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Sample records for geriatric medicine clerkship

  1. Pre-Clerkship Observerships to Increase Early Exposure to Geriatric Medicine

    PubMed Central

    You, Peng; Leung, Marie; Xu, Victoria Y. Y.; Astell, Alexander; Gill, Sudeep S.; Gibson, Michelle; Frank, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose To foster interest in geriatric care, the Queen’s Geriatrics Interest Group (QGIG) collaborated with the Division of Geriatric Medicine to arrange a Geriatrics Pre-Clerkship Observership Program. Methods Forty-two pre-clerkship medical students participated in the program between October 2013 and May 2014. Participants were paired with a resident and/or attending physician for a four-hour weekend observership on an inpatient geriatric rehabilitation unit. The program was assessed using: (1) internally developed Likert scales assessing student’s experiences and interest in geriatric medicine before and after the observership; (2) University of California Los Angeles–Geriatric Attitudes Scale (UCLA-GAS); and (3) narrative feedback. Results All participants found the process of setting up the observership easy. Some 72.7% described the observership experience as leading to positive changes in their attitude toward geriatric medicine and 54.5% felt that it stimulated their interest in the specialty. No statistically significant change in UCLA–GAS scores was detected (mean score pre- versus post-observership: 3.5 ± 0.5 versus 3.7 ± 0.4; p=.35). All participants agreed that the program should continue, and 90% stated that they would participate again. Conclusions The observership program was positively received by students. Structured pre-clerkship observerships may be a feasible method for increasing exposure to geriatric medicine. PMID:26740831

  2. Exploring the Realities of Curriculum-by-Random-Opportunity: The Case of Geriatrics on the Internal Medicine Clerkship Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Diachun, Laura; Charise, Andrea; Goldszmidt, Mark; Hui, Yin; Lingard, Lorelei

    2014-01-01

    Background While major clerkship blocks may have objectives related to specialized areas such as geriatrics, gay and lesbian bisexual transgender health, and palliative care, there is concern that teaching activities may not attend sufficiently to these objectives. Rather, these objectives are assumed to be met “by random opportunity”.(1) This study explored the case of geriatric learning opportunities on internal medicine clinical teaching units, to better understand the affordances and limitations of curriculum by random opportunity. Methods Using audio-recordings of morning case review discussions of 13 patients > 65 years old and the Canadian geriatric core competencies for medical students, we conducted a content analysis of each case for potential geriatric and non-geriatric learning opportunities. These learning opportunities were compared with attendings’ case review teaching discussions. The 13 cases contained 40 geriatric-related and 110 non-geriatric-related issues. While many of the geriatric issues (e.g., delirium, falls) were directly relevant to the presenting illness, attendings’ teaching discussions focused almost exclusively on non-geriatric medical issues, such as management of diabetes and anemia, many of which were less directly relevant to the reason for presenting to hospital. Results The authors found that the general medicine rotation provides opportunities to acquire geriatric competencies. However, the rare uptake of opportunities in this study suggests that, in curriculum-by-random-opportunity, presence of an opportunity does not justify the assumption that learning objectives will be met. Conclusions More studies are required to investigate whether these findings are transferrable to other vulnerable populations about which undergraduate students are expected to learn through curriculum by random opportunity. PMID:25452825

  3. Impact of a mandatory geriatric medicine clerkship on the care of older acute medical patients: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of geriatric medicine educational programs on patient level outcomes, as opposed to educational measures, is not well studied. We aimed to determine whether completion of a mandatory geriatrics rotation changed the clinical behaviors of clerks caring for older patients admitted to a medical clinical teaching unit. Methods We reviewed the charts of 132 older (>70y) patients, admitted to one medical clinical teaching unit (CTU) during 2005, and cared for by a clinical clerk, for documented functional assessment, cognitive assessment, recognition of medications that cause confusion, and early removal of indwelling urinary catheters. Performance of these outcomes was compared between clerks who had completed a mandatory 2-week geriatrics rotation immediately before the medical CTU rotation (n?=?62) and those who completed geriatrics immediately after (n?=?74). Patient outcomes were also measured and compared between groups. Results Compared to clerks without prior geriatric exposure, clerks with geriatrics exposure were almost 3 times as likely to assess function of their older patients within two days of assuming care (27% vs. 12%, OR: 2.73, 95% CI: 1.12 to 6.66). There were no significant differences in the other clinical behaviors. Patients cared for by geriatrics-exposed clerks were less likely to die or be institutionalized (10% vs. 31%, OR: 0.24, 95% CI: 0.09 to 0.63), and they had shorter lengths of stay by an average of -7.14days (95% CI: -12.2 to -2.07). Adjustment for baseline differences in age and cognitive impairment did not alter the results. Conclusions Clinical clerks who had completed a mandatory geriatrics rotation were more likely to document functional status upon assuming care of their older medical CTU patients, and there was also an association with better clinical outcomes. This highlights the value of including a geriatric medicine rotation as part of the core clerkship curriculum. PMID:24341470

  4. Positioning Medical Students for the Geriatric Imperative: Using Geriatrics to Effectively Teach Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Annie L.; Duthie, Elizabeth A.; Denson, Kathryn M.; Franco, Jose; Duthie, Edmund H.

    2013-01-01

    Medical schools must consider innovative ways to ensure that graduates are prepared to care for the aging population. One way is to offer a geriatrics clerkship as an option for the fulfillment of a medical school's internal medicine rotation requirement. The authors' purpose was to evaluate the geriatrics clerkship's impact on

  5. Positioning Medical Students for the Geriatric Imperative: Using Geriatrics to Effectively Teach Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Annie L.; Duthie, Elizabeth A.; Denson, Kathryn M.; Franco, Jose; Duthie, Edmund H.

    2013-01-01

    Medical schools must consider innovative ways to ensure that graduates are prepared to care for the aging population. One way is to offer a geriatrics clerkship as an option for the fulfillment of a medical school's internal medicine rotation requirement. The authors' purpose was to evaluate the geriatrics clerkship's impact on…

  6. An innovative family medicine clerkship.

    PubMed

    Smith, S R; MacLeod, N M

    1981-10-01

    A clinical clerkship in family medicine at Brown University has been developed utilizing many innovative educational modalities. These include games, simulations, group problem solving, research projects, videotaping, case presentations, field trips, sensitivity sessions, computer assisted instruction, patient management problems, slide-tape shows, and direct clinical experiences. These modalities are described together with a new approach to evaluation. Students' evaluations of the clerkship have been excellent, providing evidence that this clerkship offers a model of learning that is both effective and enjoyable. PMID:7276876

  7. Teaching Prevention in Internal Medicine Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsinger, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the rationale for including prevention in the clinical medicine clerkship. Summarizes current guidelines, presents examples of curricula in several medical schools, and proposes a future direction that stresses integrating teaching preventive medicine into internal medicine clerkships and across the entire four-year medical curriculum. (DB)

  8. Model Geriatric Clerkship for Physician Assistant Students: The Continuum of Elder Care. Manual for Physician Assistant Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Gwen; Tully, Donna

    This manual is intended to acquaint the faculty of physician assistant (PA) training programs with a model geriatric clerkship and to assist them in the process in implementing a similar clerkship. A detailed outline of the curriculum goals of a geriatric clerkship is included. The next section contains curriculum units on the following topics:…

  9. Integrated Clinical Geriatric Pharmacy Clerkship in Long Term, Acute and Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polo, Isabel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A clinical geriatric pharmacy clerkship containing three separate practice areas (long-term, acute, and ambulatory care) is described. The program follows the medical education clerkship protocol, with a clinical pharmacy specialist, pharmacy practice resident, and student. Participation in medical rounds, interdisciplinary conferences, and

  10. Ultrasound Training in the Emergency Medicine Clerkship

    PubMed Central

    Favot, Mark; Courage, Cheryl; Mantouffel, Jacob; Amponsah, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The curriculum in most emergency medicine (EM) clerkships includes very little formalized training in point-of-care ultrasound. Medical schools have begun to implement ultrasound training in the pre-clinical curriculum, and the EM clerkship is an appropriate place to build upon this training. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a focused ultrasound curriculum within an established EM clerkship and (2) to obtain feedback from medical students regarding the program. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of medical students during an EM clerkship year from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012. Participants included fourth-year medical students (n=45) enrolled in the EM clerkship at our institution. The students underwent a structured program focused on the focused assessment with sonography for trauma exam and ultrasound-guided vascular access. At the conclusion of the rotation, they took a 10-item multiple choice test assessing knowledge and image interpretation skills. A cohort of EM residents (n=20) also took the multiple choice test but did not participate in the training with the students. We used an independent samples t-test to examine differences in test scores between the groups. Results The medical students in the ultrasound training program scored significantly higher on the multiple-choice test than the EM residents, t(63)=2.3, p<0.05. The feedback from the students indicated that 82.8% were using ultrasound on their current rotations and the majority (55.2%) felt that the one-on-one scanning shift was the most valuable aspect of the curriculum. Discussion Our study demonstrates support for an ultrasound training program for medical students in the EM clerkship. After completing the training, students were able to perform similarly to EM residents on a knowledge-based exam. PMID:26594295

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Longitudinal Case-Based Learning (CBL) Experience for a Geriatric Medicine Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struck, Bryan D.; Teasdale, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    The DWR Department of Geriatric Medicine at OUHSC and the OKC VA Medical Center began a mandatory third-year geriatric medicine clerkship in 2003. As part of the didactic sessions, the Department created a longitudinal Case-Based Learning (CBL) experience. The purpose of this paper is to describe the CBL experience, report student satisfaction

  12. Development and Evaluation of a Longitudinal Case-Based Learning (CBL) Experience for a Geriatric Medicine Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struck, Bryan D.; Teasdale, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    The DWR Department of Geriatric Medicine at OUHSC and the OKC VA Medical Center began a mandatory third-year geriatric medicine clerkship in 2003. As part of the didactic sessions, the Department created a longitudinal Case-Based Learning (CBL) experience. The purpose of this paper is to describe the CBL experience, report student satisfaction…

  13. A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

  14. A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with

  15. [Review in geriatric medicine].

    PubMed

    Monod, Stéfanie; Rochat, Stéphane; Gold, Gabriel; Büla, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Several studies published in 2008 underline the potential danger of polymedication in older patients and propose indicators to identify those at higher risk for adverse events. A study from Oregon highlighted the difficulties to diagnose depression in patients, especially older ones, who made a request for assisted suicide. The HYVET study demonstrated that treatment of hypertension is beneficial even in some very old persons. A meta-analysis confirmed the benefits from community-based geriatric interventional programs, in particular when targeting older individuals recently discharged from the hospital. Finally, mixed results were observed in the field of dementia. PMID:19216320

  16. [Review in geriatric medicine].

    PubMed

    Jabri, A; Rodondi, A; Eyer, S; Doser, N; Monod, S; Gold, G; Büla, C; Rochat, S

    2011-01-12

    In 2010, a study emphasizes the difficulty to predict disability trajectories in the last year of life. A meta analysis shows the effectiveness of post-acute geriatric rehabilitation in reducing functional decline after hospitalisation. Several studies evaluated pneumococcal and herpes zoster vaccines' efficacy. A short and simple intervention is effective in reducing benzodiazepine use. The effect of vitamine D on falls and fractures has been further evaluated in several studies. Diagnostic criteria for dementias, including Alzheimer's disease, are moving to better acknowledge their preclinical stages. PMID:21309171

  17. Consensus Development of a Pediatric Emergency Medicine Clerkship Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Askew, Kim L.; Weiner, Debra; Murphy, Charles; Duong, Myto; Fox, James; Fox, Sean; ONeill, James C.; Nadkarni, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction As emergency medicine (EM) has become a more prominent feature in the clinical years of medical school training, national EM clerkship curricula have been published to address the need to standardize students experiences in the field. However, current national student curricula in EM do not include core pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) concepts. Methods A workgroup was formed by the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine and the Pediatric Interest Group of the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine to develop a consensus on the content to be covered in EM and PEM student courses. Results The consensus is presented with the goal of outlining principles of pediatric emergency care and prioritizing students exposure to the most common and life-threatening illnesses and injuries. Conclusion This consensus curriculum can serve as a guide to directors of PEM and EM courses to optimize PEM knowledge and skills education. PMID:25247034

  18. Evaluation of Students in Medicine Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magarian, Gregory J.; Mazur, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report their findings concerning the process used to evaluate medicine clerks, specifically identifying the importance given to subjective evaluations, made by attending physicians, compared with the importance given to clerks' performances on objective means of evaluation based on written or oral examinations, whether national or

  19. Re-demonstration without remediation a missed opportunity? A national survey of internal medicine clerkship directors

    PubMed Central

    Hawthorne, Mary R.; Chretien, Katherine C.; Torre, Dario; Chheda, Shobhina G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many different components factor into the final grade assigned for the internal medicine clerkship. Failure of one or more of these requires consideration of remedial measures. Purpose To determine which assessment components are used to assign students a passing grade for the clerkship and what remediation measures are required when students do not pass a component. Methods A national cross-sectional survey of Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) institutional members was conducted in April 2011. The survey included sections on remediation, grading practices, and demographics. The authors analyzed responses using descriptive and comparative statistics. Results Response rate was 73% (86/113). Medicine clerkships required students to pass the following components: clinical evaluations 83 (97%), NBME subject exam 76 (88%), written assignments 40 (46%), OSCE 35 (41%), in-house written exam 23 (27%), and mini-CEX 19 (22%). When students failed a component of the clerkship for the first time, 55 schools (64%) simply allowed students to make up the component, while only 16 (18%) allowed a simple make-up for a second failure. Additional ward time was required by 24 schools (28%) for a first-time failure of one component of the clerkship and by 49 (57%) for a second failure. The presence or absence of true remedial measures in a school was not associated with clerkship director academic rank, grading scheme, or percent of students who failed the clerkship in the previous year. Conclusions Most schools required passing clinical evaluations and NBME subject exam components to pass the medicine clerkship, but there was variability in other requirements. Most schools allowed students to simply re-take the component for a first-time failure. This study raises the question of whether true remediation is being undertaken before students are asked to re-demonstrate competence in a failed area of the clerkship to be ready for the subinternship level. PMID:25500150

  20. Evaluation of a National Curriculum Reform Effort for the Medicine Core Clerkship

    PubMed Central

    Jablonover, Robert S; Blackman, Dionne J; Bass, Eric B; Morrison, Gail; Goroll, Allan H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 1995, the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) and the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) developed and disseminated a new model curriculum for the medicine core clerkship that was designed to enhance learning of generalist competencies and increase interest in general internal medicine. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the dissemination and use of the resulting SGIM/CDIM Core Medicine Clerkship Curriculum Guide. DESIGN Survey of internal medicine clerkship directors at the 125 medical schools in the United States. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS The questionnaire elicited information about the use and usefulness of the Guide and each of its components, barriers to effective use of the Guide, and outcomes associated with use of the Guide. Responses were received from 95 clerkship directors, representing 88 (70%) of the 125 medical schools. Eighty-seven (92%) of the 95 respondents were familiar with the Guide, and 80 respondents had used it. The 4 components used most frequently were the basic generalist competencies (used by 83% of those familiar with the Guide), learning objectives for these competencies (used by 83%), learning objectives for training problems (used by 70%), and specific training problems (used by 67%); 74% to 85% of those using these components found them moderately or very useful. The most frequently identified barriers to use of the Guide were insufficient faculty time, insufficient number of ambulatory care preceptors and training sites, and need for more faculty development. About 30% or more of those familiar with the Guide reported that use of the Guide was associated with improved ability to meet clerkship accreditation criteria, improved performance of students on the clerkship exam, and increased clerkship time devoted to ambulatory care. CONCLUSION This federally supported initiative that engaged the collaborative efforts of the SGIM and the CDIM was successful in facilitating significant changes in the medicine core clerkship across the United States. PMID:10940135

  1. Organizing Family Medicine Geriatric Care

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Vonda M.

    1989-01-01

    This article, written from the perceptive of a practising community physician, examines the servies available in the field of geriatric care at the present time. It suggests integration and co-ordination of existing facilities to maximize the current potential. It also considers the economic, geographical, and ethical concerns relating to geriatric care. It is a call for family physicians to co-ordinate their efforts in a multidisciplinary mode to ensure that our elderly are maintained in a comfortable caring atmosphere that encourages their maximum independence. PMID:21248994

  2. ETHICS IN GERIATRIC MEDICINE RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    İlgili, Önder; Arda, Berna; Munir, Kerim

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to evaluate the research process in geriatrics from the ethical point of view. The elderly population is increasing rapidly, but there is no parallel in the amount of research concerning this demographic. On the other hand, in the light of research ethics, this group mainly represents vulnerable people and requires more sensitivity. Taking into account all these features, fundamental principles in research ethics are first considered: the soundness of the scientific project, qualifications of the investigators, ethics committee approval, informed consent, confidentiality and privacy, beneficence/nonmaleficence, and justice are evaluated. Special ethical issues in geriatric research such as ageism and research inclusion, paucity of research involving elderly people, vulnerability of elderly subjects, and cognitive impairments are discussed separately. PMID:25489272

  3. Undergraduate Teaching in Geriatric Medicine: The Role of National Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blundell, Adrian; Gordon, Adam; Gladman, John; Masud, Tahir

    2009-01-01

    There has been recent international concern that the teaching of geriatrics may be in decline. Research has suggested that support for geriatrics in national undergraduate curricula is the key to effective delivery of teaching in the specialty. We set out to determine the geriatric medicine content in the U.K. generic curriculum, reviewing this in

  4. Undergraduate Teaching in Geriatric Medicine: The Role of National Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blundell, Adrian; Gordon, Adam; Gladman, John; Masud, Tahir

    2009-01-01

    There has been recent international concern that the teaching of geriatrics may be in decline. Research has suggested that support for geriatrics in national undergraduate curricula is the key to effective delivery of teaching in the specialty. We set out to determine the geriatric medicine content in the U.K. generic curriculum, reviewing this in…

  5. Geriatric management in medieval Persian medicine

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Morteza; Sadeghpour, Omid; Zarshenas, Mohammad M.

    2013-01-01

    In Iran, a large group of patients are elderly people and they intend to have natural remedies as treatment. These remedies are rooted in historical of Persian and humoral medicine with a backbone of more than 1000 years. The current study was conducted to draw together medieval pharmacological information related to geriatric medicine from some of the most often manuscripts of traditional Persian medicine. Moreover, we investigated the efficacy of medicinal plants through a search of the PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar databases. In the medieval Persian documents, digestible and a small amount of food such as chicken broth, honey, fig and plum at frequent intervals as well as body massage and morning unctioning are highly recommended. In the field of pharmacotherapy, 35 herbs related to 25 families were identified. Plants were classified as tonic, anti-aging, appetizer, memory and mood enhancer, topical analgesic and laxative as well as health improvement agents. Other than historical elucidation, this paper presents medical and pharmacological approaches that medieval Persian practitioners applied to deal with geriatric complications. PMID:24381461

  6. Simulation in Medical Student Education: Survey of Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Heitz, Corey; Eyck, Raymond Ten; Smith, Michael; Fitch, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study is to identify (1) the current role of simulation in medical student emergency medicine (EM) education; (2) the challenges to initiating and sustaining simulation-based programs; and (3) educational advances to meet these challenges. Methods We solicited members of the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine (CDEM) e-mail list to complete a Web-based survey addressing the use of simulation in both EM clerkships and preclinical EM curricula. Survey elements addressed the nature of the undergraduate EM clerkship and utilization of simulation, types of technology, and barriers to increased use in each setting. Results CDEM members representing 60 EM programs on the list (80%) responded. Sixty-seven percent of EM clerkships are in the fourth year of medical school only and 45% are required. Fewer than 25% of clerkship core curriculum hours incorporate simulation. The simulation modalities used most frequently were high-fidelity models (79%), task trainers (55%), and low-fidelity models (30%). Respondents identified limited faculty time (88.7%) and clerkship hours (47.2%) as the main barriers to implementing simulation training in EM clerkships. Financial resources, faculty time, and the volume of students were the main barriers to additional simulation in preclinical years. Conclusion A focused, stepwise application of simulation to medical student EM curricula can help optimize the ratio of student benefit to faculty time. Limited time in the curriculum can be addressed by replacing existing material with simulation-based modules for those subjects better suited to simulation. Faculty can use hybrid approaches in the preclinical years to combine simulation with classroom settings for either small or large groups to more actively engage learners while minimizing identified barriers. PMID:22224137

  7. Improving Feedback for Medical Students in a Family Medicine Clerkship

    PubMed Central

    White, D.G.; Tiberius, R.; Talbot, Y.; Schiralli, V.; Rickett, M.

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate whether feedback to medical students could be improved by asking teachers to complete a student performance rating form during a family practice clerkship, the authors had students and teachers fill out a questionnaire. Teachers in the intervention group reported observing students more frequently. Students' perceptions of feedback frequency correlated strongly with their ratings of feedback quality. PMID:21234079

  8. Improving Confidence in Teaching Geriatric Medicine to Internal Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Thomas; Takenaka, Cody; Masaki, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Chief Resident Immersion Training (CRIT) is a national program to train chief residents of different specialties in principles of geriatric medicine, so they can provide this training to their residents who manage elderly patients on a daily basis. The chief residents at the University of Hawaii Internal Medicine Residency program created an education action project using principles learned in the CRIT. Methods: We created an educational curriculum for PGY-2 and PGY-3 internal medicine residents on their 4-week ward rotations. They were assigned to lead a team with interns and a 3rd year medical student. Each senior resident was required to provide teaching on common geriatric problems in the inpatient setting. To help them achieve this goal, the chief residents posted teaching materials on 5 core geriatrics topics (dementia, delirium, polypharmacy, functional decline/falls and end of life discussions) on the chief resident blog site. Before and after the rotation, each senior resident completed a survey about comfort levels in teaching and managing common geriatric syndromes, using a 5-point Likert scale (higher is better). Senior residents were also asked about barriers to teaching these topics. We compared mean scores before and after this educational intervention using paired t-tests. Results: Between August 2014 and October 2014, we collected data from 28 senior residents, with 19 having complete data. Improvement in comfort teaching geriatric topics was reported by 42% of residents (mean change 0.44 ? 0.60; P = .004). Improvement in comfort managing common geriatric problems was reported by 58% of residents (mean change 0.66 ?0.67; P = .0004). Improvement in effectively identifying resources was reported by 53% of residents (mean change 0.63 ?0.68; P = .0008). We created a composite mean score for each resident, and found an overall improvement (mean change 0.58?0.49; P < .0001). There were no significant differences in improvements in scores by hospital or PGY group. Most residents felt that this intervention was helpful (mean 4.0?0.59). The most common barrier before the intervention was lack of resources (62%), which improved after the intervention (21%). Conclusions: This innovative educational program utilized chief residents to encourage senior residents to teach geriatric topics to peers, and demonstrated effectiveness in improving confidence in teaching and managing geriatric problems and identifying resources. The majority of residents found this to be a helpful experience.

  9. A Reflection on Aging: A Portfolio of Change in Attitudes toward Geriatric Patients during a Clerkship Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Duca, Danny; Duque, Gustavo

    2006-01-01

    The process of students' evaluation in medical schools has changed from a tutor-led evaluation system based on students' performance to a student-based evaluation that involves self-reflection and their level of change in skills and attitudes. At the McGill University Division of Geriatric Medicine, we developed an innovative system of evaluation

  10. A Reflection on Aging: A Portfolio of Change in Attitudes toward Geriatric Patients during a Clerkship Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Duca, Danny; Duque, Gustavo

    2006-01-01

    The process of students' evaluation in medical schools has changed from a tutor-led evaluation system based on students' performance to a student-based evaluation that involves self-reflection and their level of change in skills and attitudes. At the McGill University Division of Geriatric Medicine, we developed an innovative system of evaluation…

  11. Evaluation of Medical Students During a Clinical Clerkship in Internal Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donohue, W. J., Jr.; Wergin, Jon F.

    1978-01-01

    During a three-month clinical clerkship in medicine 175 medical students were evaluated. A proficiency assessment process was developed that included preceptor evaluation of on-the-job performance as well as oral and written examinations. Data analysis showed small correlations among the three measurements of competence. (Author/LBH)

  12. Meeting the challenge of evidence-based medicine in the family medicine clerkship: closing the loop from academics to office.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Susan K; Calabretta, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    An EBM Seminar and POEM project was developed to teach evidence-based medicine in a family medicine clerkship. The seminar focused on the application of preclinical coursework in biostatistics and epidemiology to the clinical third year. POEM projects involved answering clinical questions, derived from patient cases in the family medicine offices, with best available evidence. These questions and answers were archived in a wiki which was made available to the institution's family medicine physicians. Selected POEMs were also published in the in-house family medicine newsletter. The POEM projects evolved from an educational exercise for medical students to a valuable repository of evidence for clinicians. PMID:23607466

  13. Does the Concept of the Flipped Classroom Extend to the Emergency Medicine Clinical Clerkship?

    PubMed Central

    Heitz, Corey; Prusakowski, Melanie; Willis, George; Franck, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Linking educational objectives and clinical learning during clerkships can be difficult. Clinical shifts during emergency medicine (EM) clerkships provide a wide variety of experiences, some of which may not be relevant to recommended educational objectives. Students can be directed to standardize their clinical experiences, and this improves performance on examinations. We hypothesized that applying a flipped classroom model to the clinical clerkship would improve performance on multiple-choice testing when compared to standard learning. Methods Students at two institutions were randomized to complete two of four selected EM clerkship topics in a flipped fashion, and two others in a standard fashion. For flipped topics, students were directed to complete chief complaint-based asynchronous modules prior to a shift, during which they were directed to focus on the chief complaint. For the other two topics, modules were to be performed at the students discretion, and shifts would not have a theme. At the end of the four-week clerkship, a 40-question multiple-choice examination was administered with 10 questions per topic. We compared performance on flipped topics with those performed in standard fashion. Students were surveyed on perceived effectiveness, ability to follow the protocol, and willingness of preceptors to allow a chief-complaint focus. Results Sixty-nine students participated; examination scores for 56 were available for analysis. For the primary outcome, no difference was seen between the flipped method and standard (p=0.494.) A mixed model approach showed no effect of flipped status, protocol adherence, or site of rotation on the primary outcome of exam scores. Students rated the concept of the flipped clerkship highly (3.48/5). Almost one third (31.1%) of students stated that they were unable to adhere to the protocol. Conclusion Preparation for a clinical shift with pre-assigned, web-based learning modules followed by an attempt at chief-complaint-focused learning during a shift did not result in improvements in performance on a multiple-choice assessment of knowledge; however, one third of participants did not adhere strictly to the protocol. Future investigations should ensure performance of pre-assigned learning as well as clinical experiences, and consider alternate measures of knowledge. PMID:26594277

  14. Medicine Clerkship Implementation in a Hospitalist Group: Curricular Innovation and Review

    PubMed Central

    Carter, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2008, the Department of Hospital Medicine at Ochsner Clinic Foundation in New Orleans, LA, began training its own students for the first time as a result of the partnership between our institution and the University of Queensland (UQ) in Brisbane, Australia, that established a global medical school. The Department of Hospital Medicine is responsible for the Medicine clerkship for third-year medical students. We have 5 resident teams at the main hospital in the system, but the majority of our hospitalists work alone. Because of staffing issues, we have had to change our mentality from having teaching hospitalists and nonteaching hospitalists to viewing all hospitalists as potential educators. Methods: The department has slowly increased the number of students in the Medicine clerkship each year with the goal of training 120 third-year students in the New Orleans area in 2016. The students in the Medicine clerkship will be divided into five 8-week rotations, allowing for 25 students to be trained at one time. Results: The UQ curriculum is similar to that of most 4-year American schools, but some differences in methods, such as a heavy emphasis on bedside instruction and oral summative assessments, are novel to us. These differences have provided our department with new goals for professional and instructor development. For the actual instruction, we pair students one on one with hospitalists and also assign them to resident teams. Student placement has been a challenge, but we are making improvements as we gain experience and explore opportunities for placement at our community hospitals. Conclusion: Our arrangement may be adapted to other institutions in the future as the number of students increases and the availability of resident teachers becomes more difficult nationwide.

  15. Smoking Assessment and Cessation Skills in the Inpatient Medicine Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Alan L.; Kleinhenz, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of 61 inpatient medical writeups by 23 third year medicine clerks found smoking history notations in 74 percent but quantification of exposure much less commonly. None detailed patient addiction or willingness to quit, or included smoking cessation in the patient plan. Students' smoking assessment and cessation skills are seen as poorly

  16. Culture Competence in the Training of Geriatric Medicine Fellows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanabe, Marianne K. G.

    2007-01-01

    With the aging and diversifying of the elder population in the United States, there is a pressing need for an organized and effective curriculum in cultural competence. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that the curriculum for Geriatric Medicine Fellowship training include cultural competency training.

  17. Geritalk: Communication Skills Training for Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine Fellows

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Amy S.; Back, Anthony L.; Arnold, Robert M.; Goldberg, Gabrielle R.; Lim, Betty B.; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B.; ONeill, Lynn B.

    2011-01-01

    Expert communication is essential to high quality care for older patients with serious illness. While the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. We drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method, to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the common communication challenges faced by geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows. The 2-day retreat, held away from the hospital environment, included large-group overview presentations, small-group communication skills practice, and development of future skills practice commitment. Faculty received in-depth training in small-group facilitation techniques prior to the course. Geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows were recruited to participate in the course and 100% (n=18) enrolled. Overall satisfaction with the course was very high (mean 4.8 on 5-point scale). Compared to before the course, fellows reported an increase in self-assessed preparedness for specific communication challenges (mean increase 1.4 on 5-point scale, p<0.01). Two months after the course, fellows reported a high level of sustained skills practice (mean 4.3 on 5-point scale). In sum, the intensive communication skills program, tailored to the specific needs of geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows, improved fellows self-assessed preparedness for challenging communication tasks and provided a model for ongoing deliberate practice of communication skills. PMID:22211768

  18. Geritalk: communication skills training for geriatric and palliative medicine fellows.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Amy S; Back, Anthony L; Arnold, Robert M; Goldberg, Gabrielle R; Lim, Betty B; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B; O'Neill, Lynn B

    2012-02-01

    Expert communication is essential to high-quality care for older patients with serious illness. Although the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatric and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. The current study drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the common communication challenges that geriatric and palliative medicine fellows face. The 2-day retreat, held away from the hospital environment, included large-group overview presentations, small-group communication skills practice, and development of future skills practice commitment. Faculty received in-depth training in small-group facilitation techniques before the course. Geriatric and palliative medicine fellows were recruited to participate in the course and 100% (n = 18) enrolled. Overall satisfaction with the course was very high (mean 4.8 on a 5-point scale). After the course, fellows reported an increase in self-assessed preparedness for specific communication challenges (mean increase 1.4 on 5-point scale, P < .001). Two months after the course, fellows reported a high level of sustained skills practice (mean 4.3 on 5-point scale). In sum, the intensive communication skills program, customized for the specific needs of geriatric and palliative medicine fellows, improved fellows' self-assessed preparedness for challenging communication tasks and provided a model for ongoing deliberate practice of communication skills. PMID:22211768

  19. Culture Competence in the Training of Geriatric Medicine Fellows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanabe, Marianne K. G.

    2007-01-01

    With the aging and diversifying of the elder population in the United States, there is a pressing need for an organized and effective curriculum in cultural competence. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that the curriculum for Geriatric Medicine Fellowship training include cultural competency training.…

  20. Impact of family medicine clerkships in undergraduate medical education: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Turkeshi, Eralda; Michels, Nele R; Hendrickx, Kristin; Remmen, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Synthesise evidence about the impact of family medicine/general practice (FM) clerkships on undergraduate medical students, teaching general/family practitioners (FPs) and/or their patients. Data sources Medline, ERIC, PsycINFO, EMBASE and Web of Knowledge searched from 21 November to 17 December 2013. Primary, empirical, quantitative or qualitative studies, since 1990, with abstracts included. No country restrictions. Full text languages: English, French, Spanish, German, Dutch or Italian. Review methods Independent selection and data extraction by two authors using predefined data extraction fields, including Kirkpatrick’s levels for educational intervention outcomes, study quality indicators and Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) strength of findings’ grades. Descriptive narrative synthesis applied. Results Sixty-four included articles: impact on students (48), teaching FPs (12) and patients (8). Sample sizes: 16-1095 students, 3-146 FPs and 94-2550 patients. Twenty-six studies evaluated at Kirkpatrick level 1, 26 at level 2 and 6 at level 3. Only one study achieved BEME’s grade 5. The majority was assessed as grade 4 (27) and 3 (33). Students reported satisfaction with content and process of teaching as well as learning in FM clerkships. They enhanced previous learning, and provided unique learning on dealing with common acute and chronic conditions, health maintenance, disease prevention, communication and problem-solving skills. Students’ attitudes towards FM were improved, but new or enhanced interest in FM careers did not persist without change after graduation. Teaching FPs reported increased job satisfaction and stimulation for professional development, but also increased workload and less productivity, depending on the setting. Overall, student’s presence and participation did not have a negative impact on patients. Conclusions Research quality on the impact of FM clerkships is still limited, yet across different settings and countries, positive impact is reported on students, FPs and patients. Future studies should involve different stakeholders, medical schools and countries, and use standardised and validated evaluation tools. PMID:26243553

  1. The importance of geriatrics to family medicine: a position paper by the Group on Geriatric Education of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mold, J W; Mehr, D R; Kvale, J N; Reed, R L

    1995-04-01

    The role of geriatrics and geriatricians in family medicine remains unsettled. Despite a rapidly aging population, a tremendous shortage now exists of faculty with interest and expertise in geriatrics. Relatively few family practice residents choose to enter geriatric fellowship programs, and federal funding for such programs has been reduced. Despite accreditation requirements, residency programs are not always able to provide the range of geriatric experiences needed to properly prepare graduates to provide care for the broad range of older patients. Medical students' exposure to geriatrics remains limited. The Group on Geriatric Education of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine believes that family medicine faculty must recognize and be committed to the notion that geriatrics is integral to family medicine. Both undergraduate and residency training programs should emphasize experience with geriatric patients in multiple settings. In particular, the nursing home should not be the main focus of geriatric training. The small number of certified geriatric faculty will be able to provide leadership, but a broad range of faculty must become involved in teaching geriatrics. Faculty development activities and continuing education programs to foster the necessary expertise will be essential to the accomplishment of this task. PMID:7797001

  2. Assessing Knowledge Base on Geriatric Competencies for Emergency Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Teresita M.; Hansoti, Bhakti; Chan, Shu B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Emergency care of older adults requires specialized knowledge of their unique physiology, atypical presentations, and care transitions. Older adults often require distinctive assessment, treatment and disposition. Emergency medicine (EM) residents should develop expertise and efficiency in geriatric care. Older adults represent over 25% of most emergency department (ED) volumes. Yet many EM residencies lack curricula or assessment tools for competent geriatric care. Fully educating residents in emergency geriatric care can demand large amounts of limited conference time. The Geriatric Emergency Medicine Competencies (GEMC) are high-impact geriatric topics developed to help residencies efficiently and effectively meet this training demand. This study examines if a 2-hour didactic intervention can significantly improve resident knowledge in 7 key domains as identified by the GEMC across multiple programs. Methods A validated 29-question didactic test was administered at six EM residencies before and after a GEMC-focused lecture delivered in summer and fall of 2009. We analyzed scores as individual questions and in defined topic domains using a paired student t test. Results A total of 301 exams were administered; 86 to PGY1, 88 to PGY2, 86 to PGY3, and 41 to PGY4 residents. The testing of didactic knowledge before and after the GEMC educational intervention had high internal reliability (87.9%). The intervention significantly improved scores in all 7 GEMC domains (improvement 13.5% to 34.6%; p<0.001). For all questions, the improvement was 23% (37.8% pre, 60.8% post; P<0.001) Graded increase in geriatric knowledge occurred by PGY year with the greatest improvement post intervention seen at the PGY 3 level (PGY1 19.1% versus PGY3 27.1%). Conclusion A brief GEMC intervention had a significant impact on EM resident knowledge of critical geriatric topics. Lectures based on the GEMC can be a high-yield tool to enhance resident knowledge of geriatric emergency care. Formal GEMC curriculum should be considered in training EM residents for the demands of an aging population. PMID:25035745

  3. [Catalogue of learning goals for pregraduate education in geriatric medicine. A recommendation of the German Geriatric Society (DGG), the German Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics (DGGG), the Austrian Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (GGG) and the Swiss Society of Geriatric Medicine (SFGG) on the basis of recommendations of the European Union of Medical Specialists Geriatric Medicine Section (UEMS-GMS) 2013].

    PubMed

    Singler, K; Stuck, A E; Masud, T; Goeldlin, A; Roller, R E

    2014-11-01

    Sound knowledge in the care and management of geriatric patients is essential for doctors in almost all medical subspecialties. Therefore, it is important that pregraduate medical education adequately covers the field of geriatric medicine. However, in most medical faculties in Europe today, learning objectives in geriatric medicine are often substandard or not even explicitly addressed. As a first step to encourage undergraduate teaching in geriatric medicine, the European Union of Medical Specialists -Geriatric Medicine Section (UEMS-GMS) recently developed a catalogue of learning goals using a modified Delphi technique in order to encourage education in this field. This catalogue of learning objectives for geriatric medicine focuses on the minimum requirements with specific learning goals in knowledge, skills and attitudes that medical students should have acquired by the end of their studies.In order to ease the implementation of this new, competence-based curriculum among the medical faculties in universities teaching in the German language, the authors translated the published English language curriculum into German and adapted it according to medical language and terms used at German-speaking medical faculties and universities of Austria, Germany and Switzerland. This article contains the final German translation of the curriculum. The Geriatric Medicine Societies of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland formally endorse the present curriculum and recommend that medical faculties adapt their curricula for undergraduate teaching based on this catalogue. PMID:25217287

  4. A conceptual model for a geriatric fellowship in podiatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Helfand, A E

    2000-06-01

    The number of older individuals living in the United States is projected to increase significantly over the next few decades. To help meet the health-care needs of this growing population, podiatric medicine must assure the public of the availability of specially educated teachers and practitioners who can not only provide direct patient care, but also participate in establishing national policies and priorities pertaining to foot health. Fellowship training, the traditional educational model beyond the first professional degree and residency education, is one means of accomplishing this goal. This article proposes a model for a geriatric fellowship in podiatric medicine. Implementation of such fellowship training in geriatrics can help the podiatric medical profession pursue its mission and fulfill its responsibility to the public. PMID:10881464

  5. Opinions about Management of Geriatric Syndromes Given by Internal Medicine Residents in Two Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Douglas K.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of opinions of residents in two programs providing different amounts of geriatric training concerning management of four geriatric and two traditional internal medicine problems found all had less confidence about geriatric than traditional problems. Students with more training offered more support for nondiscriminatory care of elderly

  6. Alternative medicines for the geriatric veterinary patient.

    PubMed

    Kidd, J Randy

    2012-07-01

    Over the past several decades, alternative medicines have gained in popularity for use in both humans and animals. While they are not without controversy, client interest and usage dictate that even those practitioners who do not want to practice any of them in their own hospital or clinic should at least be aware of their common use, safety, and efficacy. The author briefly discusses some of the more popular alternative medicinesacupuncture, chiropractic, herbal, homeopathic, and flower essenceswith respect to some of the basics that every practitioner should know about them. PMID:22720815

  7. Competencies required for the practice of geriatric medicine as a consultant physician.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, R A; Clarfield, A M; Hogan, D B

    1989-01-01

    Geriatric medicine in Canada is now being viewed not merely as an academic specialty but, rather, more broadly as a service specialty providing consulting support to other physicians. Any redesigning of training programs will have to be done with this fact in mind. We drew up a list of competencies required for consultant practice in the field and presented them to other practitioners of geriatric medicine and members of the Canadian Society of Geriatric Medicine for feedback. We believe that the resulting list of competencies can be used as a starting point for redesigning training programs in geriatric medicine. PMID:2804826

  8. [Geriatric multimorbidity - one of the key problem of contemporary medicine].

    PubMed

    Weber, Pavel; Prudius, Dana; Meluznov, Hana

    2015-12-01

    In the elderly population there are common permanent decrease of functional capacity, gradual emergence of various diseases leading to the wider multimorbidity and increased problems in the social sphere, which can develop frailty and social dependency. The paper analyzes the complex issue of geriatric multimorbidity and emphasizes its pitfalls, the need of an interdisciplinary approach and thinking of doctors, including the risks of modern pharmacotherapy. The aim of geriatric medicine is to optimize residual functions despite the decline in total functional capacity with increasing multimorbidity. The authors want to direct the attention of the professional community to the permanently growing numbers of the elderly and to emphasize the need of awareness of the problem so that they could understand and cope with this absolutely new reality. PMID:26806500

  9. Geriatric emergency medicine service: a novel approach to an emerging trend.

    PubMed

    Argento, Vivian; Calder, Gina; Ferrigno, Rockman; Skudlarska, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have described benefits to patients from geriatric care in the emergency department (ED), yet few geriatric emergency departments exist nationally. As our nation ages and health care financing for these patients becomes more complex, it will be crucial for hospitals to develop ED services that address the needs of our sickest and frailest patients. In this article, we report on our experiences using advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) embedded in an established ED. Our geriatric emergency medicine service (GEMS(SM)) model has improved patient satisfaction rates and decreased time spent in the ED. It has increased volume of geriatric patients in our hospital by 6%. Strong executive support for geriatric services has established our hospital as a local leader in geriatric emergency medicine. The program is fiscally neutral and serves a frail vulnerable population. We have improved healthcare for our seniors and believe this model of geriatric emergency care can easily be replicated nationally. PMID:25672060

  10. The Glass Is Half Full: Geriatric Precepting Encounters in Family Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Lisa K.; Martirosian, Tovia; Gazewood, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 19% to 20% of all family medicine office visits involve care to patients older than age 65, yet limited research addresses family medicine geriatric education in the outpatient setting. This study explored how geriatric content is incorporated into resident/attending precepting encounters, using direct observation. An observer

  11. The Glass Is Half Full: Geriatric Precepting Encounters in Family Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Lisa K.; Martirosian, Tovia; Gazewood, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 19% to 20% of all family medicine office visits involve care to patients older than age 65, yet limited research addresses family medicine geriatric education in the outpatient setting. This study explored how geriatric content is incorporated into resident/attending precepting encounters, using direct observation. An observer…

  12. Correlation of the National Emergency Medicine M4 Clerkship Examination with USMLE Examination Performance

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Luan E.; Musick, Davis; Brewer, Kori

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Assessment of medical students’ knowledge in clinical settings is complex yet essential to the learning process. Clinical clerkships use various types of written examinations to objectively test medical knowledge within a given discipline. Within emergency medicine (EM), a new national standardized exam was developed to test medical knowledge in this specialty. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of a new examination is an important issue to address during test development and use. Studies have shown that student performance on selected standardized exams will reveal students’ strengths and/or weaknesses, so that effective remedial efforts can be implemented. Our study sought to address these issues by examining the association of scores on the new EM national exam with other standardized exam scores. Methods From August 2011 to April 2013, average National EM M4 examination scores of fourth-year medical students taken at the end of a required EM clerkship were compiled. We examined the correlation of the National EM M4 examination with the scores of initial attempts of the United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) Step 1 and Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK) examinations. Correlation coefficients and 95% confidence intervals of correlation coefficients are reported. We also examined the association between the national EM M4 examination score, final grades for the EM rotation, and USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK scores. Results 133 students were included in the study and achieved a mean score of 79.5 SD 8.0 on the National EM M4 exam compared to a national mean of 79.7 SD 3.89. The mean USMLE Step 1 score was 226.8 SD 19.3. The mean USMLE Step 2 CK score was 238.5 SD 18.9. National EM M4 examination scores showed moderate correlation with both USMLE Step 1 (mean score=226.8; correlation coefficient=0.50; 95% CI [0.28–0.67]) and USMLE Step 2 CK (mean score=238.5; correlation coefficient=0.47; 95% CI [0.25–0.65]). Students scoring below the median on the national EM M4 exam also scored well below their colleagues on USMLE exams. Conclusion The moderate correlation of the national EM M4 examination and USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK scores provides support for the utilization of the CDEM National EM M4 examination as an effective means of assessing medical knowledge for fourth-year medical students. Identification of students scoring lower on standardized exams allows for effective remedial efforts to be undertaken throughout the medical education process. PMID:26759671

  13. Preventive geriatrics: an overview from traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D H

    1982-01-01

    The philosophical tradition of Chinese geriatrics contains a strong preventive element closely tied to the concept of a balanced man-nature relationship and body-mind relationship. It has been emphasized that a sound mind in a sound body is essential to longevity. Moderation in physical and emotional activities is encouraged. There have been a number of approaches to longevity in traditional Chinese medicine. The preventive value of Tai Chi Chuan (a gentle "spiritual" exercise), Chi Kung (a combination of breathing exercise, relaxation and meditation), acupressure and moxibustion on the point of Chu San Li, and tonic herbal medicines like ginseng is discussed in this article. These are regarded to be helpful in improving the general health of the elderly and in promoting longevity. PMID:6763844

  14. An operational model for teaching geriatric medicine in a family practice residency program.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J T; Garetz, F; Hanson, R G; Houge, D; Spencer, D; Ciriacy, E W

    1977-06-01

    Increased concern for our aging population has necessitated an evaluation of the role of gerontology and geriatric medicine in both undergraduate and graduate medical education programs. The instructional model developed for the Family Practice Residency Program at the University of Minnesota Medical School emphasizes removing barriers to health care for the aged and modifying attitudes of physicians toward normal aging. Three general components make up the Geriatric Medicine Program: (1) clinical rotations in geriatric medicine in ambulatory residential facilities, in multilevel long-term care facilities, and in an acute care hospital; (2) geriatric case conferences; and (3) a seminar in gerontology and geriatric medicine. Evaluation of these components by the residents indicates a high degree of satisfaction with the experience and belief in its applicability to future practice. PMID:874437

  15. Development and assessment of a pediatric emergency medicine simulation and skills rotation: meeting the demands of a large pediatric clerkship

    PubMed Central

    Fielder, Elaine K.; Lemke, Daniel S.; Doughty, Cara B.; Hsu, Deborah C.; Middleman, Amy B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To implement a curriculum using simulation and skills training to augment a Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) rotation within a pediatric clerkship. Background PEM faculty are often challenged with a high learner to teacher ratio in a chaotic clinical setting. This challenge was heightened when our pediatric clerkship's traditional 1-week PEM rotation (consisting of 4 students completing four 8-hour ED shifts/week) expanded to 8 students every 2 weeks. We sought to meet this challenge by integrating simulation-based education into the rotation. Methods Clerkship students from March to June 2012 completed our traditional rotation. Students between July and October 2012 completed the new PEM-SIM curriculum with 19 hours ED shifts/week and 16 hours/week of simulation/skills training. Pre/post-tests evaluated 1) medical management/procedural comfort (five-point Likert scale); and 2) PEM knowledge (15 multiple-choice questions). Results One hundred and nine students completed the study (48 traditional, 61 PEM-SIM). Improvement in comfort was significantly higher for the PEM-SIM group than the traditional group for 6 of 8 (75%) medical management items (p<0.05) and 3 of 7 (43%) procedures, including fracture splinting, lumbar puncture, and abscess incision/drainage (p<0.05). PEM-SIM students had significantly more improvement in mean knowledge compared to the traditional group (p<0.001). Conclusions We have successfully integrated 16 hours/week of faculty-facilitated simulation-based education into a PEM rotation within our clerkship. This curriculum is beneficial in clinical settings with high learner to teacher ratios and when patient care experiences alone are insufficient for all students to meet rotation objectives. PMID:26626927

  16. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive…

  17. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive

  18. First Year Medical Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Interest in Geriatric Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Wei-Hsin; Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Hosokawa, Michael C.; Gray, M. Peggy; Zweig, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an extracurricular geriatric program on medical students' knowledge of, and attitudes toward, the elderly and their interest in studying geriatric medicine. The participants were first-year medical students (n = 137) who joined the Senior Teacher Education Partnership (STEP) program that

  19. A Conceptual Framework for Teaching Geriatrics in a Family Medicine Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, James T.; Bobula, James A.

    1980-01-01

    A competency-based curriculum model for teaching geriatrics in a family medicine residency is described that divides competencies under four major goals: understanding principles, obtaining and interpreting data, managing geriatric patients, and working in a health care team. Sample objectives, instructional methods, and student evaluation are

  20. First Year Medical Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Interest in Geriatric Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Wei-Hsin; Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Hosokawa, Michael C.; Gray, M. Peggy; Zweig, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an extracurricular geriatric program on medical students' knowledge of, and attitudes toward, the elderly and their interest in studying geriatric medicine. The participants were first-year medical students (n = 137) who joined the Senior Teacher Education Partnership (STEP) program that…

  1. Monitoring Students' Clinical Experiences during a Third-Year Family Medicine Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowlowitz, Vicki; And Others

    1996-01-01

    In a documentation system designed to monitor medical student progress in clerkships at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, students completed an optical scan card for each patient seen, eliciting information on the patient and the experience. Results highlight students' lack of certain experiences and allow comparison of student…

  2. Mortality meetings in geriatric medicine: strategies for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Joanne; George, James

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of patients who die in hospital will be under the care of geriatric medicine. Mortality reviews have traditionally used trigger tools to try and identify preventable deaths, but the majority of hospital deaths are not preventable and lapses in care are often very complex. Over a period of 14 months we performed four PDSA cycles to change the focus of mortality meetings within care of the elderly and stroke medicine at Cumberland Infirmary to look beyond preventable deaths. The aim was to maximise learning from mortality meetings to improve patient care. We used collaborative working at a trust and departmental level, moving from trigger tool preparation to a narrative approach, and we set up strategies to focus and disseminate our learning. The mean number of cases discussed per meeting and the mean number of lessons identified per case discussed increased, as did the learning levels (trust, department, individual). Maintaining multidisciplinary input and consolidating lessons learnt was difficult because of clinical commitments and natural staff turnover.

  3. Development of an Ambulatory Geriatrics Knowledge Examination for Internal Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Kalender-Rich, Jessica L.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Dong, Lei; Paolo, Anthony M.; Hayley, Deon Cox; Rigler, Sally K.

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of older adults needing primary care exceeds the capacity of trained geriatricians to accommodate them. All physicians should have basic knowledge of optimal outpatient care of older adults to enhance the capacity of the system to serve this patient group. To date, there is no knowledge-assessment tool that focuses specifically on geriatric ambulatory care. Objective We developed an examination to assess internal medicine residents' knowledge of ambulatory geriatrics. Methods A consensus panel developed a 30-question examination based on topics in the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Certification Examination Blueprint, the ABIM in-training examinations, and the American Geriatrics Society Goals and Objectives. Questions were reviewed, edited, and then administered to medical students, internal medicine residents, primary care providers, and geriatricians. Results Ninety-eight individuals (20 fourth-year medical students, 57 internal medicine residents, 11 primary care faculty members, and 10 geriatrics fellowship-trained physicians) took the examination. Based on psychometric analysis of the results, 5 questions were deleted because of poor discriminatory power. The Cronbach ? coefficient of the remaining 25 questions was 0.48; however, assessment of interitem consistency may not be an appropriate measure, given the variety of clinical topics on which questions were based. Scores increased with higher levels of training in geriatrics (P?geriatric care and may be useful in assessing residents. PMID:24455023

  4. Defining the Domain of Geriatric Medicine in an Urban Public Health System Affiliated with an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Christopher M.; Weiner, Michael; Counsell, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    The American Geriatrics Society has recommended a reexamination of the roles and deployment of providers with expertise in geriatric medicine. Healthcare systems use a variety of strategies to maximize their geriatric expertise. In general, these health systems tend to focus geriatric medicine resources on a group of older adults that are locally defined as the most in need. This article describes a model of care within an academic urban public health system and describes how local characteristics interact to define the domain of geriatric medicine. This domain is defined using 4 years of data from an electronic medical record combined with data collected from clinical trials. From January 2002 to December 2005, 31,443 adults aged 65 and older were seen at any clinical site within this healthcare system. The mean age was 75 (range 65105); 61% were women; 35% African American, and 2% Hispanic. The payer mix was 80% Medicare and 17% Medicaid. The local geriatric medicine program includes sites of care in inpatient, ambulatory, nursing home, and home-based settings. By design, this geriatric medicine clinical practice complements the care provided to older adults by the primary care practice. Primary care physicians tend to cede care to geriatric medicine for older adults with advanced disability or geriatric syndromes. This is most apparent for older adults in nursing facilities or those requiring home-based care. There is a dynamic interplay between design features, reputation, and capacity that modulates volume, location, and type of patients seen by geriatrics. PMID:18795983

  5. Geriatric medicine, Japanese Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative and biomarker development.

    PubMed

    Arai, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2010-06-01

    Due to a change in disease spectrum in aged countries, the primary role of geriatricians should be directed to an appropriate management and prevention of 1) cognitive decline and dementia, 2) swallowing and aspiration pneumonia and 3) falls and fractures. Management of dementia constitutes a central part in the practice of geriatric medicine in order to support independence of life in elderly people. The current paradigm of cognitive function-based testing for the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is going to drastically shift to a biomarker-based test approach, a shift that will correspond to the emergence of disease-modifying drugs. In addition, a new molecular imaging technique that visualizes neuronal protein deposits or pathological features has been developed in Japan and the U.S.A. Based on these achievements, the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) was proposed and initiated in 2005. The ADNI is a long-term observational study being conducted in the U.S.A., Europe, Australia, and Japan using identical protocols. The objectives of ADNI are: 1) to establish methodology which will allow standard values related to long-term changes in imaging data, such as MRI and PET, in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment and normal elderly persons; 2) to obtain clinical indices, psychological test data, and blood/cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers to demonstrate the validity of image-based surrogate markers; and 3) to establish optimum methods to monitor the therapeutic effects of disease-modifying drugs for AD. Patient enrollment in the Japanese ADNI has begun in July 2008. Imaging of AD pathology not only acts as a reliable biomarker with which to assay curative drug development by novel pharmaceutical companies, but it also helps health promotion toward AD prevention. PMID:20467230

  6. Construct Validity of Three Clerkship Performance Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ming; Wimmers, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined construct validity of three commonly used clerkship performance assessments: preceptors' evaluations, OSCE-type clinical performance measures, and the NBME [National Board of Medical Examiners] medicine subject examination. Six hundred and eighty-six students taking the inpatient medicine clerkship from 2003 to 2007

  7. European undergraduate curriculum in geriatric medicine developed using an international modified Delphi technique

    PubMed Central

    Masud, Tahir; Blundell, Adrian; Gordon, Adam Lee; Mulpeter, Ken; Roller, Regina; Singler, Katrin; Goeldlin, Adrian; Stuck, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: the rise in the number of older, frail adults necessitates that future doctors are adequately trained in the skills of geriatric medicine. Few countries have dedicated curricula in geriatric medicine at the undergraduate level. The aim of this project was to develop a consensus among geriatricians on a curriculum with the minimal requirements that a medical student should achieve by the end of medical school. Methods: a modified Delphi process was used. First, educational experts and geriatricians proposed a set of learning objectives based on a literature review. Second, three Delphi rounds involving a panel with 49 experts representing 29 countries affiliated to the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) was used to gain consensus for a final curriculum. Results: the number of disagreements following Delphi Rounds 1 and 2 were 81 and 53, respectively. Complete agreement was reached following the third round. The final curriculum consisted of detailed objectives grouped under 10 overarching learning outcomes. Discussion: a consensus on the minimum requirements of geriatric learning objectives for medical students has been agreed by European geriatricians. Major efforts will be needed to implement these requirements, given the large variation in the quality of geriatric teaching in medical schools. This curriculum is a first step to help improve teaching of geriatrics in medical schools, and will also serve as a basis for advancing postgraduate training in geriatrics across Europe. PMID:24603283

  8. Developing future nursing home medical directors: a curriculum for geriatric medicine fellows.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Masaya; Wen, Aida; Masaki, Kamal

    2013-03-01

    Long term care facilities are important sites of care for elderly adults. Despite a growing need and interest in medical direction in nursing homes, there have been limited educational opportunities in this area for geriatric medicine fellows. This article describes a novel medical director's curriculum for first-year geriatric medicine fellows to prepare them for the role of nursing home medical director. This novel curriculum has been integrated into the Department of Geriatric Medicine's Fellowship training program at the John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii. The curriculum consists of seven seminars that have been integrated into the didactic sessions during the first year of fellowship. Core content areas include: (1) roles and responsibilities of the medical director, (2) infection control, (3) physician documentation, (4) federal regulations and state surveys, (5) quality improvement, (6) culture change in nursing homes, and (7) transitions in care. All topics were discussed using the framework described by the American Medical Directors Association's position statement on the roles and responsibilities of the nursing home medical director. To our knowledge, this is the first curriculum in the medical literature that is designed to prepare geriatric medicine fellows for roles as medical directors in nursing homes. PMID:23168110

  9. Fellows' Perceptions of a Mandatory Reflective Electronic Portfolio in a Geriatric Medicine Fellowship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Jorge G.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Karides, Marina; Castillo, Carmen; Milanez, Marcos; Roos, Bernard A.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic portfolios (ePortfolios) can be useful for evaluating and documenting mastery of competencies. We investigated geriatric medicine fellows' perceptions of an ePortfolio. We conducted surveys and focus groups followed by quantitative and qualitative data analysis. Our study revealed that fellows considered the ePortfolio acceptable and

  10. Fellows' Perceptions of a Mandatory Reflective Electronic Portfolio in a Geriatric Medicine Fellowship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Jorge G.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Karides, Marina; Castillo, Carmen; Milanez, Marcos; Roos, Bernard A.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic portfolios (ePortfolios) can be useful for evaluating and documenting mastery of competencies. We investigated geriatric medicine fellows' perceptions of an ePortfolio. We conducted surveys and focus groups followed by quantitative and qualitative data analysis. Our study revealed that fellows considered the ePortfolio acceptable and…

  11. Educational games in geriatric medicine education: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the medical literature to assess the effect of geriatric educational games on the satisfaction, knowledge, beliefs, attitudes and behaviors of health care professionals. Methods We conducted a systematic review following the Cochrane Collaboration methodology including an electronic search of 10 electronic databases. We included randomized controlled trials (RCT) and controlled clinical trials (CCT) and excluded single arm studies. Population of interests included members (practitioners or students) of the health care professions. Outcomes of interests were participants' satisfaction, knowledge, beliefs, attitude, and behaviors. Results We included 8 studies evaluating 5 geriatric role playing games, all conducted in United States. All studies suffered from one or more methodological limitations but the overall quality of evidence was acceptable. None of the studies assessed the effects of the games on beliefs or behaviors. None of the 8 studies reported a statistically significant difference between the 2 groups in terms of change in attitude. One study assessed the impact on knowledge and found non-statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. Two studies found levels of satisfaction among participants to be high. We did not conduct a planned meta-analysis because the included studies either reported no statistical data or reported different summary statistics. Conclusion The available evidence does not support the use of role playing interventions in geriatric medical education with the aim of improving the attitudes towards the elderly. PMID:20416055

  12. Geriatric training in family medicine: the natural history of a developing program.

    PubMed

    Moore, J T; Kane, W J

    1979-01-01

    During the past three years, the Duke-Watts Family Medicine Program and the Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development have developed training in geriatric medicine as an integral part of the family medicine residency program. This paper traces the following steps in the development of this program: a survey of resident and faculty interest, institution of a conference series, identification of potential training sites, development of elective rotations, and use of consultants. Principles found helpful in establishing training in geriatrics for family medicine residents include the following: involve residents in planning, start with modest goals, make the program relevant and practical, build on local strengths, include other health care professional trainees, and use ambulatory, acute hospital, and long-term care sites in the training rpogram. PMID:759552

  13. Assessing Effectiveness of a Geriatrics Rotation for Second-Year Internal Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, Eugenia L.; Jalali, Cathy; Finkelstein, Emily; Ramsaroop, Sharda; Ouchida, Karin; Carmen, Tessa Del; Logio, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Background Residents need to acquire an understanding of the biopsychosocial aspects of caring for older adults with chronic illness, along with effective use of interdisciplinary services inside and outside of the hospital. Objective We expanded the geriatric medicine experience for second-year internal medicine residents and present the results of the first year's experience. Methods We paired a mandatory rotation for postgraduate year–2 internal medicine residents (2 weeks of day and 1 week of night inpatient experience in the Acute Care for Elders Unit), and a 1-week outpatient systems-based practice experience with online modules and readings. Evaluation included a case presentation, an oral examination, a written questionnaire for all residents, and a global assessment of the residents' performance on the geriatrics portion of the 2012 In-Training Examination (ITE). Results All residents passed their oral examination; there was little difference between classes in systems-based practice knowledge. More than 90% (21 of 23) of the residents who took the rotation reported that it left a lasting impression on how they would care for their patients. Mean ITE scores in geriatrics for all residents increased from 53% (versus 61% overall) in 2010 to 87% (versus 81%) in 2012, although they dropped to 69% (versus 82%) in 2013. Conclusions A rotation in geriatrics that is highly rated and covers both acute care and systems-based practice concepts is feasible for internal medicine residents. Residents did not learn detailed knowledge about specific programs for older adults, but clinical geriatrics knowledge improved. PMID:26279779

  14. Geriatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Flax, H J

    1990-01-01

    Aging is not a disease, nor are there any diseases exclusive to old age. There are physiological changes that occur with aging that lead to functional impairment and eventually death. The geriatric patient usually has several medical problems under treatment concurrently. Therapeutic and technical procedures used in the rehabilitation of geriatric patients are essentially the same as those used in the general practice of rehabilitation medicine. Successful rehabilitation of geriatric patients requires a cooperative and dynamic involvement of all the team professionals, patient and family. Treatment of an elderly stroke patient is outlined as an example of geriatric rehabilitation. PMID:2180418

  15. Improving Feedback for Medical Students in a Family Medicine Clerkship: Evaluating medical student performance using frequent feedback.

    PubMed

    White, D G; Tiberius, R; Talbot, Y; Schiralli, V; Rickett, M

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate whether feedback to medical students could be improved by asking teachers to complete a student performance rating form during a family practice clerkship, the authors had students and teachers fill out a questionnaire. Teachers in the intervention group reported observing students more frequently. Students' perceptions of feedback frequency correlated strongly with their ratings of feedback quality. PMID:21234079

  16. The quality of surgical clerkships.

    PubMed

    Holden, W D

    1985-06-01

    Many of the contours of a surgical clerkship can be designed, implemented, and evaluated with varying degrees of objectivity. The recently established Association for Surgical Education and its expanding membership have performed in an excellent fashion in addressing the objectives, content, process, and evaluation of surgical clerkships. There are several factors that influence the quality of a clerkship that are not readily subjected to measurement but that have a significant impact on the environment and conduct of clerkships. Criticism, mainly from the academic community, has been directed recently to distortions of the learning process and the continuing use of traditional teaching methods that do not serve medical educational programs and students optimally. More attention should be paid to the principle that a surgical clerkship should be designed to provide an elemental comprehension of the major surgical diseases irrespective of how the students will select multiple specialties for their careers. The quality of a clinical teaching program is influenced in a realistic way by the quality of care provided to the patients. The image of the staff, especially the resident staff, plays an important role in affecting students' incentives, the development of self-discipline, their attitudes toward patients and families, and the ultimate selection of careers. As much responsibility as possible for the diagnosis of disease and the care of patients should be given to students under close supervision and always with the best interests of the patients in mind. The environment of medical schools and teaching hospitals is changing rapidly. The corporate practice of medicine will have an impact on the quality of surgical clerkships, we hope not adversely. PMID:4002120

  17. Effective Teaching Methods for Geriatric Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strano-Paul, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses how effective classroom sessions are at teaching geriatric competencies to medical students. At Stony Brook Medical School, most geriatric competencies are taught in the Ambulatory Care Clerkship during small-group educational sessions. Clinical exposure to reinforce these specialized skills varies with preceptor assignment. A

  18. Effective Teaching Methods for Geriatric Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strano-Paul, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses how effective classroom sessions are at teaching geriatric competencies to medical students. At Stony Brook Medical School, most geriatric competencies are taught in the Ambulatory Care Clerkship during small-group educational sessions. Clinical exposure to reinforce these specialized skills varies with preceptor assignment. A…

  19. Paul B. Beeson career development awards in aging research and U.S. medical schools aging and geriatric medicine programs.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Elizabeth J; Warshaw, Gregg A; van der Willik, Odette; Meganathan, Karthikeyan; Weber, Debra; Cornwall, Danielle; Leonard, Anthony C

    2011-09-01

    Established in 1995, the Paul B. Beeson Career Development program provides faculty development awards to outstanding junior and midcareer faculty committed to academic careers in aging-related research, training, and practice. This study evaluated the effect of 134 Beeson Scholars on their medical schools' aging and geriatric medicine programs and on the field of aging research from 1995 to 2007. Quantitative and qualitative survey data from multiple sources, including the American Geriatrics Society/Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs' Geriatrics Workforce Policy Studies Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH) rankings of research funding, and other governmental databases were used to compare 36 medical schools with Beeson Scholars with 34 similar medical schools without Beeson scholars and to examine the influence of Beeson Scholars on the field of geriatrics and aging. Most Beeson Scholars remained at the institution where they trained during their Beeson award, and 89% are still practicing or conducting research in the field of geriatrics and aging. Twenty-six (19.4%) of the scholars have led institutional research mentoring awards, 51 (39%) report leadership roles in institutional program project grants, and 13 (10%) report leadership roles in the Clinical and Translational Science Award programs at their institutions. Beeson Scholars are more likely than a matched sample of non-Beeson NIH K awardees to study important geriatric syndromes such as falls, cognitive impairment, adverse drug events, osteoporosis, and functional recovery from illness. Total Beeson Impact Years (the total number of years all Beeson Scholars have worked at each school) is positively correlated with more geriatrics research faculty, after controlling for NIH funding rank (P=.02). Beeson Scholars have made positive contributions to the development of academic geriatrics research programs at U.S. medical schools. PMID:21806567

  20. Development of Geriatric Competencies for Emergency Medicine Residents Using an Expert Consensus Process

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Teresita M.; Losman, Eve D.; Carpenter, Christopher R.; Sauvigne, Karen; Irmiter, Cheryl; Emanuel, Linda; Leipzig, Rosanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergency department (ED) visit rate for older patients exceeds that of all age groups other than infants. The aging population will increase elder ED patient utilization to 35% to 60% of all visits. Older patients can have complex clinical presentations and be resource-intensive. Evidence indicates that emergency physicians fail to provide consistent high-quality care for elder ED patients, resulting in poor clinical outcomes. Objectives The objective was to develop a consensus document, “Geriatric Competencies for Emergency Medicine Residents,” by identified experts. This is a minimum set of behaviorally based performance standards that all residents should be able to demonstrate by completion of their residency training. Methods This consensus-based process utilized an inductive, qualitative, multiphase method to determine the minimum geriatric competencies needed by emergency medicine (EM) residents. Assessments of face validity and reliability were used throughout the project. Results In Phase I, participants (n = 363) identified 12 domains and 300 potential competencies. In Phase II, an expert panel (n = 24) clustered the Phase I responses, resulting in eight domains and 72 competencies. In Phase III, the expert panel reduced the competencies to 26. In Phase IV, analysis of face validity and reliability yielded a 100% consensus for eight domains and 26 competencies. The domains identified were atypical presentation of disease; trauma, including falls; cognitive and behavioral disorders; emergent intervention modifications; medication management; transitions of care; pain management and palliative care; and effect of comorbid conditions. Conclusions The Geriatric Competencies for EM Residents is a consensus document that can form the basis for EM residency curricula and assessment to meet the demands of our aging population. PMID:20370765

  1. Role of complementary and alternative medicine in geriatric care: A mini review

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Mohammad Jamshed; Min, Chan Sze; Verma, Rohit Kumar; Jamshed, Shazia Qasim

    2014-01-01

    Since time immemorial homo sapiens are subjected to both health and diseases states and seek treatment for succor and assuagement in compromised health states. Since last two decades the progressive rise in the alternative form of treatment cannot be ignored and population seems to be dissatisfied with the conventional treatment modalities and therefore, resort to other forms of treatment, mainly complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The use of CAM is predominantly more popular in older adults and therefore, numerous research studies and clinical trials have been carried out to investigate the effectiveness of CAM in the management of both communicable and non-communicable disease. In this current mini review, we attempt to encompass the use of CAM in chronic non-communicable diseases that are most likely seen in geriatrics. The current review focuses not only on the reassurance of good health practices, emphasizing on the holistic development and strengthening the body's defense mechanisms, but also attempts to construct a pattern of self-care and patient empowerment in geriatrics. The issues of safety with CAM use cannot be sidelined and consultation with a health care professional is always advocated to the patient. Likewise, responsibility of the health care professional is to inform the patient about the safety and efficacy issues. In order to substantiate the efficacy and safety of CAMs, evidence-based studies and practices with consolidated standards should be planned and executed. PMID:25125879

  2. [Geriatrics from the 19th to the 21st century. 150 years of geriatric medicine: from increasing life expectancy to improving quality of life for the very old].

    PubMed

    Federspiel C; Keipes M

    2014-01-01

    With the world further aging, geriatric medicine clearly became a necessity: in the 21th century many more people reach older ages by means of continued medical success in expanding lifespan. 150 years ago life expectancy was between 30 to 40 years, but today close to 800 million people are 60 yeas old or more. During the last century aging has been associated with decline and decay, but gradually more people lived ably and healthily in older ages. The expansion in life expectancy has become a synchronism of quality of life: the average 65 year old today is much healthier, physically and mentally fitter, than the average 50 year old 150 years ago, when Alois Alzheimer war born, a period when most nowadays existing geriatric institutions were envisioned and progressively realized over time. Today we strongly believe that a healthy life and, equally, the quality of life of the very old people can be extended with presently existing medical knowledge, based on research, environmental and behavioural changes, by postponing the onset and progression of fatal and disabling diseases and disorders. But very soon ethical considerations concerning all kinds of medical and technological solutions available to maintain or even improve the mental and physical functioning of dependant elderly people will engage our society when deciding how and at what moment in time to make the best decisions and allocate resources. Geriatric medicine will be further challenged by competing and demanding medical and economic needs, when marshalling resources to meet the growing demands of our society for improving care for the very old and often demented adult. PMID:25438479

  3. Effect of a new longitudinal interprofessional geriatric medicine educational track on knowledge and attitude of medical students: a controlled cohort study.

    PubMed

    Koh, Gerald C H; Ling, Carolyn L H; Ma, Bosco H M; Chen, Cynthia; Lim, Wee Shiong; Scherer, Samuel C; Amin, Zubair; Merchant, Reshma A

    2015-03-01

    A new interprofessional geriatric medicine curriculum was recently introduced at a large undergraduate Asian medical school. A longitudinal controlled interventional cohort study was conducted to evaluate the effect of the new curriculum on the knowledge and attitudes of medical students. The medical students under the new curriculum formed the intervention cohort, and those under the former curriculum formed the control cohort. To test knowledge, the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) geriatrics knowledge test (GKT) was used in Year 2 and the University of Michigan GKT in Year 5. Geriatrics attitudes were evaluated using the UCLA geriatrics attitudes test in Years 2 and 5. Not surprisingly, geriatrics knowledge at the end of Year 5 of medical school was enhanced to a greater degree in the intervention cohort than the control cohort, although improvements in geriatrics attitudes in each cohort were of similar magnitude by the end of Year 5, suggesting that factors other than a formal geriatrics curriculum influenced the improvements in geriatrics attitudes. This article is one of few published on the effectiveness of geriatrics curricular innovations using validated knowledge and attitude outcomes in a longitudinal controlled study design and will be useful to other medical institutions seeking to improve the geriatrics knowledge and attitudes of their students. PMID:25732398

  4. Clerkship in primary care: a cross-sectional study about expectations and experiences of undergraduates in medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Stephan; Klement, Andreas; Lichte, Thomas; Abendroth, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: With the amendment of the medical licensure act (Approbationsordnung) in 2012, a four-week clerkship in primary care (FHV) became mandatory. We investigated the expectations with which students begin the FHV, which criteria are relevant in selecting the location for the FHV, and the experiences the students had during the FHV. Method: In a cross-sectional study, all third-year students at both medical schools in Saxony-Anhalt were surveyed in 2013 about their expectations and experiences regarding the FHV. This is the last cohort for which the FHV is optional. Questions were asked about 29 items addressing six topics (personal information, selection of FHV location, selection of FHV medical practice, expectations, experiences, and specialty selection). Results: Out of a student body of 446, responses were received from N=424 (response rate 95.1%; of which 61.8% female). Of these students, 71 (16.7%) had completed the FHV and 70 (16.5%) were planning to; another 267 students (63%) had not (yet) planned to participate in an FHV. Where a students parents lived, personal recommendations of a particular medical practice and the attractiveness of the region were the most important criteria for selecting the clerkship site. After completing the FHV, the learning objectives reflected themselves in the experiences of the students in a similar order and significance as in the expectations of students who planned or had not (as of yet) planned to complete the FHV. A relevant influence of the FHV confirming the choice to specialize in general practice or outpatient care was not indicated by those who had completed the FHV. Conclusion: After location and practice, the FHV is selected according to personal criteria and in connection with prioritized learning objectives. From the students perspective, the most frequently named learning objectives are also identified as acquired experience after completing the FHV. However, the FHV does not have a reinforcing effect on the selection of general practice as a specialty. PMID:25489344

  5. [Medicine for the elderly or science of old age? Max Bürger's contribution to geriatric medicine and gerontology].

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Sandra; Bruns, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The fact that, due to demographic changes, gerontology and geriatrics are gaining ever more importance gives rise to more questions regarding the history of the science of aging. Based on unpublished sources and relevant publications by Max Bürger, the doyen of gerontological research in Germany, our contributions trace the beginnings of age research in Germany. Our results confirm Bürger as the dominant expert in this field in the first decades of its emergence. Bürger was primarily interested in basic medical-scientific research, and less in clinical geriatrics. His scientific goal was not to establish a medicine for the elderly but a theory of life changes ("biomorphosis"). From the start, he saw aging as a physiological process--a view that is still valid today. His concept of "biomorphosis", however, did not catch on and reveals a constriction in Bürger's thinking, which was to some extent influenced by Hans Driesch's vitalism. Interdisciplinary approaches are noticeable in the natural sciences rather than the humanities or social sciences. Bürger's research was also influenced by the political system he lived in. During National Socialism, which Bürger joined--at least formally--in 1937, his research into labour economics and aging met with considerable interest in connection with the general mobilisation of resources. East Germany also had an interest in questions of labour productivity in old age and the extension of the working life, which meant that Bürger remained a sought-after physician and scientist up into the 1960s. As he grew older himself, Bürger's initially deficit-oriented view of old age gave way to a more positive presentation that attached greater weight to the resources of old age. PMID:26137644

  6. Geriatric veterinary pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Kukanich, Butch

    2012-07-01

    Geriatric dogs and cats are an important group of patients in veterinary medicine. Healthy geriatric patients have similar physiology and presumably pharmacology as healthy adult animals. Geriatric patients with subclinical organ dysfunction are overtly healthy but have some organ dysfunction that may alter the clinical pharmacology of some drugs. Geriatric patients with an overt disease are expected to have altered drug pharmacology for some drugs based on the underlying disease. Diseases including cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, osteoarthritis, neurologic, and neoplastic are expected in the geriatric population and discussed, including the effects of the underlying disease and potential drug-drug interactions. PMID:22720805

  7. A National Survey on the Current Status of Family Practice Residency Education in Geriatric Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ina; Arenson, Christine; Warshaw, Gregg; Bragg, Elizabeth; Shaull, Ruth; Counsell, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of family practice residency directors found that 92 percent have a required geriatrics curriculum; nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care are the predominant training sites; the mean number of geriatrics faculty is 2.6 per program; and conflicting time demands with other curricula was ranked as the most significant

  8. A National Survey on the Current Status of Family Practice Residency Education in Geriatric Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ina; Arenson, Christine; Warshaw, Gregg; Bragg, Elizabeth; Shaull, Ruth; Counsell, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of family practice residency directors found that 92 percent have a required geriatrics curriculum; nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care are the predominant training sites; the mean number of geriatrics faculty is 2.6 per program; and conflicting time demands with other curricula was ranked as the most significant…

  9. [Respiratory medicine in geriatrics. A cultural niche of relevant theoretical and practical importance].

    PubMed

    Leonardi, R; Cossi, S; Tomasi, M F; Guerrini, G; Bellia, V; Grassi, V

    1995-12-01

    Respiratory medicine in the elderly represents a topic of increasing interest in the developed countries, because of its peculiar clinical and therapeutical implications. In this respect, a deeper knowledge of the biology and physiology of aging lung is desirable: namely, the age-related immunological and structural changes involving the respiratory system do influence clinical presentation and response to the treatment in older people. A better understanding of the pharmacology in the elderly which is recognized to be different for several aspects from that of the general population, is mandatory in order to better approach these practical problems. This short review emphasizes the need of the "longitudinal", rather than "transversal", epidemiological surveys which are uniquely able to give useful information on the natural history, even in older populations. In addition, clinical and therapeutical peculiarities of some respiratory illnesses such as infectious lung diseases, including pulmonary tuberculosis, COLD and bronchial asthma, sleep-related respiratory disorders will be underlined. Finally, a few problems concerning the management of the geriatric subject with chronic respiratory disease will be analyzed, focusing mainly on the difficulties inherent in the inhalant therapy and functional evaluation of this kind of patients. PMID:8588088

  10. The Practice of Geriatrics: Specialized Geriatric Programs and Home Visits

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Home visits have a long history in geriatrics. In this narrative review, the literature on home visits performed by specialists in geriatric medicine (or psychiatry) and/or specialized programs in geriatric medicine (or psychiatry) published between January 1988 and December 2008 was examined. The papers reviewed were few and inconsistent in their message. The lessons that can be derived from them are limited. Draft recommendations about the role of home visiting by specialized geriatric programs in Canada are presented. PMID:23251306

  11. Death is not always a failure: outcomes from implementing an online virtual patient clinical case in palliative care for family medicine clerkship

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Amy; Ross, Shelley Paige; Duerksen, Kimberley

    2013-01-01

    Background The dying patient is a reality of medicine. Medical students, however, feel unprepared to effectively manage the complex end-of-life (EOL) management issues of the dying patient and want increased experiential learning in Palliative Care. Aims To address the need for more formal curriculum in EOL care, we developed and implemented an online virtual patient (VP) clinical case in Palliative Care into the 20102011 Year Three Family Medicine Clerkship rotation curriculum. Methods A mixed-method design was used to measure the change in knowledge and perceived preparedness level in EOL care before and after completing the online VP case. A survey collected qualitative descriptions of the students educational experience of using this case. Results Ninety five percent (130/137) of the students voluntarily consented to have their results analyzed. The group knowledge score (n=127) increased significantly from a pre-course average of 7.69/162.27, to a post-course average of 10.02/162.39 (p<0.001). The students self-assessed comfort level increased significantly with all aspects of EOL management from pre-course to post-course (p<0.001). Nearly, 91.1% of the students rated the VP realism as Good to Excellent, 86% rated the case as educationally beneficial. Nearly 59.3% of students felt emotionally engaged with the VP. Qualitative feedback found that the case content was very useful and realistic, but that the interface was sometimes awkward to navigate. Conclusions The online VP case in Palliative Care is a useful teaching tool that may help to address the need for increased formal Palliative Care experience in medical school training programs. PMID:24267774

  12. Geriatric syndromes and geriatric assessment for the generalist.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Charlotte; Merel, Susan E; Yukawa, Michi

    2015-03-01

    Geriatric assessment is an increasingly important area of outpatient medicine, given the unprecedented aging of the US population. Screening and evaluation for geriatric syndromes, particularly falls, urinary incontinence, frailty, and cognitive impairment, are crucial aspects of outpatient geriatric assessment. Innovative models of care are emerging to improve quality of care and enhance cost savings for the geriatric patient. High-value features of geriatric care systems include providing increased 24/7 access to care, a multidisciplinary team-based approach to care, performing medication reconciliation and comprehensive geriatric assessments, and integrating palliative care into treatment planning. PMID:25700583

  13. [150 years of geriatric medicine: from improving life expectation to better quality of life for the very old ].

    PubMed

    Federspiel C; Keipes M

    2014-01-01

    With the world further aging, geriatric medicine clearly became a necessity: in the 21th century many more people reach older ages by means of continued medical success in expanding lifespan. 150 years ago life expectancy was between 30 to 40 years, but today close to 800 million people are 60 yeas old or more. During the last century aging has been associated with decline and decay, but gradually more people lived ably and healthily in older ages. The expansion in life expectancy has become a synchronism of quality of life: the average 65 year old today is much healthier, physically and mentally fitter, than the average 50 year old 150 years ago, when Alois Alzheimer war born, a period when most nowadays existing geriatric institutions were envisioned and progressively realized over time. Today we strongly believe that a healthy life and, equally, the quality of life of the very old people can be extended with presently existing medical knowledge, based on research, environmental and behavioural changes, by postponing the onset and progression of fatal and disabling diseases and disorders. But very soon ethical considerations concerning all kinds of medical and technological solutions available to maintain or even improve the mental and physical functioning of dependant elderly people will engage our society when deciding how and at what moment in time to make the best decisions and allocate resources. Geriatric medicine will be further challenged by competing and demanding medical and economic needs, when marshalling resources to meet the growing demands of our society for improving care for the very old and often demented adult. PMID:25507996

  14. Clinical Nuclear Pharmacy Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunson, George L.; Christopherson, William J., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The School of Pharmacy, University of the Pacific, and the Pharmacy Service, Letterman Army Medical Center, initiated a 15-week clinical nuclear pharmacy clerkship in 1975. It includes basic nuclear medical science, technical competency, professional competency, and special interest emphasis. (LBH)

  15. Integrating Geriatrics into Medical School: Student Journaling as an Innovative Strategy for Evaluating Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shield, Renee R.; Farrell, Timothy W.; Nanda, Aman; Campbell, Susan E.; Wetle, Terrie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: The Alpert Medical School of Brown University began to integrate geriatrics content into all preclerkship courses and key clerkship cases as part of a major medical school curriculum redesign in 2006. This study evaluates students' responses to geriatrics integration within the curriculum using journals kept by volunteer

  16. Integrating Geriatrics into Medical School: Student Journaling as an Innovative Strategy for Evaluating Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shield, Renee R.; Farrell, Timothy W.; Nanda, Aman; Campbell, Susan E.; Wetle, Terrie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: The Alpert Medical School of Brown University began to integrate geriatrics content into all preclerkship courses and key clerkship cases as part of a major medical school curriculum redesign in 2006. This study evaluates students' responses to geriatrics integration within the curriculum using journals kept by volunteer…

  17. [Geriatrics for internists in primary care].

    PubMed

    Swoboda, W; Hermens, T

    2011-08-01

    Internal medicine specialists involved in primary care will have a leading part in the treatment of geriatric patients with complex healthcare needs in the future. Approved models like specialized geriatric practices, ambulant or mobile geriatric rehabilitation and special geriatric services for nursing homes are available. Essential is a geriatric qualification that fits with the tasks of an internist in primary care. An incentive payment system has to be created for this purpose to improve the treatment of elderly patients. PMID:21750935

  18. Students' Educational Activities During Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Logs completed by 201 medical students in third-year clerkships at nine community-based hospitals indicated students received 6.5 hours of teaching with an instructor daily, spending 4.9 more hours in clerkship-related learning. Most teaching was by full-time faculty and residents. In half their educational activities, students participated with…

  19. Hospital nutrition in geriatric long-term care medicine: II. Effects of dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Elmsthl, S; Steen, B

    1987-03-01

    The effects of three different dietary supplements were studied in 28 women admitted to geriatric long-term care by recording the dietary intake, anthropometric variables and selected biochemical analyses before and during an 8-week experimental period. The validity of the dietary intake measurements was investigated and judged as acceptable. Before supplementation the mean daily intake of energy was 5.2 MJ/1247 kcal and vitamin D and thiamine were the nutrients most commonly deficient. One third of the patients had low dietary intake of vitamin A. The intake of ascorbic acid, riboflavine and calcium were appropriate. The mean values of haemoglobin, serum albumin, plasma prealbumin and transferrin were within reference limits despite the fact that a quarter of the patients had signs of inflammation. The dietary intake improved significantly during the experimental period in all three groups and the intake of energy increased by 25%. A gain of weight was noted in all groups. The level of serum retinol-binding protein increased in two of the groups. The suppression of the appetite due to supplementation was low and the intake of snacks decreased from 20% to 11% of the energy intake. PMID:3107353

  20. Do geriatricians stay in geriatrics?.

    PubMed

    Shah, Uday; Aung, Myo; Chan, Susanna; Wolf-Klein, Gisele P

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate whether formally trained geriatricians remain in the field of Geriatrics, and to determine their job satisfaction and perceived quality of life, we surveyed the 107 fellows trained over the last 25 years in one accredited geriatric program. Of the 88 physicians who consented to participate, 75% devoted at least half of their practice to the care of the elderly. On an academic level, 89.5% had, or planned to pursue, recertification in geriatric medicine. Ninety-five percent of these geriatricians felt that the impact of a formal geriatric fellowship was positive on their medical career and satisfaction index. Sixty-four percent had yearly incomes between $100 and $200k, and 25.6% had income greater than $200k. Eighty-seven percent would recommend pursuing geriatric fellowship training. We need to further explore how recruitment process and job opportunities are presented to potential geriatric fellows. PMID:16873209

  1. External validation of the PROFUND index in polypathological patients from internal medicine and acute geriatrics departments in Aragón.

    PubMed

    Díez-Manglano, Jesús; Cabrerizo García, José Luis; García-Arilla Calvo, Ernesto; Jimeno Saínz, Araceli; Calvo Beguería, Eva; Martínez-Álvarez, Rosa M; Bejarano Tello, Esperanza; Caudevilla Martínez, Aránzazu

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was to validate externally and prospectively the PROFUND index to predict survival of polypathological patients after a year. An observational, prospective and multicenter study was performed. Polypathological patients admitted to an internal medicine or geriatrics department and attended by investigators consecutively between March 1 and June 30, 2011 were included. Data concerning age, gender, comorbidity, Barthel and Lawton-Brody indexes, Pfeiffer questionnaire, socio-familial Gijon scale, delirium, number of drugs and number of admissions during the previous year were gathered for each patient. The PROFUND index was calculated. The follow-up lasted 1 year. A Cox proportional regression model was calculated, and was used to analyze the association of the variables to mortality and C-statistic. 465 polypathological patients, 333 from internal medicine and 132 from geriatrics, were included. One-year mortality is associated with age [hazard ratio (HR) 1.52 95 % CI 1.04-2.12; p = 0.01], presence of neoplasia [HR 2.68 95 % CI 1.71-4.18; p = 0.0001] and dependence for basic activities of daily living [HR 2.34 95 % CI 1.61-3.40; p = 0.0009]. In predicting mortality, the PROFUND index shows good discrimination in patients from internal medicine (C-statistics 0.725 95 % CI 0.670-0.781), but a poor one in those from geriatrics (0.546 95 % CI 0.448-0.644). The PROFUND index is a reliable tool for predicting mortality in internal medicine PP patients. PMID:25986479

  2. [Emergency medicine after a catastrophic disaster: from a view of geriatrics and gerontology].

    PubMed

    Okinaga, Shoji; Daito, Hisayoshi; Suzuki, Motoi; Shiihara, Jun; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-01

    The megathrust earthquake and the towering tsunami hit the east coast of Japan on March 11th of 2011 after intervals of 1,142 years. About 90 % of nearly 20,000 victims were drowned in devastating waves, while every town and city along the coast turned out to be a ruin. Over 400,000 people were forced to move to the evacuation centers where the evacuees slept on the floor without electricity, running water or heating systems at freezing nights. Emergency medicine, therefore, was more required during the evacuation phase than during the acute phase of the tsunami disaster. Here discussed is the phenomenon that the events happened mostly to the elderly evacuees especially in the swept area by silty polluted seawater. PMID:23855220

  3. Longitudinal continuity experiences can repair disconnects in the core clerkships for medical students.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Carl D; Wilkerson, LuAnn; Uijtdehaage, Sebastian

    2014-02-01

    The authors describe fundamental changes that have occurred in academic health centers since the 1990 s that have caused an increasingly fragmented experience during core clerkships where medical students risk disconnection from faculty mentors, residents, and patients. Longitudinal "continuity" clinical experiences may constitute a strategy for restoring some of the historic learning conditions. In this issue, Myhre and colleagues and Woloschuk and colleagues compare the performance of students who completed a longitudinal integrated clerkship with the performance of their peers who had completed a traditional rotation-based clerkship year and find that the results are comparable in medical school and after the first year of family medicine residency training. In addition, the authors of this commentary offer observations from their own experience with adding continuity options to traditional core clinical clerkships, with the goal of helping readers understand the range of opportunities and challenges that such initiatives entail. PMID:24362395

  4. Effects and feasibility of an Integrative Medicine program for geriatric patientsa cluster-randomized pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Teut, Michael; Schnabel, Katharina; Baur, Roland; Kerckhoff, Annette; Reese, Frauke; Pilgram, Niels; Berger, Franziska; Luedtke, Rainer; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    Background Older adults often use complementary medicine; however, very few interventional studies have focused on them. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and to obtain preliminary data on effectiveness of an Integrative Medicine (IM) program compared to usual medical care. Methods The study consisted of older adults living in shared apartment communities including caregiving. The shared apartments were cluster-randomized to the IM program or Usual Care (UC). IM consisted of additional lifestyle modification (exercise and diet), external naturopathic applications, homeopathic treatment, and modification of conventional drug therapy for 12 months. The UC group received conventional care alone. The following outcomes were used: Nurses Observation Scale for Geriatric Patients (NOSGER); Assessment of Motor and Process Skills; Barthel Index; Qualidem; Profile of Wellbeing; and Mini-mental State Examination. Exploratory effect sizes (Cohens d, means adjusted for differences of baseline values) were calculated to analyze group differences. Results A total of eight shared apartment communities were included; four were allocated to IM (29 patients, median seven patients; [mean standard deviation] 82.7 8.6 years) and four to UC (29 patients, median eight patients; 76.0 12.8 years of age). After 12 months, effect sizes ?0.3 were observed for activities of daily living on the NOSGER-Activities of Daily Living subscale (0.53), Barthel Index (0.30), Qualidem total sum score (0.39), Profile of Wellbeing (0.36), NOSGER-Impaired Social Behavior (0.47), and NOSGER-Depressed Mood subscales (0.40). Smaller or no effects were observed for all other outcomes. The intervention itself was found to be feasible, but elaborate and time consuming. Discussion This exploratory pilot study showed that for a full-scale trial, the outcomes of Activities of Daily Living and Quality of Life seem to be the most promising. The results have to be interpreted with care; larger confirmatory trials are necessary to validate the effects. PMID:23901266

  5. Geriatrics: Profiles in Geriatrics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for their employees' health coverage. more info Gary J. Kennedy, MD Albert Einstein College of Medicine Montefiore ... of working in the field. more info Jerome J. Epplin, MD Litchfield Family Practice Center "Caring for ...

  6. Experiences with a Combined Perinatal Clerkship for Third-Year Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buster, John; Trygstad, Carl W.

    1977-01-01

    A UCLA School of Medicine program compared the results of teaching obstectrics and pediatric neonatal medicine as a perinatal continuum with the results of the traditional separate clerkships and to assess the benefits and liabilities of the use of this integrated approach to teaching. (LBH)

  7. The Making of Careers, the Making of a Discipline: Luck and Chance in Migrant Careers in Geriatric Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornat, Joanna; Henry, Leroi; Raghuram, Parvati

    2011-01-01

    The geriatric specialty, unpopular among most UK born and trained medical graduates, provided an opportunity for career development and achievement for those doctors whose training had been non-standard for a variety of reasons. Migrant doctors who have played a substantive role in the UK National Health Service since its inception made an

  8. The Making of Careers, the Making of a Discipline: Luck and Chance in Migrant Careers in Geriatric Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornat, Joanna; Henry, Leroi; Raghuram, Parvati

    2011-01-01

    The geriatric specialty, unpopular among most UK born and trained medical graduates, provided an opportunity for career development and achievement for those doctors whose training had been non-standard for a variety of reasons. Migrant doctors who have played a substantive role in the UK National Health Service since its inception made an…

  9. Integrating Geriatric Content into a Medical School Curriculum: Description of a Successful Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, Debra A.; Raji, Mukaila; Lieberman, Steven; Beach, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    Most medical school curricula do not equip students with adequate attitudes, knowledge and skills to care for elderly populations. We describe an effective geriatric curricular infusion model compatible with preserving the overall curricula schema. Course and clerkship directors, staff and faculty from the Office of Educational Development, Center

  10. The "Shrinking" Clerkship: Characteristics and Length of Clerkships in Psychiatry Undergraduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Renate H.; Levine, Ruth E.; Carlson, David L.; Clegg, Kathleen A.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors explored the time that is currently devoted to psychiatry clerkships to determine whether "shortened" clerkships differ in course director satisfaction and evaluation strategies. METHOD: An 18-item questionnaire was sent to 150 U.S. and Canadian clerkship directors. RESULTS: The return rate was 74% (111 questionnaires).

  11. [Preventive medicine in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Namias, B

    2003-01-01

    This paper gives a summary of check-up and preventive recommendations for elderly. It concerns screening, vaccination, chemoprophylaxy, and counseling. It is mainly based on the recommendations of the U.S. Preventive services Task force. It approaches the screening of hypertention, visual and auditive impairment, breast, colorectal, cervical, prostate cancers, about dyslipidemia, depression, osteoporosis, vaccination against influenza, pneumococcal infection,and chemoprophylaxy by estrogen, raloxifene, acetyisalicyclic acid. There is also counseling in the prevention of falls, exercises, and diet. This summary underlines the multiple recent changes compared with the 1996 recommendations. PMID:14983902

  12. Nutraceuticals for geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan

    2014-01-01

    Geriatrics is a medical practice that addresses the complex needs of older patients and emphasizes maintaining functional independence even in the presence of chronic disease. Treatment of geriatric patients requires a different strategy and is very complex. Geriatric medicines aim to promote health by preventing and treating diseases and disabilities in older adults. Development of effective dietary interventions for promoting healthy aging is an active but challenging area of research because aging is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease, disability, and death. Aging populations are a global phenomenon. The most widespread conditions affecting older people are hypertension, congestive heart failure, dementia, osteoporosis, breathing problems, cataract, and diabetes to name a few. Decreased immunity is also partially responsible for the increased morbidity and mortality resulting from infectious agents in the elderly. Nutritional status is one of the chief variables that explains differences in both the incidence and pathology of infection. Elderly people are at increased risk for micronutrient deficiencies due to a variety of factors including social, physical, economic, and emotional obstacles to eating. Thus there is an urgent need to shift priorities to increase our attention on ways to prevent chronic illnesses associated with aging. Individually, people must put increased efforts into establishing healthy lifestyle practices, including consuming a more healthful diet. The present review thus focuses on the phytochemicals of nutraceutical importance for the geriatric population. PMID:26151003

  13. [Tele-cooperation for innovative care using the example of the University Hospital Aachen. Telematics in intensive care medicine, emergency medicine, and telemedical intersectoral rehabilitation planning in geriatric trauma].

    PubMed

    Marx, Gernot; Beckers, Rainer; Brokmann, Jrg Christian; Deisz, Robert; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2015-10-01

    The demographic challenge of the ageing society is associated with increasing comorbidity. On the other hand, there will be an ageing workforce in medicine, resulting in an imbalance between the demand and supply of medical care in the near future. In rural areas in particular, this imbalance is already present today. Based on three best practice projects carried out by our telemedical center in Aachen, including emergency medicine, intensive care medicine, and the rehabilitation planning of geriatric trauma care, some experience and the potential of the intersectoral provision of care, supported by telemedicine, are demonstrated. Telemedicine is the provision of medical services over a geographical distance by using tele-communication and data transfer. It has been proven to ensure a constant quality of health care. Telemedical support enables shared expertise independent of time and space, and allows efficient allocation of resources. A review of international experience supports this notion. PMID:26281718

  14. An Evaluation of a Clerkship In Cardiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edson, John N.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Evaluation of the clinical clerkship in Cardiology for general practitioners proves there is an urgent need for continuing post graduate medical education for general practitioners. Clerkship was offered jointly by the Long Island College Hospital and the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York. (IR)

  15. Creating a longitudinal integrated clerkship with mutual benefits for an academic medical center and a community health system.

    PubMed

    Poncelet, Ann Noelle; Mazotti, Lindsay A; Blumberg, Bruce; Wamsley, Maria A; Grennan, Tim; Shore, William B

    2014-01-01

    The longitudinal integrated clerkship is a model of clinical education driven by tenets of social cognitive theory, situated learning, and workplace learning theories, and built on a foundation of continuity between students, patients, clinicians, and a system of care. Principles and goals of this type of clerkship are aligned with primary care principles, including patient-centered care and systems-based practice. Academic medical centers can partner with community health systems around a longitudinal integrated clerkship to provide mutual benefits for both organizations, creating a sustainable model of clinical training that addresses medical education and community health needs. A successful one-year longitudinal integrated clerkship was created in partnership between an academic medical center and an integrated community health system. Compared with traditional clerkship students, students in this clerkship had better scores on Clinical Performance Examinations, internal medicine examinations, and high perceptions of direct observation of clinical skills.Advantages for the academic medical center include mitigating the resources required to run a longitudinal integrated clerkship while providing primary care training and addressing core competencies such as systems-based practice, practice-based learning, and interprofessional care. Advantages for the community health system include faculty development, academic appointments, professional satisfaction, and recruitment.Success factors include continued support and investment from both organizations' leadership, high-quality faculty development, incentives for community-based physician educators, and emphasis on the mutually beneficial relationship for both organizations. Development of a longitudinal integrated clerkship in a community health system can serve as a model for developing and expanding these clerkship options for academic medical centers. PMID:24867551

  16. Creating a Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship with Mutual Benefits for an Academic Medical Center and a Community Health System

    PubMed Central

    Poncelet, Ann Noelle; Mazotti, Lindsay A; Blumberg, Bruce; Wamsley, Maria A; Grennan, Tim; Shore, William B

    2014-01-01

    The longitudinal integrated clerkship is a model of clinical education driven by tenets of social cognitive theory, situated learning, and workplace learning theories, and built on a foundation of continuity between students, patients, clinicians, and a system of care. Principles and goals of this type of clerkship are aligned with primary care principles, including patient-centered care and systems-based practice. Academic medical centers can partner with community health systems around a longitudinal integrated clerkship to provide mutual benefits for both organizations, creating a sustainable model of clinical training that addresses medical education and community health needs. A successful one-year longitudinal integrated clerkship was created in partnership between an academic medical center and an integrated community health system. Compared with traditional clerkship students, students in this clerkship had better scores on Clinical Performance Examinations, internal medicine examinations, and high perceptions of direct observation of clinical skills. Advantages for the academic medical center include mitigating the resources required to run a longitudinal integrated clerkship while providing primary care training and addressing core competencies such as systems-based practice, practice-based learning, and interprofessional care. Advantages for the community health system include faculty development, academic appointments, professional satisfaction, and recruitment. Success factors include continued support and investment from both organizations leadership, high-quality faculty development, incentives for community-based physician educators, and emphasis on the mutually beneficial relationship for both organizations. Development of a longitudinal integrated clerkship in a community health system can serve as a model for developing and expanding these clerkship options for academic medical centers. PMID:24867551

  17. Efficacy and safety of the Chinese herbal medicine shuganjieyu with and without adjunctive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for geriatric depression: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    XIE, Minmin; JIANG, Wenhai; YANG, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background Pharmacological treatment of geriatric depression is often ineffective because patients cannot tolerate adequate doses of antidepressant medications. Aim Examine the efficacy and safety of shuganjieyu the first Chinese herbal medicine approved for the treatment of depression by Chinas drug regulatory agency -- with and without adjunctive treatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of geriatric depression. Methods Sixty-five inpatients 60 or older who met ICD-10 criteria for depression were randomly assigned to an experimental group (shuganjieyu + rTMS) (n=36) or a control group (shuganjieyu + sham rTMS)(n=29). All participants received 4 capsules of shuganjieyu daily for 6 weeks. rTMS (or sham rTMS) was administered 20 minutes daily, five days a week for 4 weeks. Blinded raters used the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) and the Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale to assess clinical efficacy and safety at baseline and 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after starting treatment. Over the six-week trial, there was only one dropout from the experimental group and two dropouts from the control group. Results None of the patients had serious side effects, but 40% in the experimental group and 50% in the control group experienced minor side effects that all resolved spontaneously. Both groups showed substantial stepwise improvement in depressive symptoms over the 6 weeks. Repeated measures ANOVA found no differences between the two groups. After 6 weeks, 97% of the experimental group had experienced a 25% or greater drop in the level of depression, but only 20% had experience a 50% or greater drop in the level of depression; the corresponding values in the control group were 96% and 19%. There were some minor, non-significant differences in the onset of the treatment effect between the different types of depressive symptoms, but by the second week of treatment all five HAMD-17 subscale scores had improved significantly in both groups Conclusion The Chinese herbal medicine shuganjieyu is effective and safe in the treatment of geriatric depression, but only a minority of patients have greater than 50% improvement in their depressive symptoms after 6 weeks of treatment. Adjunctive use of rTMS with shuganjieyu does not improve the overall outcome and does not significantly speed up the onset of action of shuganjieyu. PMID:26120260

  18. A Medical Student Logbook for Streamlining Collection of Clerkship Evaluation Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DaRosa, Debra A.; Folse, Roland

    A medical student logbook that was developed by the Department of Surgery at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine to improve the clerkship is described. Specific objectives of the logbook were: (1) to reinforce student habits to systematically record relevant data concerning patients for purposes of future recall and reference; (2) to

  19. Does an AHEC-Sponsored Clerkship Experience Strengthen Medical Students' Intent to Provide Care for Medically Underserved Patients?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer D; Kiovsky, Richard D; Kayser, Ann; Kelley, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The mission of Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) is to recruit and educate students to serve as practicing health care professionals in rural, primary care, and medically underserved communities. We sought to determine if participation in an AHEC-sponsored family medicine clerkship experiences during medical school are significantly associated with a self-reported intent to practice primary care in a medically underserved environment upon graduation. The study was a prospective cohort study comparing third-year family medicine students with the Indiana University School of Medicine who participated in either an AHEC-sponsored family medicine clerkship to those who completed their required family medicine clerkship outside of the AHEC setting. Following the 160-h clinical clerkship, all students completed a mandatory, electronic survey and were asked to self-report their intent to the following question: "Which of the following statements best describes the impact of the family medicine clerkship on your intention to provide care to underserved patients when you complete residency training?" The question was integrated into a mandatory post-clerkship evaluation form required by the Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine. A Chi square test of independence as well as a multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent association of AHEC clerkship participation and reported intent. A total of 1138 students completed the survey. There were not significant differences in age, gender, race, and ethnicity between students that completed an AHEC clerkship and those that did not. After adjusting for gender, race, and ethnicity, AHEC participants were significantly more likely to report an intention to practice primary care in a medically underserved setting upon graduation. Female students were found to be 1.2-3.4 times as likely to report increased intent compared to male students (95% CI 1.241-3.394). Participation in an AHEC-supported clerkship was associated with a significant increase in self-reported intent to practice primary care in a medically underserved setting. Additional research is required to determine if participation and/or reported intent are predictive of practice selection after graduation. PMID:26026276

  20. Construct validity and generalizability of pediatrics clerkship evaluation at a problem-based medical school, Bahrain.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahroos, Fadheela

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the sources of construct validity evidence and determine generalizability of the scores given to medical students on pediatrics clerkship evaluation at the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Arabian Gulf University (CMMS-AGU). The CMMS-AGU is a problem-based medical school in Bahrain. The sample was composed of 140 students. Validity evidence and generalizability theory were sought. Results indicated that pediatrics clerkship evaluation at CMMS-AGU has content validity. Some limitations may have occurred in response process, but the students performance was observed directly by the tutors. There was evidence of range restriction and "halo'' effect. Interrater reliability was 0.74, and the generalizability coefficient for three raters was 0.61. Students' contribution to the variance component of the global clerkship evaluation scores was 24%. Decision study indicated that seven tutors are required to achieve a generalizability coefficient of about 0.80. In conclusion, this study indicated that the pediatrics clerkship evaluation at the CMMS-AGU has, overall, some acceptable content and internal structure evidence of validity and that the raters are the major source of error. To improve the construct validity, there is a need to increase the number of raters and to train raters about the proper process of clerkship evaluation. PMID:19448161

  1. Guidelines for Graduate Medical Education in Geriatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Alan S.; Beck, John C.

    1982-01-01

    Performance objectives, core content, training experiences, and clinical exposure and program evaluations are described for geriatric fellows and house staff members in internal medicine, family practice, neurology, and psychiatry. A modified Delphi study was used. (Author/MLW)

  2. Clerkship rotation in rural family practice

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John

    1995-01-01

    Every medical student at Memorial University of Newfoundland must do a rotation in rural family practice. This paper describes the organization of this clerkship learning experience and discusses its possible influence upon career choice. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:7780316

  3. Geriatrics in family practice residency education: an unmet challenge.

    PubMed

    Gazewood, John D; Vanderhoff, Bruce; Ackermann, Richard; Cefalu, Charles

    2003-01-01

    The aging of the US population poses one of the greatest future challenges for family practice residency graduates. At a time when our discipline should be strengthening geriatric education to address the needs of our aging population, the Group on Geriatric Education of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine believes that recent guidelines from important family medicine organizations suggest that our discipline's interest in geriatric education may be waning. Barriers to improving geriatric education in family practice residencies include limited geriatric faculty, changes in geriatric fellowship training, competing curricular demands, and limited diversity of geriatric training sites. Improving geriatric education in family practice residencies will require greater emphasis on faculty development and integration of geriatric principles throughout family practice residency education. The Residency Review Committee for Family Practice should review the Program Requirements for Residency Education to ensure that geriatric training requirements are consistent with current educational needs. The leadership of family medicine organizations should collaboratively address the need for continued improvement in training our residents to care for older patients and the chronically ill. PMID:12564861

  4. Geriatric Trauma: A Clinical and Ethical Review.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Casie L; Torke, Alexia M

    2016-01-01

    Because of advances in medicine and other sciences, the average human life span is longer now than any other time in history. The physiologic effects of aging as well as multimorbidity, polypharmacy, and other geriatric-specific syndromes create additional challenges when elderly patients experience a traumatic injury. However, there is a growing evidence base that can inform the clinical decision-making process. This narrative review of the literature addresses the state of the science regarding geriatric syndromes, guidelines and protocols, indices and models for prognostication, outcomes and ethical concerns in the treatment of geriatric trauma. PMID:26745538

  5. Sex Counselling for Your Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Eaid, C. R. M.

    1972-01-01

    The geriatric population has traditionally received less attention by family physicians than any other segment of society. Sexual counselling is of necessity an important sphere of family medicine. The geriatric patient is entitled to and should receive empathy and support in this area. The physician must use basic sexual advice tailored to the special needs of this group. These needs are reviewed and certain truths and fallacies are discussed. PMID:20468856

  6. Family Practice Clerkships in California and Nevada: A Manual and Guide for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., San Francisco. Div. of Family and Community Medicine.

    Information is provided on family practice clerkships (25 available at the time of publication in California and 1 in Nevada) to assist students in choosing a clerkship. For each clerkship, information is presented on the following: school/course, residency affiliation, site, address and phone number, clerkship director, clerkship coordinator,

  7. Progress in Geriatrics: A Clinical Care Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchette, Patricia Lanoie; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This issue includes 18 theme articles that examine clinical care, conditions, and practice as they relate to older adults. It contains articles on the following: men's and women's health, depression, dementia, hypertension, incontinence, bone pain, infections, preventive medicine, geriatric medicine, health care delivery, managed care, long-term…

  8. Progress in Geriatrics: A Clinical Care Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchette, Patricia Lanoie; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This issue includes 18 theme articles that examine clinical care, conditions, and practice as they relate to older adults. It contains articles on the following: men's and women's health, depression, dementia, hypertension, incontinence, bone pain, infections, preventive medicine, geriatric medicine, health care delivery, managed care, long-term

  9. Ethical dilemmas in clerkship rotations.

    PubMed

    Myers, Michael F; Herb, Alice

    2013-11-01

    A sound clinical education should include the opportunity for medical students to engage in a spirited and informed discussion with faculty about the ethical challenges they will undoubtedly face. Unfortunately, in many medical schools today this goal is thwarted by many factors, including denial that a problem exists, relentless system overload, unprofessional behavior, breakdown in communication, and inertia. What is worse is that this problem is not new, and the fallout is not insignificant. Another potential contributing factor is burnout, which is well documented in a high percentage of medical students, residents, and faculty, and two of its most serious consequences are patient dissatisfaction and medical error.The authors draw on hundreds of student reflections on ethical dilemmas submitted during classroom exercises to examine persistent themes. They posit that classroom and didactic teaching is not enough to enable students to face ethical dilemmas. The authors call for a major culture change in medical education: "buy in" from top administration, especially the dean (and associate/assistant deans), chairs of all departments, and clerkship and residency training directors; the appointing of an ombudsperson and/or ethicist to oversee and resolve issues as they arise; instructional workshops and materials to enhance and impart skills for all teachers; remediation or retiring of errant faculty; and ongoing research and dialogue between and among medical centers about novel solutions. PMID:24072128

  10. [Definition and outline on geriatric oncology].

    PubMed

    Terret, C; Droz, J-P

    2009-11-01

    Geriatric oncology is the concept for management of elderly cancer patients. It is an equal approach of the health status problems and of cancer in a patient considered as a whole. Therefore it is not a subspecialty but a practice which can be translated in the elderly cancer patient's care. The treatment of cancer is based on the same principles than this of younger patients; recommendations used are those of the scientific oncological societies. Health problems of elderly patients are screened by specific tools. Patients without major health problems are managed by the oncological team in the routine; those for whom screening have demonstrated problems are first evaluated in the geriatrics setting and then oncological decisions are adapted to the patient situation. Decisions are made in specific geriatric oncology conferences. Specific clinical trials are required to build an Evidence Based Medicine background. Geriatric oncology teaching programs are warranted. PMID:20123506

  11. Accuracy of Surgery Clerkship Performance Raters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, John H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Interrater reliability in numerical ratings of clerkship performance (n=1,482 students) in five surgery programs was studied. Raters were classified as accurate or moderately or significantly stringent or lenient. Results indicate that increasing the proportion of accurate raters would substantially improve the precision of class rankings. (MSE)

  12. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a

  13. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a…

  14. Patient safety in geriatrics: a call for action.

    PubMed

    Tsilimingras, Dionyssios; Rosen, Amy K; Berlowitz, Dan R

    2003-09-01

    Patient safety has become a major public health concern following the publication of the landmark report, To Err Is Human, by the Institute of Medicine in 1999. This report, along with a subsequent report, Crossing the Quality Chasm, recommended the design of a safer health care system by integrating well-established safety methods to avert medical errors. However, neither patient safety report specifically addressed the implications of safety for elderly patients. This article examines those implications by describing the association between aging and medical errors, identifying geriatric syndromes as medical errors, and focusing on six recommendations that will improve the safety of geriatric care. These six recommendations include the detection and reporting of geriatric syndromes, identifying system failures when geriatric syndromes occur, establishing dedicated geriatric units, improving the continuity of care, reducing adverse drug events, and improving geriatric training programs. PMID:14528037

  15. [Review in geriatric medicine 2011].

    PubMed

    Rochat, S; Doser, N; Eyer, S; Jabri, A; Rubli, E; Büla, C

    2012-01-11

    In 2011, new tools to evaluate life expectancy are available. Controversy about PSA-based screening for prostate cancer is still going on, with new data from the US Preventive services task force. A brief behavioral treatment for insomnia can be efficient and durable. Gliptines are be useful to avoid treatment-induced hypoglycemia in diabetic patients. New Alzheimer diagnostic criteria, including biomarkers, have been published. PMID:22303735

  16. [What's new in geriatric medicine].

    PubMed

    Eyer, Stephan; Rochat, Stphane; Monod, Stfanie; Bla, Christophe; Gold, Gabriel

    2010-01-13

    Several studies clarified the role of different interventions such as vitamine D replacement, denosumab treatment, and vertebroplasty in the prevention and management of falls and fractures. A trial tested the effectiveness of pharmaceutical assistance at the time of discharge, emphasizing the potential benefits for the patients and the health care system. Syncopal episodes frequently lead to hospital admission. A retrospective study evaluated the diagnostic yield of different tests and emphasized the importance to actively seek orthostatic hypotension in older patients. Finally, advances remain modest in the field of dementias. PMID:20196429

  17. Autonomy and paternalism in geriatric medicine. The Jewish ethical approach to issues of feeding terminally ill patients, and to cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Rosin, A J; Sonnenblick, M

    1998-02-01

    Respecting and encouraging autonomy in the elderly is basic to the practice of geriatrics. In this paper, we examine the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and "artificial" feeding in a geriatric unit in a general hospital subscribing to jewish orthodox religious principles, in which the sanctity of life is a fundamental ethical guideline. The literature on the administration of food and water in terminal stages of illness, including dementia, still shows division of opinion on the morality of withdrawing nutrition. We uphold the principle that as long as feeding by naso-gastric (N-G) or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) does not constitute undue danger or arouse serious opposition it should be given, without causing suffering to the patient. This is part of basic care, and the doctor has no mandate to withdraw this. The question of CPR still shows much discrepancy regarding elderly patients' wishes, and doctors' opinions about its worthwhileness, although up to 10 percent survive. Our geriatric patients rarely discuss the subject, but it is openly ventilated with families who ask about it, who are then involved in the decision-making, and the decision about CPR or "do-not-resuscitate" (DNR) is based on clinical and prognostic considerations. PMID:9549682

  18. An Approach to Address Grade Inflation in a Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Brenda J. B.; Trevino, Justin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Universally, clerkship grading is diverse and not standardized. The authors' faculty was troubled by the inability to provide meaningful evaluations, as more than 60% of students received the highest grade. Although a psychiatry clerkship mandate of a faculty-observed student clinical interview existed for several years, the majority of

  19. Use of Standardized Patients during a Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Aurora J.; Arnold, Lesley M.; Welge, Jeffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Standardized patients are used in teaching medical students and evaluating their clinical skills during the psychiatric clerkship. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the addition of a Psychiatry Clinical Standardized Patient Examination (PCX) during the third-year clerkship improved students' performances on the

  20. Development and Qualitative Evaluation of Rural Ambulatory Care Clinical Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raisch, Dennis W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A University of New Mexico pharmacy clerkship in Indian Health Service rural ambulatory clinics is described and its results compared with an urban hospital clerkship. Unique benefits to participants included improved skills in patient counseling and chart screening, more hands-on experience, extensive individual physician consultations, and…

  1. Training osteopathic geriatric academicians: impact of a model geriatric residency program.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, T A; Basehore, P; Perweiler, E; Chopra, A

    1999-07-01

    The need for osteopathic geriatric academic leaders who are educators and researchers is well recognized. The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-School of Osteopathic Medicine's Geriatric Residency program, a federally funded Faculty Training Project in Geriatric Medicine and Dentistry, has served as a model program in the osteopathic medical professional since its inception in 1989. Targeting internal medicine and family medicine physicians interested in academic careers in geriatrics, the program promotes interdisciplinary training, which develops clinical, research, and teaching/administrative skills. A survey of program graduates assessed their perceptions about the field of geriatrics and the impact of training on career choice and level of satisfaction. Results indicated that 100% of the former trainees entered the field of geriatrics; 57% hold full-time faculty appointments at an osteopathic medical school, and 43% practice as clinical geriatricians. Of those in an academic setting, all taught medical students and housestaff and were involved in research. All of the respondents wee satisfied with their career choice, although 71% indicated that a higher salary and greater respect for the discipline would further enhance their satisfaction. Greater than half perceived the need for additional geriatricians and ranked complexity of care, lower salaries, inadequate reimbursement, and indebtedness after medical school as significant barriers to entering the field. This program has been successful in training academic geriatricians, it has created role models for students, and it has responded to the shortage of osteopathic academic and clinical geriatricians. Financial incentives and reimbursement that is commensurate with complexity of care would serve to attract more trainees to this important primary care discipline. PMID:10441936

  2. Academic career development in geriatric fellowship training.

    PubMed

    Medina-Walpole, Annette; Fonzi, Judith; Katz, Paul R

    2007-12-01

    Career development is rarely formalized in the curricula of geriatric fellowship programs, and the training of new generations of academic leaders is challenging in the 1 year of fellowship training. To effectively prepare fellows for academic leadership, the University of Rochester's Division of Geriatrics, in collaboration with the Warner School of Graduate Education, created a yearlong course to achieve excellence in teaching and career development during the 1-year geriatric fellowship. Nine interdisciplinary geriatric medicine, dentistry, and psychiatry fellows completed the course in its initial year (2005/06). As participants, fellows gained the knowledge and experience to successfully develop and implement educational initiatives in various formats. Fellows acquired teaching and leadership skills necessary to succeed as clinician-educators in an academic setting and to communicate effectively with patients, families, and colleagues. Fellows completed a series of individual and group education projects, including academic portfolio development, curriculum vitae revision, abstract submission and poster presentation at national meetings, lay lecture series development, and geriatric grand rounds presentation. One hundred percent of fellows reported that the course positively affected their career development, with six of nine fellows choosing academic careers. The course provided opportunities to teach and assess all six of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education core competencies. This academic career development course was intended to prepare geriatric fellows as the next generation of academic leaders as clinician-teacher-scholars. It could set a new standard for academic development during fellowship training and provide a model for national dissemination in other geriatric and subspecialty fellowship programs. PMID:17971139

  3. Lean business model and implementation of a geriatric fracture center.

    PubMed

    Kates, Stephen L

    2014-05-01

    Geriatric hip fracture is a common event associated with high costs of care and often with suboptimal outcomes for the patients. Ideally, a new care model to manage geriatric hip fractures would address both quality and safety of patient care as well as the need for reduced costs of care. The geriatric fracture center model of care is one such model reported to improve both outcomes and quality of care. It is a lean business model applied to medicine. This article describes basic lean business concepts applied to geriatric fracture care and information needed to successfully implement a geriatric fracture center. It is written to assist physicians and surgeons in their efforts to implement an improved care model for their patients. PMID:24721360

  4. Finding the differences between the East and West in clinical clerkship: A Chinese exchange medical student's perspective.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kanhua

    2015-05-01

    As a sixth-year medical student and the first exchange medical student from Fudan University, China, I had the opportunity to take a three-month elective at University of California at Davis (UC Davis) School of Medicine from October 2013 to January 2014. I worked and studied at the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, the General Medicine Consults Service, and the Department of Emergency Medicine in those days. This precious experience enhanced my medical knowledge, broadened my view, and at the same time, deepened my understanding of clerkship as part of medical education. PMID:25183495

  5. Clerkship maturity: Does the idea of training clinical skills work?

    PubMed Central

    Stosch, Christoph; Joachim, Alexander; Ascher, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Background: With the reformed curriculum 4C, the Medical Faculty of the University of Cologne has started to systematically plan practical skills training, for which Clerkship Maturity is the first step. The key guidelines along which the curriculum was development were developed by experts. This approach has now been validated. Materials and methods: Both students and teachers were asked to fill in a questionnaire regarding preclinical practical skills training to confirm the concept of Clerkship Maturity. Results and discussion: The Cologne training program Clerkship Maturity can be validated empirically overall through the activities of the students awaiting the clerkship framework and through the evaluation by the medical staff providing the training. The subjective ratings of the advantages of the training by the students leave room for improvement. Apart from minor improvements to the program, the most likely solution providing sustainable results will involve an over-regional strategy for establishing skills training planned as part of the curriculum. PMID:21866243

  6. At the precipice: a prospective exploration of medical students' expectations of the pre-clerkship to clerkship transition.

    PubMed

    Soo, Jason; Brett-MacLean, Pamela; Cave, Marie-Therese; Oswald, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Medical learners face many challenging transitions. We prospectively explored students' perceptions of their upcoming transition to clerkship and their future professional selves. In 2013, 160/165 end-of-second-year medical students wrote narrative reflections and 79/165 completed a questionnaire on their perceptions of their upcoming transition to clerkship. Narratives were separately analyzed by four authors and then discussed to identify a final thematic framework using parsimonious category construction. We identified two overarching themes: (1) "Looking back": experiences which had helped students feel prepared for clerkship with subthemes focused on of patient care, shadowing, classroom teaching and the pre-clerkship years as foundational knowledge, (2) "Looking forward": anticipating the clerkship experience and the journey of becoming a physician with subthemes focused on death and dying, hierarchy, work-life balance, interactions with patients, concerns about competency and career choice. Questionnaire data revealed incongruities around expectations of minimal exposure to death and dying, little need for independent study and limited direct patient responsibility. We confirmed that internal transformations are happening in contemplative time even before clerkship. By prospectively exploring pre-clerkship students' perceptions of the transition to clerkship training we identified expectations and misconceptions that could be addressed with future curricular interventions. While students are aware of and anticipating their learning needs it is not as clear that they realise how much their future learning will depend on their own inner resources. We suggest that more attention be paid to professional identity formation and the development of the physician as a person during these critical transitions. PMID:26164285

  7. American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

    MedlinePLUS

    ... List AAGP Members Our Supporters >> Corporate Advisory Council Geriatric Mental Health Foundation Advertise with Us Privacy & Legal ... Tweets Top Stories Press Releases IOM Report on Geriatric Mental Health Care Workforce Annual Meeting For The ...

  8. The geriatric assessment.

    PubMed

    Elsawy, Bassem; Higgins, Kim E

    2011-01-01

    The geriatric assessment is a multidimensional, multidisciplinary assessment designed to evaluate an older person's functional ability, physical health, cognition and mental health, and socioenvironmental circumstances. It is usually initiated when the physician identifies a potential problem. Specific elements of physical health that are evaluated include nutrition, vision, hearing, fecal and urinary continence, and balance. The geriatric assessment aids in the diagnosis of medical conditions; development of treatment and follow-up plans; coordination of management of care; and evaluation of long-term care needs and optimal placement. The geriatric assessment differs from a standard medical evaluation by including nonmedical domains; by emphasizing functional capacity and quality of life; and, often, by incorporating a multidisciplinary team. It usually yields a more complete and relevant list of medical problems, functional problems, and psychosocial issues. Well-validated tools and survey instruments for evaluating activities of daily living, hearing, fecal and urinary continence, balance, and cognition are an important part of the geriatric assessment. Because of the demands of a busy clinical practice, most geriatric assessments tend to be less comprehensive and more problem-directed. When multiple concerns are presented, the use of a "rolling" assessment over several visits should be considered. Academy of Family Physicians. PMID:21888128

  9. Geriatric Medical Education in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibovitz, Arthur; Baumoehl, Yehuda; Habot, Beni

    2004-01-01

    In this article we will focus on geriatric medical education in Israel and will review our experience in this field. A coordinated effort of the Ministry of Health and the Israeli Medical Association led to the establishment of a modern geriatric system and to the recognition of geriatrics as a medical specialty in the early 1980s. All four

  10. Geriatric Medical Education in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibovitz, Arthur; Baumoehl, Yehuda; Habot, Beni

    2004-01-01

    In this article we will focus on geriatric medical education in Israel and will review our experience in this field. A coordinated effort of the Ministry of Health and the Israeli Medical Association led to the establishment of a modern geriatric system and to the recognition of geriatrics as a medical specialty in the early 1980s. All four…

  11. Physician Assistant Attitude and Expressed Intent to Work with Geriatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolsey, Lisa J.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the attitudes of physician assistant students (PAS) and practicing physician assistants (PA) toward geriatric patients and the expressed intent of PAS and practicing PAs toward practicing in the specialized field of geriatric medicine using a cross-sectional study design. The 233 participants each completed a questionnaire

  12. Some of My Best Friends Are Old: A Qualitative Exploration of Medical Students' Interest in Geriatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schigelone, Amy Schiller; Ingersoll-Dayton, Berit

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides insight into the reasons underlying medical students' interest in geriatrics. Semi-structured interviews, informed by attitude theory, were conducted with first-year medical students who indicated that they were not interested in geriatric medicine ( n =10) and those who indicated that they were moderately to very interested in…

  13. Some of My Best Friends Are Old: A Qualitative Exploration of Medical Students' Interest in Geriatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schigelone, Amy Schiller; Ingersoll-Dayton, Berit

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides insight into the reasons underlying medical students' interest in geriatrics. Semi-structured interviews, informed by attitude theory, were conducted with first-year medical students who indicated that they were not interested in geriatric medicine and those who indicated that they were moderately to very interested in…

  14. Physician Assistant Attitude and Expressed Intent to Work with Geriatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolsey, Lisa J.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the attitudes of physician assistant students (PAS) and practicing physician assistants (PA) toward geriatric patients and the expressed intent of PAS and practicing PAs toward practicing in the specialized field of geriatric medicine using a cross-sectional study design. The 233 participants each completed a questionnaire…

  15. Implementing a successful senior/geriatric health care program for veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and office managers.

    PubMed

    Fortney, William D

    2012-07-01

    Geriatrics and gerontology have emerged as one of the fastest growing portions of a progressive small animal practice. A critical component of geriatric medicine is a senior/geriatric health care program with senior profiling. Fifty percent of small animal practices have some form of senior/geriatric health care program and the percentage is growing. Armed with the knowledge gleaned from a successful health care program, the progressive veterinarian is better positioned to prevent and/or manage problems in the earliest stages, increasing the options available plus improving the overall outcome. PMID:22720816

  16. Geriatric Live Interactive Teleconferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parham, Iris A.; Wood, Joan

    1985-01-01

    This document includes a successful model for implementing educational teleconferencing, the Geriatric Live Interactive Teleconferencing program at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). As a vehicle for continuing professional education, teleconferencing can transmit the latest information to large numbers of health professionals in a variety of…

  17. American Geriatrics Society

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Us Health Care Professionals Advocacy Public Policy Public Education Featured Free Online Guide with Free CME! New Guide from ... Access “Achieving High-Quality Multicultural Geriatric Care” for free here. ... from American College of Surgeons and AGS address unique care required ...

  18. Dermatoses in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kelly, R

    1977-01-01

    Geriatric patients, though they may present many of the dermatological problems occurring throughout adult life, show a greater incidence of the degenerative skin changes consequent on sun exposure in the form of collagen degeneration, solar keratoses, keratoacanthoma and skin cancer. The benign, precancerous and malignant skin tumours, the various types of eczema, senile pruritus and certain other conditions will be discussed. PMID:140650

  19. Geriatric Sexuality Breakdown Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaas, Merrie Jean

    1981-01-01

    Focuses on the relationship between social environment and the older individual. By utilizing the Social Breakdown Syndrome a cycle of events is defined by the Geriatric Sexuality Breakdown Syndrome, in which an older individual is initially predisposed to diminished sexual activity to the end point of self-identification as nonsexual. (Author)

  20. Geriatric urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Ouslander, J G

    1992-02-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is now recognized as a prevalent, physically and emotionally disruptive, and costly health problem in the geriatric population. Because incontinence may be a manifestation of a subacute or reversible process within or outside of the lower urinary tract, and because effective treatment is available, it is important for primary care physicians to identify and appropriately assess incontinence in their geriatric patients. The initial evaluation of an incontinent geriatric patients. The initial evaluation of an incontinent geriatric patient includes a targeted history and physical examination, urinalysis, and simple tests of lower urinary tract function. Potentially reversible conditions that may be causing or contributing to the incontinence, such as delirium and urinary tract infection (UTI), should be identified and managed. Patients who may benefit from further testing, including urologic or gynecologic examination and/or complex urodynamic tests, should be identified and referred. Several therapeutic modalities can be used to treat geriatric UI. Behavioral therapies are noninvasive and effective, both in functional community-dwelling geriatric patients and in functionally impaired nursing home residents. Behavioral therapies include bladder training, pelvic muscle exercises, biofeedback, scheduled toileting, habit training, and prompted voiding. Pharmacologic therapy is often used in conjunction with behavioral therapy. For stress incontinence, alpha-adrenergic drugs are used and can be combined with topical or oral estrogen therapy in women. For urge incontinence, pharmacologic treatment involves drugs with anticholinergic and direct bladder muscle relaxant properties. Pharmacologic therapy for overflow incontinence is generally not effective on a long-term basis. Surgical treatment is indicated when a pathologic lesion such as a tumor is diagnosed, or when anatomic obstruction is believed to be the cause of the patient's symptoms. Surgical treatment of stress incontinence can be highly effective in properly selected women. Nonspecific, supportive treatments are also important in managing geriatric UI. Education for patients and caregivers is critical for the success of most therapies. Environmental manipulations and the appropriate use of toilet substitutes are especially important in frail, functionally impaired patients. Highly absorbent adult undergarments are helpful for managing many patients, but should not be used as the initial response to incontinence, and are best used in conjunction with more specific treatment whenever possible. Chronic indwelling catheterization should only be used to manage incontinence when it is associated with clinically significant urinary retention, skin conditions that cannot heal because of incontinence, or severe illness that makes the catheter the most comfortable method of management.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1732088

  1. Mapping Students Clinical Experiences to Pediatric Clerkship Goals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Sharkey, Angela; McGann, Kathleen; Sumner, Walton

    2006-01-01

    In anticipation of new LCME accreditation requirements, our third year clerkship students began tracking pediatric clinical experiences using a hand-held Electronic Student Encounter Log (ESEL) in June 2005. ESEL was tailored to support rapid documentation of diseases seen at a pediatric tertiary care hospital, while retaining access to primary care diagnoses. We matched encounters that 37 students documented to experiences that fulfill the pediatric clerkships 19 educational goals. We discovered omissions in both ESEL and the goal definitions. No student documented meeting all goals, and no goal was met by all students. Handheld encounter logs are useful for tracking clinical experiences. Logs, logging instructions, and goals require regular compatibility checks. PMID:17238622

  2. Geriatric Telemedicine: Background and Evidence for Telemedicine as a Way to Address the Challenges of Geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The global population of elderly people is increasing at a remarkable rate, which may be expected to continue for some time. Older patients require more care, and with the current model of care delivery, the costs may be expected to rise, although higher cost is unsustainable. For this reason, a new pattern of practice is needed. Telemedicine will be presented as a highly effective and necessary tool in geriatrics. Methods This review will present some of the background and evidence for telemedicine as a way to address the challenges of geriatrics through geriatric telemedicine. Some of the evidence for the value of telemedicine as a tool for physicians and healthcare systems is presented. Results Telemedicine offers many means to address the problems of geriatric care in creative ways. The use of electronic medicine, telecommunications, and information management has now found its way into the very fabric of health care. The use of telemedicine is a fait accompli in much of the world, and it continues to have an increasing role deeply imbedded in our electronic practices coupled with social media. Conclusions The evidence for successful incorporation of telemedicine into practice is abundant and continues to accrue. This is a great opportunity for medical practice to evolve to new levels of engagement with patients and new levels of attainment in terms of quality care. PMID:26618027

  3. [Specificities of pneumonia in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Pepersack, T

    2014-09-01

    Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality leading to a high rate of hospitalization especially in theelderly. It is often a sign of frailty and is associated with a poor prognosis. However, taking into account the geriatric specificities (risk factors, atypical clinical presentations with "geriatric syndromes", ethical debate) using an interdisciplinary and a comprehensive geriatric approach remains an important responsibility of the general practitionner. This article summarizes these specificities and offers interventions targeted on the characteristics of elderly patients. PMID:25675645

  4. Strength and influence of geriatrics departments in academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Marie A; Blanchette, Patricia L; Brummel-Smith, Kenneth

    2009-05-01

    The United States is establishing new medical schools and increasing class size by 30% in response to the predicted increased needs of the baby boom generation, which will retire soon and live longer than prior generations. Society in general and the medical profession in particular are ill equipped to care for the special needs of the elderly. Since the early 1980s, departments of geriatric medicine have been developed in the United States. However, the prevailing U.S. system for the training of physicians in geriatrics is through sections, divisions, or institutes. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of departments of geriatrics, using case examples from three (University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Florida State University College of Medicine, and University of Hawaii at Mnoa John A. Burns School of Medicine) of the extant 11 medical schools in the United States with departments of geriatrics. Commonalities among the three departments include a seat at the planning table in academic life, equal treatment and collaboration with other departments in academic and research program development, and direct access to key decision makers and opportunities for negotiation for funds. Each department has outreach to all undergraduate medical students through its training program. All three departments were launched through the investment of significant resources obtained both internally and externally. The challenge for the future will be to definitively demonstrate the efficacy of the department model versus the more prevalent section, division, and institute approach to training physicians to care for the elderly. PMID:19704196

  5. [Urosepsis in Geriatric Patients].

    PubMed

    Heppner, H J; Yapan, F; Wiedemann, A

    2016-02-01

    Due to the demographic shift, increasing numbers of geriatric patients are admitted to acute care hospitals of all levels of care. This means that special challenges must be met in the medical care and management of these patients.Immunosenescence and multimorbidity make elderly patients vulnerable to infectious diseases. Urinary tract infections range from "simple" cystitis to pyelonephritis and urosepsis and, at 25%, are the second most common form of infection in geriatric patients. It is often difficult to make a diagnosis because typical symptoms do not always occur. Urosepsis, a hyperactive and uncontrolled immune response of the organism due to exogenous damage, is based on bacterial infection of the urogenital tract. Urinary retention, immunosuppressive medication, malignancy, diabetes mellitus and renal or prostatic processes promote the risk for urosepsis. Complicated urosepsis additionally comprises a structural or functional abnormality, including ureteral obstruction. Risk factors for urosepsis are urinary incontinence, an indwelling urinary catheter, hydronephrosis or ureteral calculi. Patients suffering from diabetes mellitus are also at a higher risk for urosepsis. When diagnosing elderly patients, one has to consider that the classic symptoms can be masked by multimorbidity, or septic encephalopathy and acute confusion (delirium) may be the only symptoms. Body temperature is lower in elderly patients and does not necessarily rise to 38°C or more in the acute phase. In patients older than 75 years who are suspicious for sepsis, temperatures as low as 37.4°C should be rated as fever. Treatment of urosepsis basically includes clearing the focus, antimicrobial treatment, stabilisation of circulation and replacement of failed organ functions. Initial empiric antibiotic treatment, depending on local resistance, should be done with acylaminopenicilline and beta-lactamase inhibitors (e. g. piperacillin/combactam or tazobactam or group 3 cephalosporins (e. g. cefotaxim). In case of intolerance, fluoroquinolone with high urinary excretion or carbapenem can be used. Also multidrug resistant germs are of importance for urosepsis and require appropriate initial antibiotic treatment.The multimorbidity of geriatric patients puts them at risk for a severe course of infectious diseases. Early identification of high-risk patients and geriatric expert monitoring in intensive care units may assist intensive care physicians. Treatment success in intensive care can be maintained by early geriatric acute rehabilitation. This requires all those involved to enter into an interdisciplinary and interprofessional dialogue. PMID:26916045

  6. Feasibility of Incorporating Alternative Teaching Methods into Clinical Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Judith; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A study investigated the effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction, interactive video, and videotapes as alternative methods of instruction in clinical clerkship modules on diabetes and hypertension. The 17 participants were more interested in balancing time between patient contact and alternative teaching methods and had better knowledge,

  7. Medical Students' Interest in Child Psychiatry: A Clerkship Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Vicki L.; Bennett, David S.; Pitale, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine the efficacy of a brief presentation to enhance clerkship student interest in child and adolescent psychiatry as a career choice. Method: Attitudes of students attending a brief presentation on the positive aspects of child psychiatry were compared with those of non-attenders. Results: Students who attended the…

  8. Child Development and Disability: Competency-Based Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simeonsson, Rune; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A competency-based training model is presented which specifies competencies, achievement methods, and evaluation procedures for a clerkship in mental retardation. Focus is on developing practical skills and a positive orientation toward developmental problems. Evaluative measures for 12 students showed positive knowledge and attitude changes.

  9. Student Experiences with Competency Domains during a Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Donald A.; Nierenberg, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The authors reviewed medical student encounters during 3 years of a required psychiatry clerkship that were recorded on a web-based system of six broad competency domains (similar to ACGME-recommended domains). These were used to determine diagnoses of patients seen, clinical skills practiced, and experiences in interpersonal and

  10. Perceived health and geriatric risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Bluestein, Daniel; Rutledge, Carolyn M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between perceived health and self-reported presence of certain geriatric conditions. Perceived health (the way people rate their own health) is a summary measure of health status that predicts functional decline, health care use, and mortality, but has not been examined as a measure of the prevalence of key geriatric conditions among older adults. DESIGN Cross-sectional surveys addressing perceived health and other study variables were mailed to practice patients. SETTING An urban university-based family medicine residency program. PARTICIPANTS In a random sample of 400 patients (from 1327 potential participants) older than 65 years (excluding those with known dementia), more than half (262) responded with usable surveys. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Self-reported geriatric syndromes, such as perceived memory loss, depression, falls, incontinence, weight loss, problems with walking, and difficulties with instrumental activities of daily living. RESULTS Of 262 respondents, 102 reported that they perceived their health as poor or fair and were much more likely than people who perceived their health as robust (good, very good, or excellent) to report memory impairment (49.6% vs 23.1%), depression (38.0% vs 13.5%), falls (26.5% vs 12.5%), incontinence (48.5% vs 34.6%), weight loss (33.3% vs 15.4%), needing help with walking (27.3% vs 13.1%), and difficulties with activities of daily living (57.6% vs 24.4%). CONCLUSION These results support the hypothesis that assessment of perceived health can help differentiate low-risk elderly people requiring usual surveillance for geriatric conditions from high-risk elderly people who require timely evaluation and management. PMID:17327894

  11. Do Geriatricians Stay in Geriatrics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Uday; Aung, Myo; Chan, Susanna; Wolfklein, Gisele

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate whether formally trained geriatricians remain in the field of Geriatrics, and to determine their job satisfaction and perceived quality of life, we surveyed the 107 fellows trained over the last 25 years in one accredited geriatric program. Of the 88 physicians who consented to participate, 75% devoted at least half of their practice

  12. Do Geriatricians Stay in Geriatrics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Uday; Aung, Myo; Chan, Susanna; Wolfklein, Gisele

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate whether formally trained geriatricians remain in the field of Geriatrics, and to determine their job satisfaction and perceived quality of life, we surveyed the 107 fellows trained over the last 25 years in one accredited geriatric program. Of the 88 physicians who consented to participate, 75% devoted at least half of their practice…

  13. At the Precipice: A Prospective Exploration of Medical Students' Expectations of the Pre-Clerkship to Clerkship Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soo, Jason; Brett-MacLean, Pamela; Cave, Marie-Therese; Oswald, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Medical learners face many challenging transitions. We prospectively explored students' perceptions of their upcoming transition to clerkship and their future professional selves. In 2013, 160/165 end-of-second-year medical students wrote narrative reflections and 79/165 completed a questionnaire on their perceptions of their upcoming transition…

  14. At the Precipice: A Prospective Exploration of Medical Students' Expectations of the Pre-Clerkship to Clerkship Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soo, Jason; Brett-MacLean, Pamela; Cave, Marie-Therese; Oswald, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Medical learners face many challenging transitions. We prospectively explored students' perceptions of their upcoming transition to clerkship and their future professional selves. In 2013, 160/165 end-of-second-year medical students wrote narrative reflections and 79/165 completed a questionnaire on their perceptions of their upcoming transition

  15. Increasing Interest in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the Third-Year Clerkship: Results from a Post-Clerkship Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Erin; Hollar, David; Lindsey, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors aimed to determine whether a structured clinical experience in child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) during the third-year psychiatry clerkship would impact interest in pursuing careers in psychiatry and CAP. Methods: The authors constructed and administered a post-rotation survey, the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

  16. The learning environment in the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship: an exploratory study of students' perceptions before and after the clerkship

    PubMed Central

    Baecher-Lind, Laura E.; Chang, Katherine; Blanco, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    For reasons that remain not entirely clear, Obstetrics and Gynecology (Ob/Gyn) clerkships often exhibit comparatively higher rates of medical student mistreatment. To explore perceptions of our local learning environment, focus groups were held with students yet to start (pre-students) and students having completed (post-students) their Ob/Gyn clerkship. Topics of discussion included learning expectations and experiences, perceptions of mistreatment, and suggestions for improving the learning environment and student treatment. Using a naturalistic approach, we conducted a conventional content analysis to identify emergent themes. Nine pre-students and nine post-students participated. While pre-students anticipated being actively engaged, they also expected – based on peer accounts – to be subject to an unwelcoming learning environment on the Ob/Gyn clerkship, despite working hard to become team members. Due to patient advocacy and protection concerns, post-students reported low levels of student involvement and, subsequently, an overall passive learning experience. Students from both groups offered valuable suggestions for improving the learning environment and student treatment. The sensitive nature of Ob/Gyn clinical encounters may lead to overprotective behaviors that contribute to students feeling mistreated and excluded from patient care and team membership. Students’ experiences during Ob/Gyn clerkships could be improved by better balancing patient advocacy and student involvement. Practical implications to address these issues are offered. PMID:26080798

  17. Increasing Interest in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the Third-Year Clerkship: Results from a Post-Clerkship Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Erin; Hollar, David; Lindsey, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors aimed to determine whether a structured clinical experience in child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) during the third-year psychiatry clerkship would impact interest in pursuing careers in psychiatry and CAP. Methods: The authors constructed and administered a post-rotation survey, the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry…

  18. Geriatric assessment teams.

    PubMed

    Campbell, L J; Cole, K D

    1987-02-01

    In geriatric care, a form of teamwork is the recommended modality because of the complex biopsychosocial needs of the patient. The goal of geriatric assessment programs is to establish an intensive assessment of older adults which requires the competencies of several coordinated disciplines. Not only do teams have the capacity to assess patients in much greater depth but also patients share different information with different providers. The composition of the team is dictated by the needs of the patient population in accordance with resources available. Next, one must identify a method of team practice in order for interactions to take place. The method of functioning determines what kind of team it is, ranging from independent functioning with minimal formal interfacing to interdependent activity interspersed with formal and informal interactions. In initiating a geriatric assessment program, one needs to determine which tasks demand interdisciplinary collaboration, which require interdisciplinary consultation, and which can be performed using a matrix or extended team model. In this model, the core team is supplemented by other disciplines as determined by the team, predicated on patient problems. Teams can profit from training, which can help with choosing an appropriate model, establishing a manual of procedure, and managing interactive issues and problems. This can occur early in the team's formation, or when a team takes on new members. The minimal level of team development would include establishing program goals, delineating professional responsibilities and roles, and implementing a system for exchanging and documenting information about patient plans. Saving input to share only in team meeting is inefficient, so health care teams need to recognize the importance of informal interchanges. It is still a matter of conjecture about what team works best with which patients under what circumstances or conditions. Multiple randomized clinical trials with teams will give us more information in this regard. In the meantime, organizers of geriatric assessment programs will have to make decisions based on clinical practice in the team development field and extrapolations from related health care team studies. PMID:3545426

  19. Standpoints of traditional Persian physicians on geriatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Emami, Morteza; Nazarinia, Mohammad Ali; Rezaeizadeh, Hussein; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2014-10-01

    The present article aimed to compile information on the nutritional management for geriatric people. Popular textbooks of Persian medicine from 10th to 18th century were studied to derive relative viewpoints and considerations. The temperament, which is defined as the combination of 4 main elements (fire, air, water, and soil) and 4 humors made subsequently (black bile, yellow bile, phlegm, and blood), changes during age periods. Imbalance in proportional amounts of humors in elderly should be corrected with food and medicaments having opposite nature to the current condition. Traditional foods included mostly well-cooked soups, pottages, and porridges containing fresh sheep or chicken meat. Mono-ingredient foods were also administered according to their medical properties. Nutritional recommendations were also concerned with geriatrics' physiological conditions such as constipation, sleep disorders, and memory deficits. Many of traditional geriatric nutritional requirements are relevant in the present day. However, there are still notes that may be beneficial for consideration. PMID:25053755

  20. Teaching geriatric fellows how to teach: a needs assessment targeting geriatrics fellowship program directors.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Veronica; Yukawa, Michi; Aronson, Louise; Widera, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The entire healthcare workforce needs to be educated to better care for older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fellows are being trained to teach, to assess the attitudes of fellowship directors toward training fellows to be teachers, and to understand how to facilitate this type of training for fellows. A nine-question survey adapted from a 2001 survey issued to residency program directors inquiring about residents-as-teachers curricula was developed and administered. The survey was issued electronically and sent out three times over a 6-week period. Of 144 ACGME-accredited geriatric fellowship directors from geriatric, internal medicine, and family medicine departments who were e-mailed the survey, 101 (70%) responded; 75% had an academic affiliation, 15% had a community affiliation, and 10% did not report. Academic and community programs required their fellows to teach, but just 55% of academic and 29% of community programs offered teaching skills instruction as part of their fellowship curriculum; 67% of academic programs and 79% of community programs felt that their fellows would benefit from more teaching skill instruction. Program directors listed fellow (39%) and faculty (46%) time constraints as obstacles to creation and implementation of a teaching curriculum. The majority of fellowship directors believe that it is important for geriatric fellows to become competent educators, but only approximately half of programs currently provide formal instruction in teaching skills. A reproducible, accessible curriculum on teaching to teach that includes a rigorous evaluation component should be created for geriatrics fellowship programs. PMID:25516033

  1. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results support further development of structured didactic curricula for the radiation oncology clerkship.

  2. Mapping students' clinical experiences to pediatric clerkship goals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aaron; Sharkey, Angela; McGann, Kathleen; Sumner, Walton

    2006-01-01

    In anticipation of new LCME accreditation requirements, our third year clerkship students began tracking pediatric clinical experiences using a hand-held Electronic Student Encounter Log (ESEL) in June 2005. ESEL was tailored to support rapid documentation of diseases seen at a pediatric tertiary care hospital, while retaining access to primary care diagnoses. We matched encounters that 37 students documented to experiences that fulfill the pediatric clerkship's 19 educational goals. We discovered omissions in both ESEL and the goal definitions. No student documented meeting all goals, and no goal was met by all students. Handheld encounter logs are useful for tracking clinical experiences. Logs, logging instructions, and goals require regular compatibility checks. PMID:17238622

  3. Teacher-student interaction in a medical clerkship.

    PubMed

    Foley, R; Smilansky, J; Yonke, A

    1979-08-01

    Seventeen randomly selected clinical teaching sessions in a medical school clerkship were videotaped during a one-month period, including teaching rounds, working rounds, morning report sessions, lectures, patient management conferences, grand rounds, and journal clubs. Using a verbal behavior classification schedule, the investigators analyzed the videotapes in terms of the proportion of talking done by clerkship instructors, medical students, residents, and others. The nature of the verbal interaction was examined by assessing the proportion of time devoted to giving information versus asking questions. The proportions on these dimensions were further analyzed according to the cognitive level of the verbal interaction. The data suggest that the teaching observed was not optimal for promoting problem-solving ability, since students were placed in a very passive role in which they received a preponderance of low-level, factual information. PMID:469911

  4. [Geriatric oncology: epidemiological evidence].

    PubMed

    Piette, Franois; Spano, Jean-Philippe; Chaibi, Pascal; Legendre, Ccile; Toan, Shuy-Vang; Chebib, Amale; Jasmin, Claude; Khayat, David

    2010-02-01

    In Europe, 60% of all cancers and 75% of all deaths from cancer occur in patients older than 65 years. The incidence of many cancers (prostate, colorectal, and hematological) either increases with age or remains high (breast and lungs). The two principal characteristics of cancer in the elderly are late diagnosis and comorbidity that requires specific geriatric assessment and cooperation between the oncologist and the geriatrician. Academic and pharmaceutical industry research must focus on the specificities of cancers in the elderly and of response to treatment according to functional abilities and comorbidity. Equal access to high quality medical care and procedures must be ensured, regardless of age; this is not currently the case everywhere. PMID:19541447

  5. Home geriatric physiological measurements.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Toshiyo

    2012-10-01

    In an ageing society, the elderly can be monitored with numerous physiological, physical and passive devices. Sensors can be installed in the home for continuous mobility assistance and unobtrusive disease prevention. This review presents several modern sensors, which improve the quality of life and assist the elderly, disabled people and their caregivers. The main concept of geriatric sensors is that they are capable of providing assistance without limiting or disturbing the subject's daily routine, giving him or her greater comfort, pleasure and well-being. Furthermore, this review includes associated technologies of wearable/implantable monitoring systems and the 'smart-house' project. This review concludes by discussing future challenges of the future aged society. PMID:23011097

  6. Psychiatric OSCE Performance of Students with and without a Previous Core Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goisman, Robert M.; Levin, Robert M.; Krupat, Edward; Pelletier, Stephen R.; Alpert, Jonathan E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The OSCE has been demonstrated to be a reliable and valid method by which to assess students' clinical skills. An OSCE station was used to determine whether or not students who had completed a core psychiatry clerkship demonstrated skills that were superior to those who had not taken the clerkship and which areas discriminated between

  7. Shorter Psychiatry Clerkship Length Is Associated with Lower NBME Psychiatry Shelf Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostwick, J. Michael; Alexander, Cara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate a recent medical school curriculum change at our institution 3 years ago; specifically: shortening the Psychiatry core clerkship from 4 to 3 weeks and adding an optional 6-week core/elective combination rotation in lieu of the 3-week core. The authors aimed to determine whether clerkship length was…

  8. Shorter Psychiatry Clerkship Length Is Associated with Lower NBME Psychiatry Shelf Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostwick, J. Michael; Alexander, Cara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate a recent medical school curriculum change at our institution 3 years ago; specifically: shortening the Psychiatry core clerkship from 4 to 3 weeks and adding an optional 6-week core/elective combination rotation in lieu of the 3-week core. The authors aimed to determine whether clerkship length was

  9. The Design and Evaluation of a Clinical Clerkship for Hospital Pharmacists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsheim, David J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Forty hospital pharmacists participated in a 2 week pilot of a postgraduate clinical pharmacy clerkship, using different hospital services as teaching sites at the University of Illinois and Cook County hospitals in Chicago. The clerkship experience broadened participants' conceptions of the depth and scope of the clinical pharmacist's role.

  10. Effect of Curriculum Change on Exam Performance in a 4-Week Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermier, Julie; Way, David; Kasick, David; Kuperschmidt, Rada

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigated whether curriculum change could produce improved performance, despite a reduction in clerkship length from 8 to 4 weeks. Methods: The exam performance of medical students completing a 4-week clerkship in psychiatry was compared to national data from the National Board of Medical Examiners' Psychiatry Subject

  11. Psychiatric OSCE Performance of Students with and without a Previous Core Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goisman, Robert M.; Levin, Robert M.; Krupat, Edward; Pelletier, Stephen R.; Alpert, Jonathan E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The OSCE has been demonstrated to be a reliable and valid method by which to assess students' clinical skills. An OSCE station was used to determine whether or not students who had completed a core psychiatry clerkship demonstrated skills that were superior to those who had not taken the clerkship and which areas discriminated between…

  12. Creating Stories to Live By: Caring and Professional Identity Formation in a Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konkin, Jill; Suddards, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Building on other models of longitudinal integrated clerkships (LIC), the University of Alberta developed its Integrated Community Clerkship with guiding principles of continuity of care, preceptor and learning environment. Professionalism is an important theme in medical education. Caring is important in professional identity formation and an

  13. Factors Determining Students' Global Satisfaction with Clerkships: An Analysis of a Two Year Students' Ratings Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durak, Halil Ibrahim; Vatansever, Kevser; van Dalen, Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2008-01-01

    Clerkships would benefit from teachers' improved understanding of the didactic aspects of their task. The purpose of this study is to identify factors that determine the teaching quality of clerkships and to examine the predictive value of these factors for students' global satisfaction. Thus, results would be further reflected to clinical

  14. Effect of Curriculum Change on Exam Performance in a 4-Week Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermier, Julie; Way, David; Kasick, David; Kuperschmidt, Rada

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigated whether curriculum change could produce improved performance, despite a reduction in clerkship length from 8 to 4 weeks. Methods: The exam performance of medical students completing a 4-week clerkship in psychiatry was compared to national data from the National Board of Medical Examiners' Psychiatry Subject…

  15. Filling in the gaps of clerkship with a comprehensive clinical skills curriculum.

    PubMed

    Veale, Pamela; Carson, Julie; Coderre, Sylvain; Woloschuk, Wayne; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    Although the clinical clerkship model is based upon sound pedagogy, including theories of social learning and situated learning, studies evaluating clinical performance of residents suggests that this model may not fully meet the learning needs of students. Here our objective was to design a curriculum to bridge the learning gaps of the existing clerkship model and then evaluate the impact of this on performance on clerkship summative evaluations. We followed Kern's framework to design our curriculum and then compared performance on the clerkship objective structured clinical examination (OSCE), all summative clerkship multiple choice question (MCQ) examinations, and the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination (MCCQE) Part 1 before and after the introduction of our curriculum. In the 2 years following the introduction of our clinical skills curriculum the mean score on the clerkship OSCE was significantly higher than in the 2 years prior to our curriculum [67.12 (5.3) vs. 62.44 (4.93), p < 0.001, d = 0.91]. With the exception of the surgical clerkship MCQ, performance on all clerkship summative MCQ examinations and MCCQE Part 1 was significantly higher following the introduction of our curriculum. In this study we found a significant improvement in the performance on clerks on summative evaluations of knowledge and clinical skills following the introduction of our clinical skills curriculum. Given the unpredictable nature of clinical rotations, the clerkship will always be a risk of failing to deliver the intended curriculum-so medical schools should continue to explore and evaluate ways of changing the delivery of clerkship training to improve learning outcomes. PMID:24510325

  16. Models of Care in Geriatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, A.; Dale, W.; Mohile, S.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is common in older adults and the approach to cancer treatment and supportive measures in this age group is continuously evolving. Incorporating geriatric assessment (GA) into the care of the older patient with cancer has been shown to be feasible and predictive of outcomes, and there are unique aspects of the traditional geriatric domains that can be considered in this population. Geriatric assessment-guided interventions can also be developed to support patients during their treatment course. There are several existing models of incorporating geriatrics into oncology care, including a consultative geriatric assessment, geriatrician “embedded” within an oncology clinic and primary management by a dual-trained geriatric oncologist. Although a geriatrician or geriatric oncologist leads the geriatric assessment, is it truly a multidisciplinary assessment, and often includes evaluation by a physical therapist, occupational therapist, pharmacist, social worker and nutritionist. PMID:25587518

  17. Geriatric assessment for oncologists.

    PubMed

    Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz; Holmes, Holly M; Shahrokni, Armin

    2015-12-01

    The world is experiencing aging of its population. Age-specific incidence rates of cancer are higher and cancer is now recognized as a part of aging. Treating older patients can be challenging. The clinical behavior of some tumors changes with age and the aging process itself brings physiological changes leading to decline in the function of organs. It is essential to identify those patients with longer life expectancy, potentially more likely to benefit from aggressive treatment vs. those that are more vulnerable to adverse outcomes. A primary determination when considering therapy for an older cancer patient is a patient's physiologic, rather than chronologic age. In order to differentiate amongst patients of the same age, it is useful to determine if a patient is fit or frail. Frail older adults have multiple chronic conditions and difficulties maintaining independence. They may be more vulnerable to therapy toxicities, and may not have substantial lasting benefits from therapy. Geriatric assessment (GA) may be used as a tool to determine reversible deficits and devise treatment strategies to mitigate such deficits. GA is also used in treatment decision making by clinicians, helping to risk stratify patients prior to potentially high-risk therapy. An important practical aspect of GA is the feasibility of incorporating it into a busy oncology practice. Key considerations in performing the GA include: available resources, patient population, GA tools to use, and who will be responsible for using the GA results and develop care plans. Challenges in implementing GA in clinical practice will be discussed. PMID:26779363

  18. [A new geriatric battery test].

    PubMed

    Warschawski, P; Spiegel, R

    1979-05-10

    Both the clinical and the experimental field of geriatrics are in need of an instrument to test the cognitive abilities of people aged 60 and above. By means of a pre-test of the new geriatric test-battery, those abilities, which generally decrease with age, are tested first in order to obtain a testability rating for a particular patient. The geriatric test-battery, which is based on a theory of a 4 dimensional intelligence clearly delineating the differential development of specific cognitive abilities into old age, allows a precise, differentiated assessment of the cognitive abilities of the elderly. Considering the particular characteristics of the old person, the geriatric test-battery was given a new form which minimizes the feeling of being threatened by the test and at the same time maximizes motivation. The geriatric test-battery is pleasant for both the patient and the tester, it is simple to administer, can easily be given to physically impaired or bedridden patients, and is not time consuming. PMID:428845

  19. Anesthesia and analgesia for geriatric veterinary patients.

    PubMed

    Baetge, Courtney L; Matthews, Nora S

    2012-07-01

    The number of geriatric veterinary patients presented for anesthesia appears to be increasing. This article summarizes physiologic changes that occur in geriatric patients that are relevant to anesthesia. Proper patient preparation and vigilant monitoring are the best defense against anesthetic problems in the geriatric animal. The authors also discuss particular anesthetic problems as they relate to geriatric patients and seek to present solutions to these problems. PMID:22720806

  20. Expert Consensus Panel Guidelines on Geriatric Assessment in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, A.; Mohile, S.G.; Leech, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite consensus guidelines on best practice in the care of older patients with cancer, geriatric assessment (GA) has yet to be optimally integrated into the field of oncology in most countries. There is a relative lack of consensus in the published literature as to the best approach to take, and there is a degree of uncertainty as to how integration of geriatric medicine principles might optimally predict patient outcomes. The aim of the current study was to obtain consensus on GA in oncology to inform the implementation of a geriatric oncology programme. Methods A four round Delphi process was employed. The Delphi method is a structured group facilitation process, using multiple iterations in order to gain consensus on a given topic Results Consensus was reached on the optimal assessment method and interventions required for the commonly employed domains of GA. Other aspects of GA, such as screening methods and age cutoff for assessment represented a higher degree of disagreement. Discussion The expert panel employed in this study clearly identified the criteria that should be included in a clinical geriatric oncology programme. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, this may prove useful in the care of older cancer patients. PMID:25757457

  1. Geriatrics in Brazil: a big country with big opportunities.

    PubMed

    Garcez-Leme, Luiz E; Leme, Mariana Deckers; Espino, David V

    2005-11-01

    Brazil has approximately 180 million inhabitants, of whom 15.2 million are aged 60 and older and 1.9 million are aged 80 and older. By 2025, the Brazilian elderly population is expected to grow to more than 32 million. Brazil has many problems related to its geographic and population size. Great distances between major cities, marked cultural and racial heterogeneity between the various geographic regions, high poverty levels, and decreasing family size all combine to put pressure on the medical and social services that can be made available to the elder population. Less than 500 Brazilian physicians are certified as geriatricians, translating into one geriatrician for every 37,000 elderly Brazilians. Beside 15 geriatric medicine residencies a larger number of fellowship programs exist, and these programs are in high demand, with more than 20 candidates per position, indicating new opportunities for growth in elder care. In addition, geriatric initiatives such as the annual elder vaccination program and the elder statute, recently approved by the Brazilian Congress, indicate that geriatric care in Brazil is entering a new era of growth and development. Although the challenges remain great, there are opportunities for Brazilian geriatrics and gerontology. PMID:16274389

  2. A Compendium of Objectives for Geriatric Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kress, Gerard C. Jr.; Vidmar, Gordon C.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a survey of geriatric dentistry specialists concerning the competencies required of geriatric dentists and the relative importance of those skills in five settings (dental school, general practice residency, prosthodontic specialty programs, geriatric fellowship programs, and continuing education) are reported. (MSE)

  3. 28 CFR 2.78 - Geriatric parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Geriatric parole. 2.78 Section 2.78... Geriatric parole. (a) Upon receipt of a report from the institution in which the prisoner is confined that a... Commission shall determine whether or not to release the prisoner on geriatric parole. Release on...

  4. The clerkship in public health: a positive experience.

    PubMed

    Drusin, L M; Goss, M E; Horowitz, S V; Reader, G G

    1992-01-01

    Cornell University Medical College's required third-year clerkship in public health offers a unique educational experience well received by faculty and students. Within a two-week period, a combination of field trips, seminars, lectures, required reading, and a research paper enables students to gain familiarity with a broad range of issues by placing them in situations exposing them to relevant problems and solutions. Nearly all students find some aspect of either the field trips or seminars provocative. Some are motivated to plan follow-up electives. A similar course using local resources could be offered elsewhere. PMID:1576002

  5. Geriatric assessment for oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz; Holmes, Holly M.; Shahrokni, Armin

    2015-01-01

    The world is experiencing aging of its population. Age-specific incidence rates of cancer are higher and cancer is now recognized as a part of aging. Treating older patients can be challenging. The clinical behavior of some tumors changes with age and the aging process itself brings physiological changes leading to decline in the function of organs. It is essential to identify those patients with longer life expectancy, potentially more likely to benefit from aggressive treatment vs. those that are more vulnerable to adverse outcomes. A primary determination when considering therapy for an older cancer patient is a patient’s physiologic, rather than chronologic age. In order to differentiate amongst patients of the same age, it is useful to determine if a patient is fit or frail. Frail older adults have multiple chronic conditions and difficulties maintaining independence. They may be more vulnerable to therapy toxicities, and may not have substantial lasting benefits from therapy. Geriatric assessment (GA) may be used as a tool to determine reversible deficits and devise treatment strategies to mitigate such deficits. GA is also used in treatment decision making by clinicians, helping to risk stratify patients prior to potentially high-risk therapy. An important practical aspect of GA is the feasibility of incorporating it into a busy oncology practice. Key considerations in performing the GA include: available resources, patient population, GA tools to use, and who will be responsible for using the GA results and develop care plans. Challenges in implementing GA in clinical practice will be discussed. PMID:26779363

  6. Preoperative Assessment of Geriatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Justin G; Wildes, Troy S

    2016-03-01

    Geriatric patients are over-represented in hospitalizations, surgeries, and perioperative complications. Special consideration is required for this patient group in the perioperative period because of the prevalence of comorbid diseases, functional impairments, and other deficits. A comprehensive preoperative evaluation strategy is recommended to identify and address these issues. Systematic, multidomain assessments should be performed and paired with risk reduction efforts. A shared understanding of patient function and long-term health goals is also important for providing patient-centered care of the geriatric surgical patient. PMID:26927746

  7. Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  8. Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators

  9. Preoperative Assessment of Geriatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Nakhaie, Mariam; Tsai, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    The preoperative assessment of geriatric patients provides an excellent opportunity to evaluate the patient for perioperative risk factors such as frailty, functional status, nutritional status, cardiovascular and pulmonary status, and substance dependence. It also provides an overall clinical picture on which health care providers can base a framework to reduce these risk factors. PMID:26315632

  10. Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators…

  11. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Graham; Marshall, Trudi; Ritchie, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Changing global demography is resulting in older people presenting to emergency departments (EDs) in greater numbers than ever before. They present with greater urgency and are more likely to be admitted to hospital or re-attend and utilize greater resources. They experience longer waits for care and are less likely to be satisfied with their experiences. Not only that, but older people suffer poorer health outcomes after ED attendance, with higher mortality rates and greater dependence in activities of daily living or rates of admission to nursing homes. Older people's assessment and management in the ED can be complex, time consuming, and require specialist skills. The interplay of multiple comorbidities and functional decline result in the complex state of frailty that can predispose to poor health outcomes and greater care needs. Older people with frailty may present to services in an atypical fashion requiring detailed, multidimensional, and increasingly multidisciplinary care to provide the correct diagnosis and management as well as appropriate placement for ongoing care or admission avoidance. Specific challenges such as delirium, functional decline, or carer strain need to be screened for and managed appropriately. Identifying patients with specific frailty syndromes can be critical to identifying those at highest risk of poor outcomes and most likely to benefit from further specialist interventions. Models of care are evolving that aim to deliver multidimensional assessment and management by multidisciplinary specialist care teams (comprehensive geriatric assessment). Increasingly, these models are demonstrating improved outcomes, including admission avoidance or reduced death and dependence. Delivering this in the ED is an evolving area of practice that adapts the principles of geriatric medicine for the urgent-care environment. PMID:25473275

  12. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Graham; Marshall, Trudi; Ritchie, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Changing global demography is resulting in older people presenting to emergency departments (EDs) in greater numbers than ever before. They present with greater urgency and are more likely to be admitted to hospital or re-attend and utilize greater resources. They experience longer waits for care and are less likely to be satisfied with their experiences. Not only that, but older people suffer poorer health outcomes after ED attendance, with higher mortality rates and greater dependence in activities of daily living or rates of admission to nursing homes. Older people’s assessment and management in the ED can be complex, time consuming, and require specialist skills. The interplay of multiple comorbidities and functional decline result in the complex state of frailty that can predispose to poor health outcomes and greater care needs. Older people with frailty may present to services in an atypical fashion requiring detailed, multidimensional, and increasingly multidisciplinary care to provide the correct diagnosis and management as well as appropriate placement for ongoing care or admission avoidance. Specific challenges such as delirium, functional decline, or carer strain need to be screened for and managed appropriately. Identifying patients with specific frailty syndromes can be critical to identifying those at highest risk of poor outcomes and most likely to benefit from further specialist interventions. Models of care are evolving that aim to deliver multidimensional assessment and management by multidisciplinary specialist care teams (comprehensive geriatric assessment). Increasingly, these models are demonstrating improved outcomes, including admission avoidance or reduced death and dependence. Delivering this in the ED is an evolving area of practice that adapts the principles of geriatric medicine for the urgent-care environment. PMID:25473275

  13. Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine: Medical Student and Physician Attitudes toward Homeless Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden

  14. Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine: Medical Student and Physician Attitudes toward Homeless Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden…

  15. [Geriatric intervention in oncology for elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Saint-Jean, O; LeGuen, J

    2015-10-01

    Half of all cancers occur in patients older than 70 years. National cancer plans in France promote the emergence of geriatric oncology, whose aim is that every elder cancer patient receives a pertinent treatment, according to his frailty. Geriatric intervention has been evaluated in various conditions or patients since 30 years. Meta-analysis has shown the benefits on autonomy and mortality. But benefits are related to the organization of geriatric care, especially when integrated care is provided. Literature on geriatric oncology is relatively poor. But it is certain that a geriatric comprehensive assessment provided a lot of important information for the care of cancer patients, leading to a modification of cancer treatment in many cases. Randomized trials will soon begin to evaluate the benefits of geriatric integrated care for elder cancer patients, in terms of mortality and quality of life. Actually, in oncogeriatic coordination units, pilot organizations are developed for the satisfaction of patients and professionals. PMID:26344438

  16. Geriatric Depression in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mijung; Untzer, Jrgen

    2011-01-01

    Primary care settings present important opportunities for the detection and management of depression in older adults. As many as 10 % of older adults presenting in primary care have clinically significant depression, but only about half are recognized and only one in five depressed older adults receive effective treatment in primary care. We review common barriers to effective treatment such as atypical clinical presentations and comorbid medical conditions that are common in older adults. We identify treatment strategies such as measurement-based stepped care and collaborative care that can substantially improve the effectiveness of treatment in this setting and we highlight opportunities for addressing health disparities in geriatric depression care. We also point out the importance of engaging and supporting family caregivers of depressed older adults. We conclude by identifying three strategic areas to improve the treatment of geriatric depression in primary care: activation and engagement of patients and family members, health care provider training, and broader system changes. PMID:21536169

  17. Research advances in geriatric depression

    PubMed Central

    ALEXOPOULOS, GEORGE S.; KELLY JR., ROBERT E.

    2009-01-01

    Technical advances have facilitated the exploration of factors related to geriatric depression and have helped generate novel biological and psychosocial treatment approaches. This review summarizes the main advancements in epidemiology, clinical presentation and course, genetics, and other areas of biological research. Treatment interventions outlined in this paper include electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnetic seizure therapy, vagus nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulatn, depression prophylaxis, multidisciplinary approaches to depression treatment, and psychotherapy. Forms of psychotherapy for geriatric depression summarized include interpersonal psychotherapy, supportive psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, problem-solving therapy, and ecosystem-focused therapy. Neuroimaging techniques based on magnetic resonance imaging are discussed briefly, including volumetric brain studies, diffusion tensor imaging, fractional anisotropy, fiber tractography, magnetization transfer imaging, and blood-oxygenation-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Finally, treatment effectiveness is addressed in a discussion of new models to improve access to and quality of care offered in the community. PMID:19812743

  18. Evaluation of a virtual geriatric trauma institute.

    PubMed

    Katrancha, Elizabeth D; Zipf, Jami

    2014-01-01

    Geriatric trauma patients require specialized care. Objective of this study was to compare outcomes for geriatric trauma patients before and after the implementation of a virtual geriatric trauma institute. This is a retrospective chart review of 583 trauma patients older than 65 years admitted to a rural level 1 trauma center before and after the implementation of a geriatric trauma institute. Length of stay was decreased from 4.99 to 3.9 days (P = .0014). Emergency department length of stay was decreased by approximately 10 minutes (P = .059), and time from the emergency department to the operating room was decreased by 470 minutes (P = .262). PMID:25397334

  19. Bloodless surgery in geriatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Salvatore; Di Matteo, Filippo; Sorrenti, Salvatore; Greco, Roberto; Nardi, Matteo; Favoriti, Pasqualino; De Antoni, Enrico; Filippini, Angelo; Catania, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In bloodless surgery a series of measures has to be implemented to reduce the perioperative need for transfusion of whole blood or its components. Jehovah's Witness are the most representative group of patients opting for bloodless surgery as their faith follows strict believes that prohibits receiving blood. Geriatric patients requiring bloodless surgery are even more delicate and represent a challenge for surgeons. The physiological response of the over 65 year population to decreased hemoglobin level is slower and less effective than in young and adult patients. Herby we describe the perioperative protocol implemented in our surgical Department offered to geriatric Jehovah's Witness patients. Preoperative optimization of the patients is the key step in the preparation period. Intraoperative anesthetic and surgical measures are also required along with a strict postoperative follow-up. From our experience, bloodless surgery is feasible in the geriatric population as long as it is performed in specialized centers where a multidisciplinary team is prepared to specifically manage this scenario. Rigorous patients selection and preparation are mandatory. PMID:25183638

  20. The Harvard Medical School-Cambridge integrated clerkship: an innovative model of clinical education.

    PubMed

    Ogur, Barbara; Hirsh, David; Krupat, Edward; Bor, David

    2007-04-01

    The Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship (HMS-CIC) is a redesign of the principal clinical year to foster students' learning from close and continuous contact with cohorts of patients in the disciplines of internal medicine, neurology, obstetrics-gynecology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. With year-long mentoring, students follow their patients through major venues of care. Surgery and radiology also are taught longitudinally, grounded in the clinical experiences of a cohort of patients and in a brief immersion experience working directly with an attending surgeon. Students participate in weekly, case-based tutorials integrating instruction in the basic sciences with training to address the common and important issues in medicine, as identified by national organizations. In addition, they participate in a social science curriculum that focuses on self-reflection, communication skills, ethics, population sciences, and cultural competence. In the pilot year (July 2004 to July 2005), HMS-CIC students performed at least as well as traditional students in tests of content knowledge and skills, as measured by National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Subject Exams and the fourth-year Objective Structured Clinical Exam, and they scored higher on a year-end comprehensive clinical skills self-assessment examination, suggesting that they retained content knowledge better. From surveys, HMS-CIC students were much more likely to see patients before diagnosis and after discharge and to receive feedback and mentoring from experienced faculty than were their traditionally educated peers. HMS-CIC students expressed more satisfaction with their curriculum and felt better prepared to cope with the professional challenges of patient care, such as being truly caring, involving patients in decision making, and understanding how the social context affects their patients. PMID:17414198

  1. Voluntary undergraduate technical skills training course to prepare students for clerkship assignment: tutees’ and tutors’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Skills lab training has become a widespread tool in medical education, and nowadays, skills labs are ubiquitous among medical faculties across the world. An increasingly prevalent didactic approach in skills lab teaching is peer-assisted learning (PAL), which has been shown to be not only effective, but can be considered to be on a par with faculty staff-led training. The aim of the study is to determine whether voluntary preclinical skills teaching by peer tutors is a feasible method for preparing medical students for effective workplace learning in clerkships and to investigate both tutees’ and tutors’ attitudes towards such an intervention. Methods A voluntary clerkship preparation skills course was designed and delivered. N = 135 pre-clinical medical students visited the training sessions. N = 10 tutors were trained as skills-lab peer tutors. Voluntary clerkship preparation skills courses as well as tutor training were evaluated by acceptance ratings and pre-post self-assessment ratings. Furthermore, qualitative analyses of skills lab tutors’ attitudes towards the course were conducted following principles of grounded theory. Results Results show that a voluntary clerkship preparation skills course is in high demand, is highly accepted and leads to significant changes in self-assessment ratings. Regarding qualitative analysis of tutor statements, clerkship preparation skills courses were considered to be a helpful and necessary asset to preclinical medical education, which benefits from the tutors’ own clerkship experiences and a high standardization of training. Tutor training is also highly accepted and regarded as an indispensable tool for peer tutors. Conclusions Our study shows that the demand for voluntary competence-oriented clerkship preparation is high, and a peer tutor-led skills course as well as tutor training is well accepted. The focused didactic approach for tutor training is perceived to be effective in preparing tutors for their teaching activity in this context. A prospective study design would be needed to substantiate the results objectively and confirm the effectiveness. PMID:24708782

  2. Depression in Geriatric and Adult Medical Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magni, Guido; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Administered two scales for the evaluation of depression to two groups of medical inpatients: adults (N=201) and geriatric subjects (N=178). Results confirmed a high presence of depressive symptoms among patients with medical problems, particularly among geriatric subjects. Factors most predictive of depressive symptoms are identified. (JAC)

  3. Implications of Research on the Geriatric Voice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Barbaranne J.

    Noting that the progressive aging of the American population has created a need for a body of knowledge about the vocal characteristics associated with aging, this paper provides information on geriatric voice. The first section of the paper contains a selected bibliography of materials concerning geriatric voice, including literature on the need

  4. Trends in Predoctoral Education in Geriatric Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Ralph H.; Yellowitz, Janet A.; Dolan, Teresa A.; Smith, Barbara J.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 46 United States and Canadian dental schools examined curriculum trends and assessed the effectiveness of educational initiatives and the value of American Association of Dental Schools and Administration on Aging geriatric dental curricular materials. An increasing number reported geriatric didactic courses, clinical rotations, and

  5. Formal and Informal Frameworks for Teaching Geriatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosin, Arnold J.; Abramovitz, Leah

    1997-01-01

    Despite growing need, geriatrics education has been slow to develop in higher education. Much of it is conducted in informal frameworks--for example, a study center of a national service organization for the elderly in Israel and a geriatrics institute in a hospital. Both formal and informal programs are needed. (SK)

  6. Geriatric psychopharmacology: evolution of a discipline.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Barnett S; Jeste, Dilip V

    2010-11-01

    The development of geriatric psychopharmacology was built on advances in geriatric psychiatry nosology and clinical pharmacology and on increased investment in aging research by the National Institute of Mental Health and by academic institutions. Application of the US Food and Drug Administration's geriatric labeling rule provided further impetus. Developments in the knowledge about 3 principal classes of medications (antidepressants, antipsychotics, and treatments for Alzheimer's disease) illustrate the trajectory of geriatric psychopharmacology research. Nonetheless, the loss of information about age effects that has resulted from applying age exclusion criteria in studies limited to either younger adults or geriatric patients is regrettable. Antidepressant trials have moved from studying younger and medically well "geriatric" samples to focusing on "older old" persons and those with significant medical comorbidity including coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, and dementia. Increased specificity is reflected in studies of relationships between specific neuropsychological deficits, specific brain abnormalities, and antidepressant responsiveness. Clinical trials in older adults have demonstrated that the efficacy of antipsychotic medications continues across the lifespan, but that sensitivity to specific side effects changes in older age, with poor tolerability frequently mitigating the benefits of treatment. Treatments for Alzheimer's disease have fallen within the purview of geriatric psychopharmacology. The research focus is increasingly shifting from treatments to slow the course of cognitive decline to studies of early diagnosis and of interventions designed to prevent the development of deficits in vulnerable individuals. The importance of geriatric psychopharmacology will grow further as the average lifespan increases all over the world. PMID:21114947

  7. Analysis and Management of Geriatric Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallis, James F.; Lichstein, Kenneth L.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews the prevalence, negative health implications, and clinical management of geriatric anxiety. Proposes an interactive model of geriatric anxiety whereby physical disease and anxiety processes enter into reciprocal stimulation as a function of diminished capacity to withstand stress and hypervigilance of stress symptomatology. Outlines…

  8. Enhancing Geriatric Curriculum in Nursing School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    People are living longer. The average age of the population is increasing, and is expected to keep growing. Any person age 65 and older is now considered "geriatric." However, although growing, this population is not receiving adequate nursing care, and results in increased pain, falls, and even death. Geriatric curriculum is becoming…

  9. Terror Medicine as Part of the Medical School Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Leonard A.; Wagner, Katherine; Scott, Sandra; Connell, Nancy D.; Cooper, Arthur; Kennedy, Cheryl Ann; Natal, Brenda; Lamba, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Terror medicine, a field related to emergency and disaster medicine, focuses on medical issues ranging from preparedness to psychological manifestations specifically associated with terrorist attacks. Calls to teach aspects of the subject in American medical schools surged after the 2001 jetliner and anthrax attacks. Although the threat of terrorism persists, terror medicine is still addressed erratically if at all in most medical schools. This paper suggests a template for incorporating the subject throughout a 4-year medical curriculum. The instructional framework culminates in a short course for fourth year students, such as one recently introduced at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA. The proposed 4-year Rutgers curriculum serves as a model that could assist other medical schools contemplating the inclusion of terror medicine in pre-clerkship and clerkship training. PMID:25309891

  10. [Geriatric assessment. Development, status quo and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Lttje, D; Varwig, D; Teigel, B; Gilhaus, B

    2011-08-01

    Multimorbidity is typical for geriatric patients. Problems not identified in time may lead to increased hospitalisation or prolonged hospital stay. Problems of multimorbidity are not covered by most guidelines or clinical pathways. The geriatric assessment supports standard clinical and technical assessment. Geriatric identification screening is basic for general practitioners and in emergency rooms to filter those patients bearing a special risk. Geriatric basic assessment covers most of the problems relevant for people in old age, revealing even problems that had so far been hidden. It permits to structure a comprehensive and holistic therapeutic approach and to evaluate the targets of treatment relevant for independent living and well-being. This results in reduction of morbidity and mortality. Assessment tools focusing on pain, nutrition and frailty should be added to the standardized geriatric basic assessment in Germany. PMID:21750936

  11. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the older cancer patient: coming of age in clinical cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Cynthia; Berger, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer care at the extremes of life, in the young and the old, is characterized by unique issues associated with pediatrics and geriatric medicine, accentuated by the special vulnerabilities of these groups. In response to these needs, the field of pediatric oncology has been well honed to deal with the special problems associated with juvenile cancer patients. While most adult oncologists consider themselves well prepared to deal with older cancer patients, the current expansion of the geriatric population their variable levels of fitness, frailty and vulnerability, the fact that cancer is primarily a disease of older adults, the significant expansion of agents and approaches to treat cancer, as well as their resultant toxicities and complications has led to the development of specialized geriatric oncologists. Moreover, the special characteristics and needs of these patients have led to the evolution of new guidelines for evaluation, management and the conduct of research in older patients with cancer. PMID:25642321

  12. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area

  13. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

  14. How Does Emergency Department Crowding Affect Medical Student Test Scores and Clerkship Evaluations?

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Grant; Arya, Rajiv; Ritz, Z. Trevor; He, Albert S.; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A.; McCoy, Jonathan V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The effect of emergency department (ED) crowding has been recognized as a concern for more than 20 years; its effect on productivity, medical errors, and patient satisfaction has been studied extensively. Little research has reviewed the effect of ED crowding on medical education. Prior studies that have considered this effect have shown no correlation between ED crowding and resident perception of quality of medical education. Objective To determine whether ED crowding, as measured by the National ED Overcrowding Scale (NEDOCS) score, has a quantifiable effect on medical student objective and subjective experiences during emergency medicine (EM) clerkship rotations. Methods We collected end-of-rotation examinations and medical student evaluations for 21 EM rotation blocks between July 2010 and May 2012, with a total of 211 students. NEDOCS scores were calculated for each corresponding period. Weighted regression analyses examined the correlation between components of the medical student evaluation, student test scores, and the NEDOCS score for each period. Results When all 21 rotations are included in the analysis, NEDOCS scores showed a negative correlation with medical student tests scores (regression coefficient= ?0.16, p=0.04) and three elements of the rotation evaluation (attending teaching, communication, and systems-based practice; p<0.05). We excluded an outlying NEDOCS score from the analysis and obtained similar results. When the data were controlled for effect of month of the year, only student test score remained significantly correlated with NEDOCS score (p=0.011). No part of the medical student rotation evaluation attained significant correlation with the NEDOCS score (p?0.34 in all cases). Conclusion ED overcrowding does demonstrate a small but negative association with medical student performance on end-of-rotation examinations. Additional studies are recommended to further evaluate this effect. PMID:26594289

  15. Iranian Medical Students’ Perception of Psychiatry: Before and After a Psychiatry Clerkship

    PubMed Central

    Nejatisafa, Ali-Akbar; Shoar, Saeed; Kaviani, Hosein; Samimi-Ardestani, Mehdi; Shabani, Amir; Esmaeili, Sara; Moghaddam, Yasaman

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to compare the medical students’ attitude towards psychiatry before and after psychiatry clerkship, and to examine the association of choosing psychiatry as a future career with some personal characteristics. Method In a self-controlled, quasi-experimental study, all of the medical students entering the psychiatry clerkship in three major medical schools of Iran located in Tehran (Tehran, Shahid Beheshti, and Iran University of Medical Sciences) were asked to participate anonymously in the study on the first and the last 3-days of their psychiatry clerkship. From 346 invited 4th-5th year medical students, 225 (65%) completed anonymous self-report questionnaires before and after a 4-week psychiatry clerkship. Results Positive response to choose psychiatry as a career was seen in 13.3% and 18.3% before and after psychiatry rotation, respectively. However, the difference was not statistically significant; about one-quarter of the students were turned on to psychiatry and 25% were discouraged during the clerkship. Individual pair wise comparisons revealed significant improvements only in two out of 13 measured aspects of psychiatry. Seventeen out of 38 (47.7%) students who identified psychiatry as the career of choice or strong possibility reported that one of their family members or close friends’ mental illness had an impact on their choice. Those students who considered psychiatry as the strong possibility claimed that they are more interested in humanities (OR = 2.96; 95% CI: 1.17, 7.49), and playing a musical instrument (OR = 2.53; 95% CI: 1.15, 5.57). Conclusion It may be concluded that exposure to psychiatry clerkship could influence medical students’ opinion about psychiatry positively, or negatively. Personal characteristics and individual interests of students may play an important role in choosing psychiatry as their future career. PMID:23682250

  16. Hypernatremia in the geriatric population

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maulin K; Workeneh, Biruh; Taffet, George E

    2014-01-01

    Hypernatremia in the geriatric population is a common disorder associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Older people are predisposed to developing hypernatremia because of age-related physiologic changes such as decreased thirst drive, impaired urinary concentrating ability, and reduced total body water. Medications may exacerbate this predisposition. Hypernatremia and dehydration occurring in nursing homes are considered indicators of neglect that warrant reporting, but there are other nonavoidable causes of hypernatremia, and consideration at time of presentation is essential to prevent delay in diagnosis and management. We describe a case illustrating the importance of the consideration of alternate explanations for hypernatremia in a nursing home resident, followed by a review of hypernatremia in the elderly population, to underscore that neglect is the etiology of exclusion after alternatives have been considered. PMID:25429210

  17. Asthma in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Jennifer; Li, Zhenhong; Frieri, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the geriatric population. Despite the rising incidence of asthma in people >65 years of age, the diagnosis is frequently missed in this population. Factors that contribute to this include respiratory changes caused by aging, immunosenescence, lack of symptoms, polypharmacy, clinician unawareness, and lack of evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and management that target this population. This literature review addresses the current state of research in this area. Age-related changes influence the pathophysiology and role of allergy in elderly asthmatic patients. Specific obstacles encountered in caring for these patients are discussed. Asthma in the elderly and younger population are compared. We conclude with a broad set of goals to guide future management driven by a multidiscipline approach. PMID:23998239

  18. Pain management for the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Roche, R J; Forman, W B

    1994-01-01

    Pain is a common and complex problem in the geriatric population. Successful pain management in this patient population requires a comprehensive approach involving both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. PMID:8124655

  19. 28 CFR 2.78 - Geriatric parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS District of Columbia Code: Prisoners and Parolees § 2.78... for violence; (6) Criminal history; and (7) Alternatives to maintaining geriatric long-term...

  20. Incorporating Active Learning into a Psychiatry Clerkship: Does It Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morreale, Mary; Arfken, Cynthia; Bridge, Patrick; Balon, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Medical students' satisfaction with the psychiatry clerkship, sense of preparedness for an institutional Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE), expressed likelihood of choosing psychiatry as a specialty, and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) psychiatry shelf-examination scores were compared after a curriculum based on

  1. Do Student Evaluations Influence the Teaching Skills of Clerkship Clinical Faculty?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekhar, Arcot J.; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Hoyt, Amy; McNulty, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Web-based student evaluations of clinical faculty were collected over an 8-year period. There were 19,881 medical student evaluations over the 8-year period for all clinical clerkships, representing a total of 952 faculty. Students used a 5-point Likert scale to rate the teaching effectiveness of faculty. Criterion-based methods and standard

  2. Development of a longitudinal integrated clerkship at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Poncelet, Ann; Bokser, Seth; Calton, Brook; Hauer, Karen E.; Kirsch, Heidi; Jones, Tracey; Lai, Cindy J.; Mazotti, Lindsay; Shore, William; Teherani, Arianne; Tong, Lowell; Wamsley, Maria; Robertson, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, medical educators at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), began developing the Parnassus Integrated Student Clinical Experiences (PISCES) program, a year-long longitudinal integrated clerkship at its academic medical center. The principles guiding this new clerkship were continuity with faculty preceptors, patients, and peers; a developmentally progressive curriculum with an emphasis on interdisciplinary teaching; and exposure to undiagnosed illness in acute and chronic care settings. Innovative elements included quarterly student evaluation sessions with all preceptors together, peer-to-peer evaluation, and oversight advising with an assigned faculty member. PISCES launched with eight medical students for the 2007/2008 academic year and expanded to 15 students for 2008/2009. Compared to UCSF's traditional core clerkships, evaluations from PISCES indicated significantly higher student satisfaction with faculty teaching, formal didactics, direct observation of clinical skills, and feedback. Student performance on discipline-specific examinations and United States Medical Licensing Examination step 2 CK was equivalent to and on standardized patient examinations was slightly superior to that of traditional peers. Participants' career interests ranged from primary care to surgical subspecialties. These results demonstrate that a longitudinal integrated clerkship can be implemented successfully at a tertiary care academic medical center. PMID:21475642

  3. Creation of a Web-Based Lecture Series for Psychiatry Clerkship Students: Initial Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Vicki L.; Bennett, David S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: In recent years, the trend in medical education has been to utilize clerkship settings outside the medical school. Subsequently, students rotate at distant sites from the main campus and have lectures of varying quantity and quality. The objective of the present study was to standardize the core didactic experience for students in the…

  4. A Pilot Survey of Patient-Initiated Assaults on Medical Students during Clinical Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Andrea E.; Katz, Mark R.; Lofchy, Jodi; Bradley, John

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the incidents of patient-initiated assault (PIA) against clinical clerks during the first six months of clinical clerkship. To characterise the assaults with respect to service, location, clerk gender, patient gender. To examine the students' perceptions of the reporting process for PIA. Methods: A brief email survey was sent…

  5. Medical Student Psychiatry Examination Performance at VA and Non-VA Clerkship Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Phebe; von Schlageter, Margo Shultes; Park, EunMi; Rosenberg, Emily; Benjamin, Ashley B.; Nawar, Ola

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the effects of medical student assignment to U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center inpatient and outpatient psychiatry clerkship sites versus other university and community sites on the performance outcome measure of National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject examination scores. Methods:

  6. Using Multiple Assessments to Evaluate Medical Students' Clinical Ability in Psychiatric Clerkships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Peng-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Chung; Chou, Frank Huang-Chih; Tsang, Hin-Yeung; Chang, Yu-San; Huang, Mei-Feng; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Background: No single assessment method can successfully evaluate the clinical ability of medical students in psychiatric clerkships; however, few studies have examined the efficacy of multiple assessments, especially in psychiatry. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship among different types of assessments of medical students'

  7. Peer Evaluation in a Clinical Clerkship: Students' Attitudes, Experiences, and Correlations with Traditional Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Ruth E.; Kelly, P. Adam; Karakoc, Tayfun; Haidet, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors performed this study to determine whether clerkship peer evaluations, initiated as part of our "team-based learning" curriculum in 2002, correlated with other student performance measures, and to determine what qualities students rate in their peer evaluations. Method: The authors correlated peer evaluation scores with other…

  8. Academic Performance in the Context of a "Three Excused Absences" Psychiatry Clerkship Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schillerstrom, Jason E.; Lutz, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In order to better manage medical student absences during the psychiatry clerkship, a policy allowing students to miss up to 3 days without penalty was developed. The purpose of this study was to describe absence patterns and compare academic performance between students with and without absences. Method: Authors reviewed the academic

  9. Student Pre- and Post-Evaluation of an Off-Campus Clinical Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, R. Keith

    1975-01-01

    Describes the development and use of standardized forms found to be effective for evaluating clinical clerkship experiences of pharmacy students. Copies of the Preliminary Questionnaire and the Post-Evaluation Form are included along with the goals of the Washington State University College of Pharmacy Clinical Pharmacy Program. (JT)

  10. Videotaped Introductory Instruction in the Physical Examination for Clinical Clerkship Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwinghammer, Terry

    1981-01-01

    A 60-minute, color videotape of a simulated adult physical examination was produced and used by the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy to introduce clinical clerkship students to the procedures involved in the physical examination. The videotape was evaluated by a 25-question pretest and posttest. (Author/MLW)

  11. Do Clinical Evaluations in a Psychiatry Clerkship Favor Students with Positive Personality Characteristics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chibnall, John T.; Blaskiewicz, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine associations of personality characteristics, National Board of Medical Examiners subject examination performance, and Objective Structured Clinical Examination performance with clinical evaluations of third-year medical students in a psychiatry clerkship. Methods: Students completed the Revised NEO Personality…

  12. Subspecialty Exposure in a Psychiatry Clerkship Does Not Improve Student Performance in the Subject Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retamero, Carolina; Ramchandani, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared the NBME subject examination scores and subspecialty profiles of 3rd-year medical students who were assigned to psychiatry subspecialties during their clerkship with those who were not. Method: The authors collated and analyzed the shelf examination scores, the clinical grades, and the child psychiatry and emergency

  13. Psychiatry in the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: An Innovative, Year-Long Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Todd; Bullock, Christopher; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Albanese, Mark; Bonilla, Pedro; Dvorak, Ramona; Epelbaum, Claudia; Givon, Lior; Kueppenbender, Karsten; Joseph, Robert; Boyd, J. Wesley; Shtasel, Derri

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors present what is to their knowledge the first description of a model for longitudinal third-year medical student psychiatry education. Method: A longitudinal, integrated psychiatric curriculum was developed, implemented, and sustained within the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship. Curriculum elements

  14. Influence of Clerkship on Attitudes of Medical Students toward Psychiatry across Cultures: United States and Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgut, F. Tuna; Polan, H. Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assure adequate treatment for patients with mental illness worldwide, medical schools must impart positive attitudes toward psychiatry. The authors examined the effect of culture on changes in attitudes toward psychiatry among medical students receiving the same psychiatry clerkship curriculum in two different countries. Methods: A…

  15. How and What Do Medical Students Learn in Clerkships? Experience Based Learning (ExBL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dornan, Tim; Tan, Naomi; Boshuizen, Henny; Gick, Rachel; Isba, Rachel; Mann, Karen; Scherpbier, Albert; Spencer, John; Timmins, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Clerkship education has been called a "black box" because so little is known about what, how, and under which conditions students learn. Our aim was to develop a blueprint for education in ambulatory and inpatient settings, and in single encounters, traditional rotations, or longitudinal experiences. We identified 548 causal links

  16. The Performance of Female Medical Students in an Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joseph M.; Smith, Imogene K.

    1982-01-01

    A study showed that although female medical students had slightly lower National Board examination scores on part one and lower grade point averages, they performed significantly better in the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship. Possible factors include women students' interest in women's health care and female representation on the house staff.…

  17. Filling in the Gaps of Clerkship with a Comprehensive Clinical Skills Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veale, Pamela; Carson, Julie; Coderre, Sylvain; Woloschuk, Wayne; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Although the clinical clerkship model is based upon sound pedagogy, including theories of social learning and situated learning, studies evaluating clinical performance of residents suggests that this model may not fully meet the learning needs of students. Here our objective was to design a curriculum to bridge the learning gaps of the existing

  18. Incorporating Active Learning into a Psychiatry Clerkship: Does It Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morreale, Mary; Arfken, Cynthia; Bridge, Patrick; Balon, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Medical students' satisfaction with the psychiatry clerkship, sense of preparedness for an institutional Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE), expressed likelihood of choosing psychiatry as a specialty, and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) psychiatry shelf-examination scores were compared after a curriculum based on…

  19. Psychiatry in the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: An Innovative, Year-Long Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Todd; Bullock, Christopher; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Albanese, Mark; Bonilla, Pedro; Dvorak, Ramona; Epelbaum, Claudia; Givon, Lior; Kueppenbender, Karsten; Joseph, Robert; Boyd, J. Wesley; Shtasel, Derri

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors present what is to their knowledge the first description of a model for longitudinal third-year medical student psychiatry education. Method: A longitudinal, integrated psychiatric curriculum was developed, implemented, and sustained within the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship. Curriculum elements…

  20. Academic Performance in the Context of a "Three Excused Absences" Psychiatry Clerkship Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schillerstrom, Jason E.; Lutz, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In order to better manage medical student absences during the psychiatry clerkship, a policy allowing students to miss up to 3 days without penalty was developed. The purpose of this study was to describe absence patterns and compare academic performance between students with and without absences. Method: Authors reviewed the academic…

  1. Subspecialty Exposure in a Psychiatry Clerkship Does Not Improve Student Performance in the Subject Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retamero, Carolina; Ramchandani, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared the NBME subject examination scores and subspecialty profiles of 3rd-year medical students who were assigned to psychiatry subspecialties during their clerkship with those who were not. Method: The authors collated and analyzed the shelf examination scores, the clinical grades, and the child psychiatry and emergency…

  2. Filling in the Gaps of Clerkship with a Comprehensive Clinical Skills Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veale, Pamela; Carson, Julie; Coderre, Sylvain; Woloschuk, Wayne; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Although the clinical clerkship model is based upon sound pedagogy, including theories of social learning and situated learning, studies evaluating clinical performance of residents suggests that this model may not fully meet the learning needs of students. Here our objective was to design a curriculum to bridge the learning gaps of the existing…

  3. Influence of Clerkship on Attitudes of Medical Students toward Psychiatry across Cultures: United States and Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgut, F. Tuna; Polan, H. Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assure adequate treatment for patients with mental illness worldwide, medical schools must impart positive attitudes toward psychiatry. The authors examined the effect of culture on changes in attitudes toward psychiatry among medical students receiving the same psychiatry clerkship curriculum in two different countries. Methods: A

  4. Impact of clerkship attachments on students attitude toward pharmaceutical care in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tsega, Bayew; Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Sarkar, Barun Ranjan; Melaku, Tadesse; Shewamene, Zewdneh

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study objective is to investigate the impact of mandatory clinical clerkship courses on 5th-year pharmacy students attitudes and perceived barriers toward providing pharmaceutical care (PC). Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 5th-year pharmacy students undertaking mandatory clinical clerkship in the University of Gondar, Ethiopia. A pharmaceutical care attitudes survey (PCAS) questionnaire was used to assess the attitude (14 items), commonly identified drug-related problem/s (1 item) during clerkships, and perceived barriers (12 items) toward the provision of PC. Statistical analysis was conducted on the retrieved data. Results Out of the total of 69 clerkship students, 65 participated and completed the survey (94.2% response rate). Overall, 74.45% of participants opinioned a positive attitude toward PC provision. Almost all respondents agreed that the primary responsibility of pharmacists in the healthcare setting was to prevent and solve medication-related problems (98.5%), practice of PC was valuable (89.3%), and the PC movement will improve patient health (95.4%), respectively. Unnecessary drug therapy (43%), drugdrug interactions (33%), and non-adherence to medications (33%) were the most common drug-related problems identified in wards. Highly perceived barriers for PC provision included lack of a workplace for counseling in the pharmacy (75.4%), a poor image of pharmacists role in wards (67.7%), and inadequate technology in the pharmacy (64.6%). Lack of access to a patients medical record in the pharmacy had significant association (P<0.05) with PC practice, performance of PC during clerkship, provision of PC as clinical pharmacists, and Ethiopian pharmacists benefiting by PC. Conclusion Ethiopian clinical pharmacy students have a good attitude toward PC. Efforts should be targeted toward reducing these drug therapy issues, and aiding the integration of PC provision with pharmacy practice. PMID:26056513

  5. From Aging...to Saging--The Ohio State Senior Partners Program: Longitudinal and Experiential Geriatrics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantor, Bonnie S.; Myers, Michelle R.

    2006-01-01

    The Ohio State College of Medicine began its Senior Partners Program (SPP) in 2001 as part of its commitment to integrate geriatric education throughout all four years of the medical curriculum. For participating senior partners and medical students, the SPP has signified a journey through a continuum of aging. Initial evaluations suggest that…

  6. Development and validation of a questionnaire for evaluation of students' attitudes towards family medicine.

    PubMed

    ter, Marija Petek; vab, Igor; Klemenc-Keti, Zalika; Kersnik, Janko

    2015-03-01

    The development of the EURACT (European Academy of Teachers in General Practice) Educational Agenda helped many family medicine departments in development of clerkship and the aims and objectives of family medicine teaching. Our aims were to develop and validate a tool for assessment of students' attitudes towards family medicine and to evaluate the impact of the clerkship on students' attitudes regarding the competences of family doctor. In the pilot study, experienced family doctors were asked to describe their attitudes towards family medicine by using the Educational Agenda as a template for brainstorming. The statements were paraphrased and developed into a 164-items questionnaire, which was administered to 176 final-year students in academic year 2007/08. The third phase consisted of development of a final tool using statistical analysis, which resulted in the 60-items questionnaire in six domains which was used for the evaluation of students' attitudes. At the beginning of the clerkship, person-centred care and holistic approach scored lower than the other competences. Students' attitudes regarding the competences at the end of 7 weeks clerkship in family medicine were more positive, with exception of the competence regarding primary care management. The students who named family medicine as his or her future career choice, found holistic approach as more important than the students who did not name it as their future career. With the decision tree, which included students' attitudes to the competences of family medicine, we can successfully predict the future career choice in family medicine in 93.5% of the students. This study reports on the first attempt to develop a valid and reliable tool for measuring attitudes towards family medicine based on EURACT Educational Agenda. The questionnaire could be used for evaluating changes of students' attitudes in undergraduate curricula and for prediction of students' preferences regarding their future professional career in family medicine. PMID:26040061

  7. Chemotherapy in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Green, Jaime M; Hacker, Eileen Danaher

    2004-12-01

    The population in America is aging, and the number of older adults who develop cancer continues to grow. Gerontologic considerations in the delivery of health care become increasingly more important as a result of these population trends. Factors such as physiologic age-related changes, comorbid conditions, and the incidence of polypharmacy contribute to the challenges of administering chemotherapy to older patients with cancer. Age-related physiologic changes, including alterations in the gastrointestinal system, renal system, body composition, and hematopoiesis, impact patients' ability to tolerate standard doses of chemotherapy. In addition, these changes increase the likelihood of developing severe toxicities. Comorbid conditions confound the side effects of chemotherapy, and the use of multiple medications places older patients with cancer at increased risk for developing drug interactions. Older patients with cancer may be more susceptible to developing toxicities from chemotherapy, and these toxicities may be more severe. When healthcare professionals follow age-appropriate standards of oncology care, chemotherapy can be safely and effectively administered to older patients with cancer. Oncology nurses play a crucial role in assessing for potential complications and managing toxicities. Incorporating geriatric care into oncology nurses' daily practice ensures quality care for older patients with cancer. PMID:15637954

  8. Advancing geriatrics research, education, and practice: policy challenges after the great recession.

    PubMed

    Zerzan, Judy T; Rich, Eugene C

    2014-06-01

    The series of articles in this JGIM issue provides a number of policy-relevant recommendations for advancing geriatrics research, education and practice. Despite the unprecedented pressure to reduce state and federal spending, policymakers must concurrently address the challenges of a growing population of older individuals with increasingly complex health care problems. Thus, there may be opportunities to advance this agenda in creative ways. For example, without new spending, federal research agencies can make changes to encourage needed new directions in aging research, and the ACA provides new funding opportunities such as the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute. States and the federal government have an increasing need for the health professions workforce to have collaborative care skills and geriatrics clinical competencies, and are finding ways to invest in relevant initiatives. On the clinical program side, state and federal governments are initiating programs to promote delivery system changes that improve the care of older adults. Nonetheless, in the face of the policy challenges that have persisted after the "great recession," academic geriatrics and general internal medicine will need to join forces with public and private interests to secure the resources needed to advance this ambitious agenda for geriatrics research, education and practice. PMID:24557514

  9. When Patients Teach Their Doctors: A Curriculum for Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkowiak, John; Gunderson, Anne

    2004-01-01

    In response to aging patient demographics and a call for increased formal geriatric training in medical schools, a community volunteer geriatric mentor program, Bridging Generations, was developed to shape attitudes of medical students caring for the elderly. The geriatric mentor experience provided students with unique insight into the challenges

  10. Geriatrics Educational Outreach: A Tale of Three GRECCs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Elizabeth; Fitzgerald, James T.; Griffith, Jennifer; Weir, Charlene

    2011-01-01

    Current geriatrics workforce projections indicate that clinicians who care for adults will need basic geriatrics knowledge and skills to address the geriatric syndromes and issues that limit functional independence and complicate medical management. This is most evident for the clinicians caring for veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs

  11. When Patients Teach Their Doctors: A Curriculum for Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkowiak, John; Gunderson, Anne

    2004-01-01

    In response to aging patient demographics and a call for increased formal geriatric training in medical schools, a community volunteer geriatric mentor program, Bridging Generations, was developed to shape attitudes of medical students caring for the elderly. The geriatric mentor experience provided students with unique insight into the challenges…

  12. Geriatrics Educational Outreach: A Tale of Three GRECCs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Elizabeth; Fitzgerald, James T.; Griffith, Jennifer; Weir, Charlene

    2011-01-01

    Current geriatrics workforce projections indicate that clinicians who care for adults will need basic geriatrics knowledge and skills to address the geriatric syndromes and issues that limit functional independence and complicate medical management. This is most evident for the clinicians caring for veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs…

  13. Palliative Care for the Geriatric Anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Gustin, Allen N; Aslakson, Rebecca A

    2015-09-01

    Many seriously ill geriatric patients are at higher risk for perioperative morbidity and mortality, and incorporating proactive palliative care principles may be appropriate. Advanced care planning is a hallmark of palliative care in that it facilitates alignment of the goals of care between the patient and the health care team. When these goals conflict, perioperative dilemmas can occur. Anesthesiologists must overcome many cultural and religious barriers when managing the care of these patients. Palliative care is gaining ground in several perioperative populations where integration with certain patient groups has occurred. Geriatric anesthesiologists must be aware of how palliative care and hospice influence and enhance the care of elderly patients. PMID:26315640

  14. Nutrition management of geriatric surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Dudrick, Stanley J

    2011-08-01

    Surgery in geriatric patients is accompanied by increases in morbidity and mortality, increases in functional abnormalities and poor outcomes, and increases in severe malnutrition, compared with surgery of similar magnitude in nongeriatric patients. Hospitalized elderly patients are at significant risk of presenting with, or developing, protein-energy and other nutrient deficiencies. However, nutritional assessment of older geriatric patients, 65 to 100 years of age, is a challenging task because of lack of adequate age-specific reference data in this diverse and heterogeneous population. Dietary counseling and conscientious, aggressive nutritional support are required for optimal metabolic and surgical care of this age group. PMID:21787973

  15. Can enriching emotional intelligence improve medical students’ proactivity and adaptability during OB/GYN clerkships?

    PubMed Central

    Guseh, Stephanie H.; Chen, Xiaodong P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this pilot study was to examine our hypothesis that enriching workplace emotional intelligence through resident coaches could improve third-year medical students’ adaptability and proactivity on the Obstetrics and Gynecology clerkship. Methods An observational pilot study was conducted in a teaching hospital. Fourteen 3rd year medical students from two cohorts of clerkships were randomly divided into two groups, and equally assigned to trained resident coaches and untrained resident coaches. Data was collected through onsite naturalistic observation of students’ adaptability and proactivity in clinical settings using a checklist with a 4-point Likert scale (1=poor to 4=excellent). Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare the differences between these two groups. Results A total of 280 data points were collected through onsite observations conducted by investigators. All (n=14) students’ adaptability and proactivity performance significantly improved from an average of 3.04 to 3.45 (p=0.014) over 6-week clerkship. Overall, students with trained resident coaches adapted significantly faster and were more proactive in the obstetrics and gynecology clinical setting than the students with untrained coaches (3.31 vs. 3.24, p=0.019). Conclusions Findings from our pilot study supported our hypothesis that enriching workplace emotional intelligence knowledge through resident coaches was able to help medical students adapt into obstetrics and gynecology clinical settings faster and become more proactive in learning. Clerkship programs can incorporate the concept of a resident coach in their curriculum to help bridge medical students into clinical settings and to help them engage in self-directed learning throughout the rotation. PMID:26708233

  16. Geriatric Education in the Health Professions: Are We Making Progress?

    PubMed Central

    Bardach, Shoshana H.; Rowles, Graham D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Relative to the overall population, older adults consume a disproportionally large percentage of health care resources. Despite advocacy and efforts initiated more than 30 years ago, the number of providers with specialized training in geriatrics is still not commensurate with the growing population of older adults. This contribution provides a contemporary update on the status of geriatric education and explores how geriatric coverage is valued, how geriatric competence is defined, and how students are evaluated for geriatric competencies. Design and Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with curriculum representatives from 7 health profession disciplines in a case study of one academic medical center. Findings: Geriatric training varies across health professions disciplines. Although participants recognized the unique needs of older patients and valued geriatric coverage, they identified shortage of time in packed curricula, lack of geriatrics-trained educators, absence of financial incentive, and low student demand (resulting from limited exposure to older adults and gerontological stereotyping) as barriers to improving geriatric training. Implications: Progress in including geriatric training within curricula across the health professions continues to lag behind need as a result of the continuing presence of barriers identified several decades ago. There remains an urgent need for institutional commitment to enhance geriatric education as a component of health professions curricula. PMID:22394495

  17. Research Priorities for High Quality Geriatric Emergency Care: Medication Management, Screening and Prevention and Functional Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Heard, Kennon; Wilber, Scott; Ginde, Adit A.; Stiffler, Kirk; Gerson, Lowell W.; Wenger, Neal S.; Miller, Douglas K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Geriatric adults represent an increasing proportion of emergency department (ED) users, and can be particularly vulnerable to acute illnesses. Health care providers have recently begun to focus upon the development of quality indicators to define a minimal standard of care. Objectives The original objective of this project was to develop additional ED-specific quality indicators for older patients within the domains of medication management, screening and prevention, and functional assessment, but the quantity and quality of evidence was insufficient to justify unequivocal minimal standards of care for these three domains. Accordingly, the authors modified the project objectives to identify key research opportunities within these three domains that can be used to develop quality indicators in the future. Methods Each domain was assigned one or two content experts who created potential quality indicators (QI) based on a systematic review of the literature, supplemented by expert opinion. Candidate quality indicators were then reviewed by four groups: the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Geriatric Task Force, the SAEM Geriatric Interest Group, and audiences at the 2008 SAEM Annual Meeting and the 2009 American Geriatrics Society Annual Meeting, using anonymous audience response system technology as well as verbal and written feedback. Results High-quality evidence based on patient-oriented outcomes was insufficient or non-existent for all three domains. The participatory audiences did not reach a consensus on any of the proposed QIs. Key research questions for medication management (3), screening and prevention (2), and functional assessment (3) are presented based upon proposed QIs that the majority of participants accepted. Conclusions In assessing a minimal standard of care by which to systematically derive geriatric QIs for medication management, screening and prevention, and functional assessment, compelling clinical research evidence is lacking. Patient-oriented research questions that are essential to justify and characterize future quality indicators within these domains are described. PMID:21676064

  18. Medical student quality-of-life in the clerkships: a scale validation study.

    PubMed

    Brannick, Michael T; Horn, Gregory T; Schnaus, Michael J; Wahi, Monika M; Goldin, Steven B

    2015-04-01

    Many aspects of medical school are stressful for students. To empirically assess student reactions to clerkship programs, or to assess efforts to improve such programs, educators must measure the overall well-being of the students reliably and validly. The purpose of the study was to develop and validate a measure designed to achieve these goals. The authors developed a measure of quality of life for medical students by sampling (public domain) items tapping general happiness, fatigue, and anxiety. A quality-of-life scale was developed by factor analyzing responses to the items from students in two different clerkships from 2005 to 2008. Reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Validity was assessed by factor analysis, convergence with additional theoretically relevant scales, and sensitivity to change over time. The refined nine-item measure is a Likert scaled survey of quality-of-life items comprised of two domains: exhaustion and general happiness. The resulting scale demonstrated good reliability and factorial validity at two time points for each of the two samples. The quality-of-life measure also correlated with measures of depression and the amount of sleep reported during the clerkships. The quality-of-life measure appeared more sensitive to changes over time than did the depression measure. The measure is short and can be easily administered in a survey. The scale appears useful for program evaluation and more generally as an outcome variable in medical educational research. PMID:25831183

  19. What difficulties do faculty members face when conducting workplace-based assessments in undergraduate clerkships?

    PubMed Central

    Mak-van der Vossen, Marianne C.; Croiset, Gerda; Kusurkar, Rashmi A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Workplace-based assessments are based on the principle of providing feedback to medical students on clinical performance in authentic settings. In practice, however, the assessment often overshadows the feedback. The aim of this study was to determine what problems faculty perceived when performing workplace-based assessments and what solutions they suggested to overcome these difficulties. Methods Discussion meetings were conducted with education coordinators and faculty (n=55) from 11 peripheral hospitals concerning the difficulties encountered when conducting workplace-based assessments. We analysed the reports from these discussion meetings using an integrated approach guided by our research questions to code the data. Two researchers analysed the data independently and resolved differences of opinion through consensus. Results The problems perceived by faculty in workplace-based assessments (difficulties) and suggestions for improvement formed the overarching themes. Problems included the short duration of clerkships, students choosing the assessment moments, the use of grades for the mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise, the difficulty in combining teacher and assessor roles and the difficulty in giving fail judgements. Suggestions for improvement included longer clerkship duration, faculty choosing the assessment moments, using a pass/fail system for the mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise and forward feeding of performance from earlier clerkships following a fail judgement. Conclusions Our study indicates that faculty perceive difficulties when conducting workplace-based assessments. These assessments need periodical review to understand the difficulties faculty experience using them; they also require periodical feedback to ensure their proper and effective use. PMID:26803256

  20. Geriatric Syndromes: Clinical, Research and Policy Implications of a Core Geriatric Concept

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Sharon K.; Studenski, Stephanie; Tinetti, Mary E.; Kuchel, George A.

    2008-01-01

    Geriatricians have embraced the term “geriatric syndrome”, using it extensively to highlight the unique features of common health conditions in the elderly. Geriatric syndromes, such as delirium, falls, incontinence and frailty, are highly prevalent, multifactorial, and associated with substantial morbidity and poor outcomes. Nevertheless, this central geriatric concept has remained poorly defined. This article reviews criteria for defining geriatric syndromes, and proposes a balanced approach of developing preliminary criteria based on peer-reviewed evidence. Based on a review of the literature, four shared risk factors—older age, baseline cognitive impairment, baseline functional impairment, and impaired mobility—were identified across five common geriatric syndromes (pressure ulcers, incontinence, falls, functional decline, and delirium). Understanding basic mechanisms involved in geriatric syndromes will be critical to advancing research and developing targeted therapeutic options. However, given the complexity of these multifactorial conditions, attempts to define relevant mechanisms will need to incorporate more complex models, including a focus on synergistic interactions between different risk factors. Finally, major barriers have been identified in translating research advances, such as preventive strategies of proven effectiveness for delirium and falls, into clinical practice and policy initiatives. National strategic initiatives are required to overcome barriers and to achieve clinical, research, and policy advances that will improve quality of life for older persons. PMID:17493201

  1. [Prescription for proton pump inhibitors in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Schonheit, Claire; Le Petitcorps, Hlne; Pautas, ric

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are widely prescribed, notably for the over 65s, despite there being significant side effects in the geriatric population. It is therefore important that doctors, caregivers and patients are fully aware of the recognised indications of PPIs and on the less well-known problems inherent to their prescription. PMID:26574132

  2. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment in the Office

    PubMed Central

    Pereles, Laurie R.M.; Boyle, Neil G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Because of their increased incidence of illness and disability, geriatric patients require extra time and diligence to assess and track medical problems. This article describes a comprehensive geriatirc assessment, organized on a one-page, easily updated checklist, that can be used to generate a medical and functional problem list and a risk assessment. Imagesp2190-a PMID:21229091

  3. Geriatric Staff Training for Patient Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Tom

    The project investigated the effectiveness of an evironmental therapy training program for geriatric mental health workers when used in two different institutional settings. Site A was a State-operated facility for psychiatric in-patient care, accommodating 2,000 patients, with emphasis on maintenance and general patient welfare. Site B, a former

  4. Geriatric Oncology Research to Improve Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Mohile, Supriya; Dale, William; Hurria, Arti

    2013-01-01

    Summary The incidence of cancer increases with advanced age. The Cancer and Aging Research Group (CARG), in partnership with the National Institute on Aging and National Cancer Institute, held a conference in September of 2010 which summarized the gaps in knowledge in geriatric oncology and recommendations to close these gaps. One recommendation was that the comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) should be incorporated within geriatric oncology research. The information from the CGA can be used to stratify patients into risk categories to better predict their tolerance of cancer treatment. CGA can also be used to follow functional consequences from treatment. Other recommendations were to design trials for older adults with study endpoints that address the needs of the older and/or vulnerable adult with cancer and to build better infrastructure to accommodate the needs of older adults to improve their representation in trials. In this review, we utilize a case-based approach to highlight gaps in knowledge regarding the care of older adults with cancer, discuss our current state of knowledge regarding best practice patterns, and identify opportunities for research in geriatric oncology. More evidence regarding the treatment of older patients with cancer is urgently needed given the rapid aging of the population. PMID:22825377

  5. Directory of Curriculum Guidelines for Geriatric Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Health Professions.

    This directory contains information on the nature and availability of curriculum guidelines for education and training programs in geriatrics and gerontology. The curriculum guidelines or model curricula were prepared by professional associations or with federal support, most notably through the Administration on Aging or the Health Resources and

  6. Natural products and supplements for geriatric depression and cognitive disorders: an evaluation of the research.

    PubMed

    Varteresian, Taya; Lavretsky, Helen

    2014-08-01

    Numerous geriatric patients are using Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for late-life mood and cognitive disorders. Natural products and supplements are a common CAM intervention which have risks and benefits of which patients should be appropriately advised. The data for omega-3 fatty acids, ginkgo biloba, SAMe, St John's wort, B vitamins and vitamin D, huperzine, caprylidene, and coconut oil will be evaluated. Since the evidence basis for natural products and supplements is limited, especially for the geriatric population, studies involving the general adult population are included to infer effects in the aging population. Despite the data available, more rigorous studies with larger sample sizes over longer periods of time are still needed. Regardless of a physician's preference to recommend various natural supplements and products, a physician could protect their patients by having an understanding of the side effects and indications for various natural products. PMID:24912606

  7. Whats Behind a Name: The Kaufman Prize of the Canadian Geriatrics Society

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, David B.

    2011-01-01

    The Kaufman Prize has been given by the Canadian Geriatrics Society for nearly 30 years, but few Society members are aware of who Kaufman was or why the Prize was named after him. They are equally unclear about the objectives established for the Prize and how successful it has been in achieving them. This paper reviews the history of the Kaufman Prize and the eponymous A.R. Kaufman. The original objectives of the award were to encourage clinical research in geriatric medicine and to foster research interest in medical residents. Over the years the Prize has allowed the Society to both recognize and encourage excellence in age-related research among trainees. With the renaming of the Prize, now would be an opportune time for the Society to review both its objectives and its format. PMID:23251314

  8. Natural Products and Supplements for Geriatric Depression and Cognitive Disorders: An Evaluation of the Research

    PubMed Central

    Varteresian, Taya; Lavretsky, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Numerous geriatric patients are using Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for late-life mood and cognitive disorders. Natural products and supplements are a common CAM intervention which have risks and benefits of which patients should be appropriately advised. The data for omega-3 fatty acids, ginkgo biloba, SAMe, St John’s wort, B Vitamins and Vitamin D, huperzine, caprylidene and coconut oil will be evaluated. Since the evidence basis for natural products and supplements is limited, especially for the geriatric population. Studies involving the general adult population are included to infer effects in the aging population. Despite the data available, more rigorous studies with larger sample sizes over longer periods of time are still needed. Regardless of a physician’s preference to recommend various natural supplements and products, a physician could protect their patients by having an understanding of the side effects and indications for various natural products. PMID:24912606

  9. Development of an Evaluative Procedure for Clinical Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Pancorbo, Salvador

    1980-01-01

    In order to evaluate the clinical competencies of graduate pharmacy students upon the completion of a medicine rotation, an oral examination has been developed that requires students to present data and defend decisions. Objectives, responsibilities, and competencies required by the rotation and nine sample exam questions are appended. (JMD)

  10. Effect of handoff skills training for students during the medicine clerkship: a quasi-randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Juan A; Greenberg, Larrie; Amdur, Richard; Gehring, James; Lesky, Linda G

    2016-03-01

    Continuity is critical for safe patient care and its absence is associated with adverse outcomes. Continuity requires handoffs between physicians, but most published studies of educational interventions to improve handoffs have focused primarily on residents, despite interns expected to being proficient. The AAMC core entrustable activities for graduating medical students includes handoffs as a milestone, but no controlled studies with students have assessed the impact of training in handoff skills. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of an educational intervention to improve third-year medical student handoff skills, the durability of learned skills into the fourth year, and the transfer of skills from the simulated setting to the clinical environment. Trained evaluators used standardized patient cases and an observation tool to assess verbal handoff skills immediately post intervention and during the student's fourth-year acting internship. Students were also observed doing real time sign-outs during their acting internship. Evaluators assessed untrained control students using a standardized case and performing a real-time sign-out. Intervention students mean score demonstrated improvement in handoff skills immediately after the workshop (2.6-3.8; p < 0.0001) that persisted into their fourth year acting internship when compared to baseline performance (3.9-3.5; p = 0.06) and to untrained control students (3.5 vs. 2.5; p < 0.001, d = 1.2). Intervention students evaluated in the clinical setting also scored higher than control students when assessed doing real-time handoffs (3.8 vs. 3.3; p = 0.032, d = 0.71). These findings should be useful to others considering introducing handoff teaching in the undergraduate medical curriculum in preparation for post-graduate medical training. Trial Registration Number NCT02217241. PMID:26174046

  11. Effect of Handoff Skills Training for Students during the Medicine Clerkship: A Quasi-Randomized Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Juan A.; Greenberg, Larrie; Amdur, Richard; Gehring, James; Lesky, Linda G.

    2016-01-01

    Continuity is critical for safe patient care and its absence is associated with adverse outcomes. Continuity requires handoffs between physicians, but most published studies of educational interventions to improve handoffs have focused primarily on residents, despite interns expected to being proficient. The AAMC core entrustable activities for…

  12. Simulation in Medical School Education: Review for Emergency Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Bharath; ter Haar, Elizabeth; Bhat, Srinidhi Subraya; McCoy, Christopher Eric; Denmark, T. Kent; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2011-01-01

    Medical education is rapidly evolving. With the paradigm shift to small-group didactic sessions and focus on clinically oriented case-based scenarios, simulation training has provided educators a novel way to deliver medical education in the 21st century. The field continues to expand in scope and practice and is being incorporated into medical school clerkship education, and specifically in emergency medicine (EM). The use of medical simulation in graduate medical education is well documented. Our aim in this article is to perform a retrospective review of the current literature, studying simulation use in EM medical student clerkships. Studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of simulation in teaching basic science, clinical knowledge, procedural skills, teamwork, and communication skills. As simulation becomes increasingly prevalent in medical school curricula, more studies are needed to assess whether simulation training improves patient-related outcomes. PMID:22224138

  13. Meeting American Geriatrics Society Competencies: Are Residents Meeting Expectations for Quality Care of Older Adults?

    PubMed

    Bynum, Debra L; Wilson, Lindsay A; Ong, Thuan; Callahan, Kathryn E; Dalton, Thomas; Ohuabunwa, Ugochi

    2015-09-01

    In order to determine how often internal medicine and family medicine residents performed specific actions related to the geriatric competencies established by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) when caring for older hospitalized adults, a cross-sectional anonymous survey of residents at the University of North Carolina, University of Washington, Wake Forest University, Duke University, and Emory University was undertaken. Data on frequency of self-reported behaviors were analyzed, with comparisons made for different levels of training, institution, and program. A total of 375 residents responded for an overall response rate of 48%. Residents reported that they often do not demonstrate all of the AGS recommended core competencies when caring for older adults in the hospital setting. Residents report more frequently performing activities that are routinely integrated into hospital systems such as reviewing medication lists, working with an interdisciplinary team, evaluating for inappropriate bladder catheters, and evaluating for pressure ulcers. There were no consistent differences between institutions and only minor differences noted between Family Medicine and Internal Medicine residents. Operationalizing core competencies by integrating them into hospital systems' quality process indicators may prompt more consistent high-quality care and ensure systems support residents' competence. PMID:26313811

  14. Training family medicine residents for assessment and advocacy of older adults.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Myral R

    2002-11-01

    A review of the Basic Standards for Residency Training in Osteopathic Family Practice and Manipulative Treatment by the American Osteopathic Association and the American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians revealed that the family medicine residency curriculum in place at Riverside Osteopathic Hospital in Trenton, Mich, lacked formal didactic and clinical teaching in geriatric medicine. Therefore, a geriatric curriculum focusing on functional assessment strategies was developed and implemented. A three-part, 6-hour educational series was delivered to family medicine residents, interns, and medical students at Riverside Osteopathic Hospital. Content for the sessions addressed a variety of assessment and screening tools; concepts of abuse, neglect, and guardianship; available community resources to support the independent functioning of older adults; and, application of knowledge and skills. The geriatric medicine series concluded with a working session to prepare an individualized management plan for each of the patients evaluated. Each family medicine resident, the target learners, demonstrated his skill at performing a functional assessment of a geriatric patient at the community-based Horizon Family Medical Center in Taylor, Mich. Peers and faculty provided feedback. Family medicine residents were able to transfer knowledge and skills from the classroom to a geriatric patient. This teaching curriculum is the starting point for further development of clinical and community-based geriatric experiences for the family medicine residents at Riverside Osteopathic Hospital. PMID:12462309

  15. Developing Leadership in Geriatric Education: An Annual Faculty Institute. Proceedings of the Summer Geriatric Institute (4th, Lexington, Kentucky, July 24-27, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Davis L., Ed.; Hoekelman, Margaret C., Ed.

    This document presents the proceedings of a conference on geriatric education. These papers are included: Promoting Healthy Aging: A Leadership Role for Geriatric Education; National Research Priorities in Aging; Aging with a Disability; Recent Advances in Clinical Strategies in Geriatric Education: The Role of the Geriatric Nurse in the Acute…

  16. [Geriatric assessment prior to oncological therapy].

    PubMed

    Wedding, U

    2013-06-01

    Ageing is the single most important risk factor for cancer. This is also true for most cancer diseases of the genitourinary tract. In combination with the demographic changes in Germany and most other countries, the consequence is a substantial increase in the number of elderly patients with cancer. Most therapies in oncology have a high risk for toxic side effects. Ageing is a very heterogeneous process. The chronological age of a patient insufficiently reflects the individual resources, deficits and risk factors but this can be assessed by a structured geriatric assessment. Integration of geriatric assessment into oncological treatment decisions is still low and is one of the major tasks in cancer care in the future. PMID:23708006

  17. Using Facebook Within a Geriatric Pharmacotherapy Course

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate using an Internet-based social networking site within an elective geriatric pharmacotherapy course. Design Thirty pharmacy students enrolled in a geriatric pharmacotherapy elective course were invited to join a closed Facebook (Facebook Inc, Palo Alto, CA) group to enhance communication among students and faculty members within the course. Creating a discussion board was the primary activity in the course. Each week, 3 students were assigned to post a healthy aging topic, and other students in the class were expected to post their comments and reactions. The healthy aging topics also were discussed during class. Assessment Students wrote reflections about their experiences using Facebook for the activities within this course. A survey instrument also measured students' opinions about using Facebook for educational purposes. Conclusion Using Facebook allowed students to discuss topics more openly and encouraged classroom discussions of healthy aging topics. PMID:21179256

  18. Craniomandibular disorders in the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Iacopino, A M; Wathen, W F

    1993-01-01

    This paper represents a general review of basic age-related changes that take place in the craniomandibular apparatus and the most frequently presenting conditions associated with craniomandibular disorders (CMD) in the elderly. The evaluation of geriatric patients with signs or symptoms of CMD must consider (1) normal age-related changes in the craniomandibular apparatus and their impact on both normal function and responses to stress; (2) the role of dentition status and dental prosthesis in CMD; and (3) the contribution of malignant disease, psoriasis, arthritic conditions, pseudogout, granulomatous vascular conditions, and metaplastic involvement of tissue to the pathosis of CMD. The clinician must also be aware of various effects of psychologic, sociologic, and biologic aspects of aging on the development of headache and atypical facial pain as components of CMD in the geriatric patient. PMID:8467296

  19. Postoperative Delirium in the Geriatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Schenning, Katie J; Deiner, Stacie G

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative delirium, a common complication in older surgical patients, is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Patients older than 65years receive greater than one-third of the more than 40 million anesthetics delivered yearly in the United States. This number is expected to increase with the aging of the population. Thus, it is increasingly important that perioperative clinicians who care for geriatric patients have an understanding of the complex syndrome of postoperative delirium. PMID:26315635

  20. Hemangiosarcoma in a geriatric Labrador retriever.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Diya

    2012-08-01

    A geriatric Labrador retriever dog was presented for acute collapse. The dog was conscious but lethargic, tachypneic, tachycardic with weak femoral pulses, occasional pulse deficits, and pale mucous membranes. Radiography, ultrasonography, quick assessment tests, and a complete blood (cell) count (CBC)/biochemistry panel indicated internal hemorrhage and potential problems with hemostasis. The dog was euthanized. A necropsy, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry for CD31 and Factor VIII-related antigen cell markers supported a diagnosis of splenic hemangiosarcoma. PMID:23372199

  1. Achieving High-Quality Multicultural Geriatric Care.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    As the ethnic diversity of the U.S. population increases, there is a growing awareness of healthcare disparities and the need to address them. This position statement that the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Ethnogeriatrics Committee developed outlines healthcare disparities in the United States and the minimum quality indicators that healthcare organizations and healthcare providers should adopt to ensure that all older adults receive care that is culturally appropriate and takes into account level of health literacy. PMID:26804356

  2. Early exposure to geriatric nursing through an externship program.

    PubMed

    Souder, Elaine; Beverly, Claudia J; Kitch, Stephanie; Lubin, Sandie A

    2012-01-01

    The Summer Geriatric Extern Program was developed in 2004 to provide nursing students between the junior and senior year an opportunity to learn more about careers in geriatric nursing.This full-time, eight-week commitment provides students with a stipend and a faculty mentor in their area of interest. Of the 24 externs since the inception of the program, seven have enrolled in graduate programs. The findings suggest that the summer geriatric externship program is effective in developing interest in a geriatric nursing career and providing exposure to nursing research and other aspects of the faculty role. PMID:22860479

  3. Non-healing wounds: the geriatric approach.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2009-01-01

    The most common types of non-healing wounds are four types: pressure ulcers, diabetic ulcers, ischemic ulcers and venous ulcers. Many of those wounds develop among the elderly, becoming non-healing to the extent that the patient may live with them all of his life, or even die because of them. Not enough attention is paid to the underlying contributing problems specific to the elderly patient. Those factors are physiologic (aging skin, immune state and atherosclerosis) and pathologic situation (diabetic disease, ischemia of leg). Therefore, the geriatric approach to a non-healing wound is comprehensive and multidisciplinary. Those including: patient's co-morbidities, functional state as measured by the activities of daily living (ADL) scale, nutritional status, social support, ethical beliefs and quality of life and not only the wound itself. Each discipline (the nursing staff, physician, dietitian, occupational, physical therapists and social worker) has its own task in preventing and treating such wounds. The ultimate goal therefore has been altered from healing of the wounds to symptom control, prevention of complications and to contribute to the patient's overall wellbeing. This review discusses all those items in a geriatric point of view, and how to deal with the non-healing wounds as a geriatric syndrome. PMID:18838182

  4. Patient-Reported Geriatric Symptoms as Risk Factors for Hospitalization and Emergency Department Visits

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Anupam; Crane, Sarah J; Tung, Ericka E; Hanson, Gregory J; North, Frederick; Cha, Stephen S; Takahashi, Paul Y

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify predictors of adverse outcomes and increased health care utilization in the elderly. The Mayo Ambulatory Geriatric Evaluation (MAGE) is a symptom questionnaire that was completed by patients aged 65 years and older during office visits to Primary Care Internal Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. It was introduced to improve screening for geriatric conditions. We conducted this study to explore the relationship between self-reported geriatric symptoms and hospitalization and emergency department (ED) visits within 1 year of completing the survey. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients who completed the MAGE from April 2008 to December 2010. The primary outcome was an ED visit or hospitalization within 1 year. Predictors included responses to individual questions in the MAGE. Data were obtained from the electronic medical record and administrative records. Logistic regression analyses were performed from significant univariate factors to determine predictors in a multivariable setting. A weighted scoring system was created based upon the odds ratios derived from a bootstrap process. The sensitivity, specificity, and AUC were calculated using this scoring system. The MAGE survey was completed by 7738 patients. The average age was 76.2 7.68 years and 57% were women. Advanced age, a self-report of worse health, history of 2 or more falls, weight loss, and depressed mood were significantly associated with hospitalization or ED visits within 1 year. A score equal to or greater than 2 had a sensitivity of 0.74 and specificity of 0.45. The calculated AUC was 0.60. The MAGE questionnaire, which was completed by patients at an outpatient visit to screen for common geriatric issues, could also be used to assess risk for ED visits and hospitalization within 1 year. PMID:26029477

  5. Geriatric care boot cAMP: an interprofessional education program for healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Lauren B; Solberg, Laurence M; Carter, Christy S

    2015-05-01

    In response to the need for interprofessional geriatrics education, a half-day geriatric care boot camp for healthcare professionals was held that covered core concepts in geriatric medicine: delirium and dementia, medication management, palliative care, ethics, and a general overview of older adults. Aspects of the curriculum focused on interprofessional education, and the attendees and presenters were healthcare professionals from a wide variety of fields. Primary objectives were to determine changes in knowledge of core concepts in geriatrics and level of comfort in caring for older adults. Secondary objectives assessed whether participants found the interprofessional approach beneficial and whether they used or shared this information with others in their professional activities. Participants completed pre- and postassessment surveys. Changes in participant understanding of each core concept were statistically significant, as was the change in comfort level of participants in caring for older adults. Furthermore, attendees found the multidisciplinary perspective of the boot camp beneficial. A 3-month follow-up survey assessed whether attendees applied and shared information learned in their own professional activities. Half of the respondents who reported sharing universally shared core concepts. Delirium and dementia information was most frequently shared. Information was most frequently shared with students, nurses, and patients' families. Attendees less frequently shared, or did not share, with physicians, physician assistants, social workers, physical and occupational therapists, nutritionists, and dentists. The healthcare professionals who may benefit greatly from future education programs are those with whom the boot camp information was least frequently shared; thus, they are appropriate targets for advertisements for future programs. PMID:25989566

  6. [Prevention of catheter-related infections: minimizing secondary complications in geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, K; Christ, M; Battegay, M; Heppner, H J

    2013-06-01

    The use of intravascular or intraluminal catheters is common in geriatric medicine. Blood stream infections due to intravascular catheterization, peritoneal catheters for dialysis, suprapubic or transurethral catheters, or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy are a major source of nosocomial infections. Therefore, the prevention of catheter-associated infections is an important issue for physicians and nursing staff working in hospitals or in outpatient settings. The risk can be minimized by diligent checking of the indications, hygienic measures, using the correct materials, thorough follow-up, and education of the medical and nursing staff. Thus, it is possible to avoid individual suffering of patients and to reduce costs in the healthcare system. PMID:23712634

  7. Multiresistant pathogens in geriatric nursing infection control in residential facilities for geriatric nursing in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Claudia; Schablon, Anja; Bollongino, Kirsten; Maa, Monika; Ka, Dietmar; Dulon, Madeleine; Diel, Roland; Nienhaus, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background: The increase of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) causes problems in geriatric nursing homes. Older people are at increased a growing risk of infection due to multimorbidity and frequent stays in hospital. A high proportion of the elderly require residential care in geriatric nursing facilities, where hygiene requirements in nursing homes are similar to those in hospitals. For this reason we examined how well nursing homes are prepared for MDROs and how effectively protect their infection control residents and staff. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on infection control in residential geriatric nursing facilities in Germany 2012. The questionnaire recorded important parameters of hygiene, resident and staff protection and actions in case of existing MDROs. Results: The response was 54% in Hamburg and 27% in the rest of Germany. Nursing homes were generally well equipped for dealing with infection control: There were standards for MDROs and regular hygiene training for staff. The facilities provided adequate protective clothing, affected residents are usually isolated and hygienic laundry processing conducted. There are deficits in the communication of information on infected residents with hospitals and general practitioners. 54% of nursing homes performed risk assessments for staff infection precaution. Conclusion: There is a growing interest in MDROs and infection control will be a challenge in for residential geriatric nursing facilities in the future. This issue has also drawn increasing attention. Improvements could be achieved by improving communication between different participants in the health service, together with specific measures for staff protection at work. PMID:25285266

  8. Effectiveness of three types of geriatric medical services: lessons for geriatric psychiatric services.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of geriatric medical services, to identify the types of patients who would benefit from such services, to determine the service components related to positive outcomes and to apply pertinent findings to geriatric psychiatric services. DATA SOURCES: Two databases, MEDLINE and Health Planning and Administration, were searched for relevant articles published from January 1975 to February 1990. The bibliographies of identified articles were searched for additional references. STUDY SELECTION: Seventeen reports were located that met the following three inclusion criteria: original research, published in English or French and controlled trial (nonrandomized or randomized) of a geriatric medical service. Fifteen met the validity criteria for intervention studies established by McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. DATA EXTRACTION: Information about study design, patient selection, interventions, outcome measures and results was systematically abstracted from each report. DATA SYNTHESIS: Abstracted data were compared and contrasted. Most of the external services and some of the hospital units were effective in reducing the number of hospital days an deaths. Consultation services were ineffective. Continuing care appeared to be related to positive outcomes. CONCLUSION: In applying these findings to geriatric psychiatric services priority should be given to the development of external services and the organization of continuing care. PMID:2025818

  9. The Filipino Nursing Students' Dilemmas in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Cruz, Andrei Angelo R.; Cruz, Angela Laurice G.; Cruz, Robert Edward D.; Cuarto, Jose Mari Nino L.

    2009-01-01

    The continually rising percentage of the elderly population and the demand for geriatric nursing care are dramatically related. While it is true that most undergraduate programs prepare nurses for the care of geriatric patients, most receive limited academic preparation in the nursing curriculum (Williams & Mezey, 2000). This is particularly true

  10. [The locations of mobile geriatric teams in France].

    PubMed

    Salles, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Mobile geriatric teams fulfil several missions in healthcare facilities. They work within and outside hospitals. A nationwide study was carried out in 2011 and a task force was created within the French geriatric and gerontology society (SFGG) to standardise the practices of these teams in France and emphasise their place at the heart of the health care pathway of the elderly. PMID:26574125

  11. Evaluating a Geriatrics Program in an Acute-Care Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisensale, Steven K.

    1987-01-01

    Surveyed 24 key informants concerning new geriatric program. Found inservice education program and hospital-based community resource directory were received positively and implemented quickly. Community physicians hesitated to make referrals to geriatric assessment team, citing fear that team would steal patients and threats to physicians'

  12. Geriatrics in Family Practice Residency Education: An Unmet Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazewood, John D.; Vanderhoff, Bruce; Ackermann, Richard; Cefalu, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Offers a position statement on geriatric education in family practice residency, asserting that limited progress has been made despite an increasing need for such education. Offers seven recommendations, such as: every family practice residency should integrate a variety of training sites into a comprehensive curriculum of geriatric education that

  13. Ethnogeriatric Education: A Collaborative Project of Geriatric Education Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severance, Janet S.; Yeo, Gwen

    2006-01-01

    Geriatric Education Center (GEC) faculty and staff are committed to teaching health professionals about the impact of culture on the health and health care of elders from ethnically diverse backgrounds. Ethnogeriatrics was highlighted as an important issue in the National Agenda for Geriatric Education during the 1990s. Between 1999 and 2001, the…

  14. Designing a Multi-Disciplinary Geriatrics Health Professional Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, J. James; Coogle, Constance L.; Parham, Iris A.; Head, Colleen; Fulton, LaQuana; Watson, Kathleen; Curtis, Angela

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a Geriatric Health Professionals Mentoring Program designed to address recruitment and retention of health professionals in geriatrics and gerontology. The training provided information on the mentoring process, negotiating mentoring agreements, and coaching mentees. The evaluative framework described examines: (a) the effects…

  15. The Filipino Nursing Students' Dilemmas in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Cruz, Andrei Angelo R.; Cruz, Angela Laurice G.; Cruz, Robert Edward D.; Cuarto, Jose Mari Nino L.

    2009-01-01

    The continually rising percentage of the elderly population and the demand for geriatric nursing care are dramatically related. While it is true that most undergraduate programs prepare nurses for the care of geriatric patients, most receive limited academic preparation in the nursing curriculum (Williams & Mezey, 2000). This is particularly true…

  16. Grading Medical Students in a Psychiatry Clerkship: Correlation with the NBME Subject Examination Scores and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchandani, Dilip

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: The author analyzed and compared various assessment methods for assessment of medical students; these methods included clinical assessment and the standardized National Board of Medical Education (NBME) subject examination. Method: Students were evaluated on their 6-week clerkship in psychiatry by both their clinical…

  17. Assessing geriatrics in undergraduate medical education: two different approaches.

    PubMed

    Eleazer, G Paul; Liken, Michelle; Hirth, Victor A; Johnson, David; Lucas, Amy; Egbert, John; Boland, Rebecca H; Wieland, Darryl

    2004-01-01

    Most medical schools do not have a separate course in geriatrics, but rather incorporate geriatrics into existing courses. Tracking and assessing curriculum content is more difficult in this setting. This paper describes and compares two approaches to assess curriculum content in geriatrics: a survey of course directors and a course objectives review. The results suggest that course directors report more geriatric content when asked as part of a regular survey than they identify as specific course objectives. Course objectives may be more reflective of the actual emphasis placed on aging-related material in courses. These two approaches appear to be complementary. Medical educators may find both self-report and course objective analysis to be useful and complementary in tracking geriatric material in the undergraduate medical curriculum. PMID:15871933

  18. Financing geriatric programs in community health centers.

    PubMed

    Yeatts, D E; Ray, S; List, N; Duggar, B

    1991-01-01

    There are approximately 600 Community and Migrant Health Centers (C/MHCs) providing preventive and primary health care services principally to medically underserved rural and urban areas across the United States. The need to develop geriatric programs within C/MHCs is clear. Less clear is how and under what circumstances a comprehensive geriatric program can be adequately financed. The Health Resources and Services Administration of the Public Health Service contracted with La Jolla Management Corporation and Duke University Center on Aging to identify successful techniques for obtaining funding by examining 10 "good practice" C/MHC geriatric programs. The results from this study indicated that effective techniques included using a variety of funding sources, maintaining accurate cost-per-user information, developing a marketing strategy and user incentives, collaborating with the area agency on aging and other community organizations, and developing special services for the elderly. Developing cost-per-user information allowed for identifying appropriate "drawing card" services, negotiating sound reimbursement rates and contracts with other providers, and assessing the financial impact of changing service mixes. A marketing strategy was used to enhance the ability of the centers to provide a comprehensive package of services. Collaboration with the area agency on aging and other community organizations and volunteers in the aging network was found to help establish referral networks and subsequently increase the number of elderly patients served. Finally, development of special services for the elderly, such as adult day care, case management, and health education, was found to increase program visibility, opportunities to work with the network of services for the aging, and clinical utilization. PMID:1908588

  19. Alimentary neoplasia in geriatric dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Willard, Michael D

    2012-07-01

    Lymphomas, carcinomas, leiomyomas, and stromal tumors are the most common tumors found in the canine and feline gastrointestinal tract. Endoscopic and surgical biopsies are often the mainstays of diagnosis, although ultrasound is playing an increasingly greater role. Small cell lymphocytic lymphoma of the feline intestines poses a special diagnostic dilemma and may require immunohistochemistry as well as polymerase chain reaction to distinguish it from lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis. This article will focus on the more common neoplastic problems of the esophagus and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of geriatric dogs and cats. PMID:22720809

  20. Thyroid disorders in the geriatric veterinary patient.

    PubMed

    Scott-Moncrieff, J Catharine

    2012-07-01

    The effects of age, concurrent illness, and administered medications complicate diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction in geriatric patients. Interpretation of thyroid hormone testing should take these factors into account. The most common thyroid disorder in dogs is acquired hypothyroidism. Therapeutic monitoring should be utilized for monitoring treatment of canine hypothyroidism. The most common thyroid disorder in cats is benign hyperthyroidism. Diagnosis is most often complicated by the presence of concurrent illness. Treatment should be individualized based on individual case characteristics and presence of concurrent illness. Some older cats have a palpable goiter months to years before development of clinical signs of hyperthyroidism. PMID:22720810

  1. The Geriatric Population and Psychiatric Medication

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Sannidhya; Sareen, Himanshu; Trivedi, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    With improvement in medical services in the last few years, there has been a constant rise in the geriatric population throughout the world, more so in the developing countries. The elderly are highly prone to develop psychiatric disorders, probably because of age related changes in the brain, concomitant physical disorders, as well as increased stress in later life. Psychiatric disorders in this population may have a different presentation than in other groups and some of psychopathologies might be mistaken for normal age related changes by an unwary clinician. Therefore the need of the day is to train psychiatrists and physicians to better recognize and manage mental disorders in this age group. PMID:21327169

  2. [Incidence of postoperative complications in geriatric gynecology].

    PubMed

    Rummler, S

    1984-01-01

    The results of a retrospective-study concerning postoperative complications after gynecologic geriatric surgery (506 patients, aged 60 years and over) at the Departement of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the District Hospital Stralsund/GDR are presented. In 106 patients (10,94 per cent) we have registered post-operative complications, in particular anaemia, fever and wound-period (1967 to 1971 = 8,22%, 1977 to 1981 = 13,29%). Gynecologic surgery in the aged requires a carefully clinical management in preoperative diagnostic and an intensive postoperative care. PMID:6475112

  3. The Use of the Internet in Geriatrics Education: Results of a National Survey of Medical Geriatrics Academic Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajjar, Ihab M.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Teasdale, Thomas A.; Mintzer, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to characterize use of the Internet in medical geriatrics education programs, 130 medical education programs in the U.S. that train medical students, interns, residents, fellows and practicing physicians were asked to complete a survey developed by the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI). Sixty-eight programs

  4. The Use of the Internet in Geriatrics Education: Results of a National Survey of Medical Geriatrics Academic Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajjar, Ihab M.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Teasdale, Thomas A.; Mintzer, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to characterize use of the Internet in medical geriatrics education programs, 130 medical education programs in the U.S. that train medical students, interns, residents, fellows and practicing physicians were asked to complete a survey developed by the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI). Sixty-eight programs…

  5. Geriatric dyspnea: doing worse, feeling better.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Sibylle; von Leupoldt, Andreas; Van den Bergh, Omer

    2014-05-01

    Older age is associated with a decline in physical fitness and reduced efficiency of the respiratory system. Paradoxically, it is also related to reduced report of dyspnea, that is, the experience of difficult and uncomfortable breathing. Reduced symptom reporting contributes to misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of underlying disease, suboptimal treatment, faster disease progression, shorter life expectancy, lower quality of life for patients, and considerably increased costs for the health care system in an aging society. However, pathways in the complex relationship between dyspnea and age are not well explored yet. We propose a model on geriatric dyspnea that integrates physiological, neurological, psychological and social pathways which link older age with dyspnea perception and expression. We suggest that the seemingly paradox of reduction of dyspnea in older age, despite physiological decline, can be solved by taking age-related changes on these multiple levels into account. In identifying these variables, the Geriatric Dyspnea Model highlights risk factors for reduced dyspnea perception and report in older age and pathways for intervention. PMID:24675044

  6. Use of the Geriatric Institutional Assessment Profile: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Tavares, João Paulo de Almeida; da Silva, Alcione Leite

    2013-07-01

    The Geriatric Institutional Assessment Profile (GIAP) is a self-report survey, designed to assess a hospital's readiness to implement a geriatric program. Considering the importance of the GIAP in delivering high-quality geriatric care, it is appropriate and relevant to conduct an integrative review about its use for the improvement of knowledge in this area. The primary aim of this study was to undertake an integrative review of the strengths and weaknesses of the GIAP and its main implications for geriatric nursing care. This integrative review was inspired by Whittemore's method. A total of 15 articles met the criteria for review. Data analysis revealed three themes: (a) the GIAP quality metrics, (b) geriatric nursing care initiatives assessment, and (c) geriatric nursing practice environment assessment. This review revealed a high degree of specificity, conformity, appropriateness, and utility in the evaluation of nurses' perceptions of the geriatric care, and the GIAP was considered to be a crucial tool in the development and improvement of caring for hospitalized older adults. PMID:23469767

  7. Creating a Geriatric-Focused Model of Care in Trauma With Geriatric Education.

    PubMed

    Bortz, Kai L

    2015-01-01

    The literature suggests that by 2050, about 40% of all trauma patients will be over age 65 years. We already exceeded this prediction at Lehigh Valley Health Network in 2013, with 46.6% of the Pennsylvania trauma registry qualifiers being age 65 or greater, and 17.7% age 85 and greater. Currently, only 8.8% of trauma centers incorporate Geriatric Resource Programs into trauma care. Our trauma team has incorporated geriatric education for nurses by incorporating an educational nursing program called Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders, to improve outcomes, reduce hospital complications, and reduce health care costs for this high-risk population. The older adult population is on the rise and trauma nurses must be provided the tools to care for this high-risk patient group. PMID:26574941

  8. Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship: Implementation and Evaluation of a Bi-institutional Pilot Curriculum

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, Daniel W.; Spektor, Alexander; Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C.; Krishnan, Monica S.; Jimenez, Rachel B.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. Methods and Materials: A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1 = not at all, 5 = extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Results: Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as “quite useful” to “extremely useful” (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. Conclusions: A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency.

  9. GRAMPS: An Automated Ambulatory Geriatric Record

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Kenric W.; King, Carol A.; Date, Vishvanath V.; Prather, Robert J.; Loo, Lawrence; Siddiqui, Khwaja

    1988-01-01

    GRAMPS (Geriatric Record and Multidisciplinary Planning System) is an interactive MUMPS system developed for VA outpatient use. It allows physicians to effectively document care in problem-oriented format with structured narrative and free text, eliminating handwritten input. We evaluated the system in a one-year controlled cohort study. When the computer, was used, appointment times averaged 8.2 minutes longer (32.6 vs. 24.4 minutes) compared to control visits with the same physicians. Computer use was associated with better quality of care as measured in the management of a common problem, hypertension, as well as decreased overall costs of care. When a faster computer was installed, data entry times improved, suggesting that slower processing had accounted for a substantial portion of the observed difference in appointment lengths. The GRAMPS system was well-accepted by providers. The modular design used in GRAMPS has been extended to medical-care applications in Nursing and Mental Health.

  10. Comprehensive geriatric assessment during emergency admission.

    PubMed

    James, Jo

    2016-02-26

    This is the first in a short series that presents case study examples of the use of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) in different clinical settings. CGA is a holistic assessment model, which is designed to determine a frail older person's medical and mental health status, as well as functional, social and environmental issues. When applied by nurses, it can enable individualised planning for older people's health, safety and wellbeing. This article presents the case of a patient who had been admitted to hospital as an emergency for a suspected exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and subsequently developed a severe episode of delirium. It explores how the use of CGA at the point of her admission would have provided the patient with a higher standard of care and may have prevented her delirium. PMID:26917186

  11. Aging biology and geriatric clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    McLean, Allan J; Le Couteur, David G

    2004-06-01

    Population aging evokes doomsday economic and sociological prognostication, despite a minority of older people suffering significant dependency and the potential for advances in therapeutics of age-related disease and primary aging. Biological aging processes are linked mechanistically to altered drug handling, altered physiological reserve, and pharmacodynamic responses. Parenteral loading doses need only be adjusted for body weight as volumes of distribution are little changed, whereas oral loading doses in some cases may require reduction to account for age-related increases in bioavailability. Age-related reduction of hepatic blood flow and hepatocyte mass and primary aging changes in hepatic sinusoidal endothelium with effects on drug transfer and oxygen delivery reduce hepatic drug clearance. Primary renal aging is evident, although renal clearance reduction in older people is predominantly disease-related and is poorly estimated by standard methods. The geriatric dosing axiom, "start low and go slow" is based on pharmacokinetic considerations and concern for adverse drug reactions, not from clinical trial data. In the absence of generalizable dosage guidelines, individualization via effect titration is required. Altered pharmacodynamics are well documented in the cardiovascular system, with changes in the autonomic system, autacoid receptors, drug receptors, and endothelial function to modify baseline cardiovascular tone and responses to stimuli such as postural change and feeding. Adverse drug reactions and polypharmacy represent major linkages to avoidable morbidity and mortality. This, combined with a deficient therapeutic evidence base, suggests that extrapolation of risk-benefit ratios from younger adults to geriatric populations is not necessarily valid. Even so, therapeutic advances generally may convert healthy longevity from an asset of fortunate individuals into a general social benefit. PMID:15169926

  12. Curricular Strategies for Geriatrics Education in a Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A.; Moreno-Macias, Carlos H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the following: barriers to geriatrics education, teaching strategies (such as communication with patients, acceptance of one's own aging, interdisciplinary teamwork), and curriculum design for undergraduate and graduate study. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  13. Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Elderly: New Findings in Geriatric Depression.

    PubMed

    Geduldig, Emma T; Kellner, Charles H

    2016-04-01

    This paper reviews recent research on the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in elderly depressed patients. The PubMed database was searched for literature published within the past 4 years, using the search terms: "electroconvulsive elderly," "electroconvulsive geriatric," "ECT and elderly," and "ECT elderly cognition." The studies in this review indicate excellent efficacy for ECT in geriatric patients. Adverse cognitive effects of ECT in this population are usually transient and not typically severe. In addition, continuation/maintenance ECT (C/M-ECT) may be a favorable strategy for relapse prevention in the elderly after a successful acute course of ECT. ECT is an important treatment option for depressed geriatric patients with severe and/or treatment-resistant illness. New data add to the evidence demonstrating that ECT is a highly effective, safe, and well-tolerated antidepressant treatment option for geriatric patients. PMID:26909702

  14. Humanities and Geriatric Education: a Strategy for Recruitment?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher; Martin, Ruth Elwood

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is a common subject in arts and literature as it is a universal experience. The use of the humanities in medical education may have a positive effect on trainees’ attitude to caring for seniors and on geriatrics as a career choice. This paper summarizes the role of humanities in medical education and provides some examples and thoughts on how humanities curriculum can be used in geriatric teaching. PMID:25825611

  15. [The role of external mobile geriatric teams in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Chansiaux-Bucalo, Christine; Lacaille, Sophie; Roy, Claire; Bayle, Catherine; Saint-Jean, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Since 2000, the mobile team of Bretonneau Hospital in Paris has helped to improve the assessment and care management of the elderly at home by strengthening the link between community health professionals and hospital geriatric services. In January 2008, an external mobile geriatric team working with nursing homes was created for the whole of the Paris area in order to strengthen the link between care homes accommodating often highly dependent elderly people and the hospital. PMID:26574126

  16. [Quality assurance in geriatric rehabilitation--approaches and methods].

    PubMed

    Deckenbach, B; Borchelt, M; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E

    1997-08-01

    It did not take the provisions of the 5th Book of the Social Code for quality assurance issues to gain significance in the field of geriatric rehabilitation as well. While in the surgical specialties, experience in particular with external quality assurance have already been gathered over several years now, suitable concepts and methods for the new Geriatric Rehabilitation specialty are still in the initial stages of development. Proven methods from the industrial and service sectors, such as auditing, monitoring and quality circles, can in principle be drawn on for devising geriatric rehabilitation quality assurance schemes; these in particular need to take into account the multiple factors influencing the course and outcome of rehabilitation entailed by multimorbidity and multi-drug use; the eminent role of the social environment; therapeutic interventions by a multidisciplinary team; as well as the multi-dimensional nature of rehabilitation outcomes. Moreover, the specific conditions of geriatric rehabilitation require development not only of quality standards unique to this domain but also of quality assurance procedures specific to geriatrics. Along with a number of other methods, standardized geriatric assessment will play a crucial role in this respect. PMID:9411627

  17. Geriatric Care as an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Eric; Patel, Rajul A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To describe the design, delivery, and impact of a geriatric introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) to develop students’ skills related to consultant pharmacists’ roles and patient care responsibilities. Design. A required 2-unit geriatric IPPE, involving 40 hours in a geriatric-care facility, 5 reflection hours, and 12 classroom-discussion hours, was developed for first- and second-year pharmacy students. Students interviewed patients and caregivers, reviewed patient charts, triaged patient needs, prepared care plans, and performed quality-assurance functions. Assessment. After completing the IPPE, students’ geriatric- and patient-care abilities were enhanced, based on review of their interactions, care plans, reflections, and examinations, and they demonstrated cognitive, affective, and psychomotor-domain learning skills. Students’ care plans and quality assurance activities revealed positive patient outcomes, opportunities for measurable patient health improvement, and a positive impact on quality assurance activities. Student evaluations and feedback from health workers at the facilities also were positive. Conclusions. This geriatric IPPE in which students cared for a specific patient and interacted with other health care providers is an innovative approach to enhancing students’ abilities to serve the growing geriatric population. PMID:21931453

  18. [Geriatric evaluation in oncology in the elderly subject].

    PubMed

    Albrand, G

    2009-11-01

    The heterogeneity of the elderly population makes the simple application of standard therapeutic programs in oncological management complex, particularly if they have been validated on young populations. The NCCN and the SIOG recommend using a geriatric evaluation before setting up an individualized care program. Geriatric assessment has demonstrated its efficacy in a number of domains. This concept covers two broad activities: the Multidimensional Geriatric Evaluation (MGE), which is a standardized geriatric evaluation for detecting co-morbidities and broad geriatric syndromes, and the Detailed Geriatric Evaluation (DGE). The objective of the DGE is to inventory the patient's various problems, distinguish somatic and/or psychiatric pathologies from the physiological consequences of aging, assess the functional impact of diseases, understand how these diseases interfere with one another, assess their consequences on the patient's social environment, and prioritize the patient's different health issues. The DGE is a medical action organized into five phases designed to set up care so that the recommendations made can be followed. PMID:20123505

  19. The Use of an Integrated Website to Enhance the Educational Experience in a Medical School Radiology Clerkship Course.

    PubMed

    Desai, Naman S; Bunch, Paul M; DiSalvo, Donald N; O'Brien, Reiko; Andriole, Katherine P; Smith, Terri; Durfee, Sara M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of creating an integrated website for the medical students enrolled in a core radiology clerkship and to assess the impact of this website on students' overall educational experience. An integrated website was created for the medical students and hosted on the main departmental website. The components of the website included: announcements and password-protected schedule, curriculum, student assessment, information about different radiology sections, digital resources, and fourth year opportunities. The schedule section was created using Google Calendar to facilitate automatic syncing and real-time updates to the students' mobile devices. Weblinks for resources and assignments were incorporated into the calendar entries, which could be "pushed" to students in real time. Student attitudes were assessed via an exit survey. Various website usage statistics were collected. A total of 35 students who have rotated through the month-long clerkship thus far have used the website. Overall, 80% of students accessed the website once or multiple times a day. Over 90% of students thought that the website was well organized and easy to use; having access to the schedule on a smartphone had a positive impact on overall clerkship experience; the website had an overall positive impact on their clerkship experience; and they would recommend it to visiting medical students. Since July 2013, there have been a total of 9740 page views with 4113 unique visits to the website (an average of 17 visits per day from 6 visitors per day). The authors conclude that the creation of an integrated website has a positive impact on students' overall educational experience. PMID:25896546

  20. [The need for training in gerontology and geriatrics among the staff providing services at a geriatric care institution].

    PubMed

    Baerga Duperoy, Rachel; Castro Rojas, Nydia; Orta Rodrguez, Brenda; Gonzlez Caraballo, Enid; Cruz Gonzlez, Angel; Vzquez Fernndez, Jos; Oliver Vzquez, Marln

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and identify the basic training needs of nursing home staff, in terms of attitudes, knowledge and skills required to work effectively with geriatric patients. Three focus groups were performed, two groups of employees, and a group of elderly residents of the institution, in order to explore issues pertaining to the following topics: personal attributes required to work with geriatric patients, basic knowledge and skills needed to provide effective services. Group discussions were transcribed and themes were extracted through consensus reached by the investigators. Results indicated that the interviewed staff lack of formal preparation or continuing education in gerontology or geriatrics. Needs identified were the following: the aging process, caring behaviors, management of common health conditions, administration of medications, transference and mobility of residents, among others. Finding were use to design an educational program aimed in assisting nursing home staff in providing an effective service to their geriatric patients. PMID:12572242

  1. Specialist geriatric medical assessment for patients discharged from hospital acute assessment units: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of specialist geriatric medical management on the outcomes of at risk older people discharged from acute medical assessment units. Design Individual patient randomised controlled trial comparing intervention with usual care. Setting Two hospitals in Nottingham and Leicester, UK. Participants 433 patients aged 70 or over who were discharged within 72 hours of attending an acute medical assessment unit and at risk of decline as indicated by a score of at least 2 on the Identification of Seniors At Risk tool. Intervention Assessment made on the acute medical assessment unit and further outpatient management by specialist physicians in geriatric medicine, including advice and support to primary care services. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the number of days spent at home (for those admitted from home) or days spent in the same care home (if admitted from a care home) in the 90 days after randomisation. Secondary outcomes were determined at 90 days and included mortality, institutionalisation, dependency, mental wellbeing, quality of life, and health and social care resource use. Results The two groups were well matched for baseline characteristics, and withdrawal rates were similar in both groups (5%). Mean days at home over 90 days follow-up were 80.2 days in the control group and 79.7 in the intervention group. The 95% confidence interval for the difference in means was ?4.6 to 3.6 days (P=0.31). No significant differences were found for any of the secondary outcomes. Conclusions This specialist geriatric medical intervention applied to an at risk population of older people attending and being discharged from acute medical units had no effect on patients outcomes or subsequent use of secondary care or long term care. PMID:24103444

  2. Pre-anaesthetic screening of geriatric dogs.

    PubMed

    Joubert, K E

    2007-03-01

    Pre-anaesthetic screening has been advocated as a valuable tool for improving anaesthetic safety and determining anaesthetic risk. This study was done determine whether pre-anaesthetic screening result in cancellation of anaesthesia and the diagnosis of new clinical conditions in geriatric dogs. One hundred and one dogs older than 7 years of age provided informed owner consent were included in the study. Each dog was weighed, and its temperature, pulse and respiration recorded. An abdominal palpation, examination of the mouth, including capillary refill time and mucous membranes, auscultation, body condition and habitus was performed and assessed. A cephalic catheter was placed and blood drawn for pre-anaesthetic testing. A micro-haematocrit tube was filled and the packed cell volume determined. The blood placed was in a test tube, centrifuged and then analysed on an in-house blood analyser. Alkaline phosphatase, alanine transferase, urea, creatinine, glucose and total protein were determined. A urine sample was then obtained by cystocentesis, catheterisation or free-flow for analysis. The urine specific gravity was determined with a refractometer. A small quantity of urine was then placed on a dip stick. Any new diagnoses made during the pre-anaesthetic screening were recorded. The average age of the dogs was 10.99 +/- 2.44 years and the weight was 19.64 +/- 15.78 kg. There were 13 dogs with pre-existing medical conditions. A total of 30 new diagnoses were made on the basis of the pre-anaesthetic screening. The most common conditions were neoplasia, chronic kidney disease and Cushing's disease. Of the 30 patients with a new diagnosis, 13 did not undergo anaesthesia as result of the new diagnosis. From this study it can be concluded that screening of geriatric patients is important and that sub-clinical disease could be present in nearly 30 % of these patients. The value of screening before anaesthesia is perhaps more questionable in terms of anaesthetic practice but it is an appropriate time to perform such an evaluation. The value of pre-anaesthetic screening in veterinary anaesthesia still needs to be evaluated in terms of appropriate outcome variables. PMID:17665763

  3. Vestibular impairment in older people frequently contributes to dizziness as part of a geriatric syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahearn, David J; Umapathy, Dolores

    2015-02-01

    Research to identify whether dizziness is a geriatric syndrome has largely overlooked often treatable vestibular causes. To ascertain the degree to which vestibular and other causes of dizziness interact in older people, an eight-month retrospective case-note review was undertaken in patients aged ?: 65years referred with dizziness or imbalance to an audiovestibular medicine clinic. Of 41 patients aged 65-93years old, 15 (37%) had multiple symptom triggers, 23 (56%) had recent dizziness-related falls, 24 (59%) and 10 (24%) had peripheral and central vestibular causes for dizziness respectively, whereas 6 (15%) had both. Sixteen (39%) had benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, of which 13 (32%) had an additional peripheral vestibular impairment. Twenty-six (63%) had other (general medical/cardiac) causes; of these 13 (50%) also had vestibular causes. Polypharmacy, orthostatic hypotension, psychotropic drug use and anxiety were common contributory factors. Vestibular causes of dizziness contribute to a multifactorial geriatric syndrome. All patients with dizziness and falls should have a vestibular assessment (especially peripheral) to improve quality of life and reduce falls. PMID:25650194

  4. An assisted living facility curriculum to introduce geriatrics to first-year medical students.

    PubMed

    Tong, Iris L; Dodd, Kimberly A; Warrier, Sarita S; Pugliese, Louis J; McMackin, Naomi Y; Taylor, Julie Scott

    2015-01-01

    Many U.S. medical schools have developed curricula in geriatric medicine to address the growing older adult population. At our university, the authors have integrated an assisted living facility (ALF) program into a required first-year clinical skills course. During the 2011 to 2012 academic year, an electronic survey was distributed to 109 first-year medical students prior to and after the program. Eighty-eight percent and 85% of students completed the pre- and postintervention survey, respectively. Students reported a positive attitude toward caring for older adults (92.5% post- vs. 80.2% preintervention), an understanding of the medical and social needs of older adults (89.2% post- vs. 38.5% preintervention), an acquisition of the skills to assess the health of older adults (71% post- vs. 14.5% preintervention), and an understanding of ALFs as nonmedical supportive housing (92.5% post- vs. 70.8% preintervention). The authors' curriculum offers an innovative method to integrate geriatrics education early in medical education and to involve medical students in their community. PMID:25203100

  5. The Relative Value Unit in academic geriatrics: incentive or impediment?

    PubMed

    Resnick, Neil M; Radulovich, Nichole

    2014-03-01

    Although the number of older adults is rapidly expanding, the number of healthcare professionals trained in geriatrics is small and declining. The reasons are multifaceted, but because responsibility for training such professionals resides largely in academic health centers (AHCs), their support for geriatrics is critical. As AHCs face increasing financial pressure, many are seeking metrics to measure productivity and the Relative Value Unit (RVU) may be the one most commonly selected. Yet little is known about the RVU's effect on geriatric programs. Review of the literature and a survey of the leaders of the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs suggest that the advantages of an RVU-based metric are likely eclipsed by its negative impact on the care of older adults, the ability of academic geriatrics to accomplish its mission, and even the survival of geriatrics. If the RVU is to continue to be used as the index of productivity, it should be modified--by reweighting its codes (or by adding new ones)--and complemented by interventions to ensure patient access, care quality, and efficiency. Because an alternative metric, such as a Patient-based Value Unit may be preferable, this article describes the principles on which one might be based. Regardless, urgent action is required by all stakeholders to address this issue. Without it, the future of academic geriatrics--and with it the innovative care models, research, and training the nation needs to improve care and bend the cost curve--will be difficult if not impossible to sustain. PMID:24512218

  6. Guide to Geriatric Syndromes: Common and Often Related Medical Conditions in Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Urinary Incontinence Related Documents PDF A Guide to Geriatric Syndromes Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources A Guide to Geriatric Syndromes: Common and Often Related Medical Conditions in ...

  7. An Introprofessional Geriatric Medication Activity Within a Senior Mentor Program

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Heather; Byrd, Lauren; Wiley, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether a required interprofessional geriatric medication activity within a senior mentor program changed pharmacy and medical students attitudes regarding interprofessional collaboration. Design. Interprofessional teams, consisting of 1 third-year pharmacy student and 2 second-year medical students, conducted an in-home interview and medication history with a senior mentor (geriatric patient). The team members then collaboratively analyzed and discussed the patients medication use and wrote an essay in which they identified the patients medication problems and reflected on the interprofessional experience. Assessment. Students completed a validated survey instrument to measure pharmacist-physician attitudes about interprofessional collaboration before and after the experience. Pharmacy and medical students already generally positive attitudes regarding interprofessional relationships were maintained and, in some instances, significantly improved. Students found the activity enhanced their geriatric training and increased their understanding of an interprofessional team. Conclusion. Incorporation of a geriatric medication activity within a senior mentor program maintained or improved pharmacy and medical students positive attitudes about interprofessional collaboration and enhanced geriatric training within the curriculum. PMID:23459269

  8. Altered Synchronizations among Neural Networks in Geriatric Depression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong; Chou, Ying-Hui; Potter, Guy G.; Steffens, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Although major depression has been considered as a manifestation of discoordinated activity between affective and cognitive neural networks, only a few studies have examined the relationships among neural networks directly. Because of the known disconnection theory, geriatric depression could be a useful model in studying the interactions among different networks. In the present study, using independent component analysis to identify intrinsically connected neural networks, we investigated the alterations in synchronizations among neural networks in geriatric depression to better understand the underlying neural mechanisms. Resting-state fMRI data was collected from thirty-two patients with geriatric depression and thirty-two age-matched never-depressed controls. We compared the resting-state activities between the two groups in the default-mode, central executive, attention, salience, and affective networks as well as correlations among these networks. The depression group showed stronger activity than the controls in an affective network, specifically within the orbitofrontal region. However, unlike the never-depressed controls, geriatric depression group lacked synchronized/antisynchronized activity between the affective network and the other networks. Those depressed patients with lower executive function has greater synchronization between the salience network with the executive and affective networks. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the between-network analyses in examining neural models for geriatric depression. PMID:26180795

  9. Geriatric Pharmacy Curriculum in U.S. Pharmacy Schools: A Nationwide Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, William; Pratt, Clara Collette

    1982-01-01

    A survey of 72 pharmacy schools shows 22 percent of the schools had no geriatric coursework, 35 percent offered only courses in which the geriatric content averaged under 12 percent of course content, and 43 percent offered courses that focused primarily on geriatrics, most including a major clinical component. (Author/MSE)

  10. Geriatric-Focused Educational Offerings in the Department of Veterans Affairs from 1999 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thielke, Stephen; Tumosa, Nina; Lindenfeld, Rivkah; Shay, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The scope of geriatrics-related educational offerings in large health care systems, in either the target audiences or topics covered, has not previously been analyzed or reported in the professional literature. The authors reviewed the geriatrics-related educational sessions that were provided between 1999 and 2009 by the Geriatrics Research,

  11. Health Care Workforce Development in Rural America: When Geriatrics Expertise Is 100 Miles Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumosa, Nina; Horvath, Kathy J.; Huh, Terri; Livote, Elayne E.; Howe, Judith L.; Jones, Lauren Ila; Kramer, B. Josea

    2012-01-01

    The Geriatric Scholar Program (GSP) is a Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) workforce development program to infuse geriatrics competencies in primary care. This multimodal educational program is targeted to primary care providers and ancillary staff who work in VA's rural clinics. GSP consists of didactic education and training in geriatrics

  12. [The mobile geriatric team of Bretonneau Hospital and nursing home professionals].

    PubMed

    Braga, Charlotte; Chansiaux, Christine; Raynaud-Simon, Agathe

    2015-01-01

    In the wake of an experimental project, external mobile geriatric teams have been working in nursing homes in order to train the nursing teams in caring for geriatric pathologies. The mobile teams also give diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations in order to direct where necessary these dependent elderly people, often with multiple pathologies, towards geriatric care. PMID:26574127

  13. Three Strategies for Delivering Continuing Medical Education in Geriatrics to General Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rikkert, Marcel G. M.; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2004-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) need advanced skills in geriatric assessment to be competent to treat the increasing number of elderly patients. Continuing medical education in geriatrics for GPs is heterogeneous, and not assessed for effectiveness. In this study we compared the educational effects of three geriatric post-graduate training methods on

  14. 78 FR 55778 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... AFFAIRS Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans... Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee will be held on September 26-27, 2013, in Room 530 at the... Secretary of Veterans Affairs and the Under Secretary for Health on all matters pertaining to geriatrics...

  15. 78 FR 12831 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... AFFAIRS Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting Amendment The Department of... meeting of the Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee has been rescheduled on April 11-12, 2013, in... for Health on all matters pertaining to geriatrics and gerontology. The Committee assesses...

  16. 75 FR 11638 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... AFFAIRS Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans... Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee will be held on April 22- 23, 2010, in Room 630, Department of... Affairs and the Under Secretary for Health on all matters pertaining to geriatrics and gerontology....

  17. 78 FR 6406 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... AFFAIRS Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans... Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee will be held on April 10- 11, 2013, in Room 530 at the... Veterans Affairs and the Under Secretary for Health on all matters pertaining to geriatrics and...

  18. 77 FR 14860 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... AFFAIRS Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans... Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee will be held on April 11- 12, 2012, in Room 530 at the... Veterans Affairs and the Under Secretary for Health on all matters pertaining to geriatrics and...

  19. Three Strategies for Delivering Continuing Medical Education in Geriatrics to General Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rikkert, Marcel G. M.; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2004-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) need advanced skills in geriatric assessment to be competent to treat the increasing number of elderly patients. Continuing medical education in geriatrics for GPs is heterogeneous, and not assessed for effectiveness. In this study we compared the educational effects of three geriatric post-graduate training methods on…

  20. 76 FR 54536 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... AFFAIRS Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans... Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee will be held on September 15-16, 2011, in Room 250 at the... of Veterans Affairs and the Under Secretary for Health on all matters pertaining to geriatrics...

  1. Geriatric-Focused Educational Offerings in the Department of Veterans Affairs from 1999 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thielke, Stephen; Tumosa, Nina; Lindenfeld, Rivkah; Shay, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The scope of geriatrics-related educational offerings in large health care systems, in either the target audiences or topics covered, has not previously been analyzed or reported in the professional literature. The authors reviewed the geriatrics-related educational sessions that were provided between 1999 and 2009 by the Geriatrics Research,…

  2. 75 FR 54232 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... AFFAIRS Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans... Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee will be held on September 14-15, 2010, in Room 250, Department... of Veterans Affairs and the Under Secretary for Health on all matters pertaining to geriatrics...

  3. 77 FR 49865 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... AFFAIRS Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans... Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee will be held on September 5-6, 2012, in Room C-7 at the... of Veterans Affairs and the Under Secretary for Health on all matters pertaining to geriatrics...

  4. Fieldwork Rotation: A Model for Educating Social Work Students for Geriatric Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivry, Joann; Lawrance, Frances P.; Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn; Robbins, Virginia Cooke

    2005-01-01

    The Geriatric Social Work Practicum Partnership Program was funded to attract graduate students to the field of aging and to strengthen field education in geriatric social work. Rotation was selected to achieve the program's goals to provide students with exposure to the spectrum of care in geriatric social work services. This paper describes the…

  5. 76 FR 17999 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... AFFAIRS Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans... Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee will be held on April 14- 15, 2011, in Room 250, Department of... Affairs and the Under Secretary for Health on all matters pertaining to geriatrics and gerontology....

  6. Is geriatrics the answer to the problem of old age? 1

    PubMed Central

    Millard, P H

    1976-01-01

    Two doctors attempt to answer this question, one a specialist in geriatric medicine, the other a psychiatrist interested in the psychiatric problems of the elderly and the old. Both, however, come to the same general conclusion: attitudes of the doctors themselves and of society must be changed. These attitudes can determine not only whether an old person lives or dies but how he lives. Old people should not have to survive in mentally suspended animation with all objectives gone but should be helped to achieve the goal of an independent life until death in their own homes. The third paper in this miniature symposium is provided by David Hobman, of Age Concern, who amplifies the specialist views of the first two writers in his discussion of attitudes to the elderly in modern society. He hints, however, that these may shortly change as the elderly become a sophisticated and powerful lobby which governments are forced to heed. PMID:1003438

  7. What to Expect From the Evolving Field of Geriatric Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Bell, Susan P; Orr, Nicole M; Dodson, John A; Rich, Michael W; Wenger, Nanette K; Blum, Kay; Harold, John Gordon; Tinetti, Mary E; Maurer, Mathew S; Forman, Daniel E

    2015-09-15

    The population of older adults is expanding rapidly, and aging predisposes to cardiovascular disease. The principle of patient-centered care must respond to the preponderance of cardiac disease that now occurs in combination with the complexities of old age. Geriatric cardiology melds cardiovascular perspectives with multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, cognitive decline, and other clinical, social, financial, and psychological dimensions of aging. Although some assume that a cardiologist may instinctively cultivate some of these skills over the course of a career, we assert that the volume and complexity of older cardiovascular patients in contemporary practice warrants a more direct approach to achieve suitable training and a more reliable process of care. We present a rationale and vision for geriatric cardiology as a melding of primary cardiovascular and geriatrics skills, thereby infusing cardiology practice with expanded proficiencies in diagnosis, risks, care coordination, communications, end-of-life, and other competences required to best manage older cardiovascular patients. PMID:26361161

  8. [Health care of geriatric patients with urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Mueller, Edgar A; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2015-04-01

    Urinary incontinence occurs frequently in geriatric patients. In the doctor's practice, the symptoms are often not mentioned by the patients; this may lead to loss of autonomy and social isolation. A screening for urinary incontinence should therefore be part of each geriatric assessment. In the presence of urinary incontinence, several treatment options are available, which need to be tailored according to the individual capabilities (mobility, motivation and cognitive performance) of the patient. Non-pharmacological treatment options, such as behavior modification, toilet training and pelvic floor training, should be exploited before any pharmacotherapy commences. If the pharmacological treatment involves the use of anticholinergic agents, the cognitive performance should be monitored. An interdisciplinary collaboration is a prerequisite for the optimized treatment and adequate health care of geriatric patients with urinary incontinence. PMID:25826038

  9. Impact of the Foundations of Clinical Medicine Course on USMLE Scores

    PubMed Central

    Blue, Amy V.; Powell, Caroline K.; Geesey, Mark E.; Moran, William P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The synthesis of basic and clinical science knowledge during the clerkship years has failed to meet educational expectations. OBJECTIVES We hypothesized that a small-group course emphasizing the basic science underpinnings of disease, Foundations of Clinical Medicine (FCM), could be integrated into third year clerkships and would not negatively impact the United States Medical Licensure Examination (USMLE) step 2 scores. DESIGN In 20012002, all third year students met weekly in groups of 812 clustered within clerkships to discuss the clinical and basic science aspects of prescribed, discipline-specific cases. PARTICIPANTS Students completing USMLE step 2 between 1999 and 2004 (n?=?743). MEASUREMENTS Course evaluations were compared with the overall institutional average. Bivariate analyses compared the mean USMLE steps 1 and 2 scores across pre- and post-FCM student cohorts. We used multiple linear regression to assess the association between USMLE step 2 scores and FCM cohort controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS Students average course evaluation score rose from 66 to 77 (20012004) compared to an institutional average of 73. The unadjusted mean USMLE step 1 score was higher for the post-FCM cohort (212.9 vs 207.5, respectively, p?clerkships is feasible and associated with improvement in standardized testing. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi: 10.1007/s11606-008-0631-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18612732

  10. Economic viability of geriatric hip fracture centers.

    PubMed

    Clement, R Carter; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir; Bernstein, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Management of geriatric hip fractures in a protocol-driven center can improve outcomes and reduce costs. Nonetheless, this approach has not spread as broadly as the effectiveness data would imply. One possible explanation is that operating such a center is not perceived as financially worthwhile. To assess the economic viability of dedicated hip fracture centers, the authors built a financial model to estimate profit as a function of costs, reimbursement, and patient volume in 3 settings: an average US hip fracture program, a highly efficient center, and an academic hospital without a specific hip fracture program. Results were tested with sensitivity analysis. A local market analysis was conducted to assess the feasibility of supporting profitable hip fracture centers. The results demonstrate that hip fracture treatment only becomes profitable when the annual caseload exceeds approximately 72, assuming costs characteristic of a typical US hip fracture program. The threshold of profitability is 49 cases per year for high-efficiency hip fracture centers and 151 for the urban academic hospital under review. The largest determinant of profit is reimbursement, followed by costs and volume. In the authors home market, 168 hospitals offer hip fracture care, yet 85% fall below the 72-case threshold. Hip fracture centers can be highly profitable through low costs and, especially, high revenues. However, most hospitals likely lose money by offering hip fracture care due to inadequate volume. Thus, both large and small facilities would benefit financially from the consolidation of hip fracture care at dedicated hip fracture centers. Typical US cities have adequate volume to support several such centers. PMID:24579222

  11. Research Priorities in Geriatric Palliative Care: Policy Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Unroe, Kathleen T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Coordinated palliative care matched to patient needs improves quality of care for vulnerable patients with serious illness and reduces costly use of hospitals and emergency departments. Unfortunately, there is a disconnect in translating geriatric palliative care models and principles into policy and widespread practice. Gaps in policy-relevant research are addressed, including implementation strategies to scale up existing care models, the role of palliative care and geriatrics in health care payment reform efforts, development of quality measures for complex patients, strategies to address workforce shortages, and an approach to hospice reform. PMID:24147877

  12. The History of Geriatric Anesthesia in the United States and the Society for the Advancement of Geriatric Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rooke, G Alec

    2015-09-01

    Creation of the American Society of Anesthesiologists Committee on Geriatric Anesthesia provided an opportunity for individuals to interact, strategize, and work with medical organizations outside of anesthesiology. These opportunities expanded with creation of the Society for the Advancement of Geriatric Anesthesia. The American Geriatrics Society provided a major boost when they realized it was important for surgical and related specialties to take an active role in the care of older patients. From this have come educational grants to improve residency training and establishment of a major research grant program now managed by the National Institutes of Health. Nevertheless, for improved care of the older patient, the level of involvement has to increase. PMID:26315628

  13. Nutritional status assessment in geriatrics: Consensus declaration by the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology Nutrition Work Group.

    PubMed

    Camina-Martín, M Alicia; de Mateo-Silleras, Beatriz; Malafarina, Vincenzo; Lopez-Mongil, Rosa; Niño-Martín, Virtudes; López-Trigo, J Antonio; Redondo-del-Río, M Paz

    2015-07-01

    Ongoing population ageing is one of the factors influencing the increase in the prevalence of undernutrition, because elderly people are a vulnerable group due to their biological, psychological and social characteristics. Despite its high prevalence, undernutrition is underdiagnosed in the geriatric sphere. For this reason, the aim of this consensus document is to devise a protocol for geriatric nutritional assessment. A multidisciplinary team has been set up within the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (in Spanish Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, SEGG) in order to address undernutrition and risk of undernutrition so that they can be diagnosed and treated in an effective manner. The MNA-SF is a practical tool amongst the many validated methods for nutritional screening. Following suspicion of undernutrition or after establishing the presence of undernutrition, a full assessment will include a detailed nutritional history of the patient. The compilation of clinical-nutritional and dietetic histories seeks to aid in identifying the possible risk factors at the root of a patient's undernutrition. Following this, an anthropometric assessment associated to laboratory data, will describe the patient's physical and metabolic changes associated to undernutrition. Currently, the tendency is to further nutritional assessment through the use of non-invasive techniques to study body composition in association with functional status. The latter is an indirect index for nutritional status which is very interesting from a geriatrician's point of view. To conclude, correct nutritional screening is the fundamental basis for an early undernutrition diagnosis and to assess the need for nutritional treatment. In order to achieve this, it is fundamental to foster research in the field of nutritional geriatrics, in order to expand our knowledge base and to increasingly practice evidence-based geriatrics. PMID:26025067

  14. [Nutritional status assessment in Geriatrics: Consensus declaration by the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology NutritionWork Group].

    PubMed

    Camina-Martín, María Alicia; de Mateo-Silleras, Beatriz; Malafarina, Vincenzo; Lopez-Mongil, Rosa; Niño-Martín, Virtudes; López-Trigo, José Antonio; Redondo-Del-Río, María Paz

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing population ageing is one of the factors influencing the increase in the prevalence of undernutrition, as elderly people are a vulnerable group due to their biological, psychological and social characteristics. Despite its high prevalence, undernutrition is underdiagnosed in the geriatric sphere. For this reason, the aim of this consensus document is to devise a protocol for geriatric nutritional assessment. A multidisciplinary team has been set up within the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (in Spanish Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología [SEGG]) in order to address undernutrition and risk of undernutrition so that they can be diagnosed and treated in an effective manner. The MNA-SF is a practical tool amongst the many validated methods for nutritional screening. Following suspicion of undernutrition, or after establishing the presence of undernutrition, a full assessment will include a detailed nutritional history of the patient. The compilation of clinical-nutritional and dietetic histories is intended to help in identifying the possible risk factors at the root of a patient's undernutrition. Following this, an anthropometric assessment, combined with laboratory data, will describe the patient's physical and metabolic changes associated to undernutrition. Currently, the tendency is for further nutritional assessment through the use of non-invasive techniques to study body composition in association with functional status. The latter is an indirect index for nutritional status, which is very interesting from a geriatrician's point of view. To conclude, correct nutritional screening is the fundamental basis for an early undernutrition diagnosis and to assess the need for nutritional treatment. In order to achieve this, it is fundamental to foster research in the field of nutritional geriatrics, in order to expand our knowledge base and to increasingly practice evidence-based geriatrics. PMID:26388249

  15. Geriatric pain competencies and knowledge assessment for nurses in long term care settings

    PubMed Central

    Swafford, Kristen L.; Miller, Lois L.; Herr, Keela; Forcucci, Chris; Kelly, Anne Marie L.; Bakerjian, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Pain in older adults is a prevalent problem that affects quality of life and challenges nurses, particularly those caring for older adults living in long term care settings. Despite the national priority of pain management, insufficient knowledge of nurses about geriatric pain is a documented barrier to effective geriatric pain management in all long term care settings. To address this knowledge gap, a website (GeriatricPain.org) was developed by the National Geriatric Pain Collaborative with a grant from the MayDay Fund to provide a single site for evidenced-based, easy-to-use, downloadable resources on pain management. This paper describes the development of the most recent addition to the website, a set of evidence-based core geriatric pain management competencies and a geriatric pain knowledge assessment, and discusses their potential uses in improving pain care for older adults. Geriatric Pain Competencies and Knowledge Assessment for Nurses in Long Term Care Settings. PMID:25037079

  16. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  17. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive ... NIBIB-funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that ...

  18. Graduate and Undergraduate Geriatric Dentistry Education in a Selected Dental School in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Noboru; Sato, Yuji; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Geriatric dentistry and its instruction are critical in a rapidly aging population. Japan is the world’s fastest-aging society, and thus geriatric dentistry education in Japan can serve as a global model for other countries that will soon encounter the issues that Japan has already confronted. This study aimed to evaluate geriatric dental education with respect to the overall dental education system, undergraduate geriatric dentistry curricula, mandatory internships, and graduate geriatric education of a selected dental school in Japan. Bibliographic data and local information were collected. Descriptive and statistical analyses (Fisher and Chi-square test) were conducted. Japanese dental schools teach geriatric dentistry in 10 geriatric dentistry departments as well as in prosthodontic departments. There was no significant differences found between the number of public and private dental schools with geriatric dentistry departments (p = 0.615). At Showa University School of Dentistry, there are more didactic hours than practical training hours; however, there is no significant didactic/practical hour distribution difference between the overall dental curriculum and fourth-year dental students’ geriatric dental education curriculum (p=0.077). Graduate geriatric education is unique because it is a four-year Ph.D. course of study; there is neither a Master’s degree program nor a certificate program in Geriatric Dentistry. Overall, both undergraduate and graduate geriatric dentistry curricula are multidisciplinary. This study contributes to a better understanding of geriatric dental education in Japan; the implications of this study include developing a clinical/didactic curriculum, designing new national/international dental public health policies, and calibrating the competency of dentists in geriatric dentistry. PMID:21985207

  19. [A geriatrics unit with a 24 hour visiting policy].

    PubMed

    de Malherbe, Adle; Moulias, Sophie; Cudennec, Tristan; Teillet, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    As hospitals' visiting times are extended, patients' families and friends are granted an ever more important place. The nursing team of an acute geriatrics unit open 24/7 examined the place and the role of patients' families and friends and their involvement in care. PMID:26364819

  20. Health Promotion/Disease Prevention: New Directions for Geriatric Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levkoff, Sue; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes 10 modules for primary care practitioners on health promotion/disease prevention for the elderly on these topics: Alzheimer's disease in minorities, dehydration, diabetes, elder abuse, geriatric nutrition, oncology, oral health in long-term care, incontinence, injury prevention, and physical activity. These areas are significant for

  1. Use of Readers Theater to Enhance Interdisciplinary Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacRae, Nancy; Pardue, Karen T.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the design and implementation of an interdisciplinary geriatric educational project at a small New England University. A novel, affective teaching approach of Readers Theater is highlighted as a beginning classroom instructional strategy for interdisciplinary students. The physical and psychosocial considerations for health

  2. Geriatric Education in the Health Professions: Are We Making Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardach, Shoshana H.; Rowles, Graham D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Relative to the overall population, older adults consume a disproportionally large percentage of health care resources. Despite advocacy and efforts initiated more than 30 years ago, the number of providers with specialized training in geriatrics is still not commensurate with the growing population of older adults. This contribution

  3. Medical Readers' Theater: Relevance to Geriatrics Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Johanna; Cho, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Medical Readers' Theater (MRT) is an innovative and simple way of helping medical students to reflect on difficult-to-discuss topics in geriatrics medical education, such as aging stereotypes, disability and loss of independence, sexuality, assisted living, relationships with adult children, and end-of-life issues. The authors describe a required

  4. Novel ethical dilemmas arising in geriatric clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Calleja-Sordo, Elisa Constanza; de Hoyos, Adalberto; Méndez-Jiménez, Jorge; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Valderrama, Alejandro; García-Peña, Carmen; Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine empirically the state of the art of the medical care, when healthcare personal is confronted with ethical dilemmas related with the care they give to the geriatric population. An observational, longitudinal, prospective and qualitative study was conducted by analyzing the correlation between healthcare personnel-patient relationship, and ethical judgments regarding dilemmas that arise in daily clinical practice with geriatric patients. Mexican healthcare personnel with current active practices were asked to write up an ethical dilemma that arose frequently or that had impacted their medical practice. From the narrative input, we were able to draw up a database with 421 dilemmas, and those corresponding to patients 60 years and older were selected (n = 54, 12.8 %). The axiological analysis of the narrative dilemmas of geriatric patients was made using dialectical empiricism. The axiological analysis values found most frequently were classified into three groups: the impact of healthcare, the roles of the physician, and refusal of therapy; the healthcare role of educator, caring for the patients' life and the risk of imminent death where the values found more often. The persistence and universality of certain dilemmas in geriatrics calls for awareness and requires a good training in the ethical discernment of these dilemmas. This would help to improve substantially the care and the life quality of this population. PMID:25185872

  5. [Managing pressure ulcers in palliative care in geriatric units].

    PubMed

    Forasassi, Christine; Meaume, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Many elderly people at the end of life, in geriatric units, suffer from pressure ulcers despite preventive care. Measures are put in place in order to prevent the occurrence of new pressure ulcers and to define a local and general treatment strategy for those already occured . The priority remains to relieve the pain and improve the patient's comfort and quality of life. PMID:26027187

  6. A Geriatric Day Hospital: Who Improves the Most?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desrosiers, Johanne; Hebert, Rejean; Payette, Helene; Roy, Pierre-Michel; Tousignant, Michel; Cote, Sylvie; Trottier, Lise

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the changes in some bio-psychosocial variables (functional independence, nutritional risk, pain, balance and walking, grip strength, general well-being, psychiatric profile, perception of social support, leisure satisfaction, and caregivers' feeling of burden) in four categories of clients during their program at a geriatric

  7. Development of the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Dolan, Teresa A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the rationale for and the development of the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI). The GOHAI has demonstrated a high level of internal consistency and reliability. Poor GOHAI scores were significantly correlated to having fewer teeth, wearing a removable denture, and perceiving the need for dental treatment.

  8. Geriatric Training Needs of Nursing-Home Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubart, Emily; Segal, Refael; Rosenfeld, Vera; Madjar, Jack; Kakuriev, Michael; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Medical care in nursing homes is not provided by board-licensed geriatricians; it mainly comes from physicians in need of educational programs in the field of geriatrics. Such programs, based on curriculum guidelines, should be developed. The purpose of this study was to seek input from nursing home physicians on their perceived needs for training

  9. Maximizing the Potential of Internships in Gerontology and Geriatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karasik, Rona J.

    2009-01-01

    Internships and similar applied opportunities have long been valued for providing students with opportunities for practical experience, career preparation, and personal growth. The need for applied experiences in gerontology and geriatrics is particularly salient. Creating and sustaining effective internship experiences, however, requires careful

  10. The Geriatric Nurse Practitioner in the Community Mental Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trail, Ira D.

    A Federal mandate to provide comprehensive care for the aged population in this country has stimulated program planning in gerontology by mental health professionals. Introduction of the geriatric nurse practitioner into the mental health care system is viewed as one means of attempting to increase both the availability and quality of primary

  11. [Geriatric treatment in hospitals?--medical, legal, and economic aspects].

    PubMed

    Plute, G; Vogel, W

    2007-12-01

    Multimorbidity and functional impairment in geriatric patients regularly necessitate a combination of acute medical care and functional therapy. In Germany, comprehensive geriatric care is usually provided in hospitals, but also in clinical rehabilitation units. Different payment systems (diagnosis related groups in hospitals, day-to-day charges in rehabilitation centers) have precipitated a discussion on the separation of the acute phase from the rehabilitative phase of the disease with medical issues prevailing in the former and functional training in the latter. In geriatric patients, however, medical treatment of acute and chronic diseases should be continuously combined with functional therapy from the beginning of the hospital stay (i. e. early rehabilitation). Thus, acute hospital treatment followed by rehabilitation in a different institution, a method frequently used with younger patients with single defined diagnoses, has shown to be disadvantageous in geriatric patients. Some federal states in Germany favor the concept of one-step comprehensive hospital care including rehabilitation. As discussed in the article in detail, this procedure is in full accordance with the German social law. PMID:18074086

  12. Integrating Geriatric Dentistry into General Practice Residency Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Patrick M.; Shay, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    The predoctoral dental curriculum cannot provide the depth of experience and knowledge needed for the increasing representation of geriatric patients in family dental practices. A curriculum model designed to enhance knowledge and refine clinical skills in caring for the elderly is proposed. (MSE)

  13. [A partnership for the benefit of patients in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Jacquin-Mourain, Nicole

    2015-02-01

    In geriatrics, with the longer life expectancy and the growing number of neurodegenerative diseases, the need for care is increasing and working together is fundamental. The nurse/healthcare assistant partnership is the guarantor of improving patients' quality of care. PMID:26144824

  14. Clinical conundrums and challenges during geriatric orthopedic emergency surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Despite so many advancements and innovations in anesthetic techniques, expectations and challenges have also grown in plenty. Cardiac, pediatric, obstetric and neuro-anesthesia have perfectly developed to fulfill the desired needs of respective patient population. However, geriatric anesthesia has been shown a lesser interest in teaching and clinical practices over the years as compared with other anesthetic sub-specialties. The large growing geriatric population globally is also associated with an increase number of elderly patients presenting for orthopedic emergency surgeries. Orthopedic emergency surgery in geriatric population is not only a daunting clinical challenge but also has numerous socio-behavioral and economic ramifications. Decision making in anesthesia is largely influenced by the presence of co-morbidities, neuro-cognitive functions and the current socio-behavioral status. Pre-anesthetic evaluation and optimization are extremely important for a better surgical outcome but is limited by time constraints during emergency surgery. The current review aims to highlight comprehensively the various clinical, social, behavioral and psychological aspects during pre-anesthetic evaluation associated with emergency orthopedic surgery in geriatric population. PMID:25810963

  15. Facial fractures and bone healing in the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Friedman, C D; Costantino, P D

    1990-12-01

    A discussion of the biology of bone healing serves as the basis for a review of the clinical management of maxillofacial skeletal injury in the geriatric patient. Age-related changes in the facial skeleton and fractures of the edentulous mandible are described in detail. PMID:2074984

  16. Intravenous sedation in 200 geriatric patients undergoing office oral surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, R. L.; Smith, P. B.

    1997-01-01

    Two hundred geriatric patients ranging from age 65 to 92 yr (mean age 72 yr) were evaluated for office oral surgery and intravenous sedation. Surgical time ranged from 6 to 129 min. Monitored anesthesia care was utilized for the administration of fentanyl, midazolam or diazepam, and methohexital. No serious complications were seen and no patients were hospitalized. PMID:9481963

  17. Objective Structured Video Examinations (OSVEs) for Geriatrics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Deborah; Gehl, Suzanne; Helm, Robin; Kerwin, Diana; Drewniak, Theresa; Bragg, Dawn St. A.; Ziebert, Monica M.; Denson, Steven; Brown, Diane; Heffron, Mary Gleason; Mitchell, Julie; Harsch, Harold H.; Havas, Nancy; Duthie, Edmund, Jr.; Denson, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) and the Wisconsin Geriatric Education Center (WGEC) are committed to developing educational materials for primary care physicians in training. In response to the opportunity created by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competency mandate, an MCW-led interdisciplinary working…

  18. SRx: A Regional Approach to Geriatric Medication Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eng, Kathryn; Emlet, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    As medication use becomes increasingly recognized as important factor in total health care needs of older persons, combining clinical and educational interventions that reinforce each other can prove an effective means of educating consumers and providers about geriatric medication misuse and strategies for its prevention. Discusses one such

  19. Geriatric felons examined at a forensic psychiatry clinic.

    PubMed

    Rosner, R; Wiederlight, M; Schneider, M

    1985-07-01

    Descriptive statistics are presented on 25 defendants in the geriatric age range (aged 62 to 78 years old). Demographic variables, criminal charges, medical, neurological and psychiatric illnesses, prior criminal offenses, and final dispositions of the cases are tabulated, and implications for the criminal justice system and social services are discussed. PMID:4031807

  20. Maximizing the Potential of Internships in Gerontology and Geriatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karasik, Rona J.

    2009-01-01

    Internships and similar applied opportunities have long been valued for providing students with opportunities for practical experience, career preparation, and personal growth. The need for applied experiences in gerontology and geriatrics is particularly salient. Creating and sustaining effective internship experiences, however, requires careful…

  1. Geriatric Education in the Health Professions: Are We Making Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardach, Shoshana H.; Rowles, Graham D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Relative to the overall population, older adults consume a disproportionally large percentage of health care resources. Despite advocacy and efforts initiated more than 30 years ago, the number of providers with specialized training in geriatrics is still not commensurate with the growing population of older adults. This contribution…

  2. Use of Readers Theater to Enhance Interdisciplinary Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacRae, Nancy; Pardue, Karen T.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the design and implementation of an interdisciplinary geriatric educational project at a small New England University. A novel, affective teaching approach of Readers Theater is highlighted as a beginning classroom instructional strategy for interdisciplinary students. The physical and psychosocial considerations for health…

  3. E-Learning Virtual Patients for Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orton, Eric; Mulhausen, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based virtual patients (VPs) are an emerging medium for medical education that addresses barriers faced by geriatrics educators. Research has shown VPs to be as effective in changing knowledge and behavior as more traditional forms of teaching. This paper presents a descriptive study of the development of the University of Iowa's…

  4. Geriatric Training Needs of Nursing-Home Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubart, Emily; Segal, Refael; Rosenfeld, Vera; Madjar, Jack; Kakuriev, Michael; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Medical care in nursing homes is not provided by board-licensed geriatricians; it mainly comes from physicians in need of educational programs in the field of geriatrics. Such programs, based on curriculum guidelines, should be developed. The purpose of this study was to seek input from nursing home physicians on their perceived needs for training…

  5. Medical Readers' Theater: Relevance to Geriatrics Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Johanna; Cho, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Medical Readers' Theater (MRT) is an innovative and simple way of helping medical students to reflect on difficult-to-discuss topics in geriatrics medical education, such as aging stereotypes, disability and loss of independence, sexuality, assisted living, relationships with adult children, and end-of-life issues. The authors describe a required…

  6. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Kathryn Betts; Matto, Holly C.; Sanders, Sara

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) is widely used in clinical and research settings to screen older adults for depressive symptoms. Although several exploratory factor analytic structures have been proposed for the scale, no independent confirmation has been made available that would enable investigators to confidently identify scores

  7. Rasch Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale--Short Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Karl S.; Green, Kathy E.; Cox, Enid O.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine scale dimensionality, reliability, invariance, targeting, continuity, cutoff scores, and diagnostic use of the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-SF) over time with a sample of 177 English-speaking U.S. elders. Design and Methods: An item response theory, Rasch analysis, was conducted with

  8. Health Promotion/Disease Prevention: New Directions for Geriatric Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levkoff, Sue; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes 10 modules for primary care practitioners on health promotion/disease prevention for the elderly on these topics: Alzheimer's disease in minorities, dehydration, diabetes, elder abuse, geriatric nutrition, oncology, oral health in long-term care, incontinence, injury prevention, and physical activity. These areas are significant for…

  9. [Current appraisal of external quality assurance procedures in geriatric rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Lbke, N; Meinck, M

    2008-02-01

    Seven standardized external quality assurance (QA) procedures are currently being applied in geriatric rehabilitation in Germany. Five of these procedures are case-based (Gemidas, GiB-DAT, KODAS, EVA-Reha, Evaluation Procedures of the Medical Review Board of Saxony), and two are institution-based (Quality Seal for Geriatric Rehabilitation in Rhineland-Palatinate, Quality Seal for Geriatrics BAG KGE). The institution-based procedures focus on the quality dimensions "structure" and "process", whereas the case-based procedures mainly focus on the collection of administrative data, and to a limited extent on the quality dimensions "outcomes" and "patient satisfaction". The outcome quality parameters used in the case-based QA procedures are usually the "place of discharge" versus the "place of residence", the "improvement in coping with daily activities" (mostly based on the Barthel Index), and the "improvement in mobility and gait" (based on the Timed Up & Go). So far, outcomes to be specified at the beginning of rehabilitation measures have only been defined in few procedures, and only to a basic degree or on a trial basis. In the institution-based procedures, the data are mainly collected by external data collectors, whereas in the case-based procedures, they are collected by the service providers themselves. In most procedures, data processing and analysis are performed independently of the participating service providers but only partly independently of the agency responsible for the procedure and the whole group of service providers. In the case-based procedures, risk adjustment techniques are not routinely applied in comparisons between institutions. Attempts to implement standardised QA procedures in geriatric rehabilitation may be based on existing procedures and should use this appraisal for developing them further, however taking more into account QA aspects specific to geriatrics. PMID:18247270

  10. The Differential Impact of Clerk Interest and Participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clerkship Rotation upon Psychiatry and Pediatrics Residency Matches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Mark D.; Szatmari, Peter; Eva, Kevin W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluated the differential impact of clerk interest and participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) clerkship rotation upon psychiatry and pediatrics residency matches. Method: Authors studied clerks from the McMaster University M.D. program graduating years of 2005-2007. Participants were categorized as 1)

  11. Standardization of Course Plan and Design of Objective Structured Field Examination (OSFE) for the Assessment of Pharm.D. Student’s Community Pharmacy Clerkship Skills

    PubMed Central

    Monajjemzadeh, Farnaz; Shokri, Javad; Mohajel Nayebi, Ali Reza; Nemati, Mahboob; Azarmi, Yadollah; Charkhpour, Mohammad; Najafi, Moslem

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study was aimed to design Objective Structured Field Examination (OSFE) and also standardize the course plan of community pharmacy clerkship at Pharmacy Faculty of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (Iran). Methods: The study was composed of several stages including; evaluation of the old program, standardization and implementation of the new course plan, design and implementation of OSFE, and finally results evaluation. Results: Lack of a fair final assessment protocol and proper organized educating system in various fields of community pharmacy clerkship skills were assigned as the main weaknesses of the old program. Educational priorities were determined and student’s feedback was assessed to design the new curriculum consisting of sessions to fulfill a 60-hour training course. More than 70% of the students were satisfied and successfulness and efficiency of the new clerkship program was significantly greater than the old program (P<0.05). In addition, they believed that OSFE was a suitable testing method. Conclusion: The defined course plan was successfully improved different skills of the students and OSFE was concluded as a proper performance based assessment method. This is easily adoptable by pharmacy faculties to improve the educational outcomes of the clerkship course. PMID:24511477

  12. The Differential Impact of Clerk Interest and Participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clerkship Rotation upon Psychiatry and Pediatrics Residency Matches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Mark D.; Szatmari, Peter; Eva, Kevin W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluated the differential impact of clerk interest and participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) clerkship rotation upon psychiatry and pediatrics residency matches. Method: Authors studied clerks from the McMaster University M.D. program graduating years of 2005-2007. Participants were categorized as 1)…

  13. Presentation and Management Outcomes of Corneal and Scleral Perforations in Geriatric Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Ying Fong, Yoly Yeuk; Yu, Marco; Young, Alvin Lerrmann; Jhanji, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We compared the clinical presentation and treatment outcomes of corneal and scleral perforations in geriatric nursing home residents, geriatric community residents, and non-geriatric population. The medical records of patients who were treated for corneal and scleral perforations at the Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong between January 1, 2004 and May 1, 2013, were reviewed retrospectively. Of 144 cases, 53 (37%) occurred in the geriatric population, of which 16 (11%) lived in nursing homes, and 37 (26%) were community residents. There were 91 (63%) patients in the non-geriatric group. The mean age of the patients in nursing home geriatric group was 86.5 years (87.5% females). The most common etiology of perforation was trauma. Rupture due to fall was more common in geriatric patients (P?geriatric patients (P?geriatric nursing home group compared to the other groups (P?=?0.001). In the geriatric nursing home group, visual acuity at presentation (P?geriatric nursing home residents carry a poor visual prognosis. The causes and anatomical outcomes of such events in geriatric age group differ from those in the general population. In our study, geriatric patients residing in nursing homes had worse baseline as well as posttreatment visual acuity, compared to community residents. PMID:26356724

  14. American Geriatrics Society Updated Beers Criteria for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Campanelli, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) continue to be prescribed and used as first-line treatment for the most vulnerable of older adults, despite evidence of poor outcomes from the use of PIMs in older adults. PIMs now form an integral part of policy and practice and are incorporated into several quality measures. The specific aim of this project was to update the previous Beers Criteria using a comprehensive, systematic review and grading of the evidence on drug-related problems and adverse drug events (ADEs) in older adults. This was accomplished through the support of The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and the work of an interdisciplinary panel of 11 experts in geriatric care and pharmacotherapy who applied a modified Delphi method to the systematic review and grading to reach consensus on the updated 2012 AGS Beers Criteria. Fifty-three medications or medication classes encompass the final updated Criteria, which are divided into three categories: potentially inappropriate medications and classes to avoid in older adults, potentially inappropriate medications and classes to avoid in older adults with certain diseases and syndromes that the drugs listed can exacerbate, and finally medications to be used with caution in older adults. This update has much strength, including the use of an evidence-based approach using the Institute of Medicine standards and the development of a partnership to regularly update the Criteria. Thoughtful application of the Criteria will allow for (a) closer monitoring of drug use, (b) application of real-time e-prescribing and interventions to decrease ADEs in older adults, and (c) better patient outcomes. PMID:22376048

  15. The effects of firocoxib (Previcox) in geriatric dogs over a period of 90 days.

    PubMed

    Joubert, K E

    2009-09-01

    The long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents in geriatric dogs with osteoarthritis has not been well studied in veterinary medicine. This study evaluated the effects of firocoxib administered to dogs over 7 years of age for 90 days. Pain and lameness scores were evaluated by the owner weekly for the 1st month and then biweekly through to the end of the study, the veterinarian evaluated the dogs monthly. Serum chemistry, including urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, aspartate transaminase, bile acids and bilirubin, urine specific gravity and a urine dipstick, were performed at monthly intervals. Forty-five dogs were enrolled into the treatment group and 9 into the control group. A total of 33 dogs completed the trial in the treatment group and 8 in the control group. Lameness and pain scores were found to be significantly lower in the treated group from day 30 for most parameters evaluated. Bile acids (although not comparable to controls, with higher mean value and a high standard deviation in the control group; in addition the control group had increased bile acids at day 0) and urea (within normal reference range provided (WNL)) were significantly different in the treatment group between days 0 and 90. Urea (WNL) on days 30 and 90 and creatinine (WNL) on day 90 were significantly different between the control group and the treatment group. The most common adverse events reported were diarrhoea, vomition, dark faeces and anorexia. This study showed that firocoxib was effective in managing pain associated with osteoarthritis for 90 days. Despite the geriatric high-risk population used for this study, minimal biochemical changes were seen and adverse drug events seen were in agreement with those previously reported. PMID:20169752

  16. Assessment of reproductive behavior and hormonal cycles in geriatric western Lowland gorillas.

    PubMed

    Margulis, Susan W; Atsalis, Sylvia; Bellem, Astrid; Wielebnowski, Nadja

    2007-03-01

    The population of western lowland gorillas in North American zoos is aging and, as is the case with the aging human population, may have unique physical and social needs. We have documented previously that 25% of aging females (5/22) ceased to show reproductive cycles entirely, and could be defined as menopausal. Approximately 32% of females showed somewhat irregular cycling patterns. We review our hormonal and behavioral findings on reproductive aging in gorillas; describe the range of cycling patterns that we see and how we interpret these; and discuss the implications of these findings for captive management and husbandry of aging gorillas. We monitored fecal hormone metabolites (progestogens) in 30 gorillas and collected simultaneous behavioral data to evaluate the relationship between cyclicity and sexual behavior. We identified and described several discrete patterns of irregular cycling. These included extreme variability of cycle length, cyclic patterns with unusually low progestogen peak concentrations that possibly may not support luteal activity, and large variability in maximum progestogen peak height among cycles. All of these changes are consistent with age-related hormonal changes observed in humans and may be signs of changes in fertility as well. Behaviorally, nearly all cycling females exhibited signs of estrus. Affiliative behavior between male silverbacks and estrous females was observed in the control females, but not the geriatric females. These findings suggest that pre-menopausal females are exhibiting signs of perimenopause. As is the case in humans, such changes in hormone patterns may occur years before the onset of menopause. As enhancements in nutrition, husbandry, and veterinary medicine have led to increased longevity in our zoo populations of apes, it has become imperative that we investigate and better understand associated physiological and behavioral changes in geriatric animals to ensure appropriate management of this increasing demographic sub-population. Zoo Biol 0:1-23, 2007. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19360566

  17. [Geriatric trauma centers from the idea to implementation : What has been achieved?].

    PubMed

    Friess, T; Hartwig, E; Liener, U; Sturm, J; Hoffmann, R

    2016-01-01

    The geriatric trauma working party, a subgroup of the German Society of Trauma Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft fr Unfallchirurgie, DGU), focuses on the challenges of geriatric fractures, which are steadily increasing due to demographic changes. Inherent comorbidities implicate perioperative complications leading to loss of mobility and endangered independence followed by an increased burden on the social services. An interdisciplinary approach is required. The geriatric trauma working party defined criteria for interdisciplinary treatment and comprehensive care as well as early rehabilitation in interdisciplinary geriatric fracture centers. By passing an independent audit process these centers can achieve certification as a geriatric trauma center DGU (AltersTraumaZentrum DGU). Certified centers can participate in a recently established geriatric fracture registry which includes an internationally consented data set. Audit and registry enable centers to acquire an international benchmark, ensure permanent improvement in quality and allow participation in health services research. PMID:26601847

  18. Integrating and Evaluating Geriatrics in Medical School: A Novel Approach for the Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besdine, Richard W.; Shield, Renee R.; McNicoll, Lynn; Campbell, Susan E.; Wetle, Terrie

    2011-01-01

    Brown Medical School developed a comprehensive curriculum in which enriched aging content increased from 22 to 80 hours in preclerkship courses and was also added for clerkships, residencies, and nongeriatrician physicians. Innovative evaluation strategies are also described. Highlights include "treasure hunts" in the anatomy laboratory, a

  19. Integrating and Evaluating Geriatrics in Medical School: A Novel Approach for the Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besdine, Richard W.; Shield, Renee R.; McNicoll, Lynn; Campbell, Susan E.; Wetle, Terrie

    2011-01-01

    Brown Medical School developed a comprehensive curriculum in which enriched aging content increased from 22 to 80 hours in preclerkship courses and was also added for clerkships, residencies, and nongeriatrician physicians. Innovative evaluation strategies are also described. Highlights include "treasure hunts" in the anatomy laboratory, a…

  20. Geriatric Rehabilitation Patients Perceptions of Unit Dining Locations

    PubMed Central

    Baptiste, Franoise; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz-Wilner, Claire-Jehanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Eating together is promoted among hospitalized seniors to improve their nutrition. This study aimed to understand geriatric patients perceptions regarding meals in a common dining area versus at the bedside. Methods An exploratory qualitative study was conducted. Open-ended questions were asked of eight patients recruited from a geriatric rehabilitation unit where patients had a choice of meal location. Results Eating location was influenced by compliance with the perceived rules of the unit, physical and emotional well-being, and quarantine orders. Certain participants preferred eating in the common dining room where they had more assistance from hospital staff, a more attractive physical environment, and the opportunity to socialize. However, other participants preferred eating at their bedsides, feeling the quality of social interaction was poor in the dining room. Conclusions Participants experiences of, and preferences for, communal dining differed. If the benefits of communal dining are to be maximized, different experiences of this practice must be considered. PMID:24883161

  1. Managing constipation: implementing a protocol in a geriatric rehabilitation setting.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jennifer; Holowaty, Sandra

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effect of implementing a constipation management protocol (CMP) within a geriatric rehabilitation setting. A convergent mixed-methods research design was used. Quantitative data on bowel activity, laxative use, opiate drug use, and nursing documentation regarding bowel care were gathered through a review of health records for 305 patients admitted to three geriatric rehabilitation units before (n = 137) and after (n = 168) protocol implementation over two 3-month periods. Focus groups were conducted examining nursing staff's experiences with such a protocol. Findings revealed that although implementation of the CMP did not reduce constipation rates among older patients, the average number of incidences of constipation per patient was reduced after implementation of the protocol. More importantly, it resulted in more due diligence by staff regarding patients' bowel patterns as well as improved bowel care documentation. Findings and recommendations extend current literature and have practical implications for nurses interested in improving management of patients' bowel care. PMID:24804648

  2. [Successful aging: what can neurology and geriatrics contribute?].

    PubMed

    Synofzik, M; Maetzler, W

    2015-04-01

    The relative proportion of elderly persons in Western societies is rapidly growing, leading to an increasing frequency of age-related neurological diseases (e.g. dementia) and functional impairments (e.g. immobility). This article argues that this development should prompt a new focus in medical care. The key questions should not only be how can we improve treatment of age-related disorders but also how can we prevent age-related disorders in the first place or at least substantially delay their onset? These questions touch on an even more profound question: how can successful aging be accomplished? That is, which factors and processes characterize successful aging both on a system and on a molecular level? Thus, the crucial societal, scientific and medical challenges for Western societies are to develop and implement measures of primary prevention of dysfunctional aging. The disease-centered framework which currently determines most clinical thinking, scientific research and third party funding has to be supplemented by a novel framework of successful aging. This article defines dysfunctional aging as a convergent downstream result of multiple interacting system processes. Each of these detrimental system processes must be targeted by specific measures of geriatric primary prevention. This, in turn, implies that geriatrics does not start in the elderly or with the onset of particular geriatric disorders. Instead, it starts in the daily practice of neurology and other medical disciplines taking care of persons aged 20-40 years who are largely healthy and in the middle of their professional and personal career. Or, in a nutshell, geriatrics starts right in the middle of medical care. PMID:25801949

  3. Evidence-based practices in geriatric mental health care.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Stephen J; Dums, Aricca R; Oxman, Thomas E; Schneider, Lon S; Areán, Patricia A; Alexopoulos, George S; Jeste, Dilip V

    2002-11-01

    The past decade has seen dramatic growth in research on treatments for the psychiatric problems of older adults. An emerging evidence base supports the efficacy of geriatric mental health interventions. The authors provide an overview of the evidence base for clinical practice. They identified three sources of evidence-evidence-based reviews, meta-analyses, and expert consensus statements-on established and emerging interventions for the most common disorders of late life, which include depression, dementia, substance abuse, schizophrenia, and anxiety. The most extensive research support was found for the effectiveness of pharmacological and psychosocial interventions for geriatric major depression and for dementia. Less is known about the effectiveness of treatments for the other disorders, although emerging evidence is promising for selected interventions. Empirical support was also found for the effectiveness of community-based, multidisciplinary, geriatric psychiatry treatment teams. The authors discuss barriers to implementing evidence-based practices in the mental health service delivery system for older adults. They describe approaches to overcoming these barriers that are based on the findings of research on practice change and dissemination. Successful approaches to implementing change in the practices of providers emphasize moving beyond traditional models of continuing medical education to include educational techniques that actively involve the learner, as well as systems change interventions such as integrated care management, implementation toolkits, automated reminders, and decision support technologies. The anticipated growth in the population of older persons with mental disorders underscores the need for a strategy to facilitate the systematic and effective implementation of evidence-based practices in geriatric mental health care. PMID:12407270

  4. [Chronic Constipation: A Geriatric Syndrome with Urological Implications].

    PubMed

    Füsgen, I; Wiedemann, A

    2016-02-01

    Chronic constipation, faecal and urinary incontinence are a geriatric syndrome. Chronic constipation is particularly important for the field of urology as it may be considered to trigger urological incontinence problems. Both chronic constipation and urinary incontinence are age-dependent symptoms, which are associated with a significant impact on quality of life. Chronic constipation must be taken into consideration during the diagnostic work-up and treatment of urinary incontinence. PMID:26574951

  5. Improving medication management competency of clinical trainees in geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Kostas, Tia; Zimmerman, Kristin; Salow, Marci; Simone, Mark; Whitmire, Natalie; Rudolph, James L; McMahon, Graham T

    2014-08-01

    The authors hypothesized that an interprofessional workshop would improve geriatrics trainees' medication management. The workshop was based on a needs assessment and comprised an interactive session with pharmacists on managing medications in elderly adults. Participants were trainees in their geriatrics rotation at a tertiary care medical center. Trainees completed a medication appropriateness survey for three patients, one of which was their own. After the workshop, trainees reviewed medications of the three patients. Trainees completed online surveys after their rotation and 3 months later. Of 95 trainees rotating through geriatrics, 76 (80%) attended the workshop and completed the worksheet. Trainees' scores on reviewing medication lists improved significantly, from 6.72.3 to 7.72.0 out of 11 for standardized patient 1 (P<.001) and from 5.71.8 to 6.41.5 out of 11 for standardized patient 2 (P=.009). Trainees' scores on their own patients' lists also improved significantly, from 5.61.5 to 6.61.5 out of 10 (P<.001). After the workshop, 95% (71/75) planned to change the medication regimen of the patient they presented, and 93% (68/73) planned to change other patients' medications based on information learned during the workshop. Three months later, 35% (12/34) had made changes to the regimen of the patient they discussed during the workshop, and 71% (15/21) had made changes to other patients' regimens. Seventy-eight percent (18/23) rated the workshop as the top nonclinical experience of their geriatrics rotation. In conclusion, this interprofessional medication management workshop improved trainees' ability to perform medication reviews accurately and led to change in self-reported prescribing behavior. PMID:25040361

  6. SRx: a regional approach to geriatric medication education.

    PubMed

    Eng, K; Emlet, C A

    1990-06-01

    Medication use is becoming increasingly recognized as an important factor in the total health care needs of older persons. Combining clinical and educational interventions that reinforce one another can prove an effective means of educating the consumer and provider about geriatric medication misuse and strategies for its prevention. This paper discusses one such program, the SRx Regional Program of the San Francisco Bay area. PMID:2354802

  7. Perceptions, attitudes, and experiences of hematology/oncology fellows toward incorporating geriatrics in their training.

    PubMed

    Maggiore, Ronald J; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Levine, Stacie K; Dale, William

    2014-01-01

    The aging of the U.S. population continues to highlight emerging issues in providing care generally for older adults and specifically for older adults with cancer. The majority of patients with cancer in the U.S. are currently 65 years of age or older; therefore, training and research in geriatrics and geriatric oncology are viewed to be integral in meeting the needs of this vulnerable population. Yet, the ways to develop and integrate best geriatrics training within the context of hematology/oncology fellowship remain unclear. Toward this end, the current study seeks to evaluate the prior and current geriatric experiences and perspectives of hematology/oncology fellows. To gain insight into these experiences, focus groups of hematology/oncology fellows were conducted. Emergent themes included: 1) perceived lack of formal geriatric oncology didactics among fellows; 2) a considerable amount of variability exists in pre-fellowship geriatric experiences; 3) shared desire to participate in a geriatric oncology-based clinic; 4) differences across training levels in confidence in managing older adults with cancer; and 5) identification of specific criteria on how best to approach older adults with cancer in a particular clinical scenario. The present findings will help guide future studies in evaluating geriatrics among hematology/oncology fellows across institutions. They will also have implications in the development of geriatrics curricula and competencies specific to hematology/oncology training. PMID:24484724

  8. Geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway: the Hong Kong experience

    PubMed Central

    Leung, F.; Siu, D.; Wong, G.; Luk, K. D. K.

    2010-01-01

    Geriatric hip fracture is one of the commonest fractures in orthopaedic trauma. There is a trend of further increase in its incidence in the coming decades. Besides the development of techniques and implants to overcome the difficulties in fixation of osteoporosis bone, the general management of the hip fracture is also very challenging in terms of the preparation of the generally poorer pre-morbid state and complicate social problems associated with this group of patients. In order to cope with the increasing demand, our hospital started a geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway in 2007. The aim of this pathway is to provide better care for this group of patients through multidisciplinary approach. From year 2007 to 2009, we had managed 964 hip fracture patients. After the implementation of the pathway, the pre-operative and the total length of stay in acute hospital were shortened by over 5 days. Other clinical outcomes including surgical site infection, 30 days mortality and also incidence of pressure sore improved when compared to the data before the pathway. The rate of surgical site infection was 0.98%, and the 30 days mortality was 1.67% in 2009. The active participation of physiotherapists, occupational therapists as well as medical social workers also helped to formulate the discharge plan as early as the patient is admitted. In conclusion, a well-planned and executed clinical pathway for hip fracture can improve the clinical outcomes of the geriatric hip fractures. PMID:19543764

  9. An etiologic profile of anemia in 405 geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Geisel, Tabea; Martin, Julia; Schulze, Bettina; Schaefer, Roland; Bach, Matthias; Virgin, Garth; Stein, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Background. Anemia is a common condition in the elderly and a significant risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality, reducing not only functional capacity and mobility but also quality of life. Currently, few data are available regarding anemia in hospitalized geriatric patients. Our retrospective study investigated epidemiology and causes of anemia in 405 hospitalized geriatric patients. Methods. Data analysis was performed using laboratory parameters determined during routine hospital admission procedures (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin saturation, C-reactive protein, vitamin B12, folic acid, and creatinine) in addition to medical history and demographics. Results. Anemia affected approximately two-thirds of subjects. Of 386 patients with recorded hemoglobin values, 66.3% were anemic according to WHO criteria, mostly (85.1%) in a mild form. Anemia was primarily due to iron deficiency (65%), frequently due to underlying chronic infection (62.1%), or of mixed etiology involving a combination of chronic disease and iron deficiency, with absolute iron deficiency playing a comparatively minor role. Conclusion. Greater awareness of anemia in the elderly is warranted due to its high prevalence and negative effect on outcomes, hospitalization duration, and mortality. Geriatric patients should be routinely screened for anemia and etiological causes of anemia individually assessed to allow timely initiation of appropriate therapy. PMID:24707396

  10. Cadaver treasure hunt: introducing geriatrics concepts in the anatomy class.

    PubMed

    McNicoll, Lynn; Fulton, Ana Tuya; Ritter, Dale; Besdine, Richard W

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an educational program introducing geriatrics to medical students during anatomy. Observational study of an educational intervention in medical school was the design utilized. First-year medical students in an anatomy laboratory were participants. The program consists of a lecture and a workshop. First, a geriatrics lecture early in the course presents demographic data on the cadavers, followed by comparison with national data on leading causes of death. Second, there is a "treasure hunt" in the anatomy laboratory conducted by geriatricians. Each geriatrician spends 45 minutes with one-four-student cadaver group at a time, reviewing anatomical findings and facilitating a discussion of clinical correlations and implications. A list of common anatomical findings, aging- and disease-related, is distributed to the students as an aid in identifying findings of interest. Students have been surprised to learn that the mean age of the 24 cadavers exceeded 80 years (mean 81, median 85 for 2 years), and that causes of death mirrored national data. The students begin understanding aging and appreciate the valuable resource of cadavers. The students acquire a new holistic perspective regarding their cadavers that is not apparent during the dissections. Students and faculty find the experience valuable in understanding the interplay of disease and aging. Evaluations have been mostly positive (82-87% positive responses). The anatomy lecture and "treasure hunt" experience are unique strategies for using cadavers to introduce geriatrics principles into the medical school. PMID:22568595

  11. Research priorities in geriatric oncology for 2013 and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mohile, Supriya; Dale, William; Magnuson, Allison; Kamath, Nayana; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of cancer increases with advanced age. Unfortunately, there is a significant lack of evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of treatments. The oncology community also lacks information regarding which older patients are most likely to benefit from treatment without undue toxicities. Interventions to lower symptoms and reduce long-term complications from cancer and cancer treatment in older patients are urgently needed. Establishing research priorities in geriatric oncology could help guide researchers and focus efforts on interventions that have the highest likelihood of improving outcomes. The Cancer and Aging Research Group, in partnership with the National Institute on Aging and National Cancer Institute, held linked conferences as part of a U13 grant in September of 2010 and November of 2012, summarising the gaps in knowledge in geriatric oncology and recommending ways to close these gaps. The overall purpose of this review is to highlight the important research priorities in geriatric oncology from the literature and from the previous U13 meetings. More evidence regarding the treatment of older cancer patients is urgently needed given the rapid aging of the population. PMID:25346565

  12. How to Implement a Geriatric Assessment in Your Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sattar, Schroder; Alibhai, Shabbir M.H.; Wildiers, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a disease that mostly affects older adults. Other health conditions, changes in functional status, and use of multiple medications change the risks and benefits of cancer treatment for older adults. Several international organizations, such as the International Society of Geriatric Oncology, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, recommend the conduct of a geriatric assessment (GA) for older adults with cancer to help select the most appropriate treatment and identify any underlying undetected medical, functional, and psychosocial issues that can interfere with treatment. The aim of this review is to describe what a GA is and how to implement it in daily clinical practice for older adults with cancer in the oncology setting. We provide an overview of commonly used tools. Key considerations in performing the GA include the resources available (staff, space, and time), patient population (who will be assessed), what GA tools to use, and clinical follow-up (who will be responsible for using the GA results for developing care plans and who will provide follow-up care). Important challenges in implementing GA in clinical practice include not having easy and timely access to geriatric expertise, patient burden of the additional hospital visits, and establishing collaboration between the GA team and oncologists regarding expectations of the population referred for GA and expected outcomes of the GA. Finally, we provide some possible interventions for problems identified during the GA. PMID:25187477

  13. An Etiologic Profile of Anemia in 405 Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Geisel, Tabea; Martin, Julia; Schulze, Bettina; Schaefer, Roland; Bach, Matthias; Virgin, Garth; Stein, Jrgen

    2014-01-01

    Background. Anemia is a common condition in the elderly and a significant risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality, reducing not only functional capacity and mobility but also quality of life. Currently, few data are available regarding anemia in hospitalized geriatric patients. Our retrospective study investigated epidemiology and causes of anemia in 405 hospitalized geriatric patients. Methods. Data analysis was performed using laboratory parameters determined during routine hospital admission procedures (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin saturation, C-reactive protein, vitamin B12, folic acid, and creatinine) in addition to medical history and demographics. Results. Anemia affected approximately two-thirds of subjects. Of 386 patients with recorded hemoglobin values, 66.3% were anemic according to WHO criteria, mostly (85.1%) in a mild form. Anemia was primarily due to iron deficiency (65%), frequently due to underlying chronic infection (62.1%), or of mixed etiology involving a combination of chronic disease and iron deficiency, with absolute iron deficiency playing a comparatively minor role. Conclusion. Greater awareness of anemia in the elderly is warranted due to its high prevalence and negative effect on outcomes, hospitalization duration, and mortality. Geriatric patients should be routinely screened for anemia and etiological causes of anemia individually assessed to allow timely initiation of appropriate therapy. PMID:24707396

  14. Food intakes and preferences of hospitalised geriatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Shahar, Suzana; Chee, Kan Yin; Wan Chik, Wan Chak Pa'

    2002-01-01

    Background A cross sectional survey was carried out on 120 hospitalised geriatric patients aged 60 and above in Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur to investigate their nutrient intakes and food preferences. Methods Food intakes were recorded using a one day weighed method and diet recall. Food preferences were determined using a five point hedonic score. Food wastages and factors affecting dietary adequacy were also investigated. Results The findings indicated that the mean intakes of energy and all nutrients investigated except for vitamin C and fluid were below the individual requirement for energy, protein and fluid, and the Malaysian Recommendation of Dietary Allowances (RDA) for calcium, iron, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and acid ascorbic. In general, subjects preferred vegetables, fruits and beans to red meat, milk and dairy products. There was a trend of women to have a higher percentage for food wastage. Females, diabetic patients, subjects who did not take snacks and subjects who were taking hospital food only, were more likely to consume an inadequate diet (p < 0.05 for all values). Conclusions Food service system in hospital should consider the food preferences among geriatric patients in order to improve the nutrient intake. In addition, the preparation of food most likely to be rejected such as meat, milk and dairy products need some improvements to increase the acceptance of these foods among geriatric patients. This is important because these foods are good sources of energy, protein and micronutrients that can promote recovery from disease or illness. PMID:12165100

  15. Teaching and Funding of Primary Care Education in Third-Year Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berenbaum, Isidore; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A 12-week primary care elective for third-year medical students at Boston University School of Medicine is described. Clinical sites at three Boston community health centers are coordinated to provide a longitudinal, integrated experience in ambulatory pediatrics and medicine. (Author/MLW)

  16. Multidimensional Geriatric Prognostic Index, Based on a Geriatric Assessment, for Long-Term Survival in Older Adults in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hee-Won; Han, Ji Won; Kim, Kayoung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Il; Kim, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The patient´s survival estimate is important for clinical decision-making, especially in frail patients with multimorbidities. We aimed to develop a multidimensional geriatric prognosis index (GPI) for 3- and 5-year mortality in community-dwelling elderly and to validate the GPI in a separate hospital-based population. The GPI was constructed using data for 988 participants in the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging (KLoSHA) and cross-validated with 1109 patients who underwent a geriatric assessment at the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH). The GPI, with a total possible score of 8, included age, gender, activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, comorbidities, mood, cognitive function, and nutritional status. During the 5-year observation period, 179 KLoSHA participants (18.1%) and 340 SNUBH patients (30.7%) died. The c-indices for 3- and 5-year mortality were 0.78 and 0.80, respectively, in the KLoSHA group and 0.73 and 0.80, respectively, in the SNUBH group. Positive linear trends were observed for GPI scores and both 3- and 5-year mortality in both groups. In conclusions, using common components of a geriatric assessment, the GPI can stratify the risk of 3- and 5-year mortality in Korean elderly people both in the community and hospital. PMID:26771562

  17. Multidimensional Geriatric Prognostic Index, Based on a Geriatric Assessment, for Long-Term Survival in Older Adults in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hee-Won; Kim, Jin Won; Han, Ji Won; Kim, Kayoung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Il; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Ki Woong

    2016-01-01

    The patient´s survival estimate is important for clinical decision-making, especially in frail patients with multimorbidities. We aimed to develop a multidimensional geriatric prognosis index (GPI) for 3- and 5-year mortality in community-dwelling elderly and to validate the GPI in a separate hospital-based population. The GPI was constructed using data for 988 participants in the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging (KLoSHA) and cross-validated with 1109 patients who underwent a geriatric assessment at the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH). The GPI, with a total possible score of 8, included age, gender, activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, comorbidities, mood, cognitive function, and nutritional status. During the 5-year observation period, 179 KLoSHA participants (18.1%) and 340 SNUBH patients (30.7%) died. The c-indices for 3- and 5-year mortality were 0.78 and 0.80, respectively, in the KLoSHA group and 0.73 and 0.80, respectively, in the SNUBH group. Positive linear trends were observed for GPI scores and both 3- and 5-year mortality in both groups. In conclusions, using common components of a geriatric assessment, the GPI can stratify the risk of 3- and 5-year mortality in Korean elderly people both in the community and hospital. PMID:26771562

  18. Perceptions of pharmacy clerkship students and clinical preceptors regarding preceptors’ teaching behaviors at Gondar University in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the perceptions of pharmacy clerkship students and clinical preceptors of preceptors’ teaching behaviors at Gondar University. A cross-sectional study was conducted among pharmacy clerkship students and preceptors during June 2014 and December 2015. A 52-item structured questionnaire was self-administered to 126 students and 23 preceptors. The responses are presented using descriptive statistics. The Mann-Whitney U test was applied to test the significance of differences between students and preceptors. The response rate was 89.4% for students and 95.6% for preceptors. Statistically significant differences were observed in the responses regarding two of the five communication skills that were examined, six of the 26 clinical skills, and five of the 21 parameters involving feedback. The mean scores of preceptors (2.6/3) and students (1.9/3) regarding instructors’ ability to answer questions were found to be significantly different (P= 0.01). Students and preceptors gave mean scores of 1.9 and 2.8, respectively, to a question regarding preceptors’ application of appropriate up-to-date knowledge to individual patients (P= 0.00). Significant differences were also noted between students and instructors regarding the degree to which preceptors encouraged students to evaluate their own performance (P= 0.01). Discrepancies were noted between students and preceptors regarding preceptors’ teaching behaviors. Preceptors rated their teaching behaviors more highly than students did. Short-term training is warranted for preceptors to improve some aspects of their teaching skills. PMID:26971864

  19. Student perceptions of medical errors: incorporating an explicit professionalism curriculum in the third-year surgery clerkship.

    PubMed

    Newell, Pippa; Harris, Stephen; Aufses, Arthur; Ellozy, Sharif

    2008-01-01

    Among medical educators, there is a universal call for curricula that emphasize development of character, compassion, and integrity. A unique challenge to the development of such curricula is the lack of tools with which to assess student progress. To these ends, we created a curriculum designed to inculcate the values of the surgical profession alongside both fact-based and skill-based learning within the triad of medical school education. Our purposes were 1) the acknowledgment of student fears regarding committing medical errors during their third-year surgical clerkship and 2) the design of curricular content aimed toward a more comprehensive understanding of professionalism using medical error as a paradigm. Third-year clerks on the surgical service were assigned readings, participated in formalized discussions regarding medical errors and ethics, and were required to complete questionnaires that contained open-ended questions pertaining to their concerns, observations, and reactions toward any perceived or actual medical errors they encountered during the third-year surgical clerkship. Questionnaires were analyzed according to themes contained within the students' responses. Most students expressed an initial fear of committing primarily technical medical errors and subsequently causing harm to patients. The dilemma as to whether to speak up against a superior regarding unaddressed medical errors appeared as a frequent theme among the students. New prerotation and postrotation questionnaires have been designed to allow for both quantitative and qualitative analysis of the students' understanding of the gravity of varying types of medical errors and how they relate to medical professionalism. PMID:18439532

  20. How Many Sides Does a Coin Have? A Phenomenology of Filipino Nurses' Motivation and Attitudes toward Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Dangoy, Reena-Jane D.; David, Kathleen Christian V.; Dayo, Ken Jarrett H.; de Claro, Keisha A.; de Guzman, Giorgio von Gerri G.; de Jesus, Gerald Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    Nurses play a significant role in geriatric care. However, as the aging population and demand for geriatric nurses increase worldwide, shortages of nurses seem to arise. This creates the need to assess and address the motivation and attitudes of nurses toward geriatric care. The intent of this qualitative study is to surface the essence or the

  1. How Many Sides Does a Coin Have? A Phenomenology of Filipino Nurses' Motivation and Attitudes toward Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Dangoy, Reena-Jane D.; David, Kathleen Christian V.; Dayo, Ken Jarrett H.; de Claro, Keisha A.; de Guzman, Giorgio von Gerri G.; de Jesus, Gerald Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    Nurses play a significant role in geriatric care. However, as the aging population and demand for geriatric nurses increase worldwide, shortages of nurses seem to arise. This creates the need to assess and address the motivation and attitudes of nurses toward geriatric care. The intent of this qualitative study is to surface the essence or the…

  2. The Brave New World of GEC Evaluation: The Experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G.; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these…

  3. Cognitive Deficits in Geriatric Depression: Clinical Correlates and Implications for Current and Future Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis The purpose of this article is to identify the cognitive deficits commonly associated with geriatric depression, and describe their clinical significance. We then summarize the complex relationship between geriatric depression and dementia and discuss possible shared mechanisms. Last, we present evidence regarding whether the cognitive deficits in depression may be mitigated with medication or with computerized cognitive remediation. PMID:24229654

  4. Successful Implementation of a Faculty Development Program in Geriatrics for Non-Primary Care Physician Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Brent C.; Schigelone, Amy R.; Fitzgerald, James T.; Halter, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    A four-year faculty development program to enhance geriatrics learning among house officers in seven surgical and related disciplines and five medical subspecialties at a large academic institution resulted in changes in attitudes and knowledge of faculty participants, expanded curricula and teaching activities in geriatrics, and enhanced and

  5. Impairment in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and the Geriatric Syndrome of Self-Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naik, Aanand D.; Burnett, Jason; Pickens-Pace, Sabrina; Dyer, Carmel B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to characterize self-neglect definitively as a geriatric syndrome by identifying an association with functional impairment. Design and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional home evaluation of 100 community-living older adults referred by Adult Protective Services for geriatric self-neglect and 100 matched adults from a

  6. Exploring Strategies to Advance Public-Sector Funding in Geriatric Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Gary; Mancini, Michael; Briar-Lawson, Katharine; Rizzo, Victoria M.; Baskind, Frank; Valentine, Carl

    2006-01-01

    Changing U.S. demographics and family composition are challenging social work education programs to reposition and reconsider how to prepare students for practice in the field of geriatrics. Implications for future social service and health care needs include ongoing training and education of students with competencies in serving geriatric

  7. California Geriatric Education Center Logic Model: An Evaluation and Communication Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Rachel M.; Alkema, Gretchen E.; Frank, Janet C.

    2009-01-01

    A logic model is a communications tool that graphically represents a program's resources, activities, priority target audiences for change, and the anticipated outcomes. This article describes the logic model development process undertaken by the California Geriatric Education Center in spring 2008. The CGEC is one of 48 Geriatric Education

  8. The Brave New World of GEC Evaluation: The Experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G.; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these

  9. Geriatric Expertise among Medical School Faculty: Preparing for the Challenges of an Aging Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, Sarah B.; Jenkins, Carol L.; Eleazer, G. Paul; Kelsey, Susan G.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined non-geriatrician physicians' experiences in a geriatrics-focused faculty development program, and effects of the program on their geriatrics knowledge and their teaching and practice. In-depth interviews were conducted with all physicians (n = 26) participating in the Dean's Faculty Scholars in Aging program. Most participants

  10. An Innovative Continuing Nursing Education Program Targeting Key Geriatric Conditions for Hospitalized Older People in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Shen, Jun; Wu, Haifeng; Ding, Fu; He, Xizhen; Zhu, Yueping

    2013-01-01

    A lack of knowledge in registered nurses about geriatric conditions is one of the major factors that contribute to these conditions being overlooked in hospitalized older people. In China, an innovative geriatric continuing nursing education program aimed at developing registered nurses' understanding of the complex care needs of hospitalized

  11. A Community-Based Approach for Integrating Geriatrics and Gerontology into Undergraduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Iveris L.; Mora, Jorge Camilo

    2012-01-01

    Medical school accreditation requirements require educational opportunities in geriatrics. Twenty-six minimum graduating competencies in geriatrics have recently been identified for medical students. The authors describe how these competencies are being integrated into a new medical curriculum through coursework and community-based experiences.

  12. [Benefit of a geriatric mobile team in the emergency departments: a ten-year review].

    PubMed

    Natali, Jean-Philippe; Schwald, Nathalie; Bach, Frdrique; Bourgouin, Galle; Chiffray, Dominique; Bloch, Frdric

    2015-01-01

    Ageriatric mobile team was created in the emergency department of Cochin Hospital in Paris, in 2005. This key player in the multi-disciplinary management of elderly patients in the emergency department and in the geriatric care pathway, showed, during its 10-year of existence, its utility. PMID:26574128

  13. Hazards of Hospitalization: Hospitalists and Geriatricians Educating Medical Students about Delirium and Falls in Geriatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Valerie J.; Clark, Nancy S.; Medina-Walpole, Annette; McCann, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Geriatric patients are at increased risk for complications from delirium or falls during hospitalization. Medical education, however, generally places little emphasis on the hazards of hospitalization for older inpatients. Geriatricians conducted a faculty development workshop for hospitalists about the hazards of hospitalization for geriatric

  14. 9 CFR 381.157 - Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. 381.157 Section 381.157 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... Standards of Identity or Composition § 381.157 Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. (a)...

  15. 9 CFR 381.157 - Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. 381.157 Section 381.157 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... Standards of Identity or Composition § 381.157 Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. (a)...

  16. An Innovative Continuing Nursing Education Program Targeting Key Geriatric Conditions for Hospitalized Older People in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Shen, Jun; Wu, Haifeng; Ding, Fu; He, Xizhen; Zhu, Yueping

    2013-01-01

    A lack of knowledge in registered nurses about geriatric conditions is one of the major factors that contribute to these conditions being overlooked in hospitalized older people. In China, an innovative geriatric continuing nursing education program aimed at developing registered nurses' understanding of the complex care needs of hospitalized…

  17. Mortality of Geriatric and Younger Patients with Schizophrenia in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ran, Mao-Sheng; Chan, Cecilia Lai-Wan; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai; Tang, Cui-Ping; Lin, Fu-Rong; Li, Li; Li, Si-Gan; Mao, Wen-Jun; Hu, Shi-Hui; Schwab, Gerhard; Conwell, Yeates

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the differences in mortality among non-institutionalized geriatric and younger patients with schizophrenia. In this study long-term mortality and suicidal behavior of all the geriatric (age greater than or equal to 65 years), middle-age (age 41-64 years), and young (age 15-40 years) subjects with schizophrenia living in a…

  18. Mortality of Geriatric and Younger Patients with Schizophrenia in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ran, Mao-Sheng; Chan, Cecilia Lai-Wan; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai; Tang, Cui-Ping; Lin, Fu-Rong; Li, Li; Li, Si-Gan; Mao, Wen-Jun; Hu, Shi-Hui; Schwab, Gerhard; Conwell, Yeates

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the differences in mortality among non-institutionalized geriatric and younger patients with schizophrenia. In this study long-term mortality and suicidal behavior of all the geriatric (age greater than or equal to 65 years), middle-age (age 41-64 years), and young (age 15-40 years) subjects with schizophrenia living in a

  19. The Success and Struggles of Filipino Geriatric Nurses in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Coronel, Rona Denise V.; Chua, Kannerin O.; Constantino, Mariz G.; Cordova, Ericsann James C.

    2009-01-01

    Geriatric nursing is a physically and emotionally demanding job in healthcare. It is a neglected field despite the growing population of the elderly, and the experiences of geriatric nurses are one of the unrecognized aspects of this field. This qualitative study purports to explore the successes and struggles of the lived experiences of a select

  20. Successful Implementation of a Faculty Development Program in Geriatrics for Non-Primary Care Physician Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Brent C.; Schigelone, Amy R.; Fitzgerald, James T.; Halter, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    A four-year faculty development program to enhance geriatrics learning among house officers in seven surgical and related disciplines and five medical subspecialties at a large academic institution resulted in changes in attitudes and knowledge of faculty participants, expanded curricula and teaching activities in geriatrics, and enhanced and…

  1. Impairment in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and the Geriatric Syndrome of Self-Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naik, Aanand D.; Burnett, Jason; Pickens-Pace, Sabrina; Dyer, Carmel B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to characterize self-neglect definitively as a geriatric syndrome by identifying an association with functional impairment. Design and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional home evaluation of 100 community-living older adults referred by Adult Protective Services for geriatric self-neglect and 100 matched adults from a…

  2. California Geriatric Education Center Logic Model: An Evaluation and Communication Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Rachel M.; Alkema, Gretchen E.; Frank, Janet C.

    2009-01-01

    A logic model is a communications tool that graphically represents a program's resources, activities, priority target audiences for change, and the anticipated outcomes. This article describes the logic model development process undertaken by the California Geriatric Education Center in spring 2008. The CGEC is one of 48 Geriatric Education…

  3. A Community-Based Approach for Integrating Geriatrics and Gerontology into Undergraduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Iveris L.; Mora, Jorge Camilo

    2012-01-01

    Medical school accreditation requirements require educational opportunities in geriatrics. Twenty-six minimum graduating competencies in geriatrics have recently been identified for medical students. The authors describe how these competencies are being integrated into a new medical curriculum through coursework and community-based experiences.…

  4. Health Care Workforce Development in Rural America: When Geriatrics Expertise Is 100 Miles Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumosa, Nina; Horvath, Kathy J.; Huh, Terri; Livote, Elayne E.; Howe, Judith L.; Jones, Lauren Ila; Kramer, B. Josea

    2012-01-01

    The Geriatric Scholar Program (GSP) is a Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) workforce development program to infuse geriatrics competencies in primary care. This multimodal educational program is targeted to primary care providers and ancillary staff who work in VA's rural clinics. GSP consists of didactic education and training in geriatrics…

  5. The Success and Struggles of Filipino Geriatric Nurses in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Coronel, Rona Denise V.; Chua, Kannerin O.; Constantino, Mariz G.; Cordova, Ericsann James C.

    2009-01-01

    Geriatric nursing is a physically and emotionally demanding job in healthcare. It is a neglected field despite the growing population of the elderly, and the experiences of geriatric nurses are one of the unrecognized aspects of this field. This qualitative study purports to explore the successes and struggles of the lived experiences of a select…

  6. Geriatric Expertise among Medical School Faculty: Preparing for the Challenges of an Aging Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, Sarah B.; Jenkins, Carol L.; Eleazer, G. Paul; Kelsey, Susan G.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined non-geriatrician physicians' experiences in a geriatrics-focused faculty development program, and effects of the program on their geriatrics knowledge and their teaching and practice. In-depth interviews were conducted with all physicians (n = 26) participating in the Dean's Faculty Scholars in Aging program. Most participants…

  7. Community Psychiatrists Who See Geriatric Patients: What's Training Got to Do with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieff, Susan; Andrew, Melissa; Tiberius, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the issues influencing psychiatrists' decisions to provide care to the under-served geriatric population. Methods: Community-based psychiatrists who see geriatric patients participated in focus group discussions exploring factors that influence the characteristics of their current practices. Results: Personal themes,…

  8. Preventive agricultural medicine: a student's perspective of farmers' mental health.

    PubMed

    Tabereaux, Paul B; Wheat, John R

    2002-01-01

    As a medical student completing a required rural community medicine clerkship, I discovered my home community's concern for mental health of farmers. A local economic downturn affects everyone, but especially the farmers. One farmer had recently committed suicide. Leaning heavily on work presented at a Nebraska summit on the farm crisis and mental health and on the National Rural Health Association issue paper on rural mental health, I found farmer and rural mental health to be a widespread concern, exacerbated by a scarcity of rural mental health resources. In my recommendations for rural Alabama, I endorse recommendations of others, including strengthening the local family physician role as "front door" to the mental health system, outreach with such agents as extension personnel and ministers, and farm crisis hotlines. PMID:12853270

  9. Folk Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... West Asian, and Hispanic cultures. Folk medicines can contain herbs, minerals, metals, or animal products. Lead and ... a folk medicine may not know whether it contains lead. You cannot tell if a medicine has ...

  10. Taking Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Taking Medicines Drugs in the Body Medicines can enter the body in many different ways, ... many steps happen along the way. Understanding how medicines work in your body can help you learn ...

  11. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  12. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  13. Birds of a feather: introducing a virtual learning community for geriatric nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Egerton, Emily O; McConnell, Eleanor S; Corazzini, Kirsten; Kitzmiller, Rebecca R; Crook, Jonathon O

    2010-05-01

    The Duke Geriatric Nursing Education Virtual Learning Community (Gero-VLC) is a newly developed online inquiry network that enables geriatric nurse educators to borrow, share, and collaborate to promote in-depth learning and optimal communication among instructors. Recently launched, the Gero-VLC website was developed to meet the needs of nurse educators who face increasing demands to develop quality, learner-centered online instruction focused on evidence-based geriatric care. Through the Gero-VLC, nurse educators can connect with nurse clinicians expert in geriatric care; access state-of-the-science information and learning opportunities; participate in collaborative projects; and publish their work on the North Carolina Learning Object Repository. The authors present the Gero-VLC as a best practice for online geriatric nursing education, describe its theoretical underpinnings, and outline a strategy for evaluation. PMID:20481420

  14. An autonomy supportive model of geriatric team function.

    PubMed

    Powers, J S; White, S; Varnell, L; Turvy, C; Kidd, K; Harrell, D; Knight, B; Floyd, K; Zupko, K

    2000-08-01

    Interdisciplinary teams play a critical role in the delivery of geriatric health care. Health care professionals are commonly left to develop teamwork skills by chance. Medical team function differs from traditional group theory in that all members are caregivers. A non-competitive supportive atmosphere is appropriate for patient care. We propose a participatory (autonomy supportive) model fostering self-realization and positive reinforcement as an organizing philosophy. The primary group task is to maximize patient functional independence and personal goals. Leadership is task-dependent. PMID:10943147

  15. Psychosocial work load and stress in the geriatric care

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Due to the decrease in informal care by family members and the demographic development, the importance of professional geriatric care will rise considerably. Aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial workplace situation for employees in this profession. Methods The German version of the COPSOQ (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire) was used for the assessment of psychosocial factors at work. The instrument includes 22 scales and 3 single items concerning demands, control, stress, support, and strain. Results between two study groups of geriatric care were compared to each other as well as to employees in general hospital care and a general population mean (COPSOQ database). Statistical analysis included t-tests, ANOVA and multiple comparisons of means. Statistical significance (p < 0.01, two-tailed) and a difference of at least 5 points in mean values were defined as the relevant threshold. Results In total 889 respondents from 36 institutions took part in the study. 412 worked in Home Care (HC), 313 in Geriatric Nursing Homes (GNH), 164 in other professions (e.g. administration). Comparison between HC and GNH showed more favourable values for the first group for the most scales, e.g. lower quantitative and emotional demands and less work-privacy conflict, better possibilities for development etc. Compared to external values from the German COPSOQ database for general hospital care (N = 1.195) and the total mean across all professions, COPSOQ-total (N = 11.168), the results are again positive for HC workers on most of the scales concerning demands and social support. The only negative finding is the very low amount of social relations at work due to the obligation to work alone most of the time. Employees in GNH rate predictability, quality of leadership and feedback higher when compared to general hospital care and show some further favourable mean values compared to the COPSOQ mean value for all professions. A disadvantage for GNH is the high rating for job insecurity. A supplementary subgroup analysis showed that the degree of negative evaluation of psychosocial factors concerning demands was related to the amount of working hours per week and the number of on-call duties. Conclusions Compared to employees in general hospital care and the COPSOQ overall mean value across all professions, geriatric care employees and especially home care workers evaluate their psychosocial working situation more positive for most aspects. However, this seems partly due to the very high proportion of part-time workers. Critical results for the two study groups are the relatively high job insecurity in nursing homes and the lack of social relations for the HCrs. PMID:20663137

  16. Short-term geriatric assessment units: 30 years later

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The increasing number of hospitalized elderly persons has greatly challenged decision makers to reorganize services so as to meet the needs of this clientele. Established progressively over the last 30 years, the short-term Geriatric Assessment Unit (GAU) is a specialized care program, now implemented in all the general hospital centres in Quebec. Within the scope of a broader reflection upon the appropriate care delivery for elderly patients in our demographic context, there is a need to revisit the role of GAU within the hospital and the continuum of care. The objective of this project is to describe the range of activities offered by Quebec GAU and the resources available to them. Methods In 2004, 64 managers of 71 GAU answered a mail questionnaire which included 119 items covering their unit's operation and resources in 2002-2003. The clinical and administrative characteristics of the clientele admitted during this period were obtained from the provincial database Med-Echo. The results were presented according to the geographical location of GAU, their size, their university academic affiliation, the composition of their medical staff, and their clinical care profile. Results Overall, GAU programs admitted 9% of all patients aged 65 years and older in the surveyed year. GAU patients presented one or more geriatric syndromes, including dementia. Based on their clientele, three distinct clinical care profiles of GAU were identified. Only 19% of GAU were focused on geriatric assessment and acute care management; 23% mainly offered rehabilitation care, and the others offered a mix of both types. Thus, there was a significant heterogeneity in GAU's operation. Conclusions The GAU is at the cutting edge of geriatric services in hospital centres. Given the scarcity of these resources, it would be appropriate to better target the clientele that may benefit from them. Standardizing and promoting GAU's primary role in acute care must be reinforced. In order to meet the needs of the frail elderly not admitted in GAU, alternative care models centered on prevention of functional decline must be applied throughout all hospital wards. PMID:20569433

  17. Health care: economic impact of caring for geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Rich, Preston B; Adams, Sasha D

    2015-02-01

    National health care expenditures constitute a continuously expanding component of the US economy. Health care resources are distributed unequally among the population, and geriatric patients are disproportionately represented. Characterizing this group of individuals that accounts for the largest percentage of US health spending may facilitate the introduction of targeted interventions in key high-impact areas. Changing demographics, an increasing incidence of chronic disease and progressive disability, rapid technological advances, and systemic market failures in the health care sector combine to drive cost. A multidisciplinary approach will become increasingly necessary to balance the delicate relationship between our constrained supply and increasing demand. PMID:25459539

  18. Pain Management Issues for the Geriatric Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Jason L

    2015-09-01

    Adequate treatment of pain is of utmost importance in making uncomplicated the perioperative course for geriatric surgical patients. Effective analgesia reduces morbidity, improves patient and family satisfaction, and is a natural expectation of high-quality care. Pain treatment in older adults is more complicated than in younger counterparts, and great consideration must be given to age-related changes in physiology and pharmacokinetics. Pain treatment must be individualized based on each patient's profile. Side effects must be minimized and organ toxicity avoided. When complications occur they may be more severe, and treatment must be prompt. Alternative plans for analgesia must be readily enacted. PMID:26315638

  19. Structures and geriatrics from a failure analysis experience viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, D.M. )

    1993-05-01

    In a failure analysis consulting engineering practice one sees a variety of structural failures from which observations may be made concerning geriatric structures. Representative experience with power plants, refineries, offshore structures, and forensic investigations is summarized and generic observations are made regarding the maintenance of fitness for purpose of structures. Although it is important to optimize the engineering design for a range of operational and environmental variables, it is essential that fabrication and inspection controls exist along with common sense based ongoing monitoring and operations procedures. 18 figs.

  20. Looking forward in geriatric anxiety and depression: implications of basic science for the future.

    PubMed

    Gershenfeld, Howard K; Philibert, Robert A; Boehm, Gary W

    2005-12-01

    Major depression and anxiety are common psychiatric illnesses whose etiology remains incompletely understood. This review highlights progress in understanding the etiology of these illnesses through genetic strategies and looks forward to their impact on geriatric psychiatry. We briefly address three broad domains of progress, namely 1) genetic approaches to etiology, including linkage and association studies, pharmacogenetics ("personalized medicine"), and gene x environment interactions; 2) mechanisms of thyroid and testosterone action via nuclear receptors, given these hormones' status as possible augmenters of antidepressants; and 3) the role of the neuroimmune system as a contributor to the stress response. Genetic strategies offer one path for converting correlational findings into causal pathways while complementing studies of a gene's function at the molecular, cellular, network, and whole-organismal levels. Neuroendocrine supplementation (thyroid and testosterone) has a long history and tradition. A molecular understanding of nuclear receptor pathways and their coactivators, the mediator complex proteins, provides a rationale for improved targeting of hormonal action in a tissue-selective manner, yielding drugs with improved safety and efficacy. Neural-immune interactions in psychiatric illness remain tantalizing topics. Research suggests that cytokine pathways may contribute to the maintenance or susceptibility to stress, anxiety, and depressive disorders. The reciprocal and recursive interactions among basic science, drug discovery, and clinical science will continue to provide hopeful themes for improving the lives of patients with treatment-refractive psychiatric illness. PMID:16319295

  1. Abstracts from the 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society Quebec City, April 2012

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The opinions expressed in the abstracts are those of the authors and are not to be construed as the opinion of the publisher (Canadian Geriatrics Society) or the organizers of the 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society. Although the publisher (Canadian Geriatrics Society) has made every effort to accurately reproduce the abstracts, the Canadian Geriatrics Society and the 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society assumes no responsibility and/or liability for any errors and/or omissions in any abstract as published.

  2. Estimating Geriatric Mortality after Injury Using Age, Injury Severity, and Performance of a Transfusion: The Geriatric Trauma Outcome Score

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Frank Z.; Wolf, Steven E.; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Rhodes, Ramona L.; Paulk, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: A tool to determine the probability of mortality for severely injured geriatric patients is needed. Objective: We sought to create an easily calculated geriatric trauma prognostic score based on parameters available at the bedside to aid in mortality probability determination. Methods: All patients ≥65 years of age were identified from our Level I trauma center's registry between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2013. Measurements included age, Injury Severity score (ISS), units of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) transfused in the first 24 hours, and patients' mortality status at the end of their index hospitalization. As a first step, a logistic regression model with maximum likelihood estimation and robust standard errors was used to estimate the odds of mortality from age, ISS, and PRBCs after dichotomizing PRBCs as yes/no. We then constructed a Geriatric Trauma Outcome (GTO) score that became the sole predictor in the re-specified logistic regression model. Results: The sample (n=3841) mean age was 76.5±8.1 years and the mean ISS was 12.4±9.8. In-hospital mortality was 10.8%, and 11.9% received a transfusion by 24 hours. Based on the logistic regression model, the equation with the highest discriminatory ability to estimate probability of mortality was GTO Score=age+(2.5×ISS)+22 (if given PRBCs). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for this model was 0.82. Selected GTO scores and their related probability of dying were: 205=75%, 233=90%, 252=95%, 310=99%. The range of GTO scores was 67.5 (survivor) to 275.1 (died). Conclusion: The GTO model accurately estimates the probability of dying, and can be calculated at bedside by those possessing a working knowledge of ISS calculation. PMID:25974408

  3. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  4. Rationale and methods of the multicenter randomised trial of a heart failure management programme among geriatric patients (HF-Geriatrics)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disease management programmes (DMPs) have been shown to reduce hospital readmissions and mortality in adults with heart failure (HF), but their effectiveness in elderly patients or in those with major comorbidity is unknown. The Multicenter Randomised Trial of a Heart Failure Management Programme among Geriatric Patients (HF-Geriatrics) assesses the effectiveness of a DMP in elderly patients with HF and major comorbidity. Methods/Design Clinical trial in 700 patients aged ? 75 years admitted with a primary diagnosis of HF in the acute care unit of eight geriatric services in Spain. Each patient should meet at least one of the following comorbidty criteria: Charlson index ? 3, dependence in ? 2 activities of daily living, treatment with ? 5 drugs, active treatment for ? 3 diseases, recent emergency hospitalization, severe visual or hearing loss, cognitive impairment, Parkinson's disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), anaemia, or constitutional syndrome. Half of the patients will be randomly assigned to a 1-year DMP led by a case manager and the other half to usual care. The DMP consists of an educational programme for patients and caregivers on the management of HF, COPD (knowledge of the disease, smoking cessation, immunizations, use of inhaled medication, recognition of exacerbations), diabetes (knowledge of the disease, symptoms of hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia, self-adjustment of insulin, foot care) and depression (knowledge of the disease, diagnosis and treatment). It also includes close monitoring of the symptoms of decompensation and optimisation of treatment compliance. The main outcome variables are quality of life, hospital readmissions, and overall mortality during a 12-month follow-up. Discussion The physiological changes, lower life expectancy, comorbidity and low health literacy associated with aging may influence the effectiveness of DMPs in HF. The HF-Geriatrics study will provide direct evidence on the effect of a DMP in elderly patients with HF and high comorbidty, and will reduce the need to extrapolate the results of clinical trials in adults to elderly patients. Trial registration (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01076465). PMID:21819564

  5. American Geriatrics Society care of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults position statement: American Geriatrics Society Ethics Committee.

    PubMed

    2015-03-01

    There is ample evidence that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals face discrimination in the healthcare setting. Providing high-quality health care for older LGBT adults will require active steps by organizations, institutions, advocacy groups, and health professionals that create an environment that is free from discrimination. This position statement that the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Ethics Committee developed addresses the vision of the AGS for the care of LGBT older adults and specific steps that can be taken to ensure that they receive the care that they need. PMID:25803784

  6. "Pedogeriatrics": a pediatric nephrologist's outlook on common challenges facing pediatric and geriatric nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Grnberg, Jose

    2010-03-01

    Dramatic demographic changes longevity and medical progress helped create a new population made up of the survivors of previously fatal diseases. These trends pose new major social and economic challenges that should be accounted for in health policy making. This paper discusses the similarities between the specialties of pediatrics and geriatrics, especially in the realm of patient care. Children and the elderly share a limited autonomy and dependence on the human environment (i.e., willing and able caregiving persons) due to age or disease. The long-term care of dependent patients (DP) requires caregiving persons who share with dependent persons the risk of losing autonomy, facing burnout, family disruption, and interference with work and educational activities. Families with DPs may face potential losses of income because both patients and caregivers are partially or completely unable to work, the former for medical reasons and the latter due to the new demands on their time and energy. Additionally, new expenses have to be met because while direct medical expenses might be covered by insurance or the State, other expenses have to be financed by the family, such as co-payments for medicines, new water or electricity home installations, and transport and eventual hotel costs if they have to stay overnight near a hospital outside of their town. The main objectives of long-term care should be to maximize patients' independence and prevent their physical and psychological deterioration while minimizing the social, economic and personal costs to caregivers. To achieve these goals, one needs a holistic approach, a multidisciplinary professional team (doctors, nurses, social workers, nutritionists and psychologists) and auxiliary staff (secretaries, electricians, administrators, messengers, cleaning staff, doormen, nursing aids and coordinators of medical appointments and medical procedures). Optimal management of DPs on chronic treatments such as chronic dialysis requires adequate communication skills, respectful attitudes toward patients and caregivers and effective use of communication and information technologies. Auxiliary personnel require specific training to contribute effectively to the DP attention processes. This paper postulates that pediatric and geriatric teams and their patients would benefit from closer training and sharing of experiences and systems. PMID:19517264

  7. Oral Examination: A Model for Its Use within a Clinical Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vu, Nu V.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine has devised an evaluation system that not only provides the advantages of oral examination but also attempts to alleviate some of its disadvantages. The system uses oral examination to assess students' content knowledge. (MLW)

  8. The RBANS Effort Index: Base rates in geriatric samples

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Kevin; Spering, Cynthia C.; OBryant, Sid E.; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Moser, David J.; Bayless, John D.; Culp, Kennith R.; Mold, James W.; Adams, Russell L.; Scott, James G.

    2011-01-01

    The Effort Index (EI) of the RBANS was developed to assist clinicians in discriminating patients who demonstrate good effort from those with poor effort. However, there are concerns that older adults might be unfairly penalized by this index, which uses uncorrected raw scores. Using five independent samples of geriatric patients with a broad range of cognitive functioning (e.g., cognitively intact, nursing home residents, probable Alzheimers disease), base rates of failure on the EI were calculated. In cognitively intact and mildly impaired samples, few older individuals were classified as demonstrating poor effort (e.g., 3% in cognitively intact). However, in the more severely impaired geriatric patients, over one third had EI scores that fell above suggested cut-off scores (e.g., 37% in nursing home residents, 33% in probable Alzheimers disease). In the cognitively intact sample, older and less educated patients were more likely to have scores suggestive of poor effort. Education effects were observed in 3 of the 4 clinical samples. Overall cognitive functioning was significantly correlated with EI scores, with poorer cognition being associated with greater suspicion of low effort. The current results suggest that age, education, and level of cognitive functioning should be taken into consideration when interpreting EI results and that significant caution is warranted when examining EI scores in elders suspected of having dementia. PMID:21390895

  9. A systematic approach to the pharmacotherapy of geriatric major depression

    PubMed Central

    Mulsant, Benoit H.; Blumberger, Daniel M.; Ismail, Zahinoor; Rabheru, Kiran; Rapoport, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS While about 14% of older Americans are now taking an antidepressant, this broad use of antidepressants has not been associated with a notable decrease in the burden of geriatric depression. This article, based on a selective review of the literature, explores several explanations for this paradox. First, we discuss and reject the possible explanations that antidepressants are not effective in the treatment of depression or that the results of randomized clinical trials are not applicable to the treatment of depression in real-world clinical settings. Instead, we propose that the efficacy of antidepressants depends in large part on the way they are used. We present evidence supporting that the use of antidepressant pharmacotherapy is associated with better outcomes when it is guided by a treatment algorithm (a stepped care approach) as opposed to an attempt to individualize treatment. We review published guidelines and pharmacotherapy algorithms that were developed for the treatment of geriatric depression. Finally, we propose an updated algorithm based on the authors interpretation of the available evidence. PMID:25037293

  10. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kottner, J; Beeckman, D

    2015-12-01

    The key characteristics of geriatric patients are advanced age, multimorbidity, a decrease of psychical performance and care dependency. In addition, advanced age, chronic and acute diseases and treatments (e.g. polypharmacy) lead, either directly or indirectly, to a wide range of skin and tissue problems. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers (PUs) belong to the most prevalent in geriatric settings. Prolonged exposure of the skin to urine and/or stool can cause an irritant contact dermatitis. Skin surface 'wetness', increased skin surface pH, digestive intestinal enzymes, repeated skin cleansing activities, and a possible occlusive environment contribute to irritation and inflammation. Prevention and treatment includes activities to maintain and to enhance continence and to limit, to reduce exposure of the skin to urine and stool, and to promote healing and reepithelialisation. In frail aged skin, it is recommended to use incontinence products with smooth and breathable materials with maximum absorption capacity. Immediate skin cleansing after soiling using mild cleansers and protective and caring leave-on products are recommended. PUs are localized injuries to the skin and/or underlying tissue caused by sustained deformations of skin and underlying soft tissues. PUs management includes risk assessment, repositioning and mobilization, and the use of appropriate support surfaces. Patients must be never positioned directly on an existing PU. Especially at end of life, the PU closure and wound healing may not be the primary therapeutic goal. PMID:26186379

  11. Barriers to Implementation of an Organized Geriatric Fracture Program

    PubMed Central

    Kates, Stephen L.; O’Malley, Natasha; Friedman, Susan M.; Mendelson, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: There has been a recent increase in interest in implementing organized geriatric fracture programs for care of older adults with fragility fractures in order to improve both the quality and costs of care. Because such programs are relatively new, there are no standardized methods for implementation and no published descriptions of barriers to implementation. Materials and Methods: An online survey tool was sent to 185 surgeons and physicians practicing in the United States, who are involved with geriatric fracture care. Sixty-eight responses were received and evaluated. Results: Barriers identified included lack of medical and surgical leadership, need for a clinical case manager, lack of anesthesia department support, lack of hospital administration support, operating room time availability, and difficulty with cardiac clearance for surgery. Other issues important to implementation included quality improvement, cost reductions, cost to the hospital, infection prevention, readmission prevention, and dealing with competing interest groups and competing projects mandated by the government. Physicians and surgeons felt that a site visit to a functioning program was most important when considering implementing a hip fracture program. Conclusions: This study provides useful insights into barriers to implementing an organized hip fracture program. The authors offer suggestions on ways to mitigate or overcome these barriers. PMID:23569692

  12. Clinical preference for factors in treatment of geriatric depression.

    PubMed

    Riepe, Matthias W

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about symptom preferences of clinical psychiatrists in the treatment of geriatric depression and preferences for avoiding adverse drug effects. Participants (board-certified psychiatrists) were recruited prior to a lecture on geriatric depression during a continuing education program. An analytic hierarchy process was performed and participants were asked for pairwise comparison of criteria guiding them in appraising therapeutic efficacy, and in avoiding toxicity and adverse events. Of the 61 participants from the continuing education program, 42 (69%) returned their data sheet. Avoidance of cardiotoxicity was regarded as more important than avoidance of hepatotoxicity or hematotoxicity. Concerning adverse events, highest preference was given to avoidance of falls and drug interactions, followed by avoidance of sedation, weight change, and impairment of sexual function. The most important preferences for appraisal of therapeutic efficacy were suicidality over ability to concentrate and sleep. Clinical psychiatrists have a hierarchy of preferences for treatment goals and avoidance of adverse events and toxicity. This raises the question for future research whether these preferences cause differences in prescription patterns in clinical practice even though a multitude of antidepressants are similarly effective when judged with instruments used in clinical trials. PMID:25565848

  13. Geriatric depression and its relation with cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Carol; Tartaglini, María Florencia; Stefani, Dorina; Salgado, Pablo; Taragano, Fernando E; Allegri, Ricardo F

    2014-01-01

    Different subtypes of depressive syndromes exist in late life; many of them have cognitive impairment and sometimes it is difficult to differentiate them from dementia. This research aimed to investigate subtypes of geriatric depression associated with cognitive impairment, searched for differential variables and tried to propose a study model. A hundred and eighteen depressive patients and forty normal subjects matched by age and educational level were evaluated with an extensive neuropsychological battery, scales to evaluate neuropsychiatric symptoms and daily life activities (DLA). Depressive patients were classified in groups by SCAN 2.1: Major Depression Disorder (MDD) (n: 31), Dysthymia Disorder (DD) (n: 31), Subsyndromal Depression Disorder (SSD) (n: 29), Depression due to Dementia (n: 27) (DdD). Neuropsychological significant differences (p<0.05) were observed between depressive groups, demonstrating distinctive cognitive profiles. Moreover, significant differences (p<0.05) were found in DLA between DdD vs all groups and MDD vs controls and vs SSD. Age of onset varied in the different subtypes of depression. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) were significant variables that helped to differentiate depressive groups. Significant correlations between BDI and Neuropsychological tests were found in MDD and DD groups. Depressive symptoms and its relation with neuropsychological variables, MMSE, cognitive profiles, DLA and age of onset of depression should be taken into consideration for the study of subtypes of geriatric depression. PMID:24855979

  14. Referral to specialized geriatric services. Which elderly people living in the community are likely to benefit?

    PubMed Central

    Man-Son-Hing, M.; Power, B.; Byszewski, A.; Dalziel, W. B.

    1997-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: As the Canadian population ages, family physicians encounter increasing numbers of elderly people with medical, functional, psychological, and social difficulties. In the past two decades, most regions of Canada have developed systems of specialized geriatric services, available on a consultative basis, to assist family physicians evaluating and managing elderly patients with these difficulties. For many family physicians, however, it is often unclear which of their elderly patients are likely to benefit from referral to these geriatric services. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: Using an interdisciplinary approach, specialized geriatric services seek to optimize health, maximize function, promote independence, and prevent or delay institutionalization of elderly people. Yet not all elderly people benefit from referral to specialized geriatric services. This article offers a clear and clinically practical framework to help family physicians identify elderly patients in their practices who are likely to benefit from referral to specialized geriatric services. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: By synthesizing previous work on the concept of frail elderly persons into a 2 x 2 matrix, the level and intensity of geriatric intervention most appropriate for different segments of the elderly population is clarified. CONCLUSIONS: Using the simple approach described in this article, family physicians should be able to use available geriatric resources easily and efficiently to optimize the health and function of their elderly patients. PMID:9154364

  15. An interprofessionally developed geriatric oncology curriculum for hematologyoncology fellows

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Ahmed; Hughes, Caren; Karuturi, Meghan; Reyes, Connie; Yorio, Jeffrey; Holmes, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Objective Because the cancer population is aging, interprofessional education incorporating geriatric principles is essential to providing adequate training for oncology fellows. We report the targeted needs assessment, content, and evaluation tools for our geriatric oncology curriculum at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods A team comprising a geriatrician, a medical oncologist, an oncology PharmD, an oncology advanced nurse practitioner, and two oncology chief fellows developed the geriatric oncology curriculum. First, a general needs assessment was conducted by reviewing the literature and medical societies publications and by consulting experts. A targeted needs assessment was then conducted by reviewing the fellows evaluations of the geriatric oncology rotation and by interviewing fellows and recently graduated oncology faculty. Results Geriatric assessment, pharmacology, and psychosocial knowledge skills were the three identified areas of educational need. Curriculum objectives and an evaluation checklist were developed to evaluate learners in the three identified areas. The checklist content was validated by consulting experts in the field. Online materials, including a curriculum, a geriatric pharmacology job aid, and pharmacology cases, were also developed and delivered as part of the curriculum. Conclusion An interprofessional team approach was a successful method for identifying areas of learners educational needs, which in turn helped us develop an integrated geriatric oncology curriculum. The curriculum is currently being piloted and evaluated. PMID:25487037

  16. Student perceptions of the care of children: impacts of pre-clerkship pediatric and primary care clinical teaching

    PubMed Central

    Karras, Beverley; Selvaraj, Saumya; McConnell, Athena; Andres, Deirdre; Trinder, Krista; McKague, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric clinical skills teaching sessions provide an early opportunity for students to be exposed to the medical care of children. This report describes second and third year medical students perceptions of and attitudes towards working with children before and after the pediatric clinical skills teaching sessions, and the experiences of those students precepted by pediatricians only compared to those students working with a combination of pediatricians and family physicians. Method A 13 question survey was voluntarily completed before and after teaching sessions. Written reflective assignments were qualitatively analyzed for key themes. Response rate averaged 68% with class sizes of 84 and 85 students. Results Students perceptions of the care of children were generally very positive. Some differences were found based on gender, phase of study and prior clinical exposure to pediatric care. Pre and post responses were similar, regardless of preceptor specialty. Students with family physician preceptors identified the themes of prevention, health promotion and multidisciplinary care in their reflections. Conclusions Students had already formed positive attitudes toward the medical care of children and intended to care for children in their future practice. Further research is needed into the effects of pre-clerkship experiences in the care of children on choice of medical specialty. PMID:26451220

  17. Geriatric Impairments and Disability: The Cardiovascular Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sarwat I.; McAvay, Gail; Ning, Yuming; Allore, Heather G.; Newman, Anne B.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to determine the relative importance of geriatric impairments (including those in muscle strength, physical capacity, cognition, vision, hearing and psychological status) and chronic diseases in predicting subsequent functional disability in longitudinal analyses. Design We analyzed longitudinal data from the Cardiovascular Health Study. Multivariable Cox hazards regression modeling was used to analyze associations between time-dependent predictors and onset of disability in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and mobility. Setting/Participants 5888 community-dwelling elderly persons were followed for up to seven years. Intervention N/A Measurements Data were collected annually through in-person examinations. Results ADL disability developed in 15% of participants and mobility disability in 30%. A single multivariable model was developed that included demographics, marital status, body mass index, and number of impairments and diseases. The hazard ratios of having 1, 2, and ≥ 3 geriatric impairments (compared with none) for the outcome of ADL disability were 2.12 (95% CI 1.63–2.75), 4.25 (3.30–5.48), and 7.87 6.10–10.17), respectively, and for having 1, 2, and ≥ 3 chronic diseases were 1.75 (1.41–2.19), 2.45 (1.95–3.07), and 3.26 (2.53–4.19), respectively. Similarly, the hazard ratios of having 1, 2, and ≥ 3 impairments for the outcome of mobility disability were 1.48 (1.27–1.73), 2.08 (1.77–2.45), and 3.70 (3.09–4.42), and for having 1, 2, and ≥ 3 diseases were 2.06 (1.76–2.40), 2.80 (2.36–3.31), and 4.20 (3.44–5.14). Conclusion As compared with number of chronic diseases, the number of geriatric impairments was more strongly associated with subsequent ADL disability, and nearly as strongly associated with the subsequent mobility disability. PMID:20863328

  18. [Secret medicines].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, H

    2001-01-01

    Secret medicines had two characteristics: their formula remained unknown and they were prepared by many kinds of people. Before 1728 there were no general laws about these secret medicines but only peculiar rules. From 1728 to 1778, the King edicted rigorous rules in order to limit the number of secret medicines. Between 1778 and 1789, the law became more definite and the Royal Society of Medicine gave advices. The Law of Germinal An-XI forbid secret medicines but since 1805, some compromises took place. Slowly, secret medicines were replaced by pharmaceutics and new set of laws. PMID:11944653

  19. [Geriatric particularities of Parkinson's disease: Clinical and therapeutic aspects].

    PubMed

    Belin, J; Houto, J L; Constans, T; Hommet, C; de Toffol, B; Mondon, K

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequent and complex progressive neurological disorder that increases in incidence with age. Although historically PD has been characterized by the presence of progressive dopaminergic neuronal loss of the substantia nigra, the disease process also involves neurotransmitters other that dopamine and regions of the nervous system outside the basal ganglia. Its clinical presentation in elderly subjects differs from that in younger subjects, with more rapid progression, less frequent tremor, more pronounced axial signs, more frequent non-motor signs linked to concomitant degeneration of non-dopaminergic systems, and more frequent associated lesions. Despite the high prevalence of PD in elderly subjects, few therapeutic trials have been conducted in geriatric patients. Nevertheless, to improve functional disability while ensuring drug tolerance, the principles of optimized and multidisciplinary clinical management have to be known. The aim of this review is to provide an update on clinical and therapeutic features of PD specifically observed in elderly subjects. PMID:26573332

  20. Evaluating Problems With Footwear in the Geriatric Population.

    PubMed

    Ikpeze, Tochukwu C; Omar, Adan; Elfar, John H

    2015-12-01

    Foot pathologies are common in nearly 80% of all elderly patients, and studies have indicated inappropriate footwear as one of the major underlying cause. It has been postulated that ill-fitting shoe wear affects plantar pressure, thus exacerbating weak balance. Complications arising from foot pathologies, which include difficulty in maintaining balance, have increased the risk of falls that can result in fractures and other serious injuries. The link between footwear and the onset or progression of certain foot pathologies has emphasized the need to explore and promote preventative measures to combat the issue. Wider and higher toe boxed shoes, along with sneakers, are examples of footwear documented to evenly distribute plantar pressure, increase comfort, and facilitate appropriate balance and gait. Ultimately, the use of appropriate footwear can help to better stabilize the foot, thus reducing the risk of sustaining debilitating physical injuries known to drastically decrease the quality of life among the geriatric population. PMID:26623172