Science.gov

Sample records for geostationary satellite orbit

  1. Communications satellites in non-geostationary orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Kent M.; Doong, Wen; Nguyen, Tuan Q.; Turner, Andrew E.; Weyandt, Charles

    1988-01-01

    The design of a satellite communications system in an orbit lower than GEO is described. Two sun-synchronous orbits which lie in the equatorial plane have been selected: (1) the apogee at constant time-of-day equatorial orbit, a highly eccentric orbit with five revolutions per day, which allows 77-135 percent more satellite mass to be placed in orbit than for GEO; and (2) the sun-synchronous 12-hour equatorial orbit, a circular orbit with two revolutions per day, which allows 23-29 percent more mass. The results of a life cycle economic analysis illustrate that nongeostationary satellite systems could be competitive with geostationary satellite systems.

  2. 75 FR 17055 - Coordination Between the Non-Geostationary and Geostationary Satellite Orbit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ...In this document the Commission specifies rules and procedures to be used for frequency coordination between terrestrial Broadcast Auxiliary Service and Cable Television Relay Service (BAS/CARS) operations and geostationary satellite orbit (GSO) or non-geostationary satellite orbit (NGSO) fixed-satellite service (FSS) operations in the 6875-7075 MHz (7 GHz) and 12750-13250 MHz (13 GHz) bands.......

  3. On orbital allotments for geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonsalvez, David J. A.; Reilly, Charles H.; Mount-Campbell, Clark A.

    1986-01-01

    The following satellite synthesis problem is addressed: communication satellites are to be allotted positions on the geostationary arc so that interference does not exceed a given acceptable level by enforcing conservative pairwise satellite separation. A desired location is specified for each satellite, and the objective is to minimize the sum of the deviations between the satellites' prescribed and desired locations. Two mixed integer programming models for the satellite synthesis problem are presented. Four solution strategies, branch-and-bound, Benders' decomposition, linear programming with restricted basis entry, and a switching heuristic, are used to find solutions to example synthesis problems. Computational results indicate the switching algorithm yields solutions of good quality in reasonable execution times when compared to the other solution methods. It is demonstrated that the switching algorithm can be applied to synthesis problems with the objective of minimizing the largest deviation between a prescribed location and the corresponding desired location. Furthermore, it is shown that the switching heuristic can use no conservative, location-dependent satellite separations in order to satisfy interference criteria.

  4. Servicing communication satellites in geostationary orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Paul K.; Price, Kent M.

    1990-01-01

    The econmic benefits of a LEO space station are quantified by identifying alternative operating scenarios utilizing the space station's transportation facilities and assembly and repair facilities. Particular consideration is given to the analysis of the impact of on-orbit assembly and servicing on a typical communications satellite is analyzed. The results of this study show that on-orbit servicing can increase the internal rate of return by as much as 30 percent.

  5. Astrometric positioning and orbit determination of geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montojo, F. J.; López Moratalla, T.; Abad, C.

    2011-03-01

    In the project titled “Astrometric Positioning of Geostationary Satellite” (PASAGE), carried out by the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA), optical observation techniques were developed to allow satellites to be located in the geostationary ring with angular accuracies of up to a few tenths of an arcsec. These techniques do not necessarily require the use of large telescopes or especially dark areas, and furthermore, because optical observation is a passive method, they could be directly applicable to the detection and monitoring of passive objects such as space debris in the geostationary ring.By using single-station angular observations, geostationary satellite orbits with positional uncertainties below 350 m (2 sigma) were reconstructed using the Orbit Determination Tool Kit software, by Analytical Graphics, Inc. This software is used in collaboration with the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial.Orbit determination can be improved by taking into consideration the data from other stations, such as angular observations alone or together with ranging measurements to the satellite. Tests were carried out combining angular observations with the ranging measurements obtained from the Two-Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer technique that is used by ROA’s Time Section to carry out time transfer with other laboratories. Results show a reduction of the 2 sigma uncertainty to less than 100 m.

  6. 47 CFR 25.146 - Licensing and operating authorization provisions for the non-geostationary satellite orbit fixed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provisions for the non-geostationary satellite orbit fixed-satellite service (NGSO FSS) in the bands 10.7 GHz... Licensing and operating authorization provisions for the non-geostationary satellite orbit fixed-satellite... submitted for the proposed non-geostationary satellite orbit fixed-satellite service (NGSO FSS) system...

  7. 47 CFR 25.146 - Licensing and operating authorization provisions for the non-geostationary satellite orbit fixed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... provisions for the non-geostationary satellite orbit fixed-satellite service (NGSO FSS) in the bands 10.7 GHz... Licensing and operating authorization provisions for the non-geostationary satellite orbit fixed-satellite... submitted for the proposed non-geostationary satellite orbit fixed-satellite service (NGSO FSS) system...

  8. Precise Orbit Propagation of Geostationary Satellite Using Cowell's Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jae-Cheol; Choi, Kyu-Hong; Kim, Eun-Kyou

    1997-06-01

    To calculate the position and velocity of the artificial satellite precisely, one has to broil a mathematical model concerning the perturbations by understanding and analysing the space environment correctly and then quantifying. Due to these space environment model, the total acceleration of the artificial satellite can be expressed as the 2nd order differential equation and we build an orbit propagation algorithm by integrating twice this equation by using the Cowell's method which gives the position arid velocity of th artificial satellite at any given time. Perturbations important for the orbits of geostationary spacecraft are the Earth's gravitational potential, the gravitational influence of the sun and moon, and the solar radiation pressure. For precise orbit propagation in Cowell' method, 40 x 40 spherical harmonic coefficients cal be applied and the JPL DE403 ephemeris files were used to generate the range from earth to sun and moo and 8th order Runge-Kutta single step method with variable step-size control is use to integrate the orbit propagation equations.

  9. The use of satellites in non-geostationary orbits for unloading geostationary communication satellite traffic peaks. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, K.; Turner, A.; Nguyen, T.; Doong, W.; Weyandt, C.

    1987-01-01

    The overall objective of this program was to assess the application, economic benefits, and technology and system implications of satellites in non-geostationary (non-GEO) orbits for off-loading peak traffic from GEO communications satellites. The study was organized into four technical tasks which are described in turn. They are: (1) concepts development; (2) system definition; (3) economic comparisons; and (4) technology requirements definition. Each of these tasks is defined in detail and the results of each are given.

  10. 47 CFR 25.146 - Licensing and operating rules for the non-geostationary satellite orbit Fixed-Satellite Service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-geostationary satellite orbit Fixed-Satellite Service (NGSO FSS) in the 10.7 GHz-14.5 GHz bands. 25.146 Section... the non-geostationary satellite orbit Fixed-Satellite Service (NGSO FSS) in the 10.7 GHz-14.5 GHz... satellite orbit Fixed-Satellite Service (NGSO FSS) system in the 10.7-14.5 GHz bands. The...

  11. A Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite Model Using Easy Java Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wee, Loo Kang; Goh, Giam Hwee

    2013-01-01

    We develop an Easy Java Simulation (EJS) model for students to visualize geostationary orbits near Earth, modelled using a Java 3D implementation of the EJS 3D library. The simplified physics model is described and simulated using a simple constant angular velocity equation. We discuss four computer model design ideas: (1) a simple and realistic…

  12. The use of satellites in non-goestationary orbits for unloading geostationary communication satellite traffic peaks. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, K.; Turner, A.; Nguyen, T.; Doong, W.; Weyandt, C.

    1987-01-01

    The part of the geostationary (GEO) orbital arc used for United States domestic fixed, communications service is rapidly becoming filled with satellites. One of the factors currently limiting its utilization is that communications satellites must be designed to have sufficient capacity to handle peak traffic leads, and thus are under utilized most of the time. A solution is to use satellites in suitable non-geostationary orbits to unload the traffic peaks. Three different designs for a non-geostationary orbit communications satellite system are presented for the 1995 time frame. The economic performance is analyzed and compared with geostationary satellites for two classes of service, trunking and customer premise service. The result is that the larger payload of the non-geostationary satellite offsets the burdens of increased complexity and worse radiation environment to give improved economic performance. Depending on ground terminal configuration, the improved economic performance of the space segment may be offset by increased ground terminal expenses.

  13. 47 CFR 25.261 - Procedures for avoidance of in-line interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit (NGSO) Satellite Network Operations in the Fixed... avoidance of in-line interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit (NGSO) Satellite Network... procedures in this section apply to non-Federal-Government NGSO FSS satellite networks operating in...

  14. 47 CFR 25.261 - Procedures for avoidance of in-line interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit (NGSO) Satellite Network Operations in the Fixed... avoidance of in-line interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit (NGSO) Satellite Network... procedures in this section apply to non-Federal-Government NGSO FSS satellite networks operating in...

  15. Time Resolved Atmospheric Carbon Satellite Observations from Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, David; Worden, Helen

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from CHRONOS (Commercially Hosted spectroRadiometer Observations and New Opportunities for Science). The primary goal of this mission is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Both CO and CH4 are chemical precursors of tropospheric ozone pollution. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution. The CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth Venture TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution

  16. Time Resolved Atmospheric Carbon Satellite Observations from Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, D. P.; Worden, H. M.; Deeter, M. N.; Worden, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from CHRONOS (Commercially Hosted spectroRadiometer Observations and New Opportunities for Science). The primary goal of this mission is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Both CO and CH4 are chemical precursors of tropospheric ozone pollution. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution. The CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth Venture TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution

  17. 47 CFR 25.261 - Procedures for avoidance of in-line interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for avoidance of in-line interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit (NGSO) Satellite Network Operations in the Fixed... avoidance of in-line interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit (NGSO) Satellite...

  18. 47 CFR 25.261 - Procedures for avoidance of in-line interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures for avoidance of in-line interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit (NGSO) Satellite Network Operations in the Fixed... avoidance of in-line interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit (NGSO) Satellite...

  19. 47 CFR 25.261 - Procedures for avoidance of in-line interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for avoidance of in-line interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit (NGSO) Satellite Network Operations in the Fixed... avoidance of in-line interference events for Non Geostationary Satellite Orbit (NGSO) Satellite...

  20. New non-geosynchronous orbits for communications satellites to off-load daily peaks in geostationary traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, A. E.

    1987-01-01

    The potential for satellites in two orbits, the sun-synchronous 12-hour equatorial orbit (STET) and the apogee at constant time-of-day equatorial orbit (ACE), to off-load peaks in the CONUS geostationary communications traffic is discussed. These orbits are found to require maneuvers of smaller magnitudes for insertion than geostationary orbits. Advantages of the ACE orbit over the STET orbit are discussed, including larger satellite mass capability for a given launch vehicle, lower slant ranges, and larger angular separation from the geostationary arc for a nonequatorial ground observer.

  1. 47 CFR 25.146 - Licensing and operating rules for the non-geostationary orbit Fixed-Satellite Service in the 10.7...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-geostationary orbit Fixed-Satellite Service in the 10.7 GHz-14.5 GHz bands. 25.146 Section 25.146... Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.146 Licensing and operating rules for the non-geostationary orbit... submitted for the proposed non-geostationary satellite orbit Fixed-Satellite Service (NGSO FSS) system...

  2. SILEX mission - First European experiment using optical frequencies between geostationary and low earth orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faup, Michel; Laurent, Bernard; Pera, Luigi

    1991-10-01

    Since 1982, CNES has investigated the possibility to relay data from a low earth orbiting satellite to the ground via a geostationary satellite through a high data rate optical link. This work has led to a collaboration between ESA and CNES to implement the Semiconductor Intersatellite Link experiment (SILEX) which involves two terminals, one on Artemis (ESA geostationary satellite) and one on SPOT-4 (French Earth Observation Satellite). This paper presents the technical baseline that has been selected for SILEX. A short discussion of the performance will be initiated mainly concerning the questions linked to interfaces with the host platforms and the expected communication performance. The areas of development that could help to define the next generation of optical communication experiments and applications are explored.

  3. 78 FR 14952 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS). See Electronic Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR... Geostationary-Orbit Space Stations AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule....

  4. CARTEL: A method to calibrate S-band ranges with geostationary satellites. Results of orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitart, A.; Mesnard, B.

    1986-05-01

    A satellite tracking campaign was organized, with 4 S-band stations, for 1 wk. The relative geometry of the network with respect to the satellites was an opportunity to show how the most precise orbit can be computed with the operational software. This precise orbit served as a reference to evaluate what can be achieved with one station with range and angular measurements, a typical configuration used for stationkeeping of geostationary satellites. Orbit computation implied numerical integration with gravitational (Earth, Moon, and Sun) and solar radiation pressure forces acting on the satellite. Arc lengths of 2 days gave initial state vectors which were compared every day. Precision of 10 m is achieved. However, an analysis of the influence of parameters in the orbit computations reveals that the absolute accuracy is of the order of 100 m, since modeling perturbations were neglected in the operational software (e.g., polar motion). In a relative sense, the reference orbit allows estimation of systematic errors for other tracking antennas.

  5. Coarse Initial Orbit Determination for a Geostationary Satellite Using Single-Epoch GPS Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ghangho; Kim, Chongwon; Kee, Changdon

    2015-01-01

    A practical algorithm is proposed for determining the orbit of a geostationary orbit (GEO) satellite using single-epoch measurements from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver under the sparse visibility of the GPS satellites. The algorithm uses three components of a state vector to determine the satellite’s state, even when it is impossible to apply the classical single-point solutions (SPS). Through consideration of the characteristics of the GEO orbital elements and GPS measurements, the components of the state vector are reduced to three. However, the algorithm remains sufficiently accurate for a GEO satellite. The developed algorithm was tested on simulated measurements from two or three GPS satellites, and the calculated maximum position error was found to be less than approximately 40 km or even several kilometers within the geometric range, even when the classical SPS solution was unattainable. In addition, extended Kalman filter (EKF) tests of a GEO satellite with the estimated initial state were performed to validate the algorithm. In the EKF, a reliable dynamic model was adapted to reduce the probability of divergence that can be caused by large errors in the initial state. PMID:25835299

  6. In-orbit operations of Japanese geostationary meteorological satellite, GMS-2, 'HIMAWARI-2'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Y.; Saito, M.; Kitahara, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Harada, M.

    1982-09-01

    The objectives of GMS-II are the same as those of its predecessor, which was launched as part of the Global Atmospheric Research Program. GMS-2 is a spin-stabilized geostationary meteorological satellite with mechanical despun antennas. The spacecraft launch weight was reduced about 15 kg from that of its predecessor to make it compatible with the N-II launch vehicle. A description is given of the post-launch mission check, which was carried out between August and September 1981. The check was made to compare the in-orbit performance of GMS-2 with ground test data, to verify that the overall system function and performance met the requirements, and to establish a data base for future performance comparisons after the orbit life.

  7. 78 FR 19172 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ..., FR Doc. 2013-04429, on page 14952, column 1, correct the DATES section to read as follows: DATES... Geostationary-Orbit Space Stations AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule;...

  8. Geostationary orbit determination using SATRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hui; Li, ZhiGang; Yang, XuHai; Wu, WenJun; Cheng, Xuan; Yang, Ying; Feng, ChuGang

    2011-09-01

    A new strategy of precise orbit determination (POD) for GEO (Geostationary Earth Orbit) satellite using SATRE (SAtellite Time and Ranging Equipment) is presented. Two observation modes are proposed and different channels of the same instruments are used to construct different observation modes, one mode receiving time signals from their own station and the other mode receiving time signals from each other for two stations called pairs of combined observations. Using data from such a tracking network in China, the results for both modes are compared. The precise orbit determination for the Sino-1 satellite using the data from 6 June 2005 to 13 June 2005 has been carried out in this work. The RMS (Root-Mean-Square) of observing residuals for 3-day solutions with the former mode is better than 9.1 cm. The RMS of observing residuals for 3-day solutions with the latter mode is better than 4.8 cm, much better than the former mode. Orbital overlapping (3-day orbit solution with 1-day orbit overlap) tests show that the RMS of the orbit difference for the former mode is 0.16 m in the radial direction, 0.53 m in the along-track direction, 0.97 m in the cross-track direction and 1.12 m in the 3-dimension position and the RMS of the orbit difference for the latter mode is 0.36 m in the radial direction, 0.89 m in the along-track direction, 1.18 m in the cross-track direction and 1.52 m in the 3-dimension position, almost the same as the former mode. All the experiments indicate that a meter-level accuracy of orbit determination for geostationary satellite is achievable.

  9. Land Surface Temperature- Comparing Data from Polar Orbiting and Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comyn-Platt, E.; Remedios, J. J.; Good, E. J.; Ghent, D.; Saunders, R.

    2012-04-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a vital parameter in Earth climate science, driving long-wave radiation exchanges that control the surface energy budget and carbon fluxes, which are important factors in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and the monitoring of climate change. Satellites offer a convenient way to observe LST consistently and regularly over large areas. A comparison between LST retrieved from a Geostationary Instrument, the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI), and a Polar Orbiting Instrument, the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) is presented. Both sensors offer differing benefits. AATSR offers superior precision and spatial resolution with global coverage but given its sun-synchronous platform only observes at two local times, ~10am and ~10pm. SEVIRI provides the high-temporal resolution (every 15 minutes) required for observing diurnal variability of surface temperatures but given its geostationary platform has a poorer resolution, 3km at nadir, which declines at higher latitudes. A number of retrieval methods are applied to the raw satellite data: First order coefficient based algorithms provided on an operational basis by the LandSAF (for SEVIRI) and the University of Leicester (for AATSR); Second order coefficient based algorithms put forward by the University of Valencia; and an optimal estimation method using the 1DVar software provided by the NWP SAF. Optimal estimation is an iterative technique based upon inverse theory, thus is very useful for expanding into data assimilation systems. The retrievals are assessed and compared on both a fine scale using in-situ data from recognised validation sites and on a broad scale using two 100x100 regions such that biases can be better understood. Overall, the importance of LST lies in monitoring daily temperature extremes, e.g. for estimating permafrost thawing depth or risk of crop damage due to frost, hence the ideal dataset would use a combination of observations

  10. Precipitation nowcasting from geostationary satellite platforms: Neural network methodology exploiting low-Earth-orbit and ground-based data synergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivolta, G.; de Rosa, M.; Marzano, F. S.

    2009-04-01

    Many severe meteorological events develop at short time scales. The availability of effective rain-rate nowcasting techniques is valuable for Civil Protection purposes. Neural network based nowcasting techniques, exploiting satellite data, have been proven to be more accurate than conventional techniques. Several rain retrieval techniques have been proposed on the basis of multi-satellite imagery, exploiting passive sensor measurements acquired by Geostationary-Earth-Orbit (GEO) and Low Earth Orbit (LEO) platforms. These approaches tend to overcome some inherent limitations due to the use of satellite thermal infrared (IR) radiances, which are measurements poorly correlated with rainfall. In this respect, microwave (MW) radiometric data available from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) platforms can provide more accurate rain estimates. MW brightness temperatures are fairly sensitive to liquid and ice hydrometeors since rain clouds are not optically opaque at microwave frequencies. GEO satellites can ensure Earth coverage with a high temporal sampling, whereas LEO satellites have the drawback of low temporal sampling. Therefore, LEO-MW and GEO-IR radiometry are clearly complementary for monitoring the Earth's atmosphere and a highly variable phenomenon such as precipitation. The IR radiances from geostationary images can be properly calibrated using microwave-based combined algorithms. Microwave data can be extracted from the microwave imager sensors, but any rain estimation source may be, in general, foreseen. Ground based meteorological radar reflectivity can also be exploited. The objective of this work is to identify guidelines for improving the neural-network approach successfully applied to the rainfall field nowcast from thermal infrared and microwave passive-sensor imagery aboard, respectively, Geostationary-Earth-Orbit (GEO) and Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) satellites, using infrared (IR) multi-channel data available from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) and microwave (MW

  11. Use of non-geostationary orbits for a Ka-band Personal Access Satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Polly; Motamedy, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of satellites in circular orbits at altitudes high enough for continental U.S. (CONUS) visibility. This enables one satellite to relay signals between geographically separated earth stations within CONUS at any one time and thus bypasses the need for intersatellite links. System performance is examined for three circular satellite orbits at altitudes of 20,182 km, 10,353 km, and 5143 km. Inclination angles between the satellite orbit plane and the equatorial plane of 0, 45, and 90 deg are considered. The number of satellites required to provide continuous CONUS coverage is calculated.

  12. Radio frequency interference at the geostationary orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sue, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    Growing demands on the frequency spectrum have increased the possibility of radio frequency interference (RFI). Various approaches to obtain in orbit RFI data are compared; this comparision indicates that the most practical way to obtain RFI data for a desired orbit (such as a geostationary orbit) is through the extrapolation of in orbit RFI measurements by a low orbit satellite. It is concluded that a coherent RFI program that uses both experimental data and analytical predictions provides accurate RFI data at minimal cost.

  13. Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) Mission: Science from Geostationary Orbit on-board a Commercial Communications Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastes, R.; Deaver, T.; Krywonos, A.; Lankton, M. R.; McClintock, W. E.; Pang, R.

    2011-12-01

    Geostationary orbits are ideal for many science investigations of the Earth system on global scales. These orbits allow continuous observations of the same geographic region, enabling spatial and temporal changes to be distinguished and eliminating the ambiguity inherent to observations from low Earth orbit (LEO). Just as observations from geostationary orbit have revolutionized our understanding of changes in the troposphere, they will dramatically improve our understanding of the space environment at higher altitudes. However, geostationary orbits are infrequently used for science missions because of high costs. Geostationary satellites are large, typically weighing tons. Consequently, devoting an entire satellite to a science mission requires a large financial commitment, both for the spacecraft itself and for sufficient science instrumentation to justify a dedicated spacecraft. Furthermore, the small number of geostationary satellites produced for scientific missions increases the costs of each satellite. For these reasons, it is attractive to consider flying scientific instruments on satellites operated by commercial companies, some of whom have fleets of ~40 satellites. However, scientists' lack of understanding of the capabilities of commercial spacecraft as well as commercial companies' concerns about risks to their primary mission have impeded the cooperation necessary for the shared use of a spacecraft. Working with a commercial partner, the GOLD mission has successfully overcome these issues. Our experience indicates that there are numerous benefits to flying on commercial communications satellites (e.g., it is possible to downlink large amounts of data) and the costs are low if the experimental requirements adequately match the capabilities and available resources of the host spacecraft. Consequently, affordable access to geostationary orbit aboard a communications satellite now appears possible for science payloads.

  14. Asynchronous Processing of a Constellation of Geostationary and Polar-Orbiting Satellites for Fire Detection and Smoke Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyer, E. J.; Peterson, D. A.; Curtis, C. A.; Schmidt, C. C.; Hoffman, J.; Prins, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Fire Locating and Monitoring of Burning Emissions (FLAMBE) system converts satellite observations of thermally anomalous pixels into spatially and temporally continuous estimates of smoke release from open biomass burning. This system currently processes data from a constellation of 5 geostationary and 2 polar-orbiting sensors. Additional sensors, including NPP VIIRS and the imager on the Korea COMS-1 geostationary satellite, will soon be added. This constellation experiences schedule changes and outages of various durations, making the set of available scenes for fire detection highly variable on an hourly and daily basis. Adding to the complexity, the latency of the satellite data is variable between and within sensors. FLAMBE shares with many fire detection systems the goal of detecting as many fires as possible as early as possible, but the FLAMBE system must also produce a consistent estimate of smoke production with minimal artifacts from the changing constellation. To achieve this, NRL has developed a system of asynchronous processing and cross-calibration that permits satellite data to be used as it arrives, while preserving the consistency of the smoke emission estimates. This talk describes the asynchronous data ingest methodology, including latency statistics for the constellation. We also provide an overview and show results from the system we have developed to normalize multi-sensor fire detection for consistency.

  15. Ephemeris calculation and orbit determination of geostationary satellites, using Taylor series integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenbruck, Oliver

    1991-02-01

    It is shown that Taylor series integration allows problems of celestial mechanics for interplanetary orbits to be solved with relatively simple orbit models. The method is adapted to the computation of satellite orbits. A new implementation concept is included, which allows a programmation of the equations of motion. It offers simultaneously extension possibilities, which are necessary for the computation of special terms of the power function. The linking of Sun and Moon ephemeris for the treatment of gavitational disturbances of the satellite orbit is used as an example. This concept is represented with the principles of Taylor series integration, and compared with variants of the process. The power spectrum of the method is examined for disturbed and undisturbed Kepler orbits.

  16. On-Orbit Geometric Calibration Approach for High-Resolution Geostationary Optical Satellite GaoFen-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mi; Cheng, Yufeng; Long, Xiaoxiang; Yang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    The GaoFen-4 (GF-4) remote sensing satellite is China's first civilian high-resolution geostationary optical satellite, which has been launched at the end of December 2015. To guarantee the geometric quality of imagery, this paper presents an on-orbit geometric calibration method for the area-array camera of GF-4. Firstly, we introduce the imaging features of area-array camera of GF-4 and construct a rigorous imaging model based on the analysis of the major error sources from three aspects: attitude measurement error, orbit measurement error and camera distortion. Secondly, we construct an on-orbit geometric calibration model by selecting and optimizing parameters of the rigorous geometric imaging model. On this basis, the calibration parameters are divided into two groups: external and internal calibration parameters. The external parameters are installation angles between the area-array camera and the star tracker, and we propose a two-dimensional direction angle model as internal parameters to describe the distortion of the areaarray camera. Thirdly, we propose a stepwise parameters estimation method that external parameters are estimated firstly, then internal parameters are estimated based on the generalized camera frame determined by external parameters. Experiments based on the real data of GF-4 shows that after on-orbit geometric calibration, the geometric accuracy of the images without ground control points is significantly improved.

  17. Electric propulsion for geostationary orbit insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; Curran, Francis M.; Myers, Roger M.

    1995-01-01

    Solar electric propulsion (SEP) technology is already being used for geostationary satellite stationkeeping to increase payload mass. By using this same technology to perform part of the orbit transfer additional increases in payload mass can be achieved. Advanced chemical and N2H4 arcjet systems are used to increase the payload mass by performing stationkeeping and part of the orbit transfer. Four mission options are analyzed which show the impact of either sharing the orbit transfer between chemical and SEP systems or having either complete the transfer alone. Results show that for an Atlas 2AS payload increases in net mass (geostationary satellite mass less wet propulsion system mass) of up to 100 kg can be achieved using advanced chemical for the transfer and advanced N2H4 arcjets for stationkeeping. An additional 100 kg can be added using advanced N2H4 arcjets for part of a 40 day orbit transfer.

  18. Astrometry and Geostationary Satellites in Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacruz, E.; Abad, C.

    2015-10-01

    We present the current status and the first results of the astrometric project CIDA - ABAE for tracking geo-stationary satellites. This project aims to determine a preliminary orbit for the Venezuelan satellite VENESAT-1, using astrometric positions obtained from an optical telescope. The results presented here are based on observations from the Luepa space tracking ground station in Venezuela, which were processed using astrometric procedures.

  19. Transmitter diversity verification on ARTEMIS geostationary satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata Calvo, Ramon; Becker, Peter; Giggenbach, Dirk; Moll, Florian; Schwarzer, Malte; Hinz, Martin; Sodnik, Zoran

    2014-03-01

    Optical feeder links will become the extension of the terrestrial fiber communications towards space, increasing data throughput in satellite communications by overcoming the spectrum limitations of classical RF-links. The geostationary telecommunication satellite Alphasat and the satellites forming the EDRS-system will become the next generation for high-speed data-relay services. The ESA satellite ARTEMIS, precursor for geostationary orbit (GEO) optical terminals, is still a privileged experiment platform to characterize the turbulent channel and investigate the challenges of free-space optical communication to GEO. In this framework, two measurement campaigns were conducted with the scope of verifying the benefits of transmitter diversity in the uplink. To evaluate this mitigation technique, intensity measurements were carried out at both ends of the link. The scintillation parameter is calculated and compared to theory and, additionally, the Fried Parameter is estimated by using a focus camera to monitor the turbulence strength.

  20. Geostationary satellites and space debris around the Earth (on Russian)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, P., P.

    Classification of artificial satellites, the history of development of the geostationary orbit (GSO). The main aim of ground-based optical, radar and other observations GSS. Methods of observation and control of the GSO. Catalogues satellites leading space country. The problem of space debris and the Kessler syndrome. Flashes from the satellites of the constellation "Iridium", and flashes from geostationary satellites. Tips, advice for amateur astronomers to observe when the flash GSS.

  1. Impact of Non-geostationary Orbits on PASS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Polly; Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    The use of satellites in non-geostationary orbits (NGO) for PASS (Personal Access Satellite System) is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) orbit parameters (circular and elliptical orbit characteristics); (2) link characteristics (Doppler shift, propagation loss, CONUS coverage antenna, multibeam antenna gain, and impact on link equations); (3) number of satellites required for continuous CONUS coverage (circular and elliptical orbit results); and (4) advantages and disadvantages of NGOs.

  2. The geostationary orbit and developing countries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medina, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    The geostationary orbit is becoming congested due to use by several countries throughout the world, and the request for use of this orbit is increasing. There are 188 geostationary stations in operation. An equitable distribution of stations on this orbit is requested.

  3. Application of unscented filtering in analytical dynamic orbit determination for Geostationary satellite surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Kyoung-Min; Park, Eunseo; Choi, Byung Kyu

    The neutral atmosphere introduces a time delay in the propagation of GPS signals in the microwave frequencies due to refraction effects. To project this delay in a slant direction towards the satellite position, various mapping functions are proposed. As 90KEYWORDS: GPS based navigation; Tropospheric range error; Hydrostatic Mapping Function Dr. K. Parameswaran is supported by CSIR through Emeritus Scientist Scheme. *Corresponding author: cs ureshraju@vssc.gov.in

  4. 47 CFR 74.643 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 74... Television Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.643 Interference to geostationary-satellites. Applicants and... geostationary-satellites....

  5. 47 CFR 74.643 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 74... Television Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.643 Interference to geostationary-satellites. Applicants and... geostationary-satellites....

  6. 47 CFR 74.643 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 74... Television Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.643 Interference to geostationary-satellites. Applicants and... geostationary-satellites....

  7. 47 CFR 74.643 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 74... Television Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.643 Interference to geostationary-satellites. Applicants and... geostationary-satellites....

  8. 47 CFR 74.643 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 74... Television Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.643 Interference to geostationary-satellites. Applicants and... geostationary-satellites....

  9. Geostationary Meteorological Satellite-5 (GMS-5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horii, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS-5), which is being developed by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), is the fifth geostationary, spin stabilized, weather satellite. Its purposes are to observe cataclysmic events such as hurricanes, typhoons, and regional weather phenomena; to relay meteorological data from surface collection points to the Data Processing Center in Japan; and to transmit processing imaging data for facsimile reproduction. The satellite will be launched from the Tanegashima Space Center (TaSC) in Japan by a type H-II launch vehicle. The Deep Space Network (DSN) will support the transfer and drift orbit mission phases. The coverage will consist of the 26-m antennas as prime and the 34-m antenna at Madrid as backup support for launch through drift orbit. Maximum support will consist of two 8-hour tracks per station for a seven day period, plus 23 days of contingency support from all complexes. Information is given in tabular form for DSN support, frequency assignments, telemetry, command and tracking station responsibility.

  10. The operational feasibility of orbit and attitude determination for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (SMS/GEOS) using only imagery data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, E.; Jurotich, M.; Remondi, B.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental results from three evaluation periods on three geostationary spacecraft (SMS-2, GOES-1, and GOES-2) are presented. It is shown that using existing landmark extraction and identification techniques (1) for east geostationary spacecraft, a high quality orbit and attitude state is maintained with imagery data only, and (2) for west geostationary spacecraft, a high quality orbit and attitude state is recovered with imagery data only in approximately seven days.

  11. Spacecraft Charging in Geostationary Transfer Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard; Minow, Joseph I.

    2014-01-01

    The 700 km x 5.8 Re orbit of the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft provide a unique opportunity to investigate spacecraft charging in geostationary transfer orbits. We use records from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) plasma spectrometer to identify candidate surface charging events based on the "ion line" charging signature in the ion records. We summarize the energetic particle environment and the conditions necessary for charging to occur in this environment. We discuss the altitude, duration, and magnitude of events observed in the Van Allen Probes from the beginning of the mission to present time. In addition, we explore what information the dual satellites provide on the spatial and temporal variations in the charging environments.

  12. Geostationary meteorological satellite systems - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blersch, Donald J.; Probert, Todd C.

    Past and present geosynchronous meteorological satellites developed in the USA, Europe, Japan, India, and the Soviet Union are reviewed. Particular attention is given to the Applications Technology Satellite Program, GOES and SMS/GOES, METEOSAT, GMS/Himawari, the Indian National Satellite, and a Soviet geostationary meteorological satellite program, GOMS.

  13. A statistical survey of ELF waves in a geostationary orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Parrot, M.; Gaye, C.A.

    1994-11-15

    In this paper the authors summarize data taken by the wave experiment on the GEOS 2 satellite. This instrument looked at extremely low frequency emissions from a geostationary orbit. The authors do a statistical study of the observed ELF emissions, and in particular discuss chorus emissions, which with hiss and electron cyclotron emissions are the prominent low frequency wave features.

  14. Geostationary Meteorological Satellite-5 (GMS-5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Koichi; Sakabe, Hideo; Suzuki, Takao; Okawara, Motoi

    This paper describes mission features and development of the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite-5 (GMS-5). The purpose of GMS series is the improvement of Japan's meteorological services and the development of meteorological satellite technology. The satellites have been used for the World Weather Watch (WWW) program planned by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The first satellite in this series was launched into geosynchronous orbit at 140 E longitude in July 1977. GMS-2 and GMS-3 were launched in August 1981, and August 1984. GMS-4 was launched in September 1989, and is now being operated for weather services. GMS-5 is now being developed by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). GMS-5 is a spin-stabilized satellite. It consists of a despun earth-oriented antenna assembly and a spin section rotating at 100 rpm. The spin section contains the visible and infrared spin scan radiometer (VISSR), electronic devices, batteries, fuel tanks, thrusters and solar panel. The two new infrared channels have been added to the VISSR and the total number of three infrared channels will be used for observation of the atmospheric water vapor distribution, accurate measurement of sea surface temperatures, etc. The mission of GMS-5 are weather watch by VISSR, collection of weather data, distribution of image data and experiment of search and rescue (SAR). GMS-5 will be launched by a H-II launch vehicle from Tanegashima Space Center in 1994.

  15. Using Equinoctial Orbital Elements and Quasi-average Element Method to Construct Analytical Solutions for Geostationary Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Tang, Jingshi; Hou, Xiyun; Liu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    The eccentricity and the inclination of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit are both small, under this condition, perturbations from the Earth's non-spherical gravitational field result in orbit resonances due to incommensurable small denominators, that is, the problem of small eccentricity, small inclination and commensurability small incommensurable denominator exist simultaneously. Usually we adopt the classic Kepler orbital elements to describe an orbit, However, in the case of small eccentricities and small inclinations, the geometric meaning of the perigee and ascending node of an GEO is no longer clear, and the equations of motion have small denominators which results in the failure of the usual mean orbit element perturbation solution. This phenomenon of singularity is caused by the inappropriate choice of independent variables and has nothing to do with the dynamics. Such singularities can be avoided by choosing the appropriate independent variables (called non-singularity orbital elements). Incommensurable singularity appears in the process of solving the perturbation equations by the mean element methodology. The quasi-average element methodology retains the main advantages of the mean element method and reasonably revises its definition. Quasi-average orbits, without short periodic terms, while including the long-term items are taken as the reference orbit. The reference orbit in this transformation has long-term variations which are similar to the long periodic terms within a short-time duration. So we can avoid the failure of the perturbation solution caused by the periodic terms when using the classical perturbation method or the mean element method. From the perspective of mechanics, it can eliminate the incommensurable singularity, and the perturbation solution will remain valid. This paper aims at introducing the calculation method to eliminate the singularity problem of e=0,i=0 and commensurability singularity by using the quasi-average element

  16. Meteosat-8: Europe's new geostationary meteorological satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borde, Regis; Konig, Marianne; Schmetz, Johannes

    2004-11-01

    The first of the new generation of Meteosat satellites, known as Meteosat Second Generation (MSG), was launched in August 2002. From its geostationary orbit, the satellite's radiometer, the spinning enhanced visible and infrared imager (SEVIRI), observes the full disk of the Earth with an unprecedented repeat cycle of 15 minutes in 12 spectral channels, having a sampling distance of three kilometres at nadir (1 km for the high resolution channel). For comparison, the first-generation Meteosat satellite covers only three spectral channels and has an imaging repeat cycle of 30 minutes, with a sampling distance between 2.5 and 5 km. MSG offers a wealth of new observational capabilities that could benefit weather forecasting and support severe weather warnings. Significant indirect benefits will come through improved weather forecasts that predict e.g. wind fields more accurately. With the beginning of MSG's operational phase on 29 January 2004, the satellite was renamed to Meteosat-8. The Meteosat-8 operational system also includes a suite of meteorological data which are extracted from the multi-channel image information, as e.g. winds, cloud analysis, atmospheric humidity and atmospheric instability over the entire field of view. This paper presents a general overview over the Meteosat-8 imagery and will especially focus on the meteorological parameters - including the underlying algorithms - that are extracted at EUMETSAT.

  17. Small Aperture Telescope Observations of Co-located Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R.; Wallace, B.

    As geostationary orbit (GEO) continues to be populated, satellite operators are increasing usage of co-location techniques to maximize usage of fewer GEO longitude slots. Co-location is an orbital formation strategy where two or more geostationary satellites reside within one GEO stationkeeping box. The separation strategy used to prevent collision between the co-located satellites generally uses eccentricity (radial separation) and inclination (latitude separation) vector offsets. This causes the satellites to move in relative motion ellipses about each other as the relative longitude drift between the satellites is near zero. Typical separations between the satellites varies from 1 to 100 kilometers. When co-located satellites are observed by optical ground based space surveillance sensors the participants appear to be separated by a few minutes of arc or less in angular extent. Under certain viewing geometries, these satellites appear to visually conjunct even though the satellites are, in fact, well separated spatially. In situations where one of the co-located satellites is more optically reflective than the other, the reflected sunglint from the more reflective satellite can overwhelm the other. This less frequently encountered issue causes the less reflective satellite to be glint masked in the glare of the other. This paper focuses on space surveillance observations on co-located Canadian satellites using a small optical telescope operated by Defence R&D Canada - Ottawa. The two above mentioned problems (cross tagging and glint masking) are investigated and we quantify the results for Canadian operated geostationary satellites. The performance of two line element sets when making in-frame CCD image correlation between the co-located satellites is also examined. Relative visual magnitudes between the co-located members are also inspected and quantified to determine the susceptibility of automated telescopes to glint masking of co-located satellite members.

  18. European small geostationary communications satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei, , Dr.; Ellmers, Frank; Winkler, Andreas; Schuff, Herbert; Sansegundo Chamarro, Manuel Julián

    2011-04-01

    Hispasat Advanced Generation 1 (HAG1) is the first satellite using the SGEO platform, which is under the development in the ESA Artes-11 program. Since the last presentation in the IAC 2007, a European industrial consortium led by OHB has completed the mission and spacecraft design. The platform Preliminary Design Review has been carried out in May 2008. The customer for the first mission is a commercial operator—Hispasat. The contract was signed in December 2008 and the satellite will be launched in 2012. To give confidence to the customer, SGEO platform will use up to date flight proven technologies. HAG1 carries 20/24 Ku-band and 3/5 Ka-band transponders to provide commercial services. Some innovative payload technologies will also be flown on board of HAG1 to gain in-orbit heritage. SGEO has also been selected as the baseline platform for the ESA Data Relay Satellite (EDRS). Phase-A study has just kicked off in January 2009. The targeted launch date is 2013. Heinrich Hertz will also use the SGEO platform. Heinrich Hertz is funded by the German Space Agency (DLR) and provides flight opportunities for technologies and components developed by the German Space Industry. With the HAG1 contract in hand, and EDRS and Heinrich Hertz in the line, OHB with its partners has the confidence that it will be able to speed up the product development of the SGEO platform for potential customers in the commercial market. This paper will first present the updated platform design and the status of the product development will be followed with the introduction of innovative payload technologies on board the first mission—HAG1 and ended with the mission concepts of EDRS and Heinrich Hertz missions.

  19. Station keeping of geostationary satellites by electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstein, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    As various types of perturbations tend to drive a geostationary satellite away from its prescribed position, occasional orbit corrections have to be carried out by means of a suitable propulsion system. In future geostationary missions, low thrust electric propulsion is likely to be applied for station keeping because of considerable mass savings. In this paper a station keeping strategy for electric propulsion systems is developed. Both the unconstrained case and the case where thrust operation constraints are present are considered and tested by computer simulation of a realistic example.

  20. 47 CFR 25.278 - Additional coordination obligation for non-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in frequencies allocated to the fixed-satellite service. 25... SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.278 Additional coordination obligation for non-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in frequencies allocated to the fixed-satellite...

  1. 47 CFR 25.278 - Additional coordination obligation for non-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in frequencies allocated to the fixed-satellite service. 25... SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.278 Additional coordination obligation for non-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in frequencies allocated to the fixed-satellite...

  2. 47 CFR 25.278 - Additional coordination obligation for non-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in frequencies allocated to the fixed-satellite service. 25... SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.278 Additional coordination obligation for non-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in frequencies allocated to the fixed-satellite...

  3. 47 CFR 25.278 - Additional coordination obligation for non-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in frequencies allocated to the fixed-satellite service. 25... SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.278 Additional coordination obligation for non-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in frequencies allocated to the fixed-satellite...

  4. 47 CFR 25.278 - Additional coordination obligation for non-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in frequencies allocated to the fixed-satellite service. 25... SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.278 Additional coordination obligation for non-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems in frequencies allocated to the fixed-satellite...

  5. Development of the European Small Geostationary Satellite SGEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübberstedt, H.; Schneider, A.; Schuff, H.; Miesner, Th.; Winkler, A.

    2008-08-01

    The SGEO product portfolio, ranging from Satellite platform delivery up to in-orbit delivery of a turnkey system including satellite and ground control station, is designed for applications ranging from TV Broadcast to multimedia applications, Internet access, mobile or fixed services in a wide range of frequency bands. Furthermore, Data Relay missions such as the European Data Relay Satellite (EDRS) as well as other institutional missions are targeted. Key design features of the SGEO platform are high flexibility and modularity in order to accommodate a very wide range of future missions, a short development time below two years and the objective to build the system based on ITAR free subsystems and components. The system will provide a long lifetime of up to 15 years in orbit operations with high reliability. SGEO is the first European satellite to perform all orbit control tasks solely by electrical propulsion (EP). This design provides high mass efficiency and the capability for direct injection into geostationary orbit without chemical propulsion (CP). Optionally, an Apogee Engine Module based on CP will provide the perigee raising manoeuvres in case of a launch into geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). This approach allows an ideal choice out of a wide range of launcher candidates in dependence of the required payload capacity. SGEO will offer to the market a versatile and high performance satellite system with low investment risk for the customer and a short development time. This paper provides an overview of the SGEO system key features and the current status of the SGEO programme.

  6. World-wide link availability for geostationary and critically inclined orbits including rain attenuation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, L. M.

    1981-01-01

    Link availability for constellations of satellites in geostationary and critically inclined orbits is computed using a predictor model based on the Crane 8 region worldwide rain attenuation model. The results are contrasted to percent Earth visibility computations which do not include rain attenuation. For geostationary satellite constellations, the quantitative relationship for Earth coverage vs link margin vs availability vs number of satellites is described by a set of parametric curves.

  7. Local oscillator distribution using a geostationary satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardin, Joseph; Weinreb, Sander; Bagri, Durga

    2004-01-01

    A satellite communication system suitable for distribution of local oscillator reference signals for a widely spaced microwave array has been developed and tested experimentally. The system uses a round-trip correction method of the satellite This experiment was carried out using Telstar-5, a commercial Ku-band geostationary satellite. For this initial experiment, both earth stations were located at the same site to facilitate direct comparison of the received signals. The local oscillator reference frequency was chosen to be 300MHz and was sent as the difference between two Ku-band tones. The residual error after applying the round trip correction has been measured to be better than 3psec for integration times ranging from 1 to 2000 seconds. For integration times greater then 500 seconds, the system outperforms a pair of hydrogen masers with the limitation believed to be ground-based equipment phase stability. The idea of distributing local oscillators using a geostationary satellite is not new; several researchers experimented with this technique in the eighties, but the achieved accuracy was 3 to 100 times worse than the present results. Since substantially and the performance of various components has improved. An important factor is the leasing of small amounts of satellite communication bandwidth. We lease three 100kHz bands at approximately one hundredth the cost of a full 36 MHz transponder. Further tests of the system using terminal separated by large distances and comparison tests with two hydrogen masers and radio interferometry is needed.

  8. Propellant gaging for geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orazietti, A. J.; Orton, G. F.; Schreib, R.

    1986-06-01

    Evaluations were performed to select four gaging concepts for ground tests and low-g tests in the NASA KC-135 aircraft. The selected concepts were an ultrasonic point sensor system, a nucleonic gaging system, an ultrasonic torsional wave guide, and an ultrasonic flowmeter. The first three systems provide a direct measurement of propellant quantity remaining, while the fourth system integrates (totalizes) the propellant flow to the engines and infers propellant remaining based on a known initial propellant load. As a result of successful ground and KC-135 tests, two concepts (the ultrasonic point sensor and nucleonic systems) were selected for orbital test in a Shuttle Get-Away-Special experiment. These systems offer high end-of-life accuracy potential, are nonintrusive (external to the tanks and feedlines), and are low in risk because of their good technology base. The Shuttle Get-Away-Special experiment has been assembled and passed flight certification testing in late April 1986.

  9. 47 CFR 78.106 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 78...-satellites. Applicants and licensees must comply with § 101.145 of this chapter to minimize the potential of interference to geostationary-satellites....

  10. 47 CFR 78.106 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 78...-satellites. Applicants and licensees must comply with § 101.145 of this chapter to minimize the potential of interference to geostationary-satellites....

  11. 47 CFR 78.106 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 78...-satellites. Applicants and licensees must comply with § 101.145 of this chapter to minimize the potential of interference to geostationary-satellites....

  12. 47 CFR 78.106 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 78...-satellites. Applicants and licensees must comply with § 101.145 of this chapter to minimize the potential of interference to geostationary-satellites....

  13. 47 CFR 78.106 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 78...-satellites. Applicants and licensees must comply with § 101.145 of this chapter to minimize the potential of interference to geostationary-satellites....

  14. Multicolour Optical Photometry of Active Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, A.; Wade, G.; Bedard, D.

    Although broadband photometry has been used to infer information about artificial satellites since soon after the launch of Sputnik 1, the development of photometric techniques for non-resolved space object identification or characterisation has been hampered by the large number of variables involved. Many individual studies, and some long ongoing experiments, have used costly metre-class telescopes to obtain data despite other experiments demonstrating that much more flexible and affordable small aperture telescopes may be suitable for the task. In addition, due to the highly time consuming and weather dependent nature of obtaining photometric observations, many studies have suffered from data sets of limited size, or relied upon simulations to support their claims. With this in mind, an experiment was conducted with the aim of determining the utility of small aperture telescopes for conducting broadband photometry of satellites for the purpose of non-resolved space object identification and characterisation. A 14 inch Celestron CG-14 telescope was used to gain multiple night-long, high temporal resolution data sets of six active geostationary satellites. The results of the experiment cast doubt on the efficacy of some of the previous approaches to obtaining and analysing photometric data. It was discovered that geostationary satellite lightcurves can vary to a greater degree than has generally been recognised, and colour ratios vary considerably with changes in the illumination/observation geometry, making it difficult to use colour for satellite discrimination. Evidence was also detected of variations in the spectral energy distribution of sunlight reflected off satellite surface materials, which could have implications for surface material characterisation and techniques that aim to separate satellite body and solar panel contributions to the total observed spectra.

  15. Towards high temporal and moderate spatial resolutions in the remote sensing retrieval of evapotranspiration by combining geostationary and polar orbit satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, José Miguel; Ghilain, Nicolas; Arboleda, Alirio; Gellens-Meulenberghs, Françoise

    2014-05-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is the water flux going from the surface into the atmosphere as result of soil and surface water evaporation and plant transpiration. It constitutes a key component of the water cycle and its quantification is of crucial importance for a number of applications like water management, climatic modelling, agriculture monitoring and planning, etc. Estimating ET is not an easy task; specially if large areas are envisaged and various spatio-temporal patterns of ET are present as result of heterogeneity in land cover, land use and climatic conditions. In this respect, spaceborne remote sensing (RS) provides the only alternative to continuously measure surface parameters related to ET over large areas. The Royal Meteorological Institute (RMI) of Belgium, in the framework of EUMETSAT's "Land Surface Analysis-Satellite Application Facility" (LSA-SAF), has developed a model for the estimation of ET. The model is forced by RS data, numerical weather predictions and land cover information. The RS forcing is derived from measurements by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite. This ET model is operational and delivers ET estimations over the whole field of view of the MSG satellite (Europe, Africa and Eastern South America) (http://landsaf.meteo.pt) every 30 minutes. The spatial resolution of MSG is 3 x 3 km at subsatellite point and about 4 x 5 km in continental Europe. The spatial resolution of this product may constrain its full exploitation as the interest of potential users (farmers and natural resources scientists) may lie on smaller spatial units. This study aimed at testing methodological alternatives to combine RS imagery (geostationary and polar orbit satellites) for the estimation of ET such that the spatial resolution of the final product is improved. In particular, the study consisted in the implementation of two approaches for combining the current ET estimations with

  16. Normalization and calibration of geostationary satellite radiances for the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desormeaux, Yves; Rossow, William B.; Brest, Christopher L.; Campbell, G. G.

    1993-01-01

    Procedures are described for normalizing the radiometric calibration of image radiances obtained from geostationary weather satellites that contributed data to the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. The key step is comparison of coincident and collocated measurements made by each satellite and the concurrent AVHRR on the 'afternoon' NOAA polar-orbiting weather satellite at the same viewing geometry. The results of this comparison allow transfer of the AVHRR absolute calibration, which has been established over the whole series, to the radiometers on the geostationary satellites. Results are given for Meteosat-2, 3, and 4, for GOES-5, 6, and 7, for GMS-2, 3, and 4 and for Insat-1B. The relative stability of the calibrations of these radiance data is estimated to be within +/- 3 percent; the uncertainty of the absolute calibrations is estimated to be less than 10 percent. The remaining uncertainties are at least two times smaller than for the original radiance data.

  17. Interpretation of Spectrometric Measurements of Active Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedard, D.; Wade, G.

    2014-09-01

    Over 5000 visible near-infrared (VNIR) spectrometric measurements of active geostationary satellites have been collected with the National Research Council (NRC) 1.8m Plaskett telescope located at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) in Victoria, Canada. The objective of this ongoing experiment is to study how reflectance spectroscopy can be used to reliably identify specific material types on the surface of artificial Earth-orbiting objects. Active geostationary satellites were selected as the main subjects for this experiment since their orientation is stable and can be estimated to a high-level of confidence throughout a night of observation. Furthermore, for most geostationary satellites, there is a wide variety of sources that can provide some level of information as to their external surface composition. Notwithstanding the high number of measurements that have been collected to date, it was assumed that the experimenters would have a much greater success rate in material identification given the choice experimental subjects. To date, only the presence of aluminum has been confidently identified in some of the reflectance spectra that have been collected. Two additional material types, namely photovoltaic cells and polyimide film, the first layer of multi-layer insulation (MLI), have also been possibly identified. However uncertainties in the reduced spectral measurements prevent any definitive conclusion with respect to these materials at this time. The surprising lack of results with respect to material identification have forced the experimenters to use other data interpretation methods to characterize the spectral scattering characteristics of the studied satellites. The results from this study have already led to improvements in the ways that reflectance spectra from spacecraft are collected and analysed. Equally important, the data interpretation techniques elaborated over the course of this experiment will also serve to increase the body of

  18. Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Gyro Temperature Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, J. N.; Noonan, C. H.; Garrick, J.

    1996-01-01

    The geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 1/M series of spacecraft are geostationary weather satellites that use the latest in weather imaging technology. The inertial reference unit package onboard consists of three gyroscopes measuring angular velocity along each of the spacecraft's body axes. This digital integrating rate assembly (DIRA) is calibrated and used to maintain spacecraft attitude during orbital delta-V maneuvers. During the early orbit support of GOES-8 (April 1994), the gyro drift rate biases exhibited a large dependency on gyro temperature. This complicated the calibration and introduced errors into the attitude during delta-V maneuvers. Following GOES-8, a model of the DIRA temperature and drift rate bias variation was developed for GOES-9 (May 1995). This model was used to project a value of the DIRA bias to use during the orbital delta-V maneuvers based on the bias change observed as the DIRA warmed up during the calibration. The model also optimizes the yaw reorientation necessary to achieve the correct delta-V pointing attitude. As a result, a higher accuracy was achieved on GOES-9 leading to more efficient delta-V maneuvers and a propellant savings. This paper summarizes the: Data observed on GOES-8 and the complications it caused in calibration; DIRA temperature/drift rate model; Application and results of the model on GOES-9 support.

  19. 47 CFR 101.145 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 101.145 Section 101.145 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.145 Interference to geostationary-satellites. These limitations are necessary...

  20. 47 CFR 101.145 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 101.145 Section 101.145 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.145 Interference to geostationary-satellites. These limitations are necessary...

  1. Preparation to optical communication experiments with geostationary satellite ARTEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzkov, V. P.; Medveskij, M. M.; Yatskiv, D. Ya.; Nedashkovskij, V. N.; Suberlak, V. R.; Glushchenko, Yu. M.; Peretyatko, M. M.; Eremenko, N. A.

    2003-08-01

    We considered necessary conditions and performed expedient calculations for performing laser communication link experiments with geostationary satellite ARTEMIS (ESA). The scheme was proposed of performing these experiments by using two telescopes. The results of observation of the satellite are presented.

  2. Remote Sensing from Geostationary Orbit: GEO TROPSAT, A New Concept for Atmospheric Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, Alan D.; Neil, Doreen O.; Sachse, Glen W.; Fishman, Jack; Krueger, Arlin J.

    1997-01-01

    The Geostationary Tropospheric Pollution Satellite (GEO TROPSAT) mission is a new approach to measuring the critical constituents of tropospheric ozone chemistry: ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and aerosols. The GEO TROPSAT mission comprises a constellation of three instruments flying as secondary payloads on geostationary communications satellites around the world. This proposed approach can significantly reduce the cost of getting a science payload to geostationary orbit and also generates revenue for the satellite owners. The geostationary vantage point enables simultaneous high temporal and spatial resolution measurement of tropospheric trace gases, leading to greatly improved atmospheric ozone chemistry knowledge. The science data processing, conducted as a research (not operational) activity, will provide atmospheric trace gas data many times per day over the same region at better than 25 km ground footprint. The high temporal resolution identifies short time scale processes, diurnal variations, seasonal trends, and interannual variation.

  3. Microwave antenna temperature of the earth from geostationary orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.; Smith, E. K.

    1985-01-01

    The microwave antenna temperature of the earth has been computed for the case of a communication satellite antenna viewing the earth from geostationary orbit. An earth-coverage beam is assumed and detailed computations are performed to account for varying land-ocean fractions within the field of view. Emission characteristics of the earth's atmosphere and surface are used with an accurate radiative transfer program to compute observed brightness temperatures. Values of 250 to 290 K commonly used for antenna temperature in satellite communication noise calculations are found to be over-conservative estimates, with more realistic values lying in the 60-240 K range depending on frequency and subsatellite longitude. These values also depend on assumptions concerning antenna beam coverage. Variations in atmospheric and surface conditions, and variations in antenna beam shape (as distinct from coverage), affect the computed results by less than about 10 K.

  4. Effect of Ionosphere on Geostationary Communication Satellite Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Esra; Arikan, Feza; Gulgonul, Senol

    2016-07-01

    Geostationary orbit (GEO) communications satellites allow radio, television, and telephone transmissions to be sent live anywhere in the world. They are extremely important in daily life and also for military applications. Since, satellite communication is an expensive technology addressing crowd of people, it is critical to improve the performance of this technology. GEO satellites are at 35,786 kilometres from Earth's surface situated directly over the equator. A satellite in a geostationary orbit (GEO) appears to stand still in the sky, in a fixed position with respect to an observer on the earth, because the satellite's orbital period is the same as the rotation rate of the Earth. The advantage of this orbit is that ground antennas can be fixed to point towards to satellite without their having to track the satellite's motion. Radio frequency ranges used in satellite communications are C, X, Ku, Ka and even EHG and V-band. Satellite signals are disturbed by atmospheric effects on the path between the satellite and the receiver antenna. These effects are mostly rain, cloud and gaseous attenuation. It is expected that ionosphere has a minor effect on the satellite signals when the ionosphere is quiet. But there are anomalies and perturbations on the structure of ionosphere with respect to geomagnetic field and solar activity and these conditions may cause further affects on the satellite signals. In this study IONOLAB-RAY algorithm is adopted to examine the effect of ionosphere on satellite signals. IONOLAB-RAY is developed to calculate propagation path and characteristics of high frequency signals. The algorithm does not have any frequency limitation and models the plasmasphere up to 20,200 km altitude, so that propagation between a GEO satellite and antenna on Earth can be simulated. The algorithm models inhomogeneous, anisotropic and time dependent structure of the ionosphere with a 3-D spherical grid geometry and calculates physical parameters of the

  5. Sea surface temperature - Observations from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. J.; Smith, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Multispectral image data acquired from the VISSR atmospheric sounder (VAS) on the geostationary GOES satellites were used to estimate sea surface temperatures (SST). A procedure was developed to screen VAS visible and infrared data for cloud-free regions for estimation of SST from the clear infrared radiances. A data set of matches between the VAS radiances and high quality buoy estimates of SST was produced. A linear regression analysis of these matches was performed to generate an empirical algorithm relating the VAS window channel brightness temperatures to the estimates of SST recorded by NOAA fixed environment buoys. Daily maps of SST during Hurricanes Alicia (1983) and Debbie (1982) demonstrated the ability of VAS to monitor air-sea interactions at high temporal and spatial scales.

  6. A General Approach to the Geostationary Transfer Orbit Mission Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faber, Nicolas; Aresini, Andrea; Wauthier, Pascal; Francken, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses recovery scenarios for geosynchronous satellites injected in a non-nominal orbit due to a launcher underperformance. The theory on minimum-fuel orbital transfers is applied to develop an operational tool capable to design a recovery mission. To obtain promising initial guesses for the recovery three complementary techniques are used: p-optimized impulse function contouring, a numerical impulse function minimization and the solutions to the switching equations. The tool evaluates the feasibility of a recovery with the on-board propellant of the spacecraft and performs the complete mission design. This design takes into account for various mission operational constraints such as e.g., the requirement of multiple finite-duration burns, third-body orbital perturbations, spacecraft attitude constraints and ground station visibility. In a final case study, we analyze the consequences of a premature breakdown of an upper rocket stage engine during injection on a geostationary transfer orbit, as well as the possible recovery solution with the satellite on-board propellant.

  7. Refilling and Composition at Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, R. E.; Takahashi, K.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Here we examine the apparent long-term refilling (change in density at a particular position over days) of electron density and mass density. At solar maximum, the changes in these quantities following a period of large geomagnetic activity can be very different. For instance, for events during 2001 we used both the ion density measured by the Los Alamos National Lab (LANL) Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer (MPA) instrument and mass density inferred from Alfven wave frequencies measured by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) to show that the mass density varied comparatively little while the electron density dropped down to a low value and recovered slowly. During this event, the composition changed dramatically, from a high concentration of O+ very soon after large geomagnetic activity to a very low concentration of O+ after a long quiet period. This result suggests that at solar maximum O+ is quickly distributed to the region outside the plasmasphere sometimes called the warm plasma cloak while H+ refills this region much more slowly. Here we use a large database of mass density measurements based on Alfven waves observed by GOES to examine statistically the behavior of the mass density during periods of quiet following large geomagnetic activity and to see how this behavior varies over the solar cycle. We will compare with previous results for refilling of electron density.

  8. Radar for Monitoring Hurricanes from Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen; Huang, John; Lou, Michael; Smith, Eric; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    2004-01-01

    A document describes a scanning Doppler radar system to be placed in a geostationary orbit for monitoring the three-dimensional structures of hurricanes, cyclones, and severe storms in general. The system would operate at a frequency of 35 GHz. It would include a large deployable spherical antenna reflector, instead of conventional paraboloidal reflectors, that would allow the reflector to remain stationary while moving the antenna feed(s), and thus, create a set of scanning antenna beams without degradation of performance. The radar would have separate transmitting and receiving antenna feeds moving in spiral scans over an angular excursion of 4 from the boresight axis to providing one radar image per hour of a circular surface area of 5,300-km diameter. The system would utilize a real-time pulse-compression technique to obtain 300-m vertical resolution without sacrificing detection sensitivity and without need for a high-peakpower transmitter. An onboard data-processing subsystem would generate three-dimensional rainfall reflectivity and Doppler observations with 13-km horizontal resolution and line-of-sight Doppler velocity at a precision of 0.3 m/s.

  9. Geostationary payload concepts for personal satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedicto, J.; Rinous, P.; Roberts, I.; Roederer, A.; Stojkovic, I.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews candidate satellite payload architectures for systems providing world-wide communication services to mobile users equipped with hand-held terminals based on large geostationary satellites. There are a number of problems related to the payload architecture, on-board routing and beamforming, and the design of the S-band Tx and L-band Rx antenna and front ends. A number of solutions are outlined, based on trade-offs with respect to the most significant performance parameters such as capacity, G/T, flexibility of routing traffic to beams and re-configuration of the spot-beam coverage, and payload mass and power. Candidate antenna and front-end configurations were studied, in particular direct radiating arrays, arrays magnified by a reflector and active focused reflectors with overlapping feed clusters for both transmit (multimax) and receive (beam synthesis). Regarding the on-board routing and beamforming sub-systems, analog techniques based on banks of SAW filters, FET or CMOS switches and cross-bar fixed and variable beamforming are compared with a hybrid analog/digital approach based on Chirp Fourier Transform (CFT) demultiplexer combined with digital beamforming or a fully digital processor implementation, also based on CFT demultiplexing.

  10. ESA personal communications and digital audio broadcasting systems based on non-geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logalbo, P.; Benedicto, J.; Viola, R.

    1993-01-01

    Personal Communications and Digital Audio Broadcasting are two new services that the European Space Agency (ESA) is investigating for future European and Global Mobile Satellite systems. ESA is active in promoting these services in their various mission options including non-geostationary and geostationary satellite systems. A Medium Altitude Global Satellite System (MAGSS) for global personal communications at L and S-band, and a Multiregional Highly inclined Elliptical Orbit (M-HEO) system for multiregional digital audio broadcasting at L-band are described. Both systems are being investigated by ESA in the context of future programs, such as Archimedes, which are intended to demonstrate the new services and to develop the technology for future non-geostationary mobile communication and broadcasting satellites.

  11. Studies of soundings and imagings measurements from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suomi, V. E.

    1973-01-01

    Soundings and imaging measurements from geostationary satellites are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) meteorological data processing techniques, (2) sun glitter, (3) cloud growth rate study, satellite stability characteristics, and (4) high resolution optics. The use of perturbation technique to obtain the motion of sensors aboard a satellite is described. The most conditions, and measurement errors. Several performance evaluation parameters are proposed.

  12. Geostationary orbit Earth science platform concepts for global change monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jeffery T.; Campbell, Thomas G.; Davis, William T.; Garn, Paul A.; King, Charles B.; Jackson, Cheryl C.

    1991-01-01

    Functionality of a geostationary spacecraft to support Earth science regional process research is identified. Most regional process studies require high spatial and temporal resolution. These high temporal resolutions are on the order of 30 minutes and may be achievable with instruments positioned in a geostationary orbit. A complement of typical existing or near term instruments are identified to take advantage of this altitude. This set of instruments is listed, and the requirements these instruments impose on a spacecraft are discussed. A brief description of the geostationary spacecraft concepts which support these instruments is presented.

  13. Crew Transfer Options for Servicing of Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerro, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, NASA and DARPA undertook a study to examine capabilities and system architecture options which could be used to provide manned servicing of satellites in Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO). The study focused on understanding the generic nature of the problem and examining technology requirements, it was not for the purpose of proposing or justifying particular solutions. A portion of this study focused on assessing possible capabilities to efficiently transfer crew between Earth, Low Earth Orbit (LEO), and GEO satellite servicing locations. This report summarizes the crew transfer aspects of manned GEO satellite servicing. Direct placement of crew via capsule vehicles was compared to concepts of operation which divided crew transfer into multiple legs, first between earth and LEO and second between LEO and GEO. In space maneuvering via purely propulsive means was compared to in-space maneuvering which utilized aerobraking maneuvers for return to LEO from GEO. LEO waypoint locations such as equatorial, Kennedy Space Center, and International Space Station inclinations were compared. A discussion of operational concepts is followed by a discussion of appropriate areas for technology development.

  14. Operational performance report on Japan's geostationary meteorological satellite /GMS/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotoh, T.; Dosho, H.; Horikawa, Y.; Saitoh, M.

    1980-09-01

    Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS) was launched by a Delta 2914 launch vehicle from the Eastern Test Range in the United States on July 14, 1977 and stationed at 140 E longitude over the equator. The GMS, appropriately named the Himawari, a sunflower, is a part of the World Weather Watch program designed to upgrade and improve the accuracy of world-wide weather forecasting. The GMS has developed some in-orbit anomalies. The first one which occurred in the preparatory phase was that the VISSR disk image was skewed. This was corrected by modifying the synchronization mechanism in the ground equipment. The second anomaly was that the VISSR high voltage power supply shut down. Images are currently produced by use of corresponding redundant sensors. In spite of these anomalies, the GMS is performing its mission.

  15. Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 mission flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noonan, C. H.; Mcintosh, R. J.; Rowe, J. N.; Defazio, R. L.; Galal, K. F.

    1995-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 spacecraft was launched on April 13, 1994, at 06:04:02 coordinated universal time (UTC), with separation from the Atlas-Centaur launch vehicle occurring at 06:33:05 UTC. The launch was followed by a series of complex, intense operations to maneuver the spacecraft into its geosynchronous mission orbit. The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) was responsible for GOES-8 attitude, orbit maneuver, orbit determination, and station acquisition support during the ascent phase. This paper summarizes the efforts of the FDF support teams and highlights some of the unique challenges the launch team faced during critical GOES-8 mission support. FDF operations experience discussed includes: (1) The abort of apogee maneuver firing-1 (AMF-1), cancellation of AMF-3, and the subsequent replans of the maneuver profile; (2) The unexpectedly large temperature dependence of the digital integrating rate assembly (DIRA) and its effect on GOES-8 attitude targeting in support of perigee raising maneuvers; (3) The significant effect of attitude control thrusting on GOES-8 orbit determination solutions; (4) Adjustment of the trim tab to minimize torque due to solar radiation pressure; and (5) Postlaunch analysis performed to estimate the GOES-8 separation attitude. The paper also discusses some key FDF GOES-8 lessons learned to be considered for the GOES-J launch which is currently scheduled for May 19, 1995.

  16. Frozen Orbital Plane Solutions for Satellites in Nearly Circular Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulivieri, Carlo; Circi, Christian; Ortore, Emiliano; Bunkheila, Federico; Todino, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    This paper deals with the determination of the initial conditions (right ascension of the ascending node and inclination) that minimize the orbital plane variation for nearly circular orbits with a semimajor axis between 3 and 10 Earth radii. An analysis of two-line elements over the last 40 years for mid-, geostationary-, and high-Earth orbits has shown, for initially quasi-circular orbits, low eccentricity variations up to the geostationary altitude. This result makes the application of mathematical models based on satellite circular orbits advantageous for a fast prediction of long-term temporal evolution of the orbital plane. To this purpose, a previous model considering the combined effect due to the Earth's oblateness, moon, and sun (both in circular orbit) has been improved in terms of required computational time and accuracy. The eccentricity of the sun and moon and the equinoctial precession have been taken into account. Resonance phenomena with the lunar plane motion have been found in mid-Earth orbit. Dynamical properties concerning the precession motions of the orbital pole have been investigated, and frozen solutions for geosynchronous and navigation satellites have been proposed. Finally, an accurate model validation has also been carried out by comparing the obtained results with two-line elements of abandoned geostationary-Earth orbit and mid-Earth orbit satellites.

  17. Meteosat Third Generation - the future European geostationary meteorological satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bézy, Jean-Loup; Aminou, Donny; Bensi, Paolo; Stuhlman, Rolf; Tjemkes, Stephen; Rodriguez, Antonio

    2005-08-01

    Today, the Meteosat geostationary meteorological satellites play a key role in providing continuous atmospheric observations both for weather forecasting and for monitoring a wide variety of environmental phenomena. Following the successful commissioning of the first satellite in the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) series, Eumetsat and ESA are already actively planning the next European operational geostationary meteorological satellite system in the form of the Meteosat Third Generation (MTG). Being considered for launch in 2015, MTG will revolutionise weather forecasting and environmental monitoring as we now know them, by providing a very significant improvement over the capabilities of the current Meteosats.

  18. Advanced Propulsion for Geostationary Orbit Insertion and North-South Station Keeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; Myers, Roger M.; Kluever, Craig A.; Riehl, John P.; Curran, Francis M.

    1997-01-01

    Solar electric propulsion technology is currently being used for geostationary satellite station keeping. Analyses show that electric propulsion technologies can be used to obtain additional increases in payload mass by using them to perform part of the orbit transfer. Three electric propulsion technologies are examined at two power levels for geostationary insertion of an Atlas IIAS class spacecraft. The onboard chemical propulsion apogee engine fuel is reduced in this analysis to allow the use of electric propulsion. A numerical optimizer is used to determine the chemical burns that will minimize the electric propulsion transfer times. For a 1550-kg Atlas IIAS class payload, increases in net mass (geostationary satellite mass less wet propulsion system mass) of 150-800 kg are enabled by using electric propulsion for station keeping, advanced chemical engines for part of the transfer, and electric propulsion for the remainder of the transfer. Trip times are between one and four months.

  19. A Global Cloud Detection Approach for Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepte, Q.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Ayers, J. K.; Shan, B.; Yost, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Geostationary satellites provide continuous cloud and meteorological observations over a fixed portion of the Earth's surface, allowing them to monitor and track the development and movement of severe storm systems in real time. For climate studies, geostationary observations provide valuable insight of cloud formation and evolution and how they influence the Earth's radiation budget. Five well-positioned geostationary satellites can cover most of the globe and their products can be merged into a uniform data set. Presently the constellation of these geostationary satellites consists of the NOAA GOES-West (135° W) and East (75° W), the EUMETSAT Meteosat-9 (9.5° E), the Chinese Feng-Yun (105° E), and the Japanese MTSAT-2 (140° E) platforms. Stitching together observations from these imagers requires an understanding of their different spectral characteristics and calibrations. This paper presents the cloud detection algorithms developed using the imager data on the five geostationary satellites. The algorithms are used operationally in NASA's Cloud and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Time and Space Averaging (TISA) gridded cloud products and for near-real-time retrievals used for weather and nowcasting applications. Examples of cloud mask results for different surface background (ocean, land, desert) and their diurnal changes will be described. Additionally, merged global cloud fractions and zonal cloud distributions are compared with CERES-MODIS, CALIPSO, and NASA LaRC AVHRR cloud fractions. Potential future improvements are discussed.

  20. Apple - Indian experimental geostationary communication satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, U. R.; Vasagam, R. M.

    Developmental steps, responsibilities, design goals, performance characteristics, and support systems for the ISRO Ariane Passenger Payload Experiment (APPLE) experimental GEO communication satellite are described. The spacecraft underwent structural, thermal, engineering, prototype, and flight qualification tests in India before being shipped to Guyana for launch on the third Ariane test flight. APPLE carries a redundant C-band communication transponder fed by a 900 mm diam parabolic reflector. A 6 GHz uplink and 4 GHz downlink are processed through a diplexer, with the receiver employing a low noise GaAs FET amplifier. In-orbit telemetry is provided by a 4095 MHz beacon with a data rate of 64 bits/sec. Two solar panels supply 210 W of power, while an on-board Ni-Cd storage battery stores 240 Wh for the ascent and during eclipse. Teleconferencing has been successfully performed using the spacecraft link.

  1. An approach to ground based space surveillance of geostationary on-orbit servicing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Robert (Lauchie); Ellery, Alex

    2015-07-01

    On Orbit Servicing (OOS) is a class of dual-use robotic space missions that could potentially extend the life of orbiting satellites by fuel replenishment, repair, inspection, orbital maintenance or satellite repurposing, and possibly reduce the rate of space debris generation. OOS performed in geostationary orbit poses a unique challenge for the optical space surveillance community. Both satellites would be performing proximity operations in tight formation flight with separations less than 500 m making atmospheric seeing (turbulence) a challenge to resolving a geostationary satellite pair when viewed from the ground. The two objects would appear merged in an image as the resolving power of the telescope and detector, coupled with atmospheric seeing, limits the ability to resolve the two objects. This poses an issue for obtaining orbital data for conjunction flight safety or, in matters pertaining to space security, inferring the intent and trajectory of an unexpected object perched very close to one's satellite asset on orbit. In order to overcome this problem speckle interferometry using a cross spectrum approach is examined as a means to optically resolve the client and servicer's relative positions to enable a means to perform relative orbit determination of the two spacecraft. This paper explores cases where client and servicing satellites are in unforced relative motion flight and examines the observability of the objects. Tools are described that exploit cross-spectrum speckle interferometry to (1) determine the presence of a secondary in the vicinity of the client satellite and (2) estimate the servicing satellite's motion relative to the client. Experimental observations performed with the Mont Mégantic 1.6 m telescope on co-located geostationary satellites (acting as OOS proxy objects) are described. Apparent angular separations between Anik G1 and Anik F1R from 5 to 1 arcsec were observed as the two satellites appeared to graze one another. Data

  2. Non-resolved detection of objects performing On Orbit Servicing in Geostationary orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R.; Ellery, A.; Levesque, M.

    2011-09-01

    On Orbit Servicing (OOS) of geostationary (GEO) satellites represents a new robotic space mission paradigm which could extend the life of existing satellites and reduce the rate of space debris generation. This mission type poses unique challenges for traditional optical space surveillance sensors. As the satellites perform close proximity operations, a distant observer sees the two objects as a single point source on a CCD (Charged Couple Device) as the objects’ angular separations, as viewed from a distant observer, are much smaller than the point source size of a typical space surveillance instrument. This analysis explores the unforced relative motion flight of a servicer satellite about its client GEO satellite with separations of 100 meters or less. Tools developed to address the physical and optical reflectance characteristics of this kind of mission type along with example light curves for diffuse optical reflections from both satellites performing OOS are presented. These tools create synthetic light curve data to permit future testing of light curve inversion and signal separation as a means to infer the relative motion of a secondary object about a GEO satellite.

  3. a Study on Fuel Estimation Algorithms for a Geostationary Communication & Broadcasting Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, Jong-Won

    2000-12-01

    It has been developed to calculate fuel budget for a geostationary communication and broadcasting satellite. It is quite essential that the pre-launch fuel budget estimation must account for the deterministic transfer and drift orbit maneuver requirements. After on-station, the calculation of satellite lifetime should be based on the estimation of remaining fuel and assessment of actual performance. These estimations step from the proper algorithms to produce the prediction of satellite lifetime. This paper concentrates on the fuel estimation method that was studied for calculation of the propellant budget by using the given algorithms. Applications of this method are discussed for a communication and broadcasting satellite.

  4. Performance Analysis of the HTTP Protocol on Geostationary Satellite Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krus, Hans; Allman, Mark; Griner, Jim; Tran, Diepchi

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with HTTP protocol on geostationary satellite links are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Network reference points; 2) The HTTP 1.0 and 1.1 mechanisms; 3) Experimental setup; 4) TCP and HTTP configuration; 5) Modelling slow start and 6) Results and future work.

  5. Earth-to-Geostationary Orbit Transportation for Space Solar Power System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.; Donahue, Benjamin B.; Lawrence, Schuyler C.; McClanahan, James A.; Carrington, Connie K. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space solar power satellites have the potential to provide abundant quantities of electricity for use on Earth. One concept, the Sun Tower, can be assembled in geostationary orbit from pieces transferred from Earth. The cost of transportation is one of the major hurdles to space solar power. This study found that autonomous solar-electric transfer is a good choice for the transportation from LEO to GEO.

  6. Modeling water and heat balance components of large territory for vegetation season using information from polar-orbital and geostationary meteorological satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzylev, Eugene; Startseva, Zoya; Uspensky, Alexander; Volkova, Elena; Kukharsky, Alexander; Uspensky, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    To date, physical-mathematical modeling processes of land surface-atmosphere interaction is considered to be the most appropriate tool for obtaining reliable estimates of water and heat balance components of large territories. The model of these processes (Land Surface Model, LSM) developed for vegetation period is destined for simulating soil water content W, evapotranspiration Ev, vertical latent LE and heat fluxes from land surface as well as vertically distributed soil temperature and moisture, soil surface Tg and foliage Tf temperatures, and land surface skin temperature (LST) Ts. The model is suitable for utilizing remote sensing data on land surface and meteorological conditions. In the study these data have been obtained from measurements by scanning radiometers AVHRR/NOAA, MODIS/EOS Terra and Aqua, SEVIRI/geostationary satellites Meteosat-9, -10 (MSG-2, -3). The heterogeneity of the land surface and meteorological conditions has been taken into account in the model by using soil and vegetation characteristics as parameters and meteorological characteristics as input variables. Values of these characteristics have been determined from ground observations and remote sensing information. So, AVHRR data have been used to build the estimates of effective land surface temperature (LST) Ts.eff and emissivity E, vegetation-air temperature (temperature at the vegetation level) Ta, normalized vegetation index NDVI, vegetation cover fraction B, the leaf area index LAI, and precipitation. From MODIS data the values of LST Tls, Å, NDVI, LAI have been derived. From SEVIRI data there have been retrieved Tls, E, Ta, NDVI, LAI and precipitation. All named retrievals covered the vast territory of the part of the agricultural Central Black Earth Region located in the steppe-forest zone of European Russia. This territory with coordinates 49°30'-54°N, 31°-43°E and a total area of 227,300 km2 has been chosen for investigation. It has been carried out for years 2009

  7. McIDAS-V: A powerful visualization and data analysis tool for geostationary environmental satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtor, T. H.; Rink, T.; Straka, W.; Feltz, J.

    2012-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin's Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) has been at the forefront in developing data analysis and visualization tools for environmental satellite and other geophysical data. The fifth generation of the Man-computer Interactive Data Access System (McIDAS-V) is a java-based, open-source, freely available system for researchers and algorithm developers that is being adapted and expanded for use with advanced geostationary environmental satellite observations. A key attribute of analysis and visualization systems is access to and display of a large variety of geophysical data. Providing these capabilities for numerous data types provides users with powerful tools for merging information, comparison of products and evaluation. McIDAS-V provides unique capabilities that support creative techniques for developing and evaluating algorithms, visualizing data and products in 4 dimensions, and validating results. For geostationary applications, McIDAS-V provides visualization and analysis support for GOES, MSG, MTSAT and FY2 data. NOAA is supporting the McIDAS-V development program for ABI imagery and products for the GOES-R/S series, which will bring an advanced multi-spectral imager into geostationary orbit. Used together, the geostationary environmental satellites provide the user community with detailed global coverage with rapid update cycles. This poster and demonstration will provide an overview of McIDAS-V with demonstrations of the data acquisition, visualization and analysis tools to support the international geostationary environmental satellite programs. It will also present results from several research projects involving current and future environmental satellites, demonstrating how the McIDAS-V software can be used to acquire satellite and ancillary data, create multi--spectral products using both scripting and interactive data manipulation tools, and evaluate output through on-board validation techniques.;

  8. Ka-band geostationary satellite spacing requirements and access schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caron, Mario; Hindson, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Geostationary satellite systems for wideband personal communications applications have been proposed. This paper looks at the geostationary satellite spacing requirement to meet the ITU-R sharing criterion for FDMA and CDMA access schemes. CDMA capacity equation is first developed. Then the basis for the interference analysis between two systems with an overlapping coverage area is developed for the cases of identical and different access schemes and for bandwidth and power limited systems. An example of an interference analysis between two systems is fully carried out. The paper also points out the inherent problems when comparing systems with different access schemes. It is found that under certain scenarios, CDMA can allow a closer spacing between satellites.

  9. Retrieval and verification of fire radiative power using the Korean geostationary meteorological satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Sun; Lee, Yang-Won

    2014-10-01

    Recently, frequency and strength of global wildfire are on the increase. The wildfire encourages the climate change through release of GHGs into the atmosphere over one time occur. The effect of wildfire GHGs can be estimate by FRP(fire radiative power), many research using the remote sensing are trying for its efficient produce. A satellite fire product including fire mask and FRP was produced by polar orbit satellite at first, thereafter it was expanded to geostationary satellites for continuous monitoring of wide areas. However, geostationary satellites observing in East Asia no got a standard to produce the fire product yet. This paper described a retrieval of FRP using the COMS(Communication, Ocean and Meteorological satellite) that is a Korean geostationary satellite. The COMS FRP was retrieved MIR(Middle infrared) radiance method which approaches by brightness temperature of single waveband. Our test was presented that large scale wildfires(FRP > 300MW and confidence level > 9) occurred in the each April. The COMS FRP showed MAE = 103.67 MW(16%) with the MODIS. This result represents much as possibility of the FRP in East Asia. This paper is expected to provide to baseline for the FRP in East Asia, and apply to biomass loss and estimate the GHGs. In addition, the COMS FRP will contribute to studies of aerosols, economic losses and ecosystem damages as basic data.

  10. Mass density at geostationary orbit and apparent mass refilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, R. E.; Takahashi, Kazue; Amoh, Justice; Singer, H. J.

    2016-04-01

    We used the inferred equatorial mass density ρm,eq based on measurements of Alfvén wave frequencies measured by the GOES satellites during 1980-1991 in order to construct a number of different models of varying complexity for the equatorial mass density at geostationary orbit. The most complicated models are able to account for 66% of the variance with a typical variation from actual values of a factor of 1.56. The factors that influenced ρm,eq in the models were, in order of decreasing importance, the F10.7 EUV index, magnetic local time, the solar wind dynamic pressure Pdyn, the phase of the year, and the solar wind BZ (GSM Z direction). During some intervals, some of which were especially geomagnetically quiet, ρm,eq rose to values that were significantly higher than those predicted by our models. For 10 especially quiet intervals, we examined long-term (>1 day) apparent refilling, the increase in ρm,eq at a fixed location. We found that the behavior of ρm,eq varies for different events. In some cases, there is significant apparent refilling, whereas in other cases ρm,eq stays the same or even decreases slightly. Nevertheless, we showed that on average, ρm,eq increases exponentially during quiet intervals. There is variation of apparent refilling with respect to the phase of the solar cycle. On the third day of apparent refilling, ρm,eq has on average a similar value at solar maximum or solar minimum, but at solar maximum, ρm,eq begins with a larger value and rises relatively less than at solar minimum.

  11. CARTEL: A method to calibrate S-band ranges with geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitart, A.; Mesnard, R.; Nouel, F.

    1986-12-01

    An intersite tracking campaign was organized, with 4 S-band stations, for a period of 1 wk to show how the most precise orbit can be computed with the operational software. This precise orbit served as a reference in order to evaluate what can be achieved with one single station with range and angular measurements (a typical configuration used for stationkeeping of geostationary satellites). Orbit computation implied numerical integration with gravitational (Earth, Moon, and Sun) and solar radiation pressure as forces acting on the satellite. Arc lengths of 2 days gave initial state vectors which were compared every day. A precision of 10 m is achieved. However, an analysis of the influence of several parameters entering the orbit computations reveals that the absolute accuracy is of the order of 100 m, since modeling perturbations were neglected in the operational software (polar motion for example). This reference orbit allows estimation of systematic errors for other tracking antennas.

  12. Air Quality Science and Regulatory Efforts Require Geostationary Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Allen, D. J.; Stehr, J. W.

    2006-01-01

    Air quality scientists and regulatory agencies would benefit from the high spatial and temporal resolution trace gas and aerosol data that could be provided by instruments on a geostationary platform. More detailed time-resolved data from a geostationary platform could be used in tracking regional transport and in evaluating mesoscale air quality model performance in terms of photochemical evolution throughout the day. The diurnal cycle of photochemical pollutants is currently missing from the data provided by the current generation of atmospheric chemistry satellites which provide only one measurement per day. Often peak surface ozone mixing ratios are reached much earlier in the day during major regional pollution episodes than during local episodes due to downward mixing of ozone that had been transported above the boundary layer overnight. The regional air quality models often do not simulate this downward mixing well enough and underestimate surface ozone in regional episodes. Having high time-resolution geostationary data will make it possible to determine the magnitude of this lower-and mid-tropospheric transport that contributes to peak eight-hour average ozone and 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations. We will show ozone and PM(sub 2.5) episodes from the CMAQ model and suggest ways in which geostationary satellite data would improve air quality forecasting. Current regulatory modeling is typically being performed at 12 km horizontal resolution. State and regional air quality regulators in regions with complex topography and/or land-sea breezes are anxious to move to 4-km or finer resolution simulations. Geostationary data at these or finer resolutions will be useful in evaluating such models.

  13. Static and kinematic positioning using WADGPS from geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cefalo, R.; Gatti, M.

    2003-04-01

    STATIC AND KINEMATIC POSITIONING USING WADGPS CORRECTIONS FROM GEOSTATIONARY SATELLITES Cefalo R. (1), Gatti M (2) (1) Department of Civil Engineering, University of Trieste, P.le Europa 1, 34127 Trieste, Italy, cefalo@dic.univ.trieste.it, (2) Department of Engineering, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara, Italy, mgatti@ing.unife.it ABSTRACT. Starting from February 2000, static and kinematic experiments have been performed at the Department of Civil Engineering of University of Trieste, Italy and the Department of Engineering of University of Ferrara, Italy, using the WADGPS (Wide Area Differential GPS) corrections up linked by Geostationary Satellites belonging to the American WAAS and European EGNOS. Recently, a prototypal service by ESA (European Space Agency) named SISNet (Signal In Space through Internet), has been introduced using Internet to diffuse the messages up linked through AOR-E and IOR Geostationary Satellites. This service will overcome the problems relative to the availability of the corrections in urban areas. This system is currently under tests by the authors in order to verify the latency of the message and the applicability and accuracies obtainable in particular in dynamic applications.

  14. HISPASAT launch and early operations phases: Computation and monitoring of geostationary satellite positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brousse, Pascal; Desprairies, Arnaud

    1993-01-01

    Since 1974, CNES, the French National Space Agency, has been involved in the geostationary launch and early operations phases (LEOP) of moving satellites from a transfer orbit delivered by a launcher to a geostationary point. During the operations and their preparation, the Flight Dynamics Center (FDC), part of CNES LEOP facilities, is in charge of the space mechanics aspects. What is noteworthy about the Spanish HISPASAT satellite positioning is that all the operations were performed on the customer's premises, and consequently the FDC was duplicated in Madrid, Spain. The first part of this paper is the FDC presentation: its role, its hardware configuration, and its space dynamics ground control system called MERCATOR. The second part of this paper details the preparation used by the FDC for the HISPASAT mission: hardware and software installation in Madrid, integration with the other entities, and technical and operational qualifications. The third part gives results concerning flight dynamics aspects and operational activities.

  15. Aerosol data assimilation using data from Himawari-8, a next-generation geostationary meteorological satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumimoto, K.; Nagao, T. M.; Kikuchi, M.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Murakami, H.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Ogi, A.; Irie, H.; Khatri, P.; Okumura, H.; Arai, K.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.; Maki, T.

    2016-06-01

    Himawari-8, a next-generation geostationary meteorological satellite, was launched on 7 October 2014 and became operational on 7 July 2015. The advanced imager on board Himawari-8 is equipped with 16 observational bands (including three visible and three near-infrared bands) that enable retrieval of full-disk aerosol optical properties at 10 min intervals from geostationary (GEO) orbit. Here we show the first application of aerosol optical properties (AOPs) derived from Himawari-8 data to aerosol data assimilation. Validation of the assimilation experiment by comparison with independent observations demonstrated successful modeling of continental pollution that was not predicted by simulation without assimilation and reduced overestimates of dust front concentrations. These promising results suggest that AOPs derived from Himawari-8/9 and other planned GEO satellites will considerably improve forecasts of air quality, inverse modeling of emissions, and aerosol reanalysis through assimilation techniques.

  16. Development of unified propulsion system for geostationary satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Masuda, I.; Kameishi, M.; Miyoshi, K.; Takahashi, M.

    Japan's first Liquid Apogee Propulsion System (LAPS) has been developed for ETS-VI (Engineering Test Satellite - VI) 2-ton class geostationary satellite. The next largest (2-ton class) geostationary satellite, COMETS (Communication and Broadcasting Engineering Test Satellite), requires a more compact apogee propulsion system in order to increase the space for mission instruments. The study for such a propulsion system concluded with a Unified Propulsion System (UPS), which uses a common N2H4 propellant tank for both bipropellant apogee engines and monopropellant Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters. This type of propulsion system has several significant advantages compared with popular nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine (NTO/MMH) bipropellant satellite propulsion systems: The NTO/N2H4 apogee engine has a high specific impulse, and N2H4 thrusters have high reliability. Residual of N2H4 caused by propellant utilization of apogee engine firing (AEF) can be consumed by N2H4 monopropellant thrusters; that means a considerably prolonged satellite life.

  17. Satellite orbit predictor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Morton l.; Garrett, James, Major

    An analog aid to determine satellite coverage of Emergency Locator Transmitters Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (ELT/EPIRB) distress incidence is discussed. The satellite orbit predictor is a graphical aid for determining the relationship between the satellite orbit, antenna coverage of the spacecraft and coverage of the Local User Terminal. The predictor allows the user to quickly visualize if a selected position will probably be detected and is composed of a base map and a satellite track overlay for each satellite.A table of equator crossings for each satellite is included.

  18. The second Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 'Himawari-2'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Y.; Saito, M.; Kitahara, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Harada, M.; Usuda, S.

    Design features and performance to date of the Japanese meteorological satellite GMS-2 are presented. The GMS-2 is configured to provide weather imagery with VISSR sensors, collect and distribute meteorological data, and monitor solar particles. GMS-2 is spin-stabilized in GEO and was launched on an N-II rocket. The spacecraft length is 3.45 m on-station, the diameter is 2.15 m, and the mass is 653 kg beginning-of-life. Ground links are maintained through despun S-band and UHF antennas. The actual mission life is 3 yr due to the limitations of the on-board hydrazine fuel supply for station-keeping. Noncritical performance anomalies have been exhibited in the telemetry gating circuitry, S-band transmitters, and the PCM telemetry data control circuitry. Back-up systems have compensated for the failures experienced thus far.

  19. Fuzzy logic techniques for rendezvous and docking of two geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Guillermo

    1995-01-01

    Large assemblings in space require the ability to manage rendezvous and docking operations. In future these techniques will be required for the gradual build up of big telecommunication platforms in the geostationary orbit. The paper discusses the use of fuzzy logic to model and implement a control system for the docking/berthing of two satellites in geostationary orbit. The system mounted in a chaser vehicle determines the actual state of both satellites and generates torques to execute maneuvers to establish the structural latching. The paper describes the proximity operations to collocate the two satellites in the same orbital window, the fuzzy guidance and navigation of the chaser approaching the target and the final Fuzzy berthing. The fuzzy logic system represents a knowledge based controller that realizes the close loop operations autonomously replacing the conventional control algorithms. The goal is to produce smooth control actions in the proximity of the target and during the docking to avoid disturbance torques in the final assembly orbit. The knowledge of the fuzzy controller consists of a data base of rules and the definitions of the fuzzy sets. The knowledge of an experienced spacecraft controller is captured into a set of rules forming the Rules Data Base.

  20. Geostationary Atmospheric Observation Satellite Plan in Japan (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, H.; Kasai, Y.; Kita, K.; Irie, H.; Sagi, K.; Hayashida, S.

    2009-12-01

    As emissions of air pollutants in Asia have increased in the past decades accompanying with rapid economic growth of developing countries, Asian regional air pollution has attracted concern from the view of inter-continental and intra-continental long-range transport as well as domestic air quality. Particularly in Japan, transboundary transport of ozone is of recent social concern as one of a cause of increasing trend of near surface ozone concentration. In order to elucidate the transport and chemical transformation processes of air pollution in East Asia, and to attain internationally common understanding on this issue, geostationary atmospheric observation satellite has been proposed in Japan. In 2006, the Japan Society of Atmospheric Chemistry (JSAC) formed Commission on the Atmospheric Environmental Observation Satellite to initiate the discussion. In 2009, Committee on Geostationary Atmospheric Observation Satellite has been formed within JAXA to promote the plan. The proposed satellite consists of a UV/VIS sensor for O3, NO2, HCHO and AOT, and a MIR sensor for O3, CO, HNO3, NO2, H2O and temperature. Targeted spatial and temporal resolutions are ca.10 km and 1-2 hrs, respectively, and focused observation area is northeast Asia potentially covering the southeast and south Asia. Sensitivity analysis and simulation have been made for both the UV/VIS and MIR sensors. Overview of user requirement and the sensitivity analysis for each species will be presented in this talk.

  1. Orbit analysis of a geostationary gravitational wave interferometer detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinto, Massimo; de Araujo, Jose C. N.; Kuga, Helio K.; Alves, Márcio E. S.; Aguiar, Odylio D.

    2015-09-01

    We analyze the trajectories of three geostationary satellites forming the geostationary gravitational wave interferometer (GEOGRAWI) [1], a space-based laser interferometer mission aiming to detect and study gravitational radiation in the (10-4-10) Hz band. The combined effects of the gravity fields of the Earth, the Sun and the Moon make the three satellites deviate from their nominally stationary, equatorial and equilateral configuration. Since changes in the satellites’s relative distances and orientations could negatively affect the precision of the laser heterodyne measurements, we have derived the time-dependence of the inter-satellite distances and velocities, the variations of the polar angles made by the constellation’s three arms with respect to a chosen reference frame and the time changes of the triangle’s enclosed angles. We find that during the time between two consecutive station-keeping maneuvers (about two weeks) the relative variations of the inter-satellite distances do not exceed a value of 0.05%, while the relative velocities between pairs of satellites remain smaller than about 0.7 m s-1. In addition, we find the angles made by the arms of the triangle with the equatorial plane to be periodic functions of time whose amplitudes grow linearly with time; the maximum variations experienced by these angles as well as by those within the triangle remain smaller than 3 arc-minutes, while the east-west angular variations of the three arms remain smaller than about 15 arc-minutes during the two-week period.

  2. Environmental interactions of polar orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Addressed are questions concerning how large, and/or high-power, polar-orbiting spacecraft will interact with auroral environments. This paper discusses some experiences of spacecraft charging, vehicle shadowing, and current leakage encountered by AFGL measuring systems on small, polar-orbiting satellites. Because spacecraft charging at ionospheric altitudes does not seriously threaten the operation of present systems this subject has not received the widespread attention given to it at geostationary altitudes. As a matter of economics it is desirable to transfer as much as possible of what we have learned about spacecraft interactions at geostationary orbit to the auroral oval. Economics must not however blind us to the real differences between the two problems.

  3. Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) Development in the Context of Other Future Geostationary Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmetz, J.; Stuhlmann, R.; Grandell, J.; Tjemkes, S.; Calbet, X.; Koenig, M.; Rota, S.

    2012-12-01

    Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) will provide continuity to the European Meteosat observations which are currently performed with Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). MSG takes images in 12 channels with a repeat rate of 15 minutes for the full disk. The future MTG satellites will expand the capabilities far beyond those of MSG with an enhanced imager (FCI) which has 16 channels and a 10 minutes repeat cycle for taking images of the earth's full disk. Especially the novel instruments on MTG a) Lightning Imager (LI), hyperspectral InfraRed Sounder (IRS) and the Ultraviolet-Visible-Near infrared spectrometer (UVN) will provide unprecedented observations. The four instruments will fly on two types of satellites, the imaging satellites (MTG-I) carrying the FCI and LI, and the sounding satellites (MTG-S) carrying the IRS and UVN. The UVN instrument is provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European GMES (Global Monitoring and Environmental Security) programme. The first launch of an imaging satellite is foreseen for 2017. In total the MTG series will serve us with four MTG-I and two MTG-S satellites for about two decades. MTG has been defined to meet the requirements of the user community, i.e. mainly users in Europe. However an interesting perspective is to see the development of the European MTG satellite system in the context of the evolution of the global space-based meteorological satellite system, notably those from geostationary orbit. Satellite agencies in the US, Japan, China and Europe will fly advanced imagers comparable to the FCI on MTG. Therefore there is also scope for a common evolution of the applications of the observations which is being addressed inter alia by CGMS (Coordination Group for Meteorological Satellites). Various agencies will also realise lightning observations from space. Other instruments on MTG (IRS and UVN) can be seen as pioneering realisations in a geostationary orbit of measurements known from polar orbits. This step into

  4. Simulation of the water regime for a vast agricultural region territory utilizing measurements from polar-orbital and geostationary meteorological satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzylev, Eugene; Uspensky, Alexander; Startseva, Zoya; Volkova, Elena; Kukharsky, Alexander; Uspensky, Sergey

    2013-04-01

    The model of land surface-atmosphere interaction has been developed to calculate the water and heat balance components for vast vegetation covered areas during the growing season. The model is adjusted to utilize estimates of the land surface and meteorological characteristics derived from satellite-based measurements of radiometers AVHRR/NOAA, MODIS/EOS Terra, Aqua, and SEVIRI/Meteosat-9. The studies have been conducted for the territory of the European Russia Central Black Earth Region (CCR) with area of 227,300 km2 comprising seven regions of the Russian Federation for years 2009-2012 vegetation seasons. The technologies of AVHRR and MODIS data thematic processing have been refined and adapted to the study region providing the retrieval of land surface temperature Tls and emissivity E, land-air temperature (temperature at vegetation cover level) Ta, normalized difference vegetation index NDVI, vegetation cover fraction B, as well as the leaf area index LAI. The updated linear regression estimators for Tls, Ta and LAI have been built using more representative training samples compiled for the above vegetation seasons. The updated software package has been applied for AVHRR data processing to generate named remote sensing products for various dates of the mentioned vegetation periods. On the base of special technology and Internet resources the remote sounding products (Tls, E, NDVI, LAI), derived from MODIS data and covering the CCR, have been downloaded from LP DAAC web-site for the same vegetation seasons. The new method and technology have been developed and adopted for the retrieval of Tls and E from SEVIRI data. The retrievals cover the region of interest and are produced at daylight and nighttime. Method provides the derivation of Tls and E from SEVIRI measurements carried out at three successive times (for example, at 11.00, 12.00, 13.00 UTC), classified as 100% cloud-free for the study region without accurate a priori knowledge of E. The validation of

  5. Hybrid system of communication and radio determination using two geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Morikawa, Eihisa; Wakao, Masayoshi

    1990-01-01

    A new hybrid satellite system which can provide both communications and positioning services in one system using two geostationary satellites is discussed. The distinctive feature is that location information can be provided by transmitting and receiving ranging signals over the same channel as communications through two geostationary satellites.

  6. CNES organization for station positioning of geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulac, Jean

    1993-01-01

    Since 1975, the Toulouse Space Centre (a technical establishment of the French Space Agency, CNES) has successfully brought 15 geostationary satellites on to station. During these 17 years of experience, an organization of human and material resources has been built up that ensures a very high level of reliability in the execution of these station positioning operations. The main characteristics of this organization are a rigourous definition of the roles and responsibilities of each person involved, very detailed operations documentation, and methodical preparation of the operations.

  7. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Product Generation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, S. L.; Suggs, R. J.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Product Generation System (GPGS) is introduced and described. GPGS is a set of computer programs developed and maintained at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center and is designed to generate meteorological data products using visible and infrared measurements from the GOES-East Imager and Sounder instruments. The products that are produced by GPGS are skin temperature, total precipitable water, cloud top pressure, cloud albedo, surface albedo, and surface insolation. A robust cloud mask is also generated. The retrieval methodology for each product is described to include algorithm descriptions and required inputs and outputs for the programs. Validation is supplied where applicable.

  8. Research on space-based optical surveillance's observation strategy of geostationary-orbit's pitch point region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue-ying; An, Wei; Wu, Yu-hao; Li, Jun

    2015-03-01

    In order to surveillance the geostationary (GEO) objects, including man-made satellites and space debris, more efficiently, a space-based optical surveillance system was designed in this paper. A strategy to observe the pinch point region was selected because of the GEO objects' dynamics features. That strategy affects the surveillance satellites orbital type and sensor pointing strategy. In order to minimize total surveillance satellites and the revisit time for GEO objects, a equation was set. More than 700 GEO objects' TLE from NASA's website are used for simulation. Results indicate that the revisit time of the surveillance system designed in this paper is less than 24 hours, more than 95% GEO objects can be observed by the designed system.

  9. Los Alamos energetic particle sensor systems at geostationary orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.N.; Aiello, W.; Asbridge, J.R.; Belian, R.D.; Higbie, P.R.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Laros, J.G.; Tech, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has provided energetic particle sensors for a variety of spacecraft at the geostationary orbit (36,000 km altitude). The sensor system called the Charged Particle Analyzer (CPA) consists of four separate subsystems. The LoE and HiE subsystems measure electrons in the energy ranges 30 to 300 keV and 200 to 2000 keV, respectively. The LoP and HiP subsystems measure ions in the ranges 100 to 600 keV and 0.40 to 150 MeV, respectively. A separate sensor system called the spectrometer for energetic electrons (SEE) measures very high-energy electrons (2 to 15 MeV) using advanced scintillator design. In this paper we describe the relationship of operational anomalies and spacecraft upsets to the directly measured energetic particle environments at 6.6 R/sub E/. We also compare and contrast the CPA and SEE instrument design characteristics with the next generation of Los Alamos instruments to be flown at geostationary altitudes.

  10. Satellite orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. F.; Boggs, D. H.; Born, G. H.; Christensen, E. J.; Ferrari, A. J.; Green, D. W.; Hylkema, R. K.; Mohan, S. N.; Reinbold, S. J.; Sievers, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    A historic account of the activities of the Satellite OD Group during the MM'71 mission is given along with an assessment of the accuracy of the determined orbit of the Mariner 9 spacecraft. Preflight study results are reviewed, and the major error sources described. Tracking and data fitting strategy actually used in the real time operations is itemized, and Deep Space Network data available for orbit fitting during the mission and the auxiliary information used by the navigation team are described. A detailed orbit fitting history of the first four revolutions of the satellite orbit of Mariner 9 is presented, with emphasis on the convergence problems and the delivered solution for the first orbit trim maneuver. Also included are a solution accuracy summary, the history of the spacecraft orbit osculating elements, the results of verifying the radio solutions with TV imaging data, and a summary of the normal points generated for the relativity experiment.

  11. Geomagnetic pulsations observed simultaneously on three geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. J.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Barfield, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of magnetic pulsations have been made by three geostationary satellites carrying similar magnetometers and acting as an azimuthal array. Autospectral and cross-spectral analysis yields coherence and phase differences between the pulsations at the satellite positions. The majority of the data fit the Kelvin-Helmholtz generation mechanism. The azimuthal wave number changes sign near noon and corresponds to propagation away from noon. Usually, the wave number is less than 10 deg per degree of longitude. Later in the afternoon, however, strong pulsations are observed with low coherence, implying large wave numbers. This suggests an instability driven by a gradient in the intensity of energetic protons, which may be expected at this local time. The data also suggest that some of the observed phase difference between the azimuthal components is due to small separations in magnetic shell, whereas this is not the case for the radial components. This implies a localized field-line resonance.

  12. Time series analysis of electron flux at geostationary orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Szita, S.; Rodgers, D.J.; Johnstone, A.D.

    1996-07-01

    Time series of energetic (42.9{endash}300 keV) electron flux data from the geostationary satellite Meteosat-3 shows variability over various timescales. Of particular interest are the strong local time dependence of the flux data and the large flux peaks associated with particle injection events which occur over a timescale of a few hours. Fourier analysis has shown that for this energy range, the average electron flux diurnal variation can be approximated by a combination of two sine waves with periods of 12 and 24 hours. The data have been further examined using wavelet analysis, which shows how the diurnal variation changes and where it appears most significant. The injection events have a characteristic appearance but do not occur in phase with one another and therefore do not show up in a Fourier spectrum. Wavelet analysis has been used to look for characteristic time scales for these events. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Accuracy Assessment of Geostationary-Earth-Orbit with Simplified Perturbations Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lihua; Xu, Xiaojun; Pang, Feng

    2016-06-01

    A two-line element set (TLE) is a data format encoding orbital elements of an Earth-orbiting object for a given epoch. Using suitable prediction formula, the motion state of the object can be obtained at any time. The TLE data representation is specific to the simplified perturbations models, so any algorithm using a TLE as a data source must implement one of these models to correctly compute the state at a specific time. Accurately adjustment of antenna direction on the earth station is the key to satellite communications. With the TLE set topocentric elevation and azimuth direction angles can be calculated. The accuracy of perturbations models directly affect communication signal quality. Therefore, finding the error variations of the satellite orbits is really meaningful. In this present paper, the authors investigate the accuracy of the Geostationary-Earth-Orbit (GEO) with simplified perturbations models. The coordinate residuals of the simplified perturbations models in this paper can give references for engineers to predict the satellite orbits with TLE.

  14. A TEMPORAL MAP IN GEOSTATIONARY ORBIT: THE COVER ETCHING ON THE EchoStar XVI ARTIFACT

    SciTech Connect

    Weisberg, Joel M.; Paglen, Trevor

    2012-10-01

    Geostationary satellites are unique among orbital spacecraft in that they experience no appreciable atmospheric drag. After concluding their respective missions, geostationary spacecraft remain in orbit virtually in perpetuity. As such, they represent some of human civilization's longest lasting artifacts. With this in mind, the EchoStar XVI satellite, to be launched in fall 2012, will play host to a time capsule intended as a message for the deep future. Inspired in part by the Pioneer Plaque and Voyager Golden Records, the EchoStar XVI Artifact is a pair of gold-plated aluminum jackets housing a small silicon disk containing 100 photographs. The Cover Etching, the subject of this paper, is etched onto one of the two jackets. It is a temporal map consisting of a star chart, pulsar timings, and other information describing the epoch from which EchoStar XVI came. The pulsar sample consists of 13 rapidly rotating objects, 5 of which are especially stable, having spin periods <10 ms and extremely small spin-down rates. In this paper, we discuss our approach to the time map etched onto the cover and the scientific data shown on it, and we speculate on the uses that future scientists may have for its data. The other portions of the EchoStar XVI Artifact will be discussed elsewhere.

  15. Passive correlation ranging of a geostationary satellite using DVB-S payload signals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakun, Leonid; Shulga, Alexandr; Sybiryakova, Yevgeniya; Bushuev, Felix; Kaliuzhnyi, Mykola; Bezrukovs, Vladislavs; Moskalenko, Sergiy; Kulishenko, Vladislav; Balagura, Oleg

    2016-07-01

    Passive correlation ranging (PaCoRa) for geostationary satellites is now considered as an alternate to tone-ranging (https://artes.esa.int/search/node/PaCoRa). The PaCoRa method has been employed in the Research Institute "Nikolaev astronomical observatory" since the first experiment in August 2011 with two stations spatially separated on 150 km. The PaCoRa has been considered as an independent method for tracking the future Ukrainian geostationary satellite "Lybid'. Now a radio engineering complex (RC) for passive ranging consists of five spatially separated stations of receiving digital satellite television and a data processing center located in Mykolaiv. The stations are located in Kyiv, Kharkiv, Mukacheve, Mykolaiv (Ukraine) and in Ventspils (Latvia). Each station has identical equipment. The equipment allows making synchronous recording of fragments of the DVB-S signal from the quadrature detector output of a satellite television receiver. The fragments are recorded every second. Synchronization of the stations is performed using GPS receivers. Samples of the complex signal obtained in this way are archived and are sent to the data processing center over the Internet. Here the time differences of arrival (TDOA) for pairs of the stations are determined as a result of correlation processing of received signals. The values of the TDOA that measured every second are used for orbit determination (OD) of the satellite. The results of orbit determination of the geostationary telecommunication satellite "Eutelsat-13B" (13º East) obtained during about four months of observations in 2015 are presented in the report. The TDOA and OD accuracies are also given. Single-measurement error (1 sigma) of the TDOA is equal about 8.7 ns for all pairs of the stations. Standard deviations and average values of the residuals between the observed TDOA and the TDOA computed using the orbit elements obtained from optical measurements are estimated for the pairs Kharkiv-Mykolaiv and

  16. Monitoring Snow Using Geostationary Satellite Retrievals During the SAAWSO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Robert M.; Gultepe, Ismail; Kuligowski, Robert J.; Heidinger, Andrew K.

    2015-12-01

    The SAAWSO (Satellite Applications for Arctic Weather and SAR (Search And Rescue) Operations) field programs were conducted by Environment Canada near St. Johns, NL and Goose Bay, NL in the winters of 2012-13 and 2013-14, respectively. The goals of these programs were to validate satellite-based nowcasting products, including snow amount, wind intensity, and cloud physical parameters (e.g., cloud cover), over northern latitudes with potential applications to Search And Rescue (SAR) operations. Ground-based in situ sensors and remote sensing platforms were used to measure microphysical properties of precipitation, clouds and fog, radiation, temperature, moisture and wind profiles. Multi-spectral infrared observations obtained from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-13 provided estimates of cloud top temperature and height, phase (water, ice), hydrometer size, extinction, optical depth, and horizontal wind patterns at 15 min intervals. In this work, a technique developed for identifying clouds capable of producing high snowfall rates and incorporating wind information from the satellite observations is described. The cloud top physical properties retrieved from operational satellite observations are validated using measurements obtained from the ground-based in situ and remote sensing platforms collected during two precipitation events: a blizzard heavy snow storm case and a moderate snow event. The retrieved snow precipitation rates are found to be comparable to those of ground-based platform measurements in the heavy snow event.

  17. Spacecraft flight control system design selection process for a geostationary communication satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Earth's first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1, slowly tumbled in orbit. The first U.S. satellite, Explorer 1, also tumbled out of control. Now, as we launch the Mars observer and the Cassini spacecraft, stability and control have become higher priorities. The flight control system design selection process is reviewed using as an example a geostationary communication satellite which is to have a life expectancy of 10 to 14 years. Disturbance torques including aerodynamic, magnetic, gravity gradient, solar, micrometeorite, debris, collision, and internal torques are assessed to quantify the disturbance environment so that the required compensating torque can be determined. Then control torque options, including passive versus active, momentum control, bias momentum, spin stabilization, dual spin, gravity gradient, magnetic, reaction wheels, control moment gyros, nutation dampers, inertia augmentation techniques, three-axis control, reactions control system (RCS), and RCS sizing, are considered. A flight control system design is then selected and preliminary stability criteria are met by the control gains selection.

  18. The provision of spectrum for feeder links of non-geostationary mobile satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Robert R.

    The possibility of sharing spectrum in the 30/20 GHz band between geostationary fixed-satellite systems and feeder-links of low-earth orbit (LEO) mobile-satellite systems is addressed, taking into account that International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Radio Regulation 2613 would be a factor in such sharing. Interference into each network in both the uplink at 30 GHz and the downlink at 20 GHz is considered. It is determined that if sharing were to take place the mobile-satellite may have to cease transmission often for intervals up to 10 seconds, may have to use high-gain tracking antennas on its spacecraft, and may find it an advantage to use code-division multiple access. An alternate solution suggested is to designate a band 50 to 100 MHz wide at 28 and 18 GHz to be used primarily for feeder links to LEO systems.

  19. The provision of spectrum for feeder links of non-geostationary mobile satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Robert R.

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of sharing spectrum in the 30/20 GHz band between geostationary fixed-satellite systems and feeder-links of low-earth orbit (LEO) mobile-satellite systems is addressed, taking into account that International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Radio Regulation 2613 would be a factor in such sharing. Interference into each network in both the uplink at 30 GHz and the downlink at 20 GHz is considered. It is determined that if sharing were to take place the mobile-satellite may have to cease transmission often for intervals up to 10 seconds, may have to use high-gain tracking antennas on its spacecraft, and may find it an advantage to use code-division multiple access. An alternate solution suggested is to designate a band 50 to 100 MHz wide at 28 and 18 GHz to be used primarily for feeder links to LEO systems.

  20. Orbit and attitude determination using artificial satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, S.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, T.

    1980-09-01

    Simultaneous determination of orbital as well as attitude parameters of geostationary satellites is proposed in this paper. For this purpose, landmarks contained in the images of the earth taken by such satellites are utilized and attention is focussed on the accuracy of estimates of orbital parameters attained by this method, thus extracting effective informations on the location of the satellite contained in the images. The technology and algorithm for the simultaneous determination of orbit and attitude are actually applied to the geostationary meteorological satellite 'HIMAWARI' of Japan and the experimental results are presented. The precision of orbit determination using landmarks is less than 9 km, and it will offer useful informations to the image processing. The proposed method will be also useful at the emergency when a hazard takes place in the ranging station or ranging devices.

  1. Resolution enhancement of passive microwave images from geostationary Earth orbit via a projective sphere coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dawei; Liu, Kai; Lv, Changchun; Miao, Jungang

    2014-01-01

    A projective sphere coordinate system in a Wiener filter method to improve the performance of resolution enhancement for microwave radiometer data of a geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellite is proposed. Because of the impact of Earth's curvature on remote sensing measurement, the footprint of microwave radiometer is varied while scanning, especially in positions far from subsatellite point. The deconvolution technique used in the microwave radiometer measurements from Earth directly is therefore inaccurate because microwave measurement under this situation cannot be considered as a convolution process. To ameliorate the deconvolution method, a projective spherical coordinate system that enforces the footprint of a microwave radiometer invariant on the surface of a spherical coordinate system in measurements is presented in this article. The performance of the projective coordinate system is evaluated by GEO satellite simulated observations. The simulation results show that the proposed method produces better resolution enhancement, especially in the position where the footprint of the microwave radiometer is seriously influenced by Earth curvature.

  2. Differential spacecraft charging on the geostationary operational environmental satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farthing, W. H.; Brown, J. P.; Bryant, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    Subsystems aboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites 4 and 5 showed instances of anomalous changes in state corresponding to false commands. Evidence linking the anomalous changes to geomagnetic activity, and presumably static discharges generated by spacecraft differential charging induced by substorm particle injection events is presented. The anomalies are shown to be correlated with individual substorms as monitored by stations of the North American Magnetometer Chain. The relative frequency of the anomalies is shown to be a function of geomagnetic activity. Finally a least squares fit to the time delay between substorm initiation and spacecraft anomaly as a function of spacecraft local time is shown to be consistent with injected electron populations with energy in the range 10 keV to 15 keV, in agreement with present understanding of the spacecraft charging mechanism. The spacecraft elements responsible for the differential charging were not satisfactorily identified. That question is currently under investigation.

  3. Lifetime Estimation of the Upper Stage of GSAT-14 in Geostationary Transfer Orbit

    PubMed Central

    Jeyakodi David, Jim Fletcher; Sharma, Ram Krishan

    2014-01-01

    The combination of atmospheric drag and lunar and solar perturbations in addition to Earth's oblateness influences the orbital lifetime of an upper stage in geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). These high eccentric orbits undergo fluctuations in both perturbations and velocity and are very sensitive to the initial conditions. The main objective of this paper is to predict the reentry time of the upper stage of the Indian geosynchronous satellite launch vehicle, GSLV-D5, which inserted the satellite GSAT-14 into a GTO on January 05, 2014, with mean perigee and apogee altitudes of 170 km and 35975 km. Four intervals of near linear variation of the mean apogee altitude observed were used in predicting the orbital lifetime. For these four intervals, optimal values of the initial osculating eccentricity and ballistic coefficient for matching the mean apogee altitudes were estimated with the response surface methodology using a genetic algorithm. It was found that the orbital lifetime from these four time spans was between 144 and 148 days. PMID:27437491

  4. Lifetime Estimation of the Upper Stage of GSAT-14 in Geostationary Transfer Orbit.

    PubMed

    Jeyakodi David, Jim Fletcher; Sharma, Ram Krishan

    2014-01-01

    The combination of atmospheric drag and lunar and solar perturbations in addition to Earth's oblateness influences the orbital lifetime of an upper stage in geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). These high eccentric orbits undergo fluctuations in both perturbations and velocity and are very sensitive to the initial conditions. The main objective of this paper is to predict the reentry time of the upper stage of the Indian geosynchronous satellite launch vehicle, GSLV-D5, which inserted the satellite GSAT-14 into a GTO on January 05, 2014, with mean perigee and apogee altitudes of 170 km and 35975 km. Four intervals of near linear variation of the mean apogee altitude observed were used in predicting the orbital lifetime. For these four intervals, optimal values of the initial osculating eccentricity and ballistic coefficient for matching the mean apogee altitudes were estimated with the response surface methodology using a genetic algorithm. It was found that the orbital lifetime from these four time spans was between 144 and 148 days. PMID:27437491

  5. Potential for calibration of geostationary meteorological satellite imagers using the Moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; Grant, I.F.

    2005-01-01

    Solar-band imagery from geostationary meteorological satellites has been utilized in a number of important applications in Earth Science that require radiometric calibration. Because these satellite systems typically lack on-board calibrators, various techniques have been employed to establish "ground truth", including observations of stable ground sites and oceans, and cross-calibrating with coincident observations made by instruments with on-board calibration systems. The Moon appears regularly in the margins and corners of full-disk operational images of the Earth acquired by meteorological instruments with a rectangular field of regard, typically several times each month, which provides an excellent opportunity for radiometric calibration. The USGS RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) project has developed the capability for on-orbit calibration using the Moon via a model for lunar spectral irradiance that accommodates the geometries of illumination and viewing by a spacecraft. The ROLO model has been used to determine on-orbit response characteristics for several NASA EOS instruments in low Earth orbit. Relative response trending with precision approaching 0.1% per year has been achieved for SeaWiFS as a result of the long time-series of lunar observations collected by that instrument. The method has a demonstrated capability for cross-calibration of different instruments that have viewed the Moon. The Moon appears skewed in high-resolution meteorological images, primarily due to satellite orbital motion during acquisition; however, the geometric correction for this is straightforward. By integrating the lunar disk image to an equivalent irradiance, and using knowledge of the sensor's spectral response, a calibration can be developed through comparison against the ROLO lunar model. The inherent stability of the lunar surface means that lunar calibration can be applied to observations made at any time, including retroactively. Archived geostationary imager data

  6. Debris in the geostationary orbit ring, the endless shooting gallery: The necessity for a disposal policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suddeth, D. H.

    1985-03-01

    NASA is considering establishing a policy for the limitation of the physical crowding of the geostationary orbit. The proposed policy is intended to address the following issues: (1) deal only with geostationary altitudes; (2) illustrate the unique value and usefulness of the geostationary orbit ring; (3) describe the orbital dynamics as simply as possible; (4) describe the current spacecraft and debris situation; (5) briefly review current industry and agency policies; (6) project future trends of physical crowding with the present nonpolicy; (7) propose solutions that can be implemented in the near future; and (8) use previous work as much as desirable.

  7. Debris in the geostationary orbit ring, the endless shooting gallery: The necessity for a disposal policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suddeth, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    NASA is considering establishing a policy for the limitation of the physical crowding of the geostationary orbit. The proposed policy is intended to address the following issues: (1) deal only with geostationary altitudes; (2) illustrate the unique value and usefulness of the geostationary orbit ring; (3) describe the orbital dynamics as simply as possible; (4) describe the current spacecraft and debris situation; (5) briefly review current industry and agency policies; (6) project future trends of physical crowding with the present nonpolicy; (7) propose solutions that can be implemented in the near future; and (8) use previous work as much as desirable.

  8. Advanced Propulsion for Geostationary Orbit Insertion and North-South Station Keeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; Myers, Roger M.; Kluever, Craig A.; Riehl, John P.; Curran, Francis M.

    1995-01-01

    Solar electric propulsion (SEP) technology is currently being used for geostationary satellite station keeping to increase payload mass. Analyses show that advanced electric propulsion technologies can be used to obtain additional increases in payload mass by using these same technologies to perform part of the orbit transfer. In this work three electric propulsion technologies are examined at two power levels for an Atlas 2AS class spacecraft. The on-board chemical propulsion apogee engine fuel is reduced to allow the use of electric propulsion. A numerical optimizer is used to determine the chemical burns which will minimize the electric propulsion transfer time. Results show that for a 1550 kg Atlas 2AS class payload, increases in net mass (geostationary satellite mass less wet propulsion system mass) of 150 to 800 kg are possible using electric propulsion for station keeping, advanced chemical engines for part of the transfer, and electric propulsion for the remainder of the transfer. Trip times are between one and four months.

  9. Plans for EUMETSAT's Thrid Generation Meteosat (MTG) geostationary satellite program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhlmann, R. S.; Tjemkes, S. A. T.; Rodriguez, A. R. R.; Bézy, J. L. B.; Aminou, D. A.; Bensi, P. B.

    After movement of the first Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite to 3.4 degree West by end of January 2004, the satellite has been renamed Meteosat-8 and the system has been declared fully operational. Meteosat-8 is now the primary European source of geostationary observations over Europe and Africa, as the first in a series of four satellites expected to deliver operational services at least until 2015. Considering the time required for the definition phases of new space systems their typical development cycle and the approval of complex programmes, it is necessary to plan for follow-up missions. EUMETSAT has therefore, as a first step in the preparation of the Third Generation Meteosat (MTG) European geostationary satellite system, established a USER Consultation Process aimed at capturing the foreseeable high-level user/service needs and priorities of the EUMETSAT customers and users in the 2015-2025 timeframe. This process was implemented through the set up of Applications Expert Groups (AEGs) tasked to propose their vision on operational services, to define associated needs and priorities for input information and observations. At the 1st Post-MSG User Consultation Workshop, November 2001, the work of the AEGs were presented to a broader user group serving as a basis for the identification of relevant observing techniques and the definition of requirements for the MTG observation missions. Currently, a total of five observation missions has been defined for pre-phase A studies at system level under ESA contract to be started in July 2004. Those are: High Resolution Fast Imagery Mission (successor to MSG SEVIRI HRV mission) Full Disk High Spectral Resolution Imagery Mission (successor to the mission of other SEVIRI channels) Lightning Imagery Mission IR Sounding Mission UV Sounding Mission Prior to the start of industry pre-phase A studies the joined ESA/EUMETSAT MTG Project Team, supported by an external group of experts named the MTG Mission Team

  10. CHRONOS: Time Resolved Atmospheric Pollution Observations Commercially Hosted in Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, D. P.; Chronos Science Team

    2011-12-01

    This presentation describes the CHRONOS (Commercially Hosted spectroRadiometer Observations and New Opportunities for Science) mission proposed to the NASA Earth Venture-2 program. The primary goal of this mission is to measure atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide and methane from geostationary orbit concentrating on North America with high spatiotemporal (hourly at 8 km) resolution. This will provide unique insights into pollutant sources, transport, chemical transformations and climate impact. In addition to significantly improved understanding of the underlying processes determining atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will also find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. CHRONOS is partnering with private industry to provide accommodation for the instrument as a commercially hosted payload on a telecommunications satellite. The gas correlation radiometry multispectral measurement technique has a demonstrated heritage in the low-Earth orbit Terra/Measurement of Pollution in The Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument that now provides more than a decade of observations. Providing these observations from a geostationary vantage point was also a recommendation of the Decadal Survey in the context of the GEO-CAPE mission.

  11. Using Satellite Measurements to Investigate Regional-scale Chemistry: The Case for Geostationary Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack; Wozniak, Amy; Creilson, Jack

    2007-01-01

    One of the recommendations of the Decadal Survey that was recently released by the National Academy of Science was that of a geostationary platform from which to obtain trace gas measurements. The use of such a platform is particularly advantageous when applied to understanding the formation of regional air pollution. This study demonstrates the challenges of trying to utilize information from instruments on satellites in low-earth orbit (LEO). We also demonstrate the advantage gained through a simulation that would provide hourly observations. In this case study, we take advantage of the high resolution Level-2 orbital data available from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), in conjunction with assimilated stratospheric column ozone fields, to evaluate if meaningful tropospheric ozone information can be obtained on a regional scale. We focus on a period on late June 2005 when a widespread pollution episode enveloped the Houston metropolitan area as well as a large region in southeast Texas.

  12. Technologies of diffractive imaging system for high-resolution earth observation from geostationary orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoli; Su, Yun; Jiao, Jianchao

    2013-08-01

    High-resolution earth observation from geostationary orbit (GEO) is a good way to satisfy the increased time resolution for resource, environment and disaster monitor. Earth observation from geostationary orbit will require optical remote sensor with ultra-large aperture. Given size, weight and launch ability constraints, as well as cost consideration, the traditional monolithic aperture optical system couldn't satisfy the need. This paper gives a new method, the diffractive imaging system. Diffract ive imaging system is a feasible way to realize high-resolution earth observation from geostationary orbit. The principle of diffract ive imaging system is introduced firstly, then, the primary design of remote sensor with 1m resolution from geostationary orbit using diffractive imaging system is analyzed. Finally, the key technologies are analyzed and feasible solutions are given.

  13. Relativistic electrons near geostationary orbit: Evidence for internal magnetospheric acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Callis, L. B.; Belian, R. D.; Cayton, T. E.

    1989-06-01

    At times, relativistic electron fluxes in Earth's outer magnetosphere are not obviously related to an external (Jovian or solar) source. This finding suggests that an internal magnetospheric acceleration mechanism may operate under some circumstances. A possible mechanism identified for Jupiter's magnetosphere could also be considered in the terrestrial case. Such a model requires the substorm- generation of a spectrally-soft electron component with subsequent inward radial diffusion (violating the third adiabatic invariant). A large electron energy gain transverse to the magnetic field occurs in this process. Eventually, deep within the magnetosphere, substantial pitch angle scattering occurs violating all adiabatic invariants. Then, at low L-values, there occurs an energy-preserving outward transport of energetic electrons near the mirror points. This leads to a return of the accelerated population to the outer magnetosphere. Such low-altitude processes should result in ''conic'' or ''butterfly'' pitch angle distributions at very high energies as the electrons execute trans-L diffusion at the mirror altitudes and then are magnetically focussed near the equator. Data collected concurrently at geostationary orbit at three widely-spaced local times during a relativisic electron event show a butterfly pitch angle distribution, while lower energy electrons simultaneously show pancake-like distributions. The butterfly pitch angle distributions appear in /similar to/25% of the examined relativistic electron events, thereby providing support for acceleration by a recirculation process. /copyright/ American Geophysical Union 1989

  14. Determining the total ozone from geostationary earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, A. V.; Timofeev, Yu. M.

    2008-12-01

    A method for determining the total ozone (TO) with high spatial (3×3 km2) and temporal (15 min) resolutions by using measurements of the Earth’s outgoing thermal radiation from Meteosat geostationary satellites is proposed. The method is based on measurements with a SEVIRI instrument (eight IR channels) and involves additional information on the three-dimensional field of the atmospheric temperature and on the surface temperature obtained from polar satellites (AIRS instrument). The inverse problem of TO determination is solved by the method of neural networks. TO measurements with the AIRS instrument are also used for training the neural networks. Ground-based TO measurements at the international ozonometric network are used for controlling the quality of AIRS data and detecting the errors of the proposed method of TO determination from SEVIRI data. The mean and rms differences between TO values obtained with the use of the proposed method and from the results of measurements at the international ozonometric network are shown to be 1.5 and 6.5%, respectively. Examples of TO distributions reconstructed with high spatial and temporal resolutions are presented. These examples show that the elaborated method for solving various scientific and applied problems and, in particular, for investigating stratospheric dynamics is promising.

  15. 47 CFR 25.259 - Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 137-138 MHz band. 25.259 Section... SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.259 Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 137-138 MHz band. (a) A non-voice,...

  16. 47 CFR 25.259 - Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 137-138 MHz band. 25.259 Section... SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.259 Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 137-138 MHz band. (a) The space...

  17. 47 CFR 25.259 - Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 137-138 MHz band. 25.259 Section... SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.259 Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 137-138 MHz band. (a) The space...

  18. Our Understanding of Space Weather features responsible for geostationary satellite anamolies (P39)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, G.; et al.

    2006-11-01

    girija60@yahoo.com The topic of space weather effects on operational anomalies on spacecraft is one of considerable research investigation, with both pure and applied aspects. This is because of the very high costs involved in fabricating and operating spacecraft, and in insuring them against the harmful effects of space weather. This is more true for geostationary satellites than of low-orbiting spacecraft, as the former operate in the high-risk environment of the Earth’s outer radiation belts, with its large vagaries in spatial and time variations of high- energy electron and proton distributions (BAKER 2003). Without doubt, plasma and magnetic field emissions from active regions on the Sun are the root cause for spacecraft anomalies. Our study for 2005 shows that over 95% of anomalies can be related to some definite activity on the Sun, ranging from high-speed solar wind streams with their 27-day recurrence patterns/coronal holes/coronal mass ejections preceded by X or M type of flares/and magnetic cloud events. The most energetic solar activity events are generally accompanied by a large rise in solar MeV proton densities at geo-stationary orbit (WILKINSON 1994), and they account for definite anomalies classified as SEU (Single Event Upsets which most often are reversible through resetting commands). Any particles in the low energy ranges (eV and keV, and these could be of magnetospheric or ionospheric origin), are believed to cause external charging effects in exposed parts of the spacecraft such as solar power arrays and power cables. These mainly result in power losses which are debilitating over a period of time. The most dangerous and often irrecoverable damage is due to electronics in the 1-5 MeV range which cause deep dielectric discharge of arc type in semi-conductors comprising spacecraft instruments. Following major solar activity, the populations of these rise to more than (5x103) particles/cm2.ster.sec, with large spatial and time variations (LOVE

  19. Aerosol Spatial and Temporal Variations Over a Coastal Area: Implications for Geostationary Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Chin, M.; Tan, Q.; Hu, Y.; Kondragunta, S.; Ciren, P.; Holben, B. N.

    2009-12-01

    Coastal area is of great interest to the community of air pollution and climate change studies. The dispersion of air pollutants is strongly influenced by complex coastal meteorology, such as land-sea breeze circulations interacting sometimes with mountain-valley circulations. On the other hand, radiatively active air pollutants, like aerosols, could influence the coastal meteorology and hence feed back on the atmospheric dispersion. Coastal area is also an interface for impacts of air pollution on coastal ocean ecosystems. In this study, we look into spatial and temporal variations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) over southern California by examining high-resolution Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations, and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements, and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) retrievals. Both model simulations and observations show that aerosol has large spatial and temporal variations. Autocorrelation analyses of AOD suggest that these variations can be adequately (r >0.9) captured by satellite observations with time resolution on an order of 1-2 hours and spatial resolution of 4-7 km. Both model and observations show substantial day-to-day variation of aerosols over the region, which is mainly determined by the evolution of land-sea breeze circulations interacting with mountain flows. Modeling the feedbacks of aerosols on coastal meteorology and air quality requires high-resolution measurements from a geostationary orbit as a constraint.

  20. Investigation of water vapor motion winds from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velden, Christopher S.; Nieman, Steven J.; Wanzong, Steven

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor imagery from geostationary satellites has been available for over a decade. These data are used extensively by operational analysts and forecasters, mainly in a qualitative mode (Weldon and Holmes 1991). In addition to qualitative applications, motions deduced in animated water vapor imagery can be used to infer wind fields in cloudless regimes, thereby augmenting the information provided by cloud-drift wind vectors. Early attempts at quantifying the data by tracking features in water vapor imagery met with modest success (Stewart et al. 1985; Hayden and Stewart 1987). More recently, automated techniques have been developed and refined, and have resulted in upper-level wind observations comparable in quality to current operational cloud-tracked winds (Laurent 1993). In a recent study by Velden et al. (1993) it was demonstrated that wind sets derived from Meteosat-3 (M-3) water vapor imagery can provide important environmental wind information in data void areas surrounding tropical cyclones, and can positively impact objective track forecasts. M-3 was repositioned to 75W by the European Space Agency in 1992 in order to provide complete coverage of the Atlantic Ocean. Data from this satellite are being transmitted to the U.S. for operational use. Compared with the current GOES-7 (G-7) satellite (positioned near 112W), the M-3 water vapor channel contains a superior horizontal resolution (5 km vs. 16 km ). In this paper, we examine wind sets derived using automated procedures from both GOES-7 and Meteosat-3 full disk water vapor imagery in order to assess this data as a potentially important source of large-scale wind information. As part of a product demonstration wind sets were produced twice a day at CIMSS during a six-week period in March and April (1994). These data sets are assessed in terms of geographic coverage, statistical accuracy, and meteorological impact through preliminary results of numerical model forecast studies.

  1. Icing detection from geostationary satellite data using machine learning approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Ha, S.; Sim, S.; Im, J.

    2015-12-01

    Icing can cause a significant structural damage to aircraft during flight, resulting in various aviation accidents. Icing studies have been typically performed using two approaches: one is a numerical model-based approach and the other is a remote sensing-based approach. The model based approach diagnoses aircraft icing using numerical atmospheric parameters such as temperature, relative humidity, and vertical thermodynamic structure. This approach tends to over-estimate icing according to the literature. The remote sensing-based approach typically uses meteorological satellite/ground sensor data such as Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and Dual-Polarization radar data. This approach detects icing areas by applying thresholds to parameters such as liquid water path and cloud optical thickness derived from remote sensing data. In this study, we propose an aircraft icing detection approach which optimizes thresholds for L1B bands and/or Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) from Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite-Meteorological Imager (COMS MI) and newly launched Himawari-8 Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) over East Asia. The proposed approach uses machine learning algorithms including decision trees (DT) and random forest (RF) for optimizing thresholds of L1B data and/or COT. Pilot Reports (PIREPs) from South Korea and Japan were used as icing reference data. Results show that RF produced a lower false alarm rate (1.5%) and a higher overall accuracy (98.8%) than DT (8.5% and 75.3%), respectively. The RF-based approach was also compared with the existing COMS MI and GOES-R icing mask algorithms. The agreements of the proposed approach with the existing two algorithms were 89.2% and 45.5%, respectively. The lower agreement with the GOES-R algorithm was possibly due to the high uncertainty of the cloud phase product from COMS MI.

  2. Analysis of signal to noise ratio for atmospheric ultraviolet remote sensing on geostationary orbit with variations of solar incident angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Chun-guang; Yang, Wen-bo; Tian, Qing-jiu; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Zong-ming; Zhang, Han-mo

    2014-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) sensors on a geostationary orbit (GEO) have important potential value in atmospheric remote sensing, but the satellites orbit mode of it is quit different from sun-synchronous orbit satellites, which result in the significant diurnal and seasonal variations in radiation environment of earth observation and radiation signal of sensors, therefore, the effect to sensor radiometric performance, such as signal to noise ratio for atmospheric ultraviolet remote sensing caused by variations of solar angle is significant in the performance design of sensors. The synthetic ultraviolet sensor is set at the geostationary orbit, 36000 km away from the sea level of the Equator with 8.75 degree field of view, and the subsatellite track point of which is located at 90 degrees east longitude and Equator. The Satellite scanning angles (SA) from 0 to 8.648 degree that cover the earth surface are selected corresponding to the 10 degrees equal interval view zenith angle, and the SA from 8.648 to 8.785 degree cover the earth lamb 100 km far away from earth tangent point. Based on the MODTRAN4 model, on normal atmospheric conditions, the distributions of the UV upwelling radiance from surface or limb viewing path of the earth could be simulated with the change of sun's right ascension. Moreover, the average signal to noise ratio to the atmospheric sounding is obtained in different UV spectra using the Sensor signal to noise ratio model. The results show that the thresholds range, tendency and shape of signal to noise ratio have a variety of features affected by variation of Sun hour angles and declinations. These result and conclusions could contribute to performance design of UV sensors on the geostationary orbit.

  3. Reference Crop Evapotranspiration obtained from the geostationary satellite MSG (METEOSAT).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruin, H. A. R.; Trigo, I. F.; Lorite, I. J.; Cruz-Blanco, M.; Gavilán, P.

    2012-04-01

    Among others, the scope of the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA SAF) is to increase benefit from the EUMETSAT geostationary Satellites MSG data related to land, land-atmosphere interactions and biophysical applications. This is achieved by developing techniques, products and algorithms that will allow an effective use of MSG data, if needed, combined with data from numerical weather prediction models (e.g., ECMWF). Although directly designed to improve the observation of meteorological systems, the spectral characteristics, time resolution and area coverage offered by MSG allow for their use in a broad spectrum of other applications, for instance in agro- and hydrometeorology. This study concerns a method to determine how much water is needed for irrigation. Note that this is complementary to the actual evapotranspiration LSA SAF product. The objective of this study is to present a novel semi-empirical method to determine the Reference Crop Evapotranspiration (ET0) from the down-welling shortwave radiation and air temperature obtained through LSF SAF. ET0 is defined in the FAO Irrigation and Drainage report 56 (FAO56) and it is used to determine water requirements of agricultural crops in irrigated regions. It is evaluated with a special version of the Penman-Monteith equation (PM_FAO56) using data of a weather station installed over non-stressed grass. Such stations are expensive and very labor consuming. We developed our method for semi-arid regions where appropriate weather stations needed for FAO56 ET0 are missing. This concerns huge areas in the world. High-quality FAO-grass station near Cordoba, Spain were used, where, besides all input for PM-FAO56, independent lysimeter data are collected. In addition, it will be shown that significant errors in ET0 can occur if meteorological gathered over dry terrain will be used as input of PM-FAO56. For this purpose data sets obtained in different semi-arid regions will be analyzed.

  4. Low Earth Orbit satellite/terrestrial mobile service compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheriff, Ray E.; Gardiner, John G.

    1993-01-01

    Currently the geostationary type of satellite is the only one used to provide commercial mobile-satellite communication services. Low earth orbit (LEO) satellite systems are now being proposed as a future alternative. By the implementation of LEO satellite systems, predicted at between 5 and 8 years time, mobile space/terrestrial technology will have progressed to the third generation stage of development. This paper considers the system issues that will need to be addressed when developing a dual mode terminal, enabling access to both terrestrial and LEO satellite systems.

  5. Investigating the Use of Deep Convective Clouds (DCCT) to Monitor On-orbit Performance of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) using Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, Dennis E.; Christian, Hugh J.; Koshak, William J.; Goodman, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to monitor the on-orbit performance of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R (GOES-R) for changes in instrument calibration that will affect GLM's lightning detection efficiency. GLM has no onboard calibration so GLM background radiance observations (available every 2.5 min) of Deep Convective Clouds (DCCs) are investigated as invariant targets to monitor GLM performance. Observations from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and the Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) onboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite are used as proxy datasets for GLM and ABI 11 m measurements.

  6. Implementation and Test of the Automatic Flight Dynamics Operations for Geostationary Satellite Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangwook; Lee, Young-Ran; Hwang, Yoola; Javier Santiago Noguero Galilea

    2009-12-01

    This paper describes the Flight Dynamics Automation (FDA) system for COMS Flight Dynamics System (FDS) and its test result in terms of the performance of the automation jobs. FDA controls the flight dynamics functions such as orbit determination, orbit prediction, event prediction, and fuel accounting. The designed FDA is independent from the specific characteristics which are defined by spacecraft manufacturer or specific satellite missions. Therefore, FDA could easily links its autonomous job control functions to any satellite mission control system with some interface modification. By adding autonomous system along with flight dynamics system, it decreases the operator’s tedious and repeated jobs but increase the usability and reliability of the system. Therefore, FDA is used to improve the completeness of whole mission control system’s quality. The FDA is applied to the real flight dynamics system of a geostationary satellite, COMS and the experimental test is performed. The experimental result shows the stability and reliability of the mission control operations through the automatic job control.

  7. An LO Phase Link Using a Commercial Geo-Stationary Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardin, Joseph C.; Weinreb, Sander; Bagri, Durgadas S.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews an experiment to determine feasibility of achieving 1 ps level time transfer using a satellite link and make use of inexpensive Ku band transmit/receive equipment. It reviews the advantages of Two Way Satellite Time Transfer using a commercial Geo-Stationary Satellite: (1) Commercial satellites are available (2) Significant cost reduction when compared to Hydrogen Masers and (3) Large footprint- entire US (including Hawaii) with just one satellite.

  8. Minimum-fuel station-change for geostationary satellites using low-thrust considering perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, ShuGe; Zhang, JingRui

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to find the minimum-fuel station change for geostationary satellites with low-thrust while considering significant perturbation forces for geostationary Earth orbit (GEO). The effect of Earth's triaxiality, lunisolar perturbations, and solar radiation pressure on the terminal conditions of a long duration GEO transfer is derived and used for establishing the station change model with consideration of significant perturbation forces. A method is presented for analytically evaluating the effect of Earth's triaxiality on the semimajor axis and longitude during a station change. The minimum-fuel problem is solved by the indirect optimization method. The easier and related minimum-energy problem is first addressed and then the energy-to-fuel homotopy is employed to finally obtain the solution of the minimum-fuel problem. Several effective techniques are employed in solving the two-point boundary-value problem with a shooting method to overcome the problem of the small convergence radius and the sensitivity of the initial costate variables. These methods include normalization of the initial costate vector, computation of the analytic Jacobians matrix, and switching detection. The simulation results show that the solution of the minimum-fuel station change with low-thrust considering significant perturbation forces can be obtained by applying these preceding techniques.

  9. Giant pulsations on the afternoonside: Geostationary satellite and ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoba, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Kazue; Rodriguez, Juan V.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2015-10-01

    Giant pulsations (Pgs) are a special class of oscillations recognized in ground magnetometer records as exhibiting highly regular sinusoidal waveforms in the east-west component with periods around 100s. Previous statistical studies showed that Pgs occur almost exclusively on the morningside with peak occurrence in the postmidnight sector. In this paper, we present observations of Pgs extending to the afternoonside, using data from the GOES13 and 15 geostationary satellites and multiple ground magnetometers located in North America. For a long-lasting event on 29 February 2012, which spanned ˜08-18h magnetic local time, we show that basic Pg properties did not change with the local time, although the period of the pulsations was longer at later local time due to increasing mass loading. There is evidence that the Pgs resulted from fundamental poloidal mode standing Alfvén waves, both on the morning and afternoonsides. Oscillations of energetic particles associated with the field oscillations exhibited an energy-dependent phase, which has previously been reported and explained by drift resonance. A statistical analysis of the ground magnetic field data (L = 3.8-7.4) covering 2008-2013 confirms that afternoon Pgs are not unusual. We identified a total of 105 Pg events (about 70% (30%) of the events occurred during non-storm (late storm recovery) periods), 31 of which occurred on the afternoonside. The afternoon Pgs occur under solar wind and geomagnetic conditions that are similar to the morning Pgs, but the afternoon Pgs tend to have short durations and occur frequently in winter instead of around spring and fall equinoxes that are favored by the morning Pgs.

  10. Aqua satellite orbiting the Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the Aqua satellite orbiting the Earth on August 27, 2005 by revealing MODIS true-color imagery for that day. This animation is on a cartesian map projection, so the satellite w...

  11. A satellite system synthesis model for orbital arc allotment optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, Charles H.

    1987-01-01

    A mixed integer programming formulation of a satellite system synthesis problem if presented, which is referred to as the arc allotment problem (AAP). Each satellite administration is to be allotted a weighted-length segment of the geostationary orbital arc within which its satellites may be positioned at any longitudes. The objective function maximizes the length of the unweighted arc segment allotted to every administration, subject to single-entry co-channel interference restrictions and constraints imposed by the visible arc for each administration. Useful relationships between special cases of AAP and another satellite synthesis problem are established. Solutions to two example problems are presented.

  12. Angular aberration in the problem of power beaming to geostationary satellites through the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshnikov, Fedor F.

    1995-10-01

    The influence of angular aberration of radiation as a result of the difference in speed of a geostationary satellite and the speed of the Earth's surface on laser power beaming to satellites is considered. Angular aberration makes it impossible to direct the energy to the satellite, and additional beam rotation is necessary. Because the Earth's rotation may cause how to transfer incoherent radiation to remote satellites. In the framework of the Kolmogorov turbulence model simple conditions of energy transfer are derived and discussed.

  13. The First of A New Generation of Meteorological Geo-stationary Satellites Ready For Launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriol-Pibernat, E.; Oremus, R.

    The European Space Agency (ESA) in line with one of its mandates, to undertake demonstration of Earth Observation applications, had started back in 1977 a series of geostationary meteorological satellites Meteosat, now being operated by the European organization Eumetsat. Following the great success of such missions, ESA has co- operated with the later organization by developing a new series of satellites, designed to gather meteorological information from the same viewpoint i.e. a geo-stationery orbit. This features a dramatic increase in the number of available spectral channels: from 3 to 12, much higher resolution (1 Km in the broadband) and doubled scanning rate (from 30 min to 15 min), thanks to a newly designed sophisticated radiometer. The satellite also carries an instrument to measure the Earth Radiation Budget, useful for climate studies, and an SR transponder aimed to humanitarian purposes. Following a decision taken by Eumetsat, MSG-1 which had been stored during most of 2001, was de-stored by industry (Alcatel Space, Cannes-F), in fall 2001, in preparation for a planned launch in July 2002 from the Kourou site in French Guyana. The paper will focus on the spacecraft development programme and its status at the time of the Conference.

  14. A feedback control loop for autonomous time synchronisation for mobile satellite systems, including satellites in any Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soprano, C.

    This paper presents the preliminary results of the design, analysis and simulation of a feedback control-loop for application to autonomous epoch synchronization in a satellite mobile synchronous communications system which includes communications satellites in non-geostationary Earth orbits and fast-moving mobile users.

  15. Post Launch Calibration and Testing of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper on GOES-R Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafal, Marc; Cholvibul, Ruth; Clarke, Jared

    2016-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R (GOES-R) series is the planned next generation of operational weather satellites for the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is procuring the GOES-R spacecraft and instruments with the first launch of the GOES-R series planned for October 2016. Included in the GOES-R Instrument suite is the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). GLM is a single-channel, near-infrared optical detector that can sense extremely brief (800 s) transient changes in the atmosphere, indicating the presence of lightning. GLM will measure total lightning activity continuously over the Americas and adjacent ocean regions with near-uniform spatial resolution of approximately 10 km. Due to its large CCD (1372x1300 pixels), high frame rate, sensitivity and onboard event filtering, GLM will require extensive post launch characterization and calibration. Daytime and nighttime images will be used to characterize both image quality criteria inherent to GLM as a space-based optic system (focus, stray light, crosstalk, solar glint) and programmable image processing criteria (dark offsets, gain, noise, linearity, dynamic range). In addition ground data filtering will be adjusted based on lightning-specific phenomenology (coherence) to isolate real from false transients with their own characteristics. These parameters will be updated, as needed, on orbit in an iterative process guided by pre-launch testing. This paper discusses the planned tests to be performed on GLM over the six-month Post Launch Test period to optimize and demonstrate GLM performance.

  16. Post Launch Calibration and Testing of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper on the GOES-R Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafal, Marc D.; Clarke, Jared T.; Cholvibul, Ruth W.

    2016-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R (GOES-R) series is the planned next generation of operational weather satellites for the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is procuring the GOES-R spacecraft and instruments with the first launch of the GOES-R series planned for October 2016. Included in the GOES-R Instrument suite is the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). GLM is a single-channel, near-infrared optical detector that can sense extremely brief (800 microseconds) transient changes in the atmosphere, indicating the presence of lightning. GLM will measure total lightning activity continuously over the Americas and adjacent ocean regions with near-uniform spatial resolution of approximately 10 km. Due to its large CCD (1372x1300 pixels), high frame rate, sensitivity and onboard event filtering, GLM will require extensive post launch characterization and calibration. Daytime and nighttime images will be used to characterize both image quality criteria inherent to GLM as a space-based optic system (focus, stray light, crosstalk, solar glint) and programmable image processing criteria (dark offsets, gain, noise, linearity, dynamic range). In addition ground data filtering will be adjusted based on lightning-specific phenomenology (coherence) to isolate real from false transients with their own characteristics. These parameters will be updated, as needed, on orbit in an iterative process guided by pre-launch testing. This paper discusses the planned tests to be performed on GLM over the six-month Post Launch Test period to optimize and demonstrate GLM performance.

  17. Post launch calibration and testing of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper on GOES-R satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafal, Marc; Clarke, Jared T.; Cholvibul, Ruth W.

    2016-05-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R (GOES-R) series is the planned next generation of operational weather satellites for the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is procuring the GOES-R spacecraft and instruments with the first launch of the GOES-R series planned for October 2016. Included in the GOES-R Instrument suite is the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). GLM is a single-channel, near-infrared optical detector that can sense extremely brief (800 μs) transient changes in the atmosphere, indicating the presence of lightning. GLM will measure total lightning activity continuously over the Americas and adjacent ocean regions with near-uniform spatial resolution of approximately 10 km. Due to its large CCD (1372x1300 pixels), high frame rate, sensitivity and onboard event filtering, GLM will require extensive post launch characterization and calibration. Daytime and nighttime images will be used to characterize both image quality criteria inherent to GLM as a space-based optic system (focus, stray light, crosstalk, solar glint) and programmable image processing criteria (dark offsets, gain, noise, linearity, dynamic range). In addition ground data filtering will be adjusted based on lightning-specific phenomenology (coherence) to isolate real from false transients with their own characteristics. These parameters will be updated, as needed, on orbit in an iterative process guided by pre-launch testing. This paper discusses the planned tests to be performed on GLM over the six-month Post Launch Test period to optimize and demonstrate GLM performance.

  18. Synergistic Opportunities for the Geostationary Satellite Constellation: Status of the CEOS Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saadi, J. A.; Zehner, C.

    2012-12-01

    This talk will summarize activities of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Atmospheric Composition Constellation (ACC) to collaboratively advance the next generation of air quality monitoring from space. Over the past 2 years, CEOS ACC have developed a position paper describing the benefits to be derived from such collaboration. The resulting ACC recommendations were endorsed by CEOS in May 2011. We will discuss next steps toward implementing this vision, starting with a new 3-year CEOS Action in 2012. Several countries and space agencies are currently planning to launch geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) missions in 2017-2022 to obtain atmospheric composition measurements for characterizing anthropogenic and natural distributions of tropospheric ozone, aerosols, and their precursors. These missions include Europe's ESA Sentinel-4 with EUMETSAT IRS, the United States' NASA GEO-CAPE, Korea's ME/MEST/KARI GEMS, and Japan's JAXA GMAP-Asia. GEO observations offer a quantum advance in air quality monitoring from space by providing measurements many times per day. However, a single GEO satellite views only a portion of the globe. These satellites, positioned to view Europe, East Asia, and North America, will collectively provide hourly coverage of the industrialized Northern Hemisphere at similar spatial resolutions. Planned low Earth orbit (LEO) missions will provide complementary daily global observations. Observations from a single LEO satellite will overlap those from each GEO satellite once per day, providing a means for combining the GEO observations and a necessary perspective for interpreting global impacts of smaller scale processes. The EUMETSAT Metop series, NOAA/NASA JPSS series, and ESA Sentinel-5 Precursor and Sentinel-5 missions will each provide such daily overlap with the GEO missions. The Canadian PCW PHEMOS mission will make an additional unique suite of observations. PCW will provide quasi-geostationary coverage over the Arctic that

  19. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui

    1992-09-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  20. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui.

    1992-01-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  1. Improvement Limitation of Satellite Visibility by Space Diversity Consisted of Two Geostationary Satellites in Urban Areas of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Toshihiko; Juzoji, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Isao

    The paramedic in the moving ambulance sends via the communications satellite the moving picture data to the doctor in the hospital However, when an ambulance runs inside a city, a radio wave to the communication satellite is blocked and as a result the moving picture data sometimes freeze. Maximum value of the satellite visibility by the space diversity which uses two geostationary satellites is acquired in each city of Japan. From these simulation results, it was found that there was a limit in the improvement of the satellite visibility by the space. The limit of this improvement depends on the city. .Moreover the angle of elevation of the quasi zenith satellite which the satellite visibility exceeds the limit value of two geostationary satellites was acquired ,and these angles of elevation were compared between each city of Japan. It became clear that more than 69 degrees of an elevation angle of the quasi zenith satellite is necessary to exceed a maximum satellite visibility of two geostationary satellites.

  2. Aviation utilization of geostationary satellites for the augmentation to GPS: Ranging and data link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Richard Andrew, II

    2000-08-01

    The Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) is a GPS-based navigation aid currently under development by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). WAAS will provide corrections to aviation users for the GPS clock, its ephemeris, and for the delay in its signal as it passes through the ionosphere. These corrections will be broadcast to users throughout the United States via geostationary satellites. A master station that combines data from a continental network of reference GPS receivers will create these messages. The geostationary satellites serve both as wide-area differential GPS data links as well as additional ranging sources. The data message stream of WAAS enhances the accuracy and integrity of the GPS signal for aviation. Simultaneously, the satellite ranging-source increases the percentage of time that the precise signal is available. In this way, WAAS provides needed improvements in four metrics over the standard GPS signal: accuracy, integrity, availability, and continuity. The ranging function, described above, requires an estimate of the position of the geostationary satellite. This dissertation presents a novel technique for generating this position estimate. This technique is designed to provide high integrity performance in the user position domain and operates in real-time. As such, it contrasts classical orbit determination techniques that have no integrity requirement, are not designed to optimize performance in the user position domain, and usually have no real-time requirement. Our estimator is evaluated using real data from the FAA's National Satellite Test Bed (NSTB). The WAAS Signal-In-Space (SIS) has a limited data message bandwidth of 250 bits-per-second. This data bandwidth was chosen to balance two concerns. First, the power of the signal must not be so strong that it jams GPS. Second, the signal must provide the minimum amount of information necessary to ensure adequate accuracy and integrity for aviation users over the entire

  3. Effects of Surface Albedo on Smoke Detection Through Geostationary Satellite Imagery in the Hazard Mapping System (HMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salemi, A.; Ruminski, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) of NOAA/NESDIS uses geostationary and polar orbiting satellite imagery to identify fires and smoke throughout the continental United States. The fires and smoke are analyzed daily on the Hazard Mapping System (HMS) and made available via the internet in various formats. Analysis of smoke plumes generated from wildfires, agricultural and prescribe burns is performed with single channel visible imagery primarily from NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) animations. Identification of smoke in visible imagery is complicated by the presence of clouds, the viewing angle produced by the sun, smoke, satellite geometry, and the surface albedo of the ground below the smoke among other factors. This study investigates the role of surface albedo in smoke detection. LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) instruments are capable of detecting smoke and other aerosols. Through the use of ground and space based LIDAR systems in areas of varying albedo a relationship between the subjective analyst drawn smoke plumes versus those detected by LIDAR is established. The ability to detect smoke over regions of higher albedo (brighter surface, such as grassland, scrub and desert) is diminished compared to regions of lower albedo (darker surface, such as forest and water). Users of the HMS smoke product need to be aware of this limitation in smoke detection in areas of higher albedo.

  4. Geostationary satellite positioning by DLR/GSOC operations and management methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittinger, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Starting with a short description of the GSOC (German Space Operations Center) and its role within the wider framework of the research institute DLR, this paper provides a review of the geostationary telecommunications satellites positioned by the GSOC. The paper then proceeds to describe the evolution of the operations and management structures and methods which have been effectively used to accomplish these missions.

  5. A Geostationary Satellite Constellation for Observing Global Air Quality: Status of the CEOS Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saadi, J. A.; Zehner, C.

    2011-12-01

    Several countries and space agencies are currently planning to launch geostationary satellites in the 2017-2022 time frame to obtain atmospheric composition measurements for characterizing anthropogenic and natural distributions of tropospheric ozone, aerosols, and their precursors, which are important factors in understanding air quality and climate change. While a single geostationary satellite can view only a portion of the globe, it is possible for a minimum of three geostationary satellites, positioned to view Europe/Middle East/Africa, Asia/Australasia, and the Americas, to collectively provide near-global coverage. Harmonizing the planned geostationary missions to be contemporaneous and have common observing capabilities and data distribution protocols would synergistically enable critically needed understanding of the interactions between regional and global atmospheric composition and of the implications for air quality and climate. Such activities would directly address societal benefit areas of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), including Health, Energy, Climate, Disasters, and Ecosystems, and are responsive to the requirements of each mission to provide advanced user services and societal benefits. Over the past 2 years, the Atmospheric Composition Constellation (ACC) of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) has developed a white paper describing such collaboration and the benefits to be derived from it. The resulting ACC recommendations were endorsed by CEOS in May 2011. Here we will present an update on collaborative activities and next steps. This presentation is envisioned to serve as an introduction to the oral sessions associated with Session A.25.

  6. Geostationary Communications Satellites as Sensors for the Space Weather Environment: Telemetry Event Identification Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlton, A.; Cahoy, K.

    2015-12-01

    Reliability of geostationary communication satellites (GEO ComSats) is critical to many industries worldwide. The space radiation environment poses a significant threat and manufacturers and operators expend considerable effort to maintain reliability for users. Knowledge of the space radiation environment at the orbital location of a satellite is of critical importance for diagnosing and resolving issues resulting from space weather, for optimizing cost and reliability, and for space situational awareness. For decades, operators and manufacturers have collected large amounts of telemetry from geostationary (GEO) communications satellites to monitor system health and performance, yet this data is rarely mined for scientific purposes. The goal of this work is to acquire and analyze archived data from commercial operators using new algorithms that can detect when a space weather (or non-space weather) event of interest has occurred or is in progress. We have developed algorithms, collectively called SEER (System Event Evaluation Routine), to statistically analyze power amplifier current and temperature telemetry by identifying deviations from nominal operations or other events and trends of interest. This paper focuses on our work in progress, which currently includes methods for detection of jumps ("spikes", outliers) and step changes (changes in the local mean) in the telemetry. We then examine available space weather data from the NOAA GOES and the NOAA-computed Kp index and sunspot numbers to see what role, if any, it might have played. By combining the results of the algorithm for many components, the spacecraft can be used as a "sensor" for the space radiation environment. Similar events occurring at one time across many component telemetry streams may be indicative of a space radiation event or system-wide health and safety concern. Using SEER on representative datasets of telemetry from Inmarsat and Intelsat, we find events that occur across all or many of

  7. General relativity and satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The general relativistic correction to the position of a satellite is found by retaining Newtonian physics for an observer on the satellite and introducing a potential. The potential is expanded in terms of the Keplerian elements of the orbit and substituted in Lagrange's equations. Integration of the equations shows that a typical earth satellite with small orbital eccentricity is displaced by about 17 cm. from its unperturbed position after a single orbit, while the periodic displacement over the orbit reaches a maximum of about 3 cm. The moon is displaced by about the same amounts. Application of the equations to Mercury gives a total displacement of about 58 km. after one orbit and a maximum periodic displacement of about 12 km.

  8. Precise orbit determination of Beidou Satellites at GFZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhiguo; Ge, Maorong; Uhlemann, Maik; Zhao, Qile

    2014-05-01

    In December 2012 the Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (ICD) of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BeiDou system) was published. Currently the initial BeiDou regional navigation satellite system consisting of 14 satellites was completed, and provides observation data of five Geostationary-Earth-Orbit (GEO)satellites, five Inclined-GeoSynchronous-Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium-Earth-Orbit (MEO) satellites. The Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) contributes as one of the analysis centers to the International GNSS Service (IGS) since many years. In 2012 the IGS began the "Multi GNSS EXperiment" (MGEX), which supports the new GNSS, such as Galileo, Compass, and QZSS. Based on tracking data of BeiDou-capable receivers from the MGEX and chinese BeiDou networks up to 45 global distributed stations are selected to estimate orbit and clock parameters of the GPS/BeiDou satellites. Some selected results from the combined GPS/BeiDou data processing with 10 weeks of data from 2013 are shown. The quality of the orbit and clock products are assessed by means of orbit overlap statistics, clock stabilities as well as an independent validation with SLR measurements. At the end an outlook about GFZ AC's future Multi-GNSS activities will be given.

  9. The science benefits of and the antenna requirements for microwave remote sensing from geostationary orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, Warren L. (Editor); Brown, Gary S. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of the Large Space Antenna (LSA) Science Panel was to evaluate the science benefits that can be realized with a 25-meter class antenna in a microwave/millimeter wave remote sensing system in geostationary orbit. The panel concluded that a 25-meter or larger antenna in geostationary orbit can serve significant passive remote sensing needs in the 10 to 60 GHz frequency range, including measurements of precipitation, water vapor, atmospheric temperature profile, ocean surface wind speed, oceanic cloud liquid water content, and snow cover. In addition, cloud base height, atmospheric wind profile, and ocean currents can potentially be measured using active sensors with the 25-meter antenna. Other environmental parameters, particularly those that do not require high temporal resolution, are better served by low Earth orbit based sensors.

  10. Analysing the Advantages of High Temporal Resolution Geostationary MSG SEVIRI Data Compared to Polar Operational Environmental Satellite Data for Land Surface Monitoring in Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fensholt, R.; Anyamba, A.; Huber, S.; Proud, S. R.; Tucker, C. J.; Small, J.; Pak, E.; Rasmussen, M. O.; Sandholt, I.; Shisanya, C.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1972, satellite remote sensing of the environment has been dominated by polar-orbiting sensors providing useful data for monitoring the earth s natural resources. However their observation and monitoring capacity are inhibited by daily to monthly looks for any given ground surface which often is obscured by frequent and persistent cloud cover creating large gaps in time series measurements. The launch of the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite into geostationary orbit has opened new opportunities for land surface monitoring. The Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) instrument on-board MSG with an imaging capability every 15 minutes which is substantially greater than any temporal resolution that can be obtained from existing polar operational environmental satellites (POES) systems currently in use for environmental monitoring. Different areas of the African continent were affected by droughts and floods in 2008 caused by periods of abnormally low and high rainfall, respectively. Based on the effectiveness of monitoring these events from Earth Observation (EO) data the current analyses show that the new generation of geostationary remote sensing data can provide higher temporal resolution cloud-free (less than 5 days) measurements of the environment as compared to existing POES systems. SEVIRI MSG 5-day continental scale composites will enable rapid assessment of environmental conditions and improved early warning of disasters for the African continent such as flooding or droughts. The high temporal resolution geostationary data will complement existing higher spatial resolution polar-orbiting satellite data for various dynamic environmental and natural resource applications of terrestrial ecosystems.

  11. Satellite services and orbital retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adornato, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Within the capabilities of the Space Shuttle Orbiter, a broad range of services which can be made available to the satellite user community as summarized. Payload deployment, close proximity retrieval, and a number of other mission related functions are discussed. The focus here is on close proximity retrieval and retrieval of payloads in higher energy low Earth orbits.

  12. Comparison of Cloud Properties from CALIPSO-CloudSat and Geostationary Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L.; Minnis, P.; Chang, F.; Winker, D.; Sun-Mack, S.; Spangenberg, D.; Austin, R.

    2007-01-01

    Cloud properties are being derived in near-real time from geostationary satellite imager data for a variety of weather and climate applications and research. Assessment of the uncertainties in each of the derived cloud parameters is essential for confident use of the products. Determination of cloud amount, cloud top height, and cloud layering is especially important for using these real -time products for applications such as aircraft icing condition diagnosis and numerical weather prediction model assimilation. Furthermore, the distribution of clouds as a function of altitude has become a central component of efforts to evaluate climate model cloud simulations. Validation of those parameters has been difficult except over limited areas where ground-based active sensors, such as cloud radars or lidars, have been available on a regular basis. Retrievals of cloud properties are sensitive to the surface background, time of day, and the clouds themselves. Thus, it is essential to assess the geostationary satellite retrievals over a variety of locations. The availability of cloud radar data from CloudSat and lidar data from CALIPSO make it possible to perform those assessments over each geostationary domain at 0130 and 1330 LT. In this paper, CloudSat and CALIPSO data are matched with contemporaneous Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT), and Meteosat-8 data. Unlike comparisons with cloud products derived from A-Train imagers, this study considers comparisons of nadir active sensor data with off-nadir retrievals. These matched data are used to determine the uncertainties in cloud-top heights and cloud amounts derived from the geostationary satellite data using the Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) cloud retrieval algorithms. The CERES multi-layer cloud detection method is also evaluated to determine its accuracy and limitations in the off-nadir mode. The results will be useful for

  13. Ionospheric TEC Estimations with the Signals of Various Geostationary Navigational Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatov, G. A.; Padokhin, A. M.; Kunitsyn, V.; Yasyukevich, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The development of GNSS and SBAS systems provides the possibility to retrieve ionospheric TEC from the dual frequency observations from a number of geostationary satellites using the same approach as for dual frequency GPS/GLONASS observations. In this connection, the quality of geostationary data, first of all the level of noise in TEC estimations is of great interest and importance. In this work we present the results of the comparison of the noise patterns in TEC estimations using signals of geostationary satellites of augumentation systems - indian GAGAN, european EGNOS and american WAAS, as well as the signals of chinees COMPASS/Beidou navigational system. We show that among above mentioned systems geostationary COMPASS/Beidou satellites provide best noise level in TEC estimations (RMS~0.1TECU), which corresponds to those of GPS/GLONASS, while GAGAN and WAAS TEC RMS could reach up to 1.5 TECU with typical values of 0.25-0.5 TECU which is up to one order greater than for common GPS/GLONASS observations. EGNOS TEC estimations being even more noisy (TEC RMS up to 10TECU) than WAAS and GAGAN ones at present time are not suitable for ionospheric studies. We also present geostationary TEC response to increasing solar X-Ray and EUV ionizing radiation during several recent X-class flares. Good correlation was found between TEC and EUV flux for the stations at the sunlit hemisphere. We also present geostationary TEC response to geomagnetic field variations during strong and moderate geomagnetic storms (including G4 St. Patricks Day Storm of 2015) showing examples of both positive and negative TEC anomalies of order of tens of TECU during main storm phase. Our results show the capability of geostationary GNSS and SBAS observations for continuous monitoring of ionospheric TEC. Intensively growing networks of dedicated receivers (for example MGEX network) and increasing number of dual-frequency geostationary satellites in SBAS and GNSS constellations potentially make it a

  14. Carbon Observations from Geostationary Earth Orbit as Part of an Integrated Observing System for Atmospheric Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from the CHRONOS mission. The primary goal of this experiment is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. CHRONOS observations would provide measurements not currently available or planned as part of a surface, suborbital and satellite integrated observing system for atmospheric composition over North America. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution, and CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth

  15. Geostationary Satellite (GSAT) Failure; an Analysis and Possible Attitude Control Remedy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Krishna; Singh, Sanjay

    A geostationary satellite has reportedly failed during its orbit raising maneuvers from the GTO to its final stationary ring. It was felt that the failure was possibly caused by differential propellant rates of flow from the symmetrically placed pair of liquid tanks on either side of the center of mass. Alternatively even the initial fixed center-of-mass offset could have led to the same outcome. The investigation presented here models the problem as one of attitude motion by separately treating the system mass into two parts: fixed mass structure including the motor tanks and differentially shrinking bodies of liquid propellant. The system with variable mass is assumed to undergo pitching librations under the influence of thrust moments about the shifting center of mass in the orbital plane. The detailed numerical simulation is undertaken to assess the influence of pitching excitation caused by asymmetric thrusting. The effect of this attitude motion on possible reduction in velocity increment due to thrust misalignment is found to be quite significant. Besides some additional attitude control fuel may also be required to undo the pitching excitation. The simulation carried out here for the case of fixed center-of-mass offset leads to the same general adverse behavior. Finally, a suitable feedback control strategy proposed here is employed to regulate the differential flow rate in symmetrically placed pair of liquid tanks on either side of the center of mass in order to eliminate the adverse effect of the moving center of mass and instead make judicious use for attitude control. It is shown that the feedback control of fuel flow rate in this design with symmetrically laid liquid tanks can help in conserving the fuel, the precious commodity on board and thus significantly enhance the performance of orbit raising maneuvers and hence much higher reliability for mission success.

  16. Low Earth orbit communications satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroney, D.; Lashbrook, D.; Mckibben, B.; Gardener, N.; Rivers, T.; Nottingham, G.; Golden, B.; Barfield, B.; Bruening, J.; Wood, D.

    1992-01-01

    A current thrust in satellite communication systems considers a low-Earth orbiting constellations of satellites for continuous global coverage. Conceptual design studies have been done at the time of this design project by LORAL Aerospace Corporation under the program name GLOBALSTAR and by Motorola under their IRIDIUM program. This design project concentrates on the spacecraft design of the GLOBALSTAR low-Earth orbiting communication system. Overview information on the program was gained through the Federal Communications Commission licensing request. The GLOBALSTAR system consists of 48 operational satellites positioned in a Walker Delta pattern providing global coverage and redundancy. The operational orbit is 1389 km (750 nmi) altitude with eight planes of six satellites each. The orbital planes are spaced 45 deg., and the spacecraft are separated by 60 deg. within the plane. A Delta 2 launch vehicle is used to carry six spacecraft for orbit establishment. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will utilize code-division multiple access (spread spectrum modulation) for digital relay, voice, and radio determination satellite services (RDSS) yielding position determination with accuracy up to 200 meters.

  17. The Study and Applications of Satellite and Satellite Constellation Autonomous Orbit Determination Using Star Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Q. B.

    2012-07-01

    Autonomous satellite orbit determination is a key technique in autonomous satellite navigation. Many kinds of technologies have been proposed to realize the autonomous satellite navigation, such as the star sensor, the Earth magnetometer, the occultation time survey, and the phase measurement of X-ray pulsar signals. This dissertation studies a method of autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor. Moreover, the method is extended to the autonomous navigation of satellite constellation and the space-based surveillance. In chapters 1 and 2, some usual time and reference systems are introduced. Then the principles of several typical autonomous navigation methods, and their merits and shortcomings are analyzed. In chapter 3, the autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor and infrared Earth sensor (IRES) is specifically studied, which is based on the status movement simulation, the stellar background observation from star sensor, and the Earth center direction survey from IRES. By simulating the low Earth orbit satellites and pseudo Geostationary Earth orbit (PGEO) satellites, the precision of position and speed with autonomous orbit determination using star sensor is obtained. Besides, the autonomous orbit determination using star sensor with double detectors is studied. According to the observation equation's characters, an optimized type of star sensor and IRES initial assembly model is proposed. In the study of the PGEO autonomous orbit determination, an efficient sampling frequency of measurements is promoted. The simulation results confirm that the autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor is feasible for satellites with all kinds of altitudes. In chapter 4, the method of autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor is extended to the autonomous navigation of mini-satellite constellation. Combining with the high-accuracy inter satellite links data, the precision of the determined orbit and

  18. 1.6 GHz distress radio call system (DRCS) via geostationary satellite (Inmarsat-E) - Results of the preoperational demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, Walter

    1990-10-01

    The paper discusses features and operations of the spaceborne Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) system for distress alerting, which is expected to be used on every ship by August 1, 1993. Two types of EPIRBs that were developed to date are described: the floatable EPIRB, used by vessels over 300 GRT (convention ships subjected to the IMO rules) and the hand-held EPIRB used by smaller vessels such as fishing boats or yachts. The transmitted message formats of both are fully compatible. The distress alerts are presently transmitted through the polar orbiting satellite service at 406 MHz. However, the 36th Inmarsat Council in 1990 passed a decision to the effect that the Inmarsat geostationary satellite shall provide service at 1.6 GHz.

  19. A multi-angle aerosol optical depth retrieval algorithm for geostationary satellite data over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Kondragunta, S.; Laszlo, I.; Ciren, P.; Hoff, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals from geostationary satellites have high temporal resolution compared to the polar orbiting satellites and thus enable us to monitor aerosol motion. However, current Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have only one visible channel for retrieving aerosols and hence the retrieval accuracy is lower than those from the multichannel polar-orbiting satellite instruments such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The operational GOES AOD retrieval algorithm (GOES Aerosol/Smoke Product, GASP) uses 28-day composite images from the visible channel to derive surface reflectance, which can produce large uncertainties. In this work, we develop a new AOD retrieval algorithm for the GOES imager by applying a modified Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm. The algorithm assumes the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) in the channel 1 of GOES is proportional to seasonal average MODIS BRDF in the 2.1 μm channel. The ratios between them are derived through time series analysis of the GOES visible channel images. The results of AOD and surface reflectance retrievals are evaluated through comparisons against those from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), GASP, and MODIS. The AOD retrievals from the new algorithm demonstrate good agreement with AERONET retrievals at several sites across the US with correlation coefficients ranges from 0.71 to 0.85 at five out of six sites. At the two western sites Railroad Valley and UCSB, the MAIAC AOD retrievals have correlations of 0.8 and 0.85 with AERONET AOD, and are more accurate than GASP retrievals, which have correlations of 0.7 and 0.74 with AERONET AOD. At the three eastern sites, the correlations with AERONET AOD are from 0.71 to 0.81, comparable to the GASP retrievals. In the western US where surface reflectance is higher than 0.15, the new algorithm also produces larger AOD retrieval coverage

  20. A multi-angle aerosol optical depth retrieval algorithm for geostationary satellite data over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Kondragunta, S.; Laszlo, I.; Ciren, P.; Hoff, R. M.

    2011-04-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval from geostationary satellites has high temporal resolution compared to the polar orbiting satellites and thus enables us to monitor aerosol motion. However, current Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have only one visible channel for retrieving aerosol and hence the retrieval accuracy is lower than those from the multichannel polar-orbiting satellite instruments such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The operational GOES AOD retrieval algorithm (GOES Aerosol/Smoke Product, GASP) uses 28-day composite images from the visible channel to derive surface reflectance, which can produce large uncertainties. In this work, we develop a new AOD retrieval algorithm for the GOES imager by applying a modified multi-angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm. The algorithm assumes the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) at channel 1 of GOES is proportional to seasonal average BRDF in the 2.1 μm channel from MODIS. The ratios between them are derived through time series analysis of the GOES visible channel images. The results of the AOD and surface reflectance retrievals are evaluated through comparison against those from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), GASP, and MODIS. The AOD retrievals from the new algorithm demonstrate good agreement with AERONET retrievals at several sites across the US. They are comparable to the GASP retrievals in the eastern-central sites and are more accurate than GASP retrievals in the western sites. In the western US where surface reflectance is high, the new algorithm also produces larger AOD retrieval coverage than both GASP and MODIS.

  1. 47 CFR 25.260 - Time sharing between DoD meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 400.15-401 MHz band. 25.260... SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.260 Time sharing between DoD meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 400.15-401 MHz band. (a) The...

  2. 47 CFR 25.260 - Time sharing between DoD meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 400.15-401 MHz band. 25.260... SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.260 Time sharing between DoD meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 400.15-401 MHz band. (a) A...

  3. 47 CFR 25.260 - Time sharing between DoD meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 400.15-401 MHz band. 25.260... SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.260 Time sharing between DoD meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 400.15-401 MHz band. (a) A...

  4. 47 CFR 25.260 - Time sharing between DoD meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 400.15-401 MHz band. 25.260... SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.260 Time sharing between DoD meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary satellite systems in the 400.15-401 MHz band. (a) The...

  5. Investigation of mesoscale meteorological phenomena as observed by geostationary satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brundidge, K. C.

    1982-01-01

    Satellite imagery plus conventional synoptic observations were used to examine three mesoscale systems recently observed by the GOES-EAST satellite. The three systems are an arc cloud complex (ACC), mountain lee wave clouds and cloud streets parallel to the wind shear. Possible gravity-wave activity is apparent in all three cases. Of particular interest is the ACC because of its ability to interact with other mesoscale phenomena to produce or enhance convection.

  6. Satellite Orbital Interpolation Comparison Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, J.-Y.; Deleflie, F.; Gambis, D.

    2012-04-01

    A satellite or artificial probe orbit is made of time series of orbital elements such as state vectors (position and velocities, keplerian orbital elements) given at regular or irregular time intervals. These time series are fitted to observations, so that differences between observations (distance, radial velocity) and the theoretical quantity be minimal, according to a statistical criterion, mostly based on the least-squared algorithm. These computations are carried out using dedicated software, such as the GINS used by GRGS, mainly at CNES Toulouse and Paris Observatory. From an operational point of view, time series of orbital elements are 7-day long. Depending on the dynamical configurations, more generally, they can typically vary from a couple of days to some weeks. One of the fundamental parameters to be adjusted is the initial state vector. This can lead to time gaps, at the level of a few dozen of centimeters between the last point of a time series to the first one of the following data set. The objective of this presentation consists in the improvement of an interpolation method freed itself of such possible "discontinuities" resulting between satellite's orbit arcs when a new initial bulletin is adjusted. We show the principles of interpolation for these time series and compare solutions coming from different interpolation methods such as Lagrange polynomial, spline cubic, Chebyshev orthogonal polynomial and cubic Hermite polynomial. These polynomial coefficients are used to reconstruct and interpolate the satellite orbits without time gaps and discontinuities and requiring a weak memory size.

  7. Practical method to identify orbital anomaly as spacecraft breakup in the geostationary region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetsuhara, Masahiko; Hanada, Toshiya

    2013-09-01

    Identifying spacecraft breakup events is an essential issue for better understanding of the current orbital debris environment. This paper proposes an observation planning approach to identify an orbital anomaly, which appears as a significant discontinuity in archived orbital history, as a spacecraft breakup. The proposed approach is applicable to orbital anomalies in the geostationary region. The proposed approach selects a spacecraft that experienced an orbital anomaly, and then predicts trajectories of possible fragments of the spacecraft at an observation epoch. This paper theoretically demonstrates that observation planning for the possible fragments can be conducted. To do this, long-term behaviors of the possible fragments are evaluated. It is concluded that intersections of their trajectories will converge into several corresponding regions in the celestial sphere even if the breakup epoch is not specified and it has uncertainty of the order of several weeks.

  8. Monitoring biomass burning and aerosol loading and transport from a geostationary satellite perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Prins, E.M.; Menzel, W.P.

    1996-12-31

    The topic of this paper is the use of geostationary operational environmental satellites (GOES) to monitor trends in biomass burning and aerosol production and transport in South America and through the Western Hemisphere. The GOES Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (ABBA) was developed to provide diurnal information concerning fires in South America; applications demonstrating the ability to document long-term trends in fire activity are described. Analyses of imagery collected by GOES-8 is described; six biomass burning seasons in South America revealed many examples of large-scale smoke transport extending over several million square kilometers. Four major transport regimes were identified. Case studies throughout South America, Canada, the United States, Mexico, Belize, and Guatemala have successfully demonstrated the improved capability of GOES-8 for fire and smoke monitoring in various ecosystems. Global geostationary fire monitoring will be possible with the launch of new satellites. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Adaptive Array for Weak Interfering Signals: Geostationary Satellite Experiments. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steadman, Karl

    1989-01-01

    The performance of an experimental adaptive array is evaluated using signals from an existing geostationary satellite interference environment. To do this, an earth station antenna was built to receive signals from various geostationary satellites. In these experiments the received signals have a frequency of approximately 4 GHz (C-band) and have a bandwidth of over 35 MHz. These signals are downconverted to a 69 MHz intermediate frequency in the experimental system. Using the downconverted signals, the performance of the experimental system for various signal scenarios is evaluated. In this situation, due to the inherent thermal noise, qualitative instead of quantitative test results are presented. It is shown that the experimental system can null up to two interfering signals well below the noise level. However, to avoid the cancellation of the desired signal, the use a steering vector is needed. Various methods to obtain an estimate of the steering vector are proposed.

  10. Space Weather Measurements Despite Resource Limitations: A Conceptual Overview of Novel Energetic Particle Instruments at a Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burward-Hoy, J.

    2006-12-01

    Solar energetic particle events, cosmic rays, and relativistic electrons in the outer edge of the radiation belts produce single event upsets in the electronics and spacecraft charging on a host satellite located at a geostationary orbit. In order to determine the space weather environment for the host, particle instruments capable of measuring both electrons and protons in a wide energy range, with a large angular coverage but finite angular resolution are necessary. In order to adhere to resource limitations, including weight and power consumption and whether or not a host platform is spinning or three-axis stabilized, energetic particle instruments must be designed accordingly. I will present a conceptual overview of novel LANL instruments, specifically two-element collimated telescopes with solid-state sensors, and describe how the requirements for accurate space weather determination are met despite the resource limitations.

  11. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, W. D.; Shalkhauser, M. J.; Bobinsky, E. A.; Soni, N. J.; Quintana, J. A.; Kim, H.; Wagner, P.; Vanderaar, M.

    1992-08-01

    A major effort at NASA/Lewis is to identify and develop critical digital technologies and components that enable new commercial missions or significantly improve the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space comunications systems. NASA envisions the need for low data rate, direct to the user communications services, for data, facsimile, voice, and video conferencing. A report that focuses on destination directed packet switching architectures for geostationary communication satellites is presented.

  12. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, W. D.; Shalkhauser, M. J.; Bobinsky, E. A.; Soni, N. J.; Quintana, J. A.; Kim, H.; Wagner, P.; Vanderaar, M.

    1992-01-01

    A major effort at NASA/Lewis is to identify and develop critical digital technologies and components that enable new commercial missions or significantly improve the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space comunications systems. NASA envisions the need for low data rate, direct to the user communications services, for data, facsimile, voice, and video conferencing. A report that focuses on destination directed packet switching architectures for geostationary communication satellites is presented.

  13. EHL Transition Temperature Measurements on a Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Filter Wheel Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark J.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.; Predmore, Roamer E.; Shogrin, Bradley A.

    2001-01-01

    The elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) transition temperature was measured for a Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) sounder filter wheel bearing in a vacuum tribometer. Conditions included both an 89 N (20 lb.) hard and soft load, 600 rpm, temperatures between 23 C (73 F) and 85 C (185 F), and a vacuum of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp -5) Pa. Elastohydrodynamic to mixed lubrication started to occur at approximately 70 C (158 F).

  14. Polar Mesospheric Cloud Occurrence from Geostationary Satellite Observations in the Northern Hemisphere for the Period 2001 to 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, C.; Jennings, S. G.; Rodaighe, A.

    2012-04-01

    Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC) are the highest clouds in the atmosphere occurring over the summer polar regions at around 83 km in the Mesosphere. Since their discovery in 1885, they have attracted much research and recently they have attracted attention as possible indicators of Climate Change. In the past, their height and optical thinness restricted the opportunities for observation of PMC; however the development of remote sensing satellites has provided a consistent method of observing them in the Mesosphere. Observations of PMC have been made from both numerous polar orbiting satellites and the European geostationary weather satellites (METEOSAT). METEOSAT observations of PMC are in the visible band of the high resolution radiometer (MVIRI) of the first generation weather satellite; they have a greater spatial extent per observation at a higher frequency rate than those of polar orbiting platforms. The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) maintains an archive of METEOSAT observations. By building a suitable data management and image analysis infrastructure, we were able to use the archive to make PMC observations in the stored visible band imagery. The design and development of the system (PMC-Explorer) and details of dealing with EUMETSAT data formats are described. PMC occurrence frequencies for the Northern Hemisphere summers are presented for years 2001 to 2005. The seasonal properties are presented, inter-annual comparisons are made and five year seasonal means are calculated and compared with the 1995 season. A comparison with similar published data from polar orbiting satellites is made. An increase PMC in observations between 2001 and 2005 is presented. The potential impact of Climate Change on the occurrence frequency of PMC is discussed. Finally, suggestions are made on further uses of the EUMETSAT archive for PMC research and the potential of comparisons with other remote sensing platforms.

  15. Identification of geostationary satellites using polarization data from unresolved images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speicher, Andy

    In order to protect critical military and commercial space assets, the United States Space Surveillance Network must have the ability to positively identify and characterize all space objects. Unfortunately, positive identification and characterization of space objects is a manual and labor intensive process today since even large telescopes cannot provide resolved images of most space objects. Since resolved images of geosynchronous satellites are not technically feasible with current technology, another method of distinguishing space objects was explored that exploits the polarization signature from unresolved images. The objective of this study was to collect and analyze visible-spectrum polarization data from unresolved images of geosynchronous satellites taken over various solar phase angles. Different collection geometries were used to evaluate the polarization contribution of solar arrays, thermal control materials, antennas, and the satellite bus as the solar phase angle changed. Since materials on space objects age due to the space environment, it was postulated that their polarization signature may change enough to allow discrimination of identical satellites launched at different times. The instrumentation used in this experiment was a United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) Department of Physics system that consists of a 20-inch Ritchey-Chretien telescope and a dual focal plane optical train fed with a polarizing beam splitter. A rigorous calibration of the system was performed that included corrections for pixel bias, dark current, and response. Additionally, the two channel polarimeter was calibrated by experimentally determining the Mueller matrix for the system and relating image intensity at the two cameras to Stokes parameters S0 and S1. After the system calibration, polarization data was collected during three nights on eight geosynchronous satellites built by various manufacturers and launched several years apart. Three pairs of the eight

  16. 47 CFR 101.145 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... directional transmitting antenna utilized by a fixed station operating in these bands with EIRP greater than... power (EIRP) does not exceed: (1) +47 dBW for any antenna beam directed within 0.5 degrees of the... antenna beam directed between 0.5 degrees and 1.5 degrees of the stationary orbit. (c) 12.7 to 13.25...

  17. 47 CFR 101.145 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... directional transmitting antenna utilized by a fixed station operating in these bands with EIRP greater than... power (EIRP) does not exceed: (1) +47 dBW for any antenna beam directed within 0.5 degrees of the... antenna beam directed between 0.5 degrees and 1.5 degrees of the stationary orbit. (c) 12.7 to 13.25...

  18. Use of low orbital satellite communications systems for humanitarian programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlasov, Vladimir N.; Gorkovoy, Vladimir

    1991-01-01

    Communication and information exchange play a decisive role in progress and social development. However, in many parts of the world the communication infrastructure is inadequate and the capacity for on-line exchange of information may not exist. This is true of underdeveloped countries, remote and relatively inaccessible regions, sites of natural disasters, and of all cases where the resources needed to create complex communication systems are limited. The creation of an inexpensive space communications system to service such areas is therefore a high priority task. In addition to a relatively low-cost space segment, an inexpensive space communications systems requires a large number of ground terminals, which must be relatively inexpensive, energy efficient (using power generated by storage batteries, or solar arrays, etc.), small in size, and must not require highly expert maintenance. The ground terminals must be portable, and readily deployable. Communications satellites in geostationary orbit at altitudes of about 36,000 km are very expensive and require complex and expensive ground stations and launch vehicles. Given current technology, it is categorically impossible to develop inexpensive satellite systems with portable ground terminals using such satellites. To solve the problem of developing an inexpensive satellite communications system that can operate with relatively small ground stations, including portable terminals, we propose to use a system with satellites in low Earth orbit, at an altitude of 900-1500 km. Because low orbital satellites are much closer to the Earth than geostationary ones and require vastly less energy expenditure by the satellite and ground terminals for transmission of messages, a system using them is relatively inexpensive. Such a system could use portable ground terminals no more complex than ordinary mobile police radios.

  19. Near-real-time global biomass burning emissions product from geostationary satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyang; Kondragunta, Shobha; Ram, Jessica; Schmidt, Christopher; Huang, Ho-Chun

    2012-07-01

    Near-real-time estimates of biomass burning emissions are crucial for air quality monitoring and forecasting. We present here the first near-real-time global biomass burning emission product from geostationary satellites (GBBEP-Geo) produced from satellite-derived fire radiative power (FRP) for individual fire pixels. Specifically, the FRP is retrieved using WF_ABBA V65 (wildfire automated biomass burning algorithm) from a network of multiple geostationary satellites. The network consists of two Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) which are operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Meteosat second-generation satellites (Meteosat-09) operated by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, and the Multifunctional Transport Satellite (MTSAT) operated by the Japan Meteorological Agency. These satellites observe wildfires at an interval of 15-30 min. Because of the impacts from sensor saturation, cloud cover, and background surface, the FRP values are generally not continuously observed. The missing observations are simulated by combining the available instantaneous FRP observations within a day and a set of representative climatological diurnal patterns of FRP for various ecosystems. Finally, the simulated diurnal variation in FRP is applied to quantify biomass combustion and emissions in individual fire pixels with a latency of 1 day. By analyzing global patterns in hourly biomass burning emissions in 2010, we find that peak fire season varied greatly and that annual wildfires burned 1.33 × 1012 kg dry mass, released 1.27 × 1010 kg of PM2.5 (particulate mass for particles with diameter <2.5 μm) and 1.18 × 1011kg of CO globally (excluding most parts of boreal Asia, the Middle East, and India because of no coverage from geostationary satellites). The biomass burning emissions were mostly released from forest and savanna fires in Africa, South America, and North America. Evaluation of

  20. The Marshall Automated Wind Algorithm for Geostationary Satellite Wind Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    The Marshall Automated Wind (MAW) algorithm was developed over a decade ago in support of specialized studies of mesoscale meteorology. In recent years, the algorithm has been generalized to address global climate issues and other specific objectives related to NASA missions. The MAW algorithm uses a tracking scheme which minimizes image brightness temperature differences in a sequence of satellite images to determine feature displacement (winds). With the appropriate methodology accurate satellite derived winds can be obtained from visible, infrared, and water vapor imagery. Typical errors are less than 4 m/s but depend on the quality and control constraints used in post-processing. Key to this success is the judicious use of template size and search area used for tracking, image resolution and time sampling, and selection of appropriate statistical constraints which may vary with image type and desired application. The conference paper and subsequent poster will provide details of the technique and examples of its application.

  1. Operational assessment of evapotranspiration from geostationary satellite data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellens-Meulenberghs, F.; Ghilain, N.; Arboleda, A.

    2012-04-01

    EUMETSAT (http://www.eumetsat.int) has set up a network of decentralized meteorological satellite data processing centres named 'Satellite Application Facilities' (SAFs). These centres develop and achieve data products derived from European meteorological satellites. The 'Land-Surface-Analysis' SAF (LSA-SAF, http://landsaf.meteo.pt/), develops algorithms for the operational monitoring of land surface related variables. RMI participates to the LSA-SAF by developing an evapotranspiration (ET) product, ET being one of the most important water balance component [1]. As ET cannot be observed directly by remote sensing, it is assessed indirectly through modelling. The proposed model is based on a set of parameterizations of the SVAT scheme developed at ECMWF and it is adapted to be forced by real-time data derived from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites data. The SEVIRI instrument, on-board MSG, is designed to provide a wide area coverage and is able to monitor quick changing surface variables affected by cloudiness and diurnal cycle. It has a 3 km spatial resolution at sub-satellite point and a high observation repetition rate (15 min). The ET algorithm produces in near real time ET estimates at SEVIRI spatial resolution each 30 minutes. Results are generated since mid 2009 over four regions (Europe, North and South Africa and the Eastern part of South America) defined inside the MSG field of view. A daily product, available since end 2010, is also obtained through integration of the instantaneous estimates. Validation already carried out attests the robustness of the proposed algorithm, notably over Europe. Nevertheless, research will be pursued during coming years, looking for additional validation sites and evolving towards an improved combination of remote sensed observations and models. In this contribution we first present the LSA-SAF framework and we summarize how ET is deduced from MSG-SEVIRI data. In a second step, we compare LSA-SAF ET to ET products

  2. Improved monitoring of surface ozone by joint assimilation of geostationary satellite observations of ozone and CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoogman, Peter; Jacob, Daniel J.; Chance, Kelly; Worden, Helen M.; Edwards, David P.; Zhang, Lin

    2014-02-01

    Future geostationary satellite observations of tropospheric ozone aim to improve monitoring of surface ozone air quality. However, ozone retrievals from space have limited sensitivity in the lower troposphere (boundary layer). Data assimilation in a chemical transport model can propagate the information from the satellite observations to provide useful constraints on surface ozone. This may be aided by correlated satellite observations of carbon monoxide (CO), for which boundary layer sensitivity is easier to achieve. We examine the potential of concurrent geostationary observations of ozone and CO to improve constraints on surface ozone air quality through exploitation of ozone-CO model error correlations in a joint data assimilation framework. The hypothesis is that model transport errors diagnosed for CO provide information on corresponding errors in ozone. A paired-model analysis of ozone-CO error correlations in the boundary layer over North America in summer indicates positive error correlations in continental outflow but negative regional-scale error correlations over land, the latter reflecting opposite sensitivities of ozone and CO to boundary layer depth. Aircraft observations from the ICARTT campaign are consistent with this pattern but also indicate strong positive error correlations in fine-scale pollution plumes. We develop a joint ozone-CO data assimilation system and apply it to a regional-scale Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) of the planned NASA GEO-CAPE geostationary mission over North America. We find substantial benefit from joint ozone-CO data assimilation in informing US ozone air quality if the instrument sensitivity for CO in the boundary layer is greater than that for ozone. A high-quality geostationary measurement of CO could potentially relax the requirements for boundary layer sensitivity of the ozone measurement. This is contingent on accurate characterization of ozone-CO error correlations. A finer-resolution data

  3. A geostationary satellite system for mobile multimedia applications using portable, aeronautical and mobile terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losquadro, G.; Luglio, M.; Vatalaro, F.

    1997-01-01

    A geostationary satellite system for mobile multimedia services via portable, aeronautical and mobile terminals was developed within the framework of the Advanced Communications Technology Service (ACTS) programs. The architecture of the system developed under the 'satellite extremely high frequency communications for multimedia mobile services (SECOMS)/ACTS broadband aeronautical terminal experiment' (ABATE) project is presented. The system will be composed of a Ka band system component, and an extremely high frequency band component. The major characteristics of the space segment, the ground control station and the portable, aeronautical and mobile user terminals are outlined.

  4. NASA Now: Orbital Mechanics: Earth Observing Satellites

    NASA Video Gallery

    This NASA Now program is all about satellites and their orbits. Dr. James Gleason, project scientist for NPP, explains what it takes for a satellite to stay in orbit, why there are different types ...

  5. On the Feasibility of Monitoring Carbon Monoxide in the Lower Troposphere from a Constellation of Northern Hemisphere Geostationary Satellites (PART 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barre, Jerome; Edwards, David; Worden, Helen; Da Silva, Arlindo; Lahoz, William

    2015-01-01

    By the end of the current decade, there are plans to deploy several geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellite missions for atmospheric composition over North America, East Asia and Europe with additional missions proposed. Together, these present the possibility of a constellation of geostationary platforms to achieve continuous time-resolved high-density observations over continental domains for mapping pollutant sources and variability at diurnal and local scales. In this paper, we use a novel approach to sample a very high global resolution model (GEOS-5 at 7 km horizontal resolution) to produce a dataset of synthetic carbon monoxide pollution observations representative of those potentially obtainable from a GEO satellite constellation with predicted measurement sensitivities based on current remote sensing capabilities. Part 1 of this study focuses on the production of simulated synthetic measurements for air quality OSSEs (Observing System Simulation Experiments). We simulate carbon monoxide nadir retrievals using a technique that provides realistic measurements with very low computational cost. We discuss the sampling methodology: the projection of footprints and areas of regard for geostationary geometries over each of the North America, East Asia and Europe regions; the regression method to simulate measurement sensitivity; and the measurement error simulation. A detailed analysis of the simulated observation sensitivity is performed, and limitations of the method are discussed. We also describe impacts from clouds, showing that the efficiency of an instrument making atmospheric composition measurements on a geostationary platform is dependent on the dominant weather regime over a given region and the pixel size resolution. These results demonstrate the viability of the "instrument simulator" step for an OSSE to assess the performance of a constellation of geostationary satellites for air quality measurements.

  6. On the feasibility of monitoring carbon monoxide in the lower troposphere from a constellation of Northern Hemisphere geostationary satellites. (Part 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barré, Jérôme; Edwards, David; Worden, Helen; Da Silva, Arlindo; Lahoz, William

    2015-07-01

    By the end of the current decade, there are plans to deploy several geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellite missions for atmospheric composition over North America, East Asia and Europe with additional missions proposed. Together, these present the possibility of a constellation of geostationary platforms to achieve continuous time-resolved high-density observations over continental domains for mapping pollutant sources and variability at diurnal and local scales. In this paper, we use a novel approach to sample a very high global resolution model (GEOS-5 at 7 km horizontal resolution) to produce a dataset of synthetic carbon monoxide pollution observations representative of those potentially obtainable from a GEO satellite constellation with predicted measurement sensitivities based on current remote sensing capabilities. Part 1 of this study focuses on the production of simulated synthetic measurements for air quality OSSEs (Observing System Simulation Experiments). We simulate carbon monoxide nadir retrievals using a technique that provides realistic measurements with very low computational cost. We discuss the sampling methodology: the projection of footprints and areas of regard for geostationary geometries over each of the North America, East Asia and Europe regions; the regression method to simulate measurement sensitivity; and the measurement error simulation. A detailed analysis of the simulated observation sensitivity is performed, and limitations of the method are discussed. We also describe impacts from clouds, showing that the efficiency of an instrument making atmospheric composition measurements on a geostationary platform is dependent on the dominant weather regime over a given region and the pixel size resolution. These results demonstrate the viability of the "instrument simulator" step for an OSSE to assess the performance of a constellation of geostationary satellites for air quality measurements. We describe the OSSE results in a follow up

  7. Studies of lightning data in conjunction with geostationary satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auvine, B.; Martin, D.

    1985-01-01

    Since January, work has been proceeding on the first phase of this project: the creation of an extensive real-time lightning data base accessible via the Space Science and Engineering Center McIdas system. The purpose of this endeavor is two-fold: to enhance the availability and ease of access to lightning data among the various networks, governmental and research agencies; and to test the feasiblity and desirability of such efforts in succeeding years. The final steps in the creation of the necessary communications links, hardware, and software are in the process of being completed. Operations ground rules for access among the various users have been discussed and are being refined. While the research planned for the last year of the project will rely for the most part on archived, quality-controlled data from the various networks, the real-time data will provide a valuable first-look at potentially interesting case studies. For this purpose, tools are being developed on McIdas for display and analysis of the data as they become available. In conjunction with concurrent GOES real-time imagery, strike locations can be plotted, gridded and contoured, or displayed in various statistical formats including frequency distributions, histograms, and scatter plots. The user may also perform these functions in relation to arbitrarily defined areas on the satellite image. By mid-May these preparations for the access and analysis of real-time lightning data are expected to be complete.

  8. An Orbiting Standards Platform for communication satellite system RF measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, R. G.; Woodruff, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Orbiting Standards Platform (OSP) is a proposed satellite dedicated to performing RF measurements on space communications systems. It would consist of a quasi-geostationary spacecraft containing an ensemble of calibrated RF sources and field strength meters operating in several microwave bands, and would be capable of accurately and conveniently measuring critical earth station and satellite RF performance parameters, such as EIRP, gain, figure of merit (G/T), crosspolarization, beamwidth, and sidelobe levels. The feasibility and utility of the OSP concept has been under joint study by NASA, NBS, Comsat and NTIA. A survey of potential OSP users was conducted by NTIA as part of this effort. The response to this survey, along with certain trends in satellite communications system design, indicates a growing need for such a measurement service.

  9. Precise Orbit Determination of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lina; Ge, Maorong; Wang, Jiexian; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2013-04-01

    China has been developing its own independent satellite navigation system since decades. Now the COMPASS system, also known as BeiDou, is emerging and gaining more and more interest and attention in the worldwide GNSS communities. The current regional BeiDou system is ready for its operational service around the end of 2012 with a constellation including five Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites (GEO), five Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit satellites (IGSO) and four Medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellites in operation. Besides the open service with positioning accuracy of around 10m which is free to civilian users, both precise relative positioning, and precise point positioning are demonstrated as well. In order to enhance the BeiDou precise positioning service, Precise Orbit Determination (POD) which is essential of any satellite navigation system has been investigated and studied thoroughly. To further improving the orbits of different types of satellites, we study the impact of network coverage on POD data products by comparing results from tracking networks over the Chinese territory, Asian-Pacific, Asian and of global scale. Furthermore, we concentrate on the improvement of involving MEOs on the orbit quality of GEOs and IGSOs. POD with and without MEOs are undertaken and results are analyzed. Finally, integer ambiguity resolution which brings highly improvement on orbits and positions with GPS data is also carried out and its effect on POD data products is assessed and discussed in detail. Seven weeks of BeiDou data from a ground tracking network, deployed by Wuhan University is employed in this study. The test constellation includes four GEO, five IGSO and two MEO satellites in operation. The three-day solution approach is employed to enhance its strength due to the limited coverage of the tracking network and the small movement of most of the satellites. A number of tracking scenarios and processing schemas are identified and processed and overlapping orbit

  10. Possible near-IR channels for remote sensing precipitable water vapor from geostationary satellite platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, B.-C.; Goetz, A. F. H.; Westwater, Ed R.; Conel, J. E.; Green, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    Remote sensing of troposheric water vapor profiles from current geostationary weather satellites is made using a few broadband infrared (IR) channels in the 6-13 micron region. Uncertainties greater than 20% exist in derived water vapor values just above the surface from the IR emission measurements. In this paper, we propose three near-IR channels, one within the 0.94-micron water vapor band absorption region, and the other two in nearby atmospheric windows, for remote sensing of precipitable water vapor over land areas, excluding lakes and rivers, during daytime from future geostationary satellite platforms. The physical principles are as follows. The reflectance of most surface targets varies approximately linearly with wavelength near 1 micron. The solar radiation on the sun-surface-sensor ray path is attenuated by atmospheric water vapor. The ratio of the radiance from the absorption channel with the radiances from the two window channels removes the surface reflectance effects and yields approximately the mean atmospheric water vapor transmittance of the absorption channel. The integrated water vapor amount from ground to space can be obtained with a precision of better than 5% from the mean transmittance. Because surface reflectances vary slowly with time, temporal variation of precipitable water vapor can be determined reliably. High spatial resolution, precipitable water vapor images are derived from spectral data collected by the Airborne Visable-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, which measures solar radiation reflected by the surface in the 0.4-2.5 micron region in 10-nm channels and has a ground instantaneous field of view of 20 m from its platform on an ER-2 aircraft at 20 km. The proposed near-IR reflectance technique would complement the IR emission techniques for remote sensing of water vapor profiles from geostationary satellite platforms, especially in the boundary layer where most of the water vapor is located.

  11. Remote Sensing of CO2, CH4, CO, and H2o from Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, X.; Natraj, V.; Luo, M.; Zhang, Q.; Shia, R. L.; Sander, S. P.; Yung, Y. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Geostationary Carbon Process Investigation (GCPI) combines an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer with a geostationary Earth orbit vantage point to realize a transformational advance in monitoring carbon-bearing molecules and water vapor beyond the synoptic capabilities of Low Earth Orbit instruments such as SCIAMACHY, GOSAT and OCO-2. GCPI is designed to measure, several times every day, high-resolution spectra of reflected sunlight with a moderate signal to noise ratio in near-infrared (NIR) bands, that can then be used to obtain simultaneous retrievals of column averaged CO2, CH4, CO, and H2O. The aim of this project is to explore the potential of retrieving vertical profiles of CO2, CH4, CO, and H2O from high-resolution NIR spectra. We perform radiative transfer simulations over clear-sky conditions (as expected to be observed by GCPI) and estimate prospective performance of retrievals based on results from Bayesian error analysis and characterization. Through Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), we demonstrate the feasibility of retrieving vertical profiles of CO2 and CH4 and partial columns of CO and H2O with high accuracies and precisions. GCPI's unprecedented observations with high temporal and spatial coverage could be used to drive and constrain Earth system models, improve our understanding of the underlying carbon cycle and water cycle processes, and evaluate model forecasting capabilities.

  12. The Solar Dynamics Observatory After Almost Three Years in Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesnell, W. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has returned science data for 2.6 years since its launch into a geostationary orbit. SDO is unique in NASA science missions in our use of a dedicated ground station that provides a 24/7 science data downlink. This continuous downlink uses the science team SOCs as the data archive and allows rapid access to the near-realtime data stream for space weather purposes. But this also means we have to run the ground station. The instruments on SDO are measuring the information needed to follow the growth and decay of the solar magnetic field. Since beginning operations watched Solar Cycle 24 grow to a below average sunspot number, with spectacular prominence eruptions and a few large flares. But we have also studied the effects of wind gusts on 18 m antennas, the wide swings in temperature in southern New Mexico, and the realities of dealing with a data system that grows by over a petabyte each year. This talk will describe some of the successes of the SDO team while also highlighting the issues that come from running a large science observatory in geostationary orbit.

  13. A Semi-Empirical Model for Forecasting Relativistic Electrons at Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Khazanov, George V.

    2008-01-01

    We developed a new prediction model for forecasting relativistic (>2MeV) electrons, which provides a VERY HIGH correlation between predicted and actually measured electron fluxes at geostationary orbit. This model implies the multi-step particle acceleration and is based on numerical integrating two linked continuity equations for primarily accelerated particles and relativistic electrons. The model includes a source and losses, and used solar wind data as only input parameters. We used the coupling function which is a best-fit combination of solar wind/Interplanetary Magnetic Field parameters, responsible for the generation of geomagnetic activity, as a source. The loss function was derived from experimental data. We tested the model for four year period 2004-2007. The correlation coefficient between predicted and actual values of the electron fluxes for whole four year period as well as for each of these years is about 0.9. The high and stable correlation between the computed and actual electron fluxes shows that the reliable forecasting these electrons at geostationary orbit is possible. The correlation coefficient between predicted and actual electron fluxes is stable and incredibly high.

  14. Upper-Tropospheric Winds Derived from Geostationary Satellite Water Vapor Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velden, Christopher S.; Hayden, Christopher M.; Nieman, Steven J.; Menzel, W. Paul; Wanzong, Steven; Goerss, James S.

    1997-01-01

    The coverage and quality of remotely sensed upper-tropospheric moisture parameters have improved considerably with the deployment of a new generation of operational geostationary meteorological satellites: GOES-8/9 and GMS-5. The GOES-8/9 water vapor imaging capabilities have increased as a result of improved radiometric sensitivity and higher spatial resolution. The addition of a water vapor sensing channel on the latest GMS permits nearly global viewing of upper-tropospheric water vapor (when joined with GOES and Meteosat) and enhances the commonality of geostationary meteorological satellite observing capabilities. Upper-tropospheric motions derived from sequential water vapor imagery provided by these satellites can be objectively extracted by automated techniques. Wind fields can be deduced in both cloudy and cloud-free environments. In addition to the spatially coherent nature of these vector fields, the GOES-8/9 multispectral water vapor sensing capabilities allow for determination of wind fields over multiple tropospheric layers in cloud-free environments. This article provides an update on the latest efforts to extract water vapor motion displacements over meteorological scales ranging from subsynoptic to global. The potential applications of these data to impact operations, numerical assimilation and prediction, and research studies are discussed.

  15. Upper-Tropospheric Winds Derived from Geostationary Satellite Water Vapor Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velden, Christopher S.; Hayden, Christopher M.; Nieman, Steven J.; Menzel, W. Paul; Wanzong, Steven; Goerss, James S.

    1997-02-01

    The coverage and quality of remotely sensed upper-tropospheric moisture parameters have improved considerably with the deployment of a new generation of operational geostationary meteorological satellites: GOES-8/9 and GMS-5. The GOES-8/9 water vapor imaging capabilities have increased as a result of improved radiometric sensitivity and higher spatial resolution. The addition of a water vapor sensing channel on the latest GMS permits nearly global viewing of upper-tropospheric water vapor (when joined with GOES and Meteosat) and enhances the commonality of geostationary meteorological satellite observing capabilities. Upper-tropospheric motions derived from sequential water vapor imagery provided by these satellites can be objectively extracted by automated techniques. Wind fields can be deduced in both cloudy and cloud-free environments. In addition to the spatially coherent nature of these vector fields, the GOES8/9 multispectral water vapor sensing capabilities allow for determination of wind fields over multiple tropospheric layers in cloud-free environments. This article provides an update on the latest efforts to extract water vapor motion displacements over meteorological scales ranging from subsynoptic to global. The potential applications of these data to impact operations, numerical assimilation and prediction, and research studies are discussed.

  16. Potential applications of digital, visible, and infrared data from geostationary environmental satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. B.; Waters, M. P., III; Tarpley, J. D.; Green, R. N.; Dismachek, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    An hourly, digital data base from the Visible/Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer (VISSR) instrument on the GOES-1 and SMS-2 geostationary satellites is described. Several examples of developmental applications of these quantitative digital data are presented. These include a review of recent attempts to develop products that are of use to meteorologists who provide services to aviation, agriculture, forestry, hydrology, oceanography, and climatology. The sample products include high resolution thermal gradients of land and ocean surfaces, thermal change analyses, fruit frost/freeze application, cloud-top altitude analysis, analysis of hurricane characteristics, and analyses of solar insolation.

  17. Thermal/optical test setup for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurmehly, G. E.; Hookman, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Telescope is designed to be passively temperature compensated so that focus requirements will be met over a broad range of temperatures. Concerns over the effects of temperature gradients on the optical performance of the telescope and the repeatability of the 'pointing error' of the telescope spawned the need for a detailed thermal/optical test. The telescope temperature compensation system, the thermal environment in which it must work and the test setup used to measure optical performance under varying temperature conditions are discussed in this paper.

  18. A geostationary longitude acquisition planning algorithm. [for maneuver planning of geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petruzzo, C. J.; Bryant, W. C., Jr.; Nickerson, K. G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the phase of the geosynchronous mission termed station acquisition, which involves the maneuvering of a spacecraft to its geostationary longitude by means of the spacecraft propulsion system. An algorithm which assists in maneuver planning is described, and examples of its use are presented. The algorithm can be applied when sequences of more than three maneuvers are to be expected. While, in general, three maneuvers are sufficient to achieve the desired end conditions when orbital mechanics are the only consideration, operational considerations may add constraints resulting in an increased number of maneuvers required.

  19. Polar orbiting operational weather satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stampfl, R. A.; Albert, G.

    1972-01-01

    The progress in the development of operational weather satellites is reviewed, covering their chronology from Explorer 7 of 1959 through Meteor 12 of June, 1972. Special attention is given to the development of the TIROS series satellites with the evolution of their operational sensors, data systems and performance requirements. The topics also include the data collection system designs, to Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), the sounder radiometer, the Solar Environment Monitor (SEM), the data processor, and TIROS-N operation and orbital characteristics. It is expected that TIROS-N and its forthcoming advanced versions will provide an effective technology for sensing environmental data on a global scale in the latter half of the decade.

  20. Application of inclined elliptic orbits - A new dimension in satellite sound broadcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galligan, K. P.; Robson, D.

    1990-10-01

    The communications link between a geostationary satellite and a mobile user operating in a high latitude region is subject to fading through a combination of shadowing and multipath effects. The properties of the link may be substantially improved by the use of satellites in highly inclined elliptic (HEO) orbits, with a resultant improvement in availability of the satellite service. Such systems have been under study in Europe for several years primarily in connection with voice communications. The application to a sound broadcasting satellite service is currently under investigation within the Archimedes program of the European Space Agency. The design principles of such systems are described and the performance parameters for both applications within the wider European context are indicated. Finally, an initial economic assessment of the HEO system in comparison with geostationary satellite and terrestrial based alternatives is provided.

  1. Comparison of Geomagnetically-shielded Solar Energetic Proton Fluxes Observed at Geostationary Orbit by GOES and in Low-earth Orbit by SAMPEX, POES and MetOp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. V.; Mazur, J. E.; Green, J. C.; Machol, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    On the current (13-15) and upcoming (R+) series of NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES), solar protons are observed from each satellite in the eastward and westward directions. Solar protons that arrive at a given location in the inner magnetosphere have energies greater than their geomagnetic cutoffs, which depend on direction of arrival as well as the strength of geomagnetic disturbances. Protons arriving from the west at geostationary orbit (GEO) have much lower geomagnetic cutoff energies than protons arriving from the east. As a result, GOES westward observations of >4 MeV protons are representative of the interplanetary population near Earth and serve as the basis for NOAA's real-time solar radiation storm alerts. While the GOES westward observations are similar to the Solar, Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) Proton-Electron Telescope (PET) proton observations in the polar cap (above invariant L = 10), GOES eastward observations more closely approximate the PET observations at invariant L = 4-4.5 in low earth orbit (LEO). Therefore, GOES may potentially provide a real-time, two-point estimate of the radial gradient of solar energetic protons between L = 6.6 and L = 4. However, the PET observations at L = 4-4.5 exhibit a much wider range of variability than the GOES eastward observations. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine how representative the GOES two-point gradient estimate is as a function of magnetic local time and geographic longitude. The study encompasses the largest solar proton events (SPE) in Solar Cycle 23 and to date in Solar Cycle 24. From April 1998 through December 2006, GOES 10 provides eastward GEO and SAMPEX PET provides LEO observations of large SPEs. The Solar Cycle 24 GEO observations are provided by GOES 13 and 15. From July 1998 to date, the Space Environment Monitors (SEM-2) on the NOAA Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) and EUMETSAT MetOp-A provide SPE

  2. Spectrum and orbit conservation as a factor in future mobile satellite system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    Access to the radio spectrum and geostationary orbit is essential to current and future mobile satellite systems. This access is difficult to obtain for current systems, and may be even more so for larger future systems. In this environment, satellite systems that minimize the amount of spectrum orbit resource required to meet a specific traffic requirement are essential. Several spectrum conservation techniques are discussed, some of which are complementary to designing the system at minimum cost. All may need to be implemented to the limits of technological feasibility if network growth is not to be constrained because of the lack of available spectrum-orbit resource.

  3. The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) for the GOES-R Series Next Generation Operational Environmental Satellite Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, Richard; Koshak, William; Petersen, Walter; Carey, Larry; Mach, Douglas; Buechler, Dennis; Bateman, Monte; McCaul, Eugene; Bruning, Eric; Albrecht, Rachel; MacGorman, Donald

    2010-01-01

    The next generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) series with a planned launch in 2015 is a follow on to the existing GOES system currently operating over the Western Hemisphere. The system will aid in forecasting severe storms and tornado activity, and convective weather impacts on aviation safety and efficiency. The system provides products including lightning, cloud properties, rainfall rate, volcanic ash, air quality, hurricane intensity, and fire/hot spot characterization. Advancements over current GOES include a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes) from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), and improved spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for the 16-channel Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), an optical transient detector will map total (in-cloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning flashes continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km with a product refresh rate of less than 20 sec over the Americas and adjacent oceanic regions, from the west coast of Africa (GOES-E) to New Zealand (GOES-W) when the constellation is fully operational. In parallel with the instrument development, a GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the higher level algorithms and applications using the GLM alone and decision aids incorporating information from the ABI, ground-based weather radar, and numerical models. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional lightning networks are being used to develop the pre-launch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution. Real time total lightning mapping data are also being provided in an experimental mode to selected National Weather Service (NWS) national centers and forecast offices via

  4. Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Rodney L.; Born, George H.; Leonard, Jason M.; McGranaghan, Ryan M.; Fujimoto, Kohei

    2013-01-01

    A navigation technology known as LiAISON (Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation) has been known to produce very impressive navigation results for scenarios involving two or more cooperative satellites near the Moon, such that at least one satellite must be in an orbit significantly perturbed by the Earth, such as a lunar halo orbit. The two (or more) satellites track each other using satellite-to-satellite range and/or range-rate measurements. These relative measurements yield absolute orbit navigation when one of the satellites is in a lunar halo orbit, or the like. The geometry between a lunar halo orbiter and a GEO satellite continuously changes, which dramatically improves the information content of a satellite-to-satellite tracking signal. The geometrical variations include significant out-of-plane shifts, as well as inplane shifts. Further, the GEO satellite is almost continuously in view of a lunar halo orbiter. High-fidelity simulations demonstrate that LiAISON technology improves the navigation of GEO orbiters by an order of magnitude, relative to standard ground tracking. If a GEO satellite is navigated using LiAISON- only tracking measurements, its position is typically known to better than 10 meters. If LiAISON measurements are combined with simple radiometric ground observations, then the satellite s position is typically known to better than 3 meters, which is substantially better than the current state of GEO navigation. There are two features of LiAISON that are novel and advantageous compared with conventional satellite navigation. First, ordinary satellite-to-satellite tracking data only provides relative navigation of each satellite. The novelty is the placement of one navigation satellite in an orbit that is significantly perturbed by both the Earth and the Moon. A navigation satellite can track other satellites elsewhere in the Earth-Moon system and acquire knowledge about both satellites absolute positions and velocities

  5. Next generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite: GOES-R, the United States' advanced weather sentinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Hal J.

    2009-08-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-series (GOES-R) is the follow-on to the existing GOES system, completing a transition from 1980's technology to state-of-the-art. The product of a collaborative development effort between NOAA, NASA, DOC and industry, the first GOES-R satellite is planned to be launched in April 2015 with readiness to fully replace the heritage GOES constellation in 2017. This next-generation system will continue as the United States' weather sentinel for forecasting hurricanes, severe storms, and flash floods while providing information about air quality, winds, sea surface temperature, and space weather. It will provide advanced capabilities by providing five times more spectral information, temporal coverage six times faster than the current system, and 50% higher spatial resolution. The heart of the GOES-R system is the ABI instrument, a sixteen-channel imager with six visible channels and 10 infrared channels. The GLM instrument will be the first geostationary sensor to detect and monitor lightning strikes. GOES-R also includes several space environment sensors that will increase the capability to monitor and predict solar flare activity. Additionally, GOES-R will continue to provide heritage search and rescue capabilities, a data collection system, and other direct readout capabilities.

  6. Plans for EUMETSAT’s Third Generation Meteosat geostationary satellite programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhlmann, R.; Rodriguez, A.; Tjemkes, S.; Grandell, J.; Arriaga, A.; Bézy, J.-L.; Aminou, D.; Bensi, P.

    The second generation of Meteosat satellites is expected to provide operational services at least until 2015. Considering the time required for the definition phases of new space systems their typical development cycle and the approval of complex programmes, it is necessary to start planning for follow-up geostationary missions already now. EUMETSAT has therefore established a User Consultation Process aimed at capturing the foreseeable high-level user/service needs and priorities of the EUMETSAT Customers and users in the 2015-2025 timeframe. This process led to a first definition of the Third Generation Meteosat (MTG) European geostationary satellite system, which currently consists of a total of five observation missions defined for pre-phase A studies at system level under ESA contract to be started in autumn 2004. The paper gives an overview on the current status of definition of the five observation missions, and a brief description of the MTG schedule and related milestones. Results of scientific studies and presentations/conclusions of MTG User Consultation Workshops and dedicated expert workshops conducted to define the MTG candidate missions are openly available from the EUMETSAT web-page www.eumetsat.de, under the sub-directory 'Preparation of Future Programmes/Meteosat Third Generation (MTG)'.

  7. Thermal physical property-based fusion of geostationary meteorological satellite visible and infrared channel images.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Shi, Lu; Yang, Yiling; Song, Dalei

    2014-01-01

    Geostationary meteorological satellite infrared (IR) channel data contain important spectral information for meteorological research and applications, but their spatial resolution is relatively low. The objective of this study is to obtain higher-resolution IR images. One common method of increasing resolution fuses the IR data with high-resolution visible (VIS) channel data. However, most existing image fusion methods focus only on visual performance, and often fail to take into account the thermal physical properties of the IR images. As a result, spectral distortion occurs frequently. To tackle this problem, we propose a thermal physical properties-based correction method for fusing geostationary meteorological satellite IR and VIS images. In our two-step process, the high-resolution structural features of the VIS image are first extracted and incorporated into the IR image using regular multi-resolution fusion approach, such as the multiwavelet analysis. This step significantly increases the visual details in the IR image, but fake thermal information may be included. Next, the Stefan-Boltzmann Law is applied to correct the distortion, to retain or recover the thermal infrared nature of the fused image. The results of both the qualitative and quantitative evaluation demonstrate that the proposed physical correction method both improves the spatial resolution and preserves the infrared thermal properties. PMID:24919017

  8. Destination-directed, packet-switched architecture for a geostationary communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO; Bobinsky, Eric A.; Soni, Nitin J.; Quintana, Jorge A.; Kim, Heechul; Wager, Paul; Vanderaar, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A major goal of the Digital Systems Technology Branch at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to identify and develop critical digital components and technologies that either enable new commercial missions or significantly enhance the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space communications systems. NASA envisions a need for low-data-rate, interactive, direct-to-the-user communications services for data, voice, facsimile, and video conferencing. The network would provide enhanced very-small-aperture terminal (VSAT) communications services and be capable of handling data rates of 64 kbps through 2.048 Mbps in 64-kbps increments. Efforts have concentrated heavily on the space segment; however, the ground segment has been considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints. The focus of current space segment developments is a flexible, high-throughput, fault-tolerant onboard information-switching processor (ISP) for a geostationary satellite communications network. The Digital Systems Technology Branch is investigating both circuit and packet architectures for the ISP. Destination-directed, packet-switched architectures for geostationary communications satellites are addressed.

  9. Low earth orbit satellite/terrestrial mobile service compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheriff, R. E.; Gardiner, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    Digital cellular mobile 'second generation' systems are now gradually being introduced into service; one such example is GSM, which will provide a digital voice and data service throughout Europe. Total coverage is not expected to be achieved until the mid '90's, which has resulted in several proposals for the integration of GSM with a geostationary satellite service. Unfortunately, because terrestrial and space systems have been designed to optimize their performance for their particular environment, integration between a satellite and terrestrial system is unlikely to develop further than the satellite providing a back-up service. This lack of system compatibility is now being addressed by system designers of third generation systems. The next generation of mobile systems, referred to as FPLMTS (future public land mobile telecommunication systems) by CCIR and UMTS (universal mobile telecommunication system) in European research programs, are intended to provide inexpensive, hand-held terminals that can operate in either satellite, cellular, or cordless environments. This poses several challenges for system designers, not least in terms of the choice of multiple access technique and power requirements. Satellite mobile services have been dominated by the geostationary orbital type. Recently, however, a number of low earth orbit configurations have been proposed, for example Iridium. These systems are likely to be fully operational by the turn of the century, in time for the implementation of FPLMTS. The developments in LEO mobile satellite service technology were recognized at WARC-92 with the allocation of specific frequency bands for 'big' LEO's, as well as a frequency allocation for FPLMTS which included a specific satellite allocation. When considering integrating a space service into the terrestrial network, LEO's certainly appear to have their attractions: they can provide global coverage, the round trip delay is of the order of tens of milliseconds, and

  10. Investigations of the evolution of optical characteristics and dynamics of proper rotation of uncontrolled geostationary artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papushev, P.; Karavaev, Yu.; Mishina, M.

    2009-05-01

    On the base of the photometrical data an analysis of the periods and light curves of the uncontrolled artificial satellites was performed. The equipment used in the observations of the satellites is fast photoelectrical photometer attached to the astronomical telescopes of the Sayan observatory (operated by the ISTP SB RAS). Two-mirror Cassegrain telescope with 0.5 m aperture equipped photoelectrical photometer setup in the fast photometry mode have the ability to track the slow moving objects up to 15-th visual magnitude. The observations started from the second half of the 20-th century and have been continued up to the present time. The standard photometric Johnson-Morgan system UBVR had been used. The basic goals are to present observational data and both discuss the probability of detection of design changes of satellite being a long time in geostationary orbit, and display the periods behavior rarely discussed in the literature. A systematization of the rotation periods is submitted. The light curves of the uncontrolled objects has periodic structure and specific mirror spike features which are a characteristic for identification of an object. Analysis of the standard color index (CI) value can provide additional data on the mirror spike origin. When mirror spikes are eliminated color indexes (B-V) for the diffuse component of the satellites is in the range of 0.9-1.1 and exceed those for the solar type star. Unlike, mirror spikes CI (B-V) are close to zero or negative, indicating a blue excess of radiation spectrum. The processes of the variation rotation periods connected with the satellites construction and their interaction with space environment are discussed.