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Sample records for geriatric medicine clerkship

  1. Pre-Clerkship Observerships to Increase Early Exposure to Geriatric Medicine

    PubMed Central

    You, Peng; Leung, Marie; Xu, Victoria Y. Y.; Astell, Alexander; Gill, Sudeep S.; Gibson, Michelle; Frank, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose To foster interest in geriatric care, the Queen’s Geriatrics Interest Group (QGIG) collaborated with the Division of Geriatric Medicine to arrange a Geriatrics Pre-Clerkship Observership Program. Methods Forty-two pre-clerkship medical students participated in the program between October 2013 and May 2014. Participants were paired with a resident and/or attending physician for a four-hour weekend observership on an inpatient geriatric rehabilitation unit. The program was assessed using: (1) internally developed Likert scales assessing student’s experiences and interest in geriatric medicine before and after the observership; (2) University of California Los Angeles–Geriatric Attitudes Scale (UCLA-GAS); and (3) narrative feedback. Results All participants found the process of setting up the observership easy. Some 72.7% described the observership experience as leading to positive changes in their attitude toward geriatric medicine and 54.5% felt that it stimulated their interest in the specialty. No statistically significant change in UCLA–GAS scores was detected (mean score pre- versus post-observership: 3.5 ± 0.5 versus 3.7 ± 0.4; p=.35). All participants agreed that the program should continue, and 90% stated that they would participate again. Conclusions The observership program was positively received by students. Structured pre-clerkship observerships may be a feasible method for increasing exposure to geriatric medicine.

  2. Positioning Medical Students for the Geriatric Imperative: Using Geriatrics to Effectively Teach Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Annie L.; Duthie, Elizabeth A.; Denson, Kathryn M.; Franco, Jose; Duthie, Edmund H.

    2013-01-01

    Medical schools must consider innovative ways to ensure that graduates are prepared to care for the aging population. One way is to offer a geriatrics clerkship as an option for the fulfillment of a medical school's internal medicine rotation requirement. The authors' purpose was to evaluate the geriatrics clerkship's impact on…

  3. Internal Medicine Clerkship Inpatient Rotation

    E-print Network

    Sherman, S. Murray

    Oral and Written Communication Professional Behavior OME NEW Medicine IR Mid Eval Did Not ObserveInternal Medicine Clerkship Inpatient Rotation MID-ROTATION EVALUATION The University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences and the Pritzker School of Medicine Student: Date:Attending: Site

  4. Integrated Clinical Geriatric Pharmacy Clerkship in Long Term, Acute and Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polo, Isabel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A clinical geriatric pharmacy clerkship containing three separate practice areas (long-term, acute, and ambulatory care) is described. The program follows the medical education clerkship protocol, with a clinical pharmacy specialist, pharmacy practice resident, and student. Participation in medical rounds, interdisciplinary conferences, and…

  5. Ultrasound Training in the Emergency Medicine Clerkship

    PubMed Central

    Favot, Mark; Courage, Cheryl; Mantouffel, Jacob; Amponsah, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The curriculum in most emergency medicine (EM) clerkships includes very little formalized training in point-of-care ultrasound. Medical schools have begun to implement ultrasound training in the pre-clinical curriculum, and the EM clerkship is an appropriate place to build upon this training. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a focused ultrasound curriculum within an established EM clerkship and (2) to obtain feedback from medical students regarding the program. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of medical students during an EM clerkship year from July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012. Participants included fourth-year medical students (n=45) enrolled in the EM clerkship at our institution. The students underwent a structured program focused on the focused assessment with sonography for trauma exam and ultrasound-guided vascular access. At the conclusion of the rotation, they took a 10-item multiple choice test assessing knowledge and image interpretation skills. A cohort of EM residents (n=20) also took the multiple choice test but did not participate in the training with the students. We used an independent samples t-test to examine differences in test scores between the groups. Results The medical students in the ultrasound training program scored significantly higher on the multiple-choice test than the EM residents, t(63)=2.3, p<0.05. The feedback from the students indicated that 82.8% were using ultrasound on their current rotations and the majority (55.2%) felt that the one-on-one scanning shift was the most valuable aspect of the curriculum. Discussion Our study demonstrates support for an ultrasound training program for medical students in the EM clerkship. After completing the training, students were able to perform similarly to EM residents on a knowledge-based exam. PMID:26594295

  6. Perioperative Medicine and Pain Therapy Clerkship MID-ROTATION EVALUATION

    E-print Network

    Sherman, S. Murray

    your scores. 0 1 2 3 4 5 Diagnosis and Management in Perioperative Medicine and Pain Therapy 1 for the management of common acute pain syndromes. 6. Lists the signs and symptoms of allergic) or other transfusionPerioperative Medicine and Pain Therapy Clerkship MID-ROTATION EVALUATION The University of Chicago

  7. Perspectives on the future of geriatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Elon, Rebecca D

    2006-03-01

    The following comments were presented to the 20th anniversary celebration of the geriatric medicine fellowship training program at the Baylor College of Medicine in the Texas Medical Center, Houston, Texas, on June 24, 2005. The author, who was the first graduate of the geriatric medicine training program at Baylor, proposes that geriatrics is at a critical juncture and that the voice and identity of geriatric medicine should be that of advocacy for our patients, and that in such a role geriatric medicine is well suited to become the "soul of medicine." She encourages all geriatricians to read the report of the Task Force on the Future of Geriatric Medicine and to look for opportunities to personally be involved in implementing the recommendations. She suggests that since our visions of the future are often only caricatures of our past, we must be creative and dream big dreams of what the future may hold. She challenges each of us to get involved in actively creating the future of geriatric medicine. PMID:16503314

  8. Clinical content of the WAMI community clerkship in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W R; Rosenblatt, R A; Gordon, M J; Fletcher, R M

    1982-08-01

    Student experience with diagnostic encounters and clinical procedures was documented in the WAMI Program's Community Clerkship in Family Medicine from 1974 to 1978. This six-week senior clerkship was completed by 234 students and taught in six family practicees across the four-state WAMI (Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho) region. Students encountered a mean of 83 diagnostic problems and 22 procedures weekly. The average student saw 56 percent of the diagnoses common in family practic and performed 26 percent of the common procedures. The mean level of student responsibility (self-rated with 3 = independent management, 2 = assisted, and 1 = observed) was 2.7 for diagnostic encounters and 2.4 for procedures and increased over the four years. Despite the wide geographic separation and diversity of teaching sites, few differences were observed among the sites; this suggests that a community-based family medicine clerkship can be taught in a widely scattered network of rural teaching practices with uniformity of clinical content and educational quality. PMID:7097735

  9. Organizing Family Medicine Geriatric Care

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Vonda M.

    1989-01-01

    This article, written from the perceptive of a practising community physician, examines the servies available in the field of geriatric care at the present time. It suggests integration and co-ordination of existing facilities to maximize the current potential. It also considers the economic, geographical, and ethical concerns relating to geriatric care. It is a call for family physicians to co-ordinate their efforts in a multidisciplinary mode to ensure that our elderly are maintained in a comfortable caring atmosphere that encourages their maximum independence. PMID:21248994

  10. ETHICS IN GERIATRIC MEDICINE RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    ?lgili, Önder; Arda, Berna; Munir, Kerim

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to evaluate the research process in geriatrics from the ethical point of view. The elderly population is increasing rapidly, but there is no parallel in the amount of research concerning this demographic. On the other hand, in the light of research ethics, this group mainly represents vulnerable people and requires more sensitivity. Taking into account all these features, fundamental principles in research ethics are first considered: the soundness of the scientific project, qualifications of the investigators, ethics committee approval, informed consent, confidentiality and privacy, beneficence/nonmaleficence, and justice are evaluated. Special ethical issues in geriatric research such as ageism and research inclusion, paucity of research involving elderly people, vulnerability of elderly subjects, and cognitive impairments are discussed separately. PMID:25489272

  11. Impact of an emergency medicine clerkship on students’ perceptions of emergency medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Nagurka, Roxanne; Holland, Bart; Scott, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of an emergency medicine (EM) clerkship on senior (4th year) medical students’ perceptions of the EM specialty. Subjects and methods This was a pre/posttest observational study in a mandatory 4-week EM clerkship. Students were anonymously surveyed pre- and postclerkship regarding perceptions of EM. The survey used 24 statements grouped across four domains: 1) student EM clerkship expectations/experiences, 2) perceptions regarding EM physicians, 3) perceptions regarding patients in the emergency department (ED), and 4) EM as a desirable career. Data were analyzed using paired-sample t-tests, and comparisons made using McNemar’s ?2 test. Results A total of 385 of 407 students (94.6%) completed the pre- and postclerkship survey. There was no significant difference between mean ratings before and after related to perceptions regarding EM physicians (3.71 versus 3.71), ED patients (3.80 versus 3.76), or EM as a desirable career (3.88 versus 3.84). However, ratings regarding clerkship expectations/experiences decreased (3.88 versus 3.56, P=0.001). Of the 292 students that ranked their top three specialties in both pre- and postclerkship surveys, 46 (16%) included EM as a top choice preclerkship, with 31 of these maintaining this interest postclerkship. Conversely, 12 students (5%) became interested in EM postclerkship. Some survey-statement ratings were influenced and varied by urban versus community clerkship-rotation site. Conclusion A mandatory senior EM clerkship did not significantly change overall students’ perceptions regarding EM. Students with an interest in EM rated domains higher than those not interested, though there may have been an overall decline in perceptions related to clerkship expectations and experiences. Larger, multisite studies may help identify aspects of the field or EM clerkship that influence a student’s ultimate career choice. PMID:25709516

  12. Evaluation of Students in Medicine Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magarian, Gregory J.; Mazur, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report their findings concerning the process used to evaluate medicine clerks, specifically identifying the importance given to subjective evaluations, made by attending physicians, compared with the importance given to clerks' performances on objective means of evaluation based on written or oral examinations, whether national or…

  13. Re-demonstration without remediation – a missed opportunity? A national survey of internal medicine clerkship directors

    PubMed Central

    Hawthorne, Mary R.; Chretien, Katherine C.; Torre, Dario; Chheda, Shobhina G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many different components factor into the final grade assigned for the internal medicine clerkship. Failure of one or more of these requires consideration of remedial measures. Purpose To determine which assessment components are used to assign students a passing grade for the clerkship and what remediation measures are required when students do not pass a component. Methods A national cross-sectional survey of Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) institutional members was conducted in April 2011. The survey included sections on remediation, grading practices, and demographics. The authors analyzed responses using descriptive and comparative statistics. Results Response rate was 73% (86/113). Medicine clerkships required students to pass the following components: clinical evaluations 83 (97%), NBME subject exam 76 (88%), written assignments 40 (46%), OSCE 35 (41%), in-house written exam 23 (27%), and mini-CEX 19 (22%). When students failed a component of the clerkship for the first time, 55 schools (64%) simply allowed students to make up the component, while only 16 (18%) allowed a simple make-up for a second failure. Additional ward time was required by 24 schools (28%) for a first-time failure of one component of the clerkship and by 49 (57%) for a second failure. The presence or absence of true remedial measures in a school was not associated with clerkship director academic rank, grading scheme, or percent of students who failed the clerkship in the previous year. Conclusions Most schools required passing clinical evaluations and NBME subject exam components to pass the medicine clerkship, but there was variability in other requirements. Most schools allowed students to simply re-take the component for a first-time failure. This study raises the question of whether true remediation is being undertaken before students are asked to re-demonstrate competence in a failed area of the clerkship to be ready for the subinternship level. PMID:25500150

  14. Development of an Internal Medicine Clerkship by a Department of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel, Gordon L.

    1983-01-01

    The creation and evolution of an internal medicine clerkship in three large teaching hospitals undergoing transition from affiliated hospitals to the university hospitals of a new medical school, the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, is summarized. (Author/MLW)

  15. Geriatric management in medieval Persian medicine

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Morteza; Sadeghpour, Omid; Zarshenas, Mohammad M.

    2013-01-01

    In Iran, a large group of patients are elderly people and they intend to have natural remedies as treatment. These remedies are rooted in historical of Persian and humoral medicine with a backbone of more than 1000 years. The current study was conducted to draw together medieval pharmacological information related to geriatric medicine from some of the most often manuscripts of traditional Persian medicine. Moreover, we investigated the efficacy of medicinal plants through a search of the PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar databases. In the medieval Persian documents, digestible and a small amount of food such as chicken broth, honey, fig and plum at frequent intervals as well as body massage and morning unctioning are highly recommended. In the field of pharmacotherapy, 35 herbs related to 25 families were identified. Plants were classified as tonic, anti-aging, appetizer, memory and mood enhancer, topical analgesic and laxative as well as health improvement agents. Other than historical elucidation, this paper presents medical and pharmacological approaches that medieval Persian practitioners applied to deal with geriatric complications. PMID:24381461

  16. A Reflection on Aging: A Portfolio of Change in Attitudes toward Geriatric Patients during a Clerkship Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Duca, Danny; Duque, Gustavo

    2006-01-01

    The process of students' evaluation in medical schools has changed from a tutor-led evaluation system based on students' performance to a student-based evaluation that involves self-reflection and their level of change in skills and attitudes. At the McGill University Division of Geriatric Medicine, we developed an innovative system of evaluation…

  17. Geriatric medicine workforce planning: a giant geriatric problem or has the tide turned?

    PubMed

    Fisher, James M; Garside, Mark; Hunt, Kelly; Lo, Nelson

    2014-04-01

    The UK's population is ageing and an adequately staffed geriatric medicine workforce is essential for high quality care. We evaluated the current and future geriatric medicine workforce, drawing on data relating to the UK population, current geriatric medicine consultants and trainees, recruitment into the specialty and trainee career progression. Data were derived from various sources, including the British Geriatrics Society Education and Training Committee biannual survey of training posts. The demographic of consultant geriatricians is changing and so too are their job plans, with more opting to work less than full time. The number of applicants to geriatric medicine training is increasing, yet increasing numbers of posts remain unfilled (4.7% in November 2010 and 14.1% in May 2013). The majority of geriatric medicine trainees secure a substantive consultant post within 6 months of obtaining their certificate of completion of training This work highlights challenges for the future: potential barriers to trainee recruitment, unfilled training posts and an ageing population and workforce. PMID:24715117

  18. Drug Abuse Training as Part of a Family Medicine Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Confusione, Michael; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A program incorporating experiential and didactic experience in identification and treatment of drug abuse into third-year clerkship curriculum is described. Experiential training is in a methadone maintenance clinic. Students are evaluated on their knowledge, attitudes, and level of participation in the drug abuse treatment. (MSE)

  19. Improving Feedback for Medical Students in a Family Medicine Clerkship

    PubMed Central

    White, D.G.; Tiberius, R.; Talbot, Y.; Schiralli, V.; Rickett, M.

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate whether feedback to medical students could be improved by asking teachers to complete a student performance rating form during a family practice clerkship, the authors had students and teachers fill out a questionnaire. Teachers in the intervention group reported observing students more frequently. Students' perceptions of feedback frequency correlated strongly with their ratings of feedback quality. PMID:21234079

  20. Evaluation of Medical Students During a Clinical Clerkship in Internal Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donohue, W. J., Jr.; Wergin, Jon F.

    1978-01-01

    During a three-month clinical clerkship in medicine 175 medical students were evaluated. A proficiency assessment process was developed that included preceptor evaluation of on-the-job performance as well as oral and written examinations. Data analysis showed small correlations among the three measurements of competence. (Author/LBH)

  1. Improving recruitment into geriatric medicine in Canada: Findings and recommendations from the geriatric recruitment issues study.

    PubMed

    Torrible, Susan J; Diachun, Laura L; Rolfson, Darryl B; Dumbrell, Andrea C; Hogan, David B

    2006-09-01

    As the number of Canadians aged 65 and older continues to increase, declining recruitment into geriatric medicine (GM) raises concerns about the future viability of this medical subspecialty. To develop effective strategies to attract more GM trainees into the field, it is necessary to understand how medical students, residents, GM trainees, and specialists make career choices. The Geriatric Recruitment Issues Study (GRIST) was designed to assess specific methods that could be used to improve recruitment into geriatrics in Canada. Between November 2002 and January 2003, 530 participants were invited to complete the GRIST survey (117 Canadian geriatricians, 12 GM trainees, 96 internal medicine residents, and 305 senior medical students). Two hundred fifty-three surveys (47.7%) were completed and returned (from 54 participating geriatricians, 9 GM trainees, 50 internal medicine residents, and 140 senior medical students). The survey asked respondents to rate factors influencing their choice of medical career, the attractiveness of GM, and the anticipated effectiveness of potential recruitment strategies. Although feedback varied across the four groups on these issues, consistencies were observed between medical students and residents and between GM trainees and geriatricians. All groups agreed that role modeling was effective and that summer student research programs were an ineffective recruitment strategy. Based on the GRIST findings, this article proposes six recommendations for improving recruitment into Canadian geriatric medicine training programs. PMID:16970658

  2. Meeting the challenge of evidence-based medicine in the family medicine clerkship: closing the loop from academics to office.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Susan K; Calabretta, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    An EBM Seminar and POEM® project was developed to teach evidence-based medicine in a family medicine clerkship. The seminar focused on the application of preclinical coursework in biostatistics and epidemiology to the clinical third year. POEM projects involved answering clinical questions, derived from patient cases in the family medicine offices, with best available evidence. These questions and answers were archived in a wiki which was made available to the institution's family medicine physicians. Selected POEMs were also published in the in-house family medicine newsletter. The POEM projects evolved from an educational exercise for medical students to a valuable repository of evidence for clinicians. PMID:23607466

  3. Culture Competence in the Training of Geriatric Medicine Fellows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanabe, Marianne K. G.

    2007-01-01

    With the aging and diversifying of the elder population in the United States, there is a pressing need for an organized and effective curriculum in cultural competence. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that the curriculum for Geriatric Medicine Fellowship training include cultural competency training.…

  4. Does the Concept of the “Flipped Classroom” Extend to the Emergency Medicine Clinical Clerkship?

    PubMed Central

    Heitz, Corey; Prusakowski, Melanie; Willis, George; Franck, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Linking educational objectives and clinical learning during clerkships can be difficult. Clinical shifts during emergency medicine (EM) clerkships provide a wide variety of experiences, some of which may not be relevant to recommended educational objectives. Students can be directed to standardize their clinical experiences, and this improves performance on examinations. We hypothesized that applying a “flipped classroom” model to the clinical clerkship would improve performance on multiple-choice testing when compared to standard learning. Methods Students at two institutions were randomized to complete two of four selected EM clerkship topics in a “flipped fashion,” and two others in a standard fashion. For flipped topics, students were directed to complete chief complaint-based asynchronous modules prior to a shift, during which they were directed to focus on the chief complaint. For the other two topics, modules were to be performed at the students’ discretion, and shifts would not have a theme. At the end of the four-week clerkship, a 40-question multiple-choice examination was administered with 10 questions per topic. We compared performance on flipped topics with those performed in standard fashion. Students were surveyed on perceived effectiveness, ability to follow the protocol, and willingness of preceptors to allow a chief-complaint focus. Results Sixty-nine students participated; examination scores for 56 were available for analysis. For the primary outcome, no difference was seen between the flipped method and standard (p=0.494.) A mixed model approach showed no effect of flipped status, protocol adherence, or site of rotation on the primary outcome of exam scores. Students rated the concept of the flipped clerkship highly (3.48/5). Almost one third (31.1%) of students stated that they were unable to adhere to the protocol. Conclusion Preparation for a clinical shift with pre-assigned, web-based learning modules followed by an attempt at chief-complaint-focused learning during a shift did not result in improvements in performance on a multiple-choice assessment of knowledge; however, one third of participants did not adhere strictly to the protocol. Future investigations should ensure performance of pre-assigned learning as well as clinical experiences, and consider alternate measures of knowledge. PMID:26594277

  5. Assessing Knowledge Base on Geriatric Competencies for Emergency Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Teresita M.; Hansoti, Bhakti; Chan, Shu B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Emergency care of older adults requires specialized knowledge of their unique physiology, atypical presentations, and care transitions. Older adults often require distinctive assessment, treatment and disposition. Emergency medicine (EM) residents should develop expertise and efficiency in geriatric care. Older adults represent over 25% of most emergency department (ED) volumes. Yet many EM residencies lack curricula or assessment tools for competent geriatric care. Fully educating residents in emergency geriatric care can demand large amounts of limited conference time. The Geriatric Emergency Medicine Competencies (GEMC) are high-impact geriatric topics developed to help residencies efficiently and effectively meet this training demand. This study examines if a 2-hour didactic intervention can significantly improve resident knowledge in 7 key domains as identified by the GEMC across multiple programs. Methods A validated 29-question didactic test was administered at six EM residencies before and after a GEMC-focused lecture delivered in summer and fall of 2009. We analyzed scores as individual questions and in defined topic domains using a paired student t test. Results A total of 301 exams were administered; 86 to PGY1, 88 to PGY2, 86 to PGY3, and 41 to PGY4 residents. The testing of didactic knowledge before and after the GEMC educational intervention had high internal reliability (87.9%). The intervention significantly improved scores in all 7 GEMC domains (improvement 13.5% to 34.6%; p<0.001). For all questions, the improvement was 23% (37.8% pre, 60.8% post; P<0.001) Graded increase in geriatric knowledge occurred by PGY year with the greatest improvement post intervention seen at the PGY 3 level (PGY1 19.1% versus PGY3 27.1%). Conclusion A brief GEMC intervention had a significant impact on EM resident knowledge of critical geriatric topics. Lectures based on the GEMC can be a high-yield tool to enhance resident knowledge of geriatric emergency care. Formal GEMC curriculum should be considered in training EM residents for the demands of an aging population. PMID:25035745

  6. Competencies required for the practice of geriatric medicine as a consultant physician.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, R A; Clarfield, A M; Hogan, D B

    1989-01-01

    Geriatric medicine in Canada is now being viewed not merely as an academic specialty but, rather, more broadly as a service specialty providing consulting support to other physicians. Any redesigning of training programs will have to be done with this fact in mind. We drew up a list of competencies required for consultant practice in the field and presented them to other practitioners of geriatric medicine and members of the Canadian Society of Geriatric Medicine for feedback. We believe that the resulting list of competencies can be used as a starting point for redesigning training programs in geriatric medicine. PMID:2804826

  7. Alternative medicines for the geriatric veterinary patient.

    PubMed

    Kidd, J Randy

    2012-07-01

    Over the past several decades, alternative medicines have gained in popularity for use in both humans and animals. While they are not without controversy, client interest and usage dictate that even those practitioners who do not want to practice any of them in their own hospital or clinic should at least be aware of their common use, safety, and efficacy. The author briefly discusses some of the more popular alternative medicines—acupuncture, chiropractic, herbal, homeopathic, and flower essences—with respect to some of the basics that every practitioner should know about them. PMID:22720815

  8. Impact of family medicine clerkships in undergraduate medical education: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Turkeshi, Eralda; Michels, Nele R; Hendrickx, Kristin; Remmen, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Synthesise evidence about the impact of family medicine/general practice (FM) clerkships on undergraduate medical students, teaching general/family practitioners (FPs) and/or their patients. Data sources Medline, ERIC, PsycINFO, EMBASE and Web of Knowledge searched from 21 November to 17 December 2013. Primary, empirical, quantitative or qualitative studies, since 1990, with abstracts included. No country restrictions. Full text languages: English, French, Spanish, German, Dutch or Italian. Review methods Independent selection and data extraction by two authors using predefined data extraction fields, including Kirkpatrick’s levels for educational intervention outcomes, study quality indicators and Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) strength of findings’ grades. Descriptive narrative synthesis applied. Results Sixty-four included articles: impact on students (48), teaching FPs (12) and patients (8). Sample sizes: 16-1095 students, 3-146 FPs and 94-2550 patients. Twenty-six studies evaluated at Kirkpatrick level 1, 26 at level 2 and 6 at level 3. Only one study achieved BEME’s grade 5. The majority was assessed as grade 4 (27) and 3 (33). Students reported satisfaction with content and process of teaching as well as learning in FM clerkships. They enhanced previous learning, and provided unique learning on dealing with common acute and chronic conditions, health maintenance, disease prevention, communication and problem-solving skills. Students’ attitudes towards FM were improved, but new or enhanced interest in FM careers did not persist without change after graduation. Teaching FPs reported increased job satisfaction and stimulation for professional development, but also increased workload and less productivity, depending on the setting. Overall, student’s presence and participation did not have a negative impact on patients. Conclusions Research quality on the impact of FM clerkships is still limited, yet across different settings and countries, positive impact is reported on students, FPs and patients. Future studies should involve different stakeholders, medical schools and countries, and use standardised and validated evaluation tools. PMID:26243553

  9. Implementing a multidimensional geriatric curriculum in a physical medicine and rehabilitation residency program.

    PubMed

    Faulk, Clinton E; Lee, Tae Joon; Musick, David

    2012-10-01

    Residency training in physical medicine and rehabilitation may not contain a formal curriculum in geriatric patient care. A multidimensional geriatric curriculum to third and fourth year physical medicine and rehabilitation residents was implemented to enhance their knowledge in and attitude toward geriatrics. The curriculum consisted of a 12-wk clinical rotation at various sites of geriatric care including outpatient geriatric clinic, skilled nursing facility, continuing care retirement community, and home visits. Six online self-learning modules and multiple didactic sessions were also created. The residents' knowledge and attitude were assessed by pretest and posttest design using the Geriatric Knowledge Test, the Geriatric Attitude Scale, and the Attitudes Toward Teamwork in Healthcare Scale. In addition, the residents completed rotation evaluations to rate their learning experiences. Ten postgraduate year 3 and 4 physical medicine and rehabilitation residents participated in the geriatric curriculum, which included a required rotation. The Geriatric Knowledge Test score at baseline was 67.2%. With the completion of the curriculum, the Geriatric Knowledge Test scores showed improvement to 72.7%, although not statistically significant. The residents showed more favorable attitudes toward the geriatric population and interdisciplinary teamwork as measured by the Geriatric Attitude Scale and the Attitudes Toward Teamwork in Healthcare Scale. Overall, they rated the learning experiences highly on a 1-9 rating scale, with 9 being the highest rating; the residents assigned an average rating of 7.06 to specific learning activities within the rotation and an average rating of 6.89 to the organizational aspects of the rotation itself. The implementation of this geriatric curriculum allowed for improved geriatric training in physical medicine and rehabilitation residents. PMID:22854907

  10. The effect of geriatric and palliative medicine education on the knowledge and attitudes of internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasiya N; Farnie, Mark; Dyer, Carmel B

    2011-01-01

    A recent Institute of Medicine report on geriatric work force issues recommends training residents in settings with geriatric patients and increasing certification requirements to include competence in the care of older adults. Although the number of internal medicine programs with a geriatric curriculum has increased, the scope and effectiveness of these programs vary. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new academic geriatric and palliative medicine curriculum on the knowledge and attitudes of third-year internal medicine and fourth-year medicine and pediatrics residents. The study was conducted at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston. A new Division of Geriatric and Palliative medicine was created that offered inpatient, consultation, ambulatory, and home visit experiences in addition to didactic lectures. The University of Michigan Geriatrics Clinical Decision Making Assessment and the University of California at Los Angeles Geriatric Attitude Test was used to evaluate pre- and post-rotation knowledge and attitudes. Residents' knowledge improved after completing the rotation, as shown by a 6.9-point increase in posttest scores (P<.001). There was also a 10-point improvement in pretest scores over the course of the year (P=.03). Fifty-seven percent of residents had an improvement in attitude. This study shows that an increase in geriatric and palliative teaching opportunities provided by the establishment of a geriatric and palliative medicine division improves residents' knowledge significantly. PMID:21226684

  11. First Year Medical Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Interest in Geriatric Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Wei-Hsin; Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Hosokawa, Michael C.; Gray, M. Peggy; Zweig, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an extracurricular geriatric program on medical students' knowledge of, and attitudes toward, the elderly and their interest in studying geriatric medicine. The participants were first-year medical students (n = 137) who joined the Senior Teacher Education Partnership (STEP) program that…

  12. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive…

  13. Relating Medical Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Experience to an Interest in Geriatric Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, James T.; Wray, Linda A.; Halter, Jeffrey B.; Williams, Brent C.; Supiano, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined medical students' interest in geriatrics: Are knowledge, positive attitudes, and prior experience with older adults associated with an interest in geriatric medicine? Design and Methods: Entering University of Michigan medical students completed three surveys: the Revised Facts on Aging Quiz, the University of…

  14. Mortality meetings in geriatric medicine: strategies for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Joanne; George, James

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of patients who die in hospital will be under the care of geriatric medicine. Mortality reviews have traditionally used trigger tools to try and identify preventable deaths, but the majority of hospital deaths are not preventable and lapses in care are often very complex. Over a period of 14 months we performed four PDSA cycles to change the focus of mortality meetings within care of the elderly and stroke medicine at Cumberland Infirmary to look beyond preventable deaths. The aim was to maximise learning from mortality meetings to improve patient care. We used collaborative working at a trust and departmental level, moving from trigger tool preparation to a narrative approach, and we set up strategies to focus and disseminate our learning. The mean number of cases discussed per meeting and the mean number of lessons identified per case discussed increased, as did the learning levels (trust, department, individual). Maintaining multidisciplinary input and consolidating lessons learnt was difficult because of clinical commitments and natural staff turnover.

  15. Development and assessment of a pediatric emergency medicine simulation and skills rotation: meeting the demands of a large pediatric clerkship

    PubMed Central

    Fielder, Elaine K.; Lemke, Daniel S.; Doughty, Cara B.; Hsu, Deborah C.; Middleman, Amy B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To implement a curriculum using simulation and skills training to augment a Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) rotation within a pediatric clerkship. Background PEM faculty are often challenged with a high learner to teacher ratio in a chaotic clinical setting. This challenge was heightened when our pediatric clerkship's traditional 1-week PEM rotation (consisting of 4 students completing four 8-hour ED shifts/week) expanded to 8 students every 2 weeks. We sought to meet this challenge by integrating simulation-based education into the rotation. Methods Clerkship students from March to June 2012 completed our traditional rotation. Students between July and October 2012 completed the new PEM-SIM curriculum with 19 hours ED shifts/week and 16 hours/week of simulation/skills training. Pre/post-tests evaluated 1) medical management/procedural comfort (five-point Likert scale); and 2) PEM knowledge (15 multiple-choice questions). Results One hundred and nine students completed the study (48 traditional, 61 PEM-SIM). Improvement in comfort was significantly higher for the PEM-SIM group than the traditional group for 6 of 8 (75%) medical management items (p<0.05) and 3 of 7 (43%) procedures, including fracture splinting, lumbar puncture, and abscess incision/drainage (p<0.05). PEM-SIM students had significantly more improvement in mean knowledge compared to the traditional group (p<0.001). Conclusions We have successfully integrated 16 hours/week of faculty-facilitated simulation-based education into a PEM rotation within our clerkship. This curriculum is beneficial in clinical settings with high learner to teacher ratios and when patient care experiences alone are insufficient for all students to meet rotation objectives. PMID:26626927

  16. European undergraduate curriculum in geriatric medicine developed using an international modified Delphi technique

    PubMed Central

    Masud, Tahir; Blundell, Adrian; Gordon, Adam Lee; Mulpeter, Ken; Roller, Regina; Singler, Katrin; Goeldlin, Adrian; Stuck, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: the rise in the number of older, frail adults necessitates that future doctors are adequately trained in the skills of geriatric medicine. Few countries have dedicated curricula in geriatric medicine at the undergraduate level. The aim of this project was to develop a consensus among geriatricians on a curriculum with the minimal requirements that a medical student should achieve by the end of medical school. Methods: a modified Delphi process was used. First, educational experts and geriatricians proposed a set of learning objectives based on a literature review. Second, three Delphi rounds involving a panel with 49 experts representing 29 countries affiliated to the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) was used to gain consensus for a final curriculum. Results: the number of disagreements following Delphi Rounds 1 and 2 were 81 and 53, respectively. Complete agreement was reached following the third round. The final curriculum consisted of detailed objectives grouped under 10 overarching learning outcomes. Discussion: a consensus on the minimum requirements of geriatric learning objectives for medical students has been agreed by European geriatricians. Major efforts will be needed to implement these requirements, given the large variation in the quality of geriatric teaching in medical schools. This curriculum is a first step to help improve teaching of geriatrics in medical schools, and will also serve as a basis for advancing postgraduate training in geriatrics across Europe. PMID:24603283

  17. Geriatric training in family medicine: the natural history of a developing program.

    PubMed

    Moore, J T; Kane, W J

    1979-01-01

    During the past three years, the Duke-Watts Family Medicine Program and the Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development have developed training in geriatric medicine as an integral part of the family medicine residency program. This paper traces the following steps in the development of this program: a survey of resident and faculty interest, institution of a conference series, identification of potential training sites, development of elective rotations, and use of consultants. Principles found helpful in establishing training in geriatrics for family medicine residents include the following: involve residents in planning, start with modest goals, make the program relevant and practical, build on local strengths, include other health care professional trainees, and use ambulatory, acute hospital, and long-term care sites in the training rpogram. PMID:759552

  18. Construct Validity of Three Clerkship Performance Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ming; Wimmers, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined construct validity of three commonly used clerkship performance assessments: preceptors' evaluations, OSCE-type clinical performance measures, and the NBME [National Board of Medical Examiners] medicine subject examination. Six hundred and eighty-six students taking the inpatient medicine clerkship from 2003 to 2007…

  19. University of Pennsylvania Geriatric Medicine Fellowship The School of Medicine ranks in the top five research institutions in the United States. Fellows

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    University of Pennsylvania Geriatric Medicine Fellowship The School of Medicine ranks in the top Investigator Pathway (Years 1, 2 and/or 3) Master of Clinical Epidemiology Master of Translational Medicine, ethics, palliative care, sleep Cross cutting research areas or methods: ethics, health equity, community

  20. Paul B. Beeson career development awards in aging research and U.S. medical schools aging and geriatric medicine programs.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Elizabeth J; Warshaw, Gregg A; van der Willik, Odette; Meganathan, Karthikeyan; Weber, Debra; Cornwall, Danielle; Leonard, Anthony C

    2011-09-01

    Established in 1995, the Paul B. Beeson Career Development program provides faculty development awards to outstanding junior and midcareer faculty committed to academic careers in aging-related research, training, and practice. This study evaluated the effect of 134 Beeson Scholars on their medical schools' aging and geriatric medicine programs and on the field of aging research from 1995 to 2007. Quantitative and qualitative survey data from multiple sources, including the American Geriatrics Society/Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs' Geriatrics Workforce Policy Studies Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH) rankings of research funding, and other governmental databases were used to compare 36 medical schools with Beeson Scholars with 34 similar medical schools without Beeson scholars and to examine the influence of Beeson Scholars on the field of geriatrics and aging. Most Beeson Scholars remained at the institution where they trained during their Beeson award, and 89% are still practicing or conducting research in the field of geriatrics and aging. Twenty-six (19.4%) of the scholars have led institutional research mentoring awards, 51 (39%) report leadership roles in institutional program project grants, and 13 (10%) report leadership roles in the Clinical and Translational Science Award programs at their institutions. Beeson Scholars are more likely than a matched sample of non-Beeson NIH K awardees to study important geriatric syndromes such as falls, cognitive impairment, adverse drug events, osteoporosis, and functional recovery from illness. Total Beeson Impact Years (the total number of years all Beeson Scholars have worked at each school) is positively correlated with more geriatrics research faculty, after controlling for NIH funding rank (P=.02). Beeson Scholars have made positive contributions to the development of academic geriatrics research programs at U.S. medical schools. PMID:21806567

  1. Dr Marjory Warren CBE MRCS LRCP (1897-1960): the mother of British geriatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Denham, M J

    2011-08-01

    Dr Marjory Warren was a remarkable, formidable physician who reversed the neglect of chronic sick patients and brought their treatment into the modern era. She advocated the creation of the specialty of geriatric medicine with units based in district general hospitals, and that medical students and nurses should be taught about the diseases of old age. She treated the whole patient, applied advances in medicine and therapeutics, devised new techniques and equipment to assist disabled elderly stroke and amputee patients, and made great improvements in the ward environment. She emphasized the importance of the patient's social background, and electrified both staff and patients with her drive and enthusiasm. Many patients were treated successfully and discharged. Bed requirements were reduced and vacated wards allocated for other uses. She wrote extensively and lectured across the world to national and international approbation. PMID:21810847

  2. Improving Feedback for Medical Students in a Family Medicine Clerkship: Evaluating medical student performance using frequent feedback.

    PubMed

    White, D G; Tiberius, R; Talbot, Y; Schiralli, V; Rickett, M

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate whether feedback to medical students could be improved by asking teachers to complete a student performance rating form during a family practice clerkship, the authors had students and teachers fill out a questionnaire. Teachers in the intervention group reported observing students more frequently. Students' perceptions of feedback frequency correlated strongly with their ratings of feedback quality. PMID:21234079

  3. Role of complementary and alternative medicine in geriatric care: A mini review

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Mohammad Jamshed; Min, Chan Sze; Verma, Rohit Kumar; Jamshed, Shazia Qasim

    2014-01-01

    Since time immemorial homo sapiens are subjected to both health and diseases states and seek treatment for succor and assuagement in compromised health states. Since last two decades the progressive rise in the alternative form of treatment cannot be ignored and population seems to be dissatisfied with the conventional treatment modalities and therefore, resort to other forms of treatment, mainly complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The use of CAM is predominantly more popular in older adults and therefore, numerous research studies and clinical trials have been carried out to investigate the effectiveness of CAM in the management of both communicable and non-communicable disease. In this current mini review, we attempt to encompass the use of CAM in chronic non-communicable diseases that are most likely seen in geriatrics. The current review focuses not only on the reassurance of good health practices, emphasizing on the holistic development and strengthening the body's defense mechanisms, but also attempts to construct a pattern of self-care and patient empowerment in geriatrics. The issues of safety with CAM use cannot be sidelined and consultation with a health care professional is always advocated to the patient. Likewise, responsibility of the health care professional is to inform the patient about the safety and efficacy issues. In order to substantiate the efficacy and safety of CAMs, evidence-based studies and practices with consolidated standards should be planned and executed. PMID:25125879

  4. Using a queueing model to help plan bed allocation in a department of geriatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Gorunescu, Florin; McClean, Sally I; Millard, Peter H

    2002-11-01

    By integrating queuing theory and compartmental models of flow we demonstrate how changing admission rates, length of stay and bed allocation influence bed occupancy, emptiness and rejection in departments of geriatric medicine. By extending the model to include waiting beds, we show how the provision of extra, emergency use, unstaffed, back up beds could improve performance while controlling costs. The model is applicable to all lengths of stay, admission rates and bed allocations. The results show why 10-15% bed emptiness is necessary to maintain service efficiency and demonstrate how unstaffed beds can serve to provide a more responsive and cost effective service. Further work is needed to test the validity and applicability of the model. PMID:12437280

  5. [Medicine for the elderly or science of old age? Max Bürger's contribution to geriatric medicine and gerontology].

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Sandra; Bruns, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The fact that, due to demographic changes, gerontology and geriatrics are gaining ever more importance gives rise to more questions regarding the history of the science of aging. Based on unpublished sources and relevant publications by Max Bürger, the doyen of gerontological research in Germany, our contributions trace the beginnings of age research in Germany. Our results confirm Bürger as the dominant expert in this field in the first decades of its emergence. Bürger was primarily interested in basic medical-scientific research, and less in clinical geriatrics. His scientific goal was not to establish a medicine for the elderly but a theory of life changes ("biomorphosis"). From the start, he saw aging as a physiological process--a view that is still valid today. His concept of "biomorphosis", however, did not catch on and reveals a constriction in Bürger's thinking, which was to some extent influenced by Hans Driesch's vitalism. Interdisciplinary approaches are noticeable in the natural sciences rather than the humanities or social sciences. Bürger's research was also influenced by the political system he lived in. During National Socialism, which Bürger joined--at least formally--in 1937, his research into labour economics and aging met with considerable interest in connection with the general mobilisation of resources. East Germany also had an interest in questions of labour productivity in old age and the extension of the working life, which meant that Bürger remained a sought-after physician and scientist up into the 1960s. As he grew older himself, Bürger's initially deficit-oriented view of old age gave way to a more positive presentation that attached greater weight to the resources of old age. PMID:26137644

  6. Geriatric syndromes and geriatric assessment for the generalist.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Charlotte; Merel, Susan E; Yukawa, Michi

    2015-03-01

    Geriatric assessment is an increasingly important area of outpatient medicine, given the unprecedented aging of the US population. Screening and evaluation for geriatric syndromes, particularly falls, urinary incontinence, frailty, and cognitive impairment, are crucial aspects of outpatient geriatric assessment. Innovative models of care are emerging to improve quality of care and enhance cost savings for the geriatric patient. High-value features of geriatric care systems include providing increased 24/7 access to care, a multidisciplinary team-based approach to care, performing medication reconciliation and comprehensive geriatric assessments, and integrating palliative care into treatment planning. PMID:25700583

  7. External validation of the PROFUND index in polypathological patients from internal medicine and acute geriatrics departments in Aragón.

    PubMed

    Díez-Manglano, Jesús; Cabrerizo García, José Luis; García-Arilla Calvo, Ernesto; Jimeno Saínz, Araceli; Calvo Beguería, Eva; Martínez-Álvarez, Rosa M; Bejarano Tello, Esperanza; Caudevilla Martínez, Aránzazu

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was to validate externally and prospectively the PROFUND index to predict survival of polypathological patients after a year. An observational, prospective and multicenter study was performed. Polypathological patients admitted to an internal medicine or geriatrics department and attended by investigators consecutively between March 1 and June 30, 2011 were included. Data concerning age, gender, comorbidity, Barthel and Lawton-Brody indexes, Pfeiffer questionnaire, socio-familial Gijon scale, delirium, number of drugs and number of admissions during the previous year were gathered for each patient. The PROFUND index was calculated. The follow-up lasted 1 year. A Cox proportional regression model was calculated, and was used to analyze the association of the variables to mortality and C-statistic. 465 polypathological patients, 333 from internal medicine and 132 from geriatrics, were included. One-year mortality is associated with age [hazard ratio (HR) 1.52 95 % CI 1.04-2.12; p = 0.01], presence of neoplasia [HR 2.68 95 % CI 1.71-4.18; p = 0.0001] and dependence for basic activities of daily living [HR 2.34 95 % CI 1.61-3.40; p = 0.0009]. In predicting mortality, the PROFUND index shows good discrimination in patients from internal medicine (C-statistics 0.725 95 % CI 0.670-0.781), but a poor one in those from geriatrics (0.546 95 % CI 0.448-0.644). The PROFUND index is a reliable tool for predicting mortality in internal medicine PP patients. PMID:25986479

  8. Transitioning between Clerkship Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltys, Stephen M.; Pary, Robert J.; Robinson, Stephen W.; Markwell, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors report on succession-planning for mid-level academic positions. Method: The authors describe the process of succession-planning between clerkship directors and the smooth transition resulting in one case. Results: Gradually transitioning allowed a new faculty person to assume the clerkship-director position with minimal…

  9. Teaching Ethics in the Psychiatry Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salladay, Susan Anthony

    1981-01-01

    The Nebraska Psychiatric Institute at the University of Nebraska College of Medicine has developed a program for teaching ethics in the psychiatric clerkship. Educational objectives for the program are defined and the program content is described. Student response has been enthusiastic. (JMD)

  10. Geriatrics: Profiles in Geriatrics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University "I have the same passion today that I ... teaching hospitals. more info Irene Moore, MSSW, LISW University of Cincinnati "Geriatrics is a wide open field. ...

  11. Integrating Geriatrics into Medical School: Student Journaling as an Innovative Strategy for Evaluating Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shield, Renee R.; Farrell, Timothy W.; Nanda, Aman; Campbell, Susan E.; Wetle, Terrie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: The Alpert Medical School of Brown University began to integrate geriatrics content into all preclerkship courses and key clerkship cases as part of a major medical school curriculum redesign in 2006. This study evaluates students' responses to geriatrics integration within the curriculum using journals kept by volunteer…

  12. CLERKSHIP EDUCATOR'S GUIDEBOOK

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    Confidentiality at Risk · Professionalism and Mobile Devices · Absences During Clerkships · Dress Code 4. Teaching essential aspects of the history, including issues related to age, gender, sexuality, and socio management strategies (both diagnostic and therapeutic) for patients with common acute and chronic conditions

  13. CLERKSHIP EDUCATOR'S GUIDEBOOK

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    That Put Confidentiality at Risk · Professionalism and Mobile Devices · Absences During Clerkships · Dress that covers all essential aspects of the history, including issues related to age, gender, sexuality. Construct appropriate management strategies (both diagnostic and therapeutic) for patients with common acute

  14. CLERKSHIP EDUCATOR'S GUIDEBOOK

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Confidentiality at Risk · Professionalism and Mobile Devices · Absences During Clerkships · Dress Code 4. Teaching that covers all essential aspects of the history, including issues related to age, gender, sexuality. Construct appropriate management strategies (both diagnostic and therapeutic) for patients with common acute

  15. Clinical Nuclear Pharmacy Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunson, George L.; Christopherson, William J., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The School of Pharmacy, University of the Pacific, and the Pharmacy Service, Letterman Army Medical Center, initiated a 15-week clinical nuclear pharmacy clerkship in 1975. It includes basic nuclear medical science, technical competency, professional competency, and special interest emphasis. (LBH)

  16. Do geriatricians stay in geriatrics?.

    PubMed

    Shah, Uday; Aung, Myo; Chan, Susanna; Wolf-Klein, Gisele P

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate whether formally trained geriatricians remain in the field of Geriatrics, and to determine their job satisfaction and perceived quality of life, we surveyed the 107 fellows trained over the last 25 years in one accredited geriatric program. Of the 88 physicians who consented to participate, 75% devoted at least half of their practice to the care of the elderly. On an academic level, 89.5% had, or planned to pursue, recertification in geriatric medicine. Ninety-five percent of these geriatricians felt that the impact of a formal geriatric fellowship was positive on their medical career and satisfaction index. Sixty-four percent had yearly incomes between $100 and $200k, and 25.6% had income greater than $200k. Eighty-seven percent would recommend pursuing geriatric fellowship training. We need to further explore how recruitment process and job opportunities are presented to potential geriatric fellows. PMID:16873209

  17. Curriculum Development of Clerkships for the Doctor of Pharmacy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, David W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, engaged in an innovative, intense approach to clerkship curriculum development based on the nominal group process. The nominal group process is defined as a method of soliciting ideas and constructive input from experts with differing backgrounds and perceptions. (Author/MLW)

  18. Development of a Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

    PubMed

    Epstein-Lubow, Gary; Cineas, Sybil; Yess, James; Anthony, David; Fagan, Mark; George, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University is introducing a longitudinal integrated clerkship for third year students in the Primary Care-Population Medicine Program as an alternative to more traditional clerkship models. In developing the longitudinal integrated clerkship, program faculty incorporated a historical perspective of medical education, modern knowledge about students' development of clinical skills, and educational science as it relates to faculty development and learner evaluation. The longitudinal integrated clerkship is being tailored to the fit the Brown University system; as such, it will be unique in its attention to population medicine, including its exposure of students to several distinct health care systems within a single geographic region, and integration of clinical training with completion of a Master's in Population Medicine. PMID:26324972

  19. [Frailty and geriatric syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kozaki, Koichi

    2013-06-01

    Frailty comes from decline of functions in multi-organs, not a single organ dysfunction (disease). This accounts for comorbidity in the elderly, both in the acute and chronic ill conditions. In the Kyorin University Hospital, which have a role of emergency hospitals in the western area of Tokyo, more than seventy percent of the patients admitted to the geriatric ward are emergent cases. They have multi-diseases; the most frequent one is pneumonia(from aspiration). Often, their ADL is poor and have cognitive disorders, which is why they stay in the ward long. Geriatric syndrome indicates signs and symptoms frequently observed in the elderly. Because geriatric syndromes stem from multi-system dysfunction, they cannot be treated well enough. However, if geriatric syndromes are left untreated, the ADL declines in a steady state. Usually, geriatric syndromes cannot be treated by medication, but well-planned care can prevent progression. From this sense, not a medicine but multidisciplinary approach, such as cooperation with nurse, dietitian, PT, OT, pharmacist, social worker, care programmer and others, is the key to preventing elderly people from failing to the disabled state. PMID:23855198

  20. The Making of Careers, the Making of a Discipline: Luck and Chance in Migrant Careers in Geriatric Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornat, Joanna; Henry, Leroi; Raghuram, Parvati

    2011-01-01

    The geriatric specialty, unpopular among most UK born and trained medical graduates, provided an opportunity for career development and achievement for those doctors whose training had been non-standard for a variety of reasons. Migrant doctors who have played a substantive role in the UK National Health Service since its inception made an…

  1. The Senior Mentor Program at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine: An Innovative Geriatric Longitudinal Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Ellen; Richeson, Nancy A.; Thornhill, Joshua T., IV; Corwin, Sara J.; Eleazer, G. Paul

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes development, implementation, and evaluation strategies of a longitudinal geriatric curriculum, the Senior Mentor Program (SMP). The rationale for exposing undergraduate medical students to healthy, community-dwelling older adults is to use the relationship and activities as vehicles for improving knowledge of aging and…

  2. Nutraceuticals for geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan

    2014-01-01

    Geriatrics is a medical practice that addresses the complex needs of older patients and emphasizes maintaining functional independence even in the presence of chronic disease. Treatment of geriatric patients requires a different strategy and is very complex. Geriatric medicines aim to promote health by preventing and treating diseases and disabilities in older adults. Development of effective dietary interventions for promoting healthy aging is an active but challenging area of research because aging is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease, disability, and death. Aging populations are a global phenomenon. The most widespread conditions affecting older people are hypertension, congestive heart failure, dementia, osteoporosis, breathing problems, cataract, and diabetes to name a few. Decreased immunity is also partially responsible for the increased morbidity and mortality resulting from infectious agents in the elderly. Nutritional status is one of the chief variables that explains differences in both the incidence and pathology of infection. Elderly people are at increased risk for micronutrient deficiencies due to a variety of factors including social, physical, economic, and emotional obstacles to eating. Thus there is an urgent need to shift priorities to increase our attention on ways to prevent chronic illnesses associated with aging. Individually, people must put increased efforts into establishing healthy lifestyle practices, including consuming a more healthful diet. The present review thus focuses on the phytochemicals of nutraceutical importance for the geriatric population. PMID:26151003

  3. A Curricular Model for Geriatric-Gerontology Education in Pharmacy Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higbee, Martin D.

    1984-01-01

    A three-component geriatric-gerontology program developed at the University of Utah is described that consists of a lecture course, clinical clerkships, and a gerontology certificate program. This multidisciplinary approach enables students to gain a broad perspective in the complex health care of the elderly. (Author/MLW)

  4. Healthcare professional training: a comparison of geriatric competencies.

    PubMed

    Mezey, Mathy; Mitty, Ethel; Burger, Sarah G; McCallion, Philip

    2008-09-01

    Health professionals specializing in geriatrics are a unique but scarce resource who nevertheless play a critical role in shaping the care of older adults. An interdisciplinary didactic and clinical training milieu would have the potential to maximize training opportunities for geriatric healthcare professionals. The fact that little is known about the concordance between discipline-specific geriatric competencies hampers the creation of interdisciplinary geriatric training opportunities. Discipline-specific geriatric experts compared the geriatric competencies specified by geriatric-certifying bodies of five healthcare professions: dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work. Overlap and differences in geriatric competencies across disciplines are presented, and opportunities and barriers to interdisciplinary geriatric education are discussed. PMID:18691287

  5. [Tele-cooperation for innovative care using the example of the University Hospital Aachen. Telematics in intensive care medicine, emergency medicine, and telemedical intersectoral rehabilitation planning in geriatric trauma].

    PubMed

    Marx, Gernot; Beckers, Rainer; Brokmann, Jörg Christian; Deisz, Robert; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2015-10-01

    The demographic challenge of the ageing society is associated with increasing comorbidity. On the other hand, there will be an ageing workforce in medicine, resulting in an imbalance between the demand and supply of medical care in the near future. In rural areas in particular, this imbalance is already present today. Based on three best practice projects carried out by our telemedical center in Aachen, including emergency medicine, intensive care medicine, and the rehabilitation planning of geriatric trauma care, some experience and the potential of the intersectoral provision of care, supported by telemedicine, are demonstrated. Telemedicine is the provision of medical services over a geographical distance by using tele-communication and data transfer. It has been proven to ensure a constant quality of health care. Telemedical support enables shared expertise independent of time and space, and allows efficient allocation of resources. A review of international experience supports this notion. PMID:26281718

  6. Efficacy and safety of the Chinese herbal medicine shuganjieyu with and without adjunctive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for geriatric depression: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    XIE, Minmin; JIANG, Wenhai; YANG, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background Pharmacological treatment of geriatric depression is often ineffective because patients cannot tolerate adequate doses of antidepressant medications. Aim Examine the efficacy and safety of shuganjieyu – the first Chinese herbal medicine approved for the treatment of depression by China’s drug regulatory agency -- with and without adjunctive treatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of geriatric depression. Methods Sixty-five inpatients 60 or older who met ICD-10 criteria for depression were randomly assigned to an experimental group (shuganjieyu + rTMS) (n=36) or a control group (shuganjieyu + sham rTMS)(n=29). All participants received 4 capsules of shuganjieyu daily for 6 weeks. rTMS (or sham rTMS) was administered 20 minutes daily, five days a week for 4 weeks. Blinded raters used the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) and the Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale to assess clinical efficacy and safety at baseline and 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after starting treatment. Over the six-week trial, there was only one dropout from the experimental group and two dropouts from the control group. Results None of the patients had serious side effects, but 40% in the experimental group and 50% in the control group experienced minor side effects that all resolved spontaneously. Both groups showed substantial stepwise improvement in depressive symptoms over the 6 weeks. Repeated measures ANOVA found no differences between the two groups. After 6 weeks, 97% of the experimental group had experienced a 25% or greater drop in the level of depression, but only 20% had experience a 50% or greater drop in the level of depression; the corresponding values in the control group were 96% and 19%. There were some minor, non-significant differences in the onset of the treatment effect between the different types of depressive symptoms, but by the second week of treatment all five HAMD-17 subscale scores had improved significantly in both groups Conclusion The Chinese herbal medicine shuganjieyu is effective and safe in the treatment of geriatric depression, but only a minority of patients have greater than 50% improvement in their depressive symptoms after 6 weeks of treatment. Adjunctive use of rTMS with shuganjieyu does not improve the overall outcome and does not significantly speed up the onset of action of shuganjieyu. PMID:26120260

  7. Academic detailing to teach aging and geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Duckett, Ashley; Cuoco, Theresa; Pride, Pamela; Wiley, Kathy; Iverson, Patty J; Marsden, Justin; Moran, William; Caton, Cathryn

    2015-01-01

    Geriatric education is a required component of internal medicine training. Work hour rules and hectic schedules have challenged residency training programs to develop and utilize innovative teaching methods. In this study, the authors examined the use of academic detailing as a teaching intervention in their residents' clinic and on the general medicine inpatient wards to improve clinical knowledge and skills in geriatric care. The authors found that this teaching method enables efficient, directed education without disrupting patient care. We were able to show improvements in medical knowledge as well as self-efficacy across multiple geriatric topics. PMID:24794649

  8. ARE HONORS RECEIVED DURING SURGERY CLERKSHIPS USEFUL IN THE SELECTION OF INCOMING ORTHOPAEDIC RESIDENTS?

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Damion; Dyrstad, Brad; Eltrevoog, Holly; Milbrandt, Joseph C.; Allan, D. Gordon

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review institutional statistics provided in dean's letters and determine the percentage of honors awarded by institution and clerkship specialty. Institutional and clerkship aggregate data were compiled from a review of dean's letters from 80 United States medical schools. The percentage of honors awarded during 3rd year clerkships during 2005 were collected for analysis. Across clerkship specialties, there were no statistically significant differences between the mean percentage of honors given by the medical schools examined with Internal Medicine (27.6%) the low and Psychiatry (33.5%) the high. However, inter-institutional variability observed within each clerkship was high, with surgery clerkship percentage of honors ranging from 2% to 75% of the students. This suggests some schools may be more lenient and other more stringent in awarding honors to their students. This inter-institutional variability makes it difficult to compare honors received by students from different medical schools and weakens the receipt of honors as a primary tool for evaluating potential incoming residents. PMID:19742092

  9. Clinical Grading in Psychiatric Clerkships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Gregory W.; Carlson, David L.; Fore Arcand, Lisa; Levine, Ruth E.; Cohen, Mitchell J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The clinical grade assessment is the most frequently used and heavily weighted component in the overall assessment of U.S. psychiatry clerkship students, yet the topic is understudied. The authors aimed to learn more about the nature, perceived virtues, and deficiencies of the clinical grade evaluation. Methods: A 26-item questionnaire…

  10. An Evaluation of a Clerkship In Cardiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edson, John N.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Evaluation of the clinical clerkship in Cardiology for general practitioners proves there is an urgent need for continuing post graduate medical education for general practitioners. Clerkship was offered jointly by the Long Island College Hospital and the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York. (IR)

  11. A Medical Student Logbook for Streamlining Collection of Clerkship Evaluation Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DaRosa, Debra A.; Folse, Roland

    A medical student logbook that was developed by the Department of Surgery at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine to improve the clerkship is described. Specific objectives of the logbook were: (1) to reinforce student habits to systematically record relevant data concerning patients for purposes of future recall and reference; (2) to…

  12. Does an AHEC-Sponsored Clerkship Experience Strengthen Medical Students' Intent to Provide Care for Medically Underserved Patients?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer D; Kiovsky, Richard D; Kayser, Ann; Kelley, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The mission of Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) is to recruit and educate students to serve as practicing health care professionals in rural, primary care, and medically underserved communities. We sought to determine if participation in an AHEC-sponsored family medicine clerkship experiences during medical school are significantly associated with a self-reported intent to practice primary care in a medically underserved environment upon graduation. The study was a prospective cohort study comparing third-year family medicine students with the Indiana University School of Medicine who participated in either an AHEC-sponsored family medicine clerkship to those who completed their required family medicine clerkship outside of the AHEC setting. Following the 160-h clinical clerkship, all students completed a mandatory, electronic survey and were asked to self-report their intent to the following question: "Which of the following statements best describes the impact of the family medicine clerkship on your intention to provide care to underserved patients when you complete residency training?" The question was integrated into a mandatory post-clerkship evaluation form required by the Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine. A Chi square test of independence as well as a multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent association of AHEC clerkship participation and reported intent. A total of 1138 students completed the survey. There were not significant differences in age, gender, race, and ethnicity between students that completed an AHEC clerkship and those that did not. After adjusting for gender, race, and ethnicity, AHEC participants were significantly more likely to report an intention to practice primary care in a medically underserved setting upon graduation. Female students were found to be 1.2-3.4 times as likely to report increased intent compared to male students (95 % CI 1.241-3.394). Participation in an AHEC-supported clerkship was associated with a significant increase in self-reported intent to practice primary care in a medically underserved setting. Additional research is required to determine if participation and/or reported intent are predictive of practice selection after graduation. PMID:26026276

  13. Progress in Geriatrics: A Clinical Care Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchette, Patricia Lanoie; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This issue includes 18 theme articles that examine clinical care, conditions, and practice as they relate to older adults. It contains articles on the following: men's and women's health, depression, dementia, hypertension, incontinence, bone pain, infections, preventive medicine, geriatric medicine, health care delivery, managed care, long-term…

  14. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a…

  15. Trends in Undergraduate Medical Education: Clinical Clerkship Learning Objectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Michael J.; Brodkey, Amy C.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assist and inform the process of revising learning objectives for the psychiatry clerkship, a comprehensive review of the current state of learning objectives endorsed by national specialty organizations for core clinical clerkships was undertaken. Methods: National specialty organizations that have developed and endorsed clerkship

  16. Ethical dilemmas in clerkship rotations.

    PubMed

    Myers, Michael F; Herb, Alice

    2013-11-01

    A sound clinical education should include the opportunity for medical students to engage in a spirited and informed discussion with faculty about the ethical challenges they will undoubtedly face. Unfortunately, in many medical schools today this goal is thwarted by many factors, including denial that a problem exists, relentless system overload, unprofessional behavior, breakdown in communication, and inertia. What is worse is that this problem is not new, and the fallout is not insignificant. Another potential contributing factor is burnout, which is well documented in a high percentage of medical students, residents, and faculty, and two of its most serious consequences are patient dissatisfaction and medical error.The authors draw on hundreds of student reflections on ethical dilemmas submitted during classroom exercises to examine persistent themes. They posit that classroom and didactic teaching is not enough to enable students to face ethical dilemmas. The authors call for a major culture change in medical education: "buy in" from top administration, especially the dean (and associate/assistant deans), chairs of all departments, and clerkship and residency training directors; the appointing of an ombudsperson and/or ethicist to oversee and resolve issues as they arise; instructional workshops and materials to enhance and impart skills for all teachers; remediation or retiring of errant faculty; and ongoing research and dialogue between and among medical centers about novel solutions. PMID:24072128

  17. Academic career development in geriatric fellowship training.

    PubMed

    Medina-Walpole, Annette; Fonzi, Judith; Katz, Paul R

    2007-12-01

    Career development is rarely formalized in the curricula of geriatric fellowship programs, and the training of new generations of academic leaders is challenging in the 1 year of fellowship training. To effectively prepare fellows for academic leadership, the University of Rochester's Division of Geriatrics, in collaboration with the Warner School of Graduate Education, created a yearlong course to achieve excellence in teaching and career development during the 1-year geriatric fellowship. Nine interdisciplinary geriatric medicine, dentistry, and psychiatry fellows completed the course in its initial year (2005/06). As participants, fellows gained the knowledge and experience to successfully develop and implement educational initiatives in various formats. Fellows acquired teaching and leadership skills necessary to succeed as clinician-educators in an academic setting and to communicate effectively with patients, families, and colleagues. Fellows completed a series of individual and group education projects, including academic portfolio development, curriculum vitae revision, abstract submission and poster presentation at national meetings, lay lecture series development, and geriatric grand rounds presentation. One hundred percent of fellows reported that the course positively affected their career development, with six of nine fellows choosing academic careers. The course provided opportunities to teach and assess all six of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education core competencies. This academic career development course was intended to prepare geriatric fellows as the next generation of academic leaders as clinician-teacher-scholars. It could set a new standard for academic development during fellowship training and provide a model for national dissemination in other geriatric and subspecialty fellowship programs. PMID:17971139

  18. Autonomy and paternalism in geriatric medicine. The Jewish ethical approach to issues of feeding terminally ill patients, and to cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, A J; Sonnenblick, M

    1998-01-01

    Respecting and encouraging autonomy in the elderly is basic to the practice of geriatrics. In this paper, we examine the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and "artificial" feeding in a geriatric unit in a general hospital subscribing to jewish orthodox religious principles, in which the sanctity of life is a fundamental ethical guideline. The literature on the administration of food and water in terminal stages of illness, including dementia, still shows division of opinion on the morality of withdrawing nutrition. We uphold the principle that as long as feeding by naso-gastric (N-G) or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) does not constitute undue danger or arouse serious opposition it should be given, without causing suffering to the patient. This is part of basic care, and the doctor has no mandate to withdraw this. The question of CPR still shows much discrepancy regarding elderly patients' wishes, and doctors' opinions about its worthwhileness, although up to 10 percent survive. Our geriatric patients rarely discuss the subject, but it is openly ventilated with families who ask about it, who are then involved in the decision-making, and the decision about CPR or "do-not-resuscitate" (DNR) is based on clinical and prognostic considerations. PMID:9549682

  19. Psychiatry Clerkship MID-ROTATION EVALUATION

    E-print Network

    Sherman, S. Murray

    Psychiatry Clerkship MID-ROTATION EVALUATION The University of Chicago Division of the Biological evaluate the student's level of skill in the following competencies in Psychiatry. On the next page, please provide written comments to explain your scores. 0 1 2 3 4 5 Diagnosis and Management in Psychiatry 1

  20. Surgery Clerkship MID-ROTATION EVALUATION

    E-print Network

    Sherman, S. Murray

    Surgery Clerkship MID-ROTATION EVALUATION The University of Chicago Division of the Biological evaluate the student's level of skill in the following competencies in Surgery. On the next page, please provide written comments to explain your scores. 0 1 2 3 4 5 Diagnosis and Management in Surgery 1

  1. SURGERY CLERKSHIP EVALUATIONS DRIVE IMPROVED PROFESSIONALISM

    PubMed Central

    Biagioli, Frances E.; Rdesinski, Rebecca E.; Elliot, Diane L.; Chappelle, Kathryn G.; Kwong, Karen L.; Toffler, William L.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine whether a brief student survey can differentiate amongst third-year clerkship student’s professionalism experiences and whether sharing specific feedback with surgery faculty and residents can lead to improvements. METHODS Medical students completed a survey on professionalism at the conclusion of each third-year clerkship specialty rotation during academic years 2007-2010. RESULTS 2007-2008 comparisons of survey items revealed significantly lower ratings for the surgery clerkship on both Excellence (F = 10.75, p < 0.001) and Altruism/Respect (F = 15.59, p < 0.001) subscales. This data was shared with clerkship directors, prompting the surgery department to discuss student perceptions of professionalism with faculty and residents. Post-meeting ratings of surgery professionalism significantly improved on both Excellence and Altruism/Respect dimensions (p < 0.005 for each). CONCLUSIONS A brief survey can be used to measure student perceptions of professionalism and an intervention as simple as a surgery department openly sharing results and communicating expectations appears to drive positive change in student experiences. COMPETENCIES Professionalism, Interpersonal and Communication Skills PMID:23337685

  2. American Geriatrics Society

    MedlinePLUS

    ... AGS Annual Scientific Meeting is the premier educational event for geriatrics. Save-the-date for AGS16 in Long Beach, CA: May 19-21, 2016 . Be sure to submit your abstracts by TUES., DEC. 1. Annual Meeting ...

  3. 2015 AGS Annual Meeting Poster Presentations Annual Rocky Mountain Geriatrics Conference

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    2015 AGS Annual Meeting Poster Presentations The 13th Annual Rocky Mountain Geriatrics://medicine.utah.edu/internalmedicine/geriatrics/conferences/rm_conference/ FRIDAY MAY 15, 2015 Presenter Title Session - Poster Number Scan to see poster PDF T. W. Farrell, C caregivingisassociated withhealthandmarital outcomes B-125 SATURDAY MAY 16, 2015 Presenter Title Session - Poster

  4. Finding the differences between the East and West in clinical clerkship: A Chinese exchange medical student's perspective.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kanhua

    2015-05-01

    As a sixth-year medical student and the first exchange medical student from Fudan University, China, I had the opportunity to take a three-month elective at University of California at Davis (UC Davis) School of Medicine from October 2013 to January 2014. I worked and studied at the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, the General Medicine Consults Service, and the Department of Emergency Medicine in those days. This precious experience enhanced my medical knowledge, broadened my view, and at the same time, deepened my understanding of clerkship as part of medical education. PMID:25183495

  5. Integrating residency training in geriatrics into existing outpatient curricula.

    PubMed

    Lavizzo-Mourey, R; Beck, L H; Diserens, D; Day, S; Johnson, J; Forciea, M A; Sims, R V

    1990-01-01

    In recent years, the need for increasing the geriatrics component of residency training has been repeatedly addressed; however, there are still many programs that have been unable to meet this need. While alternative sites, such as geriatric evaluation units and nursing homes, may be the ideal sites to teach some aspects of geriatrics, this article argues that the ambulatory care program, required in all residency programs, is the appropriate setting for teaching many of the core skills needed to care for most older adults. Teaching geriatrics in the ambulatory setting, which eliminates the strategic and financial obstacles of developing non-hospital-based sites, can be accomplished with relatively modest additional resources. This article describes the methods used to integrate geriatrics into the ambulatory care component of one internal medicine residency program and the necessary faculty resources as well as the documentation, via chart audit, of the interns' compliance with recommended practice patterns in five categories. With the exception of vaccination status, interns documented 18% or less of possible pieces of information for their patients. While this assessment showed statistically significant improvement in interns' care of older patients after the program intervention, the overall level of performance was still low, underscoring the need for the integration of geriatrics principles in the ambulatory curriculum. PMID:2313405

  6. Geriatric Telemedicine: Background and Evidence for Telemedicine as a Way to Address the Challenges of Geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The global population of elderly people is increasing at a remarkable rate, which may be expected to continue for some time. Older patients require more care, and with the current model of care delivery, the costs may be expected to rise, although higher cost is unsustainable. For this reason, a new pattern of practice is needed. Telemedicine will be presented as a highly effective and necessary tool in geriatrics. Methods This review will present some of the background and evidence for telemedicine as a way to address the challenges of geriatrics through geriatric telemedicine. Some of the evidence for the value of telemedicine as a tool for physicians and healthcare systems is presented. Results Telemedicine offers many means to address the problems of geriatric care in creative ways. The use of electronic medicine, telecommunications, and information management has now found its way into the very fabric of health care. The use of telemedicine is a fait accompli in much of the world, and it continues to have an increasing role deeply imbedded in our electronic practices coupled with social media. Conclusions The evidence for successful incorporation of telemedicine into practice is abundant and continues to accrue. This is a great opportunity for medical practice to evolve to new levels of engagement with patients and new levels of attainment in terms of quality care. PMID:26618027

  7. Clerkship maturity: Does the idea of training clinical skills work?

    PubMed Central

    Stosch, Christoph; Joachim, Alexander; Ascher, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Background: With the reformed curriculum “4C”, the Medical Faculty of the University of Cologne has started to systematically plan practical skills training, for which Clerkship Maturity is the first step. The key guidelines along which the curriculum was development were developed by experts. This approach has now been validated. Materials and methods: Both students and teachers were asked to fill in a questionnaire regarding preclinical practical skills training to confirm the concept of Clerkship Maturity. Results and discussion: The Cologne training program Clerkship Maturity can be validated empirically overall through the activities of the students awaiting the clerkship framework and through the evaluation by the medical staff providing the training. The subjective ratings of the advantages of the training by the students leave room for improvement. Apart from minor improvements to the program, the most likely solution providing sustainable results will involve an over-regional strategy for establishing skills training planned as part of the curriculum. PMID:21866243

  8. Do Geriatricians Stay in Geriatrics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Uday; Aung, Myo; Chan, Susanna; Wolfklein, Gisele

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate whether formally trained geriatricians remain in the field of Geriatrics, and to determine their job satisfaction and perceived quality of life, we surveyed the 107 fellows trained over the last 25 years in one accredited geriatric program. Of the 88 physicians who consented to participate, 75% devoted at least half of their practice…

  9. Nursing homes as a clinical site for training geriatric health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Mezey, Mathy; Mitty, Ethel; Burger, Sarah G

    2009-03-01

    Nursing homes can be ideal clinical teaching and learning environments for acquiring geriatric specialty and interdisciplinary team skills, particularly those regarding assessment, care planning, management, monitoring, and collaborating in an interdisciplinary milieu. Little is known as to how geriatric specialty training programs use nursing homes to meet expected specialty competencies, or the types of clinical experiences in nursing homes required by academic geriatric training programs. This article describes the expectations of 5 clinical health care disciplines (dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work) and nursing home administration regarding desirable nursing home characteristics that support gaining geriatric competencies. The issues involved in using nursing homes as supportive educational environments in geriatric education are discussed. PMID:19233060

  10. Teaching Programs in Geriatric Optometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbloom, Albert A.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a survey of U.S. and Canadian optometry programs concerning curriculum design, clinical and residency training programs, continuing education, and research projects planned or under way in geriatric optometry are presented and discussed. (MSE)

  11. American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

    MedlinePLUS

    ... View Electronic Health Records Loan Repayment For Trainees/Students >> Scholars Program Careers in Geriatric Psychiatry Fellowship Programs Loan Repayment Grants and Awards Find a Mentor Awards Get Social AAGP Social Media Policy Jobs AAGP Committees and Caucuses (Members Only) ...

  12. Workplace learning through peer groups in medical school clerkships

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Calvin L.; Teherani, Arianne; Masters, Dylan E.; Vener, Margo; Wamsley, Maria; Poncelet, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Purpose When medical students move from the classroom into clinical practice environments, their roles and learning challenges shift dramatically from a formal curricular approach to a workplace learning model. Continuity among peers during clinical clerkships may play an important role in this different mode of learning. We explored students’ perceptions about how they achieved workplace learning in the context of intentionally formed or ad hoc peer groups. Method We invited students in clerkship program models with continuity (CMCs) and in traditional block clerkships (BCs) to complete a survey about peer relationships with open-ended questions based on a workplace learning framework, including themes of workplace-based relationships, the nature of work practices, and selection of tasks and activities. We conducted qualitative content analysis to characterize students’ experiences. Results In both BCs and CMCs, peer groups provided rich resources, including anticipatory guidance about clinical expectations of students, best practices in interacting with patients and supervisors, helpful advice in transitioning between rotations, and information about implicit rules of clerkships. Students also used each other as benchmarks for gauging strengths and deficits in their own knowledge and skills. Conclusions Students achieve many aspects of workplace learning in clerkships through formal or informal workplace-based peer groups. In these groups, peers provide accessible, real-time, and relevant resources to help each other navigate transitions, clarify roles and tasks, manage interpersonal challenges, and decrease isolation. Medical schools can support effective workplace learning for medical students by incorporating continuity with peers in the main clinical clerkship year. PMID:25427851

  13. Geriatrics in Brazil: a big country with big opportunities.

    PubMed

    Garcez-Leme, Luiz E; Leme, Mariana Deckers; Espino, David V

    2005-11-01

    Brazil has approximately 180 million inhabitants, of whom 15.2 million are aged 60 and older and 1.9 million are aged 80 and older. By 2025, the Brazilian elderly population is expected to grow to more than 32 million. Brazil has many problems related to its geographic and population size. Great distances between major cities, marked cultural and racial heterogeneity between the various geographic regions, high poverty levels, and decreasing family size all combine to put pressure on the medical and social services that can be made available to the elder population. Less than 500 Brazilian physicians are certified as geriatricians, translating into one geriatrician for every 37,000 elderly Brazilians. Beside 15 geriatric medicine residencies a larger number of fellowship programs exist, and these programs are in high demand, with more than 20 candidates per position, indicating new opportunities for growth in elder care. In addition, geriatric initiatives such as the annual elder vaccination program and the elder statute, recently approved by the Brazilian Congress, indicate that geriatric care in Brazil is entering a new era of growth and development. Although the challenges remain great, there are opportunities for Brazilian geriatrics and gerontology. PMID:16274389

  14. Expert Consensus Panel Guidelines on Geriatric Assessment in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, A.; Mohile, S.G.; Leech, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite consensus guidelines on best practice in the care of older patients with cancer, geriatric assessment (GA) has yet to be optimally integrated into the field of oncology in most countries. There is a relative lack of consensus in the published literature as to the best approach to take, and there is a degree of uncertainty as to how integration of geriatric medicine principles might optimally predict patient outcomes. The aim of the current study was to obtain consensus on GA in oncology to inform the implementation of a geriatric oncology programme. Methods A four round Delphi process was employed. The Delphi method is a structured group facilitation process, using multiple iterations in order to gain consensus on a given topic Results Consensus was reached on the optimal assessment method and interventions required for the commonly employed domains of GA. Other aspects of GA, such as screening methods and age cutoff for assessment represented a higher degree of disagreement. Discussion The expert panel employed in this study clearly identified the criteria that should be included in a clinical geriatric oncology programme. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, this may prove useful in the care of older cancer patients. PMID:25757457

  15. Student Experiences with Competency Domains during a Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Donald A.; Nierenberg, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The authors reviewed medical student encounters during 3 years of a required psychiatry clerkship that were recorded on a web-based system of six broad competency domains (similar to ACGME-recommended domains). These were used to determine diagnoses of patients seen, clinical skills practiced, and experiences in interpersonal and…

  16. A Compendium of Objectives for Geriatric Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kress, Gerard C. Jr.; Vidmar, Gordon C.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a survey of geriatric dentistry specialists concerning the competencies required of geriatric dentists and the relative importance of those skills in five settings (dental school, general practice residency, prosthodontic specialty programs, geriatric fellowship programs, and continuing education) are reported. (MSE)

  17. Geriatrics faculty in the United States: who are they and what are they doing?

    PubMed

    Reuben, D B; Bradley, T B; Zwanziger, J; Vivell, S; Fink, A; Hirsch, S H; Beck, J C

    1991-08-01

    Despite increases in geriatrics training at all levels of medical education, there is a nationwide shortage of geriatrics faculty. This shortage may be due in part to demands for clinical responsibilities that preclude adequate time for teaching and research. To learn about the professional activities of geriatrics faculty, we conducted a national survey of a 50% sample of all medical schools and their affiliated residency programs that focused on physician and non-physician geriatrics faculty in internal medicine, family practice, psychiatry, neurology, and physical medicine and rehabilitation. Although we found minor differences across specialties, in general, approximately one-third of physician faculty time is spent in teaching, the majority of which is clinical teaching. Less than 15% of physician faculty time is spent in research, and fewer than 10% of physician geriatrics faculty devote over half of their time to research. The percentage of time that non-physician faculty (other than "Research Only" faculty) spend in research is only slightly higher. These findings suggest that efforts to increase geriatrics education at all levels and promote research advances will be limited unless geriatricians devote substantially more of their time to these responsibilities. PMID:2071811

  18. Iatrogenesis, frailty, and geriatric syndromes.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel

    2010-01-01

    Older adults are at risk for iatrogenesis, especially if they are frail and have 1 or more geriatric syndromes. Iatrogenic events do not occur only in acute care; in nursing homes they affect 65% of residents annually. It is therefore likely that they are occurring in assisted living communities, though perhaps called by another name. Most commonly, iatrogenesis is an adverse drug event or reaction. Knowing more about the characteristics of frailty and the contributing factors to geriatric syndrome(s), assisted living nurses can be better prepared to monitor, detect, describe, and communicate an iatrogenic event or outcome. This article describes the signs and symptoms of atypical presentation of illness that can mask or are associated with iatrogenesis. Evidence-based assessment instruments are suggested for each geriatric syndrome. PMID:20832910

  19. Neuromodulation therapies for geriatric depression.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Verònica; Ho, Kerrie-Anne; Alonzo, Angelo; Martin, Donel; George, Duncan; Loo, Colleen K

    2015-07-01

    Depression is frequent in old age and its prognosis is poorer than in younger populations. The use of pharmacological treatments in geriatric depression is limited by specific pharmacodynamic age-related factors that can diminish tolerability and increase the risk of drug interactions. The possibility of modulating cerebral activity using brain stimulation techniques could result in treating geriatric depression more effectively while reducing systemic side effects and medication interactions. This may subsequently improve treatment adherence and overall prognosis in the older patient. Among clinically available neuromodulatory techniques, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains the gold standard for the treatment of severe depression in the elderly. Studies have proven that ECT is more effective and has a faster onset of action than antidepressants in the treatment of severe, unipolar, geriatric depression and that older age is a predictor of rapid ECT response and remission. The application of novel and more tolerable forms of ECT for geriatric depression is currently being examined. Preliminary results suggest that right unilateral ultrabrief ECT (RUL-UB ECT) is a promising intervention, with similar efficacy to brief-pulse ECT and fewer adverse cognitive effects. Overall findings in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) suggest that it is a safe intervention in geriatric depression. Higher rTMS stimulation intensity and more treatments may need to be given in the elderly to achieve optimal results. There is no specific data on vagus nerve stimulation in the elderly. Transcranial direct current stimulation, magnetic seizure therapy and deep brain stimulation are currently experimental, and more data from geriatric samples is needed. PMID:25995098

  20. [Cancer and geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Conde, J

    1993-01-01

    Undoubtedly we are living in a world where life expectancy is growing larger and birth rates are decreasing; in the western world we are slowly progressing towards a world of elderly people. Such forecast rises a challenge with two multidisciplinary fronts: stabilizing or controlling the biological processes of aging. Since we cannot interfere with the genetic predetermination of life, the choice could be to block the events that might alter such genetic programme, preserving our genetic inheritance, as well as promoting a healthy life style and preventing diseases acquired through life. We must create social and economic conditions that permit more and more elderly people to be active members of the community, with preserved or restored mental and working capacities. There are several factors that can interfere with the life programme that is biochemically impressed in our genetic inheritance, by changing or disrupting homeostasis and thus provoking aggression or instability factors, within what I use to call the biological sociology of the human being. Among such factors, cancer prevails as a complex biological process that settles in the human body like a biological terrorist, and evolves to a nosologic process--cancer disease--that threatens life, first leading to disease and afterwards causing a genetically non expected death. Epidemiological studies show that age-related risk is a reality that neither individual involvement nor the New Biology resources can surpass. Therefore, I thought that Cancer and the Elderly would be an interesting subject, according to the following: 1. Topics on demography and geriatrics.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8279282

  1. Increasing Interest in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the Third-Year Clerkship: Results from a Post-Clerkship Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Erin; Hollar, David; Lindsey, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors aimed to determine whether a structured clinical experience in child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) during the third-year psychiatry clerkship would impact interest in pursuing careers in psychiatry and CAP. Methods: The authors constructed and administered a post-rotation survey, the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry…

  2. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ? P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ? P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results support further development of structured didactic curricula for the radiation oncology clerkship.

  3. Geriatric Optometry Programs of Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Satya B.

    1985-01-01

    The curriculum design, philosophy, and innovation of four programs in geriatric optometry are described: the Pennsylvania College of Optometry and the colleges of Optometry at the State University of New York, University of Alabama at Birmingham, and University of Houston. (MSE)

  4. Preoperative Assessment of Geriatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Nakhaie, Mariam; Tsai, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    The preoperative assessment of geriatric patients provides an excellent opportunity to evaluate the patient for perioperative risk factors such as frailty, functional status, nutritional status, cardiovascular and pulmonary status, and substance dependence. It also provides an overall clinical picture on which health care providers can base a framework to reduce these risk factors. PMID:26315632

  5. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Graham; Marshall, Trudi; Ritchie, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Changing global demography is resulting in older people presenting to emergency departments (EDs) in greater numbers than ever before. They present with greater urgency and are more likely to be admitted to hospital or re-attend and utilize greater resources. They experience longer waits for care and are less likely to be satisfied with their experiences. Not only that, but older people suffer poorer health outcomes after ED attendance, with higher mortality rates and greater dependence in activities of daily living or rates of admission to nursing homes. Older people’s assessment and management in the ED can be complex, time consuming, and require specialist skills. The interplay of multiple comorbidities and functional decline result in the complex state of frailty that can predispose to poor health outcomes and greater care needs. Older people with frailty may present to services in an atypical fashion requiring detailed, multidimensional, and increasingly multidisciplinary care to provide the correct diagnosis and management as well as appropriate placement for ongoing care or admission avoidance. Specific challenges such as delirium, functional decline, or carer strain need to be screened for and managed appropriately. Identifying patients with specific frailty syndromes can be critical to identifying those at highest risk of poor outcomes and most likely to benefit from further specialist interventions. Models of care are evolving that aim to deliver multidimensional assessment and management by multidisciplinary specialist care teams (comprehensive geriatric assessment). Increasingly, these models are demonstrating improved outcomes, including admission avoidance or reduced death and dependence. Delivering this in the ED is an evolving area of practice that adapts the principles of geriatric medicine for the urgent-care environment. PMID:25473275

  6. Uniform experience and assessment during a multisite surgical clerkship.

    PubMed

    Collins, J P; Tregonning, G D; Gamble, G D

    1994-07-01

    Major changes in health care delivery and the increased number of clerkship sites used for teaching by many medical schools has resulted in significant implications for medical education. Methods have become necessary to achieve and maintain a comparable clinical experience and a uniform assessment process at each teaching site. Following a review of existing practices, a new core curriculum, a problem-based approach and the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) were introduced into this department. Over 1200 students have passed through this revised surgical clerkship over the past 8 years. The introduction of the OSCE has helped to direct student learning, provide an objective assessment to complement the ward grade, and enabled an audit of teaching and learning to be carried out. In one group of 103 students no significant correlation was found between the OSCE and ward grades. Performance at different hospitals was similar and those carrying out their clerkship later in the academic year benefited from their previous other attachments. The OSCE has enabled immediate feedback to be given to learners as well as providing teachers with an opportunity to see for themselves the outcome of their tuition. A clinical performance record card has now been introduced to improve the monitoring of students' clinical experience. PMID:8010926

  7. [Geriatric intervention in oncology for elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Saint-Jean, O; LeGuen, J

    2015-10-01

    Half of all cancers occur in patients older than 70 years. National cancer plans in France promote the emergence of geriatric oncology, whose aim is that every elder cancer patient receives a pertinent treatment, according to his frailty. Geriatric intervention has been evaluated in various conditions or patients since 30 years. Meta-analysis has shown the benefits on autonomy and mortality. But benefits are related to the organization of geriatric care, especially when integrated care is provided. Literature on geriatric oncology is relatively poor. But it is certain that a geriatric comprehensive assessment provided a lot of important information for the care of cancer patients, leading to a modification of cancer treatment in many cases. Randomized trials will soon begin to evaluate the benefits of geriatric integrated care for elder cancer patients, in terms of mortality and quality of life. Actually, in oncogeriatic coordination units, pilot organizations are developed for the satisfaction of patients and professionals. PMID:26344438

  8. Psychiatric OSCE Performance of Students with and without a Previous Core Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goisman, Robert M.; Levin, Robert M.; Krupat, Edward; Pelletier, Stephen R.; Alpert, Jonathan E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The OSCE has been demonstrated to be a reliable and valid method by which to assess students' clinical skills. An OSCE station was used to determine whether or not students who had completed a core psychiatry clerkship demonstrated skills that were superior to those who had not taken the clerkship and which areas discriminated between…

  9. Effect of Curriculum Change on Exam Performance in a 4-Week Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermier, Julie; Way, David; Kasick, David; Kuperschmidt, Rada

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigated whether curriculum change could produce improved performance, despite a reduction in clerkship length from 8 to 4 weeks. Methods: The exam performance of medical students completing a 4-week clerkship in psychiatry was compared to national data from the National Board of Medical Examiners' Psychiatry Subject…

  10. The Design and Evaluation of a Clinical Clerkship for Hospital Pharmacists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsheim, David J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Forty hospital pharmacists participated in a 2 week pilot of a postgraduate clinical pharmacy clerkship, using different hospital services as teaching sites at the University of Illinois and Cook County hospitals in Chicago. The clerkship experience broadened participants' conceptions of the depth and scope of the clinical pharmacist's role.…

  11. Shorter Psychiatry Clerkship Length Is Associated with Lower NBME Psychiatry Shelf Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostwick, J. Michael; Alexander, Cara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate a recent medical school curriculum change at our institution 3 years ago; specifically: shortening the Psychiatry core clerkship from 4 to 3 weeks and adding an optional 6-week core/elective combination rotation in lieu of the 3-week core. The authors aimed to determine whether clerkship length was…

  12. Creating Stories to Live By: Caring and Professional Identity Formation in a Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konkin, Jill; Suddards, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Building on other models of longitudinal integrated clerkships (LIC), the University of Alberta developed its Integrated Community Clerkship with guiding principles of continuity of care, preceptor and learning environment. Professionalism is an important theme in medical education. Caring is important in professional identity formation and an…

  13. Inter-Site Consistency at a Multi-Site Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultes von Schlageter, Margo; Park, EunMi; Tucker, Phebe

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the effects of clinical site assignment within a multiple-site psychiatry clerkship program on the convergent outcome of the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject examination. Method: NBME scores, controlled for baseline pre-clerkship knowledge base as measured by second year human behavior scores, were…

  14. Rhinitis in the geriatric population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The current geriatric population in the United States accounts for approximately 12% of the total population and is projected to reach nearly 20% (71.5 million people) by 2030[1]. With this expansion of the number of older adults, physicians will face the common complaint of rhinitis with increasing frequency. Nasal symptoms pose a significant burden on the health of older people and require attention to improve quality of life. Several mechanisms likely underlie the pathogenesis of rhinitis in these patients, including inflammatory conditions and the influence of aging on nasal physiology, with the potential for interaction between the two. Various treatments have been proposed to manage this condition; however, more work is needed to enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of the various forms of geriatric rhinitis and to develop more effective therapies for this important patient population. PMID:20465792

  15. House Officers' Knowledge of Geriatric Health Policy: Are the Gatekeepers Learning the Rules?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse, Katherine A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined knowledge of geriatric health policies of 154 physicians training in medicine, surgery, and psychiatry. Found a widespread lack of knowledge that could interfere with physicians' ability to use the health care system appropriately for patients' benefit and to function effectively as a gatekeeper to health care utilization. (Author/ABL)

  16. Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  17. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the older cancer patient: coming of age in clinical cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Cynthia; Berger, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer care at the extremes of life, in the young and the old, is characterized by unique issues associated with pediatrics and geriatric medicine, accentuated by the special vulnerabilities of these groups. In response to these needs, the field of pediatric oncology has been well honed to deal with the special problems associated with juvenile cancer patients. While most adult oncologists consider themselves well prepared to deal with older cancer patients, the current expansion of the geriatric population – their variable levels of fitness, frailty and vulnerability, the fact that cancer is primarily a disease of older adults, the significant expansion of agents and approaches to treat cancer, as well as their resultant toxicities and complications – has led to the development of specialized geriatric oncologists. Moreover, the special characteristics and needs of these patients have led to the evolution of new guidelines for evaluation, management and the conduct of research in older patients with cancer. PMID:25642321

  18. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

  19. Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine: Medical Student and Physician Attitudes toward Homeless Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden…

  20. Teaching Medical Students About Disability in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Catherine Leigh; Brown, Rachel S.; Zhen, Huiling; McDermott, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether a unique didactic focusing on delivering health care to patients with disabilities (PWDs) impacts medical students’ knowledge of specific disabilities and related concerns, attitudes about barriers to this populations’ health care, and behavior during typical primary care visits with PWDs. A 90-minute session for students during their third-year family medicine clerkship addressed clinical considerations for patients with mobility and cognitive impairments. Questionnaires were administered to students at the beginning and completion of the clerkship. Analyses of 71 matched questionnaires reveal that knowledge and attitudes were positively impacted. PMID:19724936

  1. Humanistic geriatric health care: an innovation in medical education.

    PubMed

    Rose, B K; Osterud, H T

    1980-11-01

    A geriatric health maintenance program, started in 1976 as a community medicine elective, has developed into an innovative model in humanistic health care. Junior and senior medical students act as live-in facilitators of comprehensive health care for the elderly tenants in publicly subsidized housing units. Students rotate emergency night and weekend calls and hold weekly health clinics at the housing units. Weekly seminars are given by faculty members during which case presentations by students and topics related to the complex problems of the elderly are discussed. Important aspects of this elective are experiential learning in humanistic health care, exposure to ambulatory well or stable elderly people, development of communication/interpersonal skills, and acceptance of responsibility. The program has been received enthusiastically by tenants, community physicians, students, and an increasing number of faculty members at the University of Oregon Health Sciences Center School of Medicine. PMID:7441673

  2. Hypernatremia in the geriatric population

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maulin K; Workeneh, Biruh; Taffet, George E

    2014-01-01

    Hypernatremia in the geriatric population is a common disorder associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Older people are predisposed to developing hypernatremia because of age-related physiologic changes such as decreased thirst drive, impaired urinary concentrating ability, and reduced total body water. Medications may exacerbate this predisposition. Hypernatremia and dehydration occurring in nursing homes are considered indicators of neglect that warrant reporting, but there are other nonavoidable causes of hypernatremia, and consideration at time of presentation is essential to prevent delay in diagnosis and management. We describe a case illustrating the importance of the consideration of alternate explanations for hypernatremia in a nursing home resident, followed by a review of hypernatremia in the elderly population, to underscore that neglect is the etiology of exclusion after alternatives have been considered. PMID:25429210

  3. Pain management for the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Roche, R J; Forman, W B

    1994-01-01

    Pain is a common and complex problem in the geriatric population. Successful pain management in this patient population requires a comprehensive approach involving both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. PMID:8124655

  4. An international model for geriatrics program development in China: the Johns Hopkins-Peking Union Medical College experience.

    PubMed

    Leng, Sean X; Tian, Xinping; Liu, Xiaohong; Lazarus, Gerald; Bellantoni, Michele; Greenough, William; Fried, Linda P; Shen, Ti; Durso, Samuel C

    2010-07-01

    China has the world's largest and most rapidly growing older adult population. Recent dramatic socioeconomic changes, including a large number of migrating workers leaving their elderly parents and grandparents behind and the 4:2:1 family structure caused by the one-child policy, have greatly compromised the traditional Chinese family support for older adults. These demographic and socioeconomic factors, the improved living standards, and the quest for higher quality of life are creating human economic pressures. The plight of senior citizens is leading to an unprecedented need for geriatrics expertise in China. To begin to address this need, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHU) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) have developed a joint international project aimed at establishing a leadership program at the PUMC Hospital that will promote quality geriatrics care, education, and aging research for China. Important components of this initiative include geriatrics competency training for PUMC physicians and nurses in the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at JHU, establishing a geriatrics demonstration ward at the PUMC Hospital, faculty exchange between JHU and PUMC, and on-site consultation by JHU geriatrics faculty. This article describes the context and history of this ongoing collaboration and important components, progress, challenges, and future prospects, focusing on the JHU experience. Specific and practical recommendations are made for those who plan such international joint ventures. With such unique experiences, it is hoped that this will serve as a useful model for international geriatrics program development for colleagues in the United States and abroad. PMID:20533962

  5. Terror Medicine as Part of the Medical School Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Leonard A.; Wagner, Katherine; Scott, Sandra; Connell, Nancy D.; Cooper, Arthur; Kennedy, Cheryl Ann; Natal, Brenda; Lamba, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Terror medicine, a field related to emergency and disaster medicine, focuses on medical issues ranging from preparedness to psychological manifestations specifically associated with terrorist attacks. Calls to teach aspects of the subject in American medical schools surged after the 2001 jetliner and anthrax attacks. Although the threat of terrorism persists, terror medicine is still addressed erratically if at all in most medical schools. This paper suggests a template for incorporating the subject throughout a 4-year medical curriculum. The instructional framework culminates in a short course for fourth year students, such as one recently introduced at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA. The proposed 4-year Rutgers curriculum serves as a model that could assist other medical schools contemplating the inclusion of terror medicine in pre-clerkship and clerkship training. PMID:25309891

  6. Voluntary undergraduate technical skills training course to prepare students for clerkship assignment: tutees’ and tutors’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Skills lab training has become a widespread tool in medical education, and nowadays, skills labs are ubiquitous among medical faculties across the world. An increasingly prevalent didactic approach in skills lab teaching is peer-assisted learning (PAL), which has been shown to be not only effective, but can be considered to be on a par with faculty staff-led training. The aim of the study is to determine whether voluntary preclinical skills teaching by peer tutors is a feasible method for preparing medical students for effective workplace learning in clerkships and to investigate both tutees’ and tutors’ attitudes towards such an intervention. Methods A voluntary clerkship preparation skills course was designed and delivered. N?=?135 pre-clinical medical students visited the training sessions. N?=?10 tutors were trained as skills-lab peer tutors. Voluntary clerkship preparation skills courses as well as tutor training were evaluated by acceptance ratings and pre-post self-assessment ratings. Furthermore, qualitative analyses of skills lab tutors’ attitudes towards the course were conducted following principles of grounded theory. Results Results show that a voluntary clerkship preparation skills course is in high demand, is highly accepted and leads to significant changes in self-assessment ratings. Regarding qualitative analysis of tutor statements, clerkship preparation skills courses were considered to be a helpful and necessary asset to preclinical medical education, which benefits from the tutors’ own clerkship experiences and a high standardization of training. Tutor training is also highly accepted and regarded as an indispensable tool for peer tutors. Conclusions Our study shows that the demand for voluntary competence-oriented clerkship preparation is high, and a peer tutor-led skills course as well as tutor training is well accepted. The focused didactic approach for tutor training is perceived to be effective in preparing tutors for their teaching activity in this context. A prospective study design would be needed to substantiate the results objectively and confirm the effectiveness. PMID:24708782

  7. Usage of the National Board of Medical Examiners Subject Test in Psychiatry by U.S. and Canadian Clerkships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Ruth E.; Carlson, David L.; Rosenthal, Renathe H.; Clegg, Kathleen A.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors explored psychiatry clerkship usage of the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Subject Test. METHODS: U.S. and Canadian psychiatry clerkship directors (N=150) were sent an 18-item questionnaire surveying evaluation and remediation practices. RESULTS: Of 111 questionnaires (74%) returned, 76 (69%) reported using the…

  8. How Does Emergency Department Crowding Affect Medical Student Test Scores and Clerkship Evaluations?

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Grant; Arya, Rajiv; Ritz, Z. Trevor; He, Albert S.; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A.; McCoy, Jonathan V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The effect of emergency department (ED) crowding has been recognized as a concern for more than 20 years; its effect on productivity, medical errors, and patient satisfaction has been studied extensively. Little research has reviewed the effect of ED crowding on medical education. Prior studies that have considered this effect have shown no correlation between ED crowding and resident perception of quality of medical education. Objective To determine whether ED crowding, as measured by the National ED Overcrowding Scale (NEDOCS) score, has a quantifiable effect on medical student objective and subjective experiences during emergency medicine (EM) clerkship rotations. Methods We collected end-of-rotation examinations and medical student evaluations for 21 EM rotation blocks between July 2010 and May 2012, with a total of 211 students. NEDOCS scores were calculated for each corresponding period. Weighted regression analyses examined the correlation between components of the medical student evaluation, student test scores, and the NEDOCS score for each period. Results When all 21 rotations are included in the analysis, NEDOCS scores showed a negative correlation with medical student tests scores (regression coefficient= ?0.16, p=0.04) and three elements of the rotation evaluation (attending teaching, communication, and systems-based practice; p<0.05). We excluded an outlying NEDOCS score from the analysis and obtained similar results. When the data were controlled for effect of month of the year, only student test score remained significantly correlated with NEDOCS score (p=0.011). No part of the medical student rotation evaluation attained significant correlation with the NEDOCS score (p?0.34 in all cases). Conclusion ED overcrowding does demonstrate a small but negative association with medical student performance on end-of-rotation examinations. Additional studies are recommended to further evaluate this effect. PMID:26594289

  9. Palliative Care for the Geriatric Anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Gustin, Allen N; Aslakson, Rebecca A

    2015-09-01

    Many seriously ill geriatric patients are at higher risk for perioperative morbidity and mortality, and incorporating proactive palliative care principles may be appropriate. Advanced care planning is a hallmark of palliative care in that it facilitates alignment of the goals of care between the patient and the health care team. When these goals conflict, perioperative dilemmas can occur. Anesthesiologists must overcome many cultural and religious barriers when managing the care of these patients. Palliative care is gaining ground in several perioperative populations where integration with certain patient groups has occurred. Geriatric anesthesiologists must be aware of how palliative care and hospice influence and enhance the care of elderly patients. PMID:26315640

  10. Time to trust: longitudinal integrated clerkships and entrustable professional activities.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, David A; Holmboe, Eric S; ten Cate, Olle

    2014-02-01

    Medical education shaped by the learning sciences can better serve medical students, residents, faculty, health care institutions, and patients. With increasing innovation in undergraduate and graduate medical education and more focused attention on educational principles and how people learn, this era of educational transformation offers promise. Principles manifest in "educational continuity" are informing changes in educational structures and venues and are enriching new discourse in educational pedagogy, assessment, and scholarship. The articles by Myhre and colleagues and Woloschuk and colleagues in this issue, along with mounting evidence preceding these works, should reassure that principle-driven innovation in medical education is not only possible but can be achieved safely. In this commentary, the authors draw from these works and the wider literature on longitudinal integrated educational design. They suggest that the confluences of movements for longitudinal integrated clerkships and entrustable professional activities open new possibilities for other educational and practice advancements in quality and safety. With the advent of competency-based education, explicit milestones, and improved assessment regimens, overseers will increasingly evaluate students, trainees, and other learners on their ability rather than relying solely on time spent in an activity. The authors suggest that, for such oversight to have the most value, assessors and learners need adequate oversight time, and redesign of educational models will serve this operational imperative. As education leaders are reassessing old medical school and training models, rotational blocks, and other barriers to progress, the authors explore the dynamic interplay between longitudinal integrated learning models and entrustment. PMID:24362396

  11. Geriatric Syndromes: Clinical, Research and Policy Implications of a Core Geriatric Concept

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Sharon K.; Studenski, Stephanie; Tinetti, Mary E.; Kuchel, George A.

    2008-01-01

    Geriatricians have embraced the term “geriatric syndrome”, using it extensively to highlight the unique features of common health conditions in the elderly. Geriatric syndromes, such as delirium, falls, incontinence and frailty, are highly prevalent, multifactorial, and associated with substantial morbidity and poor outcomes. Nevertheless, this central geriatric concept has remained poorly defined. This article reviews criteria for defining geriatric syndromes, and proposes a balanced approach of developing preliminary criteria based on peer-reviewed evidence. Based on a review of the literature, four shared risk factors—older age, baseline cognitive impairment, baseline functional impairment, and impaired mobility—were identified across five common geriatric syndromes (pressure ulcers, incontinence, falls, functional decline, and delirium). Understanding basic mechanisms involved in geriatric syndromes will be critical to advancing research and developing targeted therapeutic options. However, given the complexity of these multifactorial conditions, attempts to define relevant mechanisms will need to incorporate more complex models, including a focus on synergistic interactions between different risk factors. Finally, major barriers have been identified in translating research advances, such as preventive strategies of proven effectiveness for delirium and falls, into clinical practice and policy initiatives. National strategic initiatives are required to overcome barriers and to achieve clinical, research, and policy advances that will improve quality of life for older persons. PMID:17493201

  12. Faculty Preparedness in Geriatric Optometry Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancil, Gary L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of chief academic officers and faculty (n=27) in 16 schools of optometry found that, since 1986, there has been a 75% increase in institutions requiring coursework in geriatric optometry and an 83% increase in those offering continuing professional education in this field. However, 67% of faculty report no formal training. Three faculty…

  13. Directory of Curriculum Guidelines for Geriatric Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Health Professions.

    This directory contains information on the nature and availability of curriculum guidelines for education and training programs in geriatrics and gerontology. The curriculum guidelines or model curricula were prepared by professional associations or with federal support, most notably through the Administration on Aging or the Health Resources and…

  14. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment in the Office

    PubMed Central

    Pereles, Laurie R.M.; Boyle, Neil G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Because of their increased incidence of illness and disability, geriatric patients require extra time and diligence to assess and track medical problems. This article describes a comprehensive geriatirc assessment, organized on a one-page, easily updated checklist, that can be used to generate a medical and functional problem list and a risk assessment. Imagesp2190-a PMID:21229091

  15. University of Utah School of Medicine Continuing Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    University of Utah School of Medicine Continuing Medical Education 50 North Medical Drive Salt Lake of Utah School of Medicine Sponsored by University of Utah School of Medicine Office of Continuing Medical of Geriatrics & Gerontology University of Wisconsin-Madison Medical School Barbara Bates-Jensen, PhD, RN, CWOCN

  16. Molly Carnes, MD, MS Professor, Depts of Medicine,

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Molly Carnes, MD, MS Professor, Depts of Medicine, Psychiatry, and Industrial & Systems Engineering University of Wisconsin-Madison Careers in Academic Medicine: Evaluation at Gatekeeping Junctures #12;AAMC (N=0) 0 Dept Medicine Chairs at top 25: #12;What about geriatrics? Year med school graduation 1980

  17. Natural Products and Supplements for Geriatric Depression and Cognitive Disorders: An Evaluation of the Research

    PubMed Central

    Varteresian, Taya; Lavretsky, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Numerous geriatric patients are using Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for late-life mood and cognitive disorders. Natural products and supplements are a common CAM intervention which have risks and benefits of which patients should be appropriately advised. The data for omega-3 fatty acids, ginkgo biloba, SAMe, St John’s wort, B Vitamins and Vitamin D, huperzine, caprylidene and coconut oil will be evaluated. Since the evidence basis for natural products and supplements is limited, especially for the geriatric population. Studies involving the general adult population are included to infer effects in the aging population. Despite the data available, more rigorous studies with larger sample sizes over longer periods of time are still needed. Regardless of a physician’s preference to recommend various natural supplements and products, a physician could protect their patients by having an understanding of the side effects and indications for various natural products. PMID:24912606

  18. Natural products and supplements for geriatric depression and cognitive disorders: an evaluation of the research.

    PubMed

    Varteresian, Taya; Lavretsky, Helen

    2014-08-01

    Numerous geriatric patients are using Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for late-life mood and cognitive disorders. Natural products and supplements are a common CAM intervention which have risks and benefits of which patients should be appropriately advised. The data for omega-3 fatty acids, ginkgo biloba, SAMe, St John's wort, B vitamins and vitamin D, huperzine, caprylidene, and coconut oil will be evaluated. Since the evidence basis for natural products and supplements is limited, especially for the geriatric population, studies involving the general adult population are included to infer effects in the aging population. Despite the data available, more rigorous studies with larger sample sizes over longer periods of time are still needed. Regardless of a physician's preference to recommend various natural supplements and products, a physician could protect their patients by having an understanding of the side effects and indications for various natural products. PMID:24912606

  19. Summer 4th Year Elective Clerkships Elective Disciplines

    E-print Network

    Alford, Simon

    CELE 606 15281 Advanced Medicine CELE 606 15282 Ambulatory Medicine CELE 606 15283 Cardiology CELE 606 Pediatric Neurology CELE 607 20803 Special Topics-Neurology CELE 607 20806 Research-Neurology #12-Pathology Pediatrics

  20. Incorporating Active Learning into a Psychiatry Clerkship: Does It Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morreale, Mary; Arfken, Cynthia; Bridge, Patrick; Balon, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Medical students' satisfaction with the psychiatry clerkship, sense of preparedness for an institutional Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE), expressed likelihood of choosing psychiatry as a specialty, and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) psychiatry shelf-examination scores were compared after a curriculum based on…

  1. Subspecialty Exposure in a Psychiatry Clerkship Does Not Improve Student Performance in the Subject Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retamero, Carolina; Ramchandani, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared the NBME subject examination scores and subspecialty profiles of 3rd-year medical students who were assigned to psychiatry subspecialties during their clerkship with those who were not. Method: The authors collated and analyzed the shelf examination scores, the clinical grades, and the child psychiatry and emergency…

  2. Academic Performance in the Context of a "Three Excused Absences" Psychiatry Clerkship Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schillerstrom, Jason E.; Lutz, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In order to better manage medical student absences during the psychiatry clerkship, a policy allowing students to miss up to 3 days without penalty was developed. The purpose of this study was to describe absence patterns and compare academic performance between students with and without absences. Method: Authors reviewed the academic…

  3. How and What Do Medical Students Learn in Clerkships? Experience Based Learning (ExBL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dornan, Tim; Tan, Naomi; Boshuizen, Henny; Gick, Rachel; Isba, Rachel; Mann, Karen; Scherpbier, Albert; Spencer, John; Timmins, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Clerkship education has been called a "black box" because so little is known about what, how, and under which conditions students learn. Our aim was to develop a blueprint for education in ambulatory and inpatient settings, and in single encounters, traditional rotations, or longitudinal experiences. We identified 548 causal links…

  4. Effect of a Clerkship on Students' Attitudes Toward Practice Problems and Preventive Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Bernard S.; Zeppa, Robert

    1987-01-01

    A study compared the attitudes of men and women junior medical students at one medical school before and after a surgery clerkship concerning their confidence in dealing with problems in the doctor-patient relationship, concerns about future practice, and the value of preventive care. (MSE)

  5. Development of a longitudinal integrated clerkship at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Poncelet, Ann; Bokser, Seth; Calton, Brook; Hauer, Karen E.; Kirsch, Heidi; Jones, Tracey; Lai, Cindy J.; Mazotti, Lindsay; Shore, William; Teherani, Arianne; Tong, Lowell; Wamsley, Maria; Robertson, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, medical educators at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), began developing the Parnassus Integrated Student Clinical Experiences (PISCES) program, a year-long longitudinal integrated clerkship at its academic medical center. The principles guiding this new clerkship were continuity with faculty preceptors, patients, and peers; a developmentally progressive curriculum with an emphasis on interdisciplinary teaching; and exposure to undiagnosed illness in acute and chronic care settings. Innovative elements included quarterly student evaluation sessions with all preceptors together, peer-to-peer evaluation, and oversight advising with an assigned faculty member. PISCES launched with eight medical students for the 2007/2008 academic year and expanded to 15 students for 2008/2009. Compared to UCSF's traditional core clerkships, evaluations from PISCES indicated significantly higher student satisfaction with faculty teaching, formal didactics, direct observation of clinical skills, and feedback. Student performance on discipline-specific examinations and United States Medical Licensing Examination step 2 CK was equivalent to and on standardized patient examinations was slightly superior to that of traditional peers. Participants' career interests ranged from primary care to surgical subspecialties. These results demonstrate that a longitudinal integrated clerkship can be implemented successfully at a tertiary care academic medical center. PMID:21475642

  6. Do Student Evaluations Influence the Teaching Skills of Clerkship Clinical Faculty?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekhar, Arcot J.; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Hoyt, Amy; McNulty, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Web-based student evaluations of clinical faculty were collected over an 8-year period. There were 19,881 medical student evaluations over the 8-year period for all clinical clerkships, representing a total of 952 faculty. Students used a 5-point Likert scale to rate the teaching effectiveness of faculty. Criterion-based methods and standard…

  7. Filling in the Gaps of Clerkship with a Comprehensive Clinical Skills Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veale, Pamela; Carson, Julie; Coderre, Sylvain; Woloschuk, Wayne; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Although the clinical clerkship model is based upon sound pedagogy, including theories of social learning and situated learning, studies evaluating clinical performance of residents suggests that this model may not fully meet the learning needs of students. Here our objective was to design a curriculum to bridge the learning gaps of the existing…

  8. Psychiatry in the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: An Innovative, Year-Long Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Todd; Bullock, Christopher; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Albanese, Mark; Bonilla, Pedro; Dvorak, Ramona; Epelbaum, Claudia; Givon, Lior; Kueppenbender, Karsten; Joseph, Robert; Boyd, J. Wesley; Shtasel, Derri

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors present what is to their knowledge the first description of a model for longitudinal third-year medical student psychiatry education. Method: A longitudinal, integrated psychiatric curriculum was developed, implemented, and sustained within the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship. Curriculum elements…

  9. Student Pre- and Post-Evaluation of an Off-Campus Clinical Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, R. Keith

    1975-01-01

    Describes the development and use of standardized forms found to be effective for evaluating clinical clerkship experiences of pharmacy students. Copies of the Preliminary Questionnaire and the Post-Evaluation Form are included along with the goals of the Washington State University College of Pharmacy Clinical Pharmacy Program. (JT)

  10. Videotaped Introductory Instruction in the Physical Examination for Clinical Clerkship Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwinghammer, Terry

    1981-01-01

    A 60-minute, color videotape of a simulated adult physical examination was produced and used by the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy to introduce clinical clerkship students to the procedures involved in the physical examination. The videotape was evaluated by a 25-question pretest and posttest. (Author/MLW)

  11. A Self-Study of Clinical Evaluation in the McMaster Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Gerald S.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The McMaster University (Canada) undergraduate medical program participated in a nine-school self-study of clinical evaluation. Comparison of top-ranked problems found lack of transmission of evaluative information from one clerkship unit to subsequent ones to be a common problem. Faculty unwillingness to record negative evaluations was exclusive…

  12. Influence of Clerkship on Attitudes of Medical Students toward Psychiatry across Cultures: United States and Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgut, F. Tuna; Polan, H. Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assure adequate treatment for patients with mental illness worldwide, medical schools must impart positive attitudes toward psychiatry. The authors examined the effect of culture on changes in attitudes toward psychiatry among medical students receiving the same psychiatry clerkship curriculum in two different countries. Methods: A…

  13. Recognition of geriatric popular song repertoire: a comparison of geriatric clients and music therapy students.

    PubMed

    VanWeelden, Kimberly; Cevasco, Andrea M

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of the current study were to determine geriatric clients' recognition of 32 popular songs and songs from musicals by asking whether they: (a) had heard the songs before; (b) could "name the tune" of each song; and (c) list the decade that each song was composed. Additionally, comparisons were made between the geriatric clients' recognition of these songs and by music therapy students' recognition of the same, songs, based on data from an earlier study (VanWeelden, Juchniewicz, & Cevasco, 2008). Results found 90% or more of the geriatric clients had heard 28 of the 32 songs, 80% or more of the graduate students had heard 20 songs, and 80% of the undergraduates had heard 18 songs. The geriatric clients correctly identified 3 songs with 80% or more accuracy, which the graduate students also correctly identified, while the undergraduates identified 2 of the 3 same songs. Geriatric clients identified the decades of 3 songs with 50% or greater accuracy. Neither the undergraduate nor graduate students identified any songs by the correct decade with over 50% accuracy. Further results are discussed. PMID:20635525

  14. Impact of clerkship attachments on students’ attitude toward pharmaceutical care in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tsega, Bayew; Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Sarkar, Barun Ranjan; Melaku, Tadesse; Shewamene, Zewdneh

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study objective is to investigate the impact of mandatory clinical clerkship courses on 5th-year pharmacy students’ attitudes and perceived barriers toward providing pharmaceutical care (PC). Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 5th-year pharmacy students undertaking mandatory clinical clerkship in the University of Gondar, Ethiopia. A pharmaceutical care attitudes survey (PCAS) questionnaire was used to assess the attitude (14 items), commonly identified drug-related problem/s (1 item) during clerkships, and perceived barriers (12 items) toward the provision of PC. Statistical analysis was conducted on the retrieved data. Results Out of the total of 69 clerkship students, 65 participated and completed the survey (94.2% response rate). Overall, 74.45% of participants opinioned a positive attitude toward PC provision. Almost all respondents agreed that the primary responsibility of pharmacists in the healthcare setting was to prevent and solve medication-related problems (98.5%), practice of PC was valuable (89.3%), and the PC movement will improve patient health (95.4%), respectively. Unnecessary drug therapy (43%), drug–drug interactions (33%), and non-adherence to medications (33%) were the most common drug-related problems identified in wards. Highly perceived barriers for PC provision included lack of a workplace for counseling in the pharmacy (75.4%), a poor image of pharmacist’s role in wards (67.7%), and inadequate technology in the pharmacy (64.6%). Lack of access to a patient’s medical record in the pharmacy had significant association (P<0.05) with PC practice, performance of PC during clerkship, provision of PC as clinical pharmacists, and Ethiopian pharmacists benefiting by PC. Conclusion Ethiopian clinical pharmacy students have a good attitude toward PC. Efforts should be targeted toward reducing these drug therapy issues, and aiding the integration of PC provision with pharmacy practice. PMID:26056513

  15. Craniomandibular disorders in the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Iacopino, A M; Wathen, W F

    1993-01-01

    This paper represents a general review of basic age-related changes that take place in the craniomandibular apparatus and the most frequently presenting conditions associated with craniomandibular disorders (CMD) in the elderly. The evaluation of geriatric patients with signs or symptoms of CMD must consider (1) normal age-related changes in the craniomandibular apparatus and their impact on both normal function and responses to stress; (2) the role of dentition status and dental prosthesis in CMD; and (3) the contribution of malignant disease, psoriasis, arthritic conditions, pseudogout, granulomatous vascular conditions, and metaplastic involvement of tissue to the pathosis of CMD. The clinician must also be aware of various effects of psychologic, sociologic, and biologic aspects of aging on the development of headache and atypical facial pain as components of CMD in the geriatric patient. PMID:8467296

  16. Using Facebook Within a Geriatric Pharmacotherapy Course

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate using an Internet-based social networking site within an elective geriatric pharmacotherapy course. Design Thirty pharmacy students enrolled in a geriatric pharmacotherapy elective course were invited to join a closed Facebook (Facebook Inc, Palo Alto, CA) group to enhance communication among students and faculty members within the course. Creating a discussion board was the primary activity in the course. Each week, 3 students were assigned to post a healthy aging topic, and other students in the class were expected to post their comments and reactions. The healthy aging topics also were discussed during class. Assessment Students wrote reflections about their experiences using Facebook for the activities within this course. A survey instrument also measured students' opinions about using Facebook for educational purposes. Conclusion Using Facebook allowed students to discuss topics more openly and encouraged classroom discussions of healthy aging topics. PMID:21179256

  17. Hemangiosarcoma in a geriatric Labrador retriever.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Diya

    2012-08-01

    A geriatric Labrador retriever dog was presented for acute collapse. The dog was conscious but lethargic, tachypneic, tachycardic with weak femoral pulses, occasional pulse deficits, and pale mucous membranes. Radiography, ultrasonography, quick assessment tests, and a complete blood (cell) count (CBC)/biochemistry panel indicated internal hemorrhage and potential problems with hemostasis. The dog was euthanized. A necropsy, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry for CD31 and Factor VIII-related antigen cell markers supported a diagnosis of splenic hemangiosarcoma. PMID:23372199

  18. Evolving models of Geriatric Nursing care.

    PubMed

    Mezey, Mathy; Boltz, Marie; Esterson, Jessica; Mitty, Ethel

    2005-01-01

    Outcomes of care improve when older patients are cared for by nurses with demonstrated competence in geriatrics and in environments that structure nursing care around the needs of older adults. The past twenty years has seen the development of a number of exciting new nursing models in the delivery of care for older adults. This article highlights some of these evolving models of nursing practice in assisted living, home care, hospitals, and nursing homes. PMID:15716809

  19. Redefining the Economics of Geriatric Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Nacca, Christopher; Paller, David; Daniels, Alan H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The heath care system in the United States is in the midst of a transition, in large part to help accommodate an older and more medically complex population. Central to the current evolution is the reassessment of value based on the cost utility of a particular procedure compared to alternatives. The existing contribution of geriatric orthopedics to the societal burden of disease is substantial, and literature focusing on the economic value of treating elderly populations with musculoskeletal injuries is growing. Materials and Methods: A literature review of peer-reviewed publications and abstracts related to the cost-effectiveness of treating geriatric patients with orthopedic injuries was carried out. Results: In our review, we demonstrate that while cost-utility studies generally demonstrate net society savings for most orthopedic procedures, geriatric populations often contribute to negative net society savings due to decreased working years and lower salaries while in the workforce. However, the incremental cost-effective ratio for operative intervention has been shown to be below the financial willingness to treat threshold for common procedures including joint replacement surgery of the knee (ICER US$8551), hip (ICER US$17 115), and shoulder (CE US$957) as well as for spinal procedures and repair of torn rotator cuffs (ICER US$12 024). We also discuss the current trends directed toward improving institutional value and highlight important complementary next steps to help overcome the growing demands of an older, more active society. Conclusion: The geriatric population places a significant burden on the health care system. However, studies have shown that treating this demographic for orthopedic-related injuries is cost effective and profitable for providers under certain scenarios. PMID:26246943

  20. Early exposure to geriatric nursing through an externship program.

    PubMed

    Souder, Elaine; Beverly, Claudia J; Kitch, Stephanie; Lubin, Sandie A

    2012-01-01

    The Summer Geriatric Extern Program was developed in 2004 to provide nursing students between the junior and senior year an opportunity to learn more about careers in geriatric nursing.This full-time, eight-week commitment provides students with a stipend and a faculty mentor in their area of interest. Of the 24 externs since the inception of the program, seven have enrolled in graduate programs. The findings suggest that the summer geriatric externship program is effective in developing interest in a geriatric nursing career and providing exposure to nursing research and other aspects of the faculty role. PMID:22860479

  1. Patient-Reported Geriatric Symptoms as Risk Factors for Hospitalization and Emergency Department Visits

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Anupam; Crane, Sarah J; Tung, Ericka E; Hanson, Gregory J; North, Frederick; Cha, Stephen S; Takahashi, Paul Y

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify predictors of adverse outcomes and increased health care utilization in the elderly. The Mayo Ambulatory Geriatric Evaluation (MAGE) is a symptom questionnaire that was completed by patients aged 65 years and older during office visits to Primary Care Internal Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. It was introduced to improve screening for geriatric conditions. We conducted this study to explore the relationship between self-reported geriatric symptoms and hospitalization and emergency department (ED) visits within 1 year of completing the survey. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients who completed the MAGE from April 2008 to December 2010. The primary outcome was an ED visit or hospitalization within 1 year. Predictors included responses to individual questions in the MAGE. Data were obtained from the electronic medical record and administrative records. Logistic regression analyses were performed from significant univariate factors to determine predictors in a multivariable setting. A weighted scoring system was created based upon the odds ratios derived from a bootstrap process. The sensitivity, specificity, and AUC were calculated using this scoring system. The MAGE survey was completed by 7738 patients. The average age was 76.2 ± 7.68 years and 57% were women. Advanced age, a self-report of worse health, history of 2 or more falls, weight loss, and depressed mood were significantly associated with hospitalization or ED visits within 1 year. A score equal to or greater than 2 had a sensitivity of 0.74 and specificity of 0.45. The calculated AUC was 0.60. The MAGE questionnaire, which was completed by patients at an outpatient visit to screen for common geriatric issues, could also be used to assess risk for ED visits and hospitalization within 1 year. PMID:26029477

  2. [Prevention of catheter-related infections: minimizing secondary complications in geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, K; Christ, M; Battegay, M; Heppner, H J

    2013-06-01

    The use of intravascular or intraluminal catheters is common in geriatric medicine. Blood stream infections due to intravascular catheterization, peritoneal catheters for dialysis, suprapubic or transurethral catheters, or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy are a major source of nosocomial infections. Therefore, the prevention of catheter-associated infections is an important issue for physicians and nursing staff working in hospitals or in outpatient settings. The risk can be minimized by diligent checking of the indications, hygienic measures, using the correct materials, thorough follow-up, and education of the medical and nursing staff. Thus, it is possible to avoid individual suffering of patients and to reduce costs in the healthcare system. PMID:23712634

  3. Impact of an evidence-based medicine curriculum on medical students' attitudes and skills

    PubMed Central

    Dorsch, Josephine L.; Aiyer, Meenakshy K.; Meyer, Lynne E.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This evaluation study sought to assess the impact of an evidence-based medicine (EBM) course on students' self-perception of EBM skills, determine their use of EBM skills, and measure their performance in applying EBM skills in a simulated case scenario. Methods: Pre- and post-surveys and skills tests were developed to measure students' attitudes toward and proficiency in EBM skills. Third-year students completed the voluntary survey and skills test at the beginning and completion of a twelve-week clerkship in internal medicine (IM) co-taught by medical and library faculty. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test for a two-tailed test. Results: A statistically significant increase was found in the students' self-assessment of skills. Students reported using the journal literature significantly more frequently during the clerkship than before, although textbooks remained their number one resource. A majority of students reported frequent use of EBM skills during the clerkship. Statistically significant improvement in student performance was also found on the posttest, although the level of improvement was more modest than that found on the post-surveys. Conclusion: The introduction of EBM skills to students during a clinical clerkship provides students an opportunity to practice EBM skills and reinforces the use of evidence in making patient-care decisions. PMID:15494754

  4. The Filipino Nursing Students' Dilemmas in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Cruz, Andrei Angelo R.; Cruz, Angela Laurice G.; Cruz, Robert Edward D.; Cuarto, Jose Mari Nino L.

    2009-01-01

    The continually rising percentage of the elderly population and the demand for geriatric nursing care are dramatically related. While it is true that most undergraduate programs prepare nurses for the care of geriatric patients, most receive limited academic preparation in the nursing curriculum (Williams & Mezey, 2000). This is particularly true…

  5. Multiresistant pathogens in geriatric nursing – infection control in residential facilities for geriatric nursing in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Claudia; Schablon, Anja; Bollongino, Kirsten; Maaß, Monika; Kaß, Dietmar; Dulon, Madeleine; Diel, Roland; Nienhaus, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background: The increase of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) causes problems in geriatric nursing homes. Older people are at increased a growing risk of infection due to multimorbidity and frequent stays in hospital. A high proportion of the elderly require residential care in geriatric nursing facilities, where hygiene requirements in nursing homes are similar to those in hospitals. For this reason we examined how well nursing homes are prepared for MDROs and how effectively protect their infection control residents and staff. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on infection control in residential geriatric nursing facilities in Germany 2012. The questionnaire recorded important parameters of hygiene, resident and staff protection and actions in case of existing MDROs. Results: The response was 54% in Hamburg and 27% in the rest of Germany. Nursing homes were generally well equipped for dealing with infection control: There were standards for MDROs and regular hygiene training for staff. The facilities provided adequate protective clothing, affected residents are usually isolated and hygienic laundry processing conducted. There are deficits in the communication of information on infected residents with hospitals and general practitioners. 54% of nursing homes performed risk assessments for staff infection precaution. Conclusion: There is a growing interest in MDROs and infection control will be a challenge in for residential geriatric nursing facilities in the future. This issue has also drawn increasing attention. Improvements could be achieved by improving communication between different participants in the health service, together with specific measures for staff protection at work. PMID:25285266

  6. The portal of geriatrics online education: a 21st-century resource for teaching geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Leipzig, Rosanne M; Howe, Carol L; Sauvigne, Karen; Usiak, Craig; Soriano, Rainier P

    2015-02-01

    The way students are taught and evaluated is changing, with greater emphasis on flexible, individualized, learner-centered education, including the use of technology. The goal of assessment is also shifting from what students know to how they perform in practice settings. Developing educational materials for teaching in these ways is time-consuming and can be expensive. The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education (POGOe) was developed to aid educators in meeting these needs and become quicker, better-prepared teachers of geriatrics. POGOe contains more than 950 geriatrics educational materials that faculty at 45% of allopathic and 7% of osteopathic U.S. medical schools and the Centers for Geriatric Nursing Excellence have created. These materials include various instructional and assessment methodologies, including virtual and standardized patients, games, tutorials, case-based teaching, self-directed learning, and traditional lectures. Materials with common goals and resource types are available as selected educational series. Learner assessments comprise approximately 10% of the educational materials. POGOe also includes libraries of videos, images, and questions extracted from its educational materials to encourage educators to repurpose content components to create new resources and to align their teaching better with their learners' needs. Web-Geriatric Education Modules, a peer-reviewed online modular curriculum for medical students, is a prime example of this repurposing. The existence of a robust compendium of instructional and assessment materials allows educators to concentrate more on improving learner performance in practice and not simply on knowledge acquisition. It also makes it easier for nongeriatricians to teach the care of older adults in their respective disciplines. PMID:25644187

  7. Toenail onychomycosis in a Portuguese geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Dias, N; Santos, C; Portela, M; Lima, N

    2011-07-01

    Onychomycosis is a common fungal infection of the nail but few data of mycological features in geriatric Portuguese population are yet available. The aim of this study was to perform a mycological examination and characterization of fungal nail pattern of a geriatric population from the north of Portugal clinically suspected of onychomycosis. A total of 108 patients attending the Podology Service in the Centro Hospitalar do Alto Ave (Portugal) from October 2007 to January 2009 were enrolled. All were suspected of having onychomycosis by the abnormal appearance of their nails. From these, 59.3% were diabetic. Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis was the more common clinical pattern followed by total dystrophic onychomycosis. In 21.3% cases, every nail in both feet had an abnormal appearance. In 86%, the hallux was involved in at least one foot. Fifty samples were culture positive, and fifty-four isolates were reported regardless of the questionable pathogenicity of the infectious agent. In three cases, clinical feature of the nail, direct microscopy, and culture were consistent with Scopulariopsis infection. Fusarium spp. were identified in three cases; however, only one isolate was preceded by the observation of branching septate filaments by direct microscopy. No mixed infections with dermatophytes were reported. Trichophyton rubrum was the dermatophyte most frequently isolated (83.3%) followed by Trichophyton interdigitale. In Portugal, onychomycosis is still viewed by general population as a cosmetic condition. Health risk is enhanced in geriatrics that only perceived the severity of their condition when experiencing further foot complications that include bacterial infection and pain. PMID:21365319

  8. [Incidence of postoperative complications in geriatric gynecology].

    PubMed

    Rummler, S

    1984-01-01

    The results of a retrospective-study concerning postoperative complications after gynecologic geriatric surgery (506 patients, aged 60 years and over) at the Departement of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the District Hospital Stralsund/GDR are presented. In 106 patients (10,94 per cent) we have registered post-operative complications, in particular anaemia, fever and wound-period (1967 to 1971 = 8,22%, 1977 to 1981 = 13,29%). Gynecologic surgery in the aged requires a carefully clinical management in preoperative diagnostic and an intensive postoperative care. PMID:6475112

  9. Can enriching emotional intelligence improve medical students’ proactivity and adaptability during OB/GYN clerkships?

    PubMed Central

    Guseh, Stephanie H.; Chen, Xiaodong P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this pilot study was to examine our hypothesis that enriching workplace emotional intelligence through resident coaches could improve third-year medical students’ adaptability and proactivity on the Obstetrics and Gynecology clerkship. Methods An observational pilot study was conducted in a teaching hospital. Fourteen 3rd year medical students from two cohorts of clerkships were randomly divided into two groups, and equally assigned to trained resident coaches and untrained resident coaches. Data was collected through onsite naturalistic observation of students’ adaptability and proactivity in clinical settings using a checklist with a 4-point Likert scale (1=poor to 4=excellent). Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare the differences between these two groups. Results A total of 280 data points were collected through onsite observations conducted by investigators. All (n=14) students’ adaptability and proactivity performance significantly improved from an average of 3.04 to 3.45 (p=0.014) over 6-week clerkship. Overall, students with trained resident coaches adapted significantly faster and were more proactive in the obstetrics and gynecology clinical setting than the students with untrained coaches (3.31 vs. 3.24, p=0.019). Conclusions Findings from our pilot study supported our hypothesis that enriching workplace emotional intelligence knowledge through resident coaches was able to help medical students adapt into obstetrics and gynecology clinical settings faster and become more proactive in learning. Clerkship programs can incorporate the concept of a resident coach in their curriculum to help bridge medical students into clinical settings and to help them engage in self-directed learning throughout the rotation. PMID:26708233

  10. Medical student quality-of-life in the clerkships: a scale validation study.

    PubMed

    Brannick, Michael T; Horn, Gregory T; Schnaus, Michael J; Wahi, Monika M; Goldin, Steven B

    2015-04-01

    Many aspects of medical school are stressful for students. To empirically assess student reactions to clerkship programs, or to assess efforts to improve such programs, educators must measure the overall well-being of the students reliably and validly. The purpose of the study was to develop and validate a measure designed to achieve these goals. The authors developed a measure of quality of life for medical students by sampling (public domain) items tapping general happiness, fatigue, and anxiety. A quality-of-life scale was developed by factor analyzing responses to the items from students in two different clerkships from 2005 to 2008. Reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Validity was assessed by factor analysis, convergence with additional theoretically relevant scales, and sensitivity to change over time. The refined nine-item measure is a Likert scaled survey of quality-of-life items comprised of two domains: exhaustion and general happiness. The resulting scale demonstrated good reliability and factorial validity at two time points for each of the two samples. The quality-of-life measure also correlated with measures of depression and the amount of sleep reported during the clerkships. The quality-of-life measure appeared more sensitive to changes over time than did the depression measure. The measure is short and can be easily administered in a survey. The scale appears useful for program evaluation and more generally as an outcome variable in medical educational research. PMID:25831183

  11. Geriatric dyspnea: doing worse, feeling better.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Sibylle; von Leupoldt, Andreas; Van den Bergh, Omer

    2014-05-01

    Older age is associated with a decline in physical fitness and reduced efficiency of the respiratory system. Paradoxically, it is also related to reduced report of dyspnea, that is, the experience of difficult and uncomfortable breathing. Reduced symptom reporting contributes to misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of underlying disease, suboptimal treatment, faster disease progression, shorter life expectancy, lower quality of life for patients, and considerably increased costs for the health care system in an aging society. However, pathways in the complex relationship between dyspnea and age are not well explored yet. We propose a model on geriatric dyspnea that integrates physiological, neurological, psychological and social pathways which link older age with dyspnea perception and expression. We suggest that the seemingly paradox of reduction of dyspnea in older age, despite physiological decline, can be solved by taking age-related changes on these multiple levels into account. In identifying these variables, the Geriatric Dyspnea Model highlights risk factors for reduced dyspnea perception and report in older age and pathways for intervention. PMID:24675044

  12. Simulation in Medical School Education: Review for Emergency Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Bharath; ter Haar, Elizabeth; Bhat, Srinidhi Subraya; McCoy, Christopher Eric; Denmark, T. Kent; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2011-01-01

    Medical education is rapidly evolving. With the paradigm shift to small-group didactic sessions and focus on clinically oriented case-based scenarios, simulation training has provided educators a novel way to deliver medical education in the 21st century. The field continues to expand in scope and practice and is being incorporated into medical school clerkship education, and specifically in emergency medicine (EM). The use of medical simulation in graduate medical education is well documented. Our aim in this article is to perform a retrospective review of the current literature, studying simulation use in EM medical student clerkships. Studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of simulation in teaching basic science, clinical knowledge, procedural skills, teamwork, and communication skills. As simulation becomes increasingly prevalent in medical school curricula, more studies are needed to assess whether simulation training improves patient-related outcomes. PMID:22224138

  13. [Chartered specialist training in gerontology and geriatrics. Dissertation Council no. 601.001.01 working practice].

    PubMed

    Kozina, L S

    2014-01-01

    The article highlights basic facts about the foundation and activity of the Gerontology and Geriatrics Dissertation Council of St. Petersburg Institute of Bioregulation and Gerontology, which took invaluable part in chartered specialist training in this field of science that has actively developed in Russia in recent decades. Over the period from June, 2001 to December, 2013, a total of 41 doctoral dissertations were defended, of which 32 dissertations were on Medicine and 9 on Biological Sciences. Likewise, over the same period, a total of 186 candidate's dissertations were defended, of which 152 dissertations were on Medicine and 34 on Biological Sciences, the defenders coming from various regions of Russia and other countries. The defence-representative trend data acquired over the period of the Dissertation Council activities shows that the number of defended doctoral dissertations was relatively small within the period from 2002 to 2008, but it increased significantly in the years 2009 to 2013. The number of defended candidate's dissertations increased significantly over the same period, too. Among many others considered by the Dissertation Council, there were dissertations dedicated to basic research in the field of gerontology and geriatrics. The priority topics of a large number of dissertations performed in St. Petersburg and other Russian towns are age pathology mechanisms, geroprotective effects of regulatory peptides and effectiveness of their use in clinic. PMID:25306671

  14. Development of an Evaluative Procedure for Clinical Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Pancorbo, Salvador

    1980-01-01

    In order to evaluate the clinical competencies of graduate pharmacy students upon the completion of a medicine rotation, an oral examination has been developed that requires students to present data and defend decisions. Objectives, responsibilities, and competencies required by the rotation and nine sample exam questions are appended. (JMD)

  15. Contemporary Systemic Therapy for Urologic Malignancies in Geriatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Grivas, Petros D

    2015-11-01

    Current data on systemic therapy in geriatric populations with genitourinary malignancies are largely derived from retrospective analyses of prospectively conducted trials or retrospective reviews. Although extrapolation of these data to real-world patients should be cautious, patients aged 65 years or older with good functional status and minimal comorbidities seem to enjoy similar survival benefit from therapy as their younger counterparts. Chronologic age alone should generally not be used to guide management decisions. Comprehensive geriatric assessment tools and prospective studies in older adults integrating comprehensive geriatric assessment can shed light on the optimal management of urologic malignancies in this population. PMID:26476122

  16. Changing the Course of Geriatrics Education: An Evaluation of the First Cohort of Reynolds Geriatrics Education Programs

    PubMed Central

    Reuben, David B.; Bachrach, Peter S.; McCreath, Heather; Simpson, Deborah; Bragg, Elizabeth J.; Warshaw, Gregg A.; Snyder, Rani; Frank, Janet C.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Purpose To describe geriatric training initiatives implemented as a result of Reynolds Foundation grants awarded in 2001 (and concluding in 2005) and evaluate the resulting structure, process, and outcome changes Methods Cross-sectional survey of program directors at 10 academic institutions augmented by review of reports and secondary analyses of existing databases to identify structural and process measures of curriculum implementation, participation rates, and students’ responses to Association of American Medical Colleges Medical School Graduation Questionnaires about geriatrics training. Results All 10 institutions reported structural changes including newly developed or revised geriatric rotations or courses for their trainees. Most used online internet educational materials, sent students to new training venues, incorporated geriatric case discussions, implemented standardized patients, and utilized digital media. On average, each institution trained over 1,000 medical students, 500 residents, 100 faculty, and 700 non-faculty community physicians during the award period. Reynolds institutions also provided geriatrics training across 22 non-primary care disciplines. Eight schools implemented formal faculty development programs. By 2005, students at Reynolds-supported schools reported higher levels of geriatrics/gerontology education and more exposure to expert geriatric care by the attending faculty compared to students at non-Reynolds schools. Innovations and products were disseminated via journal publications, conference presentations, and POGOe (Portal of Geriatric Online Education). Conclusions The investment of extramural and institutional funds in geriatrics education has substantially influenced undergraduate, graduate, and practicing physician education at Reynolds-supported schools. The full impact of these programs on care of older persons will not be known until these trainees enter practice and educational careers. PMID:19704195

  17. Gastrointestinal and other vulnerabilities for geriatric globetrotters.

    PubMed

    Gordon, M E

    1991-05-01

    An awareness of the journey's destination and the consequential events along the way will better enhance our diagnoses and in turn sustain our elder "homo turisticus," no longer an endangered species but worthy of our continued compassionate care while enjoying their longevity. All potential treacheries must be assessed by each elderly traveler. It may be the first of many trips or the last opportunity to view and relate to the sequoia's longevity, hike the Scottish highlands, view the game of the Serengeti, explore the Nordic fjords, indulge in the Patagonian scenes of the Iguazú falls, seek the habitats of the Galápagos tortoise, partake of the photograph opportunities of Papua-New Guinea, or finalize that "last" business contract in the Orient. With consideration of these many vulnerabilities and potential hazards, why then undertake the journey? Perhaps our geriatric globetrotters give credence to the age-old saying (of unknown origin) "Running water never freezes." PMID:1855161

  18. Cholesterol management in geriatric patients: new guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mahvan, Tracy D; Hilaire, Michelle L; Vigil, Ashley; Mlodinow, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacists play an important role in the management of primary care disease states such as hypercholesterolemia. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines provide the pharmacist with pertinent treatment recommendations relevant to day-to-day clinical practice and geriatric care. This article reviews these new evidencebased guidelines for cholesterol management in general and for the elderly specifically. The new guidelines have implications for older adults remaining on or starting statin therapy. With this review, and based on the new guidelines, pharmacists will be informed on how to provide hyperlipidemia recommendations for the older adult. Monitoring of therapy, as well as adverse effects, will be reviewed, including differences among various practice settings. PMID:25695413

  19. Humanities and Geriatric Education: a Strategy for Recruitment?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher; Martin, Ruth Elwood

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is a common subject in arts and literature as it is a universal experience. The use of the humanities in medical education may have a positive effect on trainees’ attitude to caring for seniors and on geriatrics as a career choice. This paper summarizes the role of humanities in medical education and provides some examples and thoughts on how humanities curriculum can be used in geriatric teaching. PMID:25825611

  20. [Management and therapy of atrial fibrillation in geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Gosch, M; Roller, R E; Böhmdorfer, B; Benvenuti-Falger, U; Iglseder, B; Lechleitner, M; Sommeregger, U; Dovjak, P

    2012-01-01

    Among geriatric patients, atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. In patients over 80 years of age, the prevalence rises to approximately 10%. Atrial fibrillation is associated with serious health implications, including a 2-fold increase in mortality risk and a 5-fold increase in stroke risk. In contrast to these facts, the current guidelines on the management of atrial fibrillation of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) contain only a short paragraph on these patients. Many relevant clinical aspects go without any comment. Thus, the purpose of our paper is to discuss those special needs of geriatric patients and their physicians which are not mentioned in the guidelines of the ESC. In our review, we discuss rhythm versus rate control, oral anticoagulation, outcome, prevention, falls, adherence, polypharmacy, dementia, nursing home patients, frailty, and geriatric assessment in consideration of geriatric patients. An extended search of the literature on Pubmed served as the basis for this review. Individual aspects of each geriatric patient should be considered when managing these complex patients; however, the complexity of each case must not lead to an individualized therapy that is not in accordance with current guidelines and the literature. A large number of papers which help us to answer most of the clinical questions regarding the management of trial fibrillation in geriatric patients have already been published. PMID:22278008

  1. American Geriatrics Society 2015 Updated Beers Criteria for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The 2015 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Beers Criteria are presented. Like the 2012 AGS Beers Criteria, they include lists of potentially inappropriate medications to be avoided in older adults. New to the criteria are lists of select drugs that should be avoided or have their dose adjusted based on the individual's kidney function and select drug-drug interactions documented to be associated with harms in older adults. The specific aim was to have a 13-member interdisciplinary panel of experts in geriatric care and pharmacotherapy update the 2012 AGS Beers Criteria using a modified Delphi method to systematically review and grade the evidence and reach a consensus on each existing and new criterion. The process followed an evidence-based approach using Institute of Medicine standards. The 2015 AGS Beers Criteria are applicable to all older adults with the exclusion of those in palliative and hospice care. Careful application of the criteria by health professionals, consumers, payors, and health systems should lead to closer monitoring of drug use in older adults. PMID:26446832

  2. Clinical Conundrums in Management of Hypothyroidism in Critically Ill Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Vishal; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Sehgal, Rinku; Bajaj, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articles in various international and national bibliographic indices were extensively searched with an emphasis on thyroid and hypothyroid disorders, hypothyroidism in elderly hospitalized patients, hypothyroidism in critically ill geriatric population, thyroxine in elderly hypothyroid, drug interactions and thyroid hormones, and thyroid functions in elderly. Evidence acquisition: Entrez (including PubMed), NIH.gov, Medscape.com, WebMD.com, MedHelp.org, Search Medica, MD consult, yahoo.com, and google.com were searched. Manual search was performed on various textbooks of medicine, critical care, pharmacology, and endocrinology. Results: Thyroid function tests in elderly hospitalized patients must be interpreted with circumspection. The elderly are often exposed to high iodide content and critical care settings. This may occur because of either decreased iodine excretion or very high intake of iodine. This is especially true for elderly population with underlying acute or chronic kidney diseases or both. Amiodarone, with a very high iodine content, is also often used in this set of population. Moreover, other medications including iodinated contrast are often used in the critical care settings. These may affect different steps of thyroid hormone metabolism, and thereby complicate the interpretation of thyroid function tests. Conclusions: The current review is aimed at analyzing and managing various clinical aspects of hypothyroidism in hospitalized elderly, and critically ill geriatric patients. PMID:24719636

  3. Grading Medical Students in a Psychiatry Clerkship: Correlation with the NBME Subject Examination Scores and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchandani, Dilip

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: The author analyzed and compared various assessment methods for assessment of medical students; these methods included clinical assessment and the standardized National Board of Medical Education (NBME) subject examination. Method: Students were evaluated on their 6-week clerkship in psychiatry by both their clinical…

  4. Use of Clerkship Learning Objectives by Members of the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodkey, Amy C.; Sierles, Frederick S.; Woodard, John L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors aimed to determine the extent and use of the 1995 psychiatry clerkship goals and objectives published by the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry (ADMSEP) and to obtain members' guidance regarding their proposed revision. Methods: ADMSEP members were surveyed regarding their awareness and…

  5. 77 FR 14860 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ...Health Administration (VHA) strategic planning activities in geriatrics and extended care, recent VHA efforts regarding dementia and program advances in palliative care, and performance and oversight of VA Geriatric Research, Education, and...

  6. 78 FR 12831 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ...Health Administration (VHA) strategic planning activities in geriatrics and extended care, recent VHA efforts regarding dementia and program advances in palliative care, and performance and oversight of VA Geriatric Research, Education, and...

  7. 78 FR 6406 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ...Health Administration (VHA) strategic planning activities in geriatrics and extended care, recent VHA efforts regarding dementia and program advances in palliative care, and performance and oversight of VA Geriatric Research, Education, and...

  8. 78 FR 55778 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ...Health Administration (VHA) strategic planning activities in geriatrics and extended care; recent VHA efforts regarding dementia and program advances in palliative care; and performance and oversight of VA Geriatric Research, Education, and...

  9. Creation of a novel, interdisciplinary, multisite clerkship: "understanding lupus".

    PubMed

    Nambudiri, Vinod E; Newman, Lori R; Haynes, Harley A; Schur, Peter; Vleugels, Ruth Ann

    2014-03-01

    Few medical school electives include longitudinal patient care across clinical specialties and environments. Systemic lupus erythematosus represents a disease process with complex pathophysiology for students to learn from providers across medical fields, including dermatology, rheumatology, nephrology, and cardiology, in both pediatric and adult patients. Diagnosis, understanding, and management of lupus also rely heavily on basic science and clinical immunology, providing a link to the preclinical curriculum. In 2009, Harvard Medical School introduced a one-month elective course "Understanding Lupus: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Systemic Disease," designed to provide students with both outpatient and inpatient care experiences in dermatology, rheumatology, and multidisciplinary clinics at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital. Core components of the elective include a continuity experience that allows students to attend one patient's multiple specialist visits; didactics from dermatology, rheumatology, and immunology covering evidence-based medicine and basic sciences; and clinical immunology laboratory exposure to teach serologic and auto-antibody testing methods. The authors provide lessons learned in the development of this interdisciplinary, multi-institution elective rotation, which may serve as a model at other medical schools for incorporating basic sciences into the clinical curriculum and using multidisciplinary care and varied educational settings. PMID:24448033

  10. September 7 -9, 2007 5th annual rocky mountaIn GerIatrIc conference

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    September 7 - 9, 2007 5th annual rocky mountaIn GerIatrIc conference keyStone conference center key and surrounding area has many amenities and activities to offer. Rooms for the Rocky Mountain Geriatrics Rocky Mountain Geriatrics Conference when making your reservation. Course Director Robert S. Schwartz

  11. Geriatric Pharmacy Curriculum in U.S. Pharmacy Schools: A Nationwide Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, William; Pratt, Clara Collette

    1982-01-01

    A survey of 72 pharmacy schools shows 22 percent of the schools had no geriatric coursework, 35 percent offered only courses in which the geriatric content averaged under 12 percent of course content, and 43 percent offered courses that focused primarily on geriatrics, most including a major clinical component. (Author/MSE)

  12. Health Care Workforce Development in Rural America: When Geriatrics Expertise Is 100 Miles Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumosa, Nina; Horvath, Kathy J.; Huh, Terri; Livote, Elayne E.; Howe, Judith L.; Jones, Lauren Ila; Kramer, B. Josea

    2012-01-01

    The Geriatric Scholar Program (GSP) is a Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) workforce development program to infuse geriatrics competencies in primary care. This multimodal educational program is targeted to primary care providers and ancillary staff who work in VA's rural clinics. GSP consists of didactic education and training in geriatrics

  13. Three Strategies for Delivering Continuing Medical Education in Geriatrics to General Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rikkert, Marcel G. M.; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2004-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) need advanced skills in geriatric assessment to be competent to treat the increasing number of elderly patients. Continuing medical education in geriatrics for GPs is heterogeneous, and not assessed for effectiveness. In this study we compared the educational effects of three geriatric post-graduate training methods on…

  14. Inter-professional clinical placements as a recruitment strategy in geriatrics: survey of students' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Grymonpre, Ruby; van Ineveld, Cornelia; Nelson, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Inter-professional (IP) education and clinical placements have been identified as educational recruitment strategies to address the health workforce shortage. The research question in this secondary analysis study was, "What are students' attitudes toward working in geriatric environments and as part of inter-professional collaborative teams?" A five-item survey was administered to 47 pre-licensure learners from five different health professional programs (medicine, nursing, pharmacy, occupational therapy and physical therapy). Findings suggest that students want to practise on IP teams, which may influence their graduate first choice of employment. Although stronger evidence is required, offering IP clinical placements may be an important recruitment strategy, especially for those sites traditionally deemed less desirable. PMID:24034778

  15. Is geriatrics the answer to the problem of old age? 1

    PubMed Central

    Millard, P H

    1976-01-01

    Two doctors attempt to answer this question, one a specialist in geriatric medicine, the other a psychiatrist interested in the psychiatric problems of the elderly and the old. Both, however, come to the same general conclusion: attitudes of the doctors themselves and of society must be changed. These attitudes can determine not only whether an old person lives or dies but how he lives. Old people should not have to survive in mentally suspended animation with all objectives gone but should be helped to achieve the goal of an independent life until death in their own homes. The third paper in this miniature symposium is provided by David Hobman, of Age Concern, who amplifies the specialist views of the first two writers in his discussion of attitudes to the elderly in modern society. He hints, however, that these may shortly change as the elderly become a sophisticated and powerful lobby which governments are forced to heed. PMID:1003438

  16. UCF COLLEGE OF MEDICINE M.D. EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM Please contact Molly Willis for use of, or corrections to this document.

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    UCF COLLEGE OF MEDICINE M.D. EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM Please contact Molly Willis for use of & Medical Humanities Patient SafetyMedical NutritionMedical InformaticsGender Based Medicine Geriatrics and Behavior (7 weeks) Int./Fam. Medicine Neurology March April Pediatrics June Focused Inquiry and Research

  17. Geriatric pain competencies and knowledge assessment for nurses in long term care settings

    PubMed Central

    Swafford, Kristen L.; Miller, Lois L.; Herr, Keela; Forcucci, Chris; Kelly, Anne Marie L.; Bakerjian, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Pain in older adults is a prevalent problem that affects quality of life and challenges nurses, particularly those caring for older adults living in long term care settings. Despite the national priority of pain management, insufficient knowledge of nurses about geriatric pain is a documented barrier to effective geriatric pain management in all long term care settings. To address this knowledge gap, a website (GeriatricPain.org) was developed by the National Geriatric Pain Collaborative with a grant from the MayDay Fund to provide a single site for evidenced-based, easy-to-use, downloadable resources on pain management. This paper describes the development of the most recent addition to the website, a set of evidence-based core geriatric pain management competencies and a geriatric pain knowledge assessment, and discusses their potential uses in improving pain care for older adults. Geriatric Pain Competencies and Knowledge Assessment for Nurses in Long Term Care Settings. PMID:25037079

  18. Creating a Surgery Clerkship in a Changing Environment: Reality, Simulation, and the Rules of Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Leigh V.; Gusberg, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes the current challenges associated with creating a successful surgical clerkship and the ways in which teacher-focused and curriculum-focused initiatives can address these challenges. The challenges are both systemic (reflected by changes in our health care system and training programs) and institutional (reflected by factors that affect curriculum design and faculty advancement). Particular attention is paid to residents as teachers, faculty as mentors, the educational impact of the operating room, and the role of simulation. Strategies for engaging students, residents, and faculty are explored. The premise and impact of a comprehensive simulation course on the clinical education of medical students is detailed. Emphasis is placed on the educational validity of accountability and engagement of both the teachers and the learners. PMID:22461753

  19. Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship: Implementation and Evaluation of a Bi-institutional Pilot Curriculum

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, Daniel W.; Spektor, Alexander; Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C.; Krishnan, Monica S.; Jimenez, Rachel B.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. Methods and Materials: A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1 = not at all, 5 = extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Results: Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as “quite useful” to “extremely useful” (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. Conclusions: A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency.

  20. Predicting Geriatric Falls Following an Episode of Emergency Department Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Avidan, Michael S.; Wildes, Tanya; Stark, Susan; Fowler, Susan A.; Lo, Alexander X.

    2015-01-01

    Background Falls are the leading cause of traumatic mortality in geriatric adults. Despite recent multispecialty guideline recommendations that advocate for proactive fall prevention protocols in the emergency department (ED), the ability of risk factors or risk stratification instruments to identify subsets of geriatric patients at increased risk for short-term falls is largely unexplored. Objectives This was a systematic review and meta-analysis of ED-based history, physical examination, and fall risk stratification instruments with the primary objective of providing a quantitative estimate for each risk factor’s accuracy to predict future falls. A secondary objective was to quantify ED fall risk assessment test and treatment thresholds using derived estimates of sensitivity and specificity. Methods A medical librarian and two emergency physicians (EPs) conducted a medical literature search of PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL, DARE, the Cochrane Registry, and Clinical Trials. Unpublished research was located by a hand search of emergency medicine (EM) research abstracts from national meetings. Inclusion criteria for original studies included ED-based assessment of pre-ED or post-ED fall risk in patients 65 years and older with sufficient detail to reproduce contingency tables for meta-analysis. Original study authors were contacted for additional details when necessary. The Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) was used to assess individual study quality for those studies that met inclusion criteria. When more than one qualitatively similar study assessed the same risk factor for falls at the same interval following an ED evaluation, then meta-analysis was performed using Meta-DiSc software. The primary outcomes were sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios for fall risk factors or risk stratification instruments. Secondary outcomes included estimates of test and treatment thresholds using the Pauker method based on accuracy, screening risk, and the projected benefits or harms of fall prevention interventions in the ED. Results A total of 608 unique and potentially relevant studies were identified, but only three met our inclusion criteria. Two studies that included 660 patients assessed 29 risk factors and two risk stratification instruments for falls in geriatric patients in the 6 months following an ED evaluation, while one study of 107 patients assessed the risk of falls in the preceding 12 months. A self-report of depression was associated with the highest positive likelihood ratio (LR) of 6.55 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.41 to 30.48). Six fall predictors were identified in more than one study (past falls, living alone, use of walking aid, depression, cognitive deficit, and more than six medications) and meta-analysis was performed for these risk factors. One screening instrument was sufficiently accurate to identify a subset of geriatric ED patients at low risk for falls with a negative LR of 0.11 (95% CI = 0.06 to 0.20). The test threshold was 6.6% and the treatment threshold was 27.5%. Conclusions This study demonstrates the paucity of evidence in the literature regarding ED-based screening for risk of future falls among older adults. The screening tools and individual characteristics identified in this study provide an evidentiary basis on which to develop screening protocols for geriatrics adults in the ED to reduce fall risk PMID:25293956

  1. Geriatric muscle stem cells switch reversible quiescence into senescence.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Victor, Pedro; Gutarra, Susana; García-Prat, Laura; Rodriguez-Ubreva, Javier; Ortet, Laura; Ruiz-Bonilla, Vanessa; Jardí, Mercè; Ballestar, Esteban; González, Susana; Serrano, Antonio L; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2014-02-20

    Regeneration of skeletal muscle depends on a population of adult stem cells (satellite cells) that remain quiescent throughout life. Satellite cell regenerative functions decline with ageing. Here we report that geriatric satellite cells are incapable of maintaining their normal quiescent state in muscle homeostatic conditions, and that this irreversibly affects their intrinsic regenerative and self-renewal capacities. In geriatric mice, resting satellite cells lose reversible quiescence by switching to an irreversible pre-senescence state, caused by derepression of p16(INK4a) (also called Cdkn2a). On injury, these cells fail to activate and expand, undergoing accelerated entry into a full senescence state (geroconversion), even in a youthful environment. p16(INK4a) silencing in geriatric satellite cells restores quiescence and muscle regenerative functions. Our results demonstrate that maintenance of quiescence in adult life depends on the active repression of senescence pathways. As p16(INK4a) is dysregulated in human geriatric satellite cells, these findings provide the basis for stem-cell rejuvenation in sarcopenic muscles. PMID:24522534

  2. Clinical conundrums and challenges during geriatric orthopedic emergency surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Despite so many advancements and innovations in anesthetic techniques, expectations and challenges have also grown in plenty. Cardiac, pediatric, obstetric and neuro-anesthesia have perfectly developed to fulfill the desired needs of respective patient population. However, geriatric anesthesia has been shown a lesser interest in teaching and clinical practices over the years as compared with other anesthetic sub-specialties. The large growing geriatric population globally is also associated with an increase number of elderly patients presenting for orthopedic emergency surgeries. Orthopedic emergency surgery in geriatric population is not only a daunting clinical challenge but also has numerous socio-behavioral and economic ramifications. Decision making in anesthesia is largely influenced by the presence of co-morbidities, neuro-cognitive functions and the current socio-behavioral status. Pre-anesthetic evaluation and optimization are extremely important for a better surgical outcome but is limited by time constraints during emergency surgery. The current review aims to highlight comprehensively the various clinical, social, behavioral and psychological aspects during pre-anesthetic evaluation associated with emergency orthopedic surgery in geriatric population. PMID:25810963

  3. Objective Structured Video Examinations (OSVEs) for Geriatrics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Deborah; Gehl, Suzanne; Helm, Robin; Kerwin, Diana; Drewniak, Theresa; Bragg, Dawn St. A.; Ziebert, Monica M.; Denson, Steven; Brown, Diane; Heffron, Mary Gleason; Mitchell, Julie; Harsch, Harold H.; Havas, Nancy; Duthie, Edmund, Jr.; Denson, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) and the Wisconsin Geriatric Education Center (WGEC) are committed to developing educational materials for primary care physicians in training. In response to the opportunity created by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competency mandate, an MCW-led interdisciplinary working…

  4. A Geriatric Day Hospital: Who Improves the Most?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desrosiers, Johanne; Hebert, Rejean; Payette, Helene; Roy, Pierre-Michel; Tousignant, Michel; Cote, Sylvie; Trottier, Lise

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the changes in some bio-psychosocial variables (functional independence, nutritional risk, pain, balance and walking, grip strength, general well-being, psychiatric profile, perception of social support, leisure satisfaction, and caregivers' feeling of burden) in four categories of clients during their program at a geriatric

  5. [Geriatric treatment in hospitals?--medical, legal, and economic aspects].

    PubMed

    Plute, G; Vogel, W

    2007-12-01

    Multimorbidity and functional impairment in geriatric patients regularly necessitate a combination of acute medical care and functional therapy. In Germany, comprehensive geriatric care is usually provided in hospitals, but also in clinical rehabilitation units. Different payment systems (diagnosis related groups in hospitals, day-to-day charges in rehabilitation centers) have precipitated a discussion on the separation of the acute phase from the rehabilitative phase of the disease with medical issues prevailing in the former and functional training in the latter. In geriatric patients, however, medical treatment of acute and chronic diseases should be continuously combined with functional therapy from the beginning of the hospital stay (i. e. early rehabilitation). Thus, acute hospital treatment followed by rehabilitation in a different institution, a method frequently used with younger patients with single defined diagnoses, has shown to be disadvantageous in geriatric patients. Some federal states in Germany favor the concept of one-step comprehensive hospital care including rehabilitation. As discussed in the article in detail, this procedure is in full accordance with the German social law. PMID:18074086

  6. Geriatric Training Needs of Nursing-Home Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubart, Emily; Segal, Refael; Rosenfeld, Vera; Madjar, Jack; Kakuriev, Michael; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Medical care in nursing homes is not provided by board-licensed geriatricians; it mainly comes from physicians in need of educational programs in the field of geriatrics. Such programs, based on curriculum guidelines, should be developed. The purpose of this study was to seek input from nursing home physicians on their perceived needs for training…

  7. Health Promotion/Disease Prevention: New Directions for Geriatric Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levkoff, Sue; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes 10 modules for primary care practitioners on health promotion/disease prevention for the elderly on these topics: Alzheimer's disease in minorities, dehydration, diabetes, elder abuse, geriatric nutrition, oncology, oral health in long-term care, incontinence, injury prevention, and physical activity. These areas are significant for…

  8. Geriatric Day Care and Homemaker Services: An Experimental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Thomas H.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Examined the impact of geriatric day care and homemaker services on patient outcomes. It was found that there were significant differences in physical functioning and activity level for the day care samples and in physical functioning and contentment level for the homemaker study sample. (Author)

  9. 8th Annual Rocky Mountain Geriatric Conference Active Aging

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    to the Community September 15 ­ 17, 2010 Park City Marriott Park City, Utah Presented By: Division of Geriatrics and the development of com- munity-based programs. Topics include: age-related changes in musculoskeletal health in a rehabilitation environment, motivational issues in exercise and the impact of exercise on cognitive

  10. Medical Readers' Theater: Relevance to Geriatrics Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Johanna; Cho, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Medical Readers' Theater (MRT) is an innovative and simple way of helping medical students to reflect on difficult-to-discuss topics in geriatrics medical education, such as aging stereotypes, disability and loss of independence, sexuality, assisted living, relationships with adult children, and end-of-life issues. The authors describe a required…

  11. Maximizing the Potential of Internships in Gerontology and Geriatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karasik, Rona J.

    2009-01-01

    Internships and similar applied opportunities have long been valued for providing students with opportunities for practical experience, career preparation, and personal growth. The need for applied experiences in gerontology and geriatrics is particularly salient. Creating and sustaining effective internship experiences, however, requires careful…

  12. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Kathryn Betts; Matto, Holly C.; Sanders, Sara

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) is widely used in clinical and research settings to screen older adults for depressive symptoms. Although several exploratory factor analytic structures have been proposed for the scale, no independent confirmation has been made available that would enable investigators to confidently identify scores…

  13. Rasch Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale--Short Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Karl S.; Green, Kathy E.; Cox, Enid O.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine scale dimensionality, reliability, invariance, targeting, continuity, cutoff scores, and diagnostic use of the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-SF) over time with a sample of 177 English-speaking U.S. elders. Design and Methods: An item response theory, Rasch analysis, was conducted with…

  14. Novel ethical dilemmas arising in geriatric clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Calleja-Sordo, Elisa Constanza; de Hoyos, Adalberto; Méndez-Jiménez, Jorge; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Valderrama, Alejandro; García-Peña, Carmen; Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine empirically the state of the art of the medical care, when healthcare personal is confronted with ethical dilemmas related with the care they give to the geriatric population. An observational, longitudinal, prospective and qualitative study was conducted by analyzing the correlation between healthcare personnel-patient relationship, and ethical judgments regarding dilemmas that arise in daily clinical practice with geriatric patients. Mexican healthcare personnel with current active practices were asked to write up an ethical dilemma that arose frequently or that had impacted their medical practice. From the narrative input, we were able to draw up a database with 421 dilemmas, and those corresponding to patients 60 years and older were selected (n = 54, 12.8 %). The axiological analysis of the narrative dilemmas of geriatric patients was made using dialectical empiricism. The axiological analysis values found most frequently were classified into three groups: the impact of healthcare, the roles of the physician, and refusal of therapy; the healthcare role of educator, caring for the patients' life and the risk of imminent death where the values found more often. The persistence and universality of certain dilemmas in geriatrics calls for awareness and requires a good training in the ethical discernment of these dilemmas. This would help to improve substantially the care and the life quality of this population. PMID:25185872

  15. The Use of an Integrated Website to Enhance the Educational Experience in a Medical School Radiology Clerkship Course.

    PubMed

    Desai, Naman S; Bunch, Paul M; DiSalvo, Donald N; O'Brien, Reiko; Andriole, Katherine P; Smith, Terri; Durfee, Sara M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of creating an integrated website for the medical students enrolled in a core radiology clerkship and to assess the impact of this website on students' overall educational experience. An integrated website was created for the medical students and hosted on the main departmental website. The components of the website included: announcements and password-protected schedule, curriculum, student assessment, information about different radiology sections, digital resources, and fourth year opportunities. The schedule section was created using Google Calendar to facilitate automatic syncing and real-time updates to the students' mobile devices. Weblinks for resources and assignments were incorporated into the calendar entries, which could be "pushed" to students in real time. Student attitudes were assessed via an exit survey. Various website usage statistics were collected. A total of 35 students who have rotated through the month-long clerkship thus far have used the website. Overall, 80% of students accessed the website once or multiple times a day. Over 90% of students thought that the website was well organized and easy to use; having access to the schedule on a smartphone had a positive impact on overall clerkship experience; the website had an overall positive impact on their clerkship experience; and they would recommend it to visiting medical students. Since July 2013, there have been a total of 9740 page views with 4113 unique visits to the website (an average of 17 visits per day from 6 visitors per day). The authors conclude that the creation of an integrated website has a positive impact on students' overall educational experience. PMID:25896546

  16. Use of Geriatric Assessment for Older Adults in the Oncology Setting: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Geriatric assessment is a multidisciplinary diagnostic process that evaluates the older adult’s medical, psychological, social, and functional capacity. No systematic review of the use of geriatric assessment in oncology has been conducted. The goals of this systematic review were: 1) to provide an overview of all geriatric assessment instruments used in the oncology setting; 2) to examine the feasibility and psychometric properties of those instruments; and 3) to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of geriatric assessment in predicting or modifying outcomes (including the impact on treatment decision making, toxicity of treatment, and mortality). Methods We searched Medline, Embase, Psychinfo, Cinahl, and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English, French, Dutch, or German between January 1, 1996, and November 16, 2010, reporting on cross-sectional, longitudinal, interventional, or observational studies that assessed the feasibility or effectiveness of geriatric assessment instruments. The quality of articles was evaluated using relevant quality assessment frameworks. Results We identified 83 articles that reported on 73 studies. The quality of most studies was poor to moderate. Eleven studies examined psychometric properties or diagnostic accuracy of the geriatric assessment instruments used. The assessment generally took 10–45min. Geriatric assessment was most often completed to describe a patient’s health and functional status. Specific domains of geriatric assessment were associated with treatment toxicity in 6 of 9 studies and with mortality in 8 of 16 studies. Of the four studies that examined the impact of geriatric assessment on the cancer treatment decision, two found that geriatric assessment impacted 40%–50% of treatment decisions. Conclusion Geriatric assessment in the oncology setting is feasible, and some domains are associated with adverse outcomes. However, there is limited evidence that geriatric assessment impacted treatment decision making. Further research examining the effectiveness of geriatric assessment on treatment decisions and outcomes is needed. PMID:22851269

  17. Presentation and Management Outcomes of Corneal and Scleral Perforations in Geriatric Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Ying Fong, Yoly Yeuk; Yu, Marco; Young, Alvin Lerrmann; Jhanji, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We compared the clinical presentation and treatment outcomes of corneal and scleral perforations in geriatric nursing home residents, geriatric community residents, and non-geriatric population. The medical records of patients who were treated for corneal and scleral perforations at the Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong between January 1, 2004 and May 1, 2013, were reviewed retrospectively. Of 144 cases, 53 (37%) occurred in the geriatric population, of which 16 (11%) lived in nursing homes, and 37 (26%) were community residents. There were 91 (63%) patients in the non-geriatric group. The mean age of the patients in nursing home geriatric group was 86.5 years (87.5% females). The most common etiology of perforation was trauma. Rupture due to fall was more common in geriatric patients (P?geriatric patients (P?geriatric nursing home group compared to the other groups (P?=?0.001). In the geriatric nursing home group, visual acuity at presentation (P?geriatric nursing home residents carry a poor visual prognosis. The causes and anatomical outcomes of such events in geriatric age group differ from those in the general population. In our study, geriatric patients residing in nursing homes had worse baseline as well as posttreatment visual acuity, compared to community residents. PMID:26356724

  18. Managing constipation: implementing a protocol in a geriatric rehabilitation setting.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jennifer; Holowaty, Sandra

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effect of implementing a constipation management protocol (CMP) within a geriatric rehabilitation setting. A convergent mixed-methods research design was used. Quantitative data on bowel activity, laxative use, opiate drug use, and nursing documentation regarding bowel care were gathered through a review of health records for 305 patients admitted to three geriatric rehabilitation units before (n = 137) and after (n = 168) protocol implementation over two 3-month periods. Focus groups were conducted examining nursing staff's experiences with such a protocol. Findings revealed that although implementation of the CMP did not reduce constipation rates among older patients, the average number of incidences of constipation per patient was reduced after implementation of the protocol. More importantly, it resulted in more due diligence by staff regarding patients' bowel patterns as well as improved bowel care documentation. Findings and recommendations extend current literature and have practical implications for nurses interested in improving management of patients' bowel care. PMID:24804648

  19. Geriatric Rehabilitation Patients’ Perceptions of Unit Dining Locations

    PubMed Central

    Baptiste, Françoise; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz-Wilner, Claire-Jehanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Eating together is promoted among hospitalized seniors to improve their nutrition. This study aimed to understand geriatric patients’ perceptions regarding meals in a common dining area versus at the bedside. Methods An exploratory qualitative study was conducted. Open-ended questions were asked of eight patients recruited from a geriatric rehabilitation unit where patients had a choice of meal location. Results Eating location was influenced by compliance with the perceived rules of the unit, physical and emotional well-being, and quarantine orders. Certain participants preferred eating in the common dining room where they had more assistance from hospital staff, a more attractive physical environment, and the opportunity to socialize. However, other participants preferred eating at their bedsides, feeling the quality of social interaction was poor in the dining room. Conclusions Participants’ experiences of, and preferences for, communal dining differed. If the benefits of communal dining are to be maximized, different experiences of this practice must be considered. PMID:24883161

  20. Principles of comanagement and the geriatric fracture center.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Daniel Ari; Friedman, Susan M

    2014-05-01

    This article describes the principles of comanagement in an optimized geriatric fracture center. This is a collaborative model of care that uses patient-centered, protocol-driven care to standardize the care for most patient fragility fractures. This model also uses shared decision making and frequent communication to improve clinically relevant outcomes. The orthopedic and medical teams are equally responsible from admission to discharge and are responsible for daily evaluation and clinical management of the patient. PMID:24721359

  1. Research priorities in geriatric oncology for 2013 and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mohile, Supriya; Dale, William; Magnuson, Allison; Kamath, Nayana; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of cancer increases with advanced age. Unfortunately, there is a significant lack of evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of treatments. The oncology community also lacks information regarding which older patients are most likely to benefit from treatment without undue toxicities. Interventions to lower symptoms and reduce long-term complications from cancer and cancer treatment in older patients are urgently needed. Establishing research priorities in geriatric oncology could help guide researchers and focus efforts on interventions that have the highest likelihood of improving outcomes. The Cancer and Aging Research Group, in partnership with the National Institute on Aging and National Cancer Institute, held linked conferences as part of a U13 grant in September of 2010 and November of 2012, summarising the gaps in knowledge in geriatric oncology and recommending ways to close these gaps. The overall purpose of this review is to highlight the important research priorities in geriatric oncology from the literature and from the previous U13 meetings. More evidence regarding the treatment of older cancer patients is urgently needed given the rapid aging of the population. PMID:25346565

  2. How to Implement a Geriatric Assessment in Your Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sattar, Schroder; Alibhai, Shabbir M.H.; Wildiers, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a disease that mostly affects older adults. Other health conditions, changes in functional status, and use of multiple medications change the risks and benefits of cancer treatment for older adults. Several international organizations, such as the International Society of Geriatric Oncology, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, recommend the conduct of a geriatric assessment (GA) for older adults with cancer to help select the most appropriate treatment and identify any underlying undetected medical, functional, and psychosocial issues that can interfere with treatment. The aim of this review is to describe what a GA is and how to implement it in daily clinical practice for older adults with cancer in the oncology setting. We provide an overview of commonly used tools. Key considerations in performing the GA include the resources available (staff, space, and time), patient population (who will be assessed), what GA tools to use, and clinical follow-up (who will be responsible for using the GA results for developing care plans and who will provide follow-up care). Important challenges in implementing GA in clinical practice include not having easy and timely access to geriatric expertise, patient burden of the additional hospital visits, and establishing collaboration between the GA team and oncologists regarding expectations of the population referred for GA and expected outcomes of the GA. Finally, we provide some possible interventions for problems identified during the GA. PMID:25187477

  3. [Falling in geriatrics. Diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Rapp, K

    2011-08-01

    Falls are among the most frequent adverse events in the life of an older person. Accident and emergency units, outpatient services and internal medicine wards should have a diagnostic concept for falls and fall-related injuries and implement an evidence-based risk management for fall prevention. The recently published Reviews of the Cochrane Collaboration and the revised guidelines of the Anglo-American medical societies are a proper basis to plan these steps. This, of course, has to be adapted for the needs of each institution. Currently, it is probable that at least 30% of all falls are preventable. A structured fall history and multifactorial assessment is not part of the routine of outpatient and inpatient services in Germany. The planned revision of the German nursing guideline on fall prevention and the current activities of the Aktionsbündnis Patientensicherheit will also lead to a legal dilemma for those institutions that have not implemented an adequate workup. PMID:21755365

  4. Impact of the Foundations of Clinical Medicine Course on USMLE Scores

    PubMed Central

    Blue, Amy V.; Powell, Caroline K.; Geesey, Mark E.; Moran, William P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The synthesis of basic and clinical science knowledge during the clerkship years has failed to meet educational expectations. OBJECTIVES We hypothesized that a small-group course emphasizing the basic science underpinnings of disease, Foundations of Clinical Medicine (FCM), could be integrated into third year clerkships and would not negatively impact the United States Medical Licensure Examination (USMLE) step 2 scores. DESIGN In 2001–2002, all third year students met weekly in groups of 8–12 clustered within clerkships to discuss the clinical and basic science aspects of prescribed, discipline-specific cases. PARTICIPANTS Students completing USMLE step 2 between 1999 and 2004 (n?=?743). MEASUREMENTS Course evaluations were compared with the overall institutional average. Bivariate analyses compared the mean USMLE steps 1 and 2 scores across pre- and post-FCM student cohorts. We used multiple linear regression to assess the association between USMLE step 2 scores and FCM cohort controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS Students’ average course evaluation score rose from 66 to 77 (2001–2004) compared to an institutional average of 73. The unadjusted mean USMLE step 1 score was higher for the post-FCM cohort (212.9 vs 207.5, respectively, p?clerkships is feasible and associated with improvement in standardized testing. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi: 10.1007/s11606-008-0631-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18612732

  5. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  6. Teaching medical student geriatrics competencies in 1 week: an efficient model to teach and document selected competencies using clinical and community resources.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Hal H; Lambros, Ann; Davis, Brooke R; Lawlor, Janice S; Lovato, James; Sink, Kaycee M; Demons, Jamehl L; Lyles, Mary F; Watkins, Franklin S; Callahan, Kathryn E; Williamson, Jeff D

    2013-07-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the John A. Hartford Foundation published geriatrics competencies for medical students in 2008 defining specific knowledge and skills that medical students should be able to demonstrate before graduation. Medical schools, often with limited geriatrics faculty resources, face challenges in teaching and assessing these competencies. As an initial step to facilitate more-efficient implementation of the competencies, a 1-week geriatrics rotation was developed for the third year using clinical, community, and self-directed learning resources. The Wake Forest University School of Medicine Acute Care for the Elderly Unit serves as home base, and each student selects a half-day outpatient or long-term care experience. Students also perform a home-based falls-risk assessment with a Meals-on-Wheels client. The objectives for the rotation include 20 of the 26 individual AAMC competencies and specific measurable tracking tasks for seven individual competencies. In the evaluation phase, 118 students completed the rotation. Feedback was positive, with an average rating of 7.1 (1 = worst, 10 = best). Students completed a 23-item pre- and post-knowledge test, and average percentage correct improved by 15% (P < .001); this improvement persisted at graduation (2 years after the pretest). On a 12-item survey of attitudes toward older adults, improvement was observed immediately after the rotation that did not persist at graduation. Ninety-seven percent of students documented completion of the competency-based tasks. This article provides details of development, structure, evaluation, and lessons learned that will be useful for other institutions considering a brief, concentrated geriatrics experience in the third year of medical school. PMID:23710572

  7. The annual Rocky Mountain Geriatric Conference is a great tradition. Our planning committee is excited about the enthusiasm for this year's Rocky Mountain program in geriatrics. We have a full

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    [1] Welcome! The annual Rocky Mountain Geriatric Conference is a great tradition. Our planning committee is excited about the enthusiasm for this year's Rocky Mountain program in geriatrics. We have Hicken, Marilyn Luptak, Karey Johnson, Jack Christensen 9th Annual Rocky Mountain Geriatrics Conference

  8. Integrating and Evaluating Geriatrics in Medical School: A Novel Approach for the Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besdine, Richard W.; Shield, Renee R.; McNicoll, Lynn; Campbell, Susan E.; Wetle, Terrie

    2011-01-01

    Brown Medical School developed a comprehensive curriculum in which enriched aging content increased from 22 to 80 hours in preclerkship courses and was also added for clerkships, residencies, and nongeriatrician physicians. Innovative evaluation strategies are also described. Highlights include "treasure hunts" in the anatomy laboratory, a…

  9. How Many Sides Does a Coin Have? A Phenomenology of Filipino Nurses' Motivation and Attitudes toward Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Dangoy, Reena-Jane D.; David, Kathleen Christian V.; Dayo, Ken Jarrett H.; de Claro, Keisha A.; de Guzman, Giorgio von Gerri G.; de Jesus, Gerald Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    Nurses play a significant role in geriatric care. However, as the aging population and demand for geriatric nurses increase worldwide, shortages of nurses seem to arise. This creates the need to assess and address the motivation and attitudes of nurses toward geriatric care. The intent of this qualitative study is to surface the essence or the…

  10. Annual Rocky Mountain Geriatrics Conference Navigating Complexity: A Road Map for Successful

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    11th Annual Rocky Mountain Geriatrics Conference Navigating Complexity: A Road Map for Successful Transitions Across the Care Continuum September 9-10, 2013 Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort Salt Lake City, Utah on Aging, University of Utah Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center (GRECC ­ VISN 19) VA Salt

  11. An Innovative Continuing Nursing Education Program Targeting Key Geriatric Conditions for Hospitalized Older People in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Shen, Jun; Wu, Haifeng; Ding, Fu; He, Xizhen; Zhu, Yueping

    2013-01-01

    A lack of knowledge in registered nurses about geriatric conditions is one of the major factors that contribute to these conditions being overlooked in hospitalized older people. In China, an innovative geriatric continuing nursing education program aimed at developing registered nurses' understanding of the complex care needs of hospitalized…

  12. [Geriatric rehabilitation from the perspective of Book 9 of the German social code, SGB IX].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, H

    2007-10-01

    The legal foundations for provision and realization of geriatric rehabilitation benefits are contained in particular in Book 9 of the German social code, SGB IX (covering rehabilitation and participation of people with disabilities). This paper discusses claims foundations and benefit prerequisites of geriatric rehabilitation taking into consideration the relations between Book 5 (on health insurance) and Book 9 of the social code. The article includes a definition of "geriatric rehabilitation" in light of the SGB IX, describes the benefit carriers' obligations as well as the procedure in place for determining geriatric rehab need, in this context appraising the designation as "geriatric patient" in terms of its appropriateness as an identifying criterion in determining need. Provision of geriatric rehab benefits is contingent on a potential for attaining rehab goals as specified by SGB IX as well as on fulfillment of the benefit prerequisites. Responsibility for the content, extent and quality of geriatric rehabilitation lies with the benefit carriers, as is the case for the obligation to secure availability of the required numbers and quality of rehabilitation facilities and services. The article specifies the legal foundations of the various benefit types (ambulatory, mobile rehab, under a Personal Budget, integrated benefit provision, or early rehab), and discusses geriatric rehabilitation in the framework of an insurance-based medical care system as well as of activating care. PMID:17955397

  13. Mortality of Geriatric and Younger Patients with Schizophrenia in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ran, Mao-Sheng; Chan, Cecilia Lai-Wan; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai; Tang, Cui-Ping; Lin, Fu-Rong; Li, Li; Li, Si-Gan; Mao, Wen-Jun; Hu, Shi-Hui; Schwab, Gerhard; Conwell, Yeates

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the differences in mortality among non-institutionalized geriatric and younger patients with schizophrenia. In this study long-term mortality and suicidal behavior of all the geriatric (age greater than or equal to 65 years), middle-age (age 41-64 years), and young (age 15-40 years) subjects with schizophrenia living in a…

  14. Is Dental Education in Step with Current Geriatric Health Promotion Initiatives?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Teresa A.

    1992-01-01

    Several recent national initiatives by both professional associations and public agencies provide measurable health objectives and suggestions for educational activities in geriatric oral health promotion. These can be used to evaluate current educational programs in geriatric dentistry and to plan programs and health promotion activities to meet…

  15. 9 CFR 381.157 - Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. 381.157 Section 381.157 Animals...Identity or Composition § 381.157 Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. (a) Canned boned poultry shall,...

  16. 9 CFR 381.157 - Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. 381.157 Section 381.157 Animals...Identity or Composition § 381.157 Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. (a) Canned boned poultry shall,...

  17. 9 CFR 381.157 - Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. 381.157 Section 381.157 Animals...Identity or Composition § 381.157 Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. (a) Canned boned poultry shall,...

  18. 9 CFR 381.157 - Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. 381.157 Section 381.157 Animals...Identity or Composition § 381.157 Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. (a) Canned boned poultry shall,...

  19. 9 CFR 381.157 - Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. 381.157 Section 381.157 Animals...Identity or Composition § 381.157 Canned boned poultry and baby or geriatric food. (a) Canned boned poultry shall,...

  20. California Geriatric Education Center Logic Model: An Evaluation and Communication Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Rachel M.; Alkema, Gretchen E.; Frank, Janet C.

    2009-01-01

    A logic model is a communications tool that graphically represents a program's resources, activities, priority target audiences for change, and the anticipated outcomes. This article describes the logic model development process undertaken by the California Geriatric Education Center in spring 2008. The CGEC is one of 48 Geriatric Education…

  1. Impairment in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and the Geriatric Syndrome of Self-Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naik, Aanand D.; Burnett, Jason; Pickens-Pace, Sabrina; Dyer, Carmel B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to characterize self-neglect definitively as a geriatric syndrome by identifying an association with functional impairment. Design and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional home evaluation of 100 community-living older adults referred by Adult Protective Services for geriatric self-neglect and 100 matched adults from a…

  2. A Community-Based Approach for Integrating Geriatrics and Gerontology into Undergraduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Iveris L.; Mora, Jorge Camilo

    2012-01-01

    Medical school accreditation requirements require educational opportunities in geriatrics. Twenty-six minimum graduating competencies in geriatrics have recently been identified for medical students. The authors describe how these competencies are being integrated into a new medical curriculum through coursework and community-based experiences.…

  3. The Brave New World of GEC Evaluation: The Experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G.; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these…

  4. The Success and Struggles of Filipino Geriatric Nurses in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Coronel, Rona Denise V.; Chua, Kannerin O.; Constantino, Mariz G.; Cordova, Ericsann James C.

    2009-01-01

    Geriatric nursing is a physically and emotionally demanding job in healthcare. It is a neglected field despite the growing population of the elderly, and the experiences of geriatric nurses are one of the unrecognized aspects of this field. This qualitative study purports to explore the successes and struggles of the lived experiences of a select…

  5. [Benefit of a geriatric mobile team in the emergency departments: a ten-year review].

    PubMed

    Natali, Jean-Philippe; Schwald, Nathalie; Bach, Frédérique; Bourgouin, Gaëlle; Chiffray, Dominique; Bloch, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    geriatric mobile team was created in the emergency department of Cochin Hospital in Paris, in 2005. This key player in the multi-disciplinary management of elderly patients in the emergency department and in the geriatric care pathway, showed, during its 10-year of existence, its utility. PMID:26574128

  6. Community physician education in geriatrics: applying the assessing care of vulnerable elders model with a multisite primary care group.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, Gregg A; Modawal, Arvind; Kues, John; Moore, Irene; Margolin, Gordon; Sehgal, Mandi; Mueller, Stephen; Cluxton, Robert

    2010-09-01

    Providing practicing physicians with effective education that leads to better patient outcomes remains challenging. In 2003, the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine developed a comprehensive program to enhance practicing physician geriatric medicine education based on the Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders model. The program was implemented with a large, multisite primary care group based in the greater Cincinnati area and was designed to increase physicians' clinical skills and assist them in implementing new office and system strategies that could improve the quality of care for their older patients. Four topic areas were chosen: medication management, falls and mobility, urinary incontinence, and dementia. A multifaceted physician education program was developed for each topic area, with lunch-time, in-office, geriatrician-led presentations as the primary intervention. Over a 4-year period (2004-2007), more than 60 physicians in 16 primary care practices attended 107 teaching sessions. The value of the presentation content, quality of the presentations, and perception of meeting the primary care physicians' (PCPs') educational needs were each rated at 3.8 or above (4=excellent). Between 80% and 92% of the PCPs planned to make a change in their practice behavior as a result of the training, but only two offices initiated formal quality improvement projects. During the teaching sessions, the PCPs were provided with screening tools to identify "at risk" patients, assessment chart templates, and community resource and patient education materials. The application of a modified version of the ACOVE model to reach a large group of primary care physicians is possible and may be one strategy to improve the assessment and management of geriatric syndromes. PMID:20863337

  7. Pain Management Issues for the Geriatric Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Jason L

    2015-09-01

    Adequate treatment of pain is of utmost importance in making uncomplicated the perioperative course for geriatric surgical patients. Effective analgesia reduces morbidity, improves patient and family satisfaction, and is a natural expectation of high-quality care. Pain treatment in older adults is more complicated than in younger counterparts, and great consideration must be given to age-related changes in physiology and pharmacokinetics. Pain treatment must be individualized based on each patient's profile. Side effects must be minimized and organ toxicity avoided. When complications occur they may be more severe, and treatment must be prompt. Alternative plans for analgesia must be readily enacted. PMID:26315638

  8. Geriatric prosthodontics: an overview. Part I. Pretreatment considerations.

    PubMed

    Iacopino, A M; Wathen, W F

    1993-04-01

    A rising geriatric population remains dentate and requires more dental care to maintain dental health and function. This article discusses psychological aspects of aging and considerations of age-related changes of teeth, oral tissues, nutrition, and metabolism in the elderly. Aging affects all tissues and systems, as do nutritional and metabolic factors. Numerous factors alter healing, host resistance, digestion and absorption, mastication, metabolic competency, renal and hepatic function, and excretory capability. Complex drug regimens further confuse clear diagnoses. Full consideration must be given these factors before treatment plans are formulated. PMID:8362037

  9. Health care: economic impact of caring for geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Rich, Preston B; Adams, Sasha D

    2015-02-01

    National health care expenditures constitute a continuously expanding component of the US economy. Health care resources are distributed unequally among the population, and geriatric patients are disproportionately represented. Characterizing this group of individuals that accounts for the largest percentage of US health spending may facilitate the introduction of targeted interventions in key high-impact areas. Changing demographics, an increasing incidence of chronic disease and progressive disability, rapid technological advances, and systemic market failures in the health care sector combine to drive cost. A multidisciplinary approach will become increasingly necessary to balance the delicate relationship between our constrained supply and increasing demand. PMID:25459539

  10. Psychosocial work load and stress in the geriatric care

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Due to the decrease in informal care by family members and the demographic development, the importance of professional geriatric care will rise considerably. Aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial workplace situation for employees in this profession. Methods The German version of the COPSOQ (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire) was used for the assessment of psychosocial factors at work. The instrument includes 22 scales and 3 single items concerning demands, control, stress, support, and strain. Results between two study groups of geriatric care were compared to each other as well as to employees in general hospital care and a general population mean (COPSOQ database). Statistical analysis included t-tests, ANOVA and multiple comparisons of means. Statistical significance (p < 0.01, two-tailed) and a difference of at least 5 points in mean values were defined as the relevant threshold. Results In total 889 respondents from 36 institutions took part in the study. 412 worked in Home Care (HC), 313 in Geriatric Nursing Homes (GNH), 164 in other professions (e.g. administration). Comparison between HC and GNH showed more favourable values for the first group for the most scales, e.g. lower quantitative and emotional demands and less work-privacy conflict, better possibilities for development etc. Compared to external values from the German COPSOQ database for general hospital care (N = 1.195) and the total mean across all professions, COPSOQ-total (N = 11.168), the results are again positive for HC workers on most of the scales concerning demands and social support. The only negative finding is the very low amount of social relations at work due to the obligation to work alone most of the time. Employees in GNH rate predictability, quality of leadership and feedback higher when compared to general hospital care and show some further favourable mean values compared to the COPSOQ mean value for all professions. A disadvantage for GNH is the high rating for job insecurity. A supplementary subgroup analysis showed that the degree of negative evaluation of psychosocial factors concerning demands was related to the amount of working hours per week and the number of on-call duties. Conclusions Compared to employees in general hospital care and the COPSOQ overall mean value across all professions, geriatric care employees and especially home care workers evaluate their psychosocial working situation more positive for most aspects. However, this seems partly due to the very high proportion of part-time workers. Critical results for the two study groups are the relatively high job insecurity in nursing homes and the lack of social relations for the HCrs. PMID:20663137

  11. The Differential Impact of Clerk Interest and Participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clerkship Rotation upon Psychiatry and Pediatrics Residency Matches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Mark D.; Szatmari, Peter; Eva, Kevin W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluated the differential impact of clerk interest and participation in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) clerkship rotation upon psychiatry and pediatrics residency matches. Method: Authors studied clerks from the McMaster University M.D. program graduating years of 2005-2007. Participants were categorized as 1)…

  12. Estimating Geriatric Mortality after Injury Using Age, Injury Severity, and Performance of a Transfusion: The Geriatric Trauma Outcome Score

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Frank Z.; Wolf, Steven E.; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Rhodes, Ramona L.; Paulk, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: A tool to determine the probability of mortality for severely injured geriatric patients is needed. Objective: We sought to create an easily calculated geriatric trauma prognostic score based on parameters available at the bedside to aid in mortality probability determination. Methods: All patients ?65 years of age were identified from our Level I trauma center's registry between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2013. Measurements included age, Injury Severity score (ISS), units of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) transfused in the first 24 hours, and patients' mortality status at the end of their index hospitalization. As a first step, a logistic regression model with maximum likelihood estimation and robust standard errors was used to estimate the odds of mortality from age, ISS, and PRBCs after dichotomizing PRBCs as yes/no. We then constructed a Geriatric Trauma Outcome (GTO) score that became the sole predictor in the re-specified logistic regression model. Results: The sample (n=3841) mean age was 76.5±8.1 years and the mean ISS was 12.4±9.8. In-hospital mortality was 10.8%, and 11.9% received a transfusion by 24 hours. Based on the logistic regression model, the equation with the highest discriminatory ability to estimate probability of mortality was GTO Score=age+(2.5×ISS)+22 (if given PRBCs). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for this model was 0.82. Selected GTO scores and their related probability of dying were: 205=75%, 233=90%, 252=95%, 310=99%. The range of GTO scores was 67.5 (survivor) to 275.1 (died). Conclusion: The GTO model accurately estimates the probability of dying, and can be calculated at bedside by those possessing a working knowledge of ISS calculation. PMID:25974408

  13. American Geriatrics Society care of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults position statement: American Geriatrics Society Ethics Committee.

    PubMed

    2015-03-01

    There is ample evidence that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals face discrimination in the healthcare setting. Providing high-quality health care for older LGBT adults will require active steps by organizations, institutions, advocacy groups, and health professionals that create an environment that is free from discrimination. This position statement that the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Ethics Committee developed addresses the vision of the AGS for the care of LGBT older adults and specific steps that can be taken to ensure that they receive the care that they need. PMID:25803784

  14. A systematic approach to the pharmacotherapy of geriatric major depression

    PubMed Central

    Mulsant, Benoit H.; Blumberger, Daniel M.; Ismail, Zahinoor; Rabheru, Kiran; Rapoport, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS While about 14% of older Americans are now taking an antidepressant, this broad use of antidepressants has not been associated with a notable decrease in the burden of geriatric depression. This article, based on a selective review of the literature, explores several explanations for this paradox. First, we discuss and reject the possible explanations that antidepressants are not effective in the treatment of depression or that the results of randomized clinical trials are not applicable to the treatment of depression in “real-world” clinical settings. Instead, we propose that the efficacy of antidepressants depends in large part on the way they are used. We present evidence supporting that the use of antidepressant pharmacotherapy is associated with better outcomes when it is guided by a treatment algorithm (a “stepped care approach”) as opposed to an attempt to individualize treatment. We review published guidelines and pharmacotherapy algorithms that were developed for the treatment of geriatric depression. Finally, we propose an updated algorithm based on the authors’ interpretation of the available evidence. PMID:25037293

  15. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kottner, J; Beeckman, D

    2015-12-01

    The key characteristics of geriatric patients are advanced age, multimorbidity, a decrease of psychical performance and care dependency. In addition, advanced age, chronic and acute diseases and treatments (e.g. polypharmacy) lead, either directly or indirectly, to a wide range of skin and tissue problems. Incontinence-associated dermatitis and pressure ulcers (PUs) belong to the most prevalent in geriatric settings. Prolonged exposure of the skin to urine and/or stool can cause an irritant contact dermatitis. Skin surface 'wetness', increased skin surface pH, digestive intestinal enzymes, repeated skin cleansing activities, and a possible occlusive environment contribute to irritation and inflammation. Prevention and treatment includes activities to maintain and to enhance continence and to limit, to reduce exposure of the skin to urine and stool, and to promote healing and reepithelialisation. In frail aged skin, it is recommended to use incontinence products with smooth and breathable materials with maximum absorption capacity. Immediate skin cleansing after soiling using mild cleansers and protective and caring leave-on products are recommended. PUs are localized injuries to the skin and/or underlying tissue caused by sustained deformations of skin and underlying soft tissues. PUs management includes risk assessment, repositioning and mobilization, and the use of appropriate support surfaces. Patients must be never positioned directly on an existing PU. Especially at end of life, the PU closure and wound healing may not be the primary therapeutic goal. PMID:26186379

  16. Geriatric Workforce Capacity: A Pending Crisis for Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Chen; Sumaya, Ciro V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The nursing home (NH) population in the US has grown to 1.6 million people and is expected to double by 2030. While 88.3% of NH residents are over 65, the elders aged 85 and more have become the principal group. This demographic change has increased the already high rates of chronic diseases and functional disabilities in NH residents. Methods: This study reviewed the supply of geriatricians in addressing the growing healthcare needs of NH residents. Results: English-written articles between 1989 and 2012 were reviewed. Trend data demonstrate that the geriatrician workforce has decreased from 10,270 in 2000 to 8,502 in 2010. Further, the pipeline analysis of physicians projected to receive board certification in geriatrics (and maintain this certification) indicates a worsening of the already insufficient supply of geriatricians for this vulnerable population. Conclusion: Strategies to attract and maintain a geriatrician workforce are imperative to avert a mounting crisis in the geriatric care in NH and, by extension, other living settings. PMID:24350193

  17. Potential drug interactions in an ambulatory geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Costa, A J

    1991-09-01

    Drug interactions are a common cause of iatrogenic disease in geriatric patients. Computer programs now exist which allow one to analyse groups of drugs for potential interactions. In an audit of charts of 100 geriatric patients seen in the Family Practice Center at Barberton Citizens Hospital, a computer printout was obtained, listing all patients aged 60 years and over who were seen at the Center during 1989. Names were selected randomly from this list by the head nurse and their charts were obtained for review, generating information on patient identification number, age, sex, diagnoses, medications, and allergies. The medications were analysed using the Hansten Drug Interaction Knowledge Base Program, which identified 27 patients as being on a combination of medications which had one or more potential drug interactions. A total of 37 potential drug interactions were identified in this group of 27 patients. Relative risk ratios were determined using the computer program, 'Epi Info,' for sex (female versus male), age (greater than or equal to 75 vs. 60-75 years), number of diagnoses greater than or equal to 3 vs. 0-2), and number of medications (greater than or equal to 4 vs. 0-3). The five medications, or groups of medications, which were most likely to be involved in potential drug interactions were digoxin, beta-blockers, oestrogen, oral hypoglycaemic agents, and diuretics. PMID:1822974

  18. Rollator use and functional outcome of geriatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Lutz; Lucki, Katrin; Bach, Matthias; Banzer, Winfried

    2010-01-01

    In a quasi-experimental pre- and postdesign, we examined the effect of rollator use on functional rehabilitation outcome in geriatric patients.From a sample of 458 geriatric inpatients, we matched 30 subjects who were not using assistive devices in their everyday lives but received a wheeled walker at the time of hospital admission (first-time user group) according to their admission scores on three motor performance tests (Timed Up-and-Go, Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand, and Performance-Oriented Mobility Assessment -Balance) with 30 patients who were actively using rollators as their primary walking aid for at least 3 months (long-term user group) and 30 control subjects without walking-aid assistance. Measurements were repeated after the inpatient rehabilitation regimen.The Kruskal-Wallis test did not reveal significant group differences in rehabilitation progress. Controls and device users, regardless of walking-aid experience, demonstrated nearly comparable mobility, strength, and balance improvements. More than half of each cohort (controls, n = 22; first-time, n = 17; long-term, n = 18) achieved functional gains in all three motor tests.The study showed that rollator assistance does not interfere with rehabilitation outcome and, to some extent, legitimates the prescription of assistive devices to improve confidence and restore or maintain motor ability at the highest possible level. PMID:20593328

  19. Clinical preference for factors in treatment of geriatric depression

    PubMed Central

    Riepe, Matthias W

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about symptom preferences of clinical psychiatrists in the treatment of geriatric depression and preferences for avoiding adverse drug effects. Participants (board-certified psychiatrists) were recruited prior to a lecture on geriatric depression during a continuing education program. An analytic hierarchy process was performed and participants were asked for pairwise comparison of criteria guiding them in appraising therapeutic efficacy, and in avoiding toxicity and adverse events. Of the 61 participants from the continuing education program, 42 (69%) returned their data sheet. Avoidance of cardiotoxicity was regarded as more important than avoidance of hepatotoxicity or hematotoxicity. Concerning adverse events, highest preference was given to avoidance of falls and drug interactions, followed by avoidance of sedation, weight change, and impairment of sexual function. The most important preferences for appraisal of therapeutic efficacy were suicidality over ability to concentrate and sleep. Clinical psychiatrists have a hierarchy of preferences for treatment goals and avoidance of adverse events and toxicity. This raises the question for future research whether these preferences cause differences in prescription patterns in clinical practice even though a multitude of antidepressants are similarly effective when judged with instruments used in clinical trials. PMID:25565848

  20. The clinical features of foreign body aspiration into the lower airway in geriatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lianjun; Lv, Liping; Wang, Yuchuan; Zha, Xiankui; Tang, Fei; Liu, Xinmin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the clinical features of foreign-body aspiration into the lower airway in geriatric patients. Patients and methods The clinical data of 17 geriatric patients with foreign-body aspiration were retrospectively analyzed and compared with 26 nongeriatric adult patients. The data were collected from Peking University First Hospital and Anhui Chest Hospital between January 2000 and June 2014. Results (1) In the geriatric group, the most common symptoms were cough and sputum (15 cases, 88%), dyspnea (six cases, 35%), and hemoptysis (four cases, 24%). Five patients (29%) in the geriatric group could supply the history of aspiration on their first visit to doctor, a smaller percentage than in the nongeriatric group (13 cases, 50%). Only three cases in the geriatric group were diagnosed definitely without delay. Another 14 cases were misdiagnosed as pneumonia or lung cancer, and the time of delayed diagnosis ranged from 1 month to 3 years. Complications due to delay in diagnosis included obstructive pneumonitis, atelectasis, lung abscess, and pleural effusion. (2) Chest computed tomography demonstrated the foreign body in three cases (21%) in the geriatric group, which was lower than the positive proportion of detection in the nongeriatric group (nine cases, 35%). The most common type of foreign body in the geriatric group was food, such as bone fragments (seven cases, 41%) and plants (seven cases, 41%), and the foreign body was most often lodged in the right bronchus tree (eleven cases, 65%), especially the right lower bronchus (seven cases, 41%). Flexible bronchoscopy removed the foreign body successfully in all patients. Conclusion The clinical features of foreign-body aspiration in geriatric patients are usually more obscure than in nongeriatric adults, which may lead to long delay in diagnosis. Flexible bronchoscopy is safe and useful for early diagnosis and effective management in geriatric patients. We suggest flexible bronchoscopy as the first-line approach to similar patients, especially those with aspiration history and unexplained pneumonia. PMID:25284994

  1. Geriatric oncology: comparing health related quality of life in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Population ageing is increasing the number of people annually diagnosed with cancer worldwide, once most types of tumours are age-dependent. High-quality healthcare in geriatric oncology requires a multimodal approach and should take into account stratified patient outcomes based on factors other than chronological age in order to develop interventions able to optimize oncology care. This study aims to evaluate the Health Related Quality of Life in head and neck cancer patients and compare the scores in geriatric and younger patients. Methods Two hundred and eighty nine head and neck cancer patients from the Oncology Portuguese Institute participated in the Health Related Quality of Life assessment. Two patient groups were considered: the geriatric (? 65 years old, n = 115) and the younger (45-60 years old, n= 174). The EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-H&N35 questionnaires were used. Results Head and neck cancer patients were mostly males, 77.4% within geriatric group and 91.4% among younger patients group. The most frequent tumour locations were similar in both groups: larynx, oral cavity and oropharynx - base of the tongue. At the time of diagnosis, most of younger male patients were at disease stage III/IV (55.9%) whereas the majority of younger female patients were at disease stage I/II (83.4%). The geriatric patient distribution was found to be similar in any of the four disease stages and no gender differences were observed. We found that age (geriatrics scored generally worse), gender (females scored generally worse), and tumour site (larynx tumours denounce more significant problems between age groups) clearly influences Health Related Quality of Life perceptions. Conclusions Geriatric oncology assessments signalize age-independent indicators that might guide oncologic geriatric care optimization. Decision-making in geriatric oncology must be based on tumour characteristics and chronological age but also on performance status evaluation, co-morbidity, and patient reported outcomes assessment. PMID:21232097

  2. Innovations in geriatric trauma and resident research education: bridging the gap.

    PubMed

    Mangram, Alicia

    2013-12-01

    The recent history of changes in the geriatric population in the US, the unique vulnerability to different mechanisms of trauma and the need for innovative management strategies to address them are discussed using the Geriatric "G-60" service as an illustration. The issue is not whether geriatric trauma "G-60" is coming; G-60 is here. A short detour into my own research experience is presented not as prescription but guidance for the development of futures cadres of surgeons. Resident research is not a luxury but key to transforming knowledge from benchside to bedside and back. PMID:24296094

  3. No longer waiting for an accident to happen: Simulation in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Stefanie; Sullivan, Christine; McCullough, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The practice of emergency medicine (EM) requires proficient and expert skills in multiple high risk procedures. The emergency physician in-training needs a safe and realistic environment in which to practice and perfect the skills necessary to care for patients ranging from the critically ill to the patient with difficult intravenous access. Undergraduate medical, education overall has a need for training that enables students to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes to practice in a variety of specialties. This article provides an overview of simulation in a three-year emergency medicine residency at Truman Medical Center, in a required final year clerkship for all medical students at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, and discusses national trends for the use of simulation in emergency medicine. PMID:23724485

  4. [Geriatric particularities of Parkinson's disease: Clinical and therapeutic aspects].

    PubMed

    Belin, J; Houéto, J L; Constans, T; Hommet, C; de Toffol, B; Mondon, K

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequent and complex progressive neurological disorder that increases in incidence with age. Although historically PD has been characterized by the presence of progressive dopaminergic neuronal loss of the substantia nigra, the disease process also involves neurotransmitters other that dopamine and regions of the nervous system outside the basal ganglia. Its clinical presentation in elderly subjects differs from that in younger subjects, with more rapid progression, less frequent tremor, more pronounced axial signs, more frequent non-motor signs linked to concomitant degeneration of non-dopaminergic systems, and more frequent associated lesions. Despite the high prevalence of PD in elderly subjects, few therapeutic trials have been conducted in geriatric patients. Nevertheless, to improve functional disability while ensuring drug tolerance, the principles of optimized and multidisciplinary clinical management have to be known. The aim of this review is to provide an update on clinical and therapeutic features of PD specifically observed in elderly subjects. PMID:26573332

  5. Preparing Social Work Students for Interprofessional Practice in Geriatric Health Care: Insights from Two Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonifas, Robin P.; Gray, Amanda K.

    2013-01-01

    Although several interprofessional education projects have addressed training allied health students for effective teamwork in geriatrics, few curriculum evaluation studies have examined differences in learning outcomes between interprofessional and traditional uniprofessional approaches, especially for social work students. This paper compares…

  6. A Novel Geriatric Screening Tool in Older Patients with Cancer: The Korean Cancer Study Group Geriatric Score (KG)-7

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Se-Hyun; Kim, Yu Jung; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Kwang-Il; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Jee Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Geriatric assessment (GA) is resource-consuming, necessitating screening tools to select appropriate patients who need full GA. The objective of this study is to design a novel geriatric screening tool with easy-to-answer questions and high performance objectively selected from a large dataset to represent each domain of GA. A development cohort was constructed from 1284 patients who received GA from May 2004 to April 2007. Items representing each domain of functional status, cognitive function, nutritional status, and psychological status in GA were selected according to sensitivity (SE) and specificity (SP). Of the selected items, the final questions were chosen by a panel of oncologists and geriatricians to encompass most domains evenly and also by feasibility and use with cancer patients. The selected screening questions were validated in a separate cohort of 98 cancer patients. The novel screening tool, the Korean Cancer Study Group Geriatric Score (KG)-7, consisted of 7 items representing each domain of GA. KG-7 had a maximal area under the curve (AUC) of 0.93 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92?0.95) in the prediction of abnormal GA, which was higher than that of G-8 (0.87, 95% CI 0.85–0.89) within the development cohort. The cut-off value was decided at ? 5 points, with a SE of 95.0%, SP of 59.2%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 85.3%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 82.6%. In the validation cohort, the AUC was 0.82 (95% CI 0.73?0.90), and the SE, SP, PPV, and NPV were 89.5%, 48.6%, 77.3%, and 75.0%, respectively. Furthermore, patients with higher KG-7 scores showed significantly longer overall survival (OS) in the development and validation cohorts. In conclusions, the KG-7 showed high SE and NPV to predict abnormal GA. The KG-7 also predicted OS. Given the results of our studies, the KG-7 could be used effectively in countries with high patient burden and low resources to select patients in need of full GA and intervention. PMID:26401951

  7. How do Supervising Clinicians of a University Hospital and Associated Teaching Hospitals Rate the Relevance of the Key Competencies within the CanMEDS Roles Framework in Respect to Teaching in Clinical Clerkships?

    PubMed Central

    Jilg, Stefanie; Möltner, Andreas; Berberat, Pascal; Fischer, Martin R.; Breckwoldt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: In German-speaking countries, the physicians’ roles framework of the “Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists” (CanMEDS) is increasingly used to conceptualize postgraduate medical education. It is however unclear, whether it may also be applied to the final year of undergraduate education within clinical clerkships, called “Practical Year” (PY). Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore how clinically active physicians at a university hospital and at associated teaching hospitals judge the relevance of the seven CanMEDS roles (and their (role-defining) key competencies) in respect to their clinical work and as learning content for PY training. Furthermore, these physicians were asked whether the key competencies were actually taught during PY training. Methods: 124 physicians from internal medicine and surgery rated the relevance of the 28 key competencies of the CanMEDS framework using a questionnaire. For each competency, following three aspects were rated: “relevance for your personal daily work”, “importance for teaching during PY”, and “implementation into actual PY teaching”. Results: In respect to the main study objective, all questionnaires could be included into analysis. All seven CanMEDS roles were rated as relevant for personal daily work, and also as important for teaching during PY. Furthermore, all roles were stated to be taught during actual PY training. The roles “Communicator”, “Medical Expert”, and “Collaborator” were rated as significantly more important than the other roles, for all three sub-questions. No differences were found between the two disciplines internal medicine and surgery, nor between the university hospital and associated teaching hospitals. Conclusion: Participating physicians rated all key competencies of the CanMEDS model to be relevant for their personal daily work, and for teaching during PY. These findings support the suitability of the CanMEDS framework as a conceptual element of PY training. PMID:26413171

  8. Postoperative Admission to a Dedicated Geriatric Unit Decreases Mortality in Elderly Patients with Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Boddaert, Jacques; Cohen-Bittan, Judith; Khiami, Frédéric; Le Manach, Yannick; Raux, Mathieu; Beinis, Jean-Yves; Verny, Marc; Riou, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Background Elderly patients with hip fracture have a 5 to 8 fold increased risk of death during the months following surgery. We tested the hypothesis that early geriatric management of these patients focused on co-morbidities and rehabilitation improved long term mortality. Methods and Findings In a cohort study over a 6 year period, we compared patients aged >70 years with hip fracture admitted to orthopedic versus geriatric departments in a time series analysis corresponding to the creation of a dedicated geriatric unit. Co-morbidities were assessed using the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS). Each cohort was compared to matched cohorts extracted from a national registry (n?=?51,275) to validate the observed results. Main outcome measure was 6-month mortality. We included 131 patients in the orthopedic cohort and 203 in the geriatric cohort. Co-morbidities were more frequent in the geriatric cohort (median CIRS: 8 vs 5, P<0.001). In the geriatric cohort, the proportion of patients who never walked again decreased (6% versus 22%, P<0.001). At 6 months, re-admission (14% versus 29%, P?=?0.007) and mortality (15% versus 24%, P?=?0.04) were decreased. When co-morbidities were taken into account, the risk ratio of death at 6 months was reduced (0·43, 95%CI 0·25 to 0·73, P?=?0.002). Using matched cohorts, the average treatment effects on the treated associated to early geriatric management indicated a reduction in hospital mortality (?63%; 95% CI: ?92% to ?6%, P?=?0.006). Conclusions Early admission to a dedicated geriatric unit improved 6-month mortality and morbidity in elderly patients with hip fracture. PMID:24454708

  9. Student perceptions of medical errors: incorporating an explicit professionalism curriculum in the third-year surgery clerkship.

    PubMed

    Newell, Pippa; Harris, Stephen; Aufses, Arthur; Ellozy, Sharif

    2008-01-01

    Among medical educators, there is a universal call for curricula that emphasize development of character, compassion, and integrity. A unique challenge to the development of such curricula is the lack of tools with which to assess student progress. To these ends, we created a curriculum designed to inculcate the values of the surgical profession alongside both fact-based and skill-based learning within the triad of medical school education. Our purposes were 1) the acknowledgment of student fears regarding committing medical errors during their third-year surgical clerkship and 2) the design of curricular content aimed toward a more comprehensive understanding of professionalism using medical error as a paradigm. Third-year clerks on the surgical service were assigned readings, participated in formalized discussions regarding medical errors and ethics, and were required to complete questionnaires that contained open-ended questions pertaining to their concerns, observations, and reactions toward any perceived or actual medical errors they encountered during the third-year surgical clerkship. Questionnaires were analyzed according to themes contained within the students' responses. Most students expressed an initial fear of committing primarily technical medical errors and subsequently causing harm to patients. The dilemma as to whether to speak up against a superior regarding unaddressed medical errors appeared as a frequent theme among the students. New prerotation and postrotation questionnaires have been designed to allow for both quantitative and qualitative analysis of the students' understanding of the gravity of varying types of medical errors and how they relate to medical professionalism. PMID:18439532

  10. Kinematic, acoustic, and perceptual analyses of connected speech produced by parkinsonian and normal geriatric adults.

    PubMed

    Forrest, K; Weismer, G; Turner, G S

    1989-06-01

    Acoustic and kinematic analyses, as well as perceptual evaluation, were conducted on the speech of Parkinsonian and normal geriatric adults. As a group, the Parkinsonian speakers had very limited jaw movement compared to the normal geriatrics. For opening gestures, jaw displacements and velocities produced by the Parkinsonian subjects were about half those produced by the normal geriatrics. Lower lip movement amplitude and velocity also were reduced for the Parkinsonian speakers relative to the normal geriatrics, but the magnitude of the reduction was not as great as that seen in the jaw. Lower lip closing velocities expressed as a function of movement amplitude were greater for the Parkinsonian speakers than for the normal geriatrics. This increased velocity of lower lip movement may reflect a difference in the control of lip elevation for the Parkinsonian speakers, an effect that increased with the severity of dysarthria. Acoustically, the Parkinsonian subjects had reduced durations of vocalic segments, reduced formant transitions, and increased voice onset time compared to the normal geriatrics. These effects were greater for the more severe, compared to the milder, dysarthrics and were most apparent in the more complex, vocalic gestures. PMID:2745883

  11. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  12. Taking Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Taking Medicines Drugs in the Body Medicines can enter the body in many different ways, ... many steps happen along the way. Understanding how medicines work in your body can help you learn ...

  13. ADHD Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... System How the Body Works Main Page ADHD Medicines KidsHealth > Kids > Health Problems > Learning & Emotional Problems > ADHD ... doctor can decide if ADHD medicine is needed. Medicine and the Mind There are a lot of ...

  14. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends on your type of diabetes, ... pills. Combination pills contain two kinds of diabetes medicine in one tablet. Some people take pills and ...

  15. Electronic Surveillance and Pharmacist Intervention for Vulnerable Geriatric Inpatients on High-Risk Medication Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Josh F.; Kripalani, Sunil; Danciu, Ioana; Harrell, Debbie; Marvanova, Marketa; Salanitro, Amanda; Rodriguez, Carmen; Powers, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical pharmacists who review medication orders can reduce potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in hospitalized elderly patients, but this approach may be inefficient for settings with high clinical volume. Design Pilot intervention. Setting Academic, tertiary care hospital. Participants Hospitalized geriatric patients, age 65 or older, admitted to General Medicine, Orthopedics, and Urology Services during a 3 week period in 2011 and who wereadministered at least one medication from a list of 240 PIMs. Intervention A computerized PIMS dashboard flagged patients with at least one administered PIM or a high calculated anticholinergic score. Additionally, the dashboard displayed 48-hour cumulative narcotic and benzodiazepine administration. Patients were ranked to reflect the estimated risk of an adverse event using logical combinations of data (e.g. use of multiple sedatives in a non-monitored location). In a pilot implementation, a clinical pharmacist reviewed the flagged patient records and delivered an immediate point-of-care intervention for the treating physician. Measurements Clinician response to pharmacist intervention. Results Of797 patients admitted over a three-week period, the PIMS dashboard flagged 179 patients (22%) and 485 patient-medication pairs for review by the clinical pharmacist. Seventy-one patient records with 139patient-medication pairs required additional manual review of the electronic medical record. Twenty-two patients receiving 40 inappropriate medication orders were judged to warrant an intervention, which was delivered by personal communication via phone or text message. Clinicians enacted 31 of 40 (78%) pharmacist recommendations. Conclusion An electronic PIMs dashboard provided an efficient mechanism for clinical pharmacists to rapidly screen the medication regimens of hospitalized elderly and deliver a timely point-of-care intervention when indicated. PMID:25366414

  16. High Yield Research Opportunities in Geriatric Emergency Medicine: Prehospital Care, Delirium, Adverse Drug Events, and Falls

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Shah, Manish N.; Hustey, Fredric M.; Heard, Kennon; Gerson, Lowell W.

    2011-01-01

    Emergency services constitute crucial and frequently used safety nets for older persons, an emergency visit by a senior very often indicates high vulnerability for functional decline and death, and interventions via the emergency system have significant opportunities to change the clinical course of older patients who require its services. However, the evidence base for widespread employment of emergency system-based interventions is lacking. In this article, we review the evidence and offer crucial research questions to capitalize on the opportunity to optimize health trajectories of older persons seeking emergency care in four areas: prehospital care, delirium, adverse drug events, and falls. PMID:21498881

  17. Mindfulness: Reconnecting the Body and Mind in Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rejeski, W. Jack

    2008-01-01

    Derived from Buddhism, mindfulness is a unique approach for understanding human suffering and happiness that has attracted rapidly growing interest among health care professionals. In this article I describe current thinking about the concept of mindfulness and elaborate on why and how mindfulness-based interventions have potential within the…

  18. A current perspective on geriatric lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ha Bum; Kim, Hyung Jee

    2015-01-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction-such as urinary incontinence (UI), detrusor overactivity, and benign prostatic hyperplasia-is prevalent in elderly persons. These conditions can interfere with daily life and normal functioning and lead to negative effects on health-related quality of life. UI is one of the most common urologic conditions but is poorly understood elderly persons. The overall prevalence of UI increases with age in both men and women. Elderly persons often neglect UI or dismiss it as part of the normal aging process. However, UI can have significant negative effects on self-esteem and has been associated with increased rates of depression. UI also affects quality of life and activities of daily living. Although UI is more common in elderly than in younger persons, it should not be considered a normal part of aging. UI is abnormal at any age. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the cause, classification, evaluation, and management of geriatric lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:25874039

  19. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for geriatric depression: Promises and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Sabesan, Priyadharshini; Lankappa, Sudheer; Khalifa, Najat; Krishnan, Vasudevan; Gandhi, Rahul; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2015-01-01

    As the global population gets older, depression in the elderly is emerging as an important health issue. A major challenge in treating geriatric depression is the lack of robust efficacy for many treatments that are of significant benefit to depressed working age adults. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a novel physical treatment approach used mostly in working age adults with depression. Many TMS trials and clinics continue to exclude the elderly from treatment citing lack of evidence in this age group. In this review, we appraise the evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of rTMS in the elderly. A consistent observation supporting a high degree of tolerability and safety among the elderly patients emerged across the Randomised Controlled Trials and the uncontrolled trials. Further, there is no reliable evidence negating the utility of rTMS in the elderly with depression. We also identified several factors other than age that moderate the observed variations in the efficacy of rTMS in the elderly. These factors include but not limited to: (1) brain atrophy; (2) intensity and number of pulses (dose-response relationship); and (3) clinical profile of patients. On the basis of the current evidence, the practice of excluding elderly patients from TMS clinics and trials cannot be supported. PMID:26110119

  20. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for geriatric depression: Promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, Priyadharshini; Lankappa, Sudheer; Khalifa, Najat; Krishnan, Vasudevan; Gandhi, Rahul; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2015-06-22

    As the global population gets older, depression in the elderly is emerging as an important health issue. A major challenge in treating geriatric depression is the lack of robust efficacy for many treatments that are of significant benefit to depressed working age adults. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a novel physical treatment approach used mostly in working age adults with depression. Many TMS trials and clinics continue to exclude the elderly from treatment citing lack of evidence in this age group. In this review, we appraise the evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of rTMS in the elderly. A consistent observation supporting a high degree of tolerability and safety among the elderly patients emerged across the Randomised Controlled Trials and the uncontrolled trials. Further, there is no reliable evidence negating the utility of rTMS in the elderly with depression. We also identified several factors other than age that moderate the observed variations in the efficacy of rTMS in the elderly. These factors include but not limited to: (1) brain atrophy; (2) intensity and number of pulses (dose-response relationship); and (3) clinical profile of patients. On the basis of the current evidence, the practice of excluding elderly patients from TMS clinics and trials cannot be supported. PMID:26110119

  1. Oral Examination: A Model for Its Use within a Clinical Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vu, Nu V.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine has devised an evaluation system that not only provides the advantages of oral examination but also attempts to alleviate some of its disadvantages. The system uses oral examination to assess students' content knowledge. (MLW)

  2. Fractionated laser resurfacing corrects the inappropriate UVB response in geriatric skin

    PubMed Central

    Spandau, Dan F; Lewis, Davina A.; Somani, Ally-Khan; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2012-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is a disease primarily afflicting geriatric patients as evidenced by the fact that 80% of all non-melanoma skin cancers are diagnosed in patients over the age of 60 years. As such, geriatric skin responds to cancer-inducing UVB irradiation in a manner that allows the establishment of tumor cells. Currently, the only effective treatment for non-melanoma skin cancer is the removal of the tumors after they appear, indicating the need for a more cost-effective prophylactic therapy. Geriatric volunteers were treated with fractionated laser resurfacing therapy on either sun-protected (upper buttocks) or chronically sun-exposed (dorsal forearm) skin. Fractionated laser resurfacing therapy was demonstrated to decrease the occurrence of senescent fibroblasts in geriatric dermis, increase the dermal expression of insulin-like growth factor-1, and correct the inappropriate UVB response observed in untreated geriatric skin. These responses to fractionated laser resurfacing were equal to the effects seen previously using the more aggressive wounding following dermabrasion. Furthermore, fractionated laser resurfacing was equally effective in both sun-protected and sun-exposed skin. The ability of fractionated laser resurfacing treatment to protect against the occurrence of UVB-damaged proliferating keratinocytes indicates the potential of fractionated laser resurfacing to reduce or prevent aging-associated non-melanoma skin cancer. PMID:22377757

  3. [Ambulatory geriatric rehabilitation and its legal classification within the statutory health insurance system].

    PubMed

    Plate, A; Meinck, M

    2005-08-01

    In Germany, the number and proportion of elderly people will continue to increase. Only few hospitals and rehabilitation units are currently providing inpatient geriatric services. Concepts for graded geriatric care see ambulatory geriatric rehabilitation (AGR) as an independent service und as a complement to pre-existing structures in geriatric care. In 2004, the national association of statutory health insurance funds established recommendations for AGR, which include criteria of structural and process quality of ambulant geriatric rehabilitation. This article describes various aspects of these framework recommendations (target groups, rehabilitation indicators, and equipment of services). In addition, the classification of AGR within the legislation of the statutory health insurance system is evaluated. The financing of AGR by the statutory health insurance system and the preconditions for accreditation of AGR-services within this system are discussed. The authors conclude that discrimination between existing partially-inpatient day clinics and AGR services is not appropriate. Furthermore, there is no legal basis for such a discrimination; on the contrary, the terms partially-inpatient and ambulatory rehabilitation services can be seen as a uniform benefit according to book 5 of the German social code, SGB V. Therefore there is no differentiation between AGR and partially-inpatient rehabilitation in the statutory health insurance system. PMID:16059839

  4. Geriatric assessment to predict survival in older allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients

    PubMed Central

    Muffly, Lori S.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Stock, Wendy; Chu, Quynh; Bishop, Michael R.; Godley, Lucy A.; Kline, Justin; Liu, Hongtao; Odenike, Olatoyosi M.; Larson, Richard A.; van Besien, Koen; Artz, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is increasingly utilized in older adults. This study prospectively evaluated the prognostic utility of geriatric assessment domains prior to allogeneic transplantation in recipients aged 50 years and over. Geriatric assessment was performed prior to transplant, and included validated measures across domains of function and disability, comorbidity, frailty, mental health, nutritional status, and systemic inflammation. A total of 203 patients completed geriatric assessment and underwent transplant. Median age was 58 years (range 50–73). After adjusting for established prognostic factors, limitations in instrumental activities of daily living (HR 2.38, 95%CI: 1.59–3.56; P<0.001), slow walk speed (HR 1.80, 95%CI: 1.14–2.83; P=0.01), high comorbidity by hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HR 1.56, 95%CI: 1.07–2.28; P=0.02), low mental health by short-form-36 mental component summary (HR 1.67, 95%CI: 1.13–2.48; P=0.01), and elevated serum C-reactive protein (HR 2.51, 95%CI: 1.54–4.09; P<0.001) were significantly associated with inferior overall survival. These associations were more pronounced in the cohort 60 years and over. Geriatric assessment measures confer independent prognostic utility in older allogeneic transplant recipients. Implementation of geriatric assessment prior to allogeneic transplantation may aid appropriate selection of older adults. PMID:24816237

  5. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    PubMed

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel. PMID:24702775

  6. Decrease in Antioxidant Status of Plasma and Erythrocytes from Geriatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Kumawat, Manjulata; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Singh, Ishwar; Singh, Neelima; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghalaut, Veena Singh; Shankar, Vijay; Vardey, Satish Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ageing is associated with an accumulation of free radical damage, which leads to physiological and clinical modifications. The study aims to find out the status of lipid profile, antioxidant enzymes, malondialdehyde in geriatric population. Patients/methods: The study was conducted on 150 subjects (75 healthy control between the ages of 20–30 years and 75 elderly subjects between ages of 50–70 years as cases). The following parameters were analyzed using the standard reference methods: lipid profile, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, catalase, superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde. Results: The present study was conducted to estimate the oxidative stress parameters in geriatric population. Highly significant increase in total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), VLDL-cholesterol (VLDL-C), malondialdehyde, catalase and decrease in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase was observed in geriatrics when compared with their younger counterparts. Conclusion: This study concluded that there is enhanced oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant defence in geriatrics as compared to younger subjects which could play an important role in ageing. Dyslipidemia has become one of the important risk factors for the increasing prevalence of cardiovascular diseases. There is lack of awareness on the relationship between blood lipids and the risk of cardiovascular diseases in geriatric population. The strategy of early prevention should be adopted against dyslipidemia. PMID:23089922

  7. 596 Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 12:6, November-December 2004 Altered PET Functional Brain Responses

    E-print Network

    596 Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 12:6, November-December 2004 Altered PET Functional Brain Responses-related neu- rophysiologic heterogeneity. (Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 2004; 12:596­605) Received August 20, 2003,AP,NS,CH,JH,AC,YS) and the Departments of Neurology (NS,YS), Psychiatry (GHP,MHT,DPD,YS) and Pathology (BT), College of Physicians

  8. [The geriatric patient in surgical gynecology. Results of the treatment of geriatric patients--a postoperative quality control].

    PubMed

    Rummler, S; Radmann, D

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents results of a retrospective study covering 506 older women (age range: 60 years and older), who were treated by major gynecologic operations in a twenty-years-period between 1962 and 1981 at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the District Hospital of Stralsund. The total number of patients operated on during these twenty years was 6,246, the frequency of the operated older women 10.11 per cent. In two control periods (1967-1971 and 1977-1981) there was a slight increased of these patients in the last period from 8.22 per cent to 13.29 per cent. Comparing postoperative outcome and complication rate of the geriatric patients group there is no statistically significant difference to another group of patients (age range: 30-40 years) undergoing gynecologic surgery in 1981. Indications for gynecologic surgery showed age-dependent differences in the two groups. Our conclusions are that retrospective studies concerning clinical assuring of professional quality of medical care are not sufficient enough. As a result of this study we present our concept for medical data processing (documentation) regarding quality-assessment of gynecologic surgical care. PMID:3788338

  9. Update for 2014 on clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; López Díaz, Javier; Martín Santana, Antonio; García Pinilla, José Manuel; Gómez Doblas, Juan José; Gómez Bueno, Manuel; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Lambert, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    In the present article, we review publications from the previous year in the following 3 areas: clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation. Among the new developments in clinical cardiology are several contributions from Spanish groups on tricuspid and aortic regurgitation, developments in atrial fibrillation, syncope, and the clinical characteristics of heart disease, as well as various studies on familial heart disease and chronic ischemic heart disease. In geriatric cardiology, the most relevant studies published in 2014 involve heart failure, degenerative aortic stenosis, and data on atrial fibrillation in the geriatric population. In heart failure and transplantation, the most noteworthy developments concern the importance of multidisciplinary units and patients with preserved systolic function. Other notable publications were those related to iron deficiency, new drugs, and new devices and biomarkers. Finally, we review studies on acute heart failure and transplantation, such as inotropic drugs and ventricular assist devices. PMID:25758161

  10. Staying in the game: the 10-step approach to sustaining geriatrics education in hospitalists and subspecialty providers.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Suzanne M; Brandt, Lynsey E; Chang, Anna; Chao, Serena H; Corcoran, Amy M; Miller, Rachel; Harper, G Michael; Levine, Sharon A; Medina-Walpole, Annette

    2014-08-01

    Geriatrics as a field has been fortunate to have the support of several philanthropic organizations to advance geriatrics education and training in the past two decades. Awardees of such grants were presented with unparalleled opportunities to develop new and innovative educational initiatives affecting learners at multiple levels and in multiple disciplines and specialties. The lessons learned from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation initiatives about effect and sustainability are invaluable to the ongoing strategic development of geriatrics nationally. This article highlights successful educational initiatives developed at four institutions with past and current Donald W. Reynolds Foundation funding. Following an ice hockey playbook, this article identifies 10 strategies and initiatives to "stay in the geriatrics game" by training hospitalists and subspecialty providers. The authors' collective experience suggests that geriatrics educational initiatives can not only influence provider education, but also improve the care of older adults in multiple settings. PMID:25040491

  11. Training on Exercise is Medicine(®) Within an Integrative Medicine Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Hill, Linda L; Nichols, Jeanne; Wing, David; Waalen, Jill; Friedman, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    Physicians are increasingly approached by individuals seeking integrative approaches to health care and well-being. Many integrative modalities include a physical activity component. Patients seek guidance from primary and specialty care providers on the safe and effective incorporation of these modalities into their lifestyle. Physicians and other health professionals receive very limited training in the clinical applications of exercise science. This paper reports on a curriculum designed to teach health professionals key exercise constructs for application to clinical practice for prevention and management of lifestyle-related disease, and incorporating the curriculum into a preventive medicine residency training program. The course was developed in 2012-2013, data collected in 2013-2015, and analysis was done in 2015. Six modules were developed as part of a 24-hour course. Each module included didactic, laboratory, and case examples. The modules included energetics, exercise and cardiorespiratory health, bone health, obesity and sarcopenia, balance and fall prevention, and behavior change and the use of technologies. The delivery was found feasible for all three components, delivered in 2-4-hour segments. The incorporation into the residency curriculum was feasible, efficacious, well received, and easily incorporated into the existing curriculum. This comprehensive curriculum has the potential to close the gap in medical school, residency, graduate, nursing, and integrative curricula on this important topic. Current practitioners would benefit in primary care and geriatric settings. This curriculum would also be useful for cross-disciplinary researchers, including public health, health behaviors, and integrative medicine practitioners. PMID:26477904

  12. Multimorbidity Patterns in Hospitalized Older Patients: Associations among Chronic Diseases and Geriatric Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Clerencia-Sierra, Mercedes; Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia; Martínez-Velilla, Nicolás; Vergara-Mitxeltorena, Itziar; Aldaz-Herce, Pablo; Poblador-Plou, Beatriz; Machón-Sobrado, Mónica; Egüés-Olazabal, Nerea; Abellán-van Kan, Gabor; Prados-Torres, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives The clinical status of older individuals with multimorbidity can be further complicated by concomitant geriatric syndromes. This study explores multimorbidity patterns, encompassing both chronic diseases and geriatric syndromes, in geriatric patients attended in an acute hospital setting. Design Retrospective observational study. Setting Unit of Social and Clinical Assessment (UVSS), Miguel Servet University Hospital (HUMS), Zaragoza (Spain). Year, 2011. Participants A total of 924 hospitalized patients aged 65 years or older. Measurements Data on patients’ clinical, functional, cognitive and social statuses were gathered through comprehensive geriatric assessments. To identify diseases and/or geriatric syndromes that cluster into patterns, an exploratory factor analysis was applied, stratifying by sex. The factors can be interpreted as multimorbidity patterns, i.e., diseases non-randomly associated with each other within the study population. The resulting patterns were clinically assessed by several physicians. Results The mean age of the study population was 82.1 years (SD 7.2). Multimorbidity burden was lower in men under 80 years, but increased in those over 80. Immobility, urinary incontinence, hypertension, falls, dementia, cognitive decline, diabetes and arrhythmia were among the 10 most frequent health problems in both sexes, with prevalence rates above 20%. Four multimorbidity patterns were identified that were present in both sexes: Cardiovascular, Induced Dependency, Falls and Osteoarticular. The number of conditions comprising these patterns was similar in men and women. Conclusion The existence of specific multimorbidity patterns in geriatric patients, such as the Induced Dependency and Falls patterns, may facilitate the early detection of vulnerability to stressors, thus helping to avoid negative health outcomes such as functional disability. PMID:26208112

  13. COPD Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 5654 ) You are here: Health Information > Medications > COPD COPD Medicine Your doctor may prescribe medicine to control ... Calendar Read the News View Daily Pollen Count COPD Program This program offers comprehensive, individualized care for ...

  14. Herbal Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  15. Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Alternative Medicine en Español email Send this article to a ... Send Thanks for emailing that article! Tweet Alternative medicine may be defined as non-standard, unconventional treatments ...

  16. Management of the skin and soft tissue in the geriatric surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, David G

    2015-02-01

    Aging has significant effects on the healing ability of the geriatric population. When the elderly suffer injuries, they have a decreased metabolic reserve to handle the stress required to recover. Diseases of the elderly, such as malnutrition, diabetes mellitus, treatment of malignancies, and vascular disease, all impair tissue repair. The geriatric population is more prone to pressure ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, and other chronic wounds. This review discusses how changes in the elderly lead to impaired healing or chronic wounds. Prevention of these problems and their treatment are also discussed. PMID:25459545

  17. Osteopathic Medicine: About Osteopathic Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Advancing the distinctive philosophy and practice of osteopathic medicine Inside the AOA About the AOA AOA Annual ... DOs Licensed? How Are DOs Certified? About Osteopathic Medicine Page Content You are more than just the ...

  18. Cross-cultural challenges for assessing medical professionalism among clerkship physicians in a Middle Eastern country (Bahrain): feasibility and psychometric properties of multisource feedback

    PubMed Central

    Al Ansari, Ahmed; Al Khalifa, Khalid; Al Azzawi, Mohamed; Al Amer, Rashed; Al Sharqi, Dana; Al-Mansoor, Anwar; Munshi, Fadi M

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to design, implement, and evaluate the feasibility and reliability of a multisource feedback (MSF) system to assess interns in their clerkship year in the Middle Eastern culture, the Kingdom of Bahrain. Method The study was undertaken in the Bahrain Defense Force Hospital, a military teaching hospital in the Kingdom of Bahrain. A total of 21 interns (who represent the total population of the interns for the given year) were assessed in this study. All of the interns were rotating through our hospital during their year-long clerkship rotation. The study sample consisted of nine males and 12 females. Each participating intern was evaluated by three groups of raters, eight medical intern colleagues, eight senior medical colleagues, and eight coworkers from different departments. Results A total of 21 interns (nine males and 12 females) were assessed in this study. The total mean response rates were 62.3%. A factor analysis was conducted that found that the data on the questionnaire grouped into three factors that counted for 76.4% of the total variance. These three factors were labeled as professionalism, collaboration, and communication. Reliability analysis indicated that the full instrument scale had high internal consistency (Cronbach’s ? 0.98). The generalizability coefficients for the surveys were estimated to be 0.78. Conclusion Based on our results and analysis, we conclude that the MSF tool we used on the interns rotating in their clerkship year within our Middle Eastern culture provides an effective method of evaluation because it offers a reliable, valid, and feasible process. PMID:26316836

  19. Medicine and Veterinary Medicine Postgraduate Opportunities

    E-print Network

    Maizels, Rick

    Medicine and Veterinary Medicine Imaging Postgraduate Opportunities MSc/Dip/Cert by online distance of students with backgrounds in clinical medicine (Radiology, Radiography, Surgery, Medicine and Veterinary medicine); basic sciences & engineering (Biology, Biomedical Sciences, Physics, Engineering, Chemistry

  20. Social Learning: Medical Student Perceptions of Geriatric House Calls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Linda; Willett, Rita; Selby-Penczak, Rachel; McKnight, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    Bandura's social learning theory provides a useful conceptual framework to understand medical students' perceptions of a house calls experience at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine. Social learning and role modeling reflect Liaison Committee on Medical Education guidelines for "Medical schools (to) ensure that the learning…

  1. Geriatrics Education in Psychiatric Residencies: A National Survey of Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warshaw, Gregg A.; Bragg, Elizabeth J.; Layde, Joseph B.; Meganathan, Karthikeyan; Brewer, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the current characteristics of geriatrics training within general psychiatry training programs. Methods: In the fall of 2006, a survey was mailed and made available online to all U.S. psychiatric residency program directors (N=181). Results: The response rate was 54% (n=97). Of the responding psychiatry programs,…

  2. 10th Annual Rocky Mountain Geriatrics Conference Managing Patient Care at End of Life

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    with advanced illness are subjected to life-prolonging interventions they do not want, their pain10th Annual Rocky Mountain Geriatrics Conference Managing Patient Care at End of Life registration are available here: http://tiny.utah.edu/RMGC2012 Title - Managing Patient Care at End of Life

  3. Growing Old is Mandatory But Growing Up is Optional: An Explanation to Geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Pradyumna KU; Bhuyan, Sanat KU; Misra, Satya Ranjan; Pati, Abhishek Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Growing old is an inevitable process and aging graciously requires a healthy body where oral cavity occupies an important place. Geriatric dentistry is a specialized multidisciplinary branch of general dentistry designed to provide dental services to elderly patients. The rise in life expectancy has attributed to the substantial reduction in mortality which brought about by improved health care facilities, sanitation, environmental and public health reforms coupled with better hygiene and living conditions. The goal of geriatric treatment is to achieve optimal oral health, thus enhancing overall health. This begins with a concerted effort between the patient and the healthcare and dental teams. When medical problems exist, the physician and other involved healthcare professionals should be consulted, as these diseases can affect the safety and efficacy of various dental treatments. Thus a unified approach should be followed to assist geriatric patients to maintain optimal oral health and a high quality of life. Here in, this article we have reviewed the categories geriatric patients are divided to, various aging theories, changes occurring in various systems with their effects on system along with the various dental effects and age changes in them and treatment needs and strategies’ concerning the elderly population. PMID:25654057

  4. Juxtapositioning Geriatrics and Art: The Essence of Caring, Carer, and Cared-For in Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Carungcong, Bobbie Jo H.; Castillo, Jasper Q.; Castillo, Joyce Anne A.; Castro, Jenelyn S.

    2009-01-01

    The need to revolutionize geriatric nursing is dawning. However, there is a negative view regarding this nursing field. The dearth of literature on the use of theatrical films to surface universal realities in a care-driven profession has led to this attempt of bringing to reality the essences of caring, carer, and cared-for and their interactions…

  5. EFFECTS OF CHLORDIMEFORM ON CARDIOVASCULAR FUNCTIONAL PARAMETERS. PART 1. LETHALITY AND ARRHYTHMOGENICITY IN THE GERIATRIC RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlordimeform (CDM), a formamidine pesticide, had a profound effect on the cardiovascular function of geriatric rats. Two-year-old pentobarbital-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8) received sequential intravenous CDM injections of 5, 10, 30, and 60 mg/kg. A control group of ra...

  6. Needs for CME in geriatrics. Part 1: Perceptions of patients and community informants.

    PubMed Central

    Pereles, L.; Russell, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the needs of physicians for continuing education in geriatrics as perceived by patients and community informants. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey by mail and in-person interviews. SETTING: Organizations working with the elderly in the community and patients in a primary care population in Calgary. PARTICIPANTS: Key informants working with the elderly in the community, including managers and providers of physical, psychosocial, educational, or mental health services to the elderly, and the first two geriatric patients visiting physicians after telephone contact from study investigators were surveyed. Twenty-five of 27 key community informants and 32 of 61 geriatric patients responded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Potential topics for continuing medical education. RESULTS: The 10 most frequently identified topics were communication, time management, attitudes to the elderly, medication, continuity of care, mental health, medical management of complicated cases, knowledge of community resources, health promotion, and compassion. Patients were more concerned than key informants about the process of care. Key informants were concerned about the technical aspects of care. CONCLUSIONS: The process of care as well as technical aspects of care must be addressed in continuing education in geriatrics for physicians. PMID:8616284

  7. The Sensitivity of the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index to Dental Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Teresa A.

    1997-01-01

    A 24-month study of 96 patients in a community-based oral health promotion project found the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI), a self-report measure of oral health, to be sensitive to provision of dental care. Some further development of measures is needed. Potential applications of this and similar self-report measures in dental…

  8. The Impact of Curricular Changes on the Geriatrics Knowledge, Attitudes and Skills of Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagoshi, Michael H.; Tanabe, Marianne K. G.; Sakai, Damon H.; Masaki, Kamal H.; Kasuya, Richard T.; Blanchette, Patricia L.

    2008-01-01

    We redesigned our medical school's Problem-Based Learning (PBL) curriculum to include a substantial increase in required geriatrics content. Innovations included new PBL health care problems and standardized patients (SPs) throughout the first three years and a new required four-week, fourth-year rotation. We used data from the AAMC Medical School…

  9. Development of a Geriatric Scale of Hopelessness: Implications for Counseling and Intervention with the Depressed Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated hopelessness, depression, and self-esteem among depressed elderly people (N=78) and developed a Geriatric Hopelessness Scale (GHS). As predicted, elderly subjects who scored high on the GHS showed significantly higher depression and lower self-esteem scores. (JAC)

  10. A Controlled Evaluation of Computer Assisted Training Simulations in Geriatric Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Roseann; Wood, Gary J.

    1993-01-01

    A study compared effects of two methods of teaching geriatric dentistry: traditional approach based on readings, and computer-assisted simulation of patient interaction and clinical decision making. Although subjects (n=20) showed no significant differences by treatment, computer-trained students had statistically nonsignificant higher performance…

  11. The Geriatric Hand: Correlation of Hand-Muscle Function and Activity Restriction in Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Incel, Nurgul Arinci; Sezgin, Melek; As, Ismet; Cimen, Ozlem Bolgen; Sahin, Gunsah

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the importance of hand manipulation in activities of daily living (ADL), deterioration of hand function because of various factors reduces quality and independence of life of the geriatric population. The aim of this study was to identify age-induced changes in manual function and to quantify the correlations between hand-muscle…

  12. Gender Bias in the Diagnosis of a Geriatric Standardized Patient: A Potential Confounding Variable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Roya; Lamdan, Ruth M.; Wald, David; Curtis, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background: Gender bias has been reported in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with a variety of illnesses. In the context of our 10-station fourth year Objective Structured Clinical Evaluation, we queried whether this could influence diagnosis in a geriatric case. Case writers hypothesized that, due to this bias, the female standardized…

  13. Development of a Comprehensive Approach for the Early Diagnosis of Geriatric Syndromes in General Practice

    PubMed Central

    Senn, Nicolas; Monod, Stéfanie

    2015-01-01

    According to demographic projections, a significant increase in the proportion of the elderly population is anticipated worldwide. This aging of the population will lead to an increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases and functional impairment. This expected increase will result in growing use of the health care system that societies are largely unprepared to address. General practitioners (GPs) are at the front line of this huge epidemiological challenge, but appropriate tools to diagnose and manage elderly patients in routine general practice are lacking. Indeed, while primary prevention and the management of common chronic diseases, such as hypertension, diabetes, or cardiac ischemic diseases, are routinely and mostly adequately performed in primary care, the management of geriatric syndromes is often incomplete. In order to address these shortcomings, this theoretical work aims to first develop, based on the best available evidence, a brief assessment tool (BAT) specifically designed for geriatric syndromes identification in general practice and, second, to propose a conceptual framework for the management of elderly patients in general practice that integrates the BAT instrument into the usual care of GPs. To avoid proposing unachievable goals for the care of elderly patients in general practice (for example, performing all the best screening tools for geriatric conditions identification and care), this work proposes an innovative way to combine geriatric assessment with the management of common chronic diseases. PMID:26636085

  14. Geriatric Education across 94 Million Acres: Adapting Conference Programming in a Rural State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy-Southwick, Colleen; McBride, Melen

    2006-01-01

    Montana, a predominantly rural state, with a unique blend of geography and history, low population density, and cultural diversity represents the challenges for program development and implementation across remote areas. The paper discusses two statewide multidisciplinary geriatric education programs for health professionals offered by the…

  15. Study design and methods of the Ansan Geriatric Study (AGE study)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Changsu; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Kim, Nan Hee; Jo, Inho; Park, Moon Ho

    2009-01-01

    Background The overall objective of the Ansan Geriatric Study (AGE study) was to describe the prevalence, incidence, and related risk factors for geriatric diseases in elderly Koreans. Methods/Design The AGE study was designed as a population-based prospective cohort study on health, aging, and common geriatric diseases of elderly Koreans aged 60 to 84 years. The inception cohort was recruited in May 2002. The first-wave and second-wave studies were performed using uniform and structured procedures. At the screening study, 2,767 participants were enrolled. Participants (1391 in the first wave study and 841 in the second wave study) were recruited and completed the evaluation. The prevalence of geriatric disease and related factors in elderly Koreans were estimated. Discussion Here, we report the design and sampling participants, measurement tools, and characteristics of the AGE study. This cohort study will allow a detailed study of the longitudinal comprehensive data on health information of elderly Koreans, thereby contributing to policy formulation and planning of health, welfare management, and other social services in Korea. PMID:19236723

  16. Filipino Nursing Students' Behavioral Intentions toward Geriatric Care: A Structural Equation Model (SEM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Jimenez, Benito Christian B.; Jocson, Kathlyn P.; Junio, Aileen R.; Junio, Drazen E.; Jurado, Jasper Benjamin N.; Justiniano, Angela Bianca F.

    2013-01-01

    Anchored on the key constucts of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior (1985), this paper seeks to test a model that explores the influence of knowledge, attitude, and caring behavior on nursing students' behavioral intention toward geriatric care. A five-part survey-questionnaire was administered to 839 third and fourth year nursing students from a…

  17. White matter hyperintensities and geriatric syndrome: An important role of arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Saji, Naoki; Ogama, Noriko; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are defined as cerebral white matter changes presumed to be of vascular origin, bilateral and mostly symmetrical. They can appear as hyperintense on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences, and as isointense or hypointense on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. WMH have been focused on because of their clinical importance as a risk factor for cerebrovascular diseases and cognitive impairment. WMH are associated with geriatric syndrome, which is defined by clinical symptoms characteristic of older adults, including cognitive and functional impairment and falls. Cerebral small vessel diseases, such as WMH, might play an important role as risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases, cognitive impairment and geriatric syndrome through the mechanism of arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness remain unclear. Basically, arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. These changes might arise from hemodynamic stress as a result of a "tsunami effect" on cerebral parenchyma. In the present article, we review the clinical characteristics of WMH, focusing particularly on two associations: (i) those between cerebral small vessel diseases including WMH and arterial stiffness; and (ii) those between WMH and geriatric syndrome. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2015; 15 (Suppl. 1): 17-25. PMID:26671153

  18. Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Gerontology and Geriatrics in Latin America: Conceptual Approaches and Health Care Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Fernando; Curcio, Carmen Lucia

    2013-01-01

    The underlying rationale to support interdisciplinary collaboration in geriatrics and gerontology is based on the complexity of elderly care. The most important characteristic about interdisciplinary health care teams for older people in Latin America is their subjective-basis framework. In other regions, teams are organized according to a…

  19. Annual Rocky Mountain Geriatrics Conference Unlocking Doors across the Long-Term Services and

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    to develop a longitudinally shared patient centered care plan, including appropriate strategies for post. Identify best practices in longitudinally shared patient centered care plans. 3. Discuss matching needs12th Annual Rocky Mountain Geriatrics Conference Unlocking Doors across the Long-Term Services

  20. The Prevalence of Undiagnosed Geriatric Health Conditions among Adult Protective Service Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, John M.; Brown, Merle; Kobylarz, Fred A.; Castano, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to determine the prevalence of remediable health conditions from in-home geriatric assessments of referred adult protective service (APS) clients suffering elder mistreatment. Design and Methods: We used a retrospective cohort study of 211 APS clients (74% female; age, M = 77 years) in two central New Jersey counties. Results:…

  1. 76 FR 17999 - Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ...Geriatrics and Gerontology Advisory Committee will be held on April 14- 15, 2011, in Room 250, Department of Veterans Affairs, 1575 Eye Street, NW., Washington, DC. On April 14, the session will begin at 8:30 a.m. and end at 5 p.m. On April...

  2. Determinants of Length of Stay in Stroke Patients: A Geriatric Rehabilitation Unit Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to identify the predictors of length of stay--the impact of age, comorbidity, and stroke subtype--on the outcome of geriatric stroke patients. One hundred and seventy stroke patients (129 first-ever ischemic, 25 hemorrhagic, and 16 ischemic second strokes) were included in the study. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project…

  3. Validation of Geriatric Depression Scale--5 Scores among Sedentary Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquez, David X.; McAuley, Edward; Motl, Robert W.; Elavsky, Steriani; Konopack, James F.; Jerome, Gerald J.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the validity of Geriatric Depression Scale--5 (GDS-5) scores among older sedentary adults based on its structural properties and relationship with external criteria. Participants from two samples (Ns = 185 and 93; M ages = 66 and 67 years) completed baseline assessments as part of randomized controlled exercise trials.…

  4. Quality Assurance in Gerontological and Geriatric Training Programs: The European Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Politynska, Barbara; van Rijsselt, Rene J. T.; Lewko, Jolanta; Philp, Ian; Figueiredo, Daniella; De Sousa, Lilliana

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) in gerontological and geriatric education programs is regarded as essential to maintain standards, strengthen accountability, improve readability of qualifications, and facilitate professional mobility. In this article the authors present a summary of international developments in QA and elaborate four international trends,…

  5. RESEARCH (T32) FELLOWSHIP IN GERIATRIC MENTAL HEALTH RESPONSIBILITIES AND REQUIREMENTS

    E-print Network

    Squire, Larry R.

    , sexual function and dysfunction, sleep disorders, and psychiatric genetics. Each year, we also have. * Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis Seminar: The Geriatric Psychiatry ACISIR has a weekly (Thursdays Golshan, PhD This course covers basic principles in experimental design; descriptive statistics; data

  6. AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY CONSENSUS STATEMENT Vitamin D for Prevention of Falls and

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY CONSENSUS STATEMENT Vitamin D for Prevention of Falls and their Consequences in Older Adults Developed by the Workgroup of the Consensus Conference on Vitamin D for the Prevention of Falls and their Consequences #12;CONSENSUS STATEMENT:Vitamin D for Prevention of Falls

  7. Teaching geriatrics using an innovative, individual-centered educational game: students and educators win. A proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    van de Pol, Marjolein H J; Lagro, Joep; Fluit, Lia R M G; Lagro-Janssen, Toine L M; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M

    2014-10-01

    Given the increasingly aging population, nearly every doctor will encounter elderly adults who present with multiple complex comorbidities that can challenge even experienced physicians. This may explain why many medical students do not have a positive attitude toward elderly adults and find the complexity of their problems overwhelming. It was hypothesized that a recently developed medical school geriatrics course, based on the game GeriatriX and designed specifically to address the complexities associated with decision-making in geriatrics, can have a positive effect on attitudes toward geriatrics and on perceived knowledge of geriatrics. The effects of this game-based course were evaluated as a proof of concept. The assessment was based on the Aging Semantic Differential (ASD) and a validated self-perceived knowledge scale of geriatric topics. The usability of (and satisfaction with) GeriatriX was also assessed using a 5-point Likert scale. After completion of the course, the ASD changed significantly in the geriatrics course group (n = 29; P = .02) but not in a control group that took a neuroscience course (n = 24; P = .30). Moreover, the geriatrics course group had a significant increase in self-perceived knowledge for 12 of the 18 topics (P = .002), whereas in the control group self-perceived knowledge increased significantly for one topic only (sensory impairment) (P = .04). Finally, the geriatrics students reported enjoying GeriatriX. This proof-of-concept study clearly supports the hypothesis that a 4-week course using a modern educational approach such as GeriatriX can improve students' self-perceived knowledge of geriatrics and their attitudes toward elderly adults. PMID:25283695

  8. Impact of geriatric comorbidity and polypharmacy on cholinesterase inhibitors prescribing in dementia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although most guidelines recommend the use of cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) for mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease, only a small proportion of affected patients receive these drugs. We aimed to study if geriatric comorbidity and polypharmacy influence the prescription of ChEIs in patients with dementia in Germany. Methods We used claims data of 1,848 incident patients with dementia aged 65 years and older. Inclusion criteria were first outpatient diagnoses for dementia in at least three of four consecutive quarters (incidence year). Our dependent variable was the prescription of at least one ChEI in the incidence year. Main independent variables were polypharmacy (defined as the number of prescribed medications categorized into quartiles) and measures of geriatric comorbidity (levels of care dependency and 14 symptom complexes characterizing geriatric patients). Data were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. Results On average, patients were 78.7 years old (47.6% female) and received 9.7 different medications (interquartile range: 6-13). 44.4% were assigned to one of three care levels and virtually all patients (92.0%) had at least one symptom complex characterizing geriatric patients. 13.0% received at least one ChEI within the incidence year. Patients not assigned to the highest care level were more likely to receive a prescription (e.g., no level of care dependency vs. level 3: adjusted Odds Ratio [OR]: 5.35; 95% CI: 1.61-17.81). The chance decreased with increasing numbers of symptoms characterizing geriatric patients (e.g., 0 vs. 5+ geriatric complexes: OR: 4.23; 95% CI: 2.06-8.69). The overall number of prescribed medications had no influence on ChEI prescription and a significant effect of age could only be found in the univariate analysis. Living in a rural compared to an urban environment and contacts to neurologists or psychiatrists were associated with a significant increase in the likelihood of receiving ChEIs in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions It seems that not age as such but the overall clinical condition of a patient including care dependency and geriatric comorbidities influences the process of decision making on prescription of ChEIs. PMID:22145796

  9. Geriatric-focused educational offerings in the Department of Veterans Affairs from 1999 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Thielke, Stephen; Tumosa, Nina; Lindenfeld, Rivkah; Shay, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The scope of geriatrics-related educational offerings in large health care systems, in either the target audiences or topics covered, has not previously been analyzed or reported in the professional literature. The authors reviewed the geriatrics-related educational sessions that were provided between 1999 and 2009 by the Geriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Centers (GRECCs) and the Employee Education System (EES) of the United States' largest integrated health care system, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Using records of attendance and content at local training events and regional and national conferences, the authors estimated the number of attendees in different health disciplines and the number and types of lectures. During the past 11 years, GRECCs and EES provided geriatric-related educational sessions to about one third of a million attendees, most of them nurses and physicians, in about 15,000 lectures. About three-fourths of the educational events occurred through local, rather than regional or national, events. Lectures covered a wide variety of topics, with a particular emphasis on dementia and other mental health topics. A comparison of the number of potential learners in VHA with the number of geriatric-related educational presentations over this time period yields an average of one offering per VHA provider every 3 years; most providers likely never received any. Since 1999 the GRECCs have been the dominant source for geriatrics-related education for VHA health professionals, but given that about one half of VHA patients are older than age 65, there is still a large unmet need to provide geriatric education to VHA providers. Examination of the GRECC resources that have been put to use in the past to develop and deliver the face-to-face education experiences described sheds light on the magnitude of resources that might be required to address remaining unmet need in the future, and supports the prediction that there will need to be increasing reliance on distance learning and other alternatives to face-to-face educational modalities. PMID:21347930

  10. Burden and Correlates of Geriatric Depression in the Uyghur Elderly Population, Observation from Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chen; Tang, Weiming; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xihua; Ma, Ying; Ben, Yanli; Cao, Xiaolin; Mahapatra, Sanchita; Ling, Min; Gou, Anshuan; Wang, Yanmei; Xiao, Jiangqin; Hou, Ming; Wang, Xiuli; Lin, Bo; Chen, Ruoling; Wang, Faxing; Hu, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Background With the gradual aging of the population, geriatric depression has become a major public health issue in China owing to its overall upward trend and associated negative socio-economic impact. Dearth of information regarding the burden and correlates of geriatric depression among Uyghur minority population in Xinjiang Autonomous Region, called for a comprehensive survey involving representative sample for designing efficient targeted intervention to control this disabling disease. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1329 consenting Uyghur elderly in 2011 in six randomly selected communities/villages in Xinjiang. Information about socio-demographics, behavior, negative life-events, satisfaction regarding income/quality of life and other chronic diseases were collected while assessment of geriatric depression was done using Geriatric Mental State Schedule (GMS). Results Among these participants, majority were currently married, had attended elementary school or less, had an average annual family income of less than 3000 Yuan/person, had strong religious beliefs while 10.61% (2.77% in urban and 23.60% in rural area) had geriatric depression (5.91% among male and 14.58% among females). 61.83% were suffering from other chronic diseases, 96.16% could take care of themselves and 39.28% had experienced negative events during last two years. Religious belief (AOR?=?3.92, 95% CI 1.18–13.03), satisfaction regarding quality of life (AOR?=?0.53, 95% CI 0.37–0.84) and income (AOR?=?0.75, 95% CI 0.35–1.60), suffering from more chronic diseases (AOR?=?1.70, 95% CI 1.42–2.04), experiencing three or more negative events (AOR?=?1.72, 95% CI 0.92–3.22) and lack of ability to take self-care (AOR?=?2.20, 95% CI 1.09–4.48) were all associated with having geriatric depression with or without adjustment for gender, education and occupation. Conclusion High prevalence of geriatric depression among Uyghur elderly in Xinjiang seemed to call for urgent interventions, specifically targeting rural residents, who experienced more negative life-events, were suffering from chronic diseases and were dissatisfied with their income and quality of life. PMID:25437860

  11. Geriatric rehabilitation of stroke patients in nursing homes: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Geriatric patients are typically underrepresented in studies on the functional outcome of rehabilitation after stroke. Moreover, most geriatric stroke patients do probably not participate in intensive rehabilitation programs as offered by rehabilitation centers. As a result, very few studies have described the successfulness of geriatric stroke rehabilitation in nursing home patients, although it appears that the majority of these patients are being discharged back to the community, rather than being transferred to residential care. Nevertheless, factors associated with the successfulness of stroke rehabilitation in nursing homes or skilled nursing facilities are largely unknown. The primary goal of this study is, therefore, to assess the factors that uniquely contribute to the successfulness of rehabilitation in geriatric stroke patients that undergo rehabilitation in nursing homes. A secondary goal is to investigate whether these factors are similar to those associated with the outcome of stroke rehabilitation in the literature. Methods/Design This study is part of the Geriatric Rehabilitation in AMPutation and Stroke (GRAMPS) study in the Netherlands. It is a longitudinal, observational, multicenter study in 15 nursing homes in the Southern part of the Netherlands that aims to include at least 200 patients. All participating nursing homes are selected based on the existence of a specialized rehabilitation unit and the provision of dedicated multidisciplinary care. Patient characteristics, disease characteristics, functional status, cognition, behavior, and caregiver information, are collected within two weeks after admission to the nursing home. The first follow-up is at discharge from the nursing home or one year after inclusion, and focuses on functional status and behavior. Successful rehabilitation is defined as discharge from the nursing home to an independent living situation within one year after admission. The second follow-up is three months after discharge in patients who rehabilitated successfully, and assesses functional status, behavior, and quality of life. All instruments used in this study have shown to be valid and reliable in rehabilitation research or are recommended by the Netherlands Heart Foundation guidelines for stroke rehabilitation. Data will be analyzed using SPSS 16.0. Besides descriptive analyses, both univariate and multivariate analyses will be performed with the purpose of identifying associated factors as well as their unique contribution to determining successful rehabilitation. Discussion This study will provide more information about geriatric stroke rehabilitation in Dutch nursing homes. To our knowledge, this is the first large study that focuses on the determinants of success of geriatric stroke rehabilitation in nursing home patients. PMID:20346175

  12. Long-term post-injury functional recovery: Outcomes of geriatric consultation

    PubMed Central

    Tillou, Areti; Kelley-Quon, Lorraine; Burruss, Sigrid; Morley, Eric; Cryer, Henry; Cohen, Marilyn; Min, Lillian

    2013-01-01

    Importance Functional recovery is an important outcome following injury. Functional impairment is persistent in the year following injury for older trauma patients. Objective To measure the impact of routine geriatric consultation on functional outcomes in older trauma patients. Design Pretest-posttest study. The pretest control group (n=37) was retrospectively-identified (December 2006-November 2007). The posttest geriatric consultation (GC) group (n=85) was prospectively enrolled (December 2007-June 2010). We then followed both groups for 1 year after enrollment. Setting Academic Level-1 trauma center Participants Adults ? 65 years of age admitted as an activated code trauma Intervention Routine geriatric consultation Main Outcome Measure The Short Functional Status (SFS) survey of five Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) on admission and 3, 6, and 12 months post-injury. Results The unadjusted SFS (GC group only) declined from 4.6 pre-injury to 3.7 at 12 months post-injury, a decline of nearly one full ADL (p<.05). The ability to shop for personal items was the specific ADL more commonly retained by the GC compared to the control group. The GC group had a better recovery of function in the year following injury than the GC group controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, length of stay, co-morbidity, injury severity, post-discharge rehabilitation, complication, and whether surgery was performed (p<.01), a difference of 0.67 ADL abilities retained by the GC compared to the control group (95% CI 0.06–1.4). Conclusions and Relevance Functional recovery for older adults following injury may be improved by geriatric consultation. Early introduction of multidisciplinary care in geriatric trauma patients warrants further investigation. PMID:24284836

  13. Use Medicines Safely

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription Medicines ... Medicines 1 of 8 sections The Basics: Prescription Medicines There are different types of medicine. The 2 ...

  14. Assessing the Value of an Optional Radiation Oncology Clinical Rotation During the Core Clerkships in Medical School

    SciTech Connect

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Malatesta, Theresa M.; Den, Robert B.; Wuthrick, Evan; Ahn, Peter H.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Shi, Wenyin; Dicker, Adam P.; Anne, P. Rani; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Few medical students are given proper clinical training in oncology, much less radiation oncology. We attempted to assess the value of adding a radiation oncology clinical rotation to the medical school curriculum. Methods and Materials: In July 2010, Jefferson Medical College began to offer a 3-week radiation oncology rotation as an elective course for third-year medical students during the core surgical clerkship. During 2010 to 2012, 52 medical students chose to enroll in this rotation. The rotation included outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, didactic sessions, and case-based presentations by the students. Tests of students' knowledge of radiation oncology were administered anonymously before and after the rotation to evaluate the educational effectiveness of the rotation. Students and radiation oncology faculty were given surveys to assess feedback about the rotation. Results: The students' prerotation test scores had an average of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61-66%). The postrotation test scores improved to an average of 82% (95% CI, 80-83%; 18% absolute improvement). In examination question analysis, scores improved in clinical oncology from 63% to 79%, in radiobiology from 70% to 77%, and in medical physics from 62% to 88%. Improvements in all sections but radiobiology were statistically significant. Students rated the usefulness of the rotation as 8.1 (scale 1-9; 95% CI, 7.3-9.0), their understanding of radiation oncology as a result of the rotation as 8.8 (95% CI, 8.5-9.1), and their recommendation of the rotation to a classmate as 8.2 (95% CI, 7.6-9.0). Conclusions: Integrating a radiation oncology clinical rotation into the medical school curriculum improves student knowledge of radiation oncology, including aspects of clinical oncology, radiobiology, and medical physics. The rotation is appreciated by both students and faculty.

  15. Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    2007--2008 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;Welcome to Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Takao Shimizu Dean, Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo The Faculty of Medicine

  16. Vulnerable Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochner, Arthur P.

    2009-01-01

    In "Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness," Rita Charon paints an original and humane portrait of what it can mean to be a doctor, to live a life immersed in sickness and dedicated to wellness. Charon drops the veil, inviting readers to look at the secret, subjective, emotional face of medicine, a zone of self-censored feelings and…

  17. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    This abstract describes the content of a presentation for ground rounds at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine. The presentation contains three sections. The first describes the history of aerospace medicine beginning with early flights with animals. The second section of the presentation describes current programs and planning for future missions. The third section describes the medical challenges of exploration missions.

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine in US medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Cowen, Virginia S; Cyr, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in US medical school curriculum was undertaken. Websites for 130 US medical schools were systematically analyzed for course listings and content. Half of the schools (50.8%) offered at least one CAM course or clerkship. A total of 127 different course listings were identified, embracing a range of topics and methods of instruction. The most frequently listed topics were traditional medicine, acupuncture, spirituality, and herbs, along with the general topic of CAM. Nearly 25.0% of the courses referenced personal growth or self-care through CAM practices, while only 11.0% referenced inter-professional education activities involving interaction with CAM providers. The most frequently reported instructional methods were lectures, readings, and observation of, or receiving a CAM treatment. The findings of this analysis indicated fewer medical schools offered instruction in CAM than previously reported and a wide range of approaches to the topic across the schools where CAM is taught. PMID:25709517

  19. Increased Basal and Alum-Induced Interleukin-6 Levels in Geriatric Patients Are Associated with Cardiovascular Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Compté, Nathalie; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; De Breucker, Sandra; Pepersack, Thierry; Tassignon, Joel; Trelcat, Anne; Goriely, Stanislas

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim of the study Low-grade systemic inflammation was suggested to participate to the decline of physiological functions and increased vulnerability encountered in older patients. Geriatric syndromes encompass various features such as functional dependence, polymorbidity, depression and malnutrition. There is a strong prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and related risk factors and chronic cytomegalovirus infections in the geriatric population. As these underlying conditions were proposed to influence the inflammatory state, the aim of this study was to assess their potential contribution to the association of geriatric syndromes with inflammatory parameters. Methodology We recruited 100 subjects in the general population or hospitalized for chronic medical conditions (age, 23-96 years). We collected information on clinical status (medical history, ongoing comorbidities, treatments and geriatric scales), biological parameters (hematological tests, cytomegalovirus serology) and cytokines production (basal and alum-induced interleukin (IL)-1? and IL-6 levels). Using stepwise backward multivariate analyses, we defined which set of clinical and biological variables could be predictive for increased inflammatory markers. Principal Findings We confirmed the age-associated increase of circulating IL-6 levels. In contrast to geriatric scales, we found history of cardiovascular diseases to be strongly associated for this parameter as for high IL-6 production upon ex vivo stimulation with alum. Conclusions Association between low-grade inflammation and geriatric conditions could be linked to underlying cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24244750

  20. Inadequate analgesia in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Timothy; Delaney, Kathleen A

    2004-04-01

    Review of emergency department pain management practices demonstrates pain treatment inconsistency and inadequacy that extends across all demographic groups. This inconsistency and inadequacy appears to stem from a multitude of potentially remediable practical and attitudinal barriers that include (1) a lack of educational emphasis on pain management practices in nursing and medical school curricula and postgraduate training programs; (2) inadequate or nonexistent clinical quality management programs that evaluate pain management; (3) a paucity of rigorous studies of populations with special needs that improve pain management in the emergency department, particularly in geriatric and pediatric patients; (4) clinicians' attitudes toward opioid analgesics that result in inappropriate diagnosis of drug-seeking behavior and inappropriate concern about addiction, even in patients who have obvious acutely painful conditions and request pain relief; (5) inappropriate concerns about the safety of opioids compared with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that result in their underuse (opiophobia); (6) unappreciated cultural and sex differences in pain reporting by patients and interpretation of pain reporting by providers; and (7) bias and disbelief of pain reporting according to racial and ethnic stereotyping. This article reviews the literature that describes the prevalence and roots of oligoanalgesia in emergency medicine. It also discusses the regulatory efforts to address the problem and their effect on attitudes within the legal community. PMID:15039693

  1. Wilderness medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sward, Douglas G.; Bennett, Brad L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human activity in wilderness areas has increased globally in recent decades, leading to increased risk of injury and illness. Wilderness medicine has developed in response to both need and interest. METHODS: The field of wilderness medicine encompasses many areas of interest. Some focus on special circumstances (such as avalanches) while others have a broader scope (such as trauma care). Several core areas of key interest within wilderness medicine are discussed in this study. RESULTS: Wilderness medicine is characterized by remote and improvised care of patients with routine or exotic illnesses or trauma, limited resources and manpower, and delayed evacuation to definitive care. Wilderness medicine is developing rapidly and draws from the breadth of medical and surgical subspecialties as well as the technical fields of mountaineering, climbing, and diving. Research, epidemiology, and evidence-based guidelines are evolving. A hallmark of this field is injury prevention and risk mitigation. The range of topics encompasses high-altitude cerebral edema, decompression sickness, snake envenomation, lightning injury, extremity trauma, and gastroenteritis. Several professional societies, academic fellowships, and training organizations offer education and resources for laypeople and health care professionals. CONCLUSIONS: The future of wilderness medicine is unfolding on multiple fronts: education, research, training, technology, communications, and environment. Although wilderness medicine research is technically difficult to perform, it is essential to deepening our understanding of the contribution of specific techniques in achieving improvements in clinical outcomes. PMID:25215140

  2. A WSN healthcare monitoring system for elderly people in geriatric facilities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao; Weller, Peter; Grattan, Kenneth T V

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates an enhanced WSN based monitoring system for elderly people in geriatric facilities. Apart from general physical monitoring functionalities, we explore the potential of using a wireless audio module to perform mental health monitoring. The telephone version of the mini mental status examination (T-MMSE) was adopted in the mental health monitoring and the RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator) localization algorithm was implemented in this system to track elderly people's the real-time location and send alerts based on their inactivity/activity levels, movement history and entry into restricted zones. Experimental test was performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. With results obtained and studied, this work can be extended to perform detection and rehabilitation function for elderly people with mental illness. This kind of monitoring system would be expected to make an important impact on many application scenarios for geriatric facilities. PMID:25991212

  3. Factors associated with frequent admissions to an acute geriatric psychiatric inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Woo, Benjamin K P; Golshan, Shahrokh; Allen, Edward C; Daly, John W; Jeste, Dilip V; Sewell, Daniel D

    2006-12-01

    As a first step toward developing strategies to reduce the frequency of psychiatric hospitalizations, the authors retrospectively collected and analyzed demographic and clinical variables from 424 consecutive admissions to a university-based geriatric psychiatry inpatient unit over a 20-month period. The study sample was dichotomized into patients who were admitted more than one time (35.6%) versus those with a single admission. Factors associated with rehospitalization were examined with multivariate logistic regression analysis. The great majority of readmissions (81%) occurred in the first 3 months after discharge. The logistic regression model indicated that significant predictors of rehospitalization were single relationship status, male gender, and bipolar disorder diagnosis. Our findings overlap with findings from previous similar studies and suggest that information readily obtainable on admission to an acute geriatric psychiatry inpatient unit may provide a useful indication of risk for frequent psychiatric hospitalizations and may contribute to readmission prevention strategies. PMID:17085762

  4. Learning the meaning of care: a case study in a geriatric home in Upper Egypt.

    PubMed

    Boggatz, Thomas; Dassen, Theo

    2006-04-01

    Geriatric care is a new phenomenon in Egypt. This study investigates how Egyptian caregivers experience their work and how they conceive its meaning. A qualitative case study in a geriatric home in Upper Egypt was conducted using structured interviews with 10 staff members and content analysis according to Mayring. Performing care required learning to overcome initial experiences of fear, disgust, and sexual taboo. Care was perceived as a laborious repetition. Its ideal form was described as a reaction to a demand combined with kind patience and a family-like relationship. Christian and female values allowed coping with experienced problems and alleviated conflicts between traditional gender roles and care of male residents. Traditional values helped to adapt to the requirements of providing care. Sexual taboos may reduce willingness to provide care, but traditional values may encourage caregivers. PMID:16595403

  5. Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    2005--2006 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;Welcome to Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Nobutaka Hirokawa Dean, Faculty of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo The University of Tokyo Graduate

  6. Team-based learning on a third-year pediatric clerkship improves NBME subject exam blood disorder scores

    PubMed Central

    Saudek, Kris; Treat, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose At our institution, speculation amongst medical students and faculty exists as to whether team-based learning (TBL) can improve scores on high-stakes examinations over traditional didactic lectures. Faculty with experience using TBL developed and piloted a required TBL blood disorders (BD) module for third-year medical students on their pediatric clerkship. The purpose of this study is to analyze the BD scores from the NBME subject exams before and after the introduction of the module. Methods We analyzed institutional and national item difficulties for BD items from the NBME pediatrics content area item analysis reports from 2011 to 2014 before (pre) and after (post) the pilot (October 2012). Total scores of 590 NBME subject examination students from examinee performance profiles were analyzed pre/post. t-Tests and Cohen's d effect sizes were used to analyze item difficulties for institutional versus national scores and pre/post comparisons of item difficulties and total scores. Results BD scores for our institution were 0.65 (±0.19) compared to 0.62 (±0.15) nationally (P=0.346; Cohen's d=0.15). The average of post-consecutive BD scores for our students was 0.70 (±0.21) compared to examinees nationally [0.64 (±0.15)] with a significant mean difference (P=0.031; Cohen's d=0.43). The difference in our institutions pre [0.65 (±0.19)] and post [0.70 (±0.21)] BD scores trended higher (P=0.391; Cohen's d=0.27). Institutional BD scores were higher than national BD scores for both pre and post, with an effect size that tripled from pre to post scores. Institutional BD scores increased after the use of the TBL module, while overall exam scores remained steadily above national norms. Conclusions Institutional BD scores were higher than national BD scores for both pre and post, with an effect size that tripled from pre to post scores. Institutional BD scores increased after the use of the TBL module, while overall exam scores remained steadily above national norms. PMID:26466555

  7. Medicinal Herbman

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi

    2010-07-21

    Broadcast Transcript: Japanese gardens are admired for their understated elegance, their meditation/movement fusion, their precise placement of essential elements such as water and stone. In this last way at least, Medicinal ...

  8. [Sophrology in geriatrics, an innovative approach to reducing pain and anxiety].

    PubMed

    Tocheport, Pascale

    2012-03-01

    Sophrology is a non medication-based method which involves both the body and mind. It combines relaxing the muscles, increasing awareness of breathing and positive thinking, and leads to the search for improved well-being through the integration of the body percept. It generates a feeling of "letting go" and helps to relieve physical, psychological and spiritual suffering, in particular in geriatrics. PMID:22533280

  9. Preoperative assessment of the older surgical patient: honing in on geriatric syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghye; Brooks, Amber K; Groban, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 50% of Americans will have an operation after the age of 65 years. Traditional preoperative anesthesia consultations capture only some of the information needed to identify older patients (defined as ?65 years of age) undergoing elective surgery who are at increased risk for postoperative complications, prolonged hospital stays, and delayed or hampered functional recovery. As a catalyst to this review, we compared traditional risk scores (eg, cardiac-focused) to geriatric-specific risk measures from two older female patients seen in our preoperative clinic who were scheduled for elective, robotic-assisted hysterectomies. Despite having a lower cardiac risk index and Charlson comorbidity score, the younger of the two patients presented with more subtle negative geriatric-specific risk predictors - including intermediate or pre-frail status, borderline malnutrition, and reduced functional/mobility - which may have contributed to her 1-day-longer length of stay and need for readmission. Adequate screening of physiologic and cognitive reserves in older patients scheduled for surgery could identify at-risk, vulnerable elders and enable proactive perioperative management strategies (eg, strength, balance, and mobility prehabilitation) to reduce adverse postoperative outcomes and readmissions. Here, we describe our initial two cases and review the stress response to surgery and the impact of advanced age on this response as well as preoperative geriatric assessments, including frailty, nutrition, physical function, cognition, and mood state tests that may better predict postoperative outcomes in older adults. A brief overview of the literature on anesthetic techniques that may influence geriatric-related syndromes is also presented. PMID:25565783

  10. Preoperative assessment of the older surgical patient: honing in on geriatric syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunghye; Brooks, Amber K; Groban, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 50% of Americans will have an operation after the age of 65 years. Traditional preoperative anesthesia consultations capture only some of the information needed to identify older patients (defined as ?65 years of age) undergoing elective surgery who are at increased risk for postoperative complications, prolonged hospital stays, and delayed or hampered functional recovery. As a catalyst to this review, we compared traditional risk scores (eg, cardiac-focused) to geriatric-specific risk measures from two older female patients seen in our preoperative clinic who were scheduled for elective, robotic-assisted hysterectomies. Despite having a lower cardiac risk index and Charlson comorbidity score, the younger of the two patients presented with more subtle negative geriatric-specific risk predictors – including intermediate or pre-frail status, borderline malnutrition, and reduced functional/mobility – which may have contributed to her 1-day-longer length of stay and need for readmission. Adequate screening of physiologic and cognitive reserves in older patients scheduled for surgery could identify at-risk, vulnerable elders and enable proactive perioperative management strategies (eg, strength, balance, and mobility prehabilitation) to reduce adverse postoperative outcomes and readmissions. Here, we describe our initial two cases and review the stress response to surgery and the impact of advanced age on this response as well as preoperative geriatric assessments, including frailty, nutrition, physical function, cognition, and mood state tests that may better predict postoperative outcomes in older adults. A brief overview of the literature on anesthetic techniques that may influence geriatric-related syndromes is also presented. PMID:25565783

  11. Service Learning With a Geriatric Population: Changing Attitudes and Improving Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, Audrey; Foito, Kim; Pearlin, Nina; Yost, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Relatively few nursing students choose to specialize in geriatric nursing. While increased clinical exposure and improved knowledge of the elderly have been proposed to manage this staffing dilemma, successful strategies have not been identified. This study examined nursing students' attitudes and knowledge about the elderly, before and after service learning experiences in Senior Citizen Centers. Through these interventions, students had significantly improved attitudes and knowledge about the elderly. PMID:25997154

  12. General Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine What is General Nuclear Medicine? What are some ... of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  14. Medical Student Performance on the National Board of Medical Examiners Emergency Medicine Advanced Clinical Examination and the National Emergency Medicine M4 Exams

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Katherine; House, Joseph; Lawson, Luan; Poznanski, Stacey; Morrissey, Thomas K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In April 2013, the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) released an Advanced Clinical Examination (ACE) in emergency medicine (EM). In addition to this new resource, CDEM (Clerkship Directors in EM) provides two online, high-quality, internally validated examinations. National usage statistics are available for all three examinations, however, it is currently unknown how students entering an EM residency perform as compared to the entire national cohort. This information may help educators interpret examination scores of both EM-bound and non-EM-bound students. Objectives The objective of this study was to compare EM clerkship examination performance between students who matched into an EM residency in 2014 to students who did not. We made comparisons were made using the EM-ACE and both versions of the National fourth year medical student (M4) EM examinations. Method In this retrospective multi-institutional cohort study, the EM-ACE and either Version 1 (V1) or 2 (V2) of the National EM M4 examination was given to students taking a fourth-year EM rotation at five institutions between April 2013 to February 2014. We collected examination performance, including the scaled EM-ACE score, and percent correct on the EM M4 exams, and 2014 NRMP Match status. Student t-tests were performed on the examination averages of students who matched in EM as compared with those who did not. Results A total of 606 students from five different institutions took both the EM-ACE and one of the EM M4 exams; 94 (15.5%) students matched in EM in the 2014 Match. The mean score for EM-bound students on the EM-ACE, V1 and V2 of the EM M4 exams were 70.9 (n=47, SD=9.0), 84.4 (n=36, SD=5.2), and 83.3 (n=11, SD=6.9), respectively. Mean scores for non-EM-bound students were 68.0 (n=256, SD=9.7), 82.9 (n=243, SD=6.5), and 74.5 (n=13, SD=5.9). There was a significant difference in mean scores in EM-bound and non-EM-bound student for the EM-ACE (p=0.05) and V2 (p<0.01) but not V1 (p=0.18) of the National EM M4 examination. Conclusion Students who successfully matched in EM performed better on all three exams at the end of their EM clerkship. PMID:26594290

  15. Treatment of colorectal cancer in older patients: International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) consensus recommendations 2013.

    PubMed

    Papamichael, D; Audisio, R A; Glimelius, B; de Gramont, A; Glynne-Jones, R; Haller, D; Köhne, C-H; Rostoft, S; Lemmens, V; Mitry, E; Rutten, H; Sargent, D; Sastre, J; Seymour, M; Starling, N; Van Cutsem, E; Aapro, M

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in Europe and worldwide, with the peak incidence in patients >70 years of age. However, as the treatment algorithms for the treatment of patients with CRC become ever more complex, it is clear that a significant percentage of older CRC patients (>70 years) are being less than optimally treated. This document provides a summary of an International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) task force meeting convened in Paris in 2013 to update the existing expert recommendations for the treatment of older (geriatric) CRC patients published in 2009 and includes overviews of the recent data on epidemiology, geriatric assessment as it relates to surgery and oncology, and the ability of older CRC patients to tolerate surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy, treatment of their metastatic disease including palliative chemotherapy with and without the use of the biologics, and finally the use of adjuvant and palliative radiotherapy in the treatment of older rectal cancer patients. An overview of each area was presented by one of the task force experts and comments invited from other task force members. PMID:25015334

  16. Integrating Geriatric Assessment into Decision-Making after Prostatectomy: Adjuvant Radiotherapy, Salvage Radiotherapy, or None?

    PubMed Central

    Goineau, Aurore; d’Aillières, Bénédicte; de Decker, Laure; Supiot, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Despite current advancements in the field, management of older prostate cancer patients still remains a big challenge for Geriatric Oncology. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (ISGO) has recently updated its recommendations in this area, and these have been widely adopted, notably by the European Association of Urology. This article outlines the principles that should be observed in the management of elderly patients who have recently undergone prostatectomy for malignancy or with a biochemical relapse following prostatectomy. Further therapeutic intervention should not be considered in those patients who are classified as frail in the geriatric assessment. In patients presenting better health conditions, salvage radiotherapy is to be preferred to adjuvant radiotherapy, which is only indicated in certain exceptional cases. Radiotherapy of the operative bed presents a higher risk to the elderly. Additionally, hormone therapy clearly shows higher side effects in older patients and therefore it should not be administered to asymptomatic patients. We propose a decision tree based on the ISGO recommendations, with specific modifications for patients in biochemical relapse. PMID:26528437

  17. Computerized Condition-specific Templates For Improving Care of Geriatric Syndromes in a Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Constance H

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION As the U.S. population ages, primary care clinicians (PCCs) will encounter more patients with geriatric syndromes, such as urinary incontinence (UI) and falls. Yet, current evidence suggests that care of these conditions does not meet expected standards and that PCCs would benefit from tools to improve care of these conditions. Little is known about the role of computerized condition-specific templates for improving care of geriatric syndromes. AIM We sought to develop and assess the usefulness of condition-specific computerized templates in a primary care setting. SETTING A large academic Veterans Affairs medical center. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION We developed and tested the usefulness of 2 condition-specific computerized templates (UI and falls) that could be added on to an existing electronic health record system. PROGRAM EVALUATION Semistructured interviews were used to identify barriers to use of computerized templates. Usefulness and usability were assessed through a randomized-controlled trial involving standardized patients. DISCUSSION Use of condition-specific templates resulted in improved history and physical exam assessment for both UI and falls (P < .05). Our computerized, condition-specific templates are a promising method for improving care of geriatric conditions in a primary care setting, but require improvement in usability before widespread implementation. PMID:16918747

  18. Outcomes of Geriatric Hip Fractures Treated with AFFIXUS Hip Fracture Nail

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Ahmed; Madhusudan, Mysore; Waseem, Mohammed; Kershaw, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Geriatric hip fractures are one of the commonest fractures worldwide. The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of a series of unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail. A retrospective study of 100 unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail is presented. The mean follow-up duration was 8 months (range 3–32). Of the patients 83% were female. The average age was 85 years. The fracture was treated by closed reduction and intramedullary fixation. The mean acute hospital stay was 17.6 days. Systemic complications occurred in 29 patients (29%) and local complications in 3 patients (3%) including lag screw cutout in one patient (1%), lag screw backout in one patient (1%), and deep infection in one patient (1%). Mechanical failures and periprosthetic fractures were not observed in our series. Fractures united in all patients. Preinjury activity level was recovered in 78% of the patients. The results of AFFIXUS hip fracture nail were satisfactory in most elderly patients. The unique design of the lag screw and its thread spacing had effectively reduced cut-out rate. PMID:25580303

  19. Outcomes of Geriatric Hip Fractures Treated with AFFIXUS Hip Fracture Nail.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Ahmed; Madhusudan, Mysore; Waseem, Mohammed; Kershaw, Steven; Fischer, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Geriatric hip fractures are one of the commonest fractures worldwide. The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of a series of unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail. A retrospective study of 100 unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail is presented. The mean follow-up duration was 8 months (range 3-32). Of the patients 83% were female. The average age was 85 years. The fracture was treated by closed reduction and intramedullary fixation. The mean acute hospital stay was 17.6 days. Systemic complications occurred in 29 patients (29%) and local complications in 3 patients (3%) including lag screw cutout in one patient (1%), lag screw backout in one patient (1%), and deep infection in one patient (1%). Mechanical failures and periprosthetic fractures were not observed in our series. Fractures united in all patients. Preinjury activity level was recovered in 78% of the patients. The results of AFFIXUS hip fracture nail were satisfactory in most elderly patients. The unique design of the lag screw and its thread spacing had effectively reduced cut-out rate. PMID:25580303

  20. Outcome and Complications in Surgical Treatment of Lumbar Stenosis or Spondylolisthesis in Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Young; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Suh, Bo-Kyung; Yang, Myung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Development of anesthesiology and improvement of surgical instruments enabled aggressive surgical treatment even in elderly patients, who require more active physical activities than they were in the past. However, there are controversies about the clinical outcome of spinal surgery in elderly patients with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis. The purpose of this study is to review the clinical outcome of spinal surgery in elderly patients with spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis. MEDLINE search on English-language articles was performed. There were 39685 articles from 1967 to 2013 regarding spinal disease, among which 70 dealt with geriatric lumbar surgery. Eighteen out of 70 articles dealt with geriatric lumbar surgery under the diagnosis of spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis. One was non-randomized prospective, and other seventeen reports were retrospective. One non-randomized prospective and twelve out of seventeen retrospective studies showed that old ages did not affect the clinical outcomes. One non-randomized prospective and ten of seventeen retrospective studies elucidated postoperative complications: some reports showed that postoperative complications increased in elderly patients, whereas the other reports showed that they did not increase. Nevertheless, most complications were minor. There were two retrospective studies regarding the mortality. Mortality which was unrelated to surgical procedure increased, but surgical procedure-related mortality did not increase. Surgery as a treatment option in the elderly patients with the spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis may be reasonable. However, there is insufficient evidence to make strong recommendations regarding spinal surgery for geriatric patients with spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis. PMID:26256960

  1. Proposed treatment for geriatric vestibular disease in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kraeling, Margaret

    2014-03-01

    Sudden-onset vestibular dysfunction in the canine is a commonly seen condition in veterinary practice, with some veterinarians reporting several cases each month. However, traditional veterinary medicine has little to offer these patients other than symptomatic relief for the severe nausea that accompanies the vertigo and supportive advice for the owners. Owners of affected dogs are informed that these symptoms usually resolve within a few days. As physical therapists, we often see cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in our human practice clinics, and effective protocols for diagnosis and treatment of the condition have been developed for this condition. A modified testing and repositioning postural maneuver used successfully on 12 canine patients in our canine rehabilitation clinic (The Canine Fitness Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is hereby described. PMID:25103883

  2. Methodologic challenges of randomized controlled studies on in-home comprehensive geriatric assessment: the EIGER project. Evaluation of In-Home Geriatric Health Visits in Elderly Residents.

    PubMed

    Stuck, A E; Zwahlen, H G; Neuenschwander, B E; Meyer Schweizer, R A; Bauen, G; Beck, J C

    1995-06-01

    Previous controlled studies have shown that preventive home visits are a promising method for disability prevention in elderly persons; however, due to the lack of data on cost effectiveness and optimal intervention methods, there is still debate on their usefulness. Therefore, additional controlled studies must use new methods to resolve these unanswered issues. We present a novel approach used in the project EIGER (Evaluation of In-Home Geriatric Health Visits in Elderly Residents), an ongoing randomized controlled trial of preventive home visits in community-residing persons aged 75 years and older in Bern, Switzerland. The intervention consists of in-home visits with structured comprehensive geriatric assessment and follow-up by specially trained nurses who collaborate with geriatricians and an interdisciplinary team. Special methods were used to optimize the sample size, to improve the health care cost analysis, to minimize and explore refusal to participate, to apply stratified randomization for subgroup analysis, and to evaluate the intervention process with a tracer method. Selected baseline findings (N = 791, mean age 82 years, 73% female) include uncontrolled systolic hypertension (54%), balance/gait disorder (9%), cognitive impairment (7%), 6 or more medications (21%), depressive symptoms (10%), and impaired basic ADL (15%). Baseline findings demonstrate that this study is likely to contribute to some of the unresolved issues of in-home prevention for older persons. PMID:8547381

  3. Geriatric urolithiasis in the emergency department: risk factors for hospitalisation and emergency management patterns of acute urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Urolithiasis is one of the most common conditions seen in emergency departments (ED) worldwide, with an increasing frequency in geriatric patients (>65?years). Given the high costs of emergency medical urolithiasis treatment, the need to optimise management is obvious. We aimed to determine risk factors for hospitalisation and evaluate diagnostic and emergency treatment patterns by ED physicians in geriatric urolithiasis patients to assist in optimising treatment. Methods After receiving ethics committee approval, we examined the records of emergency urolithiasis admissions to our ED between January 2000 and December 2010 to determine risk factors for hospitalisation and to evaluate current diagnostic and emergency treatment patterns in geriatric urolithiasis patients. Results 1,267 consecutive patients at least 20?years of age with confirmed urolithiasis (1,361 ED visits) and complete follow-up data were analyzed. Geriatric patients comprised 10% of urolithiasis patients with more than half of them experiencing their first urolithiasis episode at ED admission. Although stone site, side and size did not significantly differ between groups, urinary stone disease was more severe in the elderly. The risk of severe complications correlated with increasing age, female sex and diabetes mellitus. Geriatric patients had a two-fold greater likelihood of being hospitalised. A significantly lower percentage of geriatric patients received combined analgesic therapy for pain management (37% vs. 64%, p?=?<0.001) and supportive expulsive treatment (9% vs. 24%, p?=?<0.001). Conclusion Geriatric patients with urolithiasis have a higher morbidity than younger patients and may be undertreated concerning analgetic and expulsive treatment in ED. PMID:22998399

  4. Mesopotamian medicine.

    PubMed

    Retief, F P; Cilliers, L

    2007-01-01

    Although the Mesopotamian civilisation is as old as that of Egypt and might even have predated it, we know much less about Mesopotamian medicine, mainly because the cuneiform source material is less well researched. Medical healers existed from the middle of the 3rd millennium. In line with the strong theocratic state culture, healers were closely integrated with the powerful priestly fraternity, and were essentially of three main kinds: barû (seers) who were experts in divination, âshipu (exorcists), and asû (healing priests) who tended directly to the sick. All illness was accepted as sent by gods, demons and other evil spirits, either as retribution for sins or as malevolent visitations. Treatment revolved around identification of the offending supernatural power, appeasement of the angry gods, for example by offering amulets or incantations, exorcism of evil spirits, as well as a measure of empirical therapy aimed against certain recognised symptom complexes. Medical practice was rigidly codified, starting with Hammurabi's Code in the 18th century BC and persisting to the late 1st millennium BC. Works like the so-called Diagnostic Handbook, the Assyrian Herbal and Prescription Texts describe the rationale of Mesopotamian medicine, based predominantly on supernatural concepts, although rudimentary traces of empirical medicine are discernible. There is evidence that Egyptian medicine might have been influenced by Mesopotamian practices, but Greek rational medicine as it evolved in the 5th/4th centuries BC almost certainly had no significant Mesopotamian roots. PMID:17378276

  5. Bioenergetic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, Russell H

    2014-01-01

    Here we discuss a specific therapeutic strategy we call ‘bioenergetic medicine’. Bioenergetic medicine refers to the manipulation of bioenergetic fluxes to positively affect health. Bioenergetic medicine approaches rely heavily on the law of mass action, and impact systems that monitor and respond to the manipulated flux. Since classically defined energy metabolism pathways intersect and intertwine, targeting one flux also tends to change other fluxes, which complicates treatment design. Such indirect effects, fortunately, are to some extent predictable, and from a therapeutic perspective may also be desirable. Bioenergetic medicine-based interventions already exist for some diseases, and because bioenergetic medicine interventions are presently feasible, new approaches to treat certain conditions, including some neurodegenerative conditions and cancers, are beginning to transition from the laboratory to the clinic. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24004341

  6. Medicinal smokes.

    PubMed

    Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali; Faridi, Pouya; Shams-Ardakani, Mohammadreza; Ghasemi, Younes

    2006-11-24

    All through time, humans have used smoke of medicinal plants to cure illness. To the best of our knowledge, the ethnopharmacological aspects of natural products' smoke for therapy and health care have not been studied. Mono- and multi-ingredient herbal and non-herbal remedies administered as smoke from 50 countries across the 5 continents are reviewed. Most of the 265 plant species of mono-ingredient remedies studied belong to Asteraceae (10.6%), followed by Solanaceae (10.2%), Fabaceae (9.8%) and Apiaceae (5.3%). The most frequent medical indications for medicinal smoke are pulmonary (23.5%), neurological (21.8%) and dermatological (8.1%). Other uses of smoke are not exactly medical but beneficial to health, and include smoke as a preservative or a repellent and the social use of smoke. The three main methods for administering smoke are inhalation, which accounts for 71.5% of the indications; smoke directed at a specific organ or body part, which accounts for 24.5%; ambient smoke (passive smoking), which makes up the remaining 4.0%. Whereas inhalation is typically used in the treatment of pulmonary and neurological disorders and directed smoke in localized situations, such as dermatological and genito-urinary disorders, ambient smoke is not directed at the body at all but used as an air purifier. The advantages of smoke-based remedies are rapid delivery to the brain, more efficient absorption by the body and lower costs of production. This review highlights the fact that not enough is known about medicinal smoke and that a lot of natural products have potential for use as medicine in the smoke form. Furthermore, this review argues in favor of medicinal smoke extended use in modern medicine as a form of drug delivery and as a promising source of new active natural ingredients. PMID:17030480

  7. Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    2009--2010 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;A Message From the Dean of Faculty and Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo Takao Shimizu Dean, Faculty and Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Faculty of Medicine

  8. Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    2011--2012 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;A Message From the Dean of Faculty and Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo Kohei Miyazono Dean, Faculty and Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Faculty of Medicine

  9. Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    2015 2016 Faculty of Medicine Graduate School of Medicine PROSPECTUS The University of Tokyo #12;#12;A Message From the Dean of Faculty and Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo Kohei Miyazono Dean, Faculty and Graduate School of Medicine The University of Tokyo Faculty of Medicine

  10. Medicinal Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, J. David

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the demand for medicinal plants as pharmaceuticals and the demand for health care treatments worldwide and the issues that arise from this. Discusses new drugs from plants, anticancer drugs, antiviral drugs, antimalarial drugs, herbal remedies, quality, safety, efficacy, and conservation of plants. Contains 30 references. (JRH)

  11. Medicine Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    New York State education law, rules, and regulations concerning the practice of medicine are presented, along with requirements and procedures for obtaining licensure and first registration as a physician. State statutory provisions cover: duration and registration of a license, practice and regulation of the profession, supervision by the Board…

  12. Medicine Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    A reference guide to laws, rules, and regulations that govern medical practice in New York State is presented. After an overview of professional regulation in the state, licensing requirements/procedures for medicine are described including education and postgraduate training requirements, state licensing examinations, and application…

  13. Nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-10-17

    In 1985 and 1986 nuclear medicine became more and more oriented toward in vov chemistry, chiefly as a result of advances in positron emission tomography (PET). The most important trend was the extension of PET technology into the care of patients with brain tumors, epilepsy, and heart disease. A second trend was the increasing use of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  14. Assembling cyavanapr?sh, Ayurveda's best-selling medicine.

    PubMed

    Bode, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    The paper discusses the many forms and representations of cyavanapr?sh, Ayurveda's best-selling medicine, already mentioned in Caraka's Compendium (c. 200 CE). The medicine's compositions, applications, and meanings, change over time and from locality to locality. Cyavanapr?sh is, for example, a patriotic formula, a booster of the immune system, a modern geriatric drug, and one of the elements in canonical Ayurvedic treatments. In the beginning of the 19th century cyavanapr?sh was a patriotic formula for fortifying Indian bodies and the nascent Indian nation. Nowadays the medicine is a Fast Moving Consumer Good (FMCG) and a money maker for Dabur India Ltd., the world largest Ayurvedic manufacturer. Instead of vitalising the nation its consumption now promises to make urban middle class consumers effectively modern. Branding and modern science must make Dabur Chyawanprash attractive in the eyes of these consumers. Ayurveda and cyavanapr?sh are also part of a global counter culture marked by neo-Orientalism and Ayurvedic medicines as facilitators of spirituality. The marketing of cyavanapr?sh by India's largest Ayurvedic manufacturer is used as a case study for discussing the proliferation of Ayurvedic brands and its critics. The imaging of Ayurvedic brands such as Dabur Chyawanprash threatens to obscure the fact that Ayurveda represents a unique way of looking upon health, disease and the human body. The proliferation of brands also makes Ayurvedic medicines more expensive and puts pressure on the natural environment as the main supplier of Ayurvedic ingredients. PMID:25639150

  15. Faculty of Medicine Faculty Education Office (Medicine)

    E-print Network

    Faculty of Medicine Faculty Education Office (Medicine) Print Candidate Name: UCAS Number: Graduate Medicine Degree Checklist It is not possible to provide a comprehensive list of all degrees that fulfil our

  16. Medicine safety and children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medicine is made to look and taste like candy. Children are curious and attracted to medicine. Most ... like you. DO NOT call medicine or vitamins candy. Children like candy and will get into medicine ...

  17. Medicines: Use Them Safely

    MedlinePLUS

    ... raquo Medicines: Use Them Safely Heath and Aging Medicines: Use Them Safely What Are Medicines? What Are ... they’re taking many different drugs. What Are Medicines? What Are Drugs? Some people refer to the ...

  18. Pregnancy and Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    Not all medicines are safe to take when you are pregnant. Some medicines can harm your baby. That includes over-the- ... care provider before you start or stop any medicine. Not using medicine that you need may be ...

  19. Pregnancy and Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pregnancy and medicines fact sheet ePublications Pregnancy and medicines fact sheet Print this fact sheet Pregnancy and ... pregnancy and medicines Is it safe to use medicine while I am pregnant? There is no clear- ...

  20. Review of fall risk assessment in geriatric populations using inertial sensors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Falls are a prevalent issue in the geriatric population and can result in damaging physical and psychological consequences. Fall risk assessment can provide information to enable appropriate interventions for those at risk of falling. Wearable inertial-sensor-based systems can provide quantitative measures indicative of fall risk in the geriatric population. Methods Forty studies that used inertial sensors to evaluate geriatric fall risk were reviewed and pertinent methodological features were extracted; including, sensor placement, derived parameters used to assess fall risk, fall risk classification method, and fall risk classification model outcomes. Results Inertial sensors were placed only on the lower back in the majority of papers (65%). One hundred and thirty distinct variables were assessed, which were categorized as position and angle (7.7%), angular velocity (11.5%), linear acceleration (20%), spatial (3.8%), temporal (23.1%), energy (3.8%), frequency (15.4%), and other (14.6%). Fallers were classified using retrospective fall history (30%), prospective fall occurrence (15%), and clinical assessment (32.5%), with 22.5% using a combination of retrospective fall occurrence and clinical assessments. Half of the studies derived models for fall risk prediction, which reached high levels of accuracy (62-100%), specificity (35-100%), and sensitivity (55-99%). Conclusions Inertial sensors are promising sensors for fall risk assessment. Future studies should identify fallers using prospective techniques and focus on determining the most promising sensor sites, in conjunction with determination of optimally predictive variables. Further research should also attempt to link predictive variables to specific fall risk factors and investigate disease populations that are at high risk of falls. PMID:23927446

  1. Impact of recommendations on crushing medications in geriatrics: from prescription to administration.

    PubMed

    Bourdenet, Gwladys; Giraud, Sophie; Artur, Marion; Dutertre, Sophie; Dufour, Marie; Lefèbvre-Caussin, Marie; Proux, Alice; Philippe, Sandrine; Capet, Corinne; Fontaine-Adam, Magali; Kadri, Karine; Landrin, Isabelle; Gréboval, Emmanuelle; Touflet, Myriam; Nanfack, Jules; Tharasse, Christine; Varin, Rémi; Rémy, Elise; Daouphars, Mikaël; Doucet, Jean

    2015-06-01

    The practice of crushing drugs is very common in geriatric units. In 2009 a first study, performed in all geriatric units of a university hospital, showed that numerous errors were made during prescription, preparation and administration. The aim of this second prospective study was to assess the impact of regional and national recommendations in the same geriatric units. A survey of 719 patients (85.3 ± 6.7 years) was performed in 2013. For each patient who received crushed drugs, we recorded the reason the drugs were crushed, pharmacological classes, galenic presentations and the technique used for preparation and administration. Results were compared to the previous study. The number of patients receiving drugs after crushing was significantly lower than in the previous study (22.9% vs. 32.3%, P < 0.001). The number of crushed drugs was lower too (594 per 165 patients vs. 966 per 224 patients (P < 0.01). The main indication for crushing drugs remained swallowing disorders. The dosage form prevented crushing in 24.9% of drugs (vs. 42.0% in 2009, P < 0.001), but the drugs generally remained crushed all together. A mortar was used less often (38.6% vs. 92.6%, P < 0.001), with preference for individual-specific cups (56.1%). Mortars were more often cleaned between each patient (56.0% vs. 11.6%). The vehicle was more often neutral (water 88.5% vs. 5.7%, P < 0.001). This second study shows that regional and national recommendations have led to an overall improvement of practices for crushing drugs. Technical improvements are still possible, in association with appropriate pharmacological studies. PMID:25789404

  2. Programs for Developing the Pipeline of Early-Career Geriatric Mental Health Researchers: Outcomes and Implications for Other Fields

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Stephen J.; Lebowitz, Barry D.; Reynolds, Charles F.; Bruce, Martha L.; Halpain, Maureen; Faison, Warachal E.; Kirwin, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings and recommendations of an expert consensus workgroup that addressed the endangered pipeline of geriatric mental health (GMH) researchers. The workgroup was convened at the Summit on Challenges in Recruitment, Retention, and Career Development in Geriatric Mental Health Research in late 2007. Major identified challenges included attracting and developing early-career investigators into the field of GMH research; a shortfall of geriatric clinical providers and researchers; a disproportionate lack of minority researchers; inadequate mentoring and career development resources; and the loss of promising researchers during the vulnerable period of transition from research training to independent research funding. The field of GMH research has been at the forefront of developing successful programs that address these issues while spanning the spectrum of research career development. These programs serve as a model for other fields and disciplines. Core elements of these multicomponent programs include summer internships to foster early interest in GMH research (Summer Training on Aging Research Topics–Mental Health Program), research sponsorships aimed at recruitment into the field of geriatric psychiatry (Stepping Stones), research training institutes for early career development (Summer Research Institute in Geriatric Psychiatry), mentored intensive programs on developing and obtaining a first research grant (Advanced Research Institute in Geriatric Psychiatry), targeted development of minority researchers (Institute for Research Minority Training on Mental Health and Aging), and a Web-based clearinghouse of mentoring seminars and resources (MedEdMentoring.org). This report discusses implications of and principles for disseminating these programs, including examples of replications in fields besides GMH research. PMID:20042817

  3. Programs for developing the pipeline of early-career geriatric mental health researchers: outcomes and implications for other fields.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Stephen J; Lebowitz, Barry D; Reynolds, Charles F; Bruce, Martha L; Halpain, Maureen; Faison, Warachal E; Kirwin, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings and recommendations of an expert consensus workgroup that addressed the endangered pipeline of geriatric mental health (GMH) researchers. The workgroup was convened at the Summit on Challenges in Recruitment, Retention, and Career Development in Geriatric Mental Health Research in late 2007. Major identified challenges included attracting and developing early-career investigators into the field of GMH research; a shortfall of geriatric clinical providers and researchers; a disproportionate lack of minority researchers; inadequate mentoring and career development resources; and the loss of promising researchers during the vulnerable period of transition from research training to independent research funding. The field of GMH research has been at the forefront of developing successful programs that address these issues while spanning the spectrum of research career development. These programs serve as a model for other fields and disciplines. Core elements of these multicomponent programs include summer internships to foster early interest in GMH research (Summer Training on Aging Research Topics-Mental Health Program), research sponsorships aimed at recruitment into the field of geriatric psychiatry (Stepping Stones), research training institutes for early career development (Summer Research Institute in Geriatric Psychiatry), mentored intensive programs on developing and obtaining a first research grant (Advanced Research Institute in Geriatric Psychiatry), targeted development of minority researchers (Institute for Research Minority Training on Mental Health and Aging), and a Web-based clearinghouse of mentoring seminars and resources (MedEdMentoring.org). This report discusses implications of and principles for disseminating these programs, including examples of replications in fields besides GMH research. PMID:20042817

  4. Optimizing geriatric social work education: program and individual characteristics that promote competencies.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Emily A; Morton, Cory; Birkenmaier, Julie; Rowan, Noell L

    2013-01-01

    Since 1998, the Hartford Partnership Program in Aging Education (HPPAE) has been implemented in over 70 graduate social work programs. This study examined whether program and individual student characteristics are associated with students' knowledge, skills, and values in aging. We conducted a secondary analysis of national program evaluation data. Results from hierarchical linear models indicated greater gains in knowledge of aging among full-time students, as well as students in programs that had defined field rotation models and/or that made greater use of geriatric social work competencies. Implications for efforts to enhance graduate social work education in aging are discussed. PMID:23600603

  5. Geriatric simulation: practicing management and leadership in care of the older adult.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sally; Overstreet, Maria

    2015-06-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, patients age 65 and older account for 43% of hospital days. The complexity of caring for older adults affords nursing students opportunities to assess, prioritize, intervene, advocate, and experience being a member of an interdisciplinary health care team. However, these multifaceted hospital experiences are not consistently available for all students. Nursing clinical simulation (NCS) can augment or replace specific clinical hours and provide clinically relevant experiences to practice management and leadership skills while caring for older adults. This article describes a geriatric management and leadership NCS. PMID:25999076

  6. Clinical Advances in Geriatric Psychiatry: A Focus on Prevention of Mood and Cognitive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Harris; Baune, Bernhard; Lavretsky, Helen

    2015-09-01

    The world population is aging at a rate unprecedented in human history, placing substantial pressure on health systems across the world along with concurrent rises in chronic diseases. In particular, rates of cognitive disorders and late-life affective disorders are expected to increase. In tandem with aging, there are robust predictions suggesting that rates of age-related cognitive decline and dementia, and geriatric depression, will increase, with serious consequences. Clearly innovative prevention and treatment strategies are needed. This article reviews the latest promising clinical advances that hold promise for assisting the prevention and treatment of depression, cognitive decline, and dementia. PMID:26300035

  7. Managing Chronic Pain in Special Populations with Emphasis on Pediatric, Geriatric, and Drug Abuser Populations.

    PubMed

    Baumbauer, Kyle M; Young, Erin E; Starkweather, Angela R; Guite, Jessica W; Russell, Beth S; Manworren, Renee C B

    2016-01-01

    In the adult population chronic pain can lead to loss of productivity and earning potential, and decreased quality of life. There are distinct groups with increased vulnerability for the emergence of chronic pain. These groups may be defined by developmental status and/or life circumstances. Within the pediatric, geriatric, and drug abuser populations, chronic pain represents a significant health issue. This article focuses on known anatomic, physiologic, and genetic mechanisms underlying chronic pain in these populations, and highlights the need for a multimodal approach from multiple health care professionals for management of chronic pain in those with the most risk. PMID:26614727

  8. Optimal Preoperative Evaluation and Perioperative Care of the Geriatric Patient: A Surgeon's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Susan E; Coleman, JoAnn; Katlic, Mark R

    2015-09-01

    The elderly preoperative patient benefits from an assessment that includes more than a routine physical examination and electrocardiogram. Such an assessment includes domains likely to affect the elderly: cognition, functionality, frailty, polypharmacy, nutrition, and social support. This fosters decisions based on functional age rather than chronologic age and on each patient as an individual. One such assessment is that promulgated by the American College of Surgeons National Surgery Quality Improvement Program/American Geriatrics Society Best Practice Guidelines. We should not miss any opportunity to improve results in this growing population of surgical patients. PMID:26315633

  9. CLERKSHIP EDUCATOR'S GUIDEBOOK

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    , health related agencies, and others with whom physicians must exchange information in carrying out. State the causes (genetic, developmental, metabolic, toxic, microbiologic, autoimmune, neoplastic conditions 6. Describe the impact of social, economic, environmental, and behavioral factors on health status

  10. Simulation in Medical School Education: Review for Emergency Medicine

    E-print Network

    Chakravarthy, Bharath; ter Haar, Elizabeth; Bhat, Srinidhi Subraya; McCoy, Christopher Erik; Denmark, T. Kent; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2011-01-01

    help in training and preplanning the surgeries. Support forof training for surgical ?elds, such as general surgery,surgery, and EM clerkships volunteered to participate in a 2-hour session of simulation training

  11. Transfusion medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

  12. Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam L.

    2000-01-01

    The National Academy of Sciences Committee on Space Biology and Medicine points out that space medicine is unique among space sciences, because in addition to addressing questions of fundamental scientific interest, it must address clinical or human health and safety issues as well. Efforts to identify how microgravity affects human physiology began in earnest by the United States in 1960 with the establishment of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA's) Life Sciences program. Before the first human space missions, prediction about the physiological effects of microgravity in space ranged from extremely severe to none at all. The understanding that has developed from our experiences in space to date allows us to be guardedly optimistic about the ultimate accommodations of humans to space flight. Only by our travels into the microgravity environment of space have we begun to unravel the mysteries associated with gravity's role in shaping human physiology. Space medicine is still at its very earliest stages. Development of this field has been slow for several reasons, including the limited number of space flights, the small number of research subjects, and the competition within the life sciences community and other disciplines for flight opportunities. The physiological changes incurred during space flight may have a dramatic effect on the course of an injury or illness. These physiological changes present an exciting challenge for the field of space medicine: how to best preserve human health and safety while simultaneously deciphering the effects of microgravity on human performance. As the United States considers the future of humans in long-term space travel, it is essential that the many mysteries as to how microgravity affects human systems be addressed with vigor. Based on the current state of our knowledge, the justification is excellent indeed compelling- for NASA to develop a sophisticated capability in space medicine. Teams of physicians and scientists should be actively engaged in fundamental and applied research designed to ensure that it is safe for humans to routinely and repeatedly stay and work in the microgravity environment of space.

  13. SCHOOL of MEDICINE School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    California at Riverside, University of

    SCHOOL of MEDICINE School of Medicine A next generation med school for the next generation of med students ABOUT THE UCR SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Built upon more than three decades of medical education experience, the new UCR School of Medicine is committed to expanding and diversifying the physician workforce

  14. *Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin and Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Administration Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    RHR, gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 receptor; HPG, hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal; LH, luteinizing hormone; MPA the production of neurosteroids is not understood. To determine whether hypothalamic-pituitary- gonadal axis-sex steroid (NSS) production, we assessed dynamic changes in expression patterns of steroidogenic acute regu

  15. The Open Geriatric Medicine Journal, 2010, 3, 1-10 1 1874-8279/10 2010 Bentham Open

    E-print Network

    Makous, Walter

    -Set, and a Control-Set (different individuals in each set) in additional PCA using Procrustes factor rotation metric, procrustes factor rotation, Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment, elderly controls

  16. Reverse Epidemiology of Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the Geriatric Population.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Seyed-Foad; Streja, Elani; Zahmatkesh, Golara; Streja, Dan; Kashyap, Moti; Moradi, Hamid; Molnar, Miklos Z; Reddy, Uttam; Amin, Alpesh N; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-11-01

    Traditional risk factors of cardiovascular death in the general population, including body mass index (BMI), serum cholesterol, and blood pressure (BP), are also found to relate to outcomes in the geriatric population, but in an opposite direction. Some degrees of elevated BMI, serum cholesterols, and BP are reportedly associated with lower, instead of higher, risk of death among the elderly. This phenomenon is termed "reverse epidemiology" or "risk factor paradox" (such as obesity paradox) and is also observed in a variety of chronic disease states such as end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis, chronic heart failure, rheumatoid arthritis, and AIDS. Several possible causes are hypothesized to explain this risk factor reversal: competing short-term and long-term killers, improved hemodynamic stability in the obese, adipokine protection against tumor necrosis factor-?, lipoprotein protection against endotoxins, and lipophilic toxin sequestration by the adipose tissue. It is possible that the current thresholds for intervention and goal levels for such traditional risk factors as BMI, serum cholesterol, and BP derived based on younger populations do not apply to the elderly, and that new levels for such risk factors should be developed for the elderly population. Reverse epidemiology of conventional cardiovascular risk factors may have a bearing on the management of the geriatric population, thus it deserves further attention. PMID:26363864

  17. A System Design for Studying Geriatric Patients with Dementia and Hypertension Based on Daily Living Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weifeng; Betz, Willian R.; Frezza, Stephen T.; Liu, Yunkai

    2011-08-01

    Geriatric patients with dementia and hypertension (DAH) suffer both physically and financially. The needs of these patients mainly include improving the quality of daily living and reducing the cost of long-term care. Traditional treatment approaches are strained to meet these needs. The goal of the paper is to design an innovative system to provide cost-effective quality treatments for geriatric patients with DAH by collecting and analyzing the multi-dimensional personal information, such as observations in daily living (ODL) from a non-clinical environment. The proposed ODLs in paper include activities, cleanliness, blood pressure, medication compliance and mood changes. To complete the system design, an incremental user-centered strategy is exploited to assemble needs of patients, caregivers, and clinicians. A service-oriented architecture (SOA) is employed to make full use of existing devices, software systems, and platforms. This health-related knowledge can be interpreted and utilized to help patients with DAH remain in their homes safely and improve their life quality while reducing medical expenditures.

  18. Automated Assessment of Medical Students’ Clinical Exposures according to AAMC Geriatric Competencies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yukun; Wrenn, Jesse; Xu, Hua; Spickard, Anderson; Habermann, Ralf; Powers, James; Denny, Joshua C.

    2014-01-01

    Competence is essential for health care professionals. Current methods to assess competency, however, do not efficiently capture medical students’ experience. In this preliminary study, we used machine learning and natural language processing (NLP) to identify geriatric competency exposures from students’ clinical notes. The system applied NLP to generate the concepts and related features from notes. We extracted a refined list of concepts associated with corresponding competencies. This system was evaluated through 10-fold cross validation for six geriatric competency domains: “medication management (MedMgmt)”, “cognitive and behavioral disorders (CBD)”, “falls, balance, gait disorders (Falls)”, “self-care capacity (SCC)”, “palliative care (PC)”, “hospital care for elders (HCE)” – each an American Association of Medical Colleges competency for medical students. The systems could accurately assess MedMgmt, SCC, HCE, and Falls competencies with F-measures of 0.94, 0.86, 0.85, and 0.84, respectively, but did not attain good performance for PC and CBD (0.69 and 0.62 in F-measure, respectively). PMID:25954341

  19. [Changes in geriatric traumatology. An analysis of 14,869 patients from the German Trauma Registry].

    PubMed

    Wutzler, S; Lefering, R; Laurer, H L; Walcher, F; Wyen, H; Marzi, I

    2008-08-01

    The increasing average age in the industrialized nations is leading to an increasing number of elderly traumatized patients. Against this background, an analysis of the age-specific characteristics of geriatric traumatized patients is necessary. In this study, 14,869 patients > or = 18 years were analysed, who were prospectively documented in the registry of the German Trauma Society (DGU) between 1996 and 2005. Patients between 18 and 59 years were defined as the control group; their proportion declined from 81.1% in 1996-2000 to 75.4% in 2001-2005. The average age rose from 41.0 years (1996) to 45.3 years (2005). With increasing age a significant increase in severe head injuries of up to 58.9% (> or = 80 years) could be observed. Older patients stayed for a significantly shorter time in hospital and on the ICU. With a comparable injury severity, the lethality after trauma increased with age (18-59 years 13.8%, 60-69 years 24.1%, 70-79 years 35.5%, > or = 80 years 43.6%). The multiply traumatized geriatric patient is different from the normal group in regard to type of injury, therapy and outcome and should therefore be treated taking this fact into consideration. PMID:18443754

  20. Student-Directed Learning in a Community Geriatrics Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Barbara L.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To assess a community geriatrics advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) that aimed to improve students' attitudes towards older adults and provide a student-directed learning experience. Design Students provided blood pressure monitoring and medication counseling to older adults living in a low-income residential facility as part of a required 6-week ambulatory care service-learning APPE. Pre-experience and post-experience essays on students' perceptions of the elderly and their intended and actual learning were retrospectively reviewed using a qualitative process to determine whether the course objectives were met. Assessment Many students initially described older adults in factual terms or using negative descriptors. Most expressed a desire to increase their knowledge of diseases commonly occurring in and drugs commonly prescribed for the elderly or to improve specific skills. Many students initially had difficulty articulating clear and measurable learning objectives and appropriate assessment metrics, which are important components of self-directed learning. The final essays revealed many students learned more about the humanistic aspects of care than they had anticipated. Conclusion This community-based geriatrics experience improved students' attitudes towards working with older adults and provided practice in developing and assessing their personal learning objectives. PMID:17136175

  1. The Blood-Brain Barrier: Geriatric Relevance of a Critical Brain-Body Interface

    PubMed Central

    Zeevi, Neer; Pachter, Joel; McCullough, Louise D.; Wolfson, Leslie; Kuchel, George A.

    2010-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents the interface between the brain and other body tissues. Its ability to protect the brain from harmful compounds has attracted the attention of both clinicians and investigators. However, far from being a simple physical barrier, the BBB is a complex, heterogeneous and dynamic tissue. The integrated function of the cerebral microvasculature, tight junction proteins, brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC), cellular transport pathways and enzymatic machinery jointly contribute to normal BBB integrity. Aging, systemic diseases and ischemic injury can disrupt these processes, resulting in a decline in overall BBB function and integrity. Based on the published literature, we propose that age- and disease-related BBB alterations play a key role in diminishing the ability of older patients to recover from acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Moreover, we also review evidence linking deficits in the cerebral microvasculature and BBB integrity to dementia, medication-related cognitive decline, white matter disease (leukoaraiosis), as well as related geriatric syndromes including delirium, gait disorders and urinary incontinence. Priority areas for a future research agenda include strategies to improve clinicians' ability to diagnose, prevent and manage BBB abnormalities. In future years, in vivo measures such as functional and contrast-enhanced neuroimaging will be used to evaluate BBB integrity in older adults while also assessing the effectiveness of interventions, some targeting inflammatory pathways known to disrupt the BBB, for their ability to prevent or slow the progression of these complex multifactorial geriatric syndromes. PMID:20863334

  2. Home health care nurse interactions with homebound geriatric patients with depression and disability.

    PubMed

    Liebel, Dianne V; Powers, Bethel Ann; Hauenstein, Emily J

    2015-01-01

    Building therapeutic nurse-patient relationships is pivotal to the provision of optimum nurse care management for geriatric home health care (HHC) patients. However, little is known about which strategies most effectively treat older adult HHC patients with concomitant depression and disability. This qualitative descriptive study was conducted in two parts to explore the issue further. The first part involved interviews regarding HHC nurse perceptions of geriatric depression and disability care management. The second part, which is the focus of the current analysis, describes HHC nurses' use of care management and therapeutic during home visits. Observation of nurse-patient interactions involved 25 nurses home visits to HHC patients 60 and older who had depression and disability. Drawing on clinical knowledge and interpersonal skills, nurses built relationships and fostered trust. However, despite their disabilities to make these connections, multiple missed opportunities occurred for nurses to engage in more productive interactions. Four training components to support improvement of nurse-patient therapeutic relationships are described and recommended. PMID:26042245

  3. Systematic Review of the Use of Online Questionnaires among the Geriatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Remillard, Meegan L.; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Cutrona, Sarah L.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Tjia, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives The use of internet-based questionnaires to collect information from older adults is not well established. This systematic literature review of studies using online questionnaires in older adult populations aims to 1. describe methodologic approaches to population targeting and sampling and 2. summarize limitations of Internet-based questionnaires in geriatric populations. Design, Setting, Participants We identified English language articles using search terms for geriatric, age 65 and over, Internet survey, online survey, Internet questionnaire, and online questionnaire in PubMed and EBSCO host between 1984 and July 2012. Inclusion criteria were: study population mean age ?65 years old and use of an online questionnaire for research. Review of 336 abstracts yielded 14 articles for full review by 2 investigators; 11 articles met inclusion criteria. Measurements Articles were extracted for study design and setting, patient characteristics, recruitment strategy, country, and study limitations. Results Eleven (11) articles were published after 2001. Studies had populations with a mean age of 65 to 78 years, included descriptive and analytical designs, and were conducted in the United States, Australia, and Japan. Recruiting methods varied widely from paper fliers and personal emails to use of consumer marketing panels. Investigator-reported study limitations included the use of small convenience samples and limited generalizability. Conclusion Online questionnaires are a feasible method of surveying older adults in some geographic regions and for some subsets of older adults, but limited Internet access constrains recruiting methods and often limits study generalizability. PMID:24635138

  4. Colonization of the oral cavity by Candida species: risk factors in long-term geriatric care.

    PubMed

    Grimoud, Anne M; Marty, Nicole; Bocquet, Hélène; Andrieu, Sandrine; Lodter, Jean P; Chabanon, Gérard

    2003-03-01

    The population of elderly people in hospitals for long-term geriatric care presents many risk factors for nosocomial infection by Candida species. The aim of this work was to reduce the risk of C. albicans nosocomial infections starting from colonization of the oral cavity. The population of concern was the patients in long-stay geriatrics units; a sample of 110 people was selected by drawing lots. The clinical and biological parameters of each patient included in the study were recorded. The oral cavity was colonized by Candida spp in 67% of cases. The distribution of the strains showed that C. albicans was the most frequently identified strain, followed by C. glabrata; of the 73 patients with at least one strain of Candida spp., 47 had a clinically diagnosed candidiasis (64.4%). The wearing of dentures was not statistically linked with the development of oral candidiasis. Detecting which patients have been colonized, identifying the risk factors and applying preventive measures should reduce the probability of elderly people falling into the vicious circle of infection-malnutrition-immune-depression. PMID:12816366

  5. Resident selection for a physical medicine and rehabilitation program: feasibility and reliability of the multiple mini-interview.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Heather C; Townson, Andrea F

    2011-04-01

    The development of a process to select the best residents for training programs is challenging. There is a paucity of literature to support the implementation of an evidence-based approach or even best practice for program directors and selection committees. Although assessment of traditional academic markers such as clerkship grades and licensing examination scores can be helpful, these measures typically fail to capture performance in the noncognitive domains of medicine. In the specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation, physician competencies such as communication, health advocacy, and managerial and collaborative skills are of particular importance, but these are often difficult to evaluate in admission interviews. Recent research on admission processes for medical schools has demonstrated reliability and validity of the "multiple mini-interview." The objective of our project was to develop and evaluate the multiple mini-interview for a physical medicine and rehabilitation residency training program, with a focus on assessment of the noncognitive physician competencies. We found that the process was feasible, time efficient, and cost-efficient and that there was good interrater reliability. The multiple mini-interview may be applied to other physical medicine and rehabilitation residency programs. Further research is needed to confirm reliability and determine validity. PMID:21765249

  6. Rehabilitation medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens, J. A.; Chamberlain, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    The nature of rehabilitation medicine is outlined in terms of its objectives, its methods, the patient groups which it seeks to help and its relationships to other specialties. Some major advances of recent years are discussed, such as the development of the impairment/disability/handicap framework. With particular emphasis upon neurological rehabilitation, the breadth of the specialty is then illustrated with examples of current preoccupations. These include recovery patterns of the damaged nervous system, testing the efficacy of existing therapies, applying new treatment techniques and developing quantitative measures of disability and handicap. Looking to the future, some key areas are identified where further advances might be sought. Images Figure PMID:7494770

  7. Long-Term Effects of Outpatient Geriatric Evaluation and Management on Health Care Utilization, Cost, and Survival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Joseph B.; Toseland, Ronald W.; Gao, Jian; Banks, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The long-term effectiveness and efficiency of an outpatient geriatric evaluation and management (GEM) program was compared to usual primary care (UPC). Design and Method: A randomized controlled group design was used. Health care utilization, cost of care, and survival were assessed during a 48-month period among a sample of 160 male…

  8. A clinical study of Punarnava Mandura in the management of Pandu Roga in old age (geriatric anemia)

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Megha G.; Dave, Alankruta R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The incidence of anemia rises with age. The consequences of anemia are many and serious, affecting not only individual's health, but also the development of societies and countries. Pandu Roga can be effectively compared with anemia on the ground of its similar signs and symptoms. Aim: To evaluate the Panduhara and Rasayana effect of Punarnava Mandura in the management of Pandu Roga in old age (geriatric anemia). Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in 50 clinically diagnosed patients of geriatric anemia. Patients were treated with Punarnava Mandura 2 tablets (250 mg each) twice in a day after lunch and dinner with Takra (butter milk) for 90 days. Among 50 registered patients, 40 patients had completed the treatment and 10 patients discontinued the treatment. Results were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank test for subjective parameters and for assessment of objective parameters paired t-test was adopted. Results: At the end of study, drug has shown beneficial effect in patients of anemia by providing highly significant result in chief complaints, associated symptoms, Kshaya of Dhatu and Agni Bala, Deha Bala and Sattwa Bala. It has also improved quality-of-life (QOL) of the patients. Moderate and mild improvement was observed in 30 and 70% of the patients respectively. Conclusion: Punarnava Mandura may work as Rasayana in geriatric anemia by providing highly significant results on clinical features of Pandu Roga, Dehabala, Agni Bala and Sattwa Bala and by improving QOL. of patients of geriatric anemia.

  9. Depressive Symptoms, Depletion, or Developmental Change? Withdrawal, Apathy, and Lack of Vigor in the Geriatric Depressive Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Kathryn Betts

    2001-01-01

    This study has dual goals of confirming the existence of a "Withdrawal/Apathy/[Lack of] Vigor" (WAV) dimension of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and determining if it is descriptive of either depletion or disengagement-related change in older adults. High endorsement rates suggest WAV may be congruent with disengagement or depletion and may…

  10. Interpretive Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Patient-centredness is a core value of general practice; it is defined as the interpersonal processes that support the holistic care of individuals. To date, efforts to demonstrate their relationship to patient outcomes have been disappointing, whilst some studies suggest values may be more rhetoric than reality. Contextual issues influence the quality of patient-centred consultations, impacting on outcomes. The legitimate use of knowledge, or evidence, is a defining aspect of modern practice, and has implications for patient-centredness. Based on a critical review of the literature, on my own empirical research, and on reflections from my clinical practice, I critique current models of the use of knowledge in supporting individualised care. Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), and its implementation within health policy as Scientific Bureaucratic Medicine (SBM), define best evidence in terms of an epistemological emphasis on scientific knowledge over clinical experience. It provides objective knowledge of disease, including quantitative estimates of the certainty of that knowledge. Whilst arguably appropriate for secondary care, involving episodic care of selected populations referred in for specialist diagnosis and treatment of disease, application to general practice can be questioned given the complex, dynamic and uncertain nature of much of the illness that is treated. I propose that general practice is better described by a model of Interpretive Medicine (IM): the critical, thoughtful, professional use of an appropriate range of knowledges in the dynamic, shared exploration and interpretation of individual illness experience, in order to support the creative capacity of individuals in maintaining their daily lives. Whilst the generation of interpreted knowledge is an essential part of daily general practice, the profession does not have an adequate framework by which this activity can be externally judged to have been done well. Drawing on theory related to the recognition of quality in interpretation and knowledge generation within the qualitative research field, I propose a framework by which to evaluate the quality of knowledge generated within generalist, interpretive clinical practice. I describe three priorities for research in developing this model further, which will strengthen and preserve core elements of the discipline of general practice, and thus promote and support the health needs of the public. PMID:21805819

  11. [Physical and pharmacological restraints in geriatric and gerontology services and centers].

    PubMed

    Ramos Cordero, Primitivo; López Trigo, José Antonio; Maíllo Pedraz, Herminio; Paz Rubio, José María

    2015-01-01

    Physical and pharmacological restraints are a controversial issue in the context of geriatric care due to their moral, ethical, social and legal repercussions and, despite this fact, no specific legislation exists at a national level. The use of restraints is being questioned with growing frequency, as there are studies that demonstrate that restraints do not reduce the number of falls or their consequences, but rather can increase them, cause complications, injuries and potentially fatal accidents. Restraints are not always used rationally, despite compromising a fundamental human right, that is, freedom, protected in the Constitution, as well as values and principles, such as dignity and personal self-esteem. There are centers where restraints are applied to more than 50% of patients, and in some cases without the consent of their legal representatives. On some occasions, restraints are used for attaining organizational or environmental objectives, such as complying with tight schedules, and for reducing or avoiding the supervision of patients who walk erratically and, at times, are used indefinitely. Even greater confusion exists with respect to the emerging concept of chemical or pharmacological restraints, since no conceptual framework exists based on scientific evidence, and with sufficient consensus for guiding healthcare workers. In this context, the Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología (SEGG--Spanish Geriatrics and Gerontology Society), aware of the significance and transcendence of the issue, and in an attempt to preserve and guarantee maximum freedom, dignity and self-esteem, on the one hand, and to ensure the maximum integrity and legal certainty of the persons cared for in geriatric and gerontology services and centers, on the other, decided to create an "Interdisciplinary Committee on Restraints" made up by members from different disciplines and members of SEGG Working Groups or Committees, external health care workers, groups, organizations, and associations, who are experts in restraints, as well as the main "anti-restraint" movements. An outcome of this decision is the Consensus document on physical and pharmacological restraints, together with the Consensus on physical and pharmacological restraints, published by the SEGG, which should signify a qualitative leap forward in care for the elderly, and serving as a best practice guide for healthcare workers. PMID:25443785

  12. Paralympic medicine.

    PubMed

    Webborn, Nick; Van de Vliet, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Paralympic medicine describes the health-care issues of those 4500 or so athletes who gather every 4 years to compete in 20 sports at the Summer Paralympic Games and in five sports at the Winter Paralympic Games. Paralympic athletes compete within six impairment groups: amputation or limb deficiencies, cerebral palsy, spinal cord-related disability, visual impairment, intellectual impairment, or a range of physically impairing disorders that do not fall into the other classification categories, known as les autres. The variety of impairments, many of which are severe, fluctuating, or progressive disorders (and are sometimes rare), makes maintenance of health in thousands of Paralympians while they undertake elite competition an unusual demand on health-care resources. The increased physical fitness of athletes with disabilities has important implications for cardiovascular risk reduction in a population for whom the prevalence of risk factors can be high. PMID:22770458

  13. Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, M.; Kong, M. G.; Morfill, G.; Stolz, W.

    2012-05-01

    Foreword R. Satava and R. J. Barker; Part I. Introduction to Non-equilibrium Plasma, Cell Biology, and Contamination: 1. Introduction M. Laroussi; 2. Fundamentals of non-equilibrium plasmas M. Kushner and M. Kong; 3. Non-equilibrium plasma sources M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 4. Basic cell biology L. Greene and G. Shama; 5. Contamination G. Shama and B. Ahlfeld; Part II. Plasma Biology and Plasma Medicine: 6. Common healthcare challenges G. Isbary and W. Stolz; 7. Plasma decontamination of surfaces M. Kong and M. Laroussi; 8. Plasma decontamination of gases and liquids A. Fridman; 9. Plasma-cell interaction: prokaryotes M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 10. Plasma-cell interaction: eukaryotes G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 11. Plasma based wound healing G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 12. Plasma ablation, surgery, and dental applications K. Stalder, J. Woloszko, S. Kalghatgi, G. McCombs, M. Darby and M. Laroussi; Index.

  14. Depression - stopping your medicines

    MedlinePLUS

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  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > Teens > Body > Getting Medical Care > Complementary and ... replacement. Continue How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  16. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  17. Blood Pressure Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... reducing sodium in your diet, you may need medicines. Blood pressure medicines work in different ways to lower blood pressure. ... and widen blood vessels. Often, two or more medicines work better than one. NIH: National Heart, Lung, ...

  18. Managing Your Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Managing Your Medicines Updated:May 27,2015 If you have heart ... Yourself • Tools & Resources Heart Insight Supplement: Know Your Medicines Keeping track of your medicines can be overwhelming. ...

  19. Preventing HIV with Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... information in Spanish ( en español ) Preventing HIV with medicine Get medicine right after you are exposed to ... to top More information on Preventing HIV with medicine Explore other publications and websites National HIV and ...

  20. Is Marijuana Medicine?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Publications » DrugFacts » Is Marijuana Medicine? DrugFacts: Is Marijuana Medicine? Email Facebook Twitter Revised July 2015 What is ... isn’t the marijuana plant an FDA-approved medicine? The FDA requires carefully conducted studies (clinical trials) ...

  1. Hypotensive syndromes are not associated with cognitive impairment in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Schoon, Yvonne; Lagro, Joep; Verhoeven, Yolanda; Rikkert, Marcel Olde; Claassen, Jurgen

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the association of the hypotensive syndromes orthostatic hypotension (OH), postprandial hypotension (PPH), and carotid sinus hypersensitivity (CSH) with cognitive impairment (mild cognitive impairment/dementia). Continuous measurements of blood pressure (Finapres) were performed during active standing, meal test, and carotid sinus massage, among 184 elderly patients presenting with falls. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia were diagnosed following a multidisciplinary assessment. The study design was a retrospective cohort study. The OH, PPH, and CSH were observed in 104 (58%), 108 (64%), and 78 (51%) patients, respectively. A total of 79 (43%) patients were cognitively impaired (MCI impairment n = 44; dementia n = 35). The prevalence of cognitive impairment varied little across the hypotensive syndromes (32%-43%) and was similar in patients with and without hypotensive syndromes (P = .59). In this geriatric population with a high prevalence of both hypotensive syndromes and cognitive impairment, patients with one or more hypotensive syndromes were not likely to have cognitive impairment. PMID:23242123

  2. A computer-aided diagnosis system for geriatrics assessment and frailty evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vairaktarakis, Charalampos; Tsiamis, Vasilis; Soursou, Georgia; Lekkas, Filippos; Nikolopoulou, Markella; Vasileiadou, Emmanouilia; Premtsis, Konstantinos; Alexiou, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    It is a common knowledge that frailty is a condition associated with getting older, and it has been considered as highly prevalent as far as falls, disability, hospitalization, and mortality are concerned. At the present time a standardized definition has not yet been established. With that in mind and for frailty being of a vital importance as a term identifying geriatric symptoms, we pursued to embody the well-known 70-scale CSHA Frailty index of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging in a Clinical Decision Support System, after categorizing and expanding it. The proposed categorization in this chapter can be helpful for usage by patients and their relatives, care givers, and medical doctors. PMID:25417017

  3. New frontiers of cognitive rehabilitation in geriatric age: the Mozart Effect (ME).

    PubMed

    Cacciafesta, M; Ettorre, E; Amici, A; Cicconetti, P; Martinelli, V; Linguanti, A; Baratta, A; Verrusio, W; Marigliano, V

    2010-01-01

    The ME was described for the first time in 1993. Subsequently other studies with similar designs were performed. The present study, therefore, proposes: (i) to verify the existence of the benefits of exposure to music in elderly subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), (ii) to explore whether it is possible to find any lasting improvement after training, conducted for a long period of time, with such musical pieces, in the measurable cognitive performances. The study we conducted showed that the ME is present in geriatric patients with MCI; the influence on spatial-temporal abilities remains constant in time if the stimulation is maintained. The continuation of our study will consist of increasing the number of individuals examined and in having them listen to music during the study of ECG rhythms and during the acquisition of cerebral functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and, at the same time, testing them by neuropsychometric methods. PMID:20138674

  4. [The quality of a restaurant service at a geriatric rehabilitation facility].

    PubMed

    Donini, L M; Castellaneta, E; Magnano, L; Valerii, B; De Felice, M R; De Bernardini, L; Cannella, C

    2003-01-01

    The aim of our study was to measure the quality of a restaurant service of a geriatric rehabilitation and long-term setting as it is perceived from patients compared with an objective measure of the quality. We have also verified the weight of the restaurant service on the whole quality of the hospital. Our data showed some problems in the organisation of the service, a substantially negative judgment from patients, the necessity to integrate subjective judgments with objective evaluations. The data confirmed also the importance that patients give to taste and variability of food and to the way in which it is presented. The results we obtained suggested an audit of the organisation of the restaurant service. The outcome of the proposed changes will be followed up and bring, eventually, to further arrangements. PMID:14969313

  5. Evolving Prehospital, Emergency Department, and “Inpatient” Management Models for Geriatric Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Platts-Mills, Timothy F.

    2013-01-01

    Alternative management methods are essential to ensure high quality and efficient emergency care for the growing number of geriatric adults worldwide. Protocols for case-finding and rapid diagnosis to support early condition-specific treatment for older adults with acute severe illness and injury are needed. Improved emergency department care for older adults will require providers to look beyond the diagnosis to address the influence of other factors on the patient's health: isolation and depression; finances and transportation; and chronic medical conditions and polypharmacy. This review article describes recent and ongoing efforts to enhance the quality of emergency care for older adults using alternative management approaches spanning the spectrum from prehospital care, through the emergency department, and into evolving inpatient or outpatient processes of care. PMID:23177599

  6. Engaged teaching for engaged learning: sharing your passion for gerontology and geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Karasik, Rona J

    2012-01-01

    Gerontologists face a unique set of obstacles in attracting newcomers to the field. Despite demographic trends favorable to a wide range of employment opportunities and job security, aging is rarely top of mind for many students when it comes to career choices. For most gerontologists, aging is our passion. How do we share that passion with others who have yet to discover its interdisciplinary opportunities, or who may be held at bay by negative stereotypes of aging and older persons? This article explores various approaches to enhance engaged teaching and engaged learning that can help personalize and contextualize the field so that educators and students at all levels and disciplines can find their passion for gerontology and geriatrics. PMID:22490070

  7. Geriatric Syndromes and Functional Status in NSHAP: Rationale, Measurement, and Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kocherginsky, Masha; Schumm, Phillip L.; Engelman, Michal; McClintock, Martha K.; Dale, William; Magett, Elizabeth; Rush, Patricia; Waite, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The geriatric functional measures and syndromes collected 5 years apart in Waves 1 and 2 of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) data set included: difficulty with activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, the timed up and go, a 3-m timed walk, repeated chair stands, self-reported physical activity, accelerometry-assessed (in)activity, falls, fractures, and frailty. The purpose of this paper was to describe the data collection methods and report preliminary population estimates for each measures. Method. Frequencies, means, or medians were estimated for each measure stratified by age and gender, using the age-eligible samples in Wave 1 (n = 3,005) and Wave 2 (n = 3,196). An adapted phenotypic frailty scale was constructed in the sample common to both waves (n = 2,261). Changes over 5 years were reported for four measures common to both waves. Results. The functional measures worsened with age (p < .001). The syndromes were more prevalent with age except “all fractures” (p value range < .001–.03). Functional measures were worse among females than males except chair stand performance and the accelerometry-assessed (in)activity measures (p value range < .001–.01). The syndromes were more common among females than males except Wave 2 falls and Wave 2 hip fractures (p value range < .001–.03). Changes from Wave 1 to 2 revealed 11.5%–25.2% of individuals reported better health and 21.3%–44.7% reported worse health. Discussion. The NSHAP provides a comprehensive assessment of geriatric health. Our findings are consistent with the literature and support the construct of the study measures. PMID:25360019

  8. Association between Acute Geriatric Syndromes and Medication-Related Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Wierenga, Peter C.; Buurman, Bianca M.; Parlevliet, Juliette L.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; Inouye, Sharon K.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Elderly patients are at a four-fold higher risk of adverse drug events (ADEs) and drug related hospitalization. Hospitalization of an elderly patient is often preceded by geriatric syndromes, like falls or delirium. Objectives The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether geriatric syndromes were associated with ADEs in acutely admitted elderly patients. Methods Consecutive medical patients, aged 65 years or more, and were acutely admitted, were enrolled. An initial multidisciplinary evaluation was completed and baseline characteristics were collected. A fall before admission was retrieved from medical charts. Delirium was determined by the Confusion Assessment Method. Results A total of 641 patients were included. Over 25% had an ADE present at admission, 26% presented with delirium and 12% with a fall. Delirium was associated with the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, and antiepileptics. In all ADEs (N=167), ADE was associated with a fall, with NSAIDs or diuretics, but not with pre-existing functioning, delirium or older age. For ADEs involving psychoactive medication (N=35), an association was found between delirium, fall, opioids and antipsychotics in bivariate analyses. A fall just before hospitalization (OR 3.69 [95% CI 1.41–9.67]), antipsychotics (OR 3.70 [95% CI 1.19–11.60]) and opioids (OR 14.57 [95% CI 2.02–105.30]) remained independently associated with an ADE involving psychoactive medication. Conclusion This prospective study demonstrated that in a cohort of elderly hospital patients a fall before admission and prevalent delirium are associated with several pharmacological groups and/or with ADE-related hospital admission. PMID:22812539

  9. Sedation in hypoalbuminemic geriatric patients under spinal anesthesia in hip surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Ay??n; Kara, Deniz; Ervatan, Zekeriya; Çak?rgöz, Mensure; K?ran, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare midazolam and propofol sedation in hypoalbuminemic geriatric patients under spinal anesthesia in hip surgery with bispectral index monitoring. Methods: This prospective and randomized study was completed in the Department of Anesthesiology, Okmeydani Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey between February 2013 and December 2014. Sixty patients undergoing elective hip surgery under spinal anesthesia in the geriatric age group with albumin levels below 3 g/dl were randomly divided into Group I and Group II. After administration of spinal block, Group I were given 0.05 mg/kg bolus midazolam, and then 0.02-0.1 mg/kg/hr dose infusion was begun. In Group II, 1 mg/kg bolus propofol was given within 10 minutes, and then 1-3 mg/kg/hr infusion was begun. The systolic arterial pressure, diastolic arterial pressure, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, peripheral oxygen saturation values, respiratory rate, and Wilson’s 5-stage sedation score were recorded at 15-minute intervals. At the end of the operation, the recovery time and surgeon satisfaction were recorded. Results: The recovery times for patients in Group I were found to be longer than in Group II (p<0.05). The respiration rate in patients in Group I at the start of surgery, 15th minute of surgery, and after surgery were lower than in Group II (p<0.05). Conclusion: We conclude that propofol is more reliable in terms of hemodynamic stability than midazolam, as it causes less respiratory depression and faster recovery in the propofol group. PMID:26446330

  10. To Operate or Not: Prediction of 3-Month Postoperative Mortality in Geriatric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Wen-Chi; Liu, Keng-Hao; Lu, Chang-Hsien; Hung, Yu-Shin; Chen, Miao-Fen; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Lin, Yung-Chang; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Context: Appropriate selection of aging patient who fit for cancer surgery is an art-of-state. Objectives: This study aimed to identify predictive factors pertinent to 3-month postoperative mortality in geriatric cancer patients. Methods: A total of 8,425 patients over 70 years old with solid cancer received radical surgery between 2007 and 2012 at four affiliated hospitals of the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were included. The clinical variables of patients who died within 3 months post-surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was performed by randomly selecting 50% of the patients (testing set) to identify specific groups of patients with the lowest and highest probability of 3-month postoperative mortality. The remaining 50% were used as validation set of the model. Results: Patients' gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance (ECOG scale), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status, age, tumor staging, and mode of admission were independent variables that predicted 3-month postoperative mortality. The RPA model identified patients with an ECOG scale of 0-2, localized tumor stage, and a CCI of 0-2 as having the lowest probability of 3-month postoperative mortality (1.1% and 1.3% in the testing set and validation set, respectively). Conversely, an ECOG scale of 3-4 and a CCI >2 were associated with the highest probability of 3-month postoperative mortality (55.2% and 47.8% in the testing set and validation set, respectively). Conclusion: We identified ECOG scale and CCI score were the two most influencing factors that determined 3-month postoperative mortality in geriatric cancer patients. PMID:26722355

  11. Medicines for osteoporosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Teriparatide (Forteo); Denosumab (Prolia); Low bone density - medicines; Osteoporosis - medicines ... Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become brittle and more likely to fracture (break). With ...

  12. Innovations in service learning: a novel program for community service at NYU School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Herlihy, Nola Seta; Brown, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Problem As NYU medical students, the authors determined that there was no structured form of service learning in their curriculum. They sought to establish a service program that recognizes students for their dedication to community service in both the NYU and NYC communities. Approach In 2012, with the support of the Office of Student Affairs (OSA), the authors created the NYU School of Medicine Community Service Program (CSP). The program tracks and verifies students’ participation in service projects. It sets a goal for students to complete 100 service hours through at least five unique service initiatives. Two reflective essays at the completion of pre-clinical and core clerkship curricula challenge students to express how their service experiences will inform their future careers in medicine. The authors developed an innovative online portal for students to track their service involvement and allow the committee to easily approve hours. They created the Community Service Committee, made up of two representatives from each class year, to be in charge of regulating the program together with the OSA. Outcomes The class of 2015 is the first class to participate; thus far, 13 students have met program requirements. In the classes of 2016 and 2017, 20 and 41 students, respectively, are expected to receive the award. Total participation has significantly increased in successive class years. Next steps The authors seek to gather data on CSP participants’ changing perspectives and hope the program can serve as a model for other schools to build service learning into their curricula. PMID:26387908

  13. Medicine organizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Ricardo; Belchior, Ismael

    2015-04-01

    In the last year of secondary school, students studying physics and chemistry are incentivized to do a project where they must put in practice their improvement of scientific knowledge and skills, like observation of phenomena and analysis of data with scientific knowledge. In this project a group of students, tutored by the teacher, wanted to build an instrument that helps people to take their medical drugs at the right time. This instrument must have some compartments with an alarm and an LED light where the people can put their medical drugs. The instrument must be easily programed using an android program that also registers if the medicine has been taken. The students needed to simulate the hardware and software, draw the electronic system and build the final product. At the end of the school year, a public oral presentation was prepared by each group of students and presented to the school community. They are also encouraged to participate in national and international scientific shows and competitions.

  14. The Internal Medicine Subinternship--Now More Important than Ever: A Joint CDIM-APDIM Position Paper.

    PubMed

    Vu, T Robert; Angus, S V; Aronowitz, P B; Harrell, H E; Levine, M A; Carbo, A; Whelton, S; Ferris, A; Appelbaum, J S; McNeill, D B; Ismail, N J; Elnicki, D M

    2015-09-01

    For decades, the internal medicine (IM) subinternship has served as a critical interface between undergraduate and graduate medical education. As such, the vast majority of U.S. medical schools offer this rotation to help students prepare for post-graduate training. Historically an experiential rotation, a formal curriculum with specific learning objectives was eventually developed for this course in 2002. Since then, graduate medical education (GME) has changed significantly with the regulation of duty hours, adoption of competency-based education, and development of training milestones and entrustable professional activities. In response to these and many other changes to residency training and medical practice, in 2010, the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM) surveyed its members-with input from the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) Subinternship Task Force-to determine which core skills program directors expected from new medical school graduates. The results of that survey helped to inform a joint CDIM-APDIM committee's decision to re-evaluate the goals of the IM subinternship in an effort to enhance the transition from medical school to residency. This joint committee defined the minimum expectations of what constitutes an IM subinternship rotation, proposed recommended skills for IM subinterns, and discussed challenges and future directions for this crucial course. PMID:26173515

  15. Genome Medicine 2009, 11

    E-print Network

    Dehene, Frank

    Genome Medicine 2009, 11::88 Correspondence BBrriiddggiinngg tthhee ggaapp bbeettwweeeenn Care Medicine and CRISMA laboratory, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Scaife 602, 3550 Biotechnology Center, University of Torino, Via Nizza 52, I, 10126 Torino, Italy; 10Institutionen för Medicin

  16. Medicine and Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) #12;400 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Graduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Officers Vice President for Medical Affairs and the Raja N. Khuri Dean of the Faculty of Medicine Ziyad Ghazzal

  17. Medicine and Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) #12;418 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Graduate Catalogue 2015­16 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Officers. Sayegh Executive Vice President for Medicine and Global Strategy and the Raja N. Khuri Dean

  18. Very Low Levels of Physical Activity in Older Patients During Hospitalization at an Acute Geriatric Ward: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Villumsen, Morten; Jorgensen, Martin Gronbech; Andreasen, Jane; Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Mølgaard, Carsten Møller

    2015-10-01

    Lack of activity during hospitalization may contribute to functional decline. The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) the time spent walking during hospitalization by geriatric patients referred to physical and/or occupational therapy and (2) the development in time spent walking during hospitalization. In this observational study, 24-hr accelerometer data (ActivPal) were collected from inclusion to discharge in 124 patients at an acute geriatric ward. The median time spent walking was 7 min per day. During the first quartile of hospitalization, the patients spent 4 (IQR:1;11) min per day walking, increasing to 10 (IQR:1;29) min during the last quartile. Improvement in time spent walking was primarily observed in the group able to perform the Timed Up & Go task at admission. When walking only 7 min per day, patients could be classified as inactive and at risk for functional decline; nonetheless, the physical activity level increased significantly during hospitalization. PMID:25415513

  19. Perception of health care providers toward geriatric oral health in Belgaum district: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nishant; Rajpurohit, Ladusingh; Ankola, Anil; Hebbal, Mamata; Setia, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To access knowledge and practices related to the oral health of geriatrics among the health care providers practicing in urban and rural areas. Background: Older adults have identified a number of barriers that contribute to lack of dental service use. However, barriers that clinicians encounter in providing dental treatment to older adults are not as clear-cut. Materials and Methods: 236 health professionals (of allopathy, ayurveda, and homeopathy) from urban and rural areas were assessed by means of structured questionnaire related to oral health practices and beliefs. Results: Doctors practicing in urban areas assessed dental care needs more frequently (P = 0.038) and performed greater practices related to oral health of geriatrics (P = 0.043) than the doctors practicing in primary health care (PHC) centers (rural) (P = 0.038). Conclusion: Owing to the relative lack of knowledge among rural practitioners, there is a need to integrate primary health care with oral care in rural areas. PMID:25984463

  20. Personality Characteristics Determine Health-Related Quality of Life as an Outcome Indicator of Geriatric Inpatient Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Jörg; Schwarz, Martina; Bauer, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Background. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships between personality and quality of life during the course of geriatric rehabilitation, against the background of Cloninger's biosocial theory of personality. Methods. All consecutive patients of a geriatric rehabilitation clinic during one year were evaluated at admission and discharge (N = 687) by means of the ‘‘Vienna List’’ (a newly developed questionnaire for the assessment of quality of life in patients with severe dementia), and two variants of the Temperament and Character Inventory. Results. Self-directedness showed the most general and highest impact on quality of life and successful rehabilitation. Conclusions. It is probable in old and very old individuals who are on their highest level of maturity that the character represents the most important regulatory system in the encounter with challenges of daily life, which necessitates rehabilitation. PMID:19415144

  1. Specific features of medicines safety and pharmacovigilance in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Shanthi N.; Olsson, Sten; Dodoo, Alexander; Bencheikh, Rachida Soulayami

    2012-01-01

    The thalidomide tragedy in the late 1950s and early 1960s served as a wakeup call and raised questions about the safety of medicinal products. The developed countries rose to the challenge putting in place systems to ensure the safety of medicines. However, this was not the case for low-resource settings because of prevailing factors inherent in them. This paper reviews some of these features and the current status of pharmacovigilance in Africa. The health systems in most of the 54 countries of Africa are essentially weak, lacking in basic infrastructure, personnel, equipment and facilities. The recent mass deployment of medicines to address diseases of public health significance in Africa poses additional challenges to the health system with notable safety concerns. Other safety issues of note include substandard and counterfeit medicines, medication errors and quality of medicinal products. The first national pharmacovigilance centres established in Africa with membership of the World Health Organization (WHO) international drug monitoring programme were in Morocco and South Africa in 1992. Of the 104 full member countries in the programme, there are now 24 African countries with a further nine countries as associate members. The pharmacovigilance systems operational in African countries are based essentially on spontaneous reporting facilitated by the introduction of the new tool Vigiflow. The individual case safety reports committed to the WHO global database (Vigibase) attest to the growth of pharmacovigilance in Africa with the number of reports rising from 2695 in 2000 to over 25,000 in 2010. There is need to engage the various identified challenges of the weak pharmacovigilance systems in the African setting and to focus efforts on how to provide resources, infrastructure and expertise. Raising the level of awareness among healthcare providers, developing training curricula for healthcare professionals, provisions for paediatric and geriatric pharmacovigilance, engaging the pharmaceutical industries as well as those for herbal remedies are of primary concern. PMID:25083223

  2. The stress response and anesthetic potency of unilateral spinal anesthesia for total Hip Replacement in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Tian, Chun; Li, Min; Peng, Ming-Qing; Ma, Kun-Long; Wang, Zhong-Lin; Ding, Jia-Hui; Cai, Yi

    2014-11-01

    Recently, some scholars suggested that it is important to keep a stablehemodynamic state and prevent the stress responses in geriatric patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR). We conducted this randomized prospective study to observe anesthetic potency of unilateral spinal anesthesia and stress response to it in geriatric patients during THR. We compared the effect of unilateral spinal and bilateral spinal on inhibition of stress response through measuring Norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and cortisol (CORT). Plasma concentrations of NE, E and CORT were determined in blood samples using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) at three time points: To (prior to anesthesia) T1 (at the time point of skin closure), T2 (twenty-four hours after the operation). Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups: group A (unilateral spinal anesthesia) and group B (conventional bilateral spinal anesthesia). 7.5tymg of hypobaric bupivacaine were injected into subarachnoid cavity at group A and 12mg hypobaric bupivacaine were given at group B. The onset time of sensory and motor block, loss of pinprick sensation, degree of motor block, regression of sensory and motor blocks and hemodynamic changes were also recorded. These data were used to evaluate anesthetic potency of spinal anesthesia. The results of this experiment show that unilateral spinal anesthesia can provide restriction of sensory and motor block, minimize the incidence of hypotension and prevent the stress responses undergoing THR. It is optimal anesthesia procedure for geriatric patients by rapid subarachnoid injection of small doses of bupivacaine. PMID:25410068

  3. Geriatric Trauma Patients With Cervical Spine Fractures due to Ground Level Fall: Five Years Experience in a Level One Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Coppola, Marco; Robinson, Richard D.; Scribner, James T.; Vithalani, Veer; de Moor, Carrie E.; Gandhi, Raj R.; Burton, Mandy; Delaney, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been found that significantly different clinical outcomes occur in trauma patients with different mechanisms of injury. Ground level falls (GLF) are usually considered “minor trauma” with less injury occurred in general. However, it is not uncommon that geriatric trauma patients sustain cervical spine (C-spine) fractures with other associated injuries due to GLF or less. The aim of this study is to determine the injury patterns and the roles of clinical risk factors in these geriatric trauma patients. Methods Data were reviewed from the institutional trauma registry of our local level 1 trauma center. All patients had sustained C-spine fracture(s). Basic clinical characteristics, the distribution of C-spine fracture(s), and mechanism of injury in geriatric patients (65 years or older) were compared with those less than 65 years old. Furthermore, different clinical variables including age, gender, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), blood alcohol level, and co-existing injuries were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression in geriatric trauma patients due to GLF and internally validated by random bootstrapping technique. Results From 2006 - 2010, a total of 12,805 trauma patients were included in trauma registry, of which 726 (5.67%) had sustained C-spine fracture(s). Among all C-spine fracture patients, 19.15% (139/726) were geriatric patients. Of these geriatric patients 27.34% (38/139) and 53.96% (75/139) had C1 and C2 fractures compared with 13.63% (80/587) and 21.98% (129/587) in young trauma patients (P < 0.001). Of geriatric trauma patients 13.67% (19/139) and 18.71% (26/139) had C6 and C7 fractures compared with 32.03% (188/587) and 41.40% (243/587) in younger ones separately (P < 0.001). Furthermore, 53.96% (75/139) geriatric patients had sustained C-spine fractures due to GLF with more upper C-spine fractures (C1 and C2). Only 3.2% of those had positive blood alcohol levels compared with 52.9% of younger patients (P < 0.001). In addition, 6.34% of geriatric patients due to GLF had intracranial pathology (ICP) which was one of the most common co-injuries with C-spine fractures. Logistic regression analysis showed the adjusted odds ratios of 1.17 (age) and 91.57 (male) in geriatric GLF patients to predict this co-injury pattern of C-spine fracture and ICP. Conclusion Geriatric patients tend to sustain more upper C-spine fractures than non-geriatric patients regardless of the mechanisms. GLF or less not only can cause isolated C-spines fracture(s) but also lead to other significant injuries with ICP as the most common one in geriatric patients. Advanced age and male are two risk factors that can predict this co-injury pattern. In addition, it seems that alcohol plays no role in the cause of GLF in geriatric trauma patients. PMID:23519239

  4. Harnessing the hidden curriculum: a four-step approach to developing and reinforcing reflective competencies in medical clinical clerkship.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Cheryl L; Harris, Ilene B; Schwartz, Alan J; Regehr, Glenn

    2015-12-01

    Changing the culture of medicine through the education of medical students has been proposed as a solution to the intractable problems of our profession. Yet few have explored the issues associated with making students partners in this change. There is a powerful hidden curriculum that perpetuates not only desired attitudes and behaviors but also those that are less than desirable. So, how do we educate medical students to resist adopting unprofessional practices they see modeled by supervisors and mentors in the clinical environment? This paper explores these issues and, informed by the literature, we propose a specific set of reflective competencies for medical students as they transition from classroom curricula to clinical practice in a four-step approach: (1) Priming-students about hidden curriculum in their clinical environment and their motivations to conform or comply with external pressures; (2) Noticing-educating students to be aware of their motivations and actions in situations where they experience pressures to conform to practices that they may view as unprofessional; (3) Processing-guiding students to analyze their experiences in collaborative reflective exercises and finally; (4) Choosing-supporting students in selecting behaviors that validate and reinforce their aspirations to develop their best professional identity. PMID:25319835

  5. www.medicine.gu.se Minnesanteckningar forskarutbildningsutskottet, inst. fr medicin

    E-print Network

    www.medicine.gu.se Minnesanteckningar forskarutbildningsutskottet, inst. för medicin 2015 inflammationsforskning hälsas välkommen som ny ledamot i FUU. Per Ladenvall vid avd. för molekylär och klinisk medicin

  6. Effectiveness of Acute Geriatric Unit Care Using Acute Care for Elders Components: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Mary T; Persaud, Malini; Maimets, Ilo; O'Brien, Kelly; Brooks, Dina; Tregunno, Deborah; Schraa, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To compare the effectiveness of acute geriatric unit care, based on all or part of the Acute Care for Elders (ACE) model and introduced in the acute phase of illness or injury, with that of usual care. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled and quasi-experimental trials with parallel comparison groups retrieved from multiple sources. Setting Acute care geriatric and nongeriatric hospital units. Participants Acutely ill or injured adults (N = 6,839) with an average age of 81. Interventions Acute geriatric unit care characterized by one or more ACE components: patient-centered care, frequent medical review, early rehabilitation, early discharge planning, prepared environment. Measurements Falls, pressure ulcers, delirium, functional decline at discharge from baseline 2-week prehospital and hospital admission statuses, length of hospital stay, discharge destination (home or nursing home), mortality, costs, and hospital readmissions. Results Acute geriatric unit care was associated with fewer falls (risk ratio (RR) = 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.29–0.88), less delirium (RR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.61–0.88), less functional decline at discharge from baseline 2-week prehospital admission status (RR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.78–0.97), shorter length of hospital stay (weighted mean difference (WMD) = ?0.61, 95% CI = ?1.16 to ?0.05), fewer discharges to a nursing home (RR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68–0.99), lower costs (WMD = ?$245.80, 95% CI = ?$446.23 to ?$45.38), and more discharges to home (RR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.01–1.10). A nonsignificant trend toward fewer pressure ulcers was observed. No differences were found in functional decline between baseline hospital admission status and discharge, mortality, or hospital readmissions. Conclusion Acute geriatric unit care, based on all or part of the ACE model and introduced during the acute phase of older adults' illness or injury, improves patient- and system-level outcomes. PMID:23176020

  7. School of Medicine Degree options

    E-print Network

    Brierley, Andrew

    136 School of Medicine Medicine Degree options BSc (Single Honours Degree) Medicine Entrance Applied Sciences`Pathway to Medicine'at Perth College The School of Medicine has formed a partnership Andrews. More information can be found on the School of Medicine web pages ( http://medicine

  8. Optimal Screening for Geriatric Assessment in Older Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Holly M.; Des Bordes, Jude K. A.; Kebriaei, Partow; Yennu, Sriram; Champlin, Richard E.; Giralt, Sergio; Mohile, Supriya G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Older patients who receive hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) may be at risk for adverse outcomes due to age-related conditions or frailty. Geriatric assessment (GA) has been used to evaluate HCT candidates but can be time-consuming. We therefore sought to determine the predictive ability of two screening tools, the Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES-13) and the G8, for abnormal GA or frailty. Materials and Methods We enrolled 50 allogeneic HCT candidates age ?60 years. The GA included measures of medical, physical, functional, and social health. Frailty was defined as 3 or more abnormalities on grip strength, gait speed, weight loss, exhaustion, and activity. We associated baseline characteristics and abnormal GA or frailty. We determined the sensitivity and predictive ability of the VES-13 and G8 for GA and frailty. Results Overall, 33 (66%) patients (mean age 65.4 years) had an abnormal GA, and11 patients (22%) were frail. The G8 screening tool had a higher sensitivity for an abnormal GA (69.7%), and the VES-13 had a higher specificity (100%). Both tools had similar discriminatory ability. Conclusions Older HCT candidates had a significant number of deficits on baseline GA and a high prevalence of frailty. Existing screening tools may not be able to replace a full GA. PMID:24835889

  9. Effect of Ayurvedic mercury preparation Makaradhwaja on geriatric canine--a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Sinyorita, S; Ghosh, C K; Chakrabarti, A; Auddy, B; Ghosh, Runa; Debnath, P K

    2011-07-01

    Makaradhwaja, an alchemical Ayurvedic mercury preparation is used as stimulant and vitalizer. Towards veterinary practices, the acceptability, tolerability and toxicity studies were undertaken in geriatric pet dogs aged more than 10 years irrespective of breed and sex for future use. Makaradhwaja (2.5 mg/kg) was used with honey once daily for 30 days. Before and after treatment, blood was collected for hematological studies as well as liver, kidney function and anti-oxidant activity. In control group, honey itself showed no appreciable change whereas, Makaradhwaja lowered neutrophil and total leucocyte count. Serum cholesterol, urea, glucose, alanine amino transferase, aspartate amino transferase, sodium, phosphorus and calcium were decreased. Haemoglobin and serum creatinine were significantly increased. There was appreciable physical, behavioral and body weight change including quality of life. The dose was used in replication of human dose (125 mg/50 kg). Anti-oxidant study showed significant increase of lipid per oxidation in experimental group while the values of ABTS radical cation decolorisation assay although decreased but did not show any significant changes. Decrease of serum urea and increase of serum creatinine could not be explained on single dose response. Different dose study could only explain the optimum dose to be required in canine practices. PMID:21800504

  10. Status and requirements of geriatric mental health services in India: An evidence-based commentary

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, S. C.; Pandey, Nisha M.

    2012-01-01

    In view of appreciable improvements in health care services in India, the longevity and life expectancy have almost doubled. As a result, there is significant demographic transition, and the population of older adults in the country is growing rapidly. Epidemiological surveys have revealed enormous mental health morbidity in older adults (aged 60 years and above) and have necessitated immediate need for the development of mental health services in India. The present population of older adults was used to calculate psychiatric morbidity based on the reported epidemiological data. The demographic and social changes, health care planning, available mental health care services and morbidity data were critically examined and analyzed. The service gap was calculated on the basis of available norms for the country vis-à-vis average mental health morbidity. Data from a recent epidemiological study indicated an average of 20.5% mental health morbidity in older adults. Accordingly, it was found that, at present, 17.13 million older adults (total population, 83.58 millions) are suffering from mental health problems in India. A differing, but in many aspects similar, picture emerged with regard to human resource and infrastructural requirements based on the two norms for the country to meet the challenges posed by psychiatrically ill older adults. A running commentary has been provided based on the available evidences and strategic options have been outlined to meet the requirements and minimize the gap. There is an urgent need to develop the subject and geriatric mental health care services in India. PMID:22556431

  11. Health information technologies in geriatrics and gerontology: a mixed systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Vedel, Isabelle; Akhlaghpour, Saeed; Vaghefi, Isaac; Bergman, Howard; Lapointe, Liette

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review, categorize, and synthesize findings from the literature about the application of health information technologies in geriatrics and gerontology (GGHIT). Materials and Methods This mixed-method systematic review is based on a comprehensive search of Medline, Embase, PsychInfo and ABI/Inform Global. Study selection and coding were performed independently by two researchers and were followed by a narrative synthesis. To move beyond a simple description of the technologies, we employed and adapted the diffusion of innovation theory (DOI). Results 112 papers were included. Analysis revealed five main types of GGHIT: (1) telecare technologies (representing half of the studies); (2) electronic health records; (3) decision support systems; (4) web-based packages for patients and/or family caregivers; and (5) assistive information technologies. On aggregate, the most consistent finding proves to be the positive outcomes of GGHIT in terms of clinical processes. Although less frequently studied, positive impacts were found on patients’ health, productivity, efficiency and costs, clinicians’ satisfaction, patients’ satisfaction and patients’ empowerment. Discussion Further efforts should focus on improving the characteristics of such technologies in terms of compatibility and simplicity. Implementation strategies also should be improved as trialability and observability are insufficient. Conclusions Our results will help organizations in making decisions regarding the choice, planning and diffusion of GGHIT implemented for the care of older adults. PMID:23666776

  12. Drug-related problems (DRPs) identified from geriatric medication safety review clinics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ding-Cheng; Chen, Jen-Hau; Kuo, Hsu-Ko; We, Chiung-Jung; Lu, I-Shu; Chiu, Lee-Shu; Wu, Shwu-Chong

    2012-01-01

    Drug-related problems (DRPs) were identified from baseline data of 193 Medication Safety Review Clinic (MSRC) patients. MSRCs enroll older adults (? 65 years) with either (1) prescriptions of ? 8 chronic medications (drugs prescribed for ? 28 days) or (2) a visit to ? 3 different physicians at the two participating hospitals in Taipei, Taiwan from August to October 2007. The Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe (PCNE) Classification Version 5.01 was used to report DRPs. Mean age was 76.2 ± 6.2 years and 53% of participants were male. Participants had, on average, 9.0 ± 2.6 chronic conditions and took 8.9 ± 3.1 chronic medications and 1.7 ± 1.8 dietary supplements. Eighty-seven percent had at least one DRP. Being older, having orthostatic hypotension and taking more chronic medications were associated with higher likelihood of having at least one DRP. For the 1713 medications and 331 diet supplements reviewed, 427 DRPs were found, 490 causes (1.1 ± 0.4 per problem) identified and 1067 interventions proposed (2.5 ± 0.6 per problem). The most common DRP category was "drug not taken/administered" (35%), and the most common offending drug category was cardiovascular agents (33%). Prevalence of DRPs was high among geriatric outpatients prescribed multiple medications. Careful medication review is needed in routine clinical practice to improve prescription quality. PMID:21353318

  13. Neuroplasticity-based computerized cognitive remediation for treatment resistant geriatric depression

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko; Wexler, Bruce E.; Liu, Jiacheng; Hu, Willie; Seirup, Joanna; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2014-01-01

    Executive dysfunction (ED) in geriatric depression (GD) is common, predicts poor clinical outcomes and often persists despite remission of symptoms. Here we develop a neuroplasticity-based computerized cognitive remediation treatment (CCR-GD) to target ED in GD. Our assumption is that remediation of these deficits may modulate the underlying brain network abnormalities shared by executive dysfunction and depression. We compare CCR-GD to a gold standard treatment (escitalopram: 20mgs/12 weeks) in 11 treatment resistant older adults with major depression; and 33 matched historical controls. We find that 91% of participants complete CCR-GD. CCR-GD is equally as effective at reducing depressive symptoms as escitalopram but does so in 4 weeks instead of 12. In addition CCR-GD improves measures of executive function more than the escitalopram. We conclude that CCR-GD may be equally effective as escitalopram in treating GD. In addition, CCR-GD participants showed greater improvement in executive functions than historical controls treated with escitalopram. PMID:25093396

  14. Marked reduction in the number of platelet-tritiated imipramine binding sites in geriatric depression

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeroff, C.B.; Knight, D.L.; Krishnan, R.R.; Slotkin, T.A.; Bissette, G.; Melville, M.L.; Blazer, D.G.

    1988-10-01

    The number (Bmax) and affinity (Kd) of platelet-tritiated imipramine binding sites was determined in young and middle-aged controls 50 years of age and younger (n = 25), elderly normal controls over 60 years of age (n = 18), patients who fulfilled DSM-III criteria for major depression who were under 50 years of age (n = 29), patients who fulfilled DSM-III criteria for major depression who were 60 years of age and older (n = 19), and patients who fulfilled both DSM-III criteria for primary degenerative dementia and National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke-Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria for probable Alzheimer's disease (n = 13). Both groups of depressed patients (under 50 and over 60 years of age) exhibited significant reductions (decreases 42%) in the number of platelet-tritiated imipramine binding sites with no change in affinity, when compared with their age-matched controls. There was little overlap in Bmax values between the elderly depressed patients and their controls. The patients with probable Alzheimer's disease showed no alteration in platelet-tritiated imipramine binding. There was no statistically significant relationship between postdexamethasone plasma cortisol concentrations and tritiated imipramine binding. These results indicate that platelet-tritiated imipramine binding may have potential utility as a diagnostic adjunct in geriatric depression, and moreover that the reduction in the number of platelet-tritiated imipramine binding sites is not due to hypercortisolemia.

  15. Validation Analysis of a Geriatric Dehydration Screening Tool in Community-Dwelling and Institutionalized Elderly People

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Susana; Silva, Joana; Severo, Milton; Inácio, Cátia; Padrão, Patrícia; Lopes, Carla; Carvalho, Joana; do Carmo, Isabel; Moreira, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration is common among elderly people. The aim of this study was to perform validation analysis of a geriatric dehydration-screening tool (DST) in the assessment of hydration status in elderly people. This tool was based on the DST proposed by Vivanti et al., which is composed by 11 items (four physical signs of dehydration and seven questions about thirst sensation, pain and mobility), with four questions extra about drinking habits. The resulting questionnaire was evaluated in a convenience sample comprising institutionalized (n = 29) and community-dwelling (n = 74) elderly people. Urinary parameters were assessed (24-h urine osmolality and volume) and free water reserve (FWR) was calculated. Exploratory factor analysis was used to evaluate the scale’s dimensionality and Cronbach’s alpha was used to measure the reliability of each subscale. Construct’s validity was tested using linear regression to estimate the association between scores in each dimension and urinary parameters. Two factors emerged from factor analysis, which were named “Hydration Score” and “Pain Score”, and both subscales showed acceptable reliabilities. The “Hydration Score” was negatively associated with 24-h urine osmolality in community-dwelling; and the “Pain Score” was negatively associated with 24-h urine osmolality, and positively associated with 24-h urine volume and FWR in institutionalized elderly people. PMID:25739005

  16. Validation analysis of a geriatric dehydration screening tool in community-dwelling and institutionalized elderly people.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Susana; Silva, Joana; Severo, Milton; Inácio, Cátia; Padrão, Patrícia; Lopes, Carla; Carvalho, Joana; do Carmo, Isabel; Moreira, Pedro

    2015-03-01

    Dehydration is common among elderly people. The aim of this study was to perform validation analysis of a geriatric dehydration-screening tool (DST) in the assessment of hydration status in elderly people. This tool was based on the DST proposed by Vivanti et al., which is composed by 11 items (four physical signs of dehydration and seven questions about thirst sensation, pain and mobility), with four questions extra about drinking habits. The resulting questionnaire was evaluated in a convenience sample comprising institutionalized (n=29) and community-dwelling (n=74) elderly people. Urinary parameters were assessed (24-h urine osmolality and volume) and free water reserve (FWR) was calculated. Exploratory factor analysis was used to evaluate the scale's dimensionality and Cronbach's alpha was used to measure the reliability of each subscale. Construct's validity was tested using linear regression to estimate the association between scores in each dimension and urinary parameters. Two factors emerged from factor analysis, which were named "Hydration Score" and "Pain Score", and both subscales showed acceptable reliabilities. The "Hydration Score" was negatively associated with 24-h urine osmolality in community-dwelling; and the "Pain Score" was negatively associated with 24-h urine osmolality, and positively associated with 24-h urine volume and FWR in institutionalized elderly people. PMID:25739005

  17. Prevalence and Distribution of Oral Mucosal Lesions in a Geriatric Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh; Doni, Bharti; Maheshwari, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral health is important to individuals of all age groups. Previous epidemiologic studies of the oral health status of the general population in India provided very little information about oral mucosal lesions in the elderly. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of the oral lesions in a geriatric Indian population. Methods 5,100 patients were clinically evaluated, with age ranging from 60 to 98 years. There were 3,100 males and 2,000 females, with a mean age of 69 ± 6.3 yrs. The statistical analysis was done using the SPSS software, where p < .05 was considered to be significant. Results 64% of the patients presented with one or more oral lesions, associated to tobacco, betel nut consumption, and lesions secondary to trauma and prosthesis. Males were more affected than females and this difference was clinically not significant (p > .05). The lesions were more frequently observed between 65 to 70 yrs. The most common alterations observed were smoker’s palate (43%), denture stomatitis (34%), oral submucous fibrosis (30%), frictional keratosis (23%), leukoplakia (22%), and pyogenic granuloma (22%). Hard palate was the most commonly affected site (23.1%). Conclusions The findings of the present study provide important information when clinically evaluating oral cavity in elderly. Close follow-up and systematic evaluation is required in the elderly population to plan future treatment needs. PMID:25825607

  18. The Role of Emergency Medical Services in Geriatrics: Bridging the Gap between Primary and Acute Care.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Judah; McVey, Jennifer; Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Caring for older adults is a major function of emergency medical services (EMS). Traditional EMS systems were designed to treat single acute conditions; this approach contrasts with best practices for the care of frail older adults. Care might be improved by the early identification of those who are frail and at highest risk for adverse outcomes. Paramedics are well positioned to play an important role via a more thorough evaluation of frailty (or vulnerability). These findings may inform both pre-hospital and subsequent emergency department (ED) based decisions. Innovative programs involving EMS, the ED, and primary care could reduce the workload on EDs while improving patient access to care, and ultimately patient outcomes. Some frail older adults will benefit from the resources and specialized knowledge provided by the ED, while others may be better helped in alternative ways, usually in coordination with primary care. Discerning between these groups is a challenge worthy of further inquiry. In either case, care should be timely, with a focus on identifying emergent or acute care needs, frailty evaluation, mobility assessments, identifying appropriate goals for treatment, promoting functional independence, and striving to have the patient return to their usual place of residence if this can be done safely. Paramedics are uniquely positioned to play a larger role in the care of our aging population. Improving paramedic education as it pertains to geriatrics is a critical next step. PMID:26282932

  19. Pretreatment orthostatic hypotension as a predictor of response to nortriptyline in geriatric depression.

    PubMed

    Schneider, L S; Sloane, R B; Staples, F R; Bender, M

    1986-06-01

    The consequences of orthostatic hypotension, a serious and common problem among the elderly, are falls, transient ischemic attacks, strokes, and myocardial infarctions. Depressed elderly taking tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are at increased risk, and the pretreatment presence of orthostatic hypotension is considered a relative contraindication to TCA treatment. Recently, it was reported that the presence of pretreatment orthostatic hypotension in geriatric outpatients with unipolar depression predicted good clinical response to imipramine or doxepin. We investigated the predictive value of pretreatment systolic orthostatic pressure changes (PSOP) in unipolar depressed elderly outpatients (mean age, 64) who were to receive a 16-week course of nortriptyline or interpersonal psychotherapy. Overall, PSOP was significantly correlated with improvement on both the Beck Depression Inventory and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Although both groups responded equally to treatment, PSOP was more strongly correlated with improvement on the Beck Depression Inventory (r = 0.74, p less than 0.01) in the nortriptyline-treated group than in the group treated with interpersonal therapy (r = 0.31, not significant). The nortriptyline-treated subjects with a PSOP of greater than or equal to 10 mm Hg had a greater improvement than those with a PSOP of less than 10 mm HG (t = -2.36, p less than 0.05). No episodes of symptomatic orthostatic hypotension occurred in the nortriptyline-treated subjects. The results suggest that orthostatic hypotension, a relative contraindication to TCA use, may potentially identify patients more likely to respond to TCAs. PMID:3711368

  20. Geriatric assessment predicts survival and toxicities in elderly myeloma patients: an International Myeloma Working Group report.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Antonio; Bringhen, Sara; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Larocca, Alessandra; Facon, Thierry; Kumar, Shaji K; Offidani, Massimo; McCarthy, Philip; Evangelista, Andrea; Lonial, Sagar; Zweegman, Sonja; Musto, Pellegrino; Terpos, Evangelos; Belch, Andrew; Hajek, Roman; Ludwig, Heinz; Stewart, A Keith; Moreau, Philippe; Anderson, Kenneth; Einsele, Hermann; Durie, Brian G M; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Landgren, Ola; San Miguel, Jesus F; Richardson, Paul; Sonneveld, Pieter; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2015-03-26

    We conducted a pooled analysis of 869 individual newly diagnosed elderly patient data from 3 prospective trials. At diagnosis, a geriatric assessment had been performed. An additive scoring system (range 0-5), based on age, comorbidities, and cognitive and physical conditions, was developed to identify 3 groups: fit (score = 0, 39%), intermediate fitness (score = 1, 31%), and frail (score ?2, 30%). The 3-year overall survival was 84% in fit, 76% in intermediate-fitness (hazard ratio [HR], 1.61; P = .042), and 57% in frail (HR, 3.57; P < .001) patients. The cumulative incidence of grade ?3 nonhematologic adverse events at 12 months was 22.2% in fit, 26.4% in intermediate-fitness (HR, 1.23; P = .217), and 34.0% in frail (HR, 1.74; P < .001) patients. The cumulative incidence of treatment discontinuation at 12 months was 16.5% in fit, 20.8% in intermediate-fitness (HR, 1.41; P = .052), and 31.2% in frail (HR, 2.21; P < .001) patients. Our frailty score predicts mortality and the risk of toxicity in elderly myeloma patients. The International Myeloma Working group proposes this score for the measurement of frailty in designing future clinical trials. These trials are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01093136 (EMN01), #NCT01190787 (26866138MMY2069), and #NCT01346787 (IST-CAR-506). PMID:25628469

  1. Canadian Academy of Geriatric Psychiatry Survey of Brief Cognitive Screening Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Zahinoor; Mulsant, Benoit H.; Herrmann, Nathan; Rapoport, Mark; Nilsson, Magnus; Shulman, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of brief cognitive screening instruments is essential in the assessment of dementia. The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency of use and perceived characteristics of cognitive screening instruments among Canadian psychogeriatric clinicians. Methods Members of the Canadian Academy of Geriatric Psychiatry (CAGP) and attendees to the 2010 Annual Scientific Meeting were asked to complete a computerized survey. This survey assessed the perceived characteristics and frequency of use of 14 instruments. Results The survey had a 55% response rate, with a total of 155 respondents. The most commonly used instruments are the Clock Drawing Test (CDT), Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and Delayed Word Recall. Effectiveness, ease of administration, and speed of administration were the perceived characteristics of instruments most correlated with frequency of use. Conclusions Consistent with previous surveys, a small number of cognitive screening instruments are used by the majority of clinicians. Use of the CDT and the MMSE were comparable. To our knowledge, this is the first survey demonstrating that the MMSE is not the most commonly used tool, and other, newer instruments like the MoCA, are gaining prominence. PMID:23737930

  2. GRACE: A Visual Comparison Framework for Integrated Spatial and Non-Spatial Geriatric Data

    PubMed Central

    Maries, Adrian; Mays, Nathan; Hunt, Megan Olson; Wong, Kim F.; Layton, William; Boudreau, Robert; Rosano, Caterina; Marai, G. Elisabeta

    2015-01-01

    We present the design of a novel framework for the visual integration, comparison, and exploration of correlations in spatial and non-spatial geriatric research data. These data are in general high-dimensional and span both the spatial, volumetric domain – through magnetic resonance imaging volumes – and the non-spatial domain, through variables such as age, gender, or walking speed. The visual analysis framework blends medical imaging, mathematical analysis and interactive visualization techniques, and includes the adaptation of Sparse Partial Least Squares and iterated Tikhonov Regularization algorithms to quantify potential neurology-mobility connections. A linked-view design geared specifically at interactive visual comparison integrates spatial and abstract visual representations to enable the users to effectively generate and refine hypotheses in a large, multidimensional, and fragmented space. In addition to the domain analysis and design description, we demonstrate the usefulness of this approach on two case studies. Last, we report the lessons learned through the iterative design and evaluation of our approach, in particular those relevant to the design of comparative visualization of spatial and non-spatial data. PMID:24051859

  3. A self-help behavioral activation treatment for geriatric depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Moss, Kathryn; Scogin, Forrest; Di Napoli, Elizabeth; Presnell, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated behavioral activation (BA) bibliotherapy as a treatment for late-life depressive symptoms. BA bibliotherapy was administered using Addis and Martell's Overcoming depression one step at a time as a stand-alone treatment that was completed by participants (N=26) over a 4-week period [Addis, M.E., & Martell, C.R. (2004). Overcoming depression one step at a time. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.]. Results of an immediate intervention group were compared with those of a delayed treatment control group and treatment response for both groups was evaluated at 1-month follow-up. Primary outcome results showed that symptoms on a clinician-rated measure of depressive symptoms, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, were significantly lower at post-treatment for those who received immediate BA bibliotherapy compared with those who were in the delayed treatment control condition. However, self-reported depressive symptoms (a secondary outcome measured via the Geriatric Depression Scale), were not significantly different at this period. Because study control was lost after the delayed treatment group received the intervention, within-subjects analyses examining both treatment groups combined showed that clinician-rated depressive symptoms significantly decreased from pre-treatment to both post-treatment and 1-month follow-up. Self-reported depressive symptoms were significantly lower from pre-treatment to 1-month follow-up. These findings suggest that BA may be useful in treating mild or subthreshold depressive symptoms in an older adult population. PMID:22304676

  4. Management of hyperglycemia in geriatric patients with diabetes mellitus: South Asian consensus guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Manash P.; Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalkrishnan; Raza, Syed Abbas; Somasundaram, Noel; John, Mathew; Katulanda, Prasad; Shrestha, Dina; Bantwal, Ganpathy; Sahay, Rakesh; Latt, Tint Swe; Pathan, Faruque

    2011-01-01

    Asia is home to four of the world's five largest diabetic populations, two of them being South Asian nations, namely, India and Pakistan. This problem is compounded by a substantial rise in the elderly population in Asian countries. On the other hand, the heterogeneous health condition and multiple co-morbidities make the care of chronic disease in the elderly a challenging task. The aim of the South Asian Consensus Guidelines is to provide evidence-based recommendations to assist healthcare providers in the rational management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the elderly population. Current Guidelines used systematic reviews of available evidence to form its key recommendations. No evidence grading was done for the purpose of this manuscript. The clinical questions of the guidelines, the methodology of literature search, and medical writing strategy were finalized by consultations in person and through mail. The South Asian Consensus guideline emphasizes tailoring of glycemic goals for patients based on age, co-morbid conditions especially that of cardiovascular system, risk of hypoglycemia, and life expectancy. It also recommends cautious use of available pharmacotherapy in geriatric patients with diabetes. The primary principle of diabetes therapy should be to achieve euglycemia, without causing hypoglycemia. Appropriate use of modern insulins and oral drugs, including incretin mimetics will help physicians achieve this aim. PMID:21731863

  5. The value of geriatric care enhancement training for direct service workers.

    PubMed

    Coogle, Constance L; Parham, Iris A; Jablonski, Rita; Rachel, Jason A

    2007-01-01

    This study reports on the evaluation of a skills-enhancement training series for direct service providers in home care that was part of a federally funded state-level initiative to improve employee recruitment and retention. The gerontological training curriculum included content to improve problem-solving, communication, and stress management skills in order to increase professionalism and self-efficacy. While the first year of training utilized a network of "real-time" compressed video-teleconferencing broadcast to satellite sites statewide, these broadcasts were videotaped and accompanied by trained moderator-led scripted case study discussions at each of the sites during the second year. As the training series progressed, there was a linear increase in the likelihood that training would change the way participants performed their jobs in the future. Importantly, the training was more highly rated by the participants who had a greater commitment to pursuing their care work with geriatric clients. The merit of the program and implications of the results for the issue of employee retention are discussed. PMID:18032194

  6. Geriatric slim implants for complete denture wearers: clinical aspects and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Huard, Cedric; Bessadet, Marion; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Veyrune, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Background Advances made in prevention have helped postpone complete edentulism in older patients. However, in the elderly, the physiological state reduces patients’ ability to adapt to oral rehabilitation and degrades the patient’s oral condition. Consequently, elderly edentulous subjects avoid many types of foods, which can lead to substantial nutritional consequences. Complete dentures retained by implants are, currently, the treatment of reference in prosthodontic mandibular rehabilitation. Indeed, the mandibular symphysis generally tolerates implantation, even when the mandible is strongly resorbed. However, in the elderly, implant rehabilitation is compromised by the complexity of the surgical protocol and possible postoperative complications. In this context, the use of geriatric “slim implants” (GSI) offers an interesting alternative. Methods In the present study, the surgical and prosthetic procedures for the use of GSI in a French dental hospital are presented. The objective was the stabilization of a complete mandibular denture in an elderly person, with the immediate implantation of four GSI. Results The operating procedure was found to be less invasive, less expensive, simpler, and more efficient than the conventional procedure. Conclusion The result strongly suggests that this protocol could be used systematically to treat complete edentulism in very elderly patients. Long-term monitoring and the evaluation of the reliability of this type of rehabilitation should be undertaken. PMID:24009432

  7. Fluid retention index predicts the 30-day mortality in geriatric care.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Peter; Waldreus, Nana; Hahn, Robert G; Stenström, Helena; Sjöstrand, Fredrik

    2015-10-01

    The incidence and medical consequences of dehydration and fluid retention in senior citizens are unclear. The present study used urine sampling to detect renal conservation of water, which is an early sign of dehydration, and assessed its relationship to mortality in elderly patients admitted for acute hospital care. A urine sample was collected from 256 patients (mean age 82 years) and analyzed for color, specific gravity and osmolality. These markers were used to calculate a composite index of fluid retention, which was indicated by urine color ? 4, specific gravity ? 1.020 and osmolality ? 600 mOsmol/kg as suggested from eight previous studies of exercise-induced dehydration, of which one extends to age 69. Concentrated urine consistent with dehydration was present in 39 (16%) of the patients. This finding was relatively more common among those with confusion and/or dementia, but less common in patients with medical disease, and in those taking diuretics daily. Patients with such fluid retention had a higher 30-day mortality when compared to those who were euhydrated (21% versus 8%; p < 0.03). A difference of 10% remained at three months and one year after the admission to hospital. Concentrated urine consistent with fluid retention was found in 16% of the geriatric patients admitted to hospital for acute care. In these patients the mortality within 30 days was almost tripled compared to those who were euhydrated. PMID:25928857

  8. Developmental and contextual factors in the role of severe childhood trauma in geriatric depression: the sample case of former indentured child laborers.

    PubMed

    Kuhlman, Kate Ryan; Maercker, Andreas; Bachem, Rahel; Simmen, Keti; Burri, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the association between childhood traumatic experiences and geriatric depression (GDS) in a population of elderly who were exposed to severe childhood trauma. We aimed to identify the role of childhood maltreatment exposure in geriatric depression and the developmental and contextual factors that exacerbate this relationship. We interviewed 141 former indentured child laborers (58 females) about their experiences as children and their current depressive symptoms (Mage=77, SD=6.8). Participants provided their age, the year they were first indentured, duration indentured, current physical health, completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Child maltreatment, specifically emotional abuse, was strongly associated with geriatric depression symptoms. These effects were specific to individuals who were removed from their biological families between the ages of 3 and 9 years, and for children who were indentured for 6-12 years. Finally, depression partially mediated the association between medical conditions and daily health impairment, but not for individuals "at risk" for depression by virtue of their maltreatment experiences. This study was conducted with a specific subpopulation of elderly and therefore may not generalize to all geriatric depression, nor to all generations or populations with exposure to childhood adversity. This study demonstrates the importance of using a developmental framework to understand how childhood maltreatment facilitates increased risk for the development of depression in late life. PMID:23747018

  9. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking plenty of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  10. Alternative and Integrative Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for e-updates Please leave this field empty Alternative & Integrative Medicine SHARE Home > Treatment and Care > Treatments Listen Alternative medicine is a term used to define therapies other ...

  11. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit an Abstract Patient Information Pages from Vascular Medicine December 2015 Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) More info ... 1, 2014 Archive Submit a Case New! Vascular Medicine Videos Geoff Barnes talks about the article, VTE: ...

  12. HIV/AIDS Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... few years. But today, there are many effective medicines to fight the infection, and people with HIV ... healthier lives. There are five major types of medicines: Reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors - interfere with a critical ...

  13. Using Medicines Wisely

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Use Medicines Wisely Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... or foods should I avoid? 2. Keep a Medicine List Write down the important facts about each ...

  14. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > Teens > Drugs & Alcohol > Drugs > Cough & Cold ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  15. The Primary Care-Population Medicine Program at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

    PubMed

    George, Paul; Tunkel, Allan R; Dollase, Richard; Gruppuso, Philip; Dumenco, Luba; Rapoza, Brenda; Borkan, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    The United States healthcare system has been in a period of rapid evolution over the past decade, a trend that is anticipated to continue for the foreseeable future. Physicians are increasingly responsible for the quality of care they provide, and are being held accountable not just for the patient in front of them, but also for the outcomes of their patient panels, communities, and populations. In response to these changes, as well as the projected shortage of primary care physicians, the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University (AMS) developed the Primary Care-Population Medicine (PC-PM) program, which builds upon the traditional curriculum with major integrated curricular innovations. The first is a Master of Science Degree in Population Medicine that requires students to take nine additional courses over four years, complete a thesis project focused on an area of Population Medicine, and take part in significant leadership training. Another significant innovative element is the development of a Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship (LIC) during the 3rd year of medical school in which the students complete a longitudinal outpatient experience with the same preceptors and patients. During the LIC students will follow a panel of patients wherever care is provided, while focusing on population health and healthcare delivery issues, in addition to medical topics throughout their clinical and didactic experiences. Though several of the innovative elements are being piloted, the inaugural PC-PM class of up to 24 students will only begin in August 2015. While the outcomes from this program will not be known for many years, the potential impact of the program is significant for AMS, medical education, and the future of healthcare delivery. PMID:26324970

  16. Orientation Laboratory Medicine & Pathology

    E-print Network

    MacMillan, Andrew

    Welcome! Graduate Student Orientation Laboratory Medicine & Pathology albertadiary.ca e.wikipedia.org Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry (FOMD) Dept of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (LMP) #12;LMP Graduate · Rounds Attendance and Seminars · Ethics and Academic Integrity Training · PhD Proposal and the Candidacy

  17. Performing Narrative Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langellier, Kristin M.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author weaves narrative medicine and performance together to consider what might it mean to call narrative medicine a performance. To name narrative medicine as performance is to recognize the texts and bodies, the stories and selves, that participate in its practice--patients' and physicians' embodied stories as well as the…

  18. Medicines By Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alison

    2006-01-01

    This publication discusses the many different ways medicines work in the body and how this information guides the hunt for drugs of the future. The science of pharmacology--understanding the basics of how our bodies react to medicines and how medicines affect our bodies--is already a vital part of 21st-century research. Pharmacology is a broad…

  19. Lisa O'Neill Named `2015 Gerontolgist of the Year' by Arizona Geriatrics Society The director of education for the University of Arizona Center on Aging is recognized for multiple

    E-print Network

    Lisa O'Neill Named `2015 Gerontolgist of the Year' by Arizona Geriatrics Society The director has been awarded to Lisa O'Neill, MPH. Each year, the Arizona Geriatrics Society recognizes and honors at the White House in July to better Lisa O'NeillLisa O'Neill #12;prepare health care workers to respond

  20. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Cold Medicine Abuse DrugFacts: Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised May 2014 Some ... diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines are usually consumed ...

  1. Prescription Drugs and Cold Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Abuse » Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Email Facebook Twitter What is Prescription Drug Abuse: ... treatment of addiction. Read more Safe Disposal of Medicines Disposal of Unused Medicines: What You Should Know ( ...

  2. HIV Medicines and Side Effects

    MedlinePLUS

    ... depend on a person’s individual needs. Can HIV medicines cause side effects? HIV medicines help people with ... are common short-term side effects from HIV medicines? When starting an HIV medicine for the first ...

  3. Using Service-Learning to Teach Community Health: The Morehouse School of Medicine Community Health Course

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Ayanna V.; Ndjakani, Yassa D.; Banks, Bahati; Blumenthal, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Medical education is evolving to include more community-based training opportunities. Most frequently, third-and fourth-year medical students have access to these opportunities. However, introducing community-based learning to medical students earlier in their training may provide a more formative experience that guides their perspectives as they enter clinical clerkships. Few known courses of this type exist for first-year medical students. Since 1998, the Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) has required first-year students to take a yearlong Community Health Course (CHC) that entails conducting a community health needs assessment and developing, implementing, and evaluating a community health promotion intervention. In teams, students conduct health needs assessments in the fall, and in the spring they develop interventions in response to the problems they identified through the needs assessments. At the end of each semester, students present their findings, outcomes, and policy recommendations at a session attended by other students, course faculty, and community stakeholders. The authors describe the course and offer data from the course’s past 11 years. Data include the types of collaborating community sites, the community health issues addressed, and the interventions implemented and evaluated. The MSM CHC has provided students with an opportunity to obtain hands-on experience in collaborating with diverse communities to address community health. Students gain insight into how health promotion interventions and community partnerships can improve health disparities. The MSM CHC is a model that other medical schools across the country can use to train students. PMID:20881688

  4. Comparison of female geriatric lumbar-extension strength: asymptotic versus chronic low back pain patients and their response to active rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, B; Leggett, S; Mooney, V; Nichols, J; Negri, S; Hoeyberghs, A

    1996-02-01

    We compared lumbar-extension strength between healthy asymptomatic geriatric females (HEAL) and symptomatic geriatric females (INJ) seeking medical attention for chronic low back pain. The INJ group used the MedX lumbar-extension machine to perform isotonic exercises two times per week and were eventually reduced to one time per week. Range of motion (ROM) and strength were significantly different between groups before beginning the program. After the program, ROM and strength improved significantly and were not different from those of the HEAL group. The average length of treatment was 97 days and 20 visits. Subjective pain ratings were significantly reduced (60%) and exercise weights significantly increased (71%). This reconfirms the notion that many back pain sufferers have weaker lumbar-extension strength and that some symptomatic geriatric women can increase strength with progressive resistance exercise, which leads to a decrease in low back pain. PMID:8727452

  5. School of Medicine Degree options

    E-print Network

    Brierley, Andrew

    126 School of Medicine Medicine Degree options BSc (Single Honours Degree) Medicine Entrance level. HNC Applied Sciences`Pathway to Medicine'at Perth College The School of Medicine has formed at St Andrews. More information can be found on the School of Medicine webpages or from Perth College T

  6. Medicinal plants: conception / contraception.

    PubMed

    Chaing, H S; Merino-chavez, G; Yang, L L; Wang, F N; Hafez, E S

    1994-01-01

    Researchers have conducted considerable experiments on the effectiveness and therapeutic values of Chinese herbs and parts of plants. We should not ignore the significance of natural medicine. The Chinese have been perfecting medicinal therapy based on the raw ingredients of plants/herbs and their derivatives for thousands of years. Chinese practitioners of traditional medicine prescribe medicines based on yin and yang. Traditional medicine is communicated in a verb or written form. Natural resources used in traditional medicine to treat diseases are not limited to just medicinal plants but also include animals, shell fish, and minerals. Parts of plants used in traditional medicine are leaves, stems, flowers, bark, and root. Chinese medicine is the world's oldest continuous surviving tradition. The Chinese experimented with local plants, often resulting in mild to violent reactions. This process allowed them to become familiar with poisonous plants and those that could relieve pain or successfully treat illness. Current allopathic medicines are composed of synthetic compounds copied from natural chemical derivatives, which tend to be more potent than the original compound. Some medicinal plants used to effect conception/contraception include Striga astiatica (contraceptive); Eurycoma longifolia (male virility); and a mixture of lengkuas, mengkudu masak, black pepper seeds, ginger, salt, and 2 eggs (increase libido). Women in Malaysia take jamu to preserve their body shape and to provide nutrition during pregnancy. Praneem causes local cell-mediated immunity in the uterus. Clinical trials of Praneem with or without the hCG vaccine are planned. PMID:12287843

  7. Integrating Population and Clinical Medicine: A New Third-Year Curriculum to Prepare Medical Students for the Care of Individuals, Panels, and Populations.

    PubMed

    White, Jordan; Riese, Alison; Clyne, Brian; Vanvleet, Marcia W; George, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Population and Clinical Medicine (PCM) I & II constitute two of the nine courses established for the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University's (AMS) innovative dual-degree Primary Care-Population Medicine (PC-PM) program. The courses will run consecutively during students' third year in the program, in conjunction with the Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship (LIC). Throughout the courses, students will examine the intersection between population and clinical medicine with a focus on vulnerable populations, the social and community context of care, quality improvement, and leadership. In addition to attending class sessions in which students will engage with leaders in relevant fields, students will also draw from patient and population-level experiences in the LIC to plan and implement two projects: a community-based intervention to address a particular health issue, and a quality improvement project to change a small aspect of care delivery at a clinical site. Finally, leadership skills development sessions will be incorporated, and leadership practice will occur during implementation of student projects. PMID:26324973

  8. Evaluation of the efficacy of nutritional screening tools to predict malnutrition in the elderly at a geriatric care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Myoung-Ha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Malnutrition in the elderly is a serious problem, prevalent in both hospitals and care homes. Due to the absence of a gold standard for malnutrition, herein we evaluate the efficacy of five nutritional screening tools developed or used for the elderly. SUBJECTS/METHODS Elected medical records of 141 elderly patients (86 men and 55 women, aged 73.5 ± 5.2 years) hospitalized at a geriatric care hospital were analyzed. Nutritional screening was performed using the following tools: Mini Nutrition Assessment (MNA), Mini Nutrition Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF), Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002). A combined index for malnutrition was also calculated as a reference tool. Each patient evaluated as malnourished to any degree or at risk of malnutrition according to at least four out of five of the aforementioned tools was categorized as malnourished in the combined index classification. RESULTS According to the combined index, 44.0% of the patients were at risk of malnutrition to some degree. While the nutritional risk and/or malnutrition varied greatly depending on the tool applied, ranging from 36.2% (MUST) to 72.3% (MNA-SF). MUST showed good validity (sensitivity 80.6%, specificity 98.7%) and almost perfect agreement (k = 0.81) with the combined index. In contrast, MNA-SF showed poor validity (sensitivity 100%, specificity 49.4%) and only moderate agreement (k = 0.46) with the combined index. CONCLUSIONS MNA-SF was found to overestimate the nutritional risk in the elderly. MUST appeared to be the most valid and useful screening tool to predict malnutrition in the elderly at a geriatric care hospital.

  9. Traditional Chinese herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y P; Woerdenbag, H J

    1995-07-28

    Herbal medicine, acupuncture and moxibustion, and massage are the three major constituent parts of traditional Chinese medicine. Although acupuncture is well known in many Western countries, Chinese herbal medicine, the most important part of traditional Chinese medicine, is less well known in the West. This article gives a brief introduction to the written history, theory, and teaching of Chinese herbal medicine in China. It also describes modern scientific research into and the quality control of Chinese herbal medicines in China. Some examples of how new drugs derived from Chinese herbs have been developed on the basis of traditional therapeutic experience are presented. Finally, the situation of Chinese herbal medicine in the West is discussed. PMID:7581215

  10. Prevalence of psychiatric and physical morbidity in an urban geriatric population

    PubMed Central

    Seby, K.; Chaudhury, Suprakash; Chakraborty, Rudraprosad

    2011-01-01

    Background: With a rapidly increasing population of older aged people, epidemiological data regarding the prevalence of mental and physical illnesses are urgently required for proper health planning. However, there is a scarcity of such data from India. Aims: To study the frequency and pattern of psychiatric morbidity present and the association of physical illness with psychiatric morbidity in an elderly urban population. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional, epidemiological study. Materials and Methods: All the consenting elderly persons in a municipal ward division (n=202) were enrolled after surveying a total adult population of 7239 people. A door to door survey was undertaken where the participants were interviewed and physically examined. General Health Questionnaire-12, Mini Mental State Examination, CAGE Questionnaire and Geriatric Depression Scale were used in the interview apart from consulting the available documents. Other family members were also interviewed to verify the information. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test with Yates correction. Results: Psychiatric illnesses were detected in 26.7% while physical illnesses were present in 69.8% of the population surveyed. Predominant psychiatric diagnoses were depressive disorders, dementia, generalized anxiety disorder, alcohol dependence and bipolar disorder. The most common physical illness was visual impairment, followed by cardiovascular disease, rheumatic illnesses, pulmonary illnesses, hearing impairment, genitourinary diseases and neurological disorders. Presence of dementia was associated with increased age, single/widowed/separated status, nuclear family, economic dependence, low education, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatic disorders and neurological disorders. Depression was associated with female sex, single/widowed/separated status, staying in nuclear families, economic dependence on others and co-morbid physical illnesses, specifically cardiovascular disorders and visual impairment. Conclusions: This study presented a higher rate of dementia and old age depression. The interesting association with several sociodemographic factors as well as physical illnesses may have important implications for health planning. PMID:21772643

  11. Study of addiction problems and morbidity among geriatric population in rural area of Aurangabad district

    PubMed Central

    Mundada, Vinod; Jadhav, Vijay; Gaikwad, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    Research Question: What is the addiction problems and morbidity profile pattern of geriatric population in rural area? Objectives: i) To study the morbidity profile of elderly. ii) To study the addiction problems among elderly. Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out at the field practice area of Rural Health and Training Center (RHTC), Paithan of Government Medical College, Aurangabad during the period of September 1, 2006 to August 31, 2007. Total elderly population according to the definition at the field practice area of RHTC, Paithan was 3128. Enlisting of the study subjects was done by systematic random sampling by using Loksabha electoral list of 2005. A sample of 20% of total elderly population was taken by including every fifth elderly from the electoral list. Study Design: Cross-sectional study Settings: Field practice area of RHTC, Paithan of Government Medical College, Aurangabad. Participants: Elderly above 60 years of age. Sample Size: 625 which was 20% of total elderly at RHTC, Paithan. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test. Results: a) The study found that the prevalence of addiction among males was 68.34%, the prevalence of various addictions were smoking 29.96%, alcohol 18.18%, tobacco chewing 29.29% and among females, 45.42% elderly females use to chew tobacco. b) Prevalence of cataract was 40.16%, joint pain - 23.04%, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) - 7.52%, senescent forgetfulness - 10.88%, hemorrhoids - 8.64%, benign enlargement of prostate (BEP) - 7.20% in elderly males, hearing impairment - 24.8%, hypertension - 21.6%, diabetes mellitus - 13.92%, and anemia - 8.32%. PMID:24672190

  12. Remission in Major Depression: Results from a Geriatric Primary Care Population

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Armin R.; Chopra, Mohit P.; Cho, Lydia Y.; Coakley, Eugenie; Rudolph, James L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES While a recent task force report recommended that remission from major depression be defined according to DSM criteria, most previous work has used depressive symptom rating scales. The current study sought to identify baseline factors associated with treatment outcome in major depression, diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria. METHODS Data from the Primary Care Research in Substance Abuse and Mental Health for the Elderly (PRISM-E) study were utilized. This analysis focused on 792 geriatric primary care patients with major depression at baseline, who were randomized to services by a mental health professional in primary care or specialty settings. Major depression was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria based on a structured interview at baseline and six months. The primary outcome was the absence of any DSM-IV depressive disorder at six-month follow-up. Association with baseline demographic characteristics, comorbid anxiety disorder, “at risk” drinking, number of co-occurring medical conditions, and depressive symptom severity was examined using multiple logistic regression modeling. RESULTS Remission occurred in 228 (29%) patients with completed follow-up assessments, while 564 (71%) did not remit. Factors which increased the odds of non-remission included comorbid anxiety (OR=1.60, 95%CI 1.11–2.31), female sex (OR=1.49, 95%CI 1.04–2.15), general medical comorbidity (OR=1.15, 95%CI 1.07–1.24), and increased baseline depressive symptom severity (OR=1.04, 95%CI 1.03–1.06). CONCLUSIONS The findings underscore the importance of using DSM criteria to define remission from major depression, and suggest that concurrent measurement of depression severity, comorbid anxiety and medical comorbidity are important in identifying patients requiring targeted interventions to optimize remission from major depression. PMID:21157850

  13. Validation of the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index in complete denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Campos, J A D B; Zucoloto, M L; Geremias, R F; Nogueira, S S; Maroco, J

    2015-07-01

    To perform a validation of the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) for complete denture wearers and present a proposal for estimation of perceived oral health. This is a cross-sectional study with non-probabilistic sampling. A total of 211 subjects with a mean age of 62·5 (s.d. = 11·4) years participated, being 169 female. The GOHAI was applied in a personal interview. The construct/convergent/discriminant validity was tested using structural equation modelling. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to verify the fit of three proposals of the GOHAI: three-factor, one-factor and second-order hierarchical models. The stability of the models was evaluated in independent samples. The three-factor model presented an inadequate fit, and items 3, 4 and 9 were removed. The new structure presented an acceptable fit and strong invariance in independent samples. The convergent, discriminant validity and internal consistency were below adequate. The one-factor model presented an adequate fit to the sample. Convergent validity was compromised. A strong invariance of the one-factor model was observed. To calculate the overall scores of the GOHAI factors (three-factor model) or of the oral health perception (one-factor model), a matrix of regression weights for each item in the model was presented as a suggestion. We found an adequate fit of the both structures of the GOHAI for denture wearers, but the three-factor structure was more parsimonious. We suggested considering the weights of the regression model to calculate the overall score of perceived oral health or of its factors in different samples. PMID:25754792

  14. Mortality in Relation to Frailty in Patients Admitted to a Specialized Geriatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, An; Song, Xiaowei; Dong, Jiahui; Mitnitski, Arnold; Liu, Jian; Guo, Zhenhui; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background. In older adults admitted to intensive care units (ICUs), frailty influences prognosis. We examined the relationship between the frailty index (FI) based on deficit accumulation and early and late survival. Methods. Older patients (?65 years) admitted to a specialized geriatric ICU at the Liuhuaqiao Hospital, Guangzhou, China between July–December 2011 (n = 155; age 82.7±7.1 y; 87.1% men) were followed for 300 days. The FI was calculated as the proportion present of 52 health deficits. FI performance was compared with that of several prognostic scores. Results. The 90-day death rate was 38.7% (n = 60; 27 died within 30 days). The FI score was correlated with the Glasgow Coma Scale, Karnofsky Scale, Palliative Performance Scale, Acute Physiology Score—APACHE II and APACHE IV (r 2 = 0.52 to 0.72, p < 0.001). Patients who died within 30 days had higher mean FI scores (0.41±0.11) than those who survived to 300 days (0.22±0.11; F = 38.91, p < 0.001). Each 1% increase in the FI from the previous level was associated with an 11% increase in the 30-day mortality risk (95% CI: 7%–15%) adjusting for age, sex, and the prognostic scores. The FI discriminated patients who died in 30 days from those who survived with moderately high accuracy (AUC = 0.89±0.03). No one with an FI score >0.46 survived past 90 days. Conclusion. ICU survival was strongly associated with the level of frailty at admission. An FI based on health deficit accumulation may help improve critical care outcome prediction in older adults. PMID:26400736

  15. [Assertive medicine: a proposal against defensive medicine].

    PubMed

    Tena Tamayo, Carlos; Sánchez González, Jorge Manuel

    2005-10-01

    More than ever the physician-patient relationship is deteriorated by diverse factors, among these liability complaints stand out, and have propitiated the practice of defensive medicine, an attitude considered in many countries as inappropriate, expensive and unethical. Defensive medicine widens the distance between a physician and his patient. To revert this vice and its noxious effects which corrupt the patient-physician relationship in our country, we propose that physicians put to practice actions which permit the renewal of the essence of humanistic medicine in their daily practice and the restoration of the relationship. These changes in attitude sum up to a proposition of professional practice which we have denominated assertive medicine. This offer is resumed in four points: 1) Maintain a proper verbal and non verbal communication with each patient, 2) Keep continuously up to date skills, knowledge and abilities, 3) Respect the patient's rights and 4) Defend their own rights as physicians. PMID:16583836

  16. [Contribution of occupational medicine to social medicine].

    PubMed

    Geraut, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Occupational medicine has always been part of social medicine, but focuses on the part of the population in paid employment. Investigations of occupational diseases have identified several toxic chemicals that can affect other sectors of society: examples include cancers due to sawdust, asbestos, benzene, as well as carcinogens, mutagens and reproductive toxins. Better knowledge of the risks posed by epoxy resins, cements, formaldehyde, lead, toluene and other chemical agents has helped to understand certain diseases in the population. Knowledge of musculoskeletal disorders due to repetitive work has been of help in other areas; gradual resumption of appropriate activity seems to be the best basic treatment. Studies of mental overload and its consequences in the workplace (suicide, depression, etc.) have implications for human relations in society as a whole. Multidisciplinary networking helps to regularly take stock of findings in occupational medicine that may be applicable to social medicine. PMID:21568051

  17. Personalized MedicinePersonalized Medicine QuoQuo VadisVadis? Conference on Personalized Medicine

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Personalized MedicinePersonalized Medicine ­­ QuoQuo VadisVadis? ? Conference on Personalized Medicine: Conference on Personalized Medicine: Breaking Down the Barriers and Achieving Results Breaking of Clinical Pharmacology CDER/FDA CDER/FDA #12;22 OutlineOutline Personalized MedicinePersonalized Medicine

  18. PRACTICE OF MEDICINE III PRACTICE OF MEDICINE IV PRACTICE OF MEDICINE V

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    PRACTICE OF MEDICINE III PRACTICE OF MEDICINE IV PRACTICE OF MEDICINE V PRACTICE OF MEDICINE I PRACTICE OF MEDICINE II SpringWinterAutumn Year3,4,[5] Year2 SCHOLARLY CONCENTRATIONS Year1 · Cells to Tissues · Molecular Foundations of Medicine · Applied Biochemistry · Genetics · Development & Disease

  19. Ethics in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Warren R; George, Michael S; Churchill, Larry; Spindler, Kurt P

    2007-05-01

    Physicians have struggled with the medical ramifications of athletic competition since ancient Greece, where rational medicine and organized athletics originated. Historically, the relationship between sport and medicine was adversarial because of conflicts between health and sport. However, modern sports medicine has emerged with the goal of improving performance and preventing injury, and the concept of the "team physician" has become an integral part of athletic culture. With this distinction come unique ethical challenges because the customary ethical norms for most forms of clinical practice, such as confidentiality and patient autonomy, cannot be translated easily into sports medicine. The particular areas of medical ethics that present unique challenges in sports medicine are informed consent, third parties, advertising, confidentiality, drug use, and innovative technology. Unfortunately, there is no widely accepted code of sports medicine ethics that adequately addresses these issues. PMID:17218662

  20. Focus group reflections on the current and future state of cognitive assessment tools in geriatric health care

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Jocelyne C; Gambino, Sara A; Richter, Jeffrey D; Ryan, Jennifer D

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study provides insight into the thoughts and opinions of geriatric health-care professionals toward cognitive assessments and the use of emerging technologies, such as eye-tracking, to supplement current tools. Methods Two focus group sessions were conducted with nurses and physicians who routinely administer neurocognitive assessments to geriatric populations. Video recordings of the focus group sessions were transcribed and a thematic analysis was performed. Results Participants reported the need for assessment and diagnostic tools that are accessible and efficient, and that are capable of accommodating the rapid growth in the aging population. The prevalence of more complex ailments experienced by older adults has had repercussions in the quality of care that the clients receive, and has contributed to lengthy wait times and resource shortages. Health-care professionals stated that they are hampered by the disjointed structure of the health-care system and that they would benefit from a more efficient allocation of responsibilities made possible through tools that did not require extensive training or certification. Eyetracking-based cognitive assessments were thought to strongly complement this system, yet it was thought that difficulty would be faced in gaining the support and increased uptake by health-care professionals due to the nonintuitive relationship between eyetracking and cognition. Conclusion The findings suggest that health-care professionals are receptive to the use of eyetracking technology to assess for cognitive health as it would conserve resources by allowing frontline staff to administer assessments with minimal training. PMID:26109860