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Sample records for geomorphic stability field

  1. Geomorphic stability field reconnaissance site visit, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, December 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-01

    To license the Canonsburg site, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has required that geomorphic stability be demonstrated for the stream banks and slopes around the perimeter of the site for 200 years. Based on a study of the stream channel and slopes, it has been determined that due to recent human intervention, the required geomorphic stability cannot now be achieved without installation of erosion protection works and continued monitoring of the site. The Pittsburgh District Corps of Engineers has plans to channelize Chartiers Creek and install erosion protection rock within the next 5 or 6 years, if local government agencies raise the necessary matching funds. Much of the stream bank and slope adjacent to the ``fenced in`` western area of the site is anticipated to remain geomorphically stable for more than 20 years, but less than 200 years without human intervention. Therefore in much of this area, the Corps of Engineers will have adequate time to perform its work without jeopardizing the integrity of the controlled area. In contrast, two approximately 200-foot (ft) (60-meter [m]) long portions of the stream channel located north-northwest of the encapsulation area are subject to active stream erosion that threatens the integrity of the controlled area. These areas should be fixed by installation of erosion protection rock within the next 2 years.

  2. Eco-geomorphic controls on slope stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, T.; Ford, C.; Hwang, T.; Vose, J.; Band, L.

    2009-04-01

    Vegetation controls soil-mantled landscape evolution primarily through growth of roots into soil and rock. Root-soil interactions affect the spatial distribution and rate of shallow landsliding and other hillslope processes. Yet the distribution and tensile strength of roots depends on a number of geomorphically-influenced parameters, including soil moisture. Our field-based study investigated the effects of topography on root distributions, tensile strengths, and cohesion. Systematic differences in plant species distribution and soil properties are found in the hollow-nose topography of soil-mantled landscapes; with hollows containing thick colluvial soils and mesic tree species and noses containing thinner, more differentiated soils and more xeric species. We investigated whether these topographic variations in geomorphic and ecologic properties affected the spatial distribution of root cohesion by measuring the distribution and tensile strength of roots from soil pits dug downslope of fifteen individual trees in the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, North Carolina. Our soil pits were located to capture variance in plant species (10 species total), topographic positions (nose, hollow), and sizes (a range of DBH between 5 cm and 60 cm). Root tensile strengths showed little variance with different species, but showed strong differences as a function of topography, with nose roots stronger than hollow roots. Similarly, within species, root cellulose content was systematically greater in trees on nose positions compared to those in hollows. For all species, roots were concentrated close to the soil surface (at least 70% of biomass occurred within 50 cm of the surface) and variations in this pattern were primarily a function of topographic position. Hollow roots were more evenly distributed in the soil column than those on noses, yet trees located on noses had higher mean root cohesion than those in hollows because of a higher root tensile force. These data provide an

  3. Geomorphic evaluation of erosional stability at reclaimed surface mines in northwestern Colorado. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The report identifies geomorphic, pedologic, vegetation, and hydrologic conditions that are associated with erosion of reclaimed surface-mined lands in northwestern Colorado. The report also presents methods for determining the appropriate values of geomorphic variables that can be manipulated during reclamation to increase erosional stability. A section on geomorphic principles associated with erosion of reclaimed land surfaces is designed for use as a primer by mine personnel and reclamation planners. The areas of interest in the study were those that were reclaimed under jurisdiction of current (1988) SMCRA reclamation regulations, yet were still affected by relatively rapid erosion rates several years after reclamation activities were completed. Geomorphic, pedologic, vegetation, and hydrologic data were collected onsite and from topographic maps. Data from reclaimed areas undergoing accelerated erosion were compared with data from reclaimed areas undergoing minimal erosion to identify conditions that controlled erosion on reclaimed surface-mined lands and to identify some postmining equilibrium landform characteristics. These data also were used to develop threshold relations.

  4. Assessing the Stability of Precariously Balanced Rocks and their Geomorphic Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, D. E.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2010-12-01

    Precariously balanced rocks (PBRs) are balanced boulders that serve as in situ negative indicators for earthquake-generated strong ground motions and can physically validate seismic hazard analyses over multiple earthquake cycles. Understanding what controls the formation of PBRs, when they were formed, and how long they remained balanced is critical to their utility in seismic hazard assessment. The geologic and geomorphic settings of PBRs were investigated using PBR surveys, slenderness analysis from digital photographs, joint density analysis, and landscape morphometry. An efficient field methodology for documenting PBRs was designed and applied to 261 precarious rocks in central Arizona. An interactive computer program that estimates 2-dimensional (2D) PBR slenderness (αmin) from digital photographs was developed and tested against 3-dimensional (3D) photogrammetrically generated PBR models. 2D slenderness estimates are accurate compared to their 3D equivalents, attaining <8.8% error in the heights of the estimated PBR centers of mass. Mean height, diameter, and aspect ratio (diameter/height) values for the surveyed PBRs are 1.16 m, 1.32 m, and 1.25 with coefficients of variation 47%, 48%, and 40%, respectively. Mean αmin values for all PBRs estimated using the software is 29° with a coefficient of variation of 38%. The joint density analysis reveals a mean PBR joint density of 0.39 m-1 with few PBRs formed in joint densities <0.22 m-1 and >0.55 m-1. Landscape morphometry shows that PBRs are situated in upper reaches of drainage basins near divides and hillslope crests. Surveyed PBRs are preserved on local hillslope gradients between 10° and 45°, and contributing areas (per unit contour length) between 1 m2/m and 30 m2/m. The close comparison between the 2D and 3D PBR stability estimates indicates that our software may be used to estimate PBR slenderness from digital photographs taken in the field within reasonable accuracy. The streamlined workflow of the

  5. Field and laboratory rainfall simulation as a tool to investigate Quaternary badland geomorphic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus; Kasanin-Grubin, Milica; Yair, Aaron; Rorke, Brian; Schwanghart, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Badlands are traditionally considered as natural analogue experiments of landscape development. Commonly, their morphology is linked to lithological properties of the bedrock. However, recent investigations indicate that the geomorphic development is sensitive to climate and in particular to precipitation characteristics. This sensitivity enables the combination of rainfall simulation experiments with numerical models to study the relevance of climate change for their long-term geomorphic development. In this study, the relevance of precipitation characteristics for the Quaternary landscape development in the Dinosaur Badlands in Alberta, Canada, and Zin Valley Badlands, Negev Desert, Israel is investigated. Runoff, erosion and weathering were simulated in the field and the laboratory to determine rates for modeling different precipitation regimes. Based on the results, a numerical model was developed and the effects of changing precipitation characteristics (rainfall, snow cover and melt) on long-term landscape development were simulated. In the Dinosoaur badlands, weathering and erosion experiments show that the balance between snowmelt induced weathering in the spring, summer rainfall, and erosion determines the rate of slope retreat. In the Zin Valley, on the other hand, the magnitude of the individual rainstorms determines whether a slope section is eroded or acts as a runoff and sediment sink. As a consequence, in the Zin Valley badland slopes experienced an auto-stabilization during the Quaternary. In the Dinosaur Badlands, on the other hand, Holocene climatic variations do not appear to have caused a permanent differentiation of patterns of erosion and deposition. Based on these results the reaction of badland slopes to changing precipitation characteristics was modeled. The model shows that both badland slope systems are currently fairly stable against climate change in the range of variations in rainfall characteristics experienced during the Holocene

  6. Impact of riverine wetlands construction and operation on stream channel stability: Conceptual framework for geomorphic assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, Bruce L.; Miller, Michael V.

    1990-11-01

    Wetland conservation is a critical environmental management issue. An emerging approach to this issue involves the construction of wetland environments. Because our understanding of wetlands function is incomplete and such projects must be monitored closely because they may have unanticipated impacts on ecological, hydrological, and geomorphological systems. Assessment of project-related impacts on stream channel stability is an important component of riverine wetlands construction and operation because enhanced erosion or deposition associated with unstable rivers can lead to loss of property, reductions in channel capacity, and degradation of water quality, aquatic habitat, and riparian aesthetics. The water/sediment budget concept provides a scientific framework for evaluating the impact of riverine wetlands construction and operation on stream channel stability. This concept is based on the principle of conservation of mass, i.e., the total amount of water and sediment moving through a specific reach of river must be conserved. Long-term measurements of channel sediment storage and other water/sediment budget components provide the basis for distinguishing between project-related impacts and those resulting from other causes. Changes in channel sediment storage that occur as a result of changes in internal inputs of water or sediment signal a project-related impact, whereas those associated with changes in upstream or tributary inputs denote a change in environmental conditions elsewhere in the watershed. A geomorphic assessment program based on the water/sediment budget concept has been implemented at the site of the Des Plaines River Wetlands Demonstration Projection near Chicago, Illinois, USA. Channel sediment storage changed little during the initial construction phase, suggesting that thus far the project has not affected stream channel stability.

  7. Synergies between geomorphic hazard and risk and sediment cascade research fields: exploiting geomorphic processes' susceptibility analyses to derive potential sediment sources in the Oltet, river catchment, southern Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurchescu, Marta-Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Identifying sediment sources and sediment availability represents a major problem and one of the first concerns in the field of sediment cascade. This paper addresses the on-site effects associated with sediment transfer, investigating the degree to which studies pertaining to the field of geomorphic hazard and risk research could be exploited in sediment budget estimations. More precisely, the paper investigates whether results obtained in assessing susceptibility to various geomorphic processes (landslides, soil erosion, gully erosion) could be transferred to the study of sediment sources within a basin. The study area is a medium-sized catchment (> 2400 km2) in southern Romania encompassing four different geomorphic units (mountains, hills, piedmont and plain). The region is highly affected by a wide range of geomorphic processes which supply sediments to the drainage network. The presence of a reservoir at the river outlet emphasizes the importance of estimating sediment budgets. The susceptibility analyses are conducted separately for each type of the considered processes in a top-down framework, i.e. at two different scales, using scale-adapted methods and validation techniques in each case, as widely-recognized in the hazard and risk research literature. The analyses start at a regional scale, which has in view the entire catchment, using readily available data on conditioning factors. In a second step, the suceptibility analyses are carried out at a medium scale for selected hotspot-compartments of the catchment. In order to appraise the extent to which susceptibility results are relevant in interpreting sediment sources at catchment scale, scale-induced differences are analysed in the case of each process. Based on the amount of uncertainty revealed by each regional-scale analysis in comparison to the medium-scale ones, decisions are made on whether the first are acceptable to the aim of identifying potential sediment source areas or if they should be

  8. Predicting geomorphic stability in low-order streams of the western Lake Superior basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Width:depth ratios, entrenchment ratios, gradients, and median substrate particle sizes (D50s) were measured in 32 second and third order stream reaches in the western Lake Superior basin, and stream reaches were assigned a Rosgen geomorphic classification. Over 700 measurements ...

  9. Field measurements confirm that hillslope sediment size varies with elevation and geomorphic process regime at Inyo Creek, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genetti, J. R.; Sklar, L. S.; Leclere, S.

    2015-12-01

    Correlating the spatial variation of hillslope sediment grain size with geomorphic process regimes is essential for understanding feedbacks between sediment production on hillslopes and channel processes. At our field site at Inyo Creek, California, an elevation gradient in the size of sediment produced on hillslopes has been quantified using cosmogenic nuclides and detrital thermochronometry with samples collected at the outlet. Here we report field measurements of surface sediment size from hillslopes within the catchment, which validate those findings. Specifically, we use multiple field methods to measure hillslope grain size distributions, and correlate size variations with geomorphic process regimes across an elevation gradient. We select sampling sites from maps of predicted grain size created by overlaying landscape attributes in GIS to delineate geomorphic landscape units (GLUs). Geomorphic process regimes include bare bedrock, angle of repose slopes of talus, landslide deposits and soil mantled convex hillslopes. We use tape transects and point counts to quantify size distributions of regolith covered slopes. We also analyze photographs using The Digital Grain Size Project software, and for sediments too small to be resolved in photos we collect bulk samples for sieve analysis in the lab. To measure joint spacing, and infer the initial size distribution of rock fragments produced by bare bedrock, we use combine photographs with measurements made with tape transects, and aerial photographs for inaccessible areas. Our findings indicate that higher elevation slopes do indeed supply coarser sediment. Lower elevations have bimodal size distributions composed of sand with scattered boulders, while at higher elevations, slopes are composed a unimodal distribution of gravel, cobbles, and boulders. While boulder density does not vary significantly with elevation, we find a highly significant linear increase in the fraction of gravel and cobble-sized particles with

  10. Landscape and geomorphic survey of Zhamanshin area, Northern Kazakhstan: Preliminary report on 1992 field trip data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burba, G. G., Jr.; Meshcherskaya, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    The June 1992 geographical expedition to Zhamanshin crater area made a landscape and geomorphic survey of this impact structure. Observational points in the area of 300 sq km give new data on the geographical processes in the impact crater. The data obtained could be applied to search for unknown impact structures anywhere through the traces of such features in landscapes.

  11. Ecosystem processes at the watershed scale: Geomorphic patterns and stability of forest catchment water, energy and nitrogen use efficiency in the southern Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, L. E.; Hwang, T.; Hales, T. C.; Ford, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Since the classic work by Hack in Goodlett in 1960, it has been recognized that there is a close coupling of geomorphic, forest ecosystem and soil development in humid mountainous catchments, with the magnitude and frequency of mass wasting events. In the southern Appalachians of the southeast United States, dense forest cover limits erosion and sediment transport during moderate events in undisturbed catchments, with most sediment delivery to streams by mass wasting processes, including the interaction of diffusive processes (soil creep) and debris avalanches. We hypothesize that debris avalanches are frequently triggered in a zone with moderate concavity at the head or just above hollows where a critical combination of sufficient gradient, colluvial soil accumulation, storm throughflow convergence and canopy root strength are achieved. The forest ecosystem adjusts patterns of foliar and root biomass in response to accessible light, water and nutrient resources, which are in turn conditioned by hydroclimate and geomorphically mediated flowpath and transport dynamics. Long term adjustment of drainage network form and density by colluvial and fluvial transport mass budgets provide slowly varying boundary conditions to hillslope hydrologic and geomorphic dynamics. We use a combination of detailed empirical observations and simulation modeling of coupled ecosystem, hydroclimate and geomorphic systems to derive the co-evolution of patterns of forest catchment water, energy and nutrient use efficiency, and the stability and response catchment form to long and short term climate perturbations.

  12. Geomorphic expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault is marked in the landscape by a series of linear valleys and mountain fronts, aligned lakes and bays, elongate ridges, and disrupted or offset stream channels. This chapter describes regional features, local geomorphic features within the fault zone, and gives detailed maps of the fault system.

  13. Assessing the Stability of Hydrologic and Associated Biogeochemical and Geomorphic Regimes Using Historical Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, J.; Kim, H.; Kumar, S.; Pastore, C.; Bain, D.; Green, M.; Pellerin, B.

    2008-12-01

    This presentation develops a foundation for future research into analyzing the stability of water quality and sediment dynamics by synthesizing existing studies and utilizing knowledge gleaned from contemporary long- term and experimental research sites. We synthesize existing historical biogeochemical and geomorphological studies for the Eastern US and present a possible path toward estimating these system stabilities through time. We hypothesize that understanding how trends in water quality and quantity change over multiple centuries will lead to improved environmental management and planning strategies. A suite of methods (sediment cores and pollen counts, tree rings, and social, historical data) were used to reconstruct historical hydrologic regimes. With this information we then utilize existing studies and contemporary scientific findings to infer biogeochemical and sediment regimes at a regional scale. This methodology explicitly accounts for human actions and highlights fundamental research needs. While uncertainty in reconstructing hydrologic data compounds when analyzing biogeochemistry and fluvial geomorphology, we argue that the trends and trajectories evident from this type of approach yield important insights into human-environment interactions, inform current management/restoration efforts and improve future predictions. One early finding suggests that nutrient management at a river basin scale could be conducted differently throughout the basin depending on current uses, legacy effects, and hydrologic connectivity.

  14. Drumlin fields and glaciated mountains - A contrast in geomorphic perception from Seasat radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Digitally correlated Seasat synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) images of the Alaska Range, Alaska, and the drumlin-drift belt in Ireland are analyzed for the perception and identification of geomorphic features. The two terrains display strongly contrasted types of glacial topography whose identification in each case is related to the geometry of the Seasat imaging radar. Identification of terrain shape and form is important within the caveats imposed by the intrinsic distortions on the radar images. Image texture serves coarsely to distinguish topography. Image tones are scene-dependent and do not uniquely identify specific targets. Extensive alignments of linear and curvilinear features provide some of the more important image information from which to make geologic interpretations in each case.

  15. Field investigation of keyblock stability

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    Discontinuities in a rock mass can intersect an excavation surface to form discrete blocks (keyblocks) which can be unstable. This engineering problem is divided into two parts: block identification, and evaluation of block stability. One stable keyblock and thirteen fallen keyblocks were observed in field investigations at the Nevada Test Site. Nine blocks were measured in detail sufficient to allow back-analysis of their stability. Measurements included block geometry, and discontinuity roughness and compressive strength. Back-analysis correctly predicted stability or failure in all but two cases. These two exceptions involved situations that violated the stress assumptions of the stability calculations. Keyblock faces correlated well with known joint set orientations. The effect of tunnel orientation on keyblock frequency was apparent. Back-analysis of physical models successfully predicted block pullout force for two-dimensional models of unit thickness. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) analytic models for the stability of simple pyramidal keyblocks were examined. Calculated stability is greater for 3D analyses than for 2D analyses. Calculated keyblock stability increases with larger in situ stress magnitudes, larger lateral stress ratios, and larger shear strengths. Discontinuity stiffness controls block displacement more strongly than it does stability itself. Large keyblocks are less stable than small ones, and stability increases as blocks become more slender. Rock mass temperature decreases reduce the confining stress magnitudes and can lead to failure. The pattern of stresses affecting each block face explains conceptually the occurrence of pyramidal keyblocks that are truncated near their apex.

  16. Scaling the Geomorphic and Ecological Consequences of Contemporary Climate Change Within the Salmon River Watershed, Central Idaho: A View From Taylor Ranch Field Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, B. T.; Baxter, C. V.

    2008-12-01

    Established in 1970 by the University of Idaho, Taylor Ranch Field Station is located in the Frank Church Wilderness of No Return, along Big Creek, a 1445 km2 tributary to the Middle Fork of the Salmon River. The field station has provided a stable center for terrestrial and aquatic ecological studies within the Salmon River for almost 40 years. Dr. Wayne Minshall began monitoring aquatic ecology indices at numerous sites in the Salmon River basin in the late 1970's. This rare continuum of roughly 30 years of field data can be coupled with publically available hydrologic, geomorphic and meteorological data sets to reveal a rich record of how recent demonstrable changes in climate have affected this wilderness watershed. As a consequence of improved access and automated and telemetered sensors of water quality and quantity, contemporary studies continue through out the watershed at an increasing temporal and spatial resolution. The impetuous is upon current researchers to understand both the role of the basin as a major water source to the Snake and Columbia River systems and also the function of the basin as ideal habitat for threatened native fish. Beyond these applied questions that directly impact management decisions, the pristine nature of much of the Salmon River basin also favors studies of fundamental feedbacks between the physical and biological systems. These interdisciplinary studies are augmented by increasing collections of high resolution spatial data sets such as Hyperspectral Imagery, Distributed Sensor Networks and LiDAR topography. We present a study that explicitly examines the feedbacks between wildfire, sediment production, basin hydrology and aquatic ecosystem function. Because the tributaries to the Salmon River span discrete ranges in elevation across the snow- to rainfall-dominated hydrologic regimes, these studies reveal how sensitive different portions of the Salmon River system are to projected changes in temperature. Depending on the

  17. Experimental investigation into Quaternary badland geomorphic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasanin-Grubin, Milica; Kuhn, Nikolaus; Yair, Aaron; Bryan, Rorke; Schwanghart, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Badland morphology is commonly linked to lithological properties of the bedrock. However, recent investigations indicate that the geomorphic development is sensitive to climate and in particular to precipitation characteristics. In this study, the precipitation characteristics that are critical for the Quaternary landscape development in the Dinosaur Badlands in Alberta, Canada, and Zin Valley Badlands, Negev Desert, Israel are investigated. Runoff, erosion and weathering were simulated in the field and the laboratory to determine rates for modeling different precipitation regimes. Currently, the geomorphic development in the Dinosaur badlands is characterized by weathering/supply limited conditions, leading to slope retreat independent of lithology. In the Negev, transport limited conditions cause frequent runoff discontinuity, creating a pattern of areas dominated by erosion or deposition. The results of the weathering and erosion experiments show that the balance between snowmelt induced weathering in the spring and summer rainfall and erosion determine the rate of slope retreat in the Dinosaur Badlands. In the Zin Valley, on the other hand, the magnitude of the individual rainstorms determines whether a slope section is eroded or acts as a sediment sink. The experiments illustrate that the badland slopes experienced an auto-stabilization during the Quaternary in the Zin Valley. In the Dinosaur Badlands Holocene climatic variations have not caused a permanent differentiation of patterns of erosion and deposition. Based on these results the reaction of badland slopes to changing precipitation characteristics was modeled. In their current state, both badland slope systems appear to be fairly stable against climate change in the range of those occurring during the Holocene. However, the stability is achieved in different ways. In the Dinosaur Badlands, weathering rates are low compared to erosion capacity, maintaining continuous evacuation of sediment from slopes

  18. Mapping of geomorphic processes on abandoned fields and cultivated land in small catchments in semi-arid Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geißler, C.; Ries, J. B.; Marzolff, I.

    2009-04-01

    In semi-arid landscapes vegetation succession on abandoned agricultural land is a long lasting process due to the water deficit for the best time of the year. During this phase of succession, geomorphic processes like the formation and development of rills, gullies and other geomorphic processes lead to a more or less constant deterioration of the abandoned land. But also on currently cultivated land and under quasi-natural vegetation the processes of soil degradation by flowing water take place. Regarding small catchments like gully catchments, the topography and the land cover (abandoned land, cultivated land, quasi-natural vegetation) are highly important factors in gully formation and soil degradation. Another important point is the distribution of different land cover units and therefore the connectivity of the catchment as described by Bracken & Croke (2007). In this study, 11 catchments of single gullies have been mapped geomorphologically and compared to the rate of gully development derived from small-format aerial photography. It could be shown that there is a high variability of processes due to differences in topography and the way the land is or has been cultivated. On abandoned land, geomorphic processes are highly active and enhance or even predestinate the direction of headcut movement. Another result is that geomorphological mapping of these gully catchments revealed interactions and dependencies of linear erosion features like the connection to the main drainage line, e.g. the gully. In the larger of the observed catchments (>5 ha) it became clear that some catchments have morphological features that tend to enhance connectivity (long rills, shallow drainage lines) and some catchments have features which tend to restrict connectivity (terraces, dense vegetation). In "more connected" catchments the retreat rate of the headcut is generally higher. By the method of geomorphological mapping, valuable information about the soil degrading processes

  19. A field study of the geomorphic effects of sublimating CO2 blocks on dune slopes at Coral Pink Dunes, Utah.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Mary; Nield, Jo; Diniega, Serina; Hansen, Candy; McElwaine, Jim

    2016-04-01

    The seasonal sublimation of CO2 ice is an active driver of present-day surface change on Mars. Diniega et al (2013) proposed that a discrete type of Martian gully, found on southern hemisphere dunes, were formed by the movement of CO2 seasonal ice blocks. These 'Linear Gullies' consist primarily of long (100 m - 2.5 km) grooves with near-uniform width (few-10 m wide), and typical depth of <2 m. They are near-linear throughout most of their length but sometimes contains zones of low-to-high sinuosity. They are commonly bounded by levées. The groove is generally prefaced by a small alcove that originates at the dune brink. We present the results of a set of field experiments that were undertaken at the Coral Pink sand dunes, Utah. These are sister experiments to those undertaken in Arizona (Bourke et al, 2016). The experiments were undertaken on an active barchan dune with a 16 m long lee slope (30.3°). Ambient air temperature was 30°C and relative humidity was 25%; sand surface temperatures were 26.5°C. A CO2 ice block (60x205x210 mm) was placed at the dune brink and with a gentle nudge it moved downslope. The dynamics of the block movement were recorded using a pair of high resolution video cameras. Geomorphological observations were noted and topographic change was quantified using a Leica P20 terrestrial laser scanner with a resolution of 0.8 mm at 10 m, and change detection limits less than 3 mm. The block run was repeated a total of 10 times and launched from the same location at the dune brink. The experiment ran for 45 minutes. The block size was reduced to (45 x 190 x 195 mm) by the end of the run series. The resultant geomorphology shows that the separate block runs occupied different tracks leading to a triangular plan form shape with a maximum width of 3.5 m. This is different from the findings in Arizona where a narrower track span was recorded (1.7m) (Bourke et al, 2016). Similar block dynamics were observed at both sites (as blocks moved straight

  20. Mapping geomorphic process domains to predict hillslope sediment size distribution using remotely-sensed data and field sampling, Inyo Creek, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclere, S.; Sklar, L. S.; Genetti, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The size distribution of sediments produced on hillslopes and supplied to channels depends on the geomorphic processes that weather, detach and transport rock fragments down slopes. Little in the way of theory or data is available to predict patterns in hillslope size distributions at the catchment scale from topographic and geologic maps. Here we use aerial imagery and a variety of remote sensing techniques to map and categorize geomorphic landscape units (GLUs) by inferred sediment production process regime, across the steep mountain catchment of Inyo Creek, eastern Sierra Nevada, California. We also use field measurements of particle size and local geomorphic attributes to test and refine GLU determinations. Across the 2 km of relief in this catchment, landcover varies from bare bedrock cliffs at higher elevations to vegetated, regolith-covered convex slopes at lower elevations. Hillslope gradient could provide a simple index of sediment production process, from rock spallation and landsliding at highest slopes, to tree-throw and other disturbance-driven soil production processes at lowest slopes. However, many other attributes are needed for a more robust predictive model, including elevation, curvature, aspect, drainage area, and color. We combine tools from ArcGIS, ERDAS Imagine and Envi with groundtruthing field work to find an optimal combination of attributes for defining sediment production GLUs. Key challenges include distinguishing: weathered from freshly eroded bedrock, boulders from intact bedrock, and landslide deposits from talus slopes. We take advantage of emerging technologies that provide new ways of conducting fieldwork and comparing field data to mapping solutions. In particular, cellphone GPS is approaching the accuracy of dedicated GPS systems and the ability to geo-reference photos simplifies field notes and increases accuracy of later map creation. However, the predictive power of the GLU mapping approach is limited by inherent uncertainty

  1. Geomorphic status of regulated rivers in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Lobera, G; Besné, P; Vericat, D; López-Tarazón, J A; Tena, A; Aristi, I; Díez, J R; Ibisate, A; Larrañaga, A; Elosegi, A; Batalla, R J

    2015-03-01

    River regulation by dams modifies flow regimes, interrupts the transfer of sediment through channel networks, and alters downstream bed dynamics, altogether affecting channel form and processes. So far, most studies on the geomorphic impacts of dams are restricted to single rivers, or even single river stretches. In this paper we analyse the geomorphic status of 74 river sites distributed across four large basins in the Iberian Peninsula (i.e. 47 sites located downstream of dams). For this purpose, we combine field data with hydrological data available from water agencies, and analyse historical (1970) and current aerial photographs. In particular, we have developed a Geomorphic Status (GS) index that allows us to assess the physical structure of a given channel reach and its change through time. The GS encompasses a determination of changes in sedimentary units, sediment availability, bar stability and channel flow capacity. Sites are statistically grouped in four clusters based on contrasted physical and climate characteristics. Results emphasise that regulation changes river's flow regime with a generalized reduction of the magnitude and frequency of floods (thus flow competence). This, in addition to the decrease downstream sediment supply, results in the loss of active bars as they are encroached by vegetation, to the point that only reaches with little or no regulation maintain exposed sedimentary deposits. The GS of regulated river reaches is negatively correlated with magnitude of the impoundment (regulation). Heavily impacted reaches present channel stabilization and, in contrast to the hydrological response, the distance and number of tributaries do not reverse the geomorphic impact of the dams. Stabilization limits river dynamics and may contribute to the environmental degradation of the fluvial ecosystem. Overall, results describe the degree of geomorphological alteration experienced by representative Iberian rivers mostly because of regulation

  2. Modeling water stability and transport on Mars and Iapetus: Exploring their effects on geomorphic and atmospheric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.

    2012-05-01

    The stability and transport of water on solid planetary surfaces strongly affects both atmospheric and surfaces processes. In this work, two bodies are specifically investigated where transport of water is relevant: Iapetus and Mars. Iapetus, an icy Kronian satellite, has a drastic albedo contrast on its surface and one of the darkest surfaces in the solar system. This extreme brightness contrast is suggested to occur via the transport of water ice from the leading hemisphere to the trailing hemisphere and the poles. Here a global heat and mass transfer model is developed for Iapetus in order to study the current state of H2O transport and to make inferences about the temporal evolution of this process on its surface. On Mars, atmosphere-regolith interactions have been suggested to control the near-surface water vapor cycle. Due to the large amount of experimental values of the absorptivity of soil materials, a model is developed in order to study the effects of an active regolith on the transport of water vapor. Liquid water has been a controversial subject in the martian literature. However, there exists sufficient evidence of past standing bodies of liquid on Mars. If these paleolakes contained dissolved salts, their evolution would be drastically affected. Therefore, a model is developed in order to study the effect of dissolved salts and investigate if there exists the possibility for brine residue formation. Recent observations also strongly suggest that liquid may be possible on present-day Mars. A model is developed in order to investigate the possibility of brine flows as the source for recurring slope lineae.

  3. Predicting vegetation-stabilized dune field morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchyn, Thomas E.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.

    2012-09-01

    The morphology of vegetation-stabilized dune fields on the North American Great Plains (NAGP) mostly comprises parabolic dunes; stabilized barchan and transverse dunes are rare, with the exception of transverse and barchan mega-dunes in the Nebraska Sand Hills. We present a hypothesis from a numerical dune field model explaining the vegetation-stabilized morphology of dunes under unidirectional wind. Simulations with a range of initial dune morphologies (closely-spaced transverse to disperse barchans) indicate that stabilized morphology is determined by the ratio of slipface deposition rate to deposition tolerance of vegetation. Slipface deposition rate is related to dune height, flux, and celerity. With a fixed depositional tolerance, large, slow-moving dunes have low slipface deposition rates and ‘freeze’ in place once vegetation is introduced. Relatively small, fast dunes have high slipface deposition rates and evolve into parabolic dunes, often colliding during stabilization. Our hypothesis could explain differences in stabilized morphology across the NAGP and elsewhere.

  4. Helical quadrupole field stabilization of field-reversed configuration plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamura, S.; Nogi, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The n = 2 mode rotational instability, which appears on a field-reversed configuration plasma produced by a theta pinch, is stabilized by a helical quadrupole field. The critical strength of the field to stabilize the instability is obtained as a function of pitch angle of the helical coil ..cap alpha.. rad/m. Typically, the plasma in the ..cap alpha.. = 6 winding field is stabilized by about one-fifth of ..cap alpha.. = 0 field strength. To physically explain such a good effectiveness of the helical field, the rotation speed of the plasma is measured by a Doppler shift of a carbon V 2270.9-A line. However, the clear explanation to the helical effect is not yet given.

  5. Hillslope Sediment Size Distributions Linked to Geomorphic Process Regimes in a Steep Mountain Catchment: Field Data from Inyo Creek, Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genetti, J. R.; Sklar, L. S.; Leclere, S.

    2014-12-01

    The size of sediments produced on hillslopes and supplied to channels regulates river incision and thus landscape evolution in steep mountain catchments, yet the controls on sediment size are poorly understood. Analysis using cosmogenic nuclides and detrital thermochronometry on samples collected at the outlet of Inyo Creek, California, has quantified spatial variation in the size of sediment produced on hillslopes, however field data are needed to validate and explain the findings. We report on a field campaign to measure hillslope grain size distributions, and correlate size variations with topographic, geomorphic, and climatic attributes, across an elevation gradient in this steep catchment. We begin by mapping hillslope geomorphic process regimes, which in this watershed, underlain by granodiorite, are: bare bedrock that erodes by spallation and landsliding, angle of repose slopes of talus, landslide and debris flow deposits, and at lower elevations, soil-mantled convex hillslopes. For each process regime, we select sampling sites to span a wide elevation range. We use tape transects to measure the size of particles >100 mm, the extent of bedrock exposure, and density of vegetation. For finer sediments we collect bulk samples for sieve analysis in the lab. On bare bedrock, we measure joint spacing to infer the size of rock fragments produced. For steep, inaccessible areas we analyze photographs, scaled by objects of known size. Early results suggest that sediment production occurs primarily on bare bedrock surfaces that supply regolith-covered surfaces below, which serve as transport pathways and storage reservoirs. At lower elevations in the catchment, size distributions are bimodal, with only large boulders and fine-gravel and sand. At higher elevations, slopes near the channel have a more continuous distribution, including gravel, cobbles, and small boulders. Results to-date are broadly consistent with the geochemical analysis, which found that higher

  6. Aerial videotape mapping of coastal geomorphic changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Debusschere, Karolien; Penland, Shea; Westphal, Karen A.; Reimer, P. Douglas; McBride, Randolph A.

    1991-01-01

    An aerial geomorphic mapping system was developed to examine the spatial and temporal variability in the coastal geomorphology of Louisiana. Between 1984 and 1990 eleven sequential annual and post-hurricane aerial videotape surveys were flown covering periods of prolonged fair weather, hurricane impacts and subsequent post-storm recoveries. A coastal geomorphic classification system was developed to map the spatial and temporal geomorphic changes between these surveys. The classification system is based on 10 years of shoreline monitoring, analysis of aerial photography for 1940-1989, and numerous field surveys. The classification system divides shorelines into two broad classes: natural and altered. Each class consists of several genetically linked categories of shorelines. Each category is further subdivided into morphologic types on the basis of landform relief, elevation, habitat type, vegetation density and type, and sediment characteristics. The classification is used with imagery from the low-altitude, high-resolution aerial videotape surveys to describe and quantify the longshore and cross-shore geomorphic, sedimentologic, and vegetative character of Louisiana's shoreline systems. The mapping system makes it possible to delineate and map detailed geomorphic habitat changes at a resolution higher than that of conventional vertical aerial photography. Morphologic units are mapped parallel to the regional shoreline from the aerial videotape imagery onto the base maps at a scale of 1:24,000. The base maps were constructed from vertical aerial photography concurrent with the data of the video imagery.

  7. Transformative geomorphic research using laboratory experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Sean J.; Ashmore, Peter; Neuman, Cheryl McKenna

    2015-09-01

    Laboratory experiments in geomorphology is the theme of the 46th annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium (BGS). While geomorphic research historically has been dominated by field-based endeavors, laboratory experimentation has emerged as an important methodological approach to study these phenomena, employed primarily to address issues related to scale and the analytical treatment of the geomorphic processes. Geomorphic laboratory experiments can result in transformative research. Several examples drawn from the fluvial and aeolian research communities are offered as testament to this statement, and these select transformative endeavors often share very similar attributes. The 46th BGS will focus on eight broad themes within laboratory experimentation, and a diverse group of scientists has been assembled to speak authoritatively on these topics, featuring several high-profile projects worldwide. This special issue of the journal Geomorphology represents a collection of the papers written in support of this symposium.

  8. Geomorphic considerations for erosion prediction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterkamp, W.R.; Toy, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    Current soil-erosion prediction technology addresses processes of rainsplash, overland-flow sediment transport, and rill erosion in small watersheds. The effects of factors determining sediment yield from larger-scale drainage basins, in which sediment movement is controlled by the combined small-scale processes and a complex set of channel and other basin-scale sediment-delivery processes, such as soil creep, bioturbation, and accelerated erosion due to denudation of vegetation, have been poorly evaluated. General suggestions are provided for the development of erosion-prediction technology at the geomorphic or drainage-basin scale based on the separation of sediment-yield data for channel and geomorphic processes from those of field-scale soil loss. An emerging technology must consider: (1) the effects on sediment yield of climate, geology and soils, topography, biotic interactions with other soil processes, and land-use practices; (2) all processes of sediment delivery to a channel system; and (3) the general tendency in most drainage basins for progressively greater sediment storage in the downstream direction.

  9. Geomorphic field experiment to quantify grain size and biotic influence on riverbed sedimentation dynamics in a dry-season reservoir, Russian River, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsheim, J. L.; Ulrich, C.; Hubbard, S. S.; Borglin, S. E.; Rosenberry, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    An important problem in geomorphology is to differentiate between abiotic and biotic fine sediment deposition on coarse gravel river beds because of the potential for fine sediment to infiltrate and clog the pore space between gravel clasts. Infiltration of fines into gravel substrate is significant because it may reduce permeability; therefore, differentiation of abiotic vs. biotic sediment helps in understanding the causes of such changes. We conducted a geomorphic field experiment during May to November 2012 in the Russian River near Wohler, CA, to quantify biotic influence on riverbed sedimentation in a small temporary reservoir. The reservoir is formed upstream of a small dam inflated during the dry season to enhance water supply pumping from the aquifer below the channel; however, some flow is maintained in the reservoir to facilitate fish outmigration. In the Russian River field area, sediment transport dynamics during storm flows prior to dam inflation created an alternate bar-riffle complex with a coarser gravel surface layer over the relatively finer gravel subsurface. The objective of our work was to link grain size distribution and topographic variation to biotic and abiotic sediment deposition dynamics in this field setting where the summertime dam annually increases flow depth and inundates the bar surfaces. The field experiment investigated fine sediment deposition over the coarser surface sediment on two impounded bars upstream of the reservoir during an approximately five month period when the temporary dam was inflated. The approach included high resolution field surveys of topography, grain size sampling and sediment traps on channel bars, and laboratory analyses of grain size distributions and loss on ignition (LOI) to determine biotic content. Sediment traps were installed at six sites on bars to measure sediment deposited during the period of impoundment. Preliminary results show that fine sediment deposition occurred at all of the sample

  10. Stability of Spherical Vesicles in Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The stability of spherical vesicles in alternating (ac) electric fields is studied theoretically for asymmetric conductivity conditions across their membranes. The vesicle deformation is obtained from a balance between the curvature elastic energies and the work done by the Maxwell stresses. The present theory describes and clarifies the mechanisms for the four types of morphological transitions observed experimentally on vesicles exposed to ac fields in the frequency range from 500 to 2 × 107 Hz. The displacement currents across the membranes redirect the electric fields toward the membrane normal to accumulate electric charges by the Maxwell−Wagner mechanism. These accumulated electric charges provide the underlying molecular mechanism for the morphological transitions of vesicles as observed on the micrometer scale. PMID:20575588

  11. Investigation of Geomorphic and Seismic Effects on the 1959 Madison Canyon, Montana, Landslide Using an Integrated Field, Engineering Geomorphology Mapping, and Numerical Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, A.; Gischig, V.; Stead, D.; Clague, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present an integrated approach to investigate the seismically triggered Madison Canyon landslide (volume = 20 Mm3), which killed 26 people in Montana, USA, in 1959. We created engineering geomorphological maps and conducted field surveys, long-range terrestrial digital photogrammetry, and preliminary 2D numerical modelling with the objective of determining the conditioning factors, mechanisms, movement behaviour, and evolution of the failure. We emphasise the importance of both endogenic (i.e. seismic) and exogenic (i.e. geomorphic) processes in conditioning the slope for failure and hypothesise a sequence of events based on the morphology of the deposit and seismic modelling. A section of the slope was slowly deforming before a magnitude-7.5 earthquake with an epicentre 30 km away triggered the catastrophic failure in August 1959. The failed rock mass rapidly fragmented as it descended the slope towards Madison River. Part of the mass remained relatively intact as it moved on a layer of pulverised debris. The main slide was followed by several debris slides, slumps, and rockfalls. The slide debris was extensively modified soon after the disaster by the US Army Corps of Engineers to provide a stable outflow channel from newly formed Earthquake Lake. Our modelling and observations show that the landslide occurred as a result of long-term damage of the slope induced by fluvial undercutting, erosion, weathering, and past seismicity, and due to the short-term triggering effect of the 1959 earthquake. Static models suggest the slope was stable prior to the 1959 earthquake; failure would have required a significant reduction in material strength. Preliminary dynamic models indicate that repeated seismic loading was a critical process for catastrophic failure. Although the ridge geometry and existing tension cracks in the initiation zone amplified ground motions, the most important factors in initiating failure were pre-existing discontinuities and seismically induced

  12. Southern San Andreas Fault evaluation field activity: approaches to measuring small geomorphic offsets--challenges and recommendations for active fault studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scharer, Katherine M.; Salisbury, J. Barrett; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon; Rockwell, Thomas K.

    2014-01-01

    In southern California, where fast slip rates and sparse vegetation contribute to crisp expression of faults and microtopography, field and high‐resolution topographic data (<1  m/pixel) increasingly are used to investigate the mark left by large earthquakes on the landscape (e.g., Zielke et al., 2010; Zielke et al., 2012; Salisbury, Rockwell, et al., 2012, Madden et al., 2013). These studies measure offset streams or other geomorphic features along a stretch of a fault, analyze the offset values for concentrations or trends along strike, and infer that the common magnitudes reflect successive surface‐rupturing earthquakes along that fault section. Wallace (1968) introduced the use of such offsets, and the challenges in interpreting their “unique complex history” with offsets on the Carrizo section of the San Andreas fault; these were more fully mapped by Sieh (1978) and followed by similar field studies along other faults (e.g., Lindvall et al., 1989; McGill and Sieh, 1991). Results from such compilations spurred the development of classic fault behavior models, notably the characteristic earthquake and slip‐patch models, and thus constitute an important component of the long‐standing contrast between magnitude–frequency models (Schwartz and Coppersmith, 1984; Sieh, 1996; Hecker et al., 2013). The proliferation of offset datasets has led earthquake geologists to examine the methods and approaches for measuring these offsets, uncertainties associated with measurement of such features, and quality ranking schemes (Arrowsmith and Rockwell, 2012; Salisbury, Arrowsmith, et al., 2012; Gold et al., 2013; Madden et al., 2013). In light of this, the Southern San Andreas Fault Evaluation (SoSAFE) project at the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) organized a combined field activity and workshop (the “Fieldshop”) to measure offsets, compare techniques, and explore differences in interpretation. A thorough analysis of the measurements from the

  13. Estimating Earthquake Magnitude from the Kentucky Bend Scarp in the New Madrid Seismic Zone Using Field Geomorphic Mapping and High-Resolution LiDAR Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelson, K. I.; Kirkendall, W. G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent suggestions that the 1811-1812 earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) ranged from M6.8-7.0 versus M8.0 have implications for seismic hazard estimation in the central US. We more accurately identify the location of the NW-striking, NE-facing Kentucky Bend scarp along the northern Reelfoot fault, which is spatially associated with the Lake County uplift, contemporary seismicity, and changes in the Mississippi River from the February 1812 earthquake. We use 1m-resolution LiDAR hillshades and slope surfaces, aerial photography, soil surveys, and field geomorphic mapping to estimate the location, pattern, and amount of late Holocene coseismic surface deformation. We define eight late Holocene to historic fluvial deposits, and delineate younger alluvia that are progressively inset into older deposits on the upthrown, western side of the fault. Some younger, clayey deposits indicate past ponding against the scarp, perhaps following surface deformational events. The Reelfoot fault is represented by sinuous breaks-in-slope cutting across these fluvial deposits, locally coinciding with shallow faults identified via seismic reflection data (Woolery et al., 1999). The deformation pattern is consistent with NE-directed reverse faulting along single or multiple SW-dipping fault planes, and the complex pattern of fluvial deposition appears partially controlled by intermittent uplift. Six localities contain scarps across correlative deposits and allow evaluation of cumulative surface deformation from LiDAR-derived topographic profiles. Displacements range from 3.4±0.2 m, to 2.2±0.2 m, 1.4±0.3 m, and 0.6±0.1 m across four progressively younger surfaces. The spatial distribution of the profiles argues against the differences being a result of along-strike uplift variability. We attribute the lesser displacements of progressively younger deposits to recurrent surface deformation, but do not yet interpret these initial data with respect to possible earthquake

  14. Mapping the stability field of Jupiter Trojans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, H. F.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Wolfe, R. F.

    1991-01-01

    Jupiter Trojans are a remnant of outer solar system planetesimals captured into stable or quasistable libration about the 1:1 resonance with the mean motion of Jupiter. The observed swarms of Trojans may provide insight into the original mass of condensed solids in the zone from which the Jovian planets accumulated, provided that the mechanisms of capture can be understood. As the first step toward this understanding, the stability field of Trojans were mapped in the coordinate proper eccentricity, e(sub p), and libration amplitude, D. To accomplish this mapping, the orbits of 100 particles with e(sub p) in the range of 0 to 0.8 and D in the range 0 to 140 deg were numerically integrated. Orbits of the Sun, the four Jovian planets, and the massless particles were integrated as a full N-body system, in a barycentric frame using fourth order symplectic scheme.

  15. Controls on the geomorphic expression and evolution of gryphons, pools, and caldera features at hydrothermal seeps in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onderdonk, Nathan; Mazzini, Adriano; Shafer, Luke; Svensen, Henrik

    2011-07-01

    In the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in southern California, expulsion of gas, sediment and water creates unique geomorphic features similar to those seen on the surface of dormant mud volcanoes. These include pools of water or highly fluid mud named “mud pots” and 0.5 to 2.5 m-tall gryphons. The features vary in size, shape, and type of eruptive activity and change form over time. To evaluate controls on the surface morphology and evolution of these features we used repeated differential GPS surveys, observations of eruptive activity, and measurements of erupted mud properties to document the physical characteristics and changes in the system over a 28-month period. We find that the morphology of the gryphons is primarily a function of the mud expulsion style. Taller (1.5 m to 2.4 m) gryphons form where narrower vents (5 cm to 15 cm diameter) expel mud to the surface in discrete Strombolian-type eruptions caused by individual gas bubbles pushing mud up through the gryphon conduit and exploding at the surface. Smaller (0.6 m to 1.5 m) gryphons form where wider vents allow a greater amount of gas to pass through, which creates 0.25 to 1 m diameter mud craters that bubble continuously, often from multiple points within the crater. Although viscous mud is required to create these positive topographic features, variations in erupted mud temperature (30 °C to 68.5 °C), density (1.44 g/cm3 to 1.59 g/cm3), and water content (36% to 44%) between different gryphons did not correlate with gryphon size. All the active gryphons experienced periods of growth and erosion over the study period due to changes in the degree of activity or small variations in the vent locations within the gryphons, but the net change in height distributions over time was negligible. Pools directly adjacent to gryphon clusters are surficial features whose water level depends on seasonal rainfall and temperature. Isolated pools are also present and do not show similar response to seasonal changes

  16. Geomorphic and vegetation changes in a meandering dryland river regulated by a large dam, Sauce Grande River, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, Ana; Peiry, Jean-Luc; Campo, Alicia M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates post-dam geomorphic and vegetation changes in the Sauce Grande River, a meandering dryland river impounded by a large water-conservation dam. As the dam impounds a river section with scarce influence of tributaries, sources for fresh water and sediment downstream are limited. Changes were inspected based on (i) analysis of historical photographs/imagery spanning pre- (1961) and post-dam (1981, 2004) channel conditions for two river segments located above and below the dam, and (ii) field survey of present channel conditions for a set of eight reference reaches along the river segments. Whilst the unregulated river exhibited active lateral migration with consequent adjustments of the channel shape and size, the river section below the dam was characterized by (i) marked planform stability (93 to 97%), and by (ii) vegetation encroachment leading to alternating yet localized contraction of the channel width (up to 30%). The present river displays a moribund, stable channel where (i) redistribution of sediment along the river course no longer occurs and (ii) channel forms constitute a remnant of a fluvial environment created before closing the dam, under conditions of higher energy. In addition to providing new information on the complex geomorphic response of dryland rivers to impoundment, this paper represents the very first geomorphic assessment of the regulated Sauce Grande and therefore provides an important platform to underpin further research assessing the geomorphic state of this highly regulated dryland river.

  17. Quantum stability of chameleon field theories.

    PubMed

    Upadhye, Amol; Hu, Wayne; Khoury, Justin

    2012-07-27

    Chameleon scalar fields are dark-energy candidates which suppress fifth forces in high density regions of the Universe by becoming massive. We consider chameleon models as effective field theories and estimate quantum corrections to their potentials. Requiring that quantum corrections be small, so as to allow reliable predictions of fifth forces, leads to an upper bound m<0.0073(ρ/10 g cm(-3))(1/3) eV for gravitational-strength coupling whereas fifth force experiments place a lower bound of m>0.0042 eV. An improvement of less than a factor of two in the range of fifth force experiments could test all classical chameleon field theories whose quantum corrections are well controlled and couple to matter with nearly gravitational strength regardless of the specific form of the chameleon potential. PMID:23006073

  18. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, D.A.; Daniel, D.E.; Koerner, R.M.; Bonaparte, R.

    1997-12-31

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project.

  19. CEO-Phase Stabilized Few-Cycle Field Synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, Stefan; Binhammer, Thomas; Harth, Anne; Kärtner, Franz X.; Morgner, Uwe

    We present an optical field synthesizer consisting of a CEO-phase stabilized octavespanning Ti:sapphire laser oscillator and prism-based pulse shaper allowing for full control of the electric field on a sub-femtosecond time-scale.

  20. Geomorphic terranes of the central Klamath Mountains: Applications to ecosystem management

    SciTech Connect

    De La Fuente, J.; Biery, E.; Creasy, M.; Elder, D.; Haessig, P.; Laurent, T.; Snavely, W. )

    1993-04-01

    Five geomorphic terranes have been identified in the Dillon Mountain area, about 20 miles southwest of Happy Camp, California. These terranes are defined as lands with similar geologic histories, where modern geomorphic processes are similar, and where soils and biotic communities are similar. They include: (1) slump/earthflow terrane; (2) glacial deposit terrane; (3) mountain slope terrane; (4) headwall terrane (steep, fan-shaped headwaters of first order drainages); and (5) inner gorge terrane (the steep landform which develops adjacent to rapidly downcutting streams). These primary geomorphic terranes are further subdivided on a basis of lithology, slope gradient, and geomorphic setting. Geomorphic terrane maps are derived from primary data layers in a geographic information system (GIS). The primary data layers include field-generated lithology, structure, and geomorphology. Slope gradient information is also used, and is derived from digital terrain data, modified by field observations. The distribution of geomorphic terranes is strongly influenced by local stratigraphy, which includes portions of the Western Jurassic Belt (Galice Formation), and the Western Paleozoic and Triassic Belt (Rattlesnake Creek, and Hayfork terranes). Tectonic and climatic events of the Pleistocene Epoch also played a major role in the formation and distribution of geomorphic terranes. These included rapid uplift, seismic activity, and alternating glacial and interglacial conditions. Work is underway to refine the geomorphic terranes by applying other variables such as bedrock structure, precipitation zones, and elevation zones.

  1. Seismic monitoring of geomorphic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtin, A.; Hovius, N.; Turowski, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    In seismology, the signal is usually analysed for earthquake data, but these represent less than 1% of continuous recording. The remaining data are considered as seismic noise and were for a long time ignored. Over the past decades, the analysis of seismic noise has constantly increased in popularity, and this has led to develop new approaches and applications in geophysics. The study of continuous seismic records is now open to other disciplines, like geomorphology. The motion of mass at the Earth's surface generates seismic waves that are recorded by nearby seismometers and can be used to monitor its transfer through the landscape. Surface processes vary in nature, mechanism, magnitude and space and time, and this variability can be observed in the seismic signals. This contribution aims to give an overview of the development and current opportunities for the seismic monitoring of geomorphic processes. We first describe the common principles of seismic signal monitoring and introduce time-frequency analysis for the purpose of identification and differentiation of surface processes. Second, we present techniques to detect, locate and quantify geomorphic events. Third, we review the diverse layout of seismic arrays and highlight their advantages and limitations for specific processes, like slope or channel activity. Finally, we illustrate all these characteristics with the analysis of seismic data acquired in a small debris-flow catchment where geomorphic events show interactions and feedbacks. Further developments must aim to fully understand the richness of the continuous seismic signals, to better quantify the geomorphic activity and improve the performance of warning systems. Seismic monitoring may ultimately allow the continuous survey of erosion and transfer of sediments in the landscape on the scales of external forcing.

  2. Stability of domain walls coupled to Abelian gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    George, Damien P.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2005-11-15

    Rozowsky, Volkas and Wali [J. Rozowsky, R. Volkas, and K. Wali, Phys. Lett. B 580, 249 (2004).] recently found interesting numerical solutions to the field equations for a gauged U(1)xU(1) scalar field model. Their solutions describe a reflection-symmetric domain wall with scalar fields and coupled gauge configurations that interpolate between constant magnetic fields on one side of the wall and exponentially decaying ones on the other side. This corresponds physically to an infinite sheet of supercurrent confined to the domain wall with a linearly rising gauge potential on one side and Meissner suppression on the other. While it was shown that these static solutions satisfied the field equations, their stability was left unresolved. In this paper, we analyze the normal modes of perturbations of the static solutions to demonstrate their perturbative stability.

  3. Phase stability of transition metal dichalcogenide by competing ligand field stabilization and charge density wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    C, Santosh K.; Zhang, Chenxi; Hong, Suklyun; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2015-09-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have been investigated extensively for potential application as device materials in recent years. TMDs are found to be stable in trigonal prismatic (H), octahedral (T), or distorted octahedral (Td) coordination of the transition metal. However, the detailed understanding of stabilities of TMDs in a particular phase is lacking. In this work, the detailed TMD phase stability using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) has been investigated to clarify the mechanism of phase stabilities of TMDs, consistent with the experimental observation. Our results indicate that the phase stability of TMDs can be explained considering the relative strength of two competing mechanisms: ligand field stabilization of d-orbitals corresponding to transition metal coordination geometry, and charge density wave (CDW) instability accompanied by a periodic lattice distortion (PLD) causing the phase transition in particular TMDs.

  4. Test results of BM109 magnet field stability during ramping

    SciTech Connect

    Kristalinski, A.

    1992-12-01

    This report presents results of the measured lag between the current ramp and the following magnetic field rise in BM109 magnets. The purpose of these tests is to choose identical ramping programs for PC4AN1, PC4AN2 and PC4AN3 magnets. The lag occurs due to the large eddy currents in the magnets' solid iron cores. The experiment requires a magnetic field stability of 0.1% during beam presence. Using existing equipment and a program slope of 100 Amp/sec starting at Tl yields fields within the 0.05% of set value. Add to this 0.05% for P.S. regulation to meet the required field stability of 0.1%. This program yields annual savings of $200,000 (assuming 100% usage) . Additional savings can be made by using faster slopes, but this requires additional controls.

  5. Test results of BM109 magnet field stability during ramping

    SciTech Connect

    Kristalinski, A.

    1992-12-01

    This report presents results of the measured lag between the current ramp and the following magnetic field rise in BM109 magnets. The purpose of these tests is to choose identical ramping programs for PC4AN1, PC4AN2 and PC4AN3 magnets. The lag occurs due to the large eddy currents in the magnets` solid iron cores. The experiment requires a magnetic field stability of 0.1% during beam presence. Using existing equipment and a program slope of 100 Amp/sec starting at Tl yields fields within the 0.05% of set value. Add to this 0.05% for P.S. regulation to meet the required field stability of 0.1%. This program yields annual savings of $200,000 (assuming 100% usage) . Additional savings can be made by using faster slopes, but this requires additional controls.

  6. Oblique magnetic field effects over stability in superposed viscous ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jothimani, S.; Anjali Devi, S. P.

    2000-12-01

    The interface of two superposed viscous ferrofluids of infinite depth in the presence of an uniform magnetic field oblique to the interface is considered. The fluids are assumed to be incompressible and a surface tension T acts on the interface. Solutions of the linear problem and the linear dispersion relation are found. Exchange of stabilities are discussed for various cases.

  7. The 3D lithospheric structure and plate tectonics of the on-going Taiwan arc-continent collision and delamination: a context for understanding patterns of geomorphic uplift and contemporary stress and geodetic displacement fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppe, J.; Kanda, R. V.; Carena, S.; Wu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    3D mapping of local and global tomographic data have considerably clarified the underlying architecture and long-term kinematics of ongoing arc-continent collision and subduction reversal in Taiwan, including the role of delamination of the continental mantle lithosphere and lowermost crust as an integral part of the ongoing collision. This subduction by continental delamination produces a new delamination Moho in northernmost Taiwan and is accompanied by extensional deformation and oroclinal bending of the overlying crust and now dead compressional mountain belt in northernmost Taiwan, even though subduction of Eurasian lithosphere continues at depth, with the Eurasian slab extending vertically to the mantle transtion zone. This subducting Eurasian continental lithosphere is continuous as a single intact slab across the Eurasian ocean-continent boundary, with the South China Sea Eurasian lithosphere to the south undergoing classic oceanic subduction. In this presentation we show that a 3D understanding of the geometry and long-term plate kinematics of this arc-continent collision informs and illuminates our understanding of [1] patterns of geomorphic uplift on a 100Ka timescale, [2] contemporary horizontal geodetic displacement fields, and [3] contemporary stress fields in the upper 100km determined from focal-mechanism inversions and borehole breakouts. Patterns of uplift and magmatism are closely linked to the locus of current delamination at depth. The contemporary horizontal displacement field shows on-going oroclinal bending. The very large changes in stress orientation are immediately clarified by their locations relative to fundamental structures, including the delamination Moho and the deep slabs of the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates.

  8. Magnetic Field Stabilization for 129Xe EDM Search Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Takeshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Nanao, Tsubasa; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Tsuchiya, Masato; Hayashi, Hironori; Uchida, Makoto; Asahi, Koichiro

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic field stabilization is a crucial condition parameter for many kinds of ultra-high precision measurements such as a search for an electric dipole moment (EDM). The instability of magnetic field strength often arises from the drift of current flow in a solenoid coil to generate the magnetic field. For our EDM search experiment with maser oscillating diamagnetic 129Xe atoms, we have developed a new stabilized current source based on a feedback system which is devised to correct the amount of current flow measured precisely with high-precision digital multimeter and standard resistor. Using this new current source, we have successfully reduced the drifts of coil current by at least a factor of 100 compared to commercially available current sources.

  9. Geomorphic surfaces in the northwestern Klamath Mountains, California and Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, K.S. ); Ricks, C.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Thick, residual, colluvial and alluvial soils derived from ophiolitic rocks mantle at least four geomorphic surfaces in the Siskiyou and marble mountains, in northwestern California and Illinois Valley, in southwestern Oregon. Analysis of digital elevation data provides constraints on the distribution and origin of these surfaces. Because of the geomorphic expression and soil mechanical properties of the surfaces, a map of slope gradients less than 22 degrees closely approximates the distribution of geomorphic surfaces as they are known from field observations. Preliminary definition of individual surfaces is based upon classification of the slop-map by elevation ranges. The Klamath Peneplain'' of Diller (1902) and associated soils, recently referred to as Klamath Saprolite'', are recognized near summit elevation (1,500 meters) across the area. Regional uplift and erosion has resulted in extensive, large earthflow landslides derived from these soils. Alluvial and residual deposits on the floor of the Illinois Valley occur at the same elevation (300 meters) as incised alluvial and colluvial terrace deposits along the Klamath River and tributary streams. At least two additional surfaces have been identified in the Siskiyou and Marble Mountains at approximately elevation 750 and 1,000 meters. Analysis of digital elevation data, combined with the map of earthflow landslides, allows rapid preliminary mapping of geomorphic surfaces in this terrain.

  10. Profile stabilization of tilt mode in a Field Reversed Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.W.; Tajima, T.; Barnes, D.C.

    1993-06-01

    The possibility of stabilizing the tilt mode in Field Reversed Configurations without resorting to explicit kinetic effects such as large ion orbits is investigated. Various pressure profiles, P({Psi}), are chosen, including ``hollow`` profiles where current is strongly peaked near the separatrix. Numerical equilibria are used as input for an initial value simulation which uses an extended Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model that includes viscous and Hall terms. Tilt stability is found for specific hollow profiles when accompanied by high values of separatrix beta, {beta}{sub sep}. The stable profiles also have moderate to large elongation, racetrack separatrix shape, and lower values of 3, average ratio of Larmor radius to device radius. The stability is unaffected by changes in viscosity, but the neglect of the Hall term does cause stable results to become marginal or unstable. Implications for interpretation of recent experiments are discussed.

  11. Geomorphic connectivity within abandoned small catchments (Stołowe Mts, SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latocha, Agnieszka

    2014-05-01

    Studying 5 small catchments (0.6-2.7 km2) located in the central part of the Stołowe Mountains (SW Poland), which are partly or totally abandoned, has revealed the substantial changes of connectivity within the catchments. Field investigation (geomorphic mapping, morphometric analyses) and GIS based analyses of historical data show that slope-channel coupling is much less efficient than in the past, mainly due to the decrease of unpaved road network, especially roads linked directly with streams. Also land-use change with considerable loss of arable land does not support erosion from slopes. The general direction of geomorphic change due to depopulation and lack of maintenance of anthropogenic features tends towards higher stability and lower efficiency of morphological processes, connected with a sustained decrease in slope-channel coupling. This tendency is evidenced by relict landscape features (e.g. road gullies, abandoned roads) formed in the period of more intensive land use, for which higher dynamics of the morphogenetic system may be inferred. The evidence of contemporary erosion and mineral material transport is very local and spatially limited to a few roads which are still in use. Sediment transfer is additionally slowed down by the presence of numerous anthropogenic barriers within slope and valley-floor domains. Even though their total impact may seem only local and negligible at the catchment scale, their contribution to increase the diversity of morphological processes is significant. Especially the neglect of hydrotechnical constructions enhances trapping of material within the catchments.

  12. Geomorphic applications of stream-gage information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, K.E.; Fitzpatrick, F.A.

    2009-01-01

    In the United States, several thousand stream gages provide what typically is the only source of continuous, long-term streamflow and channel-geometry information for the locations being monitored. In this paper, the geomorphic content of stream-gage information, previous and potential applications of stream-gage information in fluvial geomorphic research and various possible limitations are described. Documented applications include studies of hydraulic geometry, channel bankfull characteristics, sediment transport and channel geomorphic response to various types of disturbance. Potential applications include studies to determine the geomorphic effectiveness of large floods and in-stream habitat change in response to disturbance. For certain applications, various spatial, temporal and data limitations may render the stream-gage information of limited use; however, such information often is of considerable value to enable or enhance geomorphic investigations.

  13. The stability of coronal and prominence magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The significance of the localized instabilities is not yet fully understood. The nonlinear coupling of these modes may give rise to an explosive instability, with the modes coupling to longer wavelengths. On the other hand, if the modes saturate early, than the main effect of the instability may be an enhancement of transport coefficients. Nonetheless, the equation provides a simple test for the stability of cylindrical magnetic fields.

  14. Testing Geomorphic Controls on Salmonid Spawning Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, A.; Finnegan, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    The physical architecture of a landscape, as recorded in topography, is a major factor driving the spatial distribution of river habitat within a catchment. For this reason, predictive geomorphic models for fluvial characteristics, particularly grain size, have been suggested as possible contributors to salmonid habitat identification efforts. However, to our knowledge, no work has been done to both implement geomorphic predictions of reach-scale grain size and then test those predictions with salmonid habitat use data. We present a physically-based, empirically calibrated approach to predicting grain size distributions from high resolution LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging)-derived topographic data. This approach builds on previous efforts in that it predicts the full grain size distribution, rather than just median grain size, and incorporates an empirically calibrated shear stress partitioning factor. We use the predicted grain size distributions to calculate the fraction of the bed area movable by salmon of a given size, which we then compare to 7 years of steelhead trout and coho salmon spawning survey data for a 77 km2 watershed along the central California Coast. We find that grain size explains the paucity of spawning in the upper reaches of the drainage, but does not explain variation within the mainstem. In order to explain the residuals in spawning within the mainstem, we turn to the spacing of riffle bedforms. Field surveys of riffle spacing explain 64% of the variation in spawning in these reaches, suggesting that spawning is ultimately limited by the availability of riffles. Because riffle spacing varies systematically with channel width, we show that predicting riffle spacing is feasible with LiDAR data. Taken together, these findings highlight both the value and limitations of a grain-size focused approach to habitat prediction, and suggest that such approaches should be used in concert with predictions of channel bed morphology.

  15. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R

    2005-04-30

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 The past and future implications for salmon habitat.

  16. Geomorphic responses to climatic change

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, W.B.

    1991-01-01

    The primary focus of this book is the response of landscapes to Pleistocene and Holocene climatic changes. During the past 40 ky the global climate has varied from full-glacial to interglacial. Global temperatures decreased between 40 and 20 ka culminating in full-glacial climatic conditions at 20 ka. This resulted in a sea level decline of 130 m. Only 8 to 14 ky later the global temperature had reversed itself and the climate was the warmest of the past 120 ky. These dramatic changes in climate imposed significant controls on fluvial systems and impacted land forms and whole landscapes worldwide. Chapter 1, Conceptual Models for Changing landscapes, presents numerous concepts related to erosional and depositional processes controlling landscape development. Each of the next four chapters of the book, 2, 3, 4, and 5, examine different aspects of climatic change on fluvial systems. The conceptual models are used to analyze landscape response in four different climatic and geologic settings. In each setting the present and past climatic conditions, the climatically induced changes in vegetation and soil development, and geochronology are considered in assessing the influence of climatic changes on geomorphic processes. Chapter 2, investigates the influence of climatic change on the geomorphic processes operating in desert watersheds in the southwestern US and northern Mexico. The study sites for Chapter 3, are small desert drainage basins in the southwestern US and near the Sinai Peninsula in the Middle East. Chapter 4, investigates fill terraces in several drainage basins of the San Gabrial Mountains of the central Transverse Ranges of coastal southern California. The study site for Chapter 5 is the Charwell River watershed in the Seaward Kaikoura Range of New Zealand. Chapter 6, Difference Responses of Arid and Humid Fluvial Systems, compares the effects of changing climates in basins that range from extremely arid to humid.

  17. On the stability of the asymptotically free scalar field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Shalaby, A M.

    2015-03-30

    Asymptotic freedom plays a vital role in our understanding of the theory of particle interactions. To have this property, one has to resort to a Non-abelian gauge theory with the number of colors equal to or greater than three (QCD). However, recent studies have shown that simple scalar field theories can possess this interesting property. These theories have non-Hermitian effective field forms but their classical potentials are bounded from above. In this work, we shall address the stability of the vacua of the bounded from above (−Φ{sup 4+n}) scalar field theories. Moreover, we shall cover the effect of the distribution of the Stokes wedges in the complex Φ-plane on the features of the vacuum condensate within these theories.

  18. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  19. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or.crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  20. Geomorphic characteristics and classification of Duluth-area streams, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, Faith A.; Peppler, Marie C.; DePhilip, Michele M.; Lee, Kathy E.

    2006-01-01

    In 2003 and 2004, a geomorphic assessment of streams in 20 watersheds in the Duluth, Minn., area was conducted to identify and summarize geomorphic characteristics, processes, disturbance mechanisms, and potential responses to disturbance. Methods used to assess the streams included watershed characterization, descriptions of segment slopes and valley types, historical aerial photograph interpretation, and rapid field assessments and intensive field surveys of stream reaches. Geomorphic conditions were summarized into a segment-scale classification with 15 categories mainly based on drainage-network position and slope, and, secondarily, based on geologic setting, valley type, and dominant geomorphic processes. Main causes of geomorphic disturbance included historical logging and agriculture, and ongoing urban development, human-caused channel alterations, road and storm sewer drainage, ditching, hiking trails, and gravel pits or quarries. Geomorphic responses to these disturbances are dependent on a combination of drainage-network position, slope, and geologic setting. Geologic setting is related to drainage-network position because the geologic deposits parallel the Lake Superior shoreline. Headwater streams in large watersheds flow over glacial deposits above altitudes of about 1,200 feet (ft). Headwater tributaries and upper main stems have ditch-like channels with gentle slopes and no valleys. Urban development and road drainage cause increased runoff and flood peaks in these segments resulting in channel widening. Below about 1,200 ft, main-stem segments generally are affected by bedrock type and structure and have steep slopes and confined or entrenched valleys. Increases in flood peaks do not cause incision or widening in the bedrock-controlled valleys; instead, the flow and scour areas are expanded. Feeder tributaries to these main stems have steep, confined valleys and may be sources for sediment from urban areas, road runoff, or storm sewer outfalls. Main

  1. Magnetic Field Stabilization for Magnetically Shielded Volumes by External Field Coils

    PubMed Central

    Brys, T.; Czekaj, S.; Daum, M.; Fierlinger, P.; George, D.; Henneck, R.; Hochman, Z.; Kasprzak, M.; Kohlik, K.; Kirch, K.; Kuzniak, M.; Kuehne, G.; Pichlmaier, A.; Siodmok, A.; Szelc, A.; Tanner, L.

    2005-01-01

    For highly sensitive magnetic measurements, e.g., a measurement of the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM), the magnetic field has to be stable in time on a level below picoTesla. One of several measures we employ to achieve this uses an external field coil system which can stabilize the ambient external field at a predefined value. Here we report on the construction and characterization of such a system in the magnetic test facility at PSI. The system actively stabilizes the field along the axis of the EDM experiment by means of four coils in a Helmholtz-like configuration. Additional coils serve to compensate for transverse ambient field components. Because of the long integration times in the EDM experiment (about 100 s or more) only slow disturbances have to be corrected for. The performance of the system has been measured using static and moving magnetic sources and suppression factors in excess of 200 have been observed. PMID:27308117

  2. Magnetic Field Stabilization for Magnetically Shielded Volumes by External Field Coils.

    PubMed

    Brys, T; Czekaj, S; Daum, M; Fierlinger, P; George, D; Henneck, R; Hochman, Z; Kasprzak, M; Kohlik, K; Kirch, K; Kuzniak, M; Kuehne, G; Pichlmaier, A; Siodmok, A; Szelc, A; Tanner, L

    2005-01-01

    For highly sensitive magnetic measurements, e.g., a measurement of the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM), the magnetic field has to be stable in time on a level below picoTesla. One of several measures we employ to achieve this uses an external field coil system which can stabilize the ambient external field at a predefined value. Here we report on the construction and characterization of such a system in the magnetic test facility at PSI. The system actively stabilizes the field along the axis of the EDM experiment by means of four coils in a Helmholtz-like configuration. Additional coils serve to compensate for transverse ambient field components. Because of the long integration times in the EDM experiment (about 100 s or more) only slow disturbances have to be corrected for. The performance of the system has been measured using static and moving magnetic sources and suppression factors in excess of 200 have been observed. PMID:27308117

  3. Geomorphic and hydrologic study of peak-flow management on the Cedar River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magirl, Christopher S.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Marineau, Mathieu D.

    2012-01-01

    Assessing the linkages between high-flow events, geomorphic response, and effects on stream ecology is critical to river management. High flows on the gravel-bedded Cedar River in Washington are important to the geomorphic function of the river; however, high flows can deleteriously affect salmon embryos incubating in streambed gravels. A geomorphic analysis of the Cedar River showed evidence of historical changes in river form over time and quantified the effects of anthropogenic alterations to the river corridor. Field measurements with accelerometer scour monitors buried in the streambed provided insight into the depth and timing of streambed scour during high-flow events. Combined with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, the recorded accelerometer disturbances allowed the prediction of streambed disturbance at the burial depth of Chinook and sockeye salmon egg pockets for different peak discharges. Insight gained from these analyses led to the development of suggested monitoring metrics for an ongoing geomorphic monitoring program on the Cedar River.

  4. Soil aggregate stability: comparison of field and laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Eco-engineering first and foremost, aims at stabilising soil and slopes in order to protect humans and infrastructure from potential damages caused by soil failure, usually due to heavy rainstorms. Whereas the technical constructions are well-defined and their protective effects in general calculable, this is rarely the case for biological measures. Furthermore, unlike engineering structures which are immediately useable and operative after their completion, the effects of plants are developing as a function of time. Within this scope, soil aggregation processes play a decisive role in in the re-colonisation process and the re-establishing of a protective vegetation cover. The strength of soil aggregates is not only critical to the stability of slopes but plays a key role in ecosystem functioning in general as it affects water, gas and nutrient fluxes and storage influencing the activity and growth of living organisms. Not by chance, therefore, soil aggregate stability has been proposed as an indicator reflecting multiple aspects allowing extensive information on ecosystem status to be gathered in a relatively short time, in particular in respect of protecting slopes from erosion and shallow mass movements. Various methods and approaches have been used to quantify soil aggregate stability but the lack of standardisation complicates the comparison of different investigations. From this perspective we investigated soil samples from the field as well as samples artificially prepared in the laboratory using the same soil material and testing procedure. The field samples were collected at two sites in the landslide area of Dallenwil-Wirzweli in Central Switzerland, once in a gully recently affected by erosion and landslide processes bare of vegetation (control site) and once in a re-stabilised gully with 25 year old eco-engineering measures dominated by Alnus incana (re-vegetated site). The laboratory samples were prepared with the soil from the control site. Two

  5. Tectono-geomorphic study of the Karewa Basin of Kashmir Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, Reyaz Ahmad; Romshoo, Shakil Ahmad; Chandra, Rakesh; Ahmad, Ishtiaq

    2014-10-01

    The Karewa Basin nestled between the Pir Panjal Range and the Great Himalayan Range, in Northwest India, has been studied to understand its tectono-geomorphic evolution on the basis of geomorphic indices and morphotectonic parameters supported by the field evidences. Satellite data, topographic maps and digital elevation model (DEM) were used to extract various parameters at various spatial scales. Four watersheds, representative of the entire Karewa Basin, were chosen for detailed studies on the basis of the researchable evidence of the complete sequence of the stratigraphic record and the preservation of geomorphic landscapes. The integrated analysis of the geomorphic and morphometric data provides evidence of the relative variations in the tectonic activity among the watersheds. Geomorphic indices suggest a relatively high degree of tectonic activity along the Pir Panjal side of the Karewa Basin. This variation in the relative degree of tectonic activity is consistent with the field evidence, fault/lineament locations and the landscape geometry of the Karewa Basin. Based on the results from this study, it is suggested that Late Quaternary climate changes, tectonic uplift and erosion of the Pir Panjal Range and changing geometry of the Karewa Lake have played a key role in the evolution of the geomorphic landscape of the Kashmir Valley.

  6. Geomorphic criteria for selecting stable uranium tailings disposal sites in New Mexico. Volume 1. Technical report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.; Gardner, T.W.

    1985-03-01

    Essential to the disposal of uranium mill tailings in northwestern New Mexico is the geomorphic stability of the disposal site. Geomorphic stability assessment involves 3 steps: (1) evaluating the site's past geomorphic stability by determining the age of the landscape and its associated deposits; (2) quantifying short- and long-term geomorphic processes operating in the site area; and (3) evaluating the impact of mining activity and reclamation on the geomorphic stability of the site area. A heirarchy of geomorphic hazards which might impact a site area include: (1) drainage network extension/channel headcutting, (2) piping and gullying, (3) bank erosion and meander growth, (4) drainage network and channel incision, (5) channel aggradation, and (6) valley floor deposition and wind erosion. All of these processes operate on a scale of meters of change per year over historic time periods. Landscapes which have undergone significant changes in historic and Holocene time periods are valley floors. Valley floors are considered one of the most unstable landscapes for siting of uranium mill tailings.

  7. Rotational stability of a long field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D. C. Steinhauer, L. C.

    2014-02-15

    Rotationally driven modes of long systems with dominantly axial magnetic field are considered. We apply the incompressible model and order axial wavenumber small. A recently developed gyro-viscous model is incorporated. A one-dimensional equilibrium is assumed, but radial profiles are arbitrary. The dominant toroidal (azimuthal) mode numbers ℓ=1 and ℓ=2 modes are examined for a variety of non-reversed (B) and reversed profiles. Previous results for both systems with rigid rotor equilibria are reproduced. New results are obtained by incorporation of finite axial wavenumber and by relaxing the assumption of rigid electron and ion rotation. It is shown that the frequently troublesome ℓ=2 field reversed configuration (FRC) mode is not strongly affected by ion kinetic effects (in contrast to non-reversed cases) and is likely stabilized experimentally only by finite length effects. It is also shown that the ℓ=1 wobble mode has a complicated behavior and is affected by a variety of configuration and profile effects. The rotationally driven ℓ=1 wobble is completely stabilized by strong rotational shear, which is anticipated to be active in high performance FRC experiments. Thus, observed wobble modes in these systems are likely not driven by rotation alone.

  8. Catchment rehabilitation and hydro-geomorphic characteristics of mountain streams in the western Rift Valley escarpment of Northern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghebreyohannes Asfaha, Tesfaalem; Frankl, Amaury; Haile, Mitiku; Nyssen, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The catchments in the western Rift Valley escarpment of Northern Ethiopia are highly responsive in terms of hydro-geomorphic changes. With rapid deforestation in the first half of the 20th century, dense gully and scar networks developed, exporting huge amounts of runoff and sediment down to the fertile and densely populated Raya Valley. Consequently, threatening the environment and the livelihoods of the people both in the upstream and downstream areas. To reverse this problem, catchment-scale rehabilitation activities were initiated in the mid-1980s. In this study, we examine the hydro-geomorphic response of streams after catchment rehabilitation. Scar density was digitized from Google Earth imagery (2005) in 20 adjacent catchments and was explained in terms of its corresponding Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and slope gradient. This was accompanied by analysis of incidental repeat photographs and field observations. As evidenced by the series of repeat photographs, the vegetation cover of the catchments decreased up to 1975 and rapid reforestation occurred thereafter. A multiple regression analysis (R2=0.53, P<0.01) showed that scar density is negatively correlated with NDVI and positively with average gradient of very steep slopes (>60%). Moreover, due to reduction in discharge and sediment flow from the rehabilitated catchments, stream adjustments were observed in the field: previously braided stream channels have changed to single-thread streams, many lateral bars are stabilized and covered by vegetation, stream channels are incising due to clear water effect and the size of boulder deposits decreases. Therefore, the study shows that, land degradation activities in the upper catchments resulted in changes in hydro-geomorphic characteristics of the streams and reduction in runoff and sediment transport to the Raya Valley. Key words: scar density; NDVI; stream incision; soil and water conservation; stream adjustment; land use change.

  9. Gully evolution and geomorphic adjustments of badlands to recent afforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros-Cánovas, Juan Antonio; Stoffel, Markus; Francisco Martín-Duque, Jose; Corona, Christophe; Lucia, Ana; María Bodoque, Jose

    2016-04-01

    Badlands and gullied areas are among the geomorphic environments with the highest erosion rates worldwide, however records on their evolution are very scarce and often limited to presumed initial conditions and the known present state. In this communication, we present a unique and very dense and annual record and outstanding example of erosion processes in a Mediterranean environment in Central Spain, where badland and gullying processes on sandy slopes of a set of mesas have been presumably triggered by quarrying activities since Medieval times. The gully channel evolution here analyzed provides an exceptional example of a larger setting of geomorphic. Besides the analysis of geomorphic adjustments to historical land-use changes induced by historical quarrying and gullying dynamics, we also quantified the impact of current geomorphic adjustments to 20th century afforestation by combining multiproxy such as aerial photography, historical archives, and large dataset of exposed roots to date, quantify, and reconstruct the morphology of a rapidly evolving channel in a gullied catchment. In this analysis, more than 150 exposed roots were analyzed to quantify and report channel incision; widening and gully retreatment rates during the last decades, as well as to quantify sheet erosion on different soil units. Our results suggest that, rather than stabilizing gully evolution, the afforestation carried out during 1960s has played an important role in water-sediment balance and connectivity and would have triggered the initiation of channel incision processes in the 1980s. Therefore, we observe that the channel incision match with a significant increase of the vegetation cover, which leads a significant decrease in sheet erosion rates. Based on our long-term annual gully reconstruction, we observed that sediment delivery does not correlate with the estimated intensity of precipitation (Fourier index). Instead, we observe abrupt morphological changes in the gully are

  10. Geomorphic control of landscape carbon accumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbloom, N.A.; Harden, J.W.; Neff, J.C.; Schimel, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    We use the CREEP process-response model to simulate soil organic carbon accumulation in an undisturbed prairie site in Iowa. Our primary objectives are to identify spatial patterns of carbon accumulation, and explore the effect of erosion on basin-scale C accumulation. Our results point to two general findings. First, redistribution of soil carbon by erosion results in a net increase in basin-wide carbon storage relative to a noneroding environment. Landscape-average mean residence times are increased in an eroding landscape owing to the burial/preservation of otherwise labile C. Second, field observations taken along a slope transect may overlook significant intraslope variations in carbon accumulation. Spatial patterns of modeled deep C accumulation are complex. While surface carbon with its relatively short equilibration time is predictable from surface properties, deep carbon is strongly influenced by the landscape's geomorphic and climatic history, resulting in wide spatial variability. Convergence and divergence associated with upland swales and interfluves result in bimodal carbon distributions in upper and mid slopes; variability in carbon storage within modeled mid slopes was as high as simulated differences between erosional shoulders and depositional valley bottoms. The bimodality of mid-slope C variability in the model suggests that a three-dimensional sampling strategy is preferable over the traditional two-dimensional analog or "catena" approach. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Development and reliability of two core stability field tests.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Patrick M; Swensen, Thomas C

    2008-03-01

    Because of the recognized link between core stability and back and lower extremity injury in sport, additional field tests that assess the strength and power component of core stability are needed to identify athletes at risk of such injury. To that end, we developed and tested the reliability of the front and side abdominal power tests (FAPT and SAPT), which were adapted from plyometric medicine ball exercises. The FAPT and SAPT were performed by explosively contracting the core musculature using the arms as a lever to project a medicine ball. Twenty-four untrained young women (aged 20.9 +/- 1.1 year) completed three trials each of the FAPT and SAPT on separate nonconsecutive days. The average distance the medicine ball was projected on each day was recorded; power was inferred from this measure. There was an approximately 3% increase in the mean distance between the testing sessions for the FAPT and SAPT; this was not significant and indicates there was no learning effect in the measurement protocol. Heteroscedasticity was present in the SAPT data but not the FAPT data. For the FAPT, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.95, standard error of measurement was 24 cm, and random error using the limits of agreement method was 67.5 cm. For the SAPT, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93, mean coefficient of variation was 9.8%, and the limits of agreement ratio was 36.8%. The FAPT and SAPT displayed excellent test-retest reliability, as well as acceptable measurement error. These findings suggest the FAPT and SAPT are reliable tests and may be used to assess the power component of core stability in young women. PMID:18550982

  12. A Photographic Atlas of Rock Breakdown Features in Geomorphic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourke, Mary C. (Editor); Brearley, J. Alexander; Haas, Randall; Viles, Heather A.

    2007-01-01

    features (e.g., alveoli) occur across climate regimes. We have drawn on the published geomorphological literature and our own field experience. We use, where possible, images of extrusive igneous rocks as the data returned from Mars, Venus and the Moon indicates that this is the predominant rock type. One of the purposes of this atlas is to expand the range of surface features that are known to indicate a particular geomorphic environment or process history. The surface features on boulders in some environments such as aeolian and weathering are well understood. In contrast, those in fluvial or ejecta environments are not. Therefore we have presented a comprehensive assemblage of features that are likely to be produced in each of the geomorphic environments. We hope that this atlas will trigger more research on diagnostic features, particularly their morphometry and detailed morphology, their persistence and rates of formation. In this first edition of the atlas we detail the features found on clasts in three geomorphic environments: aeolian, fluvial and weathering. Future editions of the atlas will include chapters on ejecta, micro-impacts, coastal, colluvial, glacial and structural features.

  13. Tune-stabilized linear-field FFAG for carbon therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C.; Koscielniak, S.; /TRIUMF

    2006-07-01

    A hybrid design for a Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerator has been invented which uses edge and alternating-gradient focusing principles applied in a specific configuration to a combined-function magnet to stabilize tunes through an acceleration cycle which extends over a factor of 2-6 in momentum. Using normal conducting magnets, the final, extracted energy from this machine attains 400 MeV/nucleon and thus supports a carbon ion beam in the energy range of interest for cancer therapy. Competing machines for this application include superconducting cyclotrons[1], synchrotrons[2], and, more recently, scaling FFAGs. The machine proposed here has the high average current advantage of the cyclotron with smaller radial aperture requirements that are more typical of the synchrotron; and as such represents a desirable innovation for therapy machines.

  14. The topographic signature of anthropogenic geomorphic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarolli, P.; Sofia, G.

    2014-12-01

    Within an abiotic-dominated context, geomorphologic patterns and dynamics are single expressions of trade-offs between the physical resistance forces, and the mechanical and chemical forces related to climate and erosion. Recently, however, it has become essential for the geomorphological community to take into account also biota as a fundamental geomorphologic agent acting from local to regional scales. However, while there is a recent flourishing literature about the impacts of vegetation on geomorphic processes, the study of anthropogenic pressure on geomorphology is still at its early stages. Humans are indeed among the most prominent geomorphic agents, redistributing land surface, and causing drastic changes to the geomorphic organization of the landscape (e.g. intensive agriculture, urbanization), with direct consequences on land degradation and watershed response. The reconstruction or identification of artificial or anthropogenic topographies, therefore, provides a mechanism for quantifying anthropogenic changes to the landscape systems in the context of the Anthropocene epoch. High-resolution topographic data derived from the recent remote sensing technologies (e.g. lidar, SAR, SfM), offer now new opportunities to recognize better understand geomorphic processes from topographic signatures, especially in engineered landscapes where the direct anthropic alteration of processes is significant. It is possible indeed to better recognize human-induced geomorphic and anthropogenic features (e.g. road networks, agricultural terraces), and the connected erosion. The study presented here may allow improved understanding and targeted mitigation of the processes driving geomorphic changes during urban development and help guide future research directions for development-based watershed studies. Human society is deeply affecting the environment with consequences on the landscape. It is therefore fundamental to establish greater management control over the Earth

  15. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Gillies, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time- independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  16. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Gillies, D. C.; Volz, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time-independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  17. Geomorphic factors related to the persistence of subsurface oil from the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nixon, Zachary; Michel, Jacqueline; Hayes, Miles O.; Irvine, Gail V.; Short, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Oil from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill has persisted along shorelines of Prince William Sound, Alaska, for more than two decades as both surface and subsurface oil residues. To better understand the distribution of persistent subsurface oil and assess the potential need for further restoration, a thorough and quantitative understanding of the geomorphic factors controlling the presence or absence of subsurface oil is required. Data on oiling and geomorphic features were collected at 198 sites in Prince William Sound to identify and quantify the relationships among these geomorphic factors and the presence and absence of persistent subsurface oil. Geomorphic factors associated with the presence of subsurface oil were initial oil exposure, substrate permeability, topographic slope, low exposure to waves, armoring on gravel beaches, tombolos, natural breakwaters, and rubble accumulations. Geomorphic factors associated with the absence of subsurface oil were impermeable bedrock; platforms with thin sediment veneer; fine-grained, well-sorted gravel beaches with no armor; and low-permeability, raised bay-bottom beaches. Relationships were found between the geomorphic and physical site characteristics and the likelihood of encountering persistent subsurface oiling at those sites. There is quantitative evidence of more complex interactions between the overall wave energy incident at a site and the presence of fine-scale geomorphic features that may have provided smaller, local wave energy sheltering of oil. Similarly, these data provide evidence for interactions between the shoreline slope and the presence of angular rubble, with decreased likelihood for encountering subsurface oil at steeply sloped sites except at high-angle sheltered rubble shoreline locations. These results reinforce the idea that the interactions of beach permeability, stability, and site-specific wave exposure are key drivers for subsurface oil persistence in exposed and intermittently exposed mixed

  18. Nonlinear stability of field-reversed configurations with self-generated toroidal field

    SciTech Connect

    Omelchenko, Y. A.; Schaffer, M. J.; Parks, P. B.

    2001-10-01

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a high-beta compact toroidal plasma confinement scheme in which the external poloidal field is reversed on the geometric axis by azimuthal (toroidal) plasma current. A quasineutral, hybrid, particle-in-cell (PIC) approach [Y. A. Omelchenko and R. N. Sudan, Phys. Plasmas 2, 2773 (1995)] is applied to study long-term nonlinear stability of computational FRC equilibria to a number of toroidal modes, including the most disruptive tilt mode. In particular, a self-generated toroidal magnetic field is found to be an important factor in mitigating the instability and preventing the confinement disruption. This is shown to be a unique FRC property resulting from the Hall effect in the regions of vanishing poloidal magnetic field. The instability-driven toroidal field stabilizes kink formation by increasing the magnetic field energy without destabilizing curvature-driven plasma motion. Finally, the tilt instability saturates due to nonlinear, finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and plasma relaxation to a quasisteady kinetic state. During this transition the FRC is shown to dissipate a substantial amount of initially trapped flux and plasma energy. These effects are demonstrated for kinetic and fluid-like, spherical and prolate FRCs.

  19. Flute stabilization due to ponderomotive force created by an rf field with a variable gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Yasaka, Y.; Itatani, R.

    1986-06-30

    An rf-stabilization experiment was performed in the axisymmetric single-mirror device HIEI by controlling the radial-gradient scale length of the rf field with the aid of an azimuthally phased antenna array. The flute stability depends sensitively on the scale length of the perpendicular rf electric field, which shows that rf stabilization is caused by the ponderomotive force for ions.

  20. Geomorphic analysis of large alluvial rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Colin R.

    2002-05-01

    Geomorphic analysis of a large river presents particular challenges and requires a systematic and organised approach because of the spatial scale and system complexity involved. This paper presents a framework and blueprint for geomorphic studies of large rivers developed in the course of basic, strategic and project-related investigations of a number of large rivers. The framework demonstrates the need to begin geomorphic studies early in the pre-feasibility stage of a river project and carry them through to implementation and post-project appraisal. The blueprint breaks down the multi-layered and multi-scaled complexity of a comprehensive geomorphic study into a number of well-defined and semi-independent topics, each of which can be performed separately to produce a clearly defined, deliverable product. Geomorphology increasingly plays a central role in multi-disciplinary river research and the importance of effective quality assurance makes it essential that audit trails and quality checks are hard-wired into study design. The structured approach presented here provides output products and production trails that can be rigorously audited, ensuring that the results of a geomorphic study can stand up to the closest scrutiny.

  1. Slip distributions on active normal faults measured from Terrestrial Laser Scan (TLS) data and field mapping of geomorphic offsets: An example from L'Aquila, Italy, and implications for modeling seismic moment release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, M. W.; Roberts, G.; McCaffrey, K. J.; Cowie, P. A.; Faure Walker, J.; Papanikolaou, I.; Phillips, R. J.; Michetti, A.; Vittori, E.

    2012-12-01

    Surface slip distributions for an active normal fault in Italy have been measured using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), concentrating on offsets developed since 15 ±3 ka and for 2 palaeoearthquake ruptures, in order to assess the impact of spatial changes in fault orientation and kinematics on sub-surface slip distributions that control seismic moment release. The southeastern half of the surface trace of the Campo Felice active normal fault near the city of L'Aquila, central Italy, was scanned with TLS to define the vertical and horizontal offsets of geomorphic slopes that formed during the last glacial maximum (15 ±3 ka) from the center of the fault to its southeastern tip. Field measurements were made to define the strike and dip of the fault plane and plunge and plunge direction of the slip vector from striations on slickensides. Throw measurements from 250 TLS-derived scarp profiles were analyzed using the crossint cross section interpretation program developed by the authors specifically for this study. Field data of fault kinematics from 43 sites were combined with the TLS-derived throw measurements using a modification of the Kostrov equations to calculate the magnitude and directions of the horizontal principle strain-rates. The studied 5 km long portion of the fault has an overall strike of 140°, but has a prominent bend where the strike is 100-140°, where the fault has linked across a former left-stepping relay-zone which had an along strike length of ~600 m and across strike width of ~300 m. Throw-rates defined by TLS-derived profiles across a 15 ±3 ka bedrock fault scarp decrease linearly from 0.95 ±0.025 mm/yr at the fault center through 0.5 ±0.025 mm/yr to zero at the fault tip, except in the position of the prominent bend where throws rates increase by 0.15 ±0.025 mm/yr over a distance of ~1 km. The vertical co-seismic offsets averaged between two palaeoearthquake ruptures that manifest themselves as fresh stripes of rock at the base of

  2. Kinetic Effects on the Stability Properties of Field-reversed Configurations: I. Linear Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Elena V. Belova; Ronald C. Davidson; Hantao Ji; Masaaki Yamada

    2003-01-28

    New computational results are presented which advance the understanding of the stability properties of the Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). We present results of hybrid and two-fluid (Hall-MHD) simulations of prolate FRCs. The n = 1 tilt instability mechanism and growth rate reduction mechanisms are investigated in detail including resonant particle effects, finite Larmor radius and Hall stabilization, and profile effects. It is shown that the Hall effect determines the mode rotation and the change in the linear mode structure in the kinetic regime; however, the reduction in the growth rate is mostly due to finite Larmor radius effects. Resonant wave-particle interactions are studied as a function of (a) elongation, (b) the kinetic parameter S*, which is proportional to the ratio of the separatrix radius to the thermal ion Larmor radius, and (c) the separatrix shape. It is demonstrated that, contrary to the usually assumed stochasticity of the ion orbits in the FRC, a large fraction of the orbits are regular in long configurations when S* is small. A stochasticity condition is found, and a scaling with the S* parameter is presented. Resonant particle effects are shown to maintain the instability in the large gyroradius regime regardless of the separatrix shape.

  3. Frequency conversion in field stabilization system for application in SC cavity of linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipek, Tomasz A.

    2005-09-01

    The paper concerns frequency conversion circuits of electromagnetic field stabilization system in superconductive cavity of linear accelerator. The stabilization system consists of digital part (based on FPGA) and analog part (frequency conversions, ADC/DAC, filters). Frequency conversion circuit is analyzed. The main problem in the frequency conversion for the stabilization system are: linearity of conversion and stability. Also, second order problems are subject of analysis: control of local oscillator parameters and fluctuation of actuated signal (exposing conversion). The following work was done: analysis of individual stage parameters on field stability and external influence, simulation. The work was closed with conclusions of the major frequency conversion parameters for field stabilization. The results have been applied for field stabilization system (RF Feedback System) in TESLA Test Facility 2 and preliminary research on X-Ray Free Electron Laser.

  4. The geomorphic evolution of the lunar surface.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, L. B.

    1972-01-01

    The solution of the function relating craters of the continuous degradation sequence with degree of erosion was defined as the geomorphic index of the area. Studies of the geomorphic index of stratigraphic surfaces show that areas covered by considerable ballistic sediments have a geomorphic index which is not a monotonic function of time. On the other hand, areas covered almost exclusively by mare flooding show an index which is a monotonic function of the age of the flooding. As each mare surface shows a considerable range in indices, it is concluded that maria are covered by surfaces formed through a considerable length of time. By using Apollo 11 and 12 radiometric ages it is suggested that the time of mare flooding lasted on the order of one billion years. The geomorphic index of highland surfaces shows a remarkable degree of order - i.e., the farther an area is inland from the mare shores, the higher will be the index. No explanation is given for this phenomenon, but it is suggested that lunar erosion is not just a localized phenomenon centered on the locus of an impact, but has lateral trends of regional dimensions.

  5. Geomorphic settings of mangrove ecosystem in South Andaman Island: A geospatial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuvaraj, E.; Dharanirajan, K.; Jayakumar, S.; Saravanan

    2014-12-01

    Mangroves are habitats in the coasts of tropics and subtropics, hence the geomorphology of the coast prevails in both the ocean and the land processes. To study the geomorphic setting of mangroves, it is necessary to explore both the topography of the land and the bathymetry of the sea. In this study, the geomorphic setting of mangroves in the South Andaman Island has been studied in detail using remote sensing and GIS technology. The ortho-rectified IRS satellite image was used to identify and to map the mangroves and the associated features using the visual interpretation technique. Using the GIS technique, topographic and bathymetric DEMs (Digital Elevation Models) were created to understand the geomorphology and its influence on the mangrove ecosystem. This DEM was interpreted with mangrove distribution and its associated features to create the DTM (Digital Terrain Model) of the mangrove ecosystem. Topography and bathymetry of the coast result in three dominant features like rivers, tides and waves, which play a role in shaping the geomorphic settings of mangroves, which are classified into five major types. In this study, it is identified that all the five categories of major geomorphic settings of the mangrove community exist in the south Andaman. In the field surveys, ground truth of topographic elevation, mangrove species, and associated coastal land cover features were identified and confirmed in these geomorphic settings. It is concluded that topography and bathymetry settings of the island play an indispensable role in this fragile mangrove ecosystem.

  6. Geomorphic Classification and Assessment of Channel Dynamics in the Missouri National Recreational River, South Dakota and Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Caroline M.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    A multiscale geomorphic classification was established for the 39-mile, 59-mile, and adjacent segments of the Missouri National Recreational River administered by the National Park Service in South Dakota and Nebraska. The objective of the classification was to define naturally occurring clusters of geomorphic characteristics that would be indicative of discrete sets of geomorphic processes, with the intent that such a classification would be useful in river-management and rehabilitation decisions. The statistical classification was based on geomorphic characteristics of the river collected from 1999 orthophotography and the persistence of classified units was evaluated by comparison with similar datasets for 2003 and 2004 and by evaluating variation of bank erosion rates by geomorphic class. Changes in channel location and form were also explored using imagery and maps from 1993-2004, 1941 and 1894. The multivariate classification identified a hierarchy of naturally occurring clusters of reach-scale geomorphic characteristics. The simplest level of the hierarchy divides the river from segments into discrete reaches characterized by single and multithread channels and additional hierarchical levels established 4-part and 10-part classifications. The classification system presents a physical framework that can be applied to prioritization and design of bank stabilization projects, design of habitat rehabilitation projects, and stratification of monitoring and assessment sampling programs.

  7. Geomorphic Surface Maps of Northern Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    2005-08-01

    Large-scale (1:6000) surficial geology maps of northern Frenchman Flat were developed in 1995 as part of comprehensive site characterization required to operate a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in that area. Seven surficial geology maps provide fundamental data on natural processes and are the platform needed to reconstruct the Quaternary history of northern Frenchman Flat. Reconstruction of the Quaternary history provides an understanding of the natural processes that act to develop the landscape, and the time-frames involved in landscape development. The mapping was conducted using color and color-infrared aerial photographs and field verification of map unit composition and boundaries. Criteria for defining the map unit composition of geomorphic surface units are based on relative geomorphic position, landform morphology, and degree of preservation of surface morphology. Seven geomorphic surfaces (Units 1 through 7) are recognized, spanning from the early Quaternary to present time.

  8. Stream pollution concentration in riffle geomorphic units (Yzeron basin, France).

    PubMed

    Namour, Philippe; Schmitt, Laurent; Eschbach, David; Moulin, Bertrand; Fantino, Guillaume; Bordes, Claire; Breil, Pascal

    2015-11-01

    In urbanized areas, small streams can be greatly damaged by urban inflows and combined sewer overflows. These polluted inputs can be several times higher than the natural stream flow over short time periods. Sound knowledge of the spatial distribution of the discharged pollutants in sediments is therefore crucial for designing monitoring strategies and suitable remediation operations. This field study combines geomorphic characterization, hydraulic conductivity measurement and pollutant assays in sediments of a small suburban river. The study site was divided up into geomorphic units: riffles, pools and runs. The last two were grouped into one class named "pool-runs" owing to their closely similar open channel flow hydraulics. Benthic and hyporheic sediments were sampled at 2m intervals. Conventional particulate pollutants (Cr, Pb, N(org), P(tot) & C(org)) were assayed in samples. The main result was: pollutants were not randomly distributed in the stream sediments, but their location showed clear concentration differences by geomorphic units, with preferential accumulation in the hyporheic zones of riffle units and a lesser one in the hyporheic zones of pools. A decrease in hydraulic conductivity was significantly correlated with an increase in pollutant concentration. This occurred mainly at the transition between riffles and pool units. The down-welling water fluxes in the sediment calculated using Darcy's formula reflect this slowdown. Our findings highlight the need to take into account the geomorphological and hydrological functioning of a stream to accurately locate the biogeochemical hotspots to be treated and thereby develop more relevant monitoring and remediation methodologies. PMID:26057727

  9. Slope stability improvement using low intensity field electrosmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armillotta, Pasquale

    2014-05-01

    The electrosmosis technique has been introduced in the past for slope stabilization. However, its application to real cases has been scarce due to several drawbacks mostly related to the high intensity electric field needed (1.0 V/cm or higher): the rapid degradation of the electrodes, the high system management cost, the heating and cracking of the soil and the reduction of its colloidal fraction. Thanks to the introduction of new materials, the technique is currently applied to decrease the consolidation time of saturated clay soils (forcing the elimination of water), consequently improving its mechanical strength. In clay soils, the volume variation is influenced by the presence of smectites. The clay compressibility decreases with the increasing of electrolytes concentration. Soil containing smectites that have interacted with calcium showed a reduction or the absence of swelling during hydration with distilled water and a positive increase of their shear strength. The different values of pH between the anode (acid) and the cathode (basic), induced by the electrosmosis create the conditions for the precipitation of CaCO3 near the cathode. The injection of solutions containing calcium in soils and their diffusion induced by the electrosmosis, lead to calcium precipitation and consequential increase of the shear strength. The material technological advances and the laboratory experiences described in this paper, demonstrate that the use low electric field (0.1 V/cm or lower) intensity electrosmosis (LEFE in acronym) can be effective for soil dewatering and shear strength increase while reducing its adverse effect. The LEFE can be used to: reduce the potential for swelling of active clay minerals through the introduction of ions and the precipitation of hardening substances; induce the "dewatering" in cohesive soils. Several Lab activities were carried out, using custom made electrosmosis equipment. These activities can be divided in two phases: Phase 1

  10. The Geomorphic Effectiveness of a Woody Shrub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, R.; Schmidt, J. C.; Wheaton, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Vegetation plays a fundamental role in controlling channel form and influencing channel processes. Experimental work has shown that stem density, stem spacing, relative submergence, and stem flexibility are key indicators of the effectiveness of vegetation in altering the flow field. These parameters are likely to be species dependent and change over time as vegetation grows, dies back and is replaced by late successional species. Thus, the role of vegetation is highly variable in both space and time. Capturing this variability is essential in understanding how vegetation controls channel processes. Here, we investigate the spatial and temporal variability of stand characteristics (i.e. stem density and spacing) for the non-native riparian shrub, Tamarix spp. In the Colorado River basin, Tamarix dominates large portions of the riparian corridor. Tamarix is capable of establishing rapidly and in dense stands and as such been implicated in enhancing channel changes observed during the last century. However, questions relating to Tamarix’s role relative to other pervasive environmental changes necessitate a robust way to capture the effectiveness of Tamarix in altering the flow field and inducing deposition. We focus on the stand structure of aging Tamarix stands in order to relate Tamarix life-history to hydrodynamic roughness. High resolution terrestrial laser scans (TLS) were collected for Tamarix patches (10-15 m2) on different geomorphic surfaces (i.e. gravel bar, disconnected floodplain) and ages (5-60 years). Stem frontal area at varying depths was calculated from the scans over the patch and for the patch as a whole. We used Telemac 2D to evaluate how the stem density and spacing influence flow characteristics, such as drag on the stems and Froude number. To do this, the representative stem density and spacing was translated into cylindrical elements on a flat (i.e no topography) mesh. Elevation above the channel influences stand density. For example, a 20

  11. Stability of self-gravitating homogeneous spheroid with azimuthal magnetic field. I

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, V.A.; Zheleznyak, O.A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of a frozen magnetic field on the stability of a self-gravitating homogeneous spheroid with respect to a deformation that transforms it into a triaxial ellipsoid is investigated. It is shown that an azimuthal magnetic field is a stabilizing factor, allowing the spheroid to be stable at e > e/sub cr/ = 0.95285.

  12. Methodology for Developing a Crop Yield Stability Map for a Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This abstract will summarize the methodology used to develop a yield stability map for a field. We proposed that there exist yield stability patters for commercial field crop production which growers can use to optimize crop production while minimizing inputs. The methodology uses multiple years o...

  13. Geomorphic Evidence for Martian Ground Ice and Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanner, L. C.; Allen, C. C.; Bell, M. S.

    2004-01-01

    Recent results from gamma-ray and neutron spectrometers on Mars Odyssey indicate the presence of a hydrogen-rich layer tens of centimeters thick in the uppermost meter in high latitudes (>60 ) on Mars. This hydrogen-rich layer correlates to regions of ice stability. Thus, the subsurface hydrogen is thought to be water ice constituting 35+/- 15% by weight near the north and south polar regions. We refine the location of subsurface ice deposits at a < km scale by combining existing spectroscopy data with surface features indicative of subsurface ice. A positive correlation between spectroscopy data and geomorphic ice indicators has been previously suggested for high latitudes. Here we expand the comparative study to northern mid latitudes (30 deg.N- 65 deg.N).

  14. Downstream ecological effects of dams: A geomorphic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Ligon, F.K.; Dietrich, W.E.; Trush, W.J.

    1995-03-01

    The damming of a river changes the flow of water, sediment, nutrients, energy, and biota, interrupting and altering most of a river`s ecological processes. This article discusses the importance of geomorphological analysis in river conservation and management. To illustrate how subtle geomorphological adjustments may profoundly influence the ecological relationships downstream from dames, three case studies are presented. Then a geomorphically based approach for assessing and possibly mitigating some of the environmental effects of dams by tailoring dam designed and operation is outlined. The cases are as follows: channel simplification and salmon decline on the McKenzie River in Oregon; Channel incision and reduced floodplain inundation on the Oconee river in Georgia; Increased stability of a braided river in New Zealand`s south island. 41 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Geomorphic Evidence for Martian Ground Ice and Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanner, L. C.; Allen, C. C.; Bell, M. S.

    2004-01-01

    Recent results from gamma-ray and neutron spectrometers on Mars Odyssey indicate the presence of a hydrogen-rich layer tens of centimeters thick in the uppermost meter in high latitudes (greater than 60) on Mars. This hydrogen-rich layer correlates to regions of ice stability. Thus, the subsurface hydrogen is thought to be water ice constituting 35 plus or minus 15% by weight near the north and south polar regions. We refine the location of subsurface ice deposits at a less than km scale by combining existing spectroscopy data with surface features indicative of subsurface ice. A positive correlation between spectroscopy data and geomorphic ice indicators has been previously suggested for high latitudes. Here we expand the comparative study to northern mid latitudes (30 degrees N- 65 degrees N).

  16. Influence of mechanical force field on the electromechanical stability of dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanju; Liu, Liwu; Leng, Jinsong

    2009-12-01

    Arbitrary free energy functions, as is proposed by Zhao and Suo, can be applied to analyze the electromechanical stability of the dielectric elastomer. To study the electromechanical stability of mechanical force field placed on dielectric elastomer, variable free energy functions are applied to analyze the mechanical performance of dielectric elastomer. The relation among critical nominal electric field, critical real electric field, nominal stress and mechanical force field is derived, which agrees well with the experimental results. Such a result is capable of understanding better the stability conditions of dielectric elastomers and furthermore guiding the design and manufacture of sensors and actuators based on dielectric elastomers.

  17. Influence of mechanical force field on the electromechanical stability of dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanju; Liu, Liwu; Leng, Jinsong

    2010-03-01

    Arbitrary free energy functions, as is proposed by Zhao and Suo, can be applied to analyze the electromechanical stability of the dielectric elastomer. To study the electromechanical stability of mechanical force field placed on dielectric elastomer, variable free energy functions are applied to analyze the mechanical performance of dielectric elastomer. The relation among critical nominal electric field, critical real electric field, nominal stress and mechanical force field is derived, which agrees well with the experimental results. Such a result is capable of understanding better the stability conditions of dielectric elastomers and furthermore guiding the design and manufacture of sensors and actuators based on dielectric elastomers.

  18. Geomorphic Map of Worcester County, Maryland, Interpreted from a LIDAR-Based, Digital Elevation Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newell, Wayne L.; Clark, Inga

    2008-01-01

    A recently compiled mosaic of a LIDAR-based digital elevation model (DEM) is presented with geomorphic analysis of new macro-topographic details. The geologic framework of the surficial and near surface late Cenozoic deposits of the central uplands, Pocomoke River valley, and the Atlantic Coast includes Cenozoic to recent sediments from fluvial, estuarine, and littoral depositional environments. Extensive Pleistocene (cold climate) sandy dune fields are deposited over much of the terraced landscape. The macro details from the LIDAR image reveal 2 meter-scale resolution of details of the shapes of individual dunes, and fields of translocated sand sheets. Most terrace surfaces are overprinted with circular to elliptical rimmed basins that represent complex histories of ephemeral ponds that were formed, drained, and overprinted by younger basins. The terrains of composite ephemeral ponds and the dune fields are inter-shingled at their margins indicating contemporaneous erosion, deposition, and re-arrangement and possible internal deformation of the surficial deposits. The aggregate of these landform details and their deposits are interpreted as the products of arid, cold climate processes that were common to the mid-Atlantic region during the Last Glacial Maximum. In the Pocomoke valley and its larger tributaries, erosional remnants of sandy flood plains with anastomosing channels indicate the dynamics of former hydrology and sediment load of the watershed that prevailed at the end of the Pleistocene. As the climate warmed and precipitation increased during the transition from late Pleistocene to Holocene, dune fields were stabilized by vegetation, and the stream discharge increased. The increased discharge and greater local relief of streams graded to lower sea levels stimulated down cutting and created the deeply incised valleys out onto the continental shelf. These incised valleys have been filling with fluvial to intertidal deposits that record the rising sea

  19. The efficacy of stream power and flow duration on geomorphic responses to catastrophic flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magilligan, F. J.; Buraas, E. M.; Renshaw, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Geomorphologists have long studied the impacts of extreme floods, yet the association between the magnitude of flow parameters (discharge, velocity, shear stress, or stream power) and resulting geomorphic effectiveness remains vague and non-deterministic. Attempts have been made to include flow duration and total expenditure of stream power, in combination with peak unit stream power, as important variables, but there has been minimal exploration of this hydraulic combination. Taking advantage of Tropical Storm Irene's rapid track through eastern Vermont (USA) in late summer 2011, this paper presents the array of geomorphic responses to a short duration (time to peak of < 8 h) but high magnitude flood that was the twentieth century flood of record for numerous watersheds. We present herein the geomorphic imprint of Tropical Storm Irene flooding within a larger context of fluvial theory concerning the role of, and trade-off between, the magnitude of energy expenditure during a flood and its duration. Focusing on a detailed field effort within the 187-km2 Saxtons River basin in southeastern VT, augmented by select sites along the adjacent lower gradient Williams River (291-km2), we elucidate (1) the geomorphic effects of a short duration flood in a humid, well-vegetated landscape; (2) the relationship between geomorphic response and (a) peak stream power, (b) total stream power, and (c) flow duration of stream power above a critical threshold; and (3) the spatial variation of geomorphic effects relative to reach-scale geologic and geomorphic controls. Flooding associated with Tropical Storm Irene ranged from the 1000 year recurrence interval (RI) flood (based on Weibull flood frequency analysis) to the 300 year RI flood (log Pearson Type III). Discharges spawned a peak unit stream power of 712 W/m2 (Saxtons River) and 361 W/m2 (Williams River), with total energy expenditure throughout the event of ~ 16,000 × 103 and 15,000 × 103 J, respectively. For the Saxtons

  20. Geomorphic evidence for ancient seas on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Timothy J.; Schneeberger, Dale M.; Pieri, David C.; Saunders, R. Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Geomorphic evidence is presented for ancient seas on Mars. Several features, similar to terrestrial lacustrine and coastal features, were identified along the northern plains periphery from Viking images. The nature of these features argues for formation in a predominantly liquid, shallow body of standing water. Such a shallow sea would require either relatively rapid development of shoreline morphologies or a warmer than present climate at the time of outflow channel formation.

  1. Slip distributions on active normal faults measured from LiDAR and field mapping of geomorphic offsets: an example from L'Aquila, Italy, and implications for modelling seismic moment release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Maxwell; Roberts, Gerald P.; McCaffrey, Ken; Cowie, Patience A.; Faure Walker, Joanna P.; Papanikolaou, Ioannis; Phillips, Richard J.; Michetti, Alessandro Maria; Vittori, Eutizio; Gregory, Laura; Wedmore, Luke; Watson, Zoë K.

    2015-05-01

    Surface slip distributions for an active normal fault in central Italy have been measured using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), in order to assess the impact of changes in fault orientation and kinematics when modelling subsurface slip distributions that control seismic moment release. The southeastern segment of the surface trace of the Campo Felice active normal fault near the city of L'Aquila was mapped and surveyed using techniques from structural geology and using TLS to define the vertical and horizontal offsets of geomorphic slopes since the last glacial maximum (15 ± 3 ka). The fault geometry and kinematics measured from 43 sites and throw/heave measurements from geomorphic offsets seen on 250 scarp profiles were analysed using a modification of the Kostrov equations to calculate the magnitudes and directions of horizontal principal strain-rates. The map trace of the studied fault is linear, except where a prominent bend has formed to link across a former left-stepping relay-zone. The dip of the fault and slip direction are constant across the bend. Throw-rates since 15 ± 3 ka decrease linearly from the fault centre to the tip, except in the location of the prominent bend where higher throw rates are recorded. Vertical coseismic offsets for two palaeo earthquake ruptures seen as fresh strips of rock at the base of the bedrock scarp also increase within the prominent bend. The principal strain-rate, calculated by combining strike, dip, slip-direction and post 15 ± 3 ka throw rate, decreases linearly from the fault centre towards the tip; the strain-rate does not increase across the prominent fault bend. The above shows that changes in fault strike, whilst having no effect on the principal horizontal strain-rate, can produce local maxima in throw-rates during single earthquakes that persist over the timescale of multiple earthquakes (15 ± 3 ka). Detailed geomorphological and structural characterisation of active faults is therefore a critical

  2. Stabilization of single-electron pumps by high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, J. D.; Kataoka, M.; Giblin, S. P.; Park, Sunghun; Sim, H.-S.; See, P.; Ritchie, D. A.; Griffiths, J. P.; Jones, G. A. C.; Beere, H. E.; Janssen, T. J. B. M.

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally how magnetic fields influence the single-electron tunneling dynamics in electron pumps, giving a massively enhanced quantization accuracy and providing a route to a quantum current standard based on the elementary charge. The field dependence is explained by two effects: field-induced changes in the sensitivity of tunneling rates to the barrier potential and the suppression of nonadiabatic excitations due to a reduced sensitivity of the Fock-Darwin states to the electrostatic potential. These effects lead to a continued improvement in quantisation accuracy at high field which is important for applications in metrology.

  3. Phase stabilized homodyne of infrared scattering type scanning near-field optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaoji G.; Gilburd, Leonid; Walker, Gilbert C.

    2014-12-29

    Scattering type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) allows sub diffraction limited spatial resolution. Interferometric homodyne detection in s-SNOM can amplify the signal and extract vibrational responses based on sample absorption. A stable reference phase is required for a high quality homodyne-detected near-field signal. This work presents the development of a phase stabilization mechanism for s-SNOM to provide stable homodyne conditions. The phase stability is found to be better than 0.05 rad for the mid infrared light source. Phase stabilization results in improved near field images and vibrational spectroscopies. Spatial inhomogeneities of the boron nitride nanotubes are measured and compared.

  4. Nonlinear stability of surface waves in magnetic fluids: effect of a periodic tangential magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dib, Yusry O.

    1993-04-01

    Nonlinear wave propagation on the surface between two superposed magnetic fluids stressed by a tangential periodic magnetic field is investigated using the method of multiple scales. A stability analysis reveals the existence of both nonresonant and resonant cases. From the solvability conditions, three types of nonlinear Schrodinger equation are obtained. The necessary and sufficient conditions for stability are obtained in each case. Formulae for the surface elevation are also obtained in both the non-resonant and the resonant cases. It is found from the numerical calculation that the tangential periodic magnetic field plays a dual role in the stability criterion, while the field frequency has a destabilizing influence.

  5. IT Field Provides Some Stability for Workers Changing Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Peg

    2011-01-01

    When it comes to curriculum, certifying and training, no industry is more challenged to keep current than the information technology field (IT). IT industry professionals experience constant changes in computer software and hardware. As one of the top fields listed nationally, IT training programs are thriving at the Warren County Career Center…

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of cylindrical liquid bridges under a uniform axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolás, J. A.

    1992-11-01

    The effect of a uniform axial magnetic field on the stability of cylindrical liquid bridges of negligible viscosity and resistivity is examined in this paper, in the limit case when magnetic forces dominate inertia forces. The analysis yields the bifurcation curve and the growth factor in the neighborhood of the stability limit points as a function of two dimensionless parameters: Λ, the slenderness of the bridge and M, a nondimensional quantity proportional to the magnetic field. It is found that bridges of any slenderness can be stabilized by magnetic fields when M≳1/√2. The results are compared to those existing for capillary liquid jets, showing that the stability curves coincide and that the stabilizing effects are greater for liquid bridges than for infinite columns.

  7. Examples of geomorphic reclamation on mined lands in Spain by using the GeoFluv method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Duque, José F.; Bugosh, Nicholas; de Francisco, Cristina; Hernando, Néstor; Martín, Cristina; Nicolau, José M.; Nyssen, Sara; Tejedor, María; Zapico, Ignacio

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes seven examples of geomorphic reclamation on mined lands of Spain, as solutions for complex environmental problems, by using the GeoFluv method through the Natural Regrade software (Carlson). Of these seven examples, four of them have been partially or totally constructed. Each of them has its own particularities and contributions, becoming innovative geomorphic solutions to existing environmental (ecological, social and economic) problems. The Quebraderos de la Serrana example (Toledo province) allowed a local company to get permission for slate quarrying in a highly ecologically vulnerable area; before that, the permission for extracting rocks had been rejected with a conventional reclamation approach. The Somolinos case is, to this date, the most complete geomorphic reclamation in Spain, and the first one in Europe to have been built by using the GeoFluv method. This restoration has healed a degraded area of about six hectares at the outskirts of the Somolinos hamlet, in a valuable rural landscape of the Guadalajara province. The Arlanza example (Leon province) shows a design which proposes to restore the hydrological connectivity of a coal mine dump which blocked a valley. The Machorro and María Jose examples (Guadalajara province) are allowing kaolin mining to be compatible with the preservation of protected areas at the edge of the Upper Tagus Natural Park (UTNP), in highly vulnerable conditions for water erosion. The Campredó case (Tarragona province) shows an agreement between a mining company, the academia, and the Catalonian Agency of Water, to combine a high standard of geomorphic reclamation with solving problems caused by flooding downstream of a clay mining area. Finally, the Nuria example is also located at the UTNP area; the goals here are to stabilize a large landslide in a waste dump and to minimize the risk of occurrence of flash floods from mining ponds. Additional information on these examples and about the state of art of

  8. Necessary stability condition for field-reversed theta pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J. R.

    1981-03-01

    Toroidal systems of arbitrary cross section without toroidal magnetic field are analyzed via the double adiabatic fluid equations. Such systems are shown to be unstable if there exists one closed field line on which the average of kapparB/sup 2/ is positive, where kappa is the curvature. A similar criterion is derived for linear systems and is applied to a noncircular z-pinch.

  9. Wake fields, potential well distortion and beam stability in the LER PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.A.

    1996-02-01

    Longitudinal and transverse wake fields are constructed for LER PEP-II. The effects of potential well distortion and the single bunch longitudinal stability are discussed for LER PEP-II storage ring. The coupled-bunch stability recalculated with the updated impedance.

  10. Temporal stability of estimated soil water flux patterns across agricultural fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When a field or a small watershed is repeatedly surveyed for soil water content, sites often can be spotted where soil is consistently wetter or consistently dryer than average across the study area. This phenomenon has been called time stability, temporal stability, temporal persistence, or rank st...

  11. Influence of a magnetic field on the pulsational stability of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strothers, R.

    1979-01-01

    Under certain simplifying assumptions the influence of a magnetic field on the pulsational stability of stars has been investigated, with a particular application to the problem of the stability of upper-main-sequence stars. It has been found that, if the magnetic field averaged over a spherical shell is either constant at all layers or distributed such that nu, the ratio of magnetic to thermodynamic pressure, is constant at all layers, the critical mass for stability against nuclear-energized pulsations is virtually unaffected by the presence of the field. On the other hand, if the field is strong in the envelope but weak in the core of the star, the critical mass is considerably increased; when nu exceeds about 0.1 in the envelope, stability is attained at all masses.

  12. Visual field influence on manual roll and pitch stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.-K.; Young, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    Human control performance in nulling perceived tilt angles was investigated for combinations of pseudo-random vestibular disturbances and different waveforms of low frequency wide visual field motions. For both roll and pitch axes, subjects tilted the trainer in which they were seated in the direction of field rotation. This visual bias was much stronger for pitch backwards with upward field rotation. Frequency response analysis showed the dominance of visual cues at low frequencies (below 0.06 Hz) and the reliance on vestibular information in the high frequency range for both axes. Models suggest that operator balancing responses at high frequencies are mainly processed by the semicircular canals rather than the otolith organs. The results also suggest that the subject tends to rely less on the otolith organs for pitch perception than for roll.

  13. High Volume Manufacturing and Field Stability of MEMS Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jack

    Low volume MEMS/NEMS production is practical when an attractive concept is implemented with business, manufacturing, packaging, and test support. Moving beyond this to high volume production adds requirements on design, process control, quality, product stability, market size, market maturity, capital investment, and business systems. In a broad sense, this chapter uses a case study approach: It describes and compares the silicon-based MEMS accelerometers, pressure sensors, image projection systems, and gyroscopes that are in high volume production. Although they serve several markets, these businesses have common characteristics. For example, the manufacturing lines use automated semiconductor equipment and standard material sets to make consistent products in large quantities. Standard, well controlled processes are sometimes modified for a MEMS product. However, novel processes that cannot run with standard equipment and material sets are avoided when possible. This reliance on semiconductor tools, as well as the organizational practices required to manufacture clean, particle-free products partially explains why the MEMS market leaders are integrated circuit manufacturers. There are other factors. MEMS and NEMS are enabling technologies, so it can take several years for high volume applications to develop. Indeed, market size is usually a strong function of price. This becomes a vicious circle, because low price requires low cost - a result that is normally achieved only after a product is in high volume production. During the early years, IC companies reduced cost and financial risk by using existing facilities for low volume MEMS production. As a result, product architectures are partially determined by capabilities developed for previous products. This chapter includes a discussion of MEMS product architecture with particular attention to the impact of electronic integration, packaging, and surfaces. Packaging and testing are critical, because they are

  14. High Volume Manufacturing and Field Stability of MEMS Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jack

    Low volume MEMS/NEMS production is practical when an attractive concept is implemented with business, manufacturing, packaging, and test support. Moving beyond this to high volume production adds requirements on design, process control, quality, product stability, market size, market maturity, capital investment, and business systems. In a broad sense, this chapter uses a case study approach: It describes and compares the silicon-based MEMS accelerometers, pressure sensors, image projection systems, and gyroscopes that are in high volume production. Although they serve several markets, these businesses have common characteristics. For example, the manufacturing lines use automated semiconductor equipment and standard material sets to make consistent products in large quantities. Standard, well controlled processes are sometimes modified for a MEMS product. However, novel processes that cannot run with standard equipment and material sets are avoided when possible. This reliance on semiconductor tools, as well as the organizational practices required to manufacture clean, particle-free products partially explains why the MEMS market leaders are integrated circuit manufacturers. There are other factors. MEMS and NEMS are enabling technologies, so it can take several years for high volume applications to develop. Indeed, market size is usually a strong function of price. This becomes a vicious circle, because low price requires low cost - a result that is normally achieved only after a product is in high volume production. During the early years, IC companies reduced cost and financial risk by using existing facilities for low volume MEMS production. As a result, product architectures are partially determined by capabilities developed for previous products. This chapter includes a discussion of MEMS product architecture with particular attention to the impact of electronic integration, packaging, and surfaces. Packaging and testing are critical, because they are

  15. Geomorphic process fingerprints in submarine canyons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Daniel S.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Andrews, Brian D.; Chaytor, Jason D.; Twichell, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Submarine canyons are common features of continental margins worldwide. They are conduits that funnel vast quantities of sediment from the continents to the deep sea. Though it is known that submarine canyons form primarily from erosion induced by submarine sediment flows, we currently lack quantitative, empirically based expressions that describe the morphology of submarine canyon networks. Multibeam bathymetry data along the entire passive US Atlantic margin (USAM) and along the active central California margin near Monterey Bay provide an opportunity to examine the fine-scale morphology of 171 slope-sourced canyons. Log–log regression analyses of canyon thalweg gradient (S) versus up-canyon catchment area (A) are used to examine linkages between morphological domains and the generation and evolution of submarine sediment flows. For example, canyon reaches of the upper continental slope are characterized by steep, linear and/or convex longitudinal profiles, whereas reaches farther down canyon have distinctly concave longitudinal profiles. The transition between these geomorphic domains is inferred to represent the downslope transformation of debris flows into erosive, canyon-flushing turbidity flows. Over geologic timescales this process appears to leave behind a predictable geomorphic fingerprint that is dependent on the catchment area of the canyon head. Catchment area, in turn, may be a proxy for the volume of sediment released during geomorphically significant failures along the upper continental slope. Focused studies of slope-sourced submarine canyons may provide new insights into the relationships between fine-scale canyon morphology and down-canyon changes in sediment flow dynamics.

  16. Characterizing physical habitats in rivers using map-derived drivers of fluvial geomorphic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzi, Simone; Lerner, David N.

    2012-10-01

    New understanding of fluvial geomorphological processes has successfully informed flood mitigation strategies and rehabilitation schemes in recent years. However well established geomorphological assessments are location-specific and demanding in terms of resource and expertise required, and their routine application for regional or national river characterization, although desirable, is unlikely at present. This paper proposes a framework based on GIS procedures, empirical relationships and the self organized map for the analysis and classification of map-derived drivers of fluvial morphological processes. The geomorphic controls analysed are: channel gradient and hydrology, specific stream power, river order and floodplain extent. The case study is a gravel bed river in England. Using the self organized map, we analyse patterns of these controls along the river longitudinal profile and identify clusters of similar configuration. The reciprocal relationships that emerge amongst the geomorphic controls reflect the hierarchical nature of fluvial systems and are consistent with the current theoretical understanding of fluvial processes. Field observations from the River Habitat Survey are used to prove the influence of geomorphic drivers on reach-scale morphological forms. Six clusters are identified which describe six distinctive channel types. These proved to be characterized by distinctive configurations of geomorphic drivers and specific sets of physical habitat features. The method successfully characterizes the notable transitions in channel character along the river course. The framework is suitable for regional or national scale assessments through automatic GIS and statistical procedures with moderate effort.

  17. Displaying and evaluating engineering properties and natural hazards using geomorphic mapping techniques: Telluride, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawan, I.; Giardino, J.R.; Tchakerian, V.P. . Geography Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Telluride, located in the San Juan mountains of southwestern Colorado, is situated in a glacially carved, fluvially modified alpine valley. Today this chic setting is experiencing rapid urban development resulting from flourishing tourist traffic during both the winter ski season and the summer vacation period. A new development, Mountain Village, is being built on an extensive and complex landslide that has only received superficial scrutiny. Recent fast growth is placing considerable pressure on pristine, undeveloped land. This timely quandary incorporates the interaction between prospective development, geomorphic processes, engineering factors, economic feasibility, and landuse adjudication. In an attempt to respond to these issues the State of Colorado enacted Senate Bill 35 (1972) and House Bills 1034 (1974) and 1041 (1974), all mandating assessment of the natural hazards of an area, preparatory to development. The key to evaluating the natural hazards is to comprehend the geomorphic processes. The area is highly-faulted with associated mineralization. Whereas the upper slopes are composed of massive rhyodacitic-tuff breccias and flows, the valley is sculpted from shales, sandstones, and conglomerates. Several periods of glaciation occurred in the area. Glacial till, talus slopes, avalanche chutes and cones, rock glaciers, alluvium, and landslides have been identified in the field and mapped on aerial photographs. Many of the slopes in the area are active. The authors have constructed a geomorphic map (1:12,500) that shows geology, landforms, geomorphic processes and engineering properties. This map can be used by regulatory agencies in identifying areas of natural hazards potentially sensitive to development.

  18. [How to assess the stability of glaucoma? Visual field].

    PubMed

    Nordmann, J-P

    2006-05-01

    Visual field results are subject to fluctuations in glaucoma and it is important to evaluate them to differentiate fluctuation and progression. Three visual fields are thus required for the determination of progression because of these short or long term fluctuations. During each measurement, some points are tested twice in order to assess short term fluctuation. Other fluctuations are simply due to technical difficulties like a change of position of the head from one examination to the next one. Learning effect is in fact the more important factor which may improve results. However some real long term fluctuations exist, mainly as a function of the general health of the patient. Progression of the visual field is usually assessed by subjective analysis of the fields with an evaluation of the intensity and the size of scotomas and a comparison of global indices. A more objective analysis can be obtain by the use of specific programs like the "Glaucoma Progression Analysis" with the Humphrey Perimeter or the "Progressor" with the Octopus Perimeter. PMID:17072217

  19. Using optical soliton stability for magnetic field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şchiopu, IonuÅ£ Romeo; ǎgulinescu, Andrei, Dr; Marinescu, Andrei

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we propose a novel optical method for measuring the circular magnetic field. In practice, many situations may appear in which there are difficulties in measuring the magnetic field, as inside coils, motors etc., where the magnetic field lines are circular or elliptical. The proposed method, applied for measuring the current on high voltage lines, strongly benefits from the advantages that it offers as compared to classical solutions based on the inductive principle. Some of the advantages of optoelectronic and optic measurement methods have a real importance. These advantages consist in: avoiding the use of energy intensive materials (Cu, Fe etc.), reducing the weight of the measuring system, reducing at the minimum the fire danger due to the use of paper-oil insulation in high voltage devices etc. The novelty of our proposed method consists in using the electromagnetic radiation in ultrashort pulses, having a relatively large frequency band and a much improved resistance to external perturbations, for measuring the circular magnetic field generated from the current of high voltage lines, inside power transformers or high power motors.

  20. Improved field emission stability from single-walled carbon nanotubes chemically attached to silicon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the simple fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field emission electrode which shows excellent field emission characteristics and remarkable field emission stability without requiring posttreatment. Chemically functionalized SWCNTs were chemically attached to a silicon substrate. The chemical attachment led to vertical alignment of SWCNTs on the surface. Field emission sweeps and Fowler-Nordheim plots showed that the Si-SWCNT electrodes field emit with a low turn-on electric field of 1.5 V μm−1 and high electric field enhancement factor of 3,965. The Si-SWCNT electrodes were shown to maintain a current density of >740 μA cm−2 for 15 h with negligible change in applied voltage. The results indicate that adhesion strength between the SWCNTs and substrate is a much greater factor in field emission stability than previously reported. PMID:22853557

  1. Dependence of effective internal field of congruent lithium niobate on its domain configuration and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ranjit E-mail: souvik2cat@gmail.com Ghosh, Souvik E-mail: souvik2cat@gmail.com Chakraborty, Rajib E-mail: souvik2cat@gmail.com

    2014-06-28

    Congruent lithium niobate is characterized by its internal field, which arises due to defect clusters within the crystal. Here, it is shown experimentally that this internal field is a function of the molecular configuration in a particular domain and also on the stability of that particular configuration. The measurements of internal field are done using interferometric technique, while the variation of domain configuration is brought about by room temperature high voltage electric field poling.

  2. HRC and WFC Flat Fields: Dispersors, Anomalies, and Photometric Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, R. C.; Hartig, G.

    2002-03-01

    The ACS has a prism PR200L that covers the 2000-4000A region on HRC and a grism G800L that covers 5500-11000A on both HRC and WFC. The flat field for the UV prism is largely wavelength independent, while the strong wavelength dependence of the G800L Lflat structure requires a flat field correction scheme based on a data cube of monochromatic flats. Our suggested correction scheme reduces the L-flat residual structure below 1% rms over most of the wavelength range. Various anomalies in the UV polarizing flats and the F892N+POLV flats are described and solutions proposed. The repeatability of the LP-flats is quantified. Solutions are proposed for single step random variation in the filter wheel positions.

  3. Assessing significant geomorphic changes and effectiveness of dynamic restoration in a coastal dune ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Ian J.; Eamer, Jordan B. R.; Darke, Ian B.

    2013-10-01

    A shift from restoring coastal dunes as stabilized landscapes toward more morphodynamic ecosystems is underway. This paper uses results from a recent case study where invasive vegetation was removed from a coastal dune complex in western Canada as a first step in a dynamic ecosystem restoration project. Spatial statistical methods, used in the natural sciences to quantify patterns of significant spatial-temporal changes, are reviewed and the local Moran's Ii spatial autocorrelation statistic is explored for detecting and assessing significant changes. Cluster maps of positive (depositional) and negative (erosional) changes were used to derive statistically significant volumetric changes within discrete geomorphic units (beach, foredune, transgressive dune) over one year following vegetation removal. All units experienced net increases in sediment budgets compared to a pre-restoration surface. The beach experienced the highest episodic erosion and volumetric change and greatest net annual sediment budget. Compared to the beach, the annual sediment budget of the foredune was 19% whereas the transgressive dune was 33%. The foredune recovered rapidly to initial erosion during restoration and subsequent natural events with consistently positive sediment volumes and attained a form similar to that pre-restoration. Aeolian deflation and sand bypassing through the foredune was greatest in the two months following vegetation removal and peak accretion in the transgressive dune resulted from depositional lobes extending from the foredune, smaller dunes migrating within the complex, and growth of a precipitation ridge along the eastern margin. Several methodological and logistical considerations for detecting significant change in dynamic dune landscapes are discussed including sampling strategy design, data normalization and control measures, and incorporating uncertainty and inherent spatial relations within acquired datasets to ensure accuracy and comparability of results

  4. Log Distribution, Persistence, and Geomorphic Function in Streams and Rivers, in the Northeastern U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Pierre, L.; Burchsted, D.; Warren, D.

    2015-12-01

    Large wood provides critical ecosystem services such as fish habitat, temperature regulation and bank stabilization. In the northeastern U.S., the distribution of large wood is documented; however, there is little understanding of the movement, longevity and geomorphic function. This research examines the hypothesis that tree species control the persistence and geomorphic function of instream wood in the Appalachian region of the northeastern U.S. To do this, we assessed size, location, and species of logs in New Hampshire rivers, including locations in the White Mountain National Forest (WMNF) where these data were collected ten years ago. We expanded the previous dataset to include assessment of geomorphic function, including creation of diversion channels, pool formation, and sediment storage, among others. We also added new sites in the WMNF and sites on a large rural river in southwestern NH to increase the range of geomorphic variables to now include: confined and unconfined channels; 1st to 4th order streams; low to high gradient; meandering, multithreaded, and straight channels; and land use such as historic logging, modern agriculture, and post-agricultural abandonment. At each study site, we located all large logs (>10cm diameter, > 1m length) and log jams (>3 accumulated logs that provide a geomorphic function) along 100m-700m reaches. We marked each identified log with a numbered tag and recorded species, diameter, length, orientation, GPS location, tag number, and photographs. We assessed function and accumulation, decay, stability, and source classes for each log. Along each reach we measured riparian forest composition and structure and channel width. Preliminary analysis suggests that tree species significantly affects the function of logs: yellow birch and American sycamore are highly represented. Additionally, geomorphic setting also plays a primary role, where unconfined reaches have large logs that provide important functions; those functions

  5. DC link stabilized field oriented control of electric propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhoff, S.D.; Corzine, K.A.; Glover, S.F.; Hegner, H.J.; Robey, H.N. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Induction motor based electric propulsion systems can be used in a wide variety of applications including locomotives, hybrid electric vehicles, and ships. Field oriented control of these drives is attractive since it allows the torque to be tightly and nearly instantaneously controlled. However, such systems can be prone to negative impedance instability of the DC link. This paper examines this type of instability and sets forth a readily implemented albeit nonlinear control strategy to mitigate this potential problem.

  6. Geomorphic Analysis Supporting Restoration of the Walker River, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, J. W.; Echterling, C.; Majerova, M.; Wilcock, P.

    2012-12-01

    Agricultural water diversions have degraded the Walker River, Nevada, and have led to a reduction of water level at its terminus, Walker Lake. The geomorphic response of the river to water reallocation is an important issue associated with restoration of the system. To address this issue, we performed a geomorphic assessment of the portions of the river passing through the two main agricultural valleys in the watershed, Smith and Mason Valleys, Nevada. The project involved field data collection, analysis of remotely sensed data, and numerical modeling. Fieldwork focused primarily on characterizing bed and bank sediment grain size distributions and on delineating geomorphically similar reaches. The remote sensing analysis used LiDAR and air photograph mosaics from 1938, 1950, 1996, 1999, and 2006 to quantify historic changes in the active channel geometry and to identify banks that represent potential sediment sources or sinks. Polygons representing in-channel features (here defined as the scoured region between vegetation lines) were delineated by hand on each photograph. Channel centerlines were then derived from this data set and were used to identify locations of active channel movement by measuring either direct centerline offsets or local sinuosity increase rates. Both active bar area and channel migration were focused on reaches near the head of each agricultural valley, where slope decreases as the channel emerges from an upstream bedrock-controlled canyon. These same reaches also experienced large increases in width during the 1997 flood of record. The gage record shows that attenuation of this flood was most pronounced in the lower of the two agricultural valleys, Mason Valley. Surprisingly little attenuation occurred in the upstream Smith Valley, despite the relatively low relief of the valley floor, which consists primarily of Pleistocene lake deposits. The major difference between the two valleys is that the meander belt through Smith Valley is incised

  7. Demonstration and Field Evaluation of Streambank Stabilization with Submerged Vanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, H.; Hoopes, J.; Poggi, D.; Fitzpatrick, F.; Walz, K.

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of submerged vanes for reducing bank erosion and improving aquatic habitat is being evaluated at a site on North Fish Creek, a Lake Superior tributary. Increased runoff from agricultural areas with clayey soils has increased flood magnitudes and the erosion potential/transport capacity of the stream. Most of the creek's sediment load originates from the erosion of 17 large bluffs. This creek contains important recreational fisheries that are potentially limited by the loss of aquatic habitat from deposition of sediment on spawning beds. Submerged vanes are a cost effective and environmentally less intrusive alternative to traditional structural stabilization measures. Submerged vanes protrude from a channel bed, are oriented at an angle to the local velocity, and are distributed along a portion of channel. They induce a transverse force and torque on the flow along with longitudinal vortexes that alter the cross sectional shape and alignment of the channel. Submerged vanes were installed at a bluff/bend site in summer and fall 2000. The number, size, and layout of the vanes were based upon the channel morphology under estimated bankfull conditions. The effectiveness of the vanes will be evaluated by comparing surveys of the bluff face, streamflow, and channel conditions for several years after installation of the submerged vanes with surveys before and immediately after their installation.

  8. Stability of magnetic fields in non-barotropic stars: an analytic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgün, T.; Reisenegger, A.; Mastrano, A.; Marchant, P.

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic fields in upper main-sequence stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars are known to persist for time-scales comparable to their lifetimes. From a theoretical perspective this is problematic, as it can be shown that simple magnetic field configurations are always unstable. In non-barotropic stars, stable stratification allows for a much wider range of magnetic field structures than in barotropic stars, and helps stabilize them by making it harder to induce radial displacements. Recent simulations by Braithwaite and collaborators have shown that, in stably stratified stars, random initial magnetic fields evolve into nearly axisymmetric configurations with both poloidal and toroidal components, which then remain stable for some time. It is desirable to provide an analytic study of the stability of such fields. We write an explicit expression for a plausible equilibrium structure of an axially symmetric magnetic field with both poloidal and toroidal components of adjustable strengths, in a non-barotropic, non-rotating, fluid star, and study its stability using the energy principle. We construct a displacement field that should be a reasonable approximation to the most unstable mode of a toroidal field, and confirm Braithwaite's result that a given toroidal field can be stabilized by a poloidal field containing much less energy than the former, as given through the condition Epol/Etor ≳ 2aEtor/Egrav, where Epol and Etor are the energies of the poloidal and toroidal fields, respectively, and Egrav is the gravitational binding energy of the star. We find that a ≈ 7.4 for main-sequence stars, and a ˜ 200 for neutron stars. Since Epol/Egrav ≪ 1, we conclude that the energy of the toroidal field can be substantially larger than that of the poloidal field, which is consistent with the speculation that the toroidal field is the main reservoir powering magnetar activity. The deformation of a neutron star caused by the hidden toroidal field can also cause emission

  9. Geomorphic Mapping of MTMS -20022 and -20017

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    Geomorphic mapping at 1:500,000 scale within three quadrangles in Margaritifer Terra, Mars, is nearing completion (Fig. 1) [e.g., 1 - 4]. This region was previously studied [5-9] because of the combination of geomorphic processes that have shaped its surface, and the current mapping has revealed details that were not visible in Viking Orbiter images used by those previous studies. The large Uzboi- Holden-Ladon-Margaritifer megaoutflow system has shaped the western part of Margaritifer Terra (Fig. 1), and flow in the Samara and Paran -Loire valley systems merged with UHLM in MTM -15022 [3]. The area in MTMs -20022 and -20017 has also been shaped by many impact craters, including an outer ring of Ladon basin and the relatively young Jones crater. Fluvial erosion associated with Loire Valles and Samara Valles and their tributaries has influenced much of the surface, and many areas are covered by resurfacing deposits (possibly fluvial, volcanic, and/or aeolian). MTMs -20022 and -20017 include Jones crater, the confluence of Himera Valles and Samara Valles, and a significant portion of Loire Valles (Fig. 1). One of the main objectives of this mapping is to determine the relative timing of fluvial activity and impact cratering, specifically the impact that created Jones.

  10. The Promise for Geomorphic Discovery in the South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mossa, Joann

    1998-01-01

    Presents an overview of current geomorphic research in the southern United States. Conveys that the limited historical effort offers both challenges and opportunities for conducting geomorphic work in the region; much is unknown about these unique landscapes. States applied and theoretical geomorphology will benefit the society and future of the…

  11. Full scale field demonstration of unheated anaerobic contact stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, R.M.; Fan, K.S.

    1983-09-01

    A full scale field demonstration of unheated anaerobic digestion, including both solids recycle and solids nonrecycle processes, was conducted at the Jackson Pike Wastewater Treatment Plant at Columbus, Ohio. Two digesters (locally called Tanks 4E and 6E) at this facility were used for this purpose. In the experimental system, the operating temperature was reduced gradually from 91/sup 0/F to 63/sup 0/F. There were eight periods in the Recycle Phase and four periods in the Nonrecycle Phase. Gas production, solids destruction, volatile fatty acid variation, alkalinity, and pH were monitored in each period. In addition, grease, long-chain fatty acids, and foaming were intensively investigated at the last two periods, C and D, of the Nonrecycle Phase. The objectives of this research were: (1) evaluation of the unheated anaerobic digestion in full scale field units, and (2) and development of criteria for design and operation of a cold anaerobic digester. 48 references, 41 figures, 84 tables.

  12. Trapped Field Characteristics of Stacked YBCO Thin Plates for Compact NMR Magnets: Spatial Field Distribution and Temporal Stability.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Seungyong; Kim, Seok Beom; Ahn, Min Cheol; Voccio, John; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents experimental and analytical results of trapped field characteristics of a stack of square YBCO thin film plates for compact NMR magnets. Each YBCO plate, 40 mm × 40 mm × 0.08 mm, has a 25-mm diameter hole at its center. A total of 500 stacked plates were used to build a 40-mm long magnet. Its trapped field, in a bath of liquid nitrogen, was measured for spatial field distribution and temporal stability. Comparison of measured and analytical results is presented: the effects on trapped field characteristics of the unsaturated nickel substrate and the non-uniform current distribution in the YBCO plate are discussed. PMID:20585463

  13. Stability of the ACS CCD: geometry, flat fielding, photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido

    2002-07-01

    A moderately crowded stellar field, located 6' West of the centre of the cluster 47 Tuc, is observed repeatedly {every three weeks with the WFC, every other month with the HRC} in various filters, spending 1 orbit per epoch. Different filters will be used every time, so that over the course of the year all filters will have been employed at least twice. The most common filters will be checked more frequently. The same field has been observed in the course of the SMOV phase and the positions and magnitudes of the most prominent stars have been accurately measured. Although the field is neither a proper astrometric nor a proper photometric standard one, the positions and magnitudes of the objects in it can be used to monitor any local and large scale variations in the platescale and sensitivity of the detectors. It should be noted that for the filters which have already been used during the SMOV phase it will be sufficient to take one single image, without CR-SPLIT, since the exposure time is always short {20-30 sec} and there will be so many stars that the few of them which are affected by cosmic rays can be discarded as outliers in the photometry. For narrow and medium band filters not exercised on this target in the SMOV phase, however, a baseline will have to be set. This expenditure of time will apply to the current cycle only. At variance with the approach used in SMOV, there is no need for large telescope slews to place the same objects on opposite sides of the detectors, thence allowing the programme to remain compact and efficient. All exposure level parameters are set to their default values, except for the amplifier gain of the WFC exposures in the F606W band, which will be collected with the gain value of 2 for the WFC for compatibility with the SMOV observations. The exposure time is typically 30 seconds for the WFC, 60 sec for the HRC. No attempt will be made to attain a predefined or the same orientation on the sky amongst different epochs. Typically

  14. Electrodynamics—molecular dynamics simulations of the stability of Cu nanotips under high electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veske, Mihkel; Parviainen, Stefan; Zadin, Vahur; Aabloo, Alvo; Djurabekova, Flyura

    2016-06-01

    The shape memory effect and pseudoelasticity in Cu nanowires represent a possible pair of mechanisms that prevents high aspect ratio nanosized field electron emitters from being stable at room temperature and permits their growth under high electric field. By utilizing hybrid electrodynamics–molecular dynamics simulations, we show that a global electric field of 1 GV m‑1 or more significantly increases the stability and critical temperature of spontaneous reorientation of nanosized  <100>  Cu field emitters. We also show that in the studied tips the stabilizing effect of an external applied electric field is an order of magnitude greater than the destabilization caused by the field emission current. We detect the critical temperature of spontaneous reorientation using a tool that spots changes in crystal structure. The method is compatible with techniques that consider the change in potential energy, has a wider range of applicability and allows different stages in the reorientation processes to be pinpointed.

  15. Nuclear Spin Maser at Highly Stabilized Low Magnetic Field and Search for Atomic EDM

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimi, A.; Asahi, K.; Inoue, T.; Uchida, M.; Hatakeyama, N.; Tsuchiya, M.; Kagami, S.

    2009-08-04

    A nuclear spin maser is operated at a low static field through an active feedback scheme based on an optical nuclear spin detection and succeeding spin control by a transverse field application. The frequency stability of this optical-coupling spin maser is improved by installation of a low-noise current source for a solenoid magnet producing a static magnetic field in the maser operation. Experimental devices for application of the maser to EDM experiment are being developed.

  16. Stability of rotating self-gravitating filaments: effects of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Shubhadeep; Mondal, Surajit; Chakraborty, Sagar

    2016-07-01

    We have performed systematic local linear stability analysis on a radially stratified infinite self-gravitating cylinder of rotating plasma under the influence of magnetic field. In order to render the system analytically tractable, we have focused solely on the axisymmetric modes of perturbations. Using cylindrical coordinate system, we have derived the critical linear mass density of a non-rotating filament required for gravitational collapse to ensue in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field. Moreover, for such filaments threaded by axial magnetic field, we show that the growth rates of the modes having non-zero radial wavenumber are reduced more strongly by the magnetic field than that of the modes having zero radial wavenumber. More importantly, our study contributes to the understanding of the stability property of rotating astrophysical filaments that are more often than not influenced by magnetic fields. In addition to complementing many relevant numerical studies reported the literature, our results on filaments under the influence of magnetic field generalize some of the very recent analytical works. For example, here we prove that even a weak magnetic field can play a dominant role in determining stability of the filament when the rotation time-scale is larger than the free-fall time-scale. A filamentary structure with faster rotation is, however, comparatively more stable for the same magnetic field. The results reported herein, due to strong locality assumption, are strictly valid for the modes for which one can ignore the radial variations in the density and the magnetic field profiles.

  17. Selective Stabilization of the Fddd Diblock Copolymer Microphase in an Applied Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jonathan; Li, Wei; Delaney, Kris; Fredrickson, Glenn

    Using self-consistent field theory, we explore the phase behavior of AB diblock copolymer melts in a uniform applied electric field. We assign an isotropic polarizability to each monomer type, such that the electric field selectively destabilizes AB interfaces that are perpendicular to the applied field. Under the mean-field approximation of the present model, lamellar and cylindrical structures align such that their AB interfaces are parallel to the electric field, and their relative stability with respect to the disordered phase is unchanged. Sphere and network phases do not have an axis of uniformity, so the preferred orientation for each of these phases must be identified by simulation. Small distortions in morphology are induced by the electric field for these phases, such that the free energy response includes non-harmonic terms. We compute the phase diagram for a melt in an applied electric field by comparing free energies of each morphology at its preferred orientation. We find that the stability regions for the sphere and network phases shrink with increasing electric field strength. Moreover, the double gyroid phase is relatively destabilized against the Fddd phase, extending the stability region for the Fddd phase to larger segregation strengths.

  18. Challenges and Opportunities in Geomorphic-Stratigraphic Linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbank, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    Whereas geomorphic processes undeniably modulate the depositional sequences that constitute the stratigraphic record, a discrete geomorphic imprint is commonly difficult to discern in ancient sediments. Part of this disconnect results from the characteristics of typical study sites. Many geomorphic studies are conducted in terrain, i.e., mountains, that is degrading via long-term erosion, such that (i) the preservation potential of the geomorphic-depositional record is negligible and (ii) the geomorphic processes may be distinctly different from those in depositional basins. Both the disparate time scales of observation and the differing preservation tendencies of sedimentologic events in the geomorphic versus stratigraphic record also inhibit development of unambiguous linkages between them. Even some spectacularly clear stratigraphic records of deformation, such as those evinced by growth strata, may be very subtle in a modern geomorphic setting as they are being formed. To the extent that large-scale, "catastrophic" geomorphic events significantly influence the stratigraphic record, the infrequency of such events dictates that relevant geomorphic observations of them are commonly sparse. Despite these difficulties, improved understanding of geomorphic-stratigraphic connections are emerging from several perspectives. Geomorphic studies at the surface of actively aggrading basins provide modern depositional analogues. The ever-growing imagery archive available via Google Earth permits increasingly detailed reconstructions of the evolution of geomorphic and depositional systems in sites of ongoing sediment preservation in actively subsiding basins. Repeat LiDAR imaging provides quantification of channel geometries, incision, and deposition at time scales ranging from single events to decadal scales. Analogue models in which subsidence, base level, discharge, sediment supply can be controlled provide insights on the interplay between variables that modulates

  19. Aggregate stability, root length and root thickness influenced by a mycorrhizal inoculum? - Results from a three-year eco-engineering field experiment on an alpine slope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bast, Alexander; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Lüscher, Peter; Graf, Frank; Gärtner, Holger

    2014-05-01

    In mountain environments many slopes are covered by coarse grained, glacial-, periglacial- or/and denudation-derived substrate. These slopes show a high geomorphic activity and are susceptible for erosional processes, shallow landslides or debris flows, which can result in a high socio-economic hazard potential. This is especially true for steep slopes, lacking a protecting vegetation cover. Regarding hazard prevention, eco-engineering gained in importance because related techniques provide a sustainable measure to protect erosion-prone hillslopes. The idea of using plants for sustainable erosion control and protection against shallow landslides, demands some essential requirements, as e.g., a stable seedbed providing appropriate water and nutrient supply. However, degraded alpine slopes are often unstable and the coarse-grained material shows a low retention capacity of water and nutrients. Extreme conditions like this hamper a fast and sustainable development of a protecting vegetation cover even if pioneer plants are used to stabilize the slopes. Thus, the question arises what needs to be done to give planted saplings within eco-engineering projects maximum support developing their above- and belowground structures to promote slope stabilization. Laboratory experiments using potted plants have shown a positive impact of mycorrhizal fungi inoculation plant development and soil structure, i.e. the formation of (stable) aggregates within several months. Soil aggregate stability is an integrating parameter, reflecting several aspects of the plant-soil system and for this also an indicator of soil development and soil stability. Because of this and based on the promising laboratory results, we intended to apply this approach in a field-experiment We established (i) mycorrhizal and (ii) non-mycorrhizal treated eco-engineered research plots on a field experimental scale, covering a total area of approx. 1000 m2 on an ENE exposed slope (coarse morainic and denudation

  20. Vacuum stability of a general scalar potential of a few fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannike, Kristjan

    2016-06-01

    We calculate analytical vacuum stability or bounded from below conditions for general scalar potentials of a few fields. After a brief review of copositivity, we show how to find positivity conditions for more complicated potentials. We discuss the vacuum stability conditions of the general potential of two real scalars, without and with the Higgs boson included in the potential. As further examples, we give explicit vacuum stability conditions for the two Higgs doublet model with no explicit CP breaking, and for the mathbb {Z}3 scalar dark matter with an inert doublet and a complex singlet. We give a short overview of positivity conditions for tensors of quartic couplings via tensor eigenvalues.

  1. Geomorphic response to an extreme flood in two mountain rivers (northeastern Sardinia, Italy): the role of geomorphic and hydraulic controlling factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righini, Margherita; Surian, Nicola; Wohl, Ellen; Amponsah, William; Marchi, Lorenzo; Borga, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Geomorphic response to an extreme flood in two mountain rivers (northeastern Sardinia, Italy): the role of geomorphic and hydraulic controlling factors Margherita Righini (1), Nicola Surian (1), Ellen Wohl (2), William Amponsah (3, 4), Lorenzo Marchi (3), Marco Borga (4) (1) Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, Italy, (2) Department of Geosciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA, (3) CNR IRPI, Padova, Italy, (4) Department of Land, Environment, Agriculture and Forestry, University of Padova, Italy. The investigation of geomorphic effectiveness of extreme floods is crucial to improve tools for assessing channel dynamics and our capability of forecasting geomorphological hazard. This work deals with geomorphic response of two mountain rivers in the Posada catchment (northeastern Sardinia, Italy), considering a range of morphological (i.e., lateral channel confinement, channel gradient, channel sinuosity, sediment sources, and vegetation) and hydraulic variables (i.e., cross-sectional stream power, unit stream power, flow duration and total energy expenditure) as possible controlling factors. On November 18th 2013, northeastern Sardinia was affected by an extreme meteorological event with hourly rainfall intensities up to 100 mm/h and a peak in rain accumulation up to 450 mm in 24 hours, with 18 casualties and damages to infrastructure and buildings. In the Posada and Mannu di Bitti Rivers, the geomorphic response (i.e., bank erosion, channel aggradation and incision, vegetation and wood dynamics, hillslope failure) was analyzed at different spatial scales. The observed dominant geomorphic change was channel widening. Therefore, channel width changes have been analyzed in detail by remote sensing and GIS tools integrated by field surveys. The study focuses on reaches (i.e., 22.5 km in the Posada River, upstream of Maccheronis dam; 18.2 km in the Mannu di Bitti River) affected by evident and significant geomorphic responses in terms

  2. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Geomorphic Catena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  3. Tracing the Geomorphic Signature of Lateral Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvall, A. R.; Tucker, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    Active strike-slip faults are among the most dangerous geologic features on Earth. Unfortunately, it is challenging to estimate their slip rates, seismic hazard, and evolution over a range of timescales. An under-exploited tool in strike-slip fault characterization is quantitative analysis of the geomorphic response to lateral fault motion to extract tectonic information directly from the landscape. Past geomorphic work of this kind has focused almost exclusively on vertical motion, despite the ubiquity of horizontal motion in crustal deformation and mountain building. We seek to address this problem by investigating the landscape response to strike-slip faulting in two ways: 1) examining the geomorphology of the Marlborough Fault System (MFS), a suite of parallel strike-slip faults within the actively deforming South Island of New Zealand, and 2) conducting controlled experiments in strike-slip landscape evolution using the CHILD landscape evolution model. The MFS offers an excellent natural experiment site because fault initiation ages and cumulative displacements decrease from north to south, whereas slip rates increase over four fold across a region underlain by a single bedrock unit (Torlesse Greywacke). Comparison of planform and longitudinal profiles of rivers draining the MFS reveals strong disequilibrium within tributaries that drain to active fault strands, and suggests that river capture related to fault activity may be a regular process in strike-slip fault zones. Simple model experiments support this view. Model calculations that include horizontal motion as well as vertical uplift demonstrate river lengthening and shortening due to stream capture in response to shutter ridges sliding in front of stream outlets. These results suggest that systematic variability in fluvial knickpoint location, drainage area, and incision rates along different faults or fault segments may be expected in catchments upstream of strike-slip faults and could act as useful

  4. Identification of Geomorphic Signatures of Neotectonic Activity Using dem in the Precambrian Terrain of Western Ghats, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayappa, K. S.; Markose, V. J.; Nagaraju, M.

    2012-07-01

    To assess the relative tectonic activity classes, five geomorphic indices such as stream-gradient index (SL), drainage basin asymmetry (Af), hypsometric integral (Hi), valley floor width - valley height ratio (Vf) and drainage basin shape (Bs) of ninety-four sub-basins of Valapattanam river basin have been analysed by applying the standard formulae. Relative tectonic activity classes (Iat) obtained by the average (S/n) of different classes of geomorphic indices have been classified into three groups. Group I shows high tectonic activity with values of S/n < 2; group II shows moderate tectonic activity with S/n > 2 to < 2.5; and group III shows low tectonic activity with values of S/n ≥ 2.5. Field evidences such as deep valleys, sudden changes in the river course and waterfalls at fault planes clearly agree with the values and classes of tectonic geomorphic indices.

  5. Geomorphic Change in Two Historical Flood Events on the Umatilla River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, P. F.; Hughes, M. L.; Marcus, W. A.

    2003-12-01

    We mapped geomorphic change in an 80-km length of the active channel and floodplain of the Umatilla River for two flood events, 1965 and 1996/1997, both about 20 to 70-yr events. More artificial bank stabilization structures were in place during the 1996-7 cluster. We scanned and georectified pre- and post-flood aerial photos, achieving RMSE of 1.5 to 3m, and we digitized channel and floodplain features. Sinuosity generally decreased, and the scour zone and active bars increased in each flood. Secondary channels were created or reactivated. Changes were smaller during the 1996-7 flood cluster, due partly to increased bank protection. In both floods, geomorphic change was spatially variable and related to local influences (tributary junctions, human influences) as well as landscape-scale controls (downstream trends in alluvial deposit characteristics and incision). Both flood events increased areas of several types of features important for fish habitat and water quality, such as alcoves and riparian woody vegetation. Where human influences such as bank protection severely limit geomorphic change, floods can no longer renew habitat and ecological health may decline over time.

  6. Vegetated dune morphodynamics during recent stabilization of the Mu Us dune field, north-central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Mason, Joseph A.; Lu, Huayu

    2015-01-01

    The response of dune fields to changing environmental conditions can be better understood by investigating how changing vegetation cover affects dune morphodynamics. Significant increases in vegetation and widespread dune stabilization over the years 2000-2012 are evident in high-resolution satellite imagery of the Mu Us dune field in north-central China, possibly a lagged response to changing wind strength and temperature since the 1970s. These trends provide an opportunity to study how dune morphology changes with increasing vegetation stabilization. Vegetation expansion occurs mainly by expansion of pre-existing patches in interdunes. As vegetation spreads from interdunes onto surrounding dunes, it modifies their shapes in competition with wind-driven sand movement, primarily in three ways: 1) vegetation anchoring horns of barchans transforms them to parabolic dunes; 2) vegetation colonizes stoss faces of barchan and transverse dunes, resulting in lower dune height and an elongated stoss face, with shortening of barchan horns; and 3) on transverse dunes, the lee face is fixed by plants that survive sand burial. Along each of these pathways of stabilization, dune morphology tends to change from more barchanoid to more parabolic forms, but that transformation is not always completed before full stabilization. Artificial stabilization leads to an extreme case of "frozen" barchans or transverse dunes with original shapes preserved by rapid establishment of vegetation. Observations in the Mu Us dune field emphasize the point that vegetation growth and aeolian sand transport not only respond to external factors such as climate but also interact with each other. For example, some barchans lose sand mass during vegetation fixation, and actually migrate faster as they become smaller, and vegetation growth on a barchan's lower stoss face may alter sand transport over the dune in a way that favors more rapid stabilization. Conceptual models were generalized for the

  7. Role of geomorphic thresholds in determining alluvial channel morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Edgar, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Results of a combined laboratory and field investigation indicate that threshold conditions are associated with major changes in alluvial channel morphology. Thirty-one different channels were generated in the laboratory under a range of slope, discharge, and bedload transport conditions. At low values of these variables, straight channels were formed. As the values of these variables were progressively increased, threshold conditions were exceeded and meandering-thalweg channels resulted. The degree of meandering, as measured by thalweg sinuosity, increased with commensurate increases in the independent variables until critical conditions were again encountered. At this point, meandering tendencies abruptly decreased, and only braided channels were produced. When the sinuosity of these channels was plotted against slope, stream power, and other key variables, the presence and effect of thresholds became apparent. To test these observations under field conditions, geomorphic and hydrologic data were collected on 45 streams of widely ranging sizes in Indiana and Illinois. Variations analogous to those in the laboratory were observed, although there was comparatively more variation in the field relationships. From these and related results from other studies, it is clear that thresholds exist within the range of certain controlling variables and that when these thresholds are exceeded through natural processes or human influence, dramatic changes in channel morphology can occur. 38 references, 4 figures.

  8. Experiments on the stability of a liquid bridge in an axial electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Subramanian; Saville, D. A.

    1993-04-01

    The behavior of a neutrally buoyant liquid bridge was studied in the presence of axial electric fields. Silicone oil and a castor-oil-eugenol mixture were used to form cylinders with slenderness ratios larger than π with strong, axial, dc electric fields. Below a certain field strength, a smooth transition to an axisymmetric, vaselike shape occurred. Circulation patterns were observed in these bridges. At lower field strengths, the bridge shape was more deformed and, at a well-defined field, pinch-off occurred. With ac fields, the field strength required to stabilize the bridge was higher and the collapse of the cylinder was much sharper. Upon interchanging the fluids, a steady axial field was found to destabilize cylinders with slenderness ratios less than 3. This behavior is consistent with that anticipated if the fluids behave as leaky dielectrics but not if they act as perfect dielectrics.

  9. Experiments on the stability of a liquid bridge in an axial electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Subramanian; Saville, D. A.

    1993-04-01

    The behavior of a neutrally buoyant liquid bridge was studied in the presence of axial electric fields. Silicone oil and a castor-oil-eugenol mixture were used to form cylinders with slenderness ratios larger than pi with strong, axial, dc electric fields. Below a certain field strength, a smooth transition to an axisymmetric, vaselike shape occurred. Circulation patterns were observed in these bridges. At lower field strengths, the bridge shape was more deformed and, at a well-defined field, pinch-off occurred. With ac fields, the field strength required to stabilize the bridge was higher and the collapse of the cylinder was much sharper. Upon interchanging the fluids, a steady axial field was found to destabilize cylinders with slenderness ratios less than 3. This behavior is consistent with that anticipated if the fluids behave as leaky dielectrics but not if they act as perfect dielectrics.

  10. Experiments on the stability of a liquid bridge in an axial electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Subramanian; Saville, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of a neutrally buoyant liquid bridge was studied in the presence of axial electric fields. Silicone oil and a castor-oil-eugenol mixture were used to form cylinders with slenderness ratios larger than pi with strong, axial, dc electric fields. Below a certain field strength, a smooth transition to an axisymmetric, vaselike shape occurred. Circulation patterns were observed in these bridges. At lower field strengths, the bridge shape was more deformed and, at a well-defined field, pinch-off occurred. With ac fields, the field strength required to stabilize the bridge was higher and the collapse of the cylinder was much sharper. Upon interchanging the fluids, a steady axial field was found to destabilize cylinders with slenderness ratios less than 3. This behavior is consistent with that anticipated if the fluids behave as leaky dielectrics but not if they act as perfect dielectrics.

  11. New geomorphic data on the active Taiwan orogen: A multisource approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deffontaines, B.; Lee, J.-C.; Angelier, J.; Carvalho, J.; Rudant, J.-P.

    1994-01-01

    A multisource and multiscale approach of Taiwan morphotectonics combines different complementary geomorphic analyses based on a new elevation model (DEM), side-looking airborne radar (SLAR), and satellite (SPOT) imagery, aerial photographs, and control from independent field data. This analysis enables us not only to present an integrated geomorphic description of the Taiwan orogen but also to highlight some new geodynamic aspects. Well-known, major geological structures such as the Longitudinal Valley, Lishan, Pingtung, and the Foothills fault zones are of course clearly recognized, but numerous, previously unrecognized structures appear distributed within different regions of Taiwan. For instance, transfer fault zones within the Western Foothills and the Central Range are identified based on analyses of lineaments and general morphology. In many cases, the existence of geomorphic features identified in general images is supported by the results of geological field analyses carried out independently. In turn, the field analyses of structures and mechanisms at some sites provide a key for interpreting similar geomorphic featues in other areas. Examples are the conjugate pattern of strike-slip faults within the Central Range and the oblique fold-and-thrust pattern of the Coastal Range. Furthermore, neotectonic and morphological analyses (drainage and erosional surfaces) has been combined in order to obtain a more comprehensive description and interpretation of neotectonic features in Taiwan, such as for the Longitudinal Valley Fault. Next, at a more general scale, numerical processing of digital elevation models, resulting in average topography, summit level or base level maps, allows identification of major features related to the dynamics of uplift and erosion and estimates of erosion balance. Finally, a preliminary morphotectonic sketch map of Taiwan, combining information from all the sources listed above, is presented.

  12. Convective plasma stability consistent with MHD equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a decreasing field

    SciTech Connect

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2010-10-15

    A study is made of the convective (interchange, or flute) plasma stability consistent with equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a magnetic field decreasing outward and large curvature of magnetic field lines. Algorithms are developed which calculate convective plasma stability from the Kruskal-Oberman kinetic criterion and in which the convective stability is iteratively consistent with MHD equilibrium for a given pressure and a given type of anisotropy in actual magnetic geometry. Vacuum and equilibrium convectively stable configurations in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field are calculated. It is shown that, in convectively stable equilibrium, the possibility of achieving high plasma pressures in the central region is restricted either by the expansion of the separatrix (when there are large regions of a weak magnetic field) or by the filamentation of the gradient plasma current (when there are small regions of a weak magnetic field, in which case the pressure drops mainly near the separatrix). It is found that, from the standpoint of equilibrium and of the onset of nonpotential ballooning modes, a kinetic description of convective stability yields better plasma confinement parameters in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field than a simpler MHD model and makes it possible to substantially improve the confinement parameters for a given type of anisotropy. For the Magnetor experimental compact device, the maximum central pressure consistent with equilibrium and stability is calculated to be as high as {beta} {approx} 30%. It is shown that, for the anisotropy of the distribution function that is typical of a background ECR plasma, the limiting pressure gradient is about two times steeper than that for an isotropic plasma. From a practical point of view, the possibility is demonstrated of achieving better confinement parameters of a hot collisionless plasma in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field

  13. Human geomorphic footprint and global geomorphic change: implications for hydrogeomorphic hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remondo, Juan

    2010-05-01

    The human geomorphic footprint (HGF), expressed as the area affected by the construction of new 'anthropogeoforms' or the volume of geologic materials directly or indirectly displaced by human action has grown considerably in the last decades. Available data suggest that the present HGF is roughly 50,000 km2 a-1 of new anthropogeoforms and 300 x109 t a-1 of solid materials transferred from one part of the earth's surface to another. The latter represents a 'technological denudation' that could be 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than denudation by natural agents or sediment transport by the world's rivers. This implies a profound modification of geomorphic processes that produces a series of often disregarded environmental consequences. Some of those can by directly linked to excavation/accumulation activities and are essentially local, but in other cases the possible relationship appears to be more indirect and could have a widespread character. The transformation of land surface by human action is shown not only by landform construction and transfer of geologic materials, but also by land-use change in general and modification of the characteristics of the surface layer. This seems to affect both the hydrologic response and the sensitivity of that surface layer to different geomorphic agents. The magnitude of the above mentioned modification is logically related to the intensity of human activities, themselves related to the number of people on the planet and their economic and technological capabilities, which grow practically in all regions of the planet. It is thus reasonable to expect that the HGF and its effects should grow with time. If this were so, we should expect to find evidences of a general acceleration of geomorphic processes in the world that could represent a 'global geomorphic change'. The final expression of geomorphic processes, which could be used to test that hypothesis, is sediment generation and deposition. Data are presented on

  14. Geomorphic tipping points: convenient metaphor or fundamental landscape property?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    In 2000 Malcolm Gladwell published as book that has done much to publicise Tipping Points in society but also in academia. His arguments, re-expressed in a geomorphic sense, have three core elements: (1) a "Law of the Few", where rapid change results from the effects of a relatively restricted number of critical elements, ones that are able to rapidly connect systems together, that are particularly sensitive to an external force, of that are spatially organised in a particular way; (2) a "Stickiness" where an element of the landscape is able to assimilate characteristics which make it progressively more applicable to the "Law of the Few"; and (3), given (1) and (2) a history and a geography that means that the same force can have dramatically different effects, according to where and when it occurs. Expressed in this way, it is not clear that Tipping Points bring much to our understanding in geomorphology that existing concepts (e.g. landscape sensitivity and recovery; cusp-catastrophe theory; non-linear dynamics systems) do not already provide. It may also be all too easy to describe change in geomorphology as involving a Tipping Point: we know that geomorphic processes often involve a non-linear response above a certain critical threshold; we know that landscapes can, after Denys Brunsden, be though of as involving long periods of boredom ("stability") interspersed with brief moments of terror ("change"); but these are not, after Gladwell, sufficient for the term Tipping Point to apply. Following from these issues, this talk will address three themes. First, it will question, through reference to specific examples, notably in high Alpine systems, the extent to which the Tipping Point analogy is truly a property of the world in which we live. Second, it will explore how 'tipping points' become assigned metaphorically, sometimes evolving to the point that they themselves gain agency, that is, shaping the way we interpret landscape rather than vice versa. Third, I

  15. Inductive analysis about the impact of climate warming on regional geomorphic evolution in arid area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anayit, Mattohti; Abulizi, Mailiya

    2016-04-01

    Climate change on the surface of earth will produce a chain reaction among so many global natural environmental elements. Namely, all the issues will be affected by the climate change, just like the regional water environment, formation and development of landscape, plants and animals living environment, the survival of microorganisms, the human economic environment and health, and the whole social environment changes at well. But because of slow frequency of climate change and it is volatility change, its influence on other factors and the overall environmental performance is not obvious, and its reflection performs slowly. Using regional weather data, we calculated qualitatively and quantitatively and did analysis the impact of climate warming on Xinjiang (a province of China) geomorphic evolution elements, including the ground weather, erosion rate, collapse change, landslide occurrences changes and impact debris flow, combining the field survey and indoor test methods. Key words: climate change; the geomorphic induction; landscape change in river basin; Xinjiang

  16. Fringing field-induced monodomain of a polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei-Huan; Hu, De-Chun; Li, Yan; Chen, Chao Ping; Lee, Yung-Jui; Lien, Alan; Lu, Jian-Gang; Su, Yikai

    2015-12-01

    The influence of fringe electric field applied during photopolymerization on the electro-optic properties of polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystals (PS-BPLCs) was investigated. It has been found that the thermal stability would not degrade if the electric field was less than a critical value. The contrast ratio of PS-BPLC can be improved significantly because the uniformity of blue phase liquid crystal domain was enhanced by the electric fields, which were applied during photopolymerization. Meanwhile, with the electric filed, the potential energy of the BPLC molecules may lower the anchoring energy of the polymer network resulting in the improvement of electro-optic response properties. With optimized electric field during polymerization, the contrast ratio and the Kerr constant of PS-BPLC can be improved by 4.1 times and 15%, respectively, and the hysteresis can be decreased by 10%, while the response time and residual birefringence have no degradation.

  17. Stabilizing canonical-ensemble calculations in the auxiliary-field Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbreth, C. N.; Alhassid, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are powerful techniques for studying strongly interacting Fermi systems. However, implementing these methods on computers with finite-precision arithmetic requires careful attention to numerical stability. In the auxiliary-field Monte Carlo (AFMC) method, low-temperature or large-model-space calculations require numerically stabilized matrix multiplication. When adapting methods used in the grand-canonical ensemble to the canonical ensemble of fixed particle number, the numerical stabilization increases the number of required floating-point operations for computing observables by a factor of the size of the single-particle model space, and thus can greatly limit the systems that can be studied. We describe an improved method for stabilizing canonical-ensemble calculations in AFMC that exhibits better scaling, and present numerical tests that demonstrate the accuracy and improved performance of the method.

  18. Dopant segregation during vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger growth with melt stabilization by strong axial magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthiesen, D. H.; Wargo, M. J.; Motakef, S.; Carlson, D. J.; Nakos, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    Ga-doped germanium was grown in a vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger system with melt stabilization by axial magnetic fields of 30 kG. It was found that radial segregation of gallium is negligible and that the initial transient of axial macro-segregation is in apparent compliance with the theory of diffusion controlled plane front solidification.

  19. Asymptotic stability and bifurcations of 3D piecewise smooth vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Tiago; Teixeira, Marco Antônio; Tonon, Durval José

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with the analysis of the behavior of a nonsmooth three-dimensional vector field around a typal singularity. We focus on a class of generic one-parameter families {Z_{λ}} of Filippov systems and address the persistence problem for the asymptotic stability when the parameter varies near the bifurcation value {λ = 0}.

  20. Temporal stability of soil water content and soil water flux patterns across agricultural fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When an agricultural field is repeatedly surveyed for soil water content, sites often can be spotted where soil is consistently wetter or consistently dryer than average across the study area. Temporal stability presents significant interest for upscaling observed soil water content, improving soil ...

  1. Dudley Ridge, a geomorphic trap - lacustrine gas in California

    SciTech Connect

    Sugden, H.E.

    1986-04-01

    The Dudley Ridge gas field is about 6 mi southeast of Kettleman City, California. The abandoned field straddles the boundary between T23S, R19E, and T23S, R20E, MDBM, in Kings County, California. The Tulare Lake depression was formed during the Pleistocene. It is bounded by the Temblor Range on the west, the Sierra Nevada rise on the east, the north tilt of the San Joaquin Valley to the south, and a gentle rise in the San Joaquin Valley floor to the north. The depression is almost circular except for the west side where North Kettleman dome formed a peninsula. The prevailing longshore current was to the south due to Coriolis-directed winds. Dudley Ridge was formed as a spit, trailing south off the side of North Kettleman dome. The spit is sandy, silty clay, with sand lense onlaps. The geomorphic trap formed by the sand lenses serves as a trap for the methane gas being produced in the organic-rich lake-bed sediments.

  2. Spatial hierarchical geomorphic controls on salmonid spawning habitat: using geomorphic parameters to set ecological status targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, H. J.

    2009-12-01

    To set river restoration targets or identifying ‘reference condition’ benchmarks, the ‘ecological status’ of river systems is often subjectively based on how humans perceive a non-impacted river should look. Rarely are these objectives based on an explicit understanding of how physical conditions provide the habitats required by instream biota to optimally complete their life cycles. Furthermore, although much research acknowledges the spatial hierarchical physical controls on instream habitats, there is little attempt to integrate across scales while explicitly linking key aspects of instream ecology to geomorphic form and process. This paper describes the physical controls on salmon (Atlantic and Chinook) spawning habitat across a range of spatial scales (basin - reach - meso - micro). Over the past five decades much work has been conducted describing the micro-habitat (typically depth, velocity and substrate) of spawning salmonids. However, this not accounted for the implicit inter-relationships between these basic habitat variables in rivers. It is demonstrated that the specific micro-scale physical conditions selected by salmonids reflect the intersection of biotic requirements with geomorphic processes that produce specific joint hydraulic-sedimentary patterns. At the next, meso-scale, different morphological units (e.g. pools, riffles) provide contrasting joint hydraulic and sedimentary relationships that intersect to varying degrees with micro-habitat requirements, producing unit types that are used more or less frequently. Morphology also exerts a strong control on the distribution of hydraulics across a meso-scale unit under varying flow. Thus, some morphologies provide more ‘stable’ habitat conditions as discharge changes. Furthermore, the proximity of spawning units to other units that provide adult holding/ resting habitat (e.g. pools) is also shown to be an important meso-scale control. Over longer time scales, prevailing fluvial forces

  3. Utilisation of satellite data in identification of geomorphic landform and its role in arsenic release in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. P.; Singh, N.; Shashtri, S.; Mukherjee, S.

    2014-11-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the influence of geomorphic features of the area on the mobilization of arsenic in groundwater. In this study, remote sensing and GIS techniques were used to prepare the geomorphic and slope map of the area. Different geomorphic features were identified on the basis of spectral signature on the LISS III and Landsat satellite image and field survey. Groundwater samples were collected from each representative geomorphic feature to inspect the arsenic contamination in the area. The study area is drained by the Brahmaputra river and its tributaries and contain mainly fluvial geomorphic units especially older flood plain, palaeochannels, oxbow lakes, channel islands; and hilly areas at some of the places. In this study it was observed that enrichment of arsenic in groundwater varies along the geomorphic units in following trends Paleochannel> Younger alluvial plain> Active flood plain> channel island > dissected hills. The above trend shows that a higher concentration of arsenic is found in the groundwater samples collected from the fluvial landforms as compared to those collected from structural landforms. Brahmaputra River and its tributaries carry the sediment load from the Himalayan foothills, which get deposited in these features during the lateral shift of the river's courses. Arsenic bearing minerals may get transported through river and deposit in the geomorphological features along with organic matter. The flat terrain of the area as seen from the slope map provides more residence time to water to infiltrate into the aquifer. The microbial degradation of organic matter generates the reducing environment and facilitates the dissolution of iron hydroxide thus releasing the adsorbed arsenic into the groundwater.

  4. Field Stability of Piezoelectric Shear Properties in PIN-PMN-PT Crystals Under Large Drive Field

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shujun; Li, Fei; Luo, Jun; Xia, Ru; Hackenberger, Wesley; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    The coercive fields (EC) of Pb(In0.5Nb0.5)O3-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) ternary single crystals were found to be 5 kV/cm, double the value of binary Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMNT) crystals, further increased to 6 to 9 kV/cm using Mn modifications. In addition to an increased EC, the acceptor modification resulted in the developed internal bias (Eint), on the order of ~1 kV/cm. The piezoelectric shear properties of unmodified and Mn-modified PIN-PMN-PT crystals with various domain configurations were investigated. The shear piezoelectric coefficients and electromechanical coupling factors for different domain configurations were found to be >2000 pC/N and >0.85, respectively, with slightly reduced properties observed in Mn-modified tetragonal crystals. Fatigue/cycling tests performed on shear-mode samples as a function of ac drive field level demonstrated that the allowable ac field levels (the maximum applied ac field before the occurrence of depolarization) were only ~2 kV/cm for unmodified crystals, less than half of their coercive field. Allowable ac drive levels were on the order of 4 to 6 kV/cm for Mn-modified crystals with rhombohedral/orthorhombic phase, further increased to 5 to 8 kV/cm in tetragonal crystals, because of their higher coercive fields. It is of particular interest that the allowable ac drive field level for Mn-modified crystals was found to be ≥60% of their coercive fields, because of the developed Eint, induced by the acceptor-oxygen vacancy defect dipoles. PMID:21342812

  5. Consolidation of Partially Stabilized ZrO2 in the Presence of a Noncontacting Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Hasti; van Benthem, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Electric field-assisted sintering techniques demonstrate accelerated densification at lower temperatures than the conventional sintering methods. However, it is still debated whether the applied field and/or resulting currents are responsible for the densification enhancement. To distinguish the effects of an applied field from current flow, in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy experiments with soft agglomerates of partially stabilized yttria-doped zirconia particles are carried out. A new microelectromechanical system-based sample support is used to heat particle agglomerates while simultaneously exposing them to an externally applied noncontacting electric field. Under isothermal condition at 900 °C , an electric field strength of 500 V /cm shows a sudden threefold enhancement in the shrinkage of the agglomerates. The applied electrostatic potential lowers the activation energy for point defect formation within the space charge zone and therefore promotes consolidation. Obtaining similar magnitudes of shrinkage in the absence of any electric field requires a higher temperature and longer time.

  6. A Hierarchical Modeling Approach to Simulating the Geomorphic Response of River Systems to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praskievicz, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is expected to change the discharge and sediment-transport regime of river systems. Because rivers adjust their channels to accommodate their typical inputs of water and sediment, changes in these variables can potentially alter river morphology. Here, I developed and applied a hierarchical modeling approach to examine potential changes in reach-averaged bedload transport and spatial patterns of erosion and deposition for three snowmelt-dominated gravel-bed rivers in the interior Pacific Northwest (the Tucannon River in southeastern Washington and the South Fork Coeur d'Alene and Red rivers in Idaho). The modeling hierarchy was based on discharge and suspended-sediment load from a basin-scale hydrologic model driven by a range of downscaled climate-change scenarios. In the field, I collected channel morpholohy and sediment grain-size data for all three rivers. To estimate changes in reach-averaged bedload transport, I used the Bedload Assessment of Gravel-bedded Streams (BAGS) software. I then used the Cellular Automaton Evolutionary Slope and River (CAESAR) model to simulate the spatial pattern of erosion and deposition within each reach to infer potential changes in channel geometry and planform. Results from the BAGS sediment-transport formulas indicate that changes in the duration of the critical discharge needed to mobilize bed sediments are the primary drivers of changes in reach-averaged sediment transport. CAESAR modeling results include changes in river morphology for the two higher-energy river reaches, but no significant morphological changes for a lower-energy reach with steep, cohesive banks, suggesting that the geomorphic response of river systems to climate change may depend on how reach characteristics affect a river's relative stability or mobility. Changes in sediment transport and river morphology resulting from climate change could affect the management of river systems for human and ecological uses.

  7. Stability of vaccinia-vectored recombinant oral rabies vaccine under field conditions: A 3-year study

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Joseph R.; Fry, Alethea M.; Siev, David; Slate, Dennis; Lewis, Charles; Gatewood, Donna M.

    2011-01-01

    Rabies is an incurable zoonotic disease caused by rabies virus, a member of the rhabdovirus family. It is transmitted through the bite of an infected animal. Control methods, including oral rabies vaccination (ORV) programs, have led to a reduction in the spread and prevalence of the disease in wildlife. This study evaluated the stability of RABORAL, a recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine that is used in oral rabies vaccination programs. The vaccine was studied in various field microenvironments in order to describe its viability and facilitate effective baiting strategies. Field microenvironments influenced the stability of this vaccine in this study. This study emphasizes the importance of understanding how vaccines perform under varying field conditions in order to plan effective baiting strategies. PMID:22468025

  8. Inverse Doppler shift and control field as coherence generators for the stability in superluminal light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoor, Fazal; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Khan, Salman

    2015-05-01

    A gain-based four-level atomic medium for the stability in superluminal light propagation using control field and inverse Doppler shift as coherence generators is studied. In regimes of weak and strong control field, a broadband and multiple controllable transparency windows are, respectively, identified with significantly enhanced group indices. The observed Doppler effect for the class of high atomic velocity of the medium is counterintuitive in comparison to the effect of the class of low atomic velocity. The intensity of each of the two pump fields is kept less than the optimum limit reported in [M. D. Stenner and D. J. Gauthier, Phys. Rev. A 67, 063801 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevA.67.063801] for stability in the superluminal light pulse. Consequently, superluminal stable domains with the generated coherence are explored.

  9. Effect of electromagnetic field on the stability of viscoelastic fluid film flowing down an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Samadyuti

    2016-04-01

    The stability of thin electrically conducting viscoelastic fluid film flowing down on a non-conducting inclined plane in the presence of electromagnetic field is investigated under induction-free approximation. Surface evolution equation is derived by long-wave expansion method. The stabilizing role of Hartman number M (magnetic field) and the destabilizing role of the viscoelastic property {\\varGamma} and the electric parameter E on such fluid film are established through the linear stability analysis of the surface evolution equation. Investigation shows that at small values of Hartman number ( M), the influence of electric parameter ( E) on the viscoelastic parameter {(\\varGamma)} is insignificant, while for large values of M, E introduces more destabilizing effect at low values of {\\varGamma} than that at high values of {\\varGamma }. An interesting result also perceived from our analysis is that the stabilizing effect of Hartman number ( M) is decreasing with the increase of the values of {\\varGamma} and E, even it gives destabilizing effect after a certain high value of the electric field depending on the high value of {\\varGamma}. The weakly nonlinear study reveals that the increase of {\\varGamma} decreases the explosive and subcritical unstable zones but increases the supercritical stable zone keeping the unconditional zone almost constant.

  10. How Does Decommissioning Forest Roads Effect Hydrologic and Geomorphic Risk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, T.; Luce, C.; Cissel, R. M.; Nelson, N.; Staab, B.

    2010-12-01

    The US Forest Service is investigating road decommissioning projects to understand how treatments change hydrologic and geomorphic risks. Road treatment effect was measured using a before after control impact design (BACI), using the Geomorphic Road Analysis and Inventory Package (http://www.fs.fed.us/GRAIP). This suite of inventory and analysis tools evaluates: road-stream hydrologic connectivity, fine sediment production and delivery, shallow landslide risk, gully initiation risk, and risks associated with stream crossing failures. The Skokomish River study site is steep and wet and received a high intensity treatment including the removal of stream crossing pipes and fills, all ditch relief pipes and a full hillslope recontouring. Road to stream hydrologic connectivity was reduced by 70%. The treatments reduced fine sediment delivery by 21.8 tons or 81%. The removal of the stream crossing culverts and large associated road fills eliminated the risk of pipe plugging related failures and the eventual erosion of over 4,000 m3 of fill. The slope stability risk was assessed using a modified version of SINMAP (Pack et al, 2005). Risk below drain point locations on the original road was reduced as water was redistributed across the hillslope to waterbars and diffuse drainage. It is unclear; however, if landslide risk was reduced across the entire treated road length because treatments slightly increased risk in some areas where new concentrated drainage features were added above steep slopes. Similarly, values of a gully index ESI (Istanbulluoglu et al, 2003), were reduced at many of the original drainage points, however some new drainage was added. ESI values still exceed a predicted conservative initiation thresholds at some sites, therefore it is uncertain if gully risk will be changed. Mann Creek occupies a moderately steep mid-elevation site in Southern Idaho. The high intensity treatments removed all constructed road drainage features including stream crossing

  11. Geomorphic adjustment to hydrologic modifications along a meandering river: Implications for surface flooding on a floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Brandon L.; Keim, Richard F.; Johnson, Erin L.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Marre, Saraline; King, Sammy L.

    2016-09-01

    Responses of large regulated rivers to contemporary changes in base level are not well understood. We used field measurements and historical analysis of air photos and topographic maps to identify geomorphic trends of the lower White River, Arkansas, USA, in the 70 years following base-level lowering at its confluence with the Mississippi River and concurrent with flood control by dams. Incision was identified below a knickpoint area upstream of St. Charles, AR, and increases over the lowermost ~90 km of the study site to ~2 m near the confluence with the Mississippi River. Mean bankfull width increased by 30 m (21%) from 1930 to 2010. Bank widening appears to be the result of flow regulation above the incision knickpoint and concomitant with incision below the knickpoint. Hydraulic modeling indicated that geomorphic adjustments likely reduced flooding by 58% during frequent floods in the incised, lowermost floodplain affected by backwater flooding from the Mississippi River and by 22% above the knickpoint area. Dominance of backwater flooding in the incised reach indicates that incision is more important than flood control on the lower White River in altering flooding and also suggests that the Mississippi River may be the dominant control in shaping the lower floodplain. Overall, results highlight the complex geomorphic adjustment in large river-floodplain systems in response to anthropogenic modifications and their implications, including reduced river-floodplain connectivity.

  12. Evaluating the Influence of Geomorphic Conditions on Instream Fish Habitat Using Hydraulic Modeling and Geostatistical Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. S.; Rizzo, D. M.; Hession, W. C.; Watzin, M. C.; Laible, J. P.

    2006-05-01

    A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model (River2D) was utilized to evaluate the relationship between geomorphic conditions (as estimated using an existing rapid assessment protocol) and instream habitat quality in small Vermont streams. Six stream reaches ranging in geomorphic condition from good to poor according to the protocols were utilized for this study. We conducted detailed topographic surveys, quantified bed substrate, and measured velocity and discharge values during baseflow conditions. The reach models were calibrated with realistic roughness values based on field observations and pebble counts. After calibration, the weighted usable area (WUA) of habitat was calculated for each stream at three flows (7Q 10, median, and bankfull) using modeled parameters and habitat suitability curves for specific fish species and life stage. Brown trout (Salmo trutta), white sucker (Catostomus commersoni), and common shiner (Notropis cornutus) habitats were predicted using habitat parameters of velocity, depth, and channel substrate type for adult, juvenile, and fry stages. The predictions of reach-averaged WUA show a negative correlation to the geomorphic condition scores, indicating that the often-used rapid protocols, may not directly relate to habitat conditions at the reach spatial scale. However, the areas of high WUA are distributed in a patchy nature throughout the stream. This fluctuation of physical habitat conditions may be more important to classifying habitat than a single reach-averaged WUA score. The spatial distribution of habitat variables is not captured using either the reach-averaged WUA or geomorphic assessment scores to classify streams. Spatial analyses will be used to further evaluate the patchy nature of WUA distributions, and actual data on species distributions in the study streams will be compared to modeled habitat parameters and their spatial patterns.

  13. Geomorphic Evolution of Sputnik Planum and Surrounding Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, A. D.; Moore, J. M.; White, O. L.; Umurhan, O. M.; Schenk, P.; Beyer, R. A.; McKinnon, W. B.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Olkin, C.

    2015-12-01

    The informally-named Sputnik Planum is a vast expanse (about 835 km east-west and 1500 km north-south) of N2, CH4, and CO ices which appears craterless at current resolutions, but which gives evidence of both glacial and convective flow in the ices (Stern and the New Horizons Team, Science, 2015). This ice field is surrounded by uplands of varying morphology from hilly terrain to the northeast, plains of apparent ices interspersed with rough terrain to the east, and textured ice surrounding the mountainous terrain to the southwest. The morphology and composition of this bordering terrain will provide clues to the long-term evolution of Sputnik Planum as higher resolution visual and spectral imaging of this region are returned from the New Horizons spacecraft over the next few months. Interactions between Sputnik Planum and surrounding terrain may have involved glacial erosion and deposition. The geomorphic evolution of this region will be discussed in the context of newly-returned encounter data.

  14. A magnetic field-dependent modulation effect tends to stabilize light transmission through binary ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Lin, Yueqiang; Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Qingmei; Miao, Hua; Fu, Jun; Lin, Lihua

    2012-06-01

    In binary ferrofluids composed of ferromagnetic γ-Fe2O3/Ni2O3 composite nanoparticles (A particles) and noncrystalline Fe2O3 nanoparticles (B particles), the A particles alone will form chain-like aggregates upon application of a magnetic field. Due to both the long-range 'magnetic convergent force' (FC) and the short-range 'magnetic divergent force' (FD), the A-particle chains immersed in the B-particle 'sea' will move in a manner similar to the process of vibrational damping. The apparent damping of the ferrofluids will vary from weak to overdamping according to the motion of the chains, so that the intensity of light transmitted through a ferrofluid film along the direction of the field would tend to stabilize after a period of rapid decrements and increments. In binary ferrofluids, the B-particle system can produce a modulation effect on both the damping and the driving force, further stabilizing the behavior of the transmitted light. At low fields (e.g., 500 Gs, 900 Gs) only the modulation of the viscosity drag force (Fv) is considerable, so that overdamping increases linearly with B-particle volume fraction (ФB), and the variation in the transmitted light is much slower during the process tending towards stability as ФB increases. However, at high fields (e.g., 1300 Gs) the polarization of the B-particle 'sea' is enhanced, so that FD is modulated as well as Fv (i.e., both the practical damping and driving forces are modulated simultaneously). Thus, the apparent overdamping of the binary ferrofluids system will vary non-linearly as ФB increases, and the transmitted light will tend to stabilize faster for ferrofluids with high ΦB than for those with low ФB at an applied magnetic field of 1300 Gs.

  15. Numerical study on the stability of weakly collisional plasma in E×B fields

    SciTech Connect

    Horký, M.

    2015-02-15

    Plasma stability in weakly collisional plasmas in the presence of E×B fields is studied with numerical simulations. Different types of ion-neutral collisions are considered in a fully magnetized regime. We study the influence of ion-neutral collisions and the role of collision types on the stability of plasma. It is found that the stability of plasma depends on the type of ion-neutral collisions, with the plasma being unstable for charge exchange collisions, and stable for the elastic scattering. The analysis focuses on the temporal evolution of the velocity phase space, RMS values of the potential fluctuations, and coherent structures in potential densities. For the unstable case, we observe growth and propagation of electrostatic waves. Simulations are performed with a three-dimensional electrostatic particle in cell code.

  16. Geomorphic and hydraulic assessment of the Bear River in and near Evanston, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, M.E.; Maderak, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    Geomorphic and hydraulic characteristics of the Bear River in and near Evanston, Wyoming, were assessed to assist planners in stabilizing the river channel. Present-day channel instability is the result of both human-made and natural factors. The primary factor is channelization of the river in Evanston, where several meander loops were cut off artificially during early development of the city. Other contributing factors include channel-width constrictions, bank stabilization, isolated bend cutoffs upstream from the city, and flooding in 1983 and 1984. A geomorphic analysis of bankfull-channel pattern, based on four aerial photographs taken during 1946-86, quantified geomorphic properties (reach sinuosity, bend sinuosity, bend radius of curvature, and bed length) that are characteristic of the study reach. The reach sinuosity of reach 2 (the channelized reach in Evanston) was 1.18 in 1986 and remained about the same throughout the period (1946-86). The reach sinuosity of reach 2 prior to channelization was substantially larger, about 2.3 as determined from maps prepared before 1946. Hydraulic analysis of the present-day channel (surveyed 1981-87) using a one-dimensional water-surface-profile computer model identified a bankfull discharge for the study reach of 3,600 cu ft/sec. A comparison of bankfull hydraulic properties for reaches 1, 2, and 3 indicated that the effects in reach 2 of channelization and channel-width constriction--increased slope, faster velocities, and greater hydraulic radii. The present-day channel slope in reach 2 is 0.00518 ft/ft, whereas a more stable slope would be between 0.00431 ft/ft (present-day slope in reach 1) and 0.00486 ft/ft (present-day slope in reach 3).

  17. Field soil aggregate stability kit for soil quality and rangeland health evaluations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrick, J.E.; Whitford, W.G.; de Soyza, A. G.; Van Zee, J. W.; Havstad, K.M.; Seybold, C.A.; Walton, M.

    2001-01-01

    Soil aggregate stability is widely recognized as a key indicator of soil quality and rangeland health. However, few standard methods exist for quantifying soil stability in the field. A stability kit is described which can be inexpensively and easily assembled with minimal tools. It permits up to 18 samples to be evaluated in less than 10 min and eliminates the need for transportation, minimizing damage to soil structure. The kit consists of two 21??10.5??3.5 cm plastic boxes divided into eighteen 3.5??3.5 cm sections, eighteen 2.5-cm diameter sieves with 1.5-mm distance openings and a small spatula used for soil sampling. Soil samples are rated on a scale from one to six based on a combination of ocular observations of slaking during the first 5 min following immersion in distilled water, and the percent remaining on a 1.5-mm sieve after five dipping cycles at the end of the 5-min period. A laboratory comparison yielded a correlation between the stability class and percent aggregate stability based on oven dry weight remaining after treatment using a mechanical sieve. We have applied the method in a wide variety of agricultural and natural ecosystems throughout western North America, including northern Mexico, and have found that it is highly sensitive to differences in management and plant community composition. Although the field kit cannot replace the careful laboratory-based measurements of soil aggregate stability, it can clearly provide valuable information when these more intensive procedures are not possible.

  18. Predicting the type, location and magnitude of geomorphic responses to dam removal: Role of hydrologic and geomorphic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartner, John D.; Magilligan, Francis J.; Renshaw, Carl E.

    2015-12-01

    Using a dam removal on the Ashuelot River in southern New Hampshire, we test how a sudden, spatially non-uniform increase in river slope alters sediment transport dynamics and riparian sediment connectivity. Site conditions were characterized by detailed pre- and post-removal field surveys and high-resolution aerial lidar data, and locations of erosion and deposition were predicted through one-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling. The Homestead Dam was a ~ 200 year old, 4 m high, 50 m wide crib dam that created a 9.5 km long, relatively narrow reservoir. Following removal, an exhumed resistant bed feature of glaciofluvial boulders located 400 m upstream and ~ 2.5 m lower than the crest of the dam imposed a new boundary condition in the drained reservoir, acting as a grade control that maintained a backwater effect upstream. During the 15 months following removal, non-uniform erosion in the former reservoir totaled ~ 60,000 m3 (equivalent to ~ 9.3 cm when averaged across the reservoir). Net deposition of ~ 10,700 m3 was measured downstream of the dam, indicating most sediment from the reservoir was carried more than 8 km downstream beyond the study area. The most pronounced bed erosion occurred where modeled sediment transport increased in the downstream direction, and deposition occurred both within and downstream of the former reservoir where modeled sediment transport decreased in the downstream direction. We thus demonstrate that spatial gradients in sediment transport can be used to predict locations of erosion and deposition on the stream bed. We further observed that bed incision was not a necessary condition for bank erosion in the former reservoir. In this characteristically narrow and shallow reservoir lacking abundant dam-induced sedimentation, the variable resistance of the bed and banks acted as geomorphic constraints. Overall, the response deviated from the common conceptual model of knickpoint erosion and channel widening due to dam removal. With

  19. Seasonal logging, process response, and geomorphic work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, C. H.; Zimmermann, A.; Korup, O.; Iroumé, A.; Francke, T.; Bronstert, A.

    2013-09-01

    Deforestation is a prominent anthropogenic cause of erosive overland flow and slope instability, boosting rates of soil erosion and concomitant sediment flux. Conventional methods of gauging or estimating post-logging sediment flux focus on annual timescales, but potentially overlook important geomorphic responses on shorter time scales immediately following timber harvest. Sediments fluxes are commonly estimated from linear regression of intermittent measurements of water and sediment discharge using sediment rating curves (SRCs). However, these often unsatisfactorily reproduce non-linear effects such as discharge-load hystereses. We resolve such important dynamics from non-parametric Quantile Regression Forests (QRF) of high-frequency (3 min) measurements of stream discharge and sediment concentrations in similar-sized (~ 0.1 km2) forested Chilean catchments that were logged during either the rainy or the dry season. The method of QRF builds on the Random Forest (RF) algorithm, and combines quantile regression with repeated random sub-sampling of both cases and predictors. The algorithm belongs to the family of decision-tree classifiers, which allow quantifying relevant predictors in high-dimensional parameter space. We find that, where no logging occurred, ~ 80% of the total sediment load was transported during rare but high magnitude runoff events during only 5% of the monitoring period. The variability of sediment flux of these rare events spans four orders of magnitude. In particular dry-season logging dampened the role of these rare, extreme sediment-transport events by increasing load efficiency during more moderate events. We show that QRFs outperforms traditional SRCs in terms of accurately simulating short-term dynamics of sediment flux, and conclude that QRF may reliably support forest management recommendations by providing robust simulations of post-logging response of water and sediment discharge at high temporal resolution.

  20. Towards a magnetic field stabilization at ISOLTRAP for high-accuracy mass measurements on exotic nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marie-Jeanne, M.; Alonso, J.; Blaum, K.; Djekic, S.; Dworschak, M.; Hager, U.; Herlert, A.; Nagy, Sz.; Savreux, R.; Schweikhard, L.; Stahl, S.; Yazidjian, C.

    2008-03-01

    The field stability of a mass spectrometer plays a crucial role in the accuracy of mass measurements. In the case of mass determination of short-lived nuclides with a Penning trap, major causes of fluctuations are temperature variations in the vicinity of the trap and pressure changes in the liquid helium cryostat of the superconducting magnet. Thus systems for the temperature and pressure stabilization of the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at the ISOLDE facility at CERN have been installed. A reduction of the temperature and pressure fluctuations by at least an order of magnitude down to ΔT≈±5 mK and Δp≈±5 Pa has been achieved, which corresponds to a relative magnetic field change of ΔB/B=2.7×10-9 and 1.1×10-10, respectively.

  1. Assessing Variability and Uncertainty of Water Quality, Geomorphic, and Habitat Indicators to Evaluate Western New York Stream Restoration Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronner, C. E.; Rabideau, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Evaluation of stream restoration projects is often constrained by uncertainty and variability in performance indicators, as well as financial and time limitations. In Western New York (WNY), several projects, termed stream restoration, have been implemented that rely heavily on bank stabilization methods. Due to the lack of evaluation of these projects, it is uncertain if they are 1) meeting their objectives to protect against high erosion rates and 2) if they are improving stream function and processes in a manner consistent with the designation of “stream restoration”. During the summer/fall 2010 seasons, water quality, geomorphic, and rapid habitat indicators were used to characterize fourteen implemented and/or planned stream restoration projects spanning three WNY watersheds. Indicators included stream velocity, nutrient concentrations, water quality parameters (e.g. dissolved oxygen, conductivity, etc.), canopy coverage, substrate characteristics (e.g. embeddedness, particle size distribution) and bank characteristics (e.g. slope, shape, percentage erosion). In addition, five rapid assessment methods were implemented; two methods used the above indicators and three were based on visual assessments. Indicators were assessed for variability within and across sites to determine which indicators are most useful for evaluating WNY stream restoration and/or require additional investigation in summer 2011. Areas of uncertainty and vagueness in assessment methods were identified during field data collection, with a focus on how stream restoration structures were assessed. The poster presents results on select indicators, strengths/weaknesses of the rapid assessment techniques, and a preliminary evaluation of WNY stream restoration projects.

  2. General methods for determining the linear stability of coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, I. J. D.; Sneyd, A. D.; Mcclymont, A. N.

    1988-01-01

    A time integration of a linearized plasma equation of motion has been performed to calculate the ideal linear stability of arbitrary three-dimensional magnetic fields. The convergence rates of the explicit and implicit power methods employed are speeded up by using sequences of cyclic shifts. Growth rates are obtained for Gold-Hoyle force-free equilibria, and the corkscrew-kink instability is found to be very weak.

  3. Quantification of fluvial sediment transport and geomorphic change in a glacier forefield: Gepatschferner, Ötztaler Alps, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morche, D.; Baewert, H.; Bryk, A.

    2012-12-01

    combination of Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) data to quantify morphological change in lateral sediment sources/sinks through time, and in-channel water and sediment discharge measurements to constrain local mass-export rates. Total load (solid and solute load) and terrestrial LiDAR data from the 2012 field season are presented herein from several locations along the Fagge River and the Gepatschferner glacier forefield. Future work and the implications for high alpine geomorphic stability are discussed.

  4. Improved field stability in RFQ structures with vane-coupling rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, H.R.; Lancaster, H.

    1983-03-01

    The small apertures common in many RFQ linac designs lead to tuning difficulties, primarily because asymmetries in the quadrant fields can arise as a result of small non-uniformities in the vane-to-vane capacitances. Sensitivity to such capacitance or other tuning variation in the quadrants is greatly reduced by the introduction of pairs of vane-coupling rings that provide periodic electrical connections between diametrically opposite vanes. Results of measurements on a cold model RFQ structure with and without vane-coupling rings are presented. The number of rings required for field stabilization and the effect of rings on mode frequencies are discussed.

  5. Absolute stability and synchronization in neural field models with transmission delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Chiu-Yen; Shih, Chih-Wen; Wu, Chang-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Neural fields model macroscopic parts of the cortex which involve several populations of neurons. We consider a class of neural field models which are represented by integro-differential equations with transmission time delays which are space-dependent. The considered domains underlying the systems can be bounded or unbounded. A new approach, called sequential contracting, instead of the conventional Lyapunov functional technique, is employed to investigate the global dynamics of such systems. Sufficient conditions for the absolute stability and synchronization of the systems are established. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the theoretical results.

  6. Direct-current cathodic vacuum arc system with magnetic-field mechanism for plasma stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.-S.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2008-07-15

    Filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition is characterized by plasma beam directionality, plasma energy adjustment via substrate biasing, macroparticle filtering, and independent substrate temperature control. Between the two modes of FCVA deposition, namely, direct current (dc) and pulsed arc, the dc mode yields higher deposition rates than the pulsed mode. However, maintaining the dc arc discharge is challenging because of its inherent plasma instabilities. A system generating a special configuration of magnetic field that stabilizes the dc arc discharge during film deposition is presented. This magnetic field is also part of the out-of-plane magnetic filter used to focus the plasma beam and prevent macroparticle film contamination. The efficiency of the plasma-stabilizing magnetic-field mechanism is demonstrated by the deposition of amorphous carbon (a-C) films exhibiting significantly high hardness and tetrahedral carbon hybridization (sp{sup 3}) contents higher than 70%. Such high-quality films cannot be produced by dc arc deposition without the plasma-stabilizing mechanism presented in this study.

  7. Direct-current cathodic vacuum arc system with magnetic-field mechanism for plasma stabilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H-S; Komvopoulos, K

    2008-07-01

    Filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition is characterized by plasma beam directionality, plasma energy adjustment via substrate biasing, macroparticle filtering, and independent substrate temperature control. Between the two modes of FCVA deposition, namely, direct current (dc) and pulsed arc, the dc mode yields higher deposition rates than the pulsed mode. However, maintaining the dc arc discharge is challenging because of its inherent plasma instabilities. A system generating a special configuration of magnetic field that stabilizes the dc arc discharge during film deposition is presented. This magnetic field is also part of the out-of-plane magnetic filter used to focus the plasma beam and prevent macroparticle film contamination. The efficiency of the plasma-stabilizing magnetic-field mechanism is demonstrated by the deposition of amorphous carbon (a-C) films exhibiting significantly high hardness and tetrahedral carbon hybridization (sp3) contents higher than 70%. Such high-quality films cannot be produced by dc arc deposition without the plasma-stabilizing mechanism presented in this study. PMID:18681714

  8. Kinetic simulations of the formation and stability of the field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Omelchenko, Yu. A.

    2000-05-01

    The Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) is a high-beta compact toroidal plasma confined primarily by poloidal fields. In the FRC the external field is reversed on axis by the diamagnetic current carried by thermal plasma particles. A three-dimensional, hybrid, particle-in-cell (zero-inertia fluid electrons, and kinetic ions), code FLAME, previously used to study ion rings [Yu. A. Omelchenko and R. N. Sudan, J. Comp. Phys. 133, 146 (1997)], is applied to investigate FRC formation and tilt instability. Axisymmetric FRC equilibria are obtained by simulating the standard experimental reversed theta-pinch technique. These are used to study the nonlinear tilt mode in the ''kinetic'' and ''fluid-like'' cases characterized by ''small'' ({approx}3) and ''large'' ({approx}12) ratios of the characteristic radial plasma size to the mean ion gyro-radius, respectively. The formation simulations have revealed the presence of a substantial toroidal (azimuthal) magnetic field inside the separatrix, generated due to the stretching of the poloidal field by a sheared toroidal electron flow. This is shown to be an important tilt-stabilizing effect in both cases. On the other hand, the tilt mode stabilization by finite Larmor radius effects has been found relatively insignificant for the chosen equilibria. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Characterizing the geomorphic setting of precariously balanced rocks using terrestrial laser scanning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, D. E.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2009-12-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technology is rapidly becoming an effective three-dimensional imaging tool. Precariously balanced rocks are a subset of spheroidally weathered boulders. They are balanced on bedrock pedestals and are formed in upland drainage basins and pediments of exhumed plutons. Precarious rocks are used as negative evidence of earthquake-driven extreme ground motions. Field surveys of PBRs are coupled with cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) surface exposure dating techniques to determine their exhumation rates. These rates are used in statistical simulations to estimate the magnitudes and recurrences of earthquake-generated extreme ground shaking as a means to physically validate seismic hazard analyses. However, the geomorphic setting of PBRs in the landscape is poorly constrained when interpreting their exhumation rates from CRN surface exposure dates. Are PBRs located on steep or gentle hillslopes? Are they located near drainages or hillslope crests? What geomorphic processes control the spatial distribution of PBRs in a landscape, and where do these processes dominate? Because the fundamental hillslope transport laws are largely controlled by local hillslope gradient and contributing area, the location of a PBR is controlled by the geomorphic agents and their rates acting on it. Our latest efforts involve using a combination of TLS and airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) to characterize the geomorphic situation of PBRs. We used a Riegl LPM 800i (LPM 321) terrestrial laser scanner to scan a ~1.5 m tall by ~1 m wide precariously balanced rock in the Granite Dells, central Arizona. The PBR was scanned from six positions, and the scans were aligned to a point cloud totaling 3.4M points. We also scanned a ~50 m by ~150 m area covering PBR hillslopes from five scan positions. The resulting 5.5M points were used to create a digital terrain model of precarious rocks and their hillslopes. Our TLS- and ALSM-generated surface models and DEMs provide a

  10. Biotic versus geomorphic control of landscape soil carbon accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hemelryck, Hendrik; Govers, Gerard; Van Oost, Kristof

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is the largest terrestrial pool of carbon. In order to assess the impact of increasing human-induced land use changes and future climate on this huge reservoir, it is important to understand the complex process of carbon cycling at different temporal and spatial scales. A key challenge in this effort is the correct representation in global assessments and models of those processes that vary strongly over small scales and are strongly affected by the spatial distribution of carbon stocks (both horizontally and vertically) within the landscape. Many studies have shown that spatial variation of SOC storage at the landscape scale is related to topography as a result of either the redistribution of soil or spatial variation in biological C fluxes (input and decomposition). The objective of this study, is to assess the relative importance of biotic versus geomorphic controls in determining SOC patterns and their potential interactions. Therefore the relationships between topography on the one hand and SOC and carbon isotopes on the other hand, were quantified along an erosional gradient. For this purpose, a grassland area and two agricultural fields with a different management regime (conventional tillage, reduced tillage) were selected. All field sites have a similar topography but are characterized by different rates of soil redistribution, related to management regime. Our results show clearly that for temperate climate regions without moisture/nutrient deficit, soil redistribution is the main driver for spatial variations in SOC, dwarfing any biological effects. From the results, the impact of soil redistribution on carbon dynamics by the continued maintenance of a disequilibrium between carbon in-and output at different landscape positions is reconstructed and we discuss the implications for C sequestration processes.

  11. Stability of bumps in piecewise smooth neural fields with nonlinear adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2010-06-01

    We study the linear stability of stationary bumps in piecewise smooth neural fields with local negative feedback in the form of synaptic depression or spike frequency adaptation. The continuum dynamics is described in terms of a nonlocal integrodifferential equation, in which the integral kernel represents the spatial distribution of synaptic weights between populations of neurons whose mean firing rate is taken to be a Heaviside function of local activity. Discontinuities in the adaptation variable associated with a bump solution means that bump stability cannot be analyzed by constructing the Evans function for a network with a sigmoidal gain function and then taking the high-gain limit. In the case of synaptic depression, we show that linear stability can be formulated in terms of solutions to a system of pseudo-linear equations. We thus establish that sufficiently strong synaptic depression can destabilize a bump that is stable in the absence of depression. These instabilities are dominated by shift perturbations that evolve into traveling pulses. In the case of spike frequency adaptation, we show that for a wide class of perturbations the activity and adaptation variables decouple in the linear regime, thus allowing us to explicitly determine stability in terms of the spectrum of a smooth linear operator. We find that bumps are always unstable with respect to this class of perturbations, and destabilization of a bump can result in either a traveling pulse or a spatially localized breather.

  12. Structure and Stability of Magnetic Fields in Solar Active Region 12192 Based on the Nonlinear Force-free Field Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, S.; Hayashi, K.; Kusano, K.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic structure and its stability in large solar active region (AR) 12192, using the 3D coronal magnetic field constructed under a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) approximation. In particular, we focus on the magnetic structure that produced an X3.1-class flare, which is one of the X-class flares observed in AR 12192. According to our analysis, the AR contains a multiple-flux-tube system, e.g., a large flux tube, with footpoints that are anchored to the large bipole field, under which other tubes exist close to a polarity inversion line (PIL). These various flux tubes of different sizes and shapes coexist there. In particular, the latter are embedded along the PIL, which produces a favorable shape for the tether-cutting reconnection and is related to the X-class solar flare. We further found that most of magnetic twists are not released even after the flare, which is consistent with the fact that no observational evidence for major eruptions was found. On the other hand, the upper part of the flux tube is beyond a critical decay index, essential for the excitation of torus instability before the flare, even though no coronal mass ejections were observed. We discuss the stability of the complicated flux tube system and suggest the reason for the existence of the stable flux tube. In addition, we further point out a possibility for tracing the shape of flare ribbons, on the basis of a detailed structural analysis of the NLFFF before a flare.

  13. Low beta equilibrium and stability for anisotropic pressure closed field line plasma confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pastukhov, V.P.; Ilgisonis, V.I.; Subbotin, A.A.

    1994-05-01

    General formalism is developed to analyze the equilibrium and stability of low beta anisotropic pressure plasmas confined in closed field line magnetic systems. The formalism allows one to consider rather general magnetic systems with nonuniform axis curvature and longitudinal profiles of toroidal and multipole poloidal field. It also allows having a strong pressure anisotropy corresponding to enhanced plasma pressure in mirror cells of the system. As an example of such a system the authors consider the recently proposed linked mirror neutron source (LMNS). Application of the above formalism to the LMNS analysis confirms most of the preliminary results, however, they obtain a considerable reduction of mirror cell axis curvature and an appreciable ellipticity of plasma cross-section in the mirror cell midplane. They have also optimized the longitudinal pressure and magnetic field distribution.

  14. Geomorphic controls on biological soil crust distribution: A conceptual model from the Mojave Desert (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Amanda J.; Buck, Brenda J.; Soukup, Deborah A.; Merkler, Douglas J.

    2013-08-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are bio-sedimentary features that play critical geomorphic and ecological roles in arid environments. Extensive mapping, surface characterization, GIS overlays, and statistical analyses explored relationships among BSCs, geomorphology, and soil characteristics in a portion of the Mojave Desert (USA). These results were used to develop a conceptual model that explains the spatial distribution of BSCs. In this model, geologic and geomorphic processes control the ratio of fine sand to rocks, which constrains the development of three surface cover types and biogeomorphic feedbacks across intermontane basins. (1) Cyanobacteria crusts grow where abundant fine sand and negligible rocks form saltating sand sheets. Cyanobacteria facilitate moderate sand sheet activity that reduces growth potential of mosses and lichens. (2) Extensive tall moss-lichen pinnacled crusts are favored on early to late Holocene surfaces composed of mixed rock and fine sand. Moss-lichen crusts induce a dust capture feedback mechanism that promotes further crust propagation and forms biologically-mediated vesicular (Av) horizons. The presence of thick biogenic vesicular horizons supports the interpretation that BSCs are long-lived surface features. (3) Low to moderate density moss-lichen crusts grow on early Holocene and older geomorphic surfaces that display high rock cover and negligible surficial fine sand. Desert pavement processes and abiotic vesicular horizon formation dominate these surfaces and minimize bioturbation potential. The biogeomorphic interactions that sustain these three surface cover trajectories support unique biological communities and soil conditions, thereby sustaining ecological stability. The proposed conceptual model helps predict BSC distribution within intermontane basins to identify biologically sensitive areas, set reference conditions for ecological restoration, and potentially enhance arid landscape models, as scientists address impacts

  15. The double-gradient magnetic instability: Stabilizing effect of the guide field

    SciTech Connect

    Korovinskiy, D. B. Semenov, V. S.; Ivanova, V. V.; Divin, A. V.; Erkaev, N. V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Lapenta, G.; Markidis, S.; Biernat, H. K.

    2015-01-15

    The role of the dawn-dusk magnetic field component in stabilizing of the magnetotail flapping oscillations is investigated in the double-gradient model framework (Erkaev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 235003 (2007)), extended for the magnetotail-like configurations with non-zero guide field B{sub y}. Contribution of the guide field is examined both analytically and by means of linearized 2-dimensional (2D) and non-linear 3-dimensional (3D) MHD modeling. All three approaches demonstrate the same properties of the instability: stabilization of current sheet oscillations for short wavelength modes, appearing of the typical (fastest growing) wavelength λ{sub peak} of the order of the current sheet width, decrease of the peak growth rate with increasing B{sub y} value, and total decay of the mode for B{sub y}∼0.5 in the lobe magnetic field units. Analytical solution and 2D numerical simulations claim also the shift of λ{sub peak} toward the longer wavelengths with increasing guide field. This result is barely visible in 3D simulations. It may be accounted for the specific background magnetic configuration, the pattern of tail-like equilibrium provided by approximated solution of the conventional Grad-Shafranov equation. The configuration demonstrates drastically changing radius of curvature of magnetic field lines, R{sub c}. This, in turn, favors the “double-gradient” mode (λ > R{sub c}) in one part of the sheet and classical “ballooning” instability (λ < R{sub c}) in another part, which may result in generation of a “combined” unstable mode.

  16. Bonneville Basin Analogues for Large Lake Processes & Chronologies of Geomorphic Development on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, K.; Chan, M. A.; Parker, T. J.; Jewell, P. W.; Komatsu, G.; Okubo, C. H.

    2009-03-01

    We present an inventory of geomorphic analogues for Lake Bonneville and Mars, with focus on potential standing-water features. The goal is to understand water as a geomorphic agent at a variety of temporal and spatial scales.

  17. Tracking Geomorphic Signatures of Watershed Suburbanization with Multi-Temporal LiDAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban development practices redistribute surface materials through filling, grading and terracing, causing drastic changes to the geomorphic organization of the landscape. Many studies document the hydrologic, biologic, or geomorphic consequences of urbanization using space-for-t...

  18. Enhanced stability of black phosphorus field-effect transistors with SiO2 passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Bensong; Yang, Bingchao; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Junying; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2015-10-01

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) has attracted much attention due to its high mobility and suitable band gap for potential applic5ations in optoelectronics and flexible devices. However, its instability under ambient conditions limits its practical applications. Our investigations indicate that by passivation of the mechanically exfoliated BP flakes with a SiO2 layer, the fabricated BP field-effect transistors (FETs) exhibit greatly enhanced environmental stability. Compared to the unpassivated BP devices, which show a fast drop of on/off current ratio by a factor of 10 after one week of ambient exposure, the SiO2-passivated BP devices display a high retained on/off current ratio of over 600 after one week of exposure, just a little lower than the initial value of 810. Our investigations provide an effective route to passivate the few-layer BPs for enhancement of their environmental stability.

  19. Enhanced stability of black phosphorus field-effect transistors with SiO₂ passivation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Bensong; Yang, Bingchao; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Junying; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2015-10-30

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) has attracted much attention due to its high mobility and suitable band gap for potential applic5ations in optoelectronics and flexible devices. However, its instability under ambient conditions limits its practical applications. Our investigations indicate that by passivation of the mechanically exfoliated BP flakes with a SiO2 layer, the fabricated BP field-effect transistors (FETs) exhibit greatly enhanced environmental stability. Compared to the unpassivated BP devices, which show a fast drop of on/off current ratio by a factor of 10 after one week of ambient exposure, the SiO2-passivated BP devices display a high retained on/off current ratio of over 600 after one week of exposure, just a little lower than the initial value of 810. Our investigations provide an effective route to passivate the few-layer BPs for enhancement of their environmental stability. PMID:26436439

  20. Stability threshold of ion temperature gradient driven mode in reversed field pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, S. C.

    2008-12-15

    For the first time in the reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration, the stability threshold of the ion temperature gradient driven (ITG) mode is studied by linear gyrokinetic theory. In comparison with tokamaks, the RFP configuration has a shorter connection length and stronger magnetic curvature drift. These effects result in a stronger instability driving mechanism and a larger growth rate in the fluid limit. However, the kinetic theory shows that the temperature slopes required for the excitation of ITG instability are much steeper than the tokamak ones. This is because the effect of Landau damping also becomes stronger due to the shorter connection length, which is dominant and ultimately determines the stability threshold. The required temperature slope for the instability may only be found in the very edge of the plasma and/or near the border of the dominant magnetic island during the quasi-single helicity state of discharge.

  1. Stability and conductivity of self assembled wires in a transverse electric field

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, C.; Hubler, A.

    2015-01-01

    Self assembling wire networks typically evolve to minimize the resistance across electrical contacts which are frequently used in a manner comparable to Hebbian learning. In this work, we demonstrate that electrical fields can also be used to cause an increase in the resistance of the wire network. We show that if such a wire is exposed to a transverse electric field, the wire is deformed in a way that depends on it’s tensile strength. We measure the wire resistance as a function of transverse field for several field strengths and show that by deforming the wire, the amplitude of the resulting shape can be modified in a controllable fashion. At a critical value of the transverse field, we show that the wire loses stability. At this point we observe thresholding behavior in that the resistance increases abruptly to a maximum value and the wire is destroyed. This thresholding behavior suggests that self assembled wires may be manipulated via an transverse electric field and demonstrates that a mechanism exists for the destruction of undesirable connections. PMID:26463476

  2. Stability and conductivity of self assembled wires in a transverse electric field.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, C; Hubler, A

    2015-01-01

    Self assembling wire networks typically evolve to minimize the resistance across electrical contacts which are frequently used in a manner comparable to Hebbian learning. In this work, we demonstrate that electrical fields can also be used to cause an increase in the resistance of the wire network. We show that if such a wire is exposed to a transverse electric field, the wire is deformed in a way that depends on it's tensile strength. We measure the wire resistance as a function of transverse field for several field strengths and show that by deforming the wire, the amplitude of the resulting shape can be modified in a controllable fashion. At a critical value of the transverse field, we show that the wire loses stability. At this point we observe thresholding behavior in that the resistance increases abruptly to a maximum value and the wire is destroyed. This thresholding behavior suggests that self assembled wires may be manipulated via an transverse electric field and demonstrates that a mechanism exists for the destruction of undesirable connections. PMID:26463476

  3. On the problems of stability and durability of field-emission current sources for electrovacuum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Alexander N.; Aban'shin, Nikolay P.; Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, Georgy G.; Avetisyan, Yuri A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of the practical implementation of the concept of field-emission current source with high average current density of 0.1-0.3 A-cm-2 are shown. The durability of cathode samples at a level of 6000 hours is achieved under conditions of technical vacuum. A phenomenological model is suggested that describes the tunneling of both equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrons in a vacuum from the zone of concentration of electrostatic field. Conditions are discussed as the resulting increase in the emission current due to the connection mechanism of the photoelectric effect is thermodynamically favorable, that is not accompanied by an undesirable increase in the temperature of the local emission zone. It is shown that to ensure stability and durability of the cathode is also important to limit the concentration of equilibrium carriers using composite structures «DLC film on Mo substrate." This helps to reduce the criticality of the CVC. A possible alternative is to use a restrictive resistance in the cathode. However, this increases the heat losses and thus decreases assembly efficiency. The results of experimental studies of the structure showing the saturation of photoemission current component with an increase in operating voltage. This fact suggests the existence of an effective mechanism for control of emission at constant operating voltage. This is fundamentally important for the stabilization of field emission cathode, providing a reliability and durability. The single-photon processes and the small thickness DLC films (15-20 nm) provide high-speed process of control.

  4. Geomorphic legacy of medieval Himalayan earthquakes in the Pokhara Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Bernhardt, Anne; Stolle, Amelie; Hoelzmann, Philipp; Adhikari, Basanta R.; Andermann, Christoff; Tofelde, Stefanie; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg; Fort, Monique; Korup, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    The Himalayas and their foreland belong to the world's most earthquake-prone regions. With millions of people at risk from severe ground shaking and associated damages, reliable data on the spatial and temporal occurrence of past major earthquakes is urgently needed to inform seismic risk analysis. Beyond the instrumental record such information has been largely based on historical accounts and trench studies. Written records provide evidence for damages and fatalities, yet are difficult to interpret when derived from the far-field. Trench studies, in turn, offer information on rupture histories, lengths and displacements along faults but involve high chronological uncertainties and fail to record earthquakes that do not rupture the surface. Thus, additional and independent information is required for developing reliable earthquake histories. Here, we present exceptionally well-dated evidence of catastrophic valley infill in the Pokhara Valley, Nepal. Bayesian calibration of radiocarbon dates from peat beds, plant macrofossils, and humic silts in fine-grained tributary sediments yields a robust age distribution that matches the timing of nearby M>8 earthquakes in ~1100, 1255, and 1344 AD. The upstream dip of tributary valley fills and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry of their provenance rule out local sediment sources. Instead, geomorphic and sedimentary evidence is consistent with catastrophic fluvial aggradation and debris flows that had plugged several tributaries with tens of meters of calcareous sediment from the Annapurna Massif >60 km away. The landscape-changing consequences of past large Himalayan earthquakes have so far been elusive. Catastrophic aggradation in the wake of two historically documented medieval earthquakes and one inferred from trench studies underscores that Himalayan valley fills should be considered as potential archives of past earthquakes. Such valley fills are pervasive in the Lesser Himalaya though high erosion rates reduce

  5. Hydrologic versus geomorphic drivers of trends in flood hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Louise J.; Bliss Singer, Michael; Kirchner, James W.

    2016-04-01

    Flooding is a major threat to lives and infrastructure, yet trends in flood hazard are poorly understood. The capacity of river channels to convey flood flows is typically assumed to be stationary, so changes in flood frequency are thought to be driven primarily by trends in streamflow. However, changes in channel capacity will also modify flood hazard, even if the flow frequency distribution does not change. We developed new methods for separately quantifying how trends in both streamflow and channel capacity have affected flood frequency at gauging sites across the United States. Using daily discharge records and manual field measurements of channel cross-sectional geometry for USGS gauging stations that have defined flood stages (water levels), we present novel methods for measuring long-term trends in channel capacity of gauged rivers, and for quantifying how they affect overbank flood frequency. We apply these methods to 401 U.S. rivers and detect measurable trends in flood hazard linked to changes in channel capacity and/or the frequency of high flows. Flood frequency is generally nonstationary across these 401 U.S. rivers, with increasing flood hazard at a statistically significant majority of sites. Changes in flood hazard driven by channel capacity are smaller, but more numerous, than those driven by streamflow, with a slight tendency to compensate for streamflow changes. Our results demonstrate that accurately quantifying changes in flood hazard requires accounting separately for trends in both streamflow and channel capacity, or using water levels directly. They also show that channel capacity trends may have unforeseen consequences for flood management and for estimating flood insurance costs. Slater, L. J., M. B. Singer, and J. W. Kirchner (2015), Hydrologic versus geomorphic drivers of trends in flood hazard, Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 370-376, doi:10.1002/2014GL062482.

  6. Stability of an ellipsoidal stellar cluster in the tidal force field of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhanov, T. S.

    1992-02-01

    Attention is given to the dynamical characteristics of an ellipsoidal stellar cluster which rotates on an elliptical orbit relative to the center of the Galaxy in the field of its tidal forces. Regions of stability and instability of the cluster as a function of its form are defined on the basis of a numerical solution of the equations of the motion of stars inside the cluster. It is shown that, if the flattening of the cluster along the Y-axis, which coincides with the rotation direction, is larger than along the X-axis, which is directed toward the center of the Galaxy), the cluster is unstable.

  7. Formation, spin-up, and stability of field-reversed configurations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Omelchenko, Yuri A.

    2015-08-24

    Formation, spontaneous spin-up and stability of theta-pinch formed field-reversed configurations are studied self-consistently in three dimensions with a multiscale hybrid model that treats all plasma ions as full-orbit collisional macro-particles and the electrons as a massless quasineutral fluid. The end-to-end hybrid simulations for the first time reveal poloidal profiles of implosion-driven fast toroidal plasma rotation and demonstrate three well-known discharge regimes as a function of experimental parameters: the decaying stable configuration, the tilt unstable configuration and the nonlinear evolution of a fast growing tearing mode.

  8. Gas field ion source current stability for trimer and single atom terminated W(111) tips

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A.; Pitters, Jason L.

    2012-06-25

    Tungsten W(111) oriented trimer-terminated tips as well as single atom tips, fabricated by a gas and field assisted etching and evaporation process, were investigated with a view to scanning ion microscopy and ion beam writing applications. In particular, ion current stability was studied for helium and neon imaging gases. Large ion current fluctuations from individual atomic sites were observed when a trimer-terminated tip was used for the creation of neon ion beam. However, neon ion current was stable when a single atom tip was employed. No such current oscillations were observed for either a trimer or a single atom tip when imaged with helium.

  9. Acceleration and stability of a high-current ion beam in induction fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas', V. I.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Federovskaya, O. V.

    2013-03-01

    A one-dimensional nonlinear analytic theory of the filamentation instability of a high-current ion beam is formulated. The results of 2.5-dimensional numerical particle-in-cell simulations of acceleration and stability of an annular compensated ion beam (CIB) in a linear induction particle accelerator are presented. It is shown that additional transverse injection of electron beams in magnetically insulated gaps (cusps) improves the quality of the ion-beam distribution function and provides uniform beam acceleration along the accelerator. The CIB filamentation instability in both the presence and the absence of an external magnetic field is considered.

  10. Acceleration and stability of a high-current ion beam in induction fields

    SciTech Connect

    Karas', V. I.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Federovskaya, O. V.

    2013-03-15

    A one-dimensional nonlinear analytic theory of the filamentation instability of a high-current ion beam is formulated. The results of 2.5-dimensional numerical particle-in-cell simulations of acceleration and stability of an annular compensated ion beam (CIB) in a linear induction particle accelerator are presented. It is shown that additional transverse injection of electron beams in magnetically insulated gaps (cusps) improves the quality of the ion-beam distribution function and provides uniform beam acceleration along the accelerator. The CIB filamentation instability in both the presence and the absence of an external magnetic field is considered.

  11. Stabilization of neutral thin shells by gravitational effects from electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guendelman, Eduardo I.; Shilon, Idan

    2009-02-01

    We study the properties of a system consisting of an uncharged spherically symmetric two-dimensional extended object which encloses a stationary point charge placed in the shell's center. We show that there can be a static and stable configuration for the neutral shell, using only the gravitational field of the charged source as a stabilizing mechanism. In particular, two types of shells are studied: a dust shell and a string gas shell. The dynamical possibilities are also analyzed, including the possibility of child universe creation.

  12. Long-term stability of peneplains and landscape evolution in southern Tibet inferred from field data, cosmogenic nuclides, and digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobl, M.; Hetzel, R.; Ding, L.; Zhang, L.

    2010-05-01

    Peneplains constitute a widespread and well developed geomorphic element on the Tibetan Plateau, nevertheless little is known about their formation and the subsequent landscape evolution. In southern Tibet, north of Nam Co (~31° 20'N, 90° E), a particularly well-preserved peneplain occurs at an elevation of ~5350 m in Cretaceous granitoids. The main planation surface has been incised by small streams that formed additional small low-relief surfaces at lower elevations. Fluvial incision of the main peneplain has generated a local relief of up to ~700 m. The progressive incision has led to hillslope gradients that increase with decreasing elevation, i.e. from the main peneplain at ~5350 m down to the current base level at ~4650 m, as revealed by field observations and the analysis of digital elevation model. In order to quantify the landscape evolution of the peneplain region we determined local and catchment-wide erosion rates from the concentration of in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be. Local erosion rates on the main peneplain and the low-relief bedrock surfaces at lower elevation range from 6 to 12 m Ma-1 and indicate that the geomorphic surfaces are stable over long periods of time. Spatially integrated erosion rates of small river systems that are incising and eroding headwards into the main peneplain are only slightly higher and range from 11 to 18 m Ma-1. Even if river incision has proceeded at a rate that is 2-4 times higher than the catchment-wide erosion rates, i.e. at 30 to 60 m Ma-1, it would take about 10 to 20 Ma to generate the local relief of ~700 m observed today. This demonstrates that the major peneplain is a very stable geomorphic element with a minimum age of 10 to 20 Ma and that the landscape in the region has barely been modified by erosion in the last millions of years.

  13. GEOMORPHIC THRESHOLDS AND CHANNEL MORPHOLOGY IN LARGE RIVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systematic changes in channel morphology occur as channel gradient, streamflow, and sediment character change and interact. Geomorphic thresholds of various kinds are useful metrics to define these changes along the river network, as they are based on in-channel processes that d...

  14. EFFECTS OF GEOMORPHIC PROCESSES AND HYDROLOGIC REGIMES ON RIPARIAN VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, the relationships among riparian vegetation and geomorphic and hydrologic processes in central Great Basin watersheds are evaluated over a range of scales. These relationships are examined through a series of case studies that have been conducted by the Great Ba...

  15. Geomorphic responses as indicators of paleoclimate and climatic change

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    There is little doubt that climate is an important parameter affecting the shape of the Earth`s surface. However absolute observance to the principles of climatic geomorphology leads us away from the study of processes because the analyses passes directly from climate to landscape form. An alternative approach is to examine the effects of climate change on the nature of the processes operating in the near surface environment. Utilizing this methodology, the climate-process relations take on greater significance, and lead to an understanding of the response(s) of geomorphic systems to shifts in climatic regime. Given that geomorphic systems respond to changes in climate regime, it should also be true that delineation of the changes in the types, rates, and magnitudes of geomorphic processes will provide insights into the timing and nature of past shifts in climate, particularly effective moisture. It is this approach that has been utilized herein. Specifically, geomorphic responses in eolian, lacustrine, and fluvial systems that have resulted in erosional and depositional events have been documented for several sites in Nevada (Figure 1), and used to infer the timing and character of climatic change in the Basin and Range Physiographic Province. The results and conclusions of the specific studies are provided.

  16. Geomorphic context of channel locational probabilities along the Lower Mississippi River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasklewicz, Thad A.; Anderson, Shawn; Liu, Pin-Shou

    2004-12-01

    Channel change is an important aspect of geomorphological evolution and habitat dynamics in large alluvial rivers. Planimetric maps of channel locations were used to investigate spatio-temporal alluvial channel changes in a geomorphic context along the Lower Mississippi River (LMR). Analyses were conducted with the aid of a time-weighted locational probability map. The locational probability map was constructed in ArcGIS and covered a period of 205 years. An examination of the pixel data from the probability maps indicates a high occurrence of low probability pixels along the Lower Mississippi River, which is in accordance with the dynamism of alluvial rivers. The northern section of the Lower Mississippi River (Columbus, KY to Memphis, TN) has been much more stable than the southern river segments (Helena, AR to Natchez, MS). Areas of high channel probability (channel stability) were often associated with alluvial channel confinement from a combination of flood-plain deposits, geologic structures and large stable islands. Low channel probability locations were found along sections exhibiting the following geomorphic characteristics: changes in meander amplitude, meander neck and chute cutoffs, meander extensional processes and islands lost in channel migrational processes. The results provide a strong foundation for understanding channel change on the Lower Mississippi River and serves as a valuable instrument for future management and restoration schemes.

  17. Hydrophilic quantum dots stability against an external low-strength electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goftman, Valentina V.; Pankratov, Vladislav A.; Markin, Alexey V.; Ginste, Dries Vande; De Saeger, Sarah; Goryacheva, Irina Yu.

    2016-02-01

    Since the stability of nanobiolabels plays a key role in their application, we thoroughly investigated how an external, low-strength electric field impacts on the fluorescent properties of hydrophilic quantum dots (QDs). Two fundamentally different approaches were applied to make the QDs water-soluble, i.e. ligand exchange (namely silica covering) and encapsulation with an amphiphilic polymer. It is shown that, even under a low-strength electric field, the polymer-coated QDs could lose 90% of their brightness because of the weak interaction between the QD's surface and the polymeric molecule. Silica-covered QDs, on the contrary, stay bright and stable owing to the covalently attached dense silica shell. These findings, which are clearly explained and illustrated in the present paper, are of critical importance in the context of hydrophilic QDs' bioapplication.

  18. Effect of toroidal magnetic field on n = 1 mode stability in rotamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Goss, J.; Kalaria, D.; Huang, T. S.

    2011-08-15

    To study the effect of toroidal magnetic field on n = 1 mode stability, a series of experiments with linearly ramping the axial current I{sub z}, which makes field-reversed configuration (FRC) to spherical tokamak (ST) transition, have been conducted in rotamak. Results clearly demonstrate that the tilt mode can be completely suppressed by small I{sub z} around 0.4 kA (in comparison with 2.0 kA plasma current). An unknown new mode with larger magnetic perturbations is triggered when I{sub z} reaches 0.5 kA. This instability mode keeps saturation while plasma current is boosted when I{sub z} is in the range of 0.6-1.4 kA. When I{sub z} exceeds 1.6 kA, the new mode suddenly disappears and discharge is free from instability modes.

  19. Stability of an electrically induced vortical flow in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasyuk, V. Kh.; Shcherbinin, E. V.

    2004-09-01

    A numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, without any additional and special assumptions, is applied to investigate the stability of electrovortex flows (EVF) and the azimuthal rotation driven by the interaction of a working current with an external magnetic field. The field was induced by one or two rings with the current arranged at the bottom of the cylindrical area under calculation. The current in the second ring was equal to the current in the first one but was opposite in direction. The results obtained are sufficient to analyze qualitatively and quantitatively the occurrence of a non-stationary hydrodynamic stream function and a Taylor instability, when an easier liquid breaks upwards through a denser layer. Critical dependencies on the EVT parameter S and interaction N are found. The main result of the work is the found characteristic reorganization of the zero vorticity line when the parameter approaches a critical value. Figs 6, Refs 15.

  20. Specific heating power of fatty acid and phospholipid stabilized magnetic fluids in an alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCuyper, M.; Hodenius, M.; Ivanova, G.; Baumann, M.; Paciok, E.; Eckert, T.; Soenen, S. J. H.; Schmitz-Rode, T.

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic fluids (MFs) with a similar narrow size distribution of the iron oxide core were stabilized with lauric acid (MF 1), oleate (MF 2) or, after dialysis in the presence of liposomes, with phospholipid molecules (MF 3 and MF 4, respectively). The hydrodynamic sizes of the MF 1 and MF 3 were half those found for MF 2 and MF 4. The MFs were exposed to inductive heating in an alternating magnetic field at a frequency of 200 kHz and a maximum magnetic field strength of 3.8 kA m-1. Specific absorption rates (SAR) of 294 ± 42 (MF 1), 214 ± 16 (MF 2), 297 ± 13 (MF 3) and 213 ± 6 W g-1 Fe (MF 4) were obtained. The data for MF 2 and MF 4 were identical to those found for the commercially available ferucarbotran. The biomedical relevance of the phospholipid-coated MFs is briefly discussed.

  1. Geomorphic consequences of volcanic eruptions in Alaska: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2015-10-01

    Eruptions of Alaska volcanoes have significant and sometimes profound geomorphic consequences on surrounding landscapes and ecosystems. The effects of eruptions on the landscape can range from complete burial of surface vegetation and preexisting topography to subtle, short-term perturbations of geomorphic and ecological systems. In some cases, an eruption will allow for new landscapes to form in response to the accumulation and erosion of recently deposited volcaniclastic material. In other cases, the geomorphic response to a major eruptive event may set in motion a series of landscape changes that could take centuries to millennia to be realized. The effects of volcanic eruptions on the landscape and how these effects influence surface processes has not been a specific focus of most studies concerned with the physical volcanology of Alaska volcanoes. Thus, what is needed is a review of eruptive activity in Alaska in the context of how this activity influences the geomorphology of affected areas. To illustrate the relationship between geomorphology and volcanic activity in Alaska, several eruptions and their geomorphic impacts will be reviewed. These eruptions include the 1912 Novarupta-Katmai eruption, the 1989-1990 and 2009 eruptions of Redoubt volcano, the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, and the recent historical eruptions of Pavlof volcano. The geomorphic consequences of eruptive activity associated with these eruptions are described, and where possible, information about surface processes, rates of landscape change, and the temporal and spatial scale of impacts are discussed. A common feature of volcanoes in Alaska is their extensive cover of glacier ice, seasonal snow, or both. As a result, the generation of meltwater and a variety of sediment-water mass flows, including debris-flow lahars, hyperconcentrated-flow lahars, and sediment-laden water floods, are typical outcomes of most types of eruptive activity. Occasionally, such flows can be quite large

  2. Geomorphic Consequences of Volcanic Eruptions in Alaska: A Review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Eruptions of Alaska volcanoes have significant and sometimes profound geomorphic consequences on surrounding landscapes and ecosystems. The effects of eruptions on the landscape can range from complete burial of surface vegetation and preexisting topography to subtle, short-term perturbations of geomorphic and ecological systems. In some cases, an eruption will allow for new landscapes to form in response to the accumulation and erosion of recently deposited volcaniclastic material. In other cases, the geomorphic response to a major eruptive event may set in motion a series of landscape changes that could take centuries to millennia to be realized. The effects of volcanic eruptions on the landscape and how these effects influence surface processes has not been a specific focus of most studies concerned with the physical volcanology of Alaska volcanoes. Thus, what is needed is a review of eruptive activity in Alaska in the context of how this activity influences the geomorphology of affected areas. To illustrate the relationship between geomorphology and volcanic activity in Alaska, several eruptions and their geomorphic impacts will be reviewed. These eruptions include the 1912 Novarupta–Katmai eruption, the 1989–1990 and 2009 eruptions of Redoubt volcano, the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, and the recent historical eruptions of Pavlof volcano. The geomorphic consequences of eruptive activity associated with these eruptions are described, and where possible, information about surface processes, rates of landscape change, and the temporal and spatial scale of impacts are discussed.A common feature of volcanoes in Alaska is their extensive cover of glacier ice, seasonal snow, or both. As a result, the generation of meltwater and a variety of sediment–water mass flows, including debris-flow lahars, hyperconcentrated-flow lahars, and sediment-laden water floods, are typical outcomes of most types of eruptive activity. Occasionally, such flows can be quite

  3. Assessing geomorphic sensitivity in relation to river capacity for adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, H. E.; Brierley, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    River sensitivity describes the nature and rate of channel adjustments. An approach to analysis of geomorphic river sensitivity outlined in this paper relates potential sensitivity based on the expected capacity of adjustment for a river type to the recent history of channel adjustment. This approach was trialled to assess low, moderate and high geomorphic sensitivity for four different types of river (10 reaches in total) along the Lower Tongariro River, North Island, New Zealand. Building upon the River Styles framework, river types were differentiated based upon valley setting (width and confinement), channel planform, geomorphic unit assemblages and bed material size. From this, the behavioural regime and potential for adjustment (type and extent) were determined. Historical maps and aerial photographs were geo-rectified and the channel planform digitised to assess channel adjustments for each reach from 1928 to 2007. Floodplain width controlled by terraces, exerted a strong influence upon reach scale sensitivity for the partly-confined, wandering, cobble-bed river. Although forced boundaries occur infrequently, the width of the active channel zone is constrained. An unconfined braided river reach directly downstream of the terrace-confined section was the most geomorphically sensitive reach. The channel in this reach adjusted recurrently to sediment inputs that were flushed through more confined, better connected upstream reaches. A meandering, sand-bed river in downstream reaches has exhibited negligible rates of channel migration. However, channel narrowing in this reach and the associated delta indicate that the system is approaching a threshold condition, beyond which channel avulsion is likely to occur. As this would trigger more rapid migration, this reach is considered to be more geomorphically sensitive than analysis of its low migration rate alone would indicate. This demonstrates how sensitivity is fashioned both by the behavioural regime of a reach

  4. Stability of Interfaces with Self-Gravity, Relative Flow, and {ital B} Field

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.H. Jr.; Whitaker, R.W.; Lovelace, R.V.

    1998-12-01

    Observations with the {ital Hubble} {ital Space} {ital T}{ital elescope} (Hester et al.) of spectacular {open_quotes}fingers{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}elephant trunks{close_quotes} of gas protruding from a large star-forming cloud in the Eagle Nebula stimulate renewed interest in the stability of interfaces between different media in molecular clouds. Instability and nonlinear growth of crenelations of interfaces can lead to mass concentrations that in turn lead to star formation. In an earlier study of the stability of interfaces, we took into account the important physical effects{emdash}the different densities and temperatures of the media, the relative motion (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability), the gravitational acceleration perpendicular to the interface (Rayleigh-Taylor instability), and self-gravity. A new {ital self}-{ital gravitational} {ital instability} of an interface was found that was independent of the wavelength of the perturbation. At short wavelengths, the perturbations are essentially distortional, but compression becomes important as the Jeans length is approached from below. The {ital e}-folding time for the instability is comparable with the free-fall collapse time for the denser fluid. In the present work, we generalize our earlier theory in two ways: by including ordered magnetic fields parallel to the interface, and by examining the stability of long cylindrical interfaces. We show that dynamically important magnetic fields in the media can quench instabilities if the fields are oriented in different directions (that is, crossed); however, for astronomically plausible geometries in which the fields are closer to being parallel, but of different strengths in the two media, instabilities are free to grow in directions normal to the fields. A cylindrical interface between an interior medium of density {rho}{sub 1} and an exterior medium of density {rho}{sub 2} provides a model for the long filaments of dense gas observed in some molecular

  5. Stability of Interfaces with Self-Gravity, Relative Flow, and B Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, James H., Jr.; Whitaker, Rodney W.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    1998-12-01

    Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (Hester et al.) of spectacular ``fingers'' or ``elephant trunks'' of gas protruding from a large star-forming cloud in the Eagle Nebula stimulate renewed interest in the stability of interfaces between different media in molecular clouds. Instability and nonlinear growth of crenelations of interfaces can lead to mass concentrations that in turn lead to star formation. In an earlier study of the stability of interfaces, we took into account the important physical effects--the different densities and temperatures of the media, the relative motion (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability), the gravitational acceleration perpendicular to the interface (Rayleigh-Taylor instability), and self-gravity. A new self-gravitational instability of an interface was found that was independent of the wavelength of the perturbation. At short wavelengths, the perturbations are essentially distortional, but compression becomes important as the Jeans length is approached from below. The e-folding time for the instability is comparable with the free-fall collapse time for the denser fluid. In the present work, we generalize our earlier theory in two ways: by including ordered magnetic fields parallel to the interface, and by examining the stability of long cylindrical interfaces. We show that dynamically important magnetic fields in the media can quench instabilities if the fields are oriented in different directions (that is, crossed); however, for astronomically plausible geometries in which the fields are closer to being parallel, but of different strengths in the two media, instabilities are free to grow in directions normal to the fields. A cylindrical interface between an interior medium of density ρ1 and an exterior medium of density ρ2 provides a model for the long filaments of dense gas observed in some molecular clouds. We show that such an interface with ρ1 > ρ2 is stable to ``kink modes'' but unstable to ``sausage modes'' owing to self

  6. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  7. Effect of graphitic order on field emission stability of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayastha, Vijaya Kumar; Ulmen, Benjamin; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2007-01-01

    We observed current density (J) dependent degradation in field emission current from multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These degradations are recoverable and can be explained by emission current-induced dislocations along the MWCNTs. MWCNTs grown by thermal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) can emit stable current continuously for at least 1200 min with upper current density limits of ~0.5 mA cm-2. In contrast, this upper limit is<40 µA cm-2 for nanotubes grown by plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD), although higher J is possible with relatively shorter stability duration. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate higher graphitic order of the thermal CVD grown MWCNTs as compared to PECVD grown MWCNTs. Our study suggests that graphitic order affects their upper performance limits of long-term emission stability, although the effects from adsorbates cannot be completely ignored. These results indicate that field emission cannot be considered as an ideal quantum tunnelling process. The effect of electron transport along CNTs before electron tunnelling must be considered.

  8. Effect of graphitic order on field emission stability of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kayastha, Vijaya Kumar; Ulmen, Benjamin; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2007-01-24

    We observed current density (J) dependent degradation in field emission current from multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These degradations are recoverable and can be explained by emission current-induced dislocations along the MWCNTs. MWCNTs grown by thermal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) can emit stable current continuously for at least 1200 min with upper current density limits of approximately 0.5 mA cm(-2). In contrast, this upper limit is<40 microA cm(-2) for nanotubes grown by plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD), although higher J is possible with relatively shorter stability duration. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate higher graphitic order of the thermal CVD grown MWCNTs as compared to PECVD grown MWCNTs. Our study suggests that graphitic order affects their upper performance limits of long-term emission stability, although the effects from adsorbates cannot be completely ignored. These results indicate that field emission cannot be considered as an ideal quantum tunnelling process. The effect of electron transport along CNTs before electron tunnelling must be considered. PMID:19636115

  9. The use of field emission scanning electron microscopy to assess recombinant adenovirus stability.

    PubMed

    Obenauer-Kutner, Linda J; Ihnat, Peter M; Yang, Tong-Yuan; Dovey-Hartman, Barbara J; Balu, Arthi; Cullen, Constance; Bordens, Ronald W; Grace, Michael J

    2002-09-20

    A field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) method was developed to assess the stability of a recombinant adenovirus (rAd). This method was designed to simultaneously sort, count, and size the total number of rAd viral species observed within an image field. To test the method, a preparation of p53 transgene-expressing recombinant adenovirus (rAd/p53) was incubated at 37 degrees C and the viral particles were evaluated by number, structure, and degree of aggregation as a function of time. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also used to obtain ultrastructural detail. In addition, the infectious activity of the incubated rAd/p53 samples was determined using flow cytometry. FESEM image-analysis revealed that incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in a time-dependent decrease in the total number of detectable single rAd/p53 virus particles and an increase in apparent aggregates composed of more than three adenovirus particles. There was also an observed decrease in both the diameter and perimeter of the single rAd/p53 viral particles. TEM further revealed the accumulation of damaged single particles with time at 37 degrees C. The results of this study demonstrate that FESEM, coupled with sophisticated image analysis, may be an important tool in quantifying the distribution of aggregated species and assessing the overall stability of rAd samples. PMID:12396622

  10. The effect of residual axial gravity on the stability of liquid columns subjected to electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Heliodoro; Castellanos, Antonio

    1993-04-01

    The stability criterion for almost cylindrical dielectric liquid bridges subjected to axial electric fields in the presence of residual axial gravity is obtained. In its absence, a perfectly cylindrical equilibrium solution is allowed for all values of the relevant parameters, which are the slenderness of the liquid bridge, the electrical Bond number and the relative permittivity between the outer and inner media. This basic solution is unstable beyond a critical slenderness which varies with the electrical parameters (Gonzalez et al. 1989). The destabilization takes place axisymmetrically. The inclusion of the gravitational Bond number as a new, small parameter may be treated by means of the Liapunov-Schmidt Method, a well-known projection technique that gives the local bifurcation diagram relating the admissible equilibrium amplitudes for the liquid bridge and the aforementioned parameters. As in the absence of applied electric field, the gravitational Bond number breaks the pitchfork diagram into two isolated branches of axisymmetric equilibrium solutions. The stable one has a turning point whose location determines the new stability criterion. Quantitative results are presented after solving the resulting set of linear recursive problems by means of the method of lines.

  11. Structural properties of charge-stabilized ferrofluids under a magnetic field: a Brownian dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Mériguet, G; Jardat, M; Turq, P

    2004-09-22

    We present Brownian dynamics simulations of real charge-stabilized ferrofluids, which are stable colloidal dispersions of magnetic nanoparticles, with and without the presence of an external magnetic field. The colloidal suspensions are treated as collections of monodisperse spherical particles, bearing point dipoles at their centers and undergoing translational and rotational Brownian motions. The overall repulsive isotropic interactions between particles, governed by electrostatic repulsions, are taken into account by a one-component effective pair interaction potential. The potential parameters are fitted in order that computed structure factors are close to the experimental ones. Two samples of ferrofluid differing by the particle diameter and consequently by the intensity of the magnetic interaction are considered here. The magnetization and birefringence curves are computed: a deviation from the ideal Langevin behaviors is observed if the dipolar moment of particles is sufficiently large. Structure factors are also computed from simulations with and without an applied magnetic field H: the microstructure of the repulsive ferrofluid becomes anisotropic under H. Even our simple modeling of the suspension allows us to account for the main experimental features: an increase of the peak intensity is observed in the direction perpendicular to the field whereas the peak intensity decreases in the direction parallel to the field. PMID:15367036

  12. Dynamical symmetry breaking, gauge fields, and stability in four-Fermi, non-abelian interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Portney, M.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Nambu model of dynamical breaking of global symmetry is extended to the case of non-abelian SU(N) models. The possible patterns of symmetry breaking are investigated, and the masses of the composite spinless particles are found. Corresponding to each broken generator, this composite is the massless Goldstone boson. When the global symmetries are made local by the addition of gauge fields, the composite pseudoscalar Goldstone bosons disappear and the axial gauge fields become massive. This is analogous to the Higgs mechanism, but without the introduction of fundamental scalar fields. The composite scalar Goldstone bosons remain in the theory, and the vector gauge fields are still massless. This is in agreement with the charge conjugation argument. The stability of the possible solutions is discussed using several criteria. It is concluded that in theories with zero bare mass, if a nontrivial solution exists, the completely symmetric massive solution is realized. If the bare mass is symmetric and non-zero, asymmetric solutions may be found, with corresponding scalar Goldstone composites. These violate the persistent mass condition of Preskill and Weinberg.

  13. Dynamics and stability of thin films and drops subjected to magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Devin; Wray, Alex; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    We consider the interfacial dynamics of a thin, ferrofluidic film flowing down an inclined substrate, under the action of a magnetic field, bounded above by an inviscid gas. The fluid is assumed to be weakly-conducting. Its dynamics are governed by a coupled system of the steady Maxwell's, the Navier-Stokes, and continuity equations. The magnetisation of the film is a function of the magnetic field, and is prescribed by a Langevin function. We make use of a long-wave reduction in order to solve for the dynamics of the pressure and velocity fields inside the film. The potential in the gas phase is solved with the use of Fourier Transforms. Imposition of appropriate interfacial conditions allows for the construction of an evolution equation for the interfacial shape via use of the kinematic condition. The magnetic effects give rise to a non-local contribution. We conduct a parametric study of the system stability to spanwise perturbations in order to evaluate the effects of the magnetic field. Two canonical configurations are considered: constant volume, and constant flux, corresponding to a thin drop and a thin film flowing down the incline. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1, EPSRC DPF Studentship (AWW).

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic counter-rotating vortices and synergetic stabilizing effects of magnetic field and plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Throumoulopoulos, G. N.; Tasso, H.

    2010-03-15

    A nonlinear two-dimensional steady state solution in the framework of hydrodynamics describing a row of periodic counter-rotating vortices is extended to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium equation with incompressible flow of arbitrary direction. The extended solution covers a variety of equilibria because four surface quantities remain free. Similar to the case of the MHD cat-eyes equilibrium [Throumoulopoulos et al., J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42, 335501 (2009)] and unlike linear equilibria, the flow has a strong impact on isobaric surfaces by forming pressure islands located within the counter-rotating vortices even for values of beta (defined as the ratio of the thermal pressure over the external axial magnetic-field pressure) on the order of 0.01. Also, the axial current density is appreciably modified by the flow. Furthermore, a magnetic-field-aligned flow of experimental fusion relevance, i.e., for Alfven Mach numbers of the order of 0.01, and the flow shear in combination with the variation of the magnetic field perpendicular to the magnetic surfaces have significant stabilizing effects potentially related to the equilibrium nonlinearity. The stable region is enhanced by an external axial magnetic field.

  15. A comparison of post-wildfire geomorphic response over annual and millennial time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffrath, K. R.; Belmont, P.

    2014-12-01

    Wildfires have profound, highly variable impacts on erosion, sediment transport, and stream channel morphology. Climate change and fuel management actions have altered the current fire regime relative to the historic fire regime. Many researchers have quantified post-fire geomorphic response immediately following events and also over millennial timescales using geochronologic techniques and field study. While these studies have informed our understanding of the post-fire geomorphic response during the dry and wet periods of the Holocene, there are still some fundamental questions about long-term landscape erosion that we have yet to answer, particularly in fire-dominated landscapes. The Hayman fire burned 55,700 hectares in Pikes Peak National Forest, Colorado in 2002. Hillslope- and small watershed-scale sediment yield data were previously collected for 5 to 7 years in areas burned by high severity immediately after the fire. Plot data from 33 hillslope-scale plots indicate an average of 0.8 mm per year of erosion. Wildfires are common to this area and there is observable evidence of extreme geomorphic response following historic fires, similar to what has been monitored after the Hayman fire. In this study, we collected samples of channel alluvium deposited since the Hayman fire and sediment from alluvial fans thought to have been deposited in association with wildfires that may have occurred pre-European settlement. Samples were used to measure in-situ 10Be to estimate millennial-scale, catchment-averaged denudation rates that were compared to the erosion rates measured from the hillslope and watershed-scale plots to determine the proportion of erosion that is generated post-wildfire relative to undisturbed periods. Material from older alluvial fans was collected to try to evaluate whether denudation rates have changed and the ages of the older alluvial fans were determined using radiocarbon or optically-stimulated luminescence.

  16. Geomorphic Indices in the Assessment of Tectonic Activity in Forearc of the Active Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, K.; Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of GIS techniques and constant advancement of digital elevation models significantly improved the accuracy of extraction of information on active tectonics from landscape features. Numerous attempts were made to quantitatively evaluate recent tectonic activity using GIS and DEMs, and a set of geomorphic indices (GI), however these studies focused mainly on sub-basins or small-scale areal units. In forearc regions where crustal deformation is usually large-scale and do not concentrate only along one specific fault, an assessment of the complete basin is more accurate. We present here the first attempt to implement thirteen GI in the assessment of active tectonics of a forearc region of an active convergent margin using the entire river basins. The GIs were divided into groups: BTAI - basin geomorphic indices (reflecting areal erosion vs. tectonics) and STAI - stream geomorphic indices (reflecting vertical erosion vs. tectonics). We calculated selected indices for 9 large (> 450 km2) drainage basins. Then we categorized the obtained results of each index into three classes of relative tectonic activity: 1 - high, 2 - moderate, and 3 - low. Finally we averaged these classes for each basin to determine the tectonic activity level (TAI). The analysis for the case study area, the Guerrero sector at the Mexican subduction zone, revealed high tectonic activity in this area, particularly in its central and, to a lesser degree, eastern part. This pattern agrees with and is supported by interpretation of satellite images and DEM, and field observations. The results proved that the proposed approach indeed allows identification and recognition of areas witnessing recent tectonic deformation. Moreover, our results indicated that, even though no large earthquake has been recorded in this sector for more than 100 years, the area is highly active and may represent a seismic hazard for the region.

  17. Geomorphic responses of lower Bega River to catchment disturbance, 1851?1926

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Andrew P.; Brierley, Gary J.

    1997-03-01

    Prior to significant European settlement of the area in the 1850s, lower Bega River on the South Coast of NSW had a narrow, relatively deep channel lined by river oaks. The river had a suspended or mixed load, with platypus habitat available in pools. Banks were fine-grained and relatively cohesive (silts and clays), as was the floodplain, which graded to a series of valley-marginal swamps and lakes. Extensive evidence from maps and portion plans, archival photographs, bridge surveys, and anecdotal sources, complemented by field analysis of floodplain sedimentology (including radiocarbon-dated samples) and vegetation remnants are used to document the dramatic metamorphosis in the character and behaviour of lower Bega River in the latter half of the nineteenth century. By 1926 the channel had widened extensively (up to 340%) and shallowed in association with bed aggradation by coarse sandy bedload. Floodplain accretion was dominated by fine to medium sands, with some coarse sand splays. In contrast with most other studies of channel metamorphosis in Australia, which have emphasised river responses to climatically-induced flood histories, relegating human impacts to a secondary role, the profound changes to the geomorphic condition and behaviour of Bega River reflect indirect human disturbance of Bega catchment, and direct but non point source disturbance to the channel. Extensive clearance of catchment, floodplain, and channel-marginal vegetation occurred within a few decades of European settlement, altering the hydrologic and sediment regime of the river, and transforming the geomorphic effectiveness of floods. Although this study is situated in a relatively sensitive, granitic catchment, catchment clearance is likely to have induced equally significant responses in many other river systems in eastern Australia. In some instances the diffuse aspects of human disturbance on landscapes induce impacts on river character that are just as profound as major direct

  18. Geomorphic Characterization of the FortyMile Wash Alluvial Fan, Nye County, Nevada, In Support of the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cline; De Long; Pelletier; Harrington

    2005-09-06

    In the event of an unlikely volcanic eruption through the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, contaminated ash would be deposited in portions of the Fortymile Wash drainage basin and would subsequently be redistributed to the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan by fluvial processes. As part of an effort to quantify the transport of contaminated ash throughout the fluvial system, characterization of the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan is required, especially the spatial distribution of fluvial activity over time scales of repository operation, and the rates of radionuclide migration into different soils on the fan. The Fortymile Wash alluvial fan consists of extremely low relief terraces as old as 70 ka. By conducting soils-geomorphic mapping and correlating relative surface ages with available geochronology from the Fortymile Wash fan and adjacent piedmonts, we identified 4 distinct surfaces on the fan. Surface ages are used to predict the relative stability of different areas of the fan to fluvial activity. Pleistocene-aged surfaces are assumed to be fluvially inactive over the 10 kyr time scale, for example. Our mapping and correlation provides a map of the depozone for contaminated ash that takes into account long-term channel migration the time scales of repository operation, and it provides a geomorphic framework for predicting radionuclide dispersion rates into different soils across the fan. The standard model for vertical migration of radionuclides in soil is diffusion; therefore we used diffusion profiles derived from {sup 137}Cs fallout to determine infiltration rates on the various geomorphic surfaces. The results show a strong inverse correlation of the geomorphic surface age and diffusivity values inferred from the {sup 137}Cs profiles collected on the different surfaces of the fan.

  19. Geomorphic characterization of the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan, Nye County, Nevada, in support of the Yucca Mountain Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, M.; Delong, S.; Pelletier, J.

    2005-12-01

    In the event of an unlikely volcanic eruption through the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, contaminated ash may be deposited in portions of the Fortymile Wash drainage basin and subsequently redistributed to the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan by fluvial processes. Characterization of the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan has been undertaken as part of an effort to quantify the transport of contaminated ash throughout the fluvial system, especially to define the spatial distribution of fluvial activity over time scales of repository operation, and the rates of radionuclide migration into different soils on the fan. The Fortymile Wash alluvial fan consists of extremely low relief terraces as old as 70 ka. By conducting soils-geomorphic mapping and correlating relative surface ages with available geochronology from the Fortymile Wash fan and adjacent piedmonts, we identified 4 distinct surfaces on the fan. Surface ages are used to predict the relative stability of different areas of the fan to fluvial activity. Pleistocene-aged surfaces are assumed to be fluvially inactive over the 10 kyr time scale, for example. Our mapping and correlation provides a map of the depozone for contaminated ash that takes into account long-term channel migration for the time scales of repository operation, and it provides a geomorphic framework for predicting radionuclide dispersion rates into different soils across the fan. The standard model for vertical migration of radionuclides in soil is diffusion; therefore we used diffusion profiles derived from 137Cs fallout to determine radionuclide infiltration rates on the various geomorphic surfaces. The results show a strong inverse correlation of the geomorphic surface age and diffusivity values inferred from the 137Cs profiles collected on the different surfaces of the fan.

  20. Eruptive and Geomorphic Processes at the Lathrop Wells Scoria Cone

    SciTech Connect

    G. Valentine; D.J. Krier; F.V. Perry; G. Heiken

    2006-08-03

    The {approx}80 ka Lathrop Wells volcano (southern Nevada, U.S.A.) preserves evidence for a range of explosive processes and emplacement mechanisms of pyroclastic deposits and lava fields in a small-volume basaltic center. Early cone building by Strombolian bursts was accompanied by development of a fan-like lava field reaching {approx}800 m distance from the cone, built upon a gently sloping surface. Lava flows carried rafts of cone deposits, which provide indirect evidence for cone facies in lieu of direct exposures in the active quarry. Subsequent activity was of a violent Strombolian nature, with many episodes of sustained eruption columns up to a few km in height. These deposited layers of scoria lapilli and ash in different directions depending upon wind direction at the time of a given episode, reaching up to {approx}20 km from the vent, and also produced the bulk of the scoria cone. Lava effusion migrated from south to north around the eastern base of the cone as accumulation of lavas successively reversed the topography at the base of the cone. Late lavas were emplaced during violent Strombolian activity and continued for some time after explosive eruptions had waned. Volumes of the eruptive products are: fallout--0.07 km{sup 3}, scoria cone--0.02 km{sup 3}, and lavas--0.03 km{sup 3}. Shallow-derived xenolith concentrations suggest an upper bound on average conduit diameter of {approx}21 m in the uppermost 335 m beneath the volcano. The volcano was constructed over a period of at least seven months with cone building occurring only during part of that time, based upon analogy with historical eruptions. Post-eruptive geomorphic evolution varied for the three main surface types that were produced by volcanic activity: (1) scoria cone, (2) low relief surfaces (including lavas) with abundant pyroclastic material, and (3) lavas with little pyroclastic material. The role of these different initial textures must be accounted for in estimating relative ages of

  1. Eruptive and Geomorphic Processes at Lathrop Wells Scoria Cone Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krier, D. J.; Valentine, G. A.; Perry, F. V.; Heiken, G.

    2006-12-01

    The ~80 ka Lathrop Wells volcano (southern Nevada, U.S.A.) preserves evidence for a range of explosive processes and emplacement mechanisms of pyroclastic deposits and lava fields in a small-volume basaltic center. Early cone building by Strombolian bursts was accompanied by development of a fan-like lava field reaching ~800 m distance from the cone, built upon a gently sloping surface. Lava flows carried rafts of cone deposits, which provide indirect evidence for cone facies in lieu of direct exposures in the active quarry. Subsequent activity was of a violent Strombolian nature, with many episodes of sustained eruption columns up to a few km in height. These deposited layers of scoria lapilli and ash in different directions depending upon wind direction at the time of a given episode, reaching up to ~20 km from the vent, and also produced the bulk of the scoria cone. Lava effusion migrated from south to north around the eastern base of the cone as accumulation of lavas successively reversed the topography at the base of the cone. Late lavas were emplaced during violent Strombolian activity and continued for some time after explosive eruptions had waned. Volumes of the eruptive products are: fallout - 0.07 km3, scoria cone - 0.02 km3, and lavas - 0.03 km3. Shallow-derived xenolith concentrations suggest an upper bound on average conduit diameter of ~21 m in the uppermost 335 m beneath the volcano. The volcano was constructed over a period of at least seven months with cone building occurring only during part of that time, based upon analogy with historical eruptions. Post-eruptive geomorphic evolution varied for the three main surface types that were produced by volcanic activity: (1) scoria cone, (2) low relief surfaces (including lavas) with abundant pyroclastic material, and (3) lavas with little pyroclastic material. The role of these different initial textures must be accounted for in estimating relative ages of volcanic surfaces, and failure to account for

  2. Small-field dosimetry with an output-stabilized tomotherapy Hi-Art machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundertmark, Brian T.

    The Tomotherapy Hi-Art machine is a highly advanced radiotherapy treatment device that uses a megavoltage linear accelerator (linac) mounted on a CT ring-style gantry to helically deliver intensity modulated fan-beams of radiation to patients. The aim of this work is to reduce the uncertainties in the treatment delivery process induced by variations in the Hi-Art's nominal dose rate output and limitations in the accuracy of measurements made on small radiation fields produced by narrow collimator settings. An electronic dose rate servo circuit is designed, tested, and found to be effective in regulating the dose rates of a Varian Clinac 600 and a Siemens bench top linac. The circuit is then tested on a Hi-Art machine and found to improve the overall stability of its dose rate output. One-dimensional detector-scanning techniques are developed and investigated as a means to accurately measure small TomoTherapy fields. Common clinical detectors such as ion chambers and radiographic film are longitudinally scanned through static rectangular fields produced by the Hi-Art. This allows detectors to make measurements under conditions of improved lateral electronic equilibrium and virtually eliminates detector volume averaging effects. A quantity termed "the integral scanned dose to slice width ratio", or (D/SW), is introduced and found to be a sensitive metric of the photon-source occlusion effect for small TomoTherapy fields. The (D/SW) quantity proved to be highly sensitive to the modeled electron source spot size in the Monte Carlo (MC) code TomoPen, making it a valuable tool for evaluating the accuracy of photon source models used in analytical/MC dose calculation algorithms. Two-dimensional detector-scanning techniques for the measurement of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) fields are developed and investigated. SRS field measurements are made by scanning a standard ion chamber in a two-dimensional "raster" like pattern. The integral dose measured during each scan is

  3. Landscape-scale geomorphic change detection: Quantifying spatially variable uncertainty and circumventing legacy data issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffrath, Keelin R.; Belmont, Patrick; Wheaton, Joseph M.

    2015-12-01

    Repeat surveys of high-resolution topographic data enable analysis of geomorphic change through digital elevation model (DEM) differencing. Such analyses are becoming increasingly common. However, techniques for developing robust estimates of spatially variable uncertainty in DEM differencing estimates have been slow to develop and are underutilized. Further, issues often arise when comparing recent to older data sets, because of differences in data quality. Airborne lidar data were collected in 2005 and 2012 in Blue Earth County, Minnesota (1980 km2) and the occurrence of an extreme flood in 2010 produced geomorphic change clearly observed in the field, providing an opportunity to estimate landscape-scale geomorphic change. Initial assessments of the lidar-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) indicated both a vertical bias attributed to different geoid models and localized offset strips in the DEM of difference from poor coregistration of the flightlines. We applied corrections for both issues and describe the methods we used to discern those issues and correct them. We then compare different threshold models to quantify uncertainty. Poor quantification of uncertainty can erroneously over- or underestimate real change. We show that application of a uniform threshold, often called a minimum level of detection, overestimates change in areas where change would not be expected, such as stable hillslopes, and underestimates change in areas where it is expected and has been observed, such as channel banks. We describe a spatially variable DEM error model that combines the influence of slope, point density, and vegetation in a fuzzy inference system. Vegetation is represented with a metric referred to as the cloud point density ratio that assesses the complete point cloud to describe the density of above ground features that may hinder bare-earth returns. We compare the significance of spatially variable versus spatially uniform DEM errors on change detection by

  4. Geomorphic mapping of the southern Maacama fault based on LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeft, J. S.; Sowers, J. M.; Kelsey, H. M.; Prentice, C. S.; Frankel, K. L.

    2008-12-01

    The Maacama fault is an active strike slip fault, and a potentially significant seismic source, within the San Andreas transform system. The fault is located east of and parallel to the San Andreas fault in Sonoma and Mendocino counties, California and is divided into a northern and southern section based on a NW to NNW change in strike. The southern segment comprises 54 km of the fault's 144 km total length and is primarily located in an upland area traversing mountainous terrain. Strain is thought to transfer northward from the East Bay fault zone along the Rodgers Creek fault and, through a right step, to the Maacama fault. LiDAR data collected in a 1-km-wide swath along the southern Maacama fault, as part of the GeoEarthscope project, were used to produce a bare-earth digital elevation model, from which hillshade, topographic contour, slope, and curvature maps with 0.5- to 1-m-resolution were derived. Mapping was primarily conducted digitally in a GIS environment, and interpretation of LiDAR data was supplemented with aerial photograph interpretation and field inspection. Primary, Holocene-age fault-related geomorphic features, consisting of scarps and dextrally offset drainages, define the southern Maacama. These features are sparsely distributed and comprise less than 20% of the fault length. The fault scarps define a sequence of left-stepping, en echelon fault segments with an average segment length of 230 m. By contrast, the northern Maacama fault is better defined geomorphically. The poor expression of the southern Maacama is likely due to the presence of active hillslope processes and low levels of seismicity. Seismicity along the southern segment is lower than that of the northern segment. The Coast Range uplands, primarily composed of Franciscan Complex, is characterized by numerous landslides and experiences annual precipitation of 75 to 180 cm. There is approximately 30 km of overlap between the northern end of the Rodgers Creek fault and the southern

  5. Geomorphic domains and linear features on Landsat images, Circle Quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    A remote sensing study using Landsat images was undertaken as part of the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP). Geomorphic domains A and B, identified on enhanced Landsat images, divide Circle quadrangle south of Tintina fault zone into two regional areas having major differences in surface characteristics. Domain A is a roughly rectangular, northeast-trending area of relatively low relief and simple, widely spaced drainages, except where igneous rocks are exposed. In contrast, domain B, which bounds two sides of domain A, is more intricately dissected showing abrupt changes in slope and relatively high relief. The northwestern part of geomorphic domain A includes a previously mapped tectonostratigraphic terrane. The southeastern boundary of domain A occurs entirely within the adjoining tectonostratigraphic terrane. The sharp geomorphic contrast along the southeastern boundary of domain A and the existence of known faults along this boundary suggest that the southeastern part of domain A may be a subdivision of the adjoining terrane. Detailed field studies would be necessary to determine the characteristics of the subdivision. Domain B appears to be divisible into large areas of different geomorphic terrains by east-northeast-trending curvilinear lines drawn on Landsat images. Segments of two of these lines correlate with parts of boundaries of mapped tectonostratigraphic terranes. On Landsat images prominent north-trending lineaments together with the curvilinear lines form a large-scale regional pattern that is transected by mapped north-northeast-trending high-angle faults. The lineaments indicate possible lithlogic variations and/or structural boundaries. A statistical strike-frequency analysis of the linear features data for Circle quadrangle shows that northeast-trending linear features predominate throughout, and that most northwest-trending linear features are found south of Tintina fault zone. A major trend interval of N.64-72E. in the linear

  6. Partial sequencing of recent Portuguese myxoma virus field isolates exhibits a high degree of genetic stability.

    PubMed

    Muller, A; Silva, E; Abrantes, J; Esteves, P J; Ferreira, P G; Carvalheira, J C; Nowotny, N; Thompson, G

    2010-01-01

    To study genetic changes underlying myxoma virus evolution in its new host, the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), we sequenced selected genomic regions of nine recent virulent field strains and a live attenuated vaccine strain ("MAV", Germany). DNA was extracted from cell culture passaged myxoma virus. A total of 4863 bp (approximately 3% of the genome) of 10 regions spanning 12 genes of the myxoma viruses was sequenced and compared to the original virulent strain "Lausanne" and its attenuated field derivative strain "6918". The field strains displayed a maximum of three (strains C43, C95) and a minimum of one (strains CD01, CD05) nucleotide substitutions. These were distributed through all analysed coding regions, except gene M022L (major envelope protein), where all strains were identical to "Lausanne" and "6918". Two new single nucleotide insertions were observed in some of the field strains: within the intergenic region M014L/M015L and within gene M009L, where it leads to a frameshift. These insertions were located after homopolymeric regions. The vaccine strain displayed 37 nucleotide substitutions, predominantly (95%) located in genes M022L and M036L. Interestingly, regions M009L and M014L/M015L of the vaccine were not amplified successfully, suggesting major genomic changes that could account for its attenuated phenotype. Our results support a high degree of genetic stability of myxoma virus over the past five decades. None of the analysed genome regions by its own seems sufficient for the genetic characterisation of field strains. PMID:19709821

  7. Synthetic-gauge-field stabilization of the chiral-spin-liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.; Rey, Ana Maria; Hermele, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We explore the phase diagram of the SU (N ) Hubbard models describing fermionic alkaline-earth-metal atoms in a square optical lattice with, on average, one atom per site, using a slave rotor mean-field approach. We find that the chiral spin liquid (CSL) predicted for N ≥5 and large interactions passes through a fractionalized state with a spinon Fermi surface as interactions are decreased before transitioning to a weakly interacting metal. We show that by adding a uniform artificial gauge field with 2 π /N flux per plaquette, the CSL becomes the ground state for all N ≥3 at intermediate interactions, persists to weaker interactions, and exhibits a larger spin gap. For N ≥5 we find the CSL is the ground state everywhere the system is a Mott insulator. The gauge field stabilization of the CSL at lower interactions, and thus at weaker lattice depths, together with the increased spin gap, can relax the temperature constraints required for its experimental realization in ultracold atom systems.

  8. Generic super-exponential stability of elliptic equilibrium positions for symplectic vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederman, Laurent

    2013-11-01

    In this article, we consider linearly stable elliptic fixed points (equilibrium) for a symplectic vector field and prove generic results of super-exponential stability for nearby solutions. We will focus on the neighborhood of elliptic fixed points but the case of linearly stable isotropic reducible invariant tori in a Hamiltonian system should be similar. More specifically, Morbidelli and Giorgilli have proved a result of stability over superexponentially long times if one considers an analytic Lagrangian torus, invariant for an analytic Hamiltonian system, with a diophantine translation vector which admits a sign-definite torsion. Then, the solutions of the system move very little over times which are super-exponentially long with respect to the inverse of the distance to the invariant torus. The proof proceeds in two steps: first one constructs a high-order Birkhoff normal form, then one applies the Nekhoroshev theory. Bounemoura has shown that the second step of this construction remains valid if the Birkhoff normal form linked to the invariant torus or the elliptic fixed point belongs to a generic set among the formal series. This is not sufficient to prove this kind of super-exponential stability results in a general setting. We should also establish that the most strongly non resonant elliptic fixed point or invariant torus in a Hamiltonian system admits Birkhoff normal forms fitted for the application of the Nekhoroshev theory. Actually, the set introduced by Bounemoura is already very large but not big enough to ensure that a typical Birkhoff normal form falls into this class. We show here that this property is satisfied generically in the sense of the measure (prevalence) through infinite-dimensional probe spaces (that is, an infinite number of parameters chosen at random) with methods similar to those developed in a paper of Gorodetski, Kaloshin and Hunt in another setting.

  9. Macromolecular Stabilization by Excluded Cosolutes: Mean Field Theory of Crowded Solutions.

    PubMed

    Sapir, Liel; Harries, Daniel

    2015-07-14

    We propose a mean field theory to account for the experimentally determined temperature dependence of protein stabilization that emerges in solutions crowded by preferentially excluded cosolutes. Based on regular solution theory and employing the Flory-Huggins approximation, our model describes cosolutes in terms of their size, and two temperature-dependent microscopic parameters that correspond to macromolecule-cosolute and bulk solution interactions. The theory not only predicts a "depletion force" that can account for the experimentally observed stabilization of protein folding or association in the presence of excluded cosolutes but also predicts the full range of associated entropic and enthalpic components. Remarkably, depending on cosolute identity and in accordance with experiments, the theory describes entropically as well as enthalpically dominated depletion forces, even those disfavored by entropy. This emerging depletion attraction cannot be simply linked to molecular volumes. Instead, the relevant parameter is an effective volume that represents an interplay between solvent, cosolute, and macromolecular interactions. We demonstrate that the apparent depletion free energy is often accompanied by significant yet compensating entropy and enthalpy terms that, although having a net zero contribution to stabilization, can obscure the underlying molecular mechanism. This study underscores the importance of including often-neglected free energy terms that correspond to solvent-cosolute and cosolute-macromolecule interactions, which for most typical cosolutes are expected to be temperature dependent. We propose that experiments specifically aimed at resolving the temperature-dependence of cosolute exclusion from macromolecular surfaces should help reveal the full range of the underlying molecular mechanisms of the depletion force. PMID:26575781

  10. Long-term stability of time domain reflectometry measurements in a multi-year field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schofield, T. G.

    2001-01-01

    Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurements from a field demonstration of landfill covers at Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA were analyzed in an attempt to determine the long-term stability of the TDR system. The demonstration was comprised of four landfill cover designs: Conventional, EPA, Loam Capillary Barrier and Clay Loam Capillary Barrier with each design replicated at slopes of 5%, 10%, 15%, and 25% for a total of 16 plots. A total of 212 locations in the plots were instrumented with 2 rod TDR pairs and each location was interrogated at 7 hour intervals for seven years using an automated and multiplexed measurement system. The TDRs were located in a variety of soil types and at differing depths from the soil surface. Measurements from differing soil types were considered separately and seasonal changes in soil water content due to precipitation were minimized by annual averaging. Statistical and graphical analyses were performed to assess the stability of the measurements over the life of the demonstration.