g., when separating fuel (hydrogen) and oxidant (air) streams, in comparison with single-atmosphere exposures, e.g., air only. This so-called "dual-atmosphere" exposure is realized in many energy-conversion systems including turbines, boilers, gasifiers, heat exchangers, and particularly in intermediate temperature (600-800°C) planar solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. It is generally accepted that hydrogen transport through the FSS (plate or tube) and its subsequent integration into the growing air-side surface oxide layer can promote accelerated and anomalous corrosion—relative to single-atmosphere exposure—via defect chemistry changes, such as increased cation vacancy concentrations, decreased oxygen activity, and steam formation within the growing surface oxide layers. Establishment of a continuous and dense surface oxide layer on the fuel side of the FSS can inhibit hydrogen transport and the associated effects on the air side. Minor differences in FSS composition, microstructure, and surface conditions can all have dramatic influences on dual-atmosphere corrosion behaviors. This article reviews high-temperature, dual-atmosphere corrosion phenomena and discusses implications for SOFC stacks, related applications, and future research.

  4. Microstructural coarsening effects on redox instability and mechanical damage in solid oxide fuel cell anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, F.; Haataja, M.

    2013-11-01

    In state-of-the-art high temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a porous composite of nickel and yttria stabilized zirconia (Ni/YSZ) is employed as the anode. The rapid oxidation of Ni into NiO is regarded as the main cause of the so-called reduction-oxidation (redox) instability in Ni/YSZ anodes, due to the presence of extensive bulk volume changes associated with this reaction. As a consequence, the development of internal stresses can lead to performance degradation and/or structural failure. In this study, we employ a recently developed continuum formalism to quantify the mechanical deformation behavior and evolution of internal stresses in Ni/YSZ porous anodes due to re-oxidation. In our approach, a local failure criterion is coupled to the continuum framework in order to account for the heterogeneous damage accumulation in the YSZ phase. The hallmark of our approach is the ability to track the spatial evolution of mechanical damage and capture the interaction of YSZ damaged regions with the local microstructure. Simulation results highlight the importance of the microstructure characterized by Ni to YSZ particle size ratio on the redox behavior and damage accumulation in as-synthesized SOFC anode systems. Moreover, a redox-strain-to-failure criterion is developed to quantify the degree by which coarsened anode microstructures become more susceptible to mechanical damage during re-oxidation.

  5. Pore-Scale Investigation of Mass Transport and Electrochemistry in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode

    SciTech Connect

    Grew, Kyle N.; Joshi, Abhijit S.; Peracchio, Aldo A.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2009-10-31

    The development and validation of a model for the study of pore-scale transport phenomena and electrochemistry in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) anode are presented in this work. This model couples mass transport processes with a detailed reaction mechanism, which is used to model the electrochemical oxidation kinetics. Detailed electrochemical oxidation reaction kinetics, which is known to occur in the vicinity of the three-phase boundary (TPB) interfaces, is discretely considered in this work. The TPB regions connect percolating regions of electronic and ionic conducting phases of the anode, nickel (Ni) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), respectively; with porous regions supporting mass transport of the fuel and product. A two-dimensional (2D), multi-species lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to describe the diffusion process in complex pore structures that are representative of the SOFC anode. This diffusion model is discretely coupled to a kinetic electrochemical oxidation mechanism using localized flux boundary conditions. The details of the oxidation kinetics are prescribed as a function of applied activation overpotential and the localized hydrogen and water mole fractions. This development effort is aimed at understanding the effects of the anode microstructure within TPB regions. This work describes the methods used so that future studies can consider the details of SOFC anode microstructure.

  6. Atomic solid state energy scale: Universality and periodic trends in oxidation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelatt, Brian D.; Kokenyesi, Robert S.; Ravichandran, Ram; Pereira, Clifford B.; Wager, John F.; Keszler, Douglas A.

    2015-11-01

    The atomic solid state energy (SSE) scale originates from a plot of the electron affinity (EA) and ionization potential (IP) versus band gap (EG). SSE is estimated for a given atom by assessing an average EA (for a cation) or an average IP (for an anion) for binary inorganic compounds having that specific atom as a constituent. Physically, SSE is an experimentally-derived average frontier orbital energy referenced to the vacuum level. In its original formulation, 69 binary closed-shell inorganic semiconductors and insulators were employed as a database, providing SSE estimates for 40 elements. In this contribution, EA and IP versus EG are plotted for an additional 92 compounds, thus yielding SSE estimates for a total of 64 elements from the s-, p-, d-, and f-blocks of the periodic table. Additionally, SSE is refined to account for its dependence on oxidation state. Although most cations within the SSE database are found to occur in a single oxidation state, data are available for nine d-block transition metals and one p-block main group metal in more than one oxidation state. SSE is deeper in energy for a higher cation oxidation state. Two p-block main group non-metals within the SSE database are found to exist in both positive and negative oxidation states so that they can function as a cation or anion. SSEs for most cations are positioned above -4.5 eV with respect to the vacuum level, and SSEs for all anions are positioned below. Hence, the energy -4.5 eV, equal to the hydrogen donor/acceptor ionization energy ε(+/-) or equivalently the standard hydrogen electrode energy, is considered to be an absolute energy reference for chemical bonding in the solid state.

  7. Composite electrolyte with proton conductivity for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, Rizwan; Ahmed, Akhlaq; Akram, Nadeem; Saleem, Muhammad; Niaz Akhtar, Majid; Ajmal Khan, M.; Abbas, Ghazanfar; Alvi, Farah; Yasir Rafique, M.; Sherazi, Tauqir A.; Shakir, Imran; Mohsin, Munazza; Javed, Muhammad Sufyan; Zhu, Bin E-mail: zhubin@hubu.edu.cn

    2015-11-02

    In the present work, cost-effective nanocomposite electrolyte (Ba-SDC) oxide is developed for efficient low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LTSOFCs). Analysis has shown that dual phase conduction of O{sup −2} (oxygen ions) and H{sup +} (protons) plays a significant role in the development of advanced LTSOFCs. Comparatively high proton ion conductivity (0.19 s/cm) for LTSOFCs was achieved at low temperature (460 °C). In this article, the ionic conduction behaviour of LTSOFCs is explained by carrying out electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Further, the phase and structure analysis are investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Finally, we achieved an ionic transport number of the composite electrolyte for LTSOFCs as high as 0.95 and energy and power density of 90% and 550 mW/cm{sup 2}, respectively, after sintering the composite electrolyte at 800 °C for 4 h, which is promising. Our current effort toward the development of an efficient, green, low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell with the incorporation of high proton conductivity composite electrolyte may open frontiers in the fields of energy and fuel cell technology.

  8. Novel quasi-symmetric solid oxide fuel cells with enhanced electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yonghong; Cheng, Zhuanxia; Yang, Yang; Gu, Qingwen; Tian, Dong; Lu, Xiaoyong; Yu, Weili; Lin, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Symmetrical solid oxide fuel cell (SSOFC) using same materials as both anode and cathode simultaneously has gained extensively attentions, which can simplify fabrication process, minimize inter-diffusion between components, enhance sulfur and coking tolerance by operating the anode as the cathode in turn. With keeping the SSOFC's advantages, a novel quasi-symmetrical solid oxide fuel cell (Q-SSOFC) is proposed to further improve the performance, which optimally combines two different SSOFC electrode materials as both anode and cathode simultaneously. PrBaFe2O5+δ (PBFO) and PrBaFe1.6Ni0.4O5+δ (PBFNO, Fe is partially substituted by Ni.) are prepared and applied as both cathode and anode for SSOFC, which exhibit desirable chemical and thermal compatibility with Sm0.8Ce0.2O1.9 (SDC) electrolyte. PBFO cathode exhibits higher oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity than PBFNO cathode in air, whereas PBFNO anode exhibits higher hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activity than PBFO anode in H2. The as-designed Q-SSOFC of PBFNO/SDC/PBFO exhibits higher electrochemical performance than the conventional SSOFCs of both PBFO/SDC/PBFO and PBFNO/SDC/PBFNO. The superior performance of Q-SSOFC is attributed to the lowest polarization resistance (Rp). The newly developed Q-SSOFCs open doors for further improvement of electrochemical performance in SSOFC, which hold more promise for various potential applications.

  9. Operando X-ray Investigation of Electrode/Electrolyte Interfaces in Model Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We employed operando anomalous surface X-ray diffraction to investigate the buried interface between the cathode and the electrolyte of a model solid oxide fuel cell with atomic resolution. The cell was studied under different oxygen pressures at elevated temperatures and polarizations by external potential control. Making use of anomalous X-ray diffraction effects at the Y and Zr K-edges allowed us to resolve the interfacial structure and chemical composition of a (100)-oriented, 9.5 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystal electrolyte below a La0.6Sr0.4CoO3−δ (LSC) electrode. We observe yttrium segregation toward the YSZ/LSC electrolyte/electrode interface under reducing conditions. Under oxidizing conditions, the interface becomes Y depleted. The yttrium segregation is corroborated by an enhanced outward relaxation of the YSZ interfacial metal ion layer. At the same time, an increase in point defect concentration in the electrolyte at the interface was observed, as evidenced by reduced YSZ crystallographic site occupancies for the cations as well as the oxygen ions. Such changes in composition are expected to strongly influence the oxygen ion transport through this interface which plays an important role for the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The structure of the interface is compared to the bare YSZ(100) surface structure near the microelectrode under identical conditions and to the structure of the YSZ(100) surface prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. PMID:27346923

  10. Mesoporous MnCeOx solid solutions for low temperature and selective oxidation of hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Lu, Hanfeng; Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Li; Wu, Zili; Yang, Shize; Shi, Hongliang; Zhu, Qiulian; Chen, Yinfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The development of noble-metal-free heterogeneous catalysts that can realize the aerobic oxidation of C–H bonds at low temperature is a profound challenge in the catalysis community. Here we report the synthesis of a mesoporous Mn0.5Ce0.5Ox solid solution that is highly active for the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons under mild conditions (100–120 °C). Notably, the catalytic performance achieved in the oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanone/cyclohexanol (100 °C, conversion: 17.7%) is superior to those by the state-of-art commercial catalysts (140–160 °C, conversion: 3-5%). The high activity can be attributed to the formation of a Mn0.5Ce0.5Ox solid solution with an ultrahigh manganese doping concentration in the CeO2 cubic fluorite lattice, leading to maximum active surface oxygens for the activation of C–H bonds and highly reducible Mn4+ ions for the rapid migration of oxygen vacancies from the bulk to the surface. PMID:26469151

  11. Mesoporous MnCeOx solid solutions for low temperature and selective oxidation of hydrocarbons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Pengfei; Lu, Hanfeng; Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Li; Wu, Zili; Yang, Shize; Shi, Hongliang; Zhu, Qiulian; Chen, Yinfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-10-15

    The development of noble-metal-free heterogeneous catalysts that can realize the aerobic oxidation of C–H bonds at low temperature is a profound challenge in the catalysis community. Here we report the synthesis of a mesoporous Mn0.5Ce0.5Ox solid solution that is highly active for the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons under mild conditions (100–120 °C). Notably, the catalytic performance achieved in the oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanone/cyclohexanol (100 °C, conversion: 17.7%) is superior to those by the state-of-art commercial catalysts (140–160 °C, conversion: 3-5%). Finally, the high activity can be attributed to the formation of a Mn0.5Ce0.5Ox solid solution with an ultrahigh manganesemore » doping concentration in the CeO2 cubic fluorite lattice, leading to maximum active surface oxygens for the activation of C–H bonds and highly reducible Mn4+ ions for the rapid migration of oxygen vacancies from the bulk to the surface.« less

  12. Photodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pyrene by iron oxide in solid phase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Liu, C S; Li, F B; Liu, C P; Liang, J B

    2009-03-15

    To better understand the photodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in solid phase in natural environment, laboratory experiments were conducted to study the influencing factors, kinetics and intermediate compound of pyrene photodegradation by iron oxides. The results showed that the pyrene photodegradation rate followed the order of alpha-FeOOH>alpha-Fe(2)O(3)>gamma-Fe(2)O(3)>gamma-FeOOH at the same reaction conditions. Lower dosage of alpha-FeOOH and higher light intensity increased the photodegradation rate of pyrene. Iron oxides and oxalic acid can set up a photo-Fenton-like system without additional H(2)O(2) in solid phase to enhance the photodegradation of pyrene under UV irradiation. All reaction followed the first-order reaction kinetics. The half-life (t(1/2)) of pyrene in the system showed the higher efficiencies of using iron oxide as photocatalyst to degrade pyrene. Intermediate compound pyreno was found during photodegradation reactions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The photodegradation efficiency for PAHs in this photo-Fenton-like system was also confirmed by using the contaminated soil samples. This work provides some useful information to understand the remediation of PAHs contaminated soils by photochemical techniques under practical condition. PMID:18586391

  13. Theoretical analysis of solid oxide fuel cells with two-layer, composite electrolytes - Electrolyte stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virkar, Anil V.

    1991-05-01

    Theoretical analysis of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) using two-layer, composite electrolytes consisting of a solid electrolyte of a significantly higher conductivity compared to zirconia (such as ceria or bismuth oxide) with a thin layer of zirconia or thoria on the fuel side is presented. Electrochemical transport in the two-layer composite electrolytes is examined by taking both ionic and electronic fluxes into account. Similar to most electrochemical transport phenomena, it is assumed that local equilibrium prevails. An equivalent circuit approach is used to estimate the partial pressure of oxygen at the interface. It is shown that thermodynamic stability of the electrolyte (ceria or bismuth oxide) depends upon the transport characteristics of the composite electrolyte, in particular the electronic conductivity of the air-side part of the electrolyte. The analysis shows that it would be advantageous to use composite electrolytes instead of all-zirconia electrolytes, thus making low-temperature (about 600-800 C) SOFCs feasible. Implications of the analysis from the standpoint of the desired characteristics of SOFC components are discussed.

  14. A novel clean and effective syngas production system based on partial oxidation of methane assisted solid oxide co-electrolysis process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yao; Liu, Tong; Fang, Shumin; Xiao, Guoliang; Wang, Huanting; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-03-01

    Development of the syngas production from solid oxide H2O/CO2 co-electrolysis is limited by the intensive energy input and low efficiency. Here, we present a new concept to efficiently generate syngas in both sides of the solid oxide electrolyzer by synergistically combining co-electrolysis with partial oxidation of methane (POM). Thermodynamic calculation and electrochemical measurements for the POM assisted solid oxide co-electrolysis processes on the SFM-SDC/LSGM/SFM-SDC cells exhibited an reduced electric input, increased energy conversion efficiency and decreased cathodic co-electrolysis polarization resistance in comparison with the conventional co-electrolysis. This method will be crucial to establish a clean and effective energy conversion system to meet global sustainable energy needs.

  15. Fundamental Studies of the Durability of Materials for Interconnects in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick S. Pettit; Gerald H. Meier

    2006-06-30

    Ferritic stainless steels are a leading candidate material for use as an SOFC interconnect, but have the problem of forming volatile chromia species that lead to cathode poisoning. This project has focused both on optimization of ferritic alloys for SOFC applications and evaluating the possibility of using alternative materials. The initial efforts involved studying the oxidation behavior of a variety of chromia-forming ferritic stainless steels in the temperature range 700-900 C in atmospheres relevant to solid oxide fuel cell operation. The alloys exhibited a wide variety of oxidation behavior based on composition. A method for reducing the vaporization is to add alloying elements that lead to the formation of a thermally grown oxide layer over the protective chromia. Several commercial steels form manganese chromate on the surface. This same approach, combined with observations of TiO{sub 2} overlayer formation on the chromia forming, Ni-based superalloy IN 738, has resulted in the development of a series of Fe-22 Cr-X Ti alloys (X=0-4 wt%). Oxidation testing has indicated that this approach results in significant reduction in chromia evaporation. Unfortunately, the Ti also results in accelerated chromia scale growth. Fundamental thermo-mechanical aspects of the durability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect alloys have also been investigated. A key failure mechanism for interconnects is the spallation of the chromia scale that forms on the alloy, as it is exposed to fuel cell environments. Indentation testing methods to measure the critical energy release rate (Gc) associated with the spallation of chromia scale/alloy systems have been evaluated. This approach has been used to evaluate the thermomechanical stability of chromia films as a function of oxidation exposure. The oxidation of pure nickel in SOFC environments was evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the NiO scaling kinetics and a four-point probe was used to measure

  16. Characteristics of Molten Alloys as Anodes in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Javadekar, Ashay; Jayakumar, Abhimanyu; Gorte, R. J.; Vohs, J. M.; Buttrey, D. J.

    2011-11-01

    Molten alloys with 50-mol% In-Sb, Sn-Sb, Sb-Bi, and Sb-Pb were examined as anodes for solid oxide fuel cells at 973 K. The cells were operated in the battery mode, without added fuel, in order to understand the oxidation characteristics of these alloys at electrolyte interfaces. Cells using 50-mol% In-Sb and Sn-Sb mixtures exhibited open-circuit voltages (OCV) of 1.0 and 0.93 V, values that are identical to that of cell with pure In and Sn respectively. Also similar to the pure In and Sn anodes, the impedances of these cells were initially low but increased dramatically after drawing a small amount of charge, implying formation of In₂O₃ and SnO₂ layers at the electrolyte interface. The 50-mol% Sb-Bi cell had an OCV of 0.73 V initially, close to the OCV observed with pure Sb. The OCV remained constant until a charge identical to that required for oxidation of all the Sb had been passed, after which the OCV dropped to 0.43 V, similar to the value for pure Bi. SEM analysis of the cell after conversion of the Sb showed two distinct phases, with metallic Bi at the bottom and Sb₂O₃ at the top. The electrochemical oxidation of 50-mol% Sb-Pb alloys exhibited an OCV that changed continuously with conversion, from 0.73 V initially to 0.67 V following the addition of charge corresponding to oxidation of 120% the Sb. The total cell impedance remained low for this entire period. EDS measurements on the sectioned Sb-Pb cell suggested that both Sb and Pb were oxidized simultaneously to form a mixed oxide of Pb and Sb.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of solid oxide cells for energy conversion and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenghao

    2011-12-01

    There has been an increasing interest in clean and renewable energy generation for highlighted energy and environmental concerns. Solid oxide cells (SOCs) have been considered as one of the promising technologies, since they can be operated efficiently both in electrolysis mode by generating hydrogen through steam electrolysis and fuel cell mode by electrochemically combining fuel with oxidant. The present work is devoted to performing a fundamental study of SOC in both fuel cell mode for power generation and electrolysis mode for fuel production. The research work on SOCs that can be operated reversibly for power generation and fuel production has been conducted in the following six projects: (1) High performance solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) Fabrication of novel structured SOEC oxygen electrode with the conventional and commercial solid oxide fuel cell materials by screen-printing and infiltration fabrication methods. The microstructure, electrochemical properties and durability of SOECs has been investigated. It was found that the LSM infiltrated cell has an area specific resistance (ASR) of 0.20 Ω cm2 at 900°C at open circuit voltage with 50% absolute humidity (AH), which is relatively lower than that of the cell with LSM-YSZ oxygen electrode made by a conventional mixing method. Electrolysis cell with LSM infiltrated oxygen electrode has demonstrated stable performance under electrolysis operation with 0.33 A/cm2 and 50 vol.% AH at 800°C. (2) Advanced performance high temperature micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell (MT-SOFC) Phase-inversion, dip-coating, high temperature co-sintering process and impregnation method were used to fabricate micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell. The micro-structure of the micro-tubular fuel cell will be investigated and the power output and thermal robustness has been evaluated. High performance and rapid start-up behavior have been achieved, indicates that the MT-SOFC developed in this work can be a promising technology

  18. Methods for using novel cathode and electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Allan J.; Wang, Shuangyan; Kim, Gun Tae

    2016-01-12

    Methods using novel cathode, electrolyte and oxygen separation materials operating at intermediate temperatures for use in solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes include oxides with perovskite related structures and an ordered arrangement of A site cations. The materials have significantly faster oxygen kinetics than in corresponding disordered perovskites.

  19. Use of a solid mixture containing diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide (DETANO) to liberate nitric oxide gas in the presence of horticultural produce to extend postharvest life.

    PubMed

    Wills, R B H; Soegiarto, L; Bowyer, M C

    2007-08-01

    Postharvest treatment of fruit and vegetables with a low concentration of nitric oxide gas can extend postharvest life but application of nitric oxide by release from a gas cylinder is not feasible for many horticultural situations. This paper reports on development of a solid mixture to generate nitric oxide gas in the presence of horticultural produce. The solid NO-donor compound, diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide (DETANO) was found to quantitatively liberate nitric oxide in the presence of a range of acidic substances including citric acid. A solid mixture of DETANO and citric acid with wheat starch added as a filler and moisture absorbent in the ratio of 1:10:20 was found to be stable for at least six months when stored in dry air. However, in humid air, absorption of moisture from the atmosphere led to reaction of DETANO with citric acid and the evolution of nitric oxide gas. When the dry mixture was placed in a container with strawberry and mushroom, the moisture given off by produce activated the mixture and resulted in a similar extension in postharvest life as achieved by direct fumigation with nitric oxide gas. Commercial use of such a solid mixture could be through tablets or sachets which are more manageable in a farm or packing house than gas fumigation. PMID:17604663

  20. Alternative materials for solid oxide fuel cells: Factors affecting air-sintering of chromite interconnections

    SciTech Connect

    Chick, L.A.; Bates, J.L.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop alternative materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnections and electrodes with improved electrical, thermal and electrochemical properties. Another objective is to develop synthesis and fabrication processes for these materials whereby they can be consolidated in air into SOFCs. The approach is to (1) develop modifications of the current, state-of-the-art materials used in SOFCs, (2) minimize the number of cations used in the SOFC materials to reduce potential deleterious interactions, (3) improve thermal, electrical, and electrochemical properties, (4) develop methods to synthesize both state-of-the-art and alternative materials for the simultaneous fabrication and consolidation in air of the interconnections and electrodes with the solid electrolyte, and (5) understand electrochemical reactions at materials interfaces and the effects of component compositions and processing on those reactions.

  1. Strong, Tough Glass Composites Developed for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2005-01-01

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical device that continuously converts the chemical energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy. It consists of an electrolyte, an anode, and a cathode. Various types of fuel cells are available, such as direct methanol fuel cells, alkaline fuel cells, proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells, phosphoric acid fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The salient features of an SOFC are all solid construction and high-temperature electrochemical-reaction-based operation, resulting in clean, efficient power generation from a variety of fuels. SOFCs are being developed for a broad range of applications, such as portable electronic devices, automobiles, power generation, and aeronautics.

  2. Three-dimensional and time-dependent simulation of a planar solid oxide fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achenbach, E.

    1994-04-01

    The mathematical simulation of a planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is presented. The model accounts for three-dimensional and time-dependent effects. Internal methane-steam reforming and recycling of the anode gas are also considered. The effects of different flow manifolding, i.e., cross-, co-, or counter-flow are discussed. After a short description of the mathematical procedure, computational results are presented. In particular the distribution of the gases, of the current density and of the solid structure temperature across the cell are shown. Furthermore the effects of different flow manifolding, of radiation from the outer stack surface to the surroundings and of anode gas recycling on the operating conditions of the stack are considered. The response of the cell voltage to a load change is also discussed.

  3. Three-dimensional ionic conduction in the strained electrolytes of solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yupei; Zou, Minda; Lv, Weiqiang; Mao, Yiwu; Wang, Wei; He, Weidong

    2016-05-01

    Flexible power sources including fuel cells and batteries are the key to realizing flexible electronic devices with pronounced foldability. To understand the bending effects in these devices, theoretical analysis on three-dimensional (3-D) lattice bending is necessary. In this report, we derive a 3-D analytical model to analyze the effects of electrolyte crystal bending on ionic conductivity in flexible solid-state batteries/fuel cells. By employing solid oxide fuel cells as a materials' platform, the intrinsic parameters of bent electrolyte materials, including lattice constant, Young's modulus, and Poisson ratio, are evaluated. Our work facilitates the rational design of highly efficient flexible electrolytes for high-performance flexible device applications.

  4. Solid-State Thermal Reaction of a Molecular Material and Solventless Synthesis of Iron Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Debasis; Roy, Madhusudan; Zubko, Maciej; Kusz, Joachim; Bhattacharjee, Ashis

    2016-09-01

    Solid-state thermal decomposition reaction of a molecular material {As}({C}6{H}5)4[{Fe}^{II}{Fe}^{III} ({C}2{O}4)3]}n has been studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetry (TG) in an inert atmosphere. By analyzing the TG data collected at multiple heating rates in 300 K-1300 K range, the kinetic parameters (activation energy, most probable reaction mechanism function and frequency factor) are determined using different multi-heating rate analysis programs. Activation energy and the frequency factor are found to be strongly dependent on the extent of decomposition. The decomposed material has been characterized to be hematite using physical techniques (FT-IR and powder XRD). Particle morphology has been checked by TEM. A solid-state reaction pathway leading the molecular precursor to hematite has been proposed illustrating an example of solventless synthesis of iron oxides utilizing thermal decomposition as a technique using innocuous materials.

  5. Electrochemical Characterization of a Solid Oxide Membrane Electrolyzer for Production of High-Purity Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Soobhankar; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Gopalan, Srikanth; Pal, Uday B.

    2009-12-01

    A laboratory-scale solid oxide membrane (SOM) steam electrolyzer that can potentially use energy value in waste or any source of carbon or hydrocarbon to produce high-purity hydrogen has been fabricated and evaluated. The SOM electrolyzer comprises an oxygen-ion-conducting yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte with a Ni-YSZ cermet cathode coated on one side and liquid-metal anode on the other side. The SOM electrolyzer is operated at 1000 °C by providing a steam-rich gas feed to the Ni-YSZ cermet cathode and feeding a reductant source into the liquid-metal anode. The steam is reduced over the cathode, and oxygen ions are transported through the YSZ electrolyte and are oxidized at the molten metal electrode by the reductant feed. The advantage of SOM electrolyzer over the state-of-the-art solid oxide electrolyzer is its ability to use solid, liquid, and gaseous reductant feed in the liquid-metal anode to reduce the oxygen chemical potential and drive the reaction for hydrogen production. In this study, an electrochemical process model for a SOM electrolyzer was developed. The condition of the liquid-metal anode with reductant was simulated by bubbling humidified hydrogen (3 pct H2O) in the liquid metal, and the electrochemical performance of the SOM electrolyzer was modeled. The experimental data were curve-fitted into the model to identify the various polarization losses. It showed that the performance of the SOM electrolyzer was dominated by the ohmic resistance of the YSZ membrane. Based on the results of this study, future work is needed toward increasing the performance efficiency of the SOM electrolyzer.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-COST MANUFACTURING PROCESSES FOR PLANAR, MULTILAYER SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Harlan Anderson; Tim Armstrong; Michael Cobb; Kirby Meacham; James Stephan; Russell Bennett; Bob Remick; Chuck Sishtla; Scott Barnett; John Lannutti

    2004-06-12

    This report summarizes the results of a four-year project, entitled, ''Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'', jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the State of Ohio, and by project participants. The project was led by NexTech Materials, Ltd., with subcontracting support provided by University of Missouri-Rolla, Michael A. Cobb & Co., Advanced Materials Technologies, Inc., Edison Materials Technology Center, Gas Technology Institute, Northwestern University, and The Ohio State University. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, though not formally a subcontractor on the program, supported the effort with separate DOE funding. The objective of the program was to develop advanced manufacturing technologies for making solid oxide fuel cell components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. The program was carried out in three phases. In the Phase I effort, several manufacturing approaches were considered and subjected to detailed assessments of manufacturability and development risk. Estimated manufacturing costs for 5-kW stacks were in the range of $139/kW to $179/kW. The risk assessment identified a number of technical issues that would need to be considered during development. Phase II development work focused on development of planar solid oxide fuel cell elements, using a number of ceramic manufacturing methods, including tape casting, colloidal-spray deposition, screen printing, spin-coating, and sintering. Several processes were successfully established for fabrication of anode-supported, thin-film electrolyte cells, with performance levels at or near the state-of-the-art. The work in Phase III involved scale-up of cell manufacturing methods, development of non-destructive evaluation methods, and comprehensive electrical and electrochemical testing of solid oxide fuel cell materials and components.

  7. A study on production of biodiesel using a novel solid oxide catalyst derived from waste.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Samrat; Ray, Srimanta

    2016-05-01

    The issues of energy security, dwindling supply and inflating price of fossil fuel have shifted the global focus towards fuel of renewable origin. Biodiesel, having renewable origin, has exhibited great potential as substitute for fossil fuels. The most common route of biodiesel production is through transesterification of vegetable oil in presence of homogeneous acid or base or solid oxide catalyst. But, the economics of biodiesel is not competitive with respect to fossil fuel due to high cost of production. The vegetable oil waste is a potential alternative for biodiesel production, particularly when disposal of used vegetable oil has been restricted in several countries. The present study evaluates the efficacy of a low-cost solid oxide catalyst derived from eggshell (a food waste) in transesterification of vegetable oil and simulated waste vegetable oil (SWVO). The impact of thermal treatment of vegetable oil (to simulate frying operation) on transesterification using eggshell-derived solid oxide catalyst (ESSO catalyst) was also evaluated along with the effect of varying reaction parameters. The study reported that around 90 % biodiesel yield was obtained with vegetable oil at methanol/oil molar ratio of 18:1 in 3 h reaction time using 10 % ESSO catalyst. The biodiesel produced with ESSO catalyst from SWVO, thermally treated at 150 °C for 24 h, was found to conform with the biodiesel standard, but the yield was 5 % lower compared to that of the untreated oil. The utilization of waste vegetable oil along with waste eggshell as catalyst is significant for improving the overall economics of the biodiesel in the current market. The utilization of waste for societal benefit with the essence of sustainable development is the novelty of this work. PMID:26154033

  8. Effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-treatment on textural and solid-solid interactions in ferric/cobaltic oxides system

    SciTech Connect

    Fagal, Gehan A.; Badawy, Abdelrahman A.; Hassan, Neven A.; El-Shobaky, Gamil A.

    2012-10-15

    Pure and La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-containing (0.75-3.0 mol%) Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} solids were prepared by thermal treatment of their carbonates at 500-700 Degree-Sign C. The produced solids were characterized using XRD, HRTEM, EDX and nitrogen adsorption at -196 Degree-Sign C. The results revealed that pure solids calcined at 600 and 700 Degree-Sign C consisted of nanosized CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase, while pure mixed solids calcined at 500 Degree-Sign C consisted of trace amount of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and unreacted Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phases. The presence of 0.75 mol% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} enhanced solid-solid interaction between Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} at 500 Degree-Sign C yielding CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The ferrite phase existed also in all mixed oxides upon treated with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} besides LaCoO{sub 3} phase. LaCoO{sub 3} existed as a major phase in all mixed oxides treated with 3 mol% La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-treatment modified the crystallite size of all phases present to an extent dependent on calcination temperature and amount of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. This treatment decreased effectively the S{sub BET} of all mixed solids. - Graphical Abstract: TEM photographs of pure mixed oxides calcined at 500 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite exhibit chemical stability, low electric loss and high coercivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite is used in microwave devices, computer memories and magnetic storage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid-solid interactions in ferric/cobaltic oxides system were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-treatment modified surface compositions of the system investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All phases present in various solids existed as nanosized solids.

  9. Design and operation of interconnectors for solid oxide fuel cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, W.; Koeppen, J.

    Highly efficient combined cycles with solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) need an integrated heat exchanger in the stack to reach efficiencies of about 80%. The stack costs must be lower than 1000 DM/kW. A newly developed welded metallic (Haynes HA 230) interconnector with a free stretching planar SOFC and an integrated heat exchanger was tested in thermal cycling operation. The design allowed a cycling of the SOFC without mechanical damage of the electrolyte in several tests. However, more tests and a further design optimization will be necessary. These results could indicate that commercial high-temperature alloys can be used as interconnector material in order to fullfil the cost requirements.

  10. Application of ionic and electronic conducting ceramics in solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, S.C.

    1997-12-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer a pollution-free technology to electrochemically generate electricity at high efficiencies. These fuel cells consist of an oxygen ion conducting electrolyte, electronic or mixed electronic and ionic conducting electrodes, and an electronic conducting interconnection. This paper reviews the ceramic materials used for the different cell components, and discusses the performance of cells fabricated using these materials. The paper also discusses the materials and processing studies that are underway to reduce the cell cost, and summarizes the recently built power generation systems that employed state-of-the-art SOFCs.

  11. In-situ Young's moduli of the constitutive layers in a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Amit; Shyam, Amit; Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In-situ Young's moduli of thin constituent layers of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) are needed to estimate the mechanical reliability of the fuel cell unit. Because a robust technique to measure the same is not available, an improved methodology is proposed to determine the in-situ Young's moduli of thin ceramic layers of a substrate-supported SOFC. The measured Young's moduli of the constituent layers were found to be close to those of corresponding bulk materials using the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) technique but were different from the values obtained using nanoindentation.

  12. Performance of planar single cell lanthanum gallate based solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, N.; Kuriakose, A. K.

    A novel synthesis of high purity, single phase strontium-magnesium doped lanthanum gallate through a nitrate route is described. The prepared powder is formed into planar monolithic elements by uniaxial pressing followed by isostatic pressing and sintering. XRD analysis of the sintered elements reveal no detectable secondary phases. The performance of the electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) with three different anode/cathode combinations tested at 700°C with respect to the J- V and power density is reported. The data show that the characteristics of this SOFC are strongly dependent on the particular anode/cathode system chosen.

  13. LOW COST MULTI-LAYER FABRICATION METHOD FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS (SOFC)

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Christopher E. Milliken; Dr. Robert C. Ruhl

    2001-05-16

    Under this program, Technology Management, Inc, is evaluating the economic advantages of a multi-pass printing process on the costs of fabricating planar solid oxide fuel cell stacks. The technique, still unproven technically, uses a ''green-field'' or build-up approach. Other more mature processes were considered to obtain some baseline assumptions. Based on this analysis, TMI has shown that multi-pass printing can offer substantial economic advantages over many existing fabrication processes and can reduce costs. By impacting overall production costs, the time is compressed to penetrate early low volume niche markets and more mature high-volume market applications.

  14. High temperature solid oxide regenerative fuel cell for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    1987-01-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell energy storage system based on high temperature solid oxide fuel cell technology is discussed which has application to darkside energy storage for solar photovoltaics. The forward and reverse operating cycles are described, and heat flow, mass, and energy balance data are presented to characterize the system's performance and the variation of performance with changing reactant storage pressure. The present system weighs less than nickel hydrogen battery systems after 0.7 darkside operation, and it maintains a specific weight advantage over radioisotope generators for discharge periods up to 72 hours.

  15. Feed-forward control of a solid oxide fuel cell system with anode offgas recycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carré, Maxime; Brandenburger, Ralf; Friede, Wolfgang; Lapicque, François; Limbeck, Uwe; da Silva, Pedro

    2015-05-01

    In this work a combined heat and power unit (CHP unit) based on the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is analysed. This unit has a special feature: the anode offgas is partially recycled to the anode inlet. Thus it is possible to increase the electrical efficiency and the system can be operated without external water feeding. A feed-forward control concept which allows secure operating conditions of the CHP unit as well as a maximization of its electrical efficiency is introduced and validated experimentally. The control algorithm requires a limited number of measurement values and few deterministic relations for its description.

  16. Combination nickel foam expanded nickel screen electrical connection supports for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; Prevish, Thomas; Bronson, Angela; George, Raymond A.

    2007-01-02

    A solid oxide fuel assembly is made, wherein rows (14, 25) of fuel cells (17, 19, 21, 27, 29, 31), each having an outer interconnection (20) and an outer electrode (32), are disposed next to each other with corrugated, electrically conducting expanded metal mesh member (22) between each row of cells, the corrugated mesh (22) having top crown portions and bottom portions, where the top crown portion (40) have a top bonded open cell nickel foam (51) which contacts outer interconnections (20) of the fuel cells, said mesh and nickel foam electrically connecting each row of fuel cells, and where there are no more metal felt connections between any fuel cells.

  17. Solid oxide fuel cells having porous cathodes infiltrated with oxygen-reducing catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Meilin; Liu, Ze; Liu, Mingfei; Nie, Lifang; Mebane, David Spencer; Wilson, Lane Curtis; Surdoval, Wayne

    2014-08-12

    Solid-oxide fuel cells include an electrolyte and an anode electrically coupled to a first surface of the electrolyte. A cathode is provided, which is electrically coupled to a second surface of the electrolyte. The cathode includes a porous backbone having a porosity in a range from about 20% to about 70%. The porous backbone contains a mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) of a first material infiltrated with an oxygen-reducing catalyst of a second material different from the first material.

  18. Solid oxide fuel cells for transportation: A clean, efficient alternative for propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K. M.

    Fuel cells show great promise for providing clean and efficient transportation power. Of the fuel cell propulsion systems under investigation, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is particularly attractive for heavy duty transportation applications that have a relatively long duty cycle, such as locomotives, trucks, and barges. Advantages of the SOFC include a simple, compact system configuration; inherent fuel flexibility for hydrocarbon and alternative fuels; and minimal water management. The specific advantages of the SOFC for powering a railroad locomotive are examined. Feasibility, practicality, and safety concerns regarding SOFCs in transportation applications are discussed.

  19. Gasoline-fueled solid oxide fuel cell using MoO2-Based Anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiaoxue; Marin-Flores, Oscar; Kwon, Byeong Wan; Kim, Jinsoo; Norton, M. Grant; Ha, Su

    2014-12-01

    This short communication describes the performance of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) fueled by directly feeding premium gasoline to the anode without using external reforming. The novel component of the fuel cell that enables such operation is the mixed conductivity of MoO2-based anode. Using this anode, a fuel cell demonstrating a maximum power density of 31 mW/cm2 at 0.45 V was successfully fabricated. Over a 24 h period of operation, the open cell voltage remained stable at ∼0.92 V. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the anode surface pre- and post-testing showed no evidence of coking.

  20. Tritiated water processing using liquid phase catalytic exchange and solid oxide electrolyte cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yamai, H.; Konishi, S.; Hara, M.; Okuno, K.; Yamamoto, I.

    1995-10-01

    Liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) is an effective method for enrichment and removal of tritium from tritiated water. Combined electrolysis catalytic exchange (CECE) process is an attractive application of a LPCE column. We proposed a new process that improves the CECE process. Using a solid oxide electrolyte (SOE) cell for electrolysis makes the CECE process more energy efficient and eliminates other disadvantages such as large tritium inventory and extremely slow system response. When the cell is used for recombination, the system becomes even more simple, efficiently, reliable and safe. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Infiltrated Phlogopite Micas with Superior Thermal Cycle Stability as Compressive Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-03-01

    Thermal cycle stability is one of the most stringent requirements for sealants in solid oxide fuel cell stacks. The sealants have to survive several hundreds to thousands of thermal cycles during lifetime operation in stationary and transportation applications. Recently, researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a novel method to infiltrate the mica flakes with a wetting or liquid forming material such that the leak path will be reduced from 3-D to 2-D and achieve good thermal cycle stability with low leak rates.

  2. Rapid thermal cycling of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cellmembranes

    SciTech Connect

    Matus, Yuriy B.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.

    2004-01-02

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) membranes were developed in which zirconia-based electrolyte thin films were supported by a composite metal/ceramic electrode, and were subjected to rapid thermal cycling between 200 and 800 C. The effects of this cycling on membrane performance were evaluated. The membranes, not yet optimized for performance, showed a peak power density of 350mW/cm2at 900 C in laboratory-sized SOFCs that was not affected by the thermal cycling. This resistance to cycling degradation is attributed to the close matching of thermal expansion coefficient of the cermet support electrode with that of the zirconia electrolyte.

  3. Solid source growth of Si oxide nanowires promoted by carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Congxiang; Liu, Wen-wen; Wang, Xingli; Li, Xiaocheng; Tan, Chong Wei; Tay, Beng Kang; Coquet, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    We report a method to promote solid source growth of Si oxide nanowires (SiONWs) by using an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It starts with the fabrication of CNT array by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on Si wafers, followed by growth of SiONWs. Herein, CNTs serve as a scaffold, which helps the dispersion of catalysts for SiONWs and also provides space for hydrogen which boosts the diffusion of Si atoms and hence formation of SiONWs. As the result, a three dimensional (3D) hybrid network of densely packed SiONWs and CNTs can be produced rapidly.

  4. Fuzzy Logic Based Controller for a Grid-Connected Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kalyan; Shankar, Ravi; Kumar, Amit

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes a mathematical model of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power plant integrated in a multimachine power system. The utilization factor of a fuel stack maintains steady state by tuning the fuel valve in the fuel processor at a rate proportional to a current drawn from the fuel stack. A suitable fuzzy logic control is used for the overall system, its objective being controlling the current drawn by the power conditioning unit and meet a desirable output power demand. The proposed control scheme is verified through computer simulations. PMID:25053926

  5. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal- based power generation. Quarterly report, December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

  6. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal- based power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

  7. Process Developed for Fabricating Engineered Pore Structures for High- Fuel-Utilization Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofie, Stephen W.; Cable, Thomas L.; Salamone, Sam M.

    2005-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have tremendous commercial potential because of their high efficiency, high energy density, and flexible fuel capability (ability to use fossil fuels). The drive for high-power-utilizing, ultrathin electrolytes (less than 10 microns), has placed an increased demand on the anode to provide structural support, yet allow sufficient fuel entry for sustained power generation. Concentration polarization, a condition where the fuel demand exceeds the supply, is evident in all commercial-based anode-supported cells, and it presents a significant roadblock to SOFC commercialization.

  8. Control of Oxygen Delamination in Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cells via Modifying Operational Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2011-10-01

    Possible modifications of operational regimes for solid oxide fuel cell (SOEC) devices for hydrogen production are discussed. It is shown that applying alternating current (AC) voltage pulses at a certain frequency range to SOECs could reduce oxygen delamination degradation in these devices and significantly increase their lifetime. This operational scheme provides wide possibilities to increase longevity of SOEC devices required for their use in commercial hydrogen production processes, without any significant modification of used materials and/or cell design. Developed simulation method possesses a broad generality and be employed in a number of other industrial processes.

  9. Copper cobalt spinel as a high performance cathode for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Lin; Wang, Qi; Fan, Lishuang; Wang, Pengxiang; Zhang, Naiqing; Sun, Kening

    2016-06-30

    CuCo2O4 spinel prepared via an EDTA-citric acid process was studied as a candidate solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode material at intermediate temperatures (IT). CuCo2O4 cathodes were measured using thermal gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. AC impedance spectroscopy and DC polarization measurements were used to study the electrode performance. The obtained value of the polarization resistances at 800 °C was 0.12 Ω cm(2) with a maximum power density of 972 mW cm(-2). PMID:27326915

  10. Computer-Aided Geometry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoosmith, J. N. (Compiler); Fulton, R. E. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Techniques in computer-aided geometry modeling and their application are addressed. Mathematical modeling, solid geometry models, management of geometric data, development of geometry standards, and interactive and graphic procedures are discussed. The applications include aeronautical and aerospace structures design, fluid flow modeling, and gas turbine design.

  11. Optimum Chemical Regeneration of the Gases Burnt in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskakov, A. P.; Volkova, Yu. V.; Plotnikov, N. S.

    2014-07-01

    A simplified method of calculating the concentrations of the components of a thermodynamically equilibrium mixture (a synthesis gas) supplied to the anode channel of a battery of solid oxide fuel cells and the change in these concentrations along the indicated channel is proposed and results of corresponding calculations are presented. The variants of reforming of a natural gas (methane) by air and steam as well as by a part of the exhaust combustion products for obtaining a synthesis gas are considered. The amount of the anode gases that should be returned for the complete chemical regeneration of the gases burnt in the fuel cells was determined. The dependence of the electromotive force of an ideal oxide fuel element (the electric circuit of which is open) on the degree of absorption of oxygen in a thermodynamically equilibrium fuel mixture was calculated.

  12. Anode protection system for shutdown of solid oxide fuel cell system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bob X; Grieves, Malcolm J; Kelly, Sean M

    2014-12-30

    An Anode Protection Systems for a SOFC system, having a Reductant Supply and safety subsystem, a SOFC anode protection subsystem, and a Post Combustion and slip stream control subsystem. The Reductant Supply and safety subsystem includes means for generating a reducing gas or vapor to prevent re-oxidation of the Ni in the anode layer during the course of shut down of the SOFC stack. The underlying ammonia or hydrogen based material used to generate a reducing gas or vapor to prevent the re-oxidation of the Ni can be in either a solid or liquid stored inside a portable container. The SOFC anode protection subsystem provides an internal pressure of 0.2 to 10 kPa to prevent air from entering into the SOFC system. The Post Combustion and slip stream control subsystem provides a catalyst converter configured to treat any residual reducing gas in the slip stream gas exiting from SOFC stack.

  13. Encapsulated solid phase epitaxy of a Ge quantum well embedded in an epitaxial rare earth oxide.

    PubMed

    Laha, Apurba; Bugiel, E; Jestremski, M; Ranjith, R; Fissel, A; Osten, H J

    2009-11-25

    An efficient method based on molecular beam epitaxy has been developed to integrate an epitaxial Ge quantum well buried into a single crystalline rare earth oxide. The monolithic heterostructure comprised of Gd2O3-Ge-Gd2O3 grown on an Si substrate exhibits excellent crystalline quality with atomically sharp interfaces. This heterostructure with unique structural quality could be used for novel nanoelectronic applications in quantum-effect devices such as nanoscale transistors with a high mobility channel, resonant tunneling diode/transistors, etc. A phenomenological model has been proposed to explain the epitaxial growth process of the Ge layer under oxide encapsulation using a solid source molecular beam epitaxy technique. PMID:19875877

  14. Theory of the electronic and structural properties of solid state oxides. Annual technical report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chelikowsky, J.R.

    1993-06-01

    Emphasis has been on the electronic materials: silica, titania, and ruthenia. Fundamental interest centered on nature of microstructure of these solids in the amorphous state, or mixed oxide state. New theoretical techniques have been implemented to examine such issues, based on ab initio pseudopotential methods and interatomic potentials. Some areas examined under this project are: (1) Nature of the amorphization transformation of quartz under pressure. Specific focus is on the microscopic nature of the amorphous material and the driving forces for amorphization. (2) Equation of states of crystalline silica polymorphs. (3) Elastic anomalies in silica. In particular, the existence of a ``negative`` Poisson ratio in high temperature, low density forms of crystalline silica. (4) Optical and structural properties of titania and mixed oxides such as Ru{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x}O{sub 2}.

  15. A Review of RedOx Cycling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Anode

    PubMed Central

    Faes, Antonin; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Zryd, Amédée; Van Herle, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells are able to convert fuels, including hydrocarbons, to electricity with an unbeatable efficiency even for small systems. One of the main limitations for long-term utilization is the reduction-oxidation cycling (RedOx cycles) of the nickel-based anodes. This paper will review the effects and parameters influencing RedOx cycles of the Ni-ceramic anode. Second, solutions for RedOx instability are reviewed in the patent and open scientific literature. The solutions are described from the point of view of the system, stack design, cell design, new materials and microstructure optimization. Finally, a brief synthesis on RedOx cycling of Ni-based anode supports for standard and optimized microstructures is depicted. PMID:24958298

  16. Investigation into the effects of sulfur on syngas reforming inside a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting Shuai; Xu, Min; Gao, Chongxin; Wang, Baoqing; Liu, Xiyun; Li, Baihai; Wang, Wei Guo

    2014-07-01

    The electrochemical performance and long-term durability of a solid oxide fuel cell have been evaluated with a simulated coal syngas containing 2 ppm H2S as fuel. The resulting impedance spectra indicate that no observable power loss is caused by the addition of 2 ppm H2S, and the cell shows stability of nearly 500 h at 0.625 A cm-2. The composition of mixed gas is analyzed both at a current load of 0.625 A cm-2 and open circuit state. Hydrogen and carbon monoxide are directly consumed as fuels at the anode side, whereas methane stays unchanged during the operation. It seems the internal carbohydrate reforming and impurity poisoning interacts and weakens the poisoning effects. The oxidation of H2 and the water gas shift reaction take advantages over methane reforming at the cell operational conditions.

  17. Energy and exergy analysis of an ethanol reforming process for solid oxide fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Tippawan, Phanicha; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2014-04-01

    The fuel processor in which hydrogen is produced from fuels is an important unit in a fuel cell system. The aim of this study is to apply a thermodynamic concept to identify a suitable reforming process for an ethanol-fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Three different reforming technologies, i.e., steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming, are considered. The first and second laws of thermodynamics are employed to determine an energy demand and to describe how efficiently the energy is supplied to the reforming process. Effect of key operating parameters on the distribution of reforming products, such as H2, CO, CO2 and CH4, and the possibility of carbon formation in different ethanol reformings are examined as a function of steam-to-ethanol ratio, oxygen-to-ethanol ratio and temperatures at atmospheric pressure. Energy and exergy analysis are performed to identify the best ethanol reforming process for SOFC applications. PMID:24561628

  18. PEALD YSZ-based bilayer electrolyte for thin film-solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wonjong; Cho, Gu Young; Hong, Soonwook; Lee, Yeageun; Kim, Young Beom; An, Jihwan; Cha, Suk Won

    2016-10-14

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin film electrolyte deposited by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) was investigated. PEALD YSZ-based bi-layered thin film electrolyte was employed for thin film solid oxide fuel cells on nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide substrates, whose electrochemical performance was compared to the cell with sputtered YSZ-based electrolyte. The cell with PEALD YSZ electrolyte showed higher open circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.0 V and peak power density of 182 mW cm(-2) at 450 °C compared to the one with sputtered YSZ electrolyte(0.88 V(OCV), 70 mW cm(-2)(peak power density)). High OCV and high power density of the cell with PEALD YSZ-based electrolyte is due to the reduction in ohmic and activation losses as well as the gas and electrical current tightness. PMID:27595193

  19. Auxiliary power unit based on a solid oxide fuel cell and fuelled with diesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Jeremy; Boltze, Matthias

    An auxiliary power unit (APU) is presented that is fuelled with diesel, thermally self-sustaining, and based on a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The APU is rated at 1 kW electrical, and can generate electrical power after a 3 h warm-up phase. System features include a "dry" catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) diesel reformer, a 30 cell SOFC stack with an open cathode, and a porous-media afterburner. The APU does not require a supply of external water. The SOFC stack is an outcome of a development partnership with H.C. Starck GmbH and Fraunhofer IKTS, and is discussed in detail in an accompanying paper.

  20. Activity and structure of perovskites as diesel reforming catalysts for solid oxide fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.-J.; Krumpelt, M.; Chemical Engineering

    2005-01-01

    Recent progress in developing perovskite materials as more cost-effective catalysts in autothermal reforming (ATR) of diesel fuel to hydrogen-rich reformate for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application is reported. Perovskite-type metal oxides with B sites partially exchanged by ruthenium were prepared and evaluated under ATR reaction conditions. The hydrogen yield, reforming efficiency, and CO{sub x} selectivity of these catalysts were investigated using diesel surrogate fuel with 50 ppm sulfur. The catalyst performances have approached or exceeded a benchmark, high-cost rhodium-based material. In parallel with the reactivity study, we also investigated the physical properties of B-site doped perovskites and their impact on the reforming performance using various characterization techniques such as BET, X-ray powder diffraction, temperature programmable reduction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We found that ruthenium is highly dispersed into perovskite lattice and its redox behavior is directly associated with reforming activity.

  1. Cu Binding to Iron Oxide-Organic Matter Coprecipitates in Solid and Dissolved Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, T. M.; Koenigsmark, F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that Cu is released from wetlands following storm events. Assymetrical field flow field fractionation (AF4) analyses as well as total and dissolved metal concentration measurements suggest iron oxide-organic matter complexes control Cu retention and release. Coprecipitation products of Fe oxide and organic matter were prepared under conditions similar to the wetland to assess Cu partitioning to and availability from solid phases that settle from solution as well as phases remaining suspended. Cu coprecipitation and sorption to organomineral precipitation solids formed at different Fe:organic carbon (OC) ratios were compared for net Cu removal and extractability. As more humic acid was present during precipitation of Fe, TEM images indicated smaller Fe oxide particles formed within an organic matrix as expected. In coprecipitation reactions, as the ratio of Fe:OC decreased, more Cu was removed from solution at pH 5.5 and below. However, in sorption reactions, there was an inhibition of Cu removal at low OC concentrations. As the pH increased from 5.5 to 7 and as solution phase OC concentration increased, more Cu remained dissolved in both coprecipitation and sorption reactions. The addition of Ca2+, glycine, histidine and citric acid or lowering the pH resulted in more extractable Cu from the coprecipitation compared with the sorption reactions. The variations in Cu extraction were likely due to a combination of a more amorphous structure in CPT products, and the relative abundance of available Fe oxide or OC binding sites. Suspended Fe oxide-organic matter coprecipitates were assessed using AF4 coupled to online TOC analysis and ICP-MS. In laboratory prepared samples, Cu was observed in a mixture of small 1-5 nm colloids of Fe oxide-organic matter precipitates, but the majority was observed in larger organic matter colloids and were not UV absorbing, suggesting more aliphatic carbon materials. In field samples, up to 60% of the dissolved Cu

  2. 49 CFR 176.400 - Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids) and Class 5 (oxidizers and organic peroxides...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids... Solids), Class 5 (Oxidizers and Organic Peroxides), and Division 1.5 Materials § 176.400 Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids) and Class 5 (oxidizers and organic peroxides) materials. (a)...

  3. 49 CFR 176.400 - Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids) and Class 5 (oxidizers and organic peroxides...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids... Solids), Class 5 (Oxidizers and Organic Peroxides), and Division 1.5 Materials § 176.400 Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids) and Class 5 (oxidizers and organic peroxides) materials. (a)...

  4. 49 CFR 176.400 - Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids) and Class 5 (oxidizers and organic peroxides...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids... Solids), Class 5 (Oxidizers and Organic Peroxides), and Division 1.5 Materials § 176.400 Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids) and Class 5 (oxidizers and organic peroxides) materials. (a)...

  5. 49 CFR 176.400 - Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids) and Class 5 (oxidizers and organic peroxides...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids... Solids), Class 5 (Oxidizers and Organic Peroxides), and Division 1.5 Materials § 176.400 Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids) and Class 5 (oxidizers and organic peroxides) materials. (a)...

  6. 49 CFR 176.400 - Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids) and Class 5 (oxidizers and organic peroxides...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids... Solids), Class 5 (Oxidizers and Organic Peroxides), and Division 1.5 Materials § 176.400 Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids) and Class 5 (oxidizers and organic peroxides) materials. (a)...

  7. Resistivity control by solid-state reaction of perovskite-type oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamoto, H.; Tanaka, H.; Koya, T.

    1995-10-01

    Resistivity control has been conducted by solid-state reaction of two different perovskite-type oxides. One is La{sub 0.5}Ba{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3{minus}{delta}} (LBC) which showed metallic conduction, and its resistivity, {rho} was 10{sup {minus}3} {Omega} {center_dot} cm at 20 C. The other is Ba{sub 0.998}Sb{sub 0.002}TiO{sub 3} (BT) which showed positive temperature coefficient of resistivity (PTCR) effect. The sintered body of the mixture of the two oxides did not show PTCR effect. The logarithm of the resistivity of the sintered body, log {rho}{sub mix} was expressed using the resistivity of LBC, {rho}{sub LBC}, the molar ratio of BT, x, and temperature dependent constant, {alpha}(T) as log {rho}{sub mix} = (1 {minus} x) log {rho}{sub LBC} + x{alpha}(T), which holds for 0 {le} x {le} 0.8 at the temperature ranging from 20 to 240 C. {rho}{sub mix} changed by about 8 orders of magnitude at room temperature. X-ray diffraction analysis suggested that metal ions at the A-site move from one perovskite-type oxide to another and that the sintered body consisted of two perovskite-type oxides different from starting ones.

  8. Radiation induced oxidative stress: I. Studies in Ehrlich solid tumor in mice.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, A; Choudhary, D; Upreti, M; Rath, P C; Kale, R K

    2001-07-01

    Understanding the response of tumors to ionizing radiation might potentially lead to improvement in tumor control and patient morbidity. Since the antioxidant status is likely to be linked to radioresponse, its modulation needs to be examined. Therefore, Swiss albino male mice (7-8 weeks old) with Ehrlich solid tumors were irradiated with different doses of gamma rays (0-9 Gy) at a dose rate of 0.0153 Gy/s; and enzymes involved in antioxidant functions were determined in the tumors. Radiation effects in terms of oxidative damage, LDH, nitric oxide and DNA fragmentation were also examined. In tumors, the specific activity of SOD was increased with dose but declined 6 Gy onwards. GST, DTD and GSH showed an almost progressive increase. These enhanced activities might have resulted from the increased protein expression. This possibility was supported by the Western Blot analysis for GST protein. These changes might be closely linked to the radiation-induced oxidative stress as reflected by the enhanced levels of peroxidative damage, DNA fragmentation, LDH activity and nitric oxide levels. These findings may have relevance to radiation therapy of cancer as the elevated antioxidant status of irradiated tumors is likely to limit the effectiveness of radiation dose and adversely affect the therapeutic gain. PMID:11681724

  9. Vapour phase approach for iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis from solid precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mandeep; Ulbrich, Pavel; Prokopec, Vadym; Svoboda, Pavel; Šantavá, Eva; Štěpánek, František

    2013-04-01

    A new non-solution mediated approach to the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles directly from solid FeCl2 salt precursors has been developed. The method is rapid, simple and scalable. The structural properties and the phase of the resulting iron oxide particles has been determined by a range of methods including XRD, FT-IR and Mössbauer spectroscopy, and the phase is shown to be maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). The magnetic properties of the iron oxide particles have been measured using SQUID, confirming superparamagnetic behaviour of the powder and a saturation magnetization of 53.0 emu g-1 at 300 K. Aqueous dispersions at increasing concentrations were prepared and their heating rate under a 400 kHz alternating magnetic field measured. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of the iron oxide was found to be 84.8 W g-1, which makes the material suitable for the formulation of ferrofluids or ferrogels with RF heating properties.

  10. A redox-stable efficient anode for solid-oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shanwen; Irvine, John T S

    2003-05-01

    Solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) promise high efficiencies in a range of fuels. Unlike lower temperature variants, carbon monoxide is a fuel rather than a poison, and so hydrocarbon fuels can be used directly, through internal reforming or even direct oxidation. This provides a key entry strategy for fuel-cell technology into the current energy economy. Present development is mainly based on the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte. The most commonly used anode materials are Ni/YSZ cermets, which display excellent catalytic properties for fuel oxidation and good current collection, but do exhibit disadvantages, such as low tolerance to sulphur and carbon deposition when using hydrocarbon fuels, and poor redox cycling causing volume instability. Here, we report a nickel-free SOFC anode, La0.75Sr0.25Cr0.5Mn0.5O3, with comparable electrochemical performance to Ni/YSZ cermets. The electrode polarization resistance approaches 0.2 Omega cm2 at 900 degrees C in 97% H2/3% H2O. Very good performance is achieved for methane oxidation without using excess steam. The anode is stable in both fuel and air conditions, and shows stable electrode performance in methane. Thus both redox stability and operation in low steam hydrocarbons have been demonstrated, overcoming two of the major limitations of the current generation of nickel zirconia cermet SOFC anodes. PMID:12692533

  11. Composite solid oxide fuel cell anode based on ceria and strontium titanate

    DOEpatents

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.

    2008-12-23

    An anode and method of making the same wherein the anode consists of two separate phases, one consisting of a doped strontium titanate phase and one consisting of a doped cerium oxide phase. The strontium titanate phase consists of Sr.sub.1-xM.sub.xTiO.sub.3-.delta., where M is either yttrium (Y), scandium (Sc), or lanthanum (La), where "x" may vary typically from about 0.01 to about 0.5, and where .delta. is indicative of some degree of oxygen non-stoichiometry. A small quantity of cerium may also substitute for titanium in the strontium titanate lattice. The cerium oxide consists of N.sub.yCe.sub.1-yO.sub.2-.delta., where N is either niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), antimony (Sb) or tantalum (Ta) and where "y" may vary typically from about 0.001 to about 0.1 and wherein the ratio of Ti in said first phase to the sum of Ce and N in the second phase is between about 0.2 to about 0.75. Small quantities of strontium, yttrium, and/or lanthanum may additionally substitute into the cerium oxide lattice. The combination of these two phases results in better performance than either phase used separately as an anode for solid oxide fuel cell or other electrochemical device.

  12. Synthesis of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles via solid state reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bystrzejewski, M.

    2011-06-15

    The encapsulation of iron nanoparticles in protective carbon cages leads to unique hybrid core-shell nanomaterials. Recent literature reports suggest that such nanocomposites can be obtained in a relatively simple process involving the solid state carbothermal reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles. This approach is very attractive because it does not require advanced equipment and consumes less energy in comparison to widely used plasma methods. The presented more-in-depth study shows that the carbothermal approach is sensitive to temperature and the process yield strongly depends on the morphology and crystallinity of the carbon material used as a reductant. - Graphical abstract: Reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles by carbon black at 1200 deg. C yields well crystallized carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles. Highlights: > Carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles were synthesized by carbothermal reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles. > The process has the highest selectivity at 1200 C. > Lower temperatures result in iron oxide nanoparticles wrapped in carbon matrix. > The encapsulation rate of Fe at 1200 deg. C was found to be 15%.

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of zinc oxide nanorods synthesized by solid-state reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Virendra; D'Souza, Charlene; Yadav, Deepti; Shaikh, A. J.; Vigneshwaran, Nadanathangam

    2006-09-01

    Well-crystallized zinc oxide nanorods have been fabricated by single step solid-state reaction using zinc acetate and sodium hydroxide, at room temperature. The sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) stabilized zinc oxide nanorods were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction revealed the wurtzite structure of zinc oxide. The size estimation by XRD and TEM confirmed that the ZnO nanorods are made of single crystals. The growth of zinc oxide crystals into rod shape was found to be closely related to its hexagonal nature. The mass ratio of SLS:ZnO in the nanorods was found to be 1:10 based on the thermogravimetric analysis. Blue shift of photoluminescence emission was noticed in the ZnO nanorods when compared to that of ZnO bulk. FT-IR analysis confirmed the binding of SLS with ZnO nanorods. Apart from ease of preparation, this method has the advantage of eco-friendliness since the solvent and other harmful chemicals were eliminated in the synthesis protocol.

  14. A Comparison of Molten Sn and Bi for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, A.; Lee, Sang Bok; Hornés, A.; Vohs, J. M.; Gorte, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Molten Sn and Bi were examined at 973 and 1073 K for use as anodes in solid oxide fuel cells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes. Cells were operated under “battery” conditions, with dry He flow in the anode compartment, to characterize the electrochemical oxidation of the metals at the YSZ interface. For both metals, the open-circuit voltages (OCVs) were close to that expected based on their oxidation thermodynamics, ~0.93 V for Sn and ~0.48 V for Bi. With Sn, the cell performance degraded rapidly after the transfer of approximately 0.5-1.5 Ccm{sup 2} of charge due to the formation of a SnO{sub 2} layer at the YSZ interface. At 973 K, the anode impedance at OCV for freshly reduced Sn was approximately 3 {ohm}cm{sup 2} but this increased to well over 250 {ohm}cm{sup 2} after the transfer of of charge. Following the transfer of 8.2 Ccm{sup 2} at 1073 K, the formation of a 10{micro}m thick SnO{sub 2} layer was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. With Bi, the OCV anode impedance at 973 K was less than 0.25 {ohm}cm{sup 2} and remained constant until essentially all of the Bi had been oxidized to BiO{sub 2}. Some implications of these results for direct carbon fuel cells are discussed.

  15. Quantum Diffusion-Controlled Chemistry: Reactions of Atomic Hydrogen with Nitric Oxide in Solid Parahydrogen.

    PubMed

    Ruzi, Mahmut; Anderson, David T

    2015-12-17

    Our group has been working to develop parahydrogen (pH2) matrix isolation spectroscopy as a method to study low-temperature condensed-phase reactions of atomic hydrogen with various reaction partners. Guided by the well-defined studies of cold atom chemistry in rare-gas solids, the special properties of quantum hosts such as solid pH2 afford new opportunities to study the analogous chemical reactions under quantum diffusion conditions in hopes of discovering new types of chemical reaction mechanisms. In this study, we present Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of the 193 nm photoinduced chemistry of nitric oxide (NO) isolated in solid pH2 over the 1.8 to 4.3 K temperature range. Upon short-term in situ irradiation the NO readily undergoes photolysis to yield HNO, NOH, NH, NH3, H2O, and H atoms. We map the postphotolysis reactions of mobile H atoms with NO and document first-order growth in HNO and NOH reaction products for up to 5 h after photolysis. We perform three experiments at 4.3 K and one at 1.8 K to permit the temperature dependence of the reaction kinetics to be quantified. We observe Arrhenius-type behavior with a pre-exponential factor of A = 0.036(2) min(-1) and Ea = 2.39(1) cm(-1). This is in sharp contrast to previous H atom reactions we have studied in solid pH2 that display definitively non-Arrhenius behavior. The contrasting temperature dependence measured for the H + NO reaction is likely related to the details of H atom quantum diffusion in solid pH2 and deserves further study. PMID:26317154

  16. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric D. Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

    2002-03-31

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible hydrocarbons, CO, or NO{sub x} and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at low to intermediate temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued. At low temperatures, in particular, it becomes feasible to use ferritic steel for interconnects instead of expensive and brittle ceramic materials such as those based on LaCrO{sub 3}. In addition, sealing the fuel cell becomes easier and more reliable; rapid startup is facilitated; thermal stresses (e.g., those caused by thermal expansion mismatches) are reduced; radiative losses ({approx}T{sup 4}) become minimal; electrode sintering becomes negligible and (due to a smaller thermodynamic penalty) the SOFC operating cycle (heating from ambient) would be more efficient. Combined, all these improvements further result in reduced initial and operating costs. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research is to develop a stable high conductivity (> 0.05 S cm{sup -1} at {le} 550 C) electrolyte for lower

  17. Shape-Dependent Activity of Ceria for Hydrogen Electro-Oxidation in Reduced-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiaofeng; Luo, Ting; Meng, Xie; Wu, Hao; Li, Junliang; Liu, Xuejiao; Ji, Xiaona; Wang, Jianqiang; Chen, Chusheng; Zhan, Zhongliang

    2015-11-01

    Single crystalline ceria nanooctahedra, nanocubes, and nanorods are hydrothermally synthesized, colloidally impregnated into the porous La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O3-δ (LSGM) scaffolds, and electrochemically evaluated as the anode catalysts for reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Well-defined surface terminations are confirmed by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy--(111) for nanooctahedra, (100) for nanocubes, and both (110) and (100) for nanorods. Temperature-programmed reduction in H2 shows the highest reducibility for nanorods, followed sequentially by nanocubes and nanooctahedra. Measurements of the anode polarization resistances and the fuel cell power densities reveal different orders of activity of ceria nanocrystals at high and low temperatures for hydrogen electro-oxidation, i.e., nanorods > nanocubes > nanooctahedra at T ≤ 450 °C and nanooctahedra > nanorods > nanocubes at T ≥ 500 °C. Such shape-dependent activities of these ceria nanocrystals have been correlated to their difference in the local structure distortions and thus in the reducibility. These findings will open up a new strategy for design of advanced catalysts for reduced-temperature SOFCs by elaborately engineering the shape of nanocrystals and thus selectively exposing the crystal facets. PMID:26307555

  18. Numerical evaluation of oxide growth in metallic support microstructures of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and its influence on mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Persson, Åsa Helen; Weiß, Christian; Brandstätter, Wilhelm

    2015-11-01

    Metal-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are developed as a durable and cost-effective alternative to the state-of-the-art cermet SOFCs. This novel technology offers new opportunities but also new challenges. One of them is corrosion of the metallic support, which will decrease the long-term performance of the SOFCs. In order to understand the implications of the corrosion on the mass-transport through the metallic support, a corrosion model is developed that is capable of determining the change of the porous microstructure due to oxide scale growth. The model is based on high-temperature corrosion theory, and the required model parameters can be retrieved by standard corrosion weight gain measurements. The microstructure is reconstructed from X-ray computed tomography, and converted into a computational grid. The influence of the changing microstructure on the fuel cell performance is evaluated by determining an effective diffusion coefficient and the equivalent electrical area specific resistance (ASR) due to diffusion over time. It is thus possible to assess the applicability (in terms of corrosion behaviour) of potential metallic supports without costly long-term experiments. In addition to that an analytical frame-work is proposed, which is capable of estimating the porosity, tortuosity and the corresponding ASR based on weight gain measurements.

  19. Open-source computational model of a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Steven B.; Choi, Hae-Won; Pharoah, Jon G.; Roth, Helmut K.; Jasak, Hrvoje; Jeon, Dong Hyup

    2016-03-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell is an electro-chemical device which converts chemical energy into electricity and heat. To compete in today's market, design improvements, in terms of performance and life cycle, are required. Numerical prototypes can accelerate design and development progress. In this programme of research, a three-dimensional solid oxide fuel cell prototype, openFuelCell, based on open-source computational fluid dynamics software was developed and applied to a single cell. Transport phenomena, combined with the solution to the local Nernst equation for the open-circuit potential, as well as the Kirchhoff-Ohm relationship for the local current density, allow local electro-chemistry, fluid flow, multi-component species transport, and multi-region thermal analysis to be considered. The underlying physicochemical hydrodynamics, including porous-electrode and electro-chemical effects are described in detail. The openFuelCell program is developed in an object-oriented open-source C++ library. The code is available at

  20. Generator module architecture for a large solid oxide fuel cell power plant

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Zafred, Paolo R.; Riggle, Matthew W.; Litzinger, Kevin P.

    2013-06-11

    A solid oxide fuel cell module contains a plurality of integral bundle assemblies, the module containing a top portion with an inlet fuel plenum and a bottom portion receiving air inlet feed and containing a base support, the base supports dense, ceramic exhaust manifolds which are below and connect to air feed tubes located in a recuperator zone, the air feed tubes passing into the center of inverted, tubular, elongated, hollow electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells having an open end above a combustion zone into which the air feed tubes pass and a closed end near the inlet fuel plenum, where the fuel cells comprise a fuel cell stack bundle all surrounded within an outer module enclosure having top power leads to provide electrical output from the stack bundle, where the fuel cells operate in the fuel cell mode and where the base support and bottom ceramic air exhaust manifolds carry from 85% to all 100% of the weight of the stack, and each bundle assembly has its own control for vertical and horizontal thermal expansion control.