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1

Cohort Comparisons in Resources and Functioning among Centenarians: Findings from the Georgia Centenarian Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine cohort comparisons in levels of resources (e.g., mental health, physical functioning, economic and social resources, and cognitive functioning) for 211 community-dwelling centenarians (whose Mini-Mental Status Examination score was 23 or higher) of phases I and III of the Georgia Centenarian Study. The…

Cho, Jinmyoung; Martin, Peter; Margrett, Jennifer; MacDonald, Maurice; Poon, Leonard W.; Johnson, Mary Ann

2012-01-01

2

Relationship between Serum and Brain Carotenoids, ?-Tocopherol, and Retinol Concentrations and Cognitive Performance in the Oldest Old from the Georgia Centenarian Study  

PubMed Central

Oxidative stress is involved in age-related cognitive decline. The dietary antioxidants, carotenoids, tocopherols, and vitamin A may play a role in the prevention or delay in cognitive decline. In this study, sera were obtained from 78 octogenarians and 220 centenarians from the Georgia Centenarian Study. Brain tissues were obtained from 47 centenarian decedents. Samples were analyzed for carotenoids, ?-tocopherol, and retinol using HPLC. Analyte concentrations were compared with cognitive tests designed to evaluate global cognition, dementia, depression and cognitive domains (memory, processing speed, attention, and executive functioning). Serum lutein, zeaxanthin, and ?-carotene concentrations were most consistently related to better cognition (P < 0.05) in the whole population and in the centenarians. Only serum lutein was significantly related to better cognition in the octogenarians. In brain, lutein and ?-carotene were related to cognition with lutein being consistently associated with a range of measures. There were fewer significant relationships for ?-tocopherol and a negative relationship between brain retinol concentrations and delayed recognition. These findings suggest that the status of certain carotenoids in the old may reflect their cognitive function. The protective effect may not be related to an antioxidant effect given that ?-tocopherol was less related to cognition than these carotenoids.

Hausman, Dorothy B.; Scott, Tammy M.; Miller, L. Stephen; Gearing, Marla; Woodard, John; Nelson, Peter T.; Chung, Hae-Yun; Poon, Leonard W.

2013-01-01

3

Predicting Successful Aging in a Population-Based Sample of Georgia Centenarians  

PubMed Central

Used a population-based sample (Georgia Centenarian Study, GCS), to determine proportions of centenarians reaching 100 years as (1) survivors (43%) of chronic diseases first experienced between 0–80 years of age, (2) delayers (36%) with chronic diseases first experienced between 80–98 years of age, or (3) escapers (17%) with chronic diseases only at 98 years of age or older. Diseases fall into two morbidity profiles of 11 chronic diseases; one including cardiovascular disease, cancer, anemia, and osteoporosis, and another including dementia. Centenarians at risk for cancer in their lifetime tended to be escapers (73%), while those at risk for cardiovascular disease tended to be survivors (24%), delayers (39%), or escapers (32%). Approximately half (43%) of the centenarians did not experience dementia. Psychiatric disorders were positively associated with dementia, but prevalence of depression, anxiety, and psychoses did not differ significantly between centenarians and an octogenarian control group. However, centenarians were higher on the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) than octogenarians. Consistent with our model of developmental adaptation in aging, distal life events contribute to predicting survivorship outcome in which health status as survivor, delayer, or escaper appears as adaptation variables late in life.

Arnold, Jonathan; Dai, Jianliang; Nahapetyan, Lusine; Arte, Ankit; Johnson, Mary Ann; Hausman, Dorothy; Rodgers, Willard L.; Hensley, Robert; Martin, Peter; MacDonald, Maurice; Davey, Adam; Siegler, Ilene C.; Jazwinski, S. Michal; Poon, Leonard W.

2010-01-01

4

Diabetes Mellitus among Centenarians  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES Describe prevalence of diabetes mellitus among centenarians. DESIGN Cross-sectional, population-based. SETTING 44 counties in northern Georgia. PARTICIPANTS 244 centenarians (aged 98-108, 15.8% men, 20.5% African-American, 38.0% community-dwelling) from the Georgia Centenarian Study (2001-2009). MEASUREMENTS Nonfasting blood samples assessed HbA1c and relevant clinical parameters. Demographic, diagnosis, and diabetes complications covariates were assessed. RESULTS 12.5% of centenarians were known to have diabetes. Diabetes was more prevalent among African-Americans (27.7%) than Whites (8.6%, p=.0002). There were no differences between men (16.7%) and women (11.7%, p=.414), centenarians living in the community (10.2%) or facilities (13.9%, p=.540). Diabetes was more prevalent among overweight/obese (23.1%) than non-overweight (7.1%, p=.002) centenarians. Anemia (78.6% versus 48.3%, p=.004) and hypertension (79.3% versus 58.6%, p=.041) were more prevalent among centenarians with diabetes than without and centenarians with diabetes took more nonhypoglycemic medications(8.6 versus 7.0, p=.023). No centenarians with hemoglobin A1c < 6.5% had random serum glucose levels above 200 mg/dl. Diabetes was not associated with 12 month all-cause mortality, visual impairment, amputations, cardiovascular disease or neuropathy. 37% of centenarians reported onset before age 80 (survivors), 47% between 80 and 97 years (delayers) and 15% age 98 or older (escapers). CONCLUSION Diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality, but is seen in persons who live into very old age. Aside from higher rates of anemia and use of more medications, few clinical correlates of diabetes were observed in centenarians.

Davey, Adam; Lele, Uday; Elias, Merrill F.; Dore, Gregory A.; Siegler, Ilene C.; Johnson, Mary Ann; Hausman, Dorothy B.; Tenover, J. Lisa; Poon, Leonard W.

2011-01-01

5

Antioxidant defense in centenarians (a preliminary study).  

PubMed

The study was designed to assess the antioxidant defense mechanisms, either enzymatic or non-enzymatic, in a group of sixteen centenarians (one male and fifteen female subjects aged 101 to 105 years) living in the Upper Silesia district (Poland) in order to evaluate the potential role of antioxidant defenses in human longevity. The results of our preliminary study showed that in comparison with young healthy female adults the centenarians had significantly higher red blood cell glutathione reductase and catalase activities and higher, although insignificantly, serum vitamin E level. PMID:11051193

K?apci?ska, B; Derejczyk, J; Wieczorowska-Tobis, K; Sobczak, A; Sadowska-Krepa, E; Danch, A

2000-01-01

6

Correspondence of perceptions about centenarians’ mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The goals of this study were to uncover the criteria by which centenarians, proxy\\/caregivers, and interviewers rated centenarians’ mental health. Often proxy and interviewer reports are obtained in studies of the oldest-old and become a primary source of information.Methods: Data were from a population-based sample of mentally competent US centenarians in northern Georgia. The dependent variables were based on

Maurice MacDonald; Peter Martin; Jennifer Margrett; Leonard W. Poon

2009-01-01

7

The Oldest Old: Red blood cell and plasma folate in African American and White Octogenarians and Centenarians in Georgia  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the overall folate status of a population-based multi-ethnic sample of octogenarians and centenarians and the specific dietary, demographic and physiological factors associated with observed abnormalities. Design Population-based multiethnic sample of adults aged 80 to 89 and 98 and above. Setting: Northern Georgia, USA Setting Northern Georgia, USA Participants Men and women aged 80 to 89 (octogenarians, n = 77) and 98 and older (centenarians, n = 198) Analyses Wilcoxon rank sum tests, and Chi square and logistic regression analyses were used to examine associations of low and high folate status with hematological indicators and other variables of interest. Results The prevalence of low red blood cell (RBC) folate was low overall, but tended to be higher in centenarians than in octogenarians (6.5% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.058; defined as RBC folate < 317 nmol/L). The risk of having lower RBC folate (< 25th vs. ?25th percentile for RBC folate for 60yr+ in NHANES 1999–2000) was greater in association with vitamin B12 deficiency (OR = 5.36; 95%CI: 2.87–10.01), African American race (OR = 4.29; 95%CI: 2.08–8.83), and residence in a skilled nursing facility (OR = 3.25; 95%CI: 1.56–6.78) but was not influenced by age, gender, B-vitamin supplement use, high/low food score or presence of atrophic gastritis. Combined high plasma folate and low vitamin B12 status was present in some individuals (n=11), but was not associated with increased prevalence of anemia or cognitive impairment in this study. Conclusions Low RBC folate status (< 317 nmol/L) was rare in this post folic acid fortification sample of octogenarians and centenarians. RBC folate status (< 25th percentile) was strongly associated with 1) vitamin B12 deficiency, which has strong implications for vitamin treatment, and 2) with being African American, suggesting racial disparities exist even in the oldest old.

Hausman, Dorothy B.; Johnson, Mary Ann; Davey, Adam; Woodard, John L.; Poon, Leonard W.; Allen, Robert H.; Stabler, Sally P.

2010-01-01

8

The well-being of community-dwelling near-centenarians and centenarians in Hong Kong a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Hong Kong has one of the highest life expectancy rankings in the world. The number of centenarians and near-centenarians has been increasing locally and internationally. The relative growth of this population is a topic of immense importance for population and health policy makers. Living long and living well are two overlapping but distinct research topics. We previously conducted a quantitative study on 153 near-centenarians and centenarians to explore a wide range of biopsychosocial correlates of health and “living long”. This paper reports a follow-up qualitative study examining the potential correlates of “living well” among near-centenarians and centenarians in Hong Kong. Methods Six cognitively, physically, and psychologically sound community-dwelling elders were purposively recruited from a previous quantitative study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted. Results Four major themes related to living long and well emerged from the responses of the participants: (a) Positive relations with others, (b) Positive events and happiness, (c) Hope for the future, and (d) Positive life attitude. Specifically, we found that having good interpersonal relationships, possessing a collection of positive life events, and maintaining salutary attitudes towards life are considered as important to psychological well-being by long-lived adults in Hong Kong. Most participants perceived their working life as most important to their life history and retired at very old ages. Conclusions These findings also shed light on the relationships between health, work, and old age.

2014-01-01

9

Polish Centenarians Programme – Multidisciplinary studies of successful ageing: Aims, methods, and preliminary results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of centenarians as a model of successful ageing may help identify various environmental, social, psychological, and genetic factors supporting longevity. The scientific aims of the programme were to assess health status and environmental determinants of ageing of Polish centenarians, and to collect biological material for studying selected aspects of longevity, including genetic factors. The social aim of the project

Malgorzata Mossakowska; Maria Barcikowska; Katarzyna Broczek; Tomasz Grodzicki; Alicja Klich-Raczka; Malgorzata Kupisz-Urbanska; Teresa Podsiadly-Moczydlowska; Ewa Sikora; Aleksandra Szybinska; Katarzyna Wieczorowska-Tobis; Jolanta Zyczkowska; Jacek Kuznicki

2008-01-01

10

Predicting Happiness among Centenarians  

PubMed Central

Background Happiness is believed to evolve from the comparison of current circumstances relative to past achievement. However, gerontological literature on happiness in extreme old age has been limited. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine how perceptions of health, social provisions, and economics link past satisfaction with life to current feelings of happiness among persons living to 100 years of age and beyond. Methods A total of 158 centenarians from the Georgia Centenarian Study were included to conduct the investigation. Items reflecting congruence and happiness from the Life Satisfaction Index were used to evaluate a model of happiness. Pathways between congruence, perceived economic security, subjective health, perceived social provisions, and happiness were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Results Congruence emerged as a key predictor of happiness. Furthermore, congruence predicted perceived economic security and subjective health, whereas perceived economic security had a strong influence on subjective health status. Conclusion It appears that past satisfaction with life influences how centenarians frame subjective evaluations of health status and economic security. Furthermore, past satisfaction with life is directly associated with present happiness. This presents implications relative to understanding how perception of resources may enhance quality of life among persons who live exceptionally long lives.

Bishop, Alex J.; Martin, Peter; MacDonald, Maurice; Poon, Leonard

2010-01-01

11

Stability and Change in Affect among Centenarians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much information is available about physical and functional health among very old adults, but little knowledge exists about the mental health and mental health changes in very late life. This study reports findings concerning positive and negative affect changes among centenarians. Nineteen centenarians from a Midwestern state participated in four…

Martin, Peter; da Rosa, Grace; Margrett, Jennifer A.; Garasky, Steven; Franke, Warren

2012-01-01

12

Successful aging in centenarians: myths and reality.  

PubMed

The term "successful aging" appeared in the first issue of "The Gerontologist" in 1961. During the successive years, this expression has changed its meaning. Nowadays, successful aging means "absence of diseases and disabilities, maintenance of high levels of physical and cognitive abilities, preservation of the social and productive activities". It has become a common opinion that the centenarians may represent the prototypes of the successful aging. This motivated our work to study the clinical, psychical, and functional aspects in a centenarian group, verifying the real autonomy, instrumental capacities, and working abilities. Our study pool consisted of 602 centenarians, who were also subjects of then epidemiological studies of the Italian Multicenter Studies on Centenarians (IMUSCE). All subjects underwent a clinical-anamnestic evaluation, cognitive-functional tests by means of the mini mental state examination (MMSE), the independence index in activities of daily living (ADL), the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) scale. The centenarians were classified in three groups, according to the criteria elaborated previously by us, based on their psychophysical status and autonomy, as follows. Group A: centenarians in good health status; Group B: centenarians in an intermediate health status. Group C: centenarians in bad health status. Group A represented 20.0% of the total pool, Group B amounted to 33.4%, and the Group C was 46.6%. The centenarians of Group A presented normal ADL values, and 47.9% of them were autosufficient in all functions; 5.7% of them were independent in all IADL items. These data confirm that the centenarians of Group A are free of invalidating chronic diseases, are autonomous, maintain good physical and cognitive capacities, however, have not maintained any social or productive activities. Therefore, they cannot be considered as prototypes of successful aging. PMID:15814158

Motta, M; Bennati, E; Ferlito, L; Malaguarnera, M; Motta, L

2005-01-01

13

Reproduction and migration in relation to senescence in the barn swallow Hirundo rustica : A study of avian ‘centenarians  

Microsoft Academic Search

A. P. Moller, F. de Lope and N. Saino: Reproduction and migration in relation to senescence in the barn swallow Hirundo rustica: A study of avian ‘centenarians’. Senescence reflects the decrease in age-dependent residual reproductive value, and a previous\\u000a study of a cohort of migratory barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) that had reached advanced ages for this species (at least five

Anders Pape Møller; Florentino de Lope; Nicola Saino

2005-01-01

14

Profiles of Cognitive Functioning in a Population-Based Sample of Centenarians Using Factor Mixture Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background/Study Context The goal of the study was to identify and characterize latent profiles (clusters) of cognitive functioning in centenarians and the psychometric properties of cognitive measures within them. Methods Data were collected from cross-sectional, population-based sample of 244 centenarians (aged 98-108, 15.8% men, 20.5% African-American, 38.0% community-dwelling) from 44 counties in Northern Georgia participating in the Georgia Centenarian Study (2001-2009). Measures included the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Severe Impairment Battery (SIB), Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III, Similarities sub-test (WAIS), Finger Tapping, Behavioral Dyscontrol Scale (BDS), Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT), and Fuld Object Memory Evaluation (FOME). The Global Deterioration Rating Scale (GDRS) was used to independently evaluate criterion-related validity for distinguishing cognitively normal and impaired groups. Relevant covariates included directly assessed functional status for basic and instrumental activities of daily living (DAFS), race, gender, educational attainment, Geriatric Depression Scale Short Form (GDS), and vision and hearing problems. Results Results suggest two distinct classes of cognitive performance in this centenarian sample. Approximately one-third of the centenarians show a pattern of markedly lower cognitive performance on most measures. Group membership is independently well-predicted (AUC=.83) by GDRS scores (sensitivity 67.7%, specificity 82.4%). Membership in the lower cognitive performance group was more likely for individuals who were older, African Americans, had more depressive symptoms, lower plasma folate, carriers of the APOE ?4 allele, facility residents, and individuals who died in the two years following interview. Conclusions In a population expected to have high prevalence of dementia, latent subtypes can be distinguished via factor mixture analysis that provide normative values for cognitive functioning. The present study allows estimates for normative cognitive performance in this age group.

Davey, Adam; Dai, Ting; Woodard, John L.; Miller, L. Stephen; Gondo, Yasuyuki; Johnson, Mary Ann; Hausman, Dorothy B.; Martin, Peter; Green, Robert C.; Allen, Robert H.; Stabler, Sally P.; Poon, Leonard W.

2013-01-01

15

Examination of important life experiences of the oldest-old: cross-cultural comparisons of U.S. and Japanese centenarians.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to compare the most important life events reported by U.S. and Japanese centenarians. This study included a population-based sample of 239 U.S. centenarians from the Georgia Centenarian Study and 304 Japanese centenarians from the Tokyo Centenarian Study. Two open-ended life events questions were categorized and grouped into different life event domains. Several cross-tabulations were computed to investigate culture and gender differences in most important life event domains. Next, four configural frequency analyses were conducted using Neuroticism, Extraversion, and the first most often mentioned life event domain for each sample (i.e., marriage and historical life events). Results suggest that events related to marriage were the most frequent important event domains mentioned by U.S. centenarians. The Japanese sample was more likely to report historical events. Men from the U.S. were more likely to report events related to work and retirement compared to U.S. women, and U.S. women reported events related to family as the most important life events when compared to U.S. men. Japanese women considered events related to marriage, death and grief as the most important life events when compared to Japanese men. In addition, Japanese men reported events related to work and retirement as the most important life events. A cross-cultural difference was found in life events: U.S. centenarians were more likely to mention positive experiences related to marriage and children, whereas Japanese centenarians reported mostly negative and traumatic experiences such as historical, death/grief, and work/retirement events. PMID:24477838

da Rosa, Grace; Martin, Peter; Gondo, Yasuyuki; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Ishioka, Yoshiko; Poon, Leonard W

2014-06-01

16

Georgia Highway Cost Allocation Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the study was to allocate highway construction and maintenance costs among vehicle types for the State Highway System which is the responsibility of the State of Georgia. This was accomplished by determining an annual road user cost respons...

1979-01-01

17

Place and Cause of Death in Centenarians: A Population-Based Observational Study in England, 2001 to 2010  

PubMed Central

Background Centenarians are a rapidly growing demographic group worldwide, yet their health and social care needs are seldom considered. This study aims to examine trends in place of death and associations for centenarians in England over 10 years to consider policy implications of extreme longevity. Methods and Findings This is a population-based observational study using death registration data linked with area-level indices of multiple deprivations for people aged ?100 years who died 2001 to 2010 in England, compared with those dying at ages 80-99. We used linear regression to examine the time trends in number of deaths and place of death, and Poisson regression to evaluate factors associated with centenarians’ place of death. The cohort totalled 35,867 people with a median age at death of 101 years (range: 100–115 years). Centenarian deaths increased 56% (95% CI 53.8%–57.4%) in 10 years. Most died in a care home with (26.7%, 95% CI 26.3%–27.2%) or without nursing (34.5%, 95% CI 34.0%–35.0%) or in hospital (27.2%, 95% CI 26.7%–27.6%). The proportion of deaths in nursing homes decreased over 10 years (?0.36% annually, 95% CI ?0.63% to ?0.09%, p?=?0.014), while hospital deaths changed little (0.25% annually, 95% CI ?0.06% to 0.57%, p?=?0.09). Dying with frailty was common with “old age” stated in 75.6% of death certifications. Centenarians were more likely to die of pneumonia (e.g., 17.7% [95% CI 17.3%–18.1%] versus 6.0% [5.9%–6.0%] for those aged 80–84 years) and old age/frailty (28.1% [27.6%–28.5%] versus 0.9% [0.9%–0.9%] for those aged 80–84 years) and less likely to die of cancer (4.4% [4.2%–4.6%] versus 24.5% [24.6%–25.4%] for those aged 80–84 years) and ischemic heart disease (8.6% [8.3%–8.9%] versus 19.0% [18.9%–19.0%] for those aged 80–84 years) than were younger elderly patients. More care home beds available per 1,000 population were associated with fewer deaths in hospital (PR 0.98, 95% CI 0.98–0.99, p<0.001). Conclusions Centenarians are more likely to have causes of death certified as pneumonia and frailty and less likely to have causes of death of cancer or ischemic heart disease, compared with younger elderly patients. To reduce reliance on hospital care at the end of life requires recognition of centenarians’ increased likelihood to “acute” decline, notably from pneumonia, and wider provision of anticipatory care to enable people to remain in their usual residence, and increasing care home bed capacity. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

Evans, Catherine J.; Ho, Yuen; Daveson, Barbara A.; Hall, Sue; Higginson, Irene J.; Gao, Wei

2014-01-01

18

AGE, RACE AND SEASON PREDICT VITAMIN D STATUS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN AND WHITE OCTOGENARIANS AND CENTENARIANS  

PubMed Central

Objective Poor vitamin D status has been associated with osteoporosis, falls, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, autoimmune diseases, pain, nursing home placement, and other age-related conditions, but little is known about the prevalence and predictors of vitamin D status in those aged 80 and older. Thus, this study tested the hypothesis that vitamin D status would be 1) poorer in a population-based multi-ethnic sample of centenarians as compared with octogenarians and 2) predicted by specific dietary, demographic or environmental factors. Design Cross-sectional population-based analyses. Setting Northern Georgia in the United States. Participants Men and women aged 80 to 89 (octogenarians, n = 80) and 98 and older (centenarians, n = 237). Measurements Regression analyses were used to examine the associations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] with age, gender, race, living arrangements, dairy food intake, supplement intake, and season. Results The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency [25(OH)D < 50 nmol/L] was higher in centenarians than in octogenarians (p < 0.02). In logistic regression analyses, the risk of being vitamin D insufficient was significantly increased by being a centenarian vs. octogenarian (p<0.005) and by being African American vs. white (p < 0.001) and decreased by taking a supplement with vitamin D (p < 0.001) or by having vitamin D status measured in the summer or fall (each p < 0.05), compared with spring. Conclusions Centenarians and octogenarians are at high risk for vitamin D insufficiency for many of the same reasons identified in younger populations. Given the numerous potential adverse consequences of poor vitamin D status, efforts are needed to ensure vitamin D adequacy in these older adults.

JOHNSON, M.A.; DAVEY, A.; PARK, S.; HAUSMAN, D.B.; POON, L.W.

2010-01-01

19

Lamins are rapamycin targets that impact human longevity: a study in centenarians.  

PubMed

The dynamic organisation of the cell nucleus is profoundly modified during growth, development and senescence as a result of changes in chromatin arrangement and gene transcription. A plethora of data suggests that the nuclear lamina is a key player in chromatin dynamics and argues in favour of a major involvement of prelamin A in fundamental mechanisms regulating cellular senescence and organism ageing. As the best model to analyse the role of prelamin A in normal ageing, we used cells from centenarian subjects. We show that prelamin A is accumulated in fibroblasts from centenarians owing to downregulation of its specific endoprotease ZMPSTE24, whereas other nuclear envelope constituents are mostly unaffected and cells do not enter senescence. Accumulation of prelamin A in nuclei of cells from centenarians elicits loss of heterochromatin, as well as recruitment of the inactive form of 53BP1, associated with rapid response to oxidative stress. These effects, including the prelamin-A-mediated increase of nuclear 53BP1, can be reproduced by rapamycin treatment of cells from younger individuals. These data identify prelamin A and 53BP1 as new targets of rapamycin that are associated with human longevity. We propose that the reported mechanisms safeguard healthy ageing in humans through adaptation of the nuclear environment to stress stimuli. PMID:24155329

Lattanzi, Giovanna; Ortolani, Michela; Columbaro, Marta; Prencipe, Sabino; Mattioli, Elisabetta; Lanzarini, Catia; Maraldi, Nadir M; Cenni, Vittoria; Garagnani, Paolo; Salvioli, Stefano; Storci, Gianluca; Bonafè, Massimiliano; Capanni, Cristina; Franceschi, Claudio

2014-01-01

20

Exploring Positive and Negative Affect as Key Indicators of Life Satisfaction among Centenarians: Does Cognitive Performance Matter?  

PubMed Central

The aim of this investigation was to determine how cognitive performance was associated with positive and negative affect and life satisfaction over time. This study involved a secondary longitudinal analysis of cross-section data collected at Phase I (1988–1992) and during an 18-month longitudinal followup at Phase II (1992–1998) of the Georgia Centenarian Study. Participants included N = 137 centenarians at Time 1 and N = 68 survivors at Time 2. Significant stability in cognitive impairment existed at Time 1 and Time 2 for positive (? = .55, P < .01) and negative affect (? = .54, P < .01) models. Negative affect at Time 1 was associated with lower life satisfaction at Time 1 (? = ?.42, P < .01 ). In addition, cognitive impairment at Time 2 was associated with decreased positive emotionality at Time 2 (? = ?.39, P > .01). Furthermore, greater positive affect at Time 2 was associated with greater satisfaction with life at Time 2 (? = .35, P < .01). It appears that positive emotionality contemporaneously influences the association between cognitive impairment and life satisfaction among centenarians. Implications relative to improving life satisfaction among centenarians are discussed.

Bishop, Alex J.; Martin, Peter; Poon, Leonard; Johnson, Mary Ann

2011-01-01

21

Distinct DNA methylomes of newborns and centenarians.  

PubMed

Human aging cannot be fully understood in terms of the constrained genetic setting. Epigenetic drift is an alternative means of explaining age-associated alterations. To address this issue, we performed whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) of newborn and centenarian genomes. The centenarian DNA had a lower DNA methylation content and a reduced correlation in the methylation status of neighboring cytosine--phosphate--guanine (CpGs) throughout the genome in comparison with the more homogeneously methylated newborn DNA. The more hypomethylated CpGs observed in the centenarian DNA compared with the neonate covered all genomic compartments, such as promoters, exonic, intronic, and intergenic regions. For regulatory regions, the most hypomethylated sequences in the centenarian DNA were present mainly at CpG-poor promoters and in tissue-specific genes, whereas a greater level of DNA methylation was observed in CpG island promoters. We extended the study to a larger cohort of newborn and nonagenarian samples using a 450,000 CpG-site DNA methylation microarray that reinforced the observation of more hypomethylated DNA sequences in the advanced age group. WGBS and 450,000 analyses of middle-age individuals demonstrated DNA methylomes in the crossroad between the newborn and the nonagenarian/centenarian groups. Our study constitutes a unique DNA methylation analysis of the extreme points of human life at a single-nucleotide resolution level. PMID:22689993

Heyn, Holger; Li, Ning; Ferreira, Humberto J; Moran, Sebastian; Pisano, David G; Gomez, Antonio; Diez, Javier; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V; Setien, Fernando; Carmona, F Javier; Puca, Annibale A; Sayols, Sergi; Pujana, Miguel A; Serra-Musach, Jordi; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Formiga, Francesc; Fernandez, Agustin F; Fraga, Mario F; Heath, Simon C; Valencia, Alfonso; Gut, Ivo G; Wang, Jun; Esteller, Manel

2012-06-26

22

Centenarians' "holy" memory: is being positive enough?  

PubMed

The authors compared 18 centenarians' (M age = 100.1 years, SD = 1.8 years) recognition memory for emotional (positive, negative, and religious) pictures with 18 older adults (M age = 75.2 years, SD = 6.8 years). Participants observed a series of images that varied in emotional valence and meaning and were later asked to discriminate between old and new images in a series of pictures that included studied images as well as new images. Centenarians showed decreased recognition memory for positive and negative images items compared with older adults, F(1, 34) = 9.82, p < .01. In addition, a significant age by valence interaction was observed highlighting how centenarians remembered religious pictures better while older adults favoured positive information when only positive pictures were taken into consideration. Results are interpreted in terms of possible age-linked changes in meaningful goals that lead centenarians to focus on meaningful religious self-relevant information rather than simply on positive information. PMID:23534096

Fairfield, Beth; Mammarella, Nicola; Di Domenico, Alberto

2013-01-01

23

Stress in centenarians.  

PubMed

Everybody is subject to a physical clock, determining the calendar age, and also to a biological clock, the speed of which depends on the interaction between the genetic reserves and the environment. Stress is taken into account more and more as one of the main factors responsible for the acceleration of the biological clock and the dishomogeneity of the aging process. Despite the fact that centenarians are prone to chronic stress due to a progressive loss of self-sufficiency, more than a half of our centenarians were not depressed and had a low trait-anxiety: they showed an emotional tendency to react with a low anxiety-intensity to stressful conditions. Their good physical conditions may be explained by a positive character-disposition and by strong adaptability to the adversities of the life. Personality traits can be reduced to five basic phenomena, the so-called Big Five: extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, openness to experience and emotional stability. In our sample 65.4% were classified as extroverted, 50% as open minded and 34.5% showed good emotional stability. In the centenarians aging of all apparatuses was slowed down by a healthy lifestyle and also by good adaptability that allowed for a positive and effective response to stress throughout their whole lives. PMID:18433899

Tafaro, Laura; Tombolillo, Maria Teresa; Brükner, Nina; Troisi, Giovanni; Cicconetti, Paolo; Motta, Massimo; Cardillo, Elisabeth; Bennati, Ettore; Marigliano, Vincenzo

2009-01-01

24

Researching with centenarians.  

PubMed

Aims and objectives.? The objectives were shaped by ways in which to best engage the readers' curiosity about being 100?years old. Background.? In the effort to reverse negative stereotyping associated with older people, the aim was to produce a book of individual stories for public readership that had the power to combat ageism and to present alternative constructions. Methods.? Twenty-four centenarians were interviewed. Each person was asked to retell, using their own words, something about themselves and the social context that had shaped their lives. Centenarians could select whatever was foremost in their minds; an aspect of their lives that they wanted to share. We asked a few standard questions: What is it like to have lived one hundred years? What, in your opinion, has contributed to longevity? What matters today? A conversational approach to interviewing was adopted with the use of prompts to encourage story telling. Results.? Centenarians privileged talking about their early years, childhood, going to school and first employment. Although most people could relate to a country upbringing and fewer years at school, subsequent life experiences and opportunities were diverse. Advice to others who desired a long life was keeping active, leading a simple life, eating well, working hard, maintaining an interest in events and surroundings, helping others and being moderate in all things. Maintaining a sense of humour was thought to be important. Loss of eyesight, mostly in the last few years, had been a profound disruption in the lives, creating new dependencies. Extensive family cohesion and frequent contact with others who cared was a profound feature. There appears to be a matter of fact appraisal of difficulties, losses and sadness but these were considered to be part of life and not particularly extraordinary. It seemed that these people had made a successful transition to living beyond 100?years old by leaving stress behind and moving on. Embedded in the stories of centenarians was a sense of self that was strong and resilient. Conclusions.? The book containing 24 separate stories was published by Penguin. Sharing the stories of centenarians provided an opportunity to engage with the public readership and help shape wider social perceptions of older people as worth listening to. Relevance to clinical practice.? In this paper, alternatives to dominant stories about ageing are presented and challenge the negative stereotyping of older people and its associated notions of decline, dementia, decay and death. Its relevance to clinical practice is precisely to show that older people are worth listening to. Moreover their ordinary lives make interesting, popular readership. Although the stories were primed to reach a wide public audience, we argue that its health promotion message and our creative effort to combat negative stereotypes can filter to healthcare delivery. PMID:20925832

Koch, Tina; Power, Charmaine; Kralik, Debbie

2007-03-01

25

Centenarian Self-Perceptions of Factors Responsible for Attainment of Extended Health and Longevity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Pathways healthy and physically functional centenarians take to achieve advanced old age have fascinated mankind for centuries. This hermeneutic phenomenological study documents characteristics perceived by centenarians as important and central to their attainment of advanced longevity. Secondary data including written transcripts and audio and…

Freeman, Shannon; Garcia, John; Marston, Hannah R.

2013-01-01

26

Paradoxes in longevity: sequence analysis of mtDNA haplogroup J in centenarians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies have shown that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup J is significantly over-represented in healthy centenarians with respect to younger controls, thus suggesting that this haplogroup predisposes to successful aging and longevity. On the other hand, the same haplogroup is reported to have elevated frequency in some complex diseases. To verify if centenarians clustered in a particular lineage within J

Giuseppina Rose; Giuseppe Passarino; Giuseppina Carrieri; Katia Altomare; Valentina Greco; Stefano Bertolini; Massimiliano Bonafè; Claudio Franceschi; Giovanna De Benedictis

2001-01-01

27

Georgia-Armenia Transboarder seismicity studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the presented study we performed Comprehensive seismic analyses for the Armenian-Georgian transboarder active seismic fault starting on Armenian territory, cutting the state boarder and having possibly northern termination on Adjara-Triealeti frontal structure in Georgia. In the scope of International projects: ISTC A-1418 "Open network of scientific Centers for mitigation risk of natural hazards in the Southern Caucasus and Central Asia" and NATO SfP- 983284 Project "Caucasus Seismic Emergency Response" in Akhalkalaki (Georgia) seismic center, Regional Summer school trainings and intensive filed investigations were conducted. Main goal was multidisciplinary study of the Javakheti fault structure and better understanding seismicity of the area. Young scientists from Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia were participated in the deployment of temporal seismic network in order to monitor seisimity on the Javakheti highland and particularly delineate fault scarf and identify active seismic structures. In the scope of international collaboration the common seismic database has been created in the southern Caucasus and collected data from the field works is available now online. Javakheti highland, which is located in the central part of the Caucasus, belongs to the structure of the lesser Caucasus and represents a history of neotectonic volcanism existed in the area. Jasvakheti highland is seismicalu active region devastating from several severe earthquakes(1088, 1283, 1899…). Hypocenters located during analogue network were highly scattered and did not describe real pattern of seismicity of the highland. We relocated hypocenters of the region and improved local velocity model. The hypocenters derived from recently deployed local seismic network in the Javakheti highland, clearly identified seismically active structures. Fault plane solutions of analogue data of the Soviet times have been carefully analyzed and examined. Moment tensor inversion were preformed for the recent moderate size earthquakes and the results are in an agreement with paleo-trenching data showing normal fault mechanism on the south and strake slip on the northern edge of the fault. Local seismic tomography of Javakheti area has been performed in order to improve 3D structure of the region.

Godoladze, T.; Tvaradze, N.; Javakishvili, Z.; Elashvili, M.; Durgaryan, R.; Arakelyan, A.; Gevorgyan, M.

2012-12-01

28

Low circulating IGF-I bioactivity is associated with human longevity: Findings in centenarians' offspring  

PubMed Central

Centenarians’ offspring represent a suitable model to study age-dependent variables (e.g. IGF-I) potentially involved in the modulation of the lifespan. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the IGF-I in human longevity. We evaluated circulating IGF-I bioactivity measured by an innovative IGF-I Kinase Receptor Activation (KIRA) Assay, total IGF-I, IGFBP-3, total IGF-II, insulin, glucose, HOMA2-B% and HOMA2-S% in 192 centenarians’ offspring and 80 offspring-controls of which both parents died relatively young. Both groups were well-matched for age, gender and BMI with the centenarians’ offspring. IGF-I bioactivity (p<0.01), total IGF-I (p<0.01) and the IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio (p<0.001) were significantly lower in centenarians’ offspring compared to offspring matched-controls. Serum insulin, glucose, HOMA2-B% and HOMA2-S% values were similar between both groups. In centenarians’ offspring IGF-I bioactivity was inversely associated to insulin sensitivity. In conclusion: 1) centenarians’ offspring had relatively lower circulating IGF-I bioactivity compared to offspring matched-controls; 2) IGF-I bioactivity in centenarians’ offspring was inversely related to insulin sensitivity. These data support a role of the IGF-I/insulin system in the modulation of human aging process.

Vitale, Giovanni; Brugts, Michael P; Ogliari, Giulia; Castaldi, Davide; Fatti, Letizia M.; Varewijck, Aimee J.; Lamberts, Steven W.; Monti, Daniela; Bucci, Laura; Cevenini, Elisa; Cavagnini, Francesco; Franceschi, Claudio; Hofland, Leo J; Mari, Daniela; Janssen, Joseph A.M.J.L.

2012-01-01

29

High prevalence of autoantibodies among Danish centenarians  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of organ and nonorgan specific autoantibodies in relation to disability and comorbidity in an unselected population of centenarians. A population-based survey of all persons living in Denmark who celebrated their 100th birthday during the period 1 April 1995 to 31 May 1996, a total of 276 persons, was undertaken. Participants underwent an interview, a physical examination and blood sampling. Organ specific autoantibodies (Tg-ab, TPO-ab, PCA-ab) and nonorgan specific autoantibodies (ANA, IgM RF, IgA RF, MPO-ab, c-ANCA, p-ANCA, oxLDL-ab, IgM ACA, IgG ACA, PR3-ANCA, histone-ab, SSA-ab, SSB-ab, Mit-ab) were measured, and comorbidity and disability (Katz Index of ADL) were registered. In all, 207 (75·0%) of 276 eligible subjects participated, and 148 agreed to blood tests. A large majority (79·3%) had at least one autoantibody detected. Organ specific autoantibodies were present in 32·1% of the centenarians. The high level of autoantibodies did not reflect an equally high level of overt autoimmune disease. While nonorgan specific autoantibodies were equally represented in less-disabled/disabled subjects as well as in subjects with low/high comorbidity, significantly fewer subjects with organ specific autoantibodies were found among less-disabled subjects or subjects with low comorbidity. Autoantibodies (both nonorgan and organ specific) are common in an unselected population of centenarians of today, but do not reflect an equally high level of overt autoimmune disease. Non-organ specific autoantibodies are evenly distributed irrespective of the level of disability or comorbidity, suggesting underlying, undiagnosed pathological processes which may be part of the processes involved in frailty.

ANDERSEN-RANBERG, K; H?IER-MADSEN, M; WIIK, A; JEUNE, B; HEGEDUS, L

2004-01-01

30

The immunology of exceptional individuals: the lesson of centenarians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Centenarians are the best example of successful ageing, since they have escaped the major age-associated diseases, and most are in good mental and physical condition. Here, Claudio Franceschi and colleagues discuss how the study of their immune systems reveals that several immune parameters are well conserved, suggesting that a complex remodelling of most immune parameters occurs with age, rather than

Claudio Franceschi; Daniela Monti; Paolo Sansoni; Andrea Cossarizza

1995-01-01

31

Lipoprotein Profile and High-Density Lipoproteins: Subfractions Distribution in Centenarians  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to assess the role of HDL on longevity, we studied HDL subfraction distribution in centenarian women compared with a group of weight- and gender-matched healthy normolipidemic controls. We did not find any significant difference in the mean plasma lipid, apolipoprotein, and Lp(a) levels. On the contrary, in spite of similar HDL-cholesterol concentrations (1.32 ± 0.41 mmol\\/l in centenarians

Carlo M. Barbagallo; Maurizio R. Averna; Giovanni Fradà; Davide Noto; Giovanni Cavera; Alberto Notarbartolo

1998-01-01

32

Seismicity study of Javakhety highland (Southrn Georgia)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Caucasus is a region of active tectonics and complex crustal structure located between the Caspian Sea to the East and the Black Sea to the west. To the North is the aseismic Eurasian shield and to the South-West and the South are the active tectonic regions of East Anatolia and the Zagros thrust and fault belt of Northwestern Iran. Main interest of our study is Javakheti highland, which is located in the central part of the Caucasus, belongs to the structure of the Lesser Caucasus and represents a history of neotectonic volcanism existed in the area. While the region is seismically active, most of the crustal models and earthquake locations are based on field work and seismic studies of the soviet era until 2003, when recent technical advances has continued in the former USSR republics of the Southern Caucasus. Before 2003 the only broadband digital instrumentation in the region was an IRIS station in Garni, Armenia. Now there are new regional networks in Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan. There is considerable interest in examining the tectonics and fault structure of the region in more detail and in obtaining seismic data to develop crustal models and improve our ability to accurately locate events as the inputs for the seismic hazard assessment of the Caucasus. Several field works have been conducted in the Javakheti highland from 2009 to 2011. The goal of the intensive field investigations was multidisciplinary study of the fault structure and better understanding seismicity of the area. We relocated hypocenters of the earthquakes in the region and improved local 3D velocity model. The hypocenters derived from recently deployed local seismic network in the Javakheti highland, clearly identified seismically active structures. Fault plane solutions of analog data of the soviet time have been carefully analyzed and examined. Moment tensor inversions were performed for the recent moderate size earthquakes of the Javakheti highland associated with the fault system investigated by regional group of scientists. Seismic results are in a good agreement with paleo trenching performed in 2011 (NATO SfP 983284 project).

Godladze, T.; Javakhishvili, Z.; Dorbath, L.

2011-12-01

33

The frequency of 4 common gene polymorphisms in nonagenarians, centenarians, and average life span individuals.  

PubMed

Single nucleotide polymorphisms of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) such as rs1799752, nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) such as rs28362491 and cholesteryl ester transport protein (CETP) such as rs708272 (TaqB1) and rs5882 (I405V) were evaluated in nonagenarians, centenarians, and average life span individuals (controls). The study population (n = 307; 190 nonagenarians, 12 centenarians and 105 middle-aged controls) was genotyped for ACE, NFkB, and CETP genetic variants. The age of nonagenarian and centenarian group ranged between 90 and 111 years; centenarians and controls age ranged from 99 to 111, and from 18 to 80 years, respectively. The I carriers of ACE I/D gene were fewer in nonagenarians compared to centenarians (37.6% vs 62.5%, P = .016). The I carriers of ACE gene were more frequent in centenarians compared to controls (62% vs 41%, P = .045). No differences in frequency of common NFkB and CETP genotypes between patients with exceptional longevity and middle-aged patients were observed. PMID:23389097

Kolovou, Genovefa; Kolovou, Vana; Vasiliadis, Ioannis; Giannakopoulou, Vasiliki; Mihas, Constantinos; Bilianou, Helen; Kollia, Aikaterini; Papadopoulou, Evaggelia; Marvaki, Apostolia; Goumas, Georgos; Kalogeropoulos, Petros; Limperi, Sotiria; Katsiki, Niki; Mavrogeni, Sophie

2014-03-01

34

Lipoprotein profile and high-density lipoproteins: subfractions distribution in centenarians.  

PubMed

In order to assess the role of HDL on longevity, we studied HDL subfraction distribution in centenarian women compared with a group of weight- and gender-matched healthy normolipidemic controls. We did not find any significant difference in the mean plasma lipid, apolipoprotein, and Lp(a) levels. On the contrary, in spite of similar HDL-cholesterol concentrations (1.32 +/- 0.41 mmol/l in centenarians vs. 1.32 +/- 0.25 mmol/l in controls, p = not significant), HDL2b and HDL3a levels were, respectively, significantly increased and significantly reduced in centenarians in comparison with controls (HDL2b 32.4 +/- 9.2% in centenarians vs. 23.4 +/- 7.7% in controls, p < 0.002, and HDL3a 26.3 +/- 9.8% in centenarians vs. 34.1 +/- 7.3% in controls, p < 0.01). Moreover, HDL2b levels were significantly raised and HDL3a levels were significantly reduced in centenarians in comparison with both 'middle-aged' and 'elderly' subjects, whereas no difference for any HDL subfraction was found between the two groups of controls of different ages. Age was significantly correlated with HDL2b and HDL3a (respectively, +0.452, p < 0.001, and -0.370, p < 0.01) in all subjects, but not with all the other lipid, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein parameters, but we observed a large overlapping of individual values of HDL2b between centenarians and controls. Since HDL2b levels were found to be inversely correlated with coronary heart disease risk, we could speculate that, in some cases, this may probably favor a healthy ageing, but long-term longitudinal studies are necessary to define the relative importance of HDL subfractions distribution as a marker of longevity. Probably other factors or clinical characteristics play a major role in the ageing process. PMID:9523222

Barbagallo, C M; Averna, M R; Fradà, G; Noto, D; Cavera, G; Notarbartolo, A

1998-01-01

35

The Political History of Developmental Studies in the University System of Georgia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The political history of developmental education in post-secondary education is as revealing as its intellectual history. With a University system-wide Developmental Studies program initiated in 1974, the State of Georgia was a pioneer in remedial education and open access. Unfortunately, the program became linked in Georgia media, and in Georgia

Presley, John W.; Dodd, William M.

2008-01-01

36

Positive attitude towards life and emotional expression as personality phenotypes for centenarians  

PubMed Central

Centenarians have been reported to share particular personality traits including low neuroticism and high extraversion and conscientiousness. Since these traits have moderate to high heritability and are associated with various health outcomes, personality appears linked to bio-genetic mechanisms which may contribute to exceptional longevity. Therefore, the present study sought to detect genetically-based personality phenotypes in a genetically homogeneous sample of centenarians through developing and examining psychometric properties of a brief measure of the personality of centenarians, the Personality Outlook Profile Scale (POPS). The results generated two personality characteristics/domains, Positive Attitude Towards Life (PATL: optimism, easygoing, laughter, and introversion/outgoing) and Emotional Expression (EE: expressing emotions openly and not bottling up emotions). These domains demonstrated acceptable concurrent validity with two established personality measures, the NEO-Five Factor Inventory and Life Orientation Test-Revised. Additionally, centenarians in both groups had lower neuroticism and higher conscientiousness than the US adult population. Findings suggest that the POPS is a psychometrically sound measure of personality in centenarians and capture personality aspects of extraversion, neuroticism, and conscientiousness, as well as dispositional optimism which may contribute to successful aging.

Kato, Kaori; Zweig, Richard; Barzilai, Nir; Atzmon, Gil

2012-01-01

37

Intensive care unit outcomes of surgical centenarians: the "oldest old" of the new millennium.  

PubMed

This study compared the severity of illness and outcomes of surgical intensive care unit (SICU) patients age 100 years or older with those of younger SICU patients. Severity of illness was measured with the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) and the Quantified Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System (QTISS). Outcomes were evaluated with SICU length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, SICU mortality, and hospital mortality. All patients admitted to an urban, tertiary-care SICU from August 1, 1986 to July 31, 1998 (12 years) were included. A total of 24,395 consecutive patients were evaluated of whom nine (0.037%) were age 100 or more. Complete outcome data were available for 13,773 patients who were divided into five groups on the basis of age: <70, 70 to 79, 80 to 89, 90 to 99, and 100 years and above. Nine centenarians were admitted to the SICU of whom one died in the SICU and another died in the hospital after SICU discharge (22.2% overall mortality). Centenarian patients had higher SAPS and QTISS on admission than patients in all other groups, although this difference was not significant because of the small number of centenarians. SICU and hospital LOS were not significantly longer for centenarians. Mortality in the SICU and hospital was significantly different across the age groups and rose with age. However, the modest 11.1 per cent SICU mortality rate in centenarians along with their LOS statistics indicate that these patients fare relatively well in surgical intensive care. PMID:10993620

Wilson, M T; Crawford, K L; Shabot, M M

2000-09-01

38

Metabolic syndrome in the offspring of centenarians: focus on prevalence, components, and adipokines.  

PubMed

With aging, an increased prevalence of a clustering of metabolic abnormalities has been observed. These abnormalities include obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance and are collectively known as metabolic syndrome (MetS), a low-grade, systemic, inflammatory condition associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other adverse health outcomes. A number of studies have demonstrated that centenarians' offspring have a significant survival advantage and a lower risk of developing the most important age-related diseases. They therefore represent one of the best models with which to study the familiar component of human longevity. The aim of this study was to determine if the offspring of centenarians (n = 265 subjects) showed a different prevalence of MetS in comparison to the offspring of non-long-lived parents (controls, n = 101 subjects). In addition, we assessed whether centenarians' offspring showed particular features of MetS and a distinct regulation of circulating adipokines, cytokines, and metabolic mediators. Although the prevalence of MetS was quite similar both in the offspring of centenarians and the controls, MetS-affected centenarians' offspring seemed healthier, more functionally fit, and had lower resistin levels. MetS prevalence did not change in centenarians' offspring across resistin, IGF-1, and resistin/IGF-1 ratio tertiles. On the other hand, in controls, MetS prevalence strongly increased across resistin tertiles and in the third resistin/IGF-1 ratio tertile, indicating a dramatic increase in MetS prevalence when the ratio between these two factors is unbalanced, with high levels of resistin and low levels of IGF-1. PMID:23138631

Ostan, R; Bucci, L; Cevenini, E; Palmas, M G; Pini, E; Scurti, M; Vescovini, R; Caruso, C; Mari, D; Vitale, G; Franceschi, C; Monti, D

2013-10-01

39

Nonagenarians and centenarians in Switzerland, 1860-2001: a demographic analysis  

PubMed Central

Study objective: To explore the rapid rise of the extremely old population, showing the magnitude of the increase and indentifying demographic mechanisms underlying this increase. Design: Demographic analysis using census data, yearly population estimates, and mortality statistics. Setting: Switzerland 1860–2001. Main results: Indicators suggest a strong increase in the number of nonagenarians and centenarians in Switzerland as compared with other countries. The increase is mostly attributable to the decline in mortality after age 80. This decline started in the 1950s. Conclusion: Nonagenarians and centenarians constitute a new population, which became sizeable after 1950 in Switzerland. There is a need to monitor this population with appropriate demographic and epidemiological indicators.

Robine, J.; Paccaud, F.

2005-01-01

40

Understanding Perceptions of Economic Status among Centenarians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Centenarians are often concerned with outliving their accumulated resources. Yet, research consistently finds that older adults, despite low incomes, are more financially satisfied than younger adults. This "satisfaction paradox" has been attributed to psychological accommodation to poor financial circumstances and lower expectations. As a result,…

Garasky, Steven; Martin, Peter; Margrett, Jennifer A.; Cho, Jinmyoung

2012-01-01

41

Handgrip Strength, Positive Affect, and Perceived Health Are Prospectively Associated with Fewer Functional Limitations among Centenarians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the association between perceived health, fatigue, positive and negative affect, handgrip strength, objectively measured physical activity, body mass index, and self-reported functional limitations, assessed 6 months later, among 11 centenarians (age = 102 plus or minus 1). Activities of daily living, assessed 6 months prior to…

Franke, Warren D.; Margrett, Jennifer A.; Heinz, Melinda; Martin, Peter

2012-01-01

42

Primary knee and hip arthroplasty among nonagenarians and centenarians in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The number of individuals ages >100 years in the US is expected to increase considerably in the future along with the need for arthroplasties. This report focuses on the poorly studied epidemiology and mortality outcomes of arthroplasty among these individuals. Methods. We describe the epidemiology of knee and hip arthroplasties among centenarians using data from a large hospital discharge

Eswar Krishnan; James F. Fries; C. Kent Kwoh

2007-01-01

43

Seeking Better Lives by Becoming Teachers in Rural South Georgia: Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For four years the Investigator studied students in South Georgia attempting to become teachers. Three themes emerged impacting study subjects most. They are location, teacher education program, and the economy. South Georgia is one of the poorest rural regions in the United States. People are often place-bound and they endure chronic…

Moffett, David W.

2011-01-01

44

BIG FROG WILDERNESS STUDY AREA AND ADDITIONS, TENNESSEE AND GEORGIA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mineral-resource survey was made of the Big Frog Wilderness Study Area and additions, Tennessee-Georgia. Geochemical sampling found traces of gold, zinc, copper, and arsenic in rocks, stream sediments, and panned concentrates, but not in sufficient quantities to indicate the presence of deposits of these metals. The results of the survey indicate that there is little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral deposits within the study area. The only apparent resources are nonmetallic commodities including rock suitable for construction materials, and small amounts of sand and gravel; however, these commodities are found in abundance outside the study area. A potential may exist for oil and natural gas at great depths, but this cannot be evaluated by the present study.

Slack, John, F.; Gazdik, Gertrude, C.

1984-01-01

45

The Governance Divide: The Case Study for Georgia. National Center Report #05-5  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case study is part of a broader research project examining state policies and governance structures that span K-12 and postsecondary education. Georgia was the first state to have state and regional P-16 councils, and its regents' office in the University System of Georgia oversees a variety of projects that focus on connecting K-12 and…

Venezia, Andrea; Callan, Patrick M.; Kirst, Michael W.; Usdan, Michael D.

2006-01-01

46

Groundwater conditions and studies in Georgia, 2008-2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey collects groundwater data and conducts studies to monitor hydrologic conditions, better define groundwater resources, and address problems related to water supply, water use, and water quality. In Georgia, water levels were monitored continuously at 179 wells during 2008 and 181 wells during 2009. Because of missing data or short periods of record (less than 3 years) for several of these wells, a total of 161 wells are discussed in this report. These wells include 17 in the surficial aquifer system, 19 in the Brunswick aquifer and equivalent sediments, 66 in the Upper Floridan aquifer, 16 in the Lower Floridan aquifer and underlying units, 10 in the Claiborne aquifer, 1 in the Gordon aquifer, 11 in the Clayton aquifer, 12 in the Cretaceous aquifer system, 2 in Paleozoic-rock aquifers, and 7 in crystalline-rock aquifers. Data from the well network indicate that water levels generally rose during the 2008-2009 period, with water levels rising in 135 wells and declining in 26. In contrast, water levels declined over the period of record at 100 wells, increased at 56 wells, and remained relatively constant at 5 wells. In addition to continuous water-level data, periodic water-level measurements were collected and used to construct potentiometric-surface maps for the Upper Floridan aquifer in Camden, Charlton, and Ware Counties, Georgia, and adjacent counties in Florida during September 2008 and May 2009; in the Brunswick, Georgia area during July 2008 and July-August 2009; and in the City of Albany-Dougherty County, Georgia area during November 2008 and November 2009. In general, water levels in these areas were higher during 2009 than during 2008; however, the configuration of the potentiometric surfaces in each of the areas showed little change. Groundwater quality in the Floridan aquifer system is monitored in the Albany, Savannah, Brunswick, and Camden County areas of Georgia. In the Albany area, nitrate as nitrogen concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer during 2008-2009 generally increased, with concentrations in two wells above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) 10-milligrams-per-liter (mg/L) drinking-water standard. In the Savannah area, measurement of specific conductance and chloride concentration in water samples from discrete depths in three wells completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer indicate that chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer showed little change and remained below the 250 mg/L USEPA secondary drinking-water standard. Chloride concentrations in the Lower Floridan aquifer increased slightly at Tybee Island and Skidaway Island, remaining above the drinking-water standard. In the Brunswick area, maps showing the chloride concentration of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer were constructed using data collected from 28 wells during July 2008 and from 29 wells during July-August 2009, indicate that chloride concentrations remained above the USEPA secondary drinking-water standard in an approximately 2-square-mile area. During 2008-2009, chloride concentrations decreased, with a maximum decrease of 160 mg/L, in a well located in the northern part of the Brunswick area. In the Camden County area, chloride concentration during 2008-2009 was analyzed in water samples collected from eight wells, six of which were completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer and two in the Lower Floridan aquifer. In most of the wells sampled during this period, chloride concentrations did not appreciably change; however, since the closure of the Durango Paper Company in October 2002, chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer near the paper mill decreased from a high of 184 mg/L in May 2002 to 41 mg/L in September 2009. Groundwater studies conducted in Georgia during 2008-2009 include the following: * evaluation of groundwater flow, water-quality, and water-level monitoring in the Augusta-Richmond County area; * evaluation of groundwater flow, water-quality, and water

Peck, Michael F.; Leeth, David C.; Painter, Jaime A.

2011-01-01

47

Economic Base and Population Study for Evans County, Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The document analyzes past and present economic and population trends and characteristics for Evans County, Georgia. Various projections were undertaken to determine what economic and population changes could be expected in the next twenty years within th...

1973-01-01

48

Industrial Hygiene Survey of Marquette Cement Co., Rockmart, Georgia. Cement Workers Morbidity Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As part of the Cement Workers Morbidity Study, an industrial hygiene survey was conducted at the Marquette Cement Company in Rockmart, Georgia. Environmental sampling was conducted to determined respirable and total dust concentrations of various contamin...

C. Davidson W. T. Sanderson

1982-01-01

49

A Paleointensity Study on Pliocene Lava Flows from Southern Georgia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present paleomagnetic, rock-magnetic and paleointensity results obtained on 14 basaltic lava flows from two Pliocene sequences (Apnia and Korxi) from the eastern Djhavakheti Highland in southern Georgia (Caucasus). Rock magnetic experiments were carried out to find out the carriers of remanence and to determine their stability. Measurement of magnetisation versus temperature curves yielded three types of thermomagnetic curves: (i) Reversible curves with magnetite as only carrier of remenence; (ii) irreversible curves with magnetite as only carrier of remanence and (iii) irreversible curves showing a low Curie-temperature phase and magnetite. Analysis of hysteresis curves showed that samples were characterised by a mixture of single-domain and multi-domain grains. Paleomagnetic experiments allowed determining characteristic components for all flows. Normal polarities were observed in 6 flows, reversed polarities in 6 flows, and intermediate polarities in 1 flow. Another flow displayed an ambiguous result and could be considered to record either a reversed or a transitional direction. The paleomagnetic pole obtained from flows of both combined sequences (latitude ? = 80.4°N, longitude ? = 157.9°E, n=12, A95 = 11.6°, k = 14.9) showed a good agreement with the expected one. No tectonic rotations seem to have taken place in none of both studied sections. Paleointensity experiments with the Coe method were performed on 31 specimens from 10 flows. After application of specific selection criteria, 19 samples from 8 flows were observed to provide successful determinations, with mean flow values showing a wide scatter. If only flows with more than one successful paleointensity determination are taken into account, virtual dipole moments (VDM) vary between 3.5 x 1022 Am2 and 8.3 x 1022Am2. In both sites possibly showing intermediate polarity no weak transitional paleostrength values were observed.

Calvo-Rathert, M.; Bogalo, M. F.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Vashakidze, G.; Sologashvili, J.

2013-05-01

50

Making Sense of Extreme Longevity: Explorations Into the Spiritual Lives of Centenarians  

PubMed Central

As the population grows older and more individuals live into advanced age the oldest-old segment will continue to increase in size. This qualitative study analyzes data gathered using in-depth interviewing and explores the spiritual saliency for sixteen centenarians. Results illustrate the importance spirituality has for older adults over the lifecourse, particularly those in advanced age. Our findings indicate that spirituality is key factor of support, an important resource in late life, and maintains continuity over the lifecourse for the centenarians. Additionally, spirituality serves as critical component in the everyday lives of the participants and provide a framework for helping older adults make sense of having lived a very long life. The findings reported here support the need for researchers and practitioners to consider the importance of spirituality in late life, particularly for those in their last decades.

Manning, Lydia K.; Leek, Jessie A.; Radina, M. Elise

2012-01-01

51

Centenarians and supercentenarians: a black swan. Emerging social, medical and surgical problems  

PubMed Central

The Black Swan Theory was described by Nassim Nicholas Taleb in his book “The Black Swan”. This theory refers to “high-impact, hard-to-predict, and rare events beyond the realm of normal expectations”. According to Taleb’s criteria, a Black Swan Event is a surprise, it has a major impact and after the fact, the event is rationalized by hindsight, as if it had been expected. For most of human history centenarians were a rare and unpredictable phenomenon. The improvements of the social-environmental conditions, of medical care, and the quality of life caused a general improvement of the health status of the population and a consequent reduction of the overall morbidity and mortality, resulting in an overall increase of life expectancy. The study of centenarians and supercentenarians had the objective to consider this black swan and to evaluate the health, welfare, social and economic consequences of this phenomenon.

2012-01-01

52

Centenarians and supercentenarians: a black swan. Emerging social, medical and surgical problems.  

PubMed

The Black Swan Theory was described by Nassim Nicholas Taleb in his book "The Black Swan". This theory refers to "high-impact, hard-to-predict, and rare events beyond the realm of normal expectations". According to Taleb's criteria, a Black Swan Event is a surprise, it has a major impact and after the fact, the event is rationalized by hindsight, as if it had been expected. For most of human history centenarians were a rare and unpredictable phenomenon. The improvements of the social-environmental conditions, of medical care, and the quality of life caused a general improvement of the health status of the population and a consequent reduction of the overall morbidity and mortality, resulting in an overall increase of life expectancy. The study of centenarians and supercentenarians had the objective to consider this black swan and to evaluate the health, welfare, social and economic consequences of this phenomenon. PMID:23173707

Vacante, Marco; D'Agata, Velia; Motta, Massimo; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Biondi, Antonio; Basile, Francesco; Malaguarnera, Michele; Gagliano, Caterina; Drago, Filippo; Salamone, Salvatore

2012-01-01

53

Factors Associated with ADL and IADL Dependency among Korean Centenarians: Reaching the 100-Year-Old Life Transition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to examine the functional status of Korean centenarians, who have crossed the relatively rare but increasingly common life transition of living for a century. As functional health is one of the essential components of healthy aging, our primary objective is to identify the correlates of two aspects of functioning, activities of…

Kim, Hyunjee; Lee, Taeyong; Lee, Sokgoo; Kim, Keonyeop; Lee, Sungkook; Kam, Sin; Ahn, Sangnam; Cho, Jinmyoung; Ory, Marcia G.

2012-01-01

54

Centenarians and diet: what they eat in the Western part of Sicily  

PubMed Central

This paper pays attention to the modifiable lifestyle factors such as diet and nutrition that might influence life extension and successful ageing. Previous data reported that in Sicily, the biggest Mediterranean island, there are some places where there is a high frequency of male centenarians with respect to the Italian average. The present data show that in Sicani Mountain zone there are more centenarians with respect to the Italian average. In fact, in five villages of Sicani Mountains, there were 19 people with an age range of 100–107?years old from a total population of 18,328 inhabitants. So, the centenarian number was 4.32-fold higher than the national average (10.37 vs. 2.4/10,000); the female/male ratio was 1.1:1 in the study area, while the national ratio is 4.54:1. Unequivocally, their nutritional assessment showed a high adherence to the Mediterranean nutritional profile with low glycemic index food consumed. To reach successful ageing it is advisable to follow a diet with low quantity of saturated fat and high amount of fruits and vegetables rich in phytochemicals.

2012-01-01

55

Georgia fishery study: implications for dose calculations. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Fish consumption will contribute a major portion of the estimated individual and population doses from L-Reactor liquid releases and Cs-137 remobilization in Steel Creek. It is therefore important that the values for fish consumption used in dose calculations be as realistic as possible. Since publication of the L-Reactor Environmental Information Document (EID), data have become available on sport fishing in the Savannah River. These data provide SRP with a site-specific sport fish harvest and consumption values for use in dose calculations. The Georgia fishery data support the total population fish consumption and calculated dose reported in the EID. The data indicate, however, that both the EID average and maximum individual fish consumption have been underestimated, although each to a different degree. The average fish consumption value used in the EID is approximately 3% below the lower limit of the fish consumption range calculated using the Georgia data. Maximum fish consumption in the EID has been underestimated by approximately 60%, and doses to the maximum individual should also be recalculated. Future dose calculations should utilize an average adult fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr, and a maximum adult fish consumption value of 34 kg/yr. Consumption values for the teen and child age groups should be increased proportionally: (1) teen average = 8.5; maximum = 25.9 kg/yr; and (2) child average = 3.6; maximum = 11.2 kg/yr. 8 refs.

Turcotte, M.D.S.

1983-08-05

56

A Study of the Cluster Approach to Secondary Vocational Education in Georgia. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For use in planning high school vocational education programs, a study examined the success of Georgia vocational cluster programs in finding jobs, the adequacy of program training, and student attitudes towards the cluster approach. (The cluster concept involves broadly defined instructional programs around families of occupations.) The study

Scott, C. Paul; Connor, Charles C.

57

An Exploratory Study of the Philosophy and Teaching Styles of Georgia Workforce Educators and Entrepreneurship Instructors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exploratory study examines the adult educational philosophies and teaching styles of workforce educators and entrepreneurship instructors within the State of Georgia. A workforce educator is an educator teaching workforce skills; an entrepreneurship instructor is an educator who teaches entrepreneurship skills. Conti's Principles of Adult…

Floyd, Tuboise D.

2010-01-01

58

Alignment of the Georgia eighth-grade science curriculum: A collaborative action research study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this research study was to develop a collaborative action research group (ART) to design lessons for the Iowa Test of Basic Skills (ITBS) in science. As a basis for the action research group, the eighth grade science curriculum was examined in an attempt to determine the degree of alignment or non-alignment of the Georgia state curriculum, called

Charles Edward Thompson

2000-01-01

59

A Study of the Ph.D. Graduates of the University of Georgia 1966-1970.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study attempts to obtain an evaluation of the graduate training of the University of Georgia Ph.D. graduates along with a measure of how well they have done since graduating from the University. Information was obtained by means of a questionnaire to the Ph.D. graduates who received their degree from the University between 1966-70. This…

Keith, Nathan R., Jr.

60

How Accessible Are Public Libraries' Web Sites? A Study of Georgia Public Libraries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One issue that public librarians must consider when planning Web site design is accessibility for patrons with disabilities. This article reports a study of Web site accessibility of public libraries in Georgia. The focus of the report is whether public libraries use accessible guidelines and standards in making their Web sites accessible. An…

Ingle, Emma; Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

2009-01-01

61

Engineering Study for a Full Scale Demonstration of Steam Reforming Black Liquor Gasification at Georgia-Pacific's Mill in Big Island, Virginia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Georgia-Pacific Corporation performed an engineering study to determine the feasibility of installing a full-scale demonstration project of steam reforming black liquor chemical recovery at Georgia-Pacific's mill in Big Island, Virginia. The technology co...

R. DeCarrera

2002-01-01

62

Multi-Scale Drought Analysis using Thermal Remote Sensing: A Case Study in Georgia’s Altamaha River Watershed  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The unprecedented recent droughts in the Southeast US caused reservoir levels to drop dangerously low, elevated wildfire hazard risks, reduced hydropower generation and caused severe economic hardships. Most drought indices are based on recent rainfall or changes in vegetation condition. However in heterogeneous landscapes, soils and vegetation (type and cover) combine to differentially stress regions even under similar weather conditions. This is particularly true for the heterogeneous landscapes and highly variable rainfall in the Southeastern United States. This research examines the spatiotemperal evolution of watershed scale drought using a remotely sensed stress index. Using thermal-infrared imagery, a fully automated inverse model of Atmosphere-Land Exchange (ALEXI), GIS datasets and analysis tools, modeled daily surface moisture stress is examined at a 10-km resolution grid covering central to southern Georgia. Regional results are presented for the 2000-2008 period. The ALEXI evaporative stress index (ESI) is compared to existing regional drought products and validated using local hydrologic measurements in Georgia’s Altamaha River watershed at scales from 10 to 10,000 km2.

Jacobs, J. M.; Bhat, S.; Choi, M.; Mecikalski, J. R.; Anderson, M. C.

2009-12-01

63

Case study: Lockheed-Georgia Company integrated design process  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A case study of the development of an Integrated Design Process is presented. The approach taken in preparing for the development of an integrated design process includes some of the IPAD approaches such as developing a Design Process Model, cataloging Technical Program Elements (TPE's), and examining data characteristics and interfaces between contiguous TPE's. The implementation plan is based on an incremental development of capabilities over a period of time with each step directed toward, and consistent with, the final architecture of a total integrated system. Because of time schedules and different computer hardware, this system will not be the same as the final IPAD release; however, many IPAD concepts will no doubt prove applicable as the best approach. Full advantage will be taken of the IPAD development experience. A scenario that could be typical for many companies, even outside the aerospace industry, in developing an integrated design process for an IPAD-type environment is represented.

Waldrop, C. T.

1980-01-01

64

Georgia Revealed  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

OneWorld Journeys.com and Washingtonpost.com present Georgia Revealed: Searching for the Soul of the Caucasus. The site showcases a Georgia expedition that occurred April 16-29, the first of three explorations OneWorldJourneys.com have planned this year. Wilderness and nature photographers, journalists, and technicians collaborate here to bring users on their journey through the Caucasus Mountains Region of the Country of Georgia. Georgia Revealed not only features daily journal entries (text, streaming video and audio, and photographs) of the expedition, but also has sections providing background on history, travel, culture, and more. Altogether, this is a very well organized, educational site. We look forward to the next expedition to the Sonoran Desert.

65

Control Strategy Optimization for Attainment and Exposure Mitigation: Case Study for Ozone in Macon, Georgia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Implementation of more stringent 8-hour ozone standards has led the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to designate nonattainment status to 474 counties nationwide, many of which had never previously violated air quality standards. As states select emission control measures to achieve attainment in these regions, their choices pose significant implications to local economies and the health of their citizens. Considering a case study of one such nonattainment region, Macon, Georgia, we develop a menu of potential controls that could be implemented locally or in neighboring parts of the state. The control menu offers the potential to control about 20 35% of ozone precursor emissions in most Georgia regions, but marginal costs increase rapidly beyond 15 20%. We link high-order ozone sensitivities with the control menu to identify cost-optimized strategies for achieving attainment and for alternative goals such as reducing spatially averaged or population-weighted ozone concentrations. Strategies targeted toward attainment of Macon ozone would prioritize local reductions of nitrogen oxides, whereas controls in the more densely populated Atlanta region are shown to be more effective for reducing statewide potential population exposure to ozone. A U.S. EPA-sanctioned approach for demonstrating ozone attainment with photochemical models is shown to be highly dependent on the choice of a baseline period and may not foster optimal strategies for assuring attainment and protecting human health.

Cohan, Daniel S.; Tian, Di; Hu, Yongtao; Russell, Armistead G.

2006-09-01

66

Centenarians, but not octogenarians, up-regulate the expression of microRNAs  

PubMed Central

Centenarians exhibit extreme longevity and a remarkable compression of morbidity. They have a unique capacity to maintain homeostatic mechanisms. Since small non-coding RNAs (including microRNAs) are implicated in the regulation of gene expression, we hypothesised that longevity of centenarians may reflect alterations in small non-coding RNA expression. We report the first comparison of microRNAs expression profiles in mononuclear cells from centenarians, octogenarians and young individuals resident near Valencia, Spain. Principal Component Analysis of the expression of 15,644 mature microRNAs and, 2,334 snoRNAs and scaRNAs in centenarians revealed a significant overlap with profiles in young individuals but not with octogenarians and a significant up-regulation of 7 small non-coding RNAs in centenarians compared to young persons and notably 102 small non-coding RNAs when compared with octogenarians. We suggest that the small non-coding RNAs signature in centenarians may provide insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms endowing centenarians with extreme longevity.

Serna, Eva; Gambini, Juan; Borras, Consuelo; Mohammed, Kheira; Belenguer, Angel; Sanchis, Paula; Avellana, Juan A.; Rodriguez-Manas, Leocadio; Vina, Jose

2012-01-01

67

Centenarians, but not octogenarians, up-regulate the expression of microRNAs.  

PubMed

Centenarians exhibit extreme longevity and a remarkable compression of morbidity. They have a unique capacity to maintain homeostatic mechanisms. Since small non-coding RNAs (including microRNAs) are implicated in the regulation of gene expression, we hypothesised that longevity of centenarians may reflect alterations in small non-coding RNA expression. We report the first comparison of microRNAs expression profiles in mononuclear cells from centenarians, octogenarians and young individuals resident near Valencia, Spain. Principal Component Analysis of the expression of 15,644 mature microRNAs and, 2,334 snoRNAs and scaRNAs in centenarians revealed a significant overlap with profiles in young individuals but not with octogenarians and a significant up-regulation of 7 small non-coding RNAs in centenarians compared to young persons and notably 102 small non-coding RNAs when compared with octogenarians. We suggest that the small non-coding RNAs signature in centenarians may provide insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms endowing centenarians with extreme longevity. PMID:23233880

Serna, Eva; Gambini, Juan; Borras, Consuelo; Abdelaziz, Kheira M; Mohammed, Kheira; Belenguer, Angel; Sanchis, Paula; Avellana, Juan A; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Viña, Jose

2012-01-01

68

Tracer and hydrometric study of preferential flow in large undisturbed soil cores from the Georgia Piedmont, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the temporal patterns of tracer throughput in the outflow of large (30 cm diameter by 38 cm long) undisturbed cores from the Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia. Tracer breakthrough was affected by soil structure and rainfall intensity. Two rainfall intensities (20 and 40 mm hr-1) for separate Cl- and Br- amended solutions were applied to two cores (one

Janice McIntosh; Jeffrey J. McDonnell; Norman E. Peters

1999-01-01

69

Science Scores in Title I Elementary Schools in North Georgia: A Project Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB)'s emphasis of reading, language arts, and mathematics (RLA&M) and its de-emphasis of science has been a source of great concern among educators. Through an objectivist and constructionist framework, this study explored the unforeseen effects of the NCLB on public science education among Title I (TI) and non-Title I (NTI) students. The research questions focused on the effects of NCLB on Criterion Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) scores in the high-stakes subjects of reading, language arts, mathematics and the low stakes subject of science among TI and NTI 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students in a north Georgia County during the 2010/2011 school year. This study also compared instructional time TI and NTI teachers dedicated to science. A causal-comparative quantitative methodology was used to analyze Georgia's public domain CRCT scores. Three independent-samples t tests showed that TI schools exhibited significantly lower Science CRCT scores than did NTI students at all grade levels (p < 0.0001). The data also showed CRCT scores in high-stakes subjects between TI and NTI students converging but science CRCT scores between TI and NTI students diverging. The self-report survey indicated no significant differences between TI and NTI teachers' instructional science time (t (107) = 1.49, p = 0.137). A teacher development project was designed to focus on improving teacher science content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge through a formal introduction to the nature of science. With increasing global science competition, science is more relevant than ever, and communities need students with strong science foundations. Further study is recommended to analyze the factors associated with this science gap between TI and NTI students.

Frias, Ramon

70

Cigarette smoking is associated with increased diastolic blood pressure among Chinese nonagenarians/centenarians.  

PubMed

Abstract Objective. Cigarette smoking has been confirmed as a factor influencing arterial blood pressure. In the present study, we studied whether cigarette smoking habits were still associated with arterial blood pressure among Chinese nonagenarians/centenarians. Methods. The present study analyzed data from a survey conducted on all residents aged 90 years or more in the DuJiangYan district (in total 2,311,709 inhabitants) in 2005. Results. The individuals included in the statistical analysis were 216 men and 445 women. Individuals who were heavy smokers (76.62 ± 13.28 mmHg) had higher diastolic blood pressure, compared with medium and light smokers (72.33 ± 12.98 and 70.28 ± 10.31 mmHg) (F = 3.551, p = 0.030). There was a higher prevalence of diastolic hypertension (21.62% vs 5.75% and 7.14%, ?(2 =) 6.302, p = 0.043). Furthermore, there was a higher risk for diastolic hypertension in heavy smokers (OR = 3.886, 95% CI 1.241-12.161) (adjusted) compared with medium (OR = 1.475, 95% CI 0.599-3.360) and light smokers (1.00 reference). There was, however, no significant difference in systolic blood pressure or prevalence of systolic hypertension among the different smoking groups. Conclusions. In summary, we found that among Chinese nonagenarians/centenarians, heavy smoking (current or former) could increase diastolic blood pressure and prevalence of diastolic hypertension, but was not associated with changes in systolic blood pressure. PMID:24131424

Dong-Qing, Zhao; Chang-Quan, Huang; Yan-Ling, Zhang; Bi-Rong, Dong; Qing-Xiu, Liu

2014-06-01

71

Incidence rates of the primary brain tumours in Georgia - a population-based study  

PubMed Central

Background To determine the incidence rate and to describe other basic epidemiological data of primary brain tumours in a population-based study in Georgia, performed between March 2009 and March 2011. Methods Active case ascertainment was used to identify brain tumour cases by searching neuroradiology scan reports and medical records from all participating medical institutions, covering almost 100% of the neurooncology patients in the country. Results A total of 980 new cases were identified during the two-year period. For a population of almost 4.5 million, the overall annual incidence rate was 10.62 per 100,000 person-years, age-standardized to the year 2000 US population (ASR). Non-malignant tumours constituted about 65.5% of all tumours. Males accounted for 44% and females for 56% of the cases. Among classified tumours, age-standardized incidence rates by histology were highest for meningiomas (2.65/100,000), pituitary adenoma (1.23/100,000) and glioblastomas (0.51/100,000). ASR were higher among females than males for all primary brain tumours (10.35 vs. 9.48/100,000) as well as for main histology groups except for neuroepithelial, lymphomas and germ cell tumours. Conclusions The annual incidence rate of all primary brain tumours in Georgia, though comparable with some European registry data, is low in comparison with the 2004–2005 Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) database, which may reflect variations in reporting and methodology. The higher percentage of unclassified tumours (37.8%) probably also affects the discrepancies between our and CBTRUS findings. However, the most frequently reported tumour was meningioma with a significant predominance in females, which is consistent with CBTRUS data.

2014-01-01

72

Business and public health collaboration for emergency preparedness in Georgia: a case study  

PubMed Central

Background Governments may be overwhelmed by a large-scale public health emergency, such as a massive bioterrorist attack or natural disaster, requiring collaboration with businesses and other community partners to respond effectively. In Georgia, public health officials and members of the Business Executives for National Security have successfully collaborated to develop and test procedures for dispensing medications from the Strategic National Stockpile. Lessons learned from this collaboration should be useful to other public health and business leaders interested in developing similar partnerships. Methods The authors conducted a case study based on interviews with 26 government, business, and academic participants in this collaboration. Results The partnership is based on shared objectives to protect public health and assure community cohesion in the wake of a large-scale disaster, on the recognition that acting alone neither public health agencies nor businesses are likely to manage such a response successfully, and on the realization that business and community continuity are intertwined. The partnership has required participants to acknowledge and address multiple challenges, including differences in business and government cultures and operational constraints, such as concerns about the confidentiality of shared information, liability, and the limits of volunteerism. The partnership has been facilitated by a business model based on defining shared objectives, identifying mutual needs and vulnerabilities, developing carefully-defined projects, and evaluating proposed project methods through exercise testing. Through collaborative engagement in progressively more complex projects, increasing trust and understanding have enabled the partners to make significant progress in addressing these challenges. Conclusion As a result of this partnership, essential relationships have been established, substantial private resources and capabilities have been engaged in government preparedness programs, and a model for collaborative, emergency mass dispensing of pharmaceuticals has been developed, tested, and slated for expansion. The lessons learned from this collaboration in Georgia should be considered by other government and business leaders seeking to develop similar partnerships.

Buehler, James W; Whitney, Ellen A; Berkelman, Ruth L

2006-01-01

73

Extending healthy ageing: nutrient sensitive pathway and centenarian population  

PubMed Central

Ageing is a challenge for any living organism and human longevity is a complex phenotype. With increasing life expectancy, maintaining long-term health, functionality and well-being during ageing has become an essential goal. To increase our understanding of how ageing works, it may be advantageous to analyze the phenotype of centenarians, perhaps one of the best examples of successful ageing. Healthy ageing involves the interaction between genes, the environment, and lifestyle factors, particularly diet. Besides evaluating specific gene-environment interactions in relation to exceptional longevity, it is important to focus attention on modifiable lifestyle factors such as diet and nutrition to achieve extension of health span. Furthermore, a better understanding of human longevity may assist in the design of strategies to extend the duration of optimal human health. In this article we briefly discuss relevant topics on ageing and longevity with particular focus on dietary patterns of centenarians and nutrient-sensing pathways that have a pivotal role in the regulation of life span. Finally, we also discuss the potential role of Nrf2 system in the pro-ageing signaling emphasizing its phytohormetic activation.

2012-01-01

74

African-American Community Development in Theory and Practice: A Georgia Case Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines an ongoing community development project in a primarily African-American county in Georgia. Identifies characteristics of the local development effort and compares them to the elements in the black organizational autonomy model of community development. (Author/JOW)

Morris, Libby V.; Gilbreath, Gina L.

1996-01-01

75

Case Studies in Practical Career Guidance Number 6. North Gwinnett High School, Suwanee, Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Georgia's Coordinated Vocational and Academic Education (CVAE) Program is a statewide program administered with considerable local autonomy in approximately 125 high schools around the state. It serves underachieving students who are potential dropouts, p...

C. W. Dayton

1973-01-01

76

USING ADOPT-A-STREAM IN THE COASTAL PLAIN: A CASE STUDY IN SOUTHWEST GEORGIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

As major threats to Georgia's waterways continue, volunteer-based monitoring groups such as Georgia Adopt-A-Stream (GA AAS) have become a vital source of information on aquatic ecological condition. Biological monitoring is an important component of the program, with macroinvertebrates serving as the primary tool for assessing water quality. We evaluated the validity and applicability of the GA AAS macroinvertebrate index on

Tara K. Muenz; Stephen W. Golladay; George Vellidis

77

Metabolic Signatures of Extreme Longevity in Northern Italian Centenarians Reveal a Complex Remodeling of Lipids, Amino Acids, and Gut Microbiota Metabolism  

PubMed Central

The aging phenotype in humans has been thoroughly studied but a detailed metabolic profiling capable of shading light on the underpinning biological processes of longevity is still missing. Here using a combined metabonomics approach compromising holistic 1H-NMR profiling and targeted MS approaches, we report for the first time the metabolic phenotype of longevity in a well characterized human aging cohort compromising mostly female centenarians, elderly, and young individuals. With increasing age, targeted MS profiling of blood serum displayed a marked decrease in tryptophan concentration, while an unique alteration of specific glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids are seen in the longevity phenotype. We hypothesized that the overall lipidome changes specific to longevity putatively reflect centenarians' unique capacity to adapt/respond to the accumulating oxidative and chronic inflammatory conditions characteristic of their extreme aging phenotype. Our data in centenarians support promotion of cellular detoxification mechanisms through specific modulation of the arachidonic acid metabolic cascade as we underpinned increased concentration of 8,9-EpETrE, suggesting enhanced cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activity. Such effective mechanism might result in the activation of an anti-oxidative response, as displayed by decreased circulating levels of 9-HODE and 9-oxoODE, markers of lipid peroxidation and oxidative products of linoleic acid. Lastly, we also revealed that the longevity process deeply affects the structure and composition of the human gut microbiota as shown by the increased extrection of phenylacetylglutamine (PAG) and p-cresol sulfate (PCS) in urine of centenarians. Together, our novel approach in this representative Italian longevity cohort support the hypothesis that a complex remodeling of lipid, amino acid metabolism, and of gut microbiota functionality are key regulatory processes marking exceptional longevity in humans.

Collino, Sebastiano; Montoliu, Ivan; Martin, Francois-Pierre J.; Scherer, Max; Mari, Daniela; Salvioli, Stefano; Bucci, Laura; Ostan, Rita; Monti, Daniela; Biagi, Elena; Brigidi, Patrizia; Franceschi, Claudio; Rezzi, Serge

2013-01-01

78

A case-referent study: light at night and breast cancer risk in Georgia  

PubMed Central

Background Literature has identified detrimental health effects from the indiscriminate use of artificial nighttime light. We examined the co-distribution of light at night (LAN) and breast cancer (BC) incidence in Georgia, with the goal to contribute to the accumulating evidence that exposure to LAN increases risk of BC. Methods Using Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry data (2000–2007), we conducted a case-referent study among 34,053 BC cases and 14,458 lung cancer referents. Individuals with lung cancer were used as referents to control for other cancer risk factors that may be associated with elevated LAN, such as air pollution, and since this cancer type was not previously associated with LAN or circadian rhythm disruption. DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Time Series satellite images (1992–2007) were used to estimate LAN levels; low (0–20 watts per sterradian cm2), medium (21–41 watts per sterradian cm2), high (>41 watts per sterradian cm2). LAN levels were extracted for each year of exposure prior to case/referent diagnosis in ArcGIS. Results Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models controlling for individual-level year of diagnosis, race, age at diagnosis, tumor grade, stage; and population-level determinants including metropolitan statistical area (MSA) status, births per 1,000 women aged 15–50, percentage of female smokers, MSA population mobility, and percentage of population over 16 in the labor force. We found that overall BC incidence was associated with high LAN exposure (OR?=?1.12, 95% CI [1.04, 1.20]). When stratified by race, LAN exposure was associated with increased BC risk among whites (OR?=?1.13, 95% CI [1.05, 1.22]), but not among blacks (OR?=?1.02, 95% CI [0.82, 1.28]). Conclusions Our results suggest positive associations between LAN and BC incidence, especially among whites. The consistency of our findings with previous studies suggests that there could be fundamental biological links between exposure to artificial LAN and increased BC incidence, although additional research using exposure metrics at the individual level is required to confirm or refute these findings.

2013-01-01

79

Water Resources Georgia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Water Resources Georgia: From the USGS web site comes the Georgia Water Information Network (GWIN)which offers water information for thousands of surface-water, ground-water, and water-quality measurement sites in Georgia.

2008-05-28

80

Holocene environmental conditions in South Georgia - a multi-proxy study on a coastal marine record  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Holocene environmental history of the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia so far has been reconstructed from lake sediments, peat records and geomorphological observations. The data available indicate a postglacial ice retreat, which reached the coastal areas around the early Holocene. Climate reconstructions for the Holocene, on the other hand, provide a more complex picture, which may partly result from the influence of local effects. We present preliminary results of a multi-proxy study on a sediment core recovered in early 2013 from a coastal marine inlet (Little Jason Lagoon) in Cumberland West Bay. The results include elemental data (high resolution XRF-scans, total organic carbon (TOC), nitrogen, and sulphur, lipid biomarkers, and macrofossil data. The sediment core comprises a c. 11m long sequence, which contains a complete record of postglacial sedimentation in the inlet. Its base is formed by a diamicton, indicating a former glaciation of the site, which is overlain by well-stratified sediments passing over into more massive muds in the upper past. A radiocarbon age from the organic-rich sediments above the diamicton provides a first estimate of 9700 14C years BP for a minimum age of ice retreat. We use the elemental data to infer changes in clastic input (e.g., K/Ti ratios), productivity (TOC) and water salinity (Cl counts) in the course of the Holocene. While Little Jason Lagoon has a connection to the sea today (sill depth c. 1 m), a decrease in Cl counts downcore points to fresher conditions in the early part of the record. This could be an indicator for changing relative sea level and/or changes in the amounts of freshwater inflow from the catchment. Macroscopic plant remains and lipid biomarkers (n-alkanes, n-fatty acids and sterols) provide information on the terrestrial vegetation in the catchment and its changes through time as well as on the influence of marine conditions in the lagoon. We suggest that the record from Little Jason Lagoon provides an important link between terrestrial and marine archives of Holocene environmental change in South Georgia.

Berg, Sonja; Jivcov, Sandra; Groten, Sonja; Viehberg, Finn; Rethemeyer, Janet; Melles, Martin

2014-05-01

81

Discovery of Novel Sources of Vitamin B12 in Traditional Korean Foods from Nutritional Surveys of Centenarians  

PubMed Central

Human longevity can be explained by a variety of factors, among them, nutritional factor would play an important role. In our study of Korean centenarians for their longevity, the apparent nutritional imbalance in the traditional semi-vegetarian diet raised a special attention, especially on vitamin B12 status, supplied by animal foods. Interestingly, we found that the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficient Korean centenarians was not higher compared with those from Western nations with animal-oriented traditional foods. We assumed that there might be some unveiled sources for vitamin B12 in the Korean traditional foods. Screening of vitamin B12 contents has revealed that some traditional soybean-fermented foods, such as Doenjang and Chunggukjang, and seaweeds contain considerable amounts of vitamin B12. Taken together, it can be summarized that the traditional foods, especially of fermentation, might be evaluated for compensation of the nutritional imbalance in the vegetable-oriented dietary pattern by supplying vitamin B12, resulting in maintenance of health status.

Kwak, Chung Shil; Lee, Mee Sook; Oh, Se In; Park, Sang Chul

2010-01-01

82

Use of otolith microstructure to study life history of juvenile chinook salmon in the Strait of Georgia in 1995 and 1996  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pattern of otolith daily increments was used to identify hatchery-reared, wild ocean-type and wild stream-type chinook and study their life history in the Strait of Georgia. In 1995 and 1996, almost all of hatchery-reared and wild stream-type chinook entered the Strait of Georgia in May and June, while wild ocean-type chinook entered from April to August. Upon ocean entry

Z. Zhang; R. J. Beamish

2000-01-01

83

An Evaluative Assessment of Two CrossRoads Alternative Schools Program Sites in Georgia (Case Study).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes an exploratory evaluative assessment of the first year of 2 alternative public schools for 117 chronically disruptive, committed, and/or non-attending students (grades 6-12) in Georgia. The CrossRoads program is intended to provide students with the social services, individualized instruction, and/or transitions to other…

Karlin, Shary L.; Harnish, Dorothy

84

AN EASTERN INDIGO SNAKE (DRYMARCHON COUPERI) MARK RECAPTURE STUDY IN SOUTHEASTERN GEORGIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recovery of the Eastern Indigo Snake (Drymarchon couperi) that is federally listed as threatened will require population monitoring throughout the species' range. From 1998 through 2006, we used mark-recapture methods to monitor D. couperi at Fort Stewart, Georgia, USA. We captured 93 individual D. couperi while surveying for snakes at Gopher Tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) burrows, and we recaptured 40 (43%)

DIRK J. STEVENSON; KEVIN M. ENGE; LAWRENCE D. CARLILE; KAREN J. DYER; TERRY M. NORTON; NATALIE L. HYSLOP; RICHARD A. KILTIE

2009-01-01

85

Promoting universal financial protection: health insurance for the poor in Georgia - a case study  

PubMed Central

Background The present study focuses on the program “Medical Insurance for the Poor (MIP)” in Georgia. Under this program, the government purchased coverage from private insurance companies for vulnerable households identified through a means testing system, targeting up to 23% of the total population. The benefit package included outpatient and inpatient services with no co-payments, but had only limited outpatient drug benefits. This paper presents the results of the study on the impact of MIP on access to health services and financial protection of the MIP-targeted and general population. Methods With a holistic case study design, the study employed a range of quantitative and qualitative methods. The methods included document review and secondary analysis of the data obtained through the nationwide household health expenditure and utilisation surveys 2007–2010 using the difference-in-differences method. Results The study findings showed that MIP had a positive impact in terms of reduced expenditure for inpatient services and total household health care costs, and there was a higher probability of receiving free outpatient benefits among the MIP-insured. However, MIP insurance had almost no effect on health services utilisation and the households’ expenditure on outpatient drugs, including for those with MIP insurance, due to limited drug benefits in the package and a low claims ratio. In summary, the extended MIP coverage and increased financial access provided by the program, most likely due to the exclusion of outpatient drug coverage from the benefit package and possibly due to improper utilisation management by private insurance companies, were not able to reverse adverse effects of economic slow-down and escalating health expenditure. MIP has only cushioned the negative impact for the poorest by decreasing the poor/rich gradient in the rates of catastrophic health expenditure. Conclusions The recent governmental decision on major expansion of MIP coverage and inclusion of additional drug benefit will most likely significantly enhance the overall MIP impact and its potential as a viable policy instrument for achieving universal coverage. The Georgian experience presented in this paper may be useful for other low- and middle-income countries that are contemplating ways to ensure universal coverage for their populations.

2013-01-01

86

Prevalence and Risk Factors for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Republic of Georgia: A Population Based Study  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Setting: Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB, defined as resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampin) has emerged as a serious global public health problem, especially in former Soviet republics. The extent of the problem in Georgia has been incompletely defined. Objectives/Design: A population-based study was carried out between July 2005-May 2006 to determine the prevalence and risk factors for MDR-TB in Georgia. Results: Among 1314 patients with AFB smear and culture positive pulmonary TB, 799 (60.8%) were newly diagnosed patients and 515 (39.2%) were previously treated. Overall, 733 (56%) patients had resistance to at least 1 anti-TB drug and 195(15%) had MDR-TB. Patients who had previously been treated for TB were significantly more likely to have MDR-TB than patients who were newly diagnosed and never previously treated (141/515 [27.4%] vs 54/794 [6.8%], OR=5.27, 95%CI 3.75-7.41]. In multivariate analysis, previous TB treatment (AOR=5.47, 95%CI 3.87-7.74) and female gender (AOR=1.58, 95% CI 1.02-2.32) were independent risk factors for the presence of MDR-TB. Conclusions: Drug resistant TB including MDR-TB has emerged as a major public health problem in Georgia. Further TB control efforts being implemented to prevent the development of new cases of MDR-TB and to treat existing patients with MDR-TB are urgently needed.

Lomtadze, N; Aspindzelashvili, R; Janjgava, M; Mirtskhulava, V; Wright, A; Blumberg, HM; Salakaia, A

2009-01-01

87

Ground-Water Conditions and Studies in Georgia, 2006-2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey collects ground-water data and conducts studies to monitor hydrologic conditions, better define ground-water resources, and address problems related to water supply, water use, and water quality. Water levels were monitored continuously, in Georgia, in a network of 184 wells during 2006 and 182 wells during 2007. Because of missing data or the short period of record (less than 3 years) for several of these wells, a total of 166 wells from the network are discussed in this report. These wells include 18 in the surficial aquifer system, 21 in the Brunswick aquifer system and equivalent sediments, 67 in the Upper Floridan aquifer, 15 in the Lower Floridan aquifer and underlying units, 10 in the Claiborne aquifer, 1 in the Gordon aquifer, 11 in the Clayton aquifer, 12 in the Cretaceous aquifer system, 2 in Paleozoic-rock aquifers, and 9 in crystalline-rock aquifers. Data from the network indicate that water levels generally declined from 2005 levels, with water levels in 99 wells below normal, 52 wells in the normal range, 12 wells above normal, and 3 wells with insufficient data for comparison of 5-year trends and period of record statistics. In addition to continuous water-level data, periodic synoptic water-level measurements were collected and used to construct potentiometric-surface maps for the Upper Floridan aquifer in Camden, Charlton, and Ware Counties, Georgia, and adjacent counties in Florida during September 2006 and 2007, in the Brunswick area during July 2006 and August 2007, and in the City of Albany-Dougherty County area during October 2006 and October 2007. In general, the configuration of the potentiometric surfaces showed little change during 2006-2007 in each of the areas. Ground-water quality in the Upper Floridan aquifer is monitored in the Albany, Savannah, and Brunswick areas and in Camden County; and water quality in the Lower Floridan aquifer is monitored in the Savannah and Brunswick areas and in Camden County. In the Albany area, nitrate concentrations generally have increased since the end of the drought during 2002. During 2006, water from two wells had nitrate as N concentrations above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) 10-milligram-per-liter (mg/L) drinking-water standard. During 2007, only one well had concentrations above the drinking-water standard. In the Savannah area, measurement of fluid conductivity and chloride concentration in water samples from discrete depths in three wells completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer and one well in the Lower Floridan aquifer were used to assess changes in water quality in the Savannah area. At Tybee Island, chloride concentrations in samples from the Lower Floridan aquifer decreased during 2006-2007 but were still above the 250-mg/L USEPA drinking-water standard. At Skidaway Island, water in the Upper Floridan aquifer is fresh, and chloride concentrations did not appreciably change during 2006-2007. However, chloride concentrations in samples collected from the Lower Floridan aquifer during 2006-2007 showed disparate changes; whereby, chloride concentration increased in the shallowest sampled interval (900 feet) and decreased slightly in a deeper sampled interval (1,070 feet). At Fort Pulaski, water samples collected from the Upper Floridan aquifer were fresh and did not appreciably changeduring 2006-2007. In the Brunswick area, maps showing the chloride concentration of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer were constructed by using data collected from 29 wells during July 2006 and from 26 wells during August 2007. Analyses indicate that concentrations remained above the USEPA drinking-water standard in an approximate 2-square-mile area. During 2006-2007, chloride concentrations increased in only three of the wells sampled and ranged from 4.0 to 20 mg/L chloride. In the Camden County area, chloride concentration during 2006-2007 was analyzed in water samples collected from eight wells, six completed i

Peck, Michael F.; Painter, Jaime A.; Leeth, David C.

2009-01-01

88

Biodiversity Assessment for Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This biodiversity assessment for the Republic of Georgia has three interlinked objectives: (1) Summarizes the status of biodiversity and its conservation in Georgia; analyzes threats, identifies opportunities, and makes recommendations for the improved co...

2000-01-01

89

Engineering Study for a Full Scale Demonstration of Steam Reforming Black Liquor Gasification at Georgia-Pacific's Mill in Big Island, Virginia  

SciTech Connect

Georgia-Pacific Corporation performed an engineering study to determine the feasibility of installing a full-scale demonstration project of steam reforming black liquor chemical recovery at Georgia-Pacific's mill in Big Island, Virginia. The technology considered was the Pulse Enhanced Steam Reforming technology that was developed and patented by Manufacturing and Technology Conversion, International (MTCI) and is currently licensed to StoneChem, Inc., for use in North America. Pilot studies of steam reforming have been carried out on a 25-ton per day reformer at Inland Container's Ontario, California mill and on a 50-ton per day unit at Weyerhaeuser's New Bern, North Carolina mill.

Robert De Carrera; Mike Ohl

2002-03-19

90

Groundwater conditions and studies in the Augusta–Richmond County area, Georgia, 2008–2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Groundwater studies and monitoring efforts conducted during 2008–2009, as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cooperative Water Program with the City of Augusta in Richmond County, Georgia, provided data for the effective management of local water resources. During 2008–2009 the USGS completed: (1) installation of three monitoring wells and the collection of lithologic and geophysical logging data to determine the extent of hydrogeologic units, (2) collection of continuous groundwater-level data from wells near Well Fields 2 and 3, (3) collection of synoptic groundwater-level measurements and construction of potentiometric-surface maps in Richmond County to establish flow gradients and groundwater-flow directions in the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems, (4) completion of a 24-hour aquifer test to determine hydraulic characteristics of the lower Dublin aquifer, and upper and lower Midville aquifers in Well Field 2, and (5) collection of groundwater samples from selected wells in Well Field 2 for laboratory analysis of volatile organic compounds and groundwater tracers to assess groundwater quality and estimate the time of groundwater recharge. Potentiometric-surface maps of the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems for 2008–2009 indicate that the general groundwater flow direction within Richmond County is eastward toward the Savannah River, with the exception of the area around Well Field 2, where pumping interrupts the eastward flow of water toward the Savannah River and causes flow lines to bend toward the center of pumping. Results from a 24-hour aquifer test conducted in 2009 within the upper and lower Midville aquifers at Well Field 2 indicated a transmissivity and storativity for the upper and lower Midville aquifers, combined, of 4,000 feet-squared per day and 2x10-4, respectively. The upper and lower Midville aquifers and the middle lower Midville confining unit, which is 85-feet thick in this area, yielded horizontal hydraulic conductivity and specific storage values of about 45 feet per day and 2x10-6 ft-1, respectively. Results from the 24-hour aquifer test also indicate a low horizontal hydraulic conductivity for the lower Dublin aquifer of less than 1 foot per day. Of the 35 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analyzed in 23 groundwater samples during 2008–2009, only six were detected above laboratory reporting limits in samples from eight wells. No concentration in groundwater samples collected during 2008–2009 exceeded drinking water standards. Trichloroethene had the maximum VOC concentration (1.9 micrograms per liter) collected from a water sample during 2008–2009. Water-quality sampling of several wells near Well Field 2 indicate that, while in operation, the northernmost production well might have diverted groundwater, containing low levels of trichloroethene from at least two other production wells. Analysis of sulfur hexafluoride data indicate the average year of recharge ranges between 1981 and 1984 for water samples from five wells open to the upper and lower Midville aquifers, and 1991 for a water sample from one shallow well open to the lower Dublin aquifer. All of these ages suggest a short flow path and nearby source of contamination. The actual source of low levels of VOCs at Well Field 2 remains unknown. Three newly installed monitoring wells indicate that hydrogeologic units beneath Well Fields 2 and 3 are composed of sand and clay layers. Hydrogeologic units, encountered at Well Field 2, in order of increasing depth are the lower Dublin confining unit, lower Dublin aquifer, upper Midville confining unit, upper Midville aquifer, lower Midville confining unit, and lower Midville aquifer. West of Well Field 3, hydrogeologic units, in order of increasing depth are the Upper Three Runs aquifer, Gordon confining unit, Gordon aquifer, lower Dublin confining unit, lower Dublin aquifer, upper Midville confining unit, upper Midville aquifer, lower Midville confining unit, and lower Midville aquifer.

Gonthier, Gerard J.; Lawrence, Stephen J.; Peck, Michael F.; Holloway, O. Gary

2011-01-01

91

Environmental setting and factors that affect water quality in the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit covers an area of nearly 62,000 square miles in the southeastern United States, mostly in the Coastal Plain physiographic province. Land resource provinces have been designated based on generalized soil classifications. Land resource provinces in the study area include: the Coastal Flatwoods, the Southern Coastal Plain, the Central Florida Ridge, the Sand Hills, and the Southern Piedmont. The study area includes all or parts of seven hydrologic subregions: the Ogeechee-Savannah, the Altamaha- St.Marys, the Suwannee, the Ochlockonee, the St. Johns, the Peace-Tampa Bay, and the Southern Florida. The primary source of water for public supply in the study area is ground water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. In 1990, more than 90 percent of the 2,888 million gallons per day of ground water used came from this aquifer. The population of the study area was 9.3 million in 1990. The cities of Jacksonville, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Tallahassee, and Tampa, Florida, and parts of Atlanta and Savannah, Georgia, are located in the study area. Forest and agricultural areas are the most common land uses in the study area, accounting for 48 percent and 25 percent of the study area, respectively. Climatic conditions range from temperate in Atlanta, Georgia, where mean annual temperature is about 61.3 degrees Fahrenheit, to subtropical in Tampa, Florida, where mean annual temperature is about 72.4 degrees Fahrenheit. Long-term average precipitation (1961-90) ranges from 43.9 inches per year in Tampa, Florida, and 44.6 in Macon, Georgia, to 65.7 inches per year in Tallahassee, Florida. Floods in the study area result from frontal systems, hurricanes, tropical storms, or severe thunderstorms. Droughts are not common in the study area,especially in the Florida part of the study area due to extensive maritime exposure. The primary physical and cultural characteristics in the study area include physiography, soils and land resource provinces, geologic setting, ground-water systems, surface- water systems, climate, floods, droughts, population, land use, and water use. Factors affecting water quality in the study area are land use (primarily urban and agricultural land uses), water use in coastal areas, hydrogeology, ground-water/surface-water interaction, geology, and climate. Surface-water quality problems in urban areas have occurred in the Ogeechee, Canoochee, Ocmulgee, St. Marys, Alapaha, Withlacoochee (north), Santa Fe, Ochlockonee, St. Johns, and Oklawaha Rivers and include nitrogen and phosphorus loading, low dissolved oxygen, elevated bacteria, sediment, and turbidity, and increased concentrations of metals. In agricultural areas, surface-water quality problems include elevated nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations, erosion, and sedimentation and have occurred in the Ocmulgee, St. Marys, Santa Fe, Ochlockonee, St. Johns, Oklawaha, Withlacoochee (South), Hillsborough, and Alafia Rivers. Ground water-quality problems such as saltwater intrusion have occurred mostly in coastal areas and were caused by excessive withdrawals.

Berndt, M. P.; Oaksford, E. T.; Darst, M. R.; Marella, R. L.

1996-01-01

92

Is High School Graduation an Illusion? A Study to Determine the Academic and Graduation Progression between Students with Disabilities and Their Non-Disabled Peers in Georgia Public High Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined the academic and graduation progression of students with disabilities compared to their non-disabled students in Georgia public high schools. Specifically, the Georgia High School Graduation Tests (GHSGT) in math and English and graduation rates were analyzed for their progression since the enactment of the No Child Left Behind…

Thinguri, Ruth W.

2010-01-01

93

[Leptospirosis in Georgia].  

PubMed

The aim of the article was to study epidemiological patterns of leptospirosis in Georgia from 2001 to 2011. The investigation revealed that formal registration of the infection began in 1950s. Single cases were reported annually in the country with the exception of 1986, when water-borne outbreak broke out in Sukhumi with 21 detected cases. Low morbidity level of disease was reported during 2001-2005. Since 2006 significant increase of leptospirosis has been observed. The highest incidence was reported in 2011-1.81 per 100 000 population. The increase is likely to be mainly attributed to the improvements in diagnostics of the infection. Young and middle-age persons are more frequently vulnerable to leptospirosis in Georgia, 54.8% of the cases are reported among age group of 30-59. Incidence of the infection is the highest in males - 60-65% of the detected cases. In addition, leptospirosis is characterized by high case-fatality rate - 8.7 ± 3.6% (95% CI=5.7-11.7). Case fatality is especially high in persons over 60 and over reaching 24.3 ± 8.1%. Only single cases are observed in children under 14. In 21st century ethiological structure of leptospirosis has being changed somehow. By contrast, in the earlier period the disease was mainly caused by L. icterohaemorrhagiae and L.grippotyphosa, nowadays we encounter such causative agents which were not observed in 20th century - L. autunnalis, L. mankarso, L. wolffii and others. Water is mainly implicated as a risk factor in the infection transmission. Finally, to study of epidemiological characteristics of leptospirosis in Georgia, identified that, the infection is widely distributed in the country, has an increasing tendency and duration of the disease frequently is a severe. PMID:24743125

Mamuchishvili, N; Kuchuloria, T; Mchedlishvili, I; Imnadze, P

2014-03-01

94

A new automated logging gateway to study the demographics of macaroni penguins ( Eudyptes chrysolophus ) at Bird Island, South Georgia: testing the reliability of the system using radio telemetry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of automated systems to record the identity of individual penguins and their movements in and out of a colony can provide an effective means of studying penguin biology remotely. A new gateway installed at the macaroni penguin colony at Fairy Point (513 breeding pairs in 2003) on Bird Island, South Georgia in February 2003 and the implantation of

Chris J. Green; Phil N. Trathan; Mark Preston

2006-01-01

95

A Study of the Relationships between Indicators of Georgia Alternative School Effectiveness and Measures of Student Success as Perceived by Alternative School Administrators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between Georgia alternative school administrators' perceptions of student success factors and the three domains of essential elements of effective alternative schools. The success factors included: dropout rate, average grade point average (GPA), average absences per student,…

Obleton, Eddie V.

2010-01-01

96

Mobile telemonitoring for arrhythmias in outpatients in the Republic of Georgia: a brief report of a pilot study.  

PubMed

As the very first trial of mobile telemedicine in the Republic of Georgia, in June-December 2010 we investigated 35 outpatients with different types of arrhythmia (male/female ratio=16/19; 12-80 years old), among them 5 patients with concomitant epilepsy. The control group comprised 7 clinically healthy sportsmen (soccer players, all men; 15-17 years old), during a 30-min velo ergometer stress test. A three-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) loop recorder (Vitaphone BT 3300; Vitasystems GmbH, Mannheim, Germany) was used in automatic mode, using special LRMA software (MDT, Lázn? Bohdane?, Czech Republic) and a Nokia (Espoo, Finland) model 6730 Symbian phone. Automatically recorded arrhythmia events were transmitted from the loop recorder by Bluetooth(®) (Bluetooth SIG, Inc., Kirkland, WA) to a phone and then by 3G (through our partner mobile operator, MagtiCom Ltd. [Tbilsi, Georgia]) to the Vitasystems server in Germany and were available to Georgian physicians via e-mail/Internet. Arrhythmias were recorded/monitored during 7-68?h of observation. The number of automatically recorded ECG events varied between 3 and 170 per observation, or 0.4-10.7 hourly. Cases of sinus brady- and tachyarrhythmia, sinus node weakness syndrome, atrial fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardia, supraventricular premature complexes, and ventricular premature complexes were correctly recognized by automatic recognition software and recorded. In 3 patients and 1 sportsman previously unspecified (despite multiple investigations), arrhythmias were recorded: paroxysmal tachycardia (n=1), sinus node weakness syndrome (n=1), and ventricular premature complexes (n=2). In 3 cases (all women) light insomnia and nervousness were reported. In 2 patients with neurosis (both elderly men, 1 with epilepsy) we had to stop investigation prematurely because of anxiety/agitation. Mobile telecardiology represents feasible methodology to monitor arrhythmias in outpatients in Georgia, promoting earlier discharge of non-life-threatening cases, improving patients' comfort of life, and increasing their mobility with enhanced safety. Mobile telehealth might also represent significant cost-saving for insurance companies (this is an ongoing study). Finally, in remote areas mobile telemonitoring of patients will improve quality of care by timely provision of a second opinion in cases when local expertise is not sufficient. PMID:22827508

Kirtava, Zviad; Gegenava, Thea; Gegenava, Maka; Matoshvili, Zviad; Kasradze, Sofia; Kasradze, Pavle

2012-09-01

97

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Georgia Cooperative Extension program is designed to help educators teach their students about the environment, chronic diseases, physical activity, and much more. Visitors can use the Find a Resource area to look over fact sheets, field studies, lesson plans, programs, and publications. The fact sheets include well-thought out primers on energy conservation and sustainable agriculture. The lesson plans feature over 100 classroom resources designed for grades K-12 that deal with food science, public health, food safety, and drought in Georgia. The site is rounded out by the publications area, which features a number of publications ranging from backyard gardening to water conservation and soil testing.

98

Accessibility of Collegiate Education in Georgia. A Report to the Georgia Postsecondary Education Commission.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 1968 study by Warren W. Willingham of the accessibility of higher education in the United States was replicated in Georgia in 1976. Some significant methodological problems occurred in attempting complete replication. The Georgia study resulted in interpretations of accessibility for 1968 that differ from the Willingham study. It also revealed…

Murphy, Mary Kay

99

Georgia's Virtual Vault  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Peering into the world of Georgia's past has become a little easier with the Georgia Archives. Created by the Georgia Secretary of State's Office, the Virtual Vault provides access to historic Georgia manuscripts, photographs, and maps. The R.J. Taylor, Jr. Foundation provided funding for this endeavor, and visitors can look over the topical headings on the left-hand side of the page to get started. First-time visitors should look at the Lamar Q. Ball Photograph collection, which documents military and civilian life in Georgia during World War II. Visitors can also use the document management tools here to create their own collections of images for later use. The other nineteen collections here include Georgia death certificates, historic postcards, colonial will books, and district plats.

100

EMCRO - An Evaluation of Experimental Medical Care Review Organizations: Evaluation of the Georgia EMCRO; a Case Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Georgia EMCRO developed a hospital discharge abstract system which gained the participation of approximately 20 hospitals. The computerized system compared performance data collected in individual admission abstracts with explicit medical criteria (fo...

1974-01-01

101

A field and statistical modeling study to estimate irrigation water use at Benchmark Farms study sites in southwestern Georgia, 1995-96  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A benchmark irrigation monitoring network of farms located in a 32-county area in southwestern Georgia was established in 1995 to improve estimates of irrigation water use. A stratified random sample of 500 permitted irrigators was selected from a data base--maintained by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Water Resources Management Branch--to obtain 180 voluntary participants in the study area. Site-specific irrigation data were collected at each farm using running-time totalizers and noninvasive flowmeters. Data were collected and compiled for 50 farms for 1995 and 130 additional farms for the 1996 growing season--a total of 180 farms. Irrigation data collected during the 1996 growing season were compiled for 180 benchmark farms and used to develop a statistical model to estimate irrigation water use in 32 counties in southwestern Georgia. The estimates derived were developed from using a statistical approach know as ?bootstrap analysis? that allows for the estimation of precision. Five model components--whether-to-irrigate, acres irrigated, crop selected, seasonal-irrigation scheduling, and the amount of irrigation applied--compose the irrigation model and were developed to reflect patterns in the data collected at Benchmark Farms Study area sites. The model estimated that peak irrigation for all counties in the study area occurred during July with significant irrigation also occurring during May, June, and August. Irwin and Tift were the most irrigated and Schley and Houston were the least irrigated counties in the study area. High irrigation intensity primarily was located along the eastern border of the study area; whereas, low irrigation intensity was located in the southwestern quadrant where ground water was the dominant irrigation source. Crop-level estimates showed sizable variations across crops and considerable uncertainty for all crops other than peanuts and pecans. Counties having the most irrigated acres showed higher variations in annual irrigation than counties having the least irrigated acres. The Benchmark Farms Study model estimates were higher than previous irrigation estimates, with 20 percent of the bias a result of underestimating irrigation acreage in earlier studies. Model estimates showed evidence of an upward bias of about 15 percent with the likely cause being a misrepresented inches-applied model. A better understanding of the causes of bias in the model could be determined with a larger irrigation sample size and increased substantially by automating the reporting of monthly totalizer amounts.

Fanning, Julia L.; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Lewis, William C.

2001-01-01

102

Modeling the spatial differentiation in cloud-to-ground lightning: A case study in Atlanta, Georgia, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Urban cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning enhancement has been well documented for Atlanta, Georgia. This study builds on those investigations using modeling techniques. Numerous styles of analyses and regressions were conducted to establish patterns of CG lightning over the North Georgia region. CG lightning demonstrated clustering for all years of data: 1995--2008. However, the first strike of each day with lightning was randomly distributed according to a Poisson distribution, demonstrating the clustering is not due to permanent features. Attempts were unsuccessful to model CG lightning clusters as either a Matern or Thomas Poisson point process. Regressions of CG lightning with built environment covariates---FAA aviation obstacle locations and heights, population density, road length density, distance to the center of Atlanta, PM10 emissions data, distance to highways, and coal plant locations---as well as natural variables such as projected coordinate easting, northing, and NWS severe thunderstorm status were executed at resolutions of 1km, 2km, 4km, and 8km. Analyses demonstrated significantly higher flash frequency near FAA aviation obstacles. With an R2 value of 0.22, taller obstacles are struck more frequently than shorter obstacles. Regressions with road length density revealed little explanatory power (maximum R2=0.19), but demonstrated a positive correlation independent of scale. A multi-level visualization technique demonstrates the road length density correlation loses accuracy within dense urban corridors. Distance from Atlanta shows a negative correlation, but only at larger scales. Subsetting both regressions by direction reveals a significant difference on the Eastern and Western sides of Atlanta. Subsetting both regressions only to Gwinnett County, Georgia illustrates road length density has no correlation with flash frequency, and distance to Atlanta is still a scale dependent process. PM10 emissions analysis suggests that CG amplification is most likely to occur between 15 and 33microg/m 3, but the data has significant flash frequency variability even within these PM10 levels. Immediate proximity to highways proves not to be a significant variable in modeling flash frequency at any resolution. Coal plant proximity has the potential to enhance CG flash frequency, but the inherent variability in frequency precludes a strong p-value compared to randomly generated areas. However, if the data is subset by flashes/day over 500, then the areas close to coal plants have significantly more lightning (p=2.19e-5). Using a subset of the twenty-five highest frequency flash days in three equal area study areas (Haralson and Polk Counties representing rural, Cobb County representing developed and upwind of Atlanta, and Gwinnett County representing downwind and developed) Mann-Whitney tests are completed to determine if NWS severe thunderstorm storms are significantly different in CG flash frequency. In each study area, the NWS severe thunderstorms are not significantly different in flash frequency than non-severe storms. This analysis also suggests spatial tendencies of high frequency storms in each area. This multi-scale analysis also suggests that when examining CG lightning, more than one scale of examination should be used. Some processes of lightning amplification appear to occur at very local scales (500m), whereas others are coarser (up to 8km). There appears to be no goldilocks scale of analysis for CG lightning. However, if only one resolution is to be used, 2km is recommended.

Strikas, Ona

103

Antiretroviral treatment in Georgia.  

PubMed

HIV infection is the major public health, social and economic problem in Georgia. The aim of this study is to evaluate effectiveness of ARV treatment system in Georgia. Study included 1052 people living with HIV/AIDS in Georgia registered at Infectious Disease, AIDS and Clinical Immunology Research Center since 2004. To ensure universal access to ARV therapy all HIV/AIDS individuals included in the study were investigated by special algorithm, all identified patients requiring ARV therapy were offered treatment and monitored during therapy on treatment effectiveness and side effects. Detection of HIV antibodies was performed by ELISA with further confirmation by Western Blot Assay. HIV-1 RNA in plasma was measured by quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction. For determination of percentages and absolute count of T lymphocyte subpopulations single-platform immunophenotyping technique using the Becton-Dickinson FACSCalibur flow cytometer was applied. For resistance testing TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit with the OpenGene DNA Sequencing System (Siemens) was used. Treatment was offered to 595 HIV/AIDS patients. 594 patients started treatment, 1 patient refused. Out of treated 594 HIV/AIDS patients 22 patients discontinued, 111 patients died and 461 patients are currently on ARV treatment. Out of treated patients 406 adults and 21 children are receiving first-line treatment, 31 adults and 2 children are on second-line treatment and 1 adult is receiving salvage regimen. Treatment failure was defined in 55 cases. Among them immunological failure was observed in 7 cases, clinical failure in 1 case and virologic failure in 47 cases. Prevalence of drug resistance among virologic failure cases accounted for 72% and inadequate adherence for 28% cases. Majority of death cases among ARV treated patients was due to non-AIDS related or incurable conditions, while deaths due to AIDS related conditions mainly were associated to the delayed referral of patients in already advanced stage of disease. It's worth to mention that highest number of death cases was due to liver failure in HIV/HCV and/or HBV co-infected patients. PMID:19124910

Tsertsvadze, T; Bolokadze, N; Sharvadze, L; Gabunia, P; Dvali, N

2008-12-01

104

Andosols of Georgia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Andosols formed on andesite-basalts, andesite, diabase, and dolerite in the central part of the Adzhar-Trialet Ridge are studied. Their morphological features and some chemical properties are characterized. The soils are diagnosed according to the World Reference Base for Soil Resources (WRB). The soil bulk density, the contents of oxalate-soluble R2O3, adsorbed phosphates, and organic carbon are determined. It is shown that vitric and andic diagnostic features predominate in the investigated soils. According to the adopted classification, these soils are classified as mountain meadow soils. Their morphological features and chemical characteristics correspond to those of Andosols, one of the soil groups in the WRB. It can be expected that these soils are developed in some other regions of volcanic activity in Georgia.

Urushadze, T. F.; Blum, W. E. H.; Sanadze, E. V.; Kvrivishvili, T. O.

2011-09-01

105

Georgia Tech Studies of SubCritical Advanced Burner Reactors with a DT Fusion Tokamak Neutron Source for the Transmutation of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Microsoft Academic Search

The possibility that a tokamak D-T fusion neutron source, based on ITER physics and technology, could be used to drive sub-critical,\\u000a fast-spectrum nuclear reactors fueled with the transuranics (TRU) in spent nuclear fuel discharged from conventional nuclear\\u000a reactors has been investigated at Georgia Tech in a series of studies which are summarized in this paper. It is found that\\u000a sub-critical

W. M. Stacey

2009-01-01

106

The impact of invisibility on the health of migrant farmworkers in the southeastern United States: a case study from georgia.  

PubMed

Migrant farmworkers represent one of the most marginalized and underserved populations in the United States. Acculturation theory cannot be easily mapped onto the transnational experience of migrant farmworkers, who navigate multiple physical and cultural spaces yearly, and who are not recognized by the state they constitute, "the Citizen's Other" (Kerber, 2009). This paper utilizes narrative analysis of a case study to illustrate, through the relationship of the narrator to migrant farmworkers and years of participant observation by the coauthors, how isolation from family and community, as well as invisibility within institutions, affect the health and well-being of migrant farmworkers in southeastern Georgia. Invisibility of farmworkers within institutions, such as health care, the educational system, social services, domestic violence shelters, and churches contribute to illness among farmworkers. The dominant American discourse surrounding immigration policy addresses the strain immigrants put on the social systems, educational system, and the health care system. Nurses who work with farmworkers are well positioned to bring the subjective experience of farmworkers to light, especially for those engaged with socially just policies. Those who contribute to the abundant agricultural produce that feeds Americans deserve the recognition upon which social integration depends. PMID:22830007

Bail, Kari M; Foster, Jennifer; Dalmida, Safiya George; Kelly, Ursula; Howett, Maeve; Ferranti, Erin P; Wold, Judith

2012-01-01

107

The Impact of Invisibility on the Health of Migrant Farmworkers in the Southeastern United States: A Case Study from Georgia  

PubMed Central

Migrant farmworkers represent one of the most marginalized and underserved populations in the United States. Acculturation theory cannot be easily mapped onto the transnational experience of migrant farmworkers, who navigate multiple physical and cultural spaces yearly, and who are not recognized by the state they constitute, “the Citizen's Other” (Kerber, 2009). This paper utilizes narrative analysis of a case study to illustrate, through the relationship of the narrator to migrant farmworkers and years of participant observation by the coauthors, how isolation from family and community, as well as invisibility within institutions, affect the health and well-being of migrant farmworkers in southeastern Georgia. Invisibility of farmworkers within institutions, such as health care, the educational system, social services, domestic violence shelters, and churches contribute to illness among farmworkers. The dominant American discourse surrounding immigration policy addresses the strain immigrants put on the social systems, educational system, and the health care system. Nurses who work with farmworkers are well positioned to bring the subjective experience of farmworkers to light, especially for those engaged with socially just policies. Those who contribute to the abundant agricultural produce that feeds Americans deserve the recognition upon which social integration depends.

Bail, Kari M.; Foster, Jennifer; Dalmida, Safiya George; Kelly, Ursula; Howett, Maeve; Ferranti, Erin P.; Wold, Judith

2012-01-01

108

Comparing the Support-Efficacy Model among Centenarians Living in Private Homes, Assisted Living Facilities, and Nursing Homes  

PubMed Central

We investigated the influence of social relations on health outcomes in very late life by examining the support-efficacy convoy model among older adults who resided in three different residential environments (centenarians in private homes, n = 126; centenarians in assisted living facilities, n = 55; centenarians in nursing homes, n = 105). For each group, path analytic models were employed to test our hypotheses; analyses controlled for sex, mental status, education, perceived economic sufficiency, and activities of daily living. The hypothesized relationships among the models' variables were unique to each of the three groups; three different models fit the data depending upon residential environment. The direct and indirect effects of social relations assessments were positive for the mental and physical health of very old adults, suggesting that participants welcomed the support. However, residential status moderated the associations between the assessments of social relations, self-efficacy, and both outcomes, physical and mental health.

Randall, G. Kevin; Martin, Peter; MacDonald, Maurice; Margrett, Jennifer; Bishop, Alex J.; Poon, Leonard W.

2011-01-01

109

Sampling design and procedures for fixed surface-water sites in the Georgia-Florida coastal plain study unit, 1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The implementation of design guidelines for the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program has resulted in the development of new sampling procedures and the modification of existing procedures commonly used in the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. The Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain (GAFL) study unit began the intensive data collection phase of the program in October 1992. This report documents the implementation of the NAWQA guidelines by describing the sampling design and procedures for collecting surface-water samples in the GAFL study unit in 1993. This documentation is provided for agencies that use water-quality data and for future study units that will be entering the intensive phase of data collection. The sampling design is intended to account for large- and small-scale spatial variations, and temporal variations in water quality for the study area. Nine fixed sites were selected in drainage basins of different sizes and different land-use characteristics located in different land-resource provinces. Each of the nine fixed sites was sampled regularly for a combination of six constituent groups composed of physical and chemical constituents: field measurements, major ions and metals, nutrients, organic carbon, pesticides, and suspended sediments. Some sites were also sampled during high-flow conditions and storm events. Discussion of the sampling procedure is divided into three phases: sample collection, sample splitting, and sample processing. A cone splitter was used to split water samples for the analysis of the sampling constituent groups except organic carbon from approximately nine liters of stream water collected at four fixed sites that were sampled intensively. An example of the sample splitting schemes designed to provide the sample volumes required for each sample constituent group is described in detail. Information about onsite sample processing has been organized into a flowchart that describes a pathway for each of the constituent groups.

Hatzell, H. H.; Oaksford, E. T.; Asbury, C. E.

1995-01-01

110

Georgia's Forests, 1997.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This resource bulletin describes the principal findings of the seventh inventory of Georgias forest resources. Data on the extent, condition, and classification of forest land and associated timber volumes, growth, removals, and mortality are described an...

L. W. Thompson M. T. Thompson

2002-01-01

111

Georgia Environmental Protection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This homepage of the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (GEPD) presents information on how GEPD helps provide citizens of Georgia with clean air, clean water, healthy lives and productive land by assuring compliance with environmental laws and by assisting others to do their part for a better environment. There are reports of environmental quality, rules and laws for environmental assurance, plans to implement environmental laws, an outreach section on issues of concern to citizens, and forms for permits and licenses.

112

The New Georgia Encyclopedia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sponsored by the Georgia Humanities Council, in partnership with the Office of the Governor and the University of Georgia Press, the New Georgia Encyclopedia represents an ambitious effort to create an authoritative online resource for literally hundreds of topics about the state of Georgia. It would seem that they are well on their way to reaching their goal of 1600 original articles by January 2006, as visitors can select from a number of broad topics to browse through, including: folklife, education, religion, and transportation. Within each topic, there are numerous subtopics, leading the way to individual articles. One rather nice feature of the Encyclopedia is that each article is accompanied by a list of suggested reading, and in many cases, there are hyperlinks to relevant external sites. The site also provides links to basic Quick Facts about the state, galleries featuring the works of prominent museums through the state, and a Features area, which each month hones-in on any number of topics, such as Creek Leaders of Georgia and Twelve Great Works of Georgia Fiction. From Hank Aaron to the Yazoo Land Fraud, this site is a fine fountain of information about the people, places, and traditions of the Peach State.

113

Hydrologic conditions, stream-water quality, and selected groundwater studies conducted in the Lawrenceville area, Georgia, 2003-2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrologic studies conducted during 2003-2008 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Cooperative Water Program with the City of Lawrenceville, Georgia, provide important data for the management of water resources. The Cooperative Water Program includes (1) hydrologic monitoring (precipitation, streamflow, and groundwater levels) to quantify baseline conditions in anticipation of expanded groundwater development, (2) surface-water-quality monitoring to provide an understanding of how stream quality is affected by natural (such as precipitation) and anthropogenic factors (such as impervious area), and (3) geologic studies to better understand groundwater flow and hydrologic processes in a crystalline rock setting. The hydrologic monitoring network includes each of the two watersheds projected for groundwater development?the Redland-Pew Creek and upper Alcovy River watersheds?and the upper Apalachee River watershed, which serves as a background or control watershed because of its similar hydrologic and geologic characteristics to the other two watersheds. In each watershed, precipitation was generally greater during 2003-2005 than during 2006-2008, and correspondingly streamflow and groundwater levels decreased. In the upper Alcovy River and Redland-Pew Creek watersheds, groundwater level declines during 2003-2008 were mostly between 2 and 7 feet, with maximum observed declines of as much as 28.5 feet in the upper Alcovy River watershed, and 49.1 feet in the Redland-Pew Creek watershed. Synoptic base-flow measurements were used to locate and quantify gains or losses to streamflow resulting from groundwater interaction (groundwater seepage). In September 2006, seepage gains were measured at five of nine reaches evaluated in the upper Alcovy River watershed, with losses in the other four. The four losing reaches were near the confluence of the Alcovy River and Cedar Creek where the stream gradient is low and bedrock is at or near the land surface. In the Redland-Pew Creek watershed, groundwater seepage gains were observed at each of the 10 reaches measured during September 2008. Continuous specific conductance, temperature, and turbidity data were collected at gage sites located on Pew and Shoal Creeks, which drain about 32 percent of the city area, and at a background site on the Apalachee River located outside the city boundary. Continuous surface-water monitoring data indicate that reduced precipitation during 2006-2008 resulted in lower turbidity and higher stream temperature and specific conductance than in 2003-2005. In comparison to the other two stream sites, water at the Apalachee River site had the lowest mean and median values for specific conductance, and the greatest mean and median values for turbidity during October 2005-December 2008. In addition to continuous water-quality monitoring, samples were collected periodically to determine fecal-coliform bacteria concentrations. None of the individual samples at the three sites exceeded the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (GaEPD) limit of 4,000 most probable number of colonies per 100 milliliters (MPN col/100 mL) for November through April. In the Redland-Pew Creek and Shoal Creek watersheds, the GaEPD 30-day geometric mean standard of 200 MPN col/100 mL for May-October was exceeded twice during two sampling periods in May-October 2007 and twice during two sampling periods in May-October 2008. Groundwater studies conducted during 2003-2007 include the collection of borehole geophysical logs from four test wells drilled in the upper Alcovy River watershed to provide insight into subsurface geologic characteristics. A flowmeter survey was conducted in a well south of Rhodes Jordan Park to help assess the interconnection of the well with surface water and the effectiveness of a liner-packer assembly installed to eliminate that interconnection. At that same well, hydraulic packer tests were conducted in the open-hole section of the well, and water samp

Clarke, John S.; Williams, Lester J.

2010-01-01

114

Are Men Aging as Oaks and Women as Reeds? A Behavioral Hypothesis to Explain the Gender Paradox of French Centenarians  

PubMed Central

Since the 1990s, several studies involving French centenarians have shown a gender paradox in old age. Even if women are more numerous in old age and live longer than men, men are in better physical and cognitive health, are higher functioning, and have superior vision. If better health should lead to a longer life, why are men not living longer than women? This paper proposes a hypothesis based on the differences in the generational habitus between men and women who were born at the beginning of the 20th century. The concept of generational habitus combines the generation theory of Mannheim with the habitus concept of Bourdieu based on the observation that there exists a way of being, thinking, and doing for each generation. We hypothesized that this habitus still influences many gender-linked behaviours in old age. Men, as “oaks,” seem able to delay the afflictions of old age until a breaking point, while women, as “reeds,” seem able to survive despite an accumulation of health deficits.

Balard, Frederic; Beluche, Isabelle; Romieu, Isabelle; Willcox, Donald Craig; Robine, Jean-Marie

2011-01-01

115

Transmission from centenarians to their offspring of mtDNA heteroplasmy revealed by ultra-deep sequencing  

PubMed Central

The role that mtDNA heteroplasmy plays in healthy aging, familial longevity and the heritability patterns of low levels heteroplasmy in the elderly are largely unknown. We analyzed the low levels of mtDNA heteroplasmy in blood in a cohort of centenarians, their offspring and a group of offspring of non long-lived parents, characterized by a less favorable health phenotype. The aims of this study are to: (i) investigate the transmission of low level heteroplasmies in the elderly; (ii) explore the association of heteroplasmy with age and longevity and (iii) investigate heteroplasmy patterns in these three groups. We sequenced a 853 bp mtDNA fragment in 88 individuals to an average coverage of 49334-fold, using quality control filtering and triplicate PCR analysis to reduce any methodological bias, and we detected 119 heteroplasmic positions with a minor allele frequency ? 0.2%. The results indicate that low-level heteroplasmies are transmitted and maintained within families until extreme age. We did not find any heteroplasmic variant associated with longevity and healthy aging but we identified an unique heteroplasmy profile for each family, based on total level and positions. This familial profile suggests that heteroplasmy may contribute to familial longevity.

Giuliani, Cristina; Barbieri, Chiara; Li, Mingkun; Bucci, Laura; Monti, Daniela; Passarino, Giuseppe; Luiselli, Donata; Franceschi, Claudio

2014-01-01

116

A paleomagnetic and paleointensity study on Pleistocene and Pliocene basaltic flows from the Djavakheti Highland (Southern Georgia, Caucasus)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New paleomagnetic, rock-magnetic and paleointensity results obtained on samples from 23 basaltic lava flows belonging to four different flow sequences (Mashavera, Kvemo Orozmani, Zemo Karabulaki and Diliska) of Pleistocene and Pliocene age from the eastern Djavakheti Highland, in southern Georgia, are presented. Radiometric dating of these sequences yields ages between 1.8 and 2.18 Ma for Mashavera, 2.07 and 2.58 Ma for Zemo-Karabulakhi and 2.12 and 3.27 for Diliska. No radiometric ages are available for the Kvemo Orozmani sequence, which is considered to be coeval to the Mashavera sequence. Rock-magnetic experiments including measurement of thermomagnetic, hysteresis and IRM-acquisition curves suggest low-Ti titanomagnetite as main carrier of remanence, although a lower Curie-temperature component was also observed in several cases. Reversible and non-reversible curves were recorded in thermomagnetic experiments. Paleomagnetic analysis generally indicated the presence of a single component (mainly in the Mashavera sequence), but also two more or less superimposed components in some other cases. In 21 sites a characteristic component could be determined and all except one were characterised by normal-polarity directions. Flows from the Mashavera sequence had a rather steep inclination (73.1°). Nevertheless, a mean paleomagnetic direction of all four sequences is obtained ( D = 8.5°, I = 60.8°, N = 4, ?95 = 11.7°, k = 62.7) which agrees with the Plio-Quaternary directions obtained in previous studies in Georgia. The paleomagnetic pole obtained (latitude ? = 82.1°, longitude ? = 118.2°, A95 = 8.0°, k = 240.7) agrees with the pole values of both the 0 Ma and the 5 Ma windows of the synthetic Eurasian polar wander path from Besse and Courtillot (2002). In order to analyse the behaviour of secular variation, the scatter of paleosecular variation of virtual geomagnetic poles of both the Mashavera flow and all 18 studied flows of Pleistocene age was calculated. It could be observed that both data-sets seem to fit well the expected scatter at latitude 41°N. Paleointensity experiments were carried out with the Coe modification of the Thellier method. Twenty-five out of 84 samples (30%) provided reliable paleointensity results. These successful results were mainly obtained in the Mashavera sequence. Most flows yielded paleointensity results in the 30-45 ?T range, in accordance with expected Pliocene to present day intensities. Two flows, however, located near the top of the Mashavera sequence yield high paleointensity values around 60 ?T. Anomalous paleointensity results in the upper-lying Mashavera flows together with the steep inclinations observed in that sequence, could perhaps signal the near onset of the Olduvai-Matuyama reversal.

Calvo-Rathert, Manuel; Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Bógalo, María-Felicidad; Vegas-Tubía, Néstor; Carrancho, Ángel; Sologashvili, Jemal

2011-08-01

117

Familial mediterranean Fever in georgia.  

PubMed

Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder caused by mutations in the MEFV gene. Carrier rates are known to be particularly high among Sephardic Jews, Turks, Armenians and Arab populations. Our literature survey regarding FMF and MEFV mutations in Georgia revealed a lack of existing studies. We applied multiplex PCR and reverse-hybridization teststrips (FMF StripAssay) to simultaneously analyze twelve common MEFV mutations in DNA samples from dried blood on filter cards, which had been obtained from 202 unselected newborns at various hospitals in Tbilisi, Georgia. We found 30 samples to be heterozygous and one to be compound heterozygous or carrier of a complex allele (two mutations in cis). The carrier rate of MEFV mutations (15.3%) was remarkable. The most frequently observed variants were E148Q (15x), M680I G/C (5x) and M694V (4x). Five other MEFV mutations were found at lower prevalence (V726A, A744S, R761H: 2x each; P369S, F479L: 1x each). Based on these new findings, the awareness for FMF and the availability of appropriate testing should be further promoted in Georgia. PMID:24940862

Pagava, K; Rauscher, B; Korinteli, Ia; Shonvadze, D; Kriegshauser, G; Oberkanins, Ch

2014-05-01

118

Promoting health in Georgia.  

PubMed

This paper discusses the public health situation in Georgia. In 1991 Georgia became an independent republic following the collapse of the Soviet Union. The armed conflict with Russia in 2008 and political unrest in recent years has presented the Georgian population and politicians with a demanding situation. As part of the WHO European Region, the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) including Georgia is on the unfortunate side of a European health divide, with low male life expectancy and high under-five mortality. There is also a high degree of economic inequality in the population. We first look at the main players and the current strategies in public health work. Next we discuss this on the background of health promotion principles and recent international developments in knowledge and policy recommendations in the field of health promotion. Finally we point to some of the major public health challenges that Georgia faces. We conclude that the Georgian focus on reducing risk behaviours and improving access to quality health care is worthy of praise, but that this is not sufficient to solve the current public health challenges. Strategies for working across sectors with social determinants of health should be built into Georgian health thinking and policies. A health promotion work force should be developed. International developments such as the Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH) report, the 'Health 2020' framework and the HP Core Competencies project all provide useful input to future development of healthy public policies in Georgia. PMID:24458003

Raminashvili, David; Bakhturidze, George; Zarnadze, Irine; Peikrishvili, Nana; Bull, Torill

2014-03-01

119

TESTING FASST A ONE-DIMENSIONAL HYDROLOGICAL MODEL FOR SOIL MOISTURE STUDIES AT THE LITTLE RIVER WATERSHED, TIFTON GEORGIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The FASST (Fast All Season Strength model, US Army Corps of Engineer), one-dimensional hydrologic model was used to evaluate soil moisture across the USDA-ARS-SEWRL Little River Watershed in south Georgia US. The ultimate goal of this research is to assess the spatial variation of soil moisture across a complex landscape. Model simulations were compared with point readings of soil moisture

Mario A Giraldo; Andrew Grundstein; David Bosch

120

Georgia Tech Research Institute  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) has been a government and industry partner since 1934 and has branches throughout the United States and Ireland. Visitors will definitely want to click on the "Industry Solutions" on the homepage to get an idea of the industries GTRI works in, such as "Health and Human Systems", "Energy/Environment", and "Information and Communications Technologies". Visitors can click on any of the links to browse case studies in that industry. In "Health and Human Systems", there is a case study of a breath test to detect breast cancer, products made easier to use by people with arthritis and a "purpose-built" law enforcement vehicle. Users of the site interested in reading materials from their historical publication archive, such as "The Research Engineer", published between 1956 and 1961, should click on "Newsroom", to get to the link. There is also a video, called "The Solution Institution" made for GTRI's 75th anniversary, which provides a history of the institution that is "filled with intrigue, innovation, and impact."

121

Block scheduling and science education: A case study of structure and culture in a rural Georgia high school  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to contribute to the documentation and analysis of the effects of block scheduling on science education. The foundation of this case study is the ongoing innovation program called the Block-8 Schedule at a rural Georgia High School. The research extended from 1994 through 1998, allowing the collection of data during the planning and early implementation of the program. The effects of the program that are related to science education are interpreted in the context of the entire school restructuring effort. The program was developed by the faculty of the school to meet the identified needs for scheduling and innovative instruction. The result was an alternating day block schedule that was supported by inservice prior to and during the implementation. The program was also supported by efforts of the leadership team, the school's version of shared school governance. The result was a program that was well received by the staff, students, and community. After four years, satisfaction was still evident. Gains in student achievement were moderate. Findings indicate that the success realized by the program were related to the structural and cultural support provided by the school. Changes in science instruction particularly benefited from the extended ninety minute classes. The changes that occurred in the science classrooms were consistent with the goals of the national science standards. Although the gains in achievement were small to moderate, the methods used in teaching were compatible with the teaching standards of National Science Education Standards. The need for finding a fit between the goals of a reform effort and the culture and structure of the school has been overlooked in much of the science reform movement. This local reform, The Block-8 Schedule, which took into account the existing culture and structure of the school, provides a model on which other efforts at implementing science education reform could be based. This reform effort involved the entire school in restructuring time and instruction. The process was supported by the existing school culture. As the new structure became established it then promoted cultural changes in the ways that teachers taught.

Jordan, Miriam Mcelheney

122

INSTREAM FLOW GUIDELINES AND PROTECTION OF GEORGIA'S AQUATIC HABITATS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources protects environmental and economic conditions of river flows with instream flow requirements for surface water withdrawal permits. Instream flow guidelines are to be finalized by 2006. Studies of each major watershed are required for instream flow guidelines to be effective and protective. Declines in low flows in Georgia's rivers indicate that these studies will

Mary M. Davis

123

Ground-Water Conditions and Studies in Georgia, 2004-2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collects ground-water data and conducts studies to monitor hydrologic conditions, better define ground-water resources, and address problems related to water supply, water use, and water quality. During 2004-2005, ground-water levels were monitored continuously in a network of 183 wells completed in major aquifers throughout the State. Because of missing data or the short period of record for a number of these wells (less than 3 years), a total of 171 wells from the network are discussed in this report. These wells include 19 in the surficial aquifer system, 20 in the Brunswick aquifer system and equivalent sediments, 69 in the Upper Floridan aquifer, 17 in the Lower Floridan aquifer and underlying units, 10 in the Claiborne aquifer, 1 in the Gordon aquifer, 10 in the Clayton aquifer, 12 in the Cretaceous aquifer system, 2 in Paleozoic-rock aquifers, and 11 in crystalline-rock aquifers. Data from the network indicate that generally water levels rose after the end of a drought (fall 2002), with water levels in 152 of the wells in the normal or above-normal range by 2005. An exception to this pattern of water-level recovery is in the Cretaceous aquifer system where water levels in 7 of the 12 wells monitored were below normal during 2005. In addition to continuous water-level data, periodic synoptic water-level measurements were collected and used to construct potentiometric-surface maps for the Upper Floridan aquifer in the Camden County-Charlton County area during September 2004 and May 2005, in the Brunswick area during June 2004 and June 2005, and in the City of Albany-Dougherty County area during October 2004 and during October 2005. In general, the configuration of the potentiometric surfaces showed little change during 2004-2005 in each of the areas. Ground-water quality in the Upper Floridan aquifer is monitored in the Albany, Savannah, and Brunswick areas, and in Camden County; and the Lower Floridan aquifer, monitored in the Savannah and Brunswick areas and in Camden County. In the Albany area, nitrate concentrations generally increased since the end of the drought during 2002. Concentrations increased in water collected from 13 of the 16 wells sampled during 2004-2005 and by November 2005, water from 2 wells had nitrate as N concentrations that were above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) 10-milligram-per-liter (mg/L) drinking-water standard. In the Savannah area, measurement of fluid conductivity and chloride concentration in water samples from discrete depths in three wells completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer and one well in the Lower Floridan aquifer were used to assess changes in water quality in the Savannah area. At Tybee Island, chloride concentrations in samples from the Lower Floridan aquifer increased during 2004-2005 and were above the 250-mg/L USEPA drinking-water standard. At Skidaway Island, water in the Upper Floridan aquifer is fresh, and chloride concentrations did not appreciably change during 2004-2005. However, chloride concentrations in samples collected from the Lower Floridan aquifer during 2004-2005 showed disparate changes; whereby, chloride concentration increased in the deepest sampled interval (1,070 feet) and decreased in a shallower sampled interval (900 feet). At Fort Pulaski, water samples collected from the Upper Floridan aquifer are fresh and did not appreciably change during 2004-2005. In the Brunswick area, maps showing the chloride concentration of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer were constructed using data collected from 41 wells during June 2004 and from 39 wells during June 2005. Analyses indicate that concentrations remained above the USEPA drinking-water standard in an approximate 2-square-mile area. During 2004-2005, chloride concentrations increased in samples from 18 wells and decreased in samples from 11 wells. In the Camden County area, chloride concentrations during 2004-2005 were analyzed in water

Leeth, David C.; Peck, Michael F.; Painter, Jaime A.

2007-01-01

124

USGS Water Resources of Georgia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of Georgia contains a map of current streamflow conditions; Georgia HydroWatch, a portal to hydrologic data and related information for Georgia; a listing of projects being conducted by the USGS in Georgia; and publications such as abstracts and full reports for USGS projects in Georgia. The water data includes flood-frequency information, low-flow frequency statistics, a drought watch, information on the Chattahoochee BacteriALERT program, and a Flint River Flood tracking chart.

125

Analysis of nutrients in the surface waters of the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit, 1970-91  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the early phase of the Georgia-Florida National Water Quality Assessment study, existing information on nutrients was compiled and analyzed in order to evaluate the nutrient concentrations within the 61,545 square mile study unit. Evaluation of the nutrient concentrations collected at surface- water sites between October 1, 1970, and September 30,1991, utilized the environmental characteristics of land resource provinces, land use, and nonpoint and point-source discharges within the study unit. Long-term trends were investigated to determine the temporal distribution of nutrient concentrations. In order to determine a level of concern for nutrient concentrations, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidelines were used-(1) for nitrate concentrations, the maximum contaminant level in public-drinking water supplies (10 mg/L); (2) for ammonia concentrations, the chronic exposure of aquatic organisms to un-ionized ammonia (2.1 mg/L); (3) for total-phosphorus concentrations, the recommended concentration in flowing water to discourage excessive growth of aquatic plants (0.1 mg/L); and (4) for kjeldahl concentrations, however, no guidelines were available. For sites within the 10 major river basins, median nutrient concentrations were generally below USEPA guidelines, except for total-phosphorus concentrations where 45 percent of the medians exceeded the guideline. The only median ammonia concentration that exceeded the guideline occurred at the Swift Creek site (3.4 mg/L), in the Suwannee River basin, perhaps due to wastewater discharges. For all sites within the Withlacoochee, Aucilla, and St. Marys River basins, median concentrations of nitrate, ammonia, and total phosphorus were below the USEPA guidelines. Nutrient data at each monitoring site within each major basin were aggregated for comparisons of median nutrient concentrations among major basins. The Ochlockonee and Hillsborough River basins had the highest median nutrient concentrations, the Aucilla River basin had the lowest. Median concentrations of nitrate and ammonia among all major basins were below USEPA guidelines. The median total-phosphorus concentrations for the following river basins exceeded the USEPA guideline-Hillsborough, St. Johns, Suwannee, Ochlockonee, Satilla, Altamaha, and Ogeechee. Although nutrient concentrations within the study unit were low, long-term increasing trends were found in all four nutrients. All 18 study-unit wide nitrate trends had increasing slopes ranging from less than 0.01 to 0.07 (mg/L)/yr. The range in slope for the 13 ammonia trends was -0.03 to 0.01 (mg/L)/yr with 6 increasing trends in the northern part of the study unit. Of the 17 total-phosphorus trends found in the study unit, 10 were found at sites where the median concentration exceeded the USEPA guideline. At these 10 sites, 4 sites had increasing trends with slopes ranging from less than 0.01 to 0.07 (mg/L)/yr, 5 sites had decreasing trends with slopes ranging from -0.01 to -0.24 (mg/L)/yr, and one site showed a seasonal concentration trend. Median nutrient concentrations were significantly different among the four land resource provinces-Southern Piedmont, Southern Coastal Plain, Coastal Flatwoods, and Central Florida Ridge. As a result, nutrient concentrations among basins with similar nutrient inputs but located within different land resource provinces are not expected to be the same due to differences in the combination of factors such as soil permeability, runoff rates, and stream channel slopes. This concept is an important consideration in designing a surface-water quality network within the study area. For the most part, the Coastal Flatwoods showed the lowest median nutrient concentrations and the Southern Coastal Plain had the highest median nutrient concentrations. Lower median nitrate concentrations in surface-water basins were associated with the forest/wetland land-use category and higher median concentrations of nitrate and ammonia with

Ham, L. K.; Hatzell, H. H.

1996-01-01

126

Integrating Engineering Design into Technology Education: Georgia's Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This descriptive research study reported on Georgia's secondary level (grades 6-12) technology education programs capability to incorporate engineering concepts and/or engineering design into their curriculum. Participants were middle school and high school teachers in the state of Georgia who currently teach technology education. Participants…

Denson, Cameron D.; Kelley, Todd R.; Wicklein, Robert C.

2009-01-01

127

Physical Environment and Student Safety in South Georgia Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The preservation of school safety should be a primary commitment of all educators. This paper presents findings of a study that examined school facility safety in 27 Georgia schools. Data were gathered from a survey of 9 elementary, 11 middle, and 7 high schools in south Georgia. The surveys elicited information related to both school-site safety…

Chan, Tak Cheung; Morgan, P. Lena

128

National Observatory Report on Vocational Education and Training in Georgia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The state of vocational education and training (VET) in the Georgia Republic in 1999-2000 was examined. The study focused on the following topics: (1) the socioeconomic context of VET; (2) Georgia's labor market (the current labor market situation, employment, unemployment); (3) management of VET (legislation and policy, responsible bodies,…

Glonti, Kote; Ejibadze, A.; Nanobashvili, K.; Mickaia, L.; Natsvlishvili, E.; Imedashvili, M.; Mikeladze, A.

129

Historical Earthquakes and Active Structure for Georgia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-term seismic history is an important foundation for reliable assessment of seismic hazard and risk. Therefore, completeness of earthquake catalogues in the longest historical part is very important. Survived historical sources, as well as special researches from the institutes, museums, libraries and archives in Georgia, the Caucasus and the Middle East indicate to high level of seismicity which entailed numerous human casualties and destruction on the territory of Georgia during the historical period. The study and detailed analysis of these original documents and researches have allowed us to create a new catalogue of historical earthquakes of Georgia from 1250 BC to 1900 AD. The method of the study is based on a multidisciplinary approach, i.e. on the joint use of methods of history and paleoseismology, archeoseismology, seismotectonics, geomorphology, etc. We present here a new parametric catalogue of 44 historic earthquakes of Georgia and a full "descriptor" of all the phenomena described in it. Constructed on its basis, the summarized map of the distribution of maximum damage in the historical period (before 1900) on the territory of Georgia clearly shows the main features of the seismic field during this period. In particular, in the axial part and the southern slope of the Greater Caucasus there is a seismic gap, which was filled in 1991 by the strongest earthquake and its aftershocks in Racha. In addition, it is also obvious that very high seismic activity in the central and eastern parts of the Javakheti highland is not described in historical materials and this fact requires further searches of various kinds of sources that contain data about historical earthquakes. We hope that this catalogue will enable to create a new joint (instrumental and historical) parametric earthquake catalogue of Georgia and will serve to assess the real seismic hazard and risk in the country.

Tsereteli, Nino; Varazanashivli, Otar

2014-05-01

130

Student Enrollment Forecasting in Georgia: Lessons Learned.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study of school district enrollment forecasting in Georgia finds, for example, differences in forecasting accuracy between large and small school districts, the widespread use of the Cohort Survival Technique, a lag in small school districts' use of sophisticated, computer-based enrollment forecasting models. (Contains 34 references.) (PKP)

Chan, Tak Cheung; Pool, Harbison; Davidson, Ronald

2002-01-01

131

MODELING MERCURY FATE IN SEVEN GEORGIA WATERSHEDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Field and modeling studies were conducted in support of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs)for mercury in six south Georgia rivers and the Savannah River. Mercury is introduced to these rivers primarily by atmospheric deposition, with minor point source loadings. To produce mercu...

132

Health Clinic Environments in Georgia Elementary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Schools seem to be the logical place to serve the health needs of students, since children spend a majority of their time there. Design standards were not available for health clinics in Georgia elementary schools; therefore, this study examined key characteristics of an elementary school clinic in order to determine the importance of each design…

Simpson, Susan Rogers

2005-01-01

133

Changes in landscape patterns in Georgia, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this study were to determine how landscape patterns in Georgia, USA have changed through time and whether the spatial patterns varied by physiographic region. Historical aerial photography was used to analyze spatial patterns of land use from the 1930's to the 1980's. Land use patterns were quantified by: (1) mean number and size of patches; (2) fractal

Monica Goigel Turner; C. Lynn Ruscher

1988-01-01

134

Community Types and Mortality in Georgia Counties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using an "ecological regional analysis" methodology for defining types of communities and their associated mortality rates, this study of Georgia's 159 counties finds that the suburban and town centered counties have low mortality while the city-centered type predicts low mortality for the whites. The military-centered counties do not predict. The…

Young, Frank W.

2012-01-01

135

Trauma in nonagenarians and centenarians: review of 137 consecutive patients.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the hospital course and outcomes of elderly trauma patients. We accomplished a retrospective review of all consecutive trauma patients admitted to a level II trauma center from January 2000 to April 2002. Gender, Injury Severity Score (ISS), length of stay (LOS), operative procedure, morbidity, and mortality of patients > or = 90 years of age were compared with younger patients. Of 2645 trauma admissions, 137 patients (5%) were > or = 90 years (range, 90 to 108 years; mean, 93.1 years); 5 patients were > or = 100 years. One hundred eleven (81%) patients were female; 26 (19%) male. Average ISS for patients > or = 90 was 8.75 and was 7.78 for younger patients. One hundred sixteen elderly patients (85%) had ISS < 15. Falls were the most common mechanism of injury (93%), usually ground-level falls (64%). Two hundred ninety-two injuries included 133 fractures and 102 soft tissue injuries. Thirty-four elderly patients (25%) and 733 younger patients (29%) required surgery. Complications developed in 8 per cent of older and 6 per cent of younger patients. Hospital LOS averaged 4.36 days for older and 3.51 days for younger patients. Six older (4.4%) and 63 younger (2.5%) patients died. ISS scores and LOS were slightly higher in elderly patients, but morbidity and mortality were comparable in both groups. PMID:15481296

Sieling, Beth A; Beem, Karen; Hoffman, Mary T; Yuschak, James V; Morris, Jon B

2004-09-01

136

Landslide Hazard in Georgia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last decades of the XX century, protect the population from geological hazards, to maintain land and safe operation of the engineering facilities has become the most important social - economic, demographic, political and environmental problems for the whole world. Georgia, with its scales of origination of the natural-catastrophic processes (landslide, mudflow, rockfall, erosion and etc.), their re-occurrence and with the negative results inflicted by these processes to the population, agricultural lands and engineering objects, is one of the most complex mountainous region. The extremely sensitive conditions were conditioned by: 1. Activation of highly intense earthquakes; 2. Activation of the negative meteorological events provoking the disaster processes on the background of global climatic changes and their abnormally frequent occurrence (mostly increased atmospheric precipitations, temperature and humidity); 3. Large-scale Human impact on the environment. Following the problem urgency, a number of departmental and research institutions have made their operations more intense in the given direction within the limits of their competence. First of all, the activity of the Department of Geology of Georgia (which is at present included in the National Environmental Agency of the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Protection), which mapped, identified and cataloged the hazardous processes on the territory of the country and identified the spatial limits and developmental regularities of these processes for tens of years. The increased risk of Geological catastrophes in Georgia first of all is caused by insufficient information between society and responsible persons toward this event. The existed situation needs the base assessment of natural disasters level, the identification of events, to determine their caused reasons, to develop special maps in GIS system, and continuous functioning of geo monitoring researches for develop safety early warning system.

Gaprindashvili, George; Tsereteli, Emil; Gaprindashvili, Merab

2014-05-01

137

H2003: Georgia Water Law  

Microsoft Academic Search

Georgia water legislation issues was the focus of the 15th Annual Red Clay Conference. Key stakeholders in the tri-state water war debated the various options under negotiation. In addition, the merits of the differing Georgia water allocation bills, from the state's House and Senate, were discussed. Other issues discussed included stormwater and wastewater management, wetland conservation, coastal preservation and watershed

Sally Bethea; Bob Kerr; Jim Scarborough; Jen Giegerich; Jim Stokes

2003-01-01

138

Innovations @ Georgia Tech  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Some of the most interesting, high-tech research and development efforts are brought to light at this site of the Georgia Institute of Technology. The February 2003 featured story discusses work in "computer-based, low vision technologies that can automatically adapt, or morph themselves, to suit the visual capabilities of individual users." Targeted at people with macular degeneration, these devices would be a significant advancement over current vision aids. Three other stories are maintained in an archive. One describes research in blue laser technology, which will soon be used in ultra-high density DVD applications. The other two stories feature aware home research and wearable computing.

2003-01-01

139

CHATTAHOOCHEE ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mineral survey indicates that the Chattahoochee Roadless Area, Georgia, offers little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources even though gold, mica, sillimanite, soapstone, dunite, chromite, and nickel have been mined nearby, and source rocks for these commodities are present in the roadless area. Granite gneiss, gneiss, schist, and metasandstone in the roadless area are suitable for stone, crushed rock, or aggregate; however, other sources for these materials are available outside the roadless area, closer to present markets. The potential for the occurrence of hydrocarbons (probably gas) beneath the thick regional thrust sheets in this area cannot be adequately evaluated from available data.

Nelson, Arthur, E.; Welsh, Jr. , Robert, A.

1984-01-01

140

Centenarian Einstein  

ScienceCinema

Commémoration de A.Einstein avec 4 orateurs pour honnorer sa mémoire: le prof.Weisskopf parlera de l'homme de science engagé, Daniel Amati du climat de la physique aux années 1920, Sergio Fubini de l'heure scientifique d'A.Einstein et le prof.Berob(?)

None

2011-04-25

141

The Georgia Tech millimeter-wavelength measurement system and some applications to the study of planetary atmospheres  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the advent of new millimeter-wavelength arrays such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array capable of providing very precise maps of planetary emission, it becomes very critical to have an accurate knowledge of the millimeter-wavelength properties of gases under those planetary conditions. A millimeter-wavelength planetary atmospheric simulator and measurement system have been developed at the Georgia Tech Planetary Atmospheres Laboratory to accurately measure the propagation properties of gases under simulated planetary atmospheric conditions. The measurement system operates in the 2-4 millimeter-wavelength range and withstands up to 3 bars of pressure. It currently operates in the 190-300 K temperature range, and with minor modifications can operate in the 300-550 K temperature range for measurements of certain highly millimeter-wavelength-opaque gases. The measurements from this system can be used for developing accurate models of the millimeter-wavelength properties of gases under various planetary conditions which can then be used for retrieving the abundances of those gases through various remote sensing techniques.

Devaraj, Kiruthika; Steffes, Paul G.

2011-04-01

142

Blackjack Complex Fire, Georgia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For the past week, fires have raged across southeast Georgia, consuming nearly 40,000 acres of the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. This true-color image of the largest fire near Blackjack Island, Georgia, was acquired on May 3, 2002 (top), by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiomter (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The fire was ignited by lightning strikes and has spread quickly over a large area of scrub brush in the swamp. Due to the unseasonably dry conditions and the difficult swamp terrain, firefighters have been struggling to keep the fire from spreading any further across the 400,000-acre refuge. Although the fire is now endangering some buildings in nearby Stephen Foster State Park, no one has been injured or killed. By May 8th (lower) the area covered by the fire itself-denoted by red pixels-had shrunk, but smoke continued to billow from the site. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

2002-01-01

143

Case study analysis of legal and institutional obstacles and incentives to the potential hydroelectric development at High Falls State Park, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

The decision processes, legal constraints, and institutional factors involved in the development of hydroelectric plant at High Falls State Park, Georgia, are studied. Those factors which promote or discourage the development of a site are clarified. The four sites under discussion are located on the Towaliga River in the Park in Monroe County, about 50 miles south of Atlanta. The feasibility study notes that the site under consideration (the dam) is technically, environmentally, and economically feasible, but that the old powerhouse site, which was not studied because its 110 feet head exceeded the limits under the DOE Program Research and Development Announcement grant offered greater economic benefits without adding additional environmental costs. At present, the Department of Natural Resources decision involves the consideration of the historic, recreational, and environmental values, the authority to develop and sell, the budgetary appropriation, the market for the energy, the licensing of the project, and the political implications of such development. These variables are assessed with the development of the project in view.

None,

1980-05-01

144

Monopsony and teachers’ salaries in Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Does monopsony power in the labor market for teachers affect teachers’ salaries? Prior studies have found mixed evidence of\\u000a monopsony effects in teacher labor markets. A major problem has been controlling for union wage effects, which potentially\\u000a mask the wage-depressing effects of monopsony. We use data from the state of Georgia, one of the few states in the United\\u000a States

Simon Medcalfe; Robert J. Thornton

2006-01-01

145

Biogeochemical cycling in the Strait of Georgia.  

PubMed

The papers in this special issue present the results of a five-year project to study sedimentary biogeochemical processes in the Strait of Georgia, with special emphasis on the near-field of a large municipal outfall. Included in this special issue are overviews of the sedimentology, benthic biology, status of siliceous sponge reefs and distribution of organic carbon in the water column. Other papers address the cycling of contaminants (PCBs, PBDEs) and redox metals in the sediment, a method to map the extent of the influence of municipal effluent from staining on benthic bivalves, and the relationships among geochemical conditions and benthic abundance and diversity. The latter set of papers addresses the role of municipal effluent as a pathway of organic carbon and other contaminants into the Strait of Georgia and the effect of the effluent on benthic geochemistry and biology. PMID:19022498

Johannessen, S C; Macdonald, R W; Burd, B; van Roodselaar, A

2008-12-01

146

Marine and limnic radiocarbon reservoir corrections for studies of late- and postglacial environments in Georgia Basin and Puget Lowland, British Columbia, Canada and Washington, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Models of late-glacial environmental change in coastal areas are commonly based on radiocarbon ages on marine shell and basal lake sediments, both of which may be compromised by reservoir effects. The magnitude of the oceanic reservoir age in the inland waters of the Georgia Basin and Puget Lowland of northwestern North America is inferred from radiocarbon ages on shell-wood pairs in Saanich Inlet and previously published estimates. The weighted mean oceanic reservoir correction in the early and mid Holocene is -720±90 yr, slightly smaller than, but not significantly different from, the modern value. The correction in late-glacial time is -950±50 yr. Valley-head sites yield higher reservoir values (-1200±130 yr) immediately after deglaciation. The magnitude of the gyttja reservoir effect is inferred from pairs of bulk gyttja and plant macrofossil ages from four lakes in the region. Incorporation of old carbon into basal gyttja yields ages from bulk samples that are initially about 600 yr too old. The reservoir age declines to less than 100 yr after the first millennium of lake development. When these corrections are accounted for, dates of deglaciation and late-glacial sea-level change in the study area are pushed forward in time by more than 500 yr.

Hutchinson, Ian; James, Thomas S.; Reimer, Paula J.; Bornhold, Brian D.; Clague, John J.

2004-03-01

147

Georgia Tech Studies of Sub-Critical Advanced Burner Reactors with a D-T Fusion Tokamak Neutron Source for the Transmutation of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The possibility that a tokamak D-T fusion neutron source, based on ITER physics and technology, could be used to drive sub-critical, fast-spectrum nuclear reactors fueled with the transuranics (TRU) in spent nuclear fuel discharged from conventional nuclear reactors has been investigated at Georgia Tech in a series of studies which are summarized in this paper. It is found that sub-critical operation of such fast transmutation reactors is advantageous in allowing longer fuel residence time, hence greater TRU burnup between fuel reprocessing stages, and in allowing higher TRU loading without compromising safety, relative to what could be achieved in a similar critical transmutation reactor. The required plasma and fusion technology operating parameter range of the fusion neutron source is generally within the anticipated operational range of ITER. The implications of these results for fusion development policy, if they hold up under more extensive and detailed analysis, is that a D-T fusion tokamak neutron source for a sub-critical transmutation reactor, built on the basis of the ITER operating experience, could possibly be a logical next step after ITER on the path to fusion electrical power reactors. At the same time, such an application would allow fusion to contribute to meeting the nation's energy needs at an earlier stage by helping to close the fission reactor nuclear fuel cycle.

Stacey, W. M.

2009-09-01

148

Smoothing the Path: Changing State Policies to Support Early College High School. Case Studies from Georgia, Ohio, Texas, and Utah. Early College High School Initiative  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Smoothing the Path" describes successful state-level strategies and policy lessons that have been learned in four states during the development of schools that integrate secondary and postsecondary education. Statewide efforts in the multi-year Early College High School Initiative, which began in Ohio and Utah in 2002 and in Texas and Georgia in…

Jobs for the Future, 2006

2006-01-01

149

Marine and limnic radiocarbon reservoir corrections for studies of late- and postglacial environments in Georgia Basin and Puget Lowland, British Columbia, Canada and Washington, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Models of late-glacial environmental change in coastal areas are commonly based on radiocarbon ages on marine shell and basal lake sediments, both of which may be compromised by reservoir effects. The magnitude of the oceanic reservoir age in the inland waters of the Georgia Basin and Puget Lowland of northwestern North America is inferred from radiocarbon ages on shell-wood pairs

Ian Hutchinson; Thomas S. James; Paula J. Reimer; Brian D. Bornhold; John J. Clague

2004-01-01

150

GA State Profile. Georgia: Georgia High School Graduation Tests (GHSGT) and Georgia High School Writing Test (GHSWT)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides information about Georgia High School Graduation Tests (GHSGT) and Georgia High School Writing Test (GHSWT). The purpose of the exams is to: (1) Ensure that students qualifying for a diploma have mastered essential core academic content and skills. All students seeking a Georgia high school diploma must pass the GHSGT in four…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

151

Geometric and kinematic analysis, and geochemical study of the Corbin Gneiss Complex and its associated sheared rocks in the Blue Ridge of NW Georgia  

SciTech Connect

The Corbin Gneiss Complex forms the core of the Salem Church anticlinorium in the Blue Ridge of NW Georgia, and is composed of quartz monzodiorite (Corbin gneiss) and pyroxene-biotite diorite. The observed foliation and the presence of thin zones of ultramylonites and phyllonites in the rocks of the gneiss complex are the result of the ductile shearing. Subsequent to the development of the mylonitic foliation these rocks were subjected for four episodes of flexural slip folding. The first generation folds were associated with the formation of the Salem Church anticlinorium. The northeasterly striking axial planes and the southeasterly plunging fold axes of the last three systems of folds suggest that these folds were formed on the southeasterly dipping foliation planes of the Salem Church anticlinorium. The trace element study of the pyroxene-biotite diorite, the Corbin gneiss (quartz monzodiorite) including its variably sheared equivalents shows that these rocks originated from independent sources by primary petrogenetic processes, and do not show any mixing relationship. The whole rock Rb-Sr isochron of the ultramylonitic Corbin gneiss yields an age of 296 +/- 4 Ma and an initial /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratio of 0.7208 +/- 7. The much younger age of the ultramylonite in comparison to that of the unsheared Corbin gneiss (age approx. 1 Ga) is the result of resetting of the Rb-Sr systematics of the latter due to shearing, and denotes the minimum age limit of the shearing. A two point whole rock isochron of the diorite gives an apparent age of 1.22 Ga and an initial /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratio of 0.7036. The total crustal age of the diorite is slightly greater than the Corbin gneiss.

Gargi, S.P.

1985-01-01

152

AKEntAnnos. The Sardinia Study of Extreme Longevity.  

PubMed

This paper describes an epidemiological study performed in all centenarians living in Sardinia, a large island located in the Mediterranean sea, 120 Km from the Italian coast. Due to its long-standing isolation, low immigration rate, high endogamy and rather uniform lifestyle, Sardinia offers an ideal setting in which to study the genetic traits associated with extreme longevity and successful aging. A total of 233 potentially eligible centenarians were traced in the entire territory. Of these, 66 died prior to being interviewed, 11 were not found and unknown, and 15 refused to be interviewed. A multidimensional home interview was administered to 141 centenarians, and an equivalent number of 60-year-old controls matched for gender and area of residence. Furthermore, 41 living siblings of the centenarians, and 41 age- and sex-matched controls for these siblings were also studied. The prevalence of centenarians was 13.56 per 100,000, and the female/male ratio was approximately 2. Prevalence and female/male ratio were consistent across the four Sardinian municipalities and are, respectively, higher and lower than those reported in other population-based surveys. A number of methodological problems confronted in doing the field work, and plans for future analysis of this rich dataset are discussed. PMID:10476308

Deiana, L; Ferrucci, L; Pes, G M; Carru, C; Delitala, G; Ganau, A; Mariotti, S; Nieddu, A; Pettinato, S; Putzu, P; Franceschi, C; Baggio, G

1999-06-01

153

Historic Resource Study: Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia and Historic Structure Report, Historical Data Section of the Dungeness Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The present studies should fulfill the requirements of a historic resource study of Cumberland Island and of a historic structure report of the Dungeness area. It was decided for the sake of continuity that both studies should be combined under one cover ...

L. Torres

1977-01-01

154

National Water Quality Assessment Program; preliminary assessment of nitrate distribution in ground water in the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit, 1972-90  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey has implemented the National Water Quality Assessment program to describe the quality of the surface- and ground- water resources in 60 large areas or study units in the Nation. The Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit was one of the first 20 selected for study when the full-scale program was implemented in 1991. The study unit has an area of about 54,000 square miles and is located on the south- eastern coast of the United States. The primary source of water supply in this study unit is ground-water from the Upper Floridan aquifer of the Floridan aquifer system. The Upper Floridan aquifer is unconfined or semiconfined in some parts of the study unit, but in other parts is confined by the overlying surficial aquifer system and other confining units. The surficial aquifer system is also used for water supply in some parts of the study unit. Three land-resource areas have been delineated in the study unit on the basis of generalized soil classifications: the Central Florida Ridge, Coastal Flatwoods, and Southern Coastal Plain. Predominant land use and land cover as classified in the 1970's, are forest, agriculture, wetlands, and urban. Nitrate data for water from the Upper Floridan aquifer and the surficial aquifer system were obtained from the National Water Information System data base of the U.S. Geological Survey for the years 1972- 90. In the Upper Floridan aquifer, the highest median nitrate (as nitrogen) concentrations (0.43 and 0.26 milligrams per liter) were in water samples from wells in agricultural and urban areas where the aquifer was unconfined or semiconfined. The maximum contaminant level for nitrate (as nitrogen) in drinking water of 10 milligrams per liter was exceeded in 25 of the 726 water samples from this aquifer. These 25 samples were from wells in urban areas. In water samples from the surficial aquifer system, the highest median nitrate concentration, 8.7 milligrams per liter, was for water samples from agricultural areas in the Central Florida Ridge area. Nitrate (as nitrogen) concentrations exceeded 10 milligrams per liter in 50 of the 421 water samples from wells completed in the surficial aquifer system. Most of these 50 water samples were from wells in agricultural and urban areas (sewage spraying areas) in the Central Florida Ridge area.

Berndt, M. P.

1993-01-01

155

Secrecy and risk among MSM in Tbilisi, Georgia  

PubMed Central

There is concern that the tremendous economic, social, and political upheavals that the Republic of Georgia has undergone in the years since the fall of the Soviet Union may have created an environment fertile for HIV transmission. Notably absent from official statistics and HIV-related research in Georgia is discussion of men who have sex with men (MSM) and, therefore, little is known about the MSM population or its potential to acquire or transmit HIV. Data were collected from 30 MSM recruited through a testing and counseling center in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. Two focus groups with six men each and 18 individual in-depth interviews were conducted between October 2006 and February 2007. The study participants described a Georgian culture that is largely intolerant of sexual contact between men. In describing the various forms of discrimination and violence that they would face should their sexual identities be discovered, the MSM in this sample described a variety of behaviors that they and other Georgian MSM undertake to conceal their sexual behavior. Many of these could put these men and their partners at risk for HIV. Although official HIV rates in Georgia are still low, results from this qualitative study indicate that efforts to educate and to provide unobtrusive and anonymous testing and counseling services to MSM may be critical to the deterrence of an HIV epidemic in the Republic of Georgia.

Costenbader, Elizabeth C.; Otiashvili, David; Meyer, William; Zule, William A.; Orr, Alex; Kirtadze, Irma

2010-01-01

156

Secrecy and risk among MSM in Tbilisi, Georgia.  

PubMed

There is concern that the tremendous economic, social, and political upheavals that the Republic of Georgia has undergone in the years since the fall of the Soviet Union may have created an environment fertile for HIV transmission. Notably absent from official statistics and HIV-related research in Georgia is discussion of men who have sex with men (MSM) and, therefore, little is known about the MSM population or its potential to acquire or transmit HIV. Data were collected from 30 MSM recruited through a testing and counseling center in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. Two focus groups with six men each and 18 individual in-depth interviews were conducted between October 2006 and February 2007. The study participants described a Georgian culture that is largely intolerant of sexual contact between men. In describing the various forms of discrimination and violence that they would face should their sexual identities be discovered, the MSM in this sample described a variety of behaviors that they and other Georgian MSM undertake to conceal their sexual behavior. Many of these could put these men and their partners at risk for HIV. Although official HIV rates in Georgia are still low, results from this qualitative study indicate that efforts to educate and to provide unobtrusive and anonymous testing and counseling services to MSM may be critical to the deterrence of an HIV epidemic in the Republic of Georgia. PMID:19444667

Costenbader, Elizabeth C; Otiashvili, David; Meyer, William; Zule, William A; Orr, Alex; Kirtadze, Irma

2009-05-01

157

Mathematics for Georgia Middle Grades.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This eight part guide was developed to assist individuals in improving mathematics education in Georgia schools, particularly in planning curriculum at the local level. The guide was prepared on the basis of successful teaching practices and recommendations from recognized educators. Information regarding considerations unique to teaching the…

Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Instructional Services.

158

Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This factbook presents statistics and examines trends for nine indicators of children's well-being in Georgia. The indicators are: (1) number and percent of low birthweight infants; (2) infant death rate; (3) death rate of children ages 1 to 14 years; (4) violent death rate of teenagers aged 15 to 19 years; (5) rate of child abuse and neglect; (6)…

Georgians for Children, Atlanta, GA.

159

Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 1993.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This factbook examines trends during the 1980s on 11 indicators of Georgia children's well-being. The indicators are: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) death rate of children ages 1 to 14 years; (4) violent death rate of teenagers aged 15 to 19 years; (5) rate of child abuse and neglect; (6) juveniles committed to state…

Minneapolis Public Library, MN.

160

Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 1994.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This factbook presents statistical data and examines trends for 10 indicators of children's well-being in Georgia. The indicators are: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) death rate of children ages 1 to 14 years; (4) violent death rate of teenagers aged 15 to 19 years; (5) rate of child abuse and neglect; (6) juveniles…

Minneapolis Public Library, MN.

161

Automation and Its Funding in the Library Media Centers in Secondary Schools in Georgia: A Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents the results of a study whose purpose was to determine what automation is present in the library media centers in Georgia secondary schools and how it has been funded. A three-part questionnaire was sent to the media specialists in 50% of the secondary schools in Georgia, which were randomly selected. The analysis of the…

Baggett, Ann Utsey

162

Attitudes of American School Superintendents toward the Georgia Certification Test for School Administrators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although recent research studies have questioned the efficacy of certification testing, Georgia's Department of Education, with help from National Evaluation Systems, developed the Georgia Certification Test in Administration and Certification (GCT). Since 1983, the test has been required for both certification and recertification. The present…

Weller, L. David; And Others

163

Use of medications by people with chronic fatigue syndrome and healthy persons: a population-based study of fatiguing illness in Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating condition of unknown etiology and no definitive pharmacotherapy. Patients are usually prescribed symptomatic treatment or self-medicate. We evaluated prescription and non-prescription drug use among persons with CFS in Georgia and compared it to that in non-fatigued Well controls and also to chronically Unwell individuals not fully meeting criteria for CFS. METHODS: A

Roumiana S Boneva; Jin-Mann S Lin; Elizabeth M Maloney; James F Jones; William C Reeves

2009-01-01

164

A MCDM-based expert system for climate-change impact assessment and adaptation planning - A case study for the Georgia Basin, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

An MCDM-based expert system was developed to tackle the interrelationships between the climate change and the adaptation policies in terms of water resources management in the Georgia Basin, Canada. User interfaces of the developed expert system, named MAEAC (MCDM-based expert system for adaptation analysis under changing climate), was developed based on system configuration, knowledge acquisition, survey analysis, and MCDM-based policy

X. S. Qin; Guo H. Huang; A. Chakma; X. H. Nie; Q. G. Lin

2008-01-01

165

A Census Study of Georgia's 2004-2006 Reading First Schools and the Achievement of Struggling Readers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because children living in poverty and minorities consistently demonstrate persistent reading difficulties (Adams, 1990), Congress intervened and passed the No Child Left Behind Act (U.S. Department of Education, 2006) mandating that scientifically based reading research be implemented in the primary grades. Quantitative studies presented in the…

Brooks, Kristina L.

2009-01-01

166

Observing Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia: Using an Urban Field Study to Enhance Student Experiences and Instructor Knowledge in Urban Geography  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In urban geography courses, knowledge of a local area is especially useful for demonstrating geographic principles. These classroom examples are further enhanced when students conduct their own field observations, with direction from the instructor. This paper describes a field study of the metropolitan Atlanta area that is used in an intermediate…

Martin, Deborah G.

2003-01-01

167

Outcomes of Universal Access to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Georgia.  

PubMed

Since 2004, Georgia achieved universal access to free antiretroviral therapy (ART). A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the outcomes of Georgia's ART program. The study included adult patients enrolled in the ART program from 2004 through 2009. Of 752 patients, 76% were men, 60% were injection drug users (IDU), 59% had a history of an AIDS-defining illness, and 53% were coinfected with hepatitis C. The median baseline CD4 cell count was 141?cells/mm(3). During followup, 152 (20%) patients died, with the majority of deaths occurring within 12 months of ART initiation. Mortality was associated with advanced immunodeficiency or the presence of incurable disease at baseline. Among patients remaining on treatment, the median CD4 gain was 216?cell/mm(3) and 86% of patients had viral load <400 copies/ml at the last clinical visit. The Georgia ART program has been successful in treating injection drug users infected with HIV. PMID:21490781

Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Chkhartishvili, Nikoloz; Sharvadze, Lali; Dvali, Natia; Chokoshvili, Otar; Gabunia, Pati; Abutidze, Akaki; Nelson, Kenrad; Dehovitz, Jack; Del Rio, Carlos

2011-01-01

168

Outcomes of Universal Access to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Georgia  

PubMed Central

Since 2004, Georgia achieved universal access to free antiretroviral therapy (ART). A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the outcomes of Georgia's ART program. The study included adult patients enrolled in the ART program from 2004 through 2009. Of 752 patients, 76% were men, 60% were injection drug users (IDU), 59% had a history of an AIDS-defining illness, and 53% were coinfected with hepatitis C. The median baseline CD4 cell count was 141?cells/mm3. During followup, 152 (20%) patients died, with the majority of deaths occurring within 12 months of ART initiation. Mortality was associated with advanced immunodeficiency or the presence of incurable disease at baseline. Among patients remaining on treatment, the median CD4 gain was 216?cell/mm3 and 86% of patients had viral load <400 copies/ml at the last clinical visit. The Georgia ART program has been successful in treating injection drug users infected with HIV.

Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Chkhartishvili, Nikoloz; Sharvadze, Lali; Dvali, Natia; Chokoshvili, Otar; Gabunia, Pati; Abutidze, Akaki; Nelson, Kenrad; DeHovitz, Jack; del Rio, Carlos

2011-01-01

169

LANDSAT data for state planning. [of transportation for Georgia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of an effort to generate and apply automated classification of LANDSAT digital data to state of Georgia problems are presented. This phase centers on an analysis of the usefulness of LANDSAT digital data to provide land-use data for transportation planning. Hall County, Georgia was chosen as a test site because it is part of a seventeen county area for which the Georgia Department of Transportation is currently designing a Transportation Planning Land-Use Simulation Model. The land-cover information derived from this study was compared to several other existing sources of land-use data for Hall County and input into this simulation. The results indicate that there is difficulty comparing LANDSAT derived land-cover information with previous land-use information since the LANDSAT data are acquired on an acre by acre grid basis while all previous land-use surveys for Hall County used land-use data on a parcel basis.

Faust, N. L.; Spann, G. W.

1975-01-01

170

Change of Genetic Determinants of Left Ventricular Structure in Adolescence: Longitudinal Evidence from the Georgia Cardiovascular Twin Study  

PubMed Central

Objective Genetic contribution to left ventricular (LV) structure is generally recognized, but whether and how this influence varies by ethnicity or with age is unknown. Design and methods Participants were 517 European American (EA) and African American (AA) twin pairs (mean age: 14.6 ± 3.0) at visit 1 and 422 EA and AA at follow-up 4.1 years later. Echocardiograms were obtained on both visits. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling software Mx. Results Body mass index (BMI) was a strong predictor for all LV measures at both visit 1 and 2, accounting for 3.5-24.2% of the total variance. Hemodynamics explained up to 4.5% additional LV measures variance. After adjusting for BMI, LV measures showed substantial heritability (range: 21%-71%). Best-fitting longitudinal models revealed considerable novel genetic effects on the interventricular septum, posterior wall and relative wall thickness (but not LV inner diameter), accounting for 32-41% of the phenotypic variance at visit 2, with no significant gender and ethnic effects. There was a gender difference for LV mass index in AA (P < 0.01), with a significant influence of novel genetic effects in males (47%), but not in females. No gender difference was seen in EA, with 34% of the phenotypic variance at visit 2 attributable to novel genetic effects. Conclusions The heritability of cardiac structure and geometry was equally substantial in both AA and EA. Significant novel genetic influences were detected for all measures but LV inner diameter and LV mass index in AA females. Further developmental genetic studies are warranted to elucidate the nature of the emerging gene effects during the transition from adolescence into adulthood.

Kapuku, Gaston K.; Ge, Dongliang; Vemulapalli, Sarita; Harshfield, Gregory; Treiber, Frank A.; Snieder, Harold

2013-01-01

171

Mitochondrial haplogroups associated with Japanese centenarians, Alzheimer's patients, Parkinson's patients, type 2 diabetic patients and healthy non-obese young males  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationships between five classes of Japanese people (i.e., 96 centenarians, 96 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, 96 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, 96 type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, and 96 healthy non-obese young males) and their mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphism (mtSNP) frequencies at individual mtDNA positions of the entire mitochondrial genome were examined using the radial basis function (RBF) network and

Shigeru Takasaki

2009-01-01

172

The georgia rivers land margin ecosystem research program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Land Margin Ecosystem Research (LMER) Program in the United States is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation through two of its subsidiary units, Long Term Studies and Biological Oceanography. The LMER program was designed to address gaps in the coverage of certain ecosystems by multi-disciplinary teams, specifically the lack of studies of coastal boundary zones. Our Georgia interdisciplinary

R. G. Wiegert; M. Alber; C. Alexander; J. O. Blanton; A. Chalmers; R. E. Hodson; M. A. Moran; L. R. Pomeroy; W. J. Wiebe

1999-01-01

173

OZONE PRODUCTION AND TRANSPORT IN THE ATLANTA, GEORGIA REGION  

EPA Science Inventory

The report presents the results from air quality monitoring program conducted in the Atlanta, Georgia region during July 1981. The study included data collected at several ground sites as well as airborne measurements using an instrumented aircraft. Study participants included Wa...

174

Educational Trends of the Rural and Urban Population of Georgia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Major trends in the educational status of Georgia's population were studied. These included recent changes in school enrollment of farm and nonfarm youths, and in adult educational attainment. Trends in school enrollment were studied for statewide, county, and regional differentials; and high school dropouts. Trends in educational attainment were…

Tarver, James D.; Stokes, C. Shannon

175

South Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A number of institutions around the United States have been working day and night to digitize regional and small town newspapers from the 19th and 20th centuries. This website presents the fruits of one such project, crafted by the Digital Library of Georgia with funds administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The archive provides access to papers from southern Georgia from the years 1845-1922, and it includes the Albany News, the Americus Times Recorder, and the Valdosta Times. Visitors can search the newspapers by year, title, city, or keyword. Students of Southern history, journalism, and other related topics will find that this site merits numerous return visits.

2012-01-20

176

Georgia Tech sonic boom simulator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To examine the building and human response to sonic boom in the range 3 Hz to 30 Hz, Georgia Institute of Technology is building a special acoustic driver system to simulate sonic boom. To support the NASA LaRC program on building and human response, this simulator's capability has been extended to an upper frequency of 4 KHz. A residential test house was made available by Georgia Tech for these tests. At the time of preparation of this document, most of the acoustic drivers and the associated electronics have been built and assembled. The system has, however, not been fully tested. The following pages provide an overview of the progress to date. The acoustic driver systems, and the principle of their operation together with the test house are described. Future plans are also summarized.

Ahuja, Krish K.

1992-01-01

177

Epic Flooding in Georgia, 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Metropolitan Atlanta-September 2009 Floods * The epic floods experienced in the Atlanta area in September 2009 were extremely rare. Eighteen streamgages in the Metropolitan Atlanta area had flood magnitudes much greater than the estimated 0.2-percent (500-year) annual exceedance probability. * The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reported that 23 counties in Georgia were declared disaster areas due to this flood and that 16,981 homes and 3,482 businesses were affected by floodwaters. Ten lives were lost in the flood. The total estimated damages exceed $193 million (H.E. Longenecker, Federal Emergency Management Agency, written commun., November 2009). * On Sweetwater Creek near Austell, Ga., just north of Interstate 20, the peak stage was more than 6 feet higher than the estimated peak stage of the 0.2-percent (500-year) flood. Flood magnitudes in Cobb County on Sweetwater, Butler, and Powder Springs Creeks greatly exceeded the estimated 0.2-percent (500-year) floods for these streams. * In Douglas County, the Dog River at Ga. Highway 5 near Fairplay had a peak stage nearly 20 feet higher than the estimated peak stage of the 0.2-percent (500-year) flood. * On the Chattahoochee River, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) gage at Vinings reached the highest level recorded in the past 81 years. Gwinnett, De Kalb, Fulton, and Rockdale Counties also had record flooding. South Georgia March and April 2009 Floods * The March and April 2009 floods in South Georgia were smaller in magnitude than the September floods but still caused significant damage. * No lives were lost in this flood. Approximately $60 million in public infrastructure damage occurred to roads, culverts, bridges and a water treatment facility (Joseph T. McKinney, Federal Emergency Management Agency, written commun., July 2009). * Flow at the Satilla River near Waycross, exceeded the 0.5-percent (200-year) flood. Flows at seven other stations in South Georgia exceeded the 1-percent (100-year) flood.

Gotvald, Anthony J.; McCallum, Brian E.

2010-01-01

178

East Georgia Construction Company (A)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A construction company that serves a 20-county area of eastern Georgia has as its main source of revenue the manufacture and placement of asphaltic concrete used in road construction. Thanks to a new, multiyear, state-funded highway program, the company is considering the purchase of a new nonportable drum-mix plant needed to expand its asphaltic-concrete manufacturing capacity. Students can explore net

Robert Carraway; Robert Jenkins

179

East Georgia Construction Company (B)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A construction company serving a 20-county area of eastern Georgia has as its main source of revenue the manufacture and placement of asphaltic concrete used in road construction. In response to the demands of a new, multiyear, state-funded highway program, the company needs to expand its manufacturing capacity. Now, in addition to the new portable drum-mix plant (whose price has

Robert Carraway; Robert Jenkins

180

77 FR 67639 - Liberty Energy (Georgia) Corp.; Notice of Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Liberty Georgia states that it would also...Alabama, to the Alabama-Georgia border at the northern bank of the Chattahoochee River (Alabama facilities...interconnect with Atmos' Georgia facilities that serve...

2012-11-13

181

Status of Clinical Supervision among School Counselors in Southeast Georgia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous studies have investigated the role of clinical supervision in school counseling practice. This research explored the status and meaning of clinical supervision to school counselors employed in two southeastern Georgia counties. Results indicate that participants value clinical supervision even though their employers did not necessarily…

Black, Anna Lila; Bailey, Carrie Lynn; Bergin, James J.

2011-01-01

182

IN-SERVICE DELIVERY: METHODS PREFERRED BY GEORGIA AGRICULTURE TEACHERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Agricultural education teachers need to have opportunities to become students again in order to learn new skills and knowledge that will benefit their agricultural education programs. The purpose of this descriptive study was to survey agriculture teachers (N=348) in Georgia to determine their preferences for how in-service training should be delivered. Sixty one percent of the teachers (n=212) completed the

John Uesseler; John C. Ricketts; Dennis W. Duncan; Jason B. Peake

2006-01-01

183

Motor Performance Norms for Georgia Elementary School Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a study of 2,546 Georgia children, researchers have established state norms for 8 measures of physical fitness at 3 grade levels. Motor test score percentile rankings for boys and girls in the second, fourth, and sixth grades are given (in 22 tables) for the following tests: (1) jump and reach; (2) sit ups; (3) shape-o-ball (measuring shape…

Harris, I. David, Comp.; And Others

184

Cedar Creek at Cedartown, Georgia, floodflow characteristics from West Girard Avenue to the Georgia Avenue Relocation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In cooperation with the Highway Division, Georgia Department of Transportation, the U.S. Geological Survey determined the backwater effects of existing bridges and dikes on Cedar Creek at Cedartown, Georgia, for the reach from West Girard Avenue to the Georgia Avenue relocation. The maximum backwater effect for the bridges was 1.7 feet in the upstream approach at the Seaboard Coastline Railroad bridge as a combined result of the Georgia Highway 278 bridge and the Seaboard Coastline Railroad bridge. The maximum effect from the existing dikes was 0.7 foot at the approach section of Georgia Highway 278.

Price, McGlone

1981-01-01

185

Explaining Georgia's anti-corruption drive  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explains Georgia's achievements against rampant corruption that plagued the country for decades. It demonstrates how Georgia has moved from being a ‘failed state’ to the state with low corruption rates following the Rose Revolution of 2003. It is argued that several internal and external drivers motivated Georgian leadership to fight corruption in the post-revolutionary setting, including drawing legitimacy

Alexander Kupatadze

2012-01-01

186

Economic Yearbook from Georgia Trend Magazine, 1996.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on information from "Georgia Trend" magazine examining economic conditions across Georgia, Gainesville College (GC) is expected to experience an expanding base of students over the next 5 years. With respect to Hall County and the nine contiguous counties that make up GC's service area, data indicate a population growth in the region, growth…

Hamilton, John

187

Total Mental Health Services in Georgia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussed are current and proposed Georgia interagency programs for delivering mental health services to behaviorally disordered (emotionally disturbed-socially maladjusted) children through age 21 years by 1976. Considered in a brief overview of state programs are services (such as the Georgia Psychoeducational Center Network) for elementary and…

Yeomans, Beth, Ed.

188

RESIDENTIAL WATER AND SEWER RATES IN GEORGIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Georgia utilities use many different rate struc- tures and practices under an economic regulatory frame- work that has few rate setting standards. These different structures have financial impacts on utility revenue stabili- ty, customer expenditures, and water consumption. This paper describes the results of a survey of residential water and sewer utility rates in Georgia. This survey is far more

Andrew Westbrook; Jeffrey Hughes

189

Georgia After 3PM  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each afternoon across the U.S., 15 million children are alone and unsupervised after school. The parents of 18 million would enroll their children in an afterschool program, if one were available. These are some of the key findings from the nation's most in-depth study of how America's children spend their afternoons. "America After 3PM" was…

Afterschool Alliance, 2009

2009-01-01

190

Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) in Bulloch County, Georgia.  

PubMed

An 18-mo study was conducted in Bulloch County, Georgia, to determine tick species composition, seasonal activity of individual tick species, and host-tick associations. The following 7 methods of tick collection were included: (1) live trapping of potential host animals, (2) checking wild game, (3) drag sampling, (4) carbon dioxide attraction, (5) checking livestock, road kills, nests, and burrows, (6) samples submitted from veterinarians, and (7) ticks collected by local residents and submitted for identification. Twelve tick species (Ixodidae) were identified. Blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say, and American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis (Say), had the widest host ranges and were the most numerous. White-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann), supported 5 tick species, the greatest number on any host. Of 55 animal species examined, 16 mammal, 5 bird, and 3 reptile species were parasitized by ticks. Opossums, Didelphis virginiana Kerr, and cotton mice, Peromyscus gossypinus (LeConte), were the most commonly examined wild animals. PMID:8742526

Lavender, D R; Oliver, J H

1996-03-01

191

An Assessment of the Coordinated Accrediting Visit to Georgia State University by Visiting Committee Members. Report No. 78-2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 72-member team of evaluators visited Georgia State University in May 1977 as part of the institution's decennial self-study. The evaluators represented nine groups that accredit programs at the university, including: National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education; Georgia State Department of Education; American Dietetic Association;…

Ezell, Joe B.; And Others

192

Use of modified benthic bioassessment protocols for evaluation of water quality trends in Georgia. Technical completion report  

SciTech Connect

The study explored the potential for biotic evaluation of changes in water quality in the state of Georgia. Specific objectives were: (1) evaluate application of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) benthic assessment protocols for potential use in ongoing water quality monitoring in Georgia; and (2) compare biomonitoring results with water quality indices based on physical-chemical monitoring.

Cowie, G.M.; Cooley, J.L.; Dutt, A.

1991-07-01

193

Upper-crustal structure beneath the Strait of Georgia, Southwest British Columbia  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY We present a new three-dimensional (3-D) P-wave velocity model for the upper-crustal struc- ture beneath the Strait of Georgia, southwestern British Columbia based on non-linear tomo- graphic inversion of wide-angle seismic refraction data. Our study, part of the Georgia Basin Geohazards Initiative (GBGI) is primarily aimed at mapping the depth of the Cenozoic sed- imentary basin and delineating the

R. K. Dash; G. D. Spence; M. Riedel; R. D. Hyndman; T. M. Brocher

2007-01-01

194

Upper-crustal structure beneath the Strait of Georgia, Southwest British Columbia  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new three-dimensional (3-D) P-wave velocity model for the upper-crustal structure beneath the Strait of Georgia, southwestern British Columbia based on non-linear tomographic inversion of wide-angle seismic refraction data. Our study, part of the Georgia Basin Geohazards Initiative (GBGI) is primarily aimed at mapping the depth of the Cenozoic sedimentary basin and delineating the near-surface crustal faults associated

R. K. Dash; G. D. Spence; M. Riedel; R. D. Hyndman; T. M. Brocher

2007-01-01

195

Tybee Island, Georgia, Beach Erosion Control.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The action consists of restoration and periodic nourishment of 13,200 feet of ocean beach and a rubble stone terminal groin extending 800 feet seaward on Tybee Island, Georgia. Environmental impacts include the restoration and maintenance of scenic beach ...

1972-01-01

196

Trucking in Georgia: Freight Performance Measures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report provides a review of the recent literature on the development of truck freight performance measures, and specifically measures that can assist the Georgia Department of Transportation in assessing, and in tracking from year to year, how well t...

F. Southworth J. Gillet

2011-01-01

197

Georgia's Water Problems and Related Research Needs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water problems and research needs are discussed by region of the State. They are also discussed under the headings of water quantity, quality, ecology, planning and management, and agriculture. A survey of research capability in Georgia colleges is includ...

G. E. Willeke A. C. Benke A. M. Lumb B. H. Kornegay W. P. Neely

1973-01-01

198

40 CFR 81.408 - Georgia.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Identification of Mandatory Class I Federal Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.408 Georgia. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land manager...

2013-07-01

199

Virtual health care center in Georgia.  

PubMed

Application of telemedicine systems to cover distant geographical areas has increased recently. However, the potential usefulness of similar systems for creation of national networks does not seem to be widely appreciated. The article describes the "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" project. Its aim was the set up of an online integrated web-based platform to provide remote medical consultations and eLearning cycles. The project "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" was the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant dedicated for development of telemedicine in non-NATO countries. The project implemented a pilot to organize the creation of national eHealth network in Georgia and to promote the use of innovative telemedicine and eLearning services in the Georgian healthcare system. In June 2007 it was continued under the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant "ePathology--Virtual Pathology Center in Georgia as the Continuation of Virtual Health Care Center". PMID:18673518

Schrader, Thomas; Kldiashvili, Ekaterina

2008-01-01

200

Hantavirus Infection in the Republic of Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We describe a laboratory-confirmed case of hantavirus infection in the Republic of Georgia. Limited information is available about hantavirus infections in the Caucasus, although the infection has been reported throughout Europe and Russia. Increasing awa...

D. V. Clark G. Pimentel M. J. Hepburn T. Kuchuloria T. Tsertsvadze

2009-01-01

201

Georgia Healthy Farmers Farm Safety Camp  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Georgia Healthy Farmers Farm Safety Camp was instituted in 1992 in order to reduce childhood farm injuries in Georgia. In 1994, the camp began offering two tracks -a general track for 10- to 13-year-olds and a tractor certification program for 14- and 15-year-olds. This article describes the general track and impact of camp attendance upon farm safety knowledge and

W. Jay Hughes; Judy Hartley

2000-01-01

202

Degradation of chicken feathers by Chrysosporium georgiae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a baiting technique, Chrysosporium georgiae was isolated from chicken feathers. Twenty-eight different fungal isolates\\u000a were evaluated for their ability to produce keratinase enzymes using a keratin–salt agar medium containing either white chicken\\u000a feathers or a prepared feather keratin suspension (KS). The Chrysosporium species were able to use keratin and grow at different\\u000a rates. Chrysosporium georgiae completely degraded the added

M. A. El-Naghy; M. S. El-Ktatny; E. M. Fadl-Allah; W. W. Nazeer

1998-01-01

203

Project Georgia High School/High Tech  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The High School/High Tech initiative of the President's Committee on Employment of Disabilities, Georgia's application of the collaborative "Georgia Model" and NASA's commitment of funding have shown that opportunities for High School/High Tech students are unlimited. In Georgia, the partnership approach to meeting the needs of this program has opened doors previously closed. As the program grows and develops, reflecting the needs of our students and the marketplace, more opportunities will be available. Our collaboratives are there to provide these opportunities and meet the challenge of matching our students with appropriate education and career goals. Summing up the activities and outcomes of Project Georgia High School/High Tech is not difficult. Significant outcomes have already occurred in the Savannah area as a result of NASA's grant. The support of NASA has enabled Georgia Committee to "grow" High School/High Tech throughout the region-and, by example, the state. The success of the Columbus pilot project has fostered the proliferation of projects, resulting in more than 30 Georgia High School High Tech programs-with eight in the Savannah area.

2000-01-01

204

Lyme Borreliosis in Human Patients in Florida and Georgia, USA  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to determine the cause of illness in several human patients residing in Florida and Georgia, USA, with suspected Lyme disease based upon EM-like skin lesions and/or symptoms consistent with early localized or late disseminated Lyme borreliosis. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays developed specifically for Lyme group Borrelia spp., followed by DNA sequencing for confirmation, we identified Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato DNA in samples of blood and skin and also in lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum) removed from several patients who either live in or were exposed to ticks in Florida or Georgia. This is the first report to present combined PCR and DNA sequence evidence of infection with Lyme Borrelia spp. in human patients in the southern U.S., and to demonstrate that several B. burgdorferi sensu lato species may be associated with Lyme disease-like signs and symptoms in southern states. Based on the findings of this study, we suggest that human Lyme borreliosis occurs in Florida and Georgia, and that some cases of Lyme-like illness referred to as southern tick associated rash illness (STARI) in the southern U.S. may be attributable to previously undetected B. burgdorferi sensu lato infections.

Clark, Kerry L.; Leydet, Brian; Hartman, Shirley

2013-01-01

205

Effects of gamma Radiation and Storage Time on the Physical, Chemical and Sensory Qualities of ''Georgia Jet'' Sweet Potatoes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Effect of gamma radiation and storage time on sprouting, rotting, changes in nutritional composition and sensory quality of Georgia Jet Sweet Potatoes were studied. All radiation doses used in the study inhibited sprouting. Sweet potatoes were severely in...

P. I. Yakubu

1986-01-01

206

Seismic Hazard Assessment of Middle East Region: Based on the Example to Georgia (Preliminary results)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The country of Georgia is located between Russia and Turkey. The main morphological units of Georgia are the mountain ranges of the Greater and Lesser Caucasus separated by the Black Sea-Rioni and Kura (Mtkvari)-South Caspian intermountain troughs. Recent geodynamics of Georgia and adjacent territories of the Black Sea-Caspian Sea region, as a whole, are determined by its position between the still-converging Eurasian and Africa-Arabian plates. That caused moderate seismicity in the region. However, the risk resulting from these earthquakes is considerably high, as recent events during the last two decades have shown. Seismic hazard and risk assessment is a major research topic in various recent international and national projects. Despite the current efforts, estimation of regional seismic hazard assessment remains as a major problem. Georgia is one of the partners of ongoing regional project EMME (Earthquake Model for Middle East region). The main objective of EMME is calculation of Earthquake hazard uniformly with heights standards. One approach used in the project is the probabilistic seismic hazard assessment PSHA. In this study, we present the preliminary results of PSHA for Georgia in this project attempting to improve gaps especially in such steps as: determination of seismic sources; selection or derivation of ground motion prediction equations models; estimation of maximum magnitude Mmax. Seismic sources (SS) were obtained on the bases of structural geology, parameters of seismicity and seismotectonics. Finely new SS have been developed for Georgia and adjacent region. Each zone was defined with the following parameters: the magnitude-frequency parameters, maximum magnitude, and depth distribution as well as modern dynamical characteristics widely used for complex processes. As the ground motion dataset is absolutely insufficient by itself to derive a ground motion prediction model for Georgia, two approaches were taken in defining ground motions. First the modern procedure for selecting and ranking candidate ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) were done (Scherbaum et al. 2004, 2009; Cotton et al. 2006, Kale and Akkar, 2012) under a given ground motion dataset. Second the hybrid-empirical method proposed by Campbell (2003) was used. In the host-to-target simulations, Turkey and Iran was used as the host regions and Georgia as the target region. GMPEs for the Racha and Javakhety regions in Georgia are derived by scaling the pre-determined GMPEs based on the computed scaling coefficients. Finally PSH maps were calculated showing peak ground acceleration and spectral accelerations at 0, 0.2, 1, 2, 4 sec for Georgia.

Tsereteli, N. S.; Akkar, S.; Askan, A.; Varazanashvili, O.; Adamia, S.; Chkhitunidze, M.

2012-12-01

207

9. 'Central of Georgia' sign painted on the underside of ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. 'Central of Georgia' sign painted on the underside of arch spanning West Boundary Street. - Central of Georgia Railway, 1860 Brick Arch Viaduct, Spanning West Boundary Street & Savannah-Ogeechee Canal, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

208

5. DETAIL OF TRUSS MEMBERS, GUARDRAIL AND DECK TO Georgia ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. DETAIL OF TRUSS MEMBERS, GUARDRAIL AND DECK TO Georgia DOT BRIDGE No. 105-00168X-00203E - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 105-00168X-00203E, Spanning Beaverdam Creek at County Road 168, Elberton, Elbert County, GA

209

30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Division, pertaining to solid waste management. (5) Georgia Seed Laws and Rules and Regulations containing the Noxious Weed List. (f) The following are Georgia laws that interfere with the achievement of the purposes and requirements of the...

2013-07-01

210

40 CFR 282.60 - Georgia State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Georgia State-Administered Program. 282...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED...STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.60 Georgia State-Administered Program....

2013-07-01

211

Annotated Checklist of Georgia Birds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This edition of the checklist includes 446 species, of which 407 are on the Regular Species List, 8 on the Provisional, and 31 on the Hypothetical. This new publication has been greatly expanded and much revised over the previous checklist (GOS Occasional Publ. No. 10, 1986, 48 pp., 6x9 inches) to a 7?x10?-inch format with an extensive Literature Cited section added, 22 species added to the Regular List, 2 to the Provisional List, and 9 to the Hypothetical List. Each species account is much more comprehensive over all previous editions of the checklist. Among some of the new features are citations for sources of most information used, high counts of individuals for each species on the Regular List, extreme dates of occurrence within physiographic regions, a list of abbreviations and acronyms, and for each species the highest form of verifiable documentation given with its repository institution with a catalog number. This checklist is helpful for anyone working with birds in the Southeastern United States or birding in that region. Sykes' contribution to this fifth edition of the Annotated Checklist of Georgia Birds includes: suggestion of the large format and spiral binding, use of Richard A. Parks' painting of the Barn Owl on the front cover, use of literature citations throughout, and inclusion of high counts for each species. Sykes helped plan all phases of the publication, wrote about 90% of the Introduction and 84 species accounts (Osprey through Red Phalarope), designed the four maps in the introduction section and format for the Literature Cited, and with Giff Beaton designed the layout of the title page.

Beaton, G.; Sykes, P.W., Jr.; Parrish, J.W., Jr.

2003-01-01

212

ECOLOGICAL SURVEYS OF FOUR RIVER CORRIDORS IN GEORGIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Georgia's rivers are essential elements of its landscape that have undergone historical alteration and continue to experience rapid anthropogenic change. In an effort to compile a statewide assessment of the status and character of Georgia's higher-order streams and their floodplains, the Georgia River Survey undertook to examine a combination of qualitative and quantitative ecological attributes of the state's major watercourses

Ben N. Emanuel; R. Dean Hardy; Richard A. Milligan; Bryan L. Nuse

213

A Failed Experiment: Georgia's Tax Credit Scholarships for Private Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Georgia is one of seven states that currently allow tax credits for scholarships to private schools. Georgia's law was enacted in May 2008 in order to assist low income students to transfer out of low performing public schools. Operations under the new act began in late 2008. The law permits taxpayers in Georgia to reduce their annual state taxes…

Southern Education Foundation, 2011

2011-01-01

214

Georgia and the United States Constitution 1787-1789.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This pamphlet on revolutionary Georgia is one of a series designed for use in the state's public schools. The objective is to present a clear, concise picture of Georgia's history during the American Revolution. The first and major part of the text presents an historical summary. It describes how Georgia was an early and strong supporter of the…

Griffin, J. David

215

Georgia Health Policy Center Child Policy Briefs, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This set of briefs discuss state public policy and implications as they pertain to children in Georgia. The three briefs each address a single topic. The first, on benefits of child care for low-income children in Georgia, advocates implementation of the Georgia Early Learning Initiative (GELI) and details the program. The second brief, on the…

2002

216

Teachers' Perceptions of the Instructional Leadership Role of the Principal in Implementing Effective Instructional Leadership Practices to Prepare Students for the Georgia High School Graduation Test  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to build upon Askins's 2002 research by examining the perceptions of Georgia educators as it relates to the instructional leadership role of the principal in helping 11th- and 12th-grade teachers adjust to the newly implemented Georgia Performance Standards and high-stakes testing. This study used qualitative-dominant…

Holyfield, Beverly R.

2010-01-01

217

Replication of a Career Academy Model: The Georgia Central Educational Center and Four Replication Sites. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 101  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study surveyed four career academies in Georgia that replicated the model of the Georgia Central Educational Center (CEC), which integrates technical instruction and academics at the high school level. The findings of this study indicate that each site adhered to the major tenets of the CEC model: conducting a needs assessment, developing…

Detgen, Amy; Alfeld, Corinne

2011-01-01

218

Using Current Smoking Prevalence to Project Lung Cancer Morbidity and Mortality in Georgia by 2020  

PubMed Central

Introduction Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of disease and premature death in the United States. In Georgia, approximately 18% of adults smoke cigarettes, and 87% of men’s lung cancer deaths and 70% of women’s lung cancer deaths are due to smoking. From 2004–2008, the age-adjusted lung cancer incidence rate in Georgia was 112.8 per 100,000 population, and the mortality rate was 88.2 per 100,000 population. Methods The Georgia Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey was used to estimate trends in current adult smoking prevalence (1985–2010). Georgia smoking–attributable cancer mortality was estimated using a method similar to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Smoking-Attributable Morbidity, Mortality, and Economic Costs application. Data on cancer incidence (1998–2008) were obtained from the Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry, and data on cancer deaths (1990–2007) were obtained from the Georgia Department of Public Health Vital Records Program. Results From 1985 through 1993, the prevalence of smoking among Georgians declined by an average of 3% per year in men and 0.2% in women. From 2001 through 2008, lung cancer incidence rates declined in men and increased in women. Lung cancer mortality rates declined in men and women from 2000 through 2007. By 2020, Georgia lung cancer incidence rates are projected to decrease for men and increase for women. Lung cancer mortality is projected to decrease for both men and women. Conclusion The lung cancer mortality rates projected in this study are far from meeting the Healthy People 2020 goal (46 per 100,000 population). Full implementation of comprehensive tobacco-use control programs would significantly reduce tobacco-use–related morbidity and mortality.

Lavender, Antionette; Bayakly, Rana; Ray, Kenneth; Moon, Tamira

2013-01-01

219

Seasonal Patterns of CO2 and Water Vapor Exchange of 'Juncus roemerianus' Scheele in a Georgia Salt Marsh.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

CO2 and water vapor exchange studies of intact plants of black needle rush (Juncus roemerianus) were conducted in an undisturbed marsh community on Sapelo Island, Georgia. The seasonal patterns of the light and temperature responses of net photosynthesis,...

J. R. Giurgevich E. L. Dunn

1978-01-01

220

Nematodes of Scolytus scolytus F. in Eastern Georgia (Telas didi tsilachamias (Scolytus scolytus F.) Nematodofauna Agmosavlet Sakartveloshi).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The nematodes of Scolytus scolytus F. on elm were studied in 1965 - 1966 in Eastern Georgia. Six species of nematodes were observed and classified as follows: Sychnotylenchus intricati Ruhm, 1956; Bursaphelenchus xerokarterus (Ruhm, 1956) Goodey, 1960; Ec...

I. A. Kakuliya T. G. Devariani

1972-01-01

221

Social Resources and Change in Functional Health: Comparing Three Age Groups  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the mediating and moderating role of social resources on the association between age and change in functional health for three age groups of older adults. Data were provided by those in their 60s, 80s, and 100s who participated in the first two phases of the Georgia Centenarian study. Analyses confirmed the study's hypothesis…

Randall, G. Kevin; Martin, Peter; Bishop, Alex J.; Johnson, Mary Ann; Poon, Leonard W.

2012-01-01

222

Georgia Institute of Technology: Technology Policy and Assessment Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Technology Policy and Assessment Center (TPAC) at Georgia Institute of Technology performs "interdisciplinary research and analysis on technology-intensive issues." Sample projects include the High Tech Indicators Survey, which is used to generate indicators of national technological competitiveness, and a study that identified eight factors affecting managerial use of technology. The findings of this latter study were used to develop an interactive evaluative instrument, available on this website, which analysts and managers can use to assess the utilization prospects of their product. The TPAC website also profiles Hot Technologies, including overviews of who is doing the research, how much research is taking place and the prospects for technologies within the topic area.

223

Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 1998-99.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count factbook presents statistical data and examines trends for 10 indicators of children's well-being in Georgia. The indicators are: (1) low birthweight babies; (2) infant mortality; (3) child deaths; (4) teen deaths by accident, homicide, and suicide; (5) juvenile arrests; (6) reading and math scores on the Iowa Test of Basic Skills;…

Georgians for Children, Atlanta, GA.

224

Distribution of Phytoplankton in Georgia Lakes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is a data report presenting the species and abundance of phytoplankton in the 14 lakes sampled by the National Eutrophication Survey in the State of Georgia. Results from the calculation of several water quality indices are also included (Nygaard's T...

F. A. Morris M. K. Morris L. R. Williams W. D. Taylor F. A. Hiatt

1978-01-01

225

GSCA (Georgia School Counselors Association) Journal, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The articles presented in this journal issue include contributions that help meet the needs of all students. Six of the articles are based on programs presented at the Georgia School Counselor Association 2000 Fall Conference. The articles include: (1) "Effects of Group Counseling on Third Grade Students' Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement"…

Mullis, Fran, Ed.; McCarthy, Susan, Ed.

2001-01-01

226

Shenandoah New Community, Coweta County, Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is a proposal for assistance under the Title VII New Community Program. Long Acre Development, Inc., a corporation organized under the laws of the State of Georgia, has applied for a Federal Guarantee of up to $34,000,000 in debt obligations to...

1972-01-01

227

A fourth hominin skull from Dmanisi, Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Newly discovered Homo remains, stone artifacts, and animal fossils from Dmanisi, Republic of Georgia, provide a basis for better understand- ing patterns of hominin evolution and behavior in Eurasia ca. 1.77 mil- lion years ago. Here we describe a fourth skull that is nearly complete, lacking all but one of its teeth at the time of death. Both the maxillae

David Lordkipanidze; Abesalom Vekua; Reid Ferring; G. Philip Rightmire; Christoph P. E. Zollikofer; Marcia S. Ponce de León; Jordi Agusti; Gocha Kiladze; Alexander Mouskhelishvili; Medea Nioradze; Martha Tappen

2006-01-01

228

Automation at the University of Georgia Libraries.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents the design procedures, bibliographic system, file structures, acquisitions and circulation systems, functional implementation, and future development of the Managing Resources for University Libraries (MARVEL) data base at the University of Georgia Libraries, which accepts MARC input from OCLC and Library of Congress (LC) MARC tapes. (CWM)

Christoffersson, John G.

1979-01-01

229

77 FR 37727 - Georgia Disaster # GA-00039  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of GEORGIA dated 06/14/2012. Incident: Severe storms and flooding. Incident Period: 06/06/2012. Effective Date: 06/14/2012. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 08/13/2012. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date:...

2012-06-22

230

Industrial Hygiene Survey of Hitco, Atlanta, Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Worker exposures to small diameter glass fibers and noise were surveyed at Hitco (SIC-3231) in Atlanta, Georgia on August 7 and 9, 1973. The facility employed 77 persons. Personal and general area samples for airborne fibrous glass were collected for simu...

J. Dement

1973-01-01

231

Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 1996-97.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This factbook presents statistical data and examines trends for 10 indicators of children's well-being in Georgia. The indicators are: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) death rate of children ages 1 to 14 years; (4) kindergarten retention; (5) violent death rate of teenagers aged 15 to 19 years; (6) juvenile arrests; (7) youth…

Georgians for Children, Atlanta, GA.

232

Progressive Education in Georgia: Tradition or Reality?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite differences among progressive educators, they share the conviction that democracy means active participation by all citizens in the social, political, and economic decisions of their countries. The aim of this paper is to explore how Georgia is meeting goals and perspectives of progressive education by widely implementing civic education…

Kopaliani, Bella; Harnisch, Delwyn L.; Doliashvili, Nana; Guetterman, Timothy C.

2013-01-01

233

Georgia Turns to the West for Ideas  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Georgia, along with a number of other former Soviet countries, is rapidly reforming its higher-education system. Russian is being replaced by English in classrooms and textbooks. Western-trained professors are flooding campuses with new methods of teaching and liberal-arts courses are replacing vocational training. This change is part of broader…

Nemtsova, Anna

2008-01-01

234

Georgia's Surface-Water Resources and Streamflow Monitoring Network, 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Surface water provides 5 billion gallons per day, or 78 percent, of the total freshwater used (including thermoelectric) in Georgia (Fanning, 2003). Climate, geology, and landforms control the natural distribution of Georgia's water resources. Georgia is a 'headwaters' State, with most of the rivers beginning in northern Georgia and increasing in size downstream (see map at right for major watersheds). Surface water is the primary source of water in the northern one-half of the State, including the Atlanta metropolitan area, where limited ground-water resources are difficult to obtain. In Georgia, periodic droughts exacerbate competition for surface-water supplies. Many areas of Georgia also face a threat of flooding because of spring frontal thunderstorms and the potential for hurricanes from both the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. As the population of Georgia increases, these flood risks will increase with development in flood-risk zones, particularly in the coastal region.

Geological Survey (U.S.)

2008-01-01

235

Degradation of chicken feathers by Chrysosporium georgiae.  

PubMed

Using a baiting technique, Chrysosporium georgiae was isolated from chicken feathers. Twenty-eight different fungal isolates were evaluated for their ability to produce keratinase enzymes using a keratin-salt agar medium containing either white chicken feathers or a prepared feather keratin suspension (KS). The Chrysosporium species were able to use keratin and grow at different rates. Chrysosporium georgiae completely degraded the added keratin after 9 days of incubation. Degradation of feathers by C. georgiae was affected by several cultural factors. Highest keratinolytic activity occurred after 3 weeks of incubation at 6 and 8 pH at 30 degrees C. Chrysosporium georgiae was able to degrade white chicken feathers, whereas bovine and human hair and sheep wool were not degraded and did not support fungal growth. Addition of 1% glucose to the medium containing keratin improved fungal growth and increased enzyme production. Higher keratin degradation resulted in high SH accumulation and the utilization of the carbohydrate carbon in the medium resulted in high keto-acid accumulation but decreased ammonia accumulation. Supplementation of the keratin-salt medium with minerals such as NH4Cl and MgSO4 slightly increased mycelial growth, but decreased production of extracellular keratinase. Keratinase enzymes were very poorly produced in the absence of keratin, indicating its inducible nature. Analysis of endocellular keratinases in the mycelial homogenate indicated higher activity of intracellular keratinase as compared to the extracellular enzyme in culture filtrates. Chrysosporium georgiae was the most superior for keratinase production among the Chrysosporium species tested in the presence or absence of glucose. It produced more of the intracellular enzymes than the exocellular ones. PMID:10205889

el-Naghy, M A; el-Ktatny, M S; Fadl-Allah, E M; Nazeer, W W

1998-01-01

236

Black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) colonization of pig carrion in south Georgia.  

PubMed

The black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), is thought to colonize corpses 20-30 days postmortem. However, recent observations indicate this might not be true for all cases. Therefore, we conducted a study examining colonization by the black soldier fly and other Diptera on pig carrion in a plowed field in southern Georgia from 20 September through 21 February. Our data indicate black soldier flies could colonize a corpse within the first week after death. Knowing this information could prevent a serious mistake in estimating the time at which a corpse is colonized by this species. This study also represents the first record of Chrysomya rufifacies in Georgia. PMID:15831010

Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Sheppard, D Craig; Joyce, John A

2005-01-01

237

Affect and loneliness among centenarians and the oldest old: The role of individual and social resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Affect and loneliness are important indicators of mental health and well-being in older adulthood and are linked to significant outcomes including physical health and mortality. Given a large focus on young–old adults within gerontological research, the primary aim of this study was to examine the ability of individual and social resources in predicting affect and loneliness within a sample

Jennifer A. Margrett; Kate Daugherty; Peter Martin; Maurice MacDonald; Adam Davey; John L. Woodard; L. Stephen Miller; Ilene C. Siegler; Leonard W. Poon

2011-01-01

238

Religiosity and Adaptation in the Oldest-Old.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Findings from Georgia Centenarian Study of older adults (n=165; ages 60-100+) support earlier findings that religiosity does not change significantly as one ages, although trend in results suggests otherwise. Results indicated significant relationship between religiosity and physical health but no significant relationship between religiosity and…

Courtenay, Bradley C.; And Others

1992-01-01

239

The forensic pathology of nonagenarians and centenarians: do they die of old age? (The Auckland experience).  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to provide awareness of the common causes of death and their associated trends in the very aged. Forensic autopsies on patients aged >90 years were reviewed. The study lasted from January 1, 1988 to December 11, 1998 and was done in Auckland, New Zealand, the population of which is 1.3 million. Cases were divided into natural or unnatural deaths. Of the total of 319 cases, 272 (85%) deaths were natural. Of those, only 13 (5%) were "written off" as being attributed to old age or senile debility. The most common causes of death were ischemic heart disease (IHD), 74 cases (23%); bronchopneumonia, 37 cases (12%); fractures, 28 cases (9%); acute myocardial infarction, 25 cases (8%); cerebrovascular accident, 19 cases (6%); and ruptured aneurysm, 17 cases (5%); 61 (19%) deaths were multifactorial. Fractures, either as the primary cause of death or as a complicating factor, accounted for 29 cases, third only to IHD and bronchopneumonia. Forty-seven deaths (15%) were unnatural; of those, 43 were accidents, 3 were suicides, and 1 was a homicide. From these results it is clear that the very elderly succumb to disease; they do not often die of old age. PMID:11394748

John, S M; Koelmeyer, T D

2001-06-01

240

Very low birth weight births in Georgia, 1994–2005: trends and racial disparities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  To investigate the nature of very low birth weight (VLBW) births in Georgia—a major contributor to the overall and the black–white\\u000a disparity in infant mortality—as a step toward elucidating strategies for reducing VLBW births.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  This population-based retrospective cohort study utilized maternally linked vital records data from Georgia to examine the\\u000a status of and contributors to the VLBW rate for non-Hispanic

Anne L. DunlopHamisu; Hamisu M. Salihu; Gordon R. Freymann; Colin K. Smith; Alfred W. Brann

241

Mitochondria hyperfusion and elevated autophagic activity are key mechanisms for cellular bioenergetic preservation in centenarians  

PubMed Central

Mitochondria have been considered for long time as important determinants of cell aging because of their role in the production of reactive oxygen species. In this study we investigated the impact of mitochondrial metabolism and biology as determinants of successful aging in primary cultures of fibroblasts isolated from the skin of long living individuals (LLI) (about 100 years old) compared with those from young (about 27 years old) and old (about 75 years old) subjects. We observed that fibroblasts from LLI displayed significantly lower complex I-driven ATP synthesis and higher production of H2O2 in comparison with old subjects. Despite these changes, bioenergetics of these cells appeared to operate normally. This lack of functional consequences was likely due to a compensatory phenomenon at the level of mitochondria, which displayed a maintained supercomplexes organization and an increased mass. This appears to be due to a decreased mitophagy, induced by hyperfused, elongated mitochondria. The overall data indicate that longevity is characterized by a preserved bioenergetic function likely attained by a successful mitochondria remodeling that can compensate for functional defects through an increase in mass, i.e. a sort of mitochondrial “hypertrophy”.

Pinti, Marcello; Lanzarini, Catia; Ascione, Barbara; Gibellini, Lara; Dika, Emi; Patrizi, Annalisa; Tommasino, Chiara; Capri, Miriam; Cossarizza, Andrea; Baracca, Alessandra; Lenaz, Giorgio; Solaini, Giancarlo; Franceschi, Claudio; Malorni, Walter; Salvioli, Stefano

2014-01-01

242

A Survey of Pupil Transportation in Georgia. Monographs in Education No. 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this study was to describe student transportation programs in Georgia and to identify common areas of concern and common characteristics of these programs. The report summarizes the literature regarding transportation issues and the accumulated knowledge of experienced transportation managers. The study team met with the…

Carter, Martha S.; Doster, Priscilla

243

Annual Run Size and Genetic Characteristics of Atlantic Sturgeon in the Altamaha River, Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the Altamaha River, Georgia, once supported one of the largest fisheries for Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus in U.S. waters, the fishery was closed in 1997 because of severe overfishing. Since then, no studies have been conducted and population trends have remained unknown. The objective of this study was to estimate annual run size and age structure of the spring

Douglas L. Peterson; Paul Schueller; Rob DeVries; Joel Fleming; Cheryl Grunwald; Isaac Wirgin

2008-01-01

244

Teacher Job Satisfaction and Retention in a Suburban Georgia School District  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An investigation of the relationship between job satisfaction and retention among elementary, middle, and high school teachers in a suburban school district in Georgia was addressed in this mixed-methods study. The focus of the study was to determine the level of job satisfaction among the nine subscales of the Teacher Job Satisfaction…

Thompson, Denise G.

2008-01-01

245

Intergovernmental Collaboration in Emergency Management: The Case of the September 2009 Georgia Flood  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to explore the various aspects of intergovernmental collaboration in emergency management at the local, state, and federal level. It provides a descriptive analysis of how these mechanisms interact with each other for effective emergency management. Most importantly, this study provides a unique insight on how Georgia prepared for, mitigated against, responded to, and recovered

Mamadou M. Samba

2010-01-01

246

Georgia's HOPE Scholarship Program after 18 Years: Benefits, Unintended Consequences, and Changes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since its inception in 1993, Georgia's HOPE Scholarship Program has provided thousands of state residents the opportunity to pursue a college education. This study examines the history and recent changes to the merit-based program along with interesting consequences resulting from its implementation. This study demonstrates how the program has…

Condon, James V.; Prince, Lori H.; Stuckart, Erik B.

2011-01-01

247

Impacts of Land Cover on Stream Hydrology in the West Georgia Piedmont, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The southeastern United States is experiencing rapid urban development. Consequently, Georgia's streams areexperiencinghydro- logic alterations from extensive development and from other land use activities such as livestock grazing and silviculture. A study was per- formed to assess stream hydrology within 18 watersheds ranging from 500 to 2500 ha. Study streams were first, second, or third order and hydrology was continuously

Jon E. Schoonover; B. Graeme Lockaby; Brian S. Helms

2006-01-01

248

Transportation and Migrant Adjustment in Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Access to transportation is critical for functioning in modern American society, and minorities disproportionately lack access\\u000a to transportation. Latinos in Georgia—most of whom are newcomers to this country—are considerably less likely than non-Latino\\u000a whites to drive alone to and from work because they do not live in households with a car available for personal use. We propose\\u000a that this factor,

Stephanie A. Bohon; Katherine Stamps; Jorge H. Atiles

2008-01-01

249

Project Georgia High School/High Tech  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Georgia High School/High Tech has been developing a suggested curriculum for use in its programs. The purpose of this instructional material is to provide a basic curriculum format for teachers of High School/High Tech students. The curriculum is designed to implement QCC classroom instruction that encourages career development in technological fields through post-secondary education, paid summer internships, and exposure to experiences in high technology.

2000-01-01

250

Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (77th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 10-13, 1994). Part X: Miscellaneous Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Miscellaneous Studies section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 22 papers: "Men and Women Journalists in the Movies: Exploration of Some Sexism and Gender Issues in Their Portrayals in Eleven Films" (Albert D. Talbott); "Female Archetypes in Late '80s Films" (Fakhri Haghani); "Chain Ownership, Organizational…

Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

251

A comparison of storm-based and annual-based indices of hydrologic variability: a case study in Fort Benning, Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The magnitude, frequency, duration, timing, and rate of change of hydrologic conditions regulate ecological processes in aquatic\\u000a ecosystems. Conditions are typically characterized using annual-based hydrologic indices derived from daily and\\/or monthly\\u000a stream flow data. In this study, we present an alternative approach to identify hydrologic indices based on storm hydrographs.\\u000a Hydrologic indices derived from long-term daily flow data were compared

Shirish Bhat; Jennifer M. Jacobs; Kirk Hatfield; Wendy D. Graham

2010-01-01

252

77 FR 17465 - Georgia Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Project No. 2177-090] Georgia Power Company; Notice of Application...10, 2012. d. Applicant: Georgia Power Company. e. Name of...located on the Chattahoochee River in Harris and Muscogee Counties, Georgia, and Lee and Russell...

2012-03-26

253

78 FR 20091 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity, Perkins Shibaura...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...B-90-2012] Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity, Perkins Shibaura Engines, LLC (Diesel Engines), Griffin, Georgia On November 29, 2012, Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 26, submitted...

2013-04-03

254

75 FR 74624 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia: Stage II Vapor Recovery  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...to revisions to Georgia's Stage II gasoline vapor recovery rule at 391-3-1...to revisions to Georgia's Stage II gasoline vapor recovery rule at 391-3- 1...CAA and Georgia SIP Provisions A. Gasoline Vapor Recovery Provisions...

2010-12-01

255

Ground-water conditions in Georgia, 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water conditions in Georgia during 1999 and for the period of record were evaluated using data from U.S. Geological Survey ground-water-level and ground-water-quality monitoring networks. Data for 1999 included in this report are from continuous water-level records from 130 wells and chloride analyses from 14 wells. Data from one well is incomplete because data collection was discontinued. Chloride concentration in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer in most of coastal Georgia was within drinking-water standards established by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In the Savannah area, chloride concentration has not changed appreciably with time. However, chloride concentration in water from some wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system in the Brunswick area exceeds the drinking-water standards. Ground-water-level and ground-water-quality data are essential for water assessment and management. Ground-water-level fluctuations and trends can be used to estimate changes in aquifer storage resulting from the effects of ground-water withdrawal and recharge from precipitation. These data can be used to address water-management needs and to evaluate the effects of management and conservation programs. As part of the ground-water investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the State of Georgia and city and county governments, a Statewide water-level-measurement program was started in 1938. Initially, this program consisted of an observation-well network in the coastal area of Georgia to monitor variations in ground-water storage and quality. Additional wells were later included in areas where data could be used to aid in water resources development and management. During 1999, periodic water-level measurements were made in 46 wells, and continuous water-level measurements were obtained from 165 wells. Continuous water-level records were obtained using analog (pen and chart) recorders and electronic data recorders that record the water level at 60-minute intervals. For wells having incomplete water-level record, water levels during periods of missing record may have been higher or lower than recorded water levels. Water samples collected from 85 wells during May, June, July, August, September, October, November, and December 1999 were analyzed to determine chloride concentration in the Savannah and Brunswick areas.

Cressler, Alan M.

2000-01-01

256

What Should Georgia Students Know To Be Successful? A 1992 Validation Survey: Desired Outcomes for Students of Georgia Vocational-Technical Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A statewide survey was conducted by Georgia Assessment Project, Georgia State University during 1992 to determine if Georgia employers and educators agreed with Georgia policymakers that each of the 28 desired student outcomes (DSOs) was important to success in the workplace. Of 4,041 surveys mailed to a representative sample of educators and…

Fletcher, Gail

257

REPRESENTATION OF NUMBERS BY QUADRATIC FORMS. MAIN RESULTS OF THE RESEARCH DONE IN GEORGIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a survey of the main results obtained by the mathemati- cians of Georgia on the representation of natural numbers by integral qua- dratic forms before 2000. 1. Throughout the 19th century mathematicians were assiduously study- ing the arithmetic function rs(n) - the number of representations of a natural number n as a sum of s squares of integers.

GEORGE LOMADZE

258

Fish-Nursery Use in Georgia Salt-Marsh Estuaries: The Influence of Springtime Freshwater Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fish assemblage using shallow nursery habitats in the Ogeechee River-Ossabaw Sound salt-marsh estuary, Georgia, was investigated during the winter and spring of two successive years. High river discharges during these periods produced fully freshwater conditions (all tidal stages and amplitudes) in the upper portion of the study area for up to 4 months. Abundances of Atlantic croaker Micropogonias undulatus,

S. Gordon Rogers; Timothy E. Targett; Scott B. Van Sant

1984-01-01

259

Variations of turbulent flow with river discharge in the Altamaha River Estuary, Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Turbulent flow characteristics under two significantly different river discharge periods were studied in the Altamaha River Estuary, Georgia, using a variety of moored instrumentation, combined with detailed water column profiling from an anchored vessel. Estimates of the Reynolds stress, shear production (P), and dissipation rate ($\\\\varepsilon$) were derived and compared for the two contrasting river conditions which essentially characterized the

Daniela Di Iorio; Ki Ryong Kang

2007-01-01

260

Transport of pollutants in two estuarine systems on the coast of Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to examine the distribution of pollutants in two coastal systems in Georgia: (1) Kubitskali river which flows into the Black sea through the city of Batumi and is polluted mainly from the effluents of an oil refinery; (2) Paliastomi lake, which is a shallow water body at the south-east of the city of

M. Dassenakis; F. Botsou; V. Paraskevopoulou; C. Chikviladge; K. Kachiasvili

2006-01-01

261

SLIPPAGE IN FORECASTING IRRIGATION WATER DEMAND: AN APPLICATION TO THE GEORGIA FLINT RIVER BASIN  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study identifies the presence of slippage and the pitfalls associated with not considering economic substitution and expansion effects in measuring changes in water demand. Based on estimates from the Georgia Flint River Basin, the analysis indicates a 13% slippage caused by disregarding the role of economic determinants.

Irfan Y. Tareen; Lewell F. Gunter; Jimmy Bramblett; Michael E. Wetzstein

2002-01-01

262

How Far Is Georgia?: New Jersey's Teachers of Italian Evaluate Their Preparation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the professional preparation of Italian teachers in New Jersey through the lens of Cooper's (2004) investigation in Georgia, which determined how K-12 foreign language teachers perceived and evaluated the effectiveness of their professional preparation. Unfortunately, however, that report did not have an Italian representation.…

Antenos-Conforti, Enza

2008-01-01

263

Georgia's New Health Outlook. Digest of the Report of the Community Health Task Force.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A digest of a task force report concerning the major health problems of the State of Georgia is provided. The Community Health Task Force was formed to study the interaction of the environment with the physical, biological, and cultural aspects of communi...

1976-01-01

264

A Gender Analysis of Job Satisfaction Levels of Agricultural Education Teachers in Georgia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The over-arching premise of many concerning issues in secondary agricultural education may be directly related to levels of job satisfaction among teachers (Delnero & Weeks, 2000). The purpose of this study was to examine the factors that influenced the perceptions of job satisfaction/dissatisfaction among agricultural educators in Georgia. The…

Gilman, Donald; Peake, Jason B.; Parr, Brian

2012-01-01

265

Training Health Care Professionals to Manage Overweight Adolescents: Experience in Rural Georgia Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: The obesity epidemic threatens the present and future health of adolescents in the United States. Yet, health care providers lack specific training for pediatric obesity assessment and management. Purpose: This study examined the adherence of rural Georgia primary care practitioners to an overweight adolescent management protocol. The…

Dennison, David A.; Yin, Zenong; Kibbe, Debra; Burns, Susan; Trowbridge, Frederick

2008-01-01

266

Nutrition and Health Education Intervention for Whole Grain Foods in the Georgia Older Americans Nutrition Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of a nutrition education intervention on improving the intake and behaviors related to whole grain foods in congregate meal recipients in senior centers in north Georgia. Participants were a convenience sample and completed a pretest, an educational intervention, and a posttest (N = 84, mean age = 77 years, 88% female, 76% Caucasian, and 24%

Jeanna Ellis; Mary Ann Johnson; Joan G. Fischer; James L. Hargrove

2005-01-01

267

Selected Georgia Community Leadership Programs and Their Effect on Selected Leadership Practices of Program Alumni.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared the effectiveness of Georgia community leadership programs based on leadership skill development to that of programs based on issue discussion and networking. The Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI-Self) was adapted for community leaders and mailed to a stratified sample of 376 alumni of community leadership programs based on…

Taylor, Susan

268

Performance Indicators, Accountability, and Quality: An Analysis of Key Indicators at Two Georgia Postsecondary Institutions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Quality in higher education today is often measured by institutional accountability indicators. The purpose of this study was to examine trends and explore correlational relationships of the performance indicators deemed important to the stakeholders of two postsecondary institutions in the State of Georgia--retention rate, graduation rate, and…

Christopher, Minolar T.

2010-01-01

269

An Examination of Institutional Research Functions and Structures in Georgia Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the results of research conducted on the variation in structure and function of institutional research offices at 55 public and private postsecondary educational institutions in Georgia. The study examined five issues central to institutional research: (1) professional role identity, (2) location of the office in the…

Harrington, Charles; And Others

270

Economic Base and Population Analysis, Blue Ridge-McCaysville-Fannin County, Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the economic base and population analysis of Blue Ridge-McCaysville-Fannin County, Georgia. The report is divided into two sections: Section I: is the economic base study. This section of the analysis, analyzes and discusses various a...

1973-01-01

271

A Status Survey of the Elementary School Principalship in Georgia, 1969.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provides present and future elementary principals and interested persons with information about the actual role of the elementary school principal in Georgia. The survey identifies certain personal and professional characteristics of the elementary school principal and the practices under which the principalship operates. Topics…

Jarvis, Oscar T.; And Others

272

Historical Perspective and Future Prospects for the U.S., Georgia, and Southeast Beef Industry.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objectives of the study were to (1) evaluate changes in the United States beef industry between 1960 and 1975; (2) evaluate the geographic distribution of beef production and slaughter with emphasis on Georgia and the South; and (3) draw implications ...

J. C. Purcell J. C. Elrod

1976-01-01

273

PROXIMITY OF GEORGIA SANITARY LANDFILLS TO WETLANDS AND DEEPWATER HABITATS (B) DATA ON INDIVIDUAL LANDFILLS  

EPA Science Inventory

Sanitary landfill can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managed. The purpose of this report is to document the proximity of sanitary landfills included in this study in Georgia to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i.e. ...

274

Proximity of Georgia sanitary landfills to wetlands and deepwater habitats. Data on individual landfills  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sanitary landfills can cause considerable harm to sensitive ecosystems if they are not properly located, designed, and managed. This report documents the proximity of sanitary landfills included in the study in Georgia to wetlands and deepwater habitats (i.e., rivers, lakes, streams, bays, etc.). The sanitary landfills were identified on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Wetlands Inventory maps. The nearness

J. E. Moerlins; R. C. Herndon; V. W. Lambou; R. L. Gebhard

1989-01-01

275

Educational Goals of Automotive Mechanics Students Attending Postsecondary Vocational Institutes in Georgia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a study to develop a demographic profile of the 703 students enrolled in automotive mechanics courses at technical institutes in Georgia and to identify differences in the educational goals of different groups of automotive mechanics students (e.g., day/evening students, and different age, racial, and employment status groups). (MAB)

Silcox, James B.; Herren, Ray V.

1993-01-01

276

Georgia Elementary Law-Related Education Curriculum Supplements: Lessons for Fourth through Seventh Grade.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The lessons in this volume, written by experienced Georgia teachers with backgrounds in law-related education, were designed for teachers new to this area of the social studies curriculum. The lessons, which are grouped by grade level, include the following information: author, time required, concepts/vocabulary, instructional strategies,…

Hoge, John D., Ed.; Blum, Ann, Ed.

277

Black Soldier Fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) Colonization of Pig Carrion in South Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), is thought to colonize corpses 20-30 days postmortem. However, recent observations indicate this might not be true for all cases. Therefore, we conducted a study examining colonization by the black soldier fly and other Diptera on pig carrion in a plowed field in southern Georgia from 20 September through 21 February. Our data

Jeffery K. Tomberlin; D. Craig Sheppard; John A. Joyce

2005-01-01

278

DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON (DOC) CONCENTRATIONS IN SMALL STREAMS OF THE GEORGIA PIEDMONT  

EPA Science Inventory

Dissolved organic matter (DOM) supports microbial activity and contributes to transport of N and P in streams. We have studied the impact of land uses on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in 17 Georgia Piedmont headwater streams since January 2001. We classified the w...

279

HF Radar Measurements of Surface Currents at the Georgia Coast, 9 to 11 May 1978.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Described is a field experiment in which surface currents were measured by HF radar situated on the Georgia coast. The study area includes the waters of the Savannah River Delta, Wassaw Sound, and the adjacent inner continental shelf. Presented herein are...

M. M. Janopaul B. L. Weber

1980-01-01

280

Evaluation of Fungicide Timing Strategies for Control of Mummy Berry Disease of Rabbiteye Blueberry in Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mummy berry disease, caused by the fungus Monilinia vaccinii-corymbosi, is a persistent problem on rabbiteye blueberries in southern Georgia. Detailed information about the epidemiology of the disease in this production system is lacking, hence management strategies have relied on repeated applications of fungicide over a relatively long period of host development (from bud swell throughout bloom). This study evaluated various

H. Scherm; R. D. Stanaland

2001-01-01

281

Georgia's Grow-Your-Own Teacher Programs Attract the Right Stuff  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a shortage of educators and there are various factors that account for the lack of teachers. Millions of new teachers will be needed in the near future and the present study juxtaposes the vocational personality profiles of adolescents (N = 262) participating in Future Educators of America programs in Georgia to in-service teachers'…

Swanson, Peter B.

2011-01-01

282

Air Quality and Road Emission Results for Fort Stewart, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

The Directorate of Public Works Environmental & Natural Resources Division (Fort Stewart /Hunter Army Airfield) contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to monitor particulate matter (PM) concentrations on Fort Stewart, Georgia. The purpose of this investigation was to establish a PM sampling network using monitoring equipment typically used in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ''saturation sampling'', to determine air quality on the installation. In this initial study, the emphasis was on training-generated PM, not receptor PM loading. The majority of PM samples were 24-hr filter-based samples with sampling frequency ranging from every other day, to once every six days synchronized with the EPA 6th day national sampling schedule. Eight measurement sites were established and used to determine spatial variability in PM concentrations and evaluate whether fluctuations in PM appear to result from training activities and forest management practices on the installation. Data collected to date indicate the average installation PM2.5 concentration is lower than that of nearby urban Savannah, Georgia. At three sites near the installation perimeter, analyses to segregate PM concentrations by direction of air flow across the installation boundary indicate that air (below 80 ft) leaving the installation contains less PM2.5 than that entering the installation. This is reinforced by the observation that air near the ground is cleaner on average than the air at the top of the canopy.

Kirkham, Randy R.; Driver, Crystal J.; Chamness, Mickie A.; Barfuss, Brad C.

2004-02-02

283

'We are ordinary men': MSM identity categories in Tbilisi, Georgia.  

PubMed

Men who have sex with men remain largely absent from the health statistics of many Eastern European countries. This relative dearth compared to other parts of the world may be attributed to the generally hidden nature of this population. The tendency to employ Western sexual identity labels, rather than locally meaningful categories of identity, may also make it difficult to identify men who have sex with other men. In a pilot study of HIV risk in Tbilisi (Georgia), we used a suite of qualitative techniques - focus groups, individual semi-structured interviews and pile-sort exercises - to probe the opinions, knowledge and experiences of 65 Georgian men. We identified locally meaningful men-who-have-sex-with-men types, demonstrating a complex intersectionality of sexual preference, socio-economic status, behaviour and geography. Positioning within these types appeared to impact a man's exposure to the social stigma of homosexuality; the sexual, physical and mental health risks that he faced; and his access to treatment and counselling. Our results suggest the use of imported identity categories limits researchers' ability to identify men who have sex with other men in Georgia and that further research aimed at elucidating locally meaningful categories is needed - research likely to lead to more-effective group interventions and facilitate a better understanding of holistic individual health needs. PMID:20936552

Meyer, William; Costenbader, Elizabeth C; Zule, William A; Otiashvili, David; Kirtadze, Irma

2010-11-01

284

Perceptions and practice of waterbirth: a survey of Georgia midwives.  

PubMed

This study investigated the experience and perceptions of Georgia certified nurse-midwives about waterbirth and their level of support for establishing waterbirth in their work setting. A survey was distributed to a convenience sample of 119 certified nurse-midwives from the American College of Nurse Midwives, Georgia chapter; 45% of those surveyed responded. The majority of midwives had some exposure to waterbirth through self-education or through clinical practice. More than half supported the incorporation of waterbirth in their workplace setting. Maternal relaxation and reduced use of analgesia were perceived as the greatest benefit of waterbirth. Of 11 items related to disadvantages of waterbirth, certified nurse-midwives were moderately to severely concerned about none. The most concerning factors, with a mean of 2.4 to 2.5 on a scale of 1 (no worry) to 5 (severe worry), were maintenance of water temperature, physical stress on the midwife, and inability to see the perineum. Midwives' support for waterbirth focused mostly on the perceived benefits to the mother with little worry about the risks. PMID:20129230

Meyer, Shaunette L; Weible, Christopher M; Woeber, Kate

2010-01-01

285

Projecting Future Urbanization with Prescott College's Spatial Growth Model to Promote Environmental Sustainability and Smart Growth, A Case Study in Atlanta, Georgia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Planning is an integral element of good management and necessary to anticipate events not merely respond to them. Projecting the quantity and spatial distribution of urban growth is essential to effectively plan for the delivery of city services and to evaluate potential environmental impacts. The major drivers of growth in large urban areas are increasing population, employment opportunities, and quality of life attractors such as a favorable climate and recreation opportunities. The spatial distribution of urban growth is dictated by the amount and location of developable land, topography, energy and water resources, transportation network, climate change, and the existing land use configuration. The Atlanta region is growing very rapidly both in population and the consumption of forestland or low-density residential development. Air pollution and water availability are significant ongoing environmental issues. The Prescott Spatial Growth Model (SGM) was used to make growth projections for the metropolitan Atlanta region to 2010,2020 and 2030 and results used for environmental assessment in both business as usual and smart growth scenarios. The Prescott SGM is a tool that uses an ESRI ArcView extension and can be applied at the parcel level or more coarse spatial scales and can accommodate a wide range of user inputs to develop any number of growth rules each of which can be weighted depending on growth assumptions. These projections were used in conjunction with meteorological and air quality models to evaluate future environmental impacts. This presentation will focus on the application of the SGM to the 13-County Atlanta Regional Commission planning jurisdiction as a case study. The SGM will be described, including how rule sets are developed and the decision process for allocation of future development to available land use categories. Data inputs required to effectively run the model will be discussed. Spatial growth projections for ten, twenty, and thirty year planning horizons will be presented and results discussed, including regional climate and air quality impacts.

Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Crosson, William; Limaye, Ashutosh; Johnson, Hoyt; Quattrochi, Dale; Lapenta, William; Khan, Maudood

2006-01-01

286

Integration of InSAR results from TerraSAR-X with ALOS (PALSAR) data for landslide area, case study from Sachkhere region, Georgia.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landslides are complex phenomena. Each zone within the landslide may have a different behavior, especially if the landslides extends several hundred meters or more. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a good technique to detect deformation that covers areas of several kilometers. 2-pass interferometry, persistent scatterer interferometry (PS-InSAR) and the small baseline subset (SBAS) approaches were used in this work to study landslide behavior in more detail. In our work, we used two different types of SAR (ALOS and TerraSAR-X) imagery to identify the stability of landslide-prone areas. Interferograms from TerraSAR-X imagery may detect faster ground movements easier due to the short repeat cycle (11 days) with a higher accuracy, because of the short wavelength (3.1 cm) and the high spatial resolution (1m). L-band InSAR generates better results in vegetated areas due to the long wavelength (23.6 cm) and has a good ability to form long-term interferograms. Interferograms from descending TerraSAR-X imagery (observations are made from the east) show one part of the landslide, which moves several centimeters per month. By stacking ascending ALOS data (observations are made from the west) of a long time interval (2007-2010), we detect a different part of the same landslide moving at several millimeters per year. We observed that the combination of imagery with different wavelength and different methods, provide a wide picture of the velocity field in different parts of the landslide.

Nikolaeva, Elena; Walter, Thomas R.

2013-04-01

287

Manpower Requirements Report to 1980: Jobs for University of Georgia Graduates in Georgia and the Nation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This preliminary model deals with manpower requirements to 1980 and jobs for University of Georgia graduates. Emphasis is placed on suggested methodology for dealing with a projected output of graduates in terms of speciality fields and the correlation of this projected output with projected manpower requirements in the related speciality fields.…

Lechowicz, Joseph S.

288

Behavioral Treatment + Naltrexone Reduces Drug Use and Legal Problems in the Republic of Georgia  

PubMed Central

Background Known drug-users in the Republic of Georgia are 99% male. Georgian social context includes close family social structure, intense police scrutiny over daily life, and minimal social service infrastructure. Drug use is dangerous and individuals rely on family support to address socially-stigmatizing problems. Objectives To examine the changes in problem severity over time experienced by 40 adult opioid-injecting men with drug-free female partners in the Republic of Georgia who participated in a randomized clinical trial examining the feasibility and efficacy of a 22-week comprehensive intervention that paired behavioral treatment with naltrexone. Methods This secondary data analysis study examined results from a project that had randomized participants to either a comprehensive intervention that paired behavioral treatment with naltrexone or usual care and examined changes in Addiction Severity Index (ASI) composite scores. Results The comprehensive intervention showed three times the decline in ASI Drug Use and Legal composite scores than did the usual care condition in males in the Republic of Georgia, both ps<.009. Conclusion Results suggest that the use of a comprehensive behavioral intervention paired with naltrexone leads to significant reductions in drug use and legal problems in opioid-injecting males in the Republic of Georgia. Scientific Significance A comprehensive intervention that paired behavioral treatment with naltrexone provides a promising approach to protect drug users against relapse and legal risks.

Kirtadze, Irma; Otiashvili, David; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Jones, Hendree E.

2012-01-01

289

Running around in Circles: Quality Assurance Reforms in Georgia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigates the implementation of a quality assurance system in Georgia as a particular case of "Bologna transplant" in a transitioning country. In particular, the article discusses to what extent new concepts, institutions and models framed as "European" have been institutionalised in Georgia. Based on an outcome…

Jibladze, Elene

2013-01-01

290

The Georgia Psychoeducational Network (GPN) Research Report, 1989.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of papers includes five articles on the education of students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders participating in the Georgia Psychoeducational Network Program (GPN). "Training Needs of Fully Certified BD Teachers in the Georgia Psychoeducational Network" (Robert J. Stansberry) found, in a survey of 203 certified teachers…

Swan, William W., Ed.; Brown, Carvin L., Ed.

1989-01-01

291

Focus on the Future of Georgia 1970-1985.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of the Georgia Assessment Project (GAP), initiated in January 1969 to provide statewide measurement of the impact of educational programs, services, and resources on children and youth, 19 position papers were prepared by specialists to assist the Advisory Commission on Education Goals. The papers, some with critiques, concern Georgia's…

Schabacker, William H., Ed.; And Others

292

The Evolution of the Georgia Tech Library Circulation Department  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author reviews the evolution of the Circulation Department at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) Library and Information Center from 2001 to the present. It is shown how a traditional circulation department with poor customer relations transformed itself by adopting innovative policies and services leading to improved customer…

Glover, Karen

2006-01-01

293

Getting Disability-Specific Resources to Teachers in Rural Georgia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes efforts to address the shortage of special educators in rural Georgia by supplying regular education teachers with information and resources to teach disabled students. Since 1969, the Georgia Center for Students with Disabilities (GCSD) has provided yearly comprehensive medical and psychoeducational evaluations to…

Dirst, Stephanie

294

TRENDS IN SALINITIES AND FLUSHING TIMES OF GEORGIA ESTUARIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1973-1992, the Georgia EPD sponsored a monitoring program in which surface salinities were sampled regularly at fixed stations in many of Georgia's estuaries. We used these data to examine changes in the salinities and flushing times of the Savannah, Ogeechee, Altamaha, Satilla, and St. Marys estuaries over the period of record. Water-year average salinities increased slightly over time in

Merryl Alber; Joan E. Sheldon

295

WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING TOOLS FOR GEORGIA RIVER BASINS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents water resources management and planning tools proposed for Georgia watersheds. The proposed water resources management and planning tools consist of a hydrologic model, a water management model, and a cumulative hydrologic impact assessment or scenario analysis tool. The Hydrological Simulation Program - FORTRAN (HSPF) is selected to model streamflow data for Georgia watersheds (Bicknell et al., 2001).

Yusuf Mohamoud

296

Family Planning Services: Focus for State Initiative, Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Information is provided on family planning services in Georgia in an attempt to aid other States in the development of effective approaches to family planning service delivery. Estimates of need were made in 1975 among three groups of women in Georgia at ...

1975-01-01

297

Understanding and Using the Georgia Principal Assessment System (GPAS).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Georgia Principal Assessment System (GPAS) is a set of practically administered instruments and procedures for assessing performances of school principals. The instruments and procedures were developed over a four-year period of Project Results Oriented Management in Education (Project ROME) at the University of Georgia. Each of the…

Ellett, Chad D.

1978-01-01

298

Environmental radionuclide distribution in Georgia after the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric Chernobyl-released radioactivity, assessed at about 2 x 10{sup 18} Bq, caused global environmental contamination. Contaminated air masses appeared in the Transcaucasian region in early May, 1986. Rains that month promoted intense radionuclide deposition all over Georgia. The contamination level of western Georgia considerably exceeded the contamination level of eastern Georgia. The Black Sea coast of Georgia suffered from the Chernobyl accident as much as did strongly contaminated areas of the Ukraine and Belarus`. Unfortunately, governmental decrees on countermeasures against the consequences of the Chernobyl accident at that time did not even refer to the coast of Georgia. The authors observed the first increase in radioactivity background in rainfall samples collected on May 2, 1986, in Tbilisi. {gamma}-Spectrometric measurements of aerosol filters, vegetation, food stuffs, and other objects, in addition to rainfall, persistently confirmed the occurrence of short-lived radionuclides, including {sup 131}I. At first, this fact seemed unbelievable, because the Chernobyl accident had occurred only 4-5 days earlier and far from Georgia. However, these arguments proved to be faulty. Soon, environmental monitoring of radiation in Georgia became urgent. Environmental radionuclide distribution in Georgia shortly after the Chernobyl accident, as well as the methods of analysis, are reported in this paper.

Mosulishvili, L.M.; Shoniya, N.I.; Katamadze, N.M. [Institute of Physics, Tbilisi, Georgia (Russian Federation)] [and others

1994-01-01

299

The Stamp Act in Georgia, 1765-1766.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effects of the Stamp Act in the Colony of Georgia in 1765 are explored. The pamphlet is one in a series of materials about the American Revolution in Georgia. Designed for junior and senior high school students, it can be used as supplementary reading or a short unit. A teacher's guide is included. The Stamp Act was levied by Britain to force the…

Cook, James F.

300

Atlanta, Georgia as seen from STS-62  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport is visible to the south of Atlanta, situated near the center of the photograph. Dobbins Air Force Base and the city of Marietta can also be seen to the north of Atlanta in this south-looking low-oblique view. The complex system of transportation routes and interstate highways surrounding and traversing Atlanta can also be seen in the photograph. The white dot near the center of the photograph is the Georgia Dome, a major sports and entertainment complex in downtown Atlanta. The Stone Mountain Memorial, with its enormous relief carvings of Confederate figures, is located east of Atlanta and is visible on the photograph.

1994-01-01

301

Ground-water data for Georgia, 1987  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report was prepared in cooperation with the State of Georgia; Chatham County; Glynn County; the cities of Brunswick and Valdosta; and the Albany Water, Gas, and Light Commission. This report is the culmination of a concerted effort by dedicated personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey who collected, compiled, analyzed, verified, and organized the data, and who edited and assembled the report. In addition to the authors, who had primary responsibility for assuring that the information contained herein is accurate, complete, and adheres to Geological Survey policy and established guidelines, the following individuals contributed significantly to the collection, processing, and tabulation of the data:

Joiner, C. N.; Reynolds, M. S.; Stayton, W. L.; Boucher, F. G.

1988-01-01

302

Report of a Planning Conference for Solar Technology Information Transfer in Georgia (Atlanta, Georgia, July 24-25, 1978).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A summary of the deliberations of the Georgia planning conference of the Solar Technology Transfer Program is presented in this report. Topic areas include background information on the Georgia conference and a summary of the discussions and recommendations dealing with solar information transfer within state systems and the need for greater…

Aldridge, Mark C., Ed.

303

Sedimentary and atmospheric sources of iron around South Georgia, Southern Ocean: a modelling perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In high-nutrient low-chlorophyll waters of the western Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, an intense phytoplankton bloom is observed annually north of South Georgia, most likely due to an enhanced supply of the limiting micronutrient iron. Shallow sediments and atmospheric dust deposition are believed to be the main iron sources. However, their relative importance is still unclear and in the South Georgia region have yet not been ascertained because iron measurements are very few. In this study, we use austral summer dissolved iron (dFe) data around South Georgia (January and February 2008) with a coupled regional hydrodynamic and biogeochemical model to investigate natural iron fertilization around the island. The biogeochemical component of the model includes an iron cycle, where sediments and dust deposition are the sources of iron to the ocean. The model captures the characteristic flow patterns around South Georgia, hence simulating a large phytoplankton bloom to the north, i.e., downstream, of the island. Modelled dFe concentrations agree well with observations (mean difference and root mean square errors of ~0.02 nM and ~0.81 nM) and form a large plume to the north of the island that extends eastwards for more than 800 km. In agreement with observations, highest dFe concentrations are located along the coast and decrease with distance from the island. Sensitivity tests indicate that most of the iron measured in the main bloom area originates from the coast and the very shallow shelf-sediments (depths < 20 m) while dust deposition plays a minor role, with almost no effects on surface chlorophyll a concentrations. Iron sources such as run-off not represented explicitly in the model, but that likely contribute to the iron plumes observed around South Georgia, are also discussed together with the potential effects their temporal variability may have on the system.

Borrione, I.; Aumont, O.; Nielsdóttir, M. C.; Schlitzer, R.

2013-07-01

304

Bugaboo Fire Rages in Georgia and Florida  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Subtropical Storm Andrea apparently did little to quench numerous large wildfires burning in the U.S. Southeast in early May 2007. On May 11, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Terra satellite captured this image, the remnants of the storm had dwindled to a small ball of clouds in the Atlantic Ocean, and huge plumes of smoke snaked across Georgia, Florida, and the Gulf of Mexico. Areas where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. A huge fire is burning in and near the Okefenokee Swamp, which straddles the state line between Georgia and Florida. For logistical purposes, fire officials are calling the part of the fire in Florida the Florida Bugaboo Fire and the part in Georgia the Bugaboo Scrub Fire. The distinction is simply administrative, however; in reality, it is single, continuous swath of burning timber, swamp land, grass, and scrubland. The blaze was more than 133,000 thousand acres as of May 11, and it appeared to be spreading on virtually all perimeters at the time of the image, with active fire locations detected in a circle that surrounds an already burned (or partially burned) area. According to reports form the Southern Area Coordination Center, the fire grew by at least 20,000 acres on May 10. Numerous communities were threatened and hundreds of people were evacuated, while parts of Interstate 10 were closed to all but emergency vehicles. To the northeast of the Bugaboo Fire, other large wildfires were burning in Georgia as well. The Floyds Prairie Fire, to the immediate north, was threatening endangered species and their habitat, while farther north the 116,000-plus-acre Sweat Farm Road/Big Turnaround Complex Fire was still burning in the area south of the city of Waycross, nearly a month after the fires first started in mid-April. Southern Georgia and Florida are in the grip of moderate to extreme drought. The state line area where the Bugaboo Fire is burning is one of the areas in extreme drought. The extremely dry fuels, including easily flammable pine forests and plantations, and the rugged, isolated stretches of terrain, make fire officials think that these fires will continue to burn for a long time. Although extreme fire behavior may decline, smoldering and creeping fire will probably continue until heavy rain - possibly a hurricane - drenches the area. The large image provided above has a spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response Team provides the image in additional resolutions. The group also provides twice-daily subset images of the United States in a variety of resolutions and formats, including and infrared-enhanced version that emphasizes the burn scars.

2007-01-01

305

Hardwood fuelwood in North Georgia: resources, utilization and harvesting  

SciTech Connect

Broadleaved species comprise 58% of the total growing stock and 36% of these trees are less than 11 inch d.b.h. in the mountains of N. Georgia, USA. Use of broadleaved trees for pulp, composite boards and fuel has increased, but has not begun to approach the annual increment. A study was made of harvesting costs with a small skidder and a skyline yarder. The small skidder performed well in harvesting small trees on slopes less than 20%, but was underused in the test area leading to large av. costs. The yarder had quite fast turn round cycles. Average logging costs for fuelwood harvest would be reasonable if the machines were used to their capacity and worked by experienced operators. It is concluded that the broadleaved species will remain underutilized until greater demand causes increased prices. 20 references.

Cubbage, F.W.; Saucier, J.R.

1985-01-01

306

A HISTORICAL ANALYSIS OF RIVER FLOODING AT SELECT NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE RIVER FORECAST LOCATIONS IN GEORGIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

River flooding has played a significant role in Georgia's history of natural disasters. As recent as July 1994, heavy rainfall from the remnants of Tropical Storm Alberto caused some of the worst river flooding in Georgia's history. In April of 2000, the Georgia Emergency Management Agency reported that nearly 75 percent of Georgia's disaster losses since 1990 had been linked

Jeff C. Dobur

307

Georgia Regents University Minority-Based CCOP (GHSU MB-CCOP) - National Cancer Institute  

Cancer.gov

The Georgia Regents University (GRU) is located in Augusta, Georgia, 145 miles east of Atlanta. Founded in 1828, Georgia Regents University is home to the Medical College of Georgia, the 13th-oldest continuously operating medical school in the United States and the third-oldest in the Southeast.

308

Bioarchaeological research development in Georgia: steps, peculiarities, directions.  

PubMed

In Georgia, Bioarcheology in its broad sense started developing with the research in Paleoanthropology and Paleopathology. Paleoanthropology initially developed in line with Archaeology. The study of biomaterial through the angle of paleopathology started in 1956. Later works were devoted to Ethnogenesis, comparative Anthropology, spreading physiological stresses and other issues. In recent years newly discovered rich archeological materials and introduction of the modern methods of research has outlined new prospects, and our decision is to put them in to action. From our point of view the research methods and aims of Bioarchaeology include: 1. morphological study of biomaterial on the macroscopic level. 2. The research through chemical methods which gives us an opportunity to outline many parameters of life such as eating habits, the aspects of interrelation with the environment and metabolic processes through the spectrum analysis of main ingredients of material. The important part of this direction is the researching of stable isotopes which gives us additional and strong arguments. 3. Genetic research answers the following important questions: biomaterial's variety; racial and ethnic origin; time and place of migration processes traced on ethnogenesis; hereditary disease history (dating, the origin of the diseases, epidemics and other); human and animal genome evolution and mutational changes; the role of environment (food, ecosystems) in genome changes. The results of the above mentioned research allow answering a lot of important historical and biomedical issues. From these, we have started the comparative analyses of the Genographic data of Georgia, taking notes of the genetic changes which, in our opinion, are caused by the radical and stable changes of eating habits produced about 450-500 years ago, which probably resulted proportional imbalance of the diseases that appeared in the same period. PMID:23131989

Shengelia, R; Bitadze, L; Laliashvili, Sh

2012-10-01

309

Altamaha River Delta, Georgia Sea Islands  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The history of sea islands in the Altamaha River delta on the coast of Georgia is revealed in this image produced from data acquired by the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR), developed and operated by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The outlines of long-lost plantation rice fields, canals, dikes and other inlets are clearly defined. Salt marshes are shown in red, while dense cypress and live oak tree canopies are seen in yellow-greens.

Agricultural development of the Altamaha delta began soon after the founding of the Georgia Colony in 1733. About 25 plantations were located on the low-lying islands and shores by the 19th century, taking advantage of the rich alluvial flow and annual inundation of water required by some crops. The first major crop was indigo; when demand for that faded, rice and cotton took its place. A major storm in 1824 destroyed much of the town of Darien (upper right) and put many of the islands under 20 feet of water. The Civil War ended the plantation system, and many of the island plantations disappeared under heavy brush and new growth pine forests. Some were used as tree farms for paper and pulp industries, while the Butler Island (center left) plantation became a wildlife conservation site growing wild sea rice for migrating ducks and other waterfowl. Margaret Mitchell is reputed to have used the former owner of the Butler Plantation as a basis for the Rhett Butler character in her novel 'Gone With The Wind,' taking the first name from Rhett's Island (lower right).

These data were obtained during a 1994-95 campaign along the Georgia coast. AIRSAR's ability to detect vegetation canopy density, hydrological features and other topographic characteristics is a useful tool in landscape archaeology. AIRSAR flies aboard a NASA DC-8 based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The analysis on the data shown was accomplished by Dr. Gary Mckay, Department of Archaeology and Geography, and Ian Morrison, Department of Archaeology, both of the University of Edinburgh (Scotland). AIRSAR is part of NASA's Earth Enterprise program. JPL is managed by the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.

2001-01-01

310

The University of Georgia Cooperative Extension  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With a mix of agricultural tips, camping suggestions, and canning advice, the University of Georgia's Cooperative Extension site serves up a cornucopia of materials designed to serve the diverse needs of the state's residents. The homepage has three primary sections, including "Agriculture & Natural Resources", "Family & Consumer Sciences", and "4-H & Youth Development". Each of these sections is distinguished by cooperative agent information, email newsletters, and fact sheets. Also on the homepage is the "Hot List", which offers quick links to the UGA's Master Gardener's program, resources for educators, and agricultural forecasts. The "Current News & Events" area is a true delight, and headlines like "Helping Haiti" and "People, mice head indoors for winter" will inform and draw visitors in for more.

2011-01-28

311

Low-flow frequency of Georgia streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Analyses of low-flow data and tabulation of computed low-flow frequency are presented for all stream sites in Georgia where suitable flow records have been collected. These include 147 continuous-record gaging stations and 102 partial-record gaging stations. Frequency records for gaging stations with short records have been adjusted where possible so as to more nearly represent results that would have been obtained from longer records. Areal variations in low-flow characteristics are indicated and the relationship of these characteristics to geology are discussed. Streamflow (per square mile of drainage area) during dry weather periods is generally greatest in the Blue Ridge province in the northern part of the State and in the upper zone of the Coastal Plain below the Fall Line. It is generally smallest in the lower zone of the Coastal Plain. Low streamflow in the Valley and Ridge and the Piedmont provinces is generally in an intermediate range. (Woodard-USGS)

Carter, R. F.; Putnam, S. A.

1978-01-01

312

University of Georgia Libraries: Historical Maps Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Georgia Libraries has a remarkable resource in the Hargrett Rare Book & Manuscript Library. The library maintains a collection of more than 1,000 historic maps spanning nearly 500 years from the 16th to the 20th centuries. Many of the maps detail the history of the state, but still others cover medieval Europe, colonial Africa, and more. A good way to start is by clicking on the Title category. Visitors will find that this area contains "An Accurate Map of North and South Carolina" by Henry Mouzon and his colleagues from 1775, along with 36 other items. Visitors can browse through all the maps here by title, creator, facets, or century. They can also search by keyword, title, author, or year of creation. Users looking for an entry into this collection could type in military, Savannah, or Atlanta.

313

History of the University of Georgia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While the Digital Library of Georgia has many fine projects and online documents, this is one of their latest additions. This massive history (over 3000 pages!) was written by Thomas Walter Reed, the longtime registrar of the University. After presenting the work to the University, Mr. Reed remarked, "It is not such as I would call anything like a finished piece of work, but it may do some good to file it away." The work has long been a favorite of researchers within the Hargrett Rare Book & Manuscript Library, and is now available in its original form online. Divided into 19 chapters, the work deals with the presidents of the Universities, the physical development of the campus, and its student life, along with containing a general profile of all the graduating classes. The document offers a first-hand perspective into one of the South's major universities, and one that researchers will be glad to have available with such ease.

Reed, Thomas W.

314

Natural Disasters and Surface and Subsurface Water Pollution Risk Assessment for Some Regions of Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present paper, some hydrological specifications of Georgian water resources are presented. The river Rioni's possible\\u000a pollution by oil in a period of flooding is studied by numerical modelling. Some results of the investigation of pollution\\u000a of Georgia's largest river, the River Kura, are also given. With the purpose of studying subsurface water pollution by oil\\u000a in case of

T. Davitashvili

315

Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report, FY 1998.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In Fiscal Year 1998, the Georgia Water Resources Institute (GWRI) was involved in a wide range of activities. This report summarizes research, education, technology transfer, and information dissemination activities supported through the WRRI Competitive ...

1998-01-01

316

Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Georgia  

SciTech Connect

This document is a collection of spreadsheets detailing in a county by county manner the agricultural crop, agricultural wastes, municipal wastes, and industrial wastes in Georgia that are potential biomass energy sources.

Not Available

1988-11-01

317

CHE At Georgia Tech: A Period of Transition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents information on the Georgia Institute of Technology. This information includes: (1) a brief history of the institute; (2) names of the faculty members of the chemistry and metallurgy divisions; (3) undergraduate program; and (4) graduate program. (HM)

Poehlein, Gary W.

1980-01-01

318

Future Land Use and Major Thoroughfare Plan, Forest Park, Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report contains an updated land use and thoroughfare plan for the Forest Park, Georgia, planning area. The report recommends specific policies which the local government should follow in guiding future land development. In updating the original 1962 p...

1971-01-01

319

Adult Education in Savannah, Georgia 1765-1789  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advertisements in Savannah, Georgia, newspapers from 1765 through 1789 offered adults leisure-related topics for learning such as drawing, language, music and self-defense through private venture schools. (DS)

Long, Huey B.

1973-01-01

320

View looking SE inside Electrical Shop Central of Georgia ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View looking SE inside Electrical Shop - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Electrical Shop, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

321

HLA-B*5701 genetic screening prior to abacavir prescription in Georgia.  

PubMed

A hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir develops in approximately 2-8% of HIV patients receiving this drug and is strongly associated with presence of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*5701. Screening for HLA-B*5701 reduces the risk of developing an abacavir hypersensitivity reaction. The carriage rate of HLA-B*5701 has not been studied in Georgia before 2009. Objective of the study was to determine HLA-B*5701 prevalence in HIV-infected patients in Georgia. One hundred and sixty HIV positive patients attending Georgian Infectious Diseases, AIDS and Clinical Immunology Research Center in 2009 were recruited for the study. None of the patients had previously been treated with abacavir. Blood samples were collected and screened for HLA-B*5701 prior to abacavir prescription. Of 160 patients recruited 9 tested HLA B*5701 positive - 5.6% (95% CI: 2.6-10.4%). Of these nine patients 7 were males (male prevalence: 6.5%, 95% CI: 2.6-12.9 %) and 2 females (female prevalence: 4.8%, 95% CI: 0.6-16.2%). The first prospective study of HLA-B*5701 prevalence in Georgia show similar results to the results of other studies. Abacavir still remains one of the key drugs of antiretroviral regimens in Georgia and other countries. Therefore, prospective HLA-B*5701 screening should be implemented in all settings where abacavir is widely used to guide selection of ART regimens and to reduce the risk of potentially life threatening hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:21252404

Dvali, N; Chkhartishvili, N; Sharvadze, L; Karchava, M; Tsertsvadze, T

2010-12-01

322

Upper-crustal structure beneath the Strait of Georgia, Southwest British Columbia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new three-dimensional (3-D) P-wave velocity model for the upper-crustal structure beneath the Strait of Georgia, southwestern British Columbia based on non-linear tomographic inversion of wide-angle seismic refraction data. Our study, part of the Georgia Basin Geohazards Initiative (GBGI) is primarily aimed at mapping the depth of the Cenozoic sedimentary basin and delineating the near-surface crustal faults associated with recent seismic activities (e.g. M = 4.6 in 1997 and M = 5.0 in 1975) in the region. Joint inversion of first-arrival traveltimes from the 1998 Seismic Hazards Investigation in Puget Sound (SHIPS) and the 2002 Georgia Basin experiment provides a high-resolution velocity model of the subsurface to a depth of ~7 km. In the southcentral Georgia Basin, sedimentary rocks of the Cretaceous Nanaimo Group and early Tertiary rocks have seismic velocities between 3.0 and 5.5 kms-1. The basin thickness increases from north to south with a maximum thickness of 7 (+/-1) km (depth to velocities of 5.5 kms-1) at the southeast end of the strait. The underlying basement rocks, probably representing the Wrangellia terrane, have velocities of 5.5-6.5 kms-1 with considerable lateral variation. Our tomographic model reveals that the Strait of Georgia is underlain by a fault-bounded block within the central Georgia Basin. It also shows a correlation between microearthquakes and areas of rapid change in basin thickness. The 1997/1975 earthquakes are located near a northeast-trending hinge line where the thicknesses of sedimentary rocks increase rapidly to the southeast. Given its association with instrumentally recorded, moderate sized earthquakes, we infer that the hinge region is cored by an active fault that we informally name the Gabriola Island fault. A northwest-trending, southwest dipping velocity discontinuity along the eastern side of Vancouver Island correlates spatially with the surface expression of the Outer Island fault. The Outer Island fault as mapped in our seismic tomography model is a thrust fault that projects directly into the Lummi Island fault, suggesting that they are related structures forming a fault system that is continuous for nearly 90 km. Together, these inferred thrust faults may account for at least a portion of the basement uplift at the San Juan Islands.

Dash, R. K.; Spence, G. D.; Riedel, M.; Hyndman, R. D.; Brocher, T. M.

2007-08-01

323

The Lived Experience of Low-Income Minority Students Who Receive State Merit Aid at a Georgia Postsecondary Institution  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore how junior level students at a Georgia postsecondary institution perceived their college experiences were impacted by the meritbased aid they received. The study employed a phenomenological method and was based on Tinto's psycho-social-economic-organizational model, from "Theories of college student…

Grant, Michelle A.

2010-01-01

324

Rural Schooling in Georgia: The Experiences of a Minority Community Service Organization Involved in Local School Decision-Making Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation study was a descriptive case study of a minority community service organization whose members were actively involved in local school decision-making and activities in a rural Northeast Georgia community. Rural schools face unique challenges in light of current educational trends. To address the challenges, rural schools must…

Lowe, Cynthia Louise Altman

2010-01-01

325

On Climate, Desertification And Water Pollution Problems For The Territory Of Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In The Present Paper The Specific Properties Of The Regional Climate Cooling Process In Western Georgia Is Studied By Mathematical\\u000a Modeling. The Effect Of Thermal And Advective-Dynamic Factors Of The Atmosphere Upon The Changes Of The West Georgian Climate\\u000a Is Investigated. The Specific Peculiarities Of The Thermodynamic Model Of The Desertification Process Are Discussed. Some\\u000a Recommendations For Halting The Desertification

T. Davitashvili; A. Khantadze

326

STABLE ISOTOPES AND DEBRIS IN BASAL GLACIER ICE, SOUTH GEORGIA, SOUTHERN OCEAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper combines a study of the rock debris and 6D\\/6l80 isotopic characte ristics of basal ice sequences in three repres entative glaciers in South Georgia and concludes that the debris and ice has been entrained mainly by basal freezing. The size distribu tion of the rock debris is typical of crushing and abrasion, and reflects transport at the ice-rock

DAVID E. SUGDEN; CHALMERS M. CLAPPERTON; J. CAMPBELL GEMMELL

1987-01-01

327

Influence of urbanization on riparian forest diversity and structure in the Georgia Piedmont, US  

Microsoft Academic Search

Riparian forests are increasingly threatened by urban expansion and land use change worldwide. This study examined the relationships\\u000a between landscape characteristics and woody plant diversity, structure, and composition of small order riparian corridors\\u000a along an urban-rural land use gradient in the Georgia Piedmont, US. Riparian plant diversity, structure, and composition were\\u000a related to landscape metrics and land use. Species richness

Michele L. Burton; Lisa J. Samuelson

2008-01-01

328

Comparison of geodetic and paleoseismic rates of deformation in the Puget Sound Georgia Basin, Pacific Northwest  

Microsoft Academic Search

We compare geodetic rates of horizontal shortening in the Puget Sound-Georgia Basin region with long-term rates of horizontal shortening calculated from paleoseismic studies across the same region. Our region of comparison encompasses a zone of concentrated seismicity, lying within a rectangle centered at W122.5° and N48°, with edges defined by ±1.5°. Within this region, geodetic rates are well constrained by

B. L. Sherrod; S. Mazzotti; R. Haugerud

2008-01-01

329

Walking with the Dead: The Place of Ghost Walk Tourism in Savannah, Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ghost-themed walking tours are increasingly popular in the United States and globally. Although walking tours are often perceived as structured with pre-determined direction and content, this study of ghost walk tours in Savannah, Georgia alludes to something strikingly different. Although the tours are not usually free-form, interviewed ghost walk tour guides speak openly about how the tour experience is often

Glenn W. Gentry

2007-01-01

330

Trends and Seasonality of Reproductive Performance in Florida and Georgia Dairy Herds from 1976 to 2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

Trends in reproductive performance from 1976 to 2002 were studied for dairy farms located in Florida and Georgia using 2,897,517 Dairy Herd Improvement Association lactation records of Holstein cows. One-half of the 1552 herds in the final edited records had mea- sures for at least 8 yr. Measures of reproductive perfor- mance changed significantly over time. Days to first service

A. de Vries; C. A. Risco

2005-01-01

331

Historical Land-Cover Changes and Hydrogeomorphic Adjustment in a Small Georgia Watershed  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study utilizes hydrologic modeling (HEC-1) for discrete episodes of land use in a Georgia watershed to portray the hydrologic adjustments that occur during a period of intensive land clearing and subsequent revegetation. It then compares these hydrologic shifts to field-based geomorphic adjustments such as gullying and valley aggradation. The Turner Creek watershed, settled in the mid-1830s, experienced a period

Francis J. Magilligan; Melissa L. Stamp

1997-01-01

332

Geospatial Information Systems Analysis of Regional Environmental Change along the Savannah River Basin of Georgia  

PubMed Central

This paper uses remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS); and descriptive statistics in the assessment of environmental change along the Savannah River Basin of Georgia. Results of the study show that Savannah River basin side of Georgia has been experiencing environmental change due to several decades of relentless pressure induced by anthropocentric activities and host of other socio-economic factors. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) analysis of the area also shows a decline in vegetation cover. The pace of ecological change showed some variations across time and space. Generally, the results point to a decline in water bodies, vegetation, and increase in population, loss of harvested cropland, farms and increasing threats to the environmental systems of the region.

Twumasi, Yaw A.; Merem, Edmund C.

2008-01-01

333

Seismoactive Structures Of Georgia: Map And Catalogue  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The southern Caucasus is an earthquake prone region where devastating earthquakes have repeatedly caused significant loss of lives, infrastructure and buildings. Two large devastating earthquakes occurred in the region in the last 20 - 25 years. The first one was the magnitude 6.9 Spitak Earthquake on December 7, 1988 whose epicenter located within the Lesser Caucasus - Northern Armenia near the Georgian border. The earthquake became widely known due to the immense losses it caused - no less than 25 000 people were killed, some 500 000 left homeless. Another large seismic event was the magnitude 7.2 Racha earthquake on April 29, 1991.This earthquake was the strongest one ever recorded in Georgia.The earthquake took about a hundred human lives and caused a great damage and destruction within densely populated areas. High geodynamic activity of the region expressed in both seismic and aseismic deformations, is conditioned by the still-ongoing convergence of lithospheric plates and northward propagation of the Africa-Arabian continental block at a rate of several cm/year. Considerable shortening of the Earth's crust has been realized in the region through different ways: (1) crustal deformation with wide development of compressional structures - folds, thrusts; (2) warping and displacement of crustal blocks with their uplifting, subsidence, underthrusting (a process sometimes referred to as "continental subduction") and (3) lateral escaping. Seismoactive structures of Georgia are identified mainly on the basis of the correlation between neotectonic structures of the region and earthquakes .The geometry of tectonic structures and morphology is largely determined by the wedge-shaped rigid Arabian block intensively indented into the Minor Asian-Caucasian region. All structural-morphological lines have a clearly expressed arcuate northward-convex configuration reflecting the contours of the Arabian block. However, farther north, the geometry of the fold-thrust belts is somewhat different - the Achara-Trialeti fold-thrust belt is, on the whole, W-E trending. The Great Caucasian fold-thrust belt extends in WNW-ESE direction.

Adamia, S. A.; Sadradze, N.; Lursmanashvili, N.; Gventsadze, A.; Chelidze, T. L.

2011-12-01

334

SeaWinds - South Georgia Island  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Winds are blocked by an island mountain barrier that produces a long 'shadow' of low winds on the downwind side of the island stretching for hundreds of kilometers (about 500 miles long) in this image produced from data from NASA's SeaWinds instrument on the QuikScat satellite.

South Georgia Island, in the South Atlantic Ocean (approximately 1,500 kilometers, or miles, east of the Falkland/Malvinas Islands, is only 170 kilometers long (about 106 miles) and 30 kilometers (about 19 miles)wide, but contains 13 peaks exceeding 2,000 meters (more than 6,500 feet) in height. The island thus acts as a significant barrier to the surface winds in this forbidding part of the world oceans.

Mountainous islands and steep coastal topography can modify the surface wind field for many hundreds of kilometers seaward. The detailed air-sea-land interaction processes involved are not well understood, largely because of a lack of accurate, high-resolution, extensive wind speed and direction measurements. The broad-swath, all-weather SeaWinds instrument on NASA's QuikScat satellite is providing unique measurements of ocean winds, revealing previously unknown wind patterns caused by island topography and allowing development of improved models for coastal ocean winds.

This image shows QuikScat measurements of wind speed and direction during a single pass over South Georgia Island on September 13, 1999. The island itself is shown as black (for heights less than 750 meters(less than half a mile), green (for heights between 750 and 1,500 meters (less than half a mile to about one mile), and red (for regions greater than 1,500 meters, or about one mile in altitude). The white area surrounding the island represents the region where land contamination does not allow wind measurements to be made. The horizontal and vertical coordinates are in kilometers, with origin on the island at latitude 54.5 degrees south, longitude 30 degrees east.

This large-scale view shows regions of high wind speed off both the eastern and western ends of islands, corresponding to 'corner accelerations' as the winds stream by the steep island topography. The lowest wind speeds are seen to be in the lee of the highest island topography.

NASA's Earth Science Enterprise is a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

1999-01-01

335

Fluctuations in the community composition of water-column protozoa in two southeastern blackwater rivers (Georgia, USA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study addresses protozoan population dynamics of two southeastern blackwater rivers in Georgia: the sixth order Ogeechee River and fourth order Black Creek. The density and composition of the protozoan community was assessed by counting the protozoans into size classes. Particularly abundant flagellate types (bloom forms) and ciliates were enumerated separately. Protozoan density in these blackwater rivers is high. Observations

Leslie A Carlough

1989-01-01

336

Conceptual models of possible stream-aquifer relations in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site, Georgia and South Carolina  

Microsoft Academic Search

Possible hydrologic conditions conducive to movement or potential movement of ground water beneath the Savannah River (trans-river flow) near the U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Site (SRS) are being evaluated as part of a study by the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. The objectives of the

1993-01-01

337

Hydrocarbon geochemistry of the strait of Georgia: Modification of a Fraser River dominated regime by ocean dumping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the presence of Canada`s third largest city and of the largest river reaching the west coast of Canada, the study of the environmental and geochemical aspects of hydrocarbon distributions in the lower Fraser River and adjacent Strait of Georgia has not progressed beyond the cataloguing of environmental concentrations. Hence hydrocarbon distributions in the lower Fraser River are only poorly

M. B. Yunker; R. W. Macdonald; D. Paton

1996-01-01

338

Restoration of competency to stand trial: Assessment with the Georgia Court Competency Test and the Competency Screening Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluations of the Georgia Court Competency Test—Mississippi Version Revised (GCCT-MSH) and the Competency Screening Test (CST) have supported their use with pretrial defendants in initial assessment of competency to stand trial. The present study evaluated the efficacy of these measures, as well as the Texas Competency Instrument, with an inpatient sample of defendants involved in a competency restoration program. Both

Karen L. Ustad; Richard Rogers; Kenneth W. Sewell; Charles A. Guarnaccia

1996-01-01

339

Temporal dynamics and spatial variation of algae in relation to hydrology and sediment characteristics in the Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a 20-month study, phytoplankton and periphyton chl a, and dry mass of macroscopic algal aggregates in four marshes and a lake within the Okefenokee Swamp (Georgia, USA) were comparable to other wetlands and lake littoral areas. Chlorophyll levels in two marshes were inversely related to water level and phytoplankton at three marshes developed unimodal maxima following macrophyte dieback. Standing

Steven A. Schoenberg; J. Douglas Oliver

1988-01-01

340

Signs and Symptoms Predictive of Death in Patients with Foodborne Botulism—Republic of Georgia, 1980–2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

Foodborne botulism is a severe, potentially fatal disease characterized by cranial nerve palsies and descending paralysis. Little is known about signs and symptoms predictive of death from botulism. We studied patients with botulism in the Republic of Georgia, which has the highest reported rate of foodborne botulism in the world. After abstracting medical records of patients with botulism who were

Jay K. Varma; Guram Katsitadze; Maia Moiscrafishvili; Tamar Zardiashvili; Maia Chokheli; Natalia Tarkhashvili; Ekaterina Jhorjholiani; Maia Chubinidze; Teimuraz Kukhalashvili; Irakli Khmaladze; Nelli Chakvetadze; Paata Imnadze; Mike Hoekstra; Jeremy Sobel

2004-01-01

341

Meso-American Languages in the Wiregrass: An Investigation of Language Maintenance in North Florida/South Georgia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study used oral survey methods to examine first the diversity of Meso-American languages and second the potential language maintenance or loss of these languages among Meso-American language speakers in Wiregrass country (North Florida-South Georgia). Language shift, the process of gradually changing from one first language to another first…

Gladwin, Ransom

2010-01-01

342

Sweat Farm Road Fire in Georgia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dense plumes of blue-white smoke billowed from the Sweat Farm Road Fire in southern Georgia on April 19, 2007, when the Landsat 5 satellite captured this detailed image. The fire started on April 16, when a tree fell on a power line and, fanned by strong winds, quickly exploded into a major fire. By April 19, the fire had forced officials to close several roads, including U.S. Highway 1, and to evacuate hundreds of people from the perimeter of the city of Waycross, the silver cluster along the top edge of the image. The nearness of the fire is evident in the dark brown, charred land just south of the city. The active fire front is along the south edge of the burned area, where the flames are eating into the dark green hardwood forests, pine plantations, and shrubs in Okefenokee Swamp. Because of the difficult terrain, the fire and the adjoining Big Turnaround Complex fire are expected to burn until significant rain falls, said the morning report issued by the Southern Area Coordination Center on May 4. 'In the long term, the burning of the swamp will ultimately benefit the swamp wilderness habitat, which is a fire-dependent ecosystem,' said a press release issued from the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge on May 4. Such ecosystems require fire to remain healthy. In the case of southern pine forests, many pine species need fire to remove litter from the ground and release soil nutrients so that new seedlings can grow.

2007-01-01

343

Sedimentary and atmospheric sources of iron around South Georgia, Southern Ocean: a modelling perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In high-nutrient low-chlorophyll waters of the western Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, an intense phytoplankton bloom is observed annually north of South Georgia. Multiple sources, including shallow sediments and atmospheric dust deposition, are thought to introduce iron to the region. However, the relative importance of each source is still unclear, owing in part to the scarcity of dissolved iron (dFe) measurements in the South Georgia region. In this study, we combine results from a recently published dFe data set around South Georgia with a coupled regional hydrodynamic and biogeochemical model to further investigate iron supply around the island. The biogeochemical component of the model includes an iron cycle, where sediments and dust deposition are the sources of iron to the ocean. The model captures the characteristic flow patterns around South Georgia, hence simulating a large phytoplankton bloom to the north (i.e. downstream) of the island. Modelled dFe concentrations agree well with observations (mean difference and root mean square errors of ~0.02 nM and ~0.81 nM) and form a large plume to the north of the island that extends eastwards for more than 800 km. In agreement with observations, highest dFe concentrations are located along the coast and decrease with distance from the island. Sensitivity tests indicate that most of the iron measured in the main bloom area originates from the coast and very shallow shelf-sediments (depths < 20 m). Dust deposition exerts almost no effect on surface chlorophyll a concentrations. Other sources of iron such as run-off and glacial melt are not represented explicitly in the model, however we discuss their role in the local iron budget.

Borrione, I.; Aumont, O.; Nielsdóttir, M. C.; Schlitzer, R.

2014-04-01

344

Evaluation of Primary Safety Belt Laws in California, Louisiana, and Georgia  

PubMed Central

This study evaluated three states that changed to primary enforcement of safety belt laws, collecting statewide seat belt observation data for several years and conducting monthly seat belt observations for 6 months after passage of the primary law in 6 California cities, 5 Louisiana cities, and 5 Georgia cities (average 1,000–6,000 vehicles a month); monthly motorist surveys at DMVs for 6 months in these sites (n=7,061); focus groups with law enforcement officers and supervisors in each site; and citations issued locally and statewide for several years. Observed belt use increased substantially in California (+18 percentage points) and in Louisiana (+16 percentage points). Smaller increases were seen in Georgia initially, but grew the following year. In each state, most motorists understood that they could be stopped by a police officer for a belt use violation alone. In Louisiana and Georgia, there was no evidence that one racial group was targeted for enforcement as compared to any other racial group.

Cosgrove, Linda; Preusser, David; Preusser, Carol; Ulmer, Robert

1998-01-01

345

Hierarchical Bayesian modeling of spatio-temporal patterns of lung cancer incidence risk in Georgia, USA: 2000-2007  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lung cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in both men and women in Georgia, USA. However, the spatio-temporal patterns of lung cancer risk in Georgia have not been fully studied. Hierarchical Bayesian models are used here to explore the spatio-temporal patterns of lung cancer incidence risk by race and gender in Georgia for the period of 2000-2007. With the census tract level as the spatial scale and the 2-year period aggregation as the temporal scale, we compare a total of seven Bayesian spatio-temporal models including two under a separate modeling framework and five under a joint modeling framework. One joint model outperforms others based on the deviance information criterion. Results show that the northwest region of Georgia has consistently high lung cancer incidence risk for all population groups during the study period. In addition, there are inverse relationships between the socioeconomic status and the lung cancer incidence risk among all Georgian population groups, and the relationships in males are stronger than those in females. By mapping more reliable variations in lung cancer incidence risk at a relatively fine spatio-temporal scale for different Georgian population groups, our study aims to better support healthcare performance assessment, etiological hypothesis generation, and health policy making.

Yin, Ping; Mu, Lan; Madden, Marguerite; Vena, John E.

2014-05-01

346

Social ties and mortality in Evans County, Georgia.  

PubMed

In an attempt to replicate Berkman and Syme's study of social networks and mortality in Alameda County, California, the authors investigated the relationship between a social network index and survivorship from 1967 to 1980 in the Evans County, Georgia, cohort. They constructed an index modeled after the Berkman Social Network Index and tested it in race- and sex-specific proportional hazards models for 2,059 subjects who were examined in 1967-1969 during the Evans County Cardiovascular Epidemiologic Study. The present study emphasized a priori specification of the social network index and statistical hypothesis test. Descriptive analyses were consistent with a modest social networks effect (e.g., hazard ratio (95 per cent confidence interval) of 1.6 (1.2-2.2) ). Among white males, the age-adjusted hazard ratio comparing the lowest to the highest value of our six-level index was 2.0 (1.2-3.4), but control for potential confounders (principally cardiovascular disease risk factors) reduced this value to 1.5 (0.8-2.6). The social networks effect among white females, black males, and black females was weaker and clearly nonsignificant. Exploratory analyses suggested that marital status, church activities, and an alternate social network index predicted survivorship, but not in a dose-response fashion. Reduced survivorship among older subjects with few social ties was the most important feature of the data. PMID:3953538

Schoenbach, V J; Kaplan, B H; Fredman, L; Kleinbaum, D G

1986-04-01

347

Circumstances surrounding the community needle-stick injuries in Georgia.  

PubMed

Community needle-stick injuries are important public health problem due to concern of blood-borne pathogen transmission. Purpose of this study was to describe circumstances related to non-occupational needle-stick injuries in Georgia. Data were collected from one outpatient clinic in Tbilisi. Medical records from 2002 to 2007 were reviewed. Blood tests were performed on HBV, HCV and HIV at first visit and 6 months after exposure. 25 (54.4%) study subjects were children playing in street/yard and being accidentally stuck by used needle. Most frequent circumstances related to needle stick among adult individuals were recapping or discarding used needle while taking care of family member needed home injections (12 cases). Eight participants (17.4%) reported accidentally stepping on used needle at sea shore. No infection with HIV and HCV were documented. Only one case of HBV infection occurred in female patient taking care of mother with chronic HBV infection. Study suggests that seroconversion for blood-borne infections after community needle-stick injuries is very low. Family members of patients receiving home injections should be informed about potential risks and advised using infection-control measures. Parents/teachers should be educated about the circumstances related to exposure to used needles among children. PMID:21533886

Butsashvili, Maia; Kamkamidze, George; Kajaia, Maia; Kandelaki, George; Zhorzholadze, Nana

2011-12-01

348

Molecular patterns of multidrug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Georgia  

PubMed Central

Background Tuberculosis (TB) infections caused by multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR MTB) remain a significant public health concern worldwide. Georgia has a high prevalence of MDR MTB. The genetic mechanisms underlying the emergence of MDR MTB strains in this region are poorly understood and need to be determined for developing better strategies for TB control. This study investigated the frequency of major drug resistance mutations across rpoB, katG and inhA loci of Georgian MDR MTB strains and explored differences between new and previously treated patients. A total of 634 MTB strains were examined for which an MDR phenotype had been previously determined by the proportions method. The GenoType®MTBDRplus system was applied to screen the strains for the presence of rpoB (S531L, H526D, H526Y, and D516V), katG (S315T) and inhA promoter region (C15T and T8C) mutations. The target loci were amplified by PCR and then hybridized with the respective site-specific and wild type (control) probes. Results Out of the 634 isolates tested considered by phenotypic testing to be resistant to RIF and INH, this resistance was confirmed by the GenoType®MTBDRplus assay in 575 (90.7%) isolates. RIF resistance was seen in 589 (92.9%) and INH resistance was seen in 584 (92.1%); 67.2% and 84.3% of MDR strains harbored respectively rpoB S531L and katG S315T mutations (generally known as having low or no fitness cost in MTB). The inhA C15T mutation was detected in 22.6% of the strains, whereas rpoB H526D, rpoB H526Y, rpoB D516V and inhA T8C were revealed at a markedly lower frequency (?5.2%). The specific mutations responsible for the RIF resistance of 110 isolates (17.4%) could not be detected as no corresponding mutant probe was indicated in the assay. There was no specific association of the presence of mutations with the gender/age groups. All types of prevailing mutations had higher levels in new cases. A great majority of the Georgian MDR MTB strains have a strong preference for the drug resistance mutations carrying no or low fitness cost. Thus, it can be suggested that MDR MTB strains with such mutations will continue to arise in Georgia at a high frequency even in the absence of antibiotic pressure.

Shubladze, N.; Tadumadze, N.; Bablishvili, N.

2014-01-01

349

Diagenesis of organic matter in georgia salt marshes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Organic matter preserved in sediments of Georgia salt marshes derives from Spartina alterniflora and planktonic and bacterial substances. Sources and diagenesis of sedimentary organic material were studied by means of stable C and N isotopes and gas chromatography of pyrolysates from plants, suspended sediments, and a series of muds (modern to 1400 years old) from St Catherines Island, Georgia. Suspended particulate matter ( > 20 ?m) has isotopic compositions (? 13C = -18 to -22), which are composed of an average 34-42% plankton carbon and 58-65% higher plant detritus, as determined by isotopic mass balance of the system. The ? 13C of bulk sediments and humic acids (? 13C = -18 to -19) extracted from them remain relatively constant over time. The ? 13C of acid hydrolysates, however, changed from - 15‰ in surface marsh sediment to a ? 13C of -19 from sediment sampled at a depth of 125 cm. Higher-plant normal-hydrocarbons are present in muds and in particulate matter from the water column, and ? 13C in lipids and gas chromatography of pyrolysates of samples reflect this addition. With increasing age, ? 15N of total sediments and acid hydrolysates increases, and the ratio of odd-to-even hydrocarbons in the pyrolysates decreases. Initially, low density material in sediments consists primarily of plant fragments. With time, this material is decayed and diluted by microbial material, changes that are reflected by more negative ? 13C of -15 to -17·5, as compared to ? 13C of -12 for moden Spartina, and the addition of n-alkanes in the range of C 13-19. The isotopic heterogeneity in surface sediments with carbon as an example, ranged from a ? 13C of -15 (plant fragments) to -22 (sediment following lipid, humic acid, and plant fragment extraction). Nowhere was the C isotopic composition of total Spartina expressed even though microscopic plant pieces, lignocellulose pyrolysis fragments, and n-alkanes from C 22-27 were detected in suspended particulate matter, total sediments, and humic acids.

Fogel, Marilyn L.; Kent Sprague, E.; Gize, Andrew P.; Frey, Robert W.

1989-02-01

350

Deposits of Claiborne and Jackson age in Georgia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1911 the Geological Survey of Georgia published as Bulletin 26 a "Preliminary report on the geology of the Coastal Plain of Georgia," by Otto Veatch and Lloyd William Stephenson, prepared in cooperation with the United States Geological Survey under the supervision of T. Wayland Vaughan, a geologist in charge of Coastal Plain investigations, who contributed the determinations of the invertebrate fossils of the Tertiary and Quaternary formations. Although this report constituted a decided advance in our knowledge of the geology of the Coastal Plain of Georgia, it was admittedly of reconnaissance character, and corrections and additions to it were to be expected. During the last few years field work has been prosecuted vigorously in the Coastal Plain of Georgia, and the additional information thus accumulated throws light upon certain problems of stratigraphy left unsolved by Veatch and Stephenson and alters considerably some of their correlations. The object of the present paper is to present the new evidence regarding the age and correlation of the Eocene formations of Georgia and to revise in accordance with present knowledge the descriptions of the deposits of Claiborne and Jackson age.

Cooke, Charles Wythe; Shearer, Harold Kurtz

1919-01-01

351

Georgia's Ground-Water Resources and Monitoring Network, 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ground-water network for Georgia currently consists of 170 wells in which ground-water levels are continuously monitored. Most of the wells are locatedin the Coastal Plain in the southern part of the State where ground-water pumping stress is high. In particular, there are large concentrations of wells in coastal and southwestern Georgia areas, where there are issues related to ground-water pumping, saltwater intrusion along the coast, and diminished streamflow in southwestern Georgia due to irrigation pumping. The map at right shows the USGS ground-water monitoring network for Georgia. Ground-water levels are monitored in 170 wells statewide, of which 19 transmit data in real time via satellite and posted on the World Wide Web at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ga/nwis/current/?type=gw . A greater concentration of wells occurs in the Coastal Plain where there are several layers of aquifers and in coastal and southwestern Georgia areas, which are areas with specific ground-water issues.

Edited by Nobles, Patricia L.

2006-01-01

352

Implementation of telepathology in the republic of georgia.  

PubMed

Telepathology in the Republic of Georgia is still evolving. Although much progress has been made around the world, especially in the field of digital imaging and virtual slides, telepathology in Georgia still revolves around static telepathology. The results of the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant "ePathology-Virtual Pathology Center in Georgia as the continuation of Virtual Health Care Center" are presented. It is a practical implementation of telepathology in Georgia as a best practice example. Using basic methodology: idea-analysis-conception-implementation-test/deployment, the ePathology server was created for the establishment of telepathology in Georgia. Two main services were made available on the server: Simple Machines Forum (eConsultation) and Moodle (eLearning) under the premise "keep it small, safe, and simple." The ePathology server works well. By its application, introduction of the Pap-smear technique and 2001 Bethesda System for reporting cervicovaginal cytologic diagnosis has been done. The application of easily available and adaptable technology, together with the improvement of the infrastructure conditions, is the essential basis for telemedical applications. Telepathology is a very useful and applicable tool for consulting on difficult pathology cases. It has significantly increased knowledge exchange and thereby ensured a better medical service. PMID:19548828

Kldiashvili, Ekaterina; Schrader, Thomas

2009-06-01

353

Ecological investigation of a hazardous waste site, Warner Robins, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

Zone 1, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, has been designated a National Priorities List Site by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The Remedial Investigation for Zone 1 recommended a quantitative analysis of ecological risk. To accomplish this task a characterization of the bottomland hardwood forest ecosystem present on the base was required. This ecological characterization included the study of hydrology, aquatic and wildlife biology, and wetlands ecology where potential impacts were in question. In addition, a suitable reference area was studied. The hydrologic investigation consisted primarily of the installation of water level recorders and staff gauges, collection of surface water data, installation of piezometers and collection of groundwater data, and the collection of rainfall data. The aquatic biology investigation centered around the sampling of benthic macroinvertebrate communities, bioassay toxicity tests for surface water and sediment, fish sampling, aquatic macrophyte collection, macrophyte collection, and emergent and free-floating plant collection. The wildlife biology investigation focused on a breeding bird survey. The wetlands ecology investigation comprised the collection of soil and vegetation samples and using the Wetland Evaluation Technique (WET) to assess the functions and values of the wetlands present.

Wade, M.C. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Billig, P. (Federal Programs Corp., Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01

354

77 FR 58096 - Georgia Transmission Corporation: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment and To...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...portions of Atkinson, Berrien, Clinch, Coffee, and Lanier Counties, Georgia. GTC...the following repositories: Douglas/Coffee County Public Library, South Madison...northwest side of the City of Douglas in Coffee County, Georgia, to an existing...

2012-09-19

355

78 FR 43273 - Central of Georgia Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Newton County, Ga.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Georgia Railroad Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Newton County, Ga. Central of Georgia Railroad Company (CGA...Street SW., and Turner Lake Road SW., in Covington), in Newton County, Ga. The line traverses United States Postal...

2013-07-19

356

77 FR 1894 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Rome; Fine Particulate Matter 2002...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Rome; Fine Particulate Matter 2002 Emissions Inventory AGENCY: Environmental...on October 27, 2009. The emissions inventory is part of the Rome, Georgia PM 2.5 attainment demonstration that was...

2012-01-12

357

77 FR 12724 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Macon; Fine Particulate Matter 2002...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Particulate Matter 2002 Base Year Emissions Inventory AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... 2.5 ) 2002 base year emissions inventory, portion of the State Implementation...Georgia on August 17, 2009. The emissions inventory is part of the Macon, Georgia...

2012-03-02

358

Recent Results from the Georgia State University Multiple Telescope Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results of recent work with the Georgia State University Multiple Telescope Telescope (MTT) are presented. The MTT is a novel 1-m class fiber-fed spectrographic telescope, designed to be an inexpensive alternative for smaller astronomy departments. A tremendous amount of hardware and software upgrades have occurred in the last two years, which have markedly improved operations and user interaction with the telescope. The MTT has already provided scientific results, and the basic design is being used as a model by two other groups for new telescopes. In addition to presenting the current capabilities of the MTT, the results of recent observations are also discussed. We have undertaken an OB binary star survey in an effort to study mass transfer effects in binary systems.We also are measuring several hot binary star systems and separating their spectra into the individual components (using a Doppler tomography algorithm developed at GSU). Another project is a complement to the new CHARA array, which will give us interferometric data to combine with MTT spectroscopic data. The combination of which leads to the determination of the masses and other system properties, leading to a better understanding of stellar and binary star evolution

Riddle, R. L.; Bagnuolo, W. G.; Berger, D. H.; Barry, D. J.

1998-05-01

359

New underwater acoustic tank facility at Georgia Tech  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A large underwater acoustic tank facility located in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech has recently been completed. The facility includes a rectangular concrete water tank 25 feet deep, 25 feet wide, and 34 feet long containing around 160,000 gallons of water. There are three computer-controlled positioners: an x-y-z-theta positioner and a z-theta positioner mounted on carriages and a bottom mounted rotator. The facility has a large rectangular nearfield array which can be used either as a receiver or a transmitter. A single vertical nearfield line array can be translated by the x-y positioner to synthesize a cylindrical nearfield receiving array. The rectangular nearfield transmitting array and the synthesized cylindrical receiving array were designed to be used with the bottom mounted rotator to measure the true farfield bistatic target strength of any target up to one meter in length as a function of the target aspect angle. Such measurements can be done from 2 kHz to over 10 kHz. The tank is being used for transducer development, materials, and flow noise studies in addition to structural acoustics. Several available multichannel data acquisition systems will be described. [Work supported, in part, by a DURIP grant from ONR.

Gray, Michael; Herkert, Ralph; McCall, George, II; Caille, Gary; Biesel, Van; Bogle, John; Caspall, Jayme; Hahn, Steven; Lamb, Adam; Logan, Thomas

2002-11-01

360

[Irradiation doses of population in mountainous Adjara region of Georgia].  

PubMed

Radionuclide content of food and water in high mountainous regions of Georgia - Adjara (Keda, Shuakhevi, Khulo) has been studied, internal and total irradiation doses for the population have been defined and preventive measures for its reduction have been proposed. Internal irradiation dose for the population caused by K-40 was identified as 0,63 mSv/y, total irradiation dose - 1,73 mSv/y, that slightly exceeds acceptable levels, due to this it seems desirable to provide some measures with aim to reduce the radiation dose of the population and conduct further observation of the radiation situation. Measures intended to reduce irradiation doses includes: provision of population with less radioactive water sources, the regulation of medical radiation procedures (mostly - X-ray diagnostic procedures), the rational use of fertilizers with 40K content, construction of buildings on the territories with the lowest values of gamma radiation and radon release from soil, use of materials with low content of natural radionuclides for building construction, provision of premises with effective ventilation and radiation monitoring of buildings at any stages of construction, reconstruction or repair. PMID:22392786

Kugoti, I E; Vepkhvadze, N R; Kiladze, N A

2012-01-01

361

Performance of recycled mixtures in State of Georgia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) has been constructing recycled asphalt pavements routinely for about four years. This research project was undertaken to evaluate the performance of recycled pavements in comparison to virgin (control) asphalt pavements. Five projects, each consisting of a recycled section and a control section, were subjected to detailed evaluation. In-situ mix properties (such as percent air voids, resilient modulus and indirect tensile strength), recovered asphalt binder properties, and laboratory recompacted mix properties (such as Gyratory Stability Index and confined, dynamic creep modulus) were measured. A paired t-test statistical analysis indicated no significant differences between these properties of virgin and recycled mix pavements which have been in service from 1 1/2 to 3 1/2 years. Ten additional virgin mix pavements and 13 additional recycled pavements were also evaluated as two independent groups. No statistically significant differences were found between the recovered asphalt properties (penetration and viscosity) of these virgin and recycled pavements in service. The current GDOT recycling specifications and mix design procedures appear to be satisfactory based on the results of this study.

Kandhal, P.S.; Rao, S.S.; Young, B.

1994-01-01

362

Geohydrology of Brooks, Lowndes, and western Echols counties, Georgia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The principal artesian aquifer, a limestone of Eocene to Miocene age, is the main source of water supply for Brooks, Lowndes, and western Echols Counties in south Georgia. Pumpage of about 22 million gallons perday from this prolific aquifer has not posed any problems regarding declining water levels or depletion of the reservoir. However, water-quality problems do occur in the Valdosta area. Seepage-run measurements indicate that the Withlacoochee River north of Valdosta contributes an average of 112 cubic feet per second of water to caverns and sinkholes that recharge the aquifer. Wells near the recharge area withdraw relatively unfiltered water with iron concentration and color intensity exceeding standards for drinking water. South of Valdosta, water from the aquifer contains as much as 3.0 milligrams per liter of hydrogen sulfide, rendering the water unfit for drinking. Water high in sulfate concentration occurs below 550 feet in the lower part of the aquifer in Valdosta, and is assumed to be present at that depth throughout the study area. Generally, sufficient quantities of freshwater can be obtained without drilling to this depth.

Krause, R. E.

1979-01-01

363

Habitat associations of birds in the Georgia piedmont during winter  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During three winter seasons (1991-1994), we studied the distribution and abundance of birds in three habitat types of the Georgia Piedmont. Bird densities were calculated using data from 2160 variable circular-plot counts, 720 each in the interiors of the three habitats. Habitat variables were measured in 135 0.04-ha circles, 45 in each of the three habitats. The objective was to compare bird densities during winter in the Piedmont?s fragmented mature (60+ yr) pine forests and upland hardwood forests with those in planted pine plantations, a major replacement type. A total of 49 species was detected: 44 in mature pines, 42 in mature upland hardwoods, and 32 in 20-30-yr old pine plantations. Twenty-nine species occurred across all habitats. Overall, density estimates were low and variability among counts was high; consequently, significant (P <0.05) habitat preferences were found for only about 25% of the species. Species richness (S) and diversity (H ) were greatest (P <0.05) in mature pines and lowest (P <0.05) in planted pine plantations. Also, species evenness (E) was higher (P <0.05) in mature pines and upland hardwoods than in planted pine plantations.

White, D.H.; Kepler, C.B.; Hatfield, J.S.; Sykes, P.W., Jr.; Seginak, J.T.

1996-01-01

364

50 CFR 622.208 - Minimum mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida. 622.208 Section 622.208 Wildlife...applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida. (a) The minimum mesh size for the...the South Atlantic EEZ off Georgia and Florida is 17/8 inches (4.8...

2013-10-01

365

WATER USE IMPACTS ON GEORGIA'S WATER RESOURCES AND THREATS FROM INCREASED WATER INTENSIVE ENERGY PRODUCTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Georgia faces serious challenges in managing water resources and irreversible impacts to aquatic ecology. Georgia's fisheries and aquatic resources are in peril due to habitat degradation caused by water use for energy production, domestic purposes, agriculture, and industry. Water resources and the quality of aquatic life in Georgia's rivers are expected to degrade significantly with future water demands from a

Sara Barczak; Shawn P. Young

2009-01-01

366

The Response of Local School Systems in Georgia to Fiscal and Economic Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 2001 recession had a major effect on Georgia's fiscal condition. We explore how economic conditions affected state and local financing of K-12 education in Georgia. We find that the magnitude of postrecession cuts in state real revenue per student varied widely across the local school systems in Georgia. We then examine whether and how cuts in…

Alm, James; Sjoquist, David L.

2009-01-01

367

A Failed Experiment: Georgia's Tax Credit Scholarships for Private Schools. Special Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Georgia is one of seven states that currently allow tax credits for scholarships to private schools. The law permits individual taxpayers in Georgia to reduce annual state taxes up to $2,500 for joint returns when they divert funds to a student scholarship organization (SSO). Georgia's law providing tax credits for private school tuition grants or…

Southern Education Foundation, 2011

2011-01-01

368

Extreme drought-summary of hydrologic conditions in Georgia, 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Georgia Water Science Center (GaWSC) maintains a long-term hydrologic monitoring network of more than 330 real-time streamgages, including 10 real-time lake-level monitoring stations, 63 real-time water-quality monitors, and 48 water-quality sampling stations. Additionally, the GaWSC operates more than 180 groundwater monitoring wells, 42 of which are real-time. One of the many benefits from this monitoring network is that the data analyses provide a well distributed overview of the hydrologic conditions of creeks, rivers, reservoirs, and aquifers in Georgia.

Knaak, Andrew E.; Peck, Michael F.

2014-01-01

369

Georgia's Ground-Water Resources and Monitoring Network, 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water is an abundant resource in Georgia, providing 1.45 billion gallons per day, or 22 percent, of the total freshwater used (including thermoelectric) in the State (Fanning, 2003). Contrasting geologic features and landforms of the physiographic provinces of Georgia affect the quantity and quality of ground water throughout the State. Most ground-water withdrawals are in the Coastal Plain in the southern one-half of the State, where aquifers are highly productive. For a more complete discussion of the State's ground-water resources, see Leeth and others (2005).

Geological Survey (U.S.)

2008-01-01

370

Notes from the field: Severe illness associated with synthetic cannabinoid use - Brunswick, Georgia, 2013.  

PubMed

On August 23, 2013, the Georgia Poison Center was notified of eight persons examined in an emergency department in Brunswick, Georgia, after smoking or inhaling fumes from synthetic cannabinoids. The Georgia Poison Center notified the Georgia Drug and Narcotics Agency, which informed the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH). The Brunswick emergency department was asked to report any additional patients who reported use of synthetic cannabinoid to the Coastal District Health Department. DPH investigators reviewed recent medical records of patients who had gone to the emergency department and found that 22 patients had been examined after using synthetic cannabinoids during August 22-September 9, 2013. PMID:24257204

2013-11-22

371

Ocmulgee Structure, Georgia (USA): Searching for Evidence of Impact  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ocmulgee structure of south-central Georgia is a subtle domal feature that is surrounded by the arcs of two major rivers, the Ocmulgee and Oconee. This paper is a progress report on outcrop work looking for any shocked materials in that area.

Weatherington, P. H.; King, D. T.

2011-03-01

372

High Prevalence of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Georgia  

PubMed Central

Summary Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) has emerged as a serious public health problem in the country of Georgia. However, there have been little or no data on rates and risk factors for drug resistant TB including multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB in Georgia. Objective To assess the prevalence and risk factors for drug resistant TB. Methodology A cross-sectional prospective survey of patients with suspected pulmonary TB was carried out at four sentinel sites (Tbilisi, Zugdidi, Kutaisi, and Batumi) in Georgia to in 2001-2004. Results Among 1,422 patients with suspected pulmonary TB, 996 (70.0%) of 1,422 patients were culture positive; 931 (93.5%) of 996 had drug susceptibility testing performed. Overall, 64% of patients (48.3% of new and 85.3% of retreatment cases) had positive cultures for Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to ?1 first line antituberculosis drugs. The overall prevalence of MDR-TB was 28.1% (10.5% of newly diagnosed patients and 53.1% of retreatment cases). In multivariate analysis, risk factors for MDR-TB included: being a retreatment case (prevalence ratio [PR]=5.28, 95% CI 3.95-7.07); history of injection drug use (PR=1.59, 95% CI 1.21-2.09); and female gender (PR=1.36, 95% CI 1.12-1.65). Conclusion MDR-TB has emerged as a serious public health problem in Georgia and will greatly impact TB control strategies.

Mdivani, Nino; Zangaladze, Ekaterina; Volkova, Natalia; Kourbatova, Ekaterina; Jibuti, Thea; Shubladze, Natalia; Kutateladze, Tamar; Khechinashvili, George; del Rio, Carlos; Salakaia, Archil; Blumberg, Henry M.

2009-01-01

373

School Business Officials and the Price of Education in Georgia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Between the 1966-76 and 1976-77 school years, expenditures per pupil for the maintenance and operation of Georgia public schools rose 146 percent. Even after adjustments for inflation, this is a substantial increase. Faced with taxpayer resistance to increasing taxes, educational leaders can choose from three options. They can adopt an aggressive…

Matthews, Kenneth M.

374

Challenge: 2000. Strategic Implementation of Georgia's Postsecondary Vocational Education System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A review of strategic planning needs of the Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education (DTAE) identified current understandings and expectations regarding strategic planning around the state as seen by key staff and other constituents. Bases of the review were the four components of the DTAE's Strategic Development System: levels of…

Arbor Gate Group, Peachtree City, GA.

375

AFRICAN AMERICAN THEATERS IN GEORGIA: PRESERVING AN ENTERTAINMENT LEGACY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many African American theaters built in the early twentieth century have been destroyed. This thesis looks at four African American theaters in Georgia that have been preserved or are in the process of being preserved. It looks at the history of the theaters and at how preservationists took, or are taking, the initiative to restore these entertainment palaces. The restoration

JASON L. ELLERBEE

376

NITROUS OXIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN SMALL STREAMS OF THE GEORGIA PIEDMONT  

EPA Science Inventory

We are measuring the dissolved nitrous oxide concentration in 17 headwater streams in the South Fork Broad River, Georgia watershed on a monthly basis. The selected small streams drain watersheds dominated by forest, pasture, developed, or mixed land uses. Nitrous oxide concentr...

377

Information Digest 1987-1988. University System of Georgia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A collections of facts and statistical data to enhance understanding of the University System of Georgia is presented, updating information from earlier editions. Information was selected on the basis of the most frequently asked questions about the system and its 34 institutions. Eight sections focus on: general information (University System of…

University System of Georgia, Atlanta.

378

Race, Graduating Performance, and Admissions: Georgia State University's Freshman Index  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Freshman Index, a combination of SAT score and high school grade point average, is the primary mechanism facilitating admissions decisions at Georgia State University. This article examines the relationships between these three admissions criteria and the graduating grade point averages of Asian, Black, and White six-year graduates.…

Gayles, Jonathan

2006-01-01

379

University of Georgia Output Programs with HEGIS Crossclassification.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is the reference source for the cross-classification of presently authorized University of Georgia major field codes, codes for degrees granted within those major fields, and the Higher Education Information System (HEGIS) code structure. The appendix contains a taxonomy of instructional programs in higher education developed by the…

Georgia Univ., Athens. Office of Program Planning and Analysis.

380

University of Georgia: System of Program Planning and Budgeting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report reflects the status of conceptualization, progress, and partial implementation of a system of program planning and budgeting (PPB) at the University of Georgia (UGA). Emphasis is placed on detailed information flow necessary for implementation of a PPB system, how the data files existing at UGA will support further development and…

Sterns, A. A.

381

Georgia's Compensation Model: A Step in the Right Direction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses House Bill 280 as a response to the state of Georgia's drastic need to recruit and produce highly qualified mathematics teachers. The bill attempts to address the shortage of fully certified secondary mathematics and science teachers by offering additional compensation to aide recruitment. The bill also provides incentives…

Oppong, Nicholas; de Araujo, Zandra U.; Lowe, Laura; Marshall, Anne Marie; Singletary, Laura

2009-01-01

382

BIOGEOCHEMICAL INDICATORS OF ORGANIC WASTE CONTAMINATION IN GEORGIA PIEDMONT STREAMS  

EPA Science Inventory

We monitored concentrations of nitrous oxide, methane, carbon dioxide, nutrients and other parameters (T, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, pH, DOC, DON, flow rate) in 17 headwater streams (watershed sizes from 0.5 to 3.4 km2) of the South Fork Broad River, Georgia wate...

383

The Milliken/Georgia Tech Rising Senior Summer Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Rising Senior Program at the Georgia Institute of Technology, which is a cooperative education program designed to provide student interns with an opportunity to apply engineering principles to real problems related to the business interests of the Milliken textile manufacturing company. (TW)

Agrawal, Pradeep K; Sommerfeld, Jude T.

1987-01-01

384

Postcranial evidence from early Homo from Dmanisi, Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Plio-Pleistocene site of Dmanisi, Georgia, has yielded a rich fossil and archaeological record documenting an early presence of the genus Homo outside Africa. Although the craniomandibular morphology of early Homo is well known as a result of finds from Dmanisi and African localities, data about its postcranial morphology are still relatively scarce. Here we describe newly excavated postcranial material

David Lordkipanidze; Tea Jashashvili; Abesalom Vekua; Marcia S. Ponce de León; Christoph P. E. Zollikofer; G. Philip Rightmire; Herman Pontzer; Reid Ferring; Oriol Oms; Martha Tappen; Maia Bukhsianidze; Jordi Agusti; Ralf Kahlke; Gocha Kiladze; Bienvenido Martinez-Navarro; Alexander Mouskhelishvili; Medea Nioradze; Lorenzo Rook

2007-01-01

385

A New Skull of Early Homo from Dmanisi, Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Another hominid skull has been recovered at Dmanisi (Republic of Georgia) from the same strata in which hominid remains have been reported previously. The Dmanisi site dated to ~1.75 million years ago has now produced craniofacial portions of several hominid individuals, along with many well-preserved animal fossils and quantities of stone artifacts. Although there are certain anatomical differences among the

Abesalom Vekua; David Lordkipanidze; G. Philip Rightmire; Jordi Agusti; Reid Ferring; Givi Maisuradze; Alexander Mouskhelishvili; Medea Nioradze; Marcia Ponce de Leon; Martha Tappen; Merab Tvalchrelidze; Christoph Zollikofer

2002-01-01

386

A Plio-Pleistocene hominid from Dmanisi, East Georgia, Caucasus  

Microsoft Academic Search

ARCHAEOLOGICAL excavations at the mediaeval site of Dmanisi (East Georgia) revealed that the town was built on a series of deposits yielding Late Villafranchian mammalian fossils and led to the discovery in late 1991 of a well preserved early human mandible. Dmanisi, where excavations are being carried out by a joint expedition of the Archaeological Research Centre of the Georgian

L. Gabunia; A. Vekua

1995-01-01

387

Perry-Fort Valley Airport, Peach and Houston County, Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The cities of Perry and Fort Valley and Peach and Houston Counties, Georgia, prepared a request for federal funds under the Airport and Airway Development Act for a project to construct a basic transport runway and related facilities which will accommodat...

1972-01-01

388

Medical College of Georgia Fact Book 1978-79.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The third edition of the Medical College of Georgia (MCG) fact book provides a chronicle of the year 1978-1979, reflecting data and events important to the institution. Sections include: general information/Augusta; general information/MCG; administration; budget and physical plant; library/learning resources; faculty; continuing education;…

Georgia Medical Coll., Augusta.

389

EAARL topography-Potato Creek watershed, Georgia, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This DVD contains lidar-derived first-surface (FS) and bare-earth (BE) topography GIS datasets of a portion of the Potato Creek watershed in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River basin, Georgia. These datasets were acquired on February 27, 2010.

Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Fredericks, Xan; Jones, J.W.; Wright, C.W.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.

2011-01-01

390

Career Education Curriculum Materials: (Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, North Carolina).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The guide, which represents part of the product of the National Network for Curriculum Coordination in Vocational/Technical Education, presents descriptive and bibliographic information about career education curriculum materials submitted by representatives of Georgia, Mississippi, and North and South Carolina to the Research and Curriculum Unit…

Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

391

The University of Georgia Faculty Handbook, 1976-1977.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The responsibilities and privileges of the University of Georgia faculty are explained in the 1976-77 handbook. It was prepared for use as a first source and reference for faculty members, and was not intended to be definitive on policy matters. Major sections of the guide deal with: history and purpose of the university; organization; faculty…

Georgia Univ., Athens.

392

The Georgia Psychoeducational Network Research Consortium. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report describes a one-year research project on the characteristics of seriously emotionally disturbed (SED) and severely behaviorally disordered (SBD) students served by the Georgia Psychoeducational Program Network during 1984-1985 (n=5,008) and 1985-1986 (n=4,226), as well as characteristics of the 24 programs which served them.…

Swan, William W.; And Others

393

Data from complete mtDNA sequencing of Tunisian centenarians: Testing haplogroup association and the “golden mean” to longevity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the mitochondrial theory of ageing was proposed, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity has been largely studied in old people, however complete genomes are still rare, being limited to Japanese and UK\\/US samples. In this work, we evaluated possible longevity associated polymorphisms\\/haplogroups in an African population, from Tunisia, by performing complete mtDNA sequencing. This population has a mixed Eurasian\\/sub-Saharan mtDNA gene

Marta D. Costa; Lotfi Cherni; Verónica Fernandes; Fernando Freitas; Amel Ben Ammar el Gaaied; Luísa Pereira

2009-01-01

394

Pipeline Accident Report - Municipal Gas Department of Cordele, Georgia, Explosion and Fire, Cordele, Georgia, February 21, 1980.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

At 11:10 a.m., e.s.t., on February 21, 1980, an explosion and fire destroyed four stores in a shopping complex, severely damaged an adjoining restaurant, and damaged eight cars in Cordele, Georgia. Gas leaking from a 1-inch service line at 22 psig pressur...

1980-01-01

395

A new record of post-glacial sedimentation in a glacial trough, offshore sub-Antarctic South Georgia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Past studies of South Georgia's climatic history were constrained to land-based sedimentary records, such as peat bogs and coastal lakes, or to terrestrial geomorphology, such as terminal moraines. Hence, the current state of knowledge on past climatic changes in South Georgia is characterised by a complete absence of records from sedimentary marine archives in the fjords or coastal embayments of the region. This study comprises detailed examination of one of the first marine sediment cores recovered on its northeastern shelf in Royal Bay Glacial Trough. Alongside the analysis of new acoustic sub-bottom data, it is the first work to deliver extensive insight into South Georgia's post-glacial climatic history from a marine perspective. The glacial troughs on the South Georgia shelf radiate from the coast towards the shelf edge and represent major sediment traps as they form the only key large-scale depressions in the shelf bathymetry. Sedimentary records, covering a period since at least the Last Glacial Maximum, are thought likely to be recorded in most of them. The sediment core of this study covers sedimentation dated from a maximum of 15,346 ± 492 cal. yr BP until the present day. Physical core parameters indicate a major change in climatic conditions around 14,000 cal. yr BP, the time of the Antarctic Cold Reversal. Holocene climate variabilities are also recorded in the trough infill. The acoustic data show a major change in sedimentation and a pronounced unconformity at the core site, which appears to have had a widespread effect over a large area of the shelf. The origin of the unconformity remains unclear, though several hypotheses, including bottom-current erosion, glacial overriding and earthquake activity, are proposed and discussed. Another important finding at the core site is the presence of methane-derived authigenic carbonates. They form either as secondary precipitates in the subsurface or syndepositional at the seafloor as individual minerals or sediment cements. The authigenic carbonates are linked to the widespread occurrence of cold methane seeps on the shelf which are visible today as zones of acoustic blanking and wipe-out structures in the sub-bottom profiles. These seeps are evidence of major biogenic productivity and carbon drawdown on the South Georgia shelf and the subsequent decay of organic matter. This finding is an important consideration for future studies as authigenic carbonate production and methane release have an impact on the isotopic composition of carbonate shells of marine organisms. Thus, radiocarbon ages recovered from the South Georgia shelf need to be examined critically and might require additional corrections.

Meisel, Ove; Graham, Alastair; Kuhn, Gerhard

2014-05-01

396

Occurrence and fate of polycyclic musks in wastewater treatment plants in Kentucky and Georgia, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are a potential of source of polycyclic musks in the aquatic environment. In this study, contamination profiles and mass flow of polycyclic musks, 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta[?]-2-benzopyran (HHCB), 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (AHTN), and HHCB-lactone (oxidation product of HHCB), in two WWTPs, one located in Kentucky (Plant A, rural area) and the other in Georgia (Plant B, urban), USA, were determined. HHCB,

Yuichi Horii; Jessica L. Reiner; Bommanna G. Loganathan; Kurunthachalam Senthil Kumar; Kenneth Sajwan; Kurunthachalam Kannan

2007-01-01

397

Drilling a Deep Geologic Test Well at Fort Pulaski National Monument, Georgia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, is drilling a deep geologic test well at Fort Pulaski National Monument, Georgia. The operation is scheduled to run between mid-February and mid-April 2010. When completed, the well will be about 1,500 feet deep. The purpose of this test well is to gain knowledge about the regional-scale Floridan aquifer, an important source of groundwater in the Savannah area. Also, cores obtained during drilling will enable geologists to study the last 60 million years of Earth history in this area.

Schultz, Arthur P.; Seefelt, Ellen L.

2010-01-01

398

Tobacco Use and Nicotine Dependence among Conflict-Affected Men in the Republic of Georgia  

PubMed Central

Background: There is very little evidence globally on tobacco use and nicotine dependence among civilian populations affected by armed conflict, despite key vulnerability factors related to elevated mental disorders and socio-economic stressors. The study aim was to describe patterns of smoking and nicotine dependence among conflict-affected civilian men in the Republic of Georgia and associations with mental disorders. Methods: A cross-sectional household survey using multistage random sampling was conducted in late 2011 among conflict-affected populations in Georgia. Respondents included in this paper were 1,248 men aged ?18 years who were internally displaced persons (IDPs) and former IDPs who had returned in their home areas. Outcomes of current tobacco use, heavy use (?20 cigarettes per day), and nicotine dependence (using the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence) were used. PTSD, depression, anxiety and hazardous alcohol use were also measured, along with exposure to traumatic events and a range of demographic and socio-economic characteristics. Results: Of 1,248 men, 592 (47.4%) smoked and 70.9% of current smokers were heavy smokers. The mean nicotine dependence score was 5.0 and the proportion with high nicotine dependence (?6) was 41.4%. In multivariate regression analyses, nicotine dependence was significantly associated with PTSD (? 0.74) and depression (? 0.85), along with older age (except 65+ years), and being a returnee (compared to IDPs). Conclusions: The study reveals very high levels of heavy smoking and nicotine dependence among conflict-affected persons in Georgia. The associations between nicotine dependence, PTSD and depression suggest interventions could yield synergistic benefits.

Roberts, Bayard; Chikovani, Ivdity; Makhashvili, Nino; Patel, Vikram; McKee, Martin

2013-01-01

399

Irrigation Projections in Georgia's Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa and Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint Basins: 1995–2020  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we use an ecreage-response model to complementthe 1995 USDA\\/NRCS study of water demand in agriculture in theACF river basin of Georgia through the year 2020. Due to priceeffects, our results show that cotton, peanuts, vegetables andorchards receive a larger fraction of irrigation than they do inthe NRCS model, while corn receives significantly less. Inaddition, we model peanut

Charles B. Moss; Chris de Bodisco

2002-01-01

400

Inverse-derived ozone precursor emissions for Atlanta, Georgia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An inverse method was applied to a simulation of ground- level ozone and ozone precursors in Atlanta, Georgia to deduce the emissions of ozone precursors from observed ambient ozone precursor concentrations. Using a Kalman filter, emissions estimates were iteratively adjusted until the difference between simulated and observed concentrations was minimized. For an August 9-10, 1992 simulation of isoprene with concurrent surface observations extracted from the 1992 Southern Oxidants Study (SOS) Atlanta Intensive, it was determined that current estimates of biogenic isoprene emissions (BEIS2 and BEIS) were a factor of ~2 to ~10 too low. This result assumes that the vertical distribution of isoprene is constant. When it was assumed that the isoprene concentration decays with altitude due to eddy diffusion and reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH), the inverse method determined that the current emissions were only underestimated by a factor of ~1+ to ~7. Although the results of the inverse method depend on the vertical distribution of isoprene, which was not known, these results do suggest that isoprene emissions in Atlanta may be currently underestimated. As applied here, the inverse method only worked for those emissions sources that were homogeneously distributed within each grid cell, and relatively homogeneously distributed across the whole modeling domain. Only isoprene met these criteria. Emissions for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and non-isoprene volatile organic compounds (VOCs) could not be determined with the inverse method. When the inverse adjusted isoprene emissions were input into the Urban Airshed Model, version IV (UAM), the ozone simulation improved relative to the simulation with the standard emissions. Further, the inverse derived isoprene emissions significantly increased the concentration of model-simulated ozone within the plumes of NOx emitted from large point sources. Using the UAM, the impact of the increased biogenic emissions on potential ozone control strategies was also examined. When the inverse derived biogenic emissions were used, peak ozone concentrations in Atlanta were limited by the emissions of NOx.

Chang, Michael Eppard

1997-09-01

401

Attitudes towards smoking restrictions and tobacco advertisement bans in Georgia  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study aims to provide data on a public level of support for restricting smoking in public places and banning tobacco advertisements. Design A nationally representative multistage sampling design, with sampling strata defined by region (sampling quotas proportional to size) and substrata defined by urban/rural and mountainous/lowland settlement, within which census enumeration districts were randomly sampled, within which households were randomly sampled, within which a randomly selected respondent was interviewed. Setting The country of Georgia, population 4.7 million, located in the Caucasus region of Eurasia. Participants One household member aged between 13 and 70 was selected as interviewee. In households with more than one age-eligible person, selection was carried out at random. Of 1588 persons selected, 14 refused to participate and interviews were conducted with 915 women and 659 men. Outcome measures Respondents were interviewed about their level of agreement with eight possible smoking restrictions/bans, used to calculate a single dichotomous (agree/do not agree) opinion indicator. The level of agreement with restrictions was analysed in bivariate and multivariate analyses by age, gender, education, income and tobacco use status. Results Overall, 84.9% of respondents indicated support for smoking restrictions and tobacco advertisement bans. In all demographic segments, including tobacco users, the majority of respondents indicated agreement with restrictions, ranging from a low of 51% in the 13–25 age group to a high of 98% in the 56–70 age group. Logistic regression with all demographic variables entered showed that agreement with restrictions was higher with age, and was significantly higher among never smokers as compared to daily smokers. Conclusions Georgian public opinion is normatively supportive of more stringent tobacco-control measures in the form of smoking restrictions and tobacco advertisement bans.

Bakhturidze, George D; Mittelmark, Maurice B; Aar?, Leif E; Peikrishvili, Nana T

2013-01-01

402

Detection of Ehrlichia spp. in raccoons (Procyon lotor) from Georgia.  

PubMed

Raccoons (Procyonis lotor) and opossums (Didelphis virginianus) acquired from six contiguous counties in the Piedmont physiographic region of Georgia were investigated for their potential role in the epidemiology of ehrlichial and anaplasmal species. Serum was tested by indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) assay for the presence of antibodies reactive to Ehrlichia chaffeensis, E. canis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum (HGA agent). Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to test whole blood or white blood cell preparations for the presence of Ehrlichia and Anaplasma spp. 16S rRNA (rDNA) gene fragments. In addition, ticks were collected from these animals and identified. Twenty-three of 60 raccoons (38.3%) had E. chaffeensis-reactive antibodies (>1:64), 13 of 60 raccoons (21.7%) had E. canis-reactive antibodies, and one of 60 raccoons (1.7%) had A. phagocytophilum- reactive antibodies. A sequence confirmed E. canis product was obtained from one of 60 raccoons and a novel Ehrlichia-like 16S rDNA sequence was detected in 32 of 60 raccoons. This novel sequence was most closely related to an Ehrlichia-like organism identified from Ixodes ticks and rodents in Asia and Europe. Raccoons were PCR negative for E. chaffeensis and E. ewingii DNA. Five tick species, including Dermacentor variabilis, Amblyomma americanum, Ixodes texanus, I. cookei, and I. scapularis, were identified from raccoons and represent potential vectors for the ehrlichiae detected. Opossums (n = 17) were free of ticks and negative on all IFA and PCR assays. This study suggests that raccoons are potentially involved in the epidemiology of multiple ehrlichial organisms with known or potential public health and veterinary implications. PMID:16011433

Dugan, Vivien G; Gaydos, Joseph K; Stallknecht, David E; Little, Susan E; Beall, Ashley D; Mead, Daniel G; Hurd, Colin C; Davidson, William R

2005-01-01

403

Synoptic water-level measurements of the Upper Floridan aquifer in Florida and parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama, May-June 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water levels for the Upper Floridan aquifer were measured throughout Florida and in parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama in May-June 2010. These measurements were compiled for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Floridan Aquifer System Groundwater Availability Study and conducted as part of the USGS Groundwater Resources Program. Data were collected by personnel from the USGS Florida Water Science Center, Georgia Water Science Center, South Carolina Water Science Center and several state and county agencies in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama using standard techniques. Data collected by USGS personnel are stored in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS), Groundwater Site-Inventory System (GWSI). Furnished records from cooperators are stored in NWIS/GWSI when possible, but are available from the source agency.

Kinnaman, Sandra L.

2012-01-01

404

Palaeolimnological reconstructions of mid-late Holocene climate change from South Georgia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

South Georgia's position within the Polar Frontal Zone, the core belt of the Southern Hemisphere Westerly Winds, and between Antarctica and the mid-latitudes makes it a key location for studying the main drivers of past and present-day climate variability. We undertook multi-proxy analyses, including fossil diatom, pigment and ?-XRF analysis, of lake and peat cores from two sites: Annenkov Island, on the southern side of South Georgia, and Prince Olav Harbour on the northern coast of South Georgia to determine: 1) which proxies were most suitable for reconstructing Holocene palaeoclimatic change; 2) whether the climate change signals from these proxies were related to natural lake development, local catchment processes such as changes in ice extent, or regional-global scale climatic change. Deglaciation at both sites was completed by c. 7800 cal. yr. B.P. Low nutrient/low productivity environments, which persisted within lakes at both locations until c. 3500 cal. yr. B.P., are indicative of the relatively slow development of lake ecosystems following deglaciation, and suggest high altitude glaciers or persistent ice-cover remained in both catchments well into the mid Holocene. In contrast, the late Holocene (c. 3500 yr to present) was characterized by initially higher, and then highly variable within-lake biological productivity. On Annenkov Island, the late Holocene diatom composition in Fan Lake was dominated by a single species (Cyclotella stelligera), and we have identified four major phases of increased catchment disturbance (represented by Fragilaria capucina peaks in diatom data), some of which coincide with more numerous meltwater input events (identified from Ti and Sr peaks in ?-XRF data). In this poster we examine the links between these meltwater events, results from other proxies, and changes in the climate of the sub-Antarctic region.

Van Nieuwenhuyze, Wim; Roberts, Stephen J.; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Verleyen, Elie; Sterken, Mieke; Sabbe, Koen; Vyverman, Wim

2014-05-01

405

High BMI and waist circumference are associated with a high prevalence of comorbidities in Older Americans Act programs in Georgia senior centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  This study characterized the relationship of body mass index (BMI) and high waist circumference (WC) with the prevalence of\\u000a selected comorbidities among older adults receiving nutrition and wellness services from Georgia’s Older Americans Act programs\\u000a at senior centers.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Participants were a convenience sample (N = 759, mean age = 75 years, 81% female, 63% white, 36% black). Correction factors\\u000a were

D. M. Penn; J. G. Fischer; J. Sun Lee; D. B. Hausman; Mary Ann Johnson

2009-01-01

406

High seroprevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis in newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus patients in georgia.  

PubMed

Due to the shared routes of transmission, co-infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is common. There is strong evidence of bidirectional interactions between HIV and ulcerative STIs. Recent studies have also shown importance of non-ulcerative inflammatory STIs in the acquisition of HIV. The incidence of HIV and Chlamydia in Georgia has risen every year. We explored the extent of the problem of co-infection with C. trachomatis in HIV patients in the country. Study included 234 consecutive patients diagnosed with HIV from September 2008 through May 2009. Of them, approximately two-thirds were male 162 (69.23%), up to 44% (102) of patients had more than one lifetime sexual partner and one fifth of patients reported prior history of STIs. The seroprevalence of C. trachomatis in our study was 23.93% (95% CI: 18.61%-29.92%). In multivariate analysis the strongest predictors of C. trachomatis infection were history of STI (PR 1.94, 95% CI: 1.22-3.07) and female gender (PR 1.79, 95% CI: 1.11-2.87), while younger age and not being in marriage showed borderline significance. Findings of our study have important public health and clinical implications. Data suggest that STIs may play important role in increasing heterosexual transmission of HIV in Georgia. Efforts should be made to expand HIV screening programs. Further research is needed to better understand the role of inflammatory STIs in spreading HIV. PMID:21252403

Chkhartishvili, N; Dvali, N; Khechiashvili, G; Sharvadze, L; Tsertsvadze, T

2010-12-01

407

Remote Estimation of Salt Marsh Biophysical Parameters in the Georgia Coast: Model Cal/Val using NASA Sensors to Improve Monitoring and Restoration Efforts by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Salt marshes are highly productive ecosystems that provide habitat and nutrition to wildlife, offer protection from flooding and storm surges, and help filter polluted run-off from upland areas. This study demonstrates the ability to identify ';hotspots' of early stages of marsh degradation which can only be delineated by evaluating marsh biophysical characteristics including distribution of chlorophyll content (Chl), leaf area index (LAI) (a ratio of green foliage area vs. ground area), and green vegetation fraction (VF) (percent green canopy cover). These biophysical characteristics are primary indicators of photosynthetic capacity, nitrogen content, and physiological status of vegetation. Through use of NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor, we retrieve the above described biophysical characteristics in Georgia salt marshes. This work is significant because it allows for the first time the use of NASA satellite data to study the biophysical characteristics of salt marshes along Georgia's coast. Our results show an efficient and non-destructive biophysical mapping protocol for emergent wetlands to be used in restoration decision-making by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Our primary objectives are (1) to calibrate and validate a range of MODIS-based vegetation indices (VIs) and develop prototype weekly and monthly composites of the salt marsh biophysical characteristics for the coast of Georgia from 2000 through 2013, for the growing season (March-November) and (2) to perform a time-series analysis, with map products developed from MODIS imagery, to study the overall trend of salt marsh productivity during the last decade. These VIs (NDVI, WDRVI, EVI2, SAVI, and VARI) have been widely used and tested for monitoring terrestrial vegetation, but not for salt marsh ecosystems.

White, J. A.; Padgett-Vasquez, S.; Ghosh, S.; Baruch, A.; Chen, N.; Mote, J.; Mishra, D. R.

2013-12-01

408

Geochronologic evidence for a possible MIS-11 emergent barrier/beach-ridge in southeastern Georgia, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Predominantly clastic, off-lapping, transgressive, near-shore marine sediment packages that are morphologically expressed as subparallel NE-trending barriers, beach ridges, and associated back-barrier areas, characterize the near-surface stratigraphic section between the Savannah and the Ogeechee Rivers in Effingham County, southeastern Georgia. Each barrier/back-barrier (shoreline) complex is lower than and cut into a higher/older complex. Each barrier or shoreline complex overlies Miocene strata. No direct age data are available for these deposits. Previous researchers have disagreed on their age and provenance. Using luminescence and meteoric beryllium-10 (10Be) inventory analyses, we estimated a minimum age for the largest, westernmost, morphologically identifiable, and topographically-highest, barrier/beach-ridge (the Wicomico shoreline barrier) and constrained the age of a suite of younger barrier/beach-ridges that lie adjacent and seaward of the Wicomico shoreline barrier. At the study site, the near-shore marine/estuarine deposits underlying the Wicomico shoreline barrier are overlain by eolian sand and an intervening zone-of-mixing. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data indicate ages of ?43 ka for the eolian sand and 116 ka for the zone-of-mixing. Meteoric 10Be and pedostratigraphic data indicate minimum residence times of 33.4 ka for the eolian sand, 80.6 ka for the zone-of-mixing, and 247 ka for the paleosol. The combined OSL and 10Be age data indicate that, at this locality, the barrier/beach ridge has a minimum age of about 360 ka. This age for the Wicomico shoreline-barrier deposit is the first for any Pleistocene near-shore marine/estuarine deposit in southeast Georgia that is conclusively older than 80 ka. The 360-ka minimum age is in agreement with other geochronologic data for near-coastline deposits in Georgia and South Carolina. The geomorphic position of this barrier/beach-ridge is similar to deposits in South Carolina considered to be ~450 ka to >1 Ma. The age and geomorphic data for Georgia and South Carolina possibly suggest the presence of MIS-11 (~420?360 ka) shoreline deposits between 15 m and 28 m above present sea level in the Southeastern Atlantic Coastal Plain.

Markewich, H. W.; Pavich, M. J.; Schultz, A. P.; Mahan, S. A.; Aleman-Gonzalez, W. B.; Bierman, P. R.

2013-01-01

409

Geochronologic evidence for a possible MIS-11 emergent barrier/beach-ridge in southeastern Georgia, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Predominantly clastic, off-lapping, transgressive, near-shore marine sediment packages that are morphologically expressed as subparallel NE-trending barriers, beach ridges, and associated back-barrier areas, characterize the near-surface stratigraphic section between the Savannah and the Ogeechee Rivers in Effingham County, southeastern Georgia. Each barrier/back-barrier (shoreline) complex is lower than and cut into a higher/older complex. Each barrier or shoreline complex overlies Miocene strata. No direct age data are available for these deposits. Previous researchers have disagreed on their age and provenance. Using luminescence and meteoric beryllium-10 (10Be) inventory analyses, we estimated a minimum age for the largest, westernmost, morphologically identifiable, and topographically-highest, barrier/beach-ridge (the Wicomico shoreline barrier) and constrained the age of a suite of younger barrier/beach-ridges that lie adjacent and seaward of the Wicomico shoreline barrier. At the study site, the near-shore marine/estuarine deposits underlying the Wicomico shoreline barrier are overlain by eolian sand and an intervening zone-of-mixing. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data indicate ages of ?43 ka for the eolian sand and 116 ka for the zone-of-mixing. Meteoric 10Be and pedostratigraphic data indicate minimum residence times of 33.4 ka for the eolian sand, 80.6 ka for the zone-of-mixing, and 247 ka for the paleosol. The combined OSL and 10Be age data indicate that, at this locality, the barrier/beach ridge has a minimum age of about 360 ka. This age for the Wicomico shoreline-barrier deposit is the first for any Pleistocene near-shore marine/estuarine deposit in southeast Georgia that is conclusively older than 80 ka. The 360-ka minimum age is in agreement with other geochronologic data for near-coastline deposits in Georgia and South Carolina. The geomorphic position of this barrier/beach-ridge is similar to deposits in South Carolina considered to be ˜450 ka to >1 Ma. The age and geomorphic data for Georgia and South Carolina possibly suggest the presence of MIS-11 (˜420-360 ka) shoreline deposits between 15 m and 28 m above present sea level in the Southeastern Atlantic Coastal Plain.

Markewich, H. W.; Pavich, M. J.; Schultz, A. P.; Mahan, S. A.; Aleman-Gonzalez, W. B.; Bierman, P. R.

2013-01-01

410

In situ stabilization of metals (Cu, Cd, and Zn) in contaminated soils in the region of Bolnisi, Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The topsoils of the Mashavera valley in SE Georgia are highly contaminated with Cu, Zn and Cd from mining activities in the\\u000a upper reaches of the Mashavera River. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that an in situ immobilization of these metals\\u000a (M) by Fe-oxides would be an adequate remediation technique for the study area. A field experiment was thus initiated

Thomas Hanauer; Peter Felix-Henningsen; Diedrich Steffens; Besik Kalandadze; Levan Navrozashvili; Tengiz Urushadze

2011-01-01

411

STREAM-AQUIFER RELATIONS IN THE COASTAL AREA OF GEORGIA AND ADJACENT PARTS OF FLORIDA AND SOUTH CAROLINA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stream-aquifer relations in a 31,835- square-mile area in parts of Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina were evaluated in support of ground-water modeling investigations using hydrograph-separation and a linear-regression analysis of streamflow duration curves. The study area consists of three major river systems—the Altamaha-Satilla-St Marys, Salkehatchie- Savannah-Ogeechee, and Suwannee—that interact with the underlying ground-water system to varying degrees largely based on

Sherlyn Priest; John S. Clarke

412

Georgia's Surface-Water Resources and Streamflow Monitoring Network, 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) network of 223 real-time monitoring stations, the 'Georgia HydroWatch,' provides real-time water-stage data, with streamflow computed at 198 locations, and rainfall recorded at 187 stations. These sites continuously record data on 15-minute intervals and transmit the data via satellite to be incorporated into the USGS National Water Information System database. These data are automatically posted to the USGS Web site for public dissemination (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ga/nwis/nwis). The real-time capability of this network provides information to help emergency-management officials protect human life and property during floods, and mitigate the effects of prolonged drought. The map at right shows the USGS streamflow monitoring network for Georgia and major watersheds. Streamflow is monitored at 198 sites statewide, more than 80 percent of which include precipitation gages. Various Federal, State, and local agencies fund these streamflow monitoring stations.

Edited by Nobles, Patricia L.; Geological Survey (U.S.)

2006-01-01

413

Rare, Endangered, and Vulnerable Plants of the Republic of Georgia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Because of its large number of endemic species and rapid rate of habitat destruction, the Republic of Georgia is a biodiversity hot spot. In collaboration with the Missouri Botanical Garden, the Institute of Botany and the Botanical Garden of the Georgian Academy of Sciences has compiled this list of 1200 at-risk species, arranged alphabetically by family. Information on habitat and geographic distribution is included for all species, and images are included for some.

Asieshvili, L.; Eristavi, M.; Shulkina, T.

1995-01-01

414

DIEL TURBIDITY FLUCTUATIONS IN STREAMS IN GWINNETT COUNTY, GEORGIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Continuous turbidity data have been col- lected since 2001 at 12 water-quality monitoring stations in Gwinnett County, Georgia, as part of a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Gwinnett County Department of Public Utilities. With one of the largest real-time turbidity monitoring networks in the nation, this program has led in the development of deployment strategies and

Stephanie Gillain

415

Energy usage/consumption analysis for Radisson Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

A detailed analysis is given of energy consumption and energy use profiles for the Radisson Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia. Data included were collected primarily during the heating and cooling seasons, and show essentially where energy is used, how much is used, and when it is used. Energy use monitored is analyzed for space heating, space cooling, and domestic hot water. Energy use was measured for guest rooms, public areas, kitchen and service areas, and the laundry. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-12-01

416

Georgia Teachers in Academic Laboratories: Research Experiences in the Geosciences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Georgia Intern-Fellowships for Teachers (GIFT) is a collaborative effort designed to enhance mathematics and science experiences of Georgia teachers and their students through summer research internships for teachers. By offering business, industry, public science institute and research summer fellowships to teachers, GIFT provides educators with first-hand exposure to the skills and knowledge necessary for the preparation of our future workforce. Since 1991, GIFT has placed middle and high school mathematics, science and technology teachers in over 1000 positions throughout the state. In these fellowships, teachers are involved in cutting edge scientific and engineering research, data analysis, curriculum development and real-world inquiry and problem solving, and create Action Plans to assist them in translating the experience into changed classroom practice. Since 2004, an increasing number of high school students have worked with their teachers in research laboratories. The GIFT program places an average of 75 teachers per summer into internship positions. In the summer of 2005, 83 teachers worked in corporate and research environments throughout the state of Georgia and six of these positions involved authentic research in geoscience related departments at the Georgia Institute of Technology, including aerospace engineering and the earth and atmospheric sciences laboratories. This presentation will review the history and the structure of the program including the support system for teachers and mentors as well as the emphasis on inquiry based learning strategies. The focus of the presentation will be a comparison of two placement models of the teachers placed in geoscience research laboratories: middle school earth science teachers placed in a 6 week research experience and high school teachers placed in 7 week internships with teams of 3 high school students. The presentation will include interviews with faculty to determine the value of these experiences to the scientific community and interviews/classroom observations of teachers to determine the transfer of knowledge from the teacher to the students through the implementation of their Action Plans into their classroom.

Barrett, D.

2005-12-01

417

The Georgia State Fair, Macon, 1886-1960  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Seven decades ago, one "Jaydee the Great" wowed crowds at the Georgia State Fair in Macon with his high trapeze novelty act. That wasn't all that was happening at the State Fair of course and visitors with an interest in American history, entertainment, state fairs, and Georgia history will find plenty to hold their attention within this nice digital collection. The collection was created by the Digital Library of Georgia, and it documents the evolution of the state fair in Macon from 1886 to 1960. Here visitors can look over 150 black and white photographs, along with a selection of fliers advertising the fair. Most of the photographs depict county agricultural exhibits whose function was to promote a variety of farm produce and homemade items. The collection also has a number of photographs documenting community canning projects which took place during World War II. Visitors can search the collection via a search engine, or they may just wish to just browse around, which can be pretty fun as well.

418

Georgia science curriculum alignment and accountability: A blueprint for student success  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current trends and legislation in education indicate an increased dependency on standardized test results as a measure for learner success. This study analyzed test data in an effort to assess the impact of curriculum alignment on learner success as well as teacher perceptions of the changes in classroom instruction due to curriculum alignment. Qualitative and quantitative design methods were used to determine the impact of science curriculum alignment in grades 9-12. To determine the impact of science curriculum alignment from the Quality Core Curriculum (QCC) to the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) test data and teacher opinion surveys from one Georgia School system were examined. Standardized test scores before and after curriculum alignment were analyzed as well as teacher perception survey data regarding the impact of curriculum change. A quantitative teacher perception survey was administered to science teachers in the school system to identify significant changes in teacher perceptions or teaching strategies following curriculum realignment. Responses to the survey were assigned Likert scale values for analysis purposes. Selected teachers were also interviewed using panel-approved questions to further determine teacher opinions of curriculum realignment and the impact on student success and teaching strategies. Results of this study indicate significant changes related to curriculum alignment. Teachers reported a positive change in teaching strategies and instructional delivery as a result of curriculum alignment and implementation. Student scores also showed improvement, but more research is recommended in this area.

Reining-Gray, Kimberly M.

419

Directional Analysis of Sub-Antarctic Climate Change on South Georgia 1905-2009  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Directional analysis has been used to study changes in the sub-polar climate of the mountainous and glacierised sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia (54-55°S, 36-38°W). Significantly for climate change studies, South Georgia lies in the Scotia Sea between polar and temperate latitudes, and approximately 1000 km northeast and downwind of the Antarctic Peninsula - one of the fastest-warming regions on Earth (Vaughan et al., 2001). South Georgia was chosen for directional analysis because its climate is substantially advected by predominantly westerly circulations, and because it has a long (since 1905) meteorological record from King Edward Point (KEP) on its eastern side. Additional shorter records from Bird Island at the northwest tip of South Georgia allow comparison between windward (Bird Island) and leeward (KEP) climate regimes. The variation of mountain barrier heights with direction from KEP allows climate changes to be studied under different amounts of orographic influence (from ~700 m to ~2200 m). Records of glacier advance and retreat provide further independent evidence of climate change for comparison with the meteorological record. Directional climate analysis is based on a series of monthly-mean pressure fields defining the orientation and strength of synoptic-scale air-mass advection over the Scotia Sea. These fields are used to define directional climatologies for six 30° sectors with bearings from 150-180° to 300-330°; these sectors encompass 99% of recorded months since 1905. The climatologies summarise the frequencies of air masses from each sector, and the accompanying temperatures and precipitation. The 6 sectors can be broadly associated with 4 air-mass types and source regions: (i) sectors 150-210° advect cold polar maritime air that originated over the Antarctic continent before passing over the Weddell Sea, (ii) sectors 210-270° advect warmer, more stable polar maritime air from the Bellingshausen Sea/Antarctic Peninsula region, (iii) sector 270-300° has warmer, drier returning polar maritime circulated from the Bellingshausen Sea and across the Andes, and (iv) sector 300-330° has warm, humid tropical maritime air from the South Atlantic High. Detailed climatologies are compared for 4 distinct time periods covering: glacier advance (1920-1951), glacier retreat (1951-82), the latest decade (2000-2009), and a reference period (1905-1982). The comparisons show how climate changes between periods are composed of alterations in (i) air-mass frequency from different sectors, and (ii) temperature and precipitation within sectors. The ability of directional analysis to explain climate-change processes is confirmed by comparing directional results for the periods of glacier advance and glacier retreat. Specifically, during the ‘advance' period the air masses came 20% more frequently from the 4 colder, southerly sectors and correspondingly less frequently from the 2 warmer, northerly sectors. Moreover, the temperature of air coming from each sector was 0.1-0.8°C cooler than during the ‘retreat' period. Further directional analysis will compare records from the latest decade with previous periods to investigate recent sub-polar climate change, and particularly any advected warming from the Antarctic Peninsula. Directional analysis and advection climatologies can be used to test climate model performance and to examine atmospheric processes under changing climates. Previous directional analyses in an upland region of northwest England have detected changes in its mid-latitude temperate climate that were masked by directionally unsorted data (Malby et al., 2007, Ferranti et al., 2009); the South Georgia study now shows how similar methods can give insights into sub-polar climate change. FERRANTI, E. J. S., WHYATT, J. D. & TIMMIS, R. J. (2009) Development and application of topographic descriptors for conditional analysis of rainfall. Atmospheric Science Letters, 10, 177-184. MALBY, A. R., WHYATT, J. D., TIMMIS, R. J., WILBY, R. L. & ORR, H. G. (2007) Long-term variations in orographic r

Sakamoto Ferranti, Emma Jayne; Solera Garcia, Maria Angeles; Timmis, Roger James; Gerrard McKenna, Paul; Whyatt, James Duncan

2010-05-01

420

Student Perspectives of the Graduation Coach's Ethic of Care on the Dropout Epidemic in a Middle Georgia Alternative High School of Choice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the influence of the graduation coach's ethic of care on potential dropouts (at risk high school seniors) in a Georgia alternative high school. Based on Maslow's hierarchy of needs, the objective of this research was to identify if the graduation coach's ethic of care had an influence on…

Burger, Kimberly R.

2009-01-01

421

Predictors of suicide ideation and risk for HIV among juvenile offenders in Georgia.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine self-reported thoughts of suicide, HIV risk behaviors and history of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in a sample of adolescent juvenile offenders in Georgia. Participants were 2260 juvenile offenders housed at selected youth development campuses (YDCs) in the state of Georgia. Self-reported measures of suicide ideation, HIV risk, and past occurrence of STIs were collected. Significance tests were conducted using univariate logistic regressions to examine the independent associations of lifetime self-reported thoughts of suicide and dichotomized HIV risk behaviour correlates prior to incarceration. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were presented. Significant differences were observed between juveniles in several factors for increased risk, including having been previously incarcerated (p<0.04), having had more than five alcoholic drinks in the same day (p<0.007), and having performed oral sex (p<0.028). We suggest that interventions for juvenile offenders that report thoughts of suicide, and that focus on HIV risk reduction should be developed based on the consideration of targeting factors that increase risk to specific STIs. PMID:24501155

Stephens, Torrance; Holliday, Rhonda C

2014-01-01

422

Prevalence and Risk factors for Drug Resistance among Hospitalized TB Patients in Georgia  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Background Tuberculosis control in Georgia follows the WHO recommended DOTS strategy and has reached Global TB Control targets in treatment of sensitive TB, but the management of drug resistant forms of TB still represents a serious problem. A country-wide Drug Resistance Survey (DRS) found that the prevalence of MDR-TB was 6.8% in new and 27.4% in previously treated TB cases. Objective To determine prevalence and risk factors for drug resistance among TB patients in order to improve DR-TB case management and control. Methods Extensive social, clinical and bacteriological data were collected from hospitalized patients (National Centre for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases, Georgia, 2005–2007). Results Out of 605 patients DR-TB was found in 491 (81.2%) cases, MDR-TB was observed in 261(43.1%) [51 (23%) out of 222 New cases and 210 (55%) out of 383 Previously treated cases], mono-DR-TB in 130 (21.5%), poly-DR-TB in 67 (11.1%) and XDR-TB in 33 (5.5%) cases. Study showed that female gender, living in densely populated capital, family TB contact and previous TB treatment are associated with risk for having MDR-TB. Conclusions Findings confirm the necessity of improvement of infection control measures and availability of standardized treatment for DR-TB patients.

Vashakidze, L; Salakaia, A.; Shubladze, N.; Cynamon, M.; Barbakadze, K.; Kikvidze, M.; Papitashvili, L.; Nonikashvili, M.; Solomonia, N.; Bejanishvili, N.; Khurtsilava, I.

2010-01-01

423

Low-flow profiles of the Tallapoosa River and tributaries in Georgia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Low flow information is provided for use in an evaluation of the capacity of streams to permit withdrawals or to accept waste loads without exceeding the limits of State water quality standards. The report is the fourth in a series of reports presenting the results of a low flow study of all stream basins north of the Fall Line in Georgia. This report covers the part of the Tallapoosa River basin in the Piedmont province of Georgia. The low flow characteristic presented is the minimum average flow for 7 consecutive days with a 10-year recurrence interval (7Q10). The data are presented in tables and shown graphically as ' low flow profiles ' (low flow plotted against distance along a stream channel), and as ' drainage area profiles ' (drainage area plotted against distance along a stream channel). Low flow profiles were constructed by interpolation or extrapolation from points of known low flow data. Low flow profiles are included for all stream reaches where low flow data of sufficient accuracy are available to justify computation of the profiles. Drainage area profiles are included for all stream basins > 5 sq mi, except for those in a few remote areas. Flow records were not adjusted for diversions or other factors that cause measured flows to represent conditions other than natural flow. (Author 's abstract)

Carter, R. F.; Hopkins, E. H.; Perlman, H. A.

1988-01-01

424

Managing soil nutrients with compost in organic farms of East Georgia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil Fertility management in organic farming relies on a long-term integrated approach rather than the more short-term very targeted solutions common in conventional agriculture. Increasing soil organic matter content through the addition of organic amendments has proven to be a valuable practice for maintaining or restoring soil quality. Organic agriculture relies greatly on building soil organic matter with compost typically replacing inorganic fertilizers and animal manure as the fertility source of choice. In Georgia, more and more attention is paid to the development of organic farming, occupying less than 1% of total agricultural land of the country. Due to increased interest towards organic production the question about soil amendments is arising with special focus on organic fertilizers as basic nutrient supply sources under organic management practice. In the frame of current research two different types of compost was prepared and their nutritional value was studied. The one was prepared from organic fraction municipal solid waste and another one using fruit processing residues. In addition to main nutritional properties both composts were tested on heavy metals content, as one of the main quality parameter. The results have shown that concentration of main nutrient is higher in municipal solid waste compost, but it contains also more heavy metals, which is not allowed in organic farming system. Fruit processing residue compost also has lower pH value and is lower in total salt content being is more acceptable for soil in lowlands of East Georgia, mainly characterised by alkaline reaction. .

Ghambashidze, Giorgi

2013-04-01

425

Effects of river flows on growth of redbreast sunfish Lepomis auritus (Centrarchidae) in Georgia rivers.  

PubMed

Effects of river discharge on growth of redbreast sunfish Lepomis auritus were investigated in nine rivers in Georgia, U.S.A. Fish were aged and annular total length increments (L(Tinc)) estimated from measurements from sectioned sagittal otoliths using the generalized regression model that held for the effects of decreasing L(Tinc) from annual age (X): L(Tinc)=b(o)-b(1)(X) +/-b(i)(D), where b(o), b(1) and b(i) were the regression coefficients for the intercept and slopes and D, discharge, was either a single or multiple measurements of annular or seasonal flow volume or variation in flow volume. For eight of nine rivers, higher or greater variation in flows from April to June was associated with greater L. auritus growth; in the last river, higher flows from January to March were associated with greater fish growth. Across all rivers, L. auritus growth increments were 22, 45 and 36% greater in a wet year v. a dry year at ages 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively. Based on the results of this study, increasing water withdrawals by an additional 30% in five Georgia rivers would reduce the predicted number of L. auritus recruiting to 203 mm (angler preferred size) by 19-62%. PMID:20735655

Sammons, S M; Maceina, M J

2009-05-01

426

Estimating flood magnitude and frequency for urban and small, rural streams in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reliable estimates of the magnitude and frequency of floods are essential for the design of transportation and water-conveyance structures, flood insurance studies, and flood-plain management. Flood-frequency estimates are particularly important in densely populated urban areas. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used a multistate approach to update methods for determining the magnitude and frequency of floods in urban and small, rural streams that are not substantially affected by regulation or tidal fluctuations in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina (Feaster and others, 2014). The multistate approach has the advantage over a single state approach of increasing the number of streamflow-gaging station (streamgages) available for analysis, expanding the geographical coverage that would allow for application of regional regression equations across state boundaries, and building on a previous flood-frequency investigation of rural streamgages in the Southeastern United States. This investigation was funded as part of a cooperative program of water-resources investigations between the USGS, the South Carolina Department of Transportation, and the North Carolina Department of Transportation. In addition, much of the data and information for the Georgia streamgages was funded through a similar cooperative program with the Georgia Department of Transportation.

Feaster, Toby D.; Gotvald, Anthony J.; Weaver, J. Curtis

2014-01-01

427

A brucellosis disease control strategy for the Kakheti region of the country of Georgia: an agent-based model.  

PubMed

Brucellosis has been reported in livestock and humans in the country of Georgia with Brucella melitensis as the most common species causing disease. Georgia lacked sufficient data to assess effectiveness of the various potential control measures utilizing a reliable population-based simulation model of animal-to-human transmission of this infection. Therefore, an agent-based model was built using data from previous studies to evaluate the effect of an animal-level infection control programme on human incidence and sheep flock and cattle herd prevalence of brucellosis in the Kakheti region of Georgia. This model simulated the patterns of interaction of human-animal workers, sheep flocks and cattle herds with various infection control measures and returned population-based data. The model simulates the use of control measures needed for herd and flock prevalence to fall below 2%. As per the model output, shepherds had the greatest disease reduction as a result of the infection control programme. Cattle had the greatest influence on the incidence of human disease. Control strategies should include all susceptible animal species, sheep and cattle, identify the species of brucellosis present in the cattle population and should be conducted at the municipality level. This approach can be considered as a model to other countries and regions when assessment of control strategies is needed but data are scattered. PMID:23879523

Havas, K A; Boone, R B; Hill, A E; Salman, M D

2014-06-01

428

77 FR 75972 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26 - Atlanta, Georgia Notification of Proposed Production Activity Suzuki Mfg...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...America Corp. (All-Terrain Vehicles) Rome, Jonesboro and Cartersville, Georgia...of America Corp. (SMAC), located in Rome, Jonesboro, and Cartersville, Georgia...1520 and 1627 Technology Parkway, NW., Rome (Floyd County); 9250 Main Street,...

2012-12-26

429

75 FR 25839 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26 Atlanta, Georgia, Application for Subzone, Yates Bleachery Company (Textile...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Georgia, Application for Subzone, Yates Bleachery Company (Textile Fabric Finishing), Flintstone, Georgia An application has...FTZ 26, requesting special-purpose subzone status for the textile fabric finishing facility of Yates Bleachery Company...

2010-05-10

430

Extreme Scale Computing Studies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document is the draft Final Technical Report for Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech, GT) Project 210667V, 'Exascale Computing Study' (ECS). Four studies were conducted to determine the technical developments needed for a 1,000x increase in...

D. P. Campbell M. A. Richards

2010-01-01

431

Three new percid fishes (Percidae: Percina) from the Mobile Basin drainage of Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three new species of Percina are described from upland drainages of the Mobile Basin. Two of the three species are nar- rowly distributed: P. kusha, the Bridled Darter, is currently known only from the Conasauga River drainage in Georgia and Tennessee and Etowah River drainage in Georgia, both tributaries of the Coosa River, and P. sipsi , the Bankhead Darter,

JAMES D. WILLIAMS; DAVID A. NEELY; STEPHEN J. WALSH; NOEL M. BURKHEAD

2007-01-01

432

AGRICULTURAL WATER USE IN GEORGIA: RESULTS FROM THE AG. WATER PUMPING PROGRAM  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the results for the period 1999 to 2002 from the monitoring program that is estimating agricultural water use across the entire state of Georgia. This program is called AG. WATER PUMPING (Agricultural Water: Potential Use and Management Program in Georgia). Current conflicts on water allocation in the ACT (Alabama, Coosa, and Talapoosa) and ACF (Apalachicola, Flint, and

D. L. Thomas; K. A. Harrison; J. E. Hook; G. Hoogenboom; R. W. McClendon; L. R. Wheeler

433

Legal Aspects of Water Resources: A Survey of the Law in Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the decade of the 70's, the Georgia and Federal legislatures virtually rewrote the body of substantive law affecting water resources. The approach of the Georgia legislature, that portion of the law of the period which is addressed in this report, was ...

J. O. Smith

1983-01-01

434

WATER USE PATTERNS IN THE WATERSHEDS OF THE GEORGIA RIVERINE ESTUARIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined water use patterns in the hydrologic units that comprise the watersheds of the 5 major coastal rivers in Georgia (Savannah, Ogeechee, Altamaha, Satilla, St. Marys). The data for this analysis were obtained from the Georgia Water Use Program, which regularly surveys both water sources (groundwater and surface water) and water uses (domestic, commercial, industrial, mining, irrigation, livestock, thermoelectric,

Merryl Alber; Carrie Smith

435

Georgiaites: Tektite Geochemistry and Stratigraphic Occurrence in East-Central Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Georgia tektites ('georgiaites') were produced by the fusion of target rock in a late Eocene terrestrial impact event. Relative to other North American tektites, georgiaites are enriched in silica and potassium but depleted in all other major elements. Georgia tektites also have the lowest REE abundances and have lower incompatible trace element abundances. They have a mean potassium-argon age of

Edward Francis Albin Jr.

1997-01-01

436

9. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 05100025D01986N (JAMES P. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE). DETAIL OF FENDER SYSTEM FOR TURN-SPAN PIVOT PIER. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

437

Movements of Adult Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Savannah River, Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

During 1973, 1974, and 1975 movements of 33 striped bass [Morone saxatilis (Walbaum)] in the Savannah River, Georgia were followed through the use of ultrasonic and radio transmitters. During March through May striped bass congregate and spawn in a tidally influenced, relatively shallow, small branch of the river (Little Back River) near Savannah, Georgia, about 30 km upstream from the

Richard G. Dudley; Anthony W. Mullis; James W. Terrell

1977-01-01

438

5. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 05100025D01986N (JAMES P. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) FACING WEST SHOWING LOCATION OF FENDER SYSTEM FOR TURN-SPAN PIVOT PIER. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

439

7. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 05100025D01986N (JAMES P. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE). DETAIL OF EXTERIOR OF OPERATOR'S HOUSE. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

440

2. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 05100025D01986N (JAMES P. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) FACING WEST - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

441

10. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 05100025D01986N (JAMES P. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) FACING WEST SHOWING LOCATION OF TRAFFIC ARMS. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

442

8. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 05100025D01986N (JAMES P. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE). DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF OPERATOR'S HOUSE. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

443

1. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 05100025D01986N (JAMES P. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) FACING EAST - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

444

3. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 05100025D01986N (JAMES P. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) SOUTH SIDE ELEVATION - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

445

11. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 05100025D01986N (JAMES P. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE). DETAIL OF TRUSS SHOWING LATERAL SUPPORTS AND DIAGONALS. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

446

Tritium Concentrations in the Savannah River, Clyo, Georgia, 1966-1997  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Geological Survey (USGS) has maintained a monitoring network for tritium distributions in river water and precipitation for the past forty years. Among the locations routinely sampled is the Savannah River near Clyo, Georgia. Sampling began in the early 1960s at the Clyo, Georgia site and has continued to the present. The weighted average of the tritium concentration in

R. L. Michel

2001-01-01

447

6. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 05100025D01986N (JAMES P. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) FACING EAST SHOWING LOCATION OF STORAGE BUILDING. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

448

BEYOND THE INDICES: RELATIONS OF HABITAT AND FISH CHARACTERISTICS IN THE GEORGIA PIEDMONT  

EPA Science Inventory

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources has conducted biological sampling at 180 stream sites in the Georgia Piedmont (1998-99) and recorded several trophic and abundance characteristics of the fish assemblages and habitat at each site. These characteristics were combined to ...

449

Field setting, mineralogy, chemistry, and genesis of arc picrites, New Georgia, Solomon Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

The field setting, petrography, mineralogy, and geochemistry of a suite of picrite basalts and related magnesian olivine tholeiites (New Georgia arc picrites) from the New Georgia Volcanics, Kolo caldera in the active ensimatic Solomon Islands arc are presented. These lavas, with an areal extent in the order of 1002 km and almost 1 km thick in places, are located close

W. R. H. Ramsay; A. J. Crawford; J. D. Foden

1984-01-01

450

Do Peers Influence Achievement in High School Economics? Evidence from Georgia's Economics End of Course Test  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors provide the first estimates of the impact of peers on achievement in high school economics. The estimates are obtained by analyzing three years of data on all high school students who take Georgia's required economics course and its accompanying high-stakes End of Course Test (Georgia Department of Education). They use an instrumental…

Clark, Christopher; Scafidi, Benjamin; Swinton, John R.

2011-01-01

451

Georgia Is All Business as It Moves to Improve State's Showing on SAT  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students are not the only ones in Georgia fretting over scores from the recent SAT exams. More than perhaps any other state, Georgia has linked its reputation as a place to live, send children to school, and do business to the state's performance on the college-entrance test. Since Governor Sonny Perdue launched a statewide effort to raise those…

Jacobson, Linda

2005-01-01

452

4. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 05100025D01986N (JAMES P. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) FACING EAST SHOWING STEEL GRID DECKING. OPERATOR'S HOUSE LOCATED ON UPPER SECTION OF TRUSS. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA