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Sample records for geriatric nursing

  1. Enhancing Geriatric Curriculum in Nursing School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    People are living longer. The average age of the population is increasing, and is expected to keep growing. Any person age 65 and older is now considered "geriatric." However, although growing, this population is not receiving adequate nursing care, and results in increased pain, falls, and even death. Geriatric curriculum is becoming…

  2. Multiresistant pathogens in geriatric nursing – infection control in residential facilities for geriatric nursing in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Claudia; Schablon, Anja; Bollongino, Kirsten; Maaß, Monika; Kaß, Dietmar; Dulon, Madeleine; Diel, Roland; Nienhaus, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background: The increase of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) causes problems in geriatric nursing homes. Older people are at increased a growing risk of infection due to multimorbidity and frequent stays in hospital. A high proportion of the elderly require residential care in geriatric nursing facilities, where hygiene requirements in nursing homes are similar to those in hospitals. For this reason we examined how well nursing homes are prepared for MDROs and how effectively protect their infection control residents and staff. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on infection control in residential geriatric nursing facilities in Germany 2012. The questionnaire recorded important parameters of hygiene, resident and staff protection and actions in case of existing MDROs. Results: The response was 54% in Hamburg and 27% in the rest of Germany. Nursing homes were generally well equipped for dealing with infection control: There were standards for MDROs and regular hygiene training for staff. The facilities provided adequate protective clothing, affected residents are usually isolated and hygienic laundry processing conducted. There are deficits in the communication of information on infected residents with hospitals and general practitioners. 54% of nursing homes performed risk assessments for staff infection precaution. Conclusion: There is a growing interest in MDROs and infection control will be a challenge in for residential geriatric nursing facilities in the future. This issue has also drawn increasing attention. Improvements could be achieved by improving communication between different participants in the health service, together with specific measures for staff protection at work. PMID:25285266

  3. The Filipino Nursing Students' Dilemmas in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Cruz, Andrei Angelo R.; Cruz, Angela Laurice G.; Cruz, Robert Edward D.; Cuarto, Jose Mari Nino L.

    2009-01-01

    The continually rising percentage of the elderly population and the demand for geriatric nursing care are dramatically related. While it is true that most undergraduate programs prepare nurses for the care of geriatric patients, most receive limited academic preparation in the nursing curriculum (Williams & Mezey, 2000). This is particularly true…

  4. Improving the quality of geriatric nursing care: enduring outcomes from the geriatric nursing education consortium.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; Wilson, Laurie Dodge; Stanley, Joan; Watman, Rachael; Shire, Amy; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Mezey, Mathy

    2014-01-01

    The nation's aging demography, few nursing faculty with gerontological nursing expertise, and insufficient geriatric content in nursing programs have created a national imperative to increase the supply of nurses qualified to provide care for older adults. Geriatric Nursing Education Consortium (GNEC), a collaborative program of the John A. Hartford Foundation, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and the New York University (NYU) Nursing Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, was initiated to provide faculty with the necessary skills, knowledge, and competency to implement sustainable curricular innovations in care of older adults. This article describes the background, step-by-step process approach to the development of GNEC evidence-based curricular materials, and the dissemination of these materials through 6-, 2-, and a half-day national Faculty Development Institutes (FDIs). Eight hundred eight faculty, representing 418 schools of nursing, attended. A total of 479 individuals responded to an evaluation conducted by Baruch College that showed faculty feasibility to incorporate GNEC content into courses, confidence in teaching and incorporating content, and overall high rating of the GNEC materials. The impact of GNEC is discussed along with effects on faculty participants over 2 years. Administrative- and faculty-level recommendations to sustain and expand GNEC are highlighted. PMID:25455325

  5. The Faculty Learning About Geriatrics (FLAG) program: bringing together experts in geriatric nursing education.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Janice A; Cheung, Corjena K; Voss, Jo A; Kaas, Merrie J

    2011-08-01

    Strengthening geriatric content in schools of nursing is a key initiative for the Minnesota Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence. The first Faculty Learning About Geriatrics (FLAG) program was implemented in the summer of 2008. Selected nursing faculty from across the Upper Midwest and tribal colleges have successfully completed the FLAG program in the last 2 years. Participants completed a 5-day summer institute at the University of Minnesota and a 1-year mentorship program. The FLAG program is designed to broaden expertise in geriatric nursing through building teaching and academic leadership skills and to increase content knowledge through collaboration with academic and geriatric leaders. This article provides an overview of the educational experience of FLAG participants who have earned the title of FLAG program fellow. The perspectives of the FLAG mentors and fellows are highlighted. PMID:21598851

  6. What caring means to geriatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Shwu-Jiuan, Liu

    2004-06-01

    Caring is the major concept in nursing. The purpose of this study was to describe the meaning of caring for nurses caring for elderly patients. Parse' s phenomenology was addressed in the research design, which included four steps: participant selection, dialogical engagement, extraction-synthesis, and heuristic interpretation. By stratified sampling, 30 nurses who worked in medical-surgical wards in a general teaching hospital were selected as participants. Dialogical engagement was completed through in-depth, tape-recorded interviews on the open question, " What is the meaning of caring for you as a provider of care to the elderly? ". Data were interpreted by process of Parse' s phenomenology, which included extracting the essence, synthesizing the essence, formulating a proposition, extracting concepts, and structuring the meaning. The meaning of caring for nurses engaged in caring for the elderly was: " Through the initiative deliberation from sincerity, the nurse is to dedication by the empathy and tolerance". The core concepts of caring were: deliberation, initiative, sincerity, tolerance, empathy, and dedication. It should develop and apply the caring concept and theory actively to geriatric nursing care. PMID:15208778

  7. Intention of nursing students to work in geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Ben Natan, Merav; Danino, Sharon; Freundlich, Nelli; Barda, Ayelet; Yosef, Racheli Mor

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined factors related to nursing students' intention to work in geriatrics upon graduation. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used. A random sample of 200 nursing students completed a questionnaire based on the Theory of Planned Behavior and Kogan's Attitudes Toward Old People Scale. Participants expressed low intention to work in geriatrics upon graduation. Results of a multiple linear regression indicated that students' attitudes toward working in geriatrics and normative and control beliefs were found to be predictors of this intention. Additionally, male and religious students were more inclined to work in geriatrics. The current study indicated that nursing students' attitudes toward working in geriatrics were significantly predictive of their intention to work in this field upon graduation. PMID:25707032

  8. Family Perceptions of Geriatric Foster Family and Nursing Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Rose, Charles L.

    1987-01-01

    Relatives (N=62) of matched pairs of patients in geriatric foster homes and nursing homes rated care provided to their relatives. Significantly more foster family patients had positive pre-placement attitudes than did nursing home patients. Upon follow-up, relatives of foster patients reported seeing more patient improvement, satisfaction,…

  9. Geriatric Training Needs of Nursing-Home Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubart, Emily; Segal, Refael; Rosenfeld, Vera; Madjar, Jack; Kakuriev, Michael; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Medical care in nursing homes is not provided by board-licensed geriatricians; it mainly comes from physicians in need of educational programs in the field of geriatrics. Such programs, based on curriculum guidelines, should be developed. The purpose of this study was to seek input from nursing home physicians on their perceived needs for training…

  10. The Success and Struggles of Filipino Geriatric Nurses in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Coronel, Rona Denise V.; Chua, Kannerin O.; Constantino, Mariz G.; Cordova, Ericsann James C.

    2009-01-01

    Geriatric nursing is a physically and emotionally demanding job in healthcare. It is a neglected field despite the growing population of the elderly, and the experiences of geriatric nurses are one of the unrecognized aspects of this field. This qualitative study purports to explore the successes and struggles of the lived experiences of a select…

  11. Effects of a geriatric nurse practitioner on process and outcome of nursing home care.

    PubMed Central

    Kane, R L; Garrard, J; Skay, C L; Radosevich, D M; Buchanan, J L; McDermott, S M; Arnold, S B; Kepferle, L

    1989-01-01

    We compared measures of quality of care and health services utilization in 30 nursing homes employing geriatric nurse practitioners with those in 30 matched control homes. Information for this analysis came from reviews of samples of patient records drawn at comparable periods before and after the geriatric NPs were employed. The measures of geriatric nurse practitioner impact were based on comparisons of changes from pre-NP to post-NP periods. Separate analyses were done for newly admitted and long-stay residents; a subgroup of homes judged to be best case examples was analyzed separately as well as the whole sample. Favorable changes were seen in two out of eight activity of daily living (ADL) measures: five of 18 nursing therapies; two of six drug therapies; six of eight tracers. There was some reduction in hospital admissions and total days in geriatric NP homes. Overall measures of medical attention showed a mixed pattern with some evidence of geriatric NP care substituted for physician care. These findings suggest that the geriatric NP has a useful role in nursing home care. PMID:2504064

  12. An Innovative Continuing Nursing Education Program Targeting Key Geriatric Conditions for Hospitalized Older People in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Shen, Jun; Wu, Haifeng; Ding, Fu; He, Xizhen; Zhu, Yueping

    2013-01-01

    A lack of knowledge in registered nurses about geriatric conditions is one of the major factors that contribute to these conditions being overlooked in hospitalized older people. In China, an innovative geriatric continuing nursing education program aimed at developing registered nurses' understanding of the complex care needs of hospitalized…

  13. How Many Sides Does a Coin Have? A Phenomenology of Filipino Nurses' Motivation and Attitudes toward Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Dangoy, Reena-Jane D.; David, Kathleen Christian V.; Dayo, Ken Jarrett H.; de Claro, Keisha A.; de Guzman, Giorgio von Gerri G.; de Jesus, Gerald Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    Nurses play a significant role in geriatric care. However, as the aging population and demand for geriatric nurses increase worldwide, shortages of nurses seem to arise. This creates the need to assess and address the motivation and attitudes of nurses toward geriatric care. The intent of this qualitative study is to surface the essence or the…

  14. Presentation and Management Outcomes of Corneal and Scleral Perforations in Geriatric Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Ying Fong, Yoly Yeuk; Yu, Marco; Young, Alvin Lerrmann; Jhanji, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We compared the clinical presentation and treatment outcomes of corneal and scleral perforations in geriatric nursing home residents, geriatric community residents, and non-geriatric population. The medical records of patients who were treated for corneal and scleral perforations at the Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong between January 1, 2004 and May 1, 2013, were reviewed retrospectively. Of 144 cases, 53 (37%) occurred in the geriatric population, of which 16 (11%) lived in nursing homes, and 37 (26%) were community residents. There were 91 (63%) patients in the non-geriatric group. The mean age of the patients in nursing home geriatric group was 86.5 years (87.5% females). The most common etiology of perforation was trauma. Rupture due to fall was more common in geriatric patients (P < 0.001) whereas laceration due to penetrating eye injury was more common in non-geriatric patients (P < 0.001). There were more cases of infection leading to spontaneous perforation in geriatric nursing home group compared to the other groups (P = 0.001). In the geriatric nursing home group, visual acuity at presentation (P < 0.001) and postoperative visual acuity (P = 0.012) was worse compared to the other groups. Our study showed that corneal and scleral perforations in the geriatric nursing home residents carry a poor visual prognosis. The causes and anatomical outcomes of such events in geriatric age group differ from those in the general population. In our study, geriatric patients residing in nursing homes had worse baseline as well as posttreatment visual acuity, compared to community residents. PMID:26356724

  15. Physician and Nurse Acceptance of Technicians to Screen for Geriatric Syndromes in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Griffey, Richard T; Stark, Susan; Coopersmith, Craig M; Gage, Brian F

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to evaluate emergency medicine physician and nurse acceptance of nonnurse, nonphysician screening for geriatric syndromes. Methods This was a single-center emergency department (ED) survey of physicians and nurses after an 8-month project. Geriatric technicians were paid medical student research assistants evaluating consenting ED patients older than 65 years for cognitive dysfunction, fall risk, or functional decline. The primary objective of this anonymous survey was to evaluate ED nurse and physician perceptions about the geriatric screener feasibility and barriers to implementation. In addition, as a secondary objective, respondents reported ongoing geriatric screening efforts independent of the research screeners. Results The survey was completed by 72% of physicians and 33% of nurses. Most nurses and physicians identified geriatric technicians as beneficial to patients without impeding ED throughput. Fewer than 25% of physicians routinely screen for any geriatric syndromes. Nurses evaluated for fall risk significantly more often than physicians, but no other significant differences were noted in ongoing screening efforts. Conclusion Dedicated geriatric technicians are perceived by nurses and physicians as beneficial to patients with the potential to improve patient safety and clinical outcomes. Most nurses and physicians are not currently screening for any geriatric syndromes. PMID:22224145

  16. [Nursing care and essential oils in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Lobstein, Annelise; Marinier, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Aromatherapy is a valuable complementary therapeutic tool which is increasingly being used in hospitals. Essential oils help to improve patients' quality of life. They can be used for well-being purposes as well in specific nursing procedures. Some services offer aromatherapy through diffusion, inhalation, massages or aromatic baths. The benefits for healthcare teams as well as for patients are undeniable. There is also a significant reduction in the consumption of certain drugs. PMID:25137964

  17. [Geriatric nursing staff retention. Opportunities, potentials, and strategies].

    PubMed

    Joost, A

    2013-08-01

    Retaining geriatric nurses in their line of work could be an important strategy to prevent the shortage of skilled staff in the future. A prerequisite for this is detailed knowledge of the length and structure of professional careers. The IWAK ( Institut für Wirtschaft, Arbeit und Kultur) evaluated data from the German Social Insurance and carried out a structural analysis of the professional careers of geriatric nurses. Results showed that the average duration of professional careers is 20 years, of which 11.7 years constitute the period of employment and 7.8 years account for periods of inactivity. According to these findings, there is a considerable potential in extending professional careers and reducing the periods of inactivity to make better use of the existing skilled staff and to reduce staff shortage in this area. Concrete measures could involve improvement of working conditions (with the aim of avoiding long periods of inactivity and illness-related premature career endings as well as of increasing job satisfaction), creating better conditions for a good balance between work and family life, as well as setting up individual strategies to expand weekly working hours. Key players are businesses but also local authorities and politicians. PMID:23884527

  18. Nursing dependency in registered nursing homes and long term care geriatric wards in Edinburgh.

    PubMed Central

    Capewell, A E; Primrose, W R; MacIntyre, C

    1986-01-01

    There has been growing interest and public investment in registered nursing homes, apparently based on the assumption that these homes are the private equivalent of hospital long term care. We have tested this hypothesis in a survey comparing 400 patients in 18 registered nursing homes with 217 patients in 11 geriatric long term care wards in Edinburgh. The nursing home patients formed a distinct and separate group: 362 (92%) were women, 392 (98%) were single or widowed, and 358 (90%) were self financing, whereas in the geriatric long term care group 148 (68%) were women and 35 (16%) were still married. Patients in nursing homes were also far less dependent than those in geriatric long term care wards (p less than 0.005). This study suggests that there may be large differences between the patients in these two types of institution, particularly with regard to nursing dependency. This finding has important implications in the future planning of long term places for the dependent elderly. PMID:3089370

  19. Filipino Nursing Students' Behavioral Intentions toward Geriatric Care: A Structural Equation Model (SEM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Jimenez, Benito Christian B.; Jocson, Kathlyn P.; Junio, Aileen R.; Junio, Drazen E.; Jurado, Jasper Benjamin N.; Justiniano, Angela Bianca F.

    2013-01-01

    Anchored on the key constucts of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior (1985), this paper seeks to test a model that explores the influence of knowledge, attitude, and caring behavior on nursing students' behavioral intention toward geriatric care. A five-part survey-questionnaire was administered to 839 third and fourth year nursing students from a…

  20. [Gerontological and geriatric education in baccalaureate nursing degree: a national survey].

    PubMed

    Matarese, Maria; Quaggia, Giuliana

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays most nurses have to care for elderly people and in the future this will become always more frequent due to progressive ageing of population. Thus nurses will need to have the necessary skills so as to be able to answer to the many complex needs of this population. A national survey has been carried out to find out what kind of Gerontological education currently exists in Italian nursing degree courses. A questionnaire was sent out to all the coordinators/directors of the Nursing Schools in the 171 educational locations within the 38 Italian universities where the degree course was active during the academic year 2005/2006. 34 university (84.4%) and 88 of the 171 locations (51.4%) answered the questionnaire.A certain variety is present at national level for theoretical and clinical education in Geriatrics and Gerontology, in terms, for example, of number of credits, type of clinical placements and time in the curricula for the educational experiences; most Nursing Schools have specific courses dedicated to Geriatric/Gerontological contents. Moreover coordinators/directors believe that the space offered to Geriatrics education is enough and that overloading of the curriculum would be a more considerable obstacle to the introduction and to the increase of Geriatric content in the curricula. Although not all Italian Nursing Schools participated, this survey provides relevant information about present education offered in elderly care in Italy, and permits us to give useful suggestions to Italian educators and nursing tutors. PMID:20059890

  1. Incorporating geriatrics into baccalaureate nursing curricula: laying the groundwork with faculty development.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Deborah G; Thornlow, Deirdre K

    2006-01-01

    In June 2001, the John A. Hartford Foundation of New York awarded the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) a 3.99 million dollar grant to enhance gerontology curriculum development and new clinical experiences in 20 baccalaureate and 10 graduate schools of nursing. Over the 4-year grant implementation period, AACN learned a valuable lesson from the grant's site directors: Faculty development is the single most necessary precursor to the successful implementation and maintenance of geriatric curricular enhancements. Unless faculty members foster positive attitudes toward aging, expand their geriatric nursing knowledge base, and are able to integrate geriatric content into the curricula, progress cannot be made. Enhancing Geriatric Nursing Education project directors recommend that the following steps be taken toward the creation of successful faculty development activities: (1) anoint a champion to mentor and persuade faculty members to embrace gerontology; (2) garner faculty buy-in by engaging the faculty early so that they become active participants in the curricular change process; (3) assess faculty knowledge and comfort level by administering tools developed by the John A. Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing and by conducting surveys based on AACN geriatric core competencies; (4) conduct faculty development workshops that include cutting-edge knowledge and research and provide the faculty with opportunities to discuss feelings and stereotypes about aging; (5) elicit the dean's support to encourage and allow time and opportunities for training; and (6) use the many excellent resources that help the faculty integrate geriatric content into their courses. This article will further elucidate such strategies and will highlight the range of faculty development activities in which grant-funded schools engaged. PMID:16564471

  2. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Geriatric Aide. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    This task analysis for nursing education provides performance standards, steps to be followed, knowledge required, attitudes to be developed, safety procedures, and equipment and supplies needed for 13 tasks performed by geriatric aides in the duty area of performing diagnostic measures and for 30 tasks in the duty area of providing therapeutic…

  3. A survey of attitudes and perceptions toward oral hygiene among staff at a geriatric nursing home.

    PubMed

    Forsell, Marianne; Kullberg, Erika; Hoogstraate, Janet; Herbst, Bertil; Johansson, Olle; Sjögren, Petteri

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this survey was to test the impact of an oral hygiene educational model on attitudes and perceptions toward oral hygiene among nursing home staff members. A pilot questionnaire was distributed to the nursing staff before and after a course on oral hygiene at a geriatric nursing home in Stockholm in 2008. The nursing staff was of the opinion that they had sufficient time to carry out oral hygiene tasks but considered such tasks unpleasant, mainly because of unwillingness and resistance from the residents. These attitudes and perceptions among the nursing staff did not change significantly after oral hygiene education. Future oral hygiene educational models need to be developed with an aim to alter the perceptions and behavior of the nursing home staff. PMID:21035232

  4. Emotional competencies in geriatric nursing: empirical evidence from a computer based large scale assessment calibration study.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Roman; Hartig, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    The care of older people was described as involving substantial emotion-related affordances. Scholars in vocational training and nursing disagree whether emotion-related skills could be conceptualized and assessed as a professional competence. Studies on emotion work and empathy regularly neglect the multidimensionality of these phenomena and their relation to the care process, and are rarely conclusive with respect to nursing behavior in practice. To test the status of emotion-related skills as a facet of client-directed geriatric nursing competence, 402 final-year nursing students from 24 German schools responded to a 62-item computer-based test. 14 items were developed to represent emotion-related affordances. Multi-dimensional IRT modeling was employed to assess a potential subdomain structure. Emotion-related test items did not form a separate subdomain, and were found to be discriminating across the whole competence continuum. Tasks concerning emotion work and empathy are reliable indicators for various levels of client-directed nursing competence. Claims for a distinct emotion-related competence in geriatric nursing, however, appear excessive with a process-oriented perspective. PMID:26108300

  5. Teaching massage to nursing students of geriatrics through active learning.

    PubMed

    Adler, Patricia A

    2009-03-01

    The use of massage in nursing practice has declined through the years in favor of high-tech interventions. This article describes a project using active learning to teach nursing students massage with dementia residents in assisted living. Students participated in a workshop to practice basic relaxation massage techniques with the guidance of their clinical instructor and then provided massages to resident volunteers. Afterward, students discussed their experience and completed a resident assessment form. The students requested more such activities, and the residents and facility management invited the students to return for another session. The instructor observed growth in the students' assessment skills and in their confidence. Use of massage to teach nursing students how to care for and relate to older adults with cognitive impairment is recommended. Further research is needed on the use of massage as an active learning method for nursing students in long-term care. PMID:19181909

  6. A Multi-Method Study of the Geriatric Learning Needs of Acute Care Hospital Nurses in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Fox, Mary T; Butler, Jeffrey I; Persaud, Malini; Tregunno, Deborah; Sidani, Souraya; McCague, Hugh

    2016-02-01

    Older people are at risk of experiencing functional decline and related complications during hospitalization. In countries with projected increases in age demographics, preventing these adverse consequences is a priority. Because most Canadian nurses have received little geriatrics content in their basic education, understanding their learning needs is fundamental to preparing them to respond to this priority. This two-phased multi-method study identified the geriatrics learning needs and strategies to address the learning needs of acute care registered nurses (RNs) and registered practical nurses (RPNs) in the province of Ontario, Canada. In Phase I, a survey that included a geriatric nursing knowledge scale was completed by a random sample of 2005 Ontario RNs and RPNs. Average scores on the geriatric nursing knowledge scale were in the "neither good nor bad" range, with RNs demonstrating slightly higher scores than RPNs. In Phase II, 33 RN and 24 RPN survey respondents participated in 13 focus group interviews to help confirm and expand survey findings. In thematic analysis, three major themes were identified that were the same in RNs and RPNs: (a) geriatric nursing is generally regarded as simple and custodial, (b) older people's care is more complex than is generally appreciated, and (c) in the current context, older people's care is best learned experientially and in brief on-site educational sessions. Healthcare providers, policy-makers, and educators can use the findings to develop educational initiatives to prepare RNs and RPNs to respond to the needs of an aging hospital population. PMID:26471253

  7. Development and Implementation of the Advanced Practice Nurse Worldwide With an Interest in Geriatric Care.

    PubMed

    Fougère, Bertrand; Morley, John E; Decavel, Frédérique; Nourhashémi, Fati; Abele, Patricia; Resnick, Barbara; Rantz, Marilyn; Lai, Claudia Kam Yuk; Moyle, Wendy; Pédra, Maryse; Chicoulaa, Bruno; Escourrou, Emile; Oustric, Stéphane; Vellas, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Many countries are seeking to improve health care delivery by reviewing the roles of health professionals, including nurses. Developing new and more advanced roles for nurses could improve access to care in the face of a limited or diminishing supply of doctors and growing health care demand. The development of new nursing roles varies greatly from country to country. The United States and Canada established "nurse practitioners" (NPs) in the mid-1960s. The United Kingdom and Finland also have a long experience in using different forms of collaboration between doctors and nurses. In other countries, such as Australia, NPs were endorsed more recently in 2000. In France, Belgium, or Singapore, the formal recognition of advanced practice nurses is still in its infancy, whereas in other countries, such as Japan or China, advanced practice nurses are not licensed titles. The aims of this article were to define precisely what is meant by the term "advanced practice nurse (APN)," describe the state of development of APN roles, and review the main factors motivating the implementation of APN in different countries. Then, we examine the main factors that have hindered the development of APN roles. Finally, we explain the need for advanced practice roles in geriatrics. PMID:27321868

  8. Development of The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Adult/Geriatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program in HIV Prevention, Treatment, and Care.

    PubMed

    Farley, Jason E; Stewart, Jennifer; Kub, Joan; Cumpsty-Fowler, Carolyn; Lowensen, Kelly; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In response to the call to create an AIDS Education and Training Center for Nurse Practitioner Education by the Health Resources and Services Administration, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing embarked on a transformative curriculum overhaul to integrate HIV prevention, treatment, and care into the Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Program. A six-step process outlined in the Curriculum Development for Medical Education was followed. A pilot cohort of Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner students were enrolled, including 50% primary care setting and 50% HIV-focused primary care through a 12-month HIV continuity clinic experience. Through this pilot, substantive changes to the program were adopted. Programmatic outcomes were not compromised with the modification in clinical hours. The model of a 12-month HIV continuity clinical experience reduced the number of required preceptors. This model has important implications for the HIV workforce by demonstrating successful integration of HIV and primary care training for nurse practitioners. PMID:26852319

  9. Canadian Nursing Students and the Care of Older Patients: How Is Geriatric Nursing Perceived?

    PubMed

    Gould, Odette N; Dupuis-Blanchard, Suzanne; MacLennan, Anna

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this research was to contribute to an understanding about the professionalization of gerontological nursing. The specific objective was to explore attitudes about older people among undergraduate nursing students. Three focus groups were carried out with 3rd-year nursing students in a generalist program in a small Canadian city and discussions focused on experiences and attitudes surrounding the care of older patients. A qualitative descriptive approach was used to analyze the verbatim transcripts. Results indicated that students had positive reactions to caring for older patients, at least when dementia is not present, but they received a strong message from their mentors that this type of nursing is neither prestigious nor valued. Discussions surrounding the care of older adults highlighted students' perceptions of conflicts between the art and science of nursing, and their concerns regarding the divisions of tasks between nursing students, registered nurses, and licensed practical nurses. PMID:24652901

  10. IMPACT OF THE GERIATRIC MEDICATION GAME® ON NURSING STUDENTS EMPATHY AND ATTITUDES TOWARD OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Kiersma, Mary E.; Yehle, Karen S.; Plake, Kimberly S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses should be well-prepared to improve and address health-related needs of older adults, but students may have difficulty understanding and empathizing, as they may not yet have personally experienced aging-related challenges. Simulation games can be used to help students understand the experiences of others, but limited information is available on the impact of simulation experiences on student empathy. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the impact of participation in an aging simulation game on nursing students’ empathy and attitudes toward older adults as well as their understanding of patients’ experiences in the healthcare system. Design This study used a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design. Setting A school of nursing in the Midwestern United States. Participants The convenience sample included 58 sophomore-level baccalaureate nursing students. Methods Students played the role of an older adult during a 3-hour laboratory aging simulation game, the Geriatric Medication Game® (GMG). Students completed the (1) Kiersma-Chen Empathy Scale (KCES, 15 items, 7-point Likert-type), (2) Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Health Professions Students (JSE-HPS, 20 items, 7-point Likert-type), and (3) Aging Simulation Experience Survey (13 items, 7-point Likert-type) pre- and post-game to assess study objectives. Descriptive statistics and paired t-tests (were performed in SPSS v.21.0, as the data were normally distributed. Results Students’ empathy (N=58) toward older adults significantly improved overall (KCES p=0.015, JSE-HPS p<0.001). Improvements also were seen on seven out of 13 questions related to attitudes and healthcare understanding (p<0.05). In the post-test, students agreed that they experienced frustration and impatience during the GMG. Conclusions Students may not be aware of older adults’ feelings and experiences prior to experiencing aging-related changes themselves. Simulation activities, such as the GMG, can be

  11. Back disorders and lumbar load in nursing staff in geriatric care: a comparison of home-based care and nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Back pain is one of the most frequent complaints in the nursing profession. Thus, the 12-month prevalence of pain in the lumbar spine in nursing staff is as high as 76%. Only a few representative studies have assessed the prevalence rates of back pain and its risk factors among nursing staff in nursing homes in comparison to staff in home-based care facilities. The present study accordingly investigates the prevalence in the lumbar and cervical spine and determines the physical workload to lifting and caring in geriatric care. Methods 1390 health care workers in nursing homes and home care participated in this cross sectional survey. The nursing staff members were examined by occupational physicians according to the principals of the multistep diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. Occupational exposure to daily care activities with patient transfers was measured by a standardised questionnaire. The lumbar load was calculated with the Mainz-Dortmund dose model. Information on ergonomic conditions were recorded from the management of the nursing homes. Comparisons of all outcome variables were made between both care settings. Results Complete documentation, including the findings from the occupational physicians and the questionnaire, was available for 41%. Staff in nursing homes had more often positive orthopaedic findings than staff in home care. At the same time the values calculated for lumbar load were found to be significant higher in staff in nursing homes than in home-based care: 45% vs. 6% were above the reference value. Nursing homes were well equipped with technical lifting aids, though their provision with assistive advices is unsatisfactory. Situation in home care seems worse, especially as the staff often has to get by without assistance. Conclusions Future interventions should focus on counteracting work-related lumbar load among staff in nursing homes. Equipment and training in handling of assistive devices should be improved especially

  12. Doreen Norton OBE, MSc, SRN, FRCN (1922-2007): Pioneer who revolutionised pressure sore management and geriatric nursing to international acclaim.

    PubMed

    Denham, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Doreen Norton was a delightful, widely respected nurse who devoted her life to improving the care of elderly people. She researched the neglected problem of pressure sores, revolutionised their nursing care, and thus achieved international fame. Her Pressure Sore Scale was established as a management tool and is still used today. She was a key member of the design team that produced the 'King's Fund Bed', researched equipment required on geriatric wards, assessed all geriatric long stay units in Scotland and established research as a valuable nursing tool within her profession and health authorities. She lectured extensively and her publications attracted worldwide acclamation. After her retirement, she was subsequently appointed to the world's first Chair of Gerontological Nursing in Cleveland, Ohio. PMID:26968512

  13. Use of a mobile device by nursing home residents for long-term care comprehensive geriatric self-assessment: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fanpin; Chang, Polun; Hou, I-Ching; Tu, Ming-Hsiang; Lan, Chung-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Long-term-care comprehensive geriatric assessments, such as the Minimum Data Set 3.0, are used to evaluate the clinical, psychological, and personal status of residents in long-term-care nursing facilities. Nursing staff conducts assessment interviews, thereby increasing the workload of nurses and the cost of patient care. This study explored the ability of nursing home residents to use two different mobile devices for a geriatric self-assessment. Study participants were residents of long-term-care nursing homes. A modified Minimum Data Set 3.0 was converted to a format for use with a 6-inch mobile pad and a 3.7-inch mobile smartphone. The survey completion rate and the response time were measured. A Technology Assessment Model questionnaire analyzed the participants' experience. All participants were able to use a 6-inch pad, with an average completion rate of 92.9% and an average time for completion of 21 minutes. Only 20% of the participants could complete the assessment with the 3.7-inch smartphone. The participants found the 6-inch pad easier to use than the 3.7-inch smartphone. This exploratory study suggests that nursing home residents are able to use a mobile device to perform a geriatric self-assessment and delineates the importance of the ergonomics of the device. PMID:25397723

  14. Considerations for design of an e-learning program augmenting advanced geriatric nurse practitioner's clinical skills training.

    PubMed

    Rostad, Hanne M; Grov, Ellen Karine; Moen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    E-learning programs offer learners flexibility, more control over their learning experience, possibilities for repetition and allows for learning to be more individualized compared to traditional teaching methods. This paper presents considerations for an interdisciplinary project to design an e-learning program for graduate students enrolled in a master's program in Advanced Geriatric Nursing. The e-learning program offers new opportunities for learners to apply theoretical knowledge and develop their skills in the process of collaborative knowledge creation. A model based on the systematic development of instruction and learning and a pedagogical framework for e-learning has guided the design process. This paper explains how the e-learning program was created and how content was developed and implemented in an e-learning environment. PMID:24943556

  15. Practical Nursing Curriculum Advisory Committee Report Including Suggested Philosophy, Suggested Competencies, Geriatric Care Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    A study was made of the current and future role of practical nurses and the curricula used to prepare these nurses in the 16 programs in Iowa. A statewide committee of 14 persons involved in hiring, employing, and controlling practical nurse practice was formed. Between Fall 1987 and Spring 1989, the committee gathered and analyzed information and…

  16. Developing positive attitudes toward geriatric nursing among Millennials and Generation Xers.

    PubMed

    Heise, Barbara A; Johnsen, Vickie; Himes, Deborah; Wing, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increase of the older adult population, there exists a shortage of health care professionals trained to help this population remain independent as long as possible. Ageism, common among younger adults, affects the capacity building of health care for older adults. Research has indicated that increased knowledge about older adults, as well as exposure to the elderly, may alter nursing students' attitudes regarding careers in gerontological nursing. However, questions remain as to what are the most effective ways to provide gerontological content in nursing programs and enhance attitudes toward older adults.With the understanding that younger adults see a need to balance work and play, a baccalaureate nursing program provides examples of ways to accomplish this through integration of courses, simulations, positive images of aging, and learning activities that enhance empathy for both frail and healthy older adults. PMID:22860477

  17. [Improvement of oral health care in geriatric care by training of nurses and nursing assistants for the elderly].

    PubMed

    Jordan, R; Sirsch, E; Gesch, D; Zimmer, S; Bartholomeyczik, S

    2012-04-01

    Because oral health among residents of German nursing homes is inadequate, this intervention study evaluated the effects of dental training for nurses and nursing assistants (RN and RA) in homes for the elderly on their assessment of oral health in residents and, as a consequence, on the status of residents' oral health. 53 residents and the RNs and RAs from three homes for the elderly participated in this study. The nursing staff received training in dental health care. As primary outcome, the competence in performing the Brief Oral Health Examination (BOHSE) was measured at baseline date and four months after training. Additional outcome measures were dental and denture hygiene in residents, functional status of dentures, and treatment needs. Dental training was shown to improve the nursing staff's competences in oral health assessment in tendency. Residents' oral hygiene improved significantly, whereas no relevant effects on hygiene and functional status of dentures were registered. The need for dental treatment turned out to be considerable at both measurements. Modifications in test tools with identification of dental treatment needs seem to be indicated in order to improve cooperation between nursing staff and dentists in homes for the elderly. PMID:22473733

  18. Emotional Competencies in Geriatric Nursing: Empirical Evidence from a Computer Based Large Scale Assessment Calibration Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaspar, Roman; Hartig, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The care of older people was described as involving substantial emotion-related affordances. Scholars in vocational training and nursing disagree whether emotion-related skills could be conceptualized and assessed as a professional competence. Studies on emotion work and empathy regularly neglect the multidimensionality of these phenomena and…

  19. Correlates of Geriatric Loneliness in Philippine Nursing Homes: A Multiple Regression Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Maravilla, Katrina N.; Maravilla, Veniza Anne M.; Marfil, Jomille D. V.; Marinas, Janine Angelica R.; Marquez, Jorelle Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted worldwide about loneliness in older adults living in nursing homes and the factors associated with it. However, only a few studies have focused on social factors that may predispose these older adults to experience loneliness. The purpose of this study was to examine the interplay between and among loneliness,…

  20. Nursing Home Social Workers and Allied Professionals: Enhancing Geriatric Mental Health Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonifas, Robin P.

    2011-01-01

    Research has highlighted the challenges social services professionals face in providing quality psychosocial care to persons living in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). A primary area of difficulty is addressing the needs of persons with mental health conditions, including problematic behaviors associated with dementia. This study evaluated the…

  1. Comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led care coordination to prevent functional decline in community-dwelling older persons: protocol of a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Functional decline in community-dwelling older persons is associated with the loss of independence, the need for hospital and nursing-home care and premature death. The effectiveness of multifactorial interventions in preventing functional decline remains controversial. The aim of this study is to investigate whether functional decline in community-dwelling older persons can be delayed or prevented by a comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led care coordination. Methods/Design In a cluster randomized controlled trial, with the general practice as the unit of randomization, 1281 participants from 25 general practices will be enrolled in each condition to compare the intervention with usual care. The intervention will focus on older persons who are at increased risk for functional decline, identified by an Identification of Seniors at Risk Primary Care (ISAR-PC) score (≥ 2). These older persons will receive a comprehensive geriatric assessment, an individually tailored care and treatment plan, consisting of multifactorial, evidence-based interventions and subsequent nurse-led care coordination. The control group will receive 'care as usual' by the general practitioner (GP). The main outcome after 12 months is the level of physical functioning on the modified Katz-15 index score. The secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life, psychological and social functioning, healthcare utilization and institutionalization. Furthermore, a process evaluation and cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed. Discussion This study will provide new knowledge regarding the effectiveness and feasibility of a comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led elderly care in general practice. Trial registration NTR2653 Grant Unrestricted grant 'The Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and development' no 313020201 PMID:22462516

  2. Studying feasibility and effects of a two-stage nursing staff training in residential geriatric care using a 30 month mixed-methods design [ISRCTN24344776

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transfer techniques and lifting weights often cause back pain and disorders for nurses in geriatric care. The Kinaesthetics care conception claims to be an alternative, yielding benefits for nurses as well as for clients. Starting a multi-step research program on the effects of Kinaesthetics, we assess the feasibility of a two-stage nursing staff training and a pre-post research design. Using quantitative and qualitative success criteria, we address mobilisation from the bed to a chair and backwards, walking with aid and positioning in bed on the staff level as well as on the resident level. In addition, effect estimates should help to decide on and to prepare a controlled trial. Methods/Design Standard basic and advanced Kinaesthetics courses (each comprising four subsequent days and an additional counselling day during the following four months) are offered to n = 36 out of 60 nurses in a residential geriatric care home, who are in charge of 76 residents. N = 22 residents needing movement support are participating to this study. On the staff level, measurements include focus group discussions, questionnaires, physical strain self-assessment (Borg scale), video recordings and external observation of patient assistance skills using a specialised instrument (SOPMAS). Questionnaires used on the resident level include safety, comfort, pain, and level of own participation during mobilisation. A functional mobility profile is assessed using a specialised test procedure (MOTPA). Measurements will take place at baseline (T0), after basic training (T1), and after the advanced course (T2). Follow-up focus groups will be offered at T1 and 10 months later (T3). Discussion Ten criteria for feasibility success are established before the trial, assigned to resources (missing data), processes (drop-out of nurses and residents) and science (minimum effects) criteria. This will help to make rational decision on entering the next stage of the research program. Trial

  3. Geriatrics: Profiles in Geriatrics

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the field. more info Todd Semla, Pharm D. Department of Veterans Affairs "I always liked working ... Rice University, a decade earlier. more info Marc D. Rothman, MD Chief Medical Officer, Kindred Healthcare Nursing ...

  4. [Nurses in geriatrics and Alzheimer's disease: knowledge, image, and common practice-results from a survey in a French area (Alsace)].

    PubMed

    Grosclaude, Michèle

    2007-06-01

    From the data of a multicentric investigation, performed in a French area (Alsace) using questionnaires filled by 800 geriatrics nurses, the author analyses their current knowledge and representations of Alzheimer's disease, their attitudes and practice concerning the disclosure of the diagnosis to the patients, and the influence of these data for the patients care. The results show three principal common aspects: first very important gaps, difficulties and contradictions concerning Alzheimer's disease knowledge; then heavy feelings of incompetence, loneliness, and therapeutic inanity with regard to the problems of their practice; last of all, their requests insisting on their need of information, formation, and aid, all missing for them. The nurses' language was devoid of specific and professional contents. It was similar to the general public, mediatic, and societal speeches, loaded with aprioristic assertions, reducing Alzheimer's disease to an organic process of humanity decline. This alarming picture calls to question its ground, mechanisms and solutions concerning the needs conveyed by the nurses, and the pertinency of the common concept of Alzheimer's disease. It enjoins to reconsider the nurses formation and a transdisciplinar further reflection about the notion of Alzheimer's disease and the messages which are transmitted by it. PMID:17556220

  5. Developing Leadership in Geriatric Education: An Annual Faculty Institute. Proceedings of the Summer Geriatric Institute (4th, Lexington, Kentucky, July 24-27, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Davis L., Ed.; Hoekelman, Margaret C., Ed.

    This document presents the proceedings of a conference on geriatric education. These papers are included: Promoting Healthy Aging: A Leadership Role for Geriatric Education; National Research Priorities in Aging; Aging with a Disability; Recent Advances in Clinical Strategies in Geriatric Education: The Role of the Geriatric Nurse in the Acute…

  6. Geriatric study in Europe on health effects of air quality in nursing homes (GERIE study) profile: objectives, study protocol and descriptive data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Indoor air pollution (IAP) constitutes a major global public health problem requiring increasing efforts in research and policymaking that may have special significance for elderly that are likely to spend most of their day indoors and appear to be particularly susceptible to adverse effects of chemical pollutants and bio-contaminants. Yet, evidence existing on the effects of IAP in elderly is scanty. The Geriatric study in Europe on health effects of air quality in nursing homes (GERIE) study aimed to assess health effects of major indoor air pollutants and thermal conditions in elderly (> 70 years) living stably in nursing homes (NH) across Europe. Respiratory effects were particularly considered as airways and lung constitute the first target of air pollutants. Objectives We describe here the rationale and the methods of the GERIE Study. Methods 8 nursing homes were randomly selected in 7 European countries. Twenty individuals were randomly selected in each nursing home. Major indoor and outdoor air chemical pollutants (PM10, PM2.5, PM0.1, formaldehyde, NO2; O3, VOC, CO2) and bio-contaminants (moulds, allergens) were assessed objectively with standardized procedures. Major health status indicators were assessed through a standardized questionnaire, non-invasive clinical tests and blood and urine biomarkers as well as saliva for ADN. Results The GERIE study has given the opportunity to publish two reviews on respiratory health effects of indoor and outdoor air pollution in elderly. In addition it has provided the inventory of air quality and thermal conditions in 50 nursing homes across Europe and data on respiratory health status in 600 elderly aged 82 years in mean. Major future results will include the relationships between NH environment and health in elderly. Conclusions The main long-term purpose of the GERIE study is to improve the health of elderly who permanently reside in nursing homes or of those who are exposed to indoor air pollution

  7. Predictive values and other quality criteria of the German version of the Nurse-Work Instability Scale (Nurse-WIS) – follow-up survey findings of a prospective study of a cohort of geriatric care workers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Until now there has been a lack of effective screening instruments for health care workers at risk. To counteract the forecast shortage for health care workers, the offer of early interventions to maintain their work ability will become a central concern. The Nurse-Work Instability Scale (Nurse-WIS) seems to be suitable as a screening instrument and therefore a prospective study of a cohort of nursing staff from nursing homes was undertaken to validate the Nurse-Work Instability Scale (Nurse-WIS). Methods The follow-up data was used to test the sensitivity, specificity and the predictive values of the Nurse-WIS. The participants answered a questionnaire in the baseline investigation (T1) and in a follow-up 12 month after baseline. The hypothesis was that geriatric care workers with an increased risk according to the Nurse-WIS in T1 would be more likely to have taken long-term sick leave or drawn a pension for reduced work capacity in T2. Results 396 persons took part in T1 (21.3% response), 225 in T2 (42.3% loss-to-follow-up). In T1, 28.4% indicated an increased risk according to the Nurse-WIS. In T2, 10.2% had taken long-term sick leave or had drawn a pension for reduced work capacity. The sensitivity is 73.9% (95%-CI 55.7%–92.3%), the specificity is 76.7% (95%-CI 71.2%–82.8%). The ROC AUC indicated a moderate precision for the scale, at 0.74 (95%-CI 0.64–0.84). The PPV of the Nurse-WIS is 26.6%, and the NPV is 96.3%. For those with an increased risk according to the Nurse-WIS, the probability in T2 of long-term sick leave or a pension for reduced work capacity is around eight times higher (OR 8.3, 95%-CI 2.90–23.07). Persons who had indicated a long-term sick leave or made an application for a pension for reduced work capacity in T1 had a 17 times higher risk (OR 17.4, 95%-CI 3.34–90.55). Conclusion The German version of the Nurse-WIS appears to be a valid instrument with satisfactory predictive capabilities for recording an impending long

  8. Competencies in Geriatric Nursing: Empirical Evidence from a Computer-Based Large-Scale Assessment Calibration Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaspar, Roman; Döring, Ottmar; Wittmann, Eveline; Hartig, Johannes; Weyland, Ulrike; Nauerth, Annette; Möllers, Michaela; Rechenbach, Simone; Simon, Julia; Worofka, Iberé

    2016-01-01

    Valid and reliable standardized assessment of nursing competencies is needed to monitor the quality of vocational education and training (VET) in nursing and evaluate learning outcomes for care work trainees with increasingly heterogeneous learning backgrounds. To date, however, the modeling of professional competencies has not yet evolved into…

  9. Geriatric Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Perera, Thomas; Cortijo-Brown, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    The geriatric population makes up a large portion of the emergency patient population. Geriatric patients have less reserve and more comorbid diseases. They are frequently on multiple medications and are more likely to require aggressive treatment during acute illness. Although it may not be obvious, it is important to recognize the signs of shock as early as possible. Special care and monitoring should be used when resuscitating the elderly. The use of bedside ultrasound and monitoring for coagulopathies are discussed. Clinicians should be constantly vigilant and reassess throughout diagnosis and treatment. Ethical considerations in this population need to be considered on an individual basis. PMID:27475009

  10. Geriatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    Reske-Nielsen, Casper; Medzon, Ron

    2016-08-01

    Within the next 15 years, 1 in 5 Americans will be over age 65. $34 billion will be spent yearly on trauma care of this age group. This section covers situations in trauma unique to the geriatric population, who are often under-triaged and have significant injuries underestimated. Topics covered include age-related pathophysiological changes, underlying existing medical conditions and certain daily medications that increase the risk of serious injury in elderly trauma patients. Diagnostic evaluation of this group requires liberal testing, imaging, and a multidisciplinary team approach. Topics germane to geriatric trauma including hypothermia, elder abuse, and depression and suicide are also covered. PMID:27475011

  11. Geriatric Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seton Hill Coll., Greensburg, PA.

    This curriculum for training geriatric technicians is geared toward developing an understanding of, as well as the skills to assist with, the visually or hearing impaired older adult. The curriculum is organized in four modules. Each module is assigned a time frame and a credit unit base. The modules are divided into four major areas: knowledge,…

  12. Geriatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Markham, R W; Hodgkins, E M

    1989-01-01

    In recent decades, veterinary medicine has become more successful in prolonging the healthy, useful lives of pets. As a result, the practitioner spends a greater part of each practice day caring for the geriatric animal, both healthy and unhealthy. Because of their longevity, older pets are typically regular family members, with owners who seek the finest health care possible for their pets. The practice of geriatric medicine most properly should begin not when the dog or cat reaches some specific "golden" age, but rather when the wiggly, robust puppy or kitten receives its first examination. Like all parts of a sound preventive program, geriatric nutrition best follows from a well-considered juvenile and adult nutrition program. Furthermore, once it becomes senior, the "well" geriatric is as much a candidate for a diet designed especially to accommodate old age changes as is his unhealthy contemporary. In fact, evidence suggests that appropriate dietary management of the healthy, but often subclinical, patient may help postpone the signs of dysfunction and increase quality and length of life. A knowledge of the most significant nutrients and the impact of each on aging systems is now, and will become increasingly more, important to the progressive, skillful veterinarian. PMID:2646815

  13. Isolation followed by integration: a model for development of a separate geriatric course.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Meredith; Lange, Jean; Grossman, Sheila

    2005-06-01

    Because of the growing population of older adults in America, nursing faculty throughout the United States have been consistently challenged during the past decade to use the most appropriate methods to strengthen geriatric content in baccalaureate nursing programs. The question of whether to integrate content throughout the curriculum or offer a stand-alone geriatric nursing course has been explored extensively, but no ultimate conclusion has been found. With the support of a grant for geriatric curriculum integration from the John A. Hartford Foundation, one university began the journey to integrate geriatric nursing curriculum throughout all baccalaureate nursing courses. However, at a curriculum evaluation meeting held halfway through the grant period, faculty expressed the need to have concentrated content earlier in the program that could serve as a foundation on which to build geriatric knowledge. Faculty unanimously voted to create a geriatric nursing course to be offered to students during their second year of baccalaureate study. PMID:16021801

  14. Integrating geriatric resources into the classroom: a virtual tour example.

    PubMed

    Bonnel, Wanda; Fletcher, Kathy; Wingate, Anita

    2007-01-01

    As the older adult population increases, nursing students at all levels need geriatric content and access to geriatric resources. The Virtual Tour (VT) assignment, a combination of Web-based geriatric resources and applied learning activities, provides a simple way to integrate Web-based resources into classroom learning. VTs provide students a guide or "road map" to practical Web-based resources for client care. Evaluation data support that students like VTs and gain useful information for practice. VTs provide an easy way to expand geriatric resources available to students and to complement classroom content. PMID:17923286

  15. [Palliative care - also in geriatrics?].

    PubMed

    Sandgathe Husebø, B; Husebø, S

    2001-10-01

    Red Cross Clinic is the largest geriatric center in Norway (240 beds). Major parts of the center are: long time geriatric ward (215 beds), rehabilitation and acute ward (25 beds), day clinic (45 patients) and a teaching and research unit. A palliative care unit (10 beds) will be opened in spring 2000. In mai 1998 a national project: Palliative care for the elderly was opened at our center. The projects main goal is to develop and support proper palliative care to all severe ill and dying patients in Norway. In a prospective study we examined 179 consecutive deaths between 1998 and 1999. Average age was 84.5. Major symptom problems were pain, dyspnoea, death-rattle and anxiety. In the last 24 hours 83% of the patients received opioids, 67% of the cases morphine (mean daily dosage 31.8 mg). 37% of the patients received scopolamine (mean daily dosage 0.8 mg), 12% benzodiazepines and 3% of the patients haloperidol. 152 (85%) of the deaths were expected, 27 (15%) unexpected. In 137 patients (77%) open, honest, frank communication with patient or their nearest kin regarding the imminent death was possible. In our experience it is a myth that the relatives want doctors to practise "maximal therapy". All old patients in geriatric clinics and nursing homes need palliative care. We have found no international textbooks of geriatrics with chapters on palliative care or textbooks on palliative care with chapters on the elderly. They need doctors and nurses who are properly trained and educated in palliative care. In most countries in Europe this training and education is not provided. PMID:11810376

  16. [Geriatric day hospital: what evidence? A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Petermans, Jean; Velghe, Anja; Gillain, Daniel; Boman, Xavier; Van Den Noortgate, Nele

    2011-09-01

    A systematic review of the international literature concerning the organisation of the Geriatric Day Hospital (GDH) was performed. From 1987 till now, few papers were found describing the activity and the effectiveness of the GDH. All the studies comparing specific geriatric approaches to regular medicine demonstrate the efficiency of geriatric care, particularly the geriatric assessment. So, with a degree of evidence 1a, a better outcome is found for patients undergoing a geriatric assessment and intervention, compared to patients having no geriatric assessment at all. However, there is no evidence of benefit for the geriatric day hospital compared to patients treated in a geriatric ward or other location of geriatric care. Moreover, there is no clear consensus on the settings and activities of a geriatric day hospital. Terms as day unit, day hospital, day care, are used interchangeably and are not always covering the same activity. The same remark can be made on the exact composition of the geriatric multidisciplinary team and its role. However nurses and paramedical workers are always mentioned as all performing geriatric assessment. The diagnostic activities on the GDH are seldom described and studied. More information is available on rehabilitation activity, often developed in specific patient populations such as stroke patients, dementia patients, cardiac patients or patients with other chronic diseases. In this selected patient populations positive effects on outcome are shown in the GDH (level of evidence 1a). Another problem is the heterogeneity of the population. For scientific reason the GDH should focus on organising care for specific medical problems. Diseases as dementia, stroke, cardiac insufficiency, could be good models to investigate the efficiency of geriatric assessment and interventions within the setting of a GDH. PMID:21896433

  17. Emerging geriatric challenge.

    PubMed

    Dhar, H L

    2005-10-01

    India is a vast country with diversity, both physical and cultural. 72% of World's second largest population live in rural experiencing varying degrees of socioeconomic change. However, there is no nationwide registry of older people and exact statistics about elderly population is not available. Community-based data on morbidity and disability are also not available. India is one of the few countries in the world where men out number women at all ages till about 70 years and only in very old age (80+) there are more women than men. One of the main social effect of extension of life in later years is the extended period of widowhood for women mainly due to cultural practice of men marrying younger women and widow marriage as well as divorce are uncommon. Much progress has been made in the health care services in the last 50 years giving much emphasis to mother and child programme with special emphasis on controlling population. But elderly population has been neglected, there is no separate ward for elderly in hospitals, no specialized courses in the Universities for training doctors and nurses for elderly care. Recently, Indian Medical Association has organized an ambitious project for rural elderly with emphasis on Geriatric care. Still recently, emphasis has been given for developing infrastructural facilities including creating training, courses on Geriatric Medicine and integrating with alternative system for better care of elderly. However, due to increasing awareness of policy makers to multiple issues related to aging, some progress has been made like old age pension scheme, income tax rebate for elderly, old homes and day care centers and law to help retired citizens in evicting tenants etc. but environment is not as elderly-friendly as in European countries, as the State is not likely to have adequate resources in the presence of other priorities in the country. PMID:16459531

  18. Inclusion of geriatric nutrition in ADA-approved undergraduate programs.

    PubMed

    Shoaf, L R; Jensen, H M

    1989-09-01

    All ADA Plan IV programs were surveyed to determine whether geriatric nutrition was included in their curriculums. Of the 268 Plan IV programs, 66% responded. Less than one-fifth of the programs offered or planned to offer a specific geriatric nutrition course. An overview of geriatric nutrition occurred most frequently in a human nutrition course. A practicum/clinical experience or a course other than nutrition most frequently provided in-depth study, if such was available. Nursing homes and congregate meal sites were the primary locations for experiences with the geriatric population. Major activities with that age group included (a) taking diet histories, (b) making nutrition assessments, and (c) providing diet instruction. In some programs, didactic and experiential training with the geriatric population may not be adequate to prepare dietetic undergraduate students to meet the health care needs of that growing segment of society. PMID:2768741

  19. [Geriatrics: an absolute necessity].

    PubMed

    Oostvogel, F J

    1982-02-01

    The medical care for elderly people could be greatly improved. If no specific attention is paid immediately, namely through the various training courses and by way of further and part-time schooling, then this medical care will remain unsatisfactory. This situation worsens continually due to the growing number of elderly people and, within this group, a much higher rate of very aged people. Increasing the care in institutions is altogether unsatisfactory. The problem should be dealt with structurally and the emphasis placed upon prevention and early-diagnosis. There is an urgent need for an integrated method, keeping in mind the limits of the elderly person, from the physical, psychological and social aspects. This demands teamwork in a multidisciplinary system inside as well as outside the institutions. It demands a thorough knowledge of geriatrics based upon gerontology. Geriatricians are urgently needed in this development together with doctors in nursing homes, general practitioners and specialists, so that the necessary care may be established as quickly as possible. PMID:7101393

  20. Geriatric rehabilitation on an acute-care medical unit.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M F

    1984-09-01

    This study examined a geriatric rehabilitation pilot project on an acute-care medical unit. Over a 6-week period, using a 35-item geriatric rating scale and a mental assessment tool, changes in behaviours of 23 patients admitted to the geriatric rehabilitation module were compared to changes in behaviours of 10 elderly patients on a regular medical unit. The patients' demographic characteristics, their nursing and medical diagnoses, and discharge patterns were reviewed. Significant changes in behaviours of patients on the rehabilitation model included: increased ability to care for themselves, to maintain balance, and to communicate with others; decreased restlessness at night; decreased confusion; decreased incidence of incontinence; and improved social skills. The paper describes the geriatric rehabilitation programme and discusses implications for nursing of elderly patients in acute-care hospitals. PMID:6567647

  1. [The need for training in gerontology and geriatrics among the staff providing services at a geriatric care institution].

    PubMed

    Baerga Duperoy, Rachel; Castro Rojas, Nydia; Orta Rodríguez, Brenda; González Caraballo, Enid; Cruz González, Angel; Vázquez Fernández, José; Oliver Vázquez, Marlén

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and identify the basic training needs of nursing home staff, in terms of attitudes, knowledge and skills required to work effectively with geriatric patients. Three focus groups were performed, two groups of employees, and a group of elderly residents of the institution, in order to explore issues pertaining to the following topics: personal attributes required to work with geriatric patients, basic knowledge and skills needed to provide effective services. Group discussions were transcribed and themes were extracted through consensus reached by the investigators. Results indicated that the interviewed staff lack of formal preparation or continuing education in gerontology or geriatrics. Needs identified were the following: the aging process, caring behaviors, management of common health conditions, administration of medications, transference and mobility of residents, among others. Finding were use to design an educational program aimed in assisting nursing home staff in providing an effective service to their geriatric patients. PMID:12572242

  2. [Geriatrics - an interdisciplinary challenge].

    PubMed

    Nau, Roland; Djukic, Marija; Wappler, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    The care of elderly patients will continue to challenge the healthcare system over the next decades. As a rule geriatric patients suffer from multimorbidities with complex disease patterns, and the ability to cope with everyday life is severely reduced. Treatment is provided by a multiprofessional geriatric team, and the primary goal is improvement of functional status, quality of life in the social environment and autonomy by employing a holistic approach. In Germany geriatric care is provided by physicians from various medical specialties (e.g. general practitioners, internists, neurologists and psychiatrists). In the training for the subspecialty clinical geriatrics, these specialties enjoy equal rights. Recent efforts to establish a qualification as physician for internal medicine and geriatrics have initiated a discussion to make the suitability for qualification as a geriatrician dependent on the medical specialty. Geriatric patients benefit from multidisciplinary cooperation. Neurologists possess great expertise in the treatment of patients with dementia, depression, delirium, consequences of degenerative spinal cord diseases and vertebral bone fractures, stroke, Parkinson's syndrome, epileptic seizures, vertigo and dizziness, neuropathies, lesions of peripheral nerves and in the multimodal therapy of pain. To function in a position of responsibility in a geriatric department, neurologists need skills in general internal medicine. These are acquired either on a geriatric ward or during specialization as a neurologist by full time secondment to large neurological or interdisciplinary intensive care units. PMID:27167886

  3. [Interprofessionalism in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Mennel, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    A system for the coordinated care of elderly people in geriatrics was set up at Luxembourg general hospital. The creation of the short-stay geriatric unit resulted in a reorganisation which questioned the notions of team, cohesion and skill. This article describes the successful experience and the benefit it has brought patients. PMID:25137960

  4. At the End of the Rainbow, Is There Always a Pot of Gold?: Understanding the Labor and Fervor of Filipino Geriatric Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Ching, Maria Ivana D.; Chiong, Edwin Mark L.; Chua, Charlene C.; Chua, Jason Eimer P.; Dumalasa, Michelle C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Registered nurses (RNs) with specific knowledge and skills in the care of the aged are an important component in the delivery of quality health-care (Venturato, Kellet, & Windsor, 2006). These nurses experience both fervors of being in service and labor that challenge them, but which contribute to their provision of quality health care…

  5. Validation of the German version of the Nurse-Work Instability Scale: baseline survey findings of a prospective study of a cohort of geriatric care workers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A prospective study of a cohort of nursing staff from nursing homes was undertaken to validate the Nurse-Work Instability Scale (Nurse-WIS). Baseline investigation data was used to test reliability, construct validity and criterion validity. Method A survey of nursing staff from nursing homes was conducted using a questionnaire containing the Nurse-WIS along with other survey instruments (including SF-12, WAI, SPE). The self-reported number of days’ sick leave taken and if a pension for reduced work capacity was drawn were recorded. The reliability of the scale was checked by item difficulty (P), item discrimination (rjt) and by internal consistency according to Cronbach’s coefficient. The hypotheses for checking construct validity were tested on the basis of correlations. Pearson’s chi-square was used to test concurrent criterion validity; discriminant validity was tested by means of binary logistic regression. Results 396 persons answered the questionnaire (21.3% response rate). More than 80% were female and mostly work full-time in a rotating shift pattern. Following the test for item discrimination, two items were removed from the Nurse-WIS test. According to Cronbach’s (0.927) the scale provides a high degree of measuring accuracy. All hypotheses and assumptions used to test validity were confirmed: As the Nurse-WIS risk increases, health-related quality of life, work ability and job satisfaction decline. Depressive symptoms and a poor subjective prognosis of earning capacity are also more frequent. Musculoskeletal disorders and impairments of psychological well-being are more frequent. Age also influences the Nurse-WIS result. While 12.0% of those below the age of 35 had an increased risk, the figure for those aged over 55 was 50%. Conclusion This study is the first validation study of the Nurse-WIS to date. The Nurse-WIS shows good reliability, good validity and a good level of measuring accuracy. It appears to be suitable for recording

  6. A National Survey on the Current Status of Family Practice Residency Education in Geriatric Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ina; Arenson, Christine; Warshaw, Gregg; Bragg, Elizabeth; Shaull, Ruth; Counsell, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of family practice residency directors found that 92 percent have a required geriatrics curriculum; nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care are the predominant training sites; the mean number of geriatrics faculty is 2.6 per program; and conflicting time demands with other curricula was ranked as the most significant…

  7. [The geriatric university clinic].

    PubMed

    Stähelin, H B

    1995-01-01

    The very old are the fastest growing population group. Medical progress allows more autonomy and better quality of life for the elderly. Traditional medical concepts are, however, only partly suited for dealing with age-associated problems. Medical education responds to these new requirements in a limited way. Interdisciplinary teamwork is a prerequisite in treating the multimorbid, acutely ill elderly patient. The task of the university is not only the development and implementation of high-tech medicine, but first of all a comprehensive training in medicine, including geriatrics. The Geriatric University Clinic therefore offers pre- and postgraduate training in geriatrics, but also in related disciplines by promoting teaching and research. In order to attain these goals, the geriatric acute ward was created for acutely ill, very old, multimorbid, frail elderly patients. A geriatric ward for rehabilitation complements this ward. A consultation service offers geriatric know-how to all other services. A special task is the early diagnosis and treatment of dementia in an outpatient service. The aim is to prevent chronification by early intervention and to reestablish satisfactory function and autonomy. PMID:7780809

  8. Current Trends in Geriatric Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Joseph H; Magauran, Brendan G; Olshaker, Jonathan S; Shankar, Kalpana N

    2016-08-01

    The number of geriatric visits to United States emergency departments continues to rise. This article reviews demographics, statistics, and future projections in geriatric emergency medicine. Included are discussions of US health care spending, geriatric emergency departments, prehospital care, frailty of geriatric patients, delirium, geriatric trauma, geriatric screening and prediction tools, medication safety, long-term care, and palliative care. PMID:27475008

  9. Geriatric Knowledge and Educational Needs among Rural Health Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Gainor, Sara Jane; Pollard, Cecil; Spencer, S. Melinda

    2003-01-01

    In a needs assessment of 84 rural health care professionals (44.1% physicians, 15.5% pharmacists, 14.3% nurses, 26.1% other), 39% considered their geriatrics knowledge above average. They were interested in learning more about Alzheimer's/dementia, medication use, and adverse effects. Preferred methods were videotapes, CD-ROM, and an…

  10. Geriatric Medical Education in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibovitz, Arthur; Baumoehl, Yehuda; Habot, Beni

    2004-01-01

    In this article we will focus on geriatric medical education in Israel and will review our experience in this field. A coordinated effort of the Ministry of Health and the Israeli Medical Association led to the establishment of a modern geriatric system and to the recognition of geriatrics as a medical specialty in the early 1980s. All four…

  11. [Advances in geriatric cardiology].

    PubMed

    Gómez Sánchez, Miguel A; Bañuelos de Lucas, Camino; Ribera Casado, José M; Pérez Casar, Feliciano

    2006-01-01

    The continued aging of the population is an acknowledged fact. The proportion of individuals in the European Union aged over 65 years will reach 29.9% by 2050, almost double the present figure of 16.4%. Approximately one third of people in this age-group has clinically significant cardiovascular disease. Physicians dealing with cardiology in older patients have to be aware of the specific clinical and prognostic features of cardiovascular disease in the elderly, and with its treatment. Consequently, it is clear that continuing medical education in geriatric cardiology is essential, and that is one of the tasks of the Working Group on Geriatric Cardiology. This special issue provides a magnificent opportunity for presenting an update on important topics in geriatric cardiology, such as the aging of the cardiovascular system, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. PMID:16540026

  12. Telepsychiatry and geriatric care.

    PubMed

    Jones, B N

    2001-02-01

    The use of telecommunications--telephone, computer, videoconferencing equipment--to provide mental health services at a distance has grown rapidly. This review encompasses reports from programs that provide telepsychiatry services, including telephone- and computer- based education and support services, telephone screening for dementia, and the use of videoconferencing to provide psychiatric consultations, health education, and administrative support. The extensive experience to date supports the value of telepsychiatry. Applications in geriatric settings and research involving geriatric subjects are reviewed. Cost analyses and economic evaluations of telepsychiatry are preliminary at this time and need further refinement. There is great potential for using telecommunications to expand access to mental health services to underserved geriatric populations. PMID:11177756

  13. Nutraceuticals for geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan

    2014-01-01

    Geriatrics is a medical practice that addresses the complex needs of older patients and emphasizes maintaining functional independence even in the presence of chronic disease. Treatment of geriatric patients requires a different strategy and is very complex. Geriatric medicines aim to promote health by preventing and treating diseases and disabilities in older adults. Development of effective dietary interventions for promoting healthy aging is an active but challenging area of research because aging is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease, disability, and death. Aging populations are a global phenomenon. The most widespread conditions affecting older people are hypertension, congestive heart failure, dementia, osteoporosis, breathing problems, cataract, and diabetes to name a few. Decreased immunity is also partially responsible for the increased morbidity and mortality resulting from infectious agents in the elderly. Nutritional status is one of the chief variables that explains differences in both the incidence and pathology of infection. Elderly people are at increased risk for micronutrient deficiencies due to a variety of factors including social, physical, economic, and emotional obstacles to eating. Thus there is an urgent need to shift priorities to increase our attention on ways to prevent chronic illnesses associated with aging. Individually, people must put increased efforts into establishing healthy lifestyle practices, including consuming a more healthful diet. The present review thus focuses on the phytochemicals of nutraceutical importance for the geriatric population. PMID:26151003

  14. Nutraceuticals for geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan

    2015-01-01

    Geriatrics is a medical practice that addresses the complex needs of older patients and emphasizes maintaining functional independence even in the presence of chronic disease. Treatment of geriatric patients requires a different strategy and is very complex. Geriatric medicines aim to promote health by preventing and treating diseases and disabilities in older adults. Development of effective dietary interventions for promoting healthy aging is an active but challenging area of research because aging is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease, disability, and death. Aging populations are a global phenomenon. The most widespread conditions affecting older people are hypertension, congestive heart failure, dementia, osteoporosis, breathing problems, cataract, and diabetes to name a few. Decreased immunity is also partially responsible for the increased morbidity and mortality resulting from infectious agents in the elderly. Nutritional status is one of the chief variables that explains differences in both the incidence and pathology of infection. Elderly people are at increased risk for micronutrient deficiencies due to a variety of factors including social, physical, economic, and emotional obstacles to eating. Thus there is an urgent need to shift priorities to increase our attention on ways to prevent chronic illnesses associated with aging. Individually, people must put increased efforts into establishing healthy lifestyle practices, including consuming a more healthful diet. The present review thus focuses on the phytochemicals of nutraceutical importance for the geriatric population. PMID:26151003

  15. American Geriatrics Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Membership Contact Us Site Map About Us Health Care Professionals Advocacy Public Policy Public Education Featured "If you were asked to describe geriatrics using just three words, what would they be?" Now you can wear your words with ... Shop today! New Editorial & Virtual ...

  16. The portal of geriatrics online education: a 21st-century resource for teaching geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Leipzig, Rosanne M; Howe, Carol L; Sauvigne, Karen; Usiak, Craig; Soriano, Rainier P

    2015-02-01

    The way students are taught and evaluated is changing, with greater emphasis on flexible, individualized, learner-centered education, including the use of technology. The goal of assessment is also shifting from what students know to how they perform in practice settings. Developing educational materials for teaching in these ways is time-consuming and can be expensive. The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education (POGOe) was developed to aid educators in meeting these needs and become quicker, better-prepared teachers of geriatrics. POGOe contains more than 950 geriatrics educational materials that faculty at 45% of allopathic and 7% of osteopathic U.S. medical schools and the Centers for Geriatric Nursing Excellence have created. These materials include various instructional and assessment methodologies, including virtual and standardized patients, games, tutorials, case-based teaching, self-directed learning, and traditional lectures. Materials with common goals and resource types are available as selected educational series. Learner assessments comprise approximately 10% of the educational materials. POGOe also includes libraries of videos, images, and questions extracted from its educational materials to encourage educators to repurpose content components to create new resources and to align their teaching better with their learners' needs. Web-Geriatric Education Modules, a peer-reviewed online modular curriculum for medical students, is a prime example of this repurposing. The existence of a robust compendium of instructional and assessment materials allows educators to concentrate more on improving learner performance in practice and not simply on knowledge acquisition. It also makes it easier for nongeriatricians to teach the care of older adults in their respective disciplines. PMID:25644187

  17. An international definition for "nursing home".

    PubMed

    Sanford, Angela M; Orrell, Martin; Tolson, Debbie; Abbatecola, Angela Marie; Arai, Hidenori; Bauer, Juergen M; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Dong, Birong; Ga, Hyuk; Goel, Ashish; Hajjar, Ramzi; Holmerova, Iva; Katz, Paul R; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Rolland, Yves; Visvanathan, Renuka; Woo, Jean; Morley, John E; Vellas, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    There is much ambiguity regarding the term "nursing home" in the international literature. The definition of a nursing home and the type of assistance provided in a nursing home is quite varied by country. The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics and AMDA foundation developed a survey to assist with an international consensus on the definition of "nursing home." PMID:25704126

  18. The Geriatrics in Primary Care Demonstration: Integrating Comprehensive Geriatric Care into the Medical Home: Preliminary Data.

    PubMed

    Engel, Peter A; Spencer, Jacqueline; Paul, Todd; Boardman, Judith B

    2016-04-01

    Three thousand nine hundred thirty-one veterans aged 75 and older receive primary care (PC) in two large practices of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Boston Healthcare System. Cognitive and functional disabilities are endemic in this group, creating needs that predictably exceed available or appropriate resources. To address this problem, Geriatrics in Primary Care (GPC) embeds geriatric services directly into primary care. An on-site consulting geriatrician and geriatric nurse care manager work directly with PC colleagues in medicine, nursing, social work, pharmacy, and mental health within the VA medical home. This design delivers interdisciplinary geriatric care within PC that emphasizes comprehensive evaluations, care management, planned transitions, informed resource use, and a shift in care focus from multiple subspecialties to PC. Four hundred thirty-five veterans enrolled during the project's 4-year course. Complex, fragmented care was evident in a series of 50 individuals (aged 82 ± 7) enrolled during Months 1 to 6. The year before, these individuals made 372 medical or surgical subspecialty clinic visits (7.4 ± 9.8); 34% attended five or more subspecialty clinics, 48% had dementia, and 18% lacked family caregivers. During the first year after enrollment the mean number of subspecialty clinic visits declined significantly (4.7 ± 5.0, P = .01), whereas the number of PC-based visits remained stable (3.1 ± 1.5 and 3.3 ± 1.5, respectively, P = .50). Telephone contact by GPC (2.3 ± 2.0) and collaboration with PC clinicians replaced routine follow-up geriatric care. GPC facilitated planned transitions to rehabilitation centers (n = 5), home hospice (n = 2), dementia units (n = 3), and home care (n = 37). GPC provides efficient, comprehensive geriatric care and case management while preserving established relationships between patients and the PC team. Preliminary results suggest "care defragmentation," as reflected by a

  19. Applying comprehensive geriatric assessment to investigate falls.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Geraldine

    2016-04-01

    This is the second article in a short series that presents case study examples of the use of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) in different clinical settings. CGA is a holistic assessment model designed to determine frail older people's medical and mental health status, as well as functional, social and environmental issues. When applied by nurses, it can enable individualised planning for health, safety and wellbeing. This article presents the case of an older man who had a three-month history of falls. After his most recent fall he was admitted to an emergency department, where examination identified no significant abnormal pathology, and subsequently to a nurse-led older person's clinic. The article describes how a CGA approach was adopted to assess the man, establish an underlying diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, and develop a personalised care plan to address immediate falls risk and long-term planning. PMID:27029990

  20. [COMPREHENSIVE GERIATRIC ASSESSMENT SCALES].

    PubMed

    Casado Verdejo, Inés; Postigo Mota, Salvador; Muñoz Bermejo, Laura; Vallejo Villalobos, José Ramón; Arrabal Léon, Nazaret; Pinto Montealegre, Jose Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The process of comprehensive geriatric assessment is one of the key elements of geriatric care management aimed at the population. it includes evaluating the clinical, functional, mental and social aspects of aging result and/or pathological processes that appear at this stage of the life cycle. For their achievement, as well as other tools, professionals have a large number of validated rating scales specifically designed in the assessment of the different areas or fields. Its use can be very useful, especially for the objectification of evaluation results. The future of research in this area goes through deepening the adequacy of the scales to the characteristics and needs of older people in each care level or place of care. PMID:26996044

  1. Origins of British geriatrics.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, T. H.

    1976-01-01

    We may see from the foregoing account that British physicians have played a major part in the history of geriatric medicine. Other countries have no counterpart to J H Sheldon of Wolverhampton, whose work on the social medicine of old age was so fundamental, or George Adams of Belfast, to whom we owe such a debt of knowledge about cerebrovascular disease in the aged, or to Marjory Warren and the other pioneers mentioned above. Long may this tradition continue. PMID:785477

  2. Academic geriatrics in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chek Hooi; Landefeld, C Seth

    2011-11-01

    Singapore is one of the fastest-aging countries in the world. The proportion of adults aged 65 and older is projected to increase from 8.7% to 20% over the next 20 years. The country has developed various strategies to meet the needs of this increase in older adults. There is an acute shortage of geriatricians and a need to train more healthcare workers to care for older adults. Geriatric medicine is a relatively new specialty, and a small number of geriatricians have been tasked with providing an increasing load of clinical service, education, and research. Hence, there is a need to develop a cohesive structure of support for faculty development and retention, advanced specialty trainee recruitment, leadership in medical education, research, and clinical service to care for the rapidly aging population. In addition, geriatric medicine is primarily a hospital-based specialty in Singapore. There is still opportunity to collaborate and improve the academic and practice integration of geriatric medicine into primary care and intermediate and long-term care where it is most needed. PMID:22091794

  3. [Urosepsis in Geriatric Patients].

    PubMed

    Heppner, H J; Yapan, F; Wiedemann, A

    2016-02-01

    Due to the demographic shift, increasing numbers of geriatric patients are admitted to acute care hospitals of all levels of care. This means that special challenges must be met in the medical care and management of these patients.Immunosenescence and multimorbidity make elderly patients vulnerable to infectious diseases. Urinary tract infections range from "simple" cystitis to pyelonephritis and urosepsis and, at 25%, are the second most common form of infection in geriatric patients. It is often difficult to make a diagnosis because typical symptoms do not always occur. Urosepsis, a hyperactive and uncontrolled immune response of the organism due to exogenous damage, is based on bacterial infection of the urogenital tract. Urinary retention, immunosuppressive medication, malignancy, diabetes mellitus and renal or prostatic processes promote the risk for urosepsis. Complicated urosepsis additionally comprises a structural or functional abnormality, including ureteral obstruction. Risk factors for urosepsis are urinary incontinence, an indwelling urinary catheter, hydronephrosis or ureteral calculi. Patients suffering from diabetes mellitus are also at a higher risk for urosepsis. When diagnosing elderly patients, one has to consider that the classic symptoms can be masked by multimorbidity, or septic encephalopathy and acute confusion (delirium) may be the only symptoms. Body temperature is lower in elderly patients and does not necessarily rise to 38°C or more in the acute phase. In patients older than 75 years who are suspicious for sepsis, temperatures as low as 37.4°C should be rated as fever. Treatment of urosepsis basically includes clearing the focus, antimicrobial treatment, stabilisation of circulation and replacement of failed organ functions. Initial empiric antibiotic treatment, depending on local resistance, should be done with acylaminopenicilline and beta-lactamase inhibitors (e. g. piperacillin/combactam or tazobactam or group 3 cephalosporins

  4. Factors That Impact Registered Nurses' Decisions to Continue Providing Care to Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosfield, Saundra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if there is a significant difference in the following: (a) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics between age groups (those over 40 years of age and those under 40 years of age); (b) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics and personality traits; (c) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics…

  5. Do Geriatricians Stay in Geriatrics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Uday; Aung, Myo; Chan, Susanna; Wolfklein, Gisele

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate whether formally trained geriatricians remain in the field of Geriatrics, and to determine their job satisfaction and perceived quality of life, we surveyed the 107 fellows trained over the last 25 years in one accredited geriatric program. Of the 88 physicians who consented to participate, 75% devoted at least half of their practice…

  6. Geriatric assessment teams.

    PubMed

    Campbell, L J; Cole, K D

    1987-02-01

    In geriatric care, a form of teamwork is the recommended modality because of the complex biopsychosocial needs of the patient. The goal of geriatric assessment programs is to establish an intensive assessment of older adults which requires the competencies of several coordinated disciplines. Not only do teams have the capacity to assess patients in much greater depth but also patients share different information with different providers. The composition of the team is dictated by the needs of the patient population in accordance with resources available. Next, one must identify a method of team practice in order for interactions to take place. The method of functioning determines what kind of team it is, ranging from independent functioning with minimal formal interfacing to interdependent activity interspersed with formal and informal interactions. In initiating a geriatric assessment program, one needs to determine which tasks demand interdisciplinary collaboration, which require interdisciplinary consultation, and which can be performed using a matrix or extended team model. In this model, the core team is supplemented by other disciplines as determined by the team, predicated on patient problems. Teams can profit from training, which can help with choosing an appropriate model, establishing a manual of procedure, and managing interactive issues and problems. This can occur early in the team's formation, or when a team takes on new members. The minimal level of team development would include establishing program goals, delineating professional responsibilities and roles, and implementing a system for exchanging and documenting information about patient plans. Saving input to share only in team meeting is inefficient, so health care teams need to recognize the importance of informal interchanges. It is still a matter of conjecture about what team works best with which patients under what circumstances or conditions. Multiple randomized clinical trials with teams

  7. [Antipsychotics in geriatric institutions].

    PubMed

    Szulik, Judith

    2007-01-01

    The present paper approaches the use of antipsychotics in elder people in general, and particularly in geriatric institutions. During the last few years, prescription of antipsychotics in geriatric institutions increased, especially because of the availability of the atypicals, and their use was extended beyond the indications these drugs had been approved for. In dementia they are suggested for treatment of behavioral symptoms, despite having been approved only for cases of aggressiveness and risk of damage. There is a common tendency of perpetuating antipsychotic medication in elder people, with its consequent collateral effects as well. Few years ago, the increase of both risk of cerebrovascular events and of mortality in dementia patients treated with atypical agents was noticed. This generated controversy regarding their use in those kind of patients. Diverse factors associated to caregivers affect the decision of prescribing an antipsychotic in elder people. Non-pharmacological interventions are the first choice when treating behavioral symptoms; pharmacological interventions must take place with the lowest doses possible, with limited durations. PMID:18273435

  8. Improving Rural Geriatric Care Through Education: A Scalable, Collaborative Project.

    PubMed

    Buck, Harleah G; Kolanowski, Ann; Fick, Donna; Baronner, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Improving Rural Geriatric Care Through Education: A Scalable, Collaborative Project," found on pages 306-313, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until June 30, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Describe the unique nursing challenges that occur in caring for older adults in rural areas. Discuss the

  9. GRAMPS: An Automated Ambulatory Geriatric Record

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Kenric W.; King, Carol A.; Date, Vishvanath V.; Prather, Robert J.; Loo, Lawrence; Siddiqui, Khwaja

    1988-01-01

    GRAMPS (Geriatric Record and Multidisciplinary Planning System) is an interactive MUMPS system developed for VA outpatient use. It allows physicians to effectively document care in problem-oriented format with structured narrative and free text, eliminating handwritten input. We evaluated the system in a one-year controlled cohort study. When the computer, was used, appointment times averaged 8.2 minutes longer (32.6 vs. 24.4 minutes) compared to control visits with the same physicians. Computer use was associated with better quality of care as measured in the management of a common problem, hypertension, as well as decreased overall costs of care. When a faster computer was installed, data entry times improved, suggesting that slower processing had accounted for a substantial portion of the observed difference in appointment lengths. The GRAMPS system was well-accepted by providers. The modular design used in GRAMPS has been extended to medical-care applications in Nursing and Mental Health.

  10. Spirituality in geriatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Puchalski, Christina M

    2015-05-01

    This article presents an overview of spirituality as an essential domain of geriatrics palliative care, and provides guidelines for clinicians to diagnose spiritual distress and to integrate spirituality into their clinical practice. PMID:25920059

  11. Teaching Programs in Geriatric Optometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbloom, Albert A.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a survey of U.S. and Canadian optometry programs concerning curriculum design, clinical and residency training programs, continuing education, and research projects planned or under way in geriatric optometry are presented and discussed. (MSE)

  12. Vital links. Hospital's geriatric program integrates the spectrum of care.

    PubMed

    Holt, T

    1989-06-01

    In July 1988 St. Mary Medical Center (SMMC), Long Beach, CA, established Older Adult Services (OAS) to help the elderly of the community. At the time, SMMC was already providing a number of services for the elderly, but OAS enables it to provide a continuum of care. In addition, the medical staff committee developing the geriatric program recommended establishing a geriatric assessment team headed by a fellowship-trained geriatrician, having that geriatrician serve as medical director of the inpatient skilled nursing facility (SNF), having the geriatric team develop treatment protocols in various aspects of care, and extending OAS within the community. The categories of service within the continuum are extended care, acute care, ambulatory care, home care, outreach, wellness, and housing. SMMC does not directly provide all services; rather, through integrating mechanisms, it uses community-based services or services provided by other institutions to meet some patient needs. A key element to integrating the continuum is the involvement of OAS in the SNF. The SNF medical director can bring the expertise of the geriatric assessment team to a wide sphere of the medical community. This sphere of influence quickly spreads to the hospital's entire medical community. Through direct participation in utilization review and quality assurance in the SNF, the OAS director can influence the quality of care. PMID:10293329

  13. Incorporating Geriatric Medicine Providers into the Care of the Older Adult with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Allison; Canin, Beverly; van Londen, G J; Edwards, Beatrice; Bakalarski, Pamela; Parker, Ira

    2016-11-01

    A significant proportion of cancer patients and survivors are age 65 and over. Older adults with cancer often have more complex medical and social needs than their younger counterparts. Geriatric medicine providers (GMPs) such as geriatricians, geriatric-trained advanced practice providers, and geriatric certified registered nurses have expertise in caring for older adults, managing complex medical situations, and optimizing function and independence for this population. GMPs are not routinely incorporated into cancer care for older adults; however, their particular skill set may add benefit at many points along the cancer care continuum. In this article, we review the role of geriatric assessment in the care of older cancer patients, highlight specific case scenarios in which GMPs may offer additional understanding and insight in the care of older adults with cancer, and discuss specific mechanisms for incorporating GMPs into oncology care. PMID:27613166

  14. Trauma in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Cathy A

    2015-06-01

    Injury in older adults is a looming public health crisis. This article provides a broad overview of geriatric trauma across the continuum of care. After a review of the epidemiology of geriatric trauma, optimal approaches to patient care are presented for triage and transport, trauma team activation and initial assessment, inpatient management, and injury prevention. Special emphasis is given to assessment of frailty, advanced care planning, and transitions of care. PMID:25981722

  15. Nurses' Learning Experiences with the Kinaesthetics Care Concept Training in a Nursing Home: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fringer, André; Huth, Martina; Hantikainen, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    In geriatric care, movement support skills of nurses are often limited, resulting in unnecessary functional decline of older adult residents and physical strain of nurses. Kinaesthetics training aims to improve movement competences of nurses and residents. The aim of this qualitative descriptive study is to describe nursing teams' experience with…

  16. Mobilizing gerontological nursing education: The GNEC Podcast Project.

    PubMed

    Aselage, Melissa

    2010-07-01

    Capturing baccalaureate nursing student interest in gerontological nursing content can be challenging. Using technology, a joint project based on the Geriatric Nursing Education Consortium (GNEC) modules produced podcasts focused on nine major topics of care for older adults: atypical presentation, cancer, critical thinking, dementia, diabetes, geriatric resources, heart disease, intensive care, and interdisciplinary teams. Each podcast lays a foundation of content for faculty to build on in the classroom and at the bedside. PMID:20608595

  17. Geriatric dentistry education in European dental schools.

    PubMed

    Preshaw, P M; Mohammad, A R

    2005-05-01

    As the numbers of elderly adults continue to grow within European populations, the need for dental students to be trained in the management of geriatric patients becomes increasingly important. Many dental schools have developed training programmes in geriatric dentistry in response to the changing oral health needs of older adults. The purpose of this on-line survey was to identify the current status of geriatric dentistry education in European dental schools. A questionnaire relating to the teaching of geriatric dentistry was posted on the Internet, and 194 dental schools in 34 European countries were invited to participate. Data from completed questionnaires were submitted to the investigators via email from 82 schools in 27 countries (42% response rate). Thirty-six percent of schools offered a specific geriatric dentistry course that included didactic teaching or seminar groups, 21% taught geriatric dentistry by means of organised presentations in the curriculum, and 36% taught the subject by occasional lectures. 7% of schools did not teach geriatric dentistry at all. A clinical component to the geriatric dentistry curriculum was reported by 61% of schools and 18% reported operating a specific geriatric dentistry clinic within the school. Of those providing clinical geriatric dentistry training, it was provided within the school in 45% of cases, with a further 29% of schools providing training both within the school and at a remote location. Seven percent of schools operated a mobile dental clinic for treating geriatric patients. Twenty-eight percent of schools had a geriatric programme director or a chairman of a geriatric section and 39% indicated that they plan to extend the teaching of geriatric dentistry in the future. Geriatric dental education has clearly established itself in the curricula of European dental schools although the format of teaching the subject varies widely. It is of concern that geriatric dentistry was not taught at all in 7% of schools

  18. Hartford Gerontological Nursing Leaders: From Funding Initiative to National Organization.

    PubMed

    Van Cleave, Janet H; Szanton, Sarah L; Shillam, Casey; Rose, Karen; Rao, Aditi D; Perez, Adriana; O'Connor, Melissa; Walker, Rachel; Buron, Bill; Boltz, Marie; Bellot, Jennifer; Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    In 2000, the John A. Hartford Foundation established the Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Program initiative, acknowledging nursing's key role in the care of the growing population of older adults. This program has supported 249 nurse scientists with pre- and postdoctoral awards. As a result of the program's success, several Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Program awardees formed an alumni organization to continue to advance the quality care of older adults. This group of Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Program awardees joined others receiving support from the John A. Hartford Foundation nursing initiatives to grow a formal organization, the Hartford Gerontological Nursing Leaders (HGNL). The purpose of this article is to present the development, accomplishments, and challenges of the HGNL, informing other professional nursing organizations that are experiencing similar accomplishments and challenges. This article also demonstrates the power of a funding initiative to grow an organization dedicated to impact gerontological health and health care through research, practice, education, and policy. PMID:26802588

  19. A Graduate Nursing Curriculum for the Evaluation and Management of Urinary Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogalski, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Geriatric nurse practitioners should be educated in the evaluation and treatment of common geriatric syndromes like urinary incontinence. However, many advanced-practice nursing programs do not place an educational emphasis on urinary incontinence management. The purpose of this project is to provide information that supports the need for…

  20. Models of Care in Geriatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, A.; Dale, W.; Mohile, S.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is common in older adults and the approach to cancer treatment and supportive measures in this age group is continuously evolving. Incorporating geriatric assessment (GA) into the care of the older patient with cancer has been shown to be feasible and predictive of outcomes, and there are unique aspects of the traditional geriatric domains that can be considered in this population. Geriatric assessment-guided interventions can also be developed to support patients during their treatment course. There are several existing models of incorporating geriatrics into oncology care, including a consultative geriatric assessment, geriatrician “embedded” within an oncology clinic and primary management by a dual-trained geriatric oncologist. Although a geriatrician or geriatric oncologist leads the geriatric assessment, is it truly a multidisciplinary assessment, and often includes evaluation by a physical therapist, occupational therapist, pharmacist, social worker and nutritionist. PMID:25587518

  1. Effects of a Geriatrics Interdisciplinary Experience on Learners' Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, James T.; Williams, Brent C.; Halter, Jeffrey B.; Remington, Tami L.; Foulk, Mariko A.; Persky, Neal W.; Shay, Barbara R.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the impact of an interdisciplinary training program on knowledge and attitudes of learners from four health care programs: medicine, pharmacy, social work, and nursing. Sixty-two learners participated in a 4-day educational program (one day each week for 4 weeks) focusing on interdisciplinary geriatric care. After completing…

  2. Geriatric Foot Care: A Model Educational Program for Mid-Level Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggs, Patricia K.; Krissak, Ruth; Caruso, Frank; Teasdall, Robert

    2002-01-01

    An educational program on geriatric foot care was completed by 59 nurse practitioners, 12 physicians' assistants, and 1 physician. The 3 1/2 day program included interactive sessions, observation, and hands-on patient care. Posttest results and 6-month follow-up showed significant knowledge increases and incorporation of learning into practice.…

  3. [Geriatric Authority of Holyoke Workplace Literacy Project.] Final Report. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This final report documents the development of a workplace literacy program for 100 employees of the Geriatric Authority of Holyoke, Massachusetts (GAH), a major nonprofit nursing home and rehabilitation facility. It describes how GAH employees received instruction in English as a Second Language, adult basic education, and General Educational…

  4. 28 CFR 2.78 - Geriatric parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Geriatric parole. 2.78 Section 2.78... Geriatric parole. (a) Upon receipt of a report from the institution in which the prisoner is confined that a... Commission shall determine whether or not to release the prisoner on geriatric parole. Release on...

  5. 28 CFR 2.78 - Geriatric parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Geriatric parole. 2.78 Section 2.78... Geriatric parole. (a) Upon receipt of a report from the institution in which the prisoner is confined that a... Commission shall determine whether or not to release the prisoner on geriatric parole. Release on...

  6. 28 CFR 2.78 - Geriatric parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Geriatric parole. 2.78 Section 2.78... Geriatric parole. (a) Upon receipt of a report from the institution in which the prisoner is confined that a... Commission shall determine whether or not to release the prisoner on geriatric parole. Release on...

  7. 28 CFR 2.78 - Geriatric parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Geriatric parole. 2.78 Section 2.78... Geriatric parole. (a) Upon receipt of a report from the institution in which the prisoner is confined that a... Commission shall determine whether or not to release the prisoner on geriatric parole. Release on...

  8. FUNCTIONAL NEUROIMAGING IN GERIATRIC DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, Faith M.; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Abnormalities in specific cerebral networks likely confer vulnerability that increases the susceptibility for development of geriatric depression and impact the course of symptoms. Functional neuroimaging enables the in vivo identification of alterations in cerebral function that not only characterize disease vulnerability, but also may contribute to variability in depressive symptoms and antidepressant response. Judicious use of functional neuroimaging tools can advance pathophysiological models of geriatric depression. Furthermore, due to the age-related vulnerability of specific brain systems that have been implicated in mood disorders, geriatric depression provides a logical context within which to study the role of specific functional abnormalities in both antidepressant response and key behavioral and cognitive abnormalities of mood disorders. PMID:21536165

  9. Neuromodulation therapies for geriatric depression.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Verònica; Ho, Kerrie-Anne; Alonzo, Angelo; Martin, Donel; George, Duncan; Loo, Colleen K

    2015-07-01

    Depression is frequent in old age and its prognosis is poorer than in younger populations. The use of pharmacological treatments in geriatric depression is limited by specific pharmacodynamic age-related factors that can diminish tolerability and increase the risk of drug interactions. The possibility of modulating cerebral activity using brain stimulation techniques could result in treating geriatric depression more effectively while reducing systemic side effects and medication interactions. This may subsequently improve treatment adherence and overall prognosis in the older patient. Among clinically available neuromodulatory techniques, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains the gold standard for the treatment of severe depression in the elderly. Studies have proven that ECT is more effective and has a faster onset of action than antidepressants in the treatment of severe, unipolar, geriatric depression and that older age is a predictor of rapid ECT response and remission. The application of novel and more tolerable forms of ECT for geriatric depression is currently being examined. Preliminary results suggest that right unilateral ultrabrief ECT (RUL-UB ECT) is a promising intervention, with similar efficacy to brief-pulse ECT and fewer adverse cognitive effects. Overall findings in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) suggest that it is a safe intervention in geriatric depression. Higher rTMS stimulation intensity and more treatments may need to be given in the elderly to achieve optimal results. There is no specific data on vagus nerve stimulation in the elderly. Transcranial direct current stimulation, magnetic seizure therapy and deep brain stimulation are currently experimental, and more data from geriatric samples is needed. PMID:25995098

  10. Geriatric assessment for oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz; Holmes, Holly M.; Shahrokni, Armin

    2015-01-01

    The world is experiencing aging of its population. Age-specific incidence rates of cancer are higher and cancer is now recognized as a part of aging. Treating older patients can be challenging. The clinical behavior of some tumors changes with age and the aging process itself brings physiological changes leading to decline in the function of organs. It is essential to identify those patients with longer life expectancy, potentially more likely to benefit from aggressive treatment vs. those that are more vulnerable to adverse outcomes. A primary determination when considering therapy for an older cancer patient is a patient’s physiologic, rather than chronologic age. In order to differentiate amongst patients of the same age, it is useful to determine if a patient is fit or frail. Frail older adults have multiple chronic conditions and difficulties maintaining independence. They may be more vulnerable to therapy toxicities, and may not have substantial lasting benefits from therapy. Geriatric assessment (GA) may be used as a tool to determine reversible deficits and devise treatment strategies to mitigate such deficits. GA is also used in treatment decision making by clinicians, helping to risk stratify patients prior to potentially high-risk therapy. An important practical aspect of GA is the feasibility of incorporating it into a busy oncology practice. Key considerations in performing the GA include: available resources, patient population, GA tools to use, and who will be responsible for using the GA results and develop care plans. Challenges in implementing GA in clinical practice will be discussed. PMID:26779363

  11. American Geriatrics Society/Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs curricular milestones for graduating geriatric fellows.

    PubMed

    Parks, Susan M; Harper, G Michael; Fernandez, Helen; Sauvigne, Karen; Leipzig, Rosanne M

    2014-05-01

    This article describes the curricular milestones for geriatric fellows and the process used to develop them. The curricular milestones were developed to determine what every graduating geriatric fellow should be able to demonstrate to ensure that they will be able to practice effectively and safely in all care settings and with different older adult populations. Three major domains were identified: Caring for the Elderly Patient, Systems-Based Care for Elder Patients, and Geriatric Syndromes. Six hundred thirty-five geriatricians each reviewed and commented on one domain. These geriatricians represented important stakeholder groups: geriatric fellowship program directors; Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs (ADGAP) members, who are primarily geriatric program and fellowship directors; the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and ADGAP Education Committee; the AGS Teacher's Section; Geriatric Academic Career Award awardees; and through the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Family Medicine, board-certified geriatricians who spend more than 50% of their time in clinical practice. The AGS and ADGAP boards approved the final set of 76 Geriatric Curricular Milestones, which were posted on the Portal of Geriatric Online Education in December 2012. These curricular milestones are intended to assist geriatric fellowship directors as they develop curricula and assessments to inform program director reporting to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the Next Accreditation System, which begins in July 2014. PMID:24749808

  12. How Much is Geriatric Caregivers Burnout Caring-Specific? Questions from a Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Cocco, Ennio

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Background and Aims: Research dealing with occupational strain and burnout in geriatric care is generally focused on the behavioral problems of the patient and/or the psychological traits or attitudes of the carers rather than on organizational functionality. This paper describes data from a survey of all geriatric professions, using the Stressful Events Questionnaire (SEQ), a tool that takes into account multiple dimensions that can affect the genesis of burnout, including the patient, the geriatric health care professional, and the health care organization. The aim of this study is to compare patterns of answers among different roles in geriatric care. Method: Patterns of SEQ answers are described for the entire sample as well as for workers experiencing burnout and for each caring profession investigated: certified nursing assistants (CNAs), registered nurses and physicians/psychologists. Results; In general, carers refer more often as stressful the facility-related events; the only exception is that CNAs working in general hospital geriatric wards refer most often as stressful the patient-related events. The self-related events area seems to have a great importance for all professions. Discussion: The specificity of gerontological burnout has to be discussed, to better define the role played by caring problems, including psychological attitudes of carers versus the role played by the institution and by the social situation of each worker. For CNAs, the interaction between educational background and the length of time spent as a CNA seems to be a critical topic. PMID:20835358

  13. Early Walking of Geriatric Amputees

    PubMed Central

    Devas, M. B.

    1971-01-01

    After amputation geriatric patients have been enabled to get up and walk with the help of a prosthesis, an “early walking aid.” The physiotherapist measures the patient, fits the early walking aid, and instructs him in walking. The prosthesis is simple to make, easy to apply, and allows early walking with the use of a walking frame or sticks. Thus the geriatric amputee can walk as soon after operation as his general condition allows and the surgeon wishes. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:5100378

  14. Supervisory Skills for Geriatric Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Frank W.

    Designed for training supervisors in nursing centers, this publication presents three units of study: (1) getting along with people in nursing centers, (2) supervision in nursing centers, and (3) communication in nursing centers. Each unit contains five types of material on separate, removable sheets: (1) sheets with unit objectives and suggested…

  15. Teaching interdisciplinary geriatrics ambulatory care: a case study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brent C; Remington, Tami L; Foulk, Mariko A; Whall, Ann L

    2006-01-01

    Interdisciplinary health care training is advocated by numerous government and philanthropic organizations. Educators in the health professions are increasingly offering training in interdisciplinary health care in a variety of contexts, including ambulatory settings. This paper describes a three-year program to teach skills in interdisciplinary care to learners from internal medicine, social work, pharmacy, and nursing in a geriatrics clinic at a major academic institution in the United States. Framed in a critical review of existing evidence for the effectiveness of interdisciplinary training and health care and expert recommendations, specific recommendations are made to educators interested in interdisciplinary training in ambulatory settings. PMID:16446270

  16. Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators…

  17. Geriatric Optometry Programs of Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Satya B.

    1985-01-01

    The curriculum design, philosophy, and innovation of four programs in geriatric optometry are described: the Pennsylvania College of Optometry and the colleges of Optometry at the State University of New York, University of Alabama at Birmingham, and University of Houston. (MSE)

  18. Geriatric medical education: developments since the American Geriatrics Society Conferences on Geriatric Education, 1976-77.

    PubMed

    Reichel, W

    1981-01-01

    This is a Report presented to and endorsed by the Board of Directors of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS). It deals with developments since the AGS Conferences on Geriatric Education, 1976-77. Summarized is the position adopted by various medical organizations and associations, including the Institute of Medicine, Federated Council for Internal Medicine, American Society of Internal Medicine, and the American Academy of Family Physicians. Their stances essentially agree with that described in the Proceedings of the 1976-77 Conferences (JAGS, November 1977). The consensus arising from discussions by organized medical groups is that creation of a new practice specialty is unnecessary, although development and maintenance of an academic cadre of teachers and researchers is essential. Called for is greater commitment at the medical school level to incorporate geriatrics into the curriculum. The Report also deals with the question of merited recognition for those with special competency or expanded training in geriatrics. Finally, the Report provides support for the Medical Director concept, and looks to the Society's new Section for Long-Term Care Physicians to provide leadership in emphasizing the role of the physician in long-term care. The AGS intends, through future reports, publications, conferences, and liaison relationships with other organizations, to continue this advance, seeking solutions designed to improve and extend the health care of the aging population. PMID:6778906

  19. Comprehensive geriatric assessment of a patient with complex needs.

    PubMed

    Birch, Deborah

    2016-05-01

    This is the third in a short series that presents case study examples of the application of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) in different clinical settings. CGA is a holistic assessment model, which is designed to determine a frail older person's medical and mental health status, as well as functional, social and environmental issues. When undertaken by nurses, it can enable individualised care planning. The case study presented explores the application of CGA with an 89-year-old patient with complex health and social care needs. It demonstrates how a hospital admission was avoided and the patient's health outcomes improved, by using a nurse-led systematic approach to assessment and by careful consideration of CGA domains. PMID:27125938

  20. Rhinitis in the geriatric population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The current geriatric population in the United States accounts for approximately 12% of the total population and is projected to reach nearly 20% (71.5 million people) by 2030[1]. With this expansion of the number of older adults, physicians will face the common complaint of rhinitis with increasing frequency. Nasal symptoms pose a significant burden on the health of older people and require attention to improve quality of life. Several mechanisms likely underlie the pathogenesis of rhinitis in these patients, including inflammatory conditions and the influence of aging on nasal physiology, with the potential for interaction between the two. Various treatments have been proposed to manage this condition; however, more work is needed to enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of the various forms of geriatric rhinitis and to develop more effective therapies for this important patient population. PMID:20465792

  1. ETHICS IN GERIATRIC MEDICINE RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    İlgili, Önder; Arda, Berna; Munir, Kerim

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to evaluate the research process in geriatrics from the ethical point of view. The elderly population is increasing rapidly, but there is no parallel in the amount of research concerning this demographic. On the other hand, in the light of research ethics, this group mainly represents vulnerable people and requires more sensitivity. Taking into account all these features, fundamental principles in research ethics are first considered: the soundness of the scientific project, qualifications of the investigators, ethics committee approval, informed consent, confidentiality and privacy, beneficence/nonmaleficence, and justice are evaluated. Special ethical issues in geriatric research such as ageism and research inclusion, paucity of research involving elderly people, vulnerability of elderly subjects, and cognitive impairments are discussed separately. PMID:25489272

  2. Exercise Promotion in Geriatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Burhenn, Peggy S; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Mustian, Karen M

    2016-09-01

    Evidence of the benefits of exercise for people with cancer from diagnosis through survivorship is growing. However, most cancers occur in older adults and little exercise advice is available for making specific recommendations for older adults with cancer. Individualized exercise prescriptions are safe, feasible, and beneficial for the geriatric oncology population. Oncology providers must be equipped to discuss the short- and long-term benefits of exercise and assist older patients in obtaining appropriate exercise prescriptions. This review provides detailed information about professionals and their roles as it relates to functional assessment, intervention, and evaluation of the geriatric oncology population. This review addresses the importance of functional status assessment and appropriate referrals to other oncology professionals. PMID:27484061

  3. Geriatric Issues in Older Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Geriatric syndrome is common among older patients on dialysis. Basic knowledge about its prevalence and management is crucial for nephrologists to provide standard patient care. In busy clinical settings, up-to-date and holistic medical care can be delivered to elderly dialysis patients by collaboration of nephrology and geriatrics teams, or in part by training nephrology fellows the basics of geriatrics. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-07.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27379352

  4. Bloodless surgery in geriatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Salvatore; Di Matteo, Filippo; Sorrenti, Salvatore; Greco, Roberto; Nardi, Matteo; Favoriti, Pasqualino; De Antoni, Enrico; Filippini, Angelo; Catania, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In bloodless surgery a series of measures has to be implemented to reduce the perioperative need for transfusion of whole blood or its components. Jehovah's Witness are the most representative group of patients opting for bloodless surgery as their faith follows strict believes that prohibits receiving blood. Geriatric patients requiring bloodless surgery are even more delicate and represent a challenge for surgeons. The physiological response of the over 65 year population to decreased hemoglobin level is slower and less effective than in young and adult patients. Herby we describe the perioperative protocol implemented in our surgical Department offered to geriatric Jehovah's Witness patients. Preoperative optimization of the patients is the key step in the preparation period. Intraoperative anesthetic and surgical measures are also required along with a strict postoperative follow-up. From our experience, bloodless surgery is feasible in the geriatric population as long as it is performed in specialized centers where a multidisciplinary team is prepared to specifically manage this scenario. Rigorous patients selection and preparation are mandatory. PMID:25183638

  5. The Effect of Training on Medical Students' Responses to Geriatric Patient Concerns: Results of a Linguistic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Lynne S.; Wolf, Fredric M.

    1989-01-01

    Found that experience-based educational intervention in which medical students interview volunteer nursing home residents significantly changed medical students' responses to two geriatric patient vignettes. Concluded that use of elderly volunteers in practice interviews helped to sensitize students to problems of aging and taught them empathic…

  6. Implications of Research on the Geriatric Voice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Barbaranne J.

    Noting that the progressive aging of the American population has created a need for a body of knowledge about the vocal characteristics associated with aging, this paper provides information on geriatric voice. The first section of the paper contains a selected bibliography of materials concerning geriatric voice, including literature on the need…

  7. Depression in Geriatric and Adult Medical Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magni, Guido; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Administered two scales for the evaluation of depression to two groups of medical inpatients: adults (N=201) and geriatric subjects (N=178). Results confirmed a high presence of depressive symptoms among patients with medical problems, particularly among geriatric subjects. Factors most predictive of depressive symptoms are identified. (JAC)

  8. Effective Teaching Methods for Geriatric Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strano-Paul, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses how effective classroom sessions are at teaching geriatric competencies to medical students. At Stony Brook Medical School, most geriatric competencies are taught in the Ambulatory Care Clerkship during small-group educational sessions. Clinical exposure to reinforce these specialized skills varies with preceptor assignment. A…

  9. Psychosocial work load and stress in the geriatric care

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Due to the decrease in informal care by family members and the demographic development, the importance of professional geriatric care will rise considerably. Aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial workplace situation for employees in this profession. Methods The German version of the COPSOQ (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire) was used for the assessment of psychosocial factors at work. The instrument includes 22 scales and 3 single items concerning demands, control, stress, support, and strain. Results between two study groups of geriatric care were compared to each other as well as to employees in general hospital care and a general population mean (COPSOQ database). Statistical analysis included t-tests, ANOVA and multiple comparisons of means. Statistical significance (p < 0.01, two-tailed) and a difference of at least 5 points in mean values were defined as the relevant threshold. Results In total 889 respondents from 36 institutions took part in the study. 412 worked in Home Care (HC), 313 in Geriatric Nursing Homes (GNH), 164 in other professions (e.g. administration). Comparison between HC and GNH showed more favourable values for the first group for the most scales, e.g. lower quantitative and emotional demands and less work-privacy conflict, better possibilities for development etc. Compared to external values from the German COPSOQ database for general hospital care (N = 1.195) and the total mean across all professions, COPSOQ-total (N = 11.168), the results are again positive for HC workers on most of the scales concerning demands and social support. The only negative finding is the very low amount of social relations at work due to the obligation to work alone most of the time. Employees in GNH rate predictability, quality of leadership and feedback higher when compared to general hospital care and show some further favourable mean values compared to the COPSOQ mean value for all professions. A disadvantage for GNH is the

  10. Neurology of the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Fenner, W R

    1988-05-01

    Owing to improvements in health care, more animals are living to advanced ages. Many abnormal neurologic conditions can affect these patients, but those most commonly associated with advancing years include degenerative, neoplastic, and idiopathic processes. An understanding of the "normal" age-related changes seen on a neurologic examination must be kept in mind when evaluating geriatric patients. Special care and consideration of the patient and client are often required in managing these cases, especially because treatment protocols are often unsuccessful or do not exist, resulting in a prognosis that is often poor at best. PMID:3289252

  11. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

  12. Geriatric simulation: practicing management and leadership in care of the older adult.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sally; Overstreet, Maria

    2015-06-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, patients age 65 and older account for 43% of hospital days. The complexity of caring for older adults affords nursing students opportunities to assess, prioritize, intervene, advocate, and experience being a member of an interdisciplinary health care team. However, these multifaceted hospital experiences are not consistently available for all students. Nursing clinical simulation (NCS) can augment or replace specific clinical hours and provide clinically relevant experiences to practice management and leadership skills while caring for older adults. This article describes a geriatric management and leadership NCS. PMID:25999076

  13. Potential drug interactions in an ambulatory geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Costa, A J

    1991-09-01

    Drug interactions are a common cause of iatrogenic disease in geriatric patients. Computer programs now exist which allow one to analyse groups of drugs for potential interactions. In an audit of charts of 100 geriatric patients seen in the Family Practice Center at Barberton Citizens Hospital, a computer printout was obtained, listing all patients aged 60 years and over who were seen at the Center during 1989. Names were selected randomly from this list by the head nurse and their charts were obtained for review, generating information on patient identification number, age, sex, diagnoses, medications, and allergies. The medications were analysed using the Hansten Drug Interaction Knowledge Base Program, which identified 27 patients as being on a combination of medications which had one or more potential drug interactions. A total of 37 potential drug interactions were identified in this group of 27 patients. Relative risk ratios were determined using the computer program, 'Epi Info,' for sex (female versus male), age (greater than or equal to 75 vs. 60-75 years), number of diagnoses greater than or equal to 3 vs. 0-2), and number of medications (greater than or equal to 4 vs. 0-3). The five medications, or groups of medications, which were most likely to be involved in potential drug interactions were digoxin, beta-blockers, oestrogen, oral hypoglycaemic agents, and diuretics. PMID:1822974

  14. Poor oral health, a potential new geriatric syndrome.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, Gert-Jan; de Baat, Cees; De Visschere, Luc; Schols, Jos

    2014-02-01

    This article presents a brief introduction to the medical aspects of ageing and age-related diseases, and to some geriatric syndromes, followed by a discussion on their impact on general and oral healthcare provision to community-dwelling older people. Recent investigations suggest that inflammation constitutes a biological foundation of ageing and the onset of age-related diseases. Multimorbidity and polypharmacy, together with alterations in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, make older people at risk of adverse medication reactions. A side effect of several medications is causing xerostomia and hyposalivation, and both the type and number of medications used are relevant. New options of general healthcare provision to community-dwelling older people are the use of mobility aids and assistive technology devices, domiciliary health care, respite care and telecare. Their oral health status may be jeopardised by frailty, disability, care dependency and limited access to professional oral health care. Recommendations for improvement are the following: better integrating oral health care into general health care, developing and implementing an oral healthcare guideline, providing customised oral hygiene care aids, domiciliary oral healthcare provision, visiting dental hygienists and/or nurses, oral hygiene telecare, easily and safely accessible dental offices, transforming dentistry into medical oral health care and upgrading dentists to oral physicians. In case oral healthcare providers do not take the responsibility of persuading society of the importance of adequate oral health, weakened oral health of community-dwelling older people will become a potential new geriatric syndrome. PMID:24446975

  15. The Teaching Nursing Home as an Academic Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiler, Philip G.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the origins of the teaching nursing home concept, describes its goals and major components, and explores some of the problems in developing it as an academic program. Asserts that the teaching nursing home, if properly developed, can be a strong academic program that improves geriatric patient care, research, and teaching. (Author/ABB)

  16. Addressing ethical issues in geriatrics and long-term care: ethics education at the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care.

    PubMed

    Gordon, M; Turner, L; Bourret, E

    2000-01-01

    An innovative program in ethics education exists at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. This program can serve as a helpful model for long-term care and geriatric care facilities seeking to implement formal training programs in bioethics. Various aspects of the ethics education program are examined. In addition to describing the role of the ethics committee and research ethics board, consideration is given to case consultations, ethics rounds, the training of junior physicians and medical students, grand rounds and the planning of conferences and guest lectures. With regard to educational content in bioethics, health law, professional guidelines and the principlist approach of Beauchamp and Childress are used to explore the ethical dimensions of particular cases. Given the clinical context of the educational initiatives, the pedagogical approach is predominately case-based. While the bioethics literature emphasizes the patient-physician relationship, ethics education at Baycrest recognizes the importance of multiple professions. Physicians, nurses, social workers, speech pathologists, nutritionists and other health care providers are involved in ethical deliberation and education. PMID:11143884

  17. [LIMITATIONS OF THE BIOMEDICAL PARADIGM IN GERIATRICS INSTITUTIONS].

    PubMed

    Robledo, María Laura; Cabello, Cecilia; Dahl, Silvina

    2015-01-01

    The social perception of ageing related to the loss of both physical and psychological functions that determine in many cases the institutionalization of the elderly in nursing homes, leads to a medical care focused on a biomedical model, centered on organic factors as determinants of the illness. Illness is not an isolated condition in an individual, but has a subjective and social dimension. For this reason the biographic history becomes the main reference point in the care of the elderly. People experiment their disease within a narrative that gives a meaning to their experience; but this is not considered by the biomedical model, where the psychosocial factors that influence the onset or progression of the pathology are disregarded. This article attempts to explore the problem that arises when the care of the elderly that reside in geriatric institutions is centered on the biomedical model. PMID:26650415

  18. Hyperthyroidism in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Federman, D D

    1991-02-15

    Although the thyroid gland can become overactive at any age, the syndrome of hyperthyroidism changes considerably in elderly persons. The principal reason is comorbidity. The patient over age 65 is much more likely than a young adult of 20 or 25 to have one or more preexisting disorders when the thyroid becomes overactive. In the elderly, therefore, the classic picture of hyperthyroidism--the constellation of irritability, sweating, palpitations without heart disease, weight loss despite good appetite, goiter, and warm, fine skin, familiar to all physicians--may never develop. Well before it might have appeared, a milder degree of thyroid hyperfunction may become manifest because of worsening of an underlying disease. Accordingly, the recognition of the thyroid disorder is often delayed. The purpose of this article is not so much to review hyperthyroidism as to delineate the special features found in geriatric patients and to describe a simple but effective scheme of evaluation. PMID:1899255

  19. Guidelines for Graduate Medical Education in Geriatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Alan S.; Beck, John C.

    1982-01-01

    Performance objectives, core content, training experiences, and clinical exposure and program evaluations are described for geriatric fellows and house staff members in internal medicine, family practice, neurology, and psychiatry. A modified Delphi study was used. (Author/MLW)

  20. Pharmaceutical services in a capitated geriatric care program.

    PubMed

    Sorrento, T A; Bonanza, K C; Salisbury, D W

    1996-12-01

    A hospital outpatient pharmacy's planning and implementation of pharmaceutical services for a capitated geriatric care program are described. The hospital's director of pharmacy and pharmacy ambulatory care manager proposed providing distributive and clinical services for enrollees in Independent Living for Seniors (ILS), a program designed to help elderly persons to continue living at home instead of in nursing homes. ILS receives pooled monthly payments from Medicare and Medicaid; a copayment is required of enrollees not eligible for Medicaid. Medical and social services are offered, primarily through adult daycare centers. Nurses at the centers monitor ILS enrollees regularly and help them manage their medications. After a year of negotiations with the program, the outpatient satellite of the hospital's inpatient pharmacy began providing services; one pharmacist was assigned to ILS. Problems with medication stock at the daycare centers were corrected. Conservative supplies of stock drugs (mostly nonprescription items) and medications to meet patients' needs between daily pharmacy deliveries were established. A new computerized medication administration record was developed. Once distributive services were in place, a pharmacy and therapeutics committee began establishing a formulary. The pharmacist functions as part of an interdisciplinary care team, providing education on drug use and managing costs; he reviews all patients' charts every four months and meets weekly with ILS staff to recommend changes in drug therapy. The cost of services provided by the hospital outpatient pharmacy averaged $77 per patient per month in the first year, compared with about $120 for the previous vendor. A hospital's ambulatory care pharmacy improved the pharmaceutical services provided to a capitated geriatric care program. PMID:8957345

  1. Positioning Medical Students for the Geriatric Imperative: Using Geriatrics to Effectively Teach Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Annie L.; Duthie, Elizabeth A.; Denson, Kathryn M.; Franco, Jose; Duthie, Edmund H.

    2013-01-01

    Medical schools must consider innovative ways to ensure that graduates are prepared to care for the aging population. One way is to offer a geriatrics clerkship as an option for the fulfillment of a medical school's internal medicine rotation requirement. The authors' purpose was to evaluate the geriatrics clerkship's impact on…

  2. An international model for geriatrics program development in China: the Johns Hopkins-Peking Union Medical College experience.

    PubMed

    Leng, Sean X; Tian, Xinping; Liu, Xiaohong; Lazarus, Gerald; Bellantoni, Michele; Greenough, William; Fried, Linda P; Shen, Ti; Durso, Samuel C

    2010-07-01

    China has the world's largest and most rapidly growing older adult population. Recent dramatic socioeconomic changes, including a large number of migrating workers leaving their elderly parents and grandparents behind and the 4:2:1 family structure caused by the one-child policy, have greatly compromised the traditional Chinese family support for older adults. These demographic and socioeconomic factors, the improved living standards, and the quest for higher quality of life are creating human economic pressures. The plight of senior citizens is leading to an unprecedented need for geriatrics expertise in China. To begin to address this need, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHU) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) have developed a joint international project aimed at establishing a leadership program at the PUMC Hospital that will promote quality geriatrics care, education, and aging research for China. Important components of this initiative include geriatrics competency training for PUMC physicians and nurses in the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at JHU, establishing a geriatrics demonstration ward at the PUMC Hospital, faculty exchange between JHU and PUMC, and on-site consultation by JHU geriatrics faculty. This article describes the context and history of this ongoing collaboration and important components, progress, challenges, and future prospects, focusing on the JHU experience. Specific and practical recommendations are made for those who plan such international joint ventures. With such unique experiences, it is hoped that this will serve as a useful model for international geriatrics program development for colleagues in the United States and abroad. PMID:20533962

  3. [Backup territorial coordination, nursing roles and skills].

    PubMed

    Benyahia, Amina; Abraham, Éliane

    2016-06-01

    Backup territorial coordination provides accompaniment and support for professionals who work with the fragile elderly people in an area. It aligns the sanitary, medical-social and social approaches, and mobilizes useful resources to optimize the treatment pathway. It has been implemented in the Nancy urban area by an operational team including nurses and a geriatric physician. PMID:27338688

  4. Evaluation of geriatric changes in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Soumyaranjan; Panda, S. K.; Acharya, A. P.; Senapati, S.; Behera, M.; Behera, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study has been envisaged to ascertain the old age for critical management of geriatric dogs considering the parameters of externally visible changes, haemato-biochemical alterations and urine analysis in geriatric dogs approaching senility. Materials and Methods: The study was undertaken in the Department of Veterinary Pathology in collaboration with Teaching Veterinary Clinic complex spanning a period of 1 year. For screening of geriatric dogs, standard geriatric age chart of different breeds was followed. The external characteristics such as hair coat texture, dental wear and tear, skin texture and glaucoma were taken as a marker of old age. Haematology, serum biochemistry and urine analysis were also included in the study. Results: External visible changes like greying of hair, dull appearance of hair coat, glaucoma, osteoarthritis, dental wear and tear were commonly encountered in the aged dogs. The haemoglobin, total erythrocyte count and packed cell volume showed a decreasing trend in the geriatric groups. Biochemical values like total protein, albumin, calcium level showed a decreasing trend while urea level with an increasing trend in geriatric dogs without any much alteration in serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminse, serum glutamic-pyruvate transaminase, cholesterol and creatinine. Physical examination of urine revealed yellow, amber, red, deep red color with turbidity and higher specific gravity. Chemical examination revealed presence of protein, glucose, ketone bodies, blood and bilirubin on some cases. The culture and sensitivity test of the urine samples revealed presence of bacteria with sensitive and resistance to some antibiotics. Conclusion: External visible changes are still the golden standard of determining the old age in dogs. Haemato-biochemical evaluation can be useful for correlating with the pathophysiological status of the animal. Biochemical analysis of urine can be employed rightly as kidney dysfunction is being major

  5. THE INFLAMMATION HYPOTHESIS IN GERIATRIC DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, George S.; Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko

    2011-01-01

    Background A large body of research has focused on “mediating mechanisms” and predisposing brain abnormalities to geriatric depression, but little is known about its etiology. This paper examines whether age-related and comorbid disease-related immune deregulation is an etiologic contributor to geriatric depression. Methods This article reviews findings on neuroinflammation during the aging process and depression as well as studies of anti-inflammatory actions of classical antidepressants and antidepressant actions of anti-inflammatory agents. Results Aging results in increased peripheral immune responses, impaired peripheral-CNS immune communication, and a shift of the CNS into a pro-inflammatory state. These exaggerated and prolonged immune responses may lead to changes in the function of emotional and cognitive networks pertinent to geriatric depression and to behavioral changes reminiscent of the depressive and cognitive symptoms of geriatric depression. Some antidepressants may reduce the expression of inflammation markers. Limited data suggest that some anti-inflammatory agents may have antidepressant properties. Conclusions A synthesis of available findings suggests that aging-related and comorbid disease-related inflammatory processes may promote changes in the neural systems predisposing to geriatric depression or facilitating metabolic changes that mediate depressive syndromes. The “inflammation hypothesis” in geriatric depression cannot be tested in its entirety, but it can lead to testable hypotheses and data on mechanisms by which inflammatory processes promote geriatric depression. The significance of such an effort is that it may lead to a novel treatment development model bringing to bear recent advances of anti-inflammatory pharmacology to the treatment of depressed elderly patients. PMID:21370276

  6. [Ambulatory geriatric rehabilitation--concepts, chances and responsibilities of participating physicians].

    PubMed

    Stamm, T; Rittgerodt, K; Gehrke, A

    1995-12-01

    The third stage of the bill of the health structure (GSG) still focuses on the tremendous increase of costs in hospitals. Hospitals are accused that the care of the older patients involves too much money and staff. Experts complain that geriatric-rehabilitative thinking and acting does hardly influence the daily work on the wards. Competent geriatric rehabilitation should diminish or prevent the need for nursing, should support the patients ability for self-sufficiency, and decrease hospitalization time. Since the expenses for the hospital care of older patients have increased during the last couple of years and show the greatest dynamic of increase together with the supply of aids, health politicians and health economists, physicians, health insurances, and social insurances set more and more medical and economic hope on the geriatric rehabilitation. Especially models of out of hospital programs in connection with panel doctors are discussed to relieve the hospitals and are favoured by legal institutions and health politicians. Despite the documented success of geriatric rehabilitation, it is surprising the only a few areas realize differentiated out of hospital concepts. This article summarizes the most important models of out of hospital geriatric rehabilitation as they are tested in different areas in Germany. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed and the demands of the participating physicians are demonstrated. The goal of this paper is to describe the medical role in these models to win more physicians for this task. The urgently necessary development of a country-wide out of hospital rehabilitation, introduces new important medical fields of activity. PMID:8850116

  7. Long Term Outcomes of a Geriatric Liaison Intervention in Frail Elderly Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hempenius, Liesbeth; Slaets, Joris P. J.; van Asselt, Dieneke; de Bock, Truuske H.; Wiggers, Theo; van Leeuwen, Barbara L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the long term effects after discharge of a hospital-based geriatric liaison intervention to prevent postoperative delirium in frail elderly cancer patients treated with an elective surgical procedure for a solid tumour. In addition, the effect of a postoperative delirium on long term outcomes was examined. Methods A three month follow-up was performed in participants of the Liaison Intervention in Frail Elderly study, a multicentre, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Patients were randomized to standard treatment or a geriatric liaison intervention. The intervention consisted of a preoperative geriatric consultation, an individual treatment plan targeted at risk factors for delirium and daily visits by a geriatric nurse during the hospital stay. The long term outcomes included: mortality, rehospitalisation, Activities of Daily Living (ADL) functioning, return to the independent pre-operative living situation, use of supportive care, cognitive functioning and health related quality of life. Results Data of 260 patients (intervention n = 127, Control n = 133) were analysed. There were no differences between the intervention group and usual-care group for any of the outcomes three months after discharge. The presence of postoperative delirium was associated with: an increased risk of decline in ADL functioning (OR: 2.65, 95% CI: 1.02–6.88), an increased use of supportive assistance (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.02–5.87) and a decreased chance to return to the independent preoperative living situation (OR: 0.18, 95% CI: 0.07–0.49). Conclusions A hospital-based geriatric liaison intervention for the prevention of postoperative delirium in frail elderly cancer patients undergoing elective surgery for a solid tumour did not improve outcomes 3 months after discharge from hospital. The negative effect of a postoperative delirium on late outcome was confirmed. Trial Registration Nederlands Trial Register, Trial ID NTR 823

  8. [Imaging update in geriatric oncology].

    PubMed

    Gualdi, G F; Bertini, L; Lanciotti, S; Colaiacomo, M C; Casciani, E; Polettini, E

    2004-09-01

    The cancer is a problem that plagues all the ages but the greater part of the malignant tumors hits the old persons. The more elevated incidence sites of primary tumor in geriatrical age are the prostate, the lung and the colon-rectum in the men and the breast, the colon-rectum, the lung and the stomach in the women. The imaging has made steps of giant in the last few decades, with the introduction of new equipment and methodical news so as to assure everybody early and accurated diagnosis. For the lung carcinoma great advantages have been bring to us with the introduction of CT-PET and the multislice CT, that has concurred the execution of virtual bronchoscopy. The virtual endoscopy has been applied with happening also in the screening of the carcinoma of colon-rectum, executed through CT or MR. New MR technologies have allowed perform spectroscopic studies in such organs as prostate and breast, bringing the biochemical diagnosis beyond that morphologic. The MR then turns out fundamental in the appraisal of the Patient with bone metastases thanks also to the new whole body examinations. Finally the recent technology has allowed the execution of multiorgan CT screening bringing in this way new possibilities but also new questions. PMID:15700630

  9. When Patients Teach Their Doctors: A Curriculum for Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkowiak, John; Gunderson, Anne

    2004-01-01

    In response to aging patient demographics and a call for increased formal geriatric training in medical schools, a community volunteer geriatric mentor program, Bridging Generations, was developed to shape attitudes of medical students caring for the elderly. The geriatric mentor experience provided students with unique insight into the challenges…

  10. Undergraduate Teaching in Geriatric Medicine: The Role of National Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blundell, Adrian; Gordon, Adam; Gladman, John; Masud, Tahir

    2009-01-01

    There has been recent international concern that the teaching of geriatrics may be in decline. Research has suggested that support for geriatrics in national undergraduate curricula is the key to effective delivery of teaching in the specialty. We set out to determine the geriatric medicine content in the U.K. generic curriculum, reviewing this in…

  11. Geriatrics Educational Outreach: A Tale of Three GRECCs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Elizabeth; Fitzgerald, James T.; Griffith, Jennifer; Weir, Charlene

    2011-01-01

    Current geriatrics workforce projections indicate that clinicians who care for adults will need basic geriatrics knowledge and skills to address the geriatric syndromes and issues that limit functional independence and complicate medical management. This is most evident for the clinicians caring for veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs…

  12. Preparing Tomorrow’s Nursing Home Nurses: The Wisconsin-Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program

    PubMed Central

    Nolet, Kim; Roberts, Tonya; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Roiland, Rachel; Gullickson, Colleen; Ryther, Brenda; Bowers, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to care for the growing population of older adults has become a national priority. The demand for long term care services is expected to double between 2000 and 2040, yet the field remains stigmatized as an undesirable place for highly-skilled nurses to work. Recent efforts to increase student preparation in geriatrics have been shown to improve student attitudes toward working with older adults and increase knowledge, but long term care settings remain unattractive to students. This paper reports on development, implementation and evaluation of The Wisconsin Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program, a nursing home internship for baccalaureate nursing students. The program couples a paid nursing home work experience with an evidence-based long term care nursing curriculum. The program increased student preparation and interest in working with older adults and in nursing homes, while concurrently increasing the capacity of nursing homes to provide a positive student experience. PMID:25162659

  13. Palliative care in the ambulatory geriatric practice.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Thomas E; Nirmalasari, Olivia; Graham, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Geriatrics and palliative care often overlap. This article focuses on 2 areas where the disciplines may differ in their approach. The first is planning for extreme illness and death, with explicit acknowledgment that limiting therapy might be a good idea. This situation is likely to have a different impact in the course of a routine geriatrics visit than in a palliative care context. The second is pain management, especially chronic pain. In patients with sharply limited life expectancy, the risk/benefit equation tilts easily toward narcotic use. In frail elders working to remain independent, the calculus may be quite different. PMID:25920055

  14. How the principles of geriatric assessment are shaping managed care.

    PubMed

    Fillit, H M; Hill, J; Picariello, G; Warburton, S

    1998-04-01

    In traditional geriatric medicine, comprehensive assessment is considered crucial to the care of frail older patients. The principles of geriatric assessment--identifying high-risk patients and targeting them for preventive interventions--are also practiced by managed care organizations (MCOs). Self-reported health surveys and administrative data are two methods used by MCOs to identify members at high risk for adverse health outcomes and functional decline who may benefit from geriatric case management. For a successful partnership with primary care physicians, it is very important that geriatric care managers should be knowledgeable in the principles of geriatric medicine. PMID:9559029

  15. One-Year Outcome of Geriatric Hip-Fracture Patients following Prolonged ICU Treatment.

    PubMed

    Eschbach, Daphne; Bliemel, Christopher; Oberkircher, Ludwig; Aigner, Rene; Hack, Juliana; Bockmann, Benjamin; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Buecking, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Incidence of geriatric fractures is increasing. Knowledge of outcome data for hip-fracture patients undergoing intensive-care unit (ICU) treatment, including invasive ventilatory management (IVM) and hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), is sparse. Methods. Single-center prospective observational study including 402 geriatric hip-fracture patients. Age, gender, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, and the Barthel index (BI) were documented. Underlying reasons for prolonged ICU stay were registered, as well as assessed procedures like IVM and CVVHDF. Outcome parameters were in-hospital, 6-month, and 1-year mortality and need for nursing care. Results. 15% were treated > 3 days and 68% < 3 days in ICU. Both cohorts had similar ASA, BI, and age. In-hospital, 6-month, and 12-month mortality of ICU > 3d cohort were significantly increased (p = 0.001). Most frequent indications were cardiocirculatory pathology followed by respiratory failure, renal impairment, and infection. 18% of patients needed CVVHDF and 41% IVM. In these cohorts, 6-month mortality ranged > 80% and 12-month mortality > 90%. 100% needed nursing care after 6 and 12 months. Conclusions. ICU treatment > 3 days showed considerable difference in mortality and nursing care needed after 6 and 12 months. Particularly, patients requiring CVVHDF or IVM had disastrous long-term results. Our study may add one further element in complex decision making serving this vulnerable patient cohort. PMID:26881228

  16. One-Year Outcome of Geriatric Hip-Fracture Patients following Prolonged ICU Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Eschbach, Daphne; Bliemel, Christopher; Oberkircher, Ludwig; Aigner, Rene; Hack, Juliana; Bockmann, Benjamin; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Buecking, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Incidence of geriatric fractures is increasing. Knowledge of outcome data for hip-fracture patients undergoing intensive-care unit (ICU) treatment, including invasive ventilatory management (IVM) and hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), is sparse. Methods. Single-center prospective observational study including 402 geriatric hip-fracture patients. Age, gender, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, and the Barthel index (BI) were documented. Underlying reasons for prolonged ICU stay were registered, as well as assessed procedures like IVM and CVVHDF. Outcome parameters were in-hospital, 6-month, and 1-year mortality and need for nursing care. Results. 15% were treated > 3 days and 68% < 3 days in ICU. Both cohorts had similar ASA, BI, and age. In-hospital, 6-month, and 12-month mortality of ICU > 3d cohort were significantly increased (p = 0.001). Most frequent indications were cardiocirculatory pathology followed by respiratory failure, renal impairment, and infection. 18% of patients needed CVVHDF and 41% IVM. In these cohorts, 6-month mortality ranged > 80% and 12-month mortality > 90%. 100% needed nursing care after 6 and 12 months. Conclusions. ICU treatment > 3 days showed considerable difference in mortality and nursing care needed after 6 and 12 months. Particularly, patients requiring CVVHDF or IVM had disastrous long-term results. Our study may add one further element in complex decision making serving this vulnerable patient cohort. PMID:26881228

  17. Geriatric Syndromes: Clinical, Research and Policy Implications of a Core Geriatric Concept

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Sharon K.; Studenski, Stephanie; Tinetti, Mary E.; Kuchel, George A.

    2008-01-01

    Geriatricians have embraced the term “geriatric syndrome”, using it extensively to highlight the unique features of common health conditions in the elderly. Geriatric syndromes, such as delirium, falls, incontinence and frailty, are highly prevalent, multifactorial, and associated with substantial morbidity and poor outcomes. Nevertheless, this central geriatric concept has remained poorly defined. This article reviews criteria for defining geriatric syndromes, and proposes a balanced approach of developing preliminary criteria based on peer-reviewed evidence. Based on a review of the literature, four shared risk factors—older age, baseline cognitive impairment, baseline functional impairment, and impaired mobility—were identified across five common geriatric syndromes (pressure ulcers, incontinence, falls, functional decline, and delirium). Understanding basic mechanisms involved in geriatric syndromes will be critical to advancing research and developing targeted therapeutic options. However, given the complexity of these multifactorial conditions, attempts to define relevant mechanisms will need to incorporate more complex models, including a focus on synergistic interactions between different risk factors. Finally, major barriers have been identified in translating research advances, such as preventive strategies of proven effectiveness for delirium and falls, into clinical practice and policy initiatives. National strategic initiatives are required to overcome barriers and to achieve clinical, research, and policy advances that will improve quality of life for older persons. PMID:17493201

  18. [The problems and outlook of geriatric pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Zapadniuk, V I

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related changes in manifestations of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs in the elderly is presented. The ways of their correction are discussed. The advances in the development of geriatric drugs (dekamevit, kvadevit, ampevit, orkomin, potassium glutaminate, rikavit, trimethylglycine) and the perspectives for the creation of new geroprotectors are described. PMID:2201563

  19. [The particular characteristics of caregivers in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Viana, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The perception of the work of a caregiver in geriatrics is often inaccurate. Considered to consist of the most unrewarding tasks, the role of caregivers in supporting residents and families is however essential, both in terms of day-today care as well as for the prevention of dependency. PMID:22741315

  20. Progress in Geriatrics: A Clinical Care Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchette, Patricia Lanoie; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This issue includes 18 theme articles that examine clinical care, conditions, and practice as they relate to older adults. It contains articles on the following: men's and women's health, depression, dementia, hypertension, incontinence, bone pain, infections, preventive medicine, geriatric medicine, health care delivery, managed care, long-term…

  1. Geriatric Staff Training for Patient Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Tom

    The project investigated the effectiveness of an evironmental therapy training program for geriatric mental health workers when used in two different institutional settings. Site A was a State-operated facility for psychiatric in-patient care, accommodating 2,000 patients, with emphasis on maintenance and general patient welfare. Site B, a former…

  2. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment in the Office

    PubMed Central

    Pereles, Laurie R.M.; Boyle, Neil G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Because of their increased incidence of illness and disability, geriatric patients require extra time and diligence to assess and track medical problems. This article describes a comprehensive geriatirc assessment, organized on a one-page, easily updated checklist, that can be used to generate a medical and functional problem list and a risk assessment. Imagesp2190-a PMID:21229091

  3. Geriatric dentistry--meet the need.

    PubMed

    Issrani, Rakhi; Ammanagi, Renuka; Keluskar, Vaishali

    2012-06-01

    Geriatric dentistry or gerodontics is the delivery of dental care to older adults involving the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of problems associated with normal ageing and age-related diseases as part of an inter-disciplinary team with other health care professionals. Geriatric health is an ignored and under-explored area worldwide. Oral health reflects overall well being for the elderly population. Conversely, elderly patients are more predisposed to oral conditions due to age-related systemic diseases and functional changes. The major barriers to practising geriatric dentistry are the lack of trained faculty members, a crowded curriculum and monetary concerns. For successful treatment, the practitioner must adopt a humanitarian approach and develop a better understanding of the feelings and attitudes of the elderly. Prevention and early intervention strategies must be formulated to reduce the risk of oral diseases in this population. In future, dental professionals must have a proper understanding of the magnitude of the services to be provided to the elderly. This could only be realised through an education programme in geriatric dentistry, which should be started without further delay. This article hence sets out the objectives, needs, present scenario, strategies and types of dental treatment required by the elderly population. PMID:22612827

  4. Faculty Preparedness in Geriatric Optometry Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancil, Gary L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of chief academic officers and faculty (n=27) in 16 schools of optometry found that, since 1986, there has been a 75% increase in institutions requiring coursework in geriatric optometry and an 83% increase in those offering continuing professional education in this field. However, 67% of faculty report no formal training. Three faculty…

  5. A Health Belief Interview for Clinical Geriatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakowski, William; Dengiz, Alan N.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a brief nine-item interview, designed for use by practitioners. Based upon results from field-testing with 65 ambulatory geriatric patients, the instrument can be used as an aid to assess health and treatment perceptions in clinical settings. Responses to specific items may also suggest broader areas for follow-up discussion. (JAC)

  6. Factors Influencing RNs' Perceptions of Quality Geriatric Care in Rural Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cline, Daniel D; Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Kovner, Christine; Boltz, Marie; Kolanowski, Ann; Capezuti, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    The rapidly aging population and their frequent use of hospital services will create substantial quality challenges in the near future. Redesigning rural hospital work environments is the key to improving the quality of care for older adults. This study explored how the work environment influences registered nurses' (RNs') perceived quality of geriatric care in rural hospitals. We used an exploratory mixed-methods research design emphasizing the qualitative data (in-depth, semi-structured interviews). Quantitative data (questionnaire) measuring the RN work environment were also collected to augment qualitative data. Four themes emerged: (a) collegial RN relationships, (b) poor staffing/utilization, (c) technology benefits/challenges, and (d) RN-physician interactions, which were identified as key factors influencing the quality of geriatric care. We concluded that rural hospital work environments may not be optimized to facilitate the delivery of quality geriatric care. Targeted interventions are needed to improve overall quality of care for hospitalized older adults in rural settings. PMID:24319004

  7. Interdisciplinary educational approaches to promote team-based geriatrics and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Howe, Judith L; Witt Sherman, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Despite the increasing public demand for enhanced care of older patients and those with life-threatening illness, health professionals have had limited formal education in geriatrics and palliative care. Furthermore, formal education in interdisciplinary team training is limited. In order to remedy this situation, proactive interventions are being undertaken so that education and training in palliative care is being embedded within the training of physicians, nurses, social workers, as well as other associated health team members. This article discusses various educational approaches to interdisciplinary team-based geriatric and palliative care, highlighting the interdisciplinary didactic and clinical educational opportunities offered by an Interprofessional Palliative Care Fellowship Program, as well as an Associated Health Training Program at the Geriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Bronx Veteran's Medical Center. The article further describes the educational initiatives in palliative care offered through the Veteran's Integrated Service Network (VISN). Innovative educational strategies are discussed within the context of the existing literature on interdisciplinary health care team training. PMID:16446268

  8. [Review in geriatric medicine 2013].

    PubMed

    Büla, Christophe

    2014-01-15

    Physical activity appears once again as the single most effective preventative intervention in older persons to delaying functional decline, avoiding falls, and mitigating the odds of developing dementia. Integrated care that promotes interdisciplinary collaboration among healthcare professionals is a major avenue to improve care coordination in polymorbid older patients. A study depicts the large gap between physicians and nurses' views about their respective skills and role in such a collaboration. On the cognitive side, while several studies show that new cohorts of older persons appear to age in better cognitive shape, results of trials of semagestat, a gamma-secretase inhibitor, and post-menopausal estrogenic therapy were disappointing. Finally, a study challenges the benefits of hydration in terminally ill patients. PMID:24558897

  9. [Guideline for integrated geriatric assessment].

    PubMed

    Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Doubova, Svetlana Vladislavovna; García-González, José Juan; Espinosa-Aguilar, Amilcar; Jiménez-Uribe, Rodrigo; Peña-Valdovinos, Abel; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel

    2009-01-01

    A clinical practice guideline was developed as a response to the increasing of elderly in Mexican population due to the epidemiological transition; this instrument allows the assessment of health conditions for people from 60 years of age and older, and it can be a tool for helping family physicians and nurses in providing care for the main health problems of this group of age. The guideline for gerontologic assessment includes six principal health priorities in older people (loss of vision, difficulty to hear, falls or problems walking, nutritional disorders, memory difficulties, and sleep disorders); additionally, another four components for assessment are revised (medication use, physical functionality, quality of life, and social support). Simple recommendations for detection, diagnosis and management of these problems in primary care settings are presented. PMID:20141660

  10. Rethinking Teaching Nursing Homes: Potential for Improving Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mezey, Mathy D.; Mitty, Ethel L.; Burger, Sarah Green

    2008-01-01

    To meet the special needs of and provide quality health care to nursing home residents, the health care workforce must be knowledgeable about the aging process. Health professionals are minimally prepared in their academic programs to care for older adults, and few programs have required rotations in geriatrics. Teaching nursing homes (TNHs) have…

  11. Care of the Older Adult in the Emergency Department: Nurses Views of the Pressing Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boltz, Marie; Parke, Belinda; Shuluk, Joseph; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Galvin, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to describe nurses' views of the issues to be addressed to improve care of the older adult in the emergency department (ED). Design and Methods: An exploratory content analysis examined the qualitative responses of 527 registered nurses from 49U.S. hospitals who completed the Geriatric Institutional Profile.…

  12. A Statewide Faculty Development Program for Community College Associate Degree and Other Nursing Educators. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roush, Robert E.; And Others

    This final report describes a Texas educational improvement project designed to: (1) increase the amount of geriatric content in the curricula of community college associate degree nursing (ADN) programs; (2) further the development of baccalaureate nursing faculty in a Historically Black College/University (HBCU); and (3) facilitate other Texas…

  13. Stimulating Healthy Aging with a Model Nurse-Managed Free Clinic in a Senior Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Ruth H.

    As part of a Geriatric Education and Health Management program, a model nurse-managed free clinic has been established at an urban senior center by faculty and students of the University of New Mexico College of Nursing. Funded by a 3-year grant from the Department of Health and Human Services, the weekly clinic is based on Orem's self-care theory…

  14. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L.G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the following topics: rationale for performing GA; findings from a GA performed in geriatric oncology patients; ability of GA to predict oncology treatment–related complications; association between GA findings and overall survival (OS); impact of GA findings on oncology treatment decisions; composition of a GA, including domains and tools; and methods for implementing GA in clinical care. Results GA can be valuable in oncology practice for following reasons: detection of impairment not identified in routine history or physical examination, ability to predict severe treatment-related toxicity, ability to predict OS in a variety of tumors and treatment settings, and ability to influence treatment choice and intensity. The panel recommended that the following domains be evaluated in a GA: functional status, comorbidity, cognition, mental health status, fatigue, social status and support, nutrition, and presence of geriatric syndromes. Although several combinations of tools and various models are available for implementation of GA in oncology practice, the expert panel could not endorse one over another. Conclusion There is mounting data regarding the utility of GA in oncology practice; however, additional research is needed to continue to strengthen the evidence base. PMID:25071125

  15. Leadership development in geriatric care through the Intergeneration Make a Difference Project.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Mary K; Brown, Sylvia T

    2006-01-01

    The Intergeneration Make a Difference Project (MADP) is designed to develop leadership skills in geriatric nursing for seniors in a baccalaureate nursing program. This service-learning project with octogenarians and older individuals is based on theoretical constructs of caring. Stories and journaling are of great importance in the project. Expected outcomes are cognitive, affective, personal, and interpersonal. Students are expected to engage in critical/reflective thinking and develop leadership skills, heightened respect for the elderly, and interest in lifelong learning and a service orientation to society. Empowered to influence their clients, students receive the reciprocal benefits of an intergenerational relationship that, it is hoped, will affect how they care for the elderly in the future. PMID:16733972

  16. Delirium in the elderly: current problems with increasing geriatric age

    PubMed Central

    Kukreja, Deepti; Günther, Ulf; Popp, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is an acute disorder of attention and cognition seen relatively commonly in people aged 65 yr or older. The prevalence is estimated to be between 11 and 42 per cent for elderly patients on medical wards. The prevalence is also high in nursing homes and long term care (LTC) facilities. The consequences of delirium could be significant such as an increase in mortality in the hospital, long-term cognitive decline, loss of autonomy and increased risk to be institutionalized. Despite being a common condition, it remains under-recognised, poorly understood and not adequately managed. Advanced age and dementia are the most important risk factors. Pain, dehydration, infections, stroke and metabolic disturbances, and surgery are the most common triggering factors. Delirium is preventable in a large proportion of cases and therefore, it is also important from a public health perspective for interventions to reduce further complications and the substantial costs associated with these. Since the aetiology is, in most cases, multfactorial, it is important to consider a multi-component approach to management, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Detection and treatment of triggering causes must have high priority in case of delirium. The aim of this review is to highlight the importance of delirium in the elderly population, given the increasing numbers of ageing people as well as increasing geriatric age. PMID:26831414

  17. Redefining the Economics of Geriatric Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Nacca, Christopher; Paller, David; Daniels, Alan H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The heath care system in the United States is in the midst of a transition, in large part to help accommodate an older and more medically complex population. Central to the current evolution is the reassessment of value based on the cost utility of a particular procedure compared to alternatives. The existing contribution of geriatric orthopedics to the societal burden of disease is substantial, and literature focusing on the economic value of treating elderly populations with musculoskeletal injuries is growing. Materials and Methods: A literature review of peer-reviewed publications and abstracts related to the cost-effectiveness of treating geriatric patients with orthopedic injuries was carried out. Results: In our review, we demonstrate that while cost-utility studies generally demonstrate net society savings for most orthopedic procedures, geriatric populations often contribute to negative net society savings due to decreased working years and lower salaries while in the workforce. However, the incremental cost-effective ratio for operative intervention has been shown to be below the financial willingness to treat threshold for common procedures including joint replacement surgery of the knee (ICER US$8551), hip (ICER US$17 115), and shoulder (CE US$957) as well as for spinal procedures and repair of torn rotator cuffs (ICER US$12 024). We also discuss the current trends directed toward improving institutional value and highlight important complementary next steps to help overcome the growing demands of an older, more active society. Conclusion: The geriatric population places a significant burden on the health care system. However, studies have shown that treating this demographic for orthopedic-related injuries is cost effective and profitable for providers under certain scenarios. PMID:26246943

  18. Hemangiosarcoma in a geriatric Labrador retriever.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Diya

    2012-08-01

    A geriatric Labrador retriever dog was presented for acute collapse. The dog was conscious but lethargic, tachypneic, tachycardic with weak femoral pulses, occasional pulse deficits, and pale mucous membranes. Radiography, ultrasonography, quick assessment tests, and a complete blood (cell) count (CBC)/biochemistry panel indicated internal hemorrhage and potential problems with hemostasis. The dog was euthanized. A necropsy, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry for CD31 and Factor VIII-related antigen cell markers supported a diagnosis of splenic hemangiosarcoma. PMID:23372199

  19. [Why should Byzantium be considered as a cradle of clinical geriatrics?].

    PubMed

    Lapin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Generally, roots of today's medical ethics are thought to have sprouted from antiquity and from classical Hebraic consciousness, while the origin of hospital medicine and institutional nursing of the elderly was assumed in Middle Age and in modern times, respectively. But even between these two periods, notably in Byzantium (324-1453) there were many famous physicians working with surprising skills in many disciplines such as surgery and ophthalmology. The most important achievement of that time, however, was in public health care. Following the Christian ideal of philanthropy, numerous hospitals (nosokomeia), hospices (xenodocheia) and asylums for the elderly (gerokomeia) of a remarkable organisation and professionalism were founded in many cities of the Byzantine Empire. Concerning the elderly patients, interesting findings were obtained concerning ageing process (eschatogeria), geriatric symptoms, multimorbidity, marasm and typically occurring diseases. Interesting approaches were realized with regard to the nursing care, diet and recommended life style for the elderly. By the end of the Byzantium Empire in 1453 and due to the different cultural development in the West, which was sometimes marked by conflicts between church and science and by the regulations of medicine, the knowledge about the Byzantine health care was almost lost. It survived, however, only in hospitals of occidental monastic orders, which brought their experience from East-Mediterranean area. Their hospitals were than a base for modern health care and for geriatrics. PMID:18807237

  20. Everyday Excellence: A Framework for Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Stacie Salsbury; Specht, Janet Pringle; Karlman, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    Registered nurses make measurable contributions to the health and wellness of persons living in nursing homes. However, most nursing homes do not employ adequate numbers of professional nurses with specialized training in the nursing care of older adults to positively impact resident outcomes. As a result, many people never receive excellent geriatric nursing while living in a long-term care facility. Nurses have introduced various professional practice models into health care institutions as tools for leading nursing practice, improving client outcomes, and achieving organizational goals. Problematically, few professional practice models have been implemented in nursing homes. This article introduces an evidence-based framework for professional nursing practice in long-term care. The Everyday Excellence framework is based upon eight guiding principles: Valuing, Envisioning, Peopling, Securing, Learning, Empowering, Leading, and Advancing Excellence. Future research will evaluate the usefulness of this framework for professional nursing practice. PMID:20077966

  1. Geriatric Patients With Fractures Below the Hip are Medically Similar to Geriatric Patients With Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Harmeeth S.; Copeland, Marilyn E.; Crist, Brett D.; Volgas, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare a cohort of geriatric patients with operatively managed isolated fractures below the hip to a cohort of geriatric patients with operatively managed isolated hip fractures. All patients greater than 59 years of age admitted to our institution for surgical care of an isolated lower extremity fracture during a 3-year period were included. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts: BTH (fracture below the subtrochanteric region of the femur) and HIP (proximal femoral fracture at subtrochanteric region or proximal). We identified 141 patients included in cohort BTH and 205 patients included in cohort HIP. HIP patients were older (P < .01) and less obese (P < .01) but were otherwise very similar. An extensive comorbidity review revealed that the 2 cohorts were similar, with the exception of an increased incidence of dementia (P = .012) or glaucoma (P = .04) in HIP patients and of peripheral neuropathy (P = .014) in BTH patients. HIP patients were more likely to be under active antiosteoporotic medication management and were more likely to be receiving pharmacological anticoagulation at the time of admission. HIP patients and BTH patients were similar with regard to necessity of assistance with ambulation preinjury, but HIP patients were less likely to reside independently at home than were BTH patients (P < .001). HIP patients were also less likely to be discharged directly home from the hospital (P < .001). Geriatric patients with fractures below the hip are medically similar to geriatric patients with hip fracture. Medical comanagement protocols have been extensively published that improve care of geriatric patients with hip fracture; consideration should be given to similar protocol-driven medical comanagement programs for geriatric patients with fractures below the hip. PMID:26246950

  2. The need for geriatric dental education in India: the geriatric health challenges of the millennium.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Susan

    2013-06-01

    The rapid growth in the elderly population in a developing country such as India poses social and financial challenges by causing a shift towards non-communicable diseases and increases in chronic diseases. The economic impact of the burden of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes and cancer are high. The link between oral health and general health are particularly pronounced in older populations and impairs their quality of life. This paper reveals that in order to address the increasing health challenges and demands of a growing geriatric population, undergraduates and graduate students in dental schools should be given comprehensive or holistic health assessment training. Cost-effective modern educational strategies and educational tools such as problem-based learning will help to overcome the dearth of trained faculty in geriatric dentistry. Multidisciplinary health-care approaches and extended health-care team work are of vital importance to older patients who could benefit physically and psychologically from more efficient dental treatment. With often more than one chronic disease affecting individuals and use of polypharmacy, there is a need to increase overall knowledge of geriatric pharmacy and geriatric medicine. Measures to help older people remain healthy and active are a necessity in developing countries such as India for effective social and economic development. PMID:23691957

  3. Geriatric Telemedicine: Background and Evidence for Telemedicine as a Way to Address the Challenges of Geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The global population of elderly people is increasing at a remarkable rate, which may be expected to continue for some time. Older patients require more care, and with the current model of care delivery, the costs may be expected to rise, although higher cost is unsustainable. For this reason, a new pattern of practice is needed. Telemedicine will be presented as a highly effective and necessary tool in geriatrics. Methods This review will present some of the background and evidence for telemedicine as a way to address the challenges of geriatrics through geriatric telemedicine. Some of the evidence for the value of telemedicine as a tool for physicians and healthcare systems is presented. Results Telemedicine offers many means to address the problems of geriatric care in creative ways. The use of electronic medicine, telecommunications, and information management has now found its way into the very fabric of health care. The use of telemedicine is a fait accompli in much of the world, and it continues to have an increasing role deeply imbedded in our electronic practices coupled with social media. Conclusions The evidence for successful incorporation of telemedicine into practice is abundant and continues to accrue. This is a great opportunity for medical practice to evolve to new levels of engagement with patients and new levels of attainment in terms of quality care. PMID:26618027

  4. Effectiveness of three types of geriatric medical services: lessons for geriatric psychiatric services.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of geriatric medical services, to identify the types of patients who would benefit from such services, to determine the service components related to positive outcomes and to apply pertinent findings to geriatric psychiatric services. DATA SOURCES: Two databases, MEDLINE and Health Planning and Administration, were searched for relevant articles published from January 1975 to February 1990. The bibliographies of identified articles were searched for additional references. STUDY SELECTION: Seventeen reports were located that met the following three inclusion criteria: original research, published in English or French and controlled trial (nonrandomized or randomized) of a geriatric medical service. Fifteen met the validity criteria for intervention studies established by McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. DATA EXTRACTION: Information about study design, patient selection, interventions, outcome measures and results was systematically abstracted from each report. DATA SYNTHESIS: Abstracted data were compared and contrasted. Most of the external services and some of the hospital units were effective in reducing the number of hospital days an deaths. Consultation services were ineffective. Continuing care appeared to be related to positive outcomes. CONCLUSION: In applying these findings to geriatric psychiatric services priority should be given to the development of external services and the organization of continuing care. PMID:2025818

  5. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a…

  6. Pharmacists' Perceptions of Major Difficulties in Geriatric Pharmacy Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Clara Collette; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Pharmacists (N=233) responded to the question "What is the most difficult aspect of geriatric pharmacy practice?" Most commonly cited problems were (1) inadequate professional skills or knowledge in geriatrics; (2) patient compliance; (3) physician functioning (including overprescribing of medications); (4) communication with the elderly; (5) lack…

  7. Development of an Interview-Based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamison, Christine; Scogin, Forrest

    1992-01-01

    Developed interview-based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale (GDRS) and administered 35-item GDRS to 68 older adults with range of affective disturbance. Found scale to have internal consistency and split-half reliability comparable to those of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Geriatric Depression Scale. Concurrent validity, construct…

  8. Designing a Multi-Disciplinary Geriatrics Health Professional Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, J. James; Coogle, Constance L.; Parham, Iris A.; Head, Colleen; Fulton, LaQuana; Watson, Kathleen; Curtis, Angela

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a Geriatric Health Professionals Mentoring Program designed to address recruitment and retention of health professionals in geriatrics and gerontology. The training provided information on the mentoring process, negotiating mentoring agreements, and coaching mentees. The evaluative framework described examines: (a) the effects…

  9. Dental Students' Self-Assessed Competence in Geriatric Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiyak, H. Asuman; Brudvik, James

    1992-01-01

    A study of four classes of dental students (n=172) exposed to both didactic and clinical geriatric dental training found that the students perceived significant improvements in their abilities to manage geriatric patients in all areas assessed, notably treatment planning, preventive dentistry, referrals, and providing care in alternative settings.…

  10. Factor Analytic Composition of the Geriatric Rating Scale (GRS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James M.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Ambulatory geriatric patients (N=370) were rated on the Geriatric Rating Scale and results factor analyzed. The scale was found to be composed of three factors: Withdrawal/Apathy, Antisocial Disruptive Behavior, and Deficits in Activities of Daily Living. The results help explain some of the findings regarding sex differences in previous research.…

  11. Behavioral Ratings of Health Professionals' Interactions with the Geriatric Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelson, R.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Reports the reliability and validity of the Health Professional-Geriatric Patient Interaction Behavior Rating Code, an observational instrument that is used to quantify the interpersonal behaviors of health professionals in the care of the geriatric patient. Condensed 15 behavioral factors into 10 operationally defined behavioral categories.…

  12. Medical Student Attitudes toward Geriatric Medicine and Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrotta, Peter; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The influence of factual knowledge about the aged, general attitudes toward the aged, and personal contact with the aged on first-year medical students' attitudes toward geriatric patients and geriatric medicine was examined. Entering medical students indicated a preference for working with younger patients rather than aged patients. (Author/MLW)

  13. Teaching the Multidisciplinary Team Approach in a Geriatrics Miniresidency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, J. Edward; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A description is provided of the miniresidency program in geriatrics at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine which focuses on the multidisciplinary approach to the care of geriatric patients. Observations are given as to the program's effectiveness. (GLR)

  14. Person-Environment Interactions Contributing to Nursing Home Resident Falls

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Elizabeth E.; Nguyen, Tam H.; Shaha, Maya; Wenzel, Jennifer A.; DeForge, Bruce R.; Spellbring, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Although approximately 50% of nursing home residents fall annually, the surrounding circumstances remain inadequately understood. This study explored nursing staff perspectives of person, environment, and interactive circumstances surrounding nursing home falls. Focus groups were conducted at two nursing homes in the mid-Atlantic region with the highest and lowest fall rates among corporate facilities. Two focus groups were conducted per facility: one with licensed nurses and one with geriatric nursing assistants. Thematic and content analysis revealed three themes and 11 categories. Three categories under the Person theme were Change in Residents’ Health Status, Decline in Residents’ Abilities, and Residents’ Behaviors and Personality Characteristics. There were five Nursing Home Environment categories: Design Safety, Limited Space, Obstacles, Equipment Misuse and Malfunction, and Staff and Organization of Care. Three Interactions Leading to Falls categories were identified: Reasons for Falls, Time of Falls, and High-Risk Activities. Findings highlight interactions between person and environment factors as significant contributors to resident falls. PMID:20077985

  15. Financing geriatric programs in community health centers.

    PubMed Central

    Yeatts, D E; Ray, S; List, N; Duggar, B

    1991-01-01

    There are approximately 600 Community and Migrant Health Centers (C/MHCs) providing preventive and primary health care services principally to medically underserved rural and urban areas across the United States. The need to develop geriatric programs within C/MHCs is clear. Less clear is how and under what circumstances a comprehensive geriatric program can be adequately financed. The Health Resources and Services Administration of the Public Health Service contracted with La Jolla Management Corporation and Duke University Center on Aging to identify successful techniques for obtaining funding by examining 10 "good practice" C/MHC geriatric programs. The results from this study indicated that effective techniques included using a variety of funding sources, maintaining accurate cost-per-user information, developing a marketing strategy and user incentives, collaborating with the area agency on aging and other community organizations, and developing special services for the elderly. Developing cost-per-user information allowed for identifying appropriate "drawing card" services, negotiating sound reimbursement rates and contracts with other providers, and assessing the financial impact of changing service mixes. A marketing strategy was used to enhance the ability of the centers to provide a comprehensive package of services. Collaboration with the area agency on aging and other community organizations and volunteers in the aging network was found to help establish referral networks and subsequently increase the number of elderly patients served. Finally, development of special services for the elderly, such as adult day care, case management, and health education, was found to increase program visibility, opportunities to work with the network of services for the aging, and clinical utilization. PMID:1908588

  16. The Use of the Internet in Geriatrics Education: Results of a National Survey of Medical Geriatrics Academic Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajjar, Ihab M.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Teasdale, Thomas A.; Mintzer, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to characterize use of the Internet in medical geriatrics education programs, 130 medical education programs in the U.S. that train medical students, interns, residents, fellows and practicing physicians were asked to complete a survey developed by the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI). Sixty-eight programs…

  17. Geriatric care in a provincial hospital.

    PubMed

    De V Meiring, P

    1977-03-26

    Much of the work of the public medical wards at Grey's Hospital is concerned with the care of aged persons. In the absence of separate geriatric facilities, this work forms an integral part of internal medicine. During the last decade two surveys, and experience gained, have determined a comprehensive approach to the social and medical problems encountered. While team work can accomplish much, the responsibility for care of the aged currently remains divided among a number of government and private agencies. Without a unified policy and further expenditure of a certain amount of money, many of our senior citizens will continue to be denied easy access to health care facilities. PMID:857323

  18. Delta Alerts: Changing Outcomes in Geriatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Lynn L; Day, Mark D; Harris, LeAnna

    2016-01-01

    Geriatric trauma patients (GTPs) suffering minor injuries have suboptimal outcomes compared with younger populations. Patients 65 years or older account for 10% of all traumas but 28% of all trauma deaths. This trauma center established a third tier trauma alert specifically targeting GTPs at risk for poor outcomes. A Delta Alert is activated when GTPs suffer injuries that fall outside traditional trauma alert guidelines. Early identification and treatment of injuries and expedited referral to specialty groups have improved our GTPs' outcomes including decreased mortality and length of stay and increased percentage of GTPs who are discharged home. PMID:27414140

  19. Abdominal Pain in the Geriatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Leuthauser, Amy; McVane, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain in the elderly can be a challenging and difficult condition to diagnose and treat. The geriatric population has significant comorbidities and often takes polypharmacy that can mask symptoms. The presentation of common conditions can be different than that in the younger population, often lacking the traditional indicators of disease, making it of pivotal importance for the clinician to consider a wide differential during their workup. It is also important to consider extra-abdominal abnormality that may manifest as abdominal pain. PMID:27133249

  20. Thyroid disorders in the geriatric veterinary patient.

    PubMed

    Scott-Moncrieff, J Catharine

    2012-07-01

    The effects of age, concurrent illness, and administered medications complicate diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction in geriatric patients. Interpretation of thyroid hormone testing should take these factors into account. The most common thyroid disorder in dogs is acquired hypothyroidism. Therapeutic monitoring should be utilized for monitoring treatment of canine hypothyroidism. The most common thyroid disorder in cats is benign hyperthyroidism. Diagnosis is most often complicated by the presence of concurrent illness. Treatment should be individualized based on individual case characteristics and presence of concurrent illness. Some older cats have a palpable goiter months to years before development of clinical signs of hyperthyroidism. PMID:22720810

  1. Why do geriatric patients visit otorhinolaryngology?

    PubMed

    Özler, Gül Soylu; Yengil, Erhan

    2016-06-01

    The number and proportion of people more than 65 years old in the population are increasing with the rise in life expectancy. This study was designed to investigate the otolarygologic needs and visits of geriatric patients. We conducted a retrospective study that included all patients ≥65 years of age who visited the otolaryngology department between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. during 1 year. Age, gender, main complaint, and clinical diagnosis were noted on a chart and analyzed. In 2012, a total of 19,875 patients attended the otolaryngology department between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., of whom 418 (2.1%) were aged ≥65 years. The most common complaints were ear and hearing disorders (24.2%), epistaxis(15.3%), balance disorders (15.1%), pharyngotonsillar pathologies (14.8%), and head and facial trauma (9.6%). This study shows that the changing patient population will change the type and frequencies of pathologies seen in general otolaryngology practices. Geriatric patients need a targeted approach to their diseases because they have special issues unique to their population. PMID:27304440

  2. Geriatric psycho-social history outline.

    PubMed

    Velardo, C C

    1976-10-01

    The details of a Geriatric Psycho-Social History Outline for use with the institutional aged are presented. All health care facilities require background information on the patient at the time of admission, but with long-term facilities a more comprehensive psycho-social history is needed. The Outline provides a basis for obtaining information in five categories: 1) identification (detailed, observational and attitudinal); 2) referral source; 3) background; 4) family constellation or environmental factors; and 5) finances. Its comprehensiveness requires more than one pre-admission interview. It is aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality rates following admission to long-term facilities. If the aged person becomes somewhat familiar with the institution before admission, he is less susceptible to accelerated physiologic and psycho-social deterioration and death. Because of constant growth in the field of gerontology, new and improved instruments must be devised to help carry the load. The Geriatric Psycho-Social History Outline is for use as a guide to those who require such information if they are to function at maximum efficiency. PMID:965679

  3. [Clinical practice guideline: a complete geriatric evaluation].

    PubMed

    Medina-Chávez, Juan Humberto; Torres-Arreola, Laura Del Pilar; Cortés-González, Rosa María; Durán-Gómez, Verónica; Martínez-Hernández, Fernando; Esquivel-Romero, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The care of elderly patients requires an evaluation that deserves a host of special considerations, such as biological aspects of aging, those related to activities of daily living and functionality, neuro-psychological conceptions, family dynamics and economic conditions. The growth of the aging population in our country is accompanied by an increase in chronic diseases and more individuals have greater vulnerability, requiring a more consumption of resources because of the high demand for services. This requires the incorporation of specialized care in the institutional system, which has caused serious consequences in the current health system, benefiting specialization and technology, but with a loss of an integrated and horizontal view of the patient. Therefore it is necessary to develop a practical tool that allows the family physician to identify and differentiate the geriatric population that requires specialized care from who does not, identifying problems that may improve and allow the design of strategies to improve health status and maintain functional autonomy of the elderly. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is a fundamental tool for clinical practice of any medical care to the elderly. PMID:22176832

  4. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  5. Telemedicine for Specialist Geriatric Care in Small Rural Hospitals: Preliminary Data.

    PubMed

    Gray, Leonard C; Fatehi, Farhad; Martin-Khan, Melinda; Peel, Nancye M; Smith, Anthony C

    2016-06-01

    Small rural hospitals admit and manage older adults who, in city hospitals, would usually be offered geriatrician-supported comprehensive geriatric assessment and coordinated subacute care if required. Distance and diseconomies of scale prohibit access to the conventional in-person approach. A telegeriatric service model involving a geriatrician consulting remotely using wireless, mobile, high-definition videoconferencing; a trained host nurse at the rural site; structured geriatric assessment configured on a web-based clinical decision support system; routine weekly virtual rounds; and support from a local multidisciplinary team was established to overcome these barriers. This was a prospective observational study to examine the feasibility and sustainability of the model. Patient characteristics were recorded using the interRAI Acute Care assessment system. Usage patterns were derived from health service data sets and a service statistics database. Patients had characteristics that are consistent with characteristics of individuals typically referred for geriatric assessment. Overall, 53% of patients had cognitive impairment, 75% had limitations with activities of daily living, and the average Frailty Index was 0.44 ± 0.12. Stable patterns of consultation occurred within 6 months of start-up and continued uninterrupted for the remainder of the 24-month observation period. The estimated overall rate of initial consultation was 1.83 cases per occupied bed per year and 2.66 review cases per occupied bed per year. The findings indicate that the model was feasible and was sustained throughout and beyond the study period. This telegeriatric service model appears suitable for use in small rural hospitals. PMID:27321617

  6. Geriatric Syndromes in Older HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meredith; Covinsky, Kenneth E.; Valcour, Victor; Miao, Yinghui; Madamba, Joy; Lampiris, Harry; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Geriatric syndromes such as falls, frailty, and functional impairment are multifactorial conditions used to identify vulnerable older adults. Limited data exists on these conditions in older HIV-infected adults and no studies have comprehensively examined these conditions. Methods Geriatric syndromes including falls, urinary incontinence, functional impairment, frailty, sensory impairment, depression and cognitive impairment were measured in a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected adults age 50 and older who had an undetectable viral load on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined both HIV and non-HIV related predictors of geriatric syndromes including sociodemographics, number of co-morbidities and non-antiretroviral medications, and HIV specific variables in multivariate analyses. Results We studied 155 participants with a median age of 57 (IQR 54-62); (94%) were men. Pre-frailty (56%), difficulty with instrumental activities of daily living (46%), and cognitive impairment (47%) were the most frequent geriatric syndromes. Lower CD4 nadir (IRR 1.16, 95% CI 1.06-1.26), non-white race (IRR 1.38, 95% CI 1.10-1.74), and increasing number of comorbidities (IRR 1.09, 95%CI 1.03-1.15) were associated with increased risk of having more geriatric syndromes. Conclusions Geriatric syndromes are common in older HIV infected adults. Treatment of comorbidities and early initiation of ART may help to prevent development of these age related complications. Clinical care of older HIV-infected adults should consider incorporation of geriatric principles. PMID:26009828

  7. The uniqueness of elderly care: registered nurses' experience as preceptors during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Elisabeth; Bengtsson, Mariette

    2014-04-01

    The expected shortage of registered nurses with an advanced degree as specialists in geriatric care or gerontology is imminent. Previous studies report that clinical practice where student nurses are supervised by registered nurses has a direct impact on how students perceive nursing as a profession and future career choice. Considering the anticipated need for well-educated and specialised nurses it is therefore, relevant as well as necessary to describe clinical learning with a focus on preceptorship in geriatric nursing care. This paper is a report of a study describing registered nurses' experience of precepting undergraduate student nurses during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care. A qualitative design, based on seven focus group interviews, was employed with 30 registered nurses with preceptor experience from nursing homes and home-based care for the elderly. Our findings present three precepting strategies that are unique to elderly care: preparing students for end of life care, facilitating a respectful approach to the older person and promoting creativity and independent work. The findings are discussed using a socio-cultural perspective and illustrate how communities of elderly practice can be valuable learning environments. PMID:23954003

  8. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. In addition, many doctors share office space ...

  9. Contemporary Systemic Therapy for Urologic Malignancies in Geriatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Grivas, Petros D

    2015-11-01

    Current data on systemic therapy in geriatric populations with genitourinary malignancies are largely derived from retrospective analyses of prospectively conducted trials or retrospective reviews. Although extrapolation of these data to real-world patients should be cautious, patients aged 65 years or older with good functional status and minimal comorbidities seem to enjoy similar survival benefit from therapy as their younger counterparts. Chronologic age alone should generally not be used to guide management decisions. Comprehensive geriatric assessment tools and prospective studies in older adults integrating comprehensive geriatric assessment can shed light on the optimal management of urologic malignancies in this population. PMID:26476122

  10. The effect of chlorhexidine in reducing oral colonisation in geriatric patients: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sharif-Abdullah, Sharifah Shafinaz Binti; Chong, Mei Chan; Surindar-Kaur, Surat Singh; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Inadequate oral care has been implicated in the development of aspiration pneumonia in frail geriatric patients and is a major cause of mortality, due to the colonisation of microbes in vulnerable patients. This type of pneumonia has been associated with an increase in respiratory pathogens in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chlorhexidine compared to routine oral care in edentulous geriatric inpatients. METHODS A double-blind, parallel-group randomised controlled trial was carried out. The intervention group received oral care with chlorhexidine 0.2%, while the control group received routine oral care with thymol. Nurses provided oral care with assigned solutions of 20 mL once daily over seven days. Oral cavity assessment using the Brief Oral Health Status Examination form was performed before each oral care procedure. Data on medication received and the subsequent development of aspiration pneumonia was recorded. An oral swab was performed on Day 7 to obtain specimens to test for colonisation. RESULTS The final sample consisted of 35 (control) and 43 (intervention) patients. Chlorhexidine was effective in reducing oral colonisation compared to routine oral care with thymol (p < 0.001). The risk of oral bacterial colonisation was nearly three times higher in the thymol group compared to the chlorhexidine group. CONCLUSION The use of chlorhexidine 0.2% significantly reduced oral colonisation and is recommended as an easier and more cost-effective alternative for oral hygiene. PMID:27211885

  11. Homocysteine and disability in hospitalized geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Marengoni, Alessandra; Cossi, Stefania; De Martinis, Monica; Calabrese, Paolo A; Orini, Stefania; Grassi, Vittorio

    2004-08-01

    Elevated total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations have been found to be associated with cardiovascular disease and dementia in old age. The present study was performed to identify the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) and to analyze the association between tHcy concentration and sociodemographic characteristics, nutritional parameters, and cognitive and functional status in this sample of hospitalized geriatric patients. A total of 214 patients (77% females) 65+ years old admitted into an acute care geriatric ward of an internal medical department in the Northern Italy were studied. tHcy concentration was measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-F). Information about nutrition (body mass index [BMI], serum albumin, cholesterol, and transferrin) was collected on admission. Functional status was investigated with the Basic Activities of Daily Living scale (ADL) and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale (IADL); cognitive and affective status were assessed by the Mini-Mental State Evaluation (MMSE) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). The mean tHcy concentration was 18.4 +/- 13.1 micromol/L; 74.2% of males and 68.9% of females had HHcy (> 12 micromol/L). Sixty-four percent of patients with normal serum vitamin B12 and folate concentrations had HHcy. Elevated tHcy concentrations were associated with older age, male gender, increasing serum creatinine, lower MMSE score, and disability. The mean tHcy concentration depended on the occurrence of different diseases. Patients affected by atherosclerotic diseases, such as ischemic heart diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, and dementia had higher mean tHcy concentration than those without diagnosed vascular diseases. In multivariate analysis, vitamin B12, folate, serum albumin, creatinine, and disability emerged as factors associated with tHcy, adjusted for age, gender, education, MMSE score, and atherosclerotic diseases. Our results suggest that the

  12. [Nursing development at the Solothurn hospitals. Towards clinically oriented nursing expertise and practice development].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ursi Barandun; Hirsbrunner, Therese; Jäger, Susanne; Näf, Ernst; Römmich, Sabine; Horlacher, Kathrin

    2011-02-01

    At the Solothurn Hospitals (soH), 13 academically educated nurses are responsible for the development of nursing care with the goal to improve patient-oriented, effective, appropriate, and economic care. The strategy contains three priorities: a) expert care of single patients in demanding situations, b) sustained application of organisational methods such as primary nursing, nursing process, and skill/grade mix, and c) design and management of practice development projects related to specific patient groups. A first evaluation with qualitative and quantitative methods showed that the exemplary care of single patients by expert nurses was evaluated as positive for the patients as well as for the teams on two wards by nurses who were interviewed. After the introduction of primary nursing, the application rate was 81 to 90 % and the introduction of fall prevention methods in geriatric rehabilitation decreased the fall rate from 8.2 to 5.5 per 1000 patient days. A comparision with the literature shows that the expert nurses of soH perform both, working at the bedside and being responsible for practice development projects, as specialised Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs). APNs at the Solothurn Hospitals work also as generalists when organisational methods need to be consolidated. Their successes depend from their integration into the hierarchy and both, into the nursing as well as into the interprofessional teams. Competencies in Transformational Leadership also are essential at all management levels. PMID:21274841

  13. Comprehensive geriatric assessment of a mental health service user with safeguarding needs.

    PubMed

    North, Chris

    2016-05-27

    This is the final article in a short series that presents case study examples of the use of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) in different clinical settings. CGA is a holistic model that is used to determine frail older people's medical and mental health status, as well as any functional, social and environmental issues that might affect their care. When undertaken by nurses, it can enable individualised planning for health, safety and wellbeing. This article explores the case of an older woman living in the community who was receiving support from a number of health and social care services and who had significant safeguarding needs. It highlights the complexity of caring for patients with physical and mental health conditions. CGA can link these conditions and needs together to allow a better understanding of their effects on the patient. The risks of significant transitions in care are also highlighted, along with recommendations for the provision of multidisciplinary care in community settings. PMID:27231083

  14. The Geriatric Day Hospital: A Canadian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wolochow, Michael; Ham, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    As geriatric day hospitals (GDHs) and assessment units (GAUs) become increasingly established as part of the Canadian medical scene, a closer definition is emerging both of the role of the family physician working in their programs and also of the role of the family physician whose patient is being assessed in their units. This paper briefly summarizes the development of GDHs and GAUs in Canada, their rationale and their objectives. A detailed account is given of such a functioning program, the Short Term Assessment and Treatment (STAT) Centre at Vancouver General Hospital. The relationships of the family physician working there as a team member are described, and the role of the community family physician whose patient is being assessed in such a program is clarified. PMID:20469452

  15. Interprofessional meetings in geriatric assessment units: a matter of care organization.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Bernard-Simon; Presse, Nancy; Bolduc, Aline; Dutilleul, Aurore; Couturier, Yves; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne

    2013-11-01

    Inpatient geriatric assessment units (GAUs) exist in Quebec, Canada, to deliver comprehensive, integrated care to older vulnerable patients. Most cases should be discussed at interprofessional meetings (IMs), but research has shown this not to be so for 39% of GAU patients. Consequently, a study was undertaken to (1) describe GAU team composition and (2) identify GAU and patient characteristics associated with case discussion at IMs at least once during a patient's stay. To this end, 877 hospitalization records from 44 GAUs were reviewed. Results showed most teams were composed of attending physicians, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, dietitians and social workers; 66% included clinical pharmacists and 43% liaison nurses. Multilevel modeling showed longer length of stay to be the strongest predictor of case discussion at an IM. Case discussion was also more likely for patients admitted via in- or inter-hospital transfer rather than via the emergency department, if the GAU included a liaison nurse, and if the GAU was not located in an urban area. In summary, case discussion at an IM depended more on how and where a patient was admitted than on the patient characteristics per se, suggesting that this is a matter of care organization. PMID:23802732

  16. Geriatric consultation services-are wards more effective than teams?

    PubMed

    Cameron, Ian D; Kurrle, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Geriatric consultation teams are one of the models for bringing comprehensive geriatric assessment to vulnerable and frail older people in the acute care hospital setting. While ward-based comprehensive geriatric assessment has been established as effective with reference to improving functional status and other outcomes, the team-based variant remains unproven for outcomes other than mortality in the medium term, as shown in a recent study published in BMC Medicine by Deschodt and colleagues. Further research might establish the effectiveness of the team-based model but, for current clinical practice, the emphasis should be on streaming older people with complex problems needing multidisciplinary assessment and treatment to ward-based models of comprehensive geriatric assessment. PMID:23433506

  17. Curricular Strategies for Geriatrics Education in a Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A.; Moreno-Macias, Carlos H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the following: barriers to geriatrics education, teaching strategies (such as communication with patients, acceptance of one's own aging, interdisciplinary teamwork), and curriculum design for undergraduate and graduate study. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  18. Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Elderly: New Findings in Geriatric Depression.

    PubMed

    Geduldig, Emma T; Kellner, Charles H

    2016-04-01

    This paper reviews recent research on the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in elderly depressed patients. The PubMed database was searched for literature published within the past 4 years, using the search terms: "electroconvulsive elderly," "electroconvulsive geriatric," "ECT and elderly," and "ECT elderly cognition." The studies in this review indicate excellent efficacy for ECT in geriatric patients. Adverse cognitive effects of ECT in this population are usually transient and not typically severe. In addition, continuation/maintenance ECT (C/M-ECT) may be a favorable strategy for relapse prevention in the elderly after a successful acute course of ECT. ECT is an important treatment option for depressed geriatric patients with severe and/or treatment-resistant illness. New data add to the evidence demonstrating that ECT is a highly effective, safe, and well-tolerated antidepressant treatment option for geriatric patients. PMID:26909702

  19. Geriatric syndromes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Augustyniak-Bartosik, Hanna; Weyde, Wacław; Klinger, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The recent epidemiologic data pointed out, that the general number of patients on hemodialysis is steadily increasing, especially in group of elderly patients over 75 years old. The geriatric syndromes are a multietiological disorder related to physiological aging and partly associated with comorbid conditions. Frailty, falls, functional decline and disability, cognitive impairment and depression are main geriatric syndromes and occurs in patients with impaired renal function more often than among general population. The causes of higher prevalence of those syndromes are not well known, but uremic environment and overall renal replacement therapy may have an important impact on its progress. The patient with geriatric syndrome require comprehensive treatment as well as physical rehabilitation, psychiatric cure and support in everyday activities. Herein below we would like to review recent literature regarding to particular features of main geriatric syndromes in a group of nephrological patients. PMID:27333928

  20. Humanities and Geriatric Education: a Strategy for Recruitment?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher; Martin, Ruth Elwood

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is a common subject in arts and literature as it is a universal experience. The use of the humanities in medical education may have a positive effect on trainees’ attitude to caring for seniors and on geriatrics as a career choice. This paper summarizes the role of humanities in medical education and provides some examples and thoughts on how humanities curriculum can be used in geriatric teaching. PMID:25825611

  1. Review of efficacy and safety of laxatives use in geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Izzy, Manhal; Malieckal, Anju; Little, Erin; Anand, Sury

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the efficacy and safety of pharmacological treatment of constipation in geriatrics. METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, google scholar, and Ovid were searched to identify human studies performed on the use of laxatives in elderly with constipation, which were conducted between January 1990 and January 2013 using the specified keywords. Controlled studies that enrolled geriatric patients with a diagnosis of constipation and addressed the efficacy and/or the safety of pharmacological treatments were included. Studies were excluded from this review if they were non-controlled trials, case series, or case reports. RESULTS: Out of twenty three studies we initially retrieved in our search, only nine studies met the eligibility criteria of being controlled trials within geriatrics. The laxatives examined in the nine studies were senna, lactulose, sorbital, polyethylene glycol (PEG), lubiprostone, linaclotide, and prucalopride. In those studies, senna combinations had a higher efficacy than sorbitol or lactulose as well as, a very good adverse effect profile. PEG was also shown to be safe and effective in geriatric population. Furthermore, it has been shown that PEG is as safe in geriatrics as in general population. New agents like lubiprostone and prucalopride show promising results but the data about these agents in geriatrics are still limited which warrants further investigation. CONCLUSION: Senna combinations and PEG appear to have a more favorable profile over the other traditionally used laxatives in elderly patients with constipation. PMID:27158549

  2. The ELDER Project: educational model and three-year outcomes of a community-based geriatric education initiative.

    PubMed

    Lange, Jean W; Mager, Diana; Greiner, Philip A; Saracino, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the ELDER (Expanded Learning and Dedication to Elders in the Region) Project was to address the needs of underserved older adults by providing worksite education to individuals who provide nursing care to older adults in community health centers, home health agencies, and long-term care facilities. Four agencies located in a Health Professional Shortage and Medically Underserved Area participated. Project staff conducted separate focus groups with administrators and staff at each agency to determine educational needs and preferences. Curricula from the Hartford Institute, End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium, and Geriatric Education Centers were adapted to design unique curricula for each agency and level of personnel (licensed nurse or unlicensed caregiver). Activities included focus group meetings to tailor content to the needs of each agency, on-site educational sessions, and identification of an agency champion to sustain the program after the funding ended. A case-based simulation-learning approach was used in the final year to validate application of knowledge and to facilitate teamwork and interprofessional communication. Over 100 nurses and nursing assistants and eight administrators and allied health professionals participated over the three-year period of the project. Retention over this period, independent evaluations, and simulations demonstrated participants' ability to integrate best practices into typical clinical scenarios and revealed improved communication among care providers. Tailored on-site education incorporating simulation was an effective model for translating gerontological knowledge into practice and improving the care of older adults in these multiple settings. PMID:21598149

  3. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  4. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  5. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Nursing Positions KidsHealth > For Parents > Nursing Positions Print A ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ...

  6. The Relative Value Unit in academic geriatrics: incentive or impediment?

    PubMed

    Resnick, Neil M; Radulovich, Nichole

    2014-03-01

    Although the number of older adults is rapidly expanding, the number of healthcare professionals trained in geriatrics is small and declining. The reasons are multifaceted, but because responsibility for training such professionals resides largely in academic health centers (AHCs), their support for geriatrics is critical. As AHCs face increasing financial pressure, many are seeking metrics to measure productivity and the Relative Value Unit (RVU) may be the one most commonly selected. Yet little is known about the RVU's effect on geriatric programs. Review of the literature and a survey of the leaders of the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs suggest that the advantages of an RVU-based metric are likely eclipsed by its negative impact on the care of older adults, the ability of academic geriatrics to accomplish its mission, and even the survival of geriatrics. If the RVU is to continue to be used as the index of productivity, it should be modified--by reweighting its codes (or by adding new ones)--and complemented by interventions to ensure patient access, care quality, and efficiency. Because an alternative metric, such as a Patient-based Value Unit may be preferable, this article describes the principles on which one might be based. Regardless, urgent action is required by all stakeholders to address this issue. Without it, the future of academic geriatrics--and with it the innovative care models, research, and training the nation needs to improve care and bend the cost curve--will be difficult if not impossible to sustain. PMID:24512218

  7. A Survey of Geriatrics Courses in North American Chiropractic Programs

    PubMed Central

    Borggren, Cara L.; Osterbauer, Paul J.; Wiles, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: There has been a growing interest in meeting the health care needs of the anticipated “age wave.” In order to prepare for the current demographic trends, we sought to describe the status of geriatrics curricula in the 18 North American English-speaking chiropractic colleges by reviewing geriatric course syllabi. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using syllabi and catalog information solicited from each English-speaking chiropractic college in North America, collected from January 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Information was then summarized. Results: As of June 30, 2007, roughly 78% of colleges submitted their current geriatrics course syllabi. The remaining 4 colleges were estimated using online course catalog information. Sixty-one percent of colleges offered a course that was solely dedicated to the topic of geriatrics. Additionally, 37.5% of syllabi indicating credit load offer 4 or more credits to the course containing the geriatrics component. Also, 31.3% of courses include non-classroom clinical experience, while 50% require an independent study project that provides further geriatrics experience. Furthermore, 41.2% of reported courses classify the teaching strategies as lecture only. Conclusions: These results warrant a proposal for improved curricula in this specialty population. It is proposed that more time be dedicated for this topic, more experiential learning be required, and more clinical focus be given on the needs of this population. A restructure of curricula will provide more clinical experiences for students to better equip future doctors of chiropractic for the increase in geriatric health care needs. PMID:19390680

  8. Spirituality in Nursing: Filipino Elderly's Concept of, Distance from, and Involvement with God

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Dalay, Naihra Jae Z.; De Guzman, Anthony Joe M.; de Jesus, Luigi Lauren E.; de Mesa, Jacqueline Barbara C.; Flores, Jan Derick D.

    2009-01-01

    Spirituality is an aspect of holistic care delivery by health team members. However, despite the established relationship of spirituality and health, there had been little evidence of ways of assessing spirituality for nurses' clinical practice in Asia, particularly in regard to geriatric patients. This study aimed to establish an eiditic…

  9. Patient Care Assisting. A Curriculum for Career Entry in the Nursing Homes of Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Sharon; Bailey, Nancy

    This curriculum guide contains 16 units aimed at training entry-level workers as patient care assistants in nursing homes. The units cover the following topics: the role of patient care assistants; psychosocial needs of geriatric patients; work ethics; legal issues; communication skills; infection control; safety issues; patient hygiene; patient…

  10. Training the Primary Care Internist to Provide Care in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, John A.

    1983-01-01

    A pilot program at the University of California, Davis, that incorporated skilled nursing facility training into the required curriculum of their primary care internal medicine residency is described. The goal was to increase the residents' knowledge in the care of geriatric patients. (MLW)

  11. Geriatric Nutrition Workshop for the Dietetic Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This workshop guide is a unit of study for teaching dietetic assistants to work with elderly persons. The objective of the unit is to enable the students to apply knowledge of the physiological and psychological effects of aging in providing nutritional care to the elderly in independent living and nursing home situations. Following the unit…

  12. Risk scores and geriatric profile: can they really help us in anticoagulation decision making among older patients suffering from atrial fibrillation?

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Frédéric; Dalleur, Olivia; Henrard, Séverine; Wouters, Dominique; Scavée, Christophe; Spinewine, Anne; Boland, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Anticoagulation for the prevention of cardio-embolism is most frequently indicated but largely underused in frail older patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). This study aimed at identifying characteristics associated with anticoagulation underuse. Methods A cross-sectional study of consecutive geriatric patients aged ≥75 years, with AF and clear anticoagulation indication (CHADS2 [Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age >75, Diabetes mellitus, and prior Stroke or transient ischemic attack] ≥2) upon hospital admission. All patients benefited from a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Their risks of stroke and bleeding were predicted using CHADS2 and HEMORR2HAGES (Hepatic or renal disease, Ethanol abuse, Malignancy, Older (age >75 years), Reduced platelet count or function, Rebleed risk, Hypertension (uncontrolled), Anemia, Genetic factors, Excessive fall risk, and Stroke) scores, respectively. Results Anticoagulation underuse was observed in 384 (50%) of 773 geriatric patients with AF (median age 85 years; female 57%, cognitive disorder 33%, nursing home 20%). No geriatric characteristic was found to be associated with anticoagulation underuse. Conversely, anticoagulation underuse was markedly increased in the patients treated with aspirin (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval]: 5.3 [3.8; 7.5]). Other independent predictors of anticoagulation underuse were ethanol abuse (OR: 4.0 [1.4; 13.3]) and age ≥90 years (OR: 2.0 [1.2; 3.4]). Anticoagulation underuse was not inferior in patients with a lower bleeding risk and/or a higher stroke risk and underuse was surprisingly not inferior either in the AF patients who had previously had a stroke. Conclusion Half of this geriatric population did not receive any anticoagulation despite a clear indication, regardless of their individual bleeding or stroke risks. Aspirin use is the main characteristic associated with anticoagulation underuse. PMID:25053883

  13. Ash Split Cath in geriatric dialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Conz, P A; Catalano, C; Rizzioli, E; Normanno, M; Fabbian, F; Preciso, G

    2001-09-01

    Vascular access is the essential step in performing hemodialysis in uremic patients. In the absence of a permanent and utilizable native arterio-venous fistula, the use of a tunnelled catheter makes dialysis therapy possible. The Ash Split Cath, a recently introduced chronic hemodialysis catheter, was inserted in five patients (7.1% of our prevalent dialysis population) because of repeated venous thrombosis in three patients and a poor venous tree in two. The mean age of patients was 78 years +/- 7. The average blood flow rate was 250+/-50 ml/minute and the mean venous pressure 140mm Hg +/- 35. Recirculation determined by low flux technique was less than 2%. KT/V calculated 3 months after the catheter placement was 1.2+/-0.02. During the follow-up we did not document any infection of the exit site or related to the catheter. This device is simple to place, gives adequate dialysis treatment and is useful in geriatric dialyzed patients in whom the arterio-venous fistula can no longer be used. PMID:11693424

  14. Research ethics issues in geriatric psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Laura B; Misra, Sahana

    2009-06-01

    Progress in geriatric psychiatric research may be impeded by lack of attention to collecting evidence relevant to ethical issues. As has been noted for some time, unless proactive work is done to identify, clarify, and remediate ethical challenges (see Table 2 for research directions), deleterious effects on research can result, including research bans, unduly overprotective stances, or inaccurate weighing of risks and benefits of research by review boards. With regard to proxy consent, a number of issues require further study. These include: how state laws address (or fail to address) research involving cognitively impaired individuals and what effects this has on research conduct; how IRBs define and weigh risks and benefits in considering research involving proxy consent; how various stakeholders, including the general public, people with disorders that may impair decision-making capacity, and proxies themselves view proxy consent for research; and to what degree proxies' research decisions reflect what patients themselves would decide. The use of advanced directives as a stand alone method for future consent is fraught with difficulties around adequate informed consent for a particular study; however, future study may clarify if such directives provide surrogates with improved understanding of their relative's overall views of the research enterprise and possibly the types of studies they would be willing to participate in even if they are no longer able to provide their own consent. In depression and suicide research, further work is needed to develop standard procedures for meeting the ethical demands of research while conducting rigorous, crucial research. PMID:19486821

  15. Altered Synchronizations among Neural Networks in Geriatric Depression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong; Chou, Ying-Hui; Potter, Guy G.; Steffens, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Although major depression has been considered as a manifestation of discoordinated activity between affective and cognitive neural networks, only a few studies have examined the relationships among neural networks directly. Because of the known disconnection theory, geriatric depression could be a useful model in studying the interactions among different networks. In the present study, using independent component analysis to identify intrinsically connected neural networks, we investigated the alterations in synchronizations among neural networks in geriatric depression to better understand the underlying neural mechanisms. Resting-state fMRI data was collected from thirty-two patients with geriatric depression and thirty-two age-matched never-depressed controls. We compared the resting-state activities between the two groups in the default-mode, central executive, attention, salience, and affective networks as well as correlations among these networks. The depression group showed stronger activity than the controls in an affective network, specifically within the orbitofrontal region. However, unlike the never-depressed controls, geriatric depression group lacked synchronized/antisynchronized activity between the affective network and the other networks. Those depressed patients with lower executive function has greater synchronization between the salience network with the executive and affective networks. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the between-network analyses in examining neural models for geriatric depression. PMID:26180795

  16. Altered Synchronizations among Neural Networks in Geriatric Depression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Chou, Ying-Hui; Potter, Guy G; Steffens, David C

    2015-01-01

    Although major depression has been considered as a manifestation of discoordinated activity between affective and cognitive neural networks, only a few studies have examined the relationships among neural networks directly. Because of the known disconnection theory, geriatric depression could be a useful model in studying the interactions among different networks. In the present study, using independent component analysis to identify intrinsically connected neural networks, we investigated the alterations in synchronizations among neural networks in geriatric depression to better understand the underlying neural mechanisms. Resting-state fMRI data was collected from thirty-two patients with geriatric depression and thirty-two age-matched never-depressed controls. We compared the resting-state activities between the two groups in the default-mode, central executive, attention, salience, and affective networks as well as correlations among these networks. The depression group showed stronger activity than the controls in an affective network, specifically within the orbitofrontal region. However, unlike the never-depressed controls, geriatric depression group lacked synchronized/antisynchronized activity between the affective network and the other networks. Those depressed patients with lower executive function has greater synchronization between the salience network with the executive and affective networks. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the between-network analyses in examining neural models for geriatric depression. PMID:26180795

  17. Nursing: Registered Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses for jobs in health planning and development, marketing, consulting, policy development, and quality assurance. Some RNs ... workers was $36,200. Recommend this page using: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn tools Areas at a Glance Industries ...

  18. Dealing with the patient's body in nursing: nurses' ambiguous experience in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Picco, Elisa; Santoro, Roberto; Garrino, Lorenza

    2010-03-01

    The core of nursing in western countries is interaction with the patient and with his/her body in particular. As all nursing practices revolve around caring for the patient's body, nurses need to understand the frailty of the body, the intimacy surrounding it, the story it tells, as well as the discomfort and difficulties both illness and close contact can generate in the nurse-patient relationship. With this study, we wanted to explore the ward experiences of a small group of nurses in their day-to-day interaction with patients and their bodies, to highlight their perceptions and possible difficulties in providing care. We collected qualitative data from in-depth interviews with 14 nurses working in departments of general internal medicine, neurology, and geriatrics. The interviews were conducted between April and June 2006 and interpreted using an interpretive phenomenological approach. Analysis of the interview transcripts revealed that while the nurses recognize the centrality of the body in nursing, they also expressed a certain ambiguity toward it: being able to improve a patient's well-being through attentive care to the body is a major source of job satisfaction, but various coping and defense strategies are deployed to overcome care-giving situations that elicit avoidance or refusal reactions to the patient's body. PMID:20137029

  19. Geriatric-Focused Educational Offerings in the Department of Veterans Affairs from 1999 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thielke, Stephen; Tumosa, Nina; Lindenfeld, Rivkah; Shay, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The scope of geriatrics-related educational offerings in large health care systems, in either the target audiences or topics covered, has not previously been analyzed or reported in the professional literature. The authors reviewed the geriatrics-related educational sessions that were provided between 1999 and 2009 by the Geriatrics Research,…

  20. Fieldwork Rotation: A Model for Educating Social Work Students for Geriatric Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivry, Joann; Lawrance, Frances P.; Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn; Robbins, Virginia Cooke

    2005-01-01

    The Geriatric Social Work Practicum Partnership Program was funded to attract graduate students to the field of aging and to strengthen field education in geriatric social work. Rotation was selected to achieve the program's goals to provide students with exposure to the spectrum of care in geriatric social work services. This paper describes the…

  1. Three Strategies for Delivering Continuing Medical Education in Geriatrics to General Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rikkert, Marcel G. M.; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2004-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) need advanced skills in geriatric assessment to be competent to treat the increasing number of elderly patients. Continuing medical education in geriatrics for GPs is heterogeneous, and not assessed for effectiveness. In this study we compared the educational effects of three geriatric post-graduate training methods on…

  2. Geriatric Pharmacy Curriculum in U.S. Pharmacy Schools: A Nationwide Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, William; Pratt, Clara Collette

    1982-01-01

    A survey of 72 pharmacy schools shows 22 percent of the schools had no geriatric coursework, 35 percent offered only courses in which the geriatric content averaged under 12 percent of course content, and 43 percent offered courses that focused primarily on geriatrics, most including a major clinical component. (Author/MSE)

  3. Detection and documentation of dementia and delirium in acute geriatric wards.

    PubMed

    Laurila, Jouko V; Pitkala, Kaisu H; Strandberg, Timo E; Tilvis, Reijo S

    2004-01-01

    Detection of cognitive impairment among hospitalized older individuals has shown to be insufficient. A point prevalence study in two geriatric hospitals in Helsinki, Finland, was performed among 219 acutely ill individuals over 70 years to assess the detection of dementia and delirium. Documentation of dementia and delirium in medical records, and recordings of confusional symptoms in nurses' notes were compared with the researchers' diagnosis made after a detailed assessment of cognitive status. The cognitive decline was mentioned in medical records in 70/88 (79.5%) of the cases. Cognitive testing was performed on 42/88 (47.7%) of the dementia patients, and the diagnosis of dementia was recorded in 47/88 (53.4%) of them. A specific etiological diagnosis was recorded in only 4/88 (4.5%) cases. Cognitive impairment in at least one of these four means was recorded in 80/88 (90.9%) of cases (sensitivity 0.93). Eight patients had a false-positive diagnosis of dementia (specificity 0.94). Delirium was diagnosed in 77 (35.2%) patients by the researchers, but it was recorded in only 31/77 (40.3%) in medical records. In 64/77 (83.1%) cases signs of confusion were recorded in nurses' notes. Poor detection and documentation may lead to undertreatment of both disorders. PMID:14757300

  4. The experiences of undergraduate nursing students with bots in Second LifeRTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Lesele H.

    As technology continues to transform education from the status quo of traditional lecture-style instruction to an interactive engaging learning experience, students' experiences within the learning environment continues to change as well. This dissertation addressed the need for continuing research in advancing implementation of technology in higher education. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to discover more about the experiences of undergraduate nursing students using standardized geriatric evaluation tools when interacting with scripted geriatric patient bots tools in a simulated instructional intake setting. Data was collected through a Demographics questionnaire, an Experiential questionnaire, and a Reflection questionnaire. Triangulation of data collection occurred through an automatically created log of the interactions with the two bots, and by an automatically recorded log of the participants' movements while in the simulated geriatric intake interview. The data analysis consisted of an iterative review of the questionnaires and the participants' logs in an effort to identify common themes, recurring comments, and issues which would benefit from further exploration. Findings revealed that the interactions with the bots were perceived as a valuable experience for the participants from the perspective of interacting with the Geriatric Evaluation Tools in the role of an intake nurse. Further research is indicated to explore instructional interactions with bots in effectively mastering the use of established Geriatric Evaluation Tools.

  5. More than a prescriber: gerontological nurse practitioners' perspectives on prescribing and pharmaceutical marketing.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Diane Feeney; Ladd, Elissa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain understanding about nurse practitioners' (NPs') prescriptive decision making for geriatric patients with attention to pharmaceutical marketing influences. Prior research has focused on physician prescribers and identified suboptimal practices. Because the majority of medications are prescribed to older adults, NPs in geriatric practice were targeted as an information-rich group to interview about prescribing issues. Given the exploratory nature of this research, qualitative focus group methods were employed using content analysis. Fifteen NPs were recruited at an annual national geriatric NP conference. They worked in all regions of the United States, had an average of 9 years prescribing experience, and participated in 1 of the 2 focus groups. The key theme that emerged was that they were more than a prescriber. Findings revealed overwhelming consistency among the NP participants that their nursing background instilled a holistic approach that encompassed both nondrug and therapeutic drug options and skepticism about drug marketing, as well as offered a positive difference by tailoring to their patients' biophysical, psychological, and economic needs with an involvement in the interplay of geriatric care issues not typically addressed by physicians. The participants' reported approaches were in alignment with geriatric prescribing recommendations. PMID:20159350

  6. Geriatrics Education Team Model Results in Sustained Geriatrics Training in 15 Residency and Fellowship Programs and Scholarship.

    PubMed

    Denson, Steven; Simpson, Deborah; Denson, Kathryn; Brown, Diane; Manzi, Gabriel; Rehm, Judith; Wessel, Bambi; Duthie, Edmund H

    2016-04-01

    Caring for the growing elderly population will require specialty and subspecialty physicians who have not completed geriatric medicine fellowship training to participate actively in patient care. To meet this workforce demand, a sustainable approach to integrating geriatrics into specialty and subspecialty graduate medical education training is needed. This article describes the use of a geriatrics education team (GET) model to develop, implement, and sustain specialty-specific geriatrics curricula using a systematic process of team formation and needs assessment through evaluation, with a unique focus on developing curricular interventions that are meaningful to each specialty and satisfy training, scholarship, and regulatory requirements. The GET model and associated results from 15 specialty residency and fellowship training programs over a 4-year period include 93% curriculum sustainability after initial implementation, more than half of the programs introducing additional geriatrics education, and more than 80% of specialty GETs fulfilling their scholarship requirements through their curriculum dissemination. Win-wins and barriers encountered in using the GET model, along with the model's efficacy in curriculum development, sustainability, and dissemination, are summarized. PMID:27021702

  7. Geriatric epilepsy: research and clinical directions for the future.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Erik D; Hope, Omotola A; Martin, Roy C; Schmidt, Dieter

    2011-09-01

    There is a growing awareness of the need for improved treatment and care of older adults with epilepsy. The present review article highlights key clinical and research issues in the emerging field of geriatric epilepsy. Drs. Martin and Schmidt explore the scope of the problems in the field, outline topic areas including cognitive health/dementia, and diagnostic challenges, and also present important research questions that should be considered for the future. As part of this presentation, we will highlight the work of two promising young investigators whose work holds great promise for the field of geriatric epilepsy. Dr. Roberson will discuss his work focusing on the relationship of epilepsy and cognitive impairment, particularly as it relates to Alzheimer's disease pathology including tau and its role in epileptiform activity. Dr. Hope will outline key issues, as well as her work, relating to defining and measuring quality care in geriatric epilepsy. PMID:21596624

  8. [Health care of geriatric patients with urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Mueller, Edgar A; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2015-04-01

    Urinary incontinence occurs frequently in geriatric patients. In the doctor's practice, the symptoms are often not mentioned by the patients; this may lead to loss of autonomy and social isolation. A screening for urinary incontinence should therefore be part of each geriatric assessment. In the presence of urinary incontinence, several treatment options are available, which need to be tailored according to the individual capabilities (mobility, motivation and cognitive performance) of the patient. Non-pharmacological treatment options, such as behavior modification, toilet training and pelvic floor training, should be exploited before any pharmacotherapy commences. If the pharmacological treatment involves the use of anticholinergic agents, the cognitive performance should be monitored. An interdisciplinary collaboration is a prerequisite for the optimized treatment and adequate health care of geriatric patients with urinary incontinence. PMID:25826038

  9. [Electrolyte disturbances in geriatric patients with focus on hyponatremia].

    PubMed

    Grundmann, F

    2016-08-01

    Disturbances of water and electrolyte balance are commonly encountered in older patients due to a multitude of physiological changes and preexisting morbidities with hyponatremia being the most common disorder. Even mild chronic hyponatremia can lead to cognitive deficits and gait instability and is associated with an increased rate of falls and fractures. Additionally, experimental and epidemiological data suggest that hyponatremia promotes bone resorption and therefore increases the risk of osteoporosis. Furthermore, osteoporosis and sarcopenia can be stimulated by hypomagnesemia. Hypernatremia often only results in unspecific symptoms but the condition is associated with a clearly increased mortality. As electrolyte disturbances have a high prevalence in the geriatric population and can contribute to geriatric syndromes and frailty, relevant electrolyte alterations should be excluded in all geriatric patients, in particular after a change in medication schedules. PMID:27464739

  10. Increasing geriatric social work content through university/community partnerships.

    PubMed

    McCaslin, Rosemary; Barnstable, Cherie Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Since their inception, social work education programs have operated in partnership with community agencies, as both field sites and foci for research. However, surprisingly little has been written on models of university/community partnerships in social work or the role of agencies in shaping curricula. This study analyzed the outcome reports of 67 Council on Social Work Education Geriatric Enrichment Projects (Gero Rich), funded by the Hartford Foundation, that sought to infuse geriatric content throughout the foundation curricula of B.S.W. and M.S.W. programs. Using both quantitative and qualitative analyses, the structures and functions of the programs' university/community partnerships were examined along with their association with the sustainability of curriculum change efforts. Findings suggest that these partnerships were a critical component in increasing and sustaining geriatric curricular content and were beneficial for faculty, students, and agencies. PMID:19042224