Science.gov

Sample records for geopressured geothermal resource

  1. The Geopressured-Geothermal Resource, research and use

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-de Wys, J.

    1990-01-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Resource has an estimated accessible resource base of 5700 quads of gas and 11,000 quads of thermal energy in the onshore Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast area alone. After 15 years the program is now beginning a transition to commercialization. The program presently has three geopressured- geothermal wells in Texas and Louisiana. Supporting research in the Geopressured Program includes research on rock mechanics, logging, geologic studies, reservoir modeling, and co-location of brine and heavy oil, environmental monitoring, geologic studies, hydrocarbons associated with the geopressured brines and development of a pH monitor for harsh environments, research support in prediction of reservoir behavior, thermal enhanced oil recovery, direct use, hydraulic and thermal conversion, and use of supercritical processes and pyrolysis in detoxification. The on-going research and well operations are preparing the way to commercialization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource is covered in this report. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Research and Development Program Plan for Geopressure-Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    The objective of the Geopressure-Geothermal Program of the Division of Geothermal Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, is to determine by the end of FY86 the magnitude and economic potential of the geopressure-geothermal resources. This Program Plan describes how the Department of Energy proposes to achieve this objective. The main purposes of the current program are to narrow the range of uncertainty on the potential recovery of energy from the geopressure-geothermal resources and to ensure the timely development of these resources as the potential is demonstrated. For these purposes, the Division of Geothermal Energy has established the following objectives: (1) Define the magnitude, potential, and economics of the resources. (2) Conduct supporting research on reservoir and fluid characteristics. (3) Adapt or develop downhole, surface, and disposal technology. (4) Identify and mitigate adverse environmental, legal, and institutional issues in order to promote commercialization.

  3. Economic review of the geopressured-geothermal resource with recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.M.; Negus-de Wys, J.; Faulder, D.D.; Lunis, B.C.

    1989-11-01

    This report presents the results of an economic study conducted by the INEL under DOE Contract No. AC07-76ID01570 to evaluate the breakeven price to market energy from a geopressured-geothermal resource. A breakeven price is a minimum, per unit charge required for the developer to recover all direct and indirect costs and a rate of return sufficient to compensate the developer for depreciation, the time value of money, and the risk of failure. The DOE Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program and the DOE well testing and operations at three locations in the Gulf Coast region provide the bulk of resource and economic characteristics for this study. A menu-driven model was developed in LOTUS-123 to calculate the breakeven price to market gas and electricity from a geopressured-geothermal resource. This model was developed using the present value methodology and conservative assumptions. Assuming present well constraints and current off-the-shelf conversion technology, the breakeven price for electricity is about $0.26/kWh using only the thermal energy from a Hulin-type resource. Assuming identical resource and technology constraints, the breakeven price is reduced to about $0.15/kWh when using all available energy forms (methane, hydraulic, and thermal). Assuming the use of available advanced technologies, the breakeven price is reduced to about $0.10/kWh. Assuming the higher quality resource (with higher temperature and gas content) in the South Texas cases, the breakeven cost is about $0.095/kWh. Using advanced technology, this cost is further reduced to about $0.05/kWh. Both costs are within program goals. The results of this study suggest that the future direction of the Geopressured-Geothermal Program emphasize (a) selection of higher quality resource, (b) advanced energy conversion technology, and (c) total energy utilization.

  4. Future for geopressured-geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsthaler, J.; Plum, M.

    1988-01-01

    The geopressured-geothermal production technologies for recompleting the Hulin Well and design and operation of surface facilities appear to be well in hand. A preliminary capital cost estimate indicates $4.45 million is required to recomplete and prepare the Hulin Well for production testing. The planned recompletion of the production well, surface facilities, and disposal well will have the capability to handle 24,000 barrels per day (bpd) of brine. If the reservoir can produce this design flow of brine saturated with gas, and the gas can be sold for $1.30/thousand cubic feet (mcf), DOE should have a positive cash flow about $530 per day for the first year. If gas zones are located above the brine as indicated by logs, the positive cash flow could reach $4130 per day or higher. The principal uncertainties are the gas content of the brine and the reservoir performance, both initially and long term. A private developer would need a market price for natural gas of from $1.38 to $4.60 per mcf for a reasonable return on investment depending on the reservoir performance and whether or not zones of excess gas are actually encountered. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Geopressured geothermal bibliography (Geopressure Thesaurus)

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, T.R.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1981-08-01

    This thesaurus of terminology associated with the geopressured geothermal energy field has been developed as a part of the Geopressured Geothermal Information System data base. A thesaurus is a compilation of terms displaying synonymous, hierarchical, and other relationships between terms. These terms, which are called descriptors, constitute the special language of the information retrieval system, the system vocabulary. The Thesaurus' role in the Geopressured Geothermal Information System is to provide a controlled vocabulary of sufficient specificity for subject indexing and retrieval of documents in the geopressured geothermal energy field. The thesauri most closely related to the Geopressure Thesaurus in coverage are the DOE Energy Information Data Base Subject Thesaurus and the Geothermal Thesaurus being developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The Geopressure Thesaurus differs from these thesauri in two respects: (1) specificity of the vocabulary or subject scope and (2) display format.

  6. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume III. (Geopressure thesaurus). Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sepehrnoori, K.; Carter, F.; Schneider, R.; Street, S.; McGill, K.

    1985-05-01

    This thesaurus of terminology associated with the geopressured geothermal energy field has been developed as a part of the Geopressured Geothermal Information System data base. The subject scope includes: (1) geopressure resource assessment; (2) geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of geopressured systems; (3) geopressure exploration and exploration technology; (4) geopressured reservoir engineering and drilling technology; (5) economic aspects; (6) environmental aspects; (7) legal, institutional, and sociological aspects; (8) electrical and nonelectrical utilization; and (9) other energy sources, especially methane and other fossil fuel reserves, associated with geopressured reservoirs.

  7. Water Resource Assessment of Geothermal Resources and Water Use in Geopressured Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Troppe, W. A.

    2011-09-01

    This technical report from Argonne National Laboratory presents an assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation and an analysis of fresh water use in low-temperature geopressured geothermal power generation systems.

  8. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 3: Applied and direct uses, resource feasibility, economics

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant: design, testing, and operation summary; Feasibility of hydraulic energy recovery from geopressured-geothermal resources: economic analysis of the Pelton turbine; Brine production as an exploration tool for water drive gas reservoirs; Study of supercritical Rankine cycles; Application of the geopressured-geothermal resource to pyrolytic conversion or decomposition/detoxification processes; Conclusions on wet air oxidation, pyrolytic conversion, decomposition/detoxification process; Co-location of medium to heavy oil reservoirs with geopressured-geothermal resources and the feasibility of oil recovery using geopressured-geothermal fluids; Economic analysis; Application of geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses; Industrial consortium for the utilization of the geopressured-geothermal resource; Power generation; Industrial desalination, gas use and sales, pollutant removal, thermal EOR, sulfur frasching, oil and natural gas pipelining, coal desulfurization and preparation, lumber and concrete products kilning; Agriculture and aquaculture applications; Paper and cane sugar industries; Chemical processing; Environmental considerations for geopressured-geothermal development. 27 figs., 25 tabs.

  9. Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

    2012-04-01

    Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are characterized by high temperatures and high pressures with correspondingly large quantities of dissolved methane. Due to these characteristics, the reservoirs provide two sources of energy: chemical energy from the recovered methane, and thermal energy from the recovered fluid at temperatures high enough to operate a binary power plant for electricity production. Formations with the greatest potential for recoverable energy are located in the gulf coastal region of Texas and Louisiana where significantly overpressured and hot formations are abundant. This study estimates the total recoverable onshore geopressured geothermal resource for identified sites in Texas and Louisiana. In this study a geopressured geothermal resource is defined as a brine reservoir with fluid temperature greater than 212 degrees F and a pressure gradient greater than 0.7 psi/ft.

  10. Geopressured geothermal resource of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast: a technology characterization and environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Usibelli, A.; Deibler, P.; Sathaye, J.

    1980-12-01

    Two aspects of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal resource: (1) the technological requirements for well drilling, completion, and energy conversion, and, (2) the environmental impacts of resource exploitation are examined. The information comes from the literature on geopressured geothermal research and from interviews and discussions with experts. The technology characterization section emphasizes those areas in which uncertainty exists and in which further research and development is needed. The environmental assessment section discusses all anticipated environmental impacts and focuses on the two largest potential problems: (a) subsidence and (b) brine disposal.

  11. The feasibility of applying geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunis, Ben C.; Dewys, Jane Negus; Plum, Martin M.; Lienau, Paul J.; Spencer, F. J.; Nitschke, George F.

    1991-09-01

    This study concludes that direct use technologies, especially desalinated water production, can contribute significantly to the value added process and the overall economic viability in developing a geopressured resource. Although agriculture and aquaculture applications are marginal projects when they are the only use of a geopressured well, the small margin of profitability can contribute to improving the overall economics of the direct use development. The added complexity from a technical and management aspect may add to the overall risk and unpredictability of the project. Six combinations of direct uses received economic evaluation that resulted in 15 percent discounted payback periods ranging from 4 to over 10 years. Many other combinations are possible depending on the resource and market variables. Selection of appropriate technologies and sizes of applications will be established by the developer that engages in geopressured resource utilization. Currently, many areas of the country where geopressured resources are located also have surplus electrical capacity and generation; thus power utilities have been selling power for less than two cents per kWH, well below a reasonable breakeven value for geopressured produced electricity. However, when the energy demand of the integrated geopressured facility is large enough to install power generation equipment, operating expenses can be reduced by not paying the 10 to 12 cents per kWH utility rate. The study includes an analysis of a geothermal turbine unit installed with a desalination and an agriculture/aquaculture facility, taking advantage of the cascading energy values. Results suggest that this scenario becomes profitable only where the market price for electricity exceeds five cents per kWH.

  12. The feasibility of applying geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses

    SciTech Connect

    Lunis, B.C.; Negus-de Wys, J.; Plum, M.M. ); Lienau, P.J. . Geo-Heat Center); Spencer, F.J. ); Nitschke, G.F. )

    1991-09-01

    This study concludes that direct use technologies, especially desalinated water production, can contribute significantly to the value added process and the overall economic viability in developing a geopressured resource. Although agriculture and aquaculture applications are marginal projects when they are the only use of a geopressured well, the small margin of profitability can contribute to improving the overall economics of the direct use development. The added complexity from a technical and management aspect may add to the overall risk and unpredictability of the project. Six combination of direct uses received economic evaluation that resulted in 15% discounted payback periods ranging from 4 to over 10 years. Many other combinations are possible depending on the resource and market variables. Selection of appropriate technologies and sizes of applications will be established by the developer that engages in geopressured resource utilization. Currently, many areas of the country where geopressured resources are located also have surplus electrical capacity and generation, thus power utilities have been selling power for less than 2 cents per kWH, well below a reasonable breakeven value for geopressured produced electricity. However, when the energy demand of the integrated geopressured facility is large enough to install power generation equipment, operating expenses can be reduced by not paying the 10 to 12 cents per kWH utility rate. The study includes an analysis of a geothermal turbine unit installed with a desalination and an agriculture/aquaculture facility, taking advantage of the cascading energy values. Results suggest that this scenario becomes profitable only where the market price for electricity exceeds five cents per kWH.

  13. Geothermal energy geopressure subprogram

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The proposed action will consist of drilling one geopressured-geothermal resource fluid well for intermittent production testing over the first year of the test. During the next two years, long-term testing of 40,000 BPD will be flowed. A number of scenarios may be implemented, but it is felt that the total fluid production will approximate 50 million barrels. The test well will be drilled with a 22 cm (8.75 in.) borehole to a total depth of approximately 5185 m (17,000 ft). Up to four disposal wells will provide disposal of the fluid from the designated 40,000 BPD test rate. The following are included in this assessment: the existing environment; probable environmental impacts-direct and indirect; probable cumulative and long-term environmental impacts; accidents; coordination with federal, state, regional, and local agencies; and alternative actions. (MHR)

  14. Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-deWys, J.

    1990-03-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

  15. Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-deWys, J.

    1990-03-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

  16. Geopressured Geothermal Resource and Recoverable Energy Estimate for the Wilcox and Frio Formations, Texas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

    2011-10-01

    An estimate of the total and recoverable geopressured geothermal resource of the fairways in the Wilcox and Frio formations is made using the current data available. The flow rate of water and methane for wells located in the geopressured geothermal fairways is simulated over a 20-year period utilizing the TOUGH2 Reservoir Simulator and research data. The model incorporates relative permeability, capillary pressure, rock compressibility, and leakage from the bounding shale layers. The simulations show that permeability, porosity, pressure, sandstone thickness, well spacing, and gas saturation in the sandstone have a significant impact on the percent of energy recovered. The results also predict lower average well production flow rates and a significantly higher production of natural gas relative to water than in previous studies done from 1975 to 1980. Previous studies underestimate the amount of methane produced with hot brine. Based on the work completed in this study, multiphase flow processes and reservoir boundary conditions greatly influence the total quantity of the fluid produced as well as the ratio of gas and water in the produced fluid.

  17. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume 1 (citation extracts)

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, T.R.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1981-08-01

    This bibliography was compiled by the Center for Energy Studies at The University of Texas at Austin to serve as a tool for researchers in the field of geopressured geothermal energy resources. The bibliography represents citations of papers on geopressured geothermal energy resources over the past eighteen years. Topics covered in the bibliography range from the technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to social, environmental, and legal aspects of tapping those reservoirs for their energy resources. The bibliography currently contains more than 750 entries. For quick reference to a given topic, the citations are indexed into five divisions: author, category, conference title, descriptor, and sponsor. These indexes are arranged alphabetically and cross-referenced by page number.

  18. Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pilger, R.H. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

  19. Problem definition study of subsidence caused by geopressured geothermal resource development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The environmental and socio-economic settings of four environmentally representative Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal fairways were inventoried. Subsidence predictions were prepared using feasible development scenarios for the four representative subsidence sites. Based on the results of the subsidence estimates, an assessment of the associated potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts was prepared. An inventory of mitigation measures was also compiled. Results of the subsidence estimates and impact assessments are presented, as well as conclusions as to what are the major uncertainties, problems, and issues concerning the future study of geopressured geothermal subsidence.

  20. Subsurface geology and geopressured/geothermal resource evaluation of the Lirette-Chauvin-Lake Boudreaux area, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, W.S.

    1982-12-01

    The geology of a 125 square mile area located about 85 miles southeast of Baton Rouge and about 12 miles southeast of Houma, Louisiana, has been studied to evaluate its potential for geopressured/geothermal energy resources. Structure, stratigraphy, and sedimentation were studied in conjunction with pressure and temperature distributions over a broad area to locate and identify reservoirs that may be prospective. Recommendations concerning future site specific studies within the current area are proposed based on these findings.

  1. The variable pressure supercritical Rankine cycle for integrated natural gas and power production from the geopressured geothermal resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsberry, F. L.

    1982-03-01

    A small-scale power plant cycle that utilizes both a variable pressure vaporizer (heater) and a floating pressure (and temperature) air-cooled condenser is described. Further, it defends this choice on the basis of classical thermodynamics and minimum capital cost by supporting these conclusions with actual comparative examples. The application suggested is for the geopressured geothermal resource. The arguments cited in this application apply to any process (petrochemical, nuclear, etc.) involving waste heat recovery.

  2. Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured-geothermal resources in Texas. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Raney, J.A.; Seni, S.J.; DuBar, J.R.; Walter, T.G.

    1991-03-01

    In a five-county area of South Texas, geopressured-geothermal reservoirs in the upper Wilcox Group colocated with heavy-oil reservoirs in the overlying Jackson Group. In 1990, research at the Bureau of Economic Geology concentrated on evaluating the potential of using geopressured-geothermal water for hot-water flooding of heavy-oil reservoirs. Favorable geothermal reservoirs are defined by thick deltaic sandstones and growth-fault-bounded compartments. Potential geothermal reservoirs are present at a depth of 11,000 ft (3,350 m) to 15,000 ft (4,570 m) and contain water at temperatures of 350 F (177 C) to 383 F (195 C) in Fandango field, Zapata County. One potential geothermal reservoir sandstone in the upper Wilcox (R sandstone) is composed of a continuous sand body 100 ft (30 m) to greater than 200 ft (>61 m) thick. Fault blocks average 2 to 4 mi{sup 2} (5.2 to 10.4 km{sup 2}) in area.

  3. Geopressured geothermal resource potential of Miocene Bayou Hebert Prospect, Vermilion and Iberia parishes, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloh, R.P.; Pino, M.A.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Bayou Hebert prospect is a fault-bounded block of lower Miocene shale and sandstone which covers a 75-square-mile area in southeastern Vermilion and southwestern Iberia parishes, southwestern Louisiana. The average depth to the top of the geopressured zone is 12,500 feet. Detailed correlation of shale resistivity patterns on well logs from this area has delineated faults, local unconformities, and changes in thickness and facies of lithologic units. Most faults revealed by this method are associated with the boundary fault zones, but the few delineated in the interior of the prospect could reduce the volume of potential reservoir units. Cross sections show that the lower Miocene section thickens across growth faults by addition of new units as well as by expansion. Of the parameters of reservoir volume, salinity, temperature, and permeability, reservoir volume shows the most significant variation and indicates that the eastern fourth of the prospect has the most geopressured geothermal potential.

  4. Reservoir engineering studies of the Gladys McCall geopressured-geothermal resource; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen-Min; Less, K.; Miller, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    Transient pressure analysis techniques have been used to evaluate the performance of the Gladys McCall geopressured-geothermal reservoir. A fault-controlled aquifer influx model has also been developed to account for pressure support observed during both reservoir depletion and recovery phases. The Gladys McCall No. 1 well was drilled and completed in the lower Miocene geopressured sandstones under the US Department of Energy geopressured-geothermal research program. The well was shut in October 1987 after producing over 27 MMstb of brine and 676 MMscf gas since October 1983. Eight pressure transient tests were conducted in the well. Analysis of transient pressure data provided a quantitative evaluation of reservoir characteristics, including: (a) formation transmissibility and skin, (b) the size and possible shape of the main producing reservoir, and (c) characteristics of the pressure support mechanism. The pressure behavior of 1983 Reservoir Limits Test (RLT) suggested that the Gladys McCall reservoir might have a long narrow shape with the well located off-center. An elongated numerical model developed accordingly was able to reproduce the pressure characteristics shown in the test. During both the reservoir production and shut-in periods, pressure buildup tests indicated some degree of external pressure support. Aquifer recharging was believed to be the main source. Based on reservoir material-balance calculations, an aquifer influx model was derived from a conceptual model of water leakage through a partially sealing fault into the reservoir under steady-state conditions. Moreover, a match of the pressure history required that the conductivity of the fault be a function of the pressure difference between the supporting aquifer and the reservoir.

  5. Reservoir engineering studies of the Gladys McCall geopressured-geothermal resource. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, C.M.; Lee, K.; Miller, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    Transient pressure analysis techniques have been used to evaluate the performance of the Gladys McCall geopressured-geothermal reservoir. A fault-controlled aquifer influx model has also been developed to account for pressure support observed during both reservoir depletion and recovery phases. The Gladys McCall No. 1 well was drilled and completed in the lower Miocene geopressured sandstones under the US Department of energy geopressured-geothermal research program. The well was shut in october 1987 after producing over 27 MMstb of brine and 676 MMscf gas since October 1983. Eight pressure transient tests were conducted in the well. Analysis of transient pressure data provided a quantitative evaluation of reservoir characteristics, including: (a) formation transmissibility and skin, (b) the size and possible shape of the main producing reservoir, (c) characteristics of the pressure support mechanism. The pressure behavior of 1983 Reservoir Limits Test (RLT) suggested that the Gladys McCall reservoir might have a long narrow shape with the well located off-center. An elongated numerical model developed accordingly was able to reproduce the pressure characteristics show in the test. During both the reservoir production and shut-in periods, pressure buildup tests indicated some degree of external pressure support. Aquifer recharging was believed to be the main source. Based on reservoir material-balance calculations, an aquifer influx model was derived from a conceptual model of water leakage through a partially sealing fault into the reservoir under steady-state conditions. Moreover, a match of the pressure history required that the conductivity of the fault be a function of the pressure difference between the supporting aquifer and the reservoir.

  6. Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Fortuna, Raymond; Jelacic, Allan

    1989-04-01

    The geopressured-geothermal resource consists of deeply buried reservoirs of hot brine, under abnormally high pressures, that contain dissolved methane. Geopressured brine reservoirs with pressures approaching the lithostatic load are known to occur both onshore and offshore beneath the Gulf of Mexico coast, along the Pacific west coast, in Appalachia, as well as in deep sedimentary basins elsewhere in the United States. The Department of Energy (DOE) has concentrated its research on the northern Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin (Figure 1) which consists largely of Tertiary interbedded sandstones and shales deposited in alternating deltaic, fluvial, and marine environments. Thorsen (1964) and Norwood and Holland (1974) describe three generalized depositional facies in sedimentary beds of the Gulf Coast Geosyncline (Figure 2 ): (1) a massive sandstone facies in which sandstone constitutes 50 percent o r more of the sedimentary volume; (2) an alternating sandstone and shale facies in which sandstone constitutes 15 to 35 percent of the sedimentary volume. (3) a massive shale facies in which sandstone constitutes 15 percent or less of the sedimentary volume. In general, at any given location the volume of sandstone decreases with increasing depth. The datum of higher-than-normal fluid pressures is associated with the alternating sandstone and shale facies and the massive shale facies. Faulting and salt tectonics have complicated the depositional patterns and influenced the distribution of geopressured reservoirs (Wallace et a1 1978). The sandstones in the alternating sandstone and shale facies have the greatest potential for geopressured-geothermal energy development. Due to the insulating effect of surrounding shales, temperatures of the geopressured-geothermal brines typically range from 250 F to over 350 F, and under prevailing temperature, pressure, and salinity conditions, the brine contains 20 or more cubic feet of methane per barrel. Wallace et al (1978

  7. The industrial consortium for the utilization of the geopressured-geothermal resource

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-de Wys, J.

    1991-02-15

    Four feasibility studies have been developed by the INEL on thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) Use of Supercritical Fluid processes for Detoxification of Pollutants, and Hydraulic Conversion to Electricity, and Direct Use. The studies provide information bases for potential industrial partners in the resource utilization. A joint proposal from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and INEL on supercritical fluid processes in going forward. Western Resources Technology has begun development of a dozen geopressured well projects. An hydraulic turbine test will be conducted at Pleasant Bayou in Summer of 1991. Dr. Wayne Steele of Anglewood, TX, a retired medical doctor, is proposing to raise fresh water Australian lobsters in the Pleasant Bayou Well fire water pond. Additional projects such as catfish farming, crayfish, desalintion plant and agricultural greenhouse use of the resource heat are waiting in the wings'' for the DOE wells to become available for pilot use projects. 2 figs.

  8. Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured geothermal resources in Texas. 1982 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Kaiser, W.R.; Finley, R.J.

    1983-03-01

    Detailed structural mapping at several horizons in selected study areas within the Frio growth-fault trend demonstrates a pronounced variability in structural style. At Sarita in South Texas, shale mobilization produced one or more shale ridges, one of which localized a low-angle growth fault trapping a wedge of deltaic sediments. At Corpus Christi, shale mobilization produced a series of large growth faults, shale-cored domed anticlines, and shale-withdrawal basins, which become progressively younger basinward. At Blessing, major growth faults trapped sands of the Greta/Carancahua barrier system with little progradation. At Pleasant Bayou, a major early growth-fault pattern was overprinted by later salt tectonics - the intrusion of Danbury Dome and the development of a salt-withdrawal basin. At Port Arthur, low-displacement, long-lived faults formed on a sand-poor shelf margin contemporaneously with broad salt uplifts and basins. Variability in styles is related to the nature and extent of Frio sedimentation and shelf-margin progradation and to the presence or absence of salt. Structural styles that are conducive to the development of large geothermal reservoirs include blocks between widely spaced growth faults having dip reversal, salt-withdrawal basins, and shale-withdrawal basins. These styles are widespread on the Texas Gulf Coast. However, actually finding a large reservoir depends on demonstrating the existence of sufficient sandstone with adequate quality to support geopressured geothermal energy production.

  9. Environmental impact of geopressure - geothermal cogeneration facility on wetland resources and socioeconomic characteristics in Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Final report, October 10, 1983-September 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Smalley, A.M.; Saleh, F.M.S.; Fontenot, M.

    1984-08-01

    Baseline data relevant to air quality are presented. The following are also included: geology and resource assessment, design well prospects in southwestern Louisiana, water quality monitoring, chemical analysis subsidence, microseismicity, geopressure-geothermal subsidence modeling, models of compaction and subsidence, sampling handling and preparation, brine chemistry, wetland resources, socioeconomic characteristics, impacts on wetlands, salinity, toxic metals, non-metal toxicants, temperature, subsidence, and socioeconomic impacts. (MHR)

  10. Feasibility study: Application of the geopressured-geothermal resource to pyrolytic conversion or decomposition/detoxification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, W.A.; Grey, A.E.; Negus-de Wys, J.; Plum, M.M.; Haefner, D.R.

    1991-09-01

    This study presents a preliminary evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of selected conceptual processes for pyrolytic conversion of organic feedstocks or the decomposition/detoxification of hazardous wastes by coupling the process to the geopressured-geothermal resource. The report presents a detailed discussion of the resource and of each process selected for evaluation including the technical evaluation of each. A separate section presents the economic methodology used and the evaluation of the technically viable process. A final section presents conclusions and recommendations. Three separate processes were selected for evaluation. These are pyrolytic conversion of biomass to petroleum like fluids, wet air oxidation (WAO) at subcritical conditions for destruction of hazardous waste, and supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) also for the destruction of hazardous waste. The scientific feasibility of all three processes has been previously established by various bench-scale and pilot-scale studies. For a variety of reasons detailed in the report the SCWO process is the only one deemed to be technically feasible, although the effects of the high solids content of the geothermal brine need further study. This technology shows tremendous promise for contributing to solving the nation's energy and hazardous waste problems. However, the current economic analysis suggests that it is uneconomical at this time. 50 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume I. Citation extracts. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sepehrnoori, K.; Carter, F.; Schneider, R.; Street, S.; McGill, K.

    1983-05-01

    This annoted bibliography contains 1131 citations. It represents reports, papers, and articles appearing over the past eighteen years covering topics from the scientific and technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to the social, environmental, and legal considerations of exploiting those reservoirs for their energy resources. Six indexes include: author, conference title, descriptor, journal title, report number, and sponsor. (MHR)

  12. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume II (geopressure thesaurus). Second Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sepehrnoori, K.; Carter, F.; Schneider, R.; Street, S.; McGill, K.

    1983-05-01

    This thesaurus of terminology associated with the geopressured geothermal energy field has been developed as a part of the Geopressured Geothermal Information System data base. It is a compilation of terms displaying synomymous, hierarchical, and other relationships between terms. These terms, which are called descriptors, constitute the special language of the information retrieval system - the system vocabulary. The function of this thesaurus is to provide a standardized vocabulary for the information storage and retrieval system to facilitate both the indexing and subject-searching processes. In indexing, a thesaurus is used to translate the natural language of the document to be indexed into the standardized system vocabulary and to place the document at the appropriate level of generality or specificity in relation to the other documents in the data base. In subject retrieval, the thesaurus is used to match the natural language used in search requests with the system vocabulary and to find the most appropriate term to represent a concept.

  13. Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.

    1992-10-01

    Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

  14. Subsurface evaluation of the geopressured-geothermal Chloe Prospect, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, R.J.

    1981-12-01

    A 123 square mile area approximately 10 miles east of Lake Charles, Louisiana, has been studied to assess its potential geopressured-geothermal resources. Subsurface information was used to study the structure and stratigraphy of the area as they related to the development of geopressured aquifers. The Middle Frio Hackberry wedge was found to contain the geopressured-geothermal reservoir sand, as well as the shales responsible for the origin and sealing of the geopressured strata. The major reservoir within the wedge is the Hackberry massive A sand.

  15. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 4: Bibliography (annotated only for all major reports)

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    This bibliography contains US Department of Energy sponsored Geopressured-Geothermal reports published after 1984. Reports published prior to 1984 are documented in the Geopressured Geothermal bibliography Volumes 1, 2, and 3 that the Center for Energy Studies at the University of Texas at Austin compiled in May 1985. It represents reports, papers and articles covering topics from the scientific and technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to the social, environmental, and legal considerations of exploiting those reservoirs for their energy resources.

  16. Survey of potential geopressured resource areas in California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyal, S.K.; Robertson-Tait, A.; Kraemer, M.; Buening, N.

    1993-03-01

    This paper presents the initial results of a survey of the occurrence and characteristics of geopressured fluid resources in California using the publicly- available database involving more than 150,000 oil and gas wells drilled in the State. Of the 975 documented on-shore oil and gas pools studied, about 42% were identified as potentially geopressured. Geothermal gradients in California oil and gas fields lie within the normal range of 1 F to 2 F per 100 feet. Except for the Los Angeles Basin, there was no evidence of higher temperatures or temperature gradients in geopressured pools.

  17. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  18. Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir Analysis - January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Riney, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    Many sedimentary basins contain formations with pore fluids at pressures higher than hydrostatic value; these formations are called geopressured. The pore pressure is generally well in excess of hydrostatic and the fluids vary in scalinity, temperature, and dissolved methane. As part of its program to define the magnitude and recoverability of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource, the US Department of Energy has drilled and tested deep wells in geopressured formations in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Geological information for the Pleasant Bayou geopressured geothermal resource is most extensive among the reservoirs tested. Earlier testing of the DOE well (Pleasant Bayou Well No.2) was conducted in several phases during 1979-1983. Long-term testing was resumed in May 1988 and is currently in progress. This report summarizes the pertinent field and laboratory test data available through December 31, 1990. A numerical reservoir simulator is employed as a tool for synthesizing and integrating the reservoir information, formation rock and fluid properties data from laboratory tests, well data from the earlier testing (1979-1983), and the ongoing long-term production testing (1988-1990) of Pleasant Bayou Well No.2. A reservoir simulation model has been constructed which provides a detailed match to the well test history to date. This model is constructed within a geologic framework described by the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology and relies heavily on the pressure transient data from the 1980 Reservoir Limits Test in conjunction with the 1988-1990 production testing.

  19. A survey of potential geopressured resource areas in California

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyal, S.K.; Robertson-Tait, A.; Kraemer, M.; Buening, N.

    1993-01-28

    This paper presents the initial results of a survey of the occurrence and characteristics of geopressured fluid resources in California using the publicly-available database involving more than 150,000 oil and gas wells drilled in the State. Of the 975 documented on-shore oil and gas pools studied, about 42% were identified as potentially geopressured. Geothermal gradients in California oil and gas fields lie within the normal range of 1°F to 2°F per 100 feet. Except for the Los Angeles Basin, there was no evidence of higher temperatures or temperature gradients in geopressured pools. The porosity of geopressured pools shows the same normal distribution as for normal pressured pools, with a mode in the range of 20 to 25%. The salinity distribution of both the geopressured and normal pressured pools appear to be bimodal, each with two peak ranges of 0 to 10,000 and 25,000 to 30,000 ppm. Compared to the U.S. Gulf Coast region, geopressured pools in California display much lower water salinities, and therefore, should have a higher solubility for methane. Geopressured pools in California occur in the depth range of less than 1,000 feet to more than 18,000 feet. The modal depth of geopressured pools in California is 2,000 to 4,000 feet, much shallower than that encountered in the Gulf Coast region. The distribution of thickness of geopressured pools is similar to that of normal pressured pools, the majority being less than 250 feet thick. The distributions of the volume of geopressured and normal pressured pools are similar, the modal value being in the range of I to 10 billion cubic feet.

  20. Evaluation of potential geopressure geothermal test sites in southern Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.

    1980-04-01

    Six geopressured-geothermal prospects in southern Louisiana were studied in detail to assess their potential use as test sites for the production of geopressure-geothermal energy. Each of the six sites contains substantial quantities of energy. Three of these prospects, Grand Lake, Lake Theriot, and Bayou Hebert, appear to be suitable for a test site. A summary of the findings is presented.

  1. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  2. Subsidence in geopressured geothermal resource test sites: Monitoring assessment combining geodetic leveling and tidal control stations in southwestern Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, K.E.; John, C.J. ); Trahan, D.B. )

    1989-09-01

    The Louisiana Geological Survey has an ongoing environmental monitoring program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, at geopressured geothermal prospect well sites in southwestern Louisiana. This paper presents the results from monitoring subsidence at some of these reservoir sites. Over 1,000 km of first-order surveys and data from several NOAA and US Army Corps of Engineers tidal control stations were examined to determine regional trends. Tidal records were used to examine the history of sea level with respect to the land surface. Relative rates of land subsidence can be determined by comparing rates of water level rise over time with rates of rise from a stable craton. Regional subsidence ranges from 3 to 5 mm/year. First-order bench-mark networks established at Parcperdue, Sweet Lake, and Gladys McCall prospects were used to determine local trends of subsidence. Repeated leveling surveys before, during, and after fluid withdrawal from Parcperdue and Gladys McCall indicate that an increase in subsidence was observed during the drilling of the wells. Data suggest subsidence was possibly due to surface loading by heavy drilling equipment. Historical leveling in the Sweet Lake region indicates differential compaction between sediments as a possible cause for subsidence. However, in all cases, virtually no increase in subsidence was observed during and after times of fluid withdrawal.

  3. Geopressured geothermal drilling and completions technology development needs

    SciTech Connect

    Maish, A.B.

    1981-03-01

    Geopressured geothermal formations found in the Texas and Louisiana gulf coast region and elsewhere have the potential to supply large quantities of energy in the form of natural gas and warm brine (200 to 300/sup 0/F). Advances are needed, however, in hardware technology, well design technology, and drilling and completion practices to enable production and testing of exploratory wells and to enable economic production of the resource should further development be warranted. This report identifies needed technology for drilling and completing geopressured geothermal source and reinjection wells to reduce the cost and to accelerate commercial recovery of this resource. A comprehensive prioritized list of tasks to develop necessary technology has been prepared. Tasks listed in this report address a wide range of technology needs including new diagnostic techniques, control technologies, hardware, instrumentation, operational procedure guidelines and further research to define failure modes and control techniques. Tasks are organized into the functional areas of well design, drilling, casing installation, cementing, completions, logging, brine reinjection and workovers.

  4. Parcperdue Geopressure -- Geothermal Project: Appendix E

    SciTech Connect

    Sweezy, L.R.

    1981-10-05

    The mechanical and transport properties and characteristics of rock samples obtained from DOW-DOE L.R. SWEEZY NO. 1 TEST WELL at the Parcperdue Geopressure/Geothermal Site have been investigated in the laboratory. Elastic moduli, compressibility, uniaxial compaction coefficient, strength, creep parameters, permeability, acoustic velocities (all at reservoir conditions) and changes in these quantities induced by simulated reservoir production have been obtained from tests on several sandstone and shale samples from different depths. Most important results are that the compaction coefficients are approximately an order of magnitude lower than those generally accepted for the reservoir sand in the Gulf Coast area and that the creep behavior is significant. Geologic characterization includes lithological description, SEM micrographs and mercury intrusion tests to obtain pore distributions. Petrographic analysis shows that approximately half of the total sand interval has excellent reservoir potential and that most of the effective porosity in the Cib Jeff Sand is formed by secondary porosity development.

  5. Geopressured geothermal reservoir continuity: Louisiana and Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, C.R.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    The areal extent of aquifers which provide the production drive for Gulf Coast geopressured gas reservoirs are postulated to be representative of the areal extents of geopressured geothermal aquifers. Accordingly, the performances of nine water-drive geopressured gas reservoirs were analyzed to obtain inferences of the production-driving aquifers' sizes. Apparent areal extents of these aquifers ranged from 4 to 35 square miles. Two-thirds (6) of the aquifer extents exceeded 12 square miles. All three SP-log types (increased deflection upward, decreased deflection upward and uniform deflection) are represented in this larger aquifer data set. Comparisons of these inferred aquifer volumes with those determined from well log data and correlations are consistent with the existence of hydraulic reservoir continuity across faults and pinch-outs of sand within fault compartments. The magnitudes of in situ rock pore volume compressibility and shale watering could also be evaluated by careful analysis of geopressured gas reservoir performance data.

  6. The Geopressured-Geothermal Program: Energy conversion status and future possibilities

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-de Wys, J.; Lawford, T.W.; Faulder, D.D. )

    1989-01-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) began in 1976 with the Wells of Opportunity. This early research concentrated on resource characterization at several locations in Texas and Louisiana. More recently, the program has included well operations and supporting university research in geoscience and engineering. Long term flow testing, reinjection of brine, and scale prevention were accomplished at the Gladys McCall Well. The Pleasant Bayou Well provided additional data for modeling and predicting geopressured reservoir behavior. This year a hybrid power system (HPS) was constructed at Pleasant Bayou in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). This is the first conversion of the geopressured-geothermal resource to electricity. An economic review of geopressured-geothermal resource development concludes that using off-the-shelf technology, electricity can be produced for $0.125/kWh from a Gladys McCall type resource (40,000 bpd brine production, 27 scf methane/bbl, 288{degree}F brine, and 10-year resource life). The Pleasant Bayou type resource can produce electricity for $0.32/kWh. Advanced technology could reduce the cost to $0.16/kWh. A review and status of the HPS is presented with future possibilities for the program, including (1) recovery of medium and heavy oil with hot geopressured brine, (2) direct use, especially aquaculture, and (3) development and use of advanced technology for conversion at the Hulin Well, the deepest, hottest well in the program. The estimated improvement in efficiencies with advanced conversion technology range from 100 to 160%. This would greatly reduce the cost to produce electricity. 6 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

  8. Gulf Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Program Summary Report Compilation. Volume I, Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, J. John; Maciasz, Gina; Harder, Brian J.

    1998-06-01

    The significant accomplishments of this program included (1) identification of the geopressured-geothermal onshore fairways in Louisiana and Texas, (2) determination that high brine flow rates of 20,000--40,000 barrels a day can be obtained for long periods of time, (3) brine, after gas extraction can be successfully reinjected into shallow aquifers without affecting the surface waters or the fresh water aquifers, (4) no observable subsidence or microseismic activity was induced due to the subsurface injection of brine, and no detrimental environmental effects attributable to geopressured--geothermal well testing were noticed, (5) sanding can be controlled by reducing flow rates, (6) corrosion controlled with inhibitors, (7) scaling controlled by phosphonate scale inhibitors, (8) demonstrated that production of gas from saturated brine under pressure was viable and (9) a hybrid power system can be successfully used for conversion of the thermal and chemical energy contained in the geopressured-geothermal resource for generation of electricity. The U. S. Department of Energy's geopressured-geothermal research program in the Gulf Coast achieved many significant findings and disproved and clarified many historical perceptions that had previously limited industry's interest in developing this resource. Though in today's economic market it may not be commercially profitable to exploit this resource, the rapid advance of technology in all its different aspects could potentially make this resource attractive in the not too distant future. The ideal situation would involve the development of a total energy system in which all three associated forms of energy--chemical, thermal and mechanical are utilized. The extraction of gas from brine combined with the large number of potential direct and indirect uses of this resource will add to its economic profitability. This U.S. DOE's visionary research program has essentially laid the foundations for characterization of this

  9. United States Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program. Annual report, 1 November 1980-31 October 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, M.H.; Morton, R.A.; Dunlap, H.F.; Frederick, D.O.; Gray, K.E.; Peters, E.J.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Thompson, T.W.

    1982-07-01

    The following are included: objectives, overview, coordination assistance, compaction measurements on Texas Gulf Coast Sandstones and Shales; US Gulf Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Aquifer simulation, Preliminary Review of Subsidence Insurance Issues, Geopressured-Geothermal Information System, and Study of Log Derived Water Resistivity Values in Geopressured Geothermal Formations. (MHR)

  10. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    Continuous recording microearthquake monitoring networks have been established around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal design wells in southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas since summer 1980 to assess the effects well development may have had on subsidence and growth-fault activation. This monitoring has shown several unusual characteristics of Gulf Coast seismic activity. The observed activity is classified into two dominant types, one with identifiable body phases (type 1) and the other with only surface-wave signatures (type 2). During this reporting period no type 1 or body-wave events were reported. A total of 230 type 2 or surface-wave events were recorded. Origins of the type 2 events are still not positively understood; however, little or no evidence is available to connect them with geopressured-geothermal well activity. We continue to suspect sonic booms from military aircraft or some other human-induced source. 37 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Design and operation of a geopressurized-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.G.; Hattar, M.M.

    1991-02-01

    Geopressured-geothermal resources can contribute significantly to the national electricity supply once technical and economic obstacles are overcome. Power plant performance under the harsh conditions of a geopressured resource was unproven, so a demonstration power plant was built and operated on the Pleasant Bayou geopressured resource in Texas. This one megawatt facility provided valuable data over a range of operating conditions. This power plant was a first-of-a-kind demonstration of the hybrid cycle concept. A hybrid cycle was used to take advantage of the fact that geopressured resources contain energy in more than one form -- hot water and natural gas. Studies have shown that hybrid cycles can yield thirty percent more power than stand-alone geothermal and fossil fuel power plants operating on the same resource. In the hybrid cycle at Pleasant Bayou, gas was burned in engines to generate electricity directly. Exhaust heat from the engines was then combined with heat from the brine to generate additional electricity in a binary cycle. Heat from the gas engine was available at high temperature, thus improving the efficiency of the binary portion of the hybrid cycle. Design power output was achieved, and 3445 MWh of power were sold to the local utility over the course of the test. Plant availability was 97.5% and the capacity factor was over 80% for the extended run at maximum power production. The hybrid cycle power plant demonstrated that there are no technical obstacles to electricity generation at Pleasant Bayou. 14 refs., 38 figs., 16 tabs.

  12. Parcperdue Geopressure--Geothermal Project: Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    Sweezy, L.R.

    1981-10-05

    The reservoir models used to perform the drawdown and buildup pressure analyses consist of analytic forms in lieu of the finite difference or numeric simulator types. Analytic models are derived from solutions of the diffusion equation which relate a pressure response with time and distance in the reservoir for a specified flow system. Solutions of the diffusion equation are obtained through mathematical methods such as Laplace transforms, Fourier transforms, Neuman's product techniques and Green's functions. Before an analytic solution is derived, the diffusivity equation is expressed in terms of dimensionless potential (m{sub D}), dimensionless distance (r{sub D}) and dimensionless time (t{sub D}). For the cylindrical coordinate case, the diffusivity equation in dimensionless form for a geopressured system is given.

  13. Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery Using Geopressured-Geothermal Brine

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-01

    This white paper presents a unique plan for an Oil Industry-DOE cost sharing research project for Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery (TEOR) of medium and heavy oil using geopressured-geothermal brine. This technology would provide an environmentally clean method of recovery as opposed to the burning of crude oil or natural gas used widely by the industry, but presently under scrutiny by federal and state air quality agencies, as well as provide an alternative to the very expensive operational and mechanical problems associated with heating water on the surface for injection. An example test reservoir is a shallow, small structural reservoir about 1-l/2 miles long by 1/2 mile wide. It is presently producing heavy oil (18.6 API gravity) from 5 wells, and is marginally economic. One of three nearby geopressured-geothermal wells could be re-entered and recompleted to supply about 400 F brine from 13-16,000 feet. This brine can be used to heat and drive the heavy oil. It is anticipated that about one million barrels of oil may be recovered by this project. Over 3 million barrels are estimated to be in place; only 2.7% of the oil in place has been produced. The suggested teaming arrangement includes: (1) EG&G Idaho, Inc., which presently provides technical and management support to DOE in the Gulf EG&G would supply coordination, management and Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Program. technical support to DOE for the Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery Project. (2) A small business which would supply the field, geologic and well data, production wells, and production operation. They would cost-share the project and provide revenue from increased production (5% of increased production) to help offset DOE costs. Though DOE would cost-share brine supply and injection system, they would not assume well ownership. The small business would supply engineering and operations for brine supply, injection system, and collection of field producing and injection data. Phase 1--Geologic, reservoir

  14. Radon in unconventional natural gas from gulf coast geopressured-geothermal reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraemer, T.F.

    1986-01-01

    Radon-222 has been measured in natural gas produced from experimental geopressured-geothermal test wells. Comparison with published data suggests that while radon activity of this unconventional natural gas resource is higher than conventional gas produced in the gulf coast, it is within the range found for conventional gas produced throughout the U.S. A method of predicting the likely radon activity of this unconventional gas is described on the basis of the data presented, methane solubility, and known or assumed reservoir conditions of temperature, fluid pressure, and formation water salinity.

  15. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completions prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #1

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Clovis A.

    1980-04-03

    This prospective well of opportunity was originally drilled and completed as a gas producer by Wrightsman Investment Company in early 1973. The original and present producing interval was from 15,216 to 15,238 feet. IMC Exploration Company, Inc. acquired the property from Wrightsman and is the present owner operator. The well is presently shut in s a non-economic producer and IMC proposed to perform plug and abandonment operations in April, 1980. This well has a good geopressured-geothermal water sand behind the 5-1/2 inch casing that has 94 feet of net sand thickness. Pursuant to DOE/NVO authorization of March 11,1980, Eaton negotiated an option agreement with IMC whereby IMC would delay their abandonment operations for a period of 90 days to permit DOE to evaluate the well for geopressure-geothermal testing. The IMC-Eaton option agreements provide that IMG will delay plugging the well until June 15, 1980. If Eaton exercises its option to acquire the well, IMC will sell the well bore, and an adjacent salt water disposal well, to Eaton for the sole consideration of Eaton assuming the obligation to plug and abandon the wells in accordance with lease and regulatory requirements. If Eaton does not exercise its option, then Eaton will pay IMC $95,000 cash and IMC will proceed with plugging and abandonment at the termination of the option period.

  16. Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, De Witt and Colorado counties, Texas. Final report, March 1 - August 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavson, T.C.; Reeder, F.S.; Badger, E.A.

    1980-02-01

    Information collected and analyzed for a preliminary environmental analysis of geopressured geothermal prospect areas in Colorado and DeWitt Counties, Texas is presented. Specific environmental concerns for each geopressured geothermal prospect area are identified and discussed. Approximately 218 km/sup 2/(85 mi/sup 2/) were studied in the vicinity of each prospect area to: (1) conduct an environmental analysis to identify more and less suited areas for geopressured test wells; and (2) provide an environmental data base for future development of geopressured geothermal energy resources. A series of maps and tables are included to illustrate environmental characteristics including: geology, water resources, soils, current land use, vegetation, wildlife, and meteorological characteristics, and additional relevant information on cultural resources, power- and pipelines, and regulatory agencies. A series of transparent overlays at the scale of the original mapping has also been produced for the purposes of identifying and ranking areas of potential conflict between geopressured geothermal development and environmental characteristics. The methodology for ranking suitability of areas within the two prospect areas is discussed in the appendix. (MHR)

  17. Screening of three proposed DOE geopressured-geothermal aquifer natural gas project areas for potential conflicting commercial production: Freshwater Bayou, Lake Theriot, and Kaplan, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, C.F.; Rogers, L.A.

    1982-02-01

    Three proposed DOE geopressured geothermal prospects defined by the Louisiana State University resource assessment group were screened for possible conflict with existing gas production. The analysis used the public records available at the Louisiana Department of Conservation offices in Baton Rouge and structural and statigraphic interpretations made by the L.S.U. resource assessment group. (MHR)

  18. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Final report, September 27, 1978-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wrighton, F.M.; Bebout, D.; Carver, D.R.; Groat, C.C.; Johnson, A.E. Jr.

    1981-08-31

    The data analysis is based on the Brazoria Texas well and the balance of the modeling work is theoretical. Progress in the regional assessment of the geopressured-geothermal resource in Louisiana is reported. Environmental monitoring effort established monitoring systems and baseline environmental measurements. Efforts to improve the technoeconomic model, improve the estimates of methane in solution, and to evaluate newly identified sites are described. (MHR)

  19. Geothermal -- The Energy Under Our Feet: Geothermal Resource Estimates for the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Green, B. D.; Nix, R. G.

    2006-11-01

    On May 16, 2006, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado hosted a geothermal resources workshop with experts from the geothermal community. The purpose of the workshop was to re-examine domestic geothermal resource estimates. The participating experts were organized into five working groups based on their primary area of expertise in the following types of geothermal resource or application: (1) Hydrothermal, (2) Deep Geothermal Systems, (3) Direct Use, (4) Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHPs), and (5) Co-Produced and Geopressured. The workshop found that the domestic geothermal resource is very large, with significant benefits.

  20. The feasibility of recovering medium to heavy oil using geopressured- geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-de Wys, J.; Kimmell, C.E.; Hart, G.F.; Plum, M.M.

    1991-09-01

    The feasibility, economics and environmental concerns of producing more domestic oil using thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) are reviewed and the unique nature of geopressured-geothermal (GPGT) fluids for thermal recovery are outlined. Current methods of TEOR are briefly discussed and it is noted that these methods are presently under scrutiny by both federal and state air quality agencies; and moreover, they often involve costly operational and mechanical problems associated with heating water on the surface for injection into the target reservoir. The characteristics of the GPGT resources as seen through previous Department of Energy (DOE) studies from sites in Louisiana and Texas are discussed. These studies indicate sufficient quantities of GPGT fluids can be produced to sustain a TEOR project. The Alworth Field in the south Texas Mirando Trend is proposed as a TEOR pilot site. The target reservoirs for injection of the GPGT fluids are the Jackson and Yegua sandstones of the upper Eocene Epoch. The reservoirs contain an estimated 4 MMbbls of heavy oil in place (OIP) (18.6{degree}API) of which it is estimated that at least 1 MMbbls could be recovered by TEOR. The problems associated with using the GPGT fluids for TEOR include those normally associated with hot water flooding but in addition the reaction of the brine from the geopressured-geothermal reservoir with the target reservoir is uncertain. Under the elevated temperatures associated with GPGT TEOR, actual increased porosity and permeability are possible. 120 refs., 40 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. Depletion and recovery behavior of the Gladys McCall geopressured geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Riney, T.D. )

    1990-06-01

    Many sedimentary basins throughout the world contain sealed fault blocks in which the pore fluids are at higher pressures and temperatures than normal as a consequence of their depositional environment. The U.S. Department of Energy has drilled, completed, and tested four deep research wells in selected geopressured geothermal prospects in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast region to evaluate the recoverability of the thermal, hydraulic, and chemical (methane) energy in this potential energy resource. The wells are expensive and the specific energy of the fluids is relatively small, but the total recoverable energy from a single well can be extremely large. Long-term testing of the Gladys McCall No. 1 research well, located in Cameron Parish, Louisiana, U.S.A., has defined an impressively large geopressured geothermal reservoir. In this paper an integrated analysis of the test data is presented, and a numerical model is constructed that matches the available data for the 6.5-year test history of the well.

  2. Comparison of estimated and background subsidence rates in Texas-Louisiana geopressured geothermal areas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.M.; Clayton, M.; Everingham, J.; Harding, R.C.; Massa, A.

    1982-06-01

    A comparison of background and potential geopressured geothermal development-related subsidence rates is given. Estimated potential geopressured-related rates at six prospects are presented. The effect of subsidence on the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast is examined including the various associated ground movements and the possible effects of these ground movements on surficial processes. The relationships between ecosystems and subsidence, including the capability of geologic and biologic systems to adapt to subsidence, are analyzed. The actual potential for environmental impact caused by potential geopressured-related subsidence at each of four prospects is addressed. (MHR)

  3. Evaluation of the geopressured energy resource of Louisiana and Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, G.

    1980-01-01

    The economics of extracting either the geothermal energy or natural gas from geopressured aquifers does not look promising. The combined requirements of high well flow rates, long life, and the necessity for close well spacing to minimize the cost of the collection system may be incompatible with the actual characteristics of the reservoirs. These factors place such stringent requirements on the reservoir size, permeability and compressibility that the number of promising production areas may be severely limited.

  4. Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Annual report, 1 January 1991--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.

    1992-10-01

    Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

  5. Computer simulation of production from geothermal-geopressured aquifers. Final report, October 1, 1978-January 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, M.G.; Poonawala, N.A.

    1983-07-01

    This is the final report on research conducted to improve the technical and scientific understanding of geopressured and geothermal resources. The effort utilized a computer to interpret the results of well tests and compile data on gas solubility in brine and the viscosity of brine. A detailed computer reservoir study of a geopressured test well that had been abandoned as a dry hole but became a commercial producer of hydrocarbons is presented. A number of special topical reports pertaining to test activities performed on Department of Energy test wells (MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 Well, Leroy Sweezy No. 1 Well, and Pleasant Bayou No. 2 Well) are appended to the report. A referenced article written under this study that appeared in the Journal of Petroleum Technology is also reproduced.

  6. Operations research and systems analysis of geopressured-geothermal energy in Louisiana. Final report for the period June 1, 1978-August 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.E. Jr.

    1980-11-01

    The primary purpose was to provide a projection of the probable future contribution of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource in Louisiana to the overall energy requirements of the nation. A number of associated objectives were emphasized: namely, development of the tools and methodology for performing economic analyses, application of these tools to specific prospects about which adequate resource assessments have been made, identification of the impediments to resource development, and socio-economic analysis of the impact of development of the resource on these specific prospects. An overview of the geopressured-geothermal resource activities in Louisiana is provided first, followed by a detailed discussion and review of the achievements of this project. Finally the major conclusions and findings of this project with respect to commercial viability, impediments, and social and economic impact are presented, and recommendations are made for future systems analysis work.

  7. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Final report, 1 November 1983-31 October 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    This report describes environmental monitoring of microseismic activity, land-surface subsidence, and surface and ground-water quality at three designed geopressured-geothermal test well sites in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual sections. (ACR)

  8. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT, U.S. Department of Energy: Award No. DE-EE0002855 "Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Development at Sweet Lake Field - Cameron Parish, Louisiana"

    SciTech Connect

    Gayle, Phillip A., Jr.

    2012-01-13

    The goal of the project was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of geopressured-geothermal power development by exploiting the extraordinarily high pressured hot brines know to exist at depth near the Sweet Lake oil and gas field in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The existence of a geopressured-geothermal system at Sweet Lake was confirmed in the 1970's and 1980's as part of DOE's Geopressured-Geothermal Program. That program showed that the energy prices at the time could not support commercial production of the resource. Increased electricity prices and technological advancements over the last two decades, combined with the current national support for developing clean, renewable energy and the job creation it would entail, provided the justification necessary to reevaluate the commercial feasibility of power generation from this vast resource.

  9. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #2

    SciTech Connect

    1981-03-01

    A geopressured-geothermal test of Martin Exploration Company's Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2 will be conducted in the Tuscaloosa Trend. The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 1 will be converted to a saltwater disposal well for disposal of produced brine. The well is located in the Satsuma Area, Livingston parish, Louisiana. Eaton proposes to test the Tuscaloosa by perforating the 7 inch casing from 16,718 feet to 16,754 feet. The reservoir pressure at an intermediate formation depth of 16,736 feet is anticipated to be 12,010 psi and the temperature is anticipated to be 297 F. Calculated water salinity is 16,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce a maximum of 16,000 barrels of water a day with a gas content of 51 SCF/bbl. Eaton will re-enter the test well, clean out to 17,000 feet, run production casing and complete the well. The disposal well will be re-entered and completed in the 9-5/8 inch casing for disposal of produced brine. Testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton annular flow WOO tests. An optional test from 16,462 feet to 16,490 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous tests will be utilized on this test. The equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. Weatherly Engineering will operate the test equipment. The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) and Mr. Don Clark will handle sampling, testing and reservoir engineering evaluation, respectively. wireline work required will be awarded on basis of bid evaluation. At the conclusion of the test period, the D.O.E. owned test equipment will be removed from the test site, the test and disposal wells plugged and abandoned and the sites restored to the satisfaction of all parties.

  10. Subsurface geology and potential for geopressured-geothermal energy in the Turtle Bayou field-Kent Bayou field area, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.R.

    1982-09-01

    A 216 square mile area approximately 65 miles southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana, has been geologically evaluated to determine its potential for geopressured-geothermal energy production. The structural and stratigraphic analyses were made with emphasis upon the Early and Middle Miocene age sediments which lie close to and within the geopressured section. Three geopressured sands, the Robulus (43) sand, Cibicides opima sand, and Cristellaria (I) sand, are evaluated for their potential of producing geothermal energy. Two of these sands, the Robulus (43) sand and the Cibicides opima sand, meet several of the United States Department of Energy's suggested minimum requirements for a prospective geopressured-geothermal energy reservoir.

  11. Depositional setting, structural style, and sandstone distribution in three geopressured geothermal areas, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Winker, C.D.; Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Garcia, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Three areas in the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain were studied using electric logs and seismic-reflection data to interpret their depositional and structural history and to compare their potential as geopressured-geothermal reservoirs. The Cuero study area, on the lower Wilcox (upper Paleocene) growth-fault trend, is characterized by closely and evenly spaced, subparallel, down-to-the-basin growth faults, relatively small expansion ratios, and minor block rotation. Distributary-channel sandstones in the geopressured lower Wilcox Group of the South Cook fault block appear to be the best geothermal aquifers in the Cuero area. The Blessing study area, on the lower Frio (Oligocene) growth-fault trend, shows wider and more variable fault spacing and much greater expansion ratios and block rotation, particularly during early Frio time. Thick geopressured sandstone aquifers are laterally more extensive in the Blessing area than in the Cuero area. The Pleasant Bayou study area, like the Blessing area, is on the Frio growth-fault trand, and its early structural development was similar rapid movement of widely spaced faults resulted in large expansion ratios and major block rotation. However, a late-stage pattern of salt uplift and withdrawal complicated the structural style. Thick geopressured lower Frio sandstone aquifers are highly permeable and laterally extensive, as in the Blessing area. In all three areas, geopressured aquifers were created where early, rapid movement along down-to-the-basin growth faults juxtaposed shallow-water sands against older shales, probably deposited in slope environments. Major transgressions followed the deposition of reservoir sands and probably also influenced the hydraulic isolation that allowed the build up of abnormal pressures. 26 refs., 49 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF GEOPRESSURED WATERS AND THEIR PROJECTED USES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A possible source of alternate energy for the nation is believed to exist in the deep geopressured reservoirs found in the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast sedimentary basins. This report considers the potential uses of the geopressured geothermal resource and the environmental asp...

  13. Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured-geothermal resources in Texas: Barrier-bar tidal-channel reservoir facies architecture, Jackson Group, Prado field, South Texas; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J.; Choh, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    Sandstone reservoirs in the Jackson barrier/strandplain play are characterized by low recovery efficiencies and thus contain a large hydrocarbon resource target potentially amenable to advanced recovery techniques. Prado field, Jim Hogg County, South Texas, has produced over 23 million bbl of oil and over 32 million mcf gas from combination structural-stratigraphic traps in the Eocene lower Jackson Group. Hydrocarbon entrapment at Prado field is a result of anticlinal nosing by differential compaction and updip pinch-out of barrier bar sandstone. Relative base-level lowering resulted in forced regression that established lower Jackson shoreline sandstones in a relatively distal location in central Jim Hogg County. Reservoir sand bodies at Prado field comprise complex assemblages of barrier-bar, tidal-inlet fill, back-barrier bar, and shoreface environments. Subsequent progradation built the barrier-bar system seaward 1 to 2 mi. Within the barrier-bar system, favorable targets for hydrocarbon reexploration are concentrated in tidal-inlet facies because they possess the greatest degree of depositional heterogeneity. The purpose of this report is (1) to describe and analyze the sand-body architecture, depositional facies variations, and structure of Prado field, (2) to determine controls on distribution of hydrocarbons pertinent to reexploration for bypassed hydrocarbons, (3) to describe reservoir models at Prado field, and (4) to develop new data affecting the suitability of Jackson oil fields as possible candidates for thermally enhanced recovery of medium to heavy oil.

  14. Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured-geothermal resources in Texas: Barrier-bar tidal-channel reservoir facies architecture, Jackson Group, Prado Field, South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J.; Choh, S.J.

    1993-09-01

    Sandstone reservoirs in the Jackson barrier/strandplain play are characterized by low recovery efficiencies and thus contain a large hydrocarbon resource target potentially amenable to advanced recovery techniques. Prado field, Jim Hogg County, South Texas, has produced over 23 million bbl of oil and over 32 million mcf gas from combination structural-stratigraphic traps in the Eocene lower Jackson Group. Hydrocarbon entrapment at Prado field is a result of anticlinal nosing by differential compaction and updip pinch-out of barrier bar sandstone. Relative base-level lowering resulted in forced regression that established lower Jackson shoreline sandstones in a relatively distal location in central Jim Hogg County. Reservoir sand bodies at Prado field comprise complex assemblages of barrier-bar, tidal-inlet fill, back-barrier bar, and shoreface environments. Subsequent progradation built the barrier-bar system seaward 1 to 2 mi. With the barrier-bar system, favorable targets for hydrocarbon reexploration are concentrated in tidal-inlet facies because they possess the greatest degree of depositional heterogeneity.

  15. Wilcox sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy. Report of Investigations No. 117

    SciTech Connect

    Debout, D.G.; Weise, B.R.; Gregory, A.R.; Edwards, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    Regional studies of the lower Eocene Wilcox Group in Texas were conducted to assess the potential for producing heat energy and solution methane from geopressured fluids in the deep-subsurface growth-faulted zone. However, in addition to assembling the necessary data for the geopressured geothermal project, this study has provided regional information of significance to exploration for other resources such as lignite, uranium, oil, and gas. Because the focus of this study was on the geopressured section, emphasis was placed on correlating and mapping those sandstones and shales occurring deeper than about 10,000 ft. The Wilcox and Midway Groups comprise the oldest thick sandstone/shale sequence of the Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. The Wilcox crops out in a band 10 to 20 mi wide located 100 to 200 mi inland from the present-day coastline. The Wilcox sandstones and shales in the outcrop and updip shallow subsurface were deposited primarily in fluvial environments; downdip in the deep subsurface, on the other hand, the Wilcox sediments were deposited in large deltaic systems, some of which were reworked into barrier-bar and strandplain systems. Growth faults developed within the deltaic systems, where they prograded basinward beyond the older, stable Lower Cretaceous shelf margin onto the less stable basinal muds. Continued displacement along these faults during burial resulted in: (1) entrapment of pore fluids within isolated sandstone and shale sequences, and (2) buildup of pore pressure greater than hydrostatic pressure and development of geopressure.

  16. Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou, Texas: the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test well program

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, F.J.; Kimball, B.; Davis, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Brazoria seismic network, instrumentation, design, and specifications are described. The data analysis procedures are presented. Seismicity is described in relation to the Pleasant Bayou production history. Seismicity originating near the chemical plant east of the geopressured/geothermal well is discussed. (MHR)

  17. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  18. Pleasant Bayou geopressured/geothermal testing project, Brazoria County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ortego, P.K.

    1985-07-01

    Phase II-B production testing of the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well began September 22, 1982. The test plan was designed to evaluate the capabilities of the geopressured-geothermal reservoir during an extended flow period. Tests were conducted to determine reservoir areal extent; aquifer fluid properties; fluid property change with production; information on reservoir production drive mechanism; long-term scale and corrosion control methods; and disposal well operations. Operatinal aspects of geopressured-geothermal production were also evaluated. The test was discontinued prematurely in May 1983 because of a production tubing failure. Most of the production tubing was recovered from the well and cause of the failure was determined. Plans for recompletion of the well were prepared. However, the well was not recompleted because of funding constraints and/or program rescheduling. In March 1984, the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) directed that the site be placed in a standby-secured condition. In August 1984, the site was secured. Routine site maintenance and security was provided during the secured period.

  19. Contractor for geopressured-geothermal sites: Final contract report, Volume 1, fiscal years 1986--1990 (5 years), testing of wells through October 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Field tests and studies were conducted to determine the production behavior of geopressured-geothermal reservoirs and their potential as future energy sources. Results are presented for Gladys McCall Site, Pleasant Bayou Site, and Hulin Site.

  20. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Summary of Gruy Federal's Well-of-Opportunity Program to January 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Scouting and monitoring techniques peculiar to geopressured-geothermal wells and legal problems are presented. The following are tabulated: priority wells actively monitored, industry contacts, and the summary of industry responses to well-or-opportunity solicitation. (MHR)

  1. Laboratory determination of mechanical properties of rocks from the Parcperdue geopressured/geothermal site

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, K.P.; Borschel, T.F.; Holland, M.T.; Schatz, J.F.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    The deformational behavior and fluid flow characteristics of rock samples obtained from DOW/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 Test Well at the Parcperdue Geopressured/Geothermal Site have been investigated in the laboratory. Elastic moduli, compressibility, uniaxial compaction coefficient, strength, creep parameters, permeability, acoustic velocites (all at reservoir conditions) and changes in these quantities induced by simulated reservoir production have been obtained from tests on several sandstone and shale samples from different depths. Tests consisting of several hydrostatic and triaxial loading phases and pore pressure reduction were designed to provide measurements to be used for calculating several of the above mentioned parameters in a single test. Pore volume changes were measured during some phases of the tests.

  2. Uranium geochemistry in geopressured-geothermal aquifers of the U.S. Gulf Coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraemer, T.F.; Kharaka, Y.K.

    1986-01-01

    Formation water from U.S. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal sandstone aquifers has been analyzed to determine the geochemistry of uranium in these systems. Results of chemical analyses and chemical equilibrium modeling indicate the formation waters are in equilibrium with uraninite (UO2) and coffinite (USiO4). The 234U 238U activity ratios in the formation waters range from 1.06 to 1.69. These isotopic data suggest that at formation temperatures uranium is continually reequilibrating chemically and isotopically between water, a solid phase of either UO2 or USiO4 and a component of 234U supplied to solution from the aquifer matrix material by alpha recoil processes. ?? 1986.

  3. Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    Variable intensity of diagenesis is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the upper and lower Texas coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstone from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. The regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production. However, in predicting reservoir quality on a site-specific basis, locally variable factors such as relative proportions for porosity types, pore geometry as related to permeability, and local depositional environment must also be considered. Even in an area of regionally favorable reservoir quality, such local factors can significantly affect reservoir quality and, hence, the geothermal production potential of a specific sandstone unit.

  4. California's geothermal resource potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    According to a U.S. Geological Survey estimate, recoverable hydrothermal energy in California may amount to 19,000 MW of electric power for a 30-year period. At present, a geothermal installation in the Geysers region of the state provides 502 MWe of capacity; an additional 1500 MWe of electric generating capacity is scheduled to be in operation in geothermal fields by 1985. In addition to hydrothermal energy sources, hot-igneous and conduction-dominated resources are under investigation for possible development. Land-use conflicts, environmental concerns and lack of risk capital may limit this development.

  5. Tectonic and hydrologic control of the nature and distribution of geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect

    Muffler, L.J.P. )

    1993-11-01

    A broad overview of the geologic controls of the nature and distribution of geothermal resources is presented. Under forseeable economics and technology, extraction of geothermal resources is limited to the upper few kilometres of the earth's crust. At these depths, the global distribution of geothermal resources is primarily controlled by plate-tectonic features. Geothermal resources related to igneous intrusions in the upper crust occur along spreading ridges, subduction zones, inter-arc basins, and melting anomalies. Geothermal resources unrelated to igneous intrusions in the upper crust occur most commonly in porous sedimentary rocks near convergent or divergent plate boundaries where regional heat flow is high. Geothermal reservoirs at pressures well in excess of hydrostatic occur commonly in young tectonic basins characterized by high rates of sedimentation and subsidence; these reservoirs are commonly termed [open quotes]geopressured.[close quotes] The hydrologic properties of crustal rocks are very important in determining location, size, and type of geothermal resource. Hot dry rock can result from solidification of a young intrusive body or from conductive heating of impermeable rock around such a body. Convective hydrothermal systems result either from convection of meteoric water around young intrusive bodies or from deep circulation of meteoric water along fracture zones. Geopressured reservoirs are formed in deep sedimentary basins when escape of connate water and water produced by the thermal dehydration of clays is impeded by sediments of low permeability.

  6. Geothermal resources of Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Metesh, J.

    1994-06-01

    The Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology has updated its inventory of low and moderate temperature resources for the state and has assisted the Oregon Institute of Technology - GeoHeat Center and the University of Utah Research Institute in prioritizing and collocating important geothermal resource areas. The database compiled for this assessment contains information on location, flow, water chemistry, and estimated reservoir temperatures for 267 geothermal well and springs in Montana. For this assessment, the minimum temperature for low-temperature resource is defined as 10{degree} C above the mean annual air temperature at the surface. The maximum temperature for a moderate-temperature resource is defined as greater than 50{degree} C. Approximately 12% of the wells and springs in the database have temperatures above 50{degree} C, 17% are between 30{degree} and 50{degree} C, 29% are between 20{degree} and 30{degree}C, and 42% are between 10{degree} and 20{degree} C. Low and moderate temperature wells and springs can be found in nearly all areas of Montana, but most are in the western third of the state. Information sources for the current database include the MBMG Ground Water Information Center, the USGS statewide database, the USGS GEOTHERM database, and new information collected as part of this program. Five areas of Montana were identified for consideration in future investigations of geothermal development. The areas identified are those near Bozeman, Ennis, Butte, Boulder, and Camas Prairie. These areas were chosen based on the potential of the resource and its proximity to population centers.

  7. Geothermal resources of Utah, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This map shows heat flow, Known Geothermal Resources Areas, thermal springs and wells, and areas of low-temperature geothermal waters. Also shown are Indian reservations, military reservation, national or state forests, and parks, wildlife refuges, wilderness areas, etc. (MHR)

  8. Methods for collection and analysis of geopressured geothermal and oil field waters

    SciTech Connect

    Lico, M.S.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Carothers, W.W.; Wright, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Present methods are described for the collection, preservation, and chemical analysis of waters produced from geopressured geothermal and petroleum wells. Detailed procedures for collection include precautions and equipment necessary to ensure that the sample is representative of the water produced. Procedures for sample preservation include filtration, acidification, dilution for silica, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extraction of aluminum, addition of potassium permanganate to preserve mercury, and precipitation of carbonate species as strontium carbonate for stable carbon isotopes and total dissolved carbonate analysis. Characteristics determined at the well site are sulfide, pH, ammonia, and conductivity. Laboratory procedures are given for the analysis of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, iron, manganese, zinc, lead, aluminum, and mercury by atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. Chloride is determined by silver nitrate titration and fluoride by ion-specific electrode. Bromide and iodide concentrations are determined by the hypochlorite oxidation method. Sulfate is analyzed by titration using barium chloride with thorin indicator after pretreatment with alumina. Boron and silica are determined colorimetrically by the carmine and molybdate-blue methods, respectively. Aliphatic acid anions (C/sub 2/ through C/sub 5/) are determined by gas chromatography after separation and concentration in a chloroform-butanol mixture.

  9. Methods for collection and analysis of geopressured geothermal and oil field waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lico, Michael S.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Carothers, William W.; Wright, Victoria A.

    1982-01-01

    Present methods are described for the collection, preservation, and chemical analysis of waters produced from geopressured geothermal and petroleum wells. Detailed procedures for collection include precautions and equipment necessary to ensure that the sample is representative of the water produced. Procedures for sample preservation include filtration, acidification, dilution for silica, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extraction of aluminum, addition of potassium permanganate to preserve mercury, and precipitation of carbonate species as strontium carbonate for stable carbon isotopes and total dissolved carbonate analysis. Characteristics determined at the well site are sulfide, pH, ammonia, and conductivity. Laboratory procedures are given for the analysis of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, iron, manganese, zinc, lead, aluminum, .and mercury by atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. Chloride is determined by silver nitrate titration and fluoride by ion-specific electrode. Bromide and iodide concentrations are determined by the hypochlorite oxidation method. Sulfate is analyzed by titration using barium chloride with thorin indicator after pretreatment with alumina. Boron and silica are determined colorimetrically by the carmine and molybdate-blue methods, respectively. Aliphatic acid anions (C2 through C5) are determined by gas chromatography after separation and concentration in a chloroform-butanol mixture.

  10. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program: US Geothermal Resources Review and Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Entingh, Dan; McLarty, Lynn

    2000-11-30

    The purpose of this report is to lay the groundwork for an emerging process to assess U.S. geothermal resources that might be suitable for development as Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). Interviews of leading geothermists indicate that doing that will be intertwined with updating assessments of U.S. higher-quality hydrothermal resources and reviewing methods for discovering ''hidden'' hydrothermal and EGS resources. The report reviews the history and status of assessment of high-temperature geothermal resources in the United States. Hydrothermal, Enhanced, and Hot Dry Rock resources are addressed. Geopressured geothermal resources are not. There are three main uses of geothermal resource assessments: (1) They inform industry and other interest parties of reasonable estimates of the amounts and likely locations of known and prospective geothermal resources. This provides a basis for private-sector decisions whether or not to enter the geothermal energy business at all, and for where to look for useful resources. (2) They inform government agencies (Federal, State, local) of the same kinds of information. This can inform strategic decisions, such as whether to continue to invest in creating and stimulating a geothermal industry--e.g., through research or financial incentives. And it informs certain agencies, e.g., Department of Interior, about what kinds of tactical operations might be required to support such activities as exploration and leasing. (3) They help the experts who are performing the assessment(s) to clarify their procedures and data, and in turn, provide the other two kinds of users with a more accurate interpretation of what the resulting estimates mean. The process of conducting this assessment brings a spotlight to bear on what has been accomplished in the domain of detecting and understanding reservoirs, in the period since the last major assessment was conducted.

  11. Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Komar, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

  12. UWC geothermal resource exploration

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    A program was developed to explore the strength of the geothermal and hot dry rock (HDR) resource at the Montezuma Hot Springs at the United World College (UWC). The purpose of the UWC {number_sign}1 well is to obtain hydrologic, geologic, and temperature information for ongoing geothermal evaluation of the Montezuma Hot Springs area. If sufficient fluids are encountered, the hole will be cased with a 4 1/2 inch production casing and re-permitted as a geothermal low-temperature well. If no fluid is encountered, the well will be abandoned per Oil Conservation Division regulation. The objectives of the exploration are to evaluate the resource potential to provide space heating for the entire campus of the United World College, determine the effect of a well on the Hot Springs outflow, accurately measure the UWC heating loads versus time, evaluate the potential to support local thermal industry development, assess the feasibility of HDR development, and create an educational program from the collection of data derived from the research effort.

  13. United States Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal program. Special projects research and coordination assistance. Final report, 1 December 1978-30 October 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, M.H.; Morton, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    Work for the period, December 1, 1978 through October 31, 1980, is documented. The following activities are covered: project technical coordination assistance and liaison; technical assistance for review and evaluation of proposals and contract results; technical assistance for geopressured-geothermal test wells; technical assistance, coordination, and planning of surface utilization program; legal research; and special projects. (MHR)

  14. G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The acquisition, completion, and testing of a geopressured-geothermal well are described. The following are covered: geology; petrophysics; re-entry and completion operations - test well; drilling and completion operations - disposal well; test objectives; surface testing facilities; pre-test operations; test sequence; test results and analysis; and return of wells and location to operator. (MHR)

  15. A geopressured-geothermal, solar conversion system to produce potable water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitschke, George Samuel

    A design is presented for recovering Geopressured-Geothermal (GPGT) reservoir brines for conversion into solar ponds to renewably power coastal seawater desalination. The hot, gas-cut, high-pressure GPGT brine is flowed through a well-bore to surface systems which concentrate the brine in multi-effect evaporators and recover the gas. The gas and distilled water are used for thermal enhanced oil recovery, and the concentrated brine is used to construct solar ponds. The thermal energy from the solar ponds is used to produce electricity, which is then used to renewably power coastal desalination plants for large-scale potable water production from the sea. The design is proposed for deployment in California and Texas, where the two largest U.S. GPGT basins exist. Projections show that the design fully deployed in California could provide 5 MAF/y (million acre-ft per year) while yielding a 45% Rate of Return (combined oil and water revenues); the California municipal water load is 10 MAF/y. The dissertation contains a feasibility study of the design approach, supported by engineering analyses and simulation models, included in the appendices. A range of systems configurations and GPGT flow conditions are modeled to illustrate how the approach lends itself to modular implementation, i.e., incrementally installing a single system, tens of systems, up to 1000 systems, which corresponds to full deployment in California for the scenario analyzed. The dissertation includes a method for launching and piloting the approach, starting from a single system installation.

  16. An integrated approach to reservoir engineering at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, G.M.

    1992-12-01

    A numerical model has been developed for the Pleasant Bayou Geothermal-Geopressured reservoir. This reservoir description is the result of integration of a variety of data, including geological and geophysical interpretations, pressure transient test analyses, and well operations. Transient test analyses suggested several enhancements to the geologic description provided by University of Texas Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), including the presence of an internal fault not previously identified. The transient tests also suggested water influx from an adjacent aquifer during the long-term testing of Pleasant Bayou; comparisons between transient test analyses and the reservoir description from BEG suggests that this fault exhibits pressure-dependent behavior. Below some pressure difference across the fault, it remains a no-flow barrier; above this threshold pressure drop the barrier fails, and fluid moves across the fault. A history match exercise is presented, using the hypothesized {open_quotes}leaky fault.{close_quotes} Successful match of 4 years of production rates and estimates of average reservoir pressure supports the reservoir description developed herein. Sensitivity studies indicate that the degree of communication between the perforated interval and the upper and lower sands in the reservoir (termed {open_quotes}distal volume{close_quotes} by BEG) impact simulation results very little, whereas results are quite sensitive to storage and transport properties of this distal volume. The prediction phase of the study indicates that Pleasant Bayou is capable of producing 20,000 STB/d through 1997, with the final bottomhole pressure approximately 1600 psi above abandonment pressure.

  17. The feasibility of recovering medium to heavy oil using geopressured-geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Nequs-De Wys, J.; Plum, M.M. ); Kimmell, C.E. ); Hart, G.F. )

    1991-08-01

    Thermal enhanced oil recovery using geopressured-geothermal (GPGT) fluids is a unique concept for recovering heavy and medium oils that are bypassed during conventional production processes. The successful implementation of this technology would provide an environmentally clean and less expensive method of thermal recovery as opposed to the burning of crude oil or natural gas used widely by industry at the present time. GPGT fluids are under high pressure in their parent reservoir and, when linked to shallow reservoirs by suitable plumbing, will provide a self-propelled method of heat transfer to a target reservoir existing at shallow depth. GPGT fluids will heat the reservoir as in conventional thermal enhanced oil recovery. This will reduce the residual oil saturation and lower the viscosity of the oil so that it can be moved more easily and in greater amounts. The method is similar to hot water flooding, and thus the basic technology already exists. Alworth field of the south Texas Mirando trend is proposed as a pilot site. The temperatures of the upper Wilcox GPGT fluids in this region range form 350 to 500F, and salinities in the range of 3600 to 70,000 mg/L. The pressures are from 800 to 3500 psia flowing well-head pressure. The target reservoirs for injection of the GPGT fluids are the upper Eocene Jackson and Yegua sandstones. These reservoirs contain an estimated four million bbl of heavy oil in place (18 API) of which at least one million bbl could be recovered by thermal enhanced oil recovery. An additional 1.5 billion bbl of oil is recoverable from the 87 fields within the Mirando trend. Run of the economic model on the Alworth field suggests that it will be economic.

  18. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana; Final report, 1 January 1992--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has operated continuous-recording, microearthquake monitoring networks at geopressured-geothermal test well sites since 1980. These microseismic networks were designed to detect microearthquakes indicative of fault activation and/or subsidence that can potentially result from the deep subsurface withdrawal and underground disposal of large volumes of brine during well testing. Seismic networks were established before the beginning of testing to obtain background levels of seismicity. Monitoring continued during testing and for some time after cessation of flow testing to assess any delayed microseismicity caused by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. No flow testing has been done at the Hulin well since January 1990, and the Pleasant Bayou well has been shut down since September 1992. Microseismic monitoring continued at the Hulin and Pleasant Bayou sites until 31 December 1992, at which time both operations were shut down and field sites dismantled. During 1992, the networks recorded seismic signals from earthquakes, sonic booms, geophysical blasting, thunderstorms, etc. However, as in previous years, no local microseismic activity attributable to geopressured-geothermal well testing was recorded.

  19. Analysis of Texas Gulf Coast Tertiary sandstones to delineate areas of high-quality geopressured geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G.; Dodge, M.M.

    1980-06-01

    In Lower and in parts of Middle and Upper Texas Gulf Coast the Wilcox sandstones are relatively well consolidated, but in other parts of Middle and Upper Texas Gulf Coast they show a reversal toward increased porosity at depth. The Wilcox Group has good reservoir potential for geopressured geothermal energy in the Middle Texas Gulf Coast and possibly in adjacent areas, but other Wilcox areas are marginal. Vicksburg sandstones have the poorest reservoir quality of sandstones of any formation and are not prospective for geothermal energy. Reservoir quality in the Frio Formation increases from very poor to lowermost Texas, to marginal into the Middle Texas Gulf Coast, and to good through the Upper Texas Gulf Coast. This increase in reservoir quality correlates to changes in rock composition and cementation. The Frio Formation in the Upper Texas Gulf Coast has the best deep-reservoir quality of any unit along the Texas Gulf Coast. 18 references.

  20. Geothermal energy program summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This document reviews Geothermal Energy Technology and the steps necessary to place it into service. Specific topics covered are: four types of geothermal resources; putting the resource to work; power generation; FY 1989 accomplishments; hard rock penetration; conversion technology; and geopressured brine research. 16 figs. (FSD)

  1. Geothermal resource data base: Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Witcher, J.C.

    1995-09-01

    This report provides a compilation of geothermal well and spring information in Arizona up to 1993. This report and data base are a part of a larger congressionally-funded national effort to encourage and assist geothermal direct-use. In 1991, the US Department of Energy, Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) began a Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program. Phase 1 of this program includes updating the inventory of wells and springs of ten western states and placing these data into a digital format that is universally accessible to the PC. The Oregon Institute of Technology GeoHeat Center (OIT) administers the program and the University of Utah Earth Sciences and Resources Institute (ESRI) provides technical direction. In recent years, the primary growth in geothermal use in Arizona has occurred in aquaculture. Other uses include minor space heating and supply of warm mineral waters for health spas.

  2. South Dakota geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1997-12-01

    South Dakota is normally not thought of as a geothermal state. However, geothermal direct use is probably one of the best kept secrets outside the state. At present there are two geothermal district heating systems in place and operating successfully, a resort community using the water in a large swimming pool, a hospital being supplied with part of its heat, numerous geothermal heat pumps, and many individual uses by ranchers, especially in the winter months for heating residences, barns and other outbuildings, and for stock watering.

  3. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

  4. Geothermal Resources Assessment in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.M.

    1984-10-01

    The Hawaii Geothermal Resources Assessment Program was initiated in 1978. The preliminary phase of this effort identified 20 Potential Geothermal Resource Areas (PGRA's) using available geological, geochemical and geophysical data. The second phase of the Assessment Program undertook a series of field studies, utilizing a variety of geothermal exploration techniques, in an effort to confirm the presence of thermal anomalies in the identified PGRA's and, if confirmed, to more completely characterize them. A total of 15 PGRA's on four of the five major islands in the Hawaiian chain were subject to at least a preliminary field analysis. The remaining five were not considered to have sufficient resource potential to warrant study under the personnel and budget constraints of the program. The island of Kauai was not studied during the current phase of investigation. Geothermal field studies were not considered to be warranted due to the absence of significant geochemical or geophysical indications of a geothermal resource. The great age of volcanism on this island would further suggest that should a thermal resource be present, it would be of low temperature. The geothermal field studies conducted on Oahu focused on the caldera complexes of the two volcanic systems which form the island: Waianae volcano and Koolau volcano. The results of these studies and the interpreted probability for a resource are presented.

  5. Geothermal resource of Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstein, M.P. . Geothermal Inst.); Sudarman, Sayogi . Geothermal Section)

    1993-06-01

    There are at least 30 high temperatures systems (with inferred reservoir temperatures > 200 C) along the active Sumatra Arc that transfer heat from crustal intrusions to the surface. These systems, together with eleven active volcanoes, five degassing volcanoes and one caldera volcano (Lake Toba), are controlled by the Sumatra Fault Zone, an active mega shear zone that follows the median axis of the arc. At least half of the active and degassing volcanoes are associated with volcanic geothermal reservoirs containing magmatic gases and acid fluids. Large, low temperature resources exist in the Tertiary sedimentary basins of east Sumatra (back-arc region), where anomalously higher thermal gradients (up to 8 C/100 m) have been measured. Volcanic activity was not continuous during the Cenozoic; subduction and arc volcanism probably decreased after the Eocene as a result of a clockwise rotation of Sumatra. In the Late Miocene, subduction started again, and andesitic volcanism reached a new peak of intensity in the Pliocene and has been continuous ever since. Rhyolitic volcanism, which has produced voluminous ignimbrite flows, began later (Pliocene/Pleistocene). All known rhyolitic centers associated with ignimbrite flows appear to lie along the Sumatra Fault Zone.

  6. Geopressured habitat: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-de Wys, Jane

    1992-09-01

    A literature review of the geopressured-geothermal habitat is summarized. Findings are presented and discussed with respect to the principal topics: Casual agents are both geological and geochemical; they include disequilibrium compaction of sediments, clay diagenesis, aquathermal pressuring, hydrocarbon generation, and lateral tectonic compression. The overall physical and chemical characteristics of the habitats are dictated by varying combinations of sedimentation rates, alteration mineralogy, permeability, porosity and pressure, temperature, fluid content and chemistry, and hydrodynamic flow. Habitat pressure seals are considered in terms of their formation processes, geologic characteristics, and physical behavior, including pressure release and reservoir pressure recharge on a geologic time scale. World-wide occurrence of geopressured-geothermal habitats is noted. The main thrust of this topic concerns the U.S.A. and Canada; in addition, reference is made to occurrences in China and indications from deep-sea vents, as well as the contribution of paleo-overpressure to habitat initiation and maintenance. Identification and assessment of the habitat is addressed in relation to use of hydrogeologic, geophysical, geochemical, and geothermic techniques, as well as well-logging and drill-stem-test data. Conclusions concerning the adequacy of the current state of knowledge and its applicability to resource exploration and development are set forth, together with recommendations for the thrust of future work.

  7. T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

  8. Brine and gas recovery from geopressured systems. I. Parametric calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, S.K.; Riney, T.D.

    1984-02-01

    A series of parametric calculations was run with the S-CUBED geopressured-geothermal simulator MUSHRM to assess the effects of important formation, fluid and well parameters on brine and gas recovery from geopressured reservoir systems. The specific parameters considered are formation permeability, pore-fluid salinity, temperature and gas content, well radius and location with respect to reservoir boundaries, desired flow rate, and possible shale recharge. It was found that the total brine and gas recovered (as a fraction of the resource in situ) were most sensitive to formation permeability, pore-fluid gas content, and shale recharge.

  9. Depositional setting, structural style, and sandstone distribution in three geopressured geothermal areas, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Winker, C.D.; Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Garcia, D.D.

    1981-10-01

    Three areas in the Texas Gulf Coast region with different depositional settings, structural styles, and sandstone distribution were studied with well log and seismic data to evaluate some of the controls on subsurface conditions in geopressured aquifers. Structural and stratigraphic interpretations were made primarily on the basis of well log correlations. Seismic data confirm the log interpretations but also are useful in structure mapping at depths below well control.

  10. Geopressured-geothermal testing of five dry holes during 1980 and 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Klauzinski, R.Z.

    1981-01-01

    This paper summarizes the testing of five hot, geopressured aquifers in different geologic environments in Texas and Louisiana by Eaton Operating Company for the US Department of Energy. The results were encouraging. Natural gas-to-brine content ranged from 33.0 to 55.0 SCF/bbl. Gas production rates ranged from 93 to 600 MCFD. Sustained water production rates ranged from 1950 to 15,000 BWPD. Bottom-hole temperatures ranged from 260 to 327/sup 0/F. Reservoir pressures ranged from 6627 psia to 13,203 psia. A test near Beaumont resulted in discovery of oil and gas.

  11. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Final report: Beulah Simon No. 2 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Rodgers, J.A.

    1980-07-01

    Geopressured-geothermal (Geo{sup 2}) test operations were conducted at the Beulah Simon No. 2 well site during the period from September through December 1979. The well provided the second geopressured-geothermal test to be completed under the DOE-Gruy Well of Opportunity program. The completion in a geopressured aquifer of Oligocene age at approximately 14,700 feet and the testing of hot salt water from this zone were accomplished without significant difficulty. Some problems were encountered with the wireline and wireline high-pressure lubricator associated with the running of bottomhole instruments. The objectives of the project were all accomplished, and good test data were obtained on the flow rates of gas and water. The gas content was 24 standard cubic feet per stock tank barrel of water. The disposal well accepted the full wellhead stream at temperatures as high as 255{sup 0}F (124{sup 0}C). Over the 10-day flow period the hot brine did not appear to adversely affect the clay minerals in the disposal aquifer. A conclusion from this operation is that presently available wirelines and pressure lubricators are not adaptable for use with uninhibited well fluids under flowing conditions. In addition, this test demonstrated that injection of scale inhibitor down the annulus eliminated scale buildup within the flow string and surface facilities. (MHR)

  12. Analysis of three geopressured geothermal aquifer-natural gas fields; Duson Hollywood and Church Point, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.A.; Boardman, C.R.

    1981-05-01

    The available well logs, production records and geological structure maps were analyzed for the Hollywood, Duson, and Church Point, Louisiana oil and gas field to determine the areal extent of the sealed geopressured blocks and to identify which aquifer sands within the blocks are connected to commercial production of hydrocarbons. The analysis showed that over the depth intervals of the geopressured zones shown on the logs essentially all of the sands of any substantial thickness had gas production from them somewhere or other in the fault block. It is therefore expected that the sands which are fully brine saturated in many of the wells are the water drive portion of the producing gas/oil somewhere else within the fault block. In this study only one deep sand was identified, in the Hollywood field, which was not connected to a producing horizon somewhere else in the field. Estimates of the reservoir parameters were made and a hypothetical production calculation showed the probable production to be less than 10,000 b/d. The required gas price to profitably produce this gas is well above the current market price.

  13. Leasing of federal geothermal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. T.

    1974-01-01

    Pursuant to the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 and the regulations published on December 21, 1973, the first Federal geothermal competitive lease sale was held on January 22, 1974, by the Department of the Interior, offering 33 tracts totalling over 50,000 acres in three Known Geothermal Resource Areas in California. On January 1, 1974, Federal lands outside Known Geothermal Resource Areas were opened to noncompetitive lease applications, of which, 3,763 had been received by June 1, 1974. During fiscal year 1974, a total of 22 competitive leases had been issued in California and Oregon. The principal components in the Department involved in the leasing program are the Geological Survey and the Bureau of Land Management. The former has jurisdiction over drilling and production operations and other activities in the immediate area of operations. The latter receives applications and issues leases and is responsible for managing leased lands under its jurisdiction outside the area of operations. The interrelationships of the above agencies and the procedures in the leasing program are discussed.

  14. Environmental monitoring at designed geopressured-geothermal well sites, Louisiana and Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This document covers the activities of monitoring environmental aspects at designated geothermal wells in Texas and Louisiana during the second quarter of 1990 by the Louisiana Geological Survey, Louisiana State University under contract with US DOE. 1 fig. (FSD)

  15. A corrosivity classification system for geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect

    Conover, Marshall F.

    1982-10-08

    The most important difference between traditional steam systems and those that utilize geothermal fluids is the potential for corrosion of metals. The recently developed sourcebook ''Materials Selection Guidelines for Geothermal Energy Utilization Systems'' is expected to facilitate corrosion engineering decision making and reduce the cost of geothermal systems where new resources are similar to those presented by the corrosivity classification system.

  16. Final Report, Testing and Sampling Procedures for Geothermal - Geopressed Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, W.E.; Dorfman, M.H.; Podio, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Test wells to tap and sample geothermal-geopressured formations at 15,000-20,000 feet in the Gulf Coast area can be drilled routinely utilizing available equipment and methods. Electrical logs, surveys and fluid samplers can be used to obtain accurate and reliable information as to depths, temperatures, pressures, and fluid content of the geopressured formations before the well is completed. But it will be necessary to set casing and flow the well, at least temporarily, to secure fluid production volume and pressure data to evaluate the producibility of the geopressured resource. Electric logging and wireline survey methods are fully developed techniques for measuring the parameters needed to assess a geopressured zone before setting casing. Formation subsidence, though it may be slow to develop can be measured using radioactivity tracer surveys. The reports states three conclusions. (1) Existing well logging and surveying methods and equipment are generally satisfactory for testing and sampling and sampling a geothermal-geopressured resource. (2) No significant areas of research are needed to predict, detect, and evaluate geopressured formations for their potential as geothermal resources. (3) Static and dynamic testing procedures using existing technology are satisfactory to test, sample and analyze a geopressured reservoir. [DJE 2005

  17. Computer simulation of production from geopressured-geothermal aquifers. Project 61025 annual report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.A.

    1980-06-01

    In the Department of Energy test of the Edna Delcambre No. 1 well for recovery of natural gas from geopressured-geothermal brine, part of the test producted gas in excess of the amount that could be dissolved in the brine. Where this excess gas originated was unknown and several theories were proposed to explain the source. This annual report describes IGT's work to match the observed gas/water production with computer simulation. Two different theoretical models were calculated in detail using available reservoir simulators. One model considered the excess gas to be dispersed as small bubbles in pores. The other model considered the excess gas as a nearby free gas cap above the aquifer. Reservoir engineering analysis of the flow test data was used to determine the basic reservoir characteristics. The computer studies revealed that the dispersed gas model gave characteristically the wrong shape for plots of gas/water ratio, and no reasonable match of the calculated values could be made to the experimental results. The free gas cap model gave characteristically better shapes to the gas/water ratio plots if the initial edge of the free gas was only about 400 feet from the well. Because there were two other wells at approximately this distance (Delcambre No. 4 and No. 4A wells) which had a history of down-hole blowouts and mechanical problems, it appears that the source of the excess free gas is from a separate horizon which connected to the Delcambre No. 1 sand via these nearby wells. This conclusion is corroborated by the changes in gas composition when the excess gas occurs and the geological studies which indicate the nearest free gas cap to be several thousand feet away. The occurrence of this excess free gas can thus be explained by known reservoir characteristics, and no new model for gas entrapment or production is needed.

  18. Geothermal resources of southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Mabey, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    The geothermal resource of southern Idaho as assessed by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1978 is large. Most of the known hydrothermal systems in southern Idaho have calculated reservoir temperatures of less than 150 C. Water from many of these systems is valuable for direct heat applications. A majority of the known and inferred geothermal resources of southern Idaho underlie the Snake River Plain. However, major uncertainties exist concerning the geology and temperatures beneath the plain. The largest hydrothermal system in Idaho is in the Bruneau-Grang View area of the western Snake River Plain with a calculated reservoir temperature of 107 C and an energy of 4.5 x 10 to the 20th power joules. No evidence of higher temperature water associated with this system was found. Although the geology of the eastern Snake River Plain suggests that a large thermal anomaly may underlie this area of the plain, direct evidence of high temperatures was not found. Large volumes of water at temperatures between 90 and 150 C probably exist along the margins of the Snake River Plain and in local areas north and south of the plain.

  19. An Evaluation of the Available Energy Potential of the Gulf Coast Geopressured Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, R.K.; Osoba, J. S.; Hankin, J.W.

    1980-12-01

    The geopressured zones presently under serious study in the U.S. are tertiary sediments in the Gulf Coastal basin which are water saturated and exhibit pressures significantly greater than hydrostatic. These sediments are primarily shale, interbedded with sandstone. The top of the geopressured zone is frequently near 10,000 ft. or so, and extends to indeterminate depths. The water contained in these zones is at a moderately elevated temperature and, more significantly, appears to contain dissolved methane at near-saturation values. Conceptually, wells drilled into the geopressured zone might be expected to produce water without pumping, due to the high pressures. The dissolved methane could then be separated at the surface and used conventionally as natural gas. The water may contain sufficient heat to provide a useful source of geothermal energy, and the hydraulic energy might also provide useful work. Development of the geopressured/geothermal resource is largely dependent upon production characteristics of geopressured reservoirs. These in turn are intimately related to properties of the formations, and can be defined within reasonable limits.

  20. Resource assessment for geothermal direct use applications

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, C.; Hederman, W.F. Jr.; Dolenc, M.R.; Allman, D.W.

    1984-04-01

    This report discusses the topic geothermal resource assessment and its importance to laymen and investors for finding geothermal resources for direct-use applications. These are applications where the heat from lower-temperature geothermal fluids, 120 to 200/sup 0/F, are used directly rather than for generating electricity. The temperatures required for various applications are listed and the various types of geothermal resources are described. Sources of existing resource data are indicated, and the types and suitability of tests to develop more data are described. Potential development problems are indicated and guidance is given on how to decrease technical and financial risk and how to use technical consultants effectively. The objectives of this report are to provide: (1) an introduction low-temperature geothermal resource assessment; (2) experience from a series of recent direct-use projects; and (3) references to additional information.

  1. Parcperdue geopressure-geothermal project. Study a geopressured reservoir by drilling and producing a well in a limited geopressured water sand. Final technical report, September 28, 1979-December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.R.; Stanley, J.G.

    1984-01-15

    The behavior of geopressured reservoirs was investigated by drilling and producing a well in small, well defined, geopressured reservoir; and performing detailed pressure transient analysis together with geological, geophysical, chemical, and physical studies. The Dow-DOE L. R. Sweezy No. 1 well was drilled to a depth of 13,600 feet in Parcperdue field, just south of Lafayette, Louisiana, and began production in April, 1982. The production zone was a poorly consolidated sandstone which constantly produced sand into the well stream, causing damage to equipment and causing other problems. The amount of sand production was kept manageable by limiting the flow rate to below 10,000 barrels per day. Reservoir properties of size, thickness, depth, temperature, pressure, salinity, porosity, and permeability were close to predicted values. The reservoir brine was undersaturated with respect to gas, containing approximately 20 standard cubic feet of gas per barrel of brine. Shale dewatering either did not occur or was insignificant as a drive mechanism. Production terminated when the gravel-pack completion failed and the production well totally sanded in, February, 1983. Total production up to the sanding incident was 1.94 million barrels brine and 31.5 million standard cubic feet gas.

  2. Low-temperature geothermal resources of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, J.E. ); Bloomquist, R.G. )

    1994-11-01

    USDOE awarded a contract, by way of the University of Utah Research Institute and the Oregon Institute of Technology Geo-Heat Center, to the Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) to update the geothermal database for Washington. DGER with the Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) now assess and encourage geothermal energy uses, especially in the Columbia River basin where shallow geothermal sources are abundant. DGER and WSEO recommend developing existing thermal wells, do further exploration, and institute a long term effort to inform the public of the advantages economic value of utilizing geothermal resources over fossil fuels.

  3. Human Resources in Geothermal Development

    SciTech Connect

    Fridleifsson, I.B.

    1995-01-01

    Some 80 countries are potentially interested in geothermal energy development, and about 50 have quantifiable geothermal utilization at present. Electricity is produced from geothermal in 21 countries (total 38 TWh/a) and direct application is recorded in 35 countries (34 TWh/a). Geothermal electricity production is equally common in industrialized and developing countries, but plays a more important role in the developing countries. Apart from China, direct use is mainly in the industrialized countries and Central and East Europe. There is a surplus of trained geothermal manpower in many industrialized countries. Most of the developing countries as well as Central and East Europe countries still lack trained manpower. The Philippines (PNOC) have demonstrated how a nation can build up a strong geothermal workforce in an exemplary way. Data from Iceland shows how the geothermal manpower needs of a country gradually change from the exploration and field development to monitoring and operations.

  4. Identification of geopressured occurrences outside of the Gulf Coast. Final report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Strongin, O.

    1980-09-30

    As an extension of its efforts in the development of the geopressured resources of the Gulf Coast, the Division of Geothermal Energy of the US Department of Energy is interested in determining the extent and characteristics of geopressured occurrences in areas outside the Gulf Coast. The work undertaken involved a literature search of available information documenting such occurrences. Geopressured reservoirs have been reported from various types of sedimentary lithologies representing virtually all geologic ages and in a host of geologic environments, many of which are unlike those of the Gulf Coast. These include many Rocky Mountain basins (Green River, Big Horn, Powder River, Wind River, Uinta, Piceance, Denver, San Juan), Mid-Continent basins (Delaware, Anadorko, Interior Salt, Williston, Appalachian), California basins (Sacramento, San Joaquin, Los Angeles, Ventura, Coast Ranges), Alaskan onshore and offshore basins, Pacific Coast offshore basins, and other isolated occurrences, both onshore and offshore.

  5. Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1979. Annual report, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

    1980-01-01

    A program to monitor baseline air and water quality, subsidence, microseismic activity, and noise in the vicinity of Brazoria County geopressured geothermal test wells, Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2, has been underway since March 1978. The initial report on environmental baseline monitoring at the test well contained descriptions of baseline air and water quality, a noise survey, an inventory of microseismic activity, and a discussion of the installation of a liquid tilt meter (Gustavson, 1979). The following report continues the description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, includes an inventory of microseismic activity during 1979 with interpretations of the origin of the events, and discusses the installation and monitoring of a liquid tilt meter at the test well site. In addition, a brief description of flooding at the test site is presented.

  6. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Saldana well No. 2, Zapata County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-07

    The Saldana Well No. 2, approximately 35 miles Southeast of the city of Laredo, Texas, was the sixth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity Program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 9745 to 9820 feet. The geological section was the 1st Hinnant Sand, an upper member of the Wilcox Group. Produced water was injected into the Saldana Well No. 1, which was also acquired from Riddle Oil Company and converted to a disposal well. A Miocene salt water sand was perforated from 3005 to 3100 feet for disposal. One pressure drawdown flow test and one pressure buildup test were conducted during a 10-day period. A total of 9328 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was 1950 BWPD.

  7. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana: Annual report for the period 1 November 1984 to 31 December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Groat, C.G.

    1987-09-01

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities carried out by Louisiana State University (LSU) under US Department of Energy Contract FC07-85NV10425 for the period 1 November 1984 through 31 December 1986. Other aspects of the LSU technical support program completed under prior contracts were covered in final form in reports preceding this one. During the contract period, the Louisiana Geological Survey, aided by subcontractors, monitored microseismic activity, land-surface subsidence, and surface and ground-water quality at three designed geopressured-geothermal test well sites in Louisiana and Texas. Don Stevenson supervised microseismic monitoring activities, and Drukell Trahan coordinated water quality and land-surface subsidence studies. This is a progress report in the sense that it discusses program components, provides raw data, and presents preliminary interpretations. The environmental monitoring program continues and will be the subject of subsequent annual reports.

  8. High-potential geothermal energy resource areas of Nigeria and their geologic and geophysical assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Babalola, O.O.

    1984-04-01

    The widespread occurrence of geothermal manifestations in Nigeria is significant because the wide applicability and relative ease of exploitation of geothermal energy is of vital importance to an industrializing nation like Nigeria. There are two known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) in Nigeria: the Ikogosi Warm Springs of Ondo State and the Wikki Warm Springs of Bauchi State. These surficial effusions result from the circulation of water to great depths through faults in the basement complex rocks of the area. Within sedimentary areas, high geothermal gradient trends are identified in the Lagos subbasin, the Okitipupa ridge, the Auchi-Agbede are of the Benin flank/hinge line, and the Abakaliki anticlinorium. The deeper Cretaceous and Tertiary sequences of the Niger delta are geopressured geothermal horizons. In the Benue foldbelt, extending from the Abalaliki anticlinorium to the Keana anticline and the Zambuk ridge, several magmatic intrusions emplaced during the Late Cretaceous line the axis of the Benue trough. Positive Bouguer gravity anomalies also parallel this trough and are interpreted to indicate shallow mantle. Parts of this belt and the Ikom, the Jos plateau, Bauchi plateau, and the Adamawa areas, experienced Cenozoic volcanism and magmatism.

  9. Advanced geothermal technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Whetten, J.T.; Murphy, H.D.; Hanold, R.J.; Myers, C.W.; Dunn, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Research and development in advanced technologies for geothermal energy production continue to increase the energy production options for the Nation. The high-risk investment over the past few years by the US Department of Energy in geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma energy resources is producing new means to lower production costs and to take advantage of these resources. The Nation has far larger and more regionally extensive geothermal resources than heretofore realized. At the end of a short 30-day closed-loop flow test, the manmade hot dry rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was producing 10 MW thermal - and still climbing - proving the technical feasibility of this new technology. The scientific feasibility of magma energy extraction has been demonstrated, and new field tests to evaluate this technology are planned. Analysis and field tests confirm the viability of geopressured-geothermal energy and the prospect that many dry-hole or depleted petroleum wells can be turned into producing geopressured-geothermal wells. Technological advances achieved through hot dry rock, magma, geopressured, and other geothermal research are making these resources and conventional hydrothermal resources more competitive. Noteworthy among these technological advances are techniques in computer simulation of geothermal reservoirs, new means for well stimulation, new high-temperature logging tools and packers, new hard-rock penetration techniques, and new methods for mapping fracture flow paths across large underground areas in reservoirs. In addition, many of these same technological advances can be applied by the petroleum industry to help lower production costs in domestic oil and gas fields. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production. Annual report, May 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

    1980-07-01

    Differing extents of diagenetic modification is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the Upper and Lower Texas Gulf Coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area are less stable, chemically and mechanically, than Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury dome area. Vicksburg sandstones are mineralogically immature and contain greater proportions of feldspars and rock fragments than do Frio sandstones. Thr reactive detrital assemblage of Vicksubrg sandstones is highly susceptible to diagenetic modification. Susceptibility is enhanced by higher than normal geothermal gradients in the McAllen Ranch Field area. Thus, consolidation of Vicksburg sandstones began at shallower depth of burial and precipitation of authigenic phases (especially calcite) was more pervasive than in Frio sandstones. Moreover, the late-stage episode of ferroan calcite precipitation that occluded most secondary porosity in Vicksburg sandstones did not occur significantly in Frio sandstones. Therefore, regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production.

  11. FIJI geothermal resource assessment and development programme

    SciTech Connect

    Autar, Rohit K.

    1996-01-24

    The Fiji Department of Energy (DOE) has a comprehensive resource assessment programme which assesses and promotes the use of local renewable energy resources where they are economically viable. DOE is currently involved in the investigation of the extent of geothermal resources for future energy planning and supply purposes. The aim is to determine (a) whether exploitable geothermal fields exist in the Savusavu or Labasa areas. the two geothermal fields with the greatest potential, (b) the cost of exploiting these fields for electricity generation/process heat on Vanua Levu. (c) the comparative cost per mega-watt-hour (MWh) of geothermal electricity generation with other generating options on Vanua Levu, and. (d) to promote the development of the geothermal resource by inviting BOO/BOOT schemes. Results to date have indicated that prospects for using geothermal resource for generating electricity lies in Savusavu only - whereas the Labasa resource can only provide process heat. All geophysical surveys have been completed and the next stage is deep drilling to verify the theoretical findings and subsequent development.

  12. Continuity and productivity analysis of three geopressured geothermal aquifer-natural gas fields: Duson, Hollywood and Church Point, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.A.; Boardman, C.R.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    The available well logs, production records and geological structure maps were analyzed for the Hollywood, Duson, and Church Point, Louisiana oil and gas fields to determine the areal extent of the sealed geopressured blocks and to identify which aquifer sands within the blocks are connected to commercial production of hydrocarbons. Studies such as these are needed for the Department of Energy program to identify geopressured brine reservoirs that are not connected to commercial productions. The analysis showed that over the depth intervals at the geopressured zones shown on the logs essentially all of the sands of any substantial thickness had gas production from them somewhere or other in the fault block. It is therefore expected that the sands which are fully brine saturated in many of the wells are the water drive portion of the producing gas/oil somewhere else within the fault block. In this study only one deep sand was identified, in the Hollywood field, which was apparently not connected to a producing horizon somewhere else in the field. Estimates of the reservoir parameters were made for this sand and a hypothetical production calculation showed the probable production to be less than 10,000 b/d. The required gas price to profitably produce this gas is well above the current market price.

  13. Geothermal resource assessment of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muffler, L.J.P.; Christiansen, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Geothermal resource assessment is the broadly based appraisal of the quantities of heat that might be extracted from the earth and used economically at some reasonable future time. In the United States, the Geological Survey is responsible for preparing geothermal assessments based on the best available data and interpretations. Updates are required every few years owing to increasing knowledge, enlarging data base, improving technology, and changing economics. Because geothermal understanding is incomplete and rapidly evolving, the USGS complements its assessments with a broad program of geothermal research that includes (1) study of geothermal processes on crustal and local scales, (2) regional evaluations, (3) intensive study of type systems before and during exploitation (4) improvement of exploration techniques, and (5) investigation of geoenvironmental constraints. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  14. Geothermal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    An introduction to geothermal energy is provided in this discussion of: (1) how a geothermal reservoir works; (2) how to find geothermal energy; (3) where it is located; (4) electric power generation using geothermal energy; (5) use of geothermal energy as a direct source of heat; (6) geopressured reservoirs; (7) environmental effects; (8)…

  15. Geothermal resources assessment in Hawaii. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.M.

    1984-02-21

    The Hawaii Geothermal Resources Assessment Program was initiated in 1978. The preliminary phase of this effort identified 20 Potential Geothermal Resource Areas (PGRA's) using available geological, geochemical and geophysical data. The second phase of the Assessment Program undertook a series of field studies, utilizing a variety of geothermal exploration techniques, in an effort to confirm the presence of thermal anomalies in the identified PGRA's and, if confirmed, to more completely characterize them. A total of 15 PGRA's on four of the five major islands in the Hawaiian chain were subject to at least a preliminary field analysis. The remaining five were not considered to have sufficient resource potential to warrant study under the personnel and budget constraints of the program.

  16. Geothermal Energy Program Summary Document, FY 1982

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal energy is derived from the internal heat of the earth. Much of it is recoverable with current or near current technology. Geothermal energy can be used for electric power production, residential and commercial space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, and agricultural applications. Three principal types of geothermal resources are exploitable through the year 2000. In order of technology readiness, these resources are: hydrothermal; geopressured (including dissolved natural gas); and hot dry rock. In hydrothermal systems, natural water circulation moves heat from deep internal sources toward the earth's surface. Geothermal fluids (water and steam) tapped by drilling can be used to generate electricity or provide direct heat. Geopressured resources, located primarily in sedimentary basins along the Gulf Coast of Texas and of Louisiana, consist of water and dissolved methane at high pressure and at moderately high temperature. In addition to recoverable methane, geopressured resources provide thermal energy and mechanical energy derived from high fluid pressures, although methane offers the greatest immediate value. Commercial development of geopressured energy may begin in the mid-1980s. Economic feasibility depends on the amount of methane that a given well can produce, a highly uncertain factor at present.

  17. Computer simulation of production from geothermal-geopressured aquifers. Final report, October 1, 1978 through January 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, M.G.; Poonawala, N.A.

    1983-07-01

    The effort utilized a computer to interpret the results of well tests and compile data on gas solubility in brine and the viscosity of brine. A detailed computer reservoir study of a geopressured test well that had been abandoned as a dry hole but became a commercial producer of hydrocarbons is presented. A number of special topical reports pertaining to test activities performed on Department of Energy test wells (MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 Well, Leroy Sweezy No. 1 Well, and Pleasant Bayou No. 2 Well) are appended. A referenced article written under this study that appeared in the Journal of Petroleum Technology is also reproduced.

  18. A geothermal resource data base: New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Witcher, J.C.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a compilation of geothermal well and spring information in New Mexico up to 1993. Economically important geothermal direct-use development in New Mexico and the widespread use of personal computers (PC) in recent years attest to the need for an easily used and accessible data base of geothermal data in a digital format suitable for the PC. This report and data base are a part of a larger congressionally-funded national effort to encourage and assist geothermal direct-use. In 1991, the US Department of Energy, Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) began a Low Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program. Phase 1 of this program includes updating the inventory of wells and springs of ten western states and placing these data into a digital format that is universally accessible to the PC. The Oregon Institute of Technology GeoHeat Center (OIT) administers the program and the University of Utah Earth Sciences and Resources Institute (ESRI) provides technical direction.

  19. Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources, Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    This document highlights the applications of low-temperature geothermal resources and the potential for future uses as well as current Geothermal Technologies Program-funded projects related to low-temperature resources.

  20. Water Intensity of Electricity from Geothermal Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, G. S.; Glassley, W. E.

    2010-12-01

    BACKGROUND Electricity from geothermal resources could play a significant role in the United States over the next few decades; a 2006 study by MIT expects a capacity of 100GWe by 2050 as feasible; approximately 10% of total electricity generating capacity up from less than 1% today. However, there is limited research on the water requirements and impacts of generating electricity from geothermal resources - conventional as well as enhanced. To the best of our knowledge, there is no baseline exists for water requirements of geothermal electricity. Water is primarily required for cooling and dissipation of waste heat in the power plants, and to account for fluid losses during heat mining of enhanced geothermal resources. MODEL DESCRIPTION We have developed a model to assess and characterize water requirements of electricity from hydrothermal resources and enhanced geothermal resources (EGS). Our model also considers a host of factors that influence cooling water requirements ; these include the temperature and chemical composition of geothermal resource; installed power generation technology - flash, organic rankine cycle and the various configurations of these technologies; cooling technologies including air cooled condensers, wet recirculating cooling, and hybrid cooling; and finally water treatment and recycling installations. We expect to identify critical factors and technologies. Requirements for freshwater, degraded water and geothermal fluid are separately estimated. METHODOLOGY We have adopted a lifecycle analysis perspective that estimates water consumption at the goethermal field and power plant, and accounts for transmission and distribution losses before reaching the end user. Our model depends upon an extensive literature review to determine various relationships necessary to determine water usage - for example relationship between thermal efficiency and temperature of a binary power plant, or differences in efficiency between various ORC configurations

  1. 30 CFR 1202.351 - Royalties on geothermal resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.351 Royalties on geothermal... Interior temporarily waives, suspends, or reduces that rate(s). Royalties are determined under 30 CFR part 1206, subpart H. (2) Fees in lieu of royalties on geothermal resources are prescribed in 30 CFR...

  2. Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G.

    1982-04-01

    The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

  3. Final report for the geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells: DOE Pleasant Bayou test site, Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Ben N.; Seigel, Ben H.

    1994-03-13

    For a variety of reasons, thousands of oil and gas wells have been abandoned in the Gulf Coast Region of the United States. Many of these wells penetrated geopressured zones whose resource potential for power generation was undervalued or ignored. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program was chartered to improve geothermal technology to the point where electricity could be commercially produced from a substantial number of geopressured resource sites. This research program focused on relatively narrow technical issues that are unique to geopressured resources such as the ability to predict reservoir production capacity based on preliminary flow tests. Three well sites were selected for the research program. These are the Willis Hulin and Gladys McCall sites in Louisiana, and the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. The final phase of this research project consists of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and site restoration.

  4. High-resolution, three-dimensional, seismic survey over the geopressured-geothermal reservoir at Parcperdue, Louisiana. Final report, January 1, 1981-July 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsland, G.L.

    1985-07-01

    A high resolution three-dimensional seismic survey was performed over the reservoir of the geopressured-geothermal production experiment at Parcperdue, Louisiana and high quality results have been obtained. The reservoir is now mapped with more control and assurance than was possible with the previously existing data. Three differences between the map of this project and those available before are significant in the interpretation of the depletion experiment: (1) the western bounding fault is further west leading to a larger reservoir volume; (2) a down to the north (relief) fault through the reservoir has been found; and (3) there are structural highs in which small petroleum accumulations may exist within the reservoir. An original goal of testing the before and after seismic experiment idea as a production monitor has not been realized. However, the quality of the data at the stages of processing presently available is high enough that, had the well not failed, it would have been prudent to have proceeded with the project toward the second experiment. 3 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report P. R. Girouard Well No. 1, Lafayette Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The P.R. Girouard No. 1 Well, located approximately 10 miles southeast of Lafayette, Louisiana, was the fourth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the Wells of Opportunity program. The well was tested through 3-1/2 inch tubing set on a packer at 14,570 feet without major problems. The geological section tested was the Oligocene Marginulina Texana No. 1 sand of upper Frio age. The interval tested was from 14,744 to 14,819 feet. Produced water was piped down a disposal well perforated from 2870 to 3000 feet in a Miocene saltwater sand. Four flow tests were conducted for sustained production rates of approximately 4000 BWPD to approximately 15,000 BWPD. The highest achieved, during a fifth short test, was 18,460 BWPD. The test equipment was capable of handling higher rates. The gas-to-water ratio was relatively uniform at approximately 40 SCF/bbl. The heating value of the gas is 970 Btu/SCF. The reservoir tests show that is is doubtful that this well would sustain production rates over 10,000 BWPD for any lengthy period from the sand zone in which it was completed. This limited flow capacity is due to the well's poor location in the reservoir and is not a result of any production deficiencies of the Marginulina Texana sand.

  6. 30 CFR 1202.351 - Royalties on geothermal resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 1202.351 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.351 Royalties on geothermal resources. (a)(1... temporarily waives, suspends, or reduces that rate(s). Royalties are determined under 30 CFR part...

  7. 30 CFR 1202.351 - Royalties on geothermal resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 1202.351 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.351 Royalties on geothermal resources. (a)(1... temporarily waives, suspends, or reduces that rate(s). Royalties are determined under 30 CFR part...

  8. 30 CFR 1202.351 - Royalties on geothermal resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Section 1202.351 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.351 Royalties on geothermal resources. (a)(1... temporarily waives, suspends, or reduces that rate(s). Royalties are determined under 30 CFR part...

  9. Classification of geothermal resources by potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybach, L.

    2015-03-01

    When considering and reporting resources, the term "geothermal potential" is often used without clearly stating what kind of potential is meant. For renewable energy resources it is nowadays common to use different potentials: theoretical, technical, economic, sustainable, developable - decreasing successively in size. In such a sequence, the potentials are progressively realizable and more and more rewarding financially. The theoretical potential describes the physically present energy, the technical potential the fraction of this energy that can be used by currently available technology and the economic potential the time- and location-dependent fraction of the previous category; the sustainable potential constrains the fraction of the economic potential that can be utilized in the long term; the developable potential is the fraction of the economic resource which can be developed under realistic conditions. In converting theoretical to technical potential, the recovery factor (the ratio extractable heat/heat present at depth) is of key importance. An example (global geothermal resources) is given, with numerical values of the various potentials. The proposed classification could and should be used as a kind of general template for future geothermal energy resources reporting.

  10. Geothermal resource assessment, South Dakota: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gosnold, W.D. Jr.

    1987-07-01

    Seven geothermal aquifers in South Dakota contain an accessible resource base of about 11,207 x 10/sup 18/ J. The potentially productive geothermal aquifers are: Deadwood Formation (Cambrian), Winnipeg Formation + Red River Formation + Englewood Limestone (Ordovician through Devonian), Madison Limestone (Mississippian), Minnelusa Formation (Mississippian-Permian), Inyan Kara Group (Cretaceous), and Newcastle Sandstone (Cretaceous). The resource estimate was obtained by first using heat flow, thermal conductivity, temperature gradient, and stratigraphic data to estimate aquifer temperatures. The heat content of each aquifer was determined from the product of the volumetric heat capacity, aquifer volume, and temperature difference between the aquifer and the mean annual temperature for a 14 x 14 grid of 240 km/sup 2/ cells. Geothermal fluid temperatures range from about 120/sup 0/C in the Deadwood Formation in the Williston Basin to about 30/sup 0/C for the Newcastle Sandstone in south-central South Dakota. The area containing the resource lies largely west of the Missouri River. About 10,000 km/sup 2/ of the resource area is characterized by anomalously high heat flow values greater than 100 mW m/sup -2/.

  11. Assessment of geothermal resources of Caliente, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Trexler, D.T.; Flynn, T.; Koenig, B.A.; Bruce, J.

    1980-03-01

    An assessment of the geothermal resources of Caliente, Nevada was made to provide information on resource characteristics and to site 2 (two) 500 ft (152 m) test wells to confirm the resource. The strategy used in the resource assessment employed a logical sequence of work elements that included 1) baseline data collection, 2) field investigations, 3) laboratory analyses and 4) data interpretation and synthesis. Airphoto interpretation indicated that a series of normal faults produced a stepped arrangement in the canyon walls on the west side of Meadow Valley Wash north of downtown Caiente. This area coincides with the area of known geothermal occurrences. Temperature measurements in existing wells indicate a rapid cooling of the geothermal waters as they mix with cold groundwater flows in Meadow Valley Wash. Soil mercury analyses range from 15 ppB to as high as 120 ppB. Trends in soil mercury content may indicate the presence of buried faults. Temperature measured in 2-meter deep auger holes indicated temperatures as high as 40/sup 0/C in an area north of the Lincoln County Medical Facility. Interpretation of chemical analyses, both major and minor, of waters collected from wells and streams in the area failed to conclusively show any mechanisms for the mixing of thermal and nonthermal waters. The selection of sites for the 2 (two) 500 ft (152 m) reservoir confirmation wells was made using the results of temperature surveys, geologic structure and historic observations.

  12. 2014 Low-Temperature and Coproduced Geothermal Resources Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Reinhardt, Program Manager

    2014-09-01

    As a growing sector of geothermal energy development, the Low-Temperature Program supports innovative technologies that enable electricity production and cascaded uses from geothermal resources below 300° Fahrenheit.

  13. Overview of Resources for Geothermal Absorption Cooling for Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobing; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R; Mehdizadeh Momen, Ayyoub

    2015-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of a literature review in three areas: available low-temperature/coproduced geothermal resources in the United States, energy use for space conditioning in commercial buildings, and state of the art of geothermal absorption cooling.

  14. Leveling Sweet Lake Geopressured Well Site

    SciTech Connect

    1984-07-01

    First Order leveling surveys to be conducted as part of an environmental monitoring program for geopressured test well. Conduct first order leveling to determine the elevation of the previously installed and leveled bench marks in the area of the Sweetlake geothermal well. All leveling surveys to conform to NGS standards and specifications.

  15. Geopressured energy availability. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Near- and long-term prospects that geopressured/geothermal energy sources could become a viable alternative fuel for electric power generation were investigated. Technical questions of producibility and power generation were included, as well as economic and environmental considerations. The investigators relied heavily on the existing body of information, particularly in geotechnical areas. Statistical methods were used where possible to establish probable production values. Potentially productive geopressured sediments have been identified in twenty specific on-shore fairways in Louisiana and Texas. A total of 232 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of dissolved methane and 367 x 10/sup 15/ Btu (367 quads) of thermal energy may be contained in the water within the sandstone in these formations. Reasonable predictions of the significant reservoir parameters indicate that a maximum of 7.6 TCF methane and 12.6 quads of thermal energy may be producible from these potential reservoirs.

  16. Geopressured-Geothermal Drilling and Testing Plan, Volume II, Testing Plan; Dow Chemical Co. - Dept. of Energy Dow-DOE Sweezy No. 1 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    1982-02-01

    The Dow/D.O.E. L. R. Sweezy No. 1 geopressured geothermal production well was completed in August of 1981. The well was perforated and gravel packed in approximately 50 feet of sand from 13,344 feet to 13,395 feet. Permeabilities of 6 to 914 millidarcies were measured with porosity of 25 to 36%. Static surface pressure after well clean-up was 5000 psi. At 1000 B/D flow rate the drawdown was 50 psi. The water produced in clean-up contained 100,000 ppm TDS. This report details the plan for testing this well with the goal of obtaining sufficient data to define the total production curve of the small, 939 acre, reservoir. A production time of six to nine months is anticipated. The salt water disposal well is expected to be completed and surface equipment installed such that production testing will begin by April 1, 1982. The program should be finished and reports written by February 28, 1983. The brine will be produced from the No.1 well, passed through a separator where the gas is removed, then reinjected into the No.2 (SWD) well under separator pressure. Flow rates of up to 25,000 B/D are expected. The tests are divided into a two-week short-term test and six to nine-month long-term tests with periodic downhole measurement of drawdown and buildup rates. Data obtained in the testing will be relayed by phoneline computer hookup to Otis Engineering in Dallas, Texas, where the reservoir calculations and modeling will be done. At the point where sufficient data has been obtained to reach the objectives of the program, production will be ended, the wells plugged and abandoned, and a final report will be issued.

  17. Low-temperature geothermal resources of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, J.E.; Bloomquist, R.G.

    1994-06-01

    This report presents information on the location, physical characteristics, and water chemistry of low-temperature geothermal resources in Washington. The database includes 941 thermal (>20C or 68F) wells, 34 thermal springs, lakes, and fumaroles, and 238 chemical analyses. Most thermal springs occur in the Cascade Range, and many are associated with stratovolcanoes. In contrast, 97 percent of thermal wells are located in the Columbia Basin of southeastern Washington. Some 83.5 percent are located in Adams, Benton, Franklin, Grant, Walla Walla, and Yakima Counties. Yakima County, with 259 thermal wells, has the most. Thermal wells do not seem to owe their origin to local sources of heat, such as cooling magma in the Earth`s upper crust, but to moderate to deep circulation of ground water in extensive aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group and interflow sedimentary deposits, under the influence of a moderately elevated (41C/km) average geothermal gradient.

  18. Tapping the earth's geothermal resources: Hydrothermal today, magma tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1986-12-17

    The paper discusses geothermal resources, what it is, where it is, and how to extract energy from it. The materials research activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory related to geothermal energy extraction are discussed. These include high-temperature, light-weight polymer cements, elastomers, biochemical waste processing techniques, and non-metallic heat exchanger tubing. The economics of geothermal energy is also discussed. (ACR)

  19. Geothermal energy development in the eastern United States. Papers presented: Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-10-01

    Topic areas covered include: technical assistance (hydrothermal resource application in the eastern United States); GRITS - a computer model for economic evaluation of direct-uses of geothermal energy; geothermal market penetration in the residential sector - capital stock impediments and compensatory incentives; an analysis of benefits and costs of accelerated market penetration by a geothermal community heating system.

  20. Geothermal-resource verification for Air Force bases

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, P.R. Jr.

    1981-06-01

    This report summarizes the various types of geothermal energy reviews some legal uncertainties of the resource and then describes a methodology to evaluate geothermal resources for applications to US Air Force bases. Estimates suggest that exploration costs will be $50,000 to $300,000, which, if favorable, would lead to drilling a $500,000 exploration well. Successful identification and development of a geothermal resource could provide all base, fixed system needs with an inexpensive, renewable energy source.

  1. Gas evolution from geopressured brines

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, C.S.

    1980-06-01

    The process of gas evolution from geopressured brine is examined using as a basis the many past studies of gas evolution from liquids in porous media. A discussion of a number of speculations that have been made concerning gas evolution from geopressured brines is provided. According to one, rapid pressure reduction will cause methane gas to evolve as when one opens a champagne bottle. It has been further speculated that evolved methane gas would migrate up to form an easily producible cap. As a result of detailed analyses, it can be concluded that methane gas evolution from geopressured brines is far too small to ever form a connected gas saturation except very near to the producing well. Thus, no significant gas cap could ever form. Because of the very low solubility of methaned in brine, the process of methane gas evolution is not at all analogous to evolution of carbon dioxide from champagne. A number of other speculations and questions on gas evolution are analyzed, and procedures for completing wells and testing geopressured brine reservoirs are discussed, with the conclusion that presently used procedures will provide adequate data to enable a good evaluation of this resource.

  2. Geothermal energy technology: issues, R and D needs, and cooperative arrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    In 1986, the National Research Council, through its Energy Engineering Board, formed the Committee on Geothermal Energy Technology. The committee's study addressed major issues in geothermal energy technology, made recommendations for research and development, and considered cooperative arrangements among government, industry, and universities to facilitate RandD under current severe budget constraints. The report addresses four types of geothermal energy: hydrothermal, geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma systems. Hydrothermal systems are the only type that are now economically competitive commercially. Further technology development by the Department of Energy could make the uneconomical hydrothermal resources commercially attractive to the industry. The economics are more uncertain for the longer-term technologies for extracting energy from geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma systems. For some sites, the cost of energy derived from geopressured and hot dry rock systems is projected within a commercially competitive range. The use of magma energy is too far in the future to make reasonable economic calculations.

  3. Brazoria County Re-Leveling Pleasant Bayou Geopressured Well Site

    SciTech Connect

    1984-07-01

    The purpose is to conduct first order leveling surveys as part of an ongoing environmental monitoring program for geopressured-geothermal test wells. The scope is to Conduct First Order, Class I, leveling to monitor subsidence of previously installed and leveled bench marks, established by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and Vernon F. Meyer and Associates, Inc., in the area of the Pleasant Bayou geopressured test well. All leveling surveys to conform to NGS standards and specifications.

  4. Deep geothermal resources and energy: Current research and developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzella, A.; Milsch, H.; Hahne, B.; van Wees, J. D.; Bruhn, D.

    2012-04-01

    Energy from deep geothermal resources plays an increasing role in many European countries in their efforts to increase the proportion of renewables in their energy portfolio. Deep geothermal heat and electric power have a high load factor, are sustainable and environmentally friendly. However, the safe, sustainable, and economic development of deep geothermal resources, also in less favourable regions, faces a number of issues requiring substantial research efforts: (1) The probability of finding an unknown geothermal reservoir has to be improved. (2) Drilling methods have to be better adapted and developed to the specific needs of geothermal development. (3) The assessment of the geothermal potential should provide more reliable and clear guidelines for the development. (4) Stimulation methods for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) have to be refined to increase the success rate and reduce the risk associated with induced seismicity. (5) Operation and maintenance in aggressive geothermal environments require specific solutions for corrosion and scaling problems. (6) Last but not least, emerging activities to harness energy from supercritical reservoirs would make significant progress with qualified input from research. In particular, sedimentary basins like e.g. the North German and Polish Basin, the Pannonian Basin, the Po Valley, the Bavarian Molasse Basin or the Upper Rhine Graben have a high geothermal potential, even if geothermal gradients are moderate. We will highlight projects that aim at optimizing exploration, characterization, and modeling prior to drilling and at a better understanding of physical, hydraulic and chemical processes during operation of a geothermal power plant. This includes geophysical, geological and geochemical investigations regarding potential geothermal reservoirs in sedimentary basins, as well as modelling of geothermally relevant reservoir parameters that influence the potential performance and long-term behavior of a future

  5. Geothermal energy: a proven resource with costly potential

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The commercial use of geothermal energy to generate electricity has been spreading across the country since the California Geyser site was developed in 1960. Petroleum companies see geothermal power generation as a way to broaden their own base. The binary-cycle technology to use hydrothermal resources will be ready by 1985. Power generation from geothermal heat will be costly even though the resource itself is free and renewable; but the economics will improve as fossil-fuel prices increase. (DCK)

  6. Geothermal resource evaluation of the Yuma area

    SciTech Connect

    Poluianov, E.W.; Mancini, F.P.

    1985-11-29

    This report presents an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Yuma, Arizona area. A description of the study area and the Salton Trough area is followed by a geothermal analysis of the area, a discussion of the economics of geothermal exploration and exploitation, and recommendations for further testing. It was concluded economic considerations do not favor geothermal development at this time. (ACR)

  7. Geothermal energy program overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-12-01

    The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained within the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost-effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy - the heat of the Earth - is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40 percent of the total U.S. energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma (the four types of geothermal energy), still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

  8. Geothermal Energy Program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained with the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost- effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy -- the heat of the Earth -- is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40% of the total US energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma ( the four types of geothermal energy) still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

  9. Prioritizing High-Temperature Geothermal Resources in Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackett, R.E.; Brill, T.C.; Sowards, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    The Utah Geological Survey and the Utah Energy Office recently released geothermal resource information for Utah as a "digital atlas." We are now expanding this project to include economic analyses of selected geothermal sites and previously unavailable resource information. The enhancements to the digital atlas will include new resource, demographic, regulatory, economic, and other information to allow analyses of economic factors for comparing and ranking geothermal resource sites in Utah for potential electric power development. New resource information includes temperature gradient and fluid chemistry data, which was previously proprietary. Economic analyses are based upon a project evaluation model to assess capital and operating expenses for a variety of geothermal powerplant configuration scenarios. A review of legal and institutional issues regarding geothermal development coupled with water development will also be included.

  10. Quantifying the undiscovered geothermal resources of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Colin F.; Reed, Marshall J.; DeAngelo, Jacob; Galanis, S. Peter, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released summary results of an assessment of the electric power production potential from the moderate- and high-temperature geothermal resources of the United States (Williams et al., 2008a; USGS Fact Sheet 2008-3082; http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2008/3082). In the assessment, the estimated mean power production potential from undiscovered geothermal resources is 30,033 Megawatts-electric (MWe), more than three times the estimated mean potential from identified geothermal systems: 9057 MWe. The presence of significant undiscovered geothermal resources has major implications for future exploration and development activities by both the government and private industry. Previous reports summarize the results of techniques applied by the USGS and others to map the spatial distribution of undiscovered resources. This paper describes the approach applied in developing estimates of the magnitude of the undiscovered geothermal resource, as well as the manner in which that resource is likely to be distributed among geothermal systems of varying volume and temperature. A number of key issues constrain the overall estimate. One is the degree to which characteristics of the undiscovered resources correspond to those observed among identified geothermal systems. Another is the evaluation of exploration history, including both the spatial distribution of geothermal exploration activities relative to the postulated spatial distribution of undiscovered resources and the probability of successful discoveries from the application of standard geothermal exploration techniques. Also significant are the physical, chemical, and geological constraints on the formation and longevity of geothermal systems. Important observations from this study include the following. (1) Some of the largest identified geothermal systems, such as The Geysers vapor-dominated system in northern California and the diverse geothermal manifestations found in Yellowstone

  11. Geothermal and heavy-oil resources in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J.; Walter, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    In a five-county area of South Texas, geopressured-geothermal reservoirs in the Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group lie below medium- to heavy-oil reservoirs in the Eocene Jackson Group. This fortuitous association suggests the use of geothermal fluids for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR). Geothermal fairways are formed where thick deltaic sandstones are compartmentalized by growth faults. Wilcox geothermal reservoirs in South Texas are present at depths of 11,000 to 15,000 ft (3,350 to 4,570 m) in laterally continuous sandstones 100 to 200 ft (30 to 60 m) thick. Permeability is generally low (typically 1 md), porosity ranges from 12 to 24 percent, and temperature exceeds 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C). Reservoirs containing medium (20{degrees} to 25{degrees} API gravity) to heavy (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) oil are concentrated along the Texas Coastal Plain in the Jackson-Yegua Barrier/Strandplain (Mirando Trend), Cap Rock, and Piercement Salt Dome plays and in the East Texas Basin in Woodbine Fluvial/Deltaic Strandplain and Paluxy Fault Line plays. Injection of hot, moderately fresh to saline brines will improve oil recovery by lowering viscosity and decreasing residual oil saturation. Smectite clay matrix could swell and clog pore throats if injected waters have low salinity. The high temperature of injected fluids will collapse some of the interlayer clays, thus increasing porosity and permeability. Reservoir heterogeneity resulting from facies variation and diagenesis must be considered when siting production and injection wells within the heavy-oil reservoir. The ability of abandoned gas wells to produce sufficient volumes of hot water over the long term will also affect the economics of TEOR.

  12. Classification of public lands valuable for geothermal steam and associated geothermal resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godwin, Larry H.; Haigler, L.B.; Rioux, R.L.; White, D.E.; Muffler, L.J.; Wayland, R.G.

    1971-01-01

    The Organic Act of 1879 (43 U.S.C. 31) that established the U.S. Geological Survey provided, among other things, for the classification of the public lands and for the examination of the geological structure, mineral sources, and products of the national domain. In order to provide uniform executive action in classifying public lands, standards for determining which lands are valuable for mineral resources, for example, leasable mineral lands, or for other products are prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey. This report presents the classification standards for determining which Federal lands are classifiable as geothermal steam and associated geothermal resources lands under the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 (84 Star. 1566). The concept of a geothermal resources province is established for classification of lands for the purpose of retention in Federal ownership of rights to geothermal resources upon disposal of Federal lands. A geothermal resources province is defined as an area in which higher than normal temperatures are likely to occur with depth and in which there is a reasonable possibility of finding reservoir rocks that will yield steam or heated fluids to wells. The determination of a 'known geothermal resources area' is made after careful evaluation of the available geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data and any evidence derived from nearby discoveries, competitive interests, and other indicia. The initial classification required by the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 is presented.

  13. Geothermal Energy: Evaluation of a Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockemuehl, H. W.

    1976-01-01

    This article suggests the use of geothermal energy for producing electricity, using as an example the development at Wairakei, New Zealand. Other geothermal areas are identified, and economic and environmental co sts of additional development are explored. (Author/AV)

  14. Geothermal resources and reserves in Indonesia: an updated revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzi, A.

    2015-02-01

    More than 300 high- to low-enthalpy geothermal sources have been identified throughout Indonesia. From the early 1980s until the late 1990s, the geothermal potential for power production in Indonesia was estimated to be about 20 000 MWe. The most recent estimate exceeds 29 000 MWe derived from the 300 sites (Geological Agency, December 2013). This resource estimate has been obtained by adding all of the estimated geothermal potential resources and reserves classified as "speculative", "hypothetical", "possible", "probable", and "proven" from all sites where such information is available. However, this approach to estimating the geothermal potential is flawed because it includes double counting of some reserve estimates as resource estimates, thus giving an inflated figure for the total national geothermal potential. This paper describes an updated revision of the geothermal resource estimate in Indonesia using a more realistic methodology. The methodology proposes that the preliminary "Speculative Resource" category should cover the full potential of a geothermal area and form the base reference figure for the resource of the area. Further investigation of this resource may improve the level of confidence of the category of reserves but will not necessarily increase the figure of the "preliminary resource estimate" as a whole, unless the result of the investigation is higher. A previous paper (Fauzi, 2013a, b) redefined and revised the geothermal resource estimate for Indonesia. The methodology, adopted from Fauzi (2013a, b), will be fully described in this paper. As a result of using the revised methodology, the potential geothermal resources and reserves for Indonesia are estimated to be about 24 000 MWe, some 5000 MWe less than the 2013 national estimate.

  15. West Texas geothermal resource assessment. Part II. Preliminary utilization assessment of the Trans-Pecos geothermal resource. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, M.W.; Fenner, L.B.

    1980-01-01

    The utilization potential of geothermal resources in Trans-Pecos, Texas was assessed. The potential for both direct use and electric power generation were examined. As with the resource assessment work, the focus was on the Hueco Tanks area in northeastern El Paso County and the Presidio Bolson area in Presidio County. Suitable users of the Hueco Tanks and Presidio Bolson resource areas were identified by matching postulated temperature characteristics of the geothermal resource to the need characteristics of existing users in each resource area. The amount of geothermal energy required and the amount of fossil fuel that geothermal energy would replace were calculated for each of the users identified as suitable. Current data indicate that temperatures in the Hueco Tanks resource area are not high enough for electric power generation, but in at least part of the Presidio Bolson resource area, they may be high enough for electric power generation.

  16. Nevada low-temperaure geothermal resource assessment: 1994. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garside, L.J.

    1994-12-31

    Data compilation for the low-temperature program is being done by State Teams in two western states. Final products of the study include: a geothermal database, in hardcopy and as digital data (diskette) listing information on all known low- and moderate- temperature springs and wells in Nevada; a 1:1,000,000-scale map displaying these geothermal localities, and a bibliography of references on Nevada geothermal resources.

  17. Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured geothermal resources in Texas. 1984 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.E.; Light, M.P.R.; Tyler, N.; Morton, R.A.

    1986-03-01

    The report contains two sections, the first on a regional statistical survey of fault compartments, and the second on a revised theory of fluid migration and temperature history in the Frio formation. Separate abstracts were prepared for each section. (ACR)

  18. Properties of Geopressured Brines and Wells in the Gulf Coast and Opportunities for Industrial/Research Participation

    SciTech Connect

    Wys, J. Nequs- de

    1989-03-21

    Geopressured reservoirs exhibit pressure gradients in excess of the normal hydrostatic gradient. In the Gulf Coast area the normal gradient is 0.465 psi/ft. Pressures may approach lithostatic pressure and have been measured as high as 1.05 psi/ft in the Gulf Coast area. Geopressured basins exist worldwide and in a number of U.S. locations, east, west, north and south. The Gulf Coast area has been studied extensively and is the subject of the DOE geopressured-geothermal research at present. The assumed ranges in resource characteristics include: depth from -12,000 to > -20,000 feet, brine flow rate from 20,000 to 40,000 bpd, temperature from 300 to 400 F, bottomhole pressure from 12,000 to 18,500 psi; salinity from 20,000 to 200,000 mg/L, gas-water ratio from 40 to 80 scf/bbl., and condensate from a trace to production. Energy in the geopressured resource includes gas, thermal, and hydraulic energy. It has been estimated that there are 6,000 quads of methane and 11,000 quads of thermal energy in the Gulf Coast area geopressured-geothermal reservoirs. Estimates run as high as 50,000 quad for the thermal energy (Wallace et al, 1978). Present industrial interest in the Pleasant Bayou and Hulin wells includes: desalination plants, an economic study by a power company for regional use, use of generated electricity by a coalition of towns, aquaculture (catfish farming) research program, and an unsolicited proposal for enhanced oil recovery of heavy oil. Direct uses of the hot brine cover dozens of industries and processes. An example of multiple uses in the USSR is shown. Outside agency interest includes the U.S.G.S., N.S.F., G.R.I., and possibly other areas within DOE. A research spin-off: a sensitive in-line benzene monitor has been designed by USL and will be tested in the near future. An in-line pH monitor is also under development for the harsh conditions of the geopressured-geothermal wells.

  19. Frio sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At leat 30 percent of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feet of methane in solution in this water. Only 10 percent of the water and methane (1 billion barrels of water and 40 billion cubic feet of methane) will be produced without reinjection of the waste water into the producing formation. Reservoir simulation studies indicate that 90 percent of the methane can be produced with reinjection. 106 figures.

  20. Inventory of geothermal resources in Nebraska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gosnold, W.D.; Eversoll, D.A.

    1983-06-30

    The goal of the State Coupled Resource Assessment Program is to identify and evaluate geothermal resources in the state, particularly low-temperature potential. Eight tasks were identified and documented in this report as follows: bottom-hole temperature survey, heat flow and temperature gradient survey, data translation studies, gravity data, substate regions, information dissemination, state geothermal map, and reports. The project had three major products: (1) a map, Geothermal Resources of Nebraska; (2) a significant amount of thermal data collected and documented within the state; and (3) a series of publications, presentations and meetings (documented as an Appendix).

  1. Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

    1983-02-01

    Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

  2. Harnessing the geothermal resources of sedimentary basins for electricity production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhasov, A. B.; Alkhasova, D. A.

    2011-02-01

    Use of geothermal resources for generating electricity is briefly analyzed. Results obtained from optimization of the thermodynamic cycle implemented in the secondary coolant circuit of a binary geothermal power station and the parameters of its primary heat carrier circuit are presented.

  3. Identification of geopressured occurrences outside of the Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Strongin, O.

    1981-03-05

    The work focused on the occurrences of geopressures in Appalachia and selected California basins. In the former region, where geopressures have been observed, the pressure gradients for the most part were only slightly above normal as in the case of the Oriskany formation of Devonian age; this unit was also characterized by extremely high salinity. The one notable exception was in the Rome trough of West Virginia where Cambrian beds at depths below 10,000 feet display very high geopressures, approaching the lithostatic gradient, and the waters are only moderately saline. Though the geothermal gradient throughout Appalachian is relatively low, even in the Rome trough, the pressure, temperature and salinity values in this area indicate that the methane content of the Cambrian formation waters is in the range of 30 to 35 SCF/barrel. The two California areas researched included the contiguous Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys. In the first, geopressures have been principally encountered in the Forbes formation of Cretaceous age, often at very shallow depths. Further waters are invariably characterized by very low salinity, far below the salinity of normal sea water, while the geothermal gradient in apparently higher in geopressured than in normally pressured zones. In the San Joaquin Valley, geopressures are particularly noteworthy in at least two formations of Miocene age at depths generally greater than those of the Forbes. The formation waters are likewise low in salinity; however, the geothemal gradient, especially in the geopressured zones on the west side of the valley, can be extremely high, up to twice as much as the normal temperature gradient. In view of these conditions, it is estimated that in the western San Joaquin Valley the methane content of geopressured formation waters will range from 30 to 40 SCF/barrel while in the Sacramento Valley, the methane content is estimated to be 20 to 25 SCF/barrel.

  4. Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    David Blackwell; Kenneth Wisian; Maria Richards; Mark Leidig; Richard Smith; Jason McKenna

    2003-08-14

    Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dizie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems. Documented a relation between natural heat loss for geothermal and electrical power production potential and determined heat flow for 27 different geothermal systems. Prepared data set for generation of a new geothermal map of North American including industry data totaling over 25,000 points in the US alone.

  5. Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian

    2015-06-30

    Full realization of the potential of what might be considered “low-grade” geothermal resources will require that we examine many more uses for the heat than traditional electricity generation. To demonstrate that geothermal energy truly has the potential to be a national energy source we will be designing, assessing, and evaluating innovative uses for geothermal-produced water such as hybrid biomass-geothermal cogeneration of electricity and district heating and efficiency improvements to the use of cellulosic biomass in addition to utilization of geothermal in district heating for community redevelopment projects. The objectives of this project were: 1) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the integration and utilization potential of low-temperature geothermal sources. Innovative uses of low-enthalpy geothermal water were designed and examined for their ability to offset fossil fuels and decrease CO2 emissions. 2) To perform process optimizations and economic analyses of processes that can utilize low-temperature geothermal fluids. These processes included electricity generation using biomass and district heating systems. 3) To scale up and generalize the results of three case study locations to develop a regionalized model of the utilization of low-temperature geothermal resources. A national-level, GIS-based, low-temperature geothermal resource supply model was developed and used to develop a series of national supply curves. We performed an in-depth analysis of the low-temperature geothermal resources that dominate the eastern half of the United States. The final products of this study include 17 publications, an updated version of the cost estimation software GEOPHIRES, and direct-use supply curves for low-temperature utilization of geothermal resources. The supply curves for direct use geothermal include utilization from known hydrothermal, undiscovered hydrothermal, and near-hydrothermal EGS resources and presented these results at the Stanford

  6. The Preston Geothermal Resources; Renewed Interest in a Known Geothermal Resource Area

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Thomas R.; Worthing, Wade; Cannon, Cody; Palmer, Carl; Neupane, Ghanashyam; McLing, Travis L; Mattson, Earl; Dobson, Patric; Conrad, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The Preston Geothermal prospect is located in northern Cache Valley approximately 8 kilometers north of the city of Preston, in southeast Idaho. The Cache Valley is a structural graben of the northern portion of the Basin and Range Province, just south of the border with the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). This is a known geothermal resource area (KGRA) that was evaluated in the 1970's by the State of Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) and by exploratory wells drilled by Sunedco Energy Development. The resource is poorly defined but current interpretations suggest that it is associated with the Cache Valley structural graben. Thermal waters moving upward along steeply dipping northwest trending basin and range faults emanate in numerous hot springs in the area. Springs reach temperatures as hot as 84° C. Traditional geothermometry models estimated reservoir temperatures of approximately 125° C in the 1970’s study. In January of 2014, interest was renewed in the areas when a water well drilled to 79 m (260 ft) yielded a bottom hole temperature of 104° C (217° F). The well was sampled in June of 2014 to investigate the chemical composition of the water for modeling geothermometry reservoir temperature. Traditional magnesium corrected Na-K-Ca geothermometry estimates this new well to be tapping water from a thermal reservoir of 227° C (440° F). Even without the application of improved predictive methods, the results indicate much higher temperatures present at much shallower depths than previously thought. This new data provides strong support for further investigation and sampling of wells and springs in the Northern Cache Valley, proposed for the summer of 2015. The results of the water will be analyzed utilizing a new multicomponent equilibrium geothermometry (MEG) tool called Reservoir Temperature Estimate (RTEst) to obtain an improved estimate of the reservoir temperature. The new data suggest that other KGRAs and overlooked areas may need to be

  7. Study effects of geopressured-geothermal subsurface environment on elastic properties of Texas Gulf Coast sandstones and shales using well logs, core data, and velocity surveys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, A.R.

    1980-05-01

    Relations between porosity and permeability for the Pleasant Bayou wells were determined from conventional core data. Porosities from the time average equations required compaction correction factors of 1.9 in hydropressured sandstones and 1.0 in geopressured sandstones. Best average prmeabilities in the geopressured zone were found in the primary production interval 14,687 to 14,716 ft (4477 to 4485 m). Average density gradients were 2.106 x 10/sup -3/ and 2.688 x 10/sup -3/ (gm/cm/sup 3/)/100 ft in sandstones and shales respectively. Compressional (P-wave) and shear (S-wave) velocities from the long-spaced sonic log and bulk densities from the formation density log were used to compute in-situ elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, V/sub p//V/sub s/, and bulk compressibility in two intervals of deep geopressured sandstone and shale in No. 2 Pleasant Bayou. Most computed values of these parameters seem reasonable. Improved accuracy of travel times from the long-spaced sonic log should permit more accurate depth-to-time correlation with seismic data.

  8. Assessment of Geothermal Data Resources and Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2008-09-01

    This paper is a review of Geothermal Technologies Program activities and archives related to data collection and analysis. It includes an assessment of the current state of geothermal data, future program and stakeholder data needs, existence of and access to critical data, and high-level direction and prioritization of next steps to meet the Program’s data needs.

  9. Geothermal resource area 11, Clark County area development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal Resource Area 11 includes all of the land in Clark County, Nevada. Within this area are nine geothermal anomalies: Moapa Area, Las Vegas Valley, Black Canyon, Virgin River Narrows, Roger's Springs, Indian Springs, White Rock Springs, Brown's Spring, and Ash Creek Spring. All of the geothermal resources in Clark County have relatively low temperatures. The highest recorded temperature is 145{sup 0}F at Black Canyon. The temperatures of the other resources range from 70 to 90{sup 0}F. Because of the low temperature of the resources and, for the most part, the distance of the resources from any population base, the potential for the development of the resources are considered to be somewhat limited.

  10. Geothermal resource requirements for an energy self-sufficient spaceport

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, P.; Fioravanti, M.; Duchane, D.; Vaughan, A.

    1997-01-01

    Geothermal resources in the southwestern United States provide an opportunity for development of isolated spaceports with local energy self-sufficiency. Geothermal resources can provide both thermal energy and electrical energy for the spaceport facility infrastructure and production of hydrogen fuel for the space vehicles. In contrast to hydrothermal resources by which electric power is generated for sale to utilities, hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resources are more wide-spread and can be more readily developed at desired spaceport locations. This paper reviews a dynamic model used to quantify the HDR resources requirements for a generic spaceport and estimate the necessary reservoir size and heat extraction rate. The paper reviews the distribution of HDR resources in southern California and southern New Mexico, two regions where a first developmental spaceport is likely to be located. Finally, the paper discusses the design of a HDR facility for the generic spaceport and estimates the cost of the locally produced power.

  11. Geologic controls on supercritical geothermal resources above magmatic intrusions

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas; Weis, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    A new and economically attractive type of geothermal resource was recently discovered in the Krafla volcanic system, Iceland, consisting of supercritical water at 450 °C immediately above a 2-km deep magma body. Although utilizing such supercritical resources could multiply power production from geothermal wells, the abundance, location and size of similar resources are undefined. Here we present the first numerical simulations of supercritical geothermal resource formation, showing that they are an integral part of magma-driven geothermal systems. Potentially exploitable resources form in rocks with a brittle–ductile transition temperature higher than 450 °C, such as basalt. Water temperatures and enthalpies can exceed 400 °C and 3 MJ kg−1, depending on host rock permeability. Conventional high-enthalpy resources result from mixing of ascending supercritical and cooler surrounding water. Our models reproduce the measured thermal conditions of the resource discovered at Krafla. Similar resources may be widespread below conventional high-enthalpy geothermal systems. PMID:26211617

  12. Geologic controls on supercritical geothermal resources above magmatic intrusions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas; Weis, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    A new and economically attractive type of geothermal resource was recently discovered in the Krafla volcanic system, Iceland, consisting of supercritical water at 450 °C immediately above a 2-km deep magma body. Although utilizing such supercritical resources could multiply power production from geothermal wells, the abundance, location and size of similar resources are undefined. Here we present the first numerical simulations of supercritical geothermal resource formation, showing that they are an integral part of magma-driven geothermal systems. Potentially exploitable resources form in rocks with a brittle-ductile transition temperature higher than 450 °C, such as basalt. Water temperatures and enthalpies can exceed 400 °C and 3 MJ kg(-1), depending on host rock permeability. Conventional high-enthalpy resources result from mixing of ascending supercritical and cooler surrounding water. Our models reproduce the measured thermal conditions of the resource discovered at Krafla. Similar resources may be widespread below conventional high-enthalpy geothermal systems. PMID:26211617

  13. Spatial data analysis for exploration of regional scale geothermal resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Majid Kiavarz; Noorollahi, Younes; Samadzadegan, Farhad; Sharifi, Mohammad Ali; Itoi, Ryuichi

    2013-10-01

    Defining a comprehensive conceptual model of the resources sought is one of the most important steps in geothermal potential mapping. In this study, Fry analysis as a spatial distribution method and 5% well existence, distance distribution, weights of evidence (WofE), and evidential belief function (EBFs) methods as spatial association methods were applied comparatively to known geothermal occurrences, and to publicly-available regional-scale geoscience data in Akita and Iwate provinces within the Tohoku volcanic arc, in northern Japan. Fry analysis and rose diagrams revealed similar directional patterns of geothermal wells and volcanoes, NNW-, NNE-, NE-trending faults, hotsprings and fumaroles. Among the spatial association methods, WofE defined a conceptual model correspondent with the real world situations, approved with the aid of expert opinion. The results of the spatial association analyses quantitatively indicated that the known geothermal occurrences are strongly spatially-associated with geological features such as volcanoes, craters, NNW-, NNE-, NE-direction faults and geochemical features such as hotsprings, hydrothermal alteration zones and fumaroles. Geophysical data contains temperature gradients over 100 °C/km and heat flow over 100 mW/m2. In general, geochemical and geophysical data were better evidence layers than geological data for exploring geothermal resources. The spatial analyses of the case study area suggested that quantitative knowledge from hydrothermal geothermal resources was significantly useful for further exploration and for geothermal potential mapping in the case study region. The results can also be extended to the regions with nearly similar characteristics.

  14. California low-temperature geothermal resources update: 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs, L.G.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy -- Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) recently sponsored the Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program to bring the inventory of the nation`s low- and moderate-temperature geothermal resources up to date and to encourage development of the resources. The Oregon Institute of Technology, Geo-Heat Center (OIT/GHC) and the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI) established subcontracts and coordinated the project with the state resource teams from the western states that participated in the program. The California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology (DMG) entered into contract numbered 1092--023(R) with the OIT/GHC to provide the California data for the program. This report is submitted in fulfillment of that contract.

  15. Philippine geothermal resources: General geological setting and development

    SciTech Connect

    Datuin, R.T.; Troncales, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    The Phillippine Archipelago has a composite geologic structure arising from the multi-stage development of volcanic-tectonic events evidenced by volcanism and seismic activity occurring along the active blocks of the major structural lines which traverse most of the major islands of the Phillipines. The widespread volcanic activity located along the active tectonic block has generated regions of high heat flow, where a vast number of potential rich geothermal resources could be exploited as an alternative source of energy. As part of a systematic geothermal development program launched by the Philippine government after the successful pilot study at the Tiwi geothermal field in 1967 by the Commission on Volcanology (now called the Philippine Institute of Volcanology-PIV), the Philippines developed four geothermal fields in the period 1972-84. These four areas, Tiwi in Albay, Mak-Ban in Laguna, Tongonan in Leyte, and Palinpinon in Southern Negros, have already contributed 891 MW installed capacity to the total electrical power supply of the country, which is mainly dependent on oil resources. The Philippines envisaged that, with its accelerated geothermal energy programme, it would be able to achieve its target of reducing the country's dependence on imported fossil fuel by about 20% within the next decade through the utilization of its vast geothermal energy resources.

  16. U.S. DOE Geopressured/Geothermal Program: Final report on well plug and abandonment operations and well site restoration, Louisiana and Texas wells

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-30

    Some of the critical operations conducted during the plugging and abandonment of the three producing wells of the U.S. DOE GEOPRESSURED/GEOTHERL PROGRAM were witnessed by D-O-R Engineering personnel. All operations witnessed by D-O-R personnel were in compliance with the respective state regulations and were conducted as per D-O-R's recommendations to the Department of Energy and their prime contractor, EG&G Idaho. It is our belief that competent cement plugs were left in all three wells. The following describes the work actually witnessed by D-O-R personnel.

  17. Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou, Texas. The Pleasant Bayou No. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test-well program. 1982 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, F.J.; Davis, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    To investigate the seismic risks associated with geopressured fluid production from the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 design well a seismic monitoring program was conducted in the vicinity of the Brazoria County design wells since 1979. The monitoring program was designed first to establish the nature of the local ambient seismicity prior to production, and second to provide continued surveillance of the area during the well tests to determine if production altered ambient seismic conditions significantly. The operation, data analyses, results and conclusions of the Brazoria seismic network during the operational period from 1 January through 31 December 1982 are described.

  18. Geothermal Energy Program Overview: Fiscal Year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    In FY 1990-1991, the Geothermal Energy Program made significant strides in hydrothermal, geopressured brine, hot dry rock, and magma research, continuing a 20-year tradition of advances in geothermal technology.

  19. Stratabound geothermal resources in North Dakota and South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Gosnold, W.D. Jr.

    1991-08-01

    Analysis of all geothermal aquifers in North Dakota and South Dakota indicates an accessible resource base of approximately 21.25 exajoules (10{sup 18} J = 1 exajoule, 10{sup 18} J{approximately}10{sup 15} Btu=1 quad) in North Dakota and approximately 12.25 exajoules in South Dakota. Resource temperatures range from 40{degree}C at depths of about 700 m to 150{degree}C at 4500 m. This resource assessment increases the identified accessible resource base by 31% over the previous assessments. These results imply that the total stratabound geothermal resource in conduction-dominated systems in the United States is two-to-three times greater than some current estimates. The large increase in the identified accessible resource base is primarily due to inclusion of all potential geothermal aquifers in the resource assessment and secondarily due to the expanded data base compiled in this study. These factors were interdependent in that the extensive data base provided the means for inclusion of all potential geothermal aquifers in the analysis. Previous assessments included only well-known aquifer systems and were limited by the amount of available data. 40 refs., 16 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Geothermal resource area 9: Nye County. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal Resource area 9 encompasses all of Nye County, Nevada. Within this area there are many different known geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/ to over 265/sup 0/ F. Fifteen of the more major sites have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the resource sites discussed in this Area Development Plan were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities, and comparing those with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 15 geothermal sites considered in this Area Development Plan are summarized.

  1. The 1980-1982 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Korosec, Michael A.; Phillips, William M.; Schuster, J.Eric

    1983-08-01

    Since 1978, the Division of Geology and Earth Resources of the Washington Department of Natural Resources has participated in the U.S. Department of Energy's (USDOE) State-Coupled Geothermal Resource Program. Federal and state funds have been used to investigate and evaluate the potential for geothermal resources, on both a reconnaissance and area-specific level. Preliminary results and progress reports for the period up through mid-1980 have already been released as a Division Open File Report (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981). Preliminary results and progress summaries of work carried out from mid-1980 through the end of 1982 are presented in this report. Only one other summary report dealing with geothermal resource investigations in the state has been published. An Information Circular released by the Division (Schuster and others, 1978) compiled the geology, geochemistry, and heat flow drilling results from a project in the Indian Heaven area in the south Cascades. The previous progress report for the geothermal program (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981) included information on temperature gradients measured throughout the state, heat flow drilling in the southern Cascades, gravity surveys for the southern Cascades, thermal and mineral spring investigations, geologic mapping for the White Pass-Tumac Mountain area, and area specific studies for the Camas area of Clark County and Mount St. Helens. This work, along with some additional studies, led to the compilation of the Geothermal Resources of Washington map (Korosec, Kaler, and others, 1981). The map is principally a nontechnical presentation based on all available geothermal information, presented as data points, tables, and text on a map with a scale of 1:500,000.

  2. Natural resource economic implications of geothermal area use

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, d'E Charles

    1993-01-28

    Large-scale use of geothermal energy is likely to result in depletion of natural resources that support both biodiversity and other human uses. Most of the problems could be averted with competent planning and adherence to agreed conditions, but they commonly develop because they are not perceived to be directly geothermal in origin and hence are not taken into account adequately. Some of the implications of such issues are discussed below, with particular reference to countries where all or most resources are held under traditional principals of custom ownership.

  3. Geothermal resources of Sao Miguel Island, Azores, Portugal

    SciTech Connect

    Duffield, W.A.; Muffler, L.J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Geothermal studies were carried out on the island of Sao Miguel, Azores to characterize the nature of the resource, to estimate its magnitude, and to identify target areas toward which exploration and developmental drilling might be directed. The main geothermal resource areas are Furnas, Agua de Pau, and Sete Cidades, three Quaternary silicic volcanic centers characterized by summit calderas beneath which magmatic heat sources provide thermal energy to overlying hydrothermal convection systems. For each of the systems, the studies have defined the size of the system, the subsurface temperature, the thermodynamic state of fluid in the system, the chemical composition of the fluid, and permeable parts of the system. 8 figs. (ACR)

  4. Use of a Geothermal-Solar Hybrid Power Plant to Mitigate Declines in Geothermal Resource Productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

    2014-09-01

    Many, if not all, geothermal resources are subject to decreasing productivity manifested in the form of decreasing brine temperature, flow rate, or both during the life span of the associated power generation project. The impacts of resource productivity decline on power plant performance can be significant; a reduction in heat input to a power plant not only decreases the thermal energy available for conversion to electrical power, but also adversely impacts the power plant conversion efficiency. The reduction in power generation is directly correlated to a reduction in revenues from power sales. Further, projects with Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) contracts in place may be subject to significant economic penalties if power generation falls below the default level specified. A potential solution to restoring the performance of a power plant operating from a declining productivity geothermal resource involves the use of solar thermal energy to restore the thermal input to the geothermal power plant. There are numerous technical merits associated with a renewable geothermal-solar hybrid plant in which the two heat sources share a common power block. The geo-solar hybrid plant could provide a better match to typical electrical power demand profiles than a stand-alone geothermal plant. The hybrid plant could also eliminate the stand-alone concentrated solar power plant thermal storage requirement for operation during times of low or no solar insolation. This paper identifies hybrid plant configurations and economic conditions for which solar thermal retrofit of a geothermal power plant could improve project economics. The net present value of the concentrated solar thermal retrofit of an air-cooled binary geothermal plant is presented as functions of both solar collector array cost and electricity sales price.

  5. Geothermal brines and sludges: a new resource

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Lian, H.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1996-10-01

    Development of cost efficient biochemical processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges is the main thrust of a major R&D effort at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This effort has led to the design of an environmentally acceptable, technically and economically feasible new technology which converts geothermal wastes into products with significant commercial potential. These include valuable metals recovery with a metal extraction and recovery efficiency of better then 80% over short periods of time (5-25 hours). The new technology also yields valuable salts, such as potassium chloride and generates high quality pigment free silica. The basic technology is versatile and can, with slight modifications, be used in the treatment of hypersaline as well as low salinity brines and sludges. Concurrently traces of toxic metals, including radium are removed to levels which are within regulatory limits. The current status of the new biochemical technology will be discussed in this paper.

  6. Geothermal energy resource assessment of parts of Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Kienle, J.

    1982-08-01

    The central Seward Peninsula was the subject of a geological, geophysical and geochemical reconnaissance survey during a 30-day period in the summer of 1980. The survey was designed to investigate the geothermal energy resource potential of this region of Alaska. A continental rift system model was proposed to explain many of the Late Tertiary-to-Quaternary topographic, structural, volcanic and geothermal features of the region. Geologic evidence for the model includes normal faults, extensive fields of young alkalic basalts, alignment of volcanic vents, graben valleys and other features consistent with a rift system active from late Miocene time to the present. Five traverses crossing segments of the proposed rift system were run to look for evidence of structure and geothermal resources not evident from surface manifestation. Gravity, helium and mercury soil concentrations were measured along the traverses. Seismic, resistivity, and VLF studies are presented.

  7. Southern New Mexico low temperature geothermal resource economic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, C.L.; Whittier, J.; Witcher, J.C.; Schoenmackers, R.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents an overview of geothermal resource development for three-low temperature (i.e, <200{degree}F) sites in southern New Mexico: the Lower Animas Valley, the Las Cruces East Mesa, and Truth or Consequences. This report is intended to provide potential geothermal developers with detailed information on each site for planning and decision making purposes. Included in the overview for each site is both a full site characterization and an economic analysis of development costs associated with the construction and operation of both geothermal and fresh water systems at each of the three locations. The economic analysis focuses on providing utility services to a commercial greenhouse because greenhouse operations are among the most likely candidates for use of the resource base. 9 tabs., 8 figs.

  8. Water Efficient Energy Production for Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect

    GTO

    2015-06-01

    Water consumption in geothermal energy development occurs at several stages along the life cycle of the plant, during construction of the wells, piping, and plant; during hydroshearing and testing of the reservoir (for EGS); and during operation of the plant. These stages are highlighted in the illustration above. For more information about actual water use during these stages, please see the back of this sheet..

  9. DOE's Current Geothermal Reservoir Programs and Comments on International Cooperation in Hydrothermal Research

    SciTech Connect

    Toms, Ronald S.H.

    1983-12-15

    DOE's geothermal program continues to emphasize a range of reservoir-related programs in reservoir definition, brine injection, stimulation, hot dry rock, geopressured resources and, now, magma resources. These programs are described briefly. Programs in international cooperation between the U.S. and 23 other countries on hydrothermal research have produced important gains in knowledge over the past ten years. Although the activity has diminished, a resurgence is anticipated.

  10. Continuity and internal properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and their implications for geopressured fluid production

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Tyler, N.

    1983-01-01

    The intrinsic properties of the genetic sandstone units that typify many geopressured geothermal aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Gulf Coast region were systematically investigated classified, and differentiated. The following topics are coverd: structural and stratigraphic limits of sandstone reservoirs, characteristics and dimensions of Gulf Coast sandstones; fault-compartment areas; comparison of production and geologic estimates of aquifer fluid volume; geologic setting and reservoir characteristics, Wells of Opportunity; internal properties of sandstones; and implications for geopressured fluid production. (MHR)

  11. Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou Texas: the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test-well program. 1981 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, F.J.

    1982-01-01

    To investigate normal ambient seismicity as well as potentially enhanced seismic activity induced by brine production, a seismic monitoring program has been conducted in the vicinity of the Chocolate Bayou geopressured test well (the Pleasant Bayou No. 2) since September 1978. The Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well has been completed and perforated at depths of 14,467-14,707 feet (4464.4-4482.7m). The brines produced from the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well are reinjected at a depth of 6226-6538 feet (1897.7-1992.8m) in the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 well. The seismic monitoring network and results obtained from January through November 1981 are described.

  12. 1979-1980 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Korosec, M.A.; Schuster, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for seven papers. Also included are a bibliography of geothermal resource information for the State of Washington, well temperature information and locations in the State of Washington, and a map of the geology of the White Pass-Tumac Mountain Area, Washington. (MHR)

  13. 30 CFR 202.351 - Royalties on geothermal resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., suspends, or reduces that rate(s). Royalties are determined under 30 CFR part 206, subpart H. (2) Fees in lieu of royalties on geothermal resources are prescribed in 30 CFR part 206, subpart H. (3) Except for...,” and “Class III lease” have the same meanings prescribed in 30 CFR 206.351. (i) For Class I leases,...

  14. Geothermal Energy: Resource and Utilization. A Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Van Thanh

    The search for new energy resources as alternatives to fossil fuels have generated new interest in the heat of the earth itself. New geothermal areas with a variety of characteristics are being explored, as are new ways of extracting work from naturally heated steam and hot water. Some of this effort is discussed in this three-part module. Five…

  15. Geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1985-06-13

    This report describes the geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin. The report contains a discussion of the hydrology as it relates to the movement of heated water, a description and interpretation of the thermal regime, and four maps: a generalized geological map, a structure contour map, a thermal gradient contour map, and a ground water temperature map. 10 figs. (ACR)

  16. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 4. Impact of geothermal resource development in Hawaii (including air and water quality)

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.

    1980-06-01

    The environmental consequences of natural processes in a volcanic-fumerolic region and of geothermal resource development are presented. These include acute ecological effects, toxic gas emissions during non-eruptive periods, the HGP-A geothermal well as a site-specific model, and the geothermal resources potential of Hawaii. (MHR)

  17. Evaluation of Baltazor known geothermal resources area, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isherwood, W.F.; Mabey, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    By virtue of the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970, the U.S. Geological Survey is required to appraise geothermal resources of the United States prior to competitive lease sales. This appraisal involves coordinated input from a variety of disciplines, starting with reconnaissance geology and geophysics. This paper describes how the results of several geophysical methods used in KGRA evaluation were interpreted by the authors, two geophysicists, involved with both the Evaluation Committee and the research program responsible for obtaining and interpreting the geophysical data to be used by the committee. ?? 1979.

  18. Utilization of geothermal resources at United States Air Force bases

    SciTech Connect

    Grogger, P.K.

    1980-09-01

    The Air Force installations on the continental United States as well as Alaska and Hawaii, were evaluated as to the possibility of utilizing geothermal energy to develop electricity, produce process steam, or heat and/or cool buildings. Twenty-five bases have suspected geothermal resources available. Because of either need or available technology seven installations were rated priority I, six were rated priority II and priority III and IV totaled ten. Geological and geophysical data indicated further investigation of the priority I installations, Saylor Creek Range, Idaho, Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota, Charleston AFB, South Carolina, Kirkland AFB, New Mexico, Vandenberg AFB, California, Luke AFB, Arizona, and Williams AFB, Arizona, should be accomplished as soon as possible. The use of geothermal energy will decrease the need for fossil fuels by the USAF and during times of short supply allow such fuels to be used for the Air Force's primary mission, military defense.

  19. National forecast for geothermal resource exploration and development with techniques for policy analysis and resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, T.A.V.; Shimamoto, G.T.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.; Finan, W.F.; Smith, M.R.; Edeistein, R.H.

    1982-03-31

    The backgrund, structure and use of modern forecasting methods for estimating the future development of geothermal energy in the United States are documented. The forecasting instrument may be divided into two sequential submodels. The first predicts the timing and quality of future geothermal resource discoveries from an underlying resource base. This resource base represents an expansion of the widely-publicized USGS Circular 790. The second submodel forecasts the rate and extent of utilization of geothermal resource discoveries. It is based on the joint investment behavior of resource developers and potential users as statistically determined from extensive industry interviews. It is concluded that geothermal resource development, especially for electric power development, will play an increasingly significant role in meeting US energy demands over the next 2 decades. Depending on the extent of R and D achievements in related areas of geosciences and technology, expected geothermal power development will reach between 7700 and 17300 Mwe by the year 2000. This represents between 8 and 18% of the expected electric energy demand (GWh) in western and northwestern states.

  20. Geothermal resource area 3: Elko County. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal Resource Area 3 includes all of the land in Elko County, Nevada. There are in excess of 50 known thermal anomalies in this area. Several of the more major resources have been selected for detailed description and evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The other resources are considered too small, too low in temperature, or too remote to be considered for development in the near future. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the studied resource sites in Elko County were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics; the land ownership and land use patterns; existing population and projected growth rates; transportation facilities and energy requirements. These factors were then compared with resource site specific data to determine the most likely uses of the resource. The uses considered in this evaluation were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories several subdivisions were considered separately. It was determined that several of the geothermal resources evaluated in the Area Development Plan could be commercially developed. The potential for development for the seven sites considered in this study is summarized.

  1. Reconnaissance geothermal resource assessment of 40 sites in California

    SciTech Connect

    Leivas, E.; Martin, R.C.; Higgins, C.T.; Bezore, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    Results are set forth for a continuing reconnaissance-level assessment of promising geothermal sites scattered through California. The studies involve acquisition of new data based upon field observations, compilation of data from published and unpublished sources, and evaluation of the data to identify areas suitable for more intensive area-specific studies. Forty sites were chosen for reporting on the basis of their relative potential for development as a significant resource. The name and location of each site is given, and after a brief synopsis, the geothermal features, chemistry, geology, and history of the site are reported. Three sites are recommended for more detailed study on the basis of potential for use by a large number of consumers, large volume of water, and the likelihood that the resource underlies a large area. (LEW)

  2. Geothermal energy program summary: Volume 1: Overview Fiscal Year 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-02-01

    Geothermal energy is a here-and-now technology for use with dry steam resources and high-quality hydrothermal liquids. These resources are supplying about 6 percent of all electricity used in California. However, the competitiveness of power generation using lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma still depends on the technology improvements sought by the DOE Geothermal Energy R and D Program. The successful outcome of the R and D initiatives will serve to benefit the U.S. public in a number of ways. First, if a substantial portion of our geothermal resources can be used economically, they will add a very large source of secure, indigenous energy to the nation's energy supply. In addition, geothermal plants can be brought on line quickly in case of a national energy emergency. Geothermal energy is also a highly reliable resource, with very high plant availability. For example, new dry steam plants at The Geysers are operable over 99 percent of the time, and the small flash plant in Hawaii, only the second in the United States, has an availability factor of 98 percent. Geothermal plants also offer a viable baseload alternative to fossil and nuclear plants -- they are on line 24 hours a day, unaffected by diurnal or seasonal variations. The hydrothermal power plants with modern emission control technology have proved to have minimal environmental impact. The results to date with geopressured and hot dry rock resources suggest that they, too, can be operated so as to reduce environmental effects to well within the limits of acceptability. Preliminary studies on magma are also encouraging. In summary, the character and potential of geothermal energy, together with the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal R and D Program, ensure that this huge energy resource will play a major role in future U.S. energy markets.

  3. Geothermal energy program summary: Volume 1: Overview Fiscal Year 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    Geothermal energy is a here-and-now technology for use with dry steam resources and high-quality hydrothermal liquids. These resources are supplying about 6% of all electricity used in California. However, the competitiveness of power generation using lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma still depends on the technology improvements sought by the DOE Geothermal Energy R and D Program. The successful outcome of the R and D initiatives will serve to benefit the US public in a number of ways. First, if a substantial portion of our geothermal resources can be used economically, they will add a very large source of secure, indigenous energy to the nation's energy supply. In addition, geothermal plants can be brought on line quickly in case of a national energy emergency. Geothermal energy is also a highly reliable resource, with very high plant availability. For example, new dry steam plants at The Geysers are operable over 99% of the time, and the small flash plant in Hawaii, only the second in the United States, has an availability factor of 98%. Geothermal plants also offer a viable baseload alternative to fossil and nuclear plants -- they are on line 24 hours a day, unaffected by diurnal or seasonal variations. The hydrothermal power plants with modern emission control technology have proved to have minimal environmental impact. The results to date with geopressured and hot dry rock resources suggest that they, too, can be operated so as to reduce environmental effects to well within the limits of acceptability. Preliminary studies on magma are also encouraging. In summary, the character and potential of geothermal energy, together with the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal R and D Program, ensure that this huge energy resource will play a major role in future US energy markets. 7 figs.

  4. Geothermal resources of the Washakie and Great Divide basins, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    The geothermal resources of the Great Divide and Washakie Basins of southern Wyoming are described. Oil well bottomhole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data were interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. It was concluded large areas in Wyoming are underlain by water hotter than 120{sup 0}F. Isolated areas with high temperature gradients exist within each basin. 68 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  5. Geothermal resources of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, B.S.; Heasler, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    The geothermal resources of the Wind River Basin were investigated. Oil-well bottom-hole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data have been interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. Basic thermal data, which includes the background thermal gradient and the highest recorded temperature and corresponding depth for each basin, is tabulated. Background heat flow in the Wind River Basin is generally insufficient to produce high conductive gradients. Only where hydrologic systems re-distribute heat through mass movement of water will high temperatures occur at shallow depths. Aquifers which may have the confinement and structural characteristics necessary to create such geothermal systems are the Lance/Fort Union, Mesa Verde, Frontier, Muddy, Cloverly, Sundance, Nugget, Park City, Tensleep, Amsden, Madison, Bighorn, and Flathead Formations. Of these the Tensleep Sandstone and Madison Limestone are the most attractive in terms of both productivity and water quality. Most of the identified geothermal anomalies in the Wind River Basin occur along complex structures in the southwest and south. The most attractive geothermal prospects identified are anomalous Areas 2 and 3 north of Lander, Sweetwater Station Springs west of Jeffrey City, and the thermal springs southwest of Dubois. Even in these areas, it is unlikely temperatures in excess of 130 to 150/sup 0/F can be developed. 16 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  6. Geothermal resources and energy complex use in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalova, V.

    2009-04-01

    Geothermal energy use is the perspective way to clean sustainable development of the world. Russia has rich high and low temperature geothermal resources and makes good steps in their use. In Russia the geothermal resources are used predominantly for heat supply both heating of several cities and settlements on Northern Caucasus and Kamchatka with a total number of the population 500000. Besides in some regions of country the deep heat is used for greenhouses of common area 465000 m2. Most active the hydrothermal resources are used in Krasnodar territory, Dagestan and on Kamchatka. The approximately half of extracted resources is applied for heat supply of habitation and industrial puttings, third - to a heating of greenhouses, and about 13 % - for industrial processes. Besides the thermal waters are used approximately on 150 health resorts and 40 factories on bottling mineral water. The most perspective direction of usage of low temperature geothermal resources is the use of heat pumps. This way is optimal for many regions of Russia - in its European part, on Ural and others. The electricity is generated by some geothermal power plants (GeoPP) only in the Kamchatka Peninsula and Kuril Islands. At present three stations work in Kamchatka: Pauzhetka GeoPP (11MW e installed capacity) and two Severo-Mutnovka GeoPP ( 12 and 50 MWe). Moreover, another GeoPP of 100 MVe is now under preparation in the same place. Two small GeoPP are in operation in Kuril's Kunashir Isl, and Iturup Isl, with installed capacity of 2,б MWe and 6 MWe respectively. There are two possible uses of geothermal resources depending on structure and properties of thermal waters: heat/power and mineral extraction. The heat/power direction is preferable for low mineralized waters when valuable components in industrial concentration are absent, and the general mineralization does not interfere with normal operation of system. When high potential geothermal waters are characterized by the high

  7. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Final report: Beulah Simon No. 2 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Analytical data

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Rodgers, J.A.

    1980-07-01

    A compilation of the test data and computer printouts of the various reservoir calculations for the reentry of the Beulah Simon No. 2 well are presented. The data include: bottomhole and surface pressure data, geothermal field test data, pressure buildup model analysis, recombination of produced brine, chemical analyses of brine and gas, and chemical analyses performed by Champion Chemicals, Inc. (MHR)

  8. National projects on direct utilization of geothermal resources in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Sekioka, M.; Fujitomi, M.

    1981-10-01

    The two national projects on direct utilization of geothermal resources are mentioned. The merit of the projects is to utilize geothermal water which discharges, with team, from existing production wells of the geothermal power plants before injection underground. The two power plants, Kakkonda (50 MW), Iwate, and Onuma (10 MW), Akita, supply 1000 t/h of 150/sup 0/C and 400 t/h of 94/sup 0/C of thermal water to heat-exchange with fresh water and send 800 t/h of 115/sup 0/C and 150 t/h of 70/sup 0/C of fresh-heated water to Shizukuishi, Iwate, and Kazuno, Akita, respectively. Financial supports of 4.5 billion and 1.6 billion yen are offered to the Iwate and the Kazuno projects, respectively, by the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, for drilling of injection wells, constructing of heat exchangers and laying of transportation pipelines.

  9. Active and passive seismic studies of geothermal resources in New Mexico and investigations of earthquake hazards to geothermal development

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, P.; Daggett, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    Seismic data were collected in southwestern New Mexico to investigate the sources of the geothermal anomalies and to investigate the potential earthquake hazards of geothermal development. No major crustal structure anomalies have been located related to known geothermal resources, and no areas of continual seismicity have been identified, which is interpreted to indicate a lack of active, or recently active crustal intrusions in southwestern New Mexico. Without a magnetic heat source, the geothermal potential of the known anomalies is probably limited to intermediate and low temperature applications (<180/sup 0/C). The lack of continual seismicity indicates low seismic hazard in the area directly related to geothermal development, although the historic and geologically recent tectonic activity should be taken into consideration during any development in the area. A model of forced groundwater convection is presented to explain the geothermal anomalies in southwestern New Mexico, which is consistent with all available geological and geophysical data from the area.

  10. Geothermal resource assessment of Idaho Springs, Colorado. Resource series 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repplier, F. N.; Zacharakis, T. G.; Ringrose, C. D.

    Geothermal springs and wells were assessed for hydrothermal conditions. The temperature of these waters ranges from a low of 680 F to a high of 1270 F. The hydrothermal conditions of the Idaho Springs region in 1980 were defined by electrical geophysical, soil mercury geochemical, and reconnaissance geological and hydrogeological surveys. The investigation was limited to the immediate area surrounding the thermal springs at the Indian Springs Resort. It is found that bedrock of the region is faulted and fractured metamorphosed Precambrian gneisses and schists, locally intruded by Tertiary age plutons and dikes. It is shown that the thermal waters most likely are fault controlled and the thermal area does not have a large areal extent.

  11. Constraints to leasing and development of federal resources: OCS oil and gas and geothermal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Chapter I identifies possible technological, economic, and environmental constraints to geothermal resource development. Chapter II discusses constraints relative to outer continental shelf and geothermal resources. General leasing information for each resource is detailed. Chapter III summarizes the major studies relating to development constraints. 37 refs. (PSB)

  12. Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Colin F.; Reed, Marshall J.; Mariner, Robert H.; DeAngelo, Jacob; Galanis, S. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an assessment of our Nation's geothermal resources. Geothermal power plants are currently operating in six states: Alaska, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, and Utah. The assessment indicates that the electric power generation potential from identified geothermal systems is 9,057 Megawatts-electric (MWe), distributed over 13 states. The mean estimated power production potential from undiscovered geothermal resources is 30,033 MWe. Additionally, another estimated 517,800 MWe could be generated through implementation of technology for creating geothermal reservoirs in regions characterized by high temperature, but low permeability, rock formations.

  13. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-06-10

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  14. Geothermal energy resource investigations at Mt. Spurr, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.L.; Wescott, E.M.

    1986-12-01

    Spurr volcano is a composite Quaternary cone of largely andesitic composition located on the west side of Cook Inlet about 80 miles west of Anchorage and about 40 miles from the Beluga electrical transmission line. Geologic mapping (Plate 1-1) shows that the present summit depression was produced by a Mt. St. Helens-type sector collapse, rather than by a caldera collapse. Geochronologic and previous tephrachronologic studies show that there has been an active magmatic system at Spurr volcano during the late Pleistocene-to-Holocene time interval that is of critical interest for geothermal energy resource assessment. Major effort was devoted to geochemical and geophysical surveys of the accessible area south of Mt. Spurr, in addition to geologic mapping and geochronologic studies. Many coincident mercury and helium anomalies were found, suggesting the presence of geothermal systems at depth. Extremely large electrical self-potential anomalies were also found, together with extensive zones of low resistivity discovered by our controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric survey. The juxtaposition of all of these different types of anomalies at certain areas on the south slope of Crater Peak indicates the presence of a geothermal system which should be accessible by drilling to about 2000 ft depth. It is also evident that there is a strong volcanic hazard to be evaluated in considering any development on the south side of Mt. Spurr. This hazardous situation may require angle drilling of production wells from safer areas and placement of power generation facilities at a considerable distance from hazardous areas.

  15. Saline fluid flow and hydrocarbon migration and maturation as related to geopressure, Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, N.; Light, M.P.R.; Ewing, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Pleasant Bayou geopressured-geothermal test wells in Brazoria County, Texas, display a prominent thermal-maturity anomaly in the Oligocene Anahuac and Frio Formations. Highly geopressured, more-mature shales are interbedded with hydropressured to moderately geopressured sandstones in the upper Frio and Anahuac. In contrast, shales and sandstones in the lower Frio, including the Andrau geopressured-geothermal production zone, are highly geopressured but exhibit lower thermal maturities. Vitrinite-reflectance data, supported by hydrocarbon-maturation data and anomalous concentrations of C/sub 5/ to C/sub 7/ hydrocarbons at Pleasant Bayou, indicate that the upper Frio was subjected to an extended period of hot, extremely saline, basinal fluid flow which caused the above thermal anomaly. Regional salinity studies (Morton and others, 1983) suggest that regional growth faults were the conduits for vertical basinal brine movement at depth. At shallower levels the upwelling waters migrated laterally through permeable sandstone-rich sections such as the upper Frio. Anomalously mature gasoline-range (C/sub 5/-C/sub 7/) hydrocarbons were introduced into the upper Frio by this process. Fluid influx in the lower Frio was probably limited by high geopressure, consequently maturity in the deep Frio section (greater than 14,000 ft) remained consistent with the regional geothermal gradient.

  16. Geothermal resource assessment in Honduras: How we got to Platanares

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, A.W.; Frank, J.A.; Flores, W.

    1988-01-01

    The initial phase of a geothermal resource assessment of Honduras is essentially complete. Reconnaissance scale geological and geochemical investigations were performed at six previously identified sites to determine relative potentials for electricity generation or direct heat use. Two of the six sites were eliminated because of low potential for the production of electricity and detailed geological and geochemical work was concentrated at the remaining four sites. After an evaluation of new data, two sites (Platanares and San Ignacio) were selected for detailed geophysical surveys and one (Platanares) for gradient drilling. Very encouraging results were obtained from the drilling and it is apparent that a feasibility phase investigation is warranted at Platanares.

  17. Auxiliary Heating of Geothermally Preheated Water or CO2 - A Potential Solution for Low- to Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Garapati, N.; Adams, B. M.; Randolph, J.; Kuehn, T. H.; Saar, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    Typically, low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resources are more effectively used for direct heat energy applications. However, due to high thermal losses during transport, direct use requires that the heat resource is located near the user. Alternatively, we show here that if such a low-temperature geothermal resource is combined with an additional or secondary energy resource, the power production is increased compared to the sum from two separate (geothermal and secondary fuel) power plants (DiPippo et al. 1978) and the thermal losses are minimized because the thermal energy is utilized where it is produced. Since Adams et al. (2015) found that using CO2 as a subsurface working fluid produces more net power than brine at low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resource conditions, we compare over a range of parameters the net power and efficiencies of hybrid geothermal power plants that use brine or CO2 as the subsurface working fluid, that are then heated further with a secondary energy source that is unspecified here. Parameters varied include the subsurface working fluid (brine vs. CO2), geothermal reservoir depth (2.5-4.5 km), and turbine inlet temperature (200-600°C) after auxiliary heating. The hybrid power plant is numerically modeled using an iterative coupling approach of TOUGH2-ECO2N/ECO2H (Pruess, 2004) for simulation of the subsurface reservoir and Engineering Equation Solver for well bore fluid flow and surface power plant performance. We find that hybrid power plants that are CO2-based (subsurface) systems have higher thermal efficiencies than the brine based systems at low turbine inlet temperatures. Specifically, our results indicate that geothermal hybrid plants that are CO2-based are more efficient than brine-based systems when the contribution of the geothermal resource energy is higher than 48%.

  18. Fluid sampling and chemical modeling of geopressured brines containing methane. Final report, March 1980-February 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Dudak, B.; Galbraith, R.; Hansen, L.; Sverjensky, D.; Weres, O.

    1982-07-01

    The development of a flowthrough sampler capable of obtaining fluid samples from geopressured wells at temperatures up to 400/sup 0/F and pressures up to 20,000 psi is described. The sampler has been designed, fabricated from MP35N alloy, laboratory tested, and used to obtain fluid samples from a geothermal well at The Geysers, California. However, it has not yet been used in a geopressured well. The design features, test results, and operation of this device are described. Alternative sampler designs are also discussed. Another activity was to review the chemistry and geochemistry of geopressured brines and reservoirs, and to evaluate the utility of available computer codes for modeling the chemistry of geopressured brines. The thermodynamic data bases for such codes are usually the limiting factor in their application to geopressured systems, but it was concluded that existing codes can be updated with reasonable effort and can usefully explain and predict the chemical characteristics of geopressured systems, given suitable input data.

  19. Review of water resource potential for developing geothermal resource sites in the western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnichsen, J.C. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    Water resources at 28 known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) in the western United States are reviewed. Primary emphasis is placed upon examination of the waer resources, both surface and ground, that exist in the vicinity of the KGRAs located in the southwestern states of California, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, and New Mexico. In most of these regions water has been in short supply for many years and consequently a discussion of competing demands is included to provide an appropriate perspective on overall usage. A discussion of the water resources in the vicinity of KGRAs in the States of Montana, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington are also included.

  20. Reconnaissance of geothermal resources of Los Angeles County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal waters produced from large oil fields are currently the most important geothermal resources in Los Angeles County. Otherwise, the County does not appear to have any large, near-surface geothermal resources. The oil fields produce thermal water because of both the moderate depths of production and normal to above-normal geothermal gradients. Gradients are about 3.0-3.5/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Ventura Basin and range from that up to about 5.5-6.0/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Los Angeles Basin. The hottest fields in the County are west of the Newport-Inglewood Structural Zone. The Los Angeles Basin has substantially more potential for uses of heat from oil fields than does the Ventura Basin because of its large fields and dense urban development. Produced fluid temperatures there range from ambient air to boiling, but most are in the 100-150/sup 0/F range. Daily water production ranges from only a few barrels at some fields to over a million barrels at Wilmington Oil Field; nearly all fields produce less than 50,000 barrels/day. Water salinity generally ranges from about 15,000-35,000 mg/liter NaCl. Fields with the most promise as sources of heat for outside applications are Wilmington, Torrance, Venice Beach, and Lawndale. The centralized treatment facilities are the most favorable sites for extraction of heat within the oil fields. Because of the poor water quality heat exchangers will likely be required rather than direct circulation of the field water to users. The best sites for applications are commercial-industrial areas and possibly institutional structures occupied by large numbers of people.

  1. Tables of co-located geothermal-resource sites and BLM Wilderness Study Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, D.; Dorscher, M.

    1982-11-01

    Matched pairs of known geothermal wells and springs with BLM proposed Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs) were identified by inspection of WSA and Geothermal resource maps for the states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. A total of 3952 matches, for geothermal sites within 25 miles of a WSA, were identified. Of these, only 71 (1.8%) of the geothermal sites are within one mile of a WSA, and only an additional 100 (2.5%) are within one to three miles. Approximately three-fourths of the matches are at distances greater than ten miles. Only 12 of the geothermal sites within one mile of a WSA have surface temperatures reported above 50/sup 0/C. It thus appears that the geothermal potential of WSAs overall is minimal, but that evaluation of geothermal resources should be considered in more detail for some areas prior to their designation as Wilderness.

  2. Assessment of the petroleum, coal, and geothermal resources of the economic community of West African states (ECOWAS) region

    SciTech Connect

    Mattick, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Approximately 85 percent of the land area of the ECOWAS (Economic Community of West African States) region is covered by basement rocks (igneous and highly metamorphosed rocks) or relatively thin layers of Paleozoic, Upper Precambrian, and Continental Intercalaire sedimentary rocks. These areas have little or no petroleum potential. The ECOWAS region can be divided into 13 sedimentary basins on the basis of analysis of the geologic framework of Africa. These 13 basins can be further grouped into 8 categories on the basis of similarities in stratigraphy, geologic history, and probable hydrocarbon potential. The author has attempted to summarize the petroleum potential within the geologic framework of the region. The coal discoveries can be summarized as follows: the Carboniferous section in the Niger Basin; the Paleocene-Maestrichtian, Maestrichtian, and Eocene sections in the Niger Delta and Benin; the Maestrichtian section in the Senegal Basin; and the Pleistocene section in Sierra Leone. The only proved commercial deposits are the Paleocene-Maestrichtian and Maestrichtian subbituminous coal beds of the Niger Delta. Some of the lignite deposits of the Niger Delta and Senegal Basin, however, may be exploitable in the future. Published literature contains limited data on heat-flow values in the ECOWAS region. It is inferred, however, from the few values available and the regional geology that the development of geothermal resources, in general, would be uneconomical. Exceptions may include a geopressured zone in the Niger Delta and areas of recent tectonic activity in the Benue Trough and Cameroon. Development of the latter areas under present economic conditions is not feasible.

  3. 43 CFR 3210.16 - How must I prevent drainage of geothermal resources from my lease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How must I prevent drainage of geothermal resources from my lease? 3210.16 Section 3210.16 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Additional...

  4. 43 CFR 3275.13 - How must the facility operator measure the geothermal resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How must the facility operator measure the geothermal resources? 3275.13 Section 3275.13 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Conducting...

  5. 43 CFR 3275.20 - What will BLM do if I waste geothermal resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What will BLM do if I waste geothermal... LEASING Conducting Utilization Operations § 3275.20 What will BLM do if I waste geothermal resources? We will determine the amount of any resources you have lost through waste. If you did not take...

  6. 43 CFR 3275.20 - What will BLM do if I waste geothermal resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What will BLM do if I waste geothermal... LEASING Conducting Utilization Operations § 3275.20 What will BLM do if I waste geothermal resources? We will determine the amount of any resources you have lost through waste. If you did not take...

  7. 43 CFR 3275.20 - What will BLM do if I waste geothermal resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What will BLM do if I waste geothermal... LEASING Conducting Utilization Operations § 3275.20 What will BLM do if I waste geothermal resources? We will determine the amount of any resources you have lost through waste. If you did not take...

  8. 43 CFR 3275.20 - What will BLM do if I waste geothermal resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What will BLM do if I waste geothermal... LEASING Conducting Utilization Operations § 3275.20 What will BLM do if I waste geothermal resources? We will determine the amount of any resources you have lost through waste. If you did not take...

  9. Cooperative efforts by industry and government to develop geothermal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The Federal government's current plans for participation in the geothermal field appear to affect four major areas of interest: (1) resources exploration and assessment, (2) resources utilization projects, (3) advanced research and technology, and (4) environmental, legal, and institutional research. Private industry is also actively involved in these same areas of interest. Because of lack of coordination and communication between the private and public sector, it appears that there will be considerable duplication of effort, and, in some cases, serious conflict. It is also likely that this lack of coordination and communication may result in lack of effort in some key areas. Close coordination and communication between government and industry may resolve some of the major problems that are clearly evident.

  10. 43 CFR 3211.19 - What is the royalty rate on byproducts derived from geothermal resources produced from or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 CFR 3211.10(b) (2004). ... derived from geothermal resources produced from or attributable to my lease? 3211.19 Section 3211.19..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Filing and Processing...