Science.gov

Sample records for germcode gcr event-based

  1. Overview of the Graphical User Interface for the GERMcode (GCR Event-Based Risk Model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The descriptions of biophysical events from heavy ions are of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The biophysical description of the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials is best described by a stochastic approach that includes both ion track structure and nuclear interactions. A new computer model called the GCR Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code was developed for the description of biophysical events from heavy ion beams at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The GERMcode calculates basic physical and biophysical quantities of high-energy protons and heavy ions that have been studied at NSRL for the purpose of simulating space radiobiological effects. For mono-energetic beams, the code evaluates the linear-energy transfer (LET), range (R), and absorption in tissue equivalent material for a given Charge (Z), Mass Number (A) and kinetic energy (E) of an ion. In addition, a set of biophysical properties are evaluated such as the Poisson distribution of ion or delta-ray hits for a specified cellular area, cell survival curves, and mutation and tumor probabilities. The GERMcode also calculates the radiation transport of the beam line for either a fixed number of user-specified depths or at multiple positions along the Bragg curve of the particle. The contributions from primary ion and nuclear secondaries are evaluated. The GERMcode accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and has been used by the GERMcode for application to thick target experiments. The GERMcode provides scientists participating in NSRL experiments with the data needed for the interpretation of their experiments, including the ability to model the beam line, the shielding of samples and sample holders, and the estimates of basic physical and biological outputs of the designed experiments. We present an overview of the GERMcode GUI, as well as providing training applications.

  2. Development of a GCR Event-based Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Plante, Ianik; Carra, Claudio; Kim, Myung-Hee

    2009-01-01

    A goal at NASA is to develop event-based systems biology models of space radiation risks that will replace the current dose-based empirical models. Complex and varied biochemical signaling processes transmit the initial DNA and oxidative damage from space radiation into cellular and tissue responses. Mis-repaired damage or aberrant signals can lead to genomic instability, persistent oxidative stress or inflammation, which are causative of cancer and CNS risks. Protective signaling through adaptive responses or cell repopulation is also possible. We are developing a computational simulation approach to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects that is based on biological events rather than average quantities such as dose, fluence, or dose equivalent. The goal of the GCR Event-based Risk Model (GERMcode) is to provide a simulation tool to describe and integrate physical and biological events into stochastic models of space radiation risks. We used the quantum multiple scattering model of heavy ion fragmentation (QMSFRG) and well known energy loss processes to develop a stochastic Monte-Carlo based model of GCR transport in spacecraft shielding and tissue. We validated the accuracy of the model by comparing to physical data from the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Our simulation approach allows us to time-tag each GCR proton or heavy ion interaction in tissue including correlated secondary ions often of high multiplicity. Conventional space radiation risk assessment employs average quantities, and assumes linearity and additivity of responses over the complete range of GCR charge and energies. To investigate possible deviations from these assumptions, we studied several biological response pathway models of varying induction and relaxation times including the ATM, TGF -Smad, and WNT signaling pathways. We then considered small volumes of interacting cells and the time-dependent biophysical events that the GCR would produce within these tissue volumes to estimate how GCR event rates mapped to biological signaling induction and relaxation times. We considered several hypotheses related to signaling and cancer risk, and then performed simulations for conditions where aberrant or adaptive signaling would occur on long-duration space mission. Our results do not support the conventional assumptions of dose, linearity and additivity. A discussion on how event-based systems biology models, which focus on biological signaling as the mechanism to propagate damage or adaptation, can be further developed for cancer and CNS space radiation risk projections is given.

  3. GERMcode: A Stochastic Model for Space Radiation Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    A new computer model, the GCR Event-based Risk Model code (GERMcode), was developed to describe biophysical events from high-energy protons and high charge and energy (HZE) particles that have been studied at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) for the purpose of simulating space radiation biological effects. In the GERMcode, the biophysical description of the passage of HZE particles in tissue and shielding materials is made with a stochastic approach that includes both particle track structure and nuclear interactions. The GERMcode accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections. For NSRL applications, the GERMcode evaluates a set of biophysical properties, such as the Poisson distribution of particles or delta-ray hits for a given cellular area and particle dose, the radial dose on tissue, and the frequency distribution of energy deposition in a DNA volume. By utilizing the ProE/Fishbowl ray-tracing analysis, the GERMcode will be used as a bi-directional radiation transport model for future spacecraft shielding analysis in support of Mars mission risk assessments. Recent radiobiological experiments suggest the need for new approaches to risk assessment that include time-dependent biological events due to the signaling times for activation and relaxation of biological processes in cells and tissue. Thus, the tracking of the temporal and spatial distribution of events in tissue is a major goal of the GERMcode in support of the simulation of biological processes important in GCR risk assessments. In order to validate our approach, basic radiobiological responses such as cell survival curves, mutation, chromosomal aberrations, and representative mouse tumor induction curves are implemented into the GERMcode. Extension of these descriptions to other endpoints related to non-targeted effects and biochemical pathway responses will be discussed.

  4. Mixed-field GCR Simulations for Radiobiological Research Using Ground Based Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of a large number of particle types and energies, which have differential ionization power from high energy protons to high charge and energy (HZE) particles and secondary neutrons produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Ground based accelerators such as the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are used to simulate space radiation for radiobiology research and dosimetry, electronics parts, and shielding testing using mono-energetic beams for single ion species. As a tool to support research on new risk assessment models, we have developed a stochastic model of heavy ion beams and space radiation effects, the GCR Event-based Risk Model computer code (GERMcode). For radiobiological research on mixed-field space radiation, a new GCR simulator at NSRL is proposed. The NSRL-GCR simulator, which implements the rapid switching mode and the higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, can integrate multiple ions into a single simulation to create GCR Z-spectrum in major energy bins. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, a GCR reference field is proposed after extensive simulation studies using the GERMcode. The GCR reference field is shown to reproduce the Z and LET spectra of GCR behind shielding within 20% accuracy compared to simulated full GCR environments behind shielding. A major challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3-years in relation to simulations with cell and animal models of human risks. We discuss possible approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation with extended exposure of up to a few weeks and fractionation approaches at a GCR simulator.

  5. Mixed-field GCR Simulations for Radiobiological Research using Ground Based Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis

    Space radiation is comprised of a large number of particle types and energies, which have differential ionization power from high energy protons to high charge and energy (HZE) particles and secondary neutrons produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Ground based accelerators such as the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are used to simulate space radiation for radiobiology research and dosimetry, electronics parts, and shielding testing using mono-energetic beams for single ion species. As a tool to support research on new risk assessment models, we have developed a stochastic model of heavy ion beams and space radiation effects, the GCR Event-based Risk Model computer code (GERMcode). For radiobiological research on mixed-field space radiation, a new GCR simulator at NSRL is proposed. The NSRL-GCR simulator, which implements the rapid switching mode and the higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, can integrate multiple ions into a single simulation to create GCR Z-spectrum in major energy bins. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, a GCR reference field is proposed after extensive simulation studies using the GERMcode. The GCR reference field is shown to reproduce the Z and LET spectra of GCR behind shielding within 20 percents accuracy compared to simulated full GCR environments behind shielding. A major challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3-years in relation to simulations with cell and animal models of human risks. We discuss possible approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation with extended exposure of up to a few weeks and fractionation approaches at a GCR simulator.

  6. Overview of the Graphical User Interface for the GERM Code (GCR Event-Based Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The descriptions of biophysical events from heavy ions are of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The biophysical description of the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials is best described by a stochastic approach that includes both ion track structure and nuclear interactions. A new computer model called the GCR Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code was developed for the description of biophysical events from heavy ion beams at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The GERM code calculates basic physical and biophysical quantities of high-energy protons and heavy ions that have been studied at NSRL for the purpose of simulating space radiobiological effects. For mono-energetic beams, the code evaluates the linear-energy transfer (LET), range (R), and absorption in tissue equivalent material for a given Charge (Z), Mass Number (A) and kinetic energy (E) of an ion. In addition, a set of biophysical properties are evaluated such as the Poisson distribution of ion or delta-ray hits for a specified cellular area, cell survival curves, and mutation and tumor probabilities. The GERM code also calculates the radiation transport of the beam line for either a fixed number of user-specified depths or at multiple positions along the Bragg curve of the particle. The contributions from primary ion and nuclear secondaries are evaluated. The GERM code accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and has been used by the GERM code for application to thick target experiments. The GERM code provides scientists participating in NSRL experiments with the data needed for the interpretation of their experiments, including the ability to model the beam line, the shielding of samples and sample holders, and the estimates of basic physical and biological outputs of the designed experiments. We present an overview of the GERM code GUI, as well as providing training applications.

  7. GCR Environmental Models I: Sensitivity Analysis for GCR Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate galactic cosmic ray (GCR) models are required to assess crew exposure during long-duration missions to the Moon or Mars. Many of these models have been developed and compared to available measurements, with uncertainty estimates usually stated to be less than 15%. However, when the models are evaluated over a common epoch and propagated through to effective dose, relative differences exceeding 50% are observed. This indicates that the metrics used to communicate GCR model uncertainty can be better tied to exposure quantities of interest for shielding applications. This is the first of three papers focused on addressing this need. In this work, the focus is on quantifying the extent to which each GCR ion and energy group, prior to entering any shielding material or body tissue, contributes to effective dose behind shielding. Results can be used to more accurately calibrate model-free parameters and provide a mechanism for refocusing validation efforts on measurements taken over important energy regions. Results can also be used as references to guide future nuclear cross-section measurements and radiobiology experiments. It is found that GCR with Z>2 and boundary energies below 500 MeV/n induce less than 5% of the total effective dose behind shielding. This finding is important given that most of the GCR models are developed and validated against Advanced Composition Explorer/Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (ACE/CRIS) measurements taken below 500 MeV/n. It is therefore possible for two models to very accurately reproduce the ACE/CRIS data while inducing very different effective dose values behind shielding.

  8. Event-Based Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that an event-based science curriculum can provide the framework for deciding what to retain in an overloaded science curriculum. Provides examples of current events and the science concepts explored related to the event. (MDH)

  9. Isotopic Dependence of GCR Fluence behind Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross-sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple-scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (+/-100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (approx.170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past, however less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  10. GCR Environmental Models III: GCR Model Validation and Propagated Uncertainties in Effective Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Xu, Xiaojing; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan B.

    2014-01-01

    This is the last of three papers focused on quantifying the uncertainty associated with galactic cosmic rays (GCR) models used for space radiation shielding applications. In the first paper, it was found that GCR ions with Z>2 and boundary energy below 500 MeV/nucleon induce less than 5% of the total effective dose behind shielding. This is an important finding since GCR model development and validation have been heavily biased toward Advanced Composition Explorer/Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer measurements below 500 MeV/nucleon. Weights were also developed that quantify the relative contribution of defined GCR energy and charge groups to effective dose behind shielding. In the second paper, it was shown that these weights could be used to efficiently propagate GCR model uncertainties into effective dose behind shielding. In this work, uncertainties are quantified for a few commonly used GCR models. A validation metric is developed that accounts for measurements uncertainty, and the metric is coupled to the fast uncertainty propagation method. For this work, the Badhwar-O'Neill (BON) 2010 and 2011 and the Matthia GCR models are compared to an extensive measurement database. It is shown that BON2011 systematically overestimates heavy ion fluxes in the range 0.5-4 GeV/nucleon. The BON2010 and BON2011 also show moderate and large errors in reproducing past solar activity near the 2000 solar maximum and 2010 solar minimum. It is found that all three models induce relative errors in effective dose in the interval [-20%, 20%] at a 68% confidence level. The BON2010 and Matthia models are found to have similar overall uncertainty estimates and are preferred for space radiation shielding applications.

  11. Isotopic Effects in Nuclear Fragmentation and GCR Transport Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    Improving the accuracy of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment and transport models is an important goal in preparing for studies of the projected risks and the efficiency of potential mitigations methods for space exploration. In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary cosmic rays and the isotopic dependence of nuclear fragmentation cross sections on GCR transport models. Measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR including their modulation throughout the solar cycle. The quantum multiple-scattering approach to nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used as the data base generator in order to accurately describe the odd-even effect in fragment production. Using the Badhwar and O'Neill GCR model, the QMSFRG model and the HZETRN transport code, the effects of the isotopic dependence of the primary GCR composition and on fragment production for transport problems is described for a complete GCR isotopic-grid. The principle finding of this study is that large errors ( 100%) will occur in the mass-flux spectra when comparing the complete isotopic-grid (141 ions) to a reduced isotopic-grid (59 ions), however less significant errors 30%) occur in the elemental-flux spectra. Because the full isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer work-stations, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  12. A Stochastic Model of Space Radiation Transport as a Tool in the Development of Time-Dependent Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Nounu, Hatem N.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    A new computer model, the GCR Event-based Risk Model code (GERMcode), was developed to describe biophysical events from high-energy protons and heavy ions that have been studied at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) [1] for the purpose of simulating space radiation biological effects. In the GERMcode, the biophysical description of the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials is made with a stochastic approach that includes both ion track structure and nuclear interactions. The GERMcode accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model [2]. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections

  13. Host Event Based Network Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Chugg

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of INL’s research on this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a host event based network monitoring tool and the effects on host performance. Current host based network monitoring tools work on polling which can miss activity if it occurs between polls. Instead of polling, a tool could be developed that makes use of event APIs in the operating system to receive asynchronous notifications of network activity. Analysis and logging of these events will allow the tool to construct the complete real-time and historical network configuration of the host while the tool is running. This research focused on three major operating systems commonly used by SCADA systems: Linux, WindowsXP, and Windows7. Windows 7 offers two paths that have minimal impact on the system and should be seriously considered. First is the new Windows Event Logging API, and, second, Windows 7 offers the ALE API within WFP. Any future work should focus on these methods.

  14. GCR Modulation by Small-Scale Features in the Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Mulligan, T. L.; Shaul, D. N.; Galametz, M.

    2007-12-01

    In an effort to uncover the properties of structures in the interplanetary medium (IPM) that modulate galactic cosmic rays (GCR) on short time-scales (from hours to days), we study periods of differing conditions in the IPM. We analyze GCR variations from spacecraft both inside and outside the magnetosphere, using the High Sensitivity Telescope (HIST) on Polar and the Spectrometer for INTEGRAL (SPI). We seek causal correlations between the observed GCR modulations and structures in the solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field, as measured concurrently with ACE and/or Wind. Our analysis spans time-/size-scale variations ranging from classic Forbush decreases (Fds), to substructure embedded within Fds, to much smaller amplitude and shorter duration variations observed during comparatively benign interplanetary conditions. We compare and contrast the conditions leading to the range of different GCR responses to modulating structures in the IPM.

  15. Asynchronous event-based hebbian epipolar geometry.

    PubMed

    Benosman, Ryad; Ieng, Sio-Hoï; Rogister, Paul; Posch, Christoph

    2011-11-01

    Epipolar geometry, the cornerstone of perspective stereo vision, has been studied extensively since the advent of computer vision. Establishing such a geometric constraint is of primary importance, as it allows the recovery of the 3-D structure of scenes. Estimating the epipolar constraints of nonperspective stereo is difficult, they can no longer be defined because of the complexity of the sensor geometry. This paper will show that these limitations are, to some extent, a consequence of the static image frames commonly used in vision. The conventional frame-based approach suffers from a lack of the dynamics present in natural scenes. We introduce the use of neuromorphic event-based--rather than frame-based--vision sensors for perspective stereo vision. This type of sensor uses the dimension of time as the main conveyor of information. In this paper, we present a model for asynchronous event-based vision, which is then used to derive a general new concept of epipolar geometry linked to the temporal activation of pixels. Practical experiments demonstrate the validity of the approach, solving the problem of estimating the fundamental matrix applied, in a first stage, to classic perspective vision and then to more general cameras. Furthermore, this paper shows that the properties of event-based vision sensors allow the exploration of not-yet-defined geometric relationships, finally, we provide a definition of general epipolar geometry deployable to almost any visual sensor. PMID:21954205

  16. On event-based optical flow detection

    PubMed Central

    Brosch, Tobias; Tschechne, Stephan; Neumann, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Event-based sensing, i.e., the asynchronous detection of luminance changes, promises low-energy, high dynamic range, and sparse sensing. This stands in contrast to whole image frame-wise acquisition by standard cameras. Here, we systematically investigate the implications of event-based sensing in the context of visual motion, or flow, estimation. Starting from a common theoretical foundation, we discuss different principal approaches for optical flow detection ranging from gradient-based methods over plane-fitting to filter based methods and identify strengths and weaknesses of each class. Gradient-based methods for local motion integration are shown to suffer from the sparse encoding in address-event representations (AER). Approaches exploiting the local plane like structure of the event cloud, on the other hand, are shown to be well suited. Within this class, filter based approaches are shown to define a proper detection scheme which can also deal with the problem of representing multiple motions at a single location (motion transparency). A novel biologically inspired efficient motion detector is proposed, analyzed and experimentally validated. Furthermore, a stage of surround normalization is incorporated. Together with the filtering this defines a canonical circuit for motion feature detection. The theoretical analysis shows that such an integrated circuit reduces motion ambiguity in addition to decorrelating the representation of motion related activations. PMID:25941470

  17. An Event Based Approach To Situational Representation

    E-print Network

    Ashish, Naveen; Mehrotra, Sharad; Venkatasubramanian, Nalini

    2009-01-01

    Many application domains require representing interrelated real-world activities and/or evolving physical phenomena. In the crisis response domain, for instance, one may be interested in representing the state of the unfolding crisis (e.g., forest fire), the progress of the response activities such as evacuation and traffic control, and the state of the crisis site(s). Such a situation representation can then be used to support a multitude of applications including situation monitoring, analysis, and planning. In this paper, we make a case for an event based representation of situations where events are defined to be domain-specific significant occurrences in space and time. We argue that events offer a unifying and powerful abstraction to building situational awareness applications. We identify challenges in building an Event Management System (EMS) for which traditional data and knowledge management systems prove to be limited and suggest possible directions and technologies to address the challenges.

  18. GCR Simulator Reference Field and a Spectral Approach for Laboratory Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norbury, John W.; Rusek, Adam; La Tessa, Chiara; Walker, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) is intended to deliver the broad spectrum of particles and energies encountered in deep space to biological targets in a controlled laboratory setting. In this work, certain aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. Reference field specification and beam selection strategies at NSRL are the main focus, but the analysis presented herein may be modified for other facilities. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is likely within the uncertainty associated with representing any GCR reference field with discrete ion beams in the laboratory, given current facility constraints. A single reference field for deep space missions is subsequently identified. Third, an approach for selecting beams at NSRL to simulate the designated reference field is presented. Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed and weighed against alternative simulation strategies. The neutron component and track structure characteristics of the simulated field are discussed in this context.

  19. Azimuthal and meridional asymmetries of the solar wind and quasiperiodic variations of intensity of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shatashvili, L. K.; Djapiashvili, T. V.; Kavlashvili, B. G.; Naskidashvili, B. D.; Rogava, O. G.; Shafer, G. V.

    1985-01-01

    The results of analysis of 27 day, annual and quasi-two year variation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are presented. The dependence of the periods of 27 day GCR variation on the energy of initial radiation is discovered, according to the data during 1980 of the World network of station in sufficiently wide range of the observed threshold energy. The dependence of the annual variation of GCR is established, according to the data of the Huancayo station in conforming with the change of the polarity of the General Magnetic Field of the Sun (GMFS).

  20. Badhwar-O'Neil 2007 Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Model Using Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Measurements for Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P. M.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite measurements of the galactic cosmic ray flux and correlation with the Climax Neutron Monitor count over Solar Cycle 23 are used to update the Badhwar O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) model.

  1. Event-based simulation of quantum physics experiments K. Michielsen

    E-print Network

    Event-based simulation of quantum physics experiments ¤ K. Michielsen Institute for Advanced techniques; discrete event simulation; quantum theory. PACS Nos.: 02.70.�c, 03.65.�w, 03.65.Ud. 1 by constructing an event-based simulation model that reproduces the statistical distributions of quantum (and

  2. Characterization of the DNA-binding activity of GCR1: in vivo evidence for two GCR1-binding sites in the upstream activating sequence of TPI of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Huie, M A; Scott, E W; Drazinic, C M; Lopez, M C; Hornstra, I K; Yang, T P; Baker, H V

    1992-01-01

    GCR1 gene function is required for high-level glycolytic gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recently, we suggested that the CTTCC sequence motif found in front of many genes encoding glycolytic enzymes lay at the core of the GCR1-binding site. Here we mapped the DNA-binding domain of GCR1 to the carboxy-terminal 154 amino acids of the polypeptide. DNase I protection studies showed that a hybrid MBP-GCR1 fusion protein protected a region of the upstream activating sequence of TPI (UASTPI), which harbored the CTTCC sequence motif, and suggested that the fusion protein might also interact with a region of the UAS that contained the related sequence CATCC. A series of in vivo G methylation protection experiments of the native TPI promoter were carried out with wild-type and gcr1 deletion mutant strains. The G doublets that correspond to the C doublets in each site were protected in the wild-type strain but not in the gcr1 mutant strain. These data demonstrate that the UAS of TPI contains two GCR1-binding sites which are occupied in vivo. Furthermore, adjacent RAP1/GRF1/TUF- and REB1/GRF2/QBP/Y-binding sites in UASTPI were occupied in the backgrounds of both strains. In addition, DNA band-shift assays were used to show that the MBP-GCR1 fusion protein was able to form nucleoprotein complexes with oligonucleotides that contained CTTCC sequence elements found in front of other glycolytic genes, namely, PGK, ENO1, PYK, and ADH1, all of which are dependent on GCR1 gene function for full expression. However, we were unable to detect specific interactions with CTTCC sequence elements found in front of the translational component genes TEF1, TEF2, and CRY1. Taken together, these experiments have allowed us to propose a consensus GCR1-binding site which is 5'-(T/A)N(T/C)N(G/A)NC(T/A)TCC(T/A)N(T/A)(T/A)(T/G)-3'. Images PMID:1588965

  3. Integrated network construction using event based text mining

    E-print Network

    Gent, Universiteit

    Integrated network construction using event based text mining Yvan Saeys, Sofie Van Landeghem numerous interactions between biological entities. Text mining techniques have been increasingly useful mining in the systems biology field has been restricted mostly to the discovery of protein

  4. Asynchronous visual event-based time-to-contact

    PubMed Central

    Clady, Xavier; Clercq, Charles; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Houseini, Fouzhan; Randazzo, Marco; Natale, Lorenzo; Bartolozzi, Chiara; Benosman, Ryad

    2014-01-01

    Reliable and fast sensing of the environment is a fundamental requirement for autonomous mobile robotic platforms. Unfortunately, the frame-based acquisition paradigm at the basis of main stream artificial perceptive systems is limited by low temporal dynamics and redundant data flow, leading to high computational costs. Hence, conventional sensing and relative computation are obviously incompatible with the design of high speed sensor-based reactive control for mobile applications, that pose strict limits on energy consumption and computational load. This paper introduces a fast obstacle avoidance method based on the output of an asynchronous event-based time encoded imaging sensor. The proposed method relies on an event-based Time To Contact (TTC) computation based on visual event-based motion flows. The approach is event-based in the sense that every incoming event adds to the computation process thus allowing fast avoidance responses. The method is validated indoor on a mobile robot, comparing the event-based TTC with a laser range finder TTC, showing that event-based sensing offers new perspectives for mobile robotics sensing. PMID:24570652

  5. Asynchronous visual event-based time-to-contact.

    PubMed

    Clady, Xavier; Clercq, Charles; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Houseini, Fouzhan; Randazzo, Marco; Natale, Lorenzo; Bartolozzi, Chiara; Benosman, Ryad

    2014-01-01

    Reliable and fast sensing of the environment is a fundamental requirement for autonomous mobile robotic platforms. Unfortunately, the frame-based acquisition paradigm at the basis of main stream artificial perceptive systems is limited by low temporal dynamics and redundant data flow, leading to high computational costs. Hence, conventional sensing and relative computation are obviously incompatible with the design of high speed sensor-based reactive control for mobile applications, that pose strict limits on energy consumption and computational load. This paper introduces a fast obstacle avoidance method based on the output of an asynchronous event-based time encoded imaging sensor. The proposed method relies on an event-based Time To Contact (TTC) computation based on visual event-based motion flows. The approach is event-based in the sense that every incoming event adds to the computation process thus allowing fast avoidance responses. The method is validated indoor on a mobile robot, comparing the event-based TTC with a laser range finder TTC, showing that event-based sensing offers new perspectives for mobile robotics sensing. PMID:24570652

  6. 27-day variation of the GCR intensity based on corrected and uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances data of neutron monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, M. V.; Modzelewska, R.; Wawrzynczak, A.; Sdobnov, V. E.; Kravtsova, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    We study 27-day variations of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity for 2005-2008 period of the solar cycle #23. We use neutron monitors (NMs) data corrected and uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances. Besides the limited time intervals when the 27-day variations are clearly established, always exist some feeble 27-day variations in the GCR intensity related to the constantly present weak heliolongitudinal asymmetry in the heliosphere. We calculate the amplitudes of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity based on the NMs data corrected and uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances. We show that these amplitudes do not differ for NMs with cut-off rigidities smaller than 4-5 GV comparing with NMs of higher cut-off rigidities. Rigidity spectrum of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity found in the uncorrected data is soft while it is hard in the case of the corrected data. For both cases exists definite tendency of softening the temporal changes of the 27-day variation's rigidity spectrum in period of 2005 to 2008 approaching the minimum of solar activity. We believe that a study of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity based on the data uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances should be carried out by NMs with cut-off rigidities smaller than 4-5 GV.

  7. Comparative Study on Different Phonon Frequency Spectra of Graphite in GCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Sik; Kim, Kang-Seog; Kim, Do Heon; Lee, Young-Ouk; Chang, Jonghwa

    2006-04-01

    A GCR (Gas Cooled Reactor) employs graphite as a neutron moderator and a reflector. At thermal energies, the scattering of the neutrons is affected by the binding characteristics of the scattering nucleus in the moderator. Thus, these effects should be carefully described by well defined scattering laws. The calculations for the scattering laws require an exact shape of the phonon frequency distribution of a material as an input parameter, as well as its lattice structure. Currently several variations of the phonon frequency spectra are available. We have generated different sets of temperature dependent scattering laws for graphite with the module LEAPR of the NJOY using the available phonon frequency spectra. The temperature range of the generated data sets was from 300 to 2000 °K. To observe the effect of these different scattering laws on the criticality of a GCR core, MCNP calculations were carried out and their results were compared with each other. As the basis of a comparison, the keff and the temperature coefficients for the moderator and reflector were used.

  8. Elemental GCR Observations during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Israel, M. H.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we present new measurements of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) elemental composition and energy spectra for the species B through Ni in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV/nucleon during the record setting 2009-2010 solar minimum period. These data are compared with our observations from the 1997-1998 solar minimum period, when solar modulation in the heliosphere was somewhat higher. For these species, we find that the intensities during the 2009-2010 solar minimum were approx. 20% higher than those in the previous solar minimum, and in fact were the highest GCR intensities recorded during the space age. Relative abundances for these species during the two solar minimum periods differed by small but statistically significant amounts, which are attributed to the combination of spectral shape differences between primary and secondary GCRs in the interstellar medium and differences between the levels of solar modulation in the two solar minima. We also present the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe for both solar minimum periods, and demonstrate that these ratios are reasonably well fit by a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model that is combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model.

  9. Comparison of Transport Codes, HZETRN, HETC and FLUKA, Using 1977 GCR Solar Minimum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Slaba, Tony C.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norbury, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Handler, Thomas; Gabriel, Tony A.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Reddell, Brandon; Aumann, Aric R.

    2009-01-01

    The HZETRN deterministic radiation transport code is one of several tools developed to analyze the effects of harmful galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) on mission planning, astronaut shielding and instrumentation. This paper is a comparison study involving the two Monte Carlo transport codes, HETC-HEDS and FLUKA, and the deterministic transport code, HZETRN. Each code is used to transport ions from the 1977 solar minimum GCR spectrum impinging upon a 20 g/cm2 Aluminum slab followed by a 30 g/cm2 water slab. This research is part of a systematic effort of verification and validation to quantify the accuracy of HZETRN and determine areas where it can be improved. Comparisons of dose and dose equivalent values at various depths in the water slab are presented in this report. This is followed by a comparison of the proton fluxes, and the forward, backward and total neutron fluxes at various depths in the water slab. Comparisons of the secondary light ion 2H, 3H, 3He and 4He fluxes are also examined.

  10. GCR-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon: The Moon as a CR Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Lee, Kerry; Andersen, Vic

    2007-01-01

    We report on the results of a preliminary study of the GCR-induced photon luminescence of the Moon using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence when there is no sunshine or Earthshine. From the photon fluence we derive the energy spectrum which can be utilized to design an orbiting optical instrument for measuring the GCR-induced luminescence. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of its radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior. Also, we investigate transient optical flashes from high-energy CRs impacting the lunar surface (boulders and regolith). The goal is to determine to what extent the Moon could be used as a rudimentary CR detector. Meteor impacts on the Moon have been observed for centuries to generate such flashes, so why not CRs?

  11. Asynchronous event-based corner detection and matching.

    PubMed

    Clady, Xavier; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Benosman, Ryad

    2015-06-01

    This paper introduces an event-based luminance-free method to detect and match corner events from the output of asynchronous event-based neuromorphic retinas. The method relies on the use of space-time properties of moving edges. Asynchronous event-based neuromorphic retinas are composed of autonomous pixels, each of them asynchronously generating "spiking" events that encode relative changes in pixels' illumination at high temporal resolutions. Corner events are defined as the spatiotemporal locations where the aperture problem can be solved using the intersection of several geometric constraints in events' spatiotemporal spaces. A regularization process provides the required constraints, i.e. the motion attributes of the edges with respect to their spatiotemporal locations using local geometric properties of visual events. Experimental results are presented on several real scenes showing the stability and robustness of the detection and matching. PMID:25828960

  12. Abstracting event-based control models for high autonomy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luh, Cheng-Jye; Zeigler, Bernard P.

    1993-01-01

    A high autonomy system needs many models on which to base control, management, design, and other interventions. These models differ in level of abstraction and in formalism. Concepts and tools are needed to organize the models into a coherent whole. The paper deals with the abstraction processes for systematic derivation of related models for use in event-based control. The multifaceted modeling methodology is briefly reviewed. The morphism concepts needed for application to model abstraction are described. A theory for supporting the construction of DEVS models needed for event-based control is then presented. An implemented morphism on the basis of this theory is also described.

  13. Distributed Event-Based Control Karl H. Johansson

    E-print Network

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    Center Royal Ins9tute of Technology, Sweden Workshop on Event-Based Control(k) otherwise Various bounds on the convergence =me to asympto=c consensus, e.g., Karp et is the unit vector Can the gossiping pairs be selected to achieve finite-=me convergence

  14. Simulation of Quantum Computation: A deterministic event-based approach

    E-print Network

    K. Michielsen; K. De Raedt; H. De Raedt

    2005-01-24

    We demonstrate that locally connected networks of machines that have primitive learning capabilities can be used to perform a deterministic, event-based simulation of quantum computation. We present simulation results for basic quantum operations such as the Hadamard and the controlled-NOT gate, and for seven-qubit quantum networks that implement Shor's numbering factoring algorithm.

  15. Spatiotemporal features for asynchronous event-based data

    PubMed Central

    Lagorce, Xavier; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Clady, Xavier; Pfeiffer, Michael; Benosman, Ryad B.

    2015-01-01

    Bio-inspired asynchronous event-based vision sensors are currently introducing a paradigm shift in visual information processing. These new sensors rely on a stimulus-driven principle of light acquisition similar to biological retinas. They are event-driven and fully asynchronous, thereby reducing redundancy and encoding exact times of input signal changes, leading to a very precise temporal resolution. Approaches for higher-level computer vision often rely on the reliable detection of features in visual frames, but similar definitions of features for the novel dynamic and event-based visual input representation of silicon retinas have so far been lacking. This article addresses the problem of learning and recognizing features for event-based vision sensors, which capture properties of truly spatiotemporal volumes of sparse visual event information. A novel computational architecture for learning and encoding spatiotemporal features is introduced based on a set of predictive recurrent reservoir networks, competing via winner-take-all selection. Features are learned in an unsupervised manner from real-world input recorded with event-based vision sensors. It is shown that the networks in the architecture learn distinct and task-specific dynamic visual features, and can predict their trajectories over time. PMID:25759637

  16. Secondary Cosmic Ray Particles Due to GCR Interactions in the Earth's Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Battistoni, G.; Cerutti, F.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Garzelli, M.V.; Lantz, M.; Muraro, S. Pinsky, L.S.; Ranft, J.; Roesler, S.; Sala, P.R.; ,

    2009-06-16

    Primary GCR interact with the Earth's atmosphere originating atmospheric showers, thus giving rise to fluxes of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Electromagnetic and hadronic interactions interplay in the production of these particles, whose detection is performed by means of complementary techniques in different energy ranges and at different depths in the atmosphere, down to the Earth's surface. Monte Carlo codes are essential calculation tools which can describe the complexity of the physics of these phenomena, thus allowing the analysis of experimental data. However, these codes are affected by important uncertainties, concerning, in particular, hadronic physics at high energy. In this paper we shall report some results concerning inclusive particle fluxes and atmospheric shower properties as obtained using the FLUKA transport and interaction code. Some emphasis will also be given to the validation of the physics models of FLUKA involved in these calculations.

  17. Secondary Cosmic Ray particles due to GCR interactions in the Earth's atmosphere

    E-print Network

    G. Battistoni; F. Cerutti; A. Fassò; A. Ferrari; M. V. Garzelli; M. Lantz; S. Muraro; L. S. Pinsky; J. Ranft; S. Roesler; P. R. Sala

    2007-11-13

    Primary GCR interact with the Earth's atmosphere originating atmospheric showers, thus giving rise to fluxes of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Electromagnetic and hadronic interactions interplay in the production of these particles, whose detection is performed by means of complementary techniques in different energy ranges and at different depths in the atmosphere, down to the Earth's surface. Monte Carlo codes are essential calculation tools which can describe the complexity of the physics of these phenomena, thus allowing the analysis of experimental data. However, these codes are affected by important uncertainties, concerning, in particular, hadronic physics at high energy. In this paper we shall report some results concerning inclusive particle fluxes and atmospheric shower properties as obtained using the FLUKA transport and interaction code. Some emphasis will also be given to the validation of the physics models of FLUKA involved in these calculations.

  18. Nuclear fragmentation of GCR-like ions: comparisons between data and PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitlin, Cary; Guetersloh, Stephen; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Miller, Jack; Sihver, Lembit; Mancusi, Davide; Fukumura, Aki; Iwata, Yoshi; Murakami, Takeshi

    We present a summary of results from recent work in which we have compared nuclear fragmentation cross section data to predictions of the PHITS Monte Carlo simulation. The studies used beams of 12 C, 35 Cl, 40 Ar, 48 Ti, and 56 Fe at energies ranging from 290 MeV/nucleon to 1000 MeV/nucleon. Some of the data were obtained at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, others at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. These energies and ion species are representative of the heavy ion component of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR), which contribute significantly to the dose and dose equivalent that will be received by astronauts on deep-space missions. A critical need for NASA is the ability to accurately model the transport of GCR heavy ions through matter, including spacecraft walls, equipment racks, and other shielding materials, as well as through tissue. Nuclear interaction cross sections are of primary importance in the GCR transport problem. These interactions generally cause the incoming ion to break up (fragment) into one or more lighter ions, which continue approximately along the initial trajectory and with approximately the same velocity the incoming ion had prior to the interaction. Since the radiation dose delivered by a particle is proportional to the square of the quantity (charge/velocity), i.e., to (Z/?)2 , fragmentation reduces the dose (and, typically, dose equivalent) delivered by incident ions. The other mechanism by which dose can be reduced is ionization energy loss, which can lead to some particles stopping in the shielding. This is the conventional notion of shielding, but it is not applicable to human spaceflight, since the particles in the GCR tend to be highly energetic and because shielding must be relatively thin in order to keep overall mass as low as possible, keeping launch costs within reason. To support these goals, our group has systematically measured a large number of nuclear cross sections, intended to be used as either input to, or validation of, NASA transport models. A database containing over 200 charge-changing cross sections, and over 2000 fragment production cross sections, is nearing completion, with most results available online. In the past year, we have been investigating the PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport System) model of Niita et al. For purposes of modeling nuclear interactions, PHITS combines the Jet AA Microscopic Transport Model (JAM) hadron cascade model, the Jaeri Quantum Molecular Dynamics (JQMD) model, and the Generalized Evaporation Model (GEM). We will present detailed comparisons of our data to the cross sections and fragment angular distributions that arise from this model. The model contains some significant deficiencies, but, as we will show, also represents a significant advance over older, simpler models of fragmentation. 504b030414000600080000002100828abc13fa0000001c020000130000005b436f6e74656e745f54797065735d2e78

  19. Microstructure of warm rolling and pearlitic transformation of ultrafine-grained GCr15 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jun-Jie; Lian, Fu-Liang; Liu, Hong-Ji; Jiang, Tao; Guo, Sheng-Wu; Du, Lin-Xiu; Liu, Yong-Ning

    2014-09-15

    Pearlitic transformation mechanisms have been investigated in ultra-fine grained GCr15 steel. The ultrafine-grained steel, whose grain size was less than 1 ?m, was prepared by thermo-mechanical treatment at 873 K and then annealing at 923 K for 2 h. Pearlitic transformation was conducted by reheating the ultra-fine grained samples at 1073 K and 1123 K for different periods of time and then cooling in air. Scanning electron microscope observation shows that normal lamellar pearlite, instead of granular cementite and ferrite, cannot be formed when the grain size is approximately less than 4(± 0.6) ?m, which yields a critical grain size for normal lamellar pearlitic transformations in this chromium alloyed steel. The result confirms that grain size has a great influence on pearlitic transformation by increasing the diffusion rate of carbon atoms in the ultra-fine grained steel, and the addition of chromium element doesn't change this pearlitic phase transformation rule. Meanwhile, the grain growth rate is reduced by chromium alloying, which is beneficial to form fine grains during austenitizing, thus it facilitating pearlitic transformation by divorced eutectoid transformation. Moreover, chromium element can form a relatively high gradient in the frontier of the undissolved carbide, which promotes carbide formation in the frontier of the undissolved carbide, i.e., chromium promotes divorced eutectoid transformation. - Highlights: • Ultrafine-grained GCr15 steel was obtained by warm rolling and annealing technology. • Reduction of grain size makes pearlite morphology from lamellar to granular. • Adding Cr does not change normal pearlitic phase transformation rule in UFG steel. • Cr carbide resists grain growth and facilitates pearlitic transformation by DET.

  20. Mutations in GCR3, a gene involved in the expression of glycolytic genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suppress the temperature-sensitive growth of hpr1 mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, Hiroshi; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Pandit, Sunil; Sternglanz, R.

    1996-04-01

    To study the functions of DNA topoisomerase I and Hpr1 protein, a suppressor mutant of the temperature-sensitive growth of an hpr1 top1-5{sup ts} double mutant was isolated. The isolated triple mutant showed cold-sensitive growth. By complementation of this phenotype, the suppressor gene was cloned. DNA sequencing showed it to be GCR3, a gene involved in the expression of glycol genes. Further analysis showed that gcr3 mutations also suppressed the temperature-sensitive growth of hpr1 single mutants. Experiments with gcr3 truncation mutants also suggested a genetic interaction between GCR3 and HPR1. The fact that top1 suppressed the growth defect of gcr3 suggested an interaction between those two genes also. Plasmid DNA isolated from gcr3 mutants was significantly more negatively supercoiled than normal, suggesting that Gcr3 protein, like topoisomerase I and Hpr1p, affects chromatin structure, perhaps during transcription. 43 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. GCR Transport in the Brain: Assessment of Self-Shielding, Columnar Damage, and Nuclear Reactions on Cell Inactivation Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Atwell, W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Radiation shield design is driven by the need to limit radiation risks while optimizing risk reduction with launch mass/expense penalties. Both limitation and optimization objectives require the development of accurate and complete means for evaluating the effectiveness of various shield materials and body-self shielding. For galactic cosmic rays (GCR), biophysical response models indicate that track structure effects lead to substantially different assessments of shielding effectiveness relative to assessments based on LET-dependent quality factors. Methods for assessing risk to the central nervous system (CNS) from heavy ions are poorly understood at this time. High-energy and charge (HZE) ion can produce tissue events resulting in damage to clusters of cells in a columnar fashion, especially for stopping heavy ions. Grahn (1973) and Todd (1986) have discussed a microlesion concept or model of stochastic tissue events in analyzing damage from HZE's. Some tissues, including the CNS, maybe sensitive to microlesion's or stochastic tissue events in a manner not illuminated by either conventional dosimetry or fluence-based risk factors. HZE ions may also produce important lateral damage to adjacent cells. Fluences of high-energy proton and alpha particles in the GCR are many times higher than HZE ions. Behind spacecraft and body self-shielding the ratio of protons, alpha particles, and neutrons to HZE ions increases several-fold from free-space values. Models of GCR damage behind shielding have placed large concern on the role of target fragments produced from tissue atoms. The self-shielding of the brain reduces the number of heavy ions reaching the interior regions by a large amount and the remaining light particle environment (protons, neutrons, deuterons. and alpha particles) may be the greatest concern. Tracks of high-energy proton produce nuclear reactions in tissue, which can deposit doses of more than 1 Gv within 5 - 10 cell layers. Information on rates of cell killing from GCR, including patterns of cell killing from single particle tracks. can provide useful information on expected differences between proton and HZE tracks and clinical experiences with photon irradiation. To model effects on cells in the brain, it is important that transport models accurately describe changes in the GCR due to interactions in the cranium and proximate tissues. We describe calculations of the attenuated GCR particle fluxes at three dose-points in the brain and associated patterns of cell killing using biophysical models. The effects of the brain self-shielding and bone-tissue interface of the skull in modulating the GCR environment are considered. For each brain dose-point, the mass distribution in the surrounding 4(pi) solid angle is characterized using the CAM model to trace 512 rays. The CAM model describes the self-shielding by converting the tissue distribution to mass-equivalent aluminum, and nominal values of spacecraft shielding is considered. Particle transport is performed with the proton, neutron, and heavy-ion transport code HZETRN with the nuclear fragmentation model QMSFRG. The distribution of cells killed along the path of individual GCR ions is modeled using in vitro cell inactivation data for cells with varying sensitivity. Monte Carlo simulations of arrays of inactivated cells are considered for protons and heavy ions and used to describe the absolute number of cell killing events of various magnitude in the brain from the GCR. Included are simulations of positions of inactivated cells from stopping heavy ions and nuclear stars produced by high-energy ions most importantly, protons and neutrons.

  2. Assessment and Requirements of Nuclear Reaction Databases for GCR Transport in the Atmosphere and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Tripathi, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    The transport properties of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in the atmosphere, material structures, and human body (self-shielding) am of interest in risk assessment for supersonic and subsonic aircraft and for space travel in low-Earth orbit and on interplanetary missions. Nuclear reactions, such as knockout and fragmentation, present large modifications of particle type and energies of the galactic cosmic rays in penetrating materials. We make an assessment of the current nuclear reaction models and improvements in these model for developing required transport code data bases. A new fragmentation data base (QMSFRG) based on microscopic models is compared to the NUCFRG2 model and implications for shield assessment made using the HZETRN radiation transport code. For deep penetration problems, the build-up of light particles, such as nucleons, light clusters and mesons from nuclear reactions in conjunction with the absorption of the heavy ions, leads to the dominance of the charge Z = 0, 1, and 2 hadrons in the exposures at large penetration depths. Light particles are produced through nuclear or cluster knockout and in evaporation events with characteristically distinct spectra which play unique roles in the build-up of secondary radiation's in shielding. We describe models of light particle production in nucleon and heavy ion induced reactions and make an assessment of the importance of light particle multiplicity and spectral parameters in these exposures.

  3. MHD compressor---expander conversion system integrated with GCR inside a deployable reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Tuninetti, G. . Research Div.); Botta, E.; Criscuolo, C.; Riscossa, P. . Nuclear Div.); Giammanco, F. . Dipt. di Fisica); Rosa-Clot, M. . Dipt. di Fisica)

    1989-04-20

    This work originates from the proposal MHD Compressor-Expander Conversion System Integrated with a GCR Inside a Deployable Reflector''. The proposal concerned an innovative concept of nuclear, closed-cycle MHD converter for power generation on space-based systems in the multi-megawatt range. The basic element of this converter is the Power Conversion Unit (PCU) consisting of a gas core reactor directly coupled to an MHD expansion channel. Integrated with the PCU, a deployable reflector provides reactivity control. The working fluid could be either uranium hexafluoride or a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and helium, added to enhance the heat transfer properties. The original Statement of Work, which concerned the whole conversion system, was subsequently redirected and focused on the basic mechanisms of neutronics, reactivity control, ionization and electrical conductivity in the PCU. Furthermore, the study was required to be inherently generic such that the study was required to be inherently generic such that the analysis an results can be applied to various nuclear reactor and/or MHD channel designs''.

  4. Event-based Corpuscular Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    E-print Network

    K. Michielsen; F. Jin; H. De Raedt

    2010-06-09

    A corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one is presented. The event-based corpuscular model is shown to give a unified description of multiple-beam fringes of a plane parallel plate, single-photon Mach-Zehnder interferometer, Wheeler's delayed choice, photon tunneling, quantum erasers, two-beam interference, double-slit, and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm and Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiments.

  5. Event-based simulation of quantum physics experiments

    E-print Network

    Kristel Michielsen; Hans De Raedt

    2014-08-08

    We review an event-based simulation approach which reproduces the statistical distributions of wave theory not by requiring the knowledge of the solution of the wave equation of the whole system but by generating detection events one-by-one according to an unknown distribution. We illustrate its applicability to various single photon and single neutron interferometry experiments and to two Bell test experiments, a single-photon Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment employing post-selection for photon pair identification and a single-neutron Bell test interferometry experiment with nearly $100\\%$ detection efficiency.

  6. Event-Based Processing of Neutron Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Peter F.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Reuter, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell J.; Zikovsky, Janik L.

    2015-09-16

    Many of the world's time-of-flight spallation neutrons sources are migrating to the recording of individual neutron events. This provides for new opportunities in data processing, the least of which is to filter the events based on correlating them with logs of sample environment and other ancillary equipment. This paper will describe techniques for processing neutron scattering data acquired in event mode that preserve event information all the way to a final spectrum, including any necessary corrections or normalizations. This results in smaller final errors, while significantly reducing processing time and memory requirements in typical experiments. Results with traditional histogramming techniques will be shown for comparison.

  7. Event-Based Processing of Neutron Scattering Data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Peterson, Peter F.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Reuter, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell J.; Zikovsky, Janik L.

    2015-09-16

    Many of the world's time-of-flight spallation neutrons sources are migrating to the recording of individual neutron events. This provides for new opportunities in data processing, the least of which is to filter the events based on correlating them with logs of sample environment and other ancillary equipment. This paper will describe techniques for processing neutron scattering data acquired in event mode that preserve event information all the way to a final spectrum, including any necessary corrections or normalizations. This results in smaller final errors, while significantly reducing processing time and memory requirements in typical experiments. Results with traditional histogramming techniquesmore »will be shown for comparison.« less

  8. Event-based processing of neutron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Peter F.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Reuter, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell J.; Zikovsky, Janik

    2015-12-01

    Many of the world's time-of-flight spallation neutrons sources are migrating to recording individual neutron events. This provides for new opportunities in data processing, the least of which is to filter the events based on correlating them with logs of sample environment and other ancillary equipment. This paper will describe techniques for processing neutron scattering data acquired in event mode which preserve event information all the way to a final spectrum, including any necessary corrections or normalizations. This results in smaller final uncertainties compared to traditional methods, while significantly reducing processing time and memory requirements in typical experiments. Results with traditional histogramming techniques will be shown for comparison.

  9. Event-Based Simulation of Quantum Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michielsen, Kristel; de Raedt, Hans

    2015-10-01

    We review an event-based simulation approach which reproduces the statistical distributions of wave theory not by requiring the knowledge of the solution of the wave equation of the whole system but by generating detection events oneby- one according to an unknown distribution. We illustrate its applicability to various single photon and single neutron interferometry experiments and to two Bell-test experiments, a single-photon Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment employing post-selection for photon pair identification and a single-neutron Bell test interferometry experiment with nearly 100% detection efficiency.

  10. G-protein Signaling Components GCR1 and GPA1 Mediate Responses to Multiple Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Navjyoti; Singh, Navneet; Kaur, Kanwaljeet; Raghuram, Nandula

    2015-01-01

    G-protein signaling components have been implicated in some individual stress responses in Arabidopsis, but have not been comprehensively evaluated at the genetic and biochemical level. Stress emerged as the largest functional category in our whole transcriptome analyses of knock-out mutants of GCR1 and/or GPA1 in Arabidopsis (Chakraborty et al., 2015a,b). This led us to ask whether G-protein signaling components offer converging points in the plant's response to multiple abiotic stresses. In order to test this hypothesis, we carried out detailed analysis of the abiotic stress category in the present study, which revealed 144 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), spanning a wide range of abiotic stresses, including heat, cold, salt, light stress etc. Only 10 of these DEGs are shared by all the three mutants, while the single mutants (GCR1/GPA1) shared more DEGs between themselves than with the double mutant (GCR1-GPA1). RT-qPCR validation of 28 of these genes spanning different stresses revealed identical regulation of the DEGs shared between the mutants. We also validated the effects of cold, heat and salt stresses in all the 3 mutants and WT on % germination, root and shoot length, relative water content, proline content, lipid peroxidation and activities of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. All the 3 mutants showed evidence of stress tolerance, especially to cold, followed by heat and salt, in terms of all the above parameters. This clearly shows the role of GCR1 and GPA1 in mediating the plant's response to multiple abiotic stresses for the first time, especially cold, heat and salt stresses. This also implies a role for classical G-protein signaling pathways in stress sensitivity in the normal plants of Arabidopsis. This is also the first genetic and biochemical evidence of abiotic stress tolerance rendered by knock-out mutation of GCR1 and/or GPA1. This suggests that G-protein signaling pathway could offer novel common targets for the development of tolerance/resistance to multiple abiotic stresses. PMID:26635828

  11. Event-based soil loss models for construction sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenouth, William R.; Gharabaghi, Bahram

    2015-05-01

    The elevated rates of soil erosion stemming from land clearing and grading activities during urban development, can result in excessive amounts of eroded sediments entering waterways and causing harm to the biota living therein. However, construction site event-based soil loss simulations - required for reliable design of erosion and sediment controls - are one of the most uncertain types of hydrologic models. This study presents models with improved degree of accuracy to advance the design of erosion and sediment controls for construction sites. The new models are developed using multiple linear regression (MLR) on event-based permutations of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and artificial neural networks (ANN). These models were developed using surface runoff monitoring datasets obtained from three sites - Greensborough, Cookstown, and Alcona - in Ontario and datasets mined from the literature for three additional sites - Treynor, Iowa, Coshocton, Ohio and Cordoba, Spain. The predictive MLR and ANN models can serve as both diagnostic and design tools for the effective sizing of erosion and sediment controls on active construction sites, and can be used for dynamic scenario forecasting when considering rapidly changing land use conditions during various phases of construction.

  12. An Event View Model and DSL for Engineering an Event-based SOA Monitoring Infrastructure

    E-print Network

    Dustdar, Schahram

    and management tasks. However, a number of challenges in developing systems that interact in an event-based modeAn Event View Model and DSL for Engineering an Event-based SOA Monitoring Infrastructure Emmanuel University of Technology, Vienna, Austria { lastname} @ infosys.tuwien.ac.at ABSTRACT An event-based solution

  13. 17/06/15 Event-Based Control of Mul3-Agent Systems

    E-print Network

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    17/06/15 1 Event-Based Control of Mul3-Agent Systems Karl H. Johansson of Technology, Sweden IEEE Int'l Conference on Event-based Control, Communica System Plant Sensor Controller Network Actuator Network Event-Based Control

  14. Suboptimal Event-based Control of Linear Systems over Lossy Channels

    E-print Network

    Hirche, Sandra

    Suboptimal Event-based Control of Linear Systems over Lossy Channels Adam Molin Sandra Hirche consideration of control and communications. It is well known that event-based controllers outperform standard of suboptimal event-based controllers in the presence of packet loss and delayed acknowledgement for linear

  15. 11/8/2006 Christian Tominski -Event-Based Visualization for User-Centered Visual Analysis

    E-print Network

    Tominski, Christian

    11/8/2006 Christian Tominski - Event-Based Visualization for User-Centered Visual Analysis 1 Event-Based Visualization for User-Centered Visual Analysis Christian Tominski University of Rostock November 8th, 2006 #12;11/8/2006 Christian Tominski - Event-Based Visualization for User-Centered Visual Analysis 2 Classic vs. Event

  16. DNA Binding of the Cell Cycle Transcriptional Regulator GcrA Depends on N6-Adenosine Methylation in Caulobacter crescentus and Other Alphaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Saswat S.; Bompard, Coralie; Brilli, Matteo; Frandi, Antonio; Castric, Vincent; Villeret, Vincent; Viollier, Patrick H.; Biondi, Emanuele G.

    2013-01-01

    Several regulators are involved in the control of cell cycle progression in the bacterial model system Caulobacter crescentus, which divides asymmetrically into a vegetative G1-phase (swarmer) cell and a replicative S-phase (stalked) cell. Here we report a novel functional interaction between the enigmatic cell cycle regulator GcrA and the N6-adenosine methyltransferase CcrM, both highly conserved proteins among Alphaproteobacteria, that are activated early and at the end of S-phase, respectively. As no direct biochemical and regulatory relationship between GcrA and CcrM were known, we used a combination of ChIP (chromatin-immunoprecipitation), biochemical and biophysical experimentation, and genetics to show that GcrA is a dimeric DNA–binding protein that preferentially targets promoters harbouring CcrM methylation sites. After tracing CcrM-dependent N6-methyl-adenosine promoter marks at a genome-wide scale, we show that these marks recruit GcrA in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that, in the presence of a methylated target, GcrA recruits the RNA polymerase to the promoter, consistent with its role in transcriptional activation. Since methylation-dependent DNA binding is also observed with GcrA orthologs from other Alphaproteobacteria, we conclude that GcrA is the founding member of a new and conserved class of transcriptional regulators that function as molecular effectors of a methylation-dependent (non-heritable) epigenetic switch that regulates gene expression during the cell cycle. PMID:23737758

  17. Variations in the GCR Flux Associated with Heliospheric Transient Structures Near the August 20, 2006 Forbush Decrease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, T.; Blake, J.; Spence, H. E.; Jordan, A. P.; Shaul, D.; Quenby, J.

    2007-12-01

    On August 20, 2006 a Forbush decrease observed at Polar in the Earth's magnetosphere was also seen at the INTEGRAL spacecraft outside the magnetosphere during a very active time in the solar wind. Data from Polar HIST and from INTEGRAL's Ge detector saturation rate (GEDSAT), which measures the GCR background with a threshold of ~200 MeV, show similar, short-period GCR variations in and around the Forbush decrease. The solar wind magnetic field and plasma conditions during this time reveals three interplanetary shocks present in the days leading up to and including the Forbush decrease. The first two shocks are driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and the last one by a high-speed stream. However, the solar wind following these shocks and during the Forbush decrease is not particularly geoeffective. The Forbush decrease, which begins at ~1200 UT on August 20, 2006 is the largest intensity change during this active time, but there are many others on a variety of timescales. Looking at more than 14 consecutive hours of INTEGRAL and Polar data on August 21, 2006 shows great similarities in the time history of the measurements made aboard the two satellites coupled with differences that must be due to GCR variability on a scale size of the order or less than their separation distance. Despite the spacecraft separation of over 25 Re, many of the larger intensity fluctuations remain identical at both satellites. Autocorrelation and power spectral analyses have shown these are not ar-n processes and that these fluctuations are statistically significant. Such analyses can be done with high confidence because both detectors aboard Polar and INTEGRAL have large geometric factors that generate high count rates on the order of 1000 particles per spin, ensuring rigorous, statistically significant samples.

  18. The bacterial cell cycle regulator GcrA is a ?70 cofactor that drives gene expression from a subset of methylated promoters.

    PubMed

    Haakonsen, Diane L; Yuan, Andy H; Laub, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Cell cycle progression in most organisms requires tightly regulated programs of gene expression. The transcription factors involved typically stimulate gene expression by binding specific DNA sequences in promoters and recruiting RNA polymerase. Here, we found that the essential cell cycle regulator GcrA in Caulobacter crescentus activates the transcription of target genes in a fundamentally different manner. GcrA forms a stable complex with RNA polymerase and localizes to almost all active ?(70)-dependent promoters in vivo but activates transcription primarily at promoters harboring certain DNA methylation sites. Whereas most transcription factors that contact ?(70) interact with domain 4, GcrA interfaces with domain 2, the region that binds the -10 element during strand separation. Using kinetic analyses and a reconstituted in vitro transcription assay, we demonstrated that GcrA can stabilize RNA polymerase binding and directly stimulate open complex formation to activate transcription. Guided by these studies, we identified a regulon of ?200 genes, providing new insight into the essential functions of GcrA. Collectively, our work reveals a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation, and we discuss the potential benefits of activating transcription by promoting RNA polymerase isomerization rather than recruitment exclusively. PMID:26545812

  19. Event-Based User Classification in Weibo Media

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wendong; Cheng, Shiduan; Que, Xirong

    2014-01-01

    Weibo media, known as the real-time microblogging services, has attracted massive attention and support from social network users. Weibo platform offers an opportunity for people to access information and changes the way people acquire and disseminate information significantly. Meanwhile, it enables people to respond to the social events in a more convenient way. Much of the information in Weibo media is related to some events. Users who post different contents, and exert different behavior or attitude may lead to different contribution to the specific event. Therefore, classifying the large amount of uncategorized social circles generated in Weibo media automatically from the perspective of events has been a promising task. Under this circumstance, in order to effectively organize and manage the huge amounts of users, thereby further managing their contents, we address the task of user classification in a more granular, event-based approach in this paper. By analyzing real data collected from Sina Weibo, we investigate the Weibo properties and utilize both content information and social network information to classify the numerous users into four primary groups: celebrities, organizations/media accounts, grassroots stars, and ordinary individuals. The experiments results show that our method identifies the user categories accurately. PMID:25133235

  20. Event-based internet biosurveillance: relation to epidemiological observation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) collects and publishes surveillance data and statistics for select diseases, but traditional methods of gathering such data are time and labor intensive. Event-based biosurveillance, which utilizes a variety of Internet sources, complements traditional surveillance. In this study we assess the reliability of Internet biosurveillance and evaluate disease-specific alert criteria against epidemiological data. Methods We reviewed and compared WHO epidemiological data and Argus biosurveillance system data for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (April 2009 – January 2010) from 8 regions and 122 countries to: identify reliable alert criteria among 15 Argus-defined categories; determine the degree of data correlation for disease progression; and assess timeliness of Internet information. Results Argus generated a total of 1,580 unique alerts; 5 alert categories generated statistically significant (p?

  1. Local and nonlocal geometry of interplanetary coronal mass ejections: Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) short-period variations and magnetic field modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenby, J. J.; Mulligan, T.; Blake, J. B.; Mazur, J. E.; Shaul, D.

    2008-10-01

    Energetic galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles, arriving within the solar system, are modulated by the overall interplanetary field carried in the solar wind. Localized disturbances related to solar activity cause further reduction in intensity, the largest being Forbush decreases in which fluxes can fall ˜20% over a few days. Understanding Forbush decreases leads to a better understanding of the magnetic field structure related to shock waves and fast streams originating at the Sun since the propagation characteristics of the GCR probe much larger regions of space than do individual spacecraft instruments. We examined the temporal history of the integral GCR fluence (?100 MeV) measured by the high-sensitivity telescope (HIST) aboard the Polar spacecraft, along with the solar wind magnetic field and plasma data from the ACE spacecraft during a 40-day period encompassing the 25 September 1998 Forbush decrease. We also examined the Forbush and (energetic storm particles) ESP event on 28 October 2003. It is the use of HIST in a high-counting-rate integral mode that allows previously poorly seen, short-scale depressions in the GCR fluxes to be observed, adding crucial information on the origin of GCR modulation. Variability on time scales within the frequency range 0.001-1.0 mHz is detected. This paper concentrates on investigating four simple models for explaining short-term reductions in the GCR intensity of both small and large amplitude. Specifically, these models are a local increase in magnetic scattering power, the passage of a shock discontinuity, and the passage of a tangential discontinuity or magnetic rope in the solar wind plasma. Analysis of the short-scale GCR depressions during a test period in September through October 1998 shows that they are not correlated with changes in magnetic scattering power or fluctuations in solar wind speed or plasma density. However, magnetic field and plasma data during the test period of Forbush decrease strongly suggest the presence of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME). Use of a non-force-free magnetic rope model in conjunction with the energetic particle data allows modeling of the geometry of the ICME in terms of a magnetic cloud topology. It is only this cloud configuration that allows a satisfactory explanation of the magnitude of the Forbush event of 25 September 1998. Calculations made during the test period point to short-scale GCR depressions being caused by either small-scale magnetic flux rope structures or possibly tangential discontinuities in the solar wind.

  2. Event based climatology of extreme precipitation in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, Katrin M.; Becker, Nico; Ulbrich, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    An event based detection algorithm to identify extreme precipitation events in gridded data sets is introduced and applied to the observational E-OBS data set. The algorithm identifies all grid boxes in which the rainfall exceeds a threshold, which depends on the location and the aggregation period. The aggregation periods taken into account in this study range from a single time step up to 72 hours. The local 50-year return level is calculated for all aggregation periods and used as a threshold. All identified grid boxes which are located within the same continuous rain area (i.e. which are not separated by rain free grid boxes) are considered as belonging to the same event and form a cluster. The centre of mass is calculated for each cluster. The clusters are then tracked in time using a nearest neighbor approach. Thus, each detected event can consist of several grid boxes and can last for several time steps. A precipitation severity index (PSI) is assigned to the events. The severity index takes the affected area and the amount of precipitation accumulated over the duration of the event into account. It is normalized by the long-term mean annual precipitation sum expected for the grid box. The severity index can be used to compare the strength of the identified events. The detection algorithm also stores additional information for each event, such as the date, location, affected area, duration, severity and maximum precipitation. Comparing all events detected in the E-OBS data set, which exceeded the local 50-year return levels, the highest severity index was calculated for an event affecting Spain, which took place in November 1997. It had a severity index of 49.9 and was also described in the literature. In comparison, the average PSI for the extreme precipitation events over Europe is 2.4. Overall, the most active season for extreme precipitation in Europe is summer. The longest duration of an event in the data set was 11 days. It occurred over Estonia in August 1987. The largest extend (152300km2) is associated with an event which occurred in September 1992 with its centre over Eastern Europe. This work has been conducted within the EU project RAIN (Risk Analysis of Infrastructure Networks in response to extreme weather).

  3. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 6: Appendix GCR Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-31

    The Geological Characterization Report (GCR) for the WIPP site presents, in one document, a compilation of geologic information available to August, 1978, which is judged to be relevant to studies for the WIPP. The Geological Characterization Report for the WIPP site is neither a preliminary safety analysis report nor an environmental impact statement; these documents, when prepared, should be consulted for appropriate discussion of safety analysis and environmental impact. The Geological Characterization Report of the WIPP site is a unique document and at this time is not required by regulatory process. An overview is presented of the purpose of the WIPP, the purpose of the Geological Characterization Report, the site selection criteria, the events leading to studies in New Mexico, status of studies, and the techniques employed during geological characterization.

  4. Nd:YAG Laser: GCR-150-10 These questions have been designed to ensure that the users of the laser system understand the

    E-print Network

    Turro, Claudia

    Nd:YAG Laser: GCR-150-10 These questions have been designed to ensure that the users of the laser system understand the underlying principles of laser operation, that the laser is not damaged in the manual, please ask the person responsible for the laser. These questions must be answered fully

  5. Earthquake!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Earth Science Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science teachers to help their students learn about earthquakes and scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  6. Earthquake!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Earth Science Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  7. Asteroid! An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Astronomy Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science or general science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  8. Asteroid! An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Astronomy Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  9. Fire!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Chemistry and Fire Ecology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science or physical science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  10. Fire!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Chemistry and Fire Ecology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  11. First Flight!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Physics Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  12. First Flight!: An Event-Based Science Module Teacher's Guide. Physics Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school life science or physical science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  13. Volcano!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Geology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  14. Volcano!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Geology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research,…

  15. Oil Spill! An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Oceanography Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  16. Oil Spill!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Oceanography Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science or general science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  17. Tornado! An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Meteorology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  18. Tornado! An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Meteorology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science teachers to help their students learn about problems with tornadoes and scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning,…

  19. Toxic Leak!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Groundwater Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for the middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  20. Event-based Approach to Money Laundering Data Analysis and Visualization

    E-print Network

    Si, Yain Whar "Lawrence"

    Event-based Approach to Money Laundering Data Analysis and Visualization Tat-Man Cheong Faculty, an event-based approach to money laundering data analysis and visualization is proposed in this paper. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated on a money laundering case from Taiwan. Keywords Crime

  1. An Event-Based Approach to Visualization Christian Tominski and Heidrun Schumann

    E-print Network

    Tominski, Christian

    An Event-Based Approach to Visualization Christian Tominski and Heidrun Schumann University work Model of Event-Based Visualization · Event specification · Event detection · Event visualization Event Visualization in VisAxes Conclusion and future work #12;July 14, 2004 8th International Conference

  2. Event-based Document Sensing for Insider Threats Kenneth Anderson, Antonio Carzaniga, Dennis Heimbigner, Alexander Wolf

    E-print Network

    Wolf, Alexander L.

    Event-based Document Sensing for Insider Threats Kenneth Anderson, Antonio Carzaniga, Dennis University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80309-0430 #12;#12;1 Event-based Document Sensing for Insider Threats Kenneth Anderson, Antonio Carzaniga, Dennis Heimbigner, Alexander Wolf 6 February 2004 Abstract

  3. Introducing numerical bounds to improve event-based neural network simulation

    E-print Network

    Cessac, Bruno; Viéville, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Although the spike-trains in neural networks are mainly constrained by the neural dynamics itself, global temporal constraints (refractoriness, time precision, propagation delays, ..) are also to be taken into account. These constraints are revisited in this paper in order to use them in event-based simulation paradigms. We first review these constraints, and discuss their consequences at the simulation level, showing how event-based simulation of time-constrained networks can be simplified in this context: the underlying data-structures are strongly simplified, while event-based and clock-based mechanisms can be easily mixed. These ideas are applied to punctual conductance-based generalized integrate-and-fire neural networks simulation, while spike-response model simulations are also revisited within this framework. As an outcome, a fast minimal complementary alternative with respect to existing simulation event-based methods, with the possibility to simulate interesting neuron models is implemented and expe...

  4. Profile-Directed Optimization of Event-Based Programs Mohan Rajagopalan Saumya Debray

    E-print Network

    Debray, Saumya

    Profile-Directed Optimization of Event-Based Programs £ Mohan Rajagopalan Saumya Debray Department of Computer Science University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721 mohan, debray @cs.arizona.edu Matti A. Hiltunen

  5. REGULAR PAPER SUBMITTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS 1 Event-based Stabilization of Periodic Orbits for

    E-print Network

    Grizzle, Jessy W.

    REGULAR PAPER SUBMITTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS 1 Event-based Stabilization of Periodic describing the stance phase and a discrete map describing the impact event, that is, the non-stance leg both continuous and dis- crete (event-based) actions. This paper concentrates on the event- based

  6. Efficiency of Event-Based Sampling According to Error Energy Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Miskowicz, Marek

    2010-01-01

    The paper belongs to the studies that deal with the effectiveness of the particular event-based sampling scheme compared to the conventional periodic sampling as a reference. In the present study, the event-based sampling according to a constant energy of sampling error is analyzed. This criterion is suitable for applications where the energy of sampling error should be bounded (i.e., in building automation, or in greenhouse climate monitoring and control). Compared to the integral sampling criteria, the error energy criterion gives more weight to extreme sampling error values. The proposed sampling principle extends a range of event-based sampling schemes and makes the choice of particular sampling criterion more flexible to application requirements. In the paper, it is proved analytically that the proposed event-based sampling criterion is more effective than the periodic sampling by a factor defined by the ratio of the maximum to the mean of the cubic root of the signal time-derivative square in the analyzed time interval. Furthermore, it is shown that the sampling according to energy criterion is less effective than the send-on-delta scheme but more effective than the sampling according to integral criterion. On the other hand, it is indicated that higher effectiveness in sampling according to the selected event-based criterion is obtained at the cost of increasing the total sampling error defined as the sum of errors for all the samples taken. PMID:22294925

  7. An Event-Based Approach to Distributed Diagnosis of Continuous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew; Roychoudhurry, Indranil; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon

    2010-01-01

    Distributed fault diagnosis solutions are becoming necessary due to the complexity of modern engineering systems, and the advent of smart sensors and computing elements. This paper presents a novel event-based approach for distributed diagnosis of abrupt parametric faults in continuous systems, based on a qualitative abstraction of measurement deviations from the nominal behavior. We systematically derive dynamic fault signatures expressed as event-based fault models. We develop a distributed diagnoser design algorithm that uses these models for designing local event-based diagnosers based on global diagnosability analysis. The local diagnosers each generate globally correct diagnosis results locally, without a centralized coordinator, and by communicating a minimal number of measurements between themselves. The proposed approach is applied to a multi-tank system, and results demonstrate a marked improvement in scalability compared to a centralized approach.

  8. DEVS representation of dynamical systems - Event-based intelligent control. [Discrete Event System Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, Bernard P.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown how systems can be advantageously represented as discrete-event models by using DEVS (discrete-event system specification), a set-theoretic formalism. Such DEVS models provide a basis for the design of event-based logic control. In this control paradigm, the controller expects to receive confirming sensor responses to its control commands within definite time windows determined by its DEVS model of the system under control. The event-based contral paradigm is applied in advanced robotic and intelligent automation, showing how classical process control can be readily interfaced with rule-based symbolic reasoning systems.

  9. Event-Based Data Control in Healthcare Jatinder Singh and Jean Bacon

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Event-Based Data Control in Healthcare Jatinder Singh and Jean Bacon Computer Laboratory University transmission. Categories and Subject Descriptors C.2.4 [Computer-Communication Networks]: Distrib- uted Systems Keywords Data Control, Healthcare, Middleware, Publish/Subscribe 1. HEALTHCARE DIRECTIONS Health services

  10. Adapting Event-Based Applications for Synchronization in VR Clusters Dmitri K. Lemmerman Andrew S. Forsberg

    E-print Network

    Laidlaw, David

    implemented for shared- memory-based rendering systems to a cluster rendering sys- tem. We use a master-display VR setups with distributed, com- modity graphics nodes rather than a shared-memory systemAdapting Event-Based Applications for Synchronization in VR Clusters Dmitri K. Lemmerman Andrew S

  11. Event-based simulation of interference with alternatingly blocked particle sources

    E-print Network

    Event-based simulation of interference with alternatingly blocked particle sources K. Michielsen-beam interference experiments in which the two sources are alternatingly blocked. We show that such experiments may as a concept of an oscillating phase can be associated with individual particles, even a particulate model can

  12. Comment on ``Experimental Test of an Event-Based Corpuscular Model

    E-print Network

    in the material) effects.3) Because of the long-range nature of the electrical and elastic forces which are res) It is shown that an event-based simulation of the integrated optics device used in the experiment reproduces the MZI is realized as an integrated-optics device1) and as there is no evidence that the condition

  13. Estimating the frequency of extremely energetic solar events, based on solar, stellar, lunar, and terrestrial records

    E-print Network

    Schrijver, Karel

    or less. [3] Solar events have an increasing potential to impact man- kind's technological infrastructure the solar corona 1 Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, California, USA. 2 Swiss FederalEstimating the frequency of extremely energetic solar events, based on solar, stellar, lunar

  14. Event-based simulation of interference with alternatingly blocked particle sources

    E-print Network

    K. Michielsen; S. Mohanty; L. Arnold; H. De Raedt

    2011-12-12

    We analyze the predictions of an event-based corpuscular model for interference in the case of two-beam interference experiments in which the two sources are alternatingly blocked. We show that such experiments may be used to test specific predictions of the corpuscular model.

  15. Improvement of Glucose Uptake Rate and Production of Target Chemicals by Overexpressing Hexose Transporters and Transcriptional Activator Gcr1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehee; Song, Ji-Yoon; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2015-12-15

    Metabolic engineering to increase the glucose uptake rate might be beneficial to improve microbial production of various fuels and chemicals. In this study, we enhanced the glucose uptake rate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpressing hexose transporters (HXTs). Among the 5 tested HXTs (Hxt1, Hxt2, Hxt3, Hxt4, and Hxt7), overexpression of high-affinity transporter Hxt7 was the most effective in increasing the glucose uptake rate, followed by moderate-affinity transporters Hxt2 and Hxt4. Deletion of STD1 and MTH1, encoding corepressors of HXT genes, exerted differential effects on the glucose uptake rate, depending on the culture conditions. In addition, improved cell growth and glucose uptake rates could be achieved by overexpression of GCR1, which led to increased transcription levels of HXT1 and ribosomal protein genes. All genetic modifications enhancing the glucose uptake rate also increased the ethanol production rate in wild-type S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, the growth-promoting effect of GCR1 overexpression was successfully applied to lactic acid production in an engineered lactic acid-producing strain, resulting in a significant improvement of productivity and titers of lactic acid production under acidic fermentation conditions. PMID:26431967

  16. Event-Based Control Strategy for Mobile Robots in Wireless Environments.

    PubMed

    Socas, Rafael; Dormido, Sebastián; Dormido, Raquel; Fabregas, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new event-based control strategy for mobile robots is presented. It has been designed to work in wireless environments where a centralized controller has to interchange information with the robots over an RF (radio frequency) interface. The event-based architectures have been developed for differential wheeled robots, although they can be applied to other kinds of robots in a simple way. The solution has been checked over classical navigation algorithms, like wall following and obstacle avoidance, using scenarios with a unique or multiple robots. A comparison between the proposed architectures and the classical discrete-time strategy is also carried out. The experimental results shows that the proposed solution has a higher efficiency in communication resource usage than the classical discrete-time strategy with the same accuracy. PMID:26633412

  17. Event-based Transmission Line Matrix Method for Simulating Site-Specific Multipath Propagation Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Nutaro, James J; Djouadi, Seddik M

    2012-01-01

    Accurate radio channel modeling is essential for deploying advanced wireless sensors in harsh industrial and urban environments. Site-specific propagation modeling tools are required to understand the channel parameters with in these environments. Multipath delay spread determines the frequency-selective fading characteristics of the channel. This paper describes a novel computationally inexpensive technique to determine multipath delay spread. Event-based transmission line matrix-based method is used to simulate the channel.

  18. NASA Space Radiation Program Integrative Risk Model Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hu, Shaowen; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Sandridge, Chris

    2015-01-01

    NASA Space Radiation Program Element scientists have been actively involved in development of an integrative risk models toolkit that includes models for acute radiation risk and organ dose projection (ARRBOD), NASA space radiation cancer risk projection (NSCR), hemocyte dose estimation (HemoDose), GCR event-based risk model code (GERMcode), and relativistic ion tracks (RITRACKS), NASA radiation track image (NASARTI), and the On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space (OLTARIS). This session will introduce the components of the risk toolkit with opportunity for hands on demonstrations. The brief descriptions of each tools are: ARRBOD for Organ dose projection and acute radiation risk calculation from exposure to solar particle event; NSCR for Projection of cancer risk from exposure to space radiation; HemoDose for retrospective dose estimation by using multi-type blood cell counts; GERMcode for basic physical and biophysical properties for an ion beam, and biophysical and radiobiological properties for a beam transport to the target in the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory beam line; RITRACKS for simulation of heavy ion and delta-ray track structure, radiation chemistry, DNA structure and DNA damage at the molecular scale; NASARTI for modeling of the effects of space radiation on human cells and tissue by incorporating a physical model of tracks, cell nucleus, and DNA damage foci with image segmentation for the automated count; and OLTARIS, an integrated tool set utilizing HZETRN (High Charge and Energy Transport) intended to help scientists and engineers study the effects of space radiation on shielding materials, electronics, and biological systems.

  19. Music, clicks, and their imaginations favor differently the event-based timing component for rhythmic movements.

    PubMed

    Bravi, Riccardo; Quarta, Eros; Del Tongo, Claudia; Carbonaro, Nicola; Tognetti, Alessandro; Minciacchi, Diego

    2015-06-01

    The involvement or noninvolvement of a clock-like neural process, an effector-independent representation of the time intervals to produce, is described as the essential difference between event-based and emergent timing. In a previous work (Bravi et al. in Exp Brain Res 232:1663-1675, 2014a. doi: 10.1007/s00221-014-3845-9 ), we studied repetitive isochronous wrist's flexion-extensions (IWFEs), performed while minimizing visual and tactile information, to clarify whether non-temporal and temporal characteristics of paced auditory stimuli affect the precision and accuracy of the rhythmic motor performance. Here, with the inclusion of new recordings, we expand the examination of the dataset described in our previous study to investigate whether simple and complex paced auditory stimuli (clicks and music) and their imaginations influence in a different way the timing mechanisms for repetitive IWFEs. Sets of IWFEs were analyzed by the windowed (lag one) autocorrelation-w?(1), a statistical method recently introduced for the distinction between event-based and emergent timing. Our findings provide evidence that paced auditory information and its imagination favor the engagement of a clock-like neural process, and specifically that music, unlike clicks, lacks the power to elicit event-based timing, not counteracting the natural shift of w?(1) toward positive values as frequency of movements increase. PMID:25837726

  20. Networked Estimation for Event-Based Sampling Systems with Packet Dropouts

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vinh Hao; Suh, Young Soo

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a networked estimation problem in which sensor data are transmitted over the network. In the event-based sampling scheme known as level-crossing or send-on-delta (SOD), sensor data are transmitted to the estimator node if the difference between the current sensor value and the last transmitted one is greater than a given threshold. Event-based sampling has been shown to be more efficient than the time-triggered one in some situations, especially in network bandwidth improvement. However, it cannot detect packet dropout situations because data transmission and reception do not use a periodical time-stamp mechanism as found in time-triggered sampling systems. Motivated by this issue, we propose a modified event-based sampling scheme called modified SOD in which sensor data are sent when either the change of sensor output exceeds a given threshold or the time elapses more than a given interval. Through simulation results, we show that the proposed modified SOD sampling significantly improves estimation performance when packet dropouts happen. PMID:22574063

  1. Measuring pesticides in surface waters - continuous versus event-based sampling design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyring, J.; Bach, M.; Frede, H.-G.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring pesticides in surface waters is still a work- and cost-intensive procedure. Therefore, studies are normally carried out with a low monitoring frequency or with only a small selection of substances to be analyzed. In this case, it is not possible to picture the high temporal variability of pesticide concentrations, depending on application dates, weather conditions, cropping seasons and other factors. In 2007 the Institute of Landscape Ecology and Resource Management at Giessen University implemented a monitoring program during two pesticide application periods aiming to produce a detailed dataset of pesticide concentration for a wide range of substances, and which would also be suitable for the evaluation of catchment-scale pesticide exposure models. The Weida catchment in Thuringia (Eastern Germany) was selected as study area due to the availability of detailed pesticide application data for this region. The samples were taken from the river Weida at the gauge Zeulenroda, where it flows into a drinking water reservoir. The catchment area is 102 km². 67% of the area are in agricultural use, the main crops being winter wheat, maize, winter barley and winter rape. Dominant soil texture classes are loamy sand and loamy silt. About one third of the agricultural area is drained. The sampling was carried out in cooperation with the water supply agency of Thuringia (Fernwasserversorgung Thueringen). The sample analysis was done by the Institute of Environmental Research at Dortmund University. Two sampling schemes were carried out using two automatic samplers: continuous sampling with composite samples bottled two times per week and event-based sampling triggered by a discharge threshold. 53 samples from continuous sampling were collected. 19 discharge events were sampled with 45 individual samples (one to six per event). 34 pesticides and two metabolites were analyzed. 21 compounds were detected, nine of which having concentrations above the drinking water limit (0.1 µg/l). Pesticide loads were calculated separately from continuous and event-based samples. Only three pesticides dominated the total load. These were the herbicides metazachlor, terbuthylazine and quinmerac amounting to 75 % of the total load. This result seems to be plausible considering the fact that these three substances are the pesticides with the highest applied amounts in the Weida catchment. The highest pesticide loads of single pesticides were observed during or shortly after their application period, mostly accompanied by larger discharge events. They can be explained as surface runoff and drainage inputs from treated fields, since spray-drift inputs would be detected during the application periods without dependency on discharge events, and inputs from point-sources are usually independent of discharge as well. Annual loads calculated from continuous samples were mainly higher than those of event-based samples due to the fact that they represent a much longer time period. On the other hand, the highest concentrations were found in the event-based samples; in many cases they double the maximum concentrations of continuous samples. The monitoring study presented shows that different sampling strategies lead to different results and can answer different questions. If the intention is to detect maximum concentrations caused by surface runoff or drainage inputs, e.g. to assess the resulting risk to the aquatic community, the event based sampling method can be recommended. If one is rather interested in calculating annual pesticide loads and assessing which fractions of applied amounts finally enter the surface water network, continuous sampling is advisable. The dataset of continuous and event-based pesticide concentrations offers the possibility to evaluate and improve pesticide exposure models at the catchment scale. Further work is scheduled on this issue.

  2. Lessons Learned from Real-Time, Event-Based Internet Science Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T.; Myszka, E.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adams, M. L.; Koczor, R. J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the last several years the Science Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center has carried out a diverse program of Internet-based science communication. The Directorate's Science Roundtable includes active researchers, NASA public relations, educators, and administrators. The Science@NASA award-winning family of Web sites features science, mathematics, and space news. The program includes extended stories about NASA science, a curriculum resource for teachers tied to national education standards, on-line activities for students, and webcasts of real-time events. The focus of sharing science activities in real-time has been to involve and excite students and the public about science. Events have involved meteor showers, solar eclipses, natural very low frequency radio emissions, and amateur balloon flights. In some cases, broadcasts accommodate active feedback and questions from Internet participants. Through these projects a pattern has emerged in the level of interest or popularity with the public. The pattern differentiates projects that include science from those that do not, All real-time, event-based Internet activities have captured public interest at a level not achieved through science stories or educator resource material exclusively. The worst event-based activity attracted more interest than the best written science story. One truly rewarding lesson learned through these projects is that the public recognizes the importance and excitement of being part of scientific discovery. Flying a camera to 100,000 feet altitude isn't as interesting to the public as searching for viable life-forms at these oxygen-poor altitudes. The details of these real-time, event-based projects and lessons learned will be discussed.

  3. Event-based size distributions of particulate matter transported during urban rainfall-runoff events.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Yeop; Sansalone, John J

    2008-05-01

    Source area rainfall-runoff conveyances are capable of mobilizing and transporting a very hetero-disperse size gradation of particulate matter (PM). This PM is most commonly characterized through a single event-based gravimetric index such as total suspended solids (TSS) or suspended sediment concentration (SSC) without an examination of PM fractions or particle size distributions (PSDs). Recognizing the utility of such indices, this study went further to examine PM suspended-settleable-sediment fractions and PSDs to representatively characterize the entire event-based PSD of the PM non-colloidal fractions from 1 microm to larger than 24,500 microm transported by urban source area runoff events. This study examined the hetero-disperse PSD, and provided a mass balance analysis to ensure representative event-based results. On an event basis, fine PM (<75 microm; the suspended and settleable fractions) accounted for from 25% to 80% of the gradation on a mass basis, and gravel-size PM (>2000 microm) ranged from 0.5% to 30%. Measured PSDs were compared to literature PSDs on paved surfaces, and in urban runoff from paved surfaces as well as the associated sampling and analysis methods. Results indicate that published urban street surface PSDs are generally within a similar range, with wider variability for published runoff PSDs. PSD variability is attributed to differences in sampling and analytical methods between studies. Knowledge of PSDs is critical for PM transport and fate, pollutant partitioning and distribution, as well as the non-stationary behavior of unit operations. PMID:18342357

  4. Fast vision through frameless event-based sensing and convolutional processing: application to texture recognition.

    PubMed

    Perez-Carrasco, Jose Antonio; Acha, Begona; Serrano, Carmen; Camunas-Mesa, Luis; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Linares-Barranco, Bernabe

    2010-04-01

    Address-event representation (AER) is an emergent hardware technology which shows a high potential for providing in the near future a solid technological substrate for emulating brain-like processing structures. When used for vision, AER sensors and processors are not restricted to capturing and processing still image frames, as in commercial frame-based video technology, but sense and process visual information in a pixel-level event-based frameless manner. As a result, vision processing is practically simultaneous to vision sensing, since there is no need to wait for sensing full frames. Also, only meaningful information is sensed, communicated, and processed. Of special interest for brain-like vision processing are some already reported AER convolutional chips, which have revealed a very high computational throughput as well as the possibility of assembling large convolutional neural networks in a modular fashion. It is expected that in a near future we may witness the appearance of large scale convolutional neural networks with hundreds or thousands of individual modules. In the meantime, some research is needed to investigate how to assemble and configure such large scale convolutional networks for specific applications. In this paper, we analyze AER spiking convolutional neural networks for texture recognition hardware applications. Based on the performance figures of already available individual AER convolution chips, we emulate large scale networks using a custom made event-based behavioral simulator. We have developed a new event-based processing architecture that emulates with AER hardware Manjunath's frame-based feature recognition software algorithm, and have analyzed its performance using our behavioral simulator. Recognition rate performance is not degraded. However, regarding speed, we show that recognition can be achieved before an equivalent frame is fully sensed and transmitted. PMID:20181543

  5. Event-based plausibility immediately influences on-line language comprehension.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Kazunaga; Chow, Tracy; Hare, Mary; Elman, Jeffrey L; Scheepers, Christoph; McRae, Ken

    2011-07-01

    In some theories of sentence comprehension, linguistically relevant lexical knowledge, such as selectional restrictions, is privileged in terms of the time-course of its access and influence. We examined whether event knowledge computed by combining multiple concepts can rapidly influence language understanding even in the absence of selectional restriction violations. Specifically, we investigated whether instruments can combine with actions to influence comprehension of ensuing patients of (as in Rayner, Warren, Juhuasz, & Liversedge, 2004; Warren & McConnell, 2007). Instrument-verb-patient triplets were created in a norming study designed to tap directly into event knowledge. In self-paced reading (Experiment 1), participants were faster to read patient nouns, such as hair, when they were typical of the instrument-action pair (Donna used the shampoo to wash vs. the hose to wash). Experiment 2 showed that these results were not due to direct instrument-patient relations. Experiment 3 replicated Experiment 1 using eyetracking, with effects of event typicality observed in first fixation and gaze durations on the patient noun. This research demonstrates that conceptual event-based expectations are computed and used rapidly and dynamically during on-line language comprehension. We discuss relationships among plausibility and predictability, as well as their implications. We conclude that selectional restrictions may be best considered as event-based conceptual knowledge rather than lexical-grammatical knowledge. PMID:21517222

  6. Event-based surveillance in north-western Ethiopia: experience and lessons learnt in the field

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Masaki; Beyene, Belay Bezabih

    2015-01-01

    This study piloted an event-based surveillance system at the health centre (HC) level in Ethiopia. The system collects rumours in the community and registers them in rumour logbooks to record events of disease outbreaks and public health emergencies. Descriptive analysis was conducted on the events captured at the 59 study HCs in the Amhara Region in north-western Ethiopia between October 2013 and November 2014. A total of 126 rumours were registered at two thirds of the HCs during the study period. The average event reporting time was 3.8 days; response time of the HCs was 0.6 days, resulting in a total response time of 4.4 days. The most commonly reported rumours were measles-related (n = 90, 71%). These rumours followed a similar pattern of measles cases reported in the routine surveillance system. The largest proportion of rumours were reported by community members (n = 38, 36%) followed by health post workers (n = 36, 29%) who were normally informed by the community members about the rumours. This surveillance system was established along with an existing indicator-based surveillance system and was simple to implement. The implementation cost was minimal, requiring only printing and distribution of rumour logbooks to the HCs and brief orientations to focal persons. In countries where routine surveillance is still weak, an event-based surveillance system similar to this should be considered as a supplementary tool for disease monitoring. PMID:26668763

  7. Event-based and Multi Agent Control of an Innovative Wheelchair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diomin, U.; Witczak, P.; Stetter, R.

    2015-11-01

    Due to the aging population more and more people require mobility assistance in form of a wheelchair. Generally it would be desirable that such wheelchairs would be easy to use and would allow their users the possibility to move in any direction at any time. Concepts which allow such movements are existing since many years but have for several reasons not found their way to the market. Additionally for semi-autonomous (assisted) operation and fully autonomous operation (e. g. an empty wheelchair driving to its charging station) the control task is much less challenging for such drive system, because no complex manoeuvres needs to be considered and planned. In an ongoing research a drive system for a wheelchair was developed which offers such possibilities employing a relatively simple mechanical design. This drive system is based on a certain steering principle which is based on torque differences between different wheels. This allows a relatively simple mechanical design but poses challenges on the control of the vehicle. This paper describes two possible approaches to address this challenge - the use of an event based control and the application of multiple software agents. Both approaches can solve the control problem individually but can also complement each other for better system performance. The paper stars with a description of the wheelchair drive system. Then the asynchronous event based control software is described as well the multi agent based approach. The next sections report the results of the experiments and discuss the further improvements.

  8. Event-based Plausibility Immediately Influences On-line Language Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Kazunaga; Chow, Tracy; Hare, Mary; Elman, Jeffrey L.; Scheepers, Christoph; McRae, Ken

    2011-01-01

    In some theories of sentence comprehension, linguistically-relevant lexical knowledge such as selectional restrictions is privileged in terms of the time-course of its access and influence. We examined whether event knowledge computed by combining multiple concepts can rapidly influence language understanding even in the absence of selectional restriction violations. Specifically, we investigated whether instruments can combine with actions to influence comprehension of ensuing patients. Instrument-verb-patient triplets were created in a norming study designed to tap directly into event knowledge. In self-paced reading (Experiment 1), participants were faster to read patient nouns such as hair when they were typical of the instrument-action pair (Donna used the shampoo to wash vs. the hose to wash). Experiment 2 showed that these results were not due to direct instrument-patient relations. Experiment 3 replicated Experiment 1 using eyetracking, with effects of event typicality observed in first fixation and gaze durations on the patient noun. This research demonstrates that conceptual event-based expectations are computed and used rapidly and dynamically during on-line language comprehension. We discuss relationships among plausibility and predictability, as well as their implications. We conclude that selectional restrictions may be best considered as event-based conceptual knowledge, rather than lexical-grammatical knowledge. PMID:21517222

  9. Valenced Cues and Contexts Have Different Effects on Event-Based Prospective Memory

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Peter; Yu, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the separate influence and joint influences on event-based prospective memory task performance due to the valence of cues and the valence of contexts. We manipulated the valence of cues and contexts with pictures from the International Affective Picture System. The participants, undergraduate students, showed higher performance when neutral compared to valenced pictures were used for cueing prospective memory. In addition, neutral pictures were more effective as cues when they occurred in a valenced context than in the context of neutral pictures, but the effectiveness of valenced cues did not vary across contexts that differed in valence. The finding of an interaction between cue and context valence indicates that their respective influence on event-based prospective memory task performance cannot be understood in isolation from each other. Our findings are not consistent with by the prevailing view which holds that the scope of attention is broadened and narrowed, respectively, by positively and negatively valenced stimuli. Instead, our findings are more supportive of the recent proposal that the scope of attention is determined by the motivational intensity associated with valenced stimuli. Consistent with this proposal, we speculate that the motivational intensity associated with different retrieval cues determines the scope of attention, that contexts with different valence values determine participants’ task engagement, and that prospective memory task performance is determined jointly by attention scope and task engagement. PMID:25647484

  10. Event-Based Parareal: A data-flow based implementation of parareal

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Lee A; Elwasif, Wael R; Reynolds-Barredo, J.; Samaddar, D.; Sanchez, R.; Newman, David E; Chen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Parareal is an iterative algorithm that, in effect, achieves temporal decomposition for a time-dependent system of differential or partial differential equations. A solution is obtained in a shorter wall-clock time, but at the expense of increased compute cycles. The algorithm combines a fine solver that solves the system to acceptable accuracy with an approximate coarse solver. The critical task for the successful implementation of parareal on any system is the development of a coarse solver that leads to convergence in a small number of iterations compared to the number of time slices in the full time interval, and is, at the same time, much faster than the fine solver. Fast coarse solvers may not lead to sufficiently rapid convergence, and slow coarse solvers may not lead to significant gains even if the number of iterations to convergence is satisfactory. We find that the difficulty of meeting these conflicting demands can be substantially eased by using a data-driven, event-based implementation of parareal instead of the conventional algorithm where solver tasks are executed sequentially. For given convergence properties, the event-based approach relaxes the speed requirements on the coarse solver by a factor of , where is the number of iterations required for a converged solution. This may, for many problems, lead to an efficient parareal implementation that would otherwise not be possible or would require substantial coarse solver development.

  11. Qualitative Event-Based Diagnosis: Case Study on the Second International Diagnostic Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew; Roychoudhury, Indranil

    2010-01-01

    We describe a diagnosis algorithm entered into the Second International Diagnostic Competition. We focus on the first diagnostic problem of the industrial track of the competition in which a diagnosis algorithm must detect, isolate, and identify faults in an electrical power distribution testbed and provide corresponding recovery recommendations. The diagnosis algorithm embodies a model-based approach, centered around qualitative event-based fault isolation. Faults produce deviations in measured values from model-predicted values. The sequence of these deviations is matched to those predicted by the model in order to isolate faults. We augment this approach with model-based fault identification, which determines fault parameters and helps to further isolate faults. We describe the diagnosis approach, provide diagnosis results from running the algorithm on provided example scenarios, and discuss the issues faced, and lessons learned, from implementing the approach

  12. Experimental Test of an Event-Based Corpuscular Model Modification as an Alternative to Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo Pietro; Genovese, Marco; Migdall, Alan; Piacentini, Fabrizio; Polyakov, Sergey V.; Traina, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    We present the first experimental test that distinguishes between an event-based corpuscular model (EBCM) [H. De Raedt et al.: J. Comput. Theor. Nanosci. 8 (2011) 1052] of the interaction of photons with matter and quantum mechanics. The test looks at the interference that results as a single photon passes through a Mach--Zehnder interferometer [H. De Raedt et al.: J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 74 (2005) 16]. The experimental results, obtained with a low-noise single-photon source [G. Brida et al.: Opt. Express 19 (2011) 1484], agree with the predictions of standard quantum mechanics with a reduced ?2 of 0.98 and falsify the EBCM with a reduced ?2 of greater than 20.

  13. Event-Based Study of the Effect of Execution Environments on Parallel Program Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarukkai, Sekhar R.; Yan, Jerry C.; Craw, James (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we seek to demonstrate the importance of studying the effect of changes in execution environment parameters, on parallel applications executed on state-of-the-art multiprocessors. A comprehensive methodology for event-based analysis of program behavior is introduced. This methodology is used to study the performance significance of various system parameters such as processor speed, message-buffer size, buffer copy speed, network bandwidth, communication latency, interrupt overheads and other system parameters. With the help cf a few CFD examples, we illustrate the use of our technique in determining suitable parameter values of the execution environment for three applications. We also demonstrate how this approach can be used to predict performance across architectures and illustrate the use of visual and profile-like feedback to expose the effect of system parameters changes on the performance of specific applications module.

  14. SINUDYM - an event-based water quality model for ungauged catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hong Quan; Meon, Guenter

    2013-04-01

    SINUDYM - an event-based water quality model for ungauged catchments Hong Quan Nguyen, Günter Meon Water quality assessment of surface flow especially in ungauged catchments requires a proper tool. In this paper, the development, testing and application of the SINUDYM (Simplified Nutrient Dynamics Model) model to cope with practical issues (e.g. limited data, error propagation) in a robust way is presented. A simplified model structure and limited model parameters are the most appealing features of the model. With the model, event-based water balance and nutrient transport as well as relevant water quality parameters of the river system can be simulated. All model components are coupled and controlled within one file for use as an operational tool. Here, the Geomorphology Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (GIUH), a simplified process erosion and sedimentation component, the loading function and the river routing from different existing modeling systems had been adopted and linked together. Furthermore, an add-in Monte - Carlo simulation tool is implemented providing an uncertainty analysis tool for the users. SINUDYM was, among others, applied successfully within a joint German-Vietnamese research project to simulate nutrient dynamics at a small catchment scale during flood events in southern Vietnam. The success of the developed model has proven the importance of selecting suitable model components and a model complexity being adapted to the data availability. For application to catchments with a poor database or to ungauged catchments, only the dominant processes of the nutrient transport should be captured in the model, whereas minor processes may be neglected or treated in a less complex manner. Key words: SINUDYM, water quality model, nutrient transport, ungauged catchment, uncertainty analysis, Vietnam.

  15. Assessing the Continuum of Event-Based Biosurveillance Through an Operational Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Courtney D.; Lancaster, Mary J.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Chung, James S.; Walters, Ronald A.; Arthur, Ray; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Dowling, Glenn; Hartley, David M.; Kennedy, Shaun; Kircher, Amy; Klucking, Sara; Lee, Eva K.; McKenzie, Taylor K.; Nelson, Noele P.; Olsen, Jennifer; Pancerella, Carmen M.; Quitugua, Teresa N.; Reed, Jeremy T.; Thomas, Carla S.

    2012-03-28

    This research follows the Updated Guidelines for Evaluating Public Health Surveillance Systems, Recommendations from the Guidelines Working Group, published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nearly a decade ago. Since then, models have been developed and complex systems have evolved with a breadth of disparate data to detect or forecast chemical, biological, and radiological events that have significant impact in the One Health landscape. How the attributes identified in 2001 relate to the new range of event-based biosurveillance (EBB) technologies is unclear. This manuscript frames the continuum of EBB methods, models, and constructs through an operational lens (i.e., aspects and attributes associated with operational considerations in the development, testing, and validation of the EBB methods and models and their use in an operational environment). A 2-day subject matter expert workshop was held to scientifically identify, develop, and vet a set of attributes for the broad range of such operational considerations. Workshop participants identified and described comprehensive attributes for the characterization of EBB. The identified attributes are: (1) event, (2) readiness, (3) operational aspects, (4) geographic coverage, (5) population coverage, (6) input data, (7) output, and (8) cost. Ultimately, the analyses herein discuss the broad scope, complexity, and relevant issues germane to EBB useful in an operational environment.

  16. Fluence-based and microdosimetric event-based methods for radiation protection in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Stanley B.; Meinhold, C. B. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has recently published a report (Report #137) that discusses various aspects of the concepts used in radiation protection and the difficulties in measuring the radiation environment in spacecraft for the estimation of radiation risk to space travelers. Two novel dosimetric methodologies, fluence-based and microdosimetric event-based methods, are discussed and evaluated, along with the more conventional quality factor/LET method. It was concluded that for the present, any reason to switch to a new methodology is not compelling. It is suggested that because of certain drawbacks in the presently-used conventional method, these alternative methodologies should be kept in mind. As new data become available and dosimetric techniques become more refined, the question should be revisited and that in the future, significant improvement might be realized. In addition, such concepts as equivalent dose and organ dose equivalent are discussed and various problems regarding the measurement/estimation of these quantities are presented.

  17. Simulation of Greenhouse Climate Monitoring and Control with Wireless Sensor Network and Event-Based Control

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowski, Andrzej; Guzman, Jose Luis; Rodríguez, Francisco; Berenguel, Manuel; Sánchez, José; Dormido, Sebastián

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring and control of the greenhouse environment play a decisive role in greenhouse production processes. Assurance of optimal climate conditions has a direct influence on crop growth performance, but it usually increases the required equipment cost. Traditionally, greenhouse installations have required a great effort to connect and distribute all the sensors and data acquisition systems. These installations need many data and power wires to be distributed along the greenhouses, making the system complex and expensive. For this reason, and others such as unavailability of distributed actuators, only individual sensors are usually located in a fixed point that is selected as representative of the overall greenhouse dynamics. On the other hand, the actuation system in greenhouses is usually composed by mechanical devices controlled by relays, being desirable to reduce the number of commutations of the control signals from security and economical point of views. Therefore, and in order to face these drawbacks, this paper describes how the greenhouse climate control can be represented as an event-based system in combination with wireless sensor networks, where low-frequency dynamics variables have to be controlled and control actions are mainly calculated against events produced by external disturbances. The proposed control system allows saving costs related with wear minimization and prolonging the actuator life, but keeping promising performance results. Analysis and conclusions are given by means of simulation results. PMID:22389597

  18. Asynchronous Event-Based Multikernel Algorithm for High-Speed Visual Features Tracking.

    PubMed

    Lagorce, Xavier; Meyer, Cédric; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Filliat, David; Benosman, Ryad

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a number of new methods for visual tracking using the output of an event-based asynchronous neuromorphic dynamic vision sensor. It allows the tracking of multiple visual features in real time, achieving an update rate of several hundred kilohertz on a standard desktop PC. The approach has been specially adapted to take advantage of the event-driven properties of these sensors by combining both spatial and temporal correlations of events in an asynchronous iterative framework. Various kernels, such as Gaussian, Gabor, combinations of Gabor functions, and arbitrary user-defined kernels, are used to track features from incoming events. The trackers described in this paper are capable of handling variations in position, scale, and orientation through the use of multiple pools of trackers. This approach avoids the N(2) operations per event associated with conventional kernel-based convolution operations with N × N kernels. The tracking performance was evaluated experimentally for each type of kernel in order to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed solution. PMID:25248193

  19. On-Board Event-Based State Estimation for Trajectory Approaching and Tracking of a Vehicle.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rey, Miguel; Espinosa, Felipe; Gardel, Alfredo; Santos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    For the problem of pose estimation of an autonomous vehicle using networked external sensors, the processing capacity and battery consumption of these sensors, as well as the communication channel load should be optimized. Here, we report an event-based state estimator (EBSE) consisting of an unscented Kalman filter that uses a triggering mechanism based on the estimation error covariance matrix to request measurements from the external sensors. This EBSE generates the events of the estimator module on-board the vehicle and, thus, allows the sensors to remain in stand-by mode until an event is generated. The proposed algorithm requests a measurement every time the estimation distance root mean squared error (DRMS) value, obtained from the estimator's covariance matrix, exceeds a threshold value. This triggering threshold can be adapted to the vehicle's working conditions rendering the estimator even more efficient. An example of the use of the proposed EBSE is given, where the autonomous vehicle must approach and follow a reference trajectory. By making the threshold a function of the distance to the reference location, the estimator can halve the use of the sensors with a negligible deterioration in the performance of the approaching maneuver. PMID:26102489

  20. On-Board Event-Based State Estimation for Trajectory Approaching and Tracking of a Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Rey, Miguel; Espinosa, Felipe; Gardel, Alfredo; Santos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    For the problem of pose estimation of an autonomous vehicle using networked external sensors, the processing capacity and battery consumption of these sensors, as well as the communication channel load should be optimized. Here, we report an event-based state estimator (EBSE) consisting of an unscented Kalman filter that uses a triggering mechanism based on the estimation error covariance matrix to request measurements from the external sensors. This EBSE generates the events of the estimator module on-board the vehicle and, thus, allows the sensors to remain in stand-by mode until an event is generated. The proposed algorithm requests a measurement every time the estimation distance root mean squared error (DRMS) value, obtained from the estimator's covariance matrix, exceeds a threshold value. This triggering threshold can be adapted to the vehicle's working conditions rendering the estimator even more efficient. An example of the use of the proposed EBSE is given, where the autonomous vehicle must approach and follow a reference trajectory. By making the threshold a function of the distance to the reference location, the estimator can halve the use of the sensors with a negligible deterioration in the performance of the approaching maneuver. PMID:26102489

  1. Modulation of a Fronto-Parietal Network in Event-Based Prospective Memory: An rTMS Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisiacchi, P. S.; Cona, G.; Schiff, S.; Basso, D.

    2011-01-01

    Event-based prospective memory (PM) is a multi-component process that requires remembering the delayed execution of an intended action in response to a pre-specified PM cue, while being actively engaged in an ongoing task. Some neuroimaging studies have suggested that both prefrontal and parietal areas are involved in the maintenance and…

  2. Event-based Green Scheduling of Radiant Systems in Buildings Truong X. Nghiem, George J. Pappas and Rahul Mangharam

    E-print Network

    Pappas, George J.

    systems over forced-air HVAC systems for residential and commercial buildings have been well-studied [2 conditioning (HVAC) systems for buildings. In radiant systems, heat is supplied to or removed from buildingEvent-based Green Scheduling of Radiant Systems in Buildings Truong X. Nghiem, George J. Pappas

  3. A Neuromorphic Event-Based Neural Recording System for Smart Brain-Machine-Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Federico; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2015-10-01

    Neural recording systems are a central component of Brain-Machince Interfaces (BMIs). In most of these systems the emphasis is on faithful reproduction and transmission of the recorded signal to remote systems for further processing or data analysis. Here we follow an alternative approach: we propose a neural recording system that can be directly interfaced locally to neuromorphic spiking neural processing circuits for compressing the large amounts of data recorded, carrying out signal processing and neural computation to extract relevant information, and transmitting only the low-bandwidth outcome of the processing to remote computing or actuating modules. The fabricated system includes a low-noise amplifier, a delta-modulator analog-to-digital converter, and a low-power band-pass filter. The bio-amplifier has a programmable gain of 45-54 dB, with a Root Mean Squared (RMS) input-referred noise level of 2.1 ?V, and consumes 90 ?W . The band-pass filter and delta-modulator circuits include asynchronous handshaking interface logic compatible with event-based communication protocols. We describe the properties of the neural recording circuits, validating them with experimental measurements, and present system-level application examples, by interfacing these circuits to a reconfigurable neuromorphic processor comprising an array of spiking neurons with plastic and dynamic synapses. The pool of neurons within the neuromorphic processor was configured to implement a recurrent neural network, and to process the events generated by the neural recording system in order to carry out pattern recognition. PMID:26513801

  4. Event-based approach of downstream Rhône River flood regimes variability since 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénaff, Quentin; Arnaud-Fassetta, Gilles; Beltrando, Gérard

    2015-04-01

    Numerous downstream Rhône River floods have been recorded as catastrophic by French inter-ministerial order since the creation of natural disaster state recognition in 1982. Downstream Rhône River flood regimes, influenced by Mediterranean climate, are fundamentally affected by the spatio-temporal variability of rainfall events, especially in case of widespread flooding. Event-based analysis of cumulative rainfall data should allow us to characterise downstream Rhône River flood regimes variability by applying data mining methods to a spatio-temporal hydro-meteorological database. The first objective of this study is to determine if extreme rainfall events could be considered as geographical events, in other words if rainfall distribution is related to spatial processes. The proposed method is based on the measure of rainfall distribution spatial auto-correlation through the calculation of (i) Global Moran's index and (ii) the significance evaluation of that index with a z-score statistical test and its associated p-value. Secondly, cumulative rainfall data are integrated into a geo-event two-dimensional matrix: (i) cumulative rainfall per sub-catchment in row (spatial base unit) and (ii) cumulative rainfall per catastrophic event in column (temporal base unit). This matrix was co-clustered which allows simultaneous clustering of the rows (sub-catchment) and columns (events) by hierarchical clustering on principal components (HCPC) using Ward's method applying Euclidean Distance as similarity measure. Computing the Global Moran's index demonstrated a spatial aggregation tendency of rainfall distribution and the associated statistical test (z-core and p-value) noted the improbability of statistical evidence of random spatial pattern. Spatial variability of rainfall distribution is the result of two factors: rainfall event structure and rainfall event scale. The co-clustering geo-event matrix provided two co-clustering maps on two different cumulative rainfall distributions: (i) a reduced centered distribution of cumulative rainfall per sub-catchment (row) and (ii) a reduced centered distribution of cumulative rainfall per event (column). Both co-clustering maps are complementary to define spatio-temporal co-clusters. The geographical dimension of catastrophic hydro-meteorological events could be assessed by measuring and comparing the spatial auto-correlation of rainfall spatial distributions. These distributions were co-clustered to provide a geo-event typology of downstream Rhône River flood regimes. Moreover, these results show the interest of data mining methods to study spatio-temporal dimension of hydro-meteorological disasters.

  5. Event-Based Sedimentation in a Flood Bypass: Examples From the Sacramento Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, M. B.; Aalto, R.; Dunne, T.; Nittrouer, J.; Nittrouer, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    Flood bypasses are miniature, anthropogenic analogs of flood basins, which abutted many lowland rivers before the advent of major flood control engineering. Whereas natural lowland floodplains are frequently inundated by diffuse overbank flow or localized crevasse splays, an engineered bypass is only activated when passive weirs near the main channel are overtopped during large floods. Consequently, a bypass represents a focused pathway for the transport of water and sediment that may reflect a legacy of event-based sediment accumulation, compared with the more chronic, diffuse sedimentation across natural flood basins. Our investigations suggest that bypasses are net receivers of suspended sediment from the main channel, with recent sediment accumulation patterns that reflect the dimensions, flow history, and frequency of over-weir sediment delivery. Our preliminary field observations and laboratory measurements indicate that sedimentation in Colusa and Yolo Bypasses may be dominated by a few large sedimentation events (of order ˜1 m of deposition per event). However, little is known about how sediment accumulation occurs in bypasses during floods. This study commences a detailed investigation of the links between hydrology and sedimentation in the flood bypasses of the Sacramento Valley. Our strategy is to 1) model the over-weir conveyance and intra-bypass accumulation of fine sediment during floods, and 2) sample, describe, and date these sediment deposits to verify the numerical model. We modeled the influence of the 1964-1965 hydrologic event on sedimentation in the Colusa-Sutter-Yolo Bypass system by combining hydrologic records with empirical models of suspended-sediment concentration and suspendibility calculations. We used records of flood discharge for the event period into and through Colusa, Sutter, and Yolo Bypasses to compute sediment concentration entering the system based on discharge-concentration relationships and simplified hydraulics within the bypass system. We computed daily deposition via suspendibility criterion of various grain sizes at selected loci. The model results are being empirically validated with accumulation thicknesses, textures, and dates derived from 210Pb CIRCAUS geochronology, sediment granulometry, and X-radiographs from 2-6-m-deep vertical cores collected at various locations throughout the bypass system.

  6. Scalable Parallel Execution of an Event-based Radio Signal Propagation Model for Cluttered 3D Terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, Sudip K; Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2009-01-01

    Radio signal strength estimation is essential in many applications, including the design of military radio communications and industrial wireless installations. While classical approaches such as finite difference methods are well-known, new event-based models of radio signal propagation have been recently shown to deliver such estimates faster (via serial execution) than other methods. For scenarios with large or richly-featured geographical volumes, however, parallel processing is required to meet the memory and computation time demands. Here, we present a scalable and efficient parallel execution of a recently-developed event-based radio signal propagation model. We demonstrate its scalability to thousands of processors, with parallel speedups over 1000x. The speed and scale achieved by our parallel execution enable larger scenarios and faster execution than has ever been reported before.

  7. Open-loop Stability of Time-based vs. Event-based Switching in Locomotion Nelson Rosa Jr. and Kevin M. Lynch

    E-print Network

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Open-loop Stability of Time-based vs. Event-based Switching in Locomotion Nelson Rosa Jr. and Kevin the details of a specific walker, allowing the study of properties of the passive nonlinear dynamics. The walker is only stable with event-based switching; the brachiator is stable under both switching

  8. Effective utilization of flue gases in raceway reactor with event-based pH control for microalgae culture.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, A; Mendoza, J L; Guzmán, J L; Berenguel, M; Acién, F G; Dormido, S

    2014-10-01

    This work addresses effective utilization of flue gases through the proper pH control in raceway reactors. The pH control problem has been addressed with an event-based control approach using a Generalized Predictive Controller (GPC) with actuator deadband. Applying this control strategy it is possible to reduce the control effort, and at the same time saving control resources. In the pH process case, the event-based controller with actuator deadband can be tuned to supply only necessary amount of CO2 to keep the pH close to its optimal value. On the other hand, the evaluated control algorithm significantly improves the pH control accuracy, what has a direct influence on biomass production. In order to test the performance of the event-based GPC controller, several experiments have been performed on a real raceway reactor. Additionally, several control performance indexes have been used to compare the analyzed technique with commonly used on/off controller. PMID:25113401

  9. Breaking the millisecond barrier on SpiNNaker: implementing asynchronous event-based plastic models with microsecond resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lagorce, Xavier; Stromatias, Evangelos; Galluppi, Francesco; Plana, Luis A.; Liu, Shih-Chii; Furber, Steve B.; Benosman, Ryad B.

    2015-01-01

    Spike-based neuromorphic sensors such as retinas and cochleas, change the way in which the world is sampled. Instead of producing data sampled at a constant rate, these sensors output spikes that are asynchronous and event driven. The event-based nature of neuromorphic sensors implies a complete paradigm shift in current perception algorithms toward those that emphasize the importance of precise timing. The spikes produced by these sensors usually have a time resolution in the order of microseconds. This high temporal resolution is a crucial factor in learning tasks. It is also widely used in the field of biological neural networks. Sound localization for instance relies on detecting time lags between the two ears which, in the barn owl, reaches a temporal resolution of 5 ?s. Current available neuromorphic computation platforms such as SpiNNaker often limit their users to a time resolution in the order of milliseconds that is not compatible with the asynchronous outputs of neuromorphic sensors. To overcome these limitations and allow for the exploration of new types of neuromorphic computing architectures, we introduce a novel software framework on the SpiNNaker platform. This framework allows for simulations of spiking networks and plasticity mechanisms using a completely asynchronous and event-based scheme running with a microsecond time resolution. Results on two example networks using this new implementation are presented. PMID:26106288

  10. Breaking the millisecond barrier on SpiNNaker: implementing asynchronous event-based plastic models with microsecond resolution.

    PubMed

    Lagorce, Xavier; Stromatias, Evangelos; Galluppi, Francesco; Plana, Luis A; Liu, Shih-Chii; Furber, Steve B; Benosman, Ryad B

    2015-01-01

    Spike-based neuromorphic sensors such as retinas and cochleas, change the way in which the world is sampled. Instead of producing data sampled at a constant rate, these sensors output spikes that are asynchronous and event driven. The event-based nature of neuromorphic sensors implies a complete paradigm shift in current perception algorithms toward those that emphasize the importance of precise timing. The spikes produced by these sensors usually have a time resolution in the order of microseconds. This high temporal resolution is a crucial factor in learning tasks. It is also widely used in the field of biological neural networks. Sound localization for instance relies on detecting time lags between the two ears which, in the barn owl, reaches a temporal resolution of 5 ?s. Current available neuromorphic computation platforms such as SpiNNaker often limit their users to a time resolution in the order of milliseconds that is not compatible with the asynchronous outputs of neuromorphic sensors. To overcome these limitations and allow for the exploration of new types of neuromorphic computing architectures, we introduce a novel software framework on the SpiNNaker platform. This framework allows for simulations of spiking networks and plasticity mechanisms using a completely asynchronous and event-based scheme running with a microsecond time resolution. Results on two example networks using this new implementation are presented. PMID:26106288

  11. Monetary Incentive Effects on Event-Based Prospective Memory Three Months after Traumatic Brain Injury in Children

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza, Claudia; Chapman, Sandra B.; Cook, Lori G.; Vásquez, Ana C.; Levin, Harvey S.

    2011-01-01

    Information regarding the remediation of event-based prospective memory (EB-PM) impairments following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is scarce. Addressing this, two levels of monetary incentives were used to improve EB-PM in children ages 7 to 16 years with orthopedic injuries (OI, n = 51), or moderate (n = 25), and severe (n = 39) TBI at approximately three months postinjury. The EB-PM task consisted of the child giving a specific verbal response to a verbal cue from the examiner while performing a battery of neuropsychological measures (ongoing task). Significant effects were found for Age-at-Test, Motivation Condition, Period, and Group. Within-group analyses indicated OI and moderate TBI groups performed significantly better under the high-versus low-incentive condition, but the severe TBI group demonstrated no significant improvement. These results indicate EB-PM can be significantly improved at three months postinjury in children with moderate, but not severe, TBI. PMID:21347945

  12. The valence of event-based prospective memory cues or the context in which they occur affects their detection.

    PubMed

    Clark-Foos, Arlo; Brewer, Gene A; Marsh, Richard L; Meeks, J Thadeus; Cook, Gabriel I

    2009-01-01

    Event-based prospective memory tasks entail detecting cues or reminders in our environment related to previously established intentions. If they are detected at an opportune time, then the intention can be fulfilled. In Experiments 1a-1c, we gave people 3 different nonfocal intentions (e.g., respond to words denoting animals) and discovered that negatively valenced cues delivered the intention to mind less frequently than positively valenced cues. In Experiment 2, this effect was extended to valenced and neutral sentential contexts with convergent results that cues embedded in negatively valenced sentences evoked remembering the intention less often than in positive contexts. In addition, both classes of valence caused the intention to be forgotten more often than a more neutral context. We propose that valence has the ability to usurp attentional resources that otherwise would have supported successful prospective memory performance. PMID:19353934

  13. Allowing Brief Delays in Responding Improves Event-Based Prospective Memory for Young Adults Living with HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loft, Shayne; Doyle, Katie L.; Naar-King, Sylvie; Outlaw, Angulique Y.; Nichols, Sharon L.; Weber, Erica; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Woods, Steven Paul

    2014-01-01

    Event-based prospective memory (PM) tasks require individuals to remember to perform an action when they encounter a specific cue in the environment, and have clear relevance for daily functioning for individuals with HIV. In many everyday tasks, the individual must not only maintain the intent to perform the PM task, but the PM task response also competes with the alternative and more habitual task response. The current study examined whether event-based PM can be improved by slowing down the pace of the task environment. Fifty-seven young adults living with HIV performed an ongoing lexical decision task while simultaneously performing a PM task of monitoring for a specific word (which was focal to the ongoing task of making lexical decisions) or syllable contained in a word (which was nonfocal). Participants were instructed to refrain from making task responses until after a tone was presented, which occurred at varying onsets (0–1600ms) after each stimulus appeared. Improvements in focal and non-focal PM accuracy were observed with response delays of 600ms. Furthermore, the difference in PM accuracy between the low demand focal PM task and the resource demanding non-focal PM task was reduced by half across increasingly longer delays, falling from 31% at 0ms delay to only 14% at 1600ms delay. The degree of ongoing task response slowing for the PM conditions, relative to a control condition that did not have a PM task and made lexical decisions only, also decreased with increased delay. Overall, the evidence indicates that delaying the task responses of younger HIV-infected adults increased the probability that the PM relevant features of task stimuli were adequately assessed prior to the ongoing task response, and by implication that younger HIV infected adults can more adequately achieve PM goals when the pace of the task environment is slowed down. PMID:25116075

  14. Event-Based Prospective Memory Is Independently Associated with Self-Report of Medication Management in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Steven Paul; Weinborn, Michael; Maxwell, Brenton R.; Gummery, Alice; Mo, Kevin; Ng, Amanda R. J.; Bucks, Romola S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying potentially modifiable risk factors for medication non-adherence in older adults is important in order to enhance screening and intervention efforts designed to improve medication-taking behavior and health outcomes. The current study sought to determine the unique contribution of prospective memory (i.e., “remembering to remember”) to successful self-reported medication management in older adults. Methods Sixty-five older adults with current medication prescriptions completed a comprehensive research evaluation of sociodemographic, psychiatric, and neurocognitive functioning, which included the Memory for Adherence to Medication Scale (MAMS), Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ), and a performance-based measure of prospective memory that measured both semantically-related and semantically-unrelated cue-intention (i.e., when-what) pairings. Results A series of hierarchical regressions controlling for biopsychosocial, other neurocognitive, and medication-related factors showed that elevated complaints on the PM scale of the PRMQ and worse performance on an objective semantically-unrelated event-based prospective memory task were independent predictors of poorer medication adherence as measured by the MAMS. Conclusions Prospective memory plays an important role in self-report of successful medication management among older adults. Findings may have implications for screening for older individuals “at risk” of non-adherence, as well as the development of prospective memory-based interventions to improve medication adherence and, ultimately, long-term health outcomes in older adults. PMID:24410357

  15. Infectious diseases prioritisation for event-based surveillance at the European Union level for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

    PubMed

    Economopoulou, A; Kinross, P; Domanovic, D; Coulombier, D

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, London hosted the Olympic and Paralympic Games (the Games), with events occurring throughout the United Kingdom (UK) between 27 July and 9 September 2012. Public health surveillance was performed by the Health Protection Agency (HPA). Collaboration between the HPA and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) was established for the detection and assessment of significant infectious disease events (SIDEs) occurring outside the UK during the time of the Games. Additionally, ECDC undertook an internal prioritisation exercise to facilitate ECDC’s decisions on which SIDEs should have preferentially enhanced monitoring through epidemic intelligence activities for detection and reporting in daily surveillance in the European Union (EU). A team of ECDC experts evaluated potential public health risks to the Games, selecting and prioritising SIDEs for event-based surveillance with regard to their potential for importation to the Games, occurrence during the Games or export to the EU/European Economic Area from the Games. The team opted for a multilevel approach including comprehensive disease selection, development and use of a qualitative matrix scoring system and a Delphi method for disease prioritisation. The experts selected 71 infectious diseases to enter the prioritisation exercise of which 27 were considered as priority for epidemic intelligence activities by ECDC for the EU for the Games. PMID:24762663

  16. Event-based criteria in GT-STAF information indices: theory, exploratory diversity analysis and QSPR applications.

    PubMed

    Barigye, S J; Marrero-Ponce, Y; Martínez López, Y; Martínez Santiago, O; Torrens, F; García Domenech, R; Galvez, J

    2013-01-01

    Versatile event-based approaches for the definition of novel information theory-based indices (IFIs) are presented. An event in this context is the criterion followed in the "discovery" of molecular substructures, which in turn serve as basis for the construction of the generalized incidence and relations frequency matrices, Q and F, respectively. From the resultant F, Shannon's, mutual, conditional and joint entropy-based IFIs are computed. In previous reports, an event named connected subgraphs was presented. The present study is an extension of this notion, in which we introduce other events, namely: terminal paths, vertex path incidence, quantum subgraphs, walks of length k, Sach's subgraphs, MACCs, E-state and substructure fingerprints and, finally, Ghose and Crippen atom-types for hydrophobicity and refractivity. Moreover, we define magnitude-based IFIs, introducing the use of the magnitude criterion in the definition of mutual, conditional and joint entropy-based IFIs. We also discuss the use of information-theoretic parameters as a measure of the dissimilarity of codified structural information of molecules. Finally, a comparison of the statistics for QSPR models obtained with the proposed IFIs and DRAGON's molecular descriptors for two physicochemical properties log?P and log?K of 34 derivatives of 2-furylethylenes demonstrates similar to better predictive ability than the latter. PMID:23066866

  17. Evaluation of the Health Protection Event-Based Surveillance for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

    PubMed

    Severi, E; Kitching, A; Crook, P

    2014-01-01

    The Health Protection Agency (HPA) (currently Public Health England) implemented the Health Protection Event-Based Surveillance (EBS) to provide additional national epidemic intelligence for the 2012 London Olympic and Paralympic Games (the Games). We describe EBS and evaluate the system attributes. EBS aimed at identifying, assessing and reporting to the HPA Olympic Coordination Centre (OCC) possible national infectious disease threats that may significantly impact the Games. EBS reported events in England from 2 July to 12 September 2012. EBS sourced events from reports from local health protection units and from screening an electronic application 'HPZone Dashboard' (DB). During this period, 147 new events were reported to EBS, mostly food-borne and vaccine-preventable diseases: 79 from regional units, 144 from DB (76 from both). EBS reported 61 events to the OCC: 21 of these were reported onwards. EBS sensitivity was 95.2%; positive predictive value was 32.8%; reports were timely (median one day; 10th percentile: 0 days - same day; 90th percentile: 3.6 days); completeness was 99.7%; stability was 100%; EBS simplicity was assessed as good; the daily time per regional or national unit dedicated to EBS was approximately 4 hours (weekdays) and 3 hours (weekends). OCC directors judged EBS as efficient, fast and responsive. EBS provided reliable, reassuring, timely, simple and stable national epidemic intelligence for the Games. PMID:24970374

  18. Time-Based and Event-Based Prospective Memory in Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Roles of Executive Function and Theory of Mind, and Time-Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David; Boucher, Jill; Lind, Sophie; Jarrold, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Prospective memory (remembering to carry out an action in the future) has been studied relatively little in ASD. We explored time-based (carry out an action at a pre-specified time) and event-based (carry out an action upon the occurrence of a pre-specified event) prospective memory, as well as possible cognitive correlates, among 21…

  19. Investigating the variation and non-stationarity in precipitation extremes based on the concept of event-based extreme precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Dunxian; Shao, Quanxi; Xia, Jun; Taylor, John A.; Zhang, Yongyong; Zhang, Liping; Zhang, Xiang; Zou, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Extreme precipitations (EP) could induce a series of social, environmental and ecological problems. Traditional EP analysis usually investigated the characteristics based on a fixed time scale and therefore ignored the continuity of EP occurrence. As a result, a comprehensive assessment on the influence and consequence of the EP occurring during consecutive time periods were largely eliminated. On the other hand, the characteristics of EP, including variables such as frequency, intensity and extreme volume, were commonly defined without sufficient consideration of the local tolerance capacity (which can be represented by a threshold level of EP) and therefore would sometimes be inappropriate. In this study, we proposed a concept of event-based extreme precipitation (EEP) by considering the continuity of EP and defined the statistical variables for the characteristics of an EEP event by taking account of local tolerance capacity. An EEP was identified as a collection of precipitation data over the consecutive time period in which all the precipitation amounts are above the pre-defined threshold, and EEP events are separated by at least one time step (e.g., day or hour) with precipitation amount below the threshold. As a case study which in fact motivated our proposal, we investigated the changes and variations of EEP with the consideration of potential non-stationarity in the Hanjiang River Basin of China (HJRB) during the time period of 1960-2013. Results showed that the concept of EEP, which could reflect the impact of continuity of EP occurrence and mirror the differences of local tolerance capacity, was more appropriate than the traditional method in the EP analysis.

  20. Time-based and event-based prospective memory in autism spectrum disorder: the roles of executive function and theory of mind, and time-estimation.

    PubMed

    Williams, David; Boucher, Jill; Lind, Sophie; Jarrold, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Prospective memory (remembering to carry out an action in the future) has been studied relatively little in ASD. We explored time-based (carry out an action at a pre-specified time) and event-based (carry out an action upon the occurrence of a pre-specified event) prospective memory, as well as possible cognitive correlates, among 21 intellectually high-functioning children with ASD, and 21 age- and IQ-matched neurotypical comparison children. We found impaired time-based, but undiminished event-based, prospective memory among children with ASD. In the ASD group, time-based prospective memory performance was associated significantly with diminished theory of mind, but not with diminished cognitive flexibility. There was no evidence that time-estimation ability contributed to time-based prospective memory impairment in ASD. PMID:23179340

  1. Diminished Time-Based, but Undiminished Event-Based, Prospective Memory Among Intellectually High-Functioning Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorder: Relation to Working Memory Ability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Prospective memory (PM) is the ability to remember to carry out an intended action. Working memory is the ability to store information in mind while processing potentially distracting information. The few previous studies of PM in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have yielded inconsistent findings. Studies of working memory ability in ASD have suggested a selective impairment of “visual working memory.” However, it remains unclear whether any such impairment is the result of diminished (domain-specific; visual/verbal) storage capacity or diminished (domain-general) processing capacity. We aim to clarify these issues and explore the relation between PM and working memory in ASD. Method: Seventeen adults with ASD and 17 age- and IQ-matched comparison participants completed experimental measures of both event-based (perform action x when event y occurs) and time-based (perform action a at time b) PM, plus a self-report measure of PM skills. Participants also completed a working memory test battery. Results: Participants with ASD self-reported diminished PM skill, and showed diminished performance on the time-based, but not event-based, PM task. On the working memory test battery, visual but not verbal storage capacity was diminished among participants with ASD, as was processing ability. Whereas visual storage was associated with event-based PM task performance among comparison participants, verbal storage was associated among ASD participants. Conclusions: ASD appears to involve a selective deficit in time-based PM and a selective difficulty with aspects of working memory that depend on the storage of visual information. However, event-based PM may be achieved through compensatory strategies in ASD. PMID:24128041

  2. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam-energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and (4)He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  3. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam–energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and 4He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  4. Patterns of Cortical Thinning in Relation to Event-Based Prospective Memory Performance Three Months after Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Children

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Stephen R.; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Merkley, Tricia L.; Schnelle, Kathleen P.; Bigler, Erin D.; Hunter, Jill V.; Vásquez, Ana C.; Levin, Harvey S.

    2011-01-01

    While event-based prospective memory (EB-PM) tasks are a familiar part of daily life for children, currently no data exists concerning the relation between EB-PM performance and brain volumetrics after traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study investigated EB-PM in children (7 to 17 years) with moderate to severe TBI or orthopedic injuries. Participants performed an EB-PM task and concurrently underwent neuroimaging at three months postinjury. Surface reconstruction and cortical thickness analysis were performed using FreeSurfer software. Cortical thickness was significantly correlated with EB-PM (adjusting for age). Significant thinning in the left (dorsolateral and inferior prefrontal cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate, temporal lobe, fusiform and parahippocampal gyri), and right hemispheres (dorsolateral, inferior, and medial prefrontal cortex, cingulate, and temporal lobe) correlated positively and significantly with EB-PM performance; findings are comparable to those of functional neuroimaging and lesion studies of EB-PM. PMID:20446135

  5. Event-Based Runoff Across Changing Land Covers in the Panama Canal Watershed: A Synthesis of Hydrophysical Measurements and Hydrochemical Tracers Using Hydrograph Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, G.; Gardner, C.; Ogden, F. L.; Lyons, W. B.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical hydrology is understudied relative to its temperate counterparts and thus presents challenges for understanding catchment runoff behavior undergoing land use change. Combining hydrometric and hydrochemical observations can shed light on potential differences in runoff processes under changing land covers. We compare event-based dual member hydrograph separations across humid tropical lowland forest (142 ha), mixed land use (176 ha) and pasture (36 ha) catchments following two years of monitoring during the seasonal dry to wet season transition. Stable water isotope and electrical conductivity tracer event water fraction estimations agree well during small runoff events, but exhibit different results during a large runoff event with a greater runoff coefficient. Geochemical tracers exhibit event water fraction maximums during hydrograph recessions and a seasonal transition in runoff behavior among all land uses. From these results we identify potential runoff mechanisms in these steep humid tropical catchments under varying land uses.

  6. Simulation of event-based and long-term spatial redistribution of Chernobyl-derived radiocaesium within catchments using geographical information system embedded models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Perk, Marcel; Slávik, Ondrej

    2003-04-01

    The Chernobyl accident contaminated vast areas of Europe with radiocaesium (137Cs) in 1986. To evaluate long-term and event-based redistribution of Chernobyl-derived 137Cs at the catchment scale, two geographical information system embedded models have been developed. The first model simulates 137Cs redistribution using a monthly time step based on a long-term soil erosion model. The second model simulates lateral radiocaesium transport at the event scale based on the existing Limburg soil erosion model. This model accounts for surface runoff, soil erosion and deposition, and radiocaesium exchange between the topsoil layer, runoff water, and suspended sediment. Both models have been tested and applied to the Mochovce catchment, western Slovakia. The spatial distribution of 137Cs activity in soil simulated by the long-term model was used as input for the event-based model to assess the changes in 137Cs transport during rainfall events between 1986 and 2002. Soil erosion events in the first months after initial fallout input before ploughing caused a considerable decline in the 137Cs soil inventories, which were estimated at 8·9% of the total initial inventory. The majority of 137Cs transport during rainfall events occurs in particulate form. Both the absolute amounts of particulate 137Cs transport and the fraction of particulate 137Cs transport were shown to be positively related to suspended sediment transport. Between 1986 and 2002, dissolved 137Cs transport has declined by a factor of about 26, which can be largely attributed to the increased sorption to sediment particles. Particulate 137Cs transport has declined by a factor of about two, which can be largely attributed to the decrease in soil 137Cs. The 137Cs inventories in soil have decreased by a factor between three and four at the steep hillslopes, but have remained at about the same level as the initial fallout input at the valley bottoms.

  7. Sexual frequency and planning among at-risk men who have sex with men (MSM) in the US: implications for event-based intermittent pre-exposure prophylaxis (iPrEP)

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Jonathan E.; Liu, Albert; Vittinghoff, Eric; Irvin, Risha; Kroboth, Elizabeth; Krakower, Douglas; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Sullivan, Patrick S.; Buchbinder, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Intermittent dosing of pre-exposure prophylaxis (iPrEP) has potential to decrease costs, improve adherence, and minimize toxicity. Practical event-based dosing of iPrEP requires men who have sex with men (MSM) to be sexually active on fewer than 3 days each week and plan for sexual activity. MSM who may be most suitable for event-based dosing were older, more educated, more frequently used sexual networking websites, and more often reported that their last sexual encounter was not with a committed partner. A substantial proportion of these MSM endorse high-risk sexual activity, and event-based iPrEP may best target this population. PMID:22592590

  8. Task importance affects event-based prospective memory performance in adults with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and HIV-infected young adults with problematic substance use.

    PubMed

    Woods, Steven Paul; Doyle, Katie L; Morgan, Erin E; Naar-King, Sylvie; Outlaw, Angulique Y; Nichols, Sharon L; Loft, Shayne

    2014-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine the effects of task importance on event-based prospective memory (PM) in separate samples of adults with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and HIV-infected young adults with substance use disorders (SUD). All participants completed three conditions of an ongoing lexical decision task: (1) without PM task requirements; (2) with PM task requirements that emphasized the importance of the ongoing task; and (3) with PM task requirements that emphasized the importance of the PM task. In both experiments, all HIV+ groups showed the expected increase in response costs to the ongoing task when the PM task's importance was emphasized. In Experiment 1, individuals with HAND showed significantly lower PM accuracy as compared to HIV+ subjects without HAND when the importance of the ongoing task was emphasized, but improved significantly and no longer differed from HIV+ subjects without HAND when the PM task was emphasized. A similar pattern of findings emerged in Experiment 2, whereby HIV+ young adults with SUD (especially cannabis) showed significant improvements in PM accuracy when the PM task was emphasized. Findings suggest that both HAND and SUD may increase the amount of cognitive attentional resources that need to be allocated to support PM performance in persons living with HIV infection. PMID:24834469

  9. Developing a Framework for Testing Distributed Hydrologic Models at the Catchment Scale - Examples of Test Model Runs for Event Based and Long Term Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, N. C.; Kampf, S. K.; Mirus, B. B.; Loague, K.; Burges, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    We develop a testing framework for distributed hydrologic models at the catchment scale using the hypothetical reality concept. The hypothetical reality, considered an error-free hydrologic response modeled after the 10.5-ha Tarrawarra catchment in Australia, is generated using the sophisticated Integrated Hydrology Model (InHM) representing fully coupled 3D variably saturated subsurface and 2D surface flow with finite-element discretization. The hypothetical realty consists in a data set composed of two subsets designed to test long-term and event-based behavior of the test model. The first subset, a long term data set, comprises an 11-year variable time step time series of hydrograph output and head and saturation levels at 55 observation nodes as well as daily snapshots of head and saturation levels at all nodes in the domain. The second subset, short term data set, has the same type of output, but the domain snapshots are at a much finer time scale, every half hour for the selected rain events. Both data sets were obtained with the same InHM configuration but different output time steps. We use MODHMS (HydroGeoLogic, Inc.), a MODFLOW-based code that solves Richards equation for the 3-D variably saturated subsurface flow and the diffuse wave approximation 2D overland flow with finite differences in a coupled approach as the test model. We present examples of model testing scenarios with variations in spatial discretization, initial conditions, and representation of hydrologic processes. Future work includes testing of model parameters and soil characteristics, with the test model running first without any calibration and then with calibration against the hypothetical reality.

  10. Production of neutrons from interactions of GCR-like particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilbronn, L.; Frankel, K.; Holabird, K.; Zeitlin, C.; McMahan, M. A.; Rathbun, W.; Cronqvist, M.; Gong, W.; Madey, R.; Htun, M.; Elaasar, M.; Anderson, B. D.; Baldwin, A. R.; Jiang, J.; Keane, D.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Watson, J. W.; Zhang, W. M.; Galonsky, A.; Ronningen, R.; Zecher, P.; Kruse, J.; Wang, J.; Miller, J. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    In order to help assess the risk to astronauts due to the long-term exposure to the natural radiation environment in space, an understanding of how the primary radiation field is changed when passing through shielding and tissue materials must be obtained. One important aspect of the change in the primary radiation field after passing through shielding materials is the production of secondary particles from the breakup of the primary. Neutrons are an important component of the secondary particle field due to their relatively high biological weighting factors, and due to their relative abundance, especially behind thick shielding scenarios. Because of the complexity of the problem, the estimation of the risk from exposure to the secondary neutron field must be handled using calculational techniques. However, those calculations will need an extensive set of neutron cross section and thicktarget neutron yield data in order to make an accurate assessment of the risk. In this paper we briefly survey the existing neutron-production data sets that are applicable to the space radiation transport problem, and we point out how neutron production from protons is different than neutron production from heavy ions. We also make comparisons of one the heavy-ion data sets with Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) calculations.

  11. GCR-Induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. T.; Wilson, T. L.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the Moon has a ubiquitous photon luminescence induced by Galactic cosmic-rays (GCRs), using the Monte Carlo particle-physics program FLUKA. Both the fluence and the flux of the radiation can be determined by this method, but only the fluence will be presented here. This is in addition to thermal radiation emitted due to the Moon s internal temperature and radioactivity. This study is a follow-up to an earlier discussion [1] that addressed several misconceptions regarding Moonshine in the Earth-Moon system (Figure 1) and predicted this effect. There also exists a related x-ray fluorescence induced by solar energetic particles (SEPs, <350 MeV) and solar photons at lower x-ray energies, although this latter fluorescence was studied on Apollo 15 and 16 [2- 5], Lunar Prospector [6], and even EGRET [7].

  12. Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-Based Risk Model (GERM) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2013-01-01

    This software describes the transport and energy deposition of the passage of galactic cosmic rays in astronaut tissues during space travel, or heavy ion beams in patients in cancer therapy. Space radiation risk is a probability distribution, and time-dependent biological events must be accounted for physical description of space radiation transport in tissues and cells. A stochastic model can calculate the probability density directly without unverified assumptions about shape of probability density function. The prior art of transport codes calculates the average flux and dose of particles behind spacecraft and tissue shielding. Because of the signaling times for activation and relaxation in the cell and tissue, transport code must describe temporal and microspatial density of functions to correlate DNA and oxidative damage with non-targeted effects of signals, bystander, etc. These are absolutely ignored or impossible in the prior art. The GERM code provides scientists data interpretation of experiments; modeling of beam line, shielding of target samples, and sample holders; and estimation of basic physical and biological outputs of their experiments. For mono-energetic ion beams, basic physical and biological properties are calculated for a selected ion type, such as kinetic energy, mass, charge number, absorbed dose, or fluence. Evaluated quantities are linear energy transfer (LET), range (R), absorption and fragmentation cross-sections, and the probability of nuclear interactions after 1 or 5 cm of water equivalent material. In addition, a set of biophysical properties is evaluated, such as the Poisson distribution for a specified cellular area, cell survival curves, and DNA damage yields per cell. Also, the GERM code calculates the radiation transport of the beam line for either a fixed number of user-specified depths or at multiple positions along the Bragg curve of the particle in a selected material. The GERM code makes the numerical estimates of basic physical and biophysical quantities of high-energy protons and heavy ions that have been studied at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) for the purpose of simulating space radiation biological effects. In the first option, properties of monoenergetic beams are treated. In the second option, the transport of beams in different materials is treated. Similar biophysical properties as in the first option are evaluated for the primary ion and its secondary particles. Additional properties related to the nuclear fragmentation of the beam are evaluated. The GERM code is a computationally efficient Monte-Carlo heavy-ion-beam model. It includes accurate models of LET, range, residual energy, and straggling, and the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSGRG) nuclear database.

  13. An event-based architecture for solving constraint satisfaction problems

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Hesham; Müller, Lorenz K.; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are ubiquitous in many domains. They are typically solved using conventional digital computing architectures that do not reflect the distributed nature of many of these problems, and are thus ill-suited for solving them. Here we present a parallel analogue/digital hardware architecture specifically designed to solve such problems. We cast constraint satisfaction problems as networks of stereotyped nodes that communicate using digital pulses, or events. Each node contains an oscillator implemented using analogue circuits. The non-repeating phase relations among the oscillators drive the exploration of the solution space. We show that this hardware architecture can yield state-of-the-art performance on random SAT problems under reasonable assumptions on the implementation. We present measurements from a prototype electronic chip to demonstrate that a physical implementation of the proposed architecture is robust to practical non-idealities and to validate the theory proposed. PMID:26642827

  14. Deterministic event-based simulation of quantum interference

    E-print Network

    K. De Raedt; H. De Raedt; K. Michielsen

    2004-09-29

    We propose and analyse simple deterministic algorithms that can be used to construct machines that have primitive learning capabilities. We demonstrate that locally connected networks of these machines can be used to perform blind classification on an event-by-event basis, without storing the information of the individual events. We also demonstrate that properly designed networks of these machines exhibit behavior that is usually only attributed to quantum systems. We present networks that simulate quantum interference on an event-by-event basis. In particular we show that by using simple geometry and the learning capabilities of the machines it becomes possible to simulate single-photon interference in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The interference pattern generated by the network of deterministic learning machines is in perfect agreement with the quantum theoretical result for the single-photon Mach-Zehnder interferometer. To illustrate that networks of these machines are indeed capable of simulating quantum interference we simulate, event-by-event, a setup involving two chained Mach-Zehnder interferometers. We show that also in this case the simulation results agree with quantum theory.

  15. An event-based architecture for solving constraint satisfaction problems.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Hesham; Müller, Lorenz K; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are ubiquitous in many domains. They are typically solved using conventional digital computing architectures that do not reflect the distributed nature of many of these problems, and are thus ill-suited for solving them. Here we present a parallel analogue/digital hardware architecture specifically designed to solve such problems. We cast constraint satisfaction problems as networks of stereotyped nodes that communicate using digital pulses, or events. Each node contains an oscillator implemented using analogue circuits. The non-repeating phase relations among the oscillators drive the exploration of the solution space. We show that this hardware architecture can yield state-of-the-art performance on random SAT problems under reasonable assumptions on the implementation. We present measurements from a prototype electronic chip to demonstrate that a physical implementation of the proposed architecture is robust to practical non-idealities and to validate the theory proposed. PMID:26642827

  16. Wireless Control: Medium Access and Event-based Control

    E-print Network

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    concentrates the metal-bearing mineral in the ore Ore Waste Minerals Wireless control of flota@on process Ore Waste Minerals Controller #12;7/5/12 5 Wireless control of floata@ons: resource constraints, loss, conflicts, delays, outages? · How move intelligence from

  17. Event-based data dissemination control in healthcare

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    in healthcare towards preventative care. This shift involves using technology to assist in care provision outside tra- ditional care institutions -- for instance, in a patient's home. To support such an environment, care providers require notification of incidents as they occur. However, health information

  18. Event-based Simulation Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    E-print Network

    . With Einstein's explanation of the photoelectric effect in terms of photons, that is in terms of indivisible quanta gave birth to the quantum description of light. As the photoelectric effect can be explained by treating the electromagnetic field without assuming the existence of photons [3], the photoelectric effect

  19. Visualization of Sedentary Behavior Using an Event-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loudon, David; Granat, Malcolm H.

    2015-01-01

    Visualization is commonly used in the interpretation of physical behavior (PB) data, either in conjunction with or as precursor to formal analysis. Effective representations of the data can enable the identification of patterns of behavior, and how they relate to the temporal context in a single day, or across multiple days. An understanding of…

  20. Visual tracking using neuromorphic asynchronous event-based cameras.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhenjiang; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Posch, Christoph; Régnier, Stéphane; Benosman, Ryad

    2015-04-01

    This letter presents a novel computationally efficient and robust pattern tracking method based on a time-encoded, frame-free visual data. Recent interdisciplinary developments, combining inputs from engineering and biology, have yielded a novel type of camera that encodes visual information into a continuous stream of asynchronous, temporal events. These events encode temporal contrast and intensity locally in space and time. We show that the sparse yet accurately timed information is well suited as a computational input for object tracking. In this letter, visual data processing is performed for each incoming event at the time it arrives. The method provides a continuous and iterative estimation of the geometric transformation between the model and the events representing the tracked object. It can handle isometry, similarities, and affine distortions and allows for unprecedented real-time performance at equivalent frame rates in the kilohertz range on a standard PC. Furthermore, by using the dimension of time that is currently underexploited by most artificial vision systems, the method we present is able to solve ambiguous cases of object occlusions that classical frame-based techniques handle poorly. PMID:25710087

  1. Event-based text mining for biology and functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Paul; Nawaz, Raheel; McNaught, John; Kell, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of genome function requires a mapping between genome-derived entities and biochemical reactions, and the biomedical literature represents a rich source of information about reactions between biological components. However, the increasingly rapid growth in the volume of literature provides both a challenge and an opportunity for researchers to isolate information about reactions of interest in a timely and efficient manner. In response, recent text mining research in the biology domain has been largely focused on the identification and extraction of ‘events’, i.e. categorised, structured representations of relationships between biochemical entities, from the literature. Functional genomics analyses necessarily encompass events as so defined. Automatic event extraction systems facilitate the development of sophisticated semantic search applications, allowing researchers to formulate structured queries over extracted events, so as to specify the exact types of reactions to be retrieved. This article provides an overview of recent research into event extraction. We cover annotated corpora on which systems are trained, systems that achieve state-of-the-art performance and details of the community shared tasks that have been instrumental in increasing the quality, coverage and scalability of recent systems. Finally, several concrete applications of event extraction are covered, together with emerging directions of research. PMID:24907365

  2. Simultaneous Localization and Mapping for event-based Vision Systems

    E-print Network

    Kuehnlenz, Kolja

    shows the 128x128 sensor with pixel events inte- grated over 0.1 seconds. Light pixels indicate change of illumination from dark to light - dark pixels a change from light to dark. inspired pixel-wise asynchronous illumination change perceived by any pixel (see fig. 1). Such a visual representation generates small amounts

  3. Extracting Discriminative Features for Event-based Electricity Disaggregation

    E-print Network

    Hwang, Kai

    consumption of a household in the United States for one week, the data being recorded at a very high frequency for heavy energy consumption can be reported to consumers to encourage reduction in energy consumption. I correspond to the events detected within the power consumption data. Such appliance-level feedback

  4. Towards a Discipline of Geospatial Distributed Event Based Systems

    E-print Network

    Chandy, K. Mani

    a seismic network is described. Categories and Subject Descriptors C.2.1 [Computer-Communication Networks]: Network Architecture and Design; G.3 [Probability and Statis- tics]: Experimental Design General Terms Algorithms, Design, Experimentation Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work

  5. "The GCR Collection: from Alaska to Antarctica and from Martinique to Macquarie Ridge"

    E-print Network

    Layer 3 A B 0 Depth (km) Seismic wave velocity (km/s) A Basalt Diabase Gabbro Peridotite Seismic models Diabase Gabbro Peridotite #12;#12;Peridotite, Gabbro, and Diabase/Layer 2b Cores from DSDP, ODP, IODP

  6. No-migration variance petition: Draft. Volume 4, Appendices DIF, GAS, GCR (Volume 1)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-31

    The Department of Energy is responsible for the disposition of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by national defense-related activities. Approximately 2.6 million cubic feet of the se waste have been generated and are stored at various facilities across the country. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), was sited and constructed to meet stringent disposal requirements. In order to permanently dispose of TRU waste, the DOE has elected to petition the US EPA for a variance from the Land Disposal Restrictions of RCRA. This document fulfills the reporting requirements for the petition. This report is volume 4 of the petition which presents details about the transport characteristics across drum filter vents and polymer bags; gas generation reactions and rates during long-term WIPP operation; and geological characterization of the WIPP site.

  7. Quantitative estimates of the effects of cross section uncertainties on the derivation of GCR source composition. [Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, G. F.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    Cosmic-ray source abundance uncertainties, resulting from the cross-section uncertainties, are calculated for the elements carbon through nickel. A significant dominance of cross-section errors in the source abundance uncertainties is found for most of the elements considered, even with uncorrelated partial cross-section errors; much larger uncertainties than those reported previously are found for Ca, N, Na, Al, and S. Propagation errors are noted to preclude a significant determination of source abundances for F, Cl, and Mn. A need for an assessment of the existing cosmic-ray propagation models - especially the propagation cross-sections which they employ - is expressed, motivated by recent improvements in the resolution and statistical accuracy of observations.

  8. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 7: Appendix GCR Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-31

    This report contains the second part of the geological characterization report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Both hydrology and geochemistry are evaluated. The following aspects of hydrology are discussed: surface hydrology; ground water hydrology; and hydrology drilling and testing. Hydrologic studies at the site and adjacent site areas have concentrated on defining the hydrogeology and associated salt dissolution phenomena. The geochemical aspects include a description of chemical properties of geologic media presently found in the surface and subsurface environments of southeastern New Mexico in general, and of the proposed WIPP withdrawal area in particular. The characterization does not consider any aspect of artificially-introduced material, temperature, pressure, or any other physico-chemical condition not native to the rocks of southeastern New Mexico.

  9. Role of GCR positive and negative particles in charging the LISA-PF test masses in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimani, C.; Fabi, M.; Lobo, A. J.; Mateos, I.; Telloni, D.

    2015-05-01

    The LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF) mission launch is scheduled during the second half of 2015. Galactic and solar ions with energies larger than 100 MeV/n and electrons above 10 MeV penetrate the spacecraft material and charge the gold-platinum test masses. This charging process generates spurious forces that, in some cases, may mimic the effects of genuine gravitational wave signals. A study of the test-mass charging due to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) down to 1% in composition is reported here. The reliability of the results of this work is mainly limited by our capability to predict the energy spectra of GCRs in 2015. To this purpose, our model is applied to the expected PAMELA experiment proton data for the period January- March 2014 characterized by a positive polarity period and a level of solar modulation similar to those expected at the time of LISA-PF. The PAMELA observations will be available in the next few months. The comparison between our projections and measurements will provide valuable clues on the test-mass charging estimate uncertainty.

  10. Event-based rainfall-runoff modelling of the Kelantan River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basarudin, Z.; Adnan, N. A.; Latif, A. R. A.; Tahir, W.; Syafiqah, N.

    2014-02-01

    Flood is one of the most common natural disasters in Malaysia. According to hydrologists there are many causes that contribute to flood events. The two most dominant factors are the meteorology factor (i.e climate change) and change in land use. These two factors contributed to floods in recent decade especially in the monsoonal catchment such as Malaysia. This paper intends to quantify the influence of rainfall during extreme rainfall events on the hydrological model in the Kelantan River catchment. Therefore, two dynamic inputs were used in the study: rainfall and river discharge. The extreme flood events in 2008 and 2004 were compared based on rainfall data for both years. The events were modeled via a semi-distributed HEC-HMS hydrological model. Land use change was not incorporated in the study because the study only tries to quantify rainfall changes during these two events to simulate the discharge and runoff value. Therefore, the land use data representing the year 2004 were used as inputs in the 2008 runoff model. The study managed to demonstrate that rainfall change has a significant impact to determine the peak discharge and runoff depth for the study area.

  11. Qualitative Event-based Diagnosis with Possible Conflicts: Case Study on the Fourth International Diagnostic Competition

    E-print Network

    Daigle, Matthew

    Diagnostic Competition Matthew Daigle1 and Indranil Roychoudhury2 and Anibal Bregon3 1 NASA Ames Research The objective of the International Diagnostic Competition is to provide a platform for eval- uating how Competition. We focus on the first diagnostic problem of the in- dustrial track of the competition in which

  12. Prediction problem for target events based on the inter-event waiting time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoval, A.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we address the problem of forecasting the target events of a time series given the distribution ? of time gaps between target events. Strong earthquakes and stock market crashes are the two types of such events that we are focusing on. In the series of earthquakes, as McCann et al. show [W.R. Mc Cann, S.P. Nishenko, L.R. Sykes, J. Krause, Seismic gaps and plate tectonics: seismic potential for major boundaries, Pure and Applied Geophysics 117 (1979) 1082-1147], there are well-defined gaps (called seismic gaps) between strong earthquakes. On the other hand, usually there are no regular gaps in the series of stock market crashes [M. Raberto, E. Scalas, F. Mainardi, Waiting-times and returns in high-frequency financial data: an empirical study, Physica A 314 (2002) 749-755]. For the case of seismic gaps, we analytically derive an upper bound of prediction efficiency given the coefficient of variation of the distribution ?. For the case of stock market crashes, we develop an algorithm that predicts the next crash within a certain time interval after the previous one. We show that this algorithm outperforms random prediction. The efficiency of our algorithm sets up a lower bound of efficiency for effective prediction of stock market crashes.

  13. Sentiment Diffusion of Public Opinions about Hot Events: Based on Complex Network

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiaoqing; An, Haizhong; Zhang, Lijia; Li, Huajiao; Wei, Guannan

    2015-01-01

    To study the sentiment diffusion of online public opinions about hot events, we collected people’s posts through web data mining techniques. We calculated the sentiment value of each post based on a sentiment dictionary. Next, we divided those posts into five different orientations of sentiments: strongly positive (P), weakly positive (p), neutral (o), weakly negative (n), and strongly negative (N). These sentiments are combined into modes through coarse graining. We constructed sentiment mode complex network of online public opinions (SMCOP) with modes as nodes and the conversion relation in chronological order between different types of modes as edges. We calculated the strength, k-plex clique, clustering coefficient and betweenness centrality of the SMCOP. The results show that the strength distribution obeys power law. Most posts’ sentiments are weakly positive and neutral, whereas few are strongly negative. There are weakly positive subgroups and neutral subgroups with ppppp and ooooo as the core mode, respectively. Few modes have larger betweenness centrality values and most modes convert to each other with these higher betweenness centrality modes as mediums. Therefore, the relevant person or institutes can take measures to lead people’s sentiments regarding online hot events according to the sentiment diffusion mechanism. PMID:26462230

  14. EventRiver: An Event-Based Visual Analytics Approach to Exploring Large Text Collections

    E-print Network

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    to report and discuss real life events. Thus Event-Related Tasks (ERTs), such as detecting the real life with temporal locality from TCTFs, which can be mapped to real life events driving the text generation conducted to evaluate its effectiveness and efficiency. Index Terms--Visual Analytics, Information

  15. A mobile robots experimental environment with event-based wireless communication.

    PubMed

    Guinaldo, María; Fábregas, Ernesto; Farias, Gonzalo; Dormido-Canto, Sebastián; Chaos, Dictino; Sánchez, José; Dormido, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    An experimental platform to communicate between a set of mobile robots through a wireless network has been developed. The mobile robots get their position through a camera which performs as sensor. The video images are processed in a PC and a Waspmote card sends the corresponding position to each robot using the ZigBee standard. A distributed control algorithm based on event-triggered communications has been designed and implemented to bring the robots into the desired formation. Each robot communicates to its neighbors only at event times. Furthermore, a simulation tool has been developed to design and perform experiments with the system. An example of usage is presented. PMID:23881139

  16. Using an Event Based Priority Queue for Reliable and Opportunistic Scheduling of Bulk Data Transfers in

    E-print Network

    Welzl, Michael

    -This paper proposes an opportunistic, reliable and realistic QoS mechanism for bulk data transfers in Grids related overhead is assumed, our mechanism works with realistic network conditions, taking possible packet. The metrics that have been studied in the evaluation of elastic scheduling heuristics are the acceptance

  17. Event-based prediction of stream turbidity using a combined cluster analysis and classification tree approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, Amanda L.; Johnson, Richard L.

    2015-11-01

    Stream turbidity typically increases during streamflow events; however, similar event hydrographs can produce markedly different event turbidity behaviors because many factors influence turbidity in addition to streamflow, including antecedent moisture conditions, season, and supply of turbidity-causing materials. Modeling of sub-hourly turbidity as a function of streamflow shows that event model parameters vary on an event-by-event basis. Here we examine the extent to which stream turbidity can be predicted through the prediction of event model parameters. Using three mid-sized streams from the Mid-Atlantic region of the U.S., we show the model parameter set for each event can be predicted based on the event characteristics (e.g., hydrologic, meteorologic and antecedent moisture conditions) using a combined cluster analysis and classification tree approach. The results suggest that the ratio of beginning event discharge to peak event discharge (an estimate of the event baseflow index), as well as catchment antecedent moisture, are important factors in the prediction of event turbidity. Indicators of antecedent moisture, particularly those derived from antecedent discharge, account for the majority of the splitting nodes in the classification trees for all three streams. For this study, prediction of turbidity during streamflow events is based upon observed data (e.g., measured streamflow, precipitation and air temperature). However, the results also suggest that the methods presented here can, in future work, be used in conjunction with forecasts of streamflow, precipitation and air temperature to forecast stream turbidity.

  18. Provenance Logic: Enabling Multi-Event Based Trust in Mobile Sensing

    E-print Network

    Mohapatra, Prasant

    devices such as smartphones and tablet computers in recent years. These devices usually come with multiple]­[9] and mobile sensing networks [10], [11]. Provenance, i.e., the derivation history, of the sensing data has

  19. An event-based approach to validating solar wind speed predictions: High-speed

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    in the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model M. J. Owens Center for Space Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts to predictions of the solar wind speed made by the Wang- Sheeley-Arge (WSA) empirical model. The mean wind speed predictions: High-speed enhancements in the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model, J. Geophys. Res., 110

  20. Spatio-Temporal and Events Based Analysis of Topic Popularity in Twitter

    E-print Network

    Bagchi, Amitabha

    - lion topics that include both popular and less popular to- pics. On a data set containing approximately of these systems is critical. To characterize the properties of popular and non-popular to- pics is of surpassing a large-scale measurement stu- dy that attempts to describe and explain the processes that animate

  1. Issues in Informal Education: Event-Based Science Communication Involving Planetaria and the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M.; Gallagher, D. L.; Whitt, A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    For the past four years the Science Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center has carried out a diverse program of science communication through the web resources on the Internet. The program includes extended stories about NAS.4 science, a curriculum resource for teachers tied to national education standards, on-line activities for students, and webcasts of real-time events. Events have involved meteor showers, solar eclipses, natural very low frequency radio emissions, and amateur balloon flights. In some cases broadcasts accommodate active feedback and questions from Internet participants. We give here, examples of events, problems, and lessons learned from these activities.

  2. Issues in Informal Education: Event-Based Science Communication Involving Planetaria and the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Gallagher, D. L.; Whitt, A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the last several years the Science Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center has carried out a diverse program of Internet-based science communication. The program includes extended stories about NASA science, a curriculum resource for teachers tied to national education standards, on-line activities for students, and webcasts of real-time events. The focus of sharing real-time science related events has been to involve and excite students and the public about science. Events have involved meteor showers, solar eclipses, natural very low frequency radio emissions, and amateur balloon flights. In some cases broadcasts accommodate active feedback and questions from Internet participants. Panel participation will be used to communicate the problems and lessons learned from these activities over the last three years.

  3. The Relationship between Event-Based Prospective Memory and Ongoing Task Performance in Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Theodore A.; Perdue, Bonnie; Beran, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory is remembering to do something at a future time. A growing body of research supports that prospective memory may exist in nonhuman animals, but the methods used to test nonhuman prospective memory differ from those used with humans. The current work tests prospective memory in chimpanzees using a method that closely approximates a typical human paradigm. In these experiments, the prospective memory cue was embedded within an ongoing task. Tokens representing food items could be used in one of two ways: in a matching task with pictures of items (the ongoing task) or to request a food item hidden in a different location at the beginning of the trial. Chimpanzees had to disengage from the ongoing task in order to use the appropriate token to obtain a higher preference food item. In Experiment 1, chimpanzees effectively matched tokens to pictures, when appropriate, and disengaged from the ongoing task when the token matched the hidden item. In Experiment 2, performance did not differ when the target item was either hidden or visible. This suggested no effect of cognitive load on either the prospective memory task or the ongoing task, but performance was near ceiling, which may have contributed to this outcome. In Experiment 3, we created a more challenging version of the task. More errors on the matching task occurred before the prospective memory had been carried out, and this difference seemed to be limited to the hidden condition. This finding parallels results from human studies and suggests that working memory load and prospective memory may have a similar relationship in nonhuman primates. PMID:25372809

  4. Projected changes in extreme temperature events based on the NARCCAP model suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Radley M.; Coffel, Ethan D.; Winter, Jonathan M.; Bader, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    Once-per-year (annual) maximum temperature extremes in North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) models are projected to increase more (less) than mean daily maximum summer temperatures over much of the eastern (western) United States. In contrast, the models almost everywhere project greater warming of once-per-year minimum temperatures as compared to mean daily minimum winter temperatures. Under projected changes associated with extremes of the temperature distribution, Baltimore's maximum temperature that was met or exceeded once per year historically is projected to occur 17 times per season by midcentury, a 28% increase relative to projections based on summer mean daily maximum temperature change. Under the same approach, historical once-per-year cold events in Baltimore are projected to occur once per decade. The models are generally able to capture observed geopotential height anomalies associated with temperature extremes in two subregions. Projected changes in extreme temperature events cannot be explained by geopotential height anomalies or lower boundary conditions as reflected by soil moisture anomalies or snow water equivalent.

  5. A study of preservice elementary teachers enrolled in a discrepant-event-based physical science class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, James Edward

    This research evaluated the POWERFUL IDEAS IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE (PIiPS) curriculum model used to develop a physical science course taken by preservice elementary teachers. The focus was on the evaluation of discrepant events used to induce conceptual change in relation to students' ideas concerning heat, temperature, and specific heat. Both quantitative and qualitative methodologies were used for the analysis. Data was collected during the 1998 Fall semester using two classes of physical science for elementary school teachers. The traditionally taught class served as the control group and the class using the PIiPS curriculum model was the experimental group. The PIiPS curriculum model was evaluated quantitatively for its influence on students' attitude toward science, anxiety towards teaching science, self efficacy toward teaching science, and content knowledge. An analysis of covariance was performed on the quantitative data to test for significant differences between the means of the posttests for the control and experimental groups while controlling for pretest. It was found that there were no significant differences between the means of the control and experimental groups with respect to changes in their attitude toward science, anxiety toward teaching science and self efficacy toward teaching science. A significant difference between the means of the content examination was found (F(1,28) = 14.202 and p = 0.001), however, the result is questionable. The heat and energy module was the target for qualitative scrutiny. Coding for discrepant events was adapted from Appleton's 1996 work on student's responses to discrepant event science lessons. The following qualitative questions were posed for the investigation: (1) what were the ideas of the preservice elementary students prior to entering the classroom regarding heat and energy, (2) how effective were the discrepant events as presented in the PIiPS heat and energy module, and (3) how much does the "risk taking factor" associated with not telling the students the answer right away, affect the learning of the material. It was found that preservice elementary teachers harbor similar preconceptions as the general population according to the literature. The discrepant events used in this module of the PIiPS curriculum model met with varied results. It appeared that those students who had not successfully confronted their preconceptions were less likely to accept the new concepts that were to be developed using the discrepant events. Lastly, students had shown great improvement in content understanding and developed the ability to ask deep and probing questions.

  6. PicOS Tuples: Easing Event Based Programming in Tiny Pervasive Systems

    E-print Network

    Gburzynski, Pawel

    , akin to Linda [2], applied to PicOS [5], a programming environ- ment for wireless sensor networks (WSN- ming General Terms Design 1. INTRODUCTION To be practically viable, a typical wireless sensor network-specific context. Hacks mitigat- ing this problem are known under the collective name of manual stack management

  7. Team-Teaching a Current Events-Based Biology Course for Nonmajors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondos, Sarah E.; Phillips, Dereth

    2008-01-01

    Rice University has created a team-taught interactive biology course for nonmajors with a focus on cutting edge biology in the news--advances in biotechnology, medicine, and science policy, along with the biological principles and methodology upon which these advances are based. The challenges inherent to teaching current topics were minimized by…

  8. Bonsai: an event-based framework for processing and controlling data streams

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Gonçalo; Bonacchi, Niccolò; Frazão, João; Neto, Joana P.; Atallah, Bassam V.; Soares, Sofia; Moreira, Luís; Matias, Sara; Itskov, Pavel M.; Correia, Patrícia A.; Medina, Roberto E.; Calcaterra, Lorenza; Dreosti, Elena; Paton, Joseph J.; Kampff, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    The design of modern scientific experiments requires the control and monitoring of many different data streams. However, the serial execution of programming instructions in a computer makes it a challenge to develop software that can deal with the asynchronous, parallel nature of scientific data. Here we present Bonsai, a modular, high-performance, open-source visual programming framework for the acquisition and online processing of data streams. We describe Bonsai's core principles and architecture and demonstrate how it allows for the rapid and flexible prototyping of integrated experimental designs in neuroscience. We specifically highlight some applications that require the combination of many different hardware and software components, including video tracking of behavior, electrophysiology and closed-loop control of stimulation. PMID:25904861

  9. Event-based aquifer-to-atmosphere modeling over the European CORDEX domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keune, J.; Goergen, K.; Sulis, M.; Shrestha, P.; Springer, A.; Kusche, J.; Ohlwein, C.; Kollet, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that recent studies focus on the impact of soil moisture on climate and especially land-energy feedbacks, groundwater dynamics are often neglected or conceptual groundwater flow models are used. In particular, in the context of climate change and the occurrence of droughts and floods, a better understanding and an improved simulation of the physical processes involving groundwater on continental scales is necessary. This requires the implementation of a physically consistent terrestrial modeling system, which explicitly incorporates groundwater dynamics and the connection with shallow soil moisture. Such a physics-based system enables simulations and monitoring of groundwater storage and enhanced representations of the terrestrial energy and hydrologic cycles over long time periods. On shorter timescales, the prediction of groundwater-related extremes, such as floods and droughts, are expected to improve, because of the improved simulation of components of the hydrological cycle. In this study, we present a fully coupled aquifer-to-atmosphere modeling system over the European CORDEX domain. The integrated Terrestrial Systems Modeling Platform, TerrSysMP, consisting of the three-dimensional subsurface model ParFlow, the Community Land Model CLM3.5 and the numerical weather prediction model COSMO of the German Weather Service, is used. The system is set up with a spatial resolution of 0.11° (12.5km) and closes the terrestrial water and energy cycles from aquifers into the atmosphere. Here, simulations of the fully coupled system are performed over events, such as the 2013 flood in Central Europe and the 2003 European heat wave, and over extended time periods on the order of 10 years. State and flux variables of the terrestrial hydrologic and energy cycle are analyzed and compared to both in situ (e.g. stream and water level gauge networks, FLUXNET) and remotely sensed observations (e.g. GRACE, ESA ICC ECV soil moisture and SMOS). Additionally, the presented modeling system may be useful in the assessment of groundwater-related uncertainties in virtual reality and scenario simulations.

  10. DEVS Today: Recent Advances in Discrete Event-Based Information Technology

    E-print Network

    of commercial and defense information technologies 1. Introduction Originally introduced as a formalism by Sarjoughian and Cellier [1]. However, the wealth of research continues to expand and a second re is perceived as a continuous horizontal line flowing from left to right and events are stored as images located

  11. Event-Based Monitoring of Sediment Flux Following Removal of Oregon's Marmot Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, J. J.; O'Connor, J. E.; Spicer, K. R.; Bragg, H. M.; Wallick, J. R.; Kittleson, R. L.; Lee, K. K.; Cushman, D.; Piatt, D.; Tanner, D. Q.; Hale, T.; Uhrich, M. A.; Rhode, A.

    2008-12-01

    Breaching of Oregon's Marmot Dam in October 2007 allowed the 80-km-long Sandy River to flow freely from Mount Hood to the Columbia River for the first time in nearly 100 years. When breached, the dam was brimful with sediment. As part of an analysis examining the redistribution of ~730,000 m3 of stored sediment following the dam removal, we measured suspended-sediment load and bedload at sites 10 km upstream and 0.5 to 18 km downstream of the dam before, during and after breaching, and during five subsequent high-water events. Prior to breaching of the dam, suspended-sediment and bedload mass fluxes along the Sandy River both upstream and downstream of the dam were of the order of a few to a few tens of kg/s. Suspended sediment upstream was composed chiefly of sand in contrast to mostly silt and clay passing measurement sites 0.5 and 18 km below the dam. In all reaches bedload consisted chiefly (>90%) of sand. Breaching of the dam released a pulse of turbid water having an instantaneous suspended-sediment flux of 5200 kg/s. The initial sediment pulse consisted predominantly of silt and clay, presumably eroded from thin, fine-grained topset beds at the downstream end of the reservoir. However, the suspended load coarsened rapidly as the Sandy River incised into the stored sand and gravel that filled the former reservoir. Following the initial peak value, median fluxes of sandy suspended sediment 0.5 km below the dam site hovered around several tens to hundreds of kg/s for at least 24 hours, whereas the median suspended- sediment flux remained about 30 kg/s both 10 km upstream and 18 km downstream. Bedload transport also increased following breaching, but its response was slower than for suspended sediment. Bedload flux 0.5 km below the dam site increased from ~1 kg/s before breaching to 60 kg/s by 6 hours and to about 70 kg/s by 18 hours after breaching, in contrast to the steady, low (<10 kg/s) flux of sandy bedload passing upstream and farther downstream before and after breaching. Initially, the near-field bedload consisted predominantly of sand transported in large dunes. Significant gravel transport did not begin until 18 to 20 hours after breaching, in conjunction with rapid bed aggradation and downstream propagation of mid- channel gravel bars. This enhanced sediment transport occurred under a median flow just 30% greater than the river's mean annual flow at Marmot Dam. Within 3 months of breaching, the near-field high-flow-driven bedload flux remained significantly elevated above both upstream and downstream fluxes, but the suspended-sediment flux had declined substantially. Near-field bedload flux was persistently 10 to 100 times greater than that upstream and farther downstream, and remained gravel-rich compared to the sandy bedload passing stations upstream and 18 km distant. In contrast, near-field suspended-sediment concentrations declined approximately logarithmically, and by January 2008 the associated sandy suspended-sediment flux was comparable in both composition and magnitude to the suspended-sediment flux 18 km distant. The newly energetic Sandy River thus rapidly flushed sandy suspended-sediment downstream. Gravel-rich bedload continues to disperse downstream, but has yet to reach distal reaches of the river system. The majority of gravel transported thus far is stored chiefly along the 2-km-long channel reach below the dam site and within the Sandy River gorge 2-8 km downstream from the dam site.

  12. An event-based approach to understanding decadal fluctuations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Lesley; Hawkins, Ed; Woollings, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Many previous studies have shown that unforced climate model simulations exhibit decadal-scale fluctuations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), and that this variability can have impacts on surface climate fields. However, the robustness of these surface fingerprints across different models is less clear. Furthermore, with the potential for coupled feedbacks that may amplify or damp the response, it is not known whether the associated climate signals are linearly related to the strength of the AMOC changes, or if the fluctuation events exhibit nonlinear behaviour with respect to their strength or polarity. To explore these questions, we introduce an objective and flexible method for identifying the largest natural AMOC fluctuation events in multicentennial/multimillennial simulations of a variety of coupled climate models. The characteristics of the events are explored, including their magnitude, meridional coherence and spatial structure, as well as links with ocean heat transport and the horizontal circulation. The surface fingerprints in ocean temperature and salinity are examined, and compared with the results of linear regression analysis. It is found that the regressions generally provide a good indication of the surface changes associated with the largest AMOC events. However, there are some exceptions, including a nonlinear change in the atmospheric pressure signal, particularly at high latitudes, in HadCM3. Some asymmetries are also found between the changes associated with positive and negative AMOC events in the same model. Composite analysis suggests that there are signals that are robust across the largest AMOC events in each model, which provides reassurance that the surface changes associated with one particular event will be similar to those expected from regression analysis. However, large differences are found between the AMOC fingerprints in different models, which may hinder the prediction and attribution of such events in reality.

  13. Tsunami Source Identification on the 1867 Tsunami Event Based on the Impact Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    The 1867 Keelung tsunami event has drawn significant attention from people in Taiwan. Not only because the location was very close to the 3 nuclear power plants which are only about 20km away from the Taipei city but also because of the ambiguous on the tsunami sources. This event is unique in terms of many aspects. First, it was documented on many literatures with many languages and with similar descriptions. Second, the tsunami deposit was discovered recently. Based on the literatures, earthquake, 7-meter tsunami height, volcanic smoke, and oceanic smoke were observed. Previous studies concluded that this tsunami was generated by an earthquake with a magnitude around Mw7.0 along the Shanchiao Fault. However, numerical results showed that even a Mw 8.0 earthquake was not able to generate a 7-meter tsunami. Considering the steep bathymetry and intense volcanic activities along the Keelung coast, one reasonable hypothesis is that different types of tsunami sources were existed, such as the submarine landslide or volcanic eruption. In order to confirm this scenario, last year we proposed the Tsunami Reverse Tracing Method (TRTM) to find the possible locations of the tsunami sources. This method helped us ruling out the impossible far-field tsunami sources. However, the near-field sources are still remain unclear. This year, we further developed a new method named 'Impact Intensity Analysis' (IIA). In the IIA method, the study area is divided into a sequence of tsunami sources, and the numerical simulations of each source is conducted by COMCOT (Cornell Multi-grid Coupled Tsunami Model) tsunami model. After that, the resulting wave height from each source to the study site is collected and plotted. This method successfully helped us to identify the impact factor from the near-field potential sources. The IIA result (Fig. 1) shows that the 1867 tsunami event was a multi-source event. A mild tsunami was trigged by a Mw7.0 earthquake, and then followed by the submarine landslide or volcanic events. A near-field submarine landslide and landslide at Mien-Hwa Canyon were the most possible scenarios. As for the volcano scenarios, the volcanic eruption located about 10 km away from Keelung with 2.5x108 m3 disturbed water volume might be a candidate. The detailed scenario results will be presented in the full paper.

  14. Send-On-Delta Concept: An Event-Based Data Reporting Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Miskowicz, Marek

    2006-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of the send-on-delta data collecting strategy to capture information from the environment. Send-on-delta concept is the signal-dependent temporal sampling scheme, where the sampling is triggered if the signal deviates by delta defined as the significant change of its value. It is an attractive scheme for wireless sensor networking due to effective energy consumption. The quantitative evaluations of send-on-delta scheme for a general type continuous-time bandlimited signal are presented in the paper. The bounds on the mean traffic of reports for a given signal, and assumed sampling resolution, are evaluated. Furthermore, the send-on-delta effectiveness, defined as the reduction of the mean rate of reports in comparison to the periodic sampling for a given resolution, is derived. It is shown that the lower bound of the send-on-delta effectiveness (i.e. the guaranteed reduction) is independent of the sampling resolution, and constitutes the built-in feature of the input signal. The calculation of the effectiveness for standard signals, that model the state evolution of dynamic environment in time, is exemplified. Finally, the example of send-on-delta programming is shown.

  15. Event-Based Plausibility Immediately Influences On-Line Language Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuki, Kazunaga; Chow, Tracy; Hare, Mary; Elman, Jeffrey L.; Scheepers, Christoph; McRae, Ken

    2011-01-01

    In some theories of sentence comprehension, linguistically relevant lexical knowledge, such as selectional restrictions, is privileged in terms of the time-course of its access and influence. We examined whether event knowledge computed by combining multiple concepts can rapidly influence language understanding even in the absence of selectional…

  16. Event based analysis of Chlorothalonil concentrations following application to managed turf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorothalonil concentrations exceeding acute toxicity levels for certain organisms have been measured in surface water discharge events from managed turf watersheds. However, the duration of exceedence and the timing of those events with respect to precipitation/runoff and time since application ha...

  17. Event-based Modeling of Fecal Coliform Concentrations in Runoff from Manured Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative evaluation of the effect of field manure application on bacterial concentrations in creeks adjacent to the field requires developing microbial transport models. Reliable testing of such models with bacteria monitoring data requires a better understanding and estimation of the uncertaint...

  18. Event-based estimation of interacting Markov chains with applications to electrocardiogram analysis

    E-print Network

    Willsky, Alan S.

    of a case study we describe. The principal locus ofthe paper is on the development of an approach have developed a methodology for modelling electrocardiograms (ECGs) that could be used as the basis for ECG signal processing analysis algorithms. We refer to Doerschuk el a/.(1990) lor the motivation

  19. A Mobile Robots Experimental Environment with Event-Based Wireless Communication

    PubMed Central

    Guinaldo, María; Fábregas, Ernesto; Farias, Gonzalo; Dormido-Canto, Sebastián; Chaos, Dictino; Sánchez, José; Dormido, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    An experimental platform to communicate between a set of mobile robots through a wireless network has been developed. The mobile robots get their position through a camera which performs as sensor. The video images are processed in a PC and a Waspmote card sends the corresponding position to each robot using the ZigBee standard. A distributed control algorithm based on event-triggered communications has been designed and implemented to bring the robots into the desired formation. Each robot communicates to its neighbors only at event times. Furthermore, a simulation tool has been developed to design and perform experiments with the system. An example of usage is presented. PMID:23881139

  20. Event Completion: Event Based Inferences Distort Memory in a Matter of Seconds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Brent; Keil, Frank

    2011-01-01

    We present novel evidence that implicit causal inferences distort memory for events only seconds after viewing. Adults watched videos of someone launching (or throwing) an object. However, the videos omitted the moment of contact (or release). Subjects falsely reported seeing the moment of contact when it was implied by subsequent footage but did…

  1. Event completion: event based inferences distort memory in a matter of seconds.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Brent; Keil, Frank

    2011-12-01

    We present novel evidence that implicit causal inferences distort memory for events only seconds after viewing. Adults watched videos of someone launching (or throwing) an object. However, the videos omitted the moment of contact (or release). Subjects falsely reported seeing the moment of contact when it was implied by subsequent footage but did not do so when the contact was not implied. Causal implications were disrupted either by replacing the resulting flight of the ball with irrelevant video or by scrambling event segments. Subjects in the different causal implication conditions did not differ on false alarms for other moments of the event, nor did they differ in general recognition accuracy. These results suggest that as people perceive events, they generate rapid conceptual interpretations that can have a powerful effect on how events are remembered. PMID:21917244

  2. Folk Theorems on the Correspondence between State-Based and Event-Based Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reniers, Michel A.; Willemse, Tim A. C.

    Kripke Structures and Labelled Transition Systems are the two most prominent semantic models used in concurrency theory. Both models are commonly believed to be equi-expressive. One can find many ad-hoc embeddings of one of these models into the other. We build upon the seminal work of De Nicola and Vaandrager that firmly established the correspondence between stuttering equivalence in Kripke Structures and divergence-sensitive branching bisimulation in Labelled Transition Systems. We show that their embeddings can also be used for a range of other equivalences of interest, such as strong bisimilarity, simulation equivalence, and trace equivalence. Furthermore, we extend the results by De Nicola and Vaandrager by showing that there are additional translations that allow one to use minimisation techniques in one semantic domain to obtain minimal representatives in the other semantic domain for these equivalences.

  3. Bonsai: an event-based framework for processing and controlling data streams.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Gonçalo; Bonacchi, Niccolò; Frazão, João; Neto, Joana P; Atallah, Bassam V; Soares, Sofia; Moreira, Luís; Matias, Sara; Itskov, Pavel M; Correia, Patrícia A; Medina, Roberto E; Calcaterra, Lorenza; Dreosti, Elena; Paton, Joseph J; Kampff, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    The design of modern scientific experiments requires the control and monitoring of many different data streams. However, the serial execution of programming instructions in a computer makes it a challenge to develop software that can deal with the asynchronous, parallel nature of scientific data. Here we present Bonsai, a modular, high-performance, open-source visual programming framework for the acquisition and online processing of data streams. We describe Bonsai's core principles and architecture and demonstrate how it allows for the rapid and flexible prototyping of integrated experimental designs in neuroscience. We specifically highlight some applications that require the combination of many different hardware and software components, including video tracking of behavior, electrophysiology and closed-loop control of stimulation. PMID:25904861

  4. Event-Based Modeling of Driver Yielding Behavior to Pedestrians at Two-Lane Roundabout Approaches.

    PubMed

    Salamati, Katayoun; Schroeder, Bastian J; Geruschat, Duane R; Rouphail, Nagui M

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other types of controlled intersections, drivers do not always comply with the "yield to pedestrian" sign at the roundabouts. This paper aims to identify the contributing factors affecting the likelihood of driver yielding to pedestrians at two-lane roundabouts. It further models the likelihood of driver yielding based on these factors using logistic regression. The models have been applied to 1150 controlled pedestrian crossings at entry and exit legs of two-lane approaches of six roundabouts across the country. The logistic regression models developed support prior research that the likelihood of driver yielding at the entry leg of roundabouts is higher than at the exit. Drivers tend to yield to pedestrians carrying a white cane more often than to sighted pedestrians. Drivers traveling in the far lane, relative to pedestrian location, have a lower probability of yielding to a pedestrian. As the speed increases the probability of driver yielding decreases. At the exit leg of the roundabout, drivers turning right from the adjacent lane have a lower propensity of yielding than drivers coming from other directions. The findings of this paper further suggest that although there has been much debate on pedestrian right-of-way laws and distinction between pedestrian waiting positions (in the street versus at the curb), this factor does not have a significant impact on driver yielding rate. The logistic regression models also quantify the effect of each of these factors on propensity of driver yielding. The models include variables which are specific to each study location and explain the impact size of each study location on probability of yielding. The models generated in this research will be useful to transportation professionals and researchers interested in understanding the factors that impact driver yielding at modern roundabouts. The results of the research can be used to isolate factors that may increase yielding (such as lower roundabout approach speeds), and can feasibly be incorporated into microsimulation algorithms to model driver yielding at roundabouts. PMID:24619314

  5. Low-Latency Event-Based Visual Odometry Andrea Censi Davide Scaramuzza

    E-print Network

    Suresh, Subra

    of a robotic system is ultimately limited by the speed of its processing pipeline. The use of a Dynamic Vision odometry methods are not applicable. This paper presents the first visual odometry system based on a DVS-performance robotics. Once the perception problem is assumed solved, for example by the use of external motion

  6. Simulation of the ATIC-2 Silicon Matrix for Protons and Helium GCR Primaries at 0.3, 10, and 25 TeV/Nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, J.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha R. M.; Guzik, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    The energy deposition distribution for protons and helium galactic cosmic ray primaries at 0.3, 10, and 25 TeV/nucleon in the ATIC-2 silicon matrix detector are simulated with GEANT4. The GEANT3 geometrical model of ATIC developed by the University of Maryland was combined with a GEANT4 application developed for the Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB) detector package. The new code included relatively minor modifications to completely describe the ATIC materials and a more detailed model of the Silicon Matrix detector. For this analysis all particles were started as a unidirectional beam at a single point near the center of the Silicon Matrix front surface. The point was selected such that each primary passed through at least two of the overlapping silicon pixels.

  7. Event-based estimation of water budget components using the network of multi-sensor capacitance probes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A time-scale-free approach was developed for estimation of water fluxes at boundaries of monitoring soil profile using water content time series. The approach uses the soil water budget to compute soil water budget components, i.e. surface-water excess (Sw), infiltration less evapotranspiration (I-E...

  8. Supporting Event-based Unified Data Access/query over Integrated Data-views for Decision Making in Geographic

    E-print Network

    Making in Geographic Information Systems Ahmet Sayar a,b. *, Geoffrey C. Fox a,b,c , Marlon E. Pierce-warning systems. Decision making in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) increasingly relies on analyses and online service definitions in Astronomy and Geographic Information Systems respectively. We are now

  9. A plan for community event-based surveillance to reduce Ebola transmission - Sierra Leone, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Sam; Hertz, Darren; Maenner, Matt; Ratnayake, Ruwan; Baker, Pieter; Lash, R Ryan; Klena, John; Lee-Kwan, Seung Hee; Williams, Candice; Jonnie, Gabriel T; Gorina, Yelena; Anderson, Alicia; Saffa, Gbessay; Carr, Dana; Tuma, Jude; Miller, Laura; Turay, Alhajie; Belay, Ermias

    2015-01-30

    Ebola virus disease (Ebola) was first detected in Sierra Leone in May 2014 and was likely introduced into the eastern part of the country from Guinea. The disease spread westward, eventually affecting Freetown, Sierra Leone's densely populated capital. By December 2014, Sierra Leone had more Ebola cases than Guinea and Liberia, the other two West African countries that have experienced widespread transmission. As the epidemic intensified through the summer and fall, an increasing number of infected persons were not being detected by the county's surveillance system until they had died. Instead of being found early in the disease course and quickly isolated, these persons remained in their communities throughout their illness, likely spreading the disease. PMID:25632956

  10. New method to simulate quantum interference using deterministic processes and application to event-based simulation of quantum computation

    E-print Network

    H. De Raedt; K. De Raedt; K. Michielsen

    2005-01-24

    We demonstrate that networks of locally connected processing units with a primitive learning capability exhibit behavior that is usually only attributed to quantum systems. We describe networks that simulate single-photon beam-splitter and Mach-Zehnder interferometer experiments on a causal, event-by-event basis and demonstrate that the simulation results are in excellent agreement with quantum theory. We also show that this approach can be generalized to simulate universal quantum computers.

  11. An event-based comparison of two types of automated-recording, weighing bucket rain gauges 1890

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-year, multi-gage comparison of two types of automated-recording weighing-bucket raingages was conducted using precipitation data collected at the United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service’s Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in Southeast Arizona. The compariso...

  12. Building a knowledge base of severe adverse drug events based on AERS reporting data using semantic web technologies.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoqian; Wang, Liwei; Liu, Hongfang; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    A semantically coded knowledge base of adverse drug events (ADEs) with severity information is critical for clinical decision support systems and translational research applications. However it remains challenging to measure and identify the severity information of ADEs. The objective of the study is to develop and evaluate a semantic web based approach for building a knowledge base of severe ADEs based on the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) reporting data. We utilized a normalized AERS reporting dataset and extracted putative drug-ADE pairs and their associated outcome codes in the domain of cardiac disorders. We validated the drug-ADE associations using ADE datasets from SIDe Effect Resource (SIDER) and the UMLS. We leveraged the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event (CTCAE) grading system and classified the ADEs into the CTCAE in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). We identified and validated 2,444 unique Drug-ADE pairs in the domain of cardiac disorders, of which 760 pairs are in Grade 5, 775 pairs in Grade 4 and 2,196 pairs in Grade 3. PMID:23920604

  13. Integrated Data Products to Forecast, Mitigate, and Educate for Natural Hazard Events Based on Recent and Historical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, H. L.; Dunbar, P. K.; Varner, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Immediately following a damaging or fatal natural hazard event there is interest to access authoritative data and information. The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) maintains and archives a comprehensive collection of natural hazards data. The NGDC global historic event database includes all tsunami events, regardless of intensity, as well as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions that caused fatalities, moderate damage, or generated a tsunami. Examining the past record provides clues to what might happen in the future. NGDC also archives tide gauge data from stations operated by the NOAA/NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services and the NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers. In addition to the tide gauge data, NGDC preserves deep-ocean water-level, 15-second sampled data as collected by the Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunami (DART) buoys. Water-level data provide evidence of sea-level fluctuation and possible inundation events. NGDC houses an extensive collection of geologic hazards photographs available online as digital images. Visual media provide invaluable pre- and post-event data for natural hazards. Images can be used to illustrate inundation and possible damage or effects. These images are organized by event or hazard type (earthquake, volcano, tsunami, landslide, etc.), along with description and location. They may be viewed via interactive online maps and are integrated with historic event details. The planning required to achieve collection and dissemination of hazard event data is extensive. After a damaging or fatal event, NGDC begins to collect and integrate data and information from many people and organizations into the hazards databases. Sources of data include the U.S. NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers, the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. NOAA National Data Buoy Center, the UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC), Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program, news organizations, etc. NGDC then works to promptly distribute data and information for the appropriate audience. For example, when a major tsunami occurs, all of the related tsunami data are combined into one timely resource. NGDC posts a publicly accessible online report which includes: 1) event summary; 2) eyewitness and instrumental recordings from preliminary field surveys; 3) regional historical observations including similar past events and effects; 4) observed water heights and calculated tsunami travel times; and 5) near-field effects. This report is regularly updated to incorporate the most recent news and observations. Providing timely access to authoritative data and information ultimately benefits researchers, state officials, the media and the public.

  14. Robotic goalie with 3 ms reaction time at 4% CPU load using event-based dynamic vision sensor.

    PubMed

    Delbruck, Tobi; Lang, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Conventional vision-based robotic systems that must operate quickly require high video frame rates and consequently high computational costs. Visual response latencies are lower-bound by the frame period, e.g., 20 ms for 50 Hz frame rate. This paper shows how an asynchronous neuromorphic dynamic vision sensor (DVS) silicon retina is used to build a fast self-calibrating robotic goalie, which offers high update rates and low latency at low CPU load. Independent and asynchronous per pixel illumination change events from the DVS signify moving objects and are used in software to track multiple balls. Motor actions to block the most "threatening" ball are based on measured ball positions and velocities. The goalie also sees its single-axis goalie arm and calibrates the motor output map during idle periods so that it can plan open-loop arm movements to desired visual locations. Blocking capability is about 80% for balls shot from 1 m from the goal even with the fastest-shots, and approaches 100% accuracy when the ball does not beat the limits of the servo motor to move the arm to the necessary position in time. Running with standard USB buses under a standard preemptive multitasking operating system (Windows), the goalie robot achieves median update rates of 550 Hz, with latencies of 2.2 ± 2 ms from ball movement to motor command at a peak CPU load of less than 4%. Practical observations and measurements of USB device latency are provided. PMID:24311999

  15. Robotic goalie with 3 ms reaction time at 4% CPU load using event-based dynamic vision sensor

    PubMed Central

    Delbruck, Tobi; Lang, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Conventional vision-based robotic systems that must operate quickly require high video frame rates and consequently high computational costs. Visual response latencies are lower-bound by the frame period, e.g., 20 ms for 50 Hz frame rate. This paper shows how an asynchronous neuromorphic dynamic vision sensor (DVS) silicon retina is used to build a fast self-calibrating robotic goalie, which offers high update rates and low latency at low CPU load. Independent and asynchronous per pixel illumination change events from the DVS signify moving objects and are used in software to track multiple balls. Motor actions to block the most “threatening” ball are based on measured ball positions and velocities. The goalie also sees its single-axis goalie arm and calibrates the motor output map during idle periods so that it can plan open-loop arm movements to desired visual locations. Blocking capability is about 80% for balls shot from 1 m from the goal even with the fastest-shots, and approaches 100% accuracy when the ball does not beat the limits of the servo motor to move the arm to the necessary position in time. Running with standard USB buses under a standard preemptive multitasking operating system (Windows), the goalie robot achieves median update rates of 550 Hz, with latencies of 2.2 ± 2 ms from ball movement to motor command at a peak CPU load of less than 4%. Practical observations and measurements of USB device latency are provided1. PMID:24311999

  16. Event-based prospective memory in patients with Parkinson’s disease: the effect of emotional valence

    PubMed Central

    Mioni, G.; Meligrana, L.; Rendell, P. G.; Bartolomei, L.; Perini, F.; Stablum, F.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of Parkinson’s disease (PD) on prospective memory (PM) tasks by varying the emotional content of the PM actions. Twenty-one older adults with PD and 25 healthy older adults took part in the present study. Participants performed three virtual days in the Virtual Week task. On each virtual day, participants performed actions with positive, negative or neutral content. Immediately following each virtual day, participants completed a recognition task to assess their retrospective memory for the various PM tasks. PD patients were less accurate than the control group at both PM accuracy and recognition task accuracy. The effect of emotional valence was also evident, indicating that all participants were more accurate on positive PM tasks than both negative and neutral. This study confirmed PM impairment in PD patients and extended previous research showing how positive emotional stimuli can influence PM performance. PMID:26257636

  17. Event-based surveillance of food- and waterborne diseases in Europe: urgent inquiries (outbreak alerts) during 2008 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Gossner, C M; de Jong, B; Hoebe, C J; Coulombier, D

    2015-01-01

    During 2008 to 2013, 215 outbreak alerts, also known as 'urgent inquiries' (UI), for food- and waterborne diseases were launched in Europe, the majority of them (135; 63%) being related to salmonellosis. For 110 (51%) UI, a potential food vehicle of infection was identified, with vegetables being the most reported category (34;31%). A total of 28% (n = 60) of the outbreaks reported had an international dimension, involving at least two countries (mean: 4; standard deviation: 2; range:2–14). Participating countries posted 2,343 messages(initial posts and replies, excluding updates), with a median of 11 messages per urgent inquiry (range:1–28). Of 60 multicountry UI, 50 involved between two and four countries. The UI allowed early detection of multicountry outbreaks, facilitated the identification of the suspected vehicles and consequently contributed to the timely implementation of control measures. The introduction of an epidemic intelligence information system platform in 2010 has strengthened the role of the Food- and Waterborne Diseases and Zoonoses network in facilitating timely exchange of information between public health authorities of the participating countries. PMID:26132769

  18. Pre-Processing Effect on the Accuracy of Event-Based Activity Segmentation and Classification through Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fida, Benish; Bernabucci, Ivan; Bibbo, Daniele; Conforto, Silvia; Schmid, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Inertial sensors are increasingly being used to recognize and classify physical activities in a variety of applications. For monitoring and fitness applications, it is crucial to develop methods able to segment each activity cycle, e.g., a gait cycle, so that the successive classification step may be more accurate. To increase detection accuracy, pre-processing is often used, with a concurrent increase in computational cost. In this paper, the effect of pre-processing operations on the detection and classification of locomotion activities was investigated, to check whether the presence of pre-processing significantly contributes to an increase in accuracy. The pre-processing stages evaluated in this study were inclination correction and de-noising. Level walking, step ascending, descending and running were monitored by using a shank-mounted inertial sensor. Raw and filtered segments, obtained from a modified version of a rule-based gait detection algorithm optimized for sequential processing, were processed to extract time and frequency-based features for physical activity classification through a support vector machine classifier. The proposed method accurately detected >99% gait cycles from raw data and produced >98% accuracy on these segmented gait cycles. Pre-processing did not substantially increase classification accuracy, thus highlighting the possibility of reducing the amount of pre-processing for real-time applications. PMID:26378544

  19. Medical mitigation strategies for acute radiation exposure during spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Slava; Hamilton, Douglas R

    2006-02-01

    The United States Government has recently refocused their space program on manned missions to the Moon by 2018 and later to Mars. While there are many potential risks associated with exploration-class missions, one of the most serious and unpredictable is the effect of acute space radiation exposure, and the space program must make every reasonable effort to mitigate this risk. The two cosmic sources of radiation that could impact a mission outside the Earth's magnetic field are solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). Either can cause acute and chronic medical illness. Numerous researchers are currently examining the ability of GCR exposure to induce the development of genetic changes that lead to malignancies and other delayed effects. However, relatively little has been published on the medical management of an acute SPE event and the potential impact on the mission and crew. This review paper will provide the readers with medical management options for an acute radiation event based on recommendations from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and evidence-based critical analysis of the scientific literature. It is the goal of this paper to stimulate debate regarding the definition of safety parameters for exploration-class missions to determine the level of medical care necessary to provide for the crew that will undertake such missions. PMID:16491581

  20. Executive and Theory-of-Mind Contributions to Event-Based Prospective Memory in Children: Exploring the Self-Projection Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Ruth M.; Driscoll, Timothy; Shum, David; Macaulay, Catrin E.

    2012-01-01

    In two studies, 4- to 6-year-olds were asked to name pictures of animals for the benefit of a watching hand puppet (the ongoing task) but to refrain from naming and to remove from view any pictures of dogs (the prospective memory [PM] task). Children also completed assessments of verbal ability, cognitive inhibition, working memory, and…

  1. Event-based measurement of boundary-layer winds and topographic effects with a small unmanned aircraft system (sUas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddell, K.; Hugenholtz, C.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical models are invaluable tools for developing and testing hypotheses about interactions and feedbacks between wind and topography. However, field-based measurements are equally important for building and enhancing confidence in model output. Several field methods are available, including conventional approaches using tall masts equipped with an array of anemometers, as well as weather balloons, but few methods are able to match the level of detail available in model simulations of topographically-modified windflow. Here we propose an alternative method that may enhance numerical models. The method involves a small unmanned aircraft system (sUas) equipped with a meteorological sensor payload. The sUas is a two blade helicopter that weighs 5.5 kg, and has a length of 1.32 m. We designed a simple measurement and control system using an Arduino micro-controller, which acquired measurements at pre-defined coordinates autonomously. The entire survey was pre-configured and uploaded to the aircraft, effectively avoiding the need for manual aircraft operation and data collection. We collected raw measurements at each waypoint, yielding a point cloud of windspeed data. During test flights the sUas was able to maintain a stable position (± 0.6 m vertical and horizontal) in wind speeds up to 50 km/h. We used the raw data to map the wind speed-up ratio relative to a reference anemometer. Although it would be preferable to acquire continuous measurements at each waypoint, the sUas method only provides a snapshot of wind at each location. However, despite this limitation, the sUas does fill a void in terms of spatial measurements within the boundary layer. It may be possible to enhance this method in the future through deployment of sUas swarms that measure wind concurrently at many locations. Furthermore, other sensors can be deployed on sUas for measuring aeolian processes such as dust.

  2. Beam-splitters don't have memory: a comment on "Event-based corpuscular model for quantum optics experiments'' by K.Michielsen et al

    E-print Network

    Radu Ionicioiu

    2010-12-03

    In a recent article (arXiv:1006.1728) K.Michielsen et al. claim that a simple corpuscular model can explain many quantum optics experiments. We discuss these claims and show that their proposal fails at several levels. Finally, we propose an experiment to falsify the model.

  3. Comment on "Beam-splitters don't have memory: a comment on "Event-based corpuscular model for quantum optics experiments" by K.Michielsen et al."

    E-print Network

    V. A. Kuz'menko

    2010-12-10

    R. Ionicioiu in arXiv:1012.0647 claims that beam-splitters do not have memory. This is the unproved statement. From other side, such small quantum objects as molecules, atoms and even photons have memory, which is connected with the inequality of forward and reversed processes in quantum physics.

  4. Precipitation induced stream flow: An event based chemical andisotopic study of a small stream in the Great Plains region of theUSA

    SciTech Connect

    Machavaram, Madhav V.; Whittemore, Donald O.; Conrad, Mark E.; Miller, Norman L.

    2005-03-22

    A small stream in the Great Plains of USA was sampled tounderstand the streamflow components following intense precipitation andthe influence of water storage structures in the drainage basin.Precipitation, stream, ponds, ground-water and soil moisture were sampledfor determination of isotopic (D, 18O) and chemical (Cl, SO4) compositionbefore and after two intense rain events. Following the first stormevent, flow at the downstream locations was generated primarily throughshallow subsurface flow and runoff whereas in the headwaters region --where a pond is located in the stream channel -- shallow ground-water andpond outflow contributed to the flow. The distinct isotopic signatures ofprecipitation and the evaporated pond water allowed separation of theevent water from the other sources that contributed to the flow.Similarly, variations in the Cl and SO4 concentrations helped identifythe relative contributions of ground-water and soil moisture to thestream flow. The relationship between deuterium excess and Cl or SO4content reveals that the early contributions from a rain event tostreamflow depend upon the antecedent climatic conditions and theposition along the stream channel within the watershed. The design ofthis study, in which data from several locations within a watershed werecollected, shows that in small streams changes in relative contributionsfrom ground water and soil moisture complicate hydrograph separation,with surface-water bodies providing additional complexity. It alsodemonstrates the usefulness of combined chemical and isotopic methods inhydrologic investigations, especially the utility of the deuterium excessparameter in quantifying the relative contributions of various sourcecomponents to the stream flow.

  5. Reconstruction of flood events based on documentary data and transnational flood risk analysis of the Upper Rhine and its French and German tributaries since AD 1480

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmelsbach, I.; Glaser, R.; Schoenbein, J.; Riemann, D.; Martin, B.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the long-term analysis of flood occurrence along the southern part of the Upper Rhine River system and of 14 of its tributaries in France and Germany covering the period starting from 1480 BC. Special focus is given on the temporal and spatial variations of flood events and their underlying meteorological causes over time. Examples are presented of how long-term information about flood events and knowledge about the historical aspect of flood protection in a given area can help to improve the understanding of risk analysis and therefor transnational risk management. Within this context, special focus is given to flood vulnerability while comparing selected historical and modern extreme events, establishing a common evaluation scheme. The transnational aspect becomes especially evident analyzing the tributaries: on this scale, flood protection developed impressively different on the French and German sides. We argue that comparing high technological standards of flood protection, which were initiated by the dukes of Baden on the German side starting in the early 19th century, misled people to the common belief that the mechanical means of flood protection like dams and barrages can guarantee the security from floods and their impacts. This lead to widespread settlements and the establishment of infrastructure as well as modern industries in potentially unsafe areas until today. The legal status in Alsace on the French side of the Rhine did not allow for continuous flood protection measurements, leading to a constant - and probably at last annoying - reminder that the floodplains are a potentially unsafe place to be. From a modern perspective of flood risk management, this leads to a significant lower aggregation of value in the floodplains of the small rivers in Alsace compared to those on the Baden side - an interesting fact - especially if the modern European Flood directive is taken into account.

  6. Three dimensional solar anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays near the recent solar minimum 23/24

    E-print Network

    Modzelewska, R

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) galactic cosmic ray (GCR) anisotropy has been studied for 2006- 2012. The GCR anisotropy, both in the ecliptic plane and in polar direction, were obtained based on the neutron monitors (NMs) and Nagoya muon telescopes (MT) data. We analyze two dimensional (2D) GCR anisotropy in the ecliptic plane and north-south anisotropy normal to the ecliptic plane. We reveal quasi-periodicities - the annual and 27-days waves in the GCR anisotropy in 2006-2012. We investigate the relationship of the 27-day variation of the GCR anisotropy in the ecliptic plane and in the polar direction with the parameters of solar activity and solar wind.

  7. Influence of cosmic-ray variability on the monsoon rainfall and temperature

    E-print Network

    Badruddin,

    2014-01-01

    We study the role of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) variability in influencing the rainfall variability in Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) season. We find that on an average during 'drought' (low ISMR) periods in India, GCR flux is decreasing, and during 'flood' (high ISMR) periods, GCR flux is increasing. The results of our analysis suggest for a possibility that the decreasing GCR flux during the summer monsoon season in India may suppress the rainfall. On the other hand, increasing GCR flux may enhance the rainfall. We suspect that in addition to real environmental conditions, significant levitation/dispersion of low clouds and hence reduced possibility of collision/coalescence to form raindrops suppresses the rainfall during decreasing GCR flux in monsoon season. On the other hand, enhanced collision/coalescence efficiency during increasing GCR flux due to electrical effects may contribute to enhancing the rainfall. Based on the observations, we put forward the idea that, under suitable environmental con...

  8. Do Plants Contain G Protein-Coupled Receptors?1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Taddese, Bruck; Upton, Graham J.G.; Bailey, Gregory R.; Jordan, Siân R.D.; Abdulla, Nuradin Y.; Reeves, Philip J.; Reynolds, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Whether G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exist in plants is a fundamental biological question. Interest in deorphanizing new GPCRs arises because of their importance in signaling. Within plants, this is controversial, as genome analysis has identified 56 putative GPCRs, including G protein-coupled receptor1 (GCR1), which is reportedly a remote homolog to class A, B, and E GPCRs. Of these, GCR2 is not a GPCR; more recently, it has been proposed that none are, not even GCR1. We have addressed this disparity between genome analysis and biological evidence through a structural bioinformatics study, involving fold recognition methods, from which only GCR1 emerges as a strong candidate. To further probe GCR1, we have developed a novel helix-alignment method, which has been benchmarked against the class A-class B-class F GPCR alignments. In addition, we have presented a mutually consistent set of alignments of GCR1 homologs to class A, class B, and class F GPCRs and shown that GCR1 is closer to class A and/or class B GPCRs than class A, class B, or class F GPCRs are to each other. To further probe GCR1, we have aligned transmembrane helix 3 of GCR1 to each of the six GPCR classes. Variability comparisons provide additional evidence that GCR1 homologs have the GPCR fold. From the alignments and a GCR1 comparative model, we have identified motifs that are common to GCR1, class A, B, and E GPCRs. We discuss the possibilities that emerge from this controversial evidence that GCR1 has a GPCR fold. PMID:24246381

  9. Nature of long-term correlations between cloud state and variations in galactic cosmic ray flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veretenenko, S. V.; Ogurtsov, M. G.

    2015-07-01

    The nature of long-term correlations between low cloud anomalies and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity, as well as possible causes of variations in the character of these correlations in the early 2000s, were studied. It was shown that the influence of GCRs on a cloud state at midlatitudes is closely related to GCR effects on variations in extratropical cyclogenesis intensity. The high positive correlation coefficients between low clouds and GCR fluxes observed in 1983-2000 were caused by the fact that increases in GCR fluxes during this period were accompanied by an intensification of cyclonic activity at midlatitudes. The correlation between clouds and GCR fluxes in the early 2000s was possibly violated, because the sign of GCR effects on the development of extratropical baric systems reversed as a result of a change in the stratospheric polar vortex state.

  10. Low Clouds and Cosmic Rays: Possible Reasons for Correlation Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veretenenko, S. V.; Ogurtsov, M. G.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we investigated the nature of correlations between low cloud cover anomalies (LCA) and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) variations detected on the decadal time scale, as well as possible reasons for the violation of these correlations in the early 2000s. It was shown that the link between cloud cover at middle latitudes and GCR fluxes is not direct, but it is realized through GCR influence on the development of extratropical baric systems (cyclones and troughs) which form cloud field. As the sign of GCR effects on the troposphere dynamics seems to depend on the strength of the stratospheric polar vortex, a possible reason for the violation of a positive correlation between LCA and GCR fluxes in the early 2000s may be the change of the vortex state which resulted in the reversal of GCR effects on extratropical cyclone development.

  11. The Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane Survey (ChaMPlane) is designed to identify the point X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-ray Observatory along the Galactic Plane and in the Galactic Center region (GCR) [1]. Based on a multiwavelength dataset [2,3

    E-print Network

    The Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane Survey (ChaMPlane) is designed to identify the point X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-ray Observatory along the Galactic Plane and in the Galactic Center + spectroscopy of selected sources) [3]. The hard X-ray sources have absorption and spectral index inconsistent

  12. Designing a Complex Fragmentation Block for Simulating the Galactic Environment by Using a Single Accelerator Beam in PHITS (Practicle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System) 

    E-print Network

    Chen, Gary

    2011-10-21

    goal would be to reproduce the distribution of the LET (unrestricted) found in the GCR as shown in Fig.2. (Badhwar and Petrov 1998). The measurements of the GCR LET spectrum presented in Fig. 2 were taken during a joint space mission between the US... range of the GCR. All the measurements were merged together to produce the GCR diagram in Fig. 2 (Badhwar and Petrov 1998). The LET distribution found in space is unique because presently, it cannot be duplicated on Earth. Therefore, it is essential...

  13. Development of a Miniaturized Hollow-Waveguide Gas Correlation Radiometer for Trace Gas Measurements in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, E. M.; Blalock, G. W.; Marx, C. T.; Heaps, W. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary results in the development of a miniaturized gas correlation radiometer (GCR) for column trace gas measurements in the Martian atmosphere. The GCR is designed as an orbiting instrument capable of mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface.

  14. Flaviaesturariibacter amylovorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a starch-hydrolysing bacterium, isolated from estuarine water.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji Young; Chun, Jeesun; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Chul Ho; Jahng, Kwang Yeop

    2015-07-01

    A novel bacterial strain, designated GCR0105(T), was isolated from a water sample of the Mangyung estuary enclosed by the Saemangeum Embankment, located in JEOLlabuk-do, South Korea. Cells of strain GCR0105(T) were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped. Colonies of strain GCR0105(T) were pale yellow-pigmented on R2A agar and nutrient agar media, and were able to grow at 15-30 °C (optimum 25 °C) and pH 6.5-8.5 (optimum pH 7.5). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain GCR0105(T) was related most closely to Flavisolibacter ginsengisoli Gsoil 643(T) (93.14% similarity). The polar lipid profile of strain GCR0105(T) comprised phosphatidylethanolamine, two unknown aminolipids, an unknown aminophospholipid and four unknown lipids. The DNA G+C content of strain GCR0105(T) was 42.9 mol% and the respiratory quinone was MK-7.On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties, strain GCR0105(T) represents a novel species in a new genus within the family Chitinophagaceae, for which the name Flaviaesturariibacter amylovorans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Flaviaesturariibacter amylovorans is GCR0105(T) (?= KACC 16454(T) = JCM 17919(T)). PMID:25858251

  15. Astrophysical Li-7 as a product of big bang nucleosynthesis and galactic cosmic-ray spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olive, Keith A.; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    The astrophysical Li-7 abundance is considered to be largely primordial, while the Be and B abundances are thought to be due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) spallation reactions on top of a much smaller big bang component. But GCR spallation should also produce Li-7. As a consistency check on the combination of big bang nucleosynthesis and GCR spallation, the Be and B data from a sample of hot population II stars is used to subtract from the measured Li-7 abundance an estimate of the amount generated by GCR spallation for each star in the sample, and then to add to this baseline an estimate of the metallicity-dependent augmentation of Li-7 due to spallation. The singly reduced primordial Li-7 abundance is still consistent with big bang nucleosynthesis, and a single GCR spallation model can fit the Be, B, and corrected Li-7 abundances for all the stars in the sample.

  16. Modulation of Galactic Cosmic Rays Observed at L1 in Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fludra, A.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze a unique 15 yr record of galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) measurements made by the SOHO Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer NIS detectors, recording integrated GCR numbers with energies above 1.0 GeV between 1996 July and 2011 June. We are able to closely reproduce the main features of the SOHO/CDS GCR record using the modulation potential calculated from neutron monitor data by Usoskin et al. The GCR numbers show a clear solar cycle modulation: they decrease by 50% from the 1997 minimum to the 2000 maximum of the solar cycle, then return to the 1997 level in 2007 and continue to rise, in 2009 December reaching a level 25% higher than in 1997. This 25% increase is in contrast with the behavior of Ulysses/KET GCR protons extrapolated to 1 AU in the ecliptic plane, showing the same level in 2008-2009 as in 1997. The GCR numbers are inversely correlated with the tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet. In particular, the continued increase of SOHO/CDS GCRs from 2007 until 2009 is correlated with the decrease of the minimum tilt angle from 30° in mid-2008 to 5° in late 2009. The GCR level then drops sharply from 2010 January, again consistent with a rapid increase of the tilt angle to over 35°. This shows that the extended 2008 solar minimum was different from the 1997 minimum in terms of the structure of the heliospheric current sheet.

  17. MODULATION OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS OBSERVED AT L1 IN SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Fludra, A.

    2015-01-20

    We analyze a unique 15 yr record of galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) measurements made by the SOHO Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer NIS detectors, recording integrated GCR numbers with energies above 1.0 GeV between 1996 July and 2011 June. We are able to closely reproduce the main features of the SOHO/CDS GCR record using the modulation potential calculated from neutron monitor data by Usoskin et al. The GCR numbers show a clear solar cycle modulation: they decrease by 50% from the 1997 minimum to the 2000 maximum of the solar cycle, then return to the 1997 level in 2007 and continue to rise, in 2009 December reaching a level 25% higher than in 1997. This 25% increase is in contrast with the behavior of Ulysses/KET GCR protons extrapolated to 1 AU in the ecliptic plane, showing the same level in 2008-2009 as in 1997. The GCR numbers are inversely correlated with the tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet. In particular, the continued increase of SOHO/CDS GCRs from 2007 until 2009 is correlated with the decrease of the minimum tilt angle from 30° in mid-2008 to 5° in late 2009. The GCR level then drops sharply from 2010 January, again consistent with a rapid increase of the tilt angle to over 35°. This shows that the extended 2008 solar minimum was different from the 1997 minimum in terms of the structure of the heliospheric current sheet.

  18. Multiplex Assay for Protein Profiling and Potency Measurement of German Cockroach Allergen Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Taruna; Dobrovolskaia, Ekaterina; Shartouny, Jessica R.; Slater, Jay E.

    2015-01-01

    Background German cockroach (GCr) allergens induce IgE responses and may cause asthma. Commercial GCr allergen extracts are variable and existing assays may not be appropriate for determining extract composition and potency. Objective Our aim was to develop a multiplex antibody/bead-based assay for assessment of GCr allergen extracts. Methods Single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies against GCr were obtained by screening libraries derived from naïve human lymphocytes and hyperimmunized chicken splenocytes and bone marrow. Selected clones were sequenced and characterized by immunoblotting. Eighteen scFv antibodies (17 chicken, 1 human) coupled to polystyrene beads were used in this suspension assay; binding of targeted GCr allergens to antibody-coated beads was detected using rabbit antisera against GCr, and against specific allergens rBla g 1, rBla g 2, and rBla g 4. The assay was tested for specificity, accuracy, and precision. Extracts were also compared by IgE competition ELISA. Results Chicken scFv’s generated eight different binding patterns to GCr proteins from 14 to 150 kDa molecular weight. Human scFv’s recognized a 100 kDa GCr protein. The multiplex assay was found to be specific and reproducible with intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) of 2.64% and inter-assay CV of 10.0%. Overall potencies of various GCr extracts were calculated using mean logEC50s for eight selected scFvs. Overall potency measures were also analyzed by assessing the contributions to potency of each target. Conclusions An scFv antibody-based multiplex assay has been developed capable of simultaneously measuring different proteins in a complex mixture, and to determine the potencies and compositions of allergen extracts. PMID:26444288

  19. Solar activity, the QBO, and tropospheric responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, Brian A.; Brown, Geoffrey M.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    1989-01-01

    The suggestion that galactic cosmic rays (GCR) as modulated by the solar wind are the carriers of the component of solar variability that affects weather and climate has been discussed in the literature for 30 years, and there is now a considerable body of evidence that supports it. Variations of GCR occur with the 11 year solar cycle, matching the time scale of recent results for atmospheric variations, as modulated by the quasibiennial oscillation of equatorial stratospheric winds (the QBO). Variations in GCR occur on the time scale of centuries with a well defined peak in the coldest decade of the little ice age. New evidence is presented on the meteorological responses to GCR variations on the time scale of a few days. These responses include changes in the vertical temperature profile in the troposphere and lower stratosphere in the two days following solar flare related high speed plasma streams and associated GCR decreases, and in decreases in Vorticity Area Index (VAI) following Forbush decreases of GCR. The occurrence of correlations of GCR and meteorological responses on all three time scales strengthens the hypothesis of GCR as carriers of solar variability to the lower atmosphere. Both short and long term tropospheric responses are understandable as changes in the intensity of cyclonic storms initiated by mechanisms involving cloud microphysical and cloud electrification processes, due to changes in local ion production from changes in GCR fluxes and other high energy particles in the MeV to low GeV range. The nature of these mechanisms remains undetermined. Possible stratospheric wind (particularly QBO) effects on the transport of HNO3 and other constituents incorporated in cluster ions and possible condensation and freezing nuclei are considered as relevant to the long term variations.

  20. Practical Applications of Cosmic Ray Science: Spacecraft, Aircraft, Ground-Based Computation and Control Systems, Exploration, and Human Health and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve

    2015-01-01

    In this presentation a review of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects on microelectronic systems and human health and safety is given. The methods used to evaluate and mitigate unwanted cosmic ray effects in ground-based, atmospheric flight, and space flight environments are also reviewed. However not all GCR effects are undesirable. We will also briefly review how observation and analysis of GCR interactions with planetary atmospheres and surfaces and reveal important compositional and geophysical data on earth and elsewhere. About 1000 GCR particles enter every square meter of Earth’s upper atmosphere every second, roughly the same number striking every square meter of the International Space Station (ISS) and every other low- Earth orbit spacecraft. GCR particles are high energy ionized atomic nuclei (90% protons, 9% alpha particles, 1% heavier nuclei) traveling very close to the speed of light. The GCR particle flux is even higher in interplanetary space because the geomagnetic field provides some limited magnetic shielding. Collisions of GCR particles with atomic nuclei in planetary atmospheres and/or regolith as well as spacecraft materials produce nuclear reactions and energetic/highly penetrating secondary particle showers. Three twentieth century technology developments have driven an ongoing evolution of basic cosmic ray science into a set of practical engineering tools needed to design, test, and verify the safety and reliability of modern complex technological systems and assess effects on human health and safety effects. The key technology developments are: 1) high altitude commercial and military aircraft; 2) manned and unmanned spacecraft; and 3) increasingly complex and sensitive solid state micro-electronics systems. Space and geophysical exploration needs drove the development of the instruments and analytical tools needed to recover compositional and structural data from GCR induced nuclear reactions and secondary particle showers. Finally, the possible role of GCR secondary particle showers in addressing an important homeland security problem, finding nuclear contraband and weapons, will be briefly reviewed.

  1. Pulsed Magnetic Field Driven Gas Core Reactors for Space Power & Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim; Smith, Blair; Knight, Travis; Butler, Carey

    2003-01-01

    The present results indicated that: 1. A pulsed magnetic driven fission power concept, PMD-GCR is developed for closed (NER) and semi-open (NTR) operations. 2. In power mode, power is generated at alpha less than 1 for power levels of hundreds of KW or higher 3. IN semi open NTR mode, PMD-GCR generates thrust at I(sub sp) approx. 5,000 s and jet power approx. 5KW/Kg. 4. PMD-GCR is highly subcritical and is actively driven to critically. 5. Parallel path with fusion R&D needs in many areas including magnet and plasma.

  2. Comparison of Space Radiation Calculations from Deterministic and Monte Carlo Transport Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H.; Lin, Z. W.; Nasser, A. F.; Randeniya, S.; Tripathi, r. K.; Watts, J. W.; Yepes, P.

    2010-01-01

    The presentation outline includes motivation, radiation transport codes being considered, space radiation cases being considered, results for slab geometry, results from spherical geometry, and summary. ///////// main physics in radiation transport codes hzetrn uprop fluka geant4, slab geometry, spe, gcr,

  3. Particle Radiation Environments and Their Effects at Planetary Surfaces of Airless Bodies: Remote Sensing Lessons Learned at the Moon by LRO/CRaTER and Extension to Other Planetary Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, H. E.; Schwadron, N. A.; Wilson, J. K.; Jordan, A. P.; Winslow, R.; Joyce, C.; Looper, M. D.; Case, A. W.; Stubbs, T. J.; Zeitlin, C.; Blake, J. B.; Kasper, J. C.; Mazur, J. E.; Smith, S. S.; Townsend, L. W.

    2015-11-01

    We summarize the physics of GCR and SEP interactions with the Moon's surface and quantify how these same processes operate at similar airless objects throughout the solar system, including at Mercury, Mars' moons, asteroids, and the Pluto system.

  4. Iron Isotopes in the Metal Phase of IAB Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, D. L.; Burkhard, R.; Schönbächler, M.; Leya, I.

    2015-07-01

    We analyzed IAB irons with a range of CRE ages to investigate whether effects from GCR may influence Fe isotopes. No resolvable anomalies were observed. Modeling of potential cosmic ray effects on Fe are underway to compare to our observations.

  5. Observations of the Li, Be, and B Isotopes and Constraints on Cosmic-ray Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deNolfo, G. A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; George, J. S.; Hink, P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Leske, R. A.; Lijowski, M.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Strong, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Yanasak, N. E.

    2007-01-01

    The abundance of Li, Be, and B isotopes in galactic cosmic rays (GCR) between E=50-200 MeV/nucleon has been observed by the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on NASA's ACE mission since 1997 with high statistical accuracy. Precise observations of Li, Be, B can be used to constrain GCR propagation models. We find that a diffusive reacceleration model with parameters that best match CRIS results (e.g. B/C, Li/C, etc) are also consistent with other GCR observations. A approx. 15-20% overproduction of Li and Be in the model predictions is attributed to uncertainties in the production cross-section data. The latter becomes a significant limitation to the study of rare GCR species that are generated predominantly via spallation.

  6. Observations of the Li, Be, and B isotopes and Constraints on Cosmic-ray Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    de Nolfo, Georgia A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Binns, W.R.; Christian, E.R.; Cummings, A.C.; Davis, A.J.; George, J.S.; Hink, P.L.; Israel, M.H.; Leske, R.A.; Lijowski, M.; Mewaldt, R.A.; Stone, E.C.; Strong, A.W.; von Rosenvinge, T.T.; Wiedenbeck, M.E.; Yanasak, N.E.; ,

    2006-11-15

    The abundance of Li, Be, and B isotopes in galactic cosmic rays (GCR) between E=50-200 MeV/nucleon has been observed by the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on NASA's ACE mission since 1997 with high statistical accuracy. Precise observations of Li, Be, B can be used to constrain GCR propagation models. We find that a diffusive reacceleration model with parameters that best match CRIS results (e.g. B/C, Li/C, etc) are also consistent with other GCR observations. A {approx}15-20% overproduction of Li and Be in the model predictions is attributed to uncertainties in the production cross-section data. The latter becomes a significant limitation to the study of rare GCR species that are generated predominantly via spallation.

  7. Identification of Licopyranocoumarin and Glycyrurol from Herbal Medicines as Neuroprotective Compounds for Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Takahiro; Saiki, Shinji; Tashiro, Etsu; Yamada, Daisuke; Kitagawa, Mitsuhiro; Hattori, Nobutaka; Imoto, Masaya

    2014-01-01

    In the course of screening for the anti-Parkinsonian drugs from a library of traditional herbal medicines, we found that the extracts of choi-joki-to and daio-kanzo-to protected cells from MPP+-induced cell death. Because choi-joki-to and daio-kanzo-to commonly contain the genus Glycyrrhiza, we isolated licopyranocoumarin (LPC) and glycyrurol (GCR) as potent neuroprotective principals from Glycyrrhiza. LPC and GCR markedly blocked MPP+-induced neuronal PC12D cell death and disappearance of mitochondrial membrane potential, which were mediated by JNK. LPC and GCR inhibited MPP+-induced JNK activation through the suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, thereby inhibiting MPP+-induced neuronal PC12D cell death. These results indicated that LPC and GCR derived from choi-joki-to and daio-kanzo-to would be promising drug leads for PD treatment in the future. PMID:24960051

  8. PCB, PAH and trace element exposure in barn swallows nesting on the Grand Calumet River, IN, watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Custer, T.W.; Sparks, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    The Grand Calumet River/Indiana Harbor Canal (GCR/IHC) is an International Joint Commission Area of Concern (AOC) and is heavily contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and trace elements. Barn swallow hatchlings and nestlings were collected from four bridges which span the GCR/IHC and a reference location. PCB and PAH concentrations in hatchlings and nestlings were significantly higher in colonies along the GCR/IHC than the reference colony. For example, mean PCB concentrations in hatchlings and nestlings were significantly higher in colonies along the GCR/IHC than the reference colony. For example, mean PCB concentrations in hatchlings were 0.04 {micro}g/g wet weight at the reference colony and 20.42 {micro}g/g at one colony on the GCR/IHC; mean concentrations of PAHs were 0.05 {micro}g/g at the reference colony and 0.15 {micro}g/g at one colony on the GCR/IHC. PCBs accumulated in nestlings at a rate of 18.2 {micro}g/day at one colony on the GCR/IHC compared to 0.03 {micro}g/day at the reference colony. These data suggest that contaminants in the water and sediment of the GCR/IHC are being incorporated into the vertebrate food chain via aquatic insects. Because the contaminant data in the barn swallow hatchlings and nestlings seem to reflect the sediment chemistry nearby the colony, this study suggests that barn swallows are a useful biomonitoring species for this AOC.

  9. Galactic cosmic ray radiation levels in spacecraft on interplanetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Nealy, J. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Wood, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    Using the Langley Research Center Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) transport computer code (HZETRN) and the Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model, crew radiation levels inside manned spacecraft on interplanetary missions are estimated. These radiation-level estimates include particle fluxes, LET (Linear Energy Transfer) spectra, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent within various organs of interest in GCR protection studies. Changes in these radiation levels resulting from the use of various different types of shield materials are presented.

  10. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors in Müller glia is protective to retinal neurons and suppresses microglial reactivity.

    PubMed

    Gallina, Donika; Zelinka, Christopher Paul; Cebulla, Colleen M; Fischer, Andy J

    2015-11-01

    Reactive microglia and macrophages are prevalent in damaged retinas. Glucocorticoid signaling is known to suppress inflammation and the reactivity of microglia and macrophages. In the vertebrate retina, the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) is known to be activated and localized to the nuclei of Müller glia (Gallina et al., 2014). Accordingly, we investigated how signaling through GCR influences the survival of neurons using the chick retina in vivo as a model system. We applied intraocular injections of GCR agonist or antagonist, assessed microglial reactivity, and the survival of retinal neurons following different damage paradigms. Microglial reactivity was increased in retinas from eyes that were injected with vehicle, and this reactivity was decreased by GCR-agonist dexamethasone (Dex) and increased by GCR-antagonist RU486. We found that activation of GCR suppresses the reactivity of microglia and inhibited the loss of retinal neurons resulting from excitotoxicity. We provide evidence that the protection-promoting effects of Dex were maintained when the microglia were selectively ablated. Similarly, intraocular injections of Dex protected ganglion cells from colchicine-treatment and protected photoreceptors from damage caused by retinal detachment. We conclude that activation of GCR promotes the survival of ganglion cells in colchicine-damaged retinas, promotes the survival of amacrine and bipolar cells in excitotoxin-damaged retinas, and promotes the survival of photoreceptors in detached retinas. We propose that suppression of microglial reactivity is secondary to activation of GCR in Müller glia, and this mode of signaling is an effective means to lessen the damage and vision loss resulting from different types of retinal damage. PMID:26272753

  11. 2-D Modelling of Long Period Variations of Galactic Cosmic Ray Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siluszyk, M.; Iskra, K.; Alania, M.

    2015-08-01

    A new two-dimensional (2-D) time dependent model describing long-period variations of the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) intensity has been developed. New approximations for the changes of the magnitude B of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF), the tilt angle ? of the Heliospheric Neutral Sheet (HNS) and drift effects of the GCR particles have been included into the model. Moreover, temporal changes of the exponent ? expressing the power law - rigidity dependence of the amplitudes of the 11-year variation of the GCR intensity have been added. We show that changes of the expected GCR particle density precedes changes of the GCR intensity measured by the Moscow Neutron (MN) monitor by about 18 months. So ?18 months can be taken as an effective delay time between the expected intensity caused by the combined influence of the changes of the parameters implemented in the time-dependent 2-D model and the GCR intensity measured by neutron monitors during the 21 cycle of solar activity.

  12. NASA Galactic Cosmic Radiation Environment Model: Badhwar-O'Neill (2014)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P. M.; Golge, S.; Slaba, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The Badhwar-O'Neill (BON) Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) flux model is used by NASA to certify microelectronic systems and in the analysis of radiation health risks for human space flight missions. Of special interest to NASA is the kinetic energy region below 4.0 GeV/n due to the fact that exposure from GCR behind shielding (e.g., inside a space vehicle) is heavily influenced by the GCR particles from this energy domain. The BON model numerically solves the Fokker-Planck differential equation to account for particle transport in the heliosphere due to diffusion, convection, and adiabatic deceleration under the assumption of a spherically symmetric heliosphere. The model utilizes a GCR measurements database from various particle detectors to determine the boundary conditions. By using an updated GCR database and improved model fit parameters, the new BON model (BON14) is significantly improved over the previous BON models for describing the GCR radiation environment of interest to human space flight.

  13. NASA Galactic Cosmic Radiation Environment Model: Badhwar - O'Neill (2014)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golge, S.; O'Neill, P. M.; Slaba, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The Badhwar-O'Neill (BON) Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) flux model has been used by NASA to certify microelectronic systems and in the analysis of radiation health risks for human space flight missions. Of special interest to NASA is the kinetic energy region below 4.0 GeV/n due to the fact that exposure from GCR behind shielding (e.g., inside a space vehicle) is heavily influenced by the GCR particles from this energy domain. The BON model numerically solves the Fokker-Planck differential equation to account for particle transport in the heliosphere due to diffusion, convection, and adiabatic deceleration under the assumption of a spherically symmetric heliosphere. The model utilizes a comprehensive database of GCR measurements from various particle detectors to determine boundary conditions. By using an updated GCR database and improved model fit parameters, the new BON model (BON14) is significantly improved over the previous BON models for describing the GCR radiation environment of interest to human space flight.

  14. DESPIKING OF SPACECRAFT ENERGETIC PROTON FLUX TO STUDY GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY MODULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, G.; Zhao, L.-L.; Chen, H.-C. E-mail: llzhao@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2012-06-20

    Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) is usually assumed as a stable 'background', with solar influence considered as a modulation. The violent solar energetic particle (SEP) events associated with solar activities change particle fluxes by several orders of magnitude in a few minutes. Thus, the flux observation of GCR provided by satellites may be heavily contaminated by spurious spikes due to SEPs, and that provided by ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) may be contaminated by the system error spikes and the ground level enhancement effect. To obtain the 'pure' background GCR flux for modulation research, the removal of multifarious spikes is necessary. In this article, we use a robust automatic despiking algorithm based on the Poincare map thresholding method provided by Goring and Nikora for 'purification' of the time-series GCR flux observations. We can show that the algorithm is good at cleaning up the heavily contaminated GCR intensity rates measured by both spacecraft and NMs without artificial parameters. In addition, using the algorithm to despike the spacecraft observations of relatively lower energetic proton flux, we get both 11 year and 27 day period cycles comparable to the much higher energy GCR flux data measured by the ground-based NMs.

  15. Computational and Genetic Reduction of a Cell Cycle to Its Simplest, Primordial Components

    PubMed Central

    Fumeaux, Coralie; Viollier, Patrick H.; Howard, Martin

    2013-01-01

    What are the minimal requirements to sustain an asymmetric cell cycle? Here we use mathematical modelling and forward genetics to reduce an asymmetric cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components. In the Alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell cycle progression is believed to be controlled by a cyclical genetic circuit comprising four essential master regulators. Unexpectedly, our in silico modelling predicted that one of these regulators, GcrA, is in fact dispensable. We confirmed this experimentally, finding that ?gcrA cells are viable, but slow-growing and elongated, with the latter mostly due to an insufficiency of a key cell division protein. Furthermore, suppressor analysis showed that another cell cycle regulator, the methyltransferase CcrM, is similarly dispensable with simultaneous gcrA/ccrM disruption ameliorating the cytokinetic and growth defect of ?gcrA cells. Within the Alphaproteobacteria, gcrA and ccrM are consistently present or absent together, rather than either gene being present alone, suggesting that gcrA/ccrM constitutes an independent, dispensable genetic module. Together our approaches unveil the essential elements of a primordial asymmetric cell cycle that should help illuminate more complex cell cycles. PMID:24415923

  16. The influence of galactic cosmic ray on all India annual rainfall and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Sutapa; Pal, Jayanti; Guhathakurta, Suchandra

    2015-02-01

    The inverse relation between galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and sunspot numbers (SSN) suggests that the increase (decrease) in GCR count is linked with low (high) solar activity. The present study attempts to reveal the influence of GCR on all India annual rainfall and temperature during the period from 1953 to 2005. The inter-annual variation depicts that during the transition from maximum to minimum count of GCR, the rainfall anomaly shows alternative variation over India. Similar variation has also been observed for maximum temperature. Implementation of Fourier analysis shows an 11 year cycle of cosmic ray and depicts an increase in GCR count in the 11 year interval during the study period. The Fourier analysis of all India annual rainfall (AIR) and temperature also shows an 11 year cycle with a decreasing trend during the 11 year interval. The inter-decadal variation shows that during high GCR count there is a possibility of decrease in rainfall and minimum temperature but an increase in maximum temperature. The seasonal correlation shows a possible proportional association between cosmic ray and rainfall during the post monsoon season. The result further depicts that the sunspot number and temperature is positively correlated during the post-monsoon season. The correlation map of rainfall and temperature shows a meager but significant correlation with cosmic ray over some parts of West and East Indian coasts.

  17. The boron-to-beryllium ratio in halo stars - A signature of cosmic-ray nucleosynthesis in the early Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Schramm, D. N.; Olive, K. A.; Fields, B.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) spallation production of Li, Be, and B in the early Galaxy with particular attention to the uncertainties in the predictions of this model. The observed correlation between the Be abundance and the metallicity in metal-poor Population II stars requires that Be was synthesized in the early Galaxy. We show that the observations and such Population II GCR synthesis of Be are quantitatively consistent with the big bang nucleosynthesis production of Li-7. We find that there is a nearly model independent lower bound to B/Be of about 7 for GCR synthesis. Recent measurements of B/Be about 10 in HD 140283 are in excellent agreement with the predictions of Population II GCR nucleosynthesis. Measurements of the boron abundance in additional metal-poor halo stars is a key diagnostic of the GCR spallation mechanism. We also show that Population II GCR synthesis can produce amounts of Li-6 which may be observed in the hottest halo stars.

  18. Effects of Cutoffs on Galactic Cosmic-Ray Interactions in Solar-System Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.; Masarik, J.

    2005-01-01

    The energetic particles in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) induce many interactions in a variety of solar-system matter. Cosmogenic nuclides are used to study the histories of meteorites and lunar samples. Gamma rays and neutrons are used to map the compositions of planetary surfaces, such as Mars, the Moon, and asteroids. In almost all of these cases, the spectra of incident GCR particles are fairly similar, with only some modulation by the Sun over an 11-year cycle. Strong magnetic fields can seriously affect the energy spectrum of GCR particles hitting the surface of objects inside the magnetic fields. The Earth s geomagnetic field is strong enough that only GCR particles with magnetic rigidities above approx. 17 GV (a proton energy of approx. 17 GeV) reach the atmosphere over certain regions near the equator. This effect of removing lower-energy GCR particles is called a cutoff. The jovian magnetic fields are so strong that the fluxes of GCR particles hitting the 4 large Galilean satellites are similarly affected. The cutoff at Europa is estimated to be similar to or a little higher than at the Earth s equator.

  19. Implementing Badhwar-O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray Model for the Analysis of Space Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; O'Neill, Patrick M.; Slaba, Tony C.

    2014-01-01

    For the analysis of radiation risks to astronauts and planning exploratory space missions, accurate energy spectrum of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is necessary. Characterization of the ionizing radiation environment is challenging because the interplanetary plasma and radiation fields are modulated by solar disturbances and the radiation doses received by astronauts in interplanetary space are likewise influenced. A model of the Badhwar-O'Neill 2011 (BO11) GCR environment, which is represented by GCR deceleration potential theta, has been derived by utilizing all of the GCR measurements from balloons, satellites, and the newer NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). In the BO11 model, the solar modulation level is derived from the mean international sunspot numbers with time-delay, which has been calibrated with actual flight instrument measurements to produce better GCR flux data fit during solar minima. GCR fluxes provided by the BO11 model were compared with various spacecraft measurements at 1 AU, and further comparisons were made for the tissue equivalent proportional counters measurements at low Earth orbits using the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code and various GCR models. For the comparison of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent calculations with the measurements by Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) at Gale crater on Mars, the intensities and energies of GCR entering the heliosphere were calculated by using the BO11 model, which accounts for time-dependent attenuation of the local interstellar spectrum of each element. The BO11 model, which has emphasized for the last 24 solar minima, showed in relatively good agreement with the RAD data for the first 200 sols, but it was resulted in to be less well during near the solar maximum of solar cycle 24 due to subtleties in the changing heliospheric conditions. By performing the error analysis of the BO11 model and the optimization in reducing overall uncertainty, the resultant BO13 model corrects the fit at solar maxima as well as being accurate at solar minima. The BO13 model is implemented to the NASA Space Cancer Risk model for the assessment of radiation risks. Overall cumulative probability distribution of solar modulation parameters represents the percentile rank of the average interplanetary GCR environment, and the probabilistic radiation risks can be assessed for various levels of GCR environment to support mission design and operational planning for future manned space exploration missions.

  20. Calculation of The Ti Activity In 44 Chondrites Which Fell In The Last Two Centuries and Comparison With Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonino, G.; Cane, D.; Cini Castagnoli, G.; Taricco, C.; Bhandari, N.

    The cosmogenic radioisotopes in meteorites, produced by nuclear interactions of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the meteoroids in the interplanetary space are good proxies of both the GCR flux and the solar activity. Different cosmogenic radionu- clides with different half-lives give information over different time scales. Recently we have inferred the GCR annual mean spectra for the last 300 years [1]. The most prominent result concerns the cosmic ray flux during prolonged solar quiet periods. We deduced that during the Maunder minimum of solar acivity (1700), the Dal- ton minimum (1800) and the Modern minimum (1900) the GCR flux was much higher (2 times) respect to the flux observed in the last decades. Utilizing these GCR spectra we have calculated the 44 Ti (T1/2 = 59.2 y) activity in meteorites taking into account its exitation function for production from the main target element Fe, Ni and Ti [2]. Furthermore, in the last years we have measured the very low activity of the cosmogenic 44Ti in different fell chondrites and now our data cover the interval 1810 to present. The calculated 44Ti profile is in close agreement with the observed mea- surements. This result demonstrates that our inference of the GCR flux in the past 300 years is reliable. The cosmogenic 44Ti in meteorites is a unique tool, free from ter- restrial influences, for validation of both the GCR flux and the heliospheric behaviour over century time scale. [1] G. Bonino, G. Cini Castagnoli, D. Cane, C. Taricco and N. Bhandari, Proc. XXVII Intern. Cosmic Ray Conf. (Hamburg, 2001) 3769-3772. [2] R. Michel and S. Neumann (1998) Proc. Indian Acad. Sci. Earth Planet. Sci. , 107, 441-457.

  1. Badhwar-O'Neill 2011 Galactic Cosmic Ray Model Update and Future Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Pat M.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2014-01-01

    The Badhwar-O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Model based on actual GCR measurements is used by deep space mission planners for the certification of microelectronic systems and the analysis of radiation health risks to astronauts in space missions. The BO GCR Model provides GCR flux in deep space (outside the earth's magnetosphere) for any given time from 1645 to present. The energy spectrum from 50 MeV/n - 20 GeV/n is provided for ions from hydrogen to uranium. This work describes the most recent version of the BO GCR model (BO'11). BO'11 determined the GCR flux at a given time applying an emperical time delay function to past sunspot activity. We describe the GCR measurement data used in the BO'11 update - modern data from BESS, PAMELA, CAPRICE, and ACE emphasized more than the older balloon data used for the previous BO model (BO'10). We look at the GCR flux for the last 24 solar minima and show how much greater the flux was for the cycle 24 minimum in 2010. The BO'11 Model uses the traditional, steady-state Fokker-Planck differential equation to account for particle transport in the heliosphere due to diffusion, convection, and adiabatic deceleration. It assumes a radially symmetrical diffusion coefficient derived from magnetic disturbances caused by sunspots carried outward by a constant solar wind. A more complex differential equation is now being tested to account for particle transport in the heliosphere in the next generation BO model. This new model is time-dependent (no longer a steady state model). In the new model, the dynamics and anti-symmetrical features of the actual heliosphere are accounted for so emperical time delay functions will no longer be required. The new model will be capable of simulating the more subtle features of modulation - such as the Sun's polarity and modulation dependence on gradient and curvature drift. This improvement is expected to significantly improve the fidelity of the BO GCR model. Preliminary results of its performance will be presented.

  2. Features of the Diffusion Processes of the Galactic Cosmic Rays around 21/22, 22/23 and 23/24 Solar Minima Epochs: 2-D Modeling and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siluszyk, Marek; Alania, Michael; Iskra, Krzysztof

    We study changes of perpendicular and parallel diffusion coefficients versus the different structure of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) in ascending and descending periods of solar activity. We find periods when sub and super diffusion nature for Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) propagation in heliosphere distinct from each other in positive and negative polarities of solar magnetic activity for GCR particles to which neutron monitors and ground muon telescopes respond. We study different pairs of ascending and descending periods around various minima epochs (21/22, 22/23 and 23/24) comparing timelines of the exponent nu of the Power Spectral Density (PSD f (-nu) ) of the IMF and the changes of the rigidity R spectrum exponent gamma of the GCR isotropic intensity variations (deltaD(R)/D(R) R (-gamma) ). It is demonstrated that decay and creation processes of the IMF turbulence structure defer from each other for ascending and descending periods. We show that there are periods with cases of dominant sub diffusion processes over normal markovian one. We develop two-dimensional (2D) time dependent model to describe the long period variations of the GCR intensity with a new proposal to take into account a delay time among the GCR intensity changes, on one side and parameters of solar wind and solar activity (e.g. interplanetary magnetic field, tilt angle), on the other. We also attempt to take into account in modeling a more realistic role of drift during different phases of the 11-year cycle of solar activity.

  3. Production and evolution of Li, Be and B isotopes in the Galaxy

    E-print Network

    Prantzos, N

    2012-01-01

    We reassess the problem of the production and evolution of the light elements Li, Be and B and of their isotopes in the Milky Way, in the light of new observational and theoretical developments. The main novelty is the introduction of a new scheme for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays (GCR), which makes possible for the first time a self-consistent calculation of their composition during galactic evolution. The scheme accounts for key features of the present-day GCR source composition, it is based on the wind yields of the Geneva models of rotating, mass losing stars and it is fully coupled to a detailed galactic chemical evolution code. We find that the adopted GCR source composition accounts naturally for the observations of primary Be and helps understanding why Be follows closer Fe than O. We find that GCR produce ~70% of the solar B11/B10 isotopic ratio; the remaining 30% of B11 presumably result from neutrino-nucleosynthesis in massive star explosions. We find that GCR and primordial nucleosynthesis ca...

  4. Diffusion coefficient and radial gradient of galactic cosmic rays

    E-print Network

    Modzelewska, Renata

    2015-01-01

    We present the temporal changes of the diffusion coefficient K of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) at the Earth orbit calculated based on the experimental data using two different methods. The first approach is based on the Parker convection-diffusion approximation of GCR modulation [1]: i.e. K~Vr=dI where dI is the variation of the GCR intensity measured by neutron monitors (NM),V is the solar wind velocity and r is the radial distance. The second approach is based on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data. It was suggested that parallel mean free path can be expressed in terms of B as in [2]-[4]. Using data of the product of the parallel mean free path and radial gradient of GCR calculated based on the GCR anisotropy data (Ahluwalia et al., this conference ICRC 2013, poster ID: 487 [5]), we estimate the temporal changes of the radial gradient of GCR at the Earth orbit. We show that the radial gradient exhibits a strong solar cycle dependence (11-year variation) and a weak solar magnetic cycle dependence (2...

  5. Nuclide production by primary cosmic-ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in the solar system and in interstellar space were calculated for the primary protons in the galactic and solar cosmic rays. At 1 AU, the long-term average fluxes of solar protons usually produce many more atoms of a cosmogenic nuclide than the primary protons in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR), the exceptions being nuclides made only by high-energy reactions (like /sup 10/Be). Because the particle fluxes inside meteorites and other large objects in space include many secondary neutrons, the production rates are much higher and ratios inside large objects are often very different from those by just the primary GCR protons in small objects. The production rates of cosmogenic nuclides are calculated to vary by about factors of 2.5 during at typical 11-year solar cycle, in agreement with measurements of short-lived radionuclides in recently fallen meteorites. The production of cosmogenic nuclides by the GCR particles outside the heliosphere is higher than that by the modulated GCR primaries normally in the solar system. However, there is considerable uncertainty in the fluxes of interstellar protons and, therefore, in the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in interstellar space. Production rates and ratios for cosmogenic nuclides would be able to identify particles that were small in space or that were exposed to an unmodulated spectrum of GCR particles. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Breast Cancer by Age at Diagnosis in the Gharbiah, Egypt, Population-Based Registry Compared to the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 2004–2008

    PubMed Central

    Schlichting, Jennifer A.; Soliman, Amr S.; Schairer, Catherine; Harford, Joe B.; Hablas, Ahmed; Ramadan, Mohamed; Seifeldin, Ibrahim; Merajver, Sofia D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Although breast cancers (BCs) in young women often display more aggressive features, younger women are generally not screened for early detection. It is important to understand the characteristics of young onset breast cancer to increase awareness in this population. This analysis includes all ages, with emphasis placed on younger onset BC in Egypt as compared to the United States. Methods. BC cases in the Gharbiah cancer registry (GCR), Egypt, were compared to those in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. This analysis included 3,819 cases from the GCR and 273,019 from SEER diagnosed 2004–2008. Results. GCR cases were diagnosed at later stages, with <5% diagnosed at Stage I and 12% diagnosed at Stage IV. 48% of all SEER cases were diagnosed at Stage I, dropping to 30% among those ?40. Significant differences in age, tumor grade, hormone receptor status, histology, and stage exist between GCR and SEER BCs. After adjustment, GCR cases were nearly 45 times more likely to be diagnosed at stage III and 16 times more likely to be diagnosed at stage IV than SEER cases. Conclusions. Future research should examine ways to increase literacy about early detection and prompt therapy in young cases. PMID:26495294

  7. Depth-dose equivalent relationship for cosmic rays at various solar minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.; O'Neill, P. M.

    1993-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) pose a serious radiation hazard for long-duration missions. In designing a lunar habitat or a Mars transfer vehicle, the radiation exposure determines the GCR shielding thickness, and hence the weight of spacecraft. Using the spherically symmetric diffusion theory of the solar modulation of GCR, and data on the differential energy spectra of H, He, O, and Fe, from 1965 to 1989, it has been shown that (1) the flux is determined by the diffusion parameter which is a function of the time in the solar cycle, and (2) the fluxes in the 1954 and 1976-1977 solar minima were similar and higher than those in 1965. In this paper, we have extended the spherical solar modulation theory back to 1954. The 1954-1955 GCR flux was nearly the same as that from 1976 to 1977; the 1965 flux values were nearly the same as those in 1986. Using this theory we have obtained the GCR spectra for all the nuclei, and calculated the depth dose as a function of Al thickness. It is shown that the shielding required to stay below 0.5 Sv is 17.5 -3/+8 g/sq cm of Al, and 9 -1.5/+5 g/sq cm to stay below 0.6 Sv. The calculated dose equivalent using the ICRP 60 values for quality factors is about 15 percent higher than that calculated using the ICRP 26 value.

  8. Recombinant glucocerebrosidase uptake by Gaucher disease human osteoblast culture model.

    PubMed

    Lamghari, M; Barrias, C C; Sá Miranda, C; Barbosa, M A

    2005-01-01

    Bone lesions are a major cause of morbidity in Gaucher disease (GD) type I. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been successful in treating many symptoms of type I GD but skeletal response lags behind. Local exogenous glucocerebrosidase supplementation in bone lesions via a drug delivery system may overcome this limitation. Although local enzyme supplementation aims to target lipid-engorged macrophages (Gaucher Cells) in bone compartment, enzyme uptake by osteoblasts is not excluded. To investigate the ability of human osteoblasts to internalize recombinant glucocerebrosidase (rGCR), we have used an artificial GD human osteoblasts cell culture system. MG63 human osteoblasts were treated with conduritol B epoxide (CBE) to induce complete and prolonged inhibition of endogenous glucocerebrosidase activity of cells. rGCR uptake by glucocerebrosidase-inactivated osteoblasts was examined using (125)I-radiolabelling, Western blot analysis and measurement of glucocerebrosidase activity. Analysis of radiolabeled enzyme uptake by CBE treated osteoblasts showed 67.9% of internalized protein in cell extract. Enzyme internalization was also observed by Western blot analysis where the amount of mature form of glucocerebrosidase protein recognized by the glucocerebrosidase antibody was increased following the administrations of rGCR. Moreover, enzymatic activity measurement showed 23.9% of glucocerebrosidase activity of control cells. The rGCR internalization by MG63 osteoblast seems to be partially mediated by mannose receptors. These data provide evidence that MG63 human osteoblasts are able to internalize rGCR. PMID:16125984

  9. Simulated Response of a Tissue-equivalent Proportional Counter on the Surface of Mars.

    PubMed

    Northum, Jeremy D; Guetersloh, Stephen B; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John R

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties persist regarding the assessment of the carcinogenic risk associated with galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure during a mission to Mars. The GCR spectrum peaks in the range of 300(-1) MeV n to 700 MeV n(-1) and is comprised of elemental ions from H to Ni. While Fe ions represent only 0.03% of the GCR spectrum in terms of particle abundance, they are responsible for nearly 30% of the dose equivalent in free space. Because of this, radiation biology studies focusing on understanding the biological effects of GCR exposure generally use Fe ions. Acting as a thin shield, the Martian atmosphere alters the GCR spectrum in a manner that significantly reduces the importance of Fe ions. Additionally, albedo particles emanating from the regolith complicate the radiation environment. The present study uses the Monte Carlo code FLUKA to simulate the response of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter on the surface of Mars to produce dosimetry quantities and microdosimetry distributions. The dose equivalent rate on the surface of Mars was found to be 0.18 Sv y(-1) with an average quality factor of 2.9 and a dose mean lineal energy of 18.4 keV ?m(-1). Additionally, albedo neutrons were found to account for 25% of the dose equivalent. It is anticipated that these data will provide relevant starting points for use in future risk assessment and mission planning studies. PMID:26313586

  10. Evaluating Shielding Effectiveness for Reducing Space Radiation Cancer Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ren, Lei

    2007-01-01

    We discuss calculations of probability distribution functions (PDF) representing uncertainties in projecting fatal cancer risk from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). The PDF s are used in significance tests of the effectiveness of potential radiation shielding approaches. Uncertainties in risk coefficients determined from epidemiology data, dose and dose-rate reduction factors, quality factors, and physics models of radiation environments are considered in models of cancer risk PDF s. Competing mortality risks and functional correlations in radiation quality factor uncertainties are treated in the calculations. We show that the cancer risk uncertainty, defined as the ratio of the 95% confidence level (CL) to the point estimate is about 4-fold for lunar and Mars mission risk projections. For short-stay lunar missions (<180 d), SPE s present the most significant risk, however one that is mitigated effectively by shielding, especially for carbon composites structures with high hydrogen content. In contrast, for long duration lunar (>180 d) or Mars missions, GCR risks may exceed radiation risk limits, with 95% CL s exceeding 10% fatal risk for males and females on a Mars mission. For reducing GCR cancer risks, shielding materials are marginally effective because of the penetrating nature of GCR and secondary radiation produced in tissue by relativistic particles. At the present time, polyethylene or carbon composite shielding can not be shown to significantly reduce risk compared to aluminum shielding based on a significance test that accounts for radiobiology uncertainties in GCR risk projection.

  11. Neutron yields and effective doses produced by Galactic Cosmic Ray interactions in shielded environments in space.

    PubMed

    Heilbronn, Lawrence H; Borak, Thomas B; Townsend, Lawrence W; Tsai, Pi-En; Burnham, Chelsea A; McBeth, Rafe A

    2015-11-01

    In order to define the ranges of relevant neutron energies for the purposes of measurement and dosimetry in space, we have performed a series of Monte Carlo transport model calculations that predict the neutron field created by Galactic Cosmic Ray interactions inside a variety of simple shielding configurations. These predictions indicate that a significant fraction of the neutron fluence and neutron effective dose lies in the region above 20 MeV up to several hundred MeV. These results are consistent over thicknesses of shielding that range from very thin (2.7 g/cm(2)) to thick (54 g/cm(2)), and over both shielding materials considered (aluminum and water). In addition to these results, we have also investigated whether simplified Galactic Cosmic Ray source terms can yield predictions that are equivalent to simulations run with a full GCR source term. We found that a source using a GCR proton and helium spectrum together with a scaled oxygen spectrum yielded nearly identical results to a full GCR spectrum, and that the scaling factor used for the oxygen spectrum was independent of shielding material and thickness. Good results were also obtained using a GCR proton spectrum together with a scaled helium spectrum, with the helium scaling factor also independent of shielding material and thickness. Using a proton spectrum alone was unable to reproduce the full GCR results. PMID:26553642

  12. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The radiation dose received from high energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a limiting factor in the design of long duration space flights and the building of lunar and martian habitats. It is of vital importance to have an accurate understanding of the interactions of GCR in order to assess the radiation environment that the astronauts will be exposed to. Although previous studies have concentrated on the strong interaction process in GCR, there are also very large effects due to electromagnetic (EM) interactions. In this report we describe our first efforts at understanding these EM production processes due to two-photon collisions. More specifically, we shall consider particle production processes in relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHICs) through two-photon exchange.

  13. The isotopic composition of the anomalous low-energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of the isotopes of low energy cosmic ray He, C, N, O and Ne nuclei are analyzed, in concert with previous data, to examine relationships between galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and anomalous cosmic rays (ACR), which could arise from either extragalactic or interstellar sources. A ground-based heavy isotope spectrometer telescope was used for the survey, along with IMP-7 and IMP-8 data and ISEE-3 data. The data were recorded from 1973-78. Spectral and abundance data are provided for each element. Fragmentation was absent in the ACR data, unlike the GCR data. Differences were also observed in the Ne-22/Ne-20 ratios of ACR and GCR. It is suggested, therefore, that the low energy ACR isotopes have an interstellar origin and are useful for studies of the local interstellar medium.

  14. Updated Computational Model of Cosmic Rays Near Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, Patrick M.

    2006-01-01

    An updated computational model of the galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) environment in the vicinity of the Earth, Earth s Moon, and Mars has been developed, and updated software has been developed to implement the updated model. This model accounts for solar modulation of the cosmic-ray contribution for each element from hydrogen through iron by computationally propagating the local interplanetary spectrum of each element through the heliosphere. The propagation is effected by solving the Fokker-Planck diffusion, convection, energy-loss boundary-value problem. The Advanced Composition Explorer NASA satellite has provided new data on GCR energy spectra. These new data were used to update the original model and greatly improve the accuracy of prediction of interplanetary GCR.

  15. The Development of Materials for Structures and Radiation Shielding in Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.; Orwoll, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Polymeric materials on space vehicles and high-altitude aircraft win be exposed to highly penetrating radiations. These radiations come from solar flares and galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Radiation from solar flares consists primarily of protons with energies less than 1 GeV. On the other hand, GCR consist of nuclei with energies as high as 10(exp 10) GeV. Over 90% of the nuclei in GCR are protons and alpha particles, however there is a small but significant component of particles with atomic numbers greater than ten. Particles with high atomic number (Z) and high energy interact with very high specific ionization and thus represent a serious hazard for humans and electronic equipment on a spacecraft or on high-altitude commercial aircraft (most importantly for crew members who would have long exposures). Neutrons generated by reactions with the high energy particles also represent a hazard both for humans and electronic equipment.

  16. Radiation shielding requirements for manned deep space missions

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Ingersoll, D.T.

    1991-04-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and, particularly, solar flares (SF) constitute the major radiation hazards in deep space. The dose to astronauts from these radiation sources and the shielding required to mitigate its effect during a 480 day Mars mission is estimated here for a simplistic spacecraft geometry. The intent is to ball park'' the magnitude of the doses for the constant GCR background and for SF's that occur randomly during the mission. The spacecraft shielding and dose data are given only for primary GCR and SF radiation, recognizing that secondary particles produced by primary particle reactions in the spacecraft and High Z-High Energy particles will also contribute to the dose suffered by the astronauts. 22 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    The radiation dose received from high energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a limiting factor in the design of long duration space flights and the building of lunar and martian habitats. It is of vital importance to have an accurate understanding of the interactions of GCR in order to assess the radiation environment that the astronauts will be exposed to. Although previous studies have concentrated on the strong interaction process in GCR, there are also very large effects due to electromagnetic (EM) interactions. In this report we describe our first efforts at understanding these EM production processes due to two-photon collisions. More specifically, we shall consider particle production processes in relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHICs) through two-photon exchange.

  18. Interpreting high time resolution galactic cosmic ray observations in a diffusive context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Shaul, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    We interpret galactic cosmic ray (GCR) variations near Earth within a diffusive context. The variations occur on time-/size-scales ranging from Forbush decreases (Fds), to substructure embedded within Fds, to smaller amplitude and shorter duration variations during relatively benign interplanetary conditions. We use high time resolution GCR observations from the High Sensitivity Telescope (HIST) on Polar and from the Spectrometer for INTEGRAL (SPI) and also use solar wind plasma and magnetic field observations from ACE and/or Wind. To calculate the coefficient of diffusion, we combine these datasets with a simple convection-diffusion model for relativistic charged particles in a magnetic field. We find reasonable agreement between our and previous estimates of the coefficient. We also show whether changes in the coefficient of diffusion are sufficient to explain the above GCR variations.

  19. Experimental Plans for Subsystems of a Shock Wave Driven Gas Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazeminezhad, F.; Anghai, S.

    2008-01-01

    This Contractor Report proposes a number of plans for experiments on subsystems of a shock wave driven pulsed magnetic induction gas core reactor (PMI-GCR, or PMD-GCR pulsed magnet driven gas core reactor). Computer models of shock generation and collision in a large-scale PMI-GCR shock tube have been performed. Based upon the simulation results a number of issues arose that can only be addressed adequately by capturing experimental data on high pressure (approx.1 atmosphere or greater) partial plasma shock wave effects in large bore shock tubes ( 10 cm radius). There are three main subsystems that are of immediate interest (for appraisal of the concept viability). These are (1) the shock generation in a high pressure gas using either a plasma thruster or pulsed high magnetic field, (2) collision of MHD or gas dynamic shocks, their interaction time, and collision pile-up region thickness, and (3) magnetic flux compression power generation (not included here).

  20. Occurrence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in the Beef Cattle Production and Processing Continuum.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, John W; Agga, Getahun E; Bosilevac, Joseph M; Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M; Shackelford, Steven D; Wang, Rong; Wheeler, Tommy L; Arthur, Terrance M

    2015-01-01

    Specific concerns have been raised that third-generation cephalosporin-resistant (3GC(r)) Escherichia coli, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant (COT(r)) E. coli, 3GC(r) Salmonella enterica, and nalidixic acid-resistant (NAL(r)) S. enterica may be present in cattle production environments, persist through beef processing, and contaminate final products. The prevalences and concentrations of these organisms were determined in feces and hides (at feedlot and processing plant), pre-evisceration carcasses, and final carcasses from three lots of fed cattle (n = 184). The prevalences and concentrations were further determined for strip loins from 103 of the carcasses. 3GC(r) Salmonella was detected on 7.6% of hides during processing and was not detected on the final carcasses or strip loins. NAL(r) S. enterica was detected on only one hide. 3GC(r) E. coli and COT(r) E. coli were detected on 100.0% of hides during processing. Concentrations of 3GC(r) E. coli and COT(r) E. coli on hides were correlated with pre-evisceration carcass contamination. 3GC(r) E. coli and COT(r) E. coli were each detected on only 0.5% of final carcasses and were not detected on strip loins. Five hundred and 42 isolates were screened for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) virulence-associated markers. Only two COT(r) E. coli isolates from hides were ExPEC, indicating that fed cattle products are not a significant source of ExPEC causing human urinary tract infections. The very low prevalences of these organisms on final carcasses and their absence on strip loins demonstrate that current sanitary dressing procedures and processing interventions are effective against antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. PMID:25398858

  1. Occurrence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in the Beef Cattle Production and Processing Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Agga, Getahun E.; Bosilevac, Joseph M.; Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M.; Shackelford, Steven D.; Wang, Rong; Wheeler, Tommy L.; Arthur, Terrance M.

    2014-01-01

    Specific concerns have been raised that third-generation cephalosporin-resistant (3GCr) Escherichia coli, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant (COTr) E. coli, 3GCr Salmonella enterica, and nalidixic acid-resistant (NALr) S. enterica may be present in cattle production environments, persist through beef processing, and contaminate final products. The prevalences and concentrations of these organisms were determined in feces and hides (at feedlot and processing plant), pre-evisceration carcasses, and final carcasses from three lots of fed cattle (n = 184). The prevalences and concentrations were further determined for strip loins from 103 of the carcasses. 3GCr Salmonella was detected on 7.6% of hides during processing and was not detected on the final carcasses or strip loins. NALr S. enterica was detected on only one hide. 3GCr E. coli and COTr E. coli were detected on 100.0% of hides during processing. Concentrations of 3GCr E. coli and COTr E. coli on hides were correlated with pre-evisceration carcass contamination. 3GCr E. coli and COTr E. coli were each detected on only 0.5% of final carcasses and were not detected on strip loins. Five hundred and 42 isolates were screened for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) virulence-associated markers. Only two COTr E. coli isolates from hides were ExPEC, indicating that fed cattle products are not a significant source of ExPEC causing human urinary tract infections. The very low prevalences of these organisms on final carcasses and their absence on strip loins demonstrate that current sanitary dressing procedures and processing interventions are effective against antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. PMID:25398858

  2. Assessment of Galactic Cosmic Ray Models and Implications on the Estimation of Radiation Exposure in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrigakshi, A. I.; Matthiä, D.; Berger, T.; Reitz, G.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    Astronauts are subjected to elevated levels of high-energy ionizing radiation in space which poses a substantial risk to their health. Therefore, the assessment of the radiation exposure for long duration manned spaceflight is essential. This is done by measuring dose using various detector techniques and by performing numerical simulations utilizing radiation transport codes which allow to predict radiation exposure for future missions and for conditions where measurements are not feasible or available. A necessary prerequisite for an accurate estimation of the exposure using the latter approach is a reliable description of the radiation spectra. Accordingly, in order to estimate the exposure from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), which are one of the major sources of radiation exposure in space, GCR models are required. This work presents an evaluation of GCR models for dosimetry purposes and the effect of applying these models on the estimation of GCR exposure in space outside and inside the Earth's magnetosphere. To achieve this, widely used GCR models - Badhwar-O'Neill2010, Burger-Usoskin, CREME2009 and CREME96, were evaluated by comparing model spectra for light and heavy nuclei with measurements from various high-altitude balloon and space missions over several decades. Additionally a new model, based on the GCR-ISO model, developed at the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) was also investigated. The differences arising in the radiation exposure by applying these models are quantified in terms of absorbed dose and dose equivalent rates that were estimated numerically using the GEANT4 Monte-Carlo framework. During certain epochs in the last decade, there are large discrepancies between the model and the measured spectra. All models exhibit weaknesses in describing the increased GCR flux that was observed in 2009-2010. The differences in the spectra, described by the models, result in considerable differences in the estimated dose quantities.

  3. North-south component of galactic cosmic ray anisotropy at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) solar diurnal anisotropy (SDA) may be represented by a vector (A; Ar, A?, A?) in a spherical polar coordinate system centered on the sun. We reported (elsewhere) the results of a detailed study of time variations of yearly radial (Ar) and east-west (A?) components recorded by the global network of the neutron monitors (NMs) with a long track record for 1963-2013, for four sunspot number (SSN) cycles (20-23) and the rising phase of cycle 24. A powerful new technique is used to compute and study time variations of the transverse component (A?) due to off-ecliptic GCR contributions, with the same NM data; GCR radial particle density gradient (Gr) drives all three components. The north-south anisotropy (A?) is computed from yearly NM data (G? = 0), a flat heliospheric current sheet (HCS) model and the concept of GCR isotropic hard sphere scattering in the solar wind plasma. Relationships to SSN, rigidity and solar polarity intervals are studied. For a positive (p-) polarity the solar magnetic field in the northern hemisphere points outward and GCRs drift from polar regions toward equatorial plane and out along HCS, setting up a symmetric gradient (G?s) pointing away from HCS (there is a local GCR density minimum on HCS); for n-polarity interval G?s points towards HCS (there is a local GCR density maximum on HCS). Also, there exists a heliospheric asymmetric density gradient (G?a) perpendicular to the ecliptic plane, it is the main contributor to A? for the period of our analysis. This is the most interesting and significant insight.

  4. Accelerator experiments on the contribution of secondary particles to the production of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P.

    1985-01-01

    Through the interaction of galactic cosmic particle radiation (GCR) a wide variety of cosmogenic nuclides is produced in meteorites. They provide historical information about the cosmic radiation and the bombarded meteorites. An important way to understand the production mechanisms of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites is to gather information about the depth and size dependence of the build-up of Galactic Rays Cosmic-secondary particles within meteorites of different sizes and chemical compositions. Simulation experiments with meteorite models offer an alternative to direct observation providing a data basis to describe the development and action of the secondary cascade induced by the GCR in meteorites.

  5. FLUKA Simulation of the Radiation Environment on the Surface of Mars 

    E-print Network

    Northum, Jeremy

    2013-07-10

    only 0.03% of the GCR spectrum in terms of particle abundance, they are responsible for nearly 30% of the dose equivalent in free space. Because of this, radiation biology studies focusing on understanding the biological e ects of GCR exposure.... Stephen Guetersloh and my committee members Dr. Leslie Braby, Dr. John Ford, and Dr. John Lawler. I am thankful for their e orts. This work was supported by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Faculty Development Program, grant number NRC-38...

  6. Badhwar-O'Neill 2011 Galactic Cosmic Ray Model Update and Future Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Pat M.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2014-01-01

    The Badhwar-O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Model based on actual GR measurements is used by deep space mission planners for the certification of micro-electronic systems and the analysis of radiation health risks to astronauts in space missions. The BO GCR Model provides GCR flux in deep space (outside the earth's magnetosphere) for any given time from 1645 to present. The energy spectrum from 50 MeV/n-20 GeV/n is provided for ions from hydrogen to uranium. This work describes the most recent version of the BO GCR model (BO'11). BO'11 determines the GCR flux at a given time applying an empirical time delay function to past sunspot activity. We describe the GCR measurement data used in the BO'11 update - modern data from BESS, PAMELA, CAPRICE, and ACE emphasized for than the older balloon data used for the previous BO model (BO'10). We look at the GCR flux for the last 24 solar minima and show how much greater the flux was for the cycle 24 minimum in 2010. The BO'11 Model uses the traditional, steady-state Fokker-Planck differential equation to account for particle transport in the heliosphere due to diffusion, convection, and adiabatic deceleration. It assumes a radially symmetrical diffusion coefficient derived from magnetic disturbances caused by sunspots carried onward by a constant solar wind. A more complex differential equation is now being tested to account for particle transport in the heliosphere in the next generation BO model. This new model is time-dependent (no longer a steady state model). In the new model, the dynamics and anti-symmetrical features of the actual heliosphere are accounted for so empirical time delay functions will no longer be required. The new model will be capable of simulating the more subtle features of modulation - such as the Sun's polarity and modulation dependence on the gradient and curvature drift. This improvement is expected to significantly improve the fidelity of the BO GCR model. Preliminary results of its performance will be presented.

  7. January 2007 Economic Impact of ATP's

    E-print Network

    January 2007 Economic Impact of ATP's Contributions to DNA Diagnostics Technologies GCR 06 Alan O'Connor, Brent Rowe, Michael Gallaher Joel Sevinsky, and Dallas Wood #12;About ATP's Economic payoffs and widespread benefits for the economy. Since the inception of ATP in 1990, ATP's Economic

  8. Galactic Cosmic Ray Dose Rate at 1 A.U. During Solar Activity Cycle 24 Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, M. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Wilson, J. K.; Case, A. W.; Townsend, L.; Kasper, J. C.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements made by the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) instrument aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) have been used to create a time history of the absorbed dose rate resulting from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) exposure at a distance from the Sun of 1 astronomical unit (A.U.). These measurements, made during the period 2009-06-26 to 2010-12-31, include the deepest point of solar minimum activity (2009 Oct), maximum GCR dose rate (2010 Jan), and the onset of the first solar energetic particle (SEP) events of solar activity cycle 24 (2010 Jun). General features of the dose rate time history include: (a) an approximately 90-day lag between an increase in the coronal mass ejection (CME) rate/IMF field strength and the modulation of the daily GCR dose rate; a 21% decrease in the average daily GCR dose rate 15 months after solar activity minimum; and the detection of a cluster of 5 particle enhancements between 2010-06-12 and 2010-08-20 at the location of the LRO orbiter. Three additional enhancements measured between 2010-09-01 and 2010-09-23 do not appear to be linked with any observed solar activity, although two of the enhancements occurred during passage of coronal high-speed solar wind streams at the location of Earth.

  9. Implication of the sidereal anisotropy of ~5 TeV cosmic ray intensity observed with the Tibet III air shower array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenomori, M.; Ayabe, S.; Bi, X. J.; Chen, D.; Cui, S. W.; Danzengluobu; Ding, L. K.; Ding, X. H.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z. Y.; Gao, X. Y.; Geng, Q. X.; Guo, H. W.; He, H. H.; He, M.; Hibino, K.; Hotta, N.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H. B.; Huang, J.; Huang, Q.; Jia, H. Y.; Kajino, F.; Kasahara, K.; Katayose, Y.; Kato, C.; Kawata, K.; Labaciren; Le, G. M.; Li, A. F.; Li, J. Y.; Lou, Y.-Q.; Lu, H.; Lu, S. L.; Meng, X. R.; Mizutani, K.; Mu, J.; Munakata, K.; Nagai, A.; Nanjo, H.; Nishizawa, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohta, I.; Onuma, H.; Ouchi, T.; Ozawa, S.; Ren, J. R.; Saito, T.; Saito, T. Y.; Sakata, M.; Sako, T. K.; Sasaki, T.; Shibata, M.; Shiomi, A.; Shirai, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Takita, M.; Tan, Y. H.; Tateyama, N.; Torii, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Udo, S.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. G.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yan, C. T.; Yang, X. C.; Yasue, S.; Ye, Z. H.; Yu, G. C.; Yuan, A. F.; Yuda, T.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, N. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.

    2007-08-01

    We show that the large-scale anisotropy of ~5 TeV galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity observed by Tibet Air Shower experiment can be reproduced by the superposition of a bi-directional and uni-directional flows (UDF and BDF) of GCRs. The heliosphere is located inside the local interstellar cloud (LIC) very close to the inner edge of the LIC. If the GCR population is lower inside the LIC than outside, the BDF flow is expected from the parallel diffusion of GCRs into LIC along the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF) connecting the heliosphere with the region outside the LIC, where the GCR population is higher. A type of the UDF, on the other hand, is expected from the B×?n drift flux driven by a gradient of GCR density (n) in the LISMF (B). The LISMF orientation deduced from the best-fit direction of the BDF is almost parallel to the galactic plane and more consistent with the suggestion of Frisch (1996) than that of Lallement et al. (2005). We note that the model, if holds, yields the LISMF polarity together with its orientation.

  10. National Institute of Standards and Technology Technology Administration U.S. Department of Commerce February 2007

    E-print Network

    With Applications in Packaging, Metals Recycling, Energy, and Water Treatment GCR 06-897 Thomas Pelsoci A Benefit Reporting System, a unique online survey of ATP project participants, that gathers regular data with Applications in Packaging, Metals Recycling, Energy, and Water Treatment A Benefit-Cost Analysis Prepared

  11. Predictors of Satisfaction in Geographically Close and Long-Distance Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ji-yeon; Pistole, M. Carole

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined geographically close (GCRs) and long-distance (LDRs) romantic relationship satisfaction as explained by insecure attachment, self-disclosure, gossip, and idealization. After college student participants (N = 536) completed a Web survey, structural equation modeling (SEM) multigroup analysis revealed that the GCR

  12. CUTTING EDGE Cutting Edge: Back to "One-Way" Germinal Centers1

    E-print Network

    Maini, Philip K.

    CUTTING EDGE IMMUNOLOGY THE OF JOURNAL Cutting Edge: Back to "One-Way" Germinal Centers1 Michael E. Meyer-Hermann2 * and Philip K. Maini* The present status of germinal center (GC) research is re- visited of Immunology, 2005, 174: 2489­2493. I n the germinal center (GC)3 reaction (GCR) preplasma and memory cells

  13. What can we learn on germinal centre reactions from in silico experiments?

    E-print Network

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    What can we learn on germinal centre reactions from in silico experiments? M.E. Meyer-Hermann1 , T that terminates germinal centre reactions in the framework of in silico experiments. Introduction The germinal, concurring views of how the germinal centre works still hold. These concern the initiation of the GCR

  14. G-Protein Complex Mutants Are Hypersensitive to Abscisic Acid Regulation of Germination

    E-print Network

    Jones, Alan M.

    G-Protein Complex Mutants Are Hypersensitive to Abscisic Acid Regulation of Germination throughout plant growth and development. Seed germination, early seedling development, stomatal guard cell), and the candidate G-protein-coupled receptor (GCR1) in ABA signaling during germination and early seedling

  15. Radiation Dose Analysis of Galactic Cosmic Ray in Low Earth Orbit/Near Equatorial Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suparta, W.; Zulkeple, S. K.

    2014-10-01

    Space environment contained harmful radiation that posed risk to spacecraft orbiting the Earth. In this paper, we looked into radiation doses caused by galactic cosmic ray (GCR) towards satellites orbiting in low earth orbit (LEO) near Earth's equator (NEqO) and compared them with doses caused by solar energetic particles (SEP) and trapped particles to determine the damage level of GCR. The radiation doses included linear energy transfer (LET) and nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) through a 1mm gallium arsenide (GaAs) planar geometry by using Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) method. The orbital data followed Malaysian Razaksat satellite at 685km altitude and 9° inclination during selected solar minimum and solar maximum from solar cycles 21 to 24. We found that trapped particles gave the highest LET and no SEP was detected in SPENVIS. The LET values tend to be higher during solar minimum for trapped particles and GCR, corresponding to their anti-correlated fluxes with the solar activity. However, the NIEL values for GCR in solar cycle 23 did not follow the anti-correlation pattern.

  16. GUIDELINES FOR DETERMINATION OF LABORATORY ACCEPTABILITY FOR ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC POLLUTANTS COLLECTED ON TENAX GC (TRADE NAME) ADSORBENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Technical Assistant Document (TAD) has been prepared which is intended to serve as a guide to those persons responsible for evaluating and/or selecting a laboratory to perform sampling and analysis of airborne, organic pollutants using Tenax GCR polymer and gas chromatography/m...

  17. NSF Grant Number: DMI-0300370 PI: Rakesh Nagi and Rajan Batta Institution: University at Buffalo

    E-print Network

    Nagi, Rakesh

    be applied to distribution network design such as warehouse location/sizing, product routing, etc. 3 Title: Congestion in Facilities Location and Layout: Deterministic and Stochastic Models ·Graphic for the planar facility location problem with generalized congested regions (GCR), vis-à-vis unifying existing

  18. Cosmic Ray 11-Year Modulation for Sunspot Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Ygbuhay, R. C.

    2015-02-01

    Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) modulation at 1 AU for sunspot (SSN) Cycle 24 is studied using data from a global network of detectors and balloon measurements of low-energy ions at high latitudes in Russia. The observed modulation is modest compared with previous cycles. The tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet reached a maximum value for Cycle 24 even though the peak of the interplanetary magnetic-field intensity at 1 AU has a much lower value (? 5 nT). The solar polar field in the northern hemisphere reversed in June 2012 and again in March 2014 while that in the southern hemisphere reversed in July 2013. The double field reversal in northern hemisphere after SSN maximum is not expected from dynamo theory. GCR modulation is at maximum phase in 2013. We have also studied the anomalous GCR recovery in 2009 using data from a low-energy proton channel on Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA). The rigidity dependence of the Cycle 24 modulation is computed using data from neutron monitors, directional muon telescopes at Nagoya, Japan, and detectors on balloons at high latitudes in Russia. It is a power law with an exponent -1.29, similar to previous solar cycles (-1.2±0.1); the nearly linear dependence of the modulation on the rigidity over a wide range poses a challenge to the quasi-linear theory (QLT) of GCR modulation.

  19. Commitment Predictors: Long-Distance versus Geographically Close Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole; Roberts, Amber; Mosko, Jonathan E.

    2010-01-01

    In this web-based study, the authors examined long-distance relationships (LDRs) and geographically close relationships (GCRs). Two hierarchical multiple regressions (N = 138) indicated that attachment predicted LDR and GCR commitment in Step 1. Final equations indicated that high satisfaction and investments predicted LDR commitment, whereas low…

  20. How safe is safe enough? Radiation risk for a human mission to Mars.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Chappell, Lori J; Huff, Janice L

    2013-01-01

    Astronauts on a mission to Mars would be exposed for up to 3 years to galactic cosmic rays (GCR)--made up of high-energy protons and high charge (Z) and energy (E) (HZE) nuclei. GCR exposure rate increases about three times as spacecraft venture out of Earth orbit into deep space where protection of the Earth's magnetosphere and solid body are lost. NASA's radiation standard limits astronaut exposures to a 3% risk of exposure induced death (REID) at the upper 95% confidence interval (CI) of the risk estimate. Fatal cancer risk has been considered the dominant risk for GCR, however recent epidemiological analysis of radiation risks for circulatory diseases allow for predictions of REID for circulatory diseases to be included with cancer risk predictions for space missions. Using NASA's models of risks and uncertainties, we predicted that central estimates for radiation induced mortality and morbidity could exceed 5% and 10% with upper 95% CI near 10% and 20%, respectively for a Mars mission. Additional risks to the central nervous system (CNS) and qualitative differences in the biological effects of GCR compared to terrestrial radiation may significantly increase these estimates, and will require new knowledge to evaluate. PMID:24146746

  1. How Safe Is Safe Enough? Radiation Risk for a Human Mission to Mars

    PubMed Central

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Chappell, Lori J.; Huff, Janice L.

    2013-01-01

    Astronauts on a mission to Mars would be exposed for up to 3 years to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) — made up of high-energy protons and high charge (Z) and energy (E) (HZE) nuclei. GCR exposure rate increases about three times as spacecraft venture out of Earth orbit into deep space where protection of the Earth's magnetosphere and solid body are lost. NASA's radiation standard limits astronaut exposures to a 3% risk of exposure induced death (REID) at the upper 95% confidence interval (CI) of the risk estimate. Fatal cancer risk has been considered the dominant risk for GCR, however recent epidemiological analysis of radiation risks for circulatory diseases allow for predictions of REID for circulatory diseases to be included with cancer risk predictions for space missions. Using NASA's models of risks and uncertainties, we predicted that central estimates for radiation induced mortality and morbidity could exceed 5% and 10% with upper 95% CI near 10% and 20%, respectively for a Mars mission. Additional risks to the central nervous system (CNS) and qualitative differences in the biological effects of GCR compared to terrestrial radiation may significantly increase these estimates, and will require new knowledge to evaluate. PMID:24146746

  2. Sex differences in operant responding and survivability following exposure to space radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On exploratory class missions, such as a mission to Mars, astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation (galactic cosmic rays [GCR]) which are not experienced in low earth orbit where the space shuttle and International Space Station operate. Despite the fact that the crew on such a mi...

  3. Comparison of CREME (cosmic-ray effects on microelectronics) model LET (linear energy transfer) spaceflight dosimetry data

    SciTech Connect

    Letaw, J.R.; Adams, J.H.

    1986-07-15

    The galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) component of space radiation is the dominant cause of single-event phenomena in microelectronic circuits when Earth's magnetic shielding is low. Spaceflights outside the magnetosphere and in high inclination orbits are examples of such circumstances. In high-inclination orbits, low-energy (high LET) particles are transmitted through the field only at extreme latitudes, but can dominate the orbit-averaged dose. GCR is an important part of the radiation dose to astronauts under the same conditions. As a test of the CREME environmental model and particle transport codes used to estimate single event upsets, we have compiled existing measurements of HZE doses were compiled where GCR is expected to be important: Apollo 16 and 17, Skylab, Apollo Soyuz Test Project, and Kosmos 782. The LET spectra, due to direct ionization from GCR, for each of these missions has been estimated. The resulting comparisons with data validate the CREME model predictions of high-LET galactic cosmic-ray fluxes to within a factor of two. Some systematic differences between the model and data are identified.

  4. A heavy ion spectrometer system for the measurement of projectile fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Engelage, J.; Crawford, H.J.; Greiner, L.; Kuo, C.

    1996-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) at the LBL Bevalac provided a unique facility for measuring projectile fragmentation cross sections important in deconvolving the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) source composition. The general characteristics of the apparatus specific to this application are described and the main features of the event reconstruction and analysis used in the TRANSPORT experiment are discussed.

  5. Lunar soil as shielding against space radiation J. Miller a,*, L. Taylor b

    E-print Network

    Kah, Linda

    Lunar soil as shielding against space radiation J. Miller a,*, L. Taylor b , C. Zeitlin c , L January 2009 Keywords: Lunar soil Lunar regolith Space radiation shielding Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR properties of lunar soil with respect to selected heavy ion beams with charges and energies comparable

  6. Managing Lunar and Mars Mission Radiation Risks. Part 1; Cancer Risks, Uncertainties, and Shielding Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ren, Lei

    2005-01-01

    This document addresses calculations of probability distribution functions (PDFs) representing uncertainties in projecting fatal cancer risk from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPEs). PDFs are used to test the effectiveness of potential radiation shielding approaches. Monte-Carlo techniques are used to propagate uncertainties in risk coefficients determined from epidemiology data, dose and dose-rate reduction factors, quality factors, and physics models of radiation environments. Competing mortality risks and functional correlations in radiation quality factor uncertainties are treated in the calculations. The cancer risk uncertainty is about four-fold for lunar and Mars mission risk projections. For short-stay lunar missins (<180 d), SPEs present the most significant risk, but one effectively mitigated by shielding. For long-duration (>180 d) lunar or Mars missions, GCR risks may exceed radiation risk limits. While shielding materials are marginally effective in reducing GCR cancer risks because of the penetrating nature of GCR and secondary radiation produced in tissue by relativisitc particles, polyethylene or carbon composite shielding cannot be shown to significantly reduce risk compared to aluminum shielding. Therefore, improving our knowledge of space radiobiology to narrow uncertainties that lead to wide PDFs is the best approach to ensure radiation protection goals are met for space exploration.

  7. 32ND INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE, BEIJING 2011 Solar modulation of cosmic rays since 1936: Neutron monitors and balloon-borne data

    E-print Network

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    method. The reconstructed series has been tested against long-term data of balloon-borne measurements years with negative heliospheric magnetic field polarity may be related to possible deviations) where index i denotes the type of GCR particle (with charge Zi and mass Ai numbers), T is the particle

  8. Variations of cosmogenic radionuclide production rates along the meteorite orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, V. A.; Laubenstein, M.; Povinec, P. P.; Ustinova, G. K.

    2015-08-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in meteorites during their motion in space are natural detectors of the GCR intensity and variations along the meteorite orbits. On the basis of measured and calculated contents of cosmogenic radionuclides in the freshly fallen Chelyabinsk and Košice chondrites some peculiarities of generation of cosmogenic radionuclides of different half-lives in the chondrites of different orbits and dates of fall onto the Earth are demonstrated. Dependence of production rates of the radionuclides on the GCR variations in the heliosphere is analyzed. Using radionuclides with different half-lives it is possible to compare the average GCR intensity over various time periods. The measurement and theoretical analysis of cosmogenic radionuclides in consecutively fallen chondrites provide a unique information on the space-time continuum of the cosmogenic radionuclide production rates and their variations over a long time scale, which could be useful in correlative analyses of processes in the heliosphere. Some applications of cosmogenic radionuclide depth distribution in chondrites for estimation of their pre-atmospheric sizes are illustrated.

  9. Space Radiation Transport Codes: A Comparative Study for Galactic Cosmic Rays Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ram; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Gabriel, Tony; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Slaba, Tony

    For long duration and/or deep space human missions, protection from severe space radiation exposure is a challenging design constraint and may be a potential limiting factor. The space radiation environment consists of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar particle events (SPE), trapped radiation, and includes ions of all the known elements over a very broad energy range. These ions penetrate spacecraft materials producing nuclear fragments and secondary particles that damage biological tissues, microelectronic devices, and materials. In deep space missions, where the Earth's magnetic field does not provide protection from space radiation, the GCR environment is significantly enhanced due to the absence of geomagnetic cut-off and is a major component of radiation exposure. Accurate risk assessments critically depend on the accuracy of the input information as well as radiation transport codes used, and so systematic verification of codes is necessary. In this study, comparisons are made between the deterministic code HZETRN2006 and the Monte Carlo codes HETC-HEDS and FLUKA for an aluminum shield followed by a water target exposed to the 1977 solar minimum GCR spectrum. Interaction and transport of high charge ions present in GCR radiation environment provide a more stringent constraint in the comparison of the codes. Dose, dose equivalent and flux spectra are compared; details of the comparisons will be discussed, and conclusions will be drawn for future directions.

  10. Mars surface radiation exposure for solar maximum conditions and 1989 solar proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.

    1992-01-01

    The Langley heavy-ion/nucleon transport code, HZETRN, and the high-energy nucleon transport code, BRYNTRN, are used to predict the propagation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR's) and solar flare protons through the carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars. Particle fluences and the resulting doses are estimated on the surface of Mars for GCR's during solar maximum conditions and the Aug., Sep., and Oct. 1989 solar proton events. These results extend previously calculated surface estimates for GCR's at solar minimum conditions and the Feb. 1956, Nov. 1960, and Aug. 1972 solar proton events. Surface doses are estimated with both a low-density and a high-density carbon dioxide model of the atmosphere for altitudes of 0, 4, 8, and 12 km above the surface. A solar modulation function is incorporated to estimate the GCR dose variation between solar minimum and maximum conditions over the 11-year solar cycle. By using current Mars mission scenarios, doses to the skin, eye, and blood-forming organs are predicted for short- and long-duration stay times on the Martian surface throughout the solar cycle.

  11. Impact of galactic cosmic radiation and CO2 on Phanerozoic climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallmann, Klaus

    The flux of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) reaching the solar system has been modulated periodically by the passage of the solar system through the spiral arms of our galaxy on long geological time scales (tens of millions of years) while solar irradiance increased continuously due to the aging of the sun. Therefore, the analysis of Phanerozoic time-series data allows for a discrimination between the potential effects of cosmic versus solar radiation on global climate change over the past 540 million years. The d18O record of marine carbonates features secular variations that are suggesting strong effects of GCR on Phanerozoic climate change. Against this background, a model is presented to evaluate the relative climate effects of atmospheric pCO2, GCR and solar irradiance over the Phanerozoic. The model is making use of the avail-able geological time series data (87Sr/86Sr, d13C, and d18O in marine carbonates and other geological archives) to constrain critical model parameter values and to evaluate the model output. The model confirms that the increase in solar radiation had no significant effect on the evolution of global mean surface temperatures over the model period. The climate evolution seems to be controlled by changes in GCR and pCO2. According to the model, the two major Phanerozoic glaciations during the late Carboniferous to early Permian and the late Cenozoic are the result of dense cloud coverage induced by strong GCR fluxes and carbon cycling pro-cesses causing a draw-down of atmospheric pCO2. The two moderately cool periods during the Ordovician -Silurian and late Jurassic -early Cretaceous are characterized by both high pCO2 and GCR levels such that greenhouse warming compensated for the cooling effect of GCR-enhanced cloudiness (Wallmann, 2004). References Wallmann, K., 2004. Impact of atmospheric CO2 and galactic cosmic radiation on Phanerozoic climate change and the marine d18O record. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosys-tems, 5(1): doi:10.1029/2003GC000683.

  12. Determination of the flux and energy distribution of energetic solar protons in the past 2 Myr using lunar rock 68815

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.N.; Garrison, D.H. Lockheed-ESC, Houston, TX ); Bogard, D.D. ); Reedy, R.C. )

    1994-10-01

    Cosmogenic [sup 21]Ne, [sup 22]Ne, [sup 38]Ar, and [sup 3]He produced by nuclear interactions of energetic (>10 MeV) solar protons were determined in 11 depth samples of lunar rock 68815. Concentrations of these proton-produced, SCR nuclides smoothly decrease from the rock surface down to 4.3 cm, where a galactic cosmic ray (GCR) component dominates. The cosmogenic [sup 21]Ne/[sup 22]Ne isotopic ratios shows a systematic change with depth, from the characteristic GCR value of 0.79 at 4.9 cm to a mixed SCR + GCR ratio of 0.66 near the surface. The surface exposure age for 68815 calculated from both SCR and GCR components for [sup 21]Ne, [sup 22]Ne, [sup 38]Ar agrees with the reported [sup 81]Kr-Kr exposure age of 2.04 Myr. Theoretical SCR + GCR depth profiles were calculated from cross-section data for different assumed spectra of energetic solar protons (R[sub 0], or rigidity, values of 50-125 MV) and for different rock surface erosion rates (0-3 mm/Myr). These theoretical SCR profiles were added to GCR profiles and statistically compared with measured data by minimizing the standard deviation of the least squares statistical fit and by requiring the GCR component in the 4.3 cm sample to be >90% of the measured concentration. SCR [sup 21]Ne, [sup 22]Ne, and [sup 38]Ar give the following results for energetic solar protons over the last 2 Myr. For a preferred erosion rate of 1 mm/Myr and R[sub 0] of 80-90 MV, J(4[pi], E > 10 MeV) [approx equal] 58-73 p/cm[sup 2]/s; for the broader possible range of R[sub 0] values of 70-100 MV, J(4[pi], E > 10 MeV) [approx equal] 49-92 p/cm[sup 2]/s. These proton fluxes increase by [approximately] 12 and [approximately] 24% for erosion rates of 2 mm/Myr and 3 mm/Myr, respectively. These same data analysis techniques were also applied to literature depth profiles for SCR radionuclides in rock 68815.

  13. Dependence of the 27-day variation of cosmic rays on the global magnetic field of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modzelewska, R.; Alania, M. V.

    2012-09-01

    We show that the higher range of the heliolongitudinal asymmetry of the solar wind speed in the positive polarity period (A > 0) than in the negative polarity period (A < 0) is one of the important reasons of the larger amplitudes of the 27-day variation of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity in the period of 1995-1997 (A > 0) than in 1985-1987 (A < 0). Subsequently, different ranges of the heliolongitudinal asymmetry of the solar wind speed jointly with equally important corresponding drift effect are general causes of the polarity dependence of the amplitudes of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity. At the same time, we show that the polarity dependence is feeble for the last unusual minimum epoch of solar activity 2007-2009 (A < 0); the amplitude of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity shows only a tendency of the polarity dependence. We present a three dimensional (3-D) model of the 27-day variation of GCR based on the Parker's transport equation. In the 3-D model is implemented a longitudinal variation of the solar wind speed reproducing in situ measurements and corresponding divergence-free interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) derived from the Maxwell's equations. We show that results of the proposed 3-D modeling of the 27-day variation of GCR intensity for different polarities of the solar magnetic cycle are in good agreement with the neutron monitors experimental data. To reach a compatibility of the theoretical modeling with observations for the last minimum epoch of solar activity 2007-2009 (A < 0) a parallel diffusion coefficient was increased by ˜40%.

  14. Simulation and Comparison of Martian Surface Ionization Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of energetic particle radiation and corresponding doses at the surface of Mars is being characterized by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), one of ten science instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover. The time series of dose rate for the first 300 Sols after landing on Mars on August 6, 2012 is presented here. For the comparison to RAD measurements of dose rate, Martian surface ionization radiation is simulated by utilizing observed space quantities. The GCR primary radiation spectrum is calculated by using the Badhwar-O'Neill 2011 (BO11) galactic cosmic ray (GCR) model, which has been developed by utilizing all balloon and satellite GCR measurements since 1955 and the newer 1997-2012 Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) measurements. In the BO11 model, solar modulation of the GCR primary radiation spectrum is described in terms of the international smoothed sunspot number and a time delay function. For the transport of the impingent GCR primary radiation through Mars atmosphere, a vertical distribution of atmospheric thickness at each elevation is calculated using the vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and pressure made by Mars Global Surveyor measurements. At Gale Crater in the southern hemisphere, the seasonal variation of atmospheric thickness is accounted for the daily atmospheric pressure measurements of the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) by using low- and high-density models for cool- and warm-season, respectively. The spherically distributed atmospheric distance is traced along the slant path, and the resultant directional shielding by Martian atmosphere is coupled with Curiosity vehicle for dose estimates. We present predictions of dose rate and comparison to the RAD measurements. The simulation agrees to within +/- 20% with the RAD measurements showing clearly the variation of dose rate by heliospheric conditions, and presenting the sensitivity of dose rate by atmospheric pressure, which has been found from the RAD experiments and driven by thermal tides on Martian surface.

  15. Large Galactic Cosmic Ray Anisotropies in the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, M. E.; Decker, R. B.; Hamilton, D. C.; Brown, L. E.; Krimigis, S. M.; Roelof, E. C.

    2013-12-01

    The angular distribution of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities had been observed to be nearly isotropic throughout the space age, with even the largest anisotropies falling well short of 1%. Voyager 1, after the initial GCR intensity enhancement in May 2012 and upon sustainably entering a region depleted of hot plasma on 25 August 2012 (Burlaga et al. 2013; Krimigis et al. 2013; Stone et al. 2013; Webber & McDonald 2013), has uncovered a new regime where large GCR anisotropies prevail. We recently reported on the largest GCR anisotropies observed (Krimigis et al., 2013; Hill et al., 2013), with the second order anisotropy of >200 MeV GCRs reaching ~3.5%. We developed a new technique to extract bi-directional intensities from a double-ended particle telescope that has asymmetric viewing geometry (i.e., the geometric factor for particle detection with one end is unequal to the geometric factor of the other end). Applying this technique we report here on the variation of GCR anisotropies at Voyager 1 and 2 in the depletion region, in the hot heliosheath, and upstream of the termination shock. Burlaga, L.F. et al, 2013, Science 341, 147-150, DOI: 10.1126/science.1235451. Hill, M.E. et al, 2013, presented at the 12th Ann. Inter. Astrophys. Conf., Myrtle Beach, SC, 15-19 April 2013. Krimigis, S.M. et al., 2013, Science 341, 144-147, DOI: 10.1126/science.1235721. Stone, E.C. et al., 2013, Science 341, 150-153, DOI: 10.1126/science.1236408. Webber & McDonald, 2013, Geophys. Res. Let. 40, 1665-1668, DOI: 10.1002/grl.50383.

  16. Corotating solar wind structures and recurrent trains of enhanced diurnal variation in galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Yeeram, T.; Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Kamyan, N.; Nutaro, T. E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th E-mail: p_chang24@hotmail.com

    2014-04-01

    Data from the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor at Doi Inthanon, Thailand, with a vertical cutoff rigidity of 16.8 GV, were utilized to determine the diurnal anisotropy (DA) of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) near Earth during solar minimum conditions between 2007 November and 2010 November. We identified trains of enhanced DA over several days, which often recur after a solar rotation period (?27 days). By investigating solar coronal holes as identified from synoptic maps and solar wind parameters, we found that the intensity and anisotropy of cosmic rays are associated with the high-speed streams (HSSs) in the solar wind, which are in turn related to the structure and evolution of coronal holes. An enhanced DA was observed after the onset of some, but not all, HSSs. During time periods of recurrent trains, the DA was often enhanced or suppressed according to the sign of the interplanetary magnetic field B, which suggests a contribution from a mechanism involving a southward gradient in the GCR density, n, and a gradient anisotropy along B × ?n. In one non-recurrent and one recurrent sequence, an HSS from an equatorial coronal hole was merged with that from a trailing mid-latitude extension of a polar coronal hole, and the slanted HSS structure in space with suppressed GCR density can account for the southward GCR gradient. We conclude that the gradient anisotropy is a source of temporary changes in the GCR DA under solar minimum conditions, and that the latitudinal GCR gradient can sometimes be explained by the coronal hole morphology.

  17. A field assessment of long-term laboratory sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, C.G.; Wang, N.; Hayward, J.M.R.; Jones, J.R.; Jones, S.B.; Ireland, D.S.

    2005-01-01

    Response of the amphipod Hyalella azteca exposed to contaminated sediments for 10 to 42 d in laboratory toxicity tests was compared to responses observed in controlled three-month invertebrate colonization exposures conducted in a pond. Sediments evaluated included a sediment spiked with dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD) or dilutions of a field sediment collected from the Grand Calumet River (GCR) in Indiana (USA) (contaminated with organic compounds and metals). Consistent effects were observed at the highest exposure concentrations (400 ??g DDD/goc [DDD concentrations normalized to grams of organic carbon (goc) in sedimentl or 4% GCR sediment) on survival, length, and reproduction of amphipods in the laboratory and on abundance of invertebrates colonizing sediments in the field. Effect concentrations for DDD observed for 10-d length and 42-d reproduction of amphipods (e.g., chronic value [ChV] of 66 ??g DDD/goc and 25% inhibition concentration [IC25] of 68 ??g DDD/goc for reproduction) were similar to the lowest effect concentrations for DDD measured on invertebrates colonizing sediment the field. Effect concentrations for GCR sediment on 28-d survival and length and 42-d reproduction and length of amphipods (i.e., ChVs of 0.20-0.66% GCR sediment) provided more conservative effect concentrations compared to 10-d survival or length of amphipods in the laboratory or the response of invertebrates colonizing sediment in the field (e.g., ChVs of 2.2% GCR sediment). Results of this study indicate that use of chronic laboratory toxicity tests with H. azteca and benthic colonization studies should be used to provide conservative estimates of impacts on benthic communities exposed to contaminated sediments. Bioaccumulation of DDD by oligochaetes colonizing the DDD-spiked sediment was similar to results of laboratory sediment tests previously conducted with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegates, confirming that laboratory exposures can be used to estimate bioaccumulation by oligochaetes exposed in the field. ?? 2005 SETAC.

  18. Physics of the Isotopic Dependence of Galactic Cosmic Ray Fluence Behind Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Saganti, Premkumar B.; Hu, Xiao-Dong; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy F.; Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2003-01-01

    For over 25 years, NASA has supported the development of space radiation transport models for shielding applications. The NASA space radiation transport model now predicts dose and dose equivalent in Earth and Mars orbit to an accuracy of plus or minus 20%. However, because larger errors may occur in particle fluence predictions, there is interest in further assessments and improvements in NASA's space radiation transport model. In this paper, we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and the isotopic dependence of nuclear fragmentation cross-sections on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. Using NASA's quantum multiple-scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, we study the effect of the isotopic dependence of the primary GCR composition and secondary nuclei on shielding calculations. The QMSFRG is shown to accurately describe the iso-spin dependence of nuclear fragmentation. The principal finding of this study is that large errors (plus or minus 100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotope grid (approximately 170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotope grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past, however less significant errors (less than 20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotope grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  19. Sunspot numbers, interplanetary magnetic field, and cosmic ray intensity at earth: Nexus for the twentieth century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.

    2013-12-01

    The pivotal role played by the interplanetary magnetic field (B) in modulating galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity in the heliosphere is described. We show that the inverse correlation observed by Forbush (1958) between GCRs and sunspot numbers (SSNs) is reflected in high correlation between SSNs and B (cc = 0.94). The SSN data are available since 1700 and the derived B data since 1835. The paleo-cosmic ray data are available for several millennia in the form of 10Be radionuclide sequestered in polar ice. The data of the ion chambers (ICs) at the Cheltenham-Fredericksburg-Yakutsk (CFY) sites are combined to create a data string for 1937-1988. In turn, these data are used to extend the measurements of the low energy GCR ions (>0.1 GeV) at balloon altitudes at high latitudes in Russia to 1937. These data are then correlated to B and the fit parameters are used to extend the low energy ion data to 1900, creating the instrumental era GCR time series for the twentieth century. The derived GCR time series is compared to 10Be measured at two sites in Greenland, namely Dye 3 and NGRIP for 1900-2000 to check the internal consistency of datasets for the long-term trend. We find that the annual mean rate (%) for 1965 at NGRIP is an outlier. We replace it with the mean of 1964 and 1965 rates and construct a new re-normalized time series at NGIP, improving the agreement with the derived instrumental era GCR time series for the twentieth century as well. This should encourage its use by heliophysics community for varied applications.

  20. Stochastic differences of the solar cycles according to monitoring cosmogenic radionuclides in fresh-fallen meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, Victor; Ustinova, Galina; Povinec, Pavel; Laubenstein, Matthias

    Cosmogenic radionuclides with different T_1/2, which are observed in meteorites, are natural detectors of cosmic rays along the meteorite orbits during ~1.5 T_1/2 of the radionuclides before the meteorite fall onto the Earth. The investigation of radionuclides with different T_1/2 in the chondrites with various dates of fall, which have various extension and inclination of orbits, provides us with such long sequences of homogeneous data on variation of the GCR intensity and integral gradients (E>100 MeV) in the 3D heliosphere [1]. The long sequences of homogeneous data on the GCR intensity in the stratosphere are used for evaluation of the gradients [2]. Nowadays, such a sequence of certain homogeneous data on the GCR intensity and gradients in the inner heliosphere covers ~5 solar cycles [3]. This smoothes, to a considerable extent, both the temporal and spatial GCR variations revealing the most important general regularities, namely: the dependence of the GCR gradients in the inner heliosphere (at 2-4 AU from the Sun) on the phase of the solar cycles and the constancy of the mechanism of the solar modulation of GCRs, at least over the last ~1 Ma. The most striking effect - which due to the monitoring became evident - is a stochastic difference of the solar cycles in addition to their determination by the solar activity. A rigorous analysis of correlations between the distribution and variations of GCRs and various indexes of the solar activity, as well as the strength of interplanetary magnetic fields and the title of the heliospheric current sheet in the three-dimensional heliosphere, have been carry out. As a whole, it testifies to the approximately positive correlations of all the parameters. However, the analysis has revealed some dependence of the depth of GCR modulation in the heliosphere on the character of the solar magnetic fields inversion during the maximum phases of the solar cycles, namely, on N-S asymmetry of emergence of active areas, on difference of their beginning and developing, on different lasting of the inversion periods, etc. For instance, a combined operation of the effects resulted in the deepest minimum of the GCR intensity in stratosphere in 1990-1991 and the highest GCR gradients for the 22nd solar cycle. Some peculiarities of the 23 and 24 solar cycles are considered due to study of radionuclides in the recently fallen Kosice and Chelyabinsk chondrites. The observed features of the GCR modulation during the last solar cycles could be conditioned by some disturbances of processes in the convective zone of the Sun at the change of the current secular cycle. [1] Lavrukhina A K and Ustinova G K 1990 Meteorites as Probes of Cosmic Ray Variations (Moscow: Nauka) [2] Stozhkov Yu I et al. 2009 Adv. Space Res. 44 1124-37 [3] Alexeev V A et al. 2013 Journal of Physics: Conf. Ser. 409 012146

  1. Validity of the Aluminum Equivalent Approximation in Space Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Adams, Daniel O.; Wilson, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The origin of the aluminum equivalent shield approximation in space radiation analysis can be traced back to its roots in the early years of the NASA space programs (Mercury, Gemini and Apollo) wherein the primary radiobiological concern was the intense sources of ionizing radiation causing short term effects which was thought to jeopardize the safety of the crew and hence the mission. Herein, it is shown that the aluminum equivalent shield approximation, although reasonably well suited for that time period and to the application for which it was developed, is of questionable usefulness to the radiobiological concerns of routine space operations of the 21 st century which will include long stays onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and perhaps the moon. This is especially true for a risk based protection system, as appears imminent for deep space exploration where the long-term effects of Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) exposure is of primary concern. The present analysis demonstrates that sufficiently large errors in the interior particle environment of a spacecraft result from the use of the aluminum equivalent approximation, and such approximations should be avoided in future astronaut risk estimates. In this study, the aluminum equivalent approximation is evaluated as a means for estimating the particle environment within a spacecraft structure induced by the GCR radiation field. For comparison, the two extremes of the GCR environment, the 1977 solar minimum and the 2001 solar maximum, are considered. These environments are coupled to the Langley Research Center (LaRC) deterministic ionized particle transport code High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN), which propagates the GCR spectra for elements with charges (Z) in the range I <= Z <= 28 (H -- Ni) and secondary neutrons through selected target materials. The coupling of the GCR extremes to HZETRN allows for the examination of the induced environment within the interior' of an idealized spacecraft as approximated by a spherical shell shield, and the effects of the aluminum equivalent approximation for a good polymeric shield material such as genetic polyethylene (PE). The shield thickness is represented by a 25 g/cm spherical shell. Although one could imagine the progression to greater thickness, the current range will be sufficient to evaluate the qualitative usefulness of the aluminum equivalent approximation. Upon establishing the inaccuracies of the aluminum equivalent approximation through numerical simulations of the GCR radiation field attenuation for PE and aluminum equivalent PE spherical shells, we Anther present results for a limited set of commercially available, hydrogen rich, multifunctional polymeric constituents to assess the effect of the aluminum equivalent approximation on their radiation attenuation response as compared to the generic PE.

  2. Time-dependent radiation hazard estimations during space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander

    Cosmic particle radiation is a limiting factor for the out of magnetosphere crewed flights. The cosmic radiation uncrewed flights inside heliosphere and crewed flights inside of magnetosphere tend to become a routine procedure, whereas there have been only few shot time flights out of it (Apollo missions 1969-1972) with maximum duration less than a month. Long term crewed missions set much higher requirements to the radiation shielding, primarily because of long exposition term. Inside the helosphere there are two main sources of cosmic radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and coronal mass ejections (CME). GCR come from the outside of heliosphere forming a background of overall radiation that affects the spacecraft. The intensity of GCR is varied according to solar activity, increasing with solar activity decrease and backward, with the modulation time (time between nearest maxima) of 11 yeas. CME are shot term events, comparing to GCR modulation time, but are much more energetic. The probability of CME increases with the increase of solar activity. Time dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when intensity and affection of CME and GCR would be minimized. Applying time dependent models of GCR spectra [1] and estimations of CME we show the time dependence of the radiation dose in a realistic human phantom [2] inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease the incident particle energy, at the same time minimizing flow of secondary induced particles and minimizing most harmful particle types flows. 1.Nymmik et. al., “Galactic cosmic ray flux simulation and prediction”, Adv. Space Res. 17:19-30, (1996); 2. Xu et. al., “VIP-Man: an image-based whole-body adult male model constructed from color photographs of the Visible Human Project for multi-particle Monte Carlo calculations” Health Phys. 78:476-86, (2000).

  3. Urinary tubular biomarkers in short-term type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wen-Jin; Xiong, Shi-Long; Fang, Yao-Gao; Wen, Shu; Chen, Mei-Lian; Deng, Ren-Tang; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Shao-Bo; Pen, Lan-Fen; Wang, Qian

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tubular damage in short-term (less than five years) type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and to explore the correlation between tubular markers and their relationship with renal indices at different stages of diabetic nephropathy. A group of 101 short-term T2DM patients and 28 control subjects were recruited. Tubular markers, such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), N-acetyl-?-D: -glucosaminidase (NAG), and kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1), as well as urinary albumin excretion were measured in voided urine. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated via Macisaac's formula. The patients were further categorized into three groups, namely, the normoalbuminuria, microalbuminuria, and macroalbuminuria groups, according to their urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR). Urinary tubular markers were compared and their correlations with renal indices [UACR and estimated GFR (eGFR)] were analyzed among the different diabetic groups. Compared with the control group, Urinary NGAL [median (IQR)][83.6(41.4-138.7) ?g/gcr vs. 32.9(26.1-64.5) ?g/gcr], NAG [13.5(8.7-17.9) U/gcr vs. 7.6(6.5-13.0) U/gcr] and KIM-1 [120.0(98.4-139.9) ng/gcr vs. 103.1(86.8-106.2) ng/gcr] in the T2DM were all markedly increased. For all patients, urinary NGAL had stronger positive correlations with UACR than NAG (R = 0.556 vs. 0.305, both P < 0.05). In addition, only urinary NGAL showed a negative correlation with eGFR (R = -0.215, P < 0.05). Urinary KIM-1, however, showed no significant difference among the three T2DM groups and did not correlate with either UACR or eGFR. As UACR increased from the normoalbuminuria to the last macroalbuminuria group, all of the markers increased. However, only the concentrations of NGAL were statistically different among the three diabetic groups. The correlation between the tubular markers and their relationships with the renal indices differed markedly among the three T2DM groups. In conclusion, these results suggest that tubular damage is common in short-term T2DM patients. Urinary NGAL may be a promising early marker for monitoring renal impairment in short-term T2DM patients. PMID:21779943

  4. An analytical model for the prediction of a micro-dosimeter response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis; Michael, Michael; Wilson, John W.

    A rapid analytical procedure for the prediction of a micro-dosimeter response function in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), correlated with the Space Transportation System (STS, shuttle) Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) measurements is presented. The analytical model takes into consideration the energy loss straggling and chord length distribution of the detector, and is capable of predicting energy deposition fluctuations in a cylindrical micro-volume of arbitrary aspect ratio (height/diameter) by incoming ions through both direct and indirect (? rays) events. At any designated (ray traced) target point within the vehicle, the model as input accepts the differential flux spectrum of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and/or trapped protons at LEO. On a desktop PC, the response function of TEPC for each ion in the GCR/trapped field is computed at the average rate of 30 seconds/ion. The ionizing radiation environment at LEO is represented by O'Neill's GCR model (2004), covering charge particles in the 1?Z?28 range. O'Neill's free space GCR model is coupled with the Langley Research Center (LaRC) cutoff model with angular dependency compensation to compute the transmission coefficient at LEO. The trapped proton environment is represented by a LaRC developed time dependent procedure which couples the AP8min/AP8max, Deep River Neutron Monitor (DRNM) and F10.7 solar radio frequency measurements. The albedo neutron environment is represented by the extrapolation of the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurements. The charged particle transport calculations correlated with STS 56, 51, 110 and 114 flights are accomplished by using the most recent version (2005) of LaRC's deterministic ionized particle transport code High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN). Herein, we present the correlations between the TEPC model predictions (response function) and TEPC measured differential/integral spectra in the lineal energy (y) domain for both GCR and trapped protons, with the conclusion that the model correctly accounts for the increase in flux at low y values where energetic ions are the primary contributor. We further discuss that even with the incorporation of angular dependency in the cutoffs, comparison of the GCR differential/integral flux in the y domain between STS 56, 51, 110 and 114 TEPC measured data and current calculations indicates that there still exists an underestimation by the simulations (model) at low to mid range y values. This underestimation is argued to be partly related the exclusion of the secondary pion and kaon particle production from the current version of HZETRN.

  5. Radiation characteristics in the spherical tissue-equivalent phantom on the ISS during solar activity minimum according to the data from Liulin-5 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkova, J.; Koleva, R.; Maltchev, St.; Bankov, N.; Benghin, V.; Chernykh, I.; Shurshakov, V.; Petrov, V.

    2013-07-01

    The Liulin-5 charged particle telescope observes the radiation characteristics in the spherical tissue-equivalent phantom of MATROSHKA-R international project on the International Space Station (ISS). Liulin-5 measures time resolved deposited energy spectra, linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum, flux and absorbed dose rates for electrons, protons and the biologically relevant heavy ion components of the cosmic radiation at three depths along the phantom's radius. We present some new results of Liulin-5 experiment obtained from June 2007 to March 2010. The average quality factor for different time intervals is between 2.7 and 4.4. Due to the heavy ions in LET spectrum of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR), the GCR quality factor is bigger than that of the trapped protons. The absorbed dose rates measured at depths in the phantom corresponding to the depths of blood forming organs in human body are 7.75-9.6 ?Gy/h and the dose equivalent rates are 24.6-36.7 ?Sv/h. Usually the trapped protons contribute about 60% of the total absorbed dose at 40 mm depth in the phantom and about 40% at 165 mm depth. The rest of the dose comes from GCR. Space Shuttle docking and the change of ISS attitude preformed for that purpose lead to a decrease in the total doses and to decreasing the trapped protons contributions. The doses from GCR are not affected neither by the depth of measurement not by Shuttle docking. At 165 mm depth in the phantom the largest fluxes along the ISS orbit are obtained from the trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) at L values 1.26-1.27, B?0.198 Gs, geographical longitude ?-51° to -55°, latitude ?-28° to -29° and altitudes 361-363 km. Minimal values about 0.1 particles/cm2s were recorded at L?1 from GCR, at L?4 the GCR flux reaches 2.1 particles/cm2s.

  6. An Analytical Model for the Prediction of a Micro-Dosimeter Response Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Xapsos, Mike

    2008-01-01

    A rapid analytical procedure for the prediction of a micro-dosimeter response function in low Earth orbit (LEO), correlated with the Space Transportation System (STS, shuttle) Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) measurements is presented. The analytical model takes into consideration the energy loss straggling and chord length distribution of the detector, and is capable of predicting energy deposition fluctuations in a cylindrical micro-volume of arbitrary aspect ratio (height/diameter) by incoming ions through both direct and indirect (ray) events. At any designated (ray traced) target point within the vehicle, the model accepts the differential flux spectrum of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and/or trapped protons at LEO as input. On a desktop PC, the response function of TEPC for each ion in the GCR/trapped field is computed at the average rate of 30 seconds/ion. The ionizing radiation environment at LEO is represented by O'Neill fs GCR model (2004), covering charged particles in the 1 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 28. O'Neill's free space GCR model is coupled with the Langley Research Center (LaRC) angular dependent geomagnetic cutoff model to compute the transmission coefficient in LEO. The trapped proton environment is represented by a LaRC developed time dependent procedure which couples the AP8MIN/AP8MAX, Deep River Neutron Monitor (DRNM) and F10.7 solar radio frequency measurements. The albedo neutron environment is represented by the extrapolation of the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurements. The charged particle transport calculations correlated with STS 51 and 114 flights are accomplished by using the most recent version (2005) of the LaRC deterministic High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN) code. We present the correlations between the TEPC model predictions (response function) and TEPC measured differential/integral spectra in the lineal energy (y) domain for both GCR and trapped protons, with the conclusion that the model correctly accounts for the increase in flux at low y values where energetic ions are the primary contributor. We further discuss that, even with the incorporation of angular dependency in the cutoffs, comparison of the GCR differential/integral flux between STS 51 and 114 TEPC measured data and current calculations indicates that there still exists an underestimation by the simulations at low to mid range y values. This underestimation is partly related the exclusion of the secondary pion particle production from the current version of HZETRN.

  7. Galactic Cosmic Rays in the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florinski, V.; Washimi, H.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Adams, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    We report a next generation model of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) transport in the three dimensional heliosphere. Our model is based on an accurate three-dimensional representation of the heliospheric interface. This representation is obtained by taking into account the interaction between partially ionized, magnetized plasma flows of the solar wind and the local interstellar medium. Our model reveals that after entering the heliosphere GCRs are stored in the heliosheath for several years. The preferred GCR entry locations are near the nose of the heliopause and at high latitudes. Low-energy (hundreds of MeV) galactic ions observed in the heliosheath have spent, on average, a longer time in the solar wind than those observed in the inner heliosphere, which would explain their cooled-off spectra at these energies. We also discuss radial gradients in the heliosheath and the implications for future Voyager observations

  8. Badhwar - O'Neill 2014 Galactic Cosmic Ray Flux Model Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P. M.; Golge, S.; Slaba, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    The Badhwar-O'Neill (BON) Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) model is based on GCR measurements from particle detectors. The model has mainly been used by NASA to certify microelectronic systems and the analysis of radiation health risks to astronauts in space missions. The BON14 model numerically solves the Fokker-Planck differential equation to account for particle transport in the heliosphere due to diffusion, convection, and adiabatic deceleration under the assumption of a spherically symmetric heliosphere. The model also incorporates an empirical time delay function to account for the lag of the solar activity to reach the boundary of the heliosphere. This technical paper describes the most recent improvements in parameter fits to the BON model (BON14). Using a comprehensive measurement database, it is shown that BON14 is significantly improved over the previous version, BON11.

  9. Study - Radiation Shielding Effectiveness of the Prototyped High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) 'Artificial' Magnetosphere for Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denkins, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    The high temperature superconductor (HTS) is being used to develop the magnets for the Variable Specific Impulse Magneto-plasma Rocket (VASIMR ) propulsion system and may provide lightweight magnetic radiation shielding to protect spacecraft crews from radiation caused by GCR and SPEs on missions to Mars. A study is being planned to assess the radiation shielding effectiveness of the artificial magnetosphere produced by the HTS magnet. VASIMR is an advanced technology propulsion engine which is being touted as enabling one way transit to Mars in 90 days or less. This is extremely important to NASA. This technology would enable a significant reduction in the number of days in transit to and from Mars and significantly reduce the astronauts exposure to a major threat - high energy particles from solar storms and GCR during long term deep space missions. This paper summarizes the plans for the study and the subsequent testing of the VASIMR technology onboard the ISS slated for 2013.

  10. Optimized Shielding for Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Schimmerling, W.

    2000-01-01

    Abstract. Future deep space mission and International Space Station exposures will be dominated by the high-charge and -energy (HZE) ions of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). A few mammalian systems have been extensively tested over a broad range of ion types and energies. For example, C3H10T1/2 cells, V79 cells, and Harderian gland tumors have been described by various track-structure dependent response models. The attenuation of GCR induced biological effects depends strongly on the biological endpoint, response model used, and material composition. Optimization of space shielding is then driven by the nature of the response model and the transmission characteristics of the given material.

  11. Variations of dose rate observed by MSL/RAD in transit to Mars

    E-print Network

    Guo, Jingnan; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Hassler, Donald M; Posner, Arik; Heber, Bernd; Köhler, Jan; Rafkin, Scot; Ehresmann, Bent; Appel, Jan K; Böhm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Brinza, David E; Lohf, Henning; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Günther

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To predict the cruise radiation environment related to future human missions to Mars, the correlation between solar modulation potential and the dose rate measured by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) has been analyzed and empirical models have been employed to quantify this correlation. Methods: The instrument RAD, onboard Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures a broad spectrum of energetic particles along with the radiation dose rate during the 253-day cruise phase as well as on the surface of Mars. With these first ever measurements inside a spacecraft from Earth to Mars, RAD observed the impulsive enhancement of dose rate during solar particle events as well as a gradual evolution of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) induced radiation dose rate due to the modulation of the primary GCR flux by the solar magnetic field, which correlates with long-term solar activities and heliospheric rotation. Results: We analyzed the dependence of the dose rate measured by RAD on solar modulatio...

  12. Solar modulation and nuclear fragmentation effects in galactic cosmic ray transport through shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, C. F.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badhwar, G.

    1994-01-01

    Crews of manned interplanetary missions may accumulate significant radiation exposures from the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) environment in space. Estimates of how these dose levels are affected by the assumed temporal and spatial variations in the composition of the GCR environment, and by the effects of the spacecraft and body self-shielding on the transported fields are presented. In this work, the physical processes through which shielding alters the transported radiation fields are described. We then present estimates of the effects on model calculations of (1) nuclear fragmentation model uncertainties, (2) solar modulation, (3) variations between solar cycles, and (4) proposed changes to the quality factors which relate dose equivalent to absorbed dose.

  13. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on the Radiation Hazard from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Z. W.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays is a major obstacle in long duration human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. We find that, in deep space, cross sections between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/u usually have the largest effect on dose-equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between 0.85 and 1.2 GeV/u have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff.

  14. Radiation Physics for Space and High Altitude Air Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Saganti, P.; Shavers, M. R.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are of extra-solar origin consisting of high-energy hydrogen, helium, and heavy ions. The GCR are modified by physical processes as they traverse through the solar system, spacecraft shielding, atmospheres, and tissues producing copious amounts of secondary radiation including fragmentation products, neutrons, mesons, and muons. We discuss physical models and measurements relevant for estimating biological risks in space and high-altitude air travel. Ambient and internal spacecraft computational models for the International Space Station and a Mars mission are discussed. Risk assessment is traditionally based on linear addition of components. We discuss alternative models that include stochastic treatments of columnar damage by heavy ion tracks and multi-cellular damage following nuclear fragmentation in tissue.

  15. The connection of the interplanetary magnetic field turbulence and rigidity spectrum of Forbush decrease of the galactic cosmic ray intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzynczak, A.; Alania, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the temporal changes in the rigidity spectrum of Forbush decrease (Fd) of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity observed in November 2004. We compute the rigidity spectrum in two energy ranges based on the daily data from the worldwide network of neutron monitors and Nagoya ground muon telescope. We demonstrate that the changes in the rigidity spectrum of Fd are linked to the evolution/decay of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) turbulence during various phases of the Fd. We analyze the time-evolution of the state of the turbulence of the IMF in various frequency ranges during the Fd. Performed analysis show that the decrease of the exponent ? of the Power Spectral Density (PSD ? f-?, where f is frequency) of the IMF turbulence with decreasing frequency lead to the soft rigidity spectrum of Fd for GCR particles with relatively higher energies.

  16. Preliminary Design of a Galactic Cosmic Ray Shielding Materials Testbed for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Berkebile, Stephen; Sechkar, Edward A.; Panko, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    The preliminary design of a testbed to evaluate the effectiveness of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) shielding materials, the MISSE Radiation Shielding Testbed (MRSMAT) is presented. The intent is to mount the testbed on the Materials International Space Station Experiment-X (MISSE-X) which is to be mounted on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2016. A key feature is the ability to simultaneously test nine samples, including standards, which are 5.25 cm thick. This thickness will enable most samples to have an areal density greater than 5 g/sq cm. It features a novel and compact GCR telescope which will be able to distinguish which cosmic rays have penetrated which shielding material, and will be able to evaluate the dose transmitted through the shield. The testbed could play a pivotal role in the development and qualification of new cosmic ray shielding technologies.

  17. Suppression of gross chromosomal rearrangements by a new alternative replication factor C complex

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Soma; Sikdar, Nilabja; Myung, Kyungjae

    2007-10-26

    Defects in DNA replication fidelity lead to genomic instability. Gross chromosomal rearrangement (GCR), a type of genomic instability, is highly enhanced by various initial mutations affecting DNA replication. Frequent observations of GCRs in many cancers strongly argue the importance of maintaining high fidelity of DNA replication to suppress carcinogenesis. Recent genome wide screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified a new GCR suppressor gene, ELG1, enhanced level of genome instability gene 1. Its physical interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and complex formation with Rfc2-5p proteins suggest that Elg1 functions to load/unload PCNA onto DNA during a certain DNA metabolism. High level of DNA damage accumulation and enhanced phenotypes with mutations in genes involved in cell cycle checkpoints, homologous recombination (HR), or chromatin assembly in the elg1 strain suggest that Elg1p-Rfc2-5p functions in a fundamental DNA metabolism to suppress genomic instability.

  18. Light ion components of the galactic cosmic rays: Nuclear interactions and transport theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badhwar, G. D.; Dubey, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Light nuclei are present in the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and are produced in thick targets due to projectile or target fragmentation from both nucleon and heavy induced reactions. In the primary GCR, He-4 is the most abundant nucleus after H-1. However, there are also a substantial fluxes of H-2 and He-3. In this paper we describe theoretical models based on quantum multiple scattering theory for the description of light ion nuclear interactions. The energy dependence of the light ion fragmentation cross section is considered with comparisons of inclusive yields and secondary momentum distributions to experiments described. We also analyze the importance of a fast component of lights ions from proton and neutron induced target fragementation. These theoretical models have been incorporated into the cosmic ray transport code HZETRN and will be used to analyze the role of shielding materials in modulating the production and the energy spectrum of light ions.

  19. Galactic cosmic ray abundances and spectra behind defined shielding.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, W; Benton, E V; Wiegel, B; Zens, R; Rusch, G

    1994-10-01

    LET spectra have been measured for lunar missions and for several near Earth orbits ranging from 28 degrees to 83 degrees inclination. In some of the experiments the flux of GCR was determined separately from contributions caused by interactions in the detector material. Results of these experiments are compared to model calculations. The general agreement justifies the use of the model to calculate GCR fluxes. The magnitude of variations caused by solar modulation, geomagnetic shielding, and shielding by matter determined from calculated LET spectra is generally in agreement with experimental data. However, more detailed investigations show that there are some weak points in modeling solar modulation and shielding by material. These points are discussed in more detail. PMID:11540030

  20. Quiet-Time Spectra and Abundances of Energetic Particles During the 1996 Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1998-01-01

    This report concerns the energy spectra and abundances of ions with atomic number, Z, in the interval 2 greater than or equal to Z and Z less than or equal to 36 and energies approximately 3-20 MeV/amu for solar and interplanetary quiet periods between November 1994 and April 1998 as measured by the large-geometry LEMT telescope on the Wind spacecraft near Earth. The energy spectra show the presence of galactic (GCR) and 'anomalous' cosmic ray (ACR) components, depending on the element. ACR components are reported for Mg and Si for the first time at 1 AU and the previous observation of S and Ar is confirmed. However, only GCR components are clearly apparent for the elements Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, as well as for C. New limits are placed on a possible ACR contribution for other elements, including Kr.

  1. Space Radiation and Exploration - Information for the Augustine Committee Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Semones, Edward; Kim, Myung-Hee; Jackson, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Space radiation presents significant health risks including mortality for Exploration missions: a) Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) heavy ions are distinct from radiation that occurs on Earth leading to different biological impacts. b) Large uncertainties in GCR risk projections impact ability to design and assess mitigation approaches and select crew. c) Solar Proton Events (SPEs) require new operational and shielding approaches and new biological data on risks. Risk estimates are changing as new scientific knowledge is gained: a) Research on biological effects of space radiation show qualitative and quantitative differences with X- or gamma-rays. b) Expert recommendations and regulatory policy are changing. c) New knowledge leads to changes in estimates for the number of days in space to stay below Permissible Exposure Limits (PELS).

  2. Numerical Study of the Generation of Linear Energy Transfer Spectra for Space Radiation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Wilson, John W.; Hunter, Abigail

    2005-01-01

    In analyzing charged particle spectra in space due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE), the conversion of particle energy spectra into linear energy transfer (LET) distributions is a convenient guide in assessing biologically significant components of these spectra. The mapping of LET to energy is triple valued and can be defined only on open energy subintervals where the derivative of LET with respect to energy is not zero. Presented here is a well-defined numerical procedure which allows for the generation of LET spectra on the open energy subintervals that are integrable in spite of their singular nature. The efficiency and accuracy of the numerical procedures is demonstrated by providing examples of computed differential and integral LET spectra and their equilibrium components for historically large SPEs and 1977 solar minimum GCR environments. Due to the biological significance of tissue, all simulations are done with tissue as the target material.

  3. Effects of radiobiological uncertainty on vehicle and habitat shield design for missions to the moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.; Schimmerling, Walter; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wood, James S.

    1993-01-01

    Some consequences of uncertainties in radiobiological risk due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure are analyzed for their effect on engineering designs for the first lunar outpost and a mission to explore Mars. This report presents the plausible effect of biological uncertainties, the design changes necessary to reduce the uncertainties to acceptable levels for a safe mission, and an evaluation of the mission redesign cost. Estimates of the amount of shield mass required to compensate for radiobiological uncertainty are given for a simplified vehicle and habitat. The additional amount of shield mass required to provide a safety factor for uncertainty compensation is calculated from the expected response to GCR exposure. The amount of shield mass greatly increases in the estimated range of biological uncertainty, thus, escalating the estimated cost of the mission. The estimates are used as a quantitative example for the cost-effectiveness of research in radiation biophysics and radiation physics.

  4. Modeling the variations of Dose Rate measured by RAD during the first MSL Martian year: 2012-2014

    E-print Network

    Guo, Jingnan; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Rafkin, Scot; Hassler, Donald M; Posner, Arik; Heber, Bernd; Koehler, Jan; Ehresmann, Bent; Appel, Jan K; Boehm, Eckart; Boettcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Soenke; Brinza, David E; Lohf, Henning; Martin, Cesar; Kahanpaeae, H; Reitz, Guenther

    2015-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), on board Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures the {energy spectra} of both energetic charged and neutral particles along with the radiation dose rate at the surface of Mars. With these first-ever measurements on the Martian surface, RAD observed several effects influencing the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) induced surface radiation dose concurrently: [a] short-term diurnal variations of the Martian atmospheric pressure caused by daily thermal tides, [b] long-term seasonal pressure changes in the Martian atmosphere, and [c] the modulation of the primary GCR flux by the heliospheric magnetic field, which correlates with long-term solar activity and the rotation of the Sun. The RAD surface dose measurements, along with the surface pressure data and the solar modulation factor, are analysed and fitted to empirical models which quantitatively demonstrate} how the long-term influences ([b] and [c]) are related to the measured dose rates. {Correspondingly we ...

  5. Effects of nuclear cross sections at different energies on the radiation hazard from galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z W; Adams, J H

    2007-03-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major obstacle to long-duration human space exploration. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate the radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport calculations. We find that, in deep space, cross sections at energies between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/nucleon have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff. PMID:17316078

  6. The descent of the solar cycle 24 cosmic ray modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Ygbuhay, R. C.

    2013-06-01

    The descending phase of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) modulation at earth orbit, for the sunspot number (SSN) cycle 24 is studied, using data from the global network of neutron monitors and the balloon measurements at high latitudes in Russia. The decrease in intensity, two years after the onset of modulation, is modest compared to earlier cycles. The tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet is very close to its maximum value for a cycle and the solar polar field has reversed in the northern hemisphere. So, one should expect the GCR modulation to be close to its maximum value. A preliminary determination is made of the rigidity dependence of the observed modulation for two years. It is a power law with an exponent -1.11, similar to that observed for earlier cycles (20-23).

  7. A space radiation shielding model of the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE).

    PubMed

    Atwell, W; Saganti, P; Cucinotta, F A; Zeitlin, C J

    2004-01-01

    The 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft was launched towards Mars on April 7, 2001. Onboard the spacecraft is the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE), which is designed to measure the background radiation environment due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar protons in the 20-500 MeV/n energy range. We present an approach for developing a space radiation-shielding model of the spacecraft that includes the MARIE instrument in the current mapping phase orientation. A discussion is presented describing the development and methodology used to construct the shielding model. For a given GCR model environment, using the current MARIE shielding model and the high-energy particle transport codes, dose rate values are compared with MARIE measurements during the early mapping phase in Mars orbit. The results show good agreement between the model calculations and the MARIE measurements as presented for the March 2002 dataset. PMID:15791735

  8. Optimized shielding for space radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Kim, M. H.; Schimmerling, W.

    2001-01-01

    Future deep space mission and International Space Station exposures will be dominated by the high-charge and -energy (HZE) ions of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). A few mammalian systems have been extensively tested over a broad range of ion types and energies. For example, C3H10T1/2 cells, V79 cells, and Harderian gland tumors have been described by various track-structure dependent response models. The attenuation of GCR induced biological effects depends strongly on the biological endpoint, response model used, and material composition. Optimization of space shielding is then driven by the nature of the response model and the transmission characteristics of the given material.

  9. Cosmic Ray Modulation in the Outer Heliosphere During the Minimum of Solar Cycle 23/24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Florinski, V.; Washimi, H.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2011-01-01

    We report a next generation model of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) transport in the three dimensional heliosphere. Our model is based on an accurate three-dimensional representation of the heliospheric interface. This representation is obtained by taking into account the interaction between partially ionized, magnetized plasma flows of the solar wind and the local interstellar medium. Our model reveals that after entering the heliosphere GCRs are stored in the heliosheath for several years. The preferred GCR entry locations are near the nose of the heliopause and at high latitudes. Low-energy (hundreds of MeV) galactic ions observed in the heliosheath have spent, on average, a longer time in the solar wind than those observed in the inner heliosphere, which would explain their cooled-off spectra at these energies. We also discuss radial gradients in the heliosheath and the implications for future Voyager observations.

  10. The Origin of HELIUM-3 Isotope Enhancement in the Magnetosphere Observed by Tsubasa Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareyama, M.; Fujii, M.; Hasebe, N.; Kajiwara, N.; Kodaira, S.; Sakurai, K.; Takano, M.; Goka, T.; Koshiishi, H.; Matsumoto, H.

    2006-04-01

    The energetic helium isotopes, 3He and 4He, were observed by Heavy Ion Telescope (HIT) onboard the TSUBASA satellite from March, 2002 to September, 2003 in the geostationary transfer orbit. These isotope data in the quiet periods were analyzed to obtain the spatial and temporal variation of fluxes of both isotopes. The enhancement and variation of the 3He/4He ratio in low L-value were found to be large in comparison with that of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), while the ratio in high L-value is almost stable and comparable to GCR one. These results suggest that the injection and loss mechanism of heavy ions differ between inner and outer radiation belts.

  11. Solar cosmic ray produced neon in lunar soils and their implication for gas-rich meteorite studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nautiyal, C. M.; Rao, M. N.

    1984-01-01

    Characteristic neon isotopic ratios, produced due to solar cosmic ray spallation (SCR) in lunar soils, are useful in deciphering and estimating the relative contributions of SCR and GCR spallation. To delineate these features, etched mineral grains from mature and immature lunar soils (14148 and 61221 respectively) were analyzed using mass spectrometry. The SF-Ne composition deduced in this work agrees with that obtained from earlier etched lunar pyroxene studies. The data points for mature soil 14148 define a line which significantly deviates from the 61221 tie line. This deviation is attributed to the presence of SCR spallation component. In this context, neon isotopic compositions (step-wise heating) in Pantar and Leighton dark portions were studied and compared with that of Fayetteville. The meteorite data points deviate significantly from the tie line joining SF-Ne and GCR (pyroxene) end points. This deviation is attributed to SCR-spallation in gas-rich chondrites.

  12. Matrix models and graph colouring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuta, Giovanni M.; Molinari, Luca; Montaldi, Emilio

    1993-06-01

    We study an edge-colouring problem on random planar graphs which is one of the simplest vertex models that may be analyzed by standard methods of large N matrix models. The main features of the saddle point solution and its critical behaviour are described. At the critical value of the coupling gcr the eigen value density u(?)M is found to vanish at the border of the support as ?-a2/3.

  13. MCNP6 Cosmic-Source Option

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Gregg W; Armstrong, Hirotatsu; James, Michael R; Clem, John; Goldhagen, Paul

    2012-06-19

    MCNP is a Monte Carlo radiation transport code that has been under development for over half a century. Over the last decade, the development team of a high-energy offshoot of MCNP, called MCNPX, has implemented several physics and algorithm improvements important for modeling galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) interactions with matter. In this presentation, we discuss the latest of these improvements, a new Cosmic-Source option, that has been implemented in MCNP6.

  14. Radiation risk predictions for Space Station Freedom orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Atwell, William; Weyland, Mark; Hardy, Alva C.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Katz, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Risk assessment calculations are presented for the preliminary proposed solar minimum and solar maximum orbits for Space Station Freedom (SSF). Integral linear energy transfer (LET) fluence spectra are calculated for the trapped proton and GCR environments. Organ dose calculations are discussed using the computerized anatomical man model. The cellular track model of Katz is applied to calculate cell survival, transformation, and mutation rates for various aluminum shields. Comparisons between relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and quality factor (QF) values for SSF orbits are made.

  15. Space Radiation Hazards on Human Missions to the Moon and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L.

    2004-12-01

    One of the most significant health risks for humans exploring Earth's moon and Mars is exposure to the harsh space radiation environment. Crews on these exploration missions will be exposed to a complex mixture of very energetic particles. Chronic exposures to the ever-present background galactic cosmic ray (GCR) spectrum consisting of various fluxes of all naturally - occurring chemical elements are combined with infrequent, possibly acute exposures to large fluxes of solar energetic particles, consisting of protons and heavier particles. The GCR environment is primarily a concern for stochastic effects, such as the induction of cancer, with subsequent mortality in many cases, and late deterministic effects, such as cataracts and possible damage to the central nervous system. An acute radiation syndrome response ("radiation sickness") is not possible from the GCR environment since the organ doses are well below levels of concern. Unfortunately, the actual risks of cancer induction and mortality for the very important high-energy heavy ion component of the GCR spectrum are essentially unknown. The sporadic occurrence of extremely large solar energetic particle events, usually associated with intense solar activity, is also a major concern for Lunar and Mars missions because of the possible manifestation of acute effects from the accompanying high doses of such radiations, especially acute radiation syndrome effects such as nausea, emesis, hemorrhaging or possibly even death. Large solar energetic particle events can also contribute significantly to crew risks from cancer mortality. In this presentation an overview of current estimates of critical organ doses and equivalent doses for crews of Lunar and Mars bases and on those on transits between Earth and Mars is presented. Possible methods of mitigating these radiation exposures by shielding, thereby reducing the associated health risks to crews, are also described.

  16. Changes in expression of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type-1, type-2 and glucocorticoid receptor mRNAs in porcine corpus luteum during the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Sakumoto, Ryosuke; Ito, Shuichi; Okuda, Kiyoshi

    2008-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether glucocorticoid (GC) and its receptor (GC-R) are expressed in the porcine corpus luteum (CL), and whether GC influences porcine luteal hormone production. The gene expressions of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11-HSD1), type 2 (11-HSD2), GC-R, and the concentrations of GC were determined in the CL of Chinese Meishan pigs during the estrous cycle. Moreover, the effects of GC on progesterone (P(4)), estradiol-17beta (E(2)), and prostaglandin (PG) F2alpha secretion by cultured luteal cells were investigated. Messenger RNAs of the 11-HSD1, 11-HSD2, and GC-R were clearly expressed in the CL throughout the estrous cycle. The 11-HSD1 mRNA level in the CL was higher at the regressed stage than at the other stages (P < 0.05), whereas 11-HSD2 mRNA was lower at the regressed stage than at the other stages (P < 0.05). GC-R mRNA level was higher at the regressed stages than at the other stages (P < 0.01). Concentrations of GC were lower in the regressed CL than in the other stages (P < 0.01). When the cultured luteal cells obtained from mid-stage CL (Days 8-11) were exposed to GC (50-5,000 ng/ml), P(4) and PGF2alpha secretion by the cells were reduced (P < 0.05), whereas GC had no effect on E(2) secretion by the cells. The overall results suggest that GC is regulated locally by 11-HSD1 and 11-HSD2 in the porcine CL. GC inhibits P(4) and PGF2alpha production from luteal cells via their specific receptors, implying GC plays some roles in regulating porcine CL function throughout the estrous cycle. PMID:18033680

  17. Multi-Scale Model of Galactic Cosmic Ray Effects on the Hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucinotta, Francis

    An important concern for risk assessment from galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures is impacts to the central nervous systems including changes in cognition, and associations with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD, which affects about 50 percent of the population above age 80-yr, is a degenerative disease that worsens with time after initial onset leading to death, and has no known cure. AD is difficult to detect at early stages, and the small number of epidemiology studies that have considered the possibility have not identified an association with low dose radiation. However, experimental studies in transgenic mice suggest the possibility exits. We discuss modeling approaches to consider mechanisms whereby GCR would accelerate the occurrence of AD to earlier ages. Biomarkers of AD include Amyloid beta plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) made up of aggregates of the hyper-phosphorylated form of the micro-tubule associated, tau protein. Related markers include synaptic degeneration, dendritic spine loss, and neuronal cell loss through apoptosis. GCR may affect these processes by causing oxidative stress, aberrant signaling following DNA damage, and chronic neuro-inflammation. Cell types considered in multi-scale models are neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. We developed biochemical and cell kinetics models of DNA damage signaling related to glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta and neuro-inflammation, and considered approaches to develop computer simulations of GCR induced cell interactions and their relationships to Amyloid beta plaques and NFTs. Comparison of model results to experimental data for the age specific development of plaques in transgenic mice and predictions of space radiation effects will be discussed.

  18. An Algorithm for the Transport of Anisotropic Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.

    2005-01-01

    One major obstacle to human space exploration is the possible limitations imposed by the adverse effect of long-term exposure to the space environment. Even before human spaceflight began, the potentially brief exposure of astronauts to the very intense random solar particle events (SPE) were of great concern. A new challenge appears in deep space exploration from exposure to the low-intensity heavy-ion flux of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since the missions are of long duration and the accumulated GCR exposures can be high. Because cancer induction rates increase behind low to rather large thicknesses of aluminum shielding, according to available biological data on mammalian exposures to GCR like ions, the shield requirements for a Mars mission are prohibitively expensive in terms of mission launch costs. Therefore, a critical issue in the Human Exploration and Development of Space enterprise is cost effective mitigation of risk associated with ionizing radiation exposure. In order to estimate astronaut risk to GCR exposure and associated cancer risks and health hazards, it is necessary to do shield material studies. To determine an optimum radiation shield material it is necessary to understand nuclear interaction processes such as fragmentation and secondary particle production which is a function of energy dependent cross sections. This requires knowledge of material transmission characteristics either through laboratory testing or improved theoretical modeling. Here ion beam transport theory is of importance in that testing of materials in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are a major emphasis of the present work.

  19. The influence of cosmic rays on the size of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    E-print Network

    M. Alvarez Madrigal; J. Perez Peraza; V. M. Velasco

    2010-01-15

    The Antarctic region in which severe ozone depletion has taken place is known as the ozone hole. This region has two basic indicators: the area, where the ozone abundance is low (size), and the quantity of ozone mass deficit (depth). The energetic particles that penetrate deeply into the atmosphere and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) modify the ozone abundance in the stratosphere. With this research project, we are looking for evidence of a connection between variations in the cosmic ray flux and variations in the size of the ozone hole. In addition, we are looking for signs of the kind of processes that physically connect GCR fluxes with variations in the stratospheric ozone hole size (OHS) in the Antarctic region. With this goal in mind, we also analyze here the atmospheric temperature (AT) anomalies, which have often been linked with such variations. Using Morlet's wavelet spectral analysis to compute the coherence between two time series, we found that during the analyzed period (1982-2005), there existed a common signal of around 3 and 5 years between the OHS and GCR time series, during September and November, respectively. In both cases, the relationship showed a time-dependent anti-correlation between the two series. On the other hand, for October the analysis showed a time-dependent correlation that occurs around 1.7 years. These results seem to indicate that there exist at least two kinds of modulation processes of GCR fluxes on the OHS that work simultaneously but that change their relative relevance along the timeline.

  20. Radiological health risks for exploratory class missions in space.

    PubMed

    Nachtwey, D S; Yang, T C

    1991-01-01

    Crewmembers on missions to the Moon or Mars will be unavoidably exposed to ionizing radiation as they pass through the Van Allen belts and the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) flux. There is the possibility for exposure to proton radiation from Solar Particle Events (SPE). Using absorbed doses and ICRP 26, Linear Energy Transfer (LET) -dependent quality factors, the following dose-equivalents are estimated: In a spacecraft with 0.75 cm aluminum walls (2 g/cm2) at solar minimum, the lunar round trip dose-equivalent is less than 0.05 Sv. During a Mars mission the estimated dose-equivalents are: outbound (Van Allen Belts) <0.02 Sv; Earth to Mars (205 days exposure to free space GCR) 0.32 Sv; 30 days on the Martian surface (GCR) 0.023 Sv; Mars to Earth (225 days exposure to free space) 0.35 Sv; and through the Van Allen Belts 0.02 Sv. Conventionally, the total of 0.73 Sv over 460 days could be expected to increase the risk of cancer mortality in a 35-year old male astronaut by about one percent. However three-fourths of the dose-equivalent in free space is contributed by high LET heavy ions (Z > or = 3) and target fragments with average quality factors of 10.3 and 20 respectively. The biological effectiveness of these radiations is poorly understood; so the quality factors are set at conservatively very high values. The entire concept of absorbed dose/quality factor/dose-equivalent as applied to GCR must be reconsidered. PMID:11537128

  1. Radiation Measured with Different Dosimeters for ISS-Expedition 18-19/ULF2 on Board International Space Station during Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Dazhuang; Gaza, R.; Roed, Y.; Semones, E.; Lee, K.; Steenburgh, R.; Johnson, S.; Flanders, J.; Zapp, N.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation field of particles in low Earth orbit (LEO) is mainly composed of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar energetic particles and particles in SAA (South Atlantic Anomaly). GCR are modulated by solar activity, at the period of solar minimum activity, GCR intensity is at maximum and the main contributor for space radiation is GCR. At present for space radiation measurements conducted by JSC (Johnson Space Center) SRAG (Space Radiation Analysis Group), the preferred active dosimeter sensitive to all LET (Linear Energy Transfer) is the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC); the preferred passive dosimeters are thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) sensitive to low LET as well as CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) sensitive to high LET. For the method using passive dosimeters, radiation quantities for all LET can be obtained by combining radiation results measured with TLDs/OSLDs and CR-39 PNTDs. TEPC, TLDs/OSLDs and CR-39 detectors were used to measure the radiation field for the ISS (International Space Station) - Expedition 18-19/ULF2 space mission which was conducted from 15 November 2008 to 31 July 2009 - near the period of the recent solar minimum activity. LET spectra (differential and integral fluence, absorbed dose and dose equivalent) and radiation quantities were measured for positions TEPC, TESS (Temporary Sleeping Station, inside the polyethylene lined sleep station), SM-P 327 and 442 (Service Module - Panel 327 and 442). This paper presents radiation LET spectra measured with TEPC and CR-39 PNTDs and radiation dose measured with TLDs/OSLDs as well as the radiation quantities combined from results measured with passive dosimeters.

  2. Comparisons of Integrated Radiation Transport Models with Microdosimetry Data in Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Nikjoo, H.; Kim, M. Y.; Hu, X.; Dicello, J. F.; Pisacane, V. L.

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts are exposed to galactic cosmic rays (GCR), trapped protons, and possible solar particle events (SPE) during spaceflight. For such complicated mixtures of radiation types and kinetic energies, tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC's) represent a simple time-dependent approach for radiation monitoring. Of interest in radiation protection is the average quality factor of a radiation field defined as a function of linear energy transfer, LET, Q(sub ave)(LET). However TEPC's measure the average quality factors as a function of lineal energy (y), Q(sub ave)(y) defined as the average energy deposition in a volume divided by the average chord length of the volume. Lineal energy, y deviates from LET due to energy straggling, delta-ray escape or entry, and nuclear fragments produced in the detector. Using integrated space radiation models that includes the transport code HZETRN/BRYNTRN, the quantum nuclear interaction model, QMSFRG, and results from Monte-Carlo track simulations of TEPC's response to ions, we consider comparisons of model calculations to TEPC results from NASA missions in low Earth orbit and make predictions for lunar and Mars missions. Good agreement between the model and measured spectra from past NASA missions is found. A finding of this work is that TEPC's values for trapped or solar protons of Q(sub ave)(y) range from 1.9-2.5, overestimating Q(sub ave)(LET), which ranges from 1.4-1.6 with both quantities increasing with shielding depth due to nuclear secondaries Comparisons for the complete GCR spectra show that Q(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is approximately 3.5-4.5, while TEPC's measure 2.9-3.4 for Q(sub ave)(y) with the GCR values decreasing with depth as heavy ions are absorbed in shielding material. Our results support the use of TEPC's for space radiation environmental monitoring when computational analysis is used for proper data interpretation.

  3. Sunspot activity and cosmic ray modulation at 1 a.u. for 1900-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.

    2014-10-01

    The descent of sunspot cycle 23 to an unprecedented minimum of long duration in 2006-2009 led to a prolonged galactic cosmic ray (GCR) recovery to the highest level observed in the instrumental era for a variety of energetic charged particle species on Earth, over a wide range of rigidities. The remarkable GCR increase measured by several ground-based, balloon-borne, and detectors on a satellite is described and discussed. It is accompanied by a decrease in solar wind velocity and interplanetary magnetic field at 1 a.u., reaching the lowest values since measurements of the solar wind began in October 1963; the solar polar field strength (?T) measured at the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) is also significantly reduced compared to prior cycles since the start of the program in 1976, the polar field in the northern hemisphere reversed in June 2012 and again in February 2014, that in the southern hemisphere reversed in July 2013. If updates of WSO data confirm the second reversal in northern solar hemisphere, it would pose a serious challenge to the Dynamo Theory. The long-term change in solar behavior may have begun in 1992, perhaps earlier. The physical underpinnings of these solar changes need to be understood and their effect on GCR modulation processes clarified. The study discusses the recent phenomena in the context of GCR modulation since 1900. These happenings affected our empirical predictions for the key parameters for the next two sunspot cycles (they may be progressively less active than sunspot cycle 24) but it enhanced support for our prediction that solar activity is descending into a Dalton-like grand minimum in the middle of the twentyfirst century, reducing the frequency of the coronal mass ejections; they determine the space weather affecting the quality of life on Earth, radiation dose for hardware and human activities in space as well as the frequency of large Forbush decreases at 1 a.u.

  4. Galactic Cosmic Ray Modulation near the Heliospheric Current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. R.; Owens, M. J.; Lockwood, M.; Scott, C. J.

    2014-07-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are modulated by the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) both over decadal time scales (due to long-term, global HMF variations), and over time scales of a few hours (associated with solar wind structures such as coronal mass ejections or the heliospheric current sheet, HCS). Due to the close association between the HCS, the streamer belt, and the band of slow solar wind, HCS crossings are often associated with corotating interaction regions where fast solar wind catches up and compresses slow solar wind ahead of it. However, not all HCS crossings are associated with strong compressions. In this study we categorize HCS crossings in two ways: Firstly, using the change in magnetic polarity, as either away-to-toward (AT) or toward-to-away (TA) magnetic field directions relative to the Sun and, secondly, using the strength of the associated solar wind compression, determined from the observed plasma density enhancement. For each category, we use superposed epoch analyses to show differences in both solar wind parameters and GCR flux inferred from neutron monitors. For strong-compression HCS crossings, we observe a peak in neutron counts preceding the HCS crossing, followed by a large drop after the crossing, attributable to the so-called `snow-plough' effect. For weak-compression HCS crossings, where magnetic field polarity effects are more readily observable, we instead observe that the neutron counts have a tendency to peak in the away magnetic field sector. By splitting the data by the dominant polarity at each solar polar region, we find that the increase in GCR flux prior to the HCS crossing is primarily from strong compressions in cycles with negative north polar fields due to GCR drift effects. Finally, we report on unexpected differences in GCR behavior between TA weak compressions during opposing polarity cycles.

  5. Polymeric Materials With Additives for Durability and Radiation Shielding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Polymeric materials are attractive for use in space structures because of their light weight and high strength In addition, polymers are made of elements with low atomic numbers (Z), primarily carbon (C), hydrogen (H), oxygen (0), and nitrogen (N) which provide the best shielding from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) (ref. 1). Galactic cosmic rays are composed primarily of nuclei (i.e., fully ionized atoms) plus a contribution of about 2% from electrons and positrons. There is a small but significant component of GCR particles with high charge (Z > 10) and high energy (E >100 GeV) (ref. 2). These so-called HZE particles comprise only 1 to 2% of the cosmic ray fluence but they interact with very high specific ionization and contribute 50% of the long- term dose to humans. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is not feasible. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Moreover, neutrons are formed in the interactions of GCR particles with materials. Neutrons can only lose energy by collisions or reactions with a nucleus since they are uncharged. This is a process that is much less probable than the Coulombic interactions of charged particles. Thus, neutrons migrate far from the site of the reaction in which they were formed. This increases the probability of neutrons reaching humans or electronic equipment. Fast neutrons (> 1 MeV) can interact with silicon chips in electronic equipment resulting in the production of recoil ions which can cause single event upsets (SEU) in sensitive components (ref. 3). Neutrons lose energy most effectively by elastic collisions with light atoms, particularly hydrogen atoms. Therefore, hydrogen-containing polymers are not only effective in interacting with GCR particles; they are also effective in reducing the energy of the neutrons formed in the interactions.

  6. Galactic Cosmic Ray Intensity Response to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections/Magnetic Clouds in 1995-2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the response of the galactic cosmic ray (CGR) intensity to the passage of the more than 300 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and their associated shocks that passed the Earth during 1995-2009, a period that encompasses the whole of Solar Cycle 23. In approx.80% of cases, the GCR intensity decreased during the passage of these structures, i.e., a "Forbush decrease" occurred, while in approx.10% there was no significant change. In the remaining cases, the GCR intensity increased. Where there was an intensity decrease, minimum intensity was observed inside the ICME in approx.90% of these events. The observations confirm the role of both post-shock regions and ICMEs in the generation of these decreases, consistent with many previous studies, but contrary to the conclusion of Reames, Kahler, and Tylka (Astrophys. 1. Lett. 700, L199, 2009) who, from examining a subset of ICMEs with flux-rope-like magnetic fields (magnetic clouds) argued that these are "open structures" that allow free access of particles including GCRs to their interior. In fact, we find that magnetic clouds are more likely to participate in the deepest GCR decreases than ICMEs that are not magnetic clouds.

  7. Calibration of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathew, K. J.; Marti, K.

    2004-01-01

    We report first Xe data on the cross-calibration of I-129-Xe-129(sub n) ages with conventional CRE ages, a method which is expected to provide information on the long-term constancy of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux. We studied isotopic signatures of Xe released in stepwise heating, decomposition and melting of troilites in the Cape York iron meteorite to identify isotopic shifts in Xe-129 and Xe-131 due to neutron capture in Te-128 and Te-130. We also resolve components due to extinct 129I, spallation and fission Xe. There has recently been much speculation on the constancy of GCR over long time scales, as may be inferred from iron meteorites. If GCRs originate from supernova events, this provides the basis for postulating increased fluxes at locations with higher than average densities of supernovae, specifically in OB-associations. The solar system at present appears to be inside a local bubble between spiral arms and may experience an increased GCR flux.

  8. Initiation-promotion model of tumor prevalence in mice from space radiation exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Exposures in space consist of low-level background components from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), occasional intense-energetic solar-particle events, periodic passes through geomagnetic-trapped radiation, and exposure from possible onboard nuclear-propulsion engines. Risk models for astronaut exposure from such diverse components and modalities must be developed to assure adequate protection in future NASA missions. The low-level background exposures (GCR), including relativistic heavy ions (HZE), will be the ultimate limiting factor for astronaut career exposure. We consider herein a two-mutation, initiation-promotion, radiation-carcinogenesis model in mice in which the initiation stage is represented by a linear kinetics model of cellular repair/misrepair, including the track-structure model for heavy ion action cross-sections. The model is validated by comparison with the harderian gland tumor experiments of Alpen et al. for various ion beams. We apply the initiation-promotion model to exposures from galactic cosmic rays, using models of the cosmic-ray environment and heavy ion transport, and consider the effects of the age of the mice prior to and after the exposure and of the length of time in space on predictions of relative risk. Our results indicate that biophysical models of age-dependent radiation hazard will provide a better understanding of GCR risk than models that rely strictly on estimates of the initial slopes of these radiations.

  9. Designing Spacecraft and Mission Operations Plans to Meet Flight Crew Radiation Dose Requirements: Why is this an "Epic Challenge" for Long-Term Manned Interplanetary Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Outline of presentation: (1) Radiation Shielding Concepts and Performance - Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) (1a) Some general considerations (1b) Galactic Cosmic Rays (2)GCR Shielding I: What material should I use and how much do I need? (2a) GCR shielding materials design and verification (2b) Spacecraft materials point dose cosmic ray shielding performance - hydrogen content and atomic number (2c) Accelerator point dose materials testing (2d) Material ranking and selection guidelines (2e) Development directions and return on investment (point dose metric) (2f) Secondary particle showers in the human body (2f-1) limited return of investment for low-Z, high-hydrogen content materials (3) GCR shielding II: How much will it cost? (3a) Spacecraft design and verification for mission radiation dose to the crew (3b) Habitat volume, shielding areal density, total weight, and launch cost for two habitat volumes (3c) It's All about the Money - Historical NASA budgets and budget limits (4) So, what can I do about all this? (4a) Program Design Architecture Trade Space (4b) The Vehicle Design Trade Space (4c) Some Near Term Recommendations

  10. 27-day Variation of the Three Dimensional Solar Anisotropy of Galactic Cosmic Ray: 1965-2014

    E-print Network

    Modzelewska, R

    2015-01-01

    The temporal evaluation of the 27-day variation of the three dimensional (3D) galactic cosmic ray (GCR) anisotropy has been studied for 1965-2014. 3D anisotropy vector was obtained based on the neutron monitors and Nagoya muon telescopes data. We analyze the 27-day variation of the (1) two dimensional (2D) GCR anisotropy in the ecliptic plane, and (2) north-south anisotropy normal to the ecliptic plane. Studying the time line of the 27-day variation of the 2D GCR anisotropy, we confirm that the average amplitude in the minimum epoch of solar activity is polarity dependent, as it is expected from the drift theory. The amplitude in the negative polarity epochs is less as we had shown before. The feeble 11-year variation connected with solar cycle and strong 22-year pattern connected with solar magnetic cycle is visible in the 27-day variation of the 2D anisotropy for 1965-2014. We show that the 27-day variation of the GG index (being a measure of the north-south asymmetry) varies in accordance to solar cycle wi...

  11. Radiation climate map for analyzing risks to astronauts on the mars surface from galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saganti, Premkumar B.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Zeitlin, Cary

    2004-01-01

    The potential risks for late effects including cancer, cataracts, and neurological disorders due to exposures to the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a large concern for the human exploration of Mars. Physical models are needed to project the radiation exposures to be received by astronauts in transit to Mars and on the Mars surface, including the understanding of the modification of the GCR by the Martian atmosphere and identifying shielding optimization approaches. The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission has been collecting Martian surface topographical data with the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Here we present calculations of radiation climate maps of the surface of Mars using the MOLA data, the radiation transport model HZETRN (high charge and high energy transport), and the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation model, QMSFRG. Organ doses and the average number of particle hits per cell nucleus from GCR components (protons, heavy ions, and neutrons) are evaluated as a function of the altitude on the Martian surface. Approaches to improve the accuracy of the radiation climate map, presented here using data from the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission, are discussed.

  12. Radiation Climate Map for Analyzing Risks to Astronauts on the Mars Surface from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saganti, Premkumar B.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Zeitlin, Cary

    The potential risks for late effects including cancer, cataracts, and neurological disorders due to exposures to the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a large concern for the human exploration of Mars. Physical models are needed to project the radiation exposures to be received by astronauts in transit to Mars and on the Mars surface, including the understanding of the modification of the GCR by the Martian atmosphere and identifying shielding optimization approaches. The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission has been collecting Martian surface topographical data with the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Here we present calculations of radiation climate maps of the surface of Mars using the MOLA data, the radiation transport model HZETRN (high charge and high energy transport), and the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation model, QMSFRG. Organ doses and the average number of particle hits per cell nucleus from GCR components (protons, heavy ions, and neutrons) are evaluated as a function of the altitude on the Martian surface. Approaches to improve the accuracy of the radiation climate map, presented here using data from the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission, are discussed.

  13. [Results of statistical analysis of the dynamics of ionizing radiation dose fields in the service module of the International Space Station in 2000-2012].

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, V G

    2014-01-01

    The on-going 24th solar cycle (SC) is distinguished from the previous ones by low activity. On the contrary, levels of proton fluxes from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are high, which increases the proton flow striking the Earth's radiation belts (ERB). Therefore, at present the absorbed dose from ERB protons should be calculated with consideration of the tangible increase of protons intensity built into the model descriptions based on experimental measurements during the minimum between cycles 19 and 20, and the cycle 21 maximum. The absorbed dose from GCR and ERB protons copies galactic protons dynamics, while the ERB electrons dose copies SC dynamics. The major factors that determine the absorbed dose value are SC phase, ISS orbital altitude and shielding of the dosimeter readings of which are used in analysis. The paper presents the results of dynamic analysis of absorbed doses measured by a variety of dosimeters, namely, R-16 (2 ionization chambers), DB8-1, DB8-2, DB8-3, DB8-4 as a function of ISS orbit altitude and SC phase. The existence of annual variation in the absorbed dose dynamics has been confirmed; several additional variations with the periods of 17 and 52 months have been detected. Modulation of absorbed dose variations by the SC and GCR amplitudes has been demonstrated. PMID:25035897

  14. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on Space Radiation Exposure from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zi-Wei; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major hazard to space crews, especially in long duration human space explorations. For this reason, they will be protected by radiation shielding that fragments the GCR heavy ions. Here we investigate how sensitive the crew's radiation exposure is to nuclear fragmentation cross sections at different energies. We find that in deep space cross sections between about 0.2 and 1.2 GeV/u have the strongest effect on dose equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV/u are the most important at solar maximum'. On the other hand, at the location of the International Space Station, cross sections at_higher -energies, between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV /u at solar minimum and between about 1.7 and 3.4 GeV/u'at,solar maximum, are the most important This is. due-to the average geomagnetic cutoff for the ISS orbit. We also show the effect of uncertainties in the fragmentation cross sections on the elemental energy spectra behind shielding. These results help to focus the studies of fragmentation cross sections on the proper energy range in order to improve our predictions of crew exposures.

  15. MCNPX Cosmic Ray Shielding Calculations with the NORMAN Phantom Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Michael R.; Durkee, Joe W.; McKinney, Gregg; Singleterry Robert

    2008-01-01

    The United States is planning manned lunar and interplanetary missions in the coming years. Shielding from cosmic rays is a critical aspect of manned spaceflight. These ventures will present exposure issues involving the interplanetary Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) environment. GCRs are comprised primarily of protons (approx.84.5%) and alpha-particles (approx.14.7%), while the remainder is comprised of massive, highly energetic nuclei. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) has commissioned a joint study with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to investigate the interaction of the GCR environment with humans using high-fidelity, state-of-the-art computer simulations. The simulations involve shielding and dose calculations in order to assess radiation effects in various organs. The simulations are being conducted using high-resolution voxel-phantom models and the MCNPX[1] Monte Carlo radiation-transport code. Recent advances in MCNPX physics packages now enable simulated transport over 2200 types of ions of widely varying energies in large, intricate geometries. We report here initial results obtained using a GCR spectrum and a NORMAN[3] phantom.

  16. Solar-Cosmic-Ray-Produced Nuclides in Extraterrestrial Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    There are two main types of cosmic rays that have sufficient energy to induce nuclear reactions -- the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar cosmic rays (also called solar energetic particles). Both types of particles can have production rates and production ratios in the small objects often found in cold and hot deserts that are different from those seen for most meteorites, which typically have radii of approx.10-100 centimeters. GCR production rates are often lower than those for most meteorites. GCR production ratios, such as Ne-22/Ne-21, are also often different in small objects. Smaller meteoroids also are more likely to have nuclides made by solar-cosmic-ray (SCR) particles than typically-sized meteorites. The very small meteorite Salem had large amounts of SCR-produced radionuclides. Meteorites recovered in Antarctica are more likely to contain SCR-produced nuclides than other meteorites. Martian and lunar meteorites are also likely to have SCR-produced nuclides. Production rates and profiles for SCR-produced nuclides in meteoroids have been calculated previously. However, the cross sections for the nuclear reactions making many SCR-produced nuclides, such as Be-10, were not well measured then. New rates and profiles are calculated here using good cross sections for the reactions making these nuclides.

  17. Solar-Cosmic-Ray-Produced Nuclides in Extraterrestrial Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    There are two main types of cosmic rays that have sufficient energy to induce nuclear reactions -- the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar cosmic rays (also called solar energetic particles). Both types of particles can have production rates and production ratios in the small objects often found in cold and hot deserts that are different from those seen for most meteorites, which typically have radii of approx. 10-100 centimeters. GCR production rates are often lower than those for most meteorites. GCR production ratios, such as Ne-22/Ne-21, are also often different in small objects. Smaller meteoroids also are more likely to have nuclides made by solar-cosmic-ray (SCR) particles than typically-sized meteorites. The very small meteorite Salem had large amounts of SCR-produced radionuclides. Meteorites recovered in Antarctica are more likely to contain SCR-produced nuclides than other meteorites. Martian and lunar meteorites are also likely to have SCR-produced nuclides. Production rates and profiles for SCR-produced nuclides in meteoroids have been calculated previously. However, the cross sections for the nuclear reactions making many SCR-produced nuclides, such as Be-10 were not well measured then. New rates and profiles are calculated here using good cross sections for the reactions making these nuclides.

  18. Galactic Cosmic Rays and Lunar Secondary Particles from Solar Minimum to Maximum: CRaTER Observations and Geant4 Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Blake, J. B.; Spence, H. E.; Schwadron, N.; Golightly, M. J.; Case, A. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission was launched in 2009 during the recent deep and extended solar minimum, with the highest galactic cosmic ray (GCR) fluxes observed since the beginning of the space era. Its Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) instrument was designed to measure the spectra of energy deposits in silicon detectors shielded behind pieces of tissue equivalent plastic, simulating the self-shielding provided by an astronaut's body around radiation-sensitive organs. The CRaTER data set now covers the evolution of the GCR environment near the moon during the first five years of development of the present solar cycle. We will present these observations, along with Geant4 modeling to illustrate the varying particle contributions to the energy-deposit spectra. CRaTER has also measured protons traveling up from the lunar surface after their creation during GCR interactions with surface material, and we will report observations and modeling of the energy and angular distributions of these "albedo" protons.

  19. The Orbiting Astrophysical Spectrometer In Space (OASIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    The Orbiting Astrophysical Spectrometer In Space (OASIS) is an Advanced Concept currently understudy at NASA as a mission for the next decade. The goal of the OASIS mission is to identify a local site or sites where galactic cosmic rays (GCR) originate and are accelerated. The mission will allow GCR data to be used to investigate how elements are made and distributed in the galaxy and to improve our understanding of supernovae and the nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements needed for life. OASIS consists of two instruments that provide complementary data on the location and nature of the source(s) through investigating the composition of ultraheavy nuclei and the energy spectrum of electrons. OASIS will measure the relative abundances in the actinide group to determine the age of the r-process material in GCRs. The presence of young r-process material would indicate that GCRs are a sample of the interstellar medium in OB associations. OASIS will follow the electron spectrum to its high-energy end. The energy where this spectrum ends will tell us the distance to the nearest GCR source(s). OASIS will look for spectral features and anisotropy in the high energy electron spectrum that are expected to appear when only a few of the nearest sources can contribute the electron flux. Possibly these measurements will lead to the identification of the nearest cosmic ray electron source.

  20. The role of the ejecta magnetic flux on the two-step Forbush decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masías Meza, Jimmy; Dasso, Sergio

    A Forbush Decrease (FD) is a depression in the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) background intensity, and are usually associated to the passage of an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME). Magnetic Clouds (MCs) are a subset of ICMEs that are well studied, and are known to cause the deepest FDs. Usually, FDs present two steps in the depression profile, one associated to the shock arrival, and a steeper one restricted to the duration of the ejecta passage. There is a wide variety of processes responsible for the GCR depressions. For instance: the enhanced solar wind (SW) convection, reduced diffusion coefficients, enhanced adiabatic cooling, increase of the coherent magnetic field, etc. Our aim is to make a selection of FD events filtering those associated to well studied magnetic structures, such as Magnetic Clouds (MCs), in order to minimize the mixing processes involved in the ICME-GCR interactions in the resulting sample, and to study statistical properties. We determine the parameters of each FD profile and look for correlations with the associated MC parameters. We propose a method to decompose the FD profile into shock and ejecta components, and investigate correlations with the associated amplitudes of the ejecta components. We introduce the parameter, ``magnetic flux per unit length F/L'', and investigate its importance in the context of a simple ``diffusive barrier'' model. According to the correlations found, the two-step events are better represented by the ``diffusive barrier'' model, and the flux F/L is the parameter that better correlates with these events.

  1. LISA Pathfinder test-mass charging during galactic cosmic-ray flux short-term variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimani, C.; Fabi, M.; Lobo, A.; Mateos, I.; Telloni, D.

    2015-02-01

    Metal free-floating test masses aboard the future interferometers devoted to gravitational wave detection in space are charged by galactic and solar cosmic rays with energies \\gt 100 MeV/n. This process represents one of the main sources of noise in the lowest frequency band (\\lt 10-3 Hz) of these experiments. We study here the charging of the LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF) gold-platinum test masses due to galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) protons and helium nuclei with the Fluka Monte Carlo toolkit. Projections of the energy spectra of GCRs during the LISA-PF operations in 2015 are considered. This work was carried out on the basis of the solar activity level and solar polarity epoch expected for LISA-PF. The effects of GCR short-term variations are evaluated here for the first time. Classical Forbush decreases, GCR variations induced by the Sun rotation, and fluctuations in the LISA-PF frequency bandwidth are discussed.

  2. Monte Carlo transport model comparison with 1A GeV accelerated iron experiment: heavy-ion shielding evaluation of NASA space flight-crew foodstuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, D. L.; Townsend, L. W.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.

    Deep-space manned flight as a reality depends on a viable solution to the radiation problem. Both acute and chronic radiation health threats are known to exist, with solar particle events as an example of the former and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) of the latter. In this experiment Iron ions of 1A GeV are used to simulate GCR and to determine the secondary radiation field created as the GCR-like particles interact with a thick target. A NASA prepared food pantry locker was subjected to the iron beam and the secondary fluence recorded. A modified version of the Monte Carlo heavy ion transport code developed by Zeitlin at LBNL is compared with experimental fluence. The foodstuff is modeled as mixed nuts as defined by the 71 st edition of the Chemical Rubber Company (CRC) Handbook of Physics and Chemistry. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model. The agreement between model and experiment is determined using a linear fit to ordered pairs of data. The intercept is forced to zero. The slope fit is 0.825 and the R 2 value is 0.429 over the resolved fluence region. The removal of an outlier, Z=14, gives values of 0.888 and 0.705 for slope and R 2 respectively.

  3. [Galactic heavy charged particles damaging effect on biological structures].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, A I; Krasavin, E A; Ostrovski?, M A

    2013-03-01

    A concept of the radiation risk of the manned interplanetary flights is proposed and substantiated. Heavy charged particles that are a component of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have a high damaging effect on the biological structures as great amount of energy is deposited in heavy particle tracks. The high biological effectiveness of heavy ions is observed in their action on cell genetic structures and the whole organism, including the brain structures. The hippocampus is the part of the central nervous system that is the most sensitive to radiation--first of all, to heavy charged particles. Irradiation of animals with accelerated iron ions at doses corresponding to the real fluxes of GCR heavy nuclei, to which Mars mission crews can be exposed, leads to marked behavioral function disorders in the post-irradiation period. To evaluate the radiation risk for the interplanetary flight crews, the concept of successful mission accomplishment is introduced. In these conditions, the central nervous system structures can be the critical target of GCR heavy nuclei. Their damage can modify the higher integrative functions of the brain and cause disorders in the crew members' operator performances. PMID:23789432

  4. Recent results from measurements of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons aboard an ER-2 airplane and on the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhagen, P.; Clem, J.; Wilson, J.

    Air crews are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). Crews of future higher flying commercial aircraft would be even more exposed. To reduce the uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) Project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer (MNS), which was also used to make m asurements on thee ground. MNS detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. We have now recalculated the detector responses using new versions of MCNPX with improved data libraries and including the effects of the airplane structure. We are also using new FLUKA calculations of GCR-induced AIR hadron spectra to correct for MNS counts produced by charged hadrons. Neutron spectra are unfolded from the corrected measured count rates using the MAXED code. Results for the measured cosmic -ray neutron spectrum (thermal to >10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron dose equivalent and effective dose rates and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cutoff generally agree well with results from calculations of GCR-induced AIR neutron spectra using FLUKA. These results can be applied to improve models of the effects of cosmic radiation on avionics as well as to improve calculations of radiation doses to air crews.

  5. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  6. Ternary Nucleation of Sulfuric Acid, Water and Dimethylamine in the Cloud Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praplan, A. P.; Bianchi, F.; Riccobono, F.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Laboratory Of Atmospheric Chemistry; Cloud Consortium

    2011-12-01

    Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) variations were found to correlate with several past climate reconstructions. However, the microphysical mechanism responsible for this link remains mysterious. GCRs are thought to influence the formation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN): an increased GCR flux could modify cloud properties, and therefore induce a cooling effect on the climate [Kirkby, 2007]. The formation of new particles from the cluster size and their growth to CCN has been investigated at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) facility at CERN, which consists of a 26 m3 aerosol chamber exposed to an adjustable particle beam, reproducing GCR at different altitudes or latitudes. With state of the art instrumentation for particles of a few nanometers diameter as well as for trace gases, the nucleation of the sulfuric acid (H2SO4) - water (H2O) system, as well as the influence of ammonia (NH3) was already examined in the first experiments [Kirkby et al., 2011]. This paper presents the results on the nucleation of sulfuric acid in the presence of dimethylamine. Kirkby, J. (2007), Cosmic Rays and Climate, Surv Geophys, 28(5-6), 333-375, doi:10.1007/s10712-008-9030-6. Kirkby, J. et al. (2011), Role of sulphuric acid, ammonia and galactic cosmic rays in atmospheric aerosol nucleation, Nature, in press.

  7. High time resolution observations of the drivers of Forbush decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Mulligan, T. L.; Shaul, D. N.

    2008-12-01

    The drivers of Forbush decreases in galactic cosmic ray (GCR) fluxes are thought to be magnetic turbulence in the sheath of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) and the closed magnetic field lines in the ICME itself. This model, however, is the result of studies utilizing hourly or longer time averaging. Such averaging can smooth over important correlations between variabilities in the GCR flux and those in the interplanetary medium. To test the validity of the current model of Forbush decreases, we analyze a number of Forbush decreases using high time resolution GCR data from the High Sensitivity Telescope (HIST) on Polar and the Spectrometer for INTEGRAL (SPI). We seek causal correlations between the onset of the decrease and structures in the solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field, as measured concurrently with ACE and/or Wind. We find evidence that planar magnetic structures in the sheath preceding the ICME may be a factor in driving the decrease in at least one event.

  8. Transient IP Structures Associated with Short-Period Variations in the Solar Energetic Particle and Galactic Cosmic Ray Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, T.; Blake, J.; Spence, H. E.; Jordan, A. P.; Quenby, J. J.; Shaul, D.

    2006-12-01

    Short-period variations in the integral SEP ( > 10 MeV) and GCR fluence ( > 100 MeV), often observed in neutron monitor data have also been seen by the High Sensitivity Telescope (HIST) aboard the Polar Spacecraft. Although HIST was designed to measure radiation-belt electrons, it makes clean measurements of the integral SEP and GCR fluence when Polar is outside the radiation belts. These measurements show variability on a variety of timescales including 0.1~mHz - 1~mHz. We examine these variations from Polar and compare them with IMF and plasma solar wind conditions at L1 using ACE data. We find coherent short-term variability occurs when Earth is in close proximity to the HCS and when Earth is either inside an ICME or when an ICME has just transited the Earth. Also, when a flux rope ICME signature is present, the rope axis is nearly parallel to the radial direction and the HCS. The launch of STEREO will enable detailed 3-D analyses of such solar wind disturbances along spatial scales on the same order of typical SEP and GCR proton gyroradii, which are needed to elucidate the mechanism behind this short-period variability.

  9. Use of Apollo 17 Epoch Neutron Spectrum as a Benchmark in Testing LEND Collimated Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Gordon; Sagdeev, R.; Milikh, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Apollo 17 neutron experiment LPNE provided a unique set of data on production of neutrons in the Lunar soil bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). It serves as valuable "ground-truth" in the age of orbital remote sensing. We used the neutron data attributed to Apollo 17 epoch as a benchmark for testing the LEND's collimated sensor, as introduced by the geometry of collimator and efficiency of He3 counters. The latter is defined by the size of gas counter and pressure inside it. The intensity and energy spectrum of neutrons escaping the lunar surface are dependent on incident flux of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) whose variability is associated with Solar Cycle and its peculiarities. We obtain first the share of neutrons entering through the field of view of collimator as a fraction of the total neutron flux by using the angular distribution of neutron exiting the Moon described by our Monte Carlo code. We computed next the count rate of the 3He sensor by using the neutron energy spectrum from McKinney et al. [JGR, 2006] and by consider geometry and gas pressure of the LEND sensor. Finally the neutron count rate obtained for the Apollo 17 epoch characterized by intermediate solar activity was adjusted to the LRO epoch characterized by low solar activity. It has been done by taking into account solar modulation potential, which affects the GCR flux, and in turn changes the neutron albedo flux.

  10. Space Radiation Cancer Risks and Uncertainities for Different Mission Time Periods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim,Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    Space radiation consists of solar particle events (SPEs), comprised largely of medium energy protons (less than several hundred MeV); and galactic cosmic ray (GCR), which includes high energy protons and high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei. For long duration missions, space radiation presents significant health risks including cancer mortality. Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is essential for radiation protection of crews on long term space missions outside of the protection of the Earth s magnetic field and for optimization of mission planning and costs. For the assessment of organ dosimetric quantities and cancer risks, the particle spectra at each critical body organs must be characterized. In implementing a PRA approach, a statistical model of SPE fluence was developed, because the individual SPE occurrences themselves are random in nature while the frequency distribution of SPEs depends strongly upon the phase within the solar activity cycle. Spectral variability of SPEs was also examined, because the detailed energy spectra of protons are important especially at high energy levels for assessing the cancer risk associated with energetic particles for large events. An overall cumulative probability of a GCR environment for a specified mission period was estimated for the temporal characterization of the GCR environment represented by the deceleration potential (theta). Finally, this probabilistic approach to space radiation cancer risk was coupled with a model of the radiobiological factors and uncertainties in projecting cancer risks. Probabilities of fatal cancer risk and 95% confidence intervals will be reported for various periods of space missions.

  11. Investigation of Galactic Cosmic Rays Modulation by the Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Florinski, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are produced as a result of the interaction between fast and slowsolar-wind streams, and quite ubiquitous in every region of the heliosphere. Observations shown thatthe stream interfaces of CIRs between fast and slow solar wind streams and the leading edges of CIRsare responsible for the depressions of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) intensity. Based on the well knownlocal-scale expansion of the ideal MHD conservation law and the developed global MHD model ofCIRs in the heliosphere, we perform the numerical investigation of the transport and turbulence of thesolar wind fluctuation in CIRs. Turbulent energy density and correlation length distribution throughoutthe heliosphere are presented, and further in turn used to compute the mean free path and perpendiculardiffusion coefficient of energetic particles. We attempt to use the plasma background from the globalMHD simulations and the transport coefficients in our existing stochastic cosmic-ray transport code tonumerically solve the Parker transport equation for GCRs. The modulated GCR spectrum from Voyager2 observations near the termination shock was used at the external boundary condition. The computedGCR spectral features and temporal profiles at any given location was directly compared withobservations by spacecraft based cosmic-ray detectors and neutron monitors on the ground, which willgreatly enhance our understanding of the physics of GCR modulation by the CIRs in heliosphere.

  12. A model for predicting the radiation exposure for mission planning aboard the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Lewis, Brent J.; Tomi, Leena

    2014-04-01

    The International Space Station Cosmic Radiation Exposure Model (ISSCREM) has been developed as a possible tool for use in radiation mission planning as based on operational data collected with a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) aboard the ISS since 2000. It is able to reproduce the observed trapped radiation and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) contributions to the total dose equivalent to within ±20% and ±10%, respectively, as would be measured by the onboard TEPC at the Zvezda Service Module panel 327 (SM-327). Furthermore, when these contributions are combined, the total dose equivalent that would be measured at this location is estimated to within ±10%. The models incorporated into ISSCREM correlate the GCR dose equivalent rate to the cutoff rigidity magnetic shielding parameter and the trapped radiation dose equivalent rate to atmospheric density inside the South Atlantic Anomaly. The GCR dose equivalent rate is found to vary minimally with altitude and TEPC module location however, due to the statistics and data available, the trapped radiation model could only be developed for the TEPC located at SM-327. Evidence of the variation in trapped radiation dose with detector orientation and the East-West asymmetry were observed at this location.

  13. Short-term and Long-term Variations of Dose Rate measured by MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jingnan; Zeitlin, Cary; Rafkin, Scot; Boettcher, Stephan; Reitz, Guenther; Koehler, Jan; Ehresmann, Bent; Martin, Cesar; Burmeister, Soenke; Posner, Arik; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Hassler, Donald M.; Brinza, David; Boehm, Henning Eckart; Lohf, Henning; Appel, Jan

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), onboard Mars Science Laboratory’s (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures the spectra of both energetic charged and neutral particles along with radiation dose rate at the surface of Mars. Several effects have been observed for the first time to influence the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR)-driven particle radiation on the surface: [a] short-term diurnal variations of the Martian atmospheric pressure caused by daily thermal tides [Rafkin 2014]; [b] long-term seasonal pressure changes in the Martian atmosphere; and [c] the modulation of the primary GCR fluxes by the heliospheric magnetic field, which correlates with long-term solar activities and heliospheric rotation. These concurrent factors affect the dose rate variations measured by RAD on the Martian surface. RAD also recorded the dose rate during the 253-day cruise phase of MSL from the Earth to Mars. The variations of the GCR-induced dose rates during quiet time period without the direct detection of Solar Particle Events (SPE) were solely driven by the changes of heliospheric conditions (i.e. [c]). The RAD cruise and surface dose measurements, along with the surface pressure data and the solar modulation factor, are analysed in order to understand how the long-term influences ([b] and [c]) individually correlate with the measured dose rates.

  14. Analysis of Dose Rate Variations Observed By MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Rafkin, S. C.; Ehresmann, B.; Kohler, J.; Appel, J. K.; Hassler, D.; Boehm, E.; Böttcher, S. I.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Brinza, D. E.; Lohf, H.; Burmeister, S.; Heber, B.; Posner, A.; Reitz, G.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.; Kahanpää, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), on board Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures the spectra of both energetic charged and neutral particles along with the radiation dose rate at the surface of Mars. With these first-ever measurements on the Martian surface, RAD observed several effects influencing the galactic cosmic ray (GCR)-induced surface radiation dose concurrently: [a] short-term diurnal variations of the Martian atmospheric pressure caused by daily thermal tides; [b] long-term seasonal pressure changes in the Martian atmosphere; and [c] the modulation of the primary GCR flux by the solar magnetic field, which correlates with long-term solar activities and heliospheric rotation. RAD also recorded the dose rate during the 253-day cruise phase of MSL from Earth to Mars. There, the variations of the GCR-induced dose rates during quiet time period without the influences of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) were theoretically solely driven by the changes of heliospheric conditions (i.e., [c]). The RAD cruise and surface dose measurements, along with the surface pressure data and the solar modulation factor, are analyzed in order to understand how the long-term influences ([b] and [c]) individually correlate with the measured dose rates.

  15. A Monte Carlo-based radiation safety assessment for astronauts in an environment with confined magnetic field shielding.

    PubMed

    Geng, Changran; Tang, Xiaobin; Gong, Chunhui; Guan, Fada; Johns, Jesse; Shu, Diyun; Chen, Da

    2015-12-01

    The active shielding technique has great potential for radiation protection in space exploration because it has the advantage of a significant mass saving compared with the passive shielding technique. This paper demonstrates a Monte Carlo-based approach to evaluating the shielding effectiveness of the active shielding technique using confined magnetic fields (CMFs). The International Commission on Radiological Protection reference anthropomorphic phantom, as well as the toroidal CMF, was modeled using the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4. The penetrating primary particle fluence, organ-specific dose equivalent, and male effective dose were calculated for particles in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and solar particle events (SPEs). Results show that the SPE protons can be easily shielded against, even almost completely deflected, by the toroidal magnetic field. GCR particles can also be more effectively shielded against by increasing the magnetic field strength. Our results also show that the introduction of a structural Al wall in the CMF did not provide additional shielding for GCR; in fact it can weaken the total shielding effect of the CMF. This study demonstrated the feasibility of accurately determining the radiation field inside the environment and evaluating the organ dose equivalents for astronauts under active shielding using the CMF. PMID:26484984

  16. Early Results from the LRO Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) During this Historic Solar Minimum (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, H. E.; Kasper, J. C.; Golightly, M. J.; Blake, J. B.; Mazur, J. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Case, A. W.; Looper, M. D.; Larsen, B. A.; Stubbs, T. J.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Semones, E.; Onsager, T. G.; Huang, C.; Jordan, A.

    2009-12-01

    We describe early results from a new instrument, the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER), which is providing measurements of energetic particles while in orbit around the Moon onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission. CRaTER measures the effects of ionizing energy loss in matter due to penetrating solar energetic protons (SEP) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR), specifically in six silicon solid-state detectors and after interactions with tissue-equivalent plastic (TEP), a synthetic analog of human tissue. The CRaTER investigation quantifies the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum in these materials through direct measurements with the lunar space radiation environment, particularly the interactions of ions with energies above 10 MeV. Combined with models of radiation transport through materials, CRaTER LET measurements constrain models of the biological effects of ionizing radiation in the lunar environment as well as provide valuable information on radiation effects on electronic systems in deep space. In addition to these human exploration goals, CRaTER measurement capabilities provide new insights on the spatial and temporal variability of the SEP and GCR populations and their interactions with the lunar surface. We present an overview of the CRaTER instrument, its exploration and science goals, and early results from flight observations obtained since LRO’s launch in June 2009 until present, an interesting interval during this historic solar minimum accompanied by record high GCR intensity.

  17. Commensal enteric bacteria engender a self-limiting humoral mucosal immune response while permanently colonizing the gut.

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, K E; Meslin, K; Cebra, J J

    1995-01-01

    We have employed a germfree mouse model to study the development and persistence of a humoral mucosal immune response to a gram-negative murine commensal organism, Morganella morganii. M. morganii bacteria rapidly colonize the gut, resulting in hypertrophy of Peyer's patches (PP), including germinal center reactions (GCR), and the development of specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses detected in vitro in PP fragment cultures and by ELISPOT assays of lamina propria cells. The GCR peaks 14 days after infection and begins to wane thereafter. Upon colonization, the organisms successfully translocate to the mesenteric lymph node and spleen, but the number of translocating bacteria begins to drop with the onset of a specific IgA response. A clonal B-cell microculture technique was used to determine the frequency of specific IgA plasmablasts and IgA memory cells. The frequencies of preplasmablasts were seen to be higher in the earlier stages of germinal center development, whereas the frequencies of antigen-specific memory cells appeared to remain at a relatively constant level even after 193 days postmonoassociation. We suggest that a successful secretory IgA response can attenuate chronic stimulation of GCR even though the bacteria persist in the gut. The observed developing hyporesponsiveness to a chronically present commensal organism may be relevant to the use of bacterial vectors for mucosal immunization. PMID:7558298

  18. Probabilistic Assessment of Radiation Risk for Astronauts in Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; DeAngelis, Giovanni; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate predictions of the health risks to astronauts from space radiation exposure are necessary for enabling future lunar and Mars missions. Space radiation consists of solar particle events (SPEs), comprised largely of medium energy protons, (less than 100 MeV); and galactic cosmic rays (GCR), which include protons and heavy ions of higher energies. While the expected frequency of SPEs is strongly influenced by the solar activity cycle, SPE occurrences themselves are random in nature. A solar modulation model has been developed for the temporal characterization of the GCR environment, which is represented by the deceleration potential, phi. The risk of radiation exposure from SPEs during extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) or in lightly shielded vehicles is a major concern for radiation protection, including determining the shielding and operational requirements for astronauts and hardware. To support the probabilistic risk assessment for EVAs, which would be up to 15% of crew time on lunar missions, we estimated the probability of SPE occurrence as a function of time within a solar cycle using a nonhomogeneous Poisson model to fit the historical database of measurements of protons with energy > 30 MeV, (phi)30. The resultant organ doses and dose equivalents, as well as effective whole body doses for acute and cancer risk estimations are analyzed for a conceptual habitat module and a lunar rover during defined space mission periods. This probabilistic approach to radiation risk assessment from SPE and GCR is in support of mission design and operational planning to manage radiation risks for space exploration.

  19. ANISOTROPY AS A PROBE OF THE GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY PROPAGATION AND HALO MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Hong-bo; Xue, Liang

    2012-05-01

    The anisotropy of cosmic rays (CRs) in the solar vicinity is generally attributed to CR streaming due to the discrete distribution of CR sources or local magnetic field modulation. Recently, the two-dimensional large-scale CR anisotropy has been measured by many experiments in the TeV-PeV energy range in both hemispheres. The tail-in excess along the tangential direction of the local spiral arm and the loss cone deficit pointing to the north Galactic pole direction agree with what have been obtained in tens to hundreds of GeV. The persistence of the two large-scale anisotropy structures in such a wide energy range suggests that the anisotropy might be due to global streaming of the Galactic CRs (GCRs). This work tries to extend the observed CR anisotropy picture from the solar system to the whole galaxy. In such a case, we can find a new interesting signature, a loop of GCR streaming, of the GCR propagation. We further calculate the overall GCR streaming induced magnetic field, and find a qualitative consistency with the observed structure of the halo magnetic field.

  20. Full Mission Astronaut Radiation Exposure Assessments for Long Duration Lunar Surface Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, Anne; Clowdsley, Martha; Qualls, Garry; Blattnig, Steve; Lee, Kerry; Fry, Dan; Stoffle, Nicholas; Simonsen, Lisa; Slaba, Tony; Walker, Steven; Zapp, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Risk to astronauts due to ionizing radiation exposure is a primary concern for missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and will drive mission architecture requirements, mission timelines, and operational practices. For short missions, radiation risk is dominated by the possibility of a large Solar Particle Event (SPE). Longer duration missions have both SPE and Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) risks. SPE exposure can contribute significantly toward cancer induction in combination with GCR. As mission duration increases, mitigation strategies must address the combined risks from SPE and GCR exposure. In this paper, full mission exposure assessments were performed for the proposed long duration lunar surface mission scenarios. In order to accomplish these assessments, previously developed radiation shielding models for a proposed lunar habitat and rover were utilized. End-to-End mission exposure assessments were performed by first calculating exposure rates for locations in the habitat, rover, and during Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA). Subsequently, total mission exposures were evaluated for the proposed timelines. Mission exposure results, assessed in terms of effective dose, are presented for the proposed timelines and recommendations are made for improved astronaut shielding and safer operational practices.

  1. An analytical model for the prediction of a micro-dosimeter response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, F. F.; Xapsos, M. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    2009-07-01

    A rapid analytical procedure for the prediction of a micro-dosimeter response function in low Earth orbit (LEO), correlated with the Space Transportation System (STS, shuttle) Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) measurements is presented. The analytical model takes into consideration the energy loss straggling and chord length distribution of the detector, and is capable of predicting energy deposition fluctuations in a cylindrical micro-volume of arbitrary aspect ratio (height/diameter) by incoming ions through both direct and indirect (? ray) events. At any designated (ray traced) target point within the vehicle, the model accepts the differential flux spectrum of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and/or trapped protons at LEO as input. On a desktop PC, the response function of TEPC for each ion in the GCR/trapped field is computed at the average rate of 30 s/ion. The ionizing radiation environment at LEO is represented by O'Neill's GCR model (2004), covering charged particles in the 1 ? Z ? 28 range. O'Neill's free space GCR model is coupled with the Langley Research Center (LaRC) angular dependent geomagnetic cutoff model to compute the transmission coefficient in LEO. The trapped proton environment is represented by a LaRC developed time dependent procedure which couples the AP8MIN/AP8MAX, Deep River Neutron Monitor (DRNM) and F10.7 solar radio frequency measurements. The albedo neutron environment is represented by the extrapolation of the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurements. The charged particle transport calculations correlated with STS 51 and 114 flights are accomplished by using the most recent version (2005) of the LaRC deterministic High charge ( Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN) code. We present the correlations between the TEPC model predictions (response function) and TEPC measured differential/integral spectra in the lineal energy ( y) domain for both GCR and trapped protons, with the conclusion that the model correctly accounts for the increase in flux at low y values where energetic ions are the primary contributor. We further discuss that, even with the incorporation of angular dependency in the cutoffs, comparison of the GCR differential/integral flux between STS 51 and 114 TEPC measured data and current calculations indicates that there still exists an underestimation by the simulations at low to mid range y values. This underestimation is partly related the exclusion of the secondary pion particle production from the current version of HZETRN.

  2. Development of Liquid-Vapor Core Reactors with MHD Generator for Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Samim Anghaie

    2002-08-13

    Any reactor that utilizes fuel consisting of a fissile material in a gaseous state may be referred to as a gaseous core reactor (GCR). Studies on GCRs have primarily been limited to the conceptual phase, mostly due to budget cuts and program cancellations in the early 1970's. A few scientific experiments have been conducted on candidate concepts, primarily of static pressure fissile gas filling a cylindrical or spherical cavity surrounded by a moderating shell, such as beryllium, heavy water, or graphite. The main interest in this area of nuclear power generation is for space applications. The interest in space applications has developed due to the promise of significant enhancement in fuel utilization, safety, plant efficiency, special high-performance features, load-following capabilities, power conversion optimization, and other key aspects of nuclear power generation. The design of a successful GCR adapted for use in space is complicated. The fissile material studied in the pa st has been in a fluorine compound, either a tetrafluoride or a hexafluoride. Both of these molecules have an impact on the structural material used in the making of a GCR. Uranium hexafluoride as a fuel allows for a lower operating temperature, but at temperatures greater than 900K becomes essentially impossible to contain. This difficulty with the use of UF6 has caused engineers and scientists to use uranium tetrafluoride, which is a more stable molecule but has the disadvantage of requiring significantly higher operating temperatures. Gas core reactors have traditionally been studied in a steady state configuration. In this manner a fissile gas and working fluid are introduced into the core, called a cavity, that is surrounded by a reflector constructed of materials such as Be or BeO. These reactors have often been described as cavity reactors because the density of the fissile gas is low and criticality is achieved only by means of the reflector to reduce neutron leakage from the core. Still there are problems of containment since many of the proposed vessel materials such as W or Mo have high neutron cross sections making the design of a critical system difficult. There is also the possibility for a GCR to remain in a subcritical state, and by the use of a shockwave mechanism, increase the pressure and temperature inside the core to achieve criticality. This type of GCR is referred to as a shockwave-driven pulsed gas core reactor. These two basic designs were evaluated as advance concepts for space power and propulsion.

  3. F. Saglietti and N. Oster (Eds.): SAFECOMP 2007, LNCS 4680, pp. 276282, 2007. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

    E-print Network

    Belli, Fevzi

    for specification and testing of software and system behavior, e.g., for conformance test- ing [3], as well-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007 Modeling, Analysis and Testing of Safety Issues - An Event-Based Approach and Case South Bank University, London, UK Abstract. This paper proposes an event-based approach

  4. M17: Event-triggered and Self-triggered Control Lectures 10-14

    E-print Network

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    4/24/13 1 M17: Event-triggered and Self-triggered Control Lectures 10-14 EECI, Piergiuseppe di Marco, Carlo Fischione Outline Lecture 10: StochasNc event-based control Lecture 11: Event-based control over wireless networks Lecture 12: Distributed

  5. AN AGNPS-BASED RUNOFF AND SEDIMENT YIELD MODEL FOR Two SMALL WATERSHEDS IN GERMANY

    E-print Network

    Grunwald, Sabine

    . D. Norton ABSTRACT. The event-based Agricultural Non-Point Source (AGNPS) pollution model is usedQff, Sediment yield. The event-based Agricultural Non-Point Source The"AGNPS) pollution model (Young et al words. AGNPS, Non-point source pollution, Rainfall-runoff modeling, Calibration, Validation, Surface run

  6. Probabilistic Assessment of Cancer Risk from Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    For long duration missions outside of the protection of the Earth's magnetic field, space radi-ation presents significant health risks including cancer mortality. Space radiation consists of solar particle events (SPEs), comprised largely of medium energy protons (less than several hundred MeV); and galactic cosmic ray (GCR), which include high energy protons and heavy ions. While the frequency distribution of SPEs depends strongly upon the phase within the solar activity cycle, the individual SPE occurrences themselves are random in nature. We es-timated the probability of SPE occurrence using a non-homogeneous Poisson model to fit the historical database of proton measurements. Distributions of particle fluences of SPEs for a specified mission period were simulated ranging from its 5th to 95th percentile to assess the cancer risk distribution. Spectral variability of SPEs was also examined, because the detailed energy spectra of protons are important especially at high energy levels for assessing the cancer risk associated with energetic particles for large events. We estimated the overall cumulative probability of GCR environment for a specified mission period using a solar modulation model for the temporal characterization of the GCR environment represented by the deceleration po-tential (?). Probabilistic assessment of cancer fatal risk was calculated for various periods of lunar and Mars missions. This probabilistic approach to risk assessment from space radiation is in support of mission design and operational planning for future manned space exploration missions. In future work, this probabilistic approach to the space radiation will be combined with a probabilistic approach to the radiobiological factors that contribute to the uncertainties in projecting cancer risks.

  7. 3-D Color Separation Maximizing the Printer Gamut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Huanzhao

    2003-01-01

    Besides having CMY colorants, most of color printers include at lease one extra colorant, black (K), to increase the density for shadow colors and to reduce the colorants required for printing shadow colors. In recent years, CMYKcm, CMYKcmk (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, blacK, light-cyan, light-magenta, and light-black), and CMYKOG (O and G stand for Orange, and Green) or CMYKOV (V stands for Violet) ink-sets have been used in printers to reduce graininess or to extend printer color gamut. No matter how many colorants are used, a printer is often configured as a three-channel printer to simplify the color mapping process. The traditional GCR/UCR approach has been widely applied for CMY to CMYK color separation. However, this approach is not flexible for controlling K usage locally; it does not guarantee reasonable gamut usage; and it does not work very well for more than CMYK colorants. In order to solve the problems existed in traditional GCR approaches, a color separation method based on 3-D interpolation was developed. In this process, we first determine the color conversion for some important node points, which include primary colors, neutral colors, and other color ramps in the gamut surface. Then different interpolation approaches are applied to fill the entire 3-D lookup table. This approach solves the problem existed in traditional GCR that a lot of high-chroma shadow colors may be lost in the color separation step. It controls K usage globally as well as locally. It well controls ink limit in the entire gamut. It also works for the color separation for more than CMYK four colorants. Because it performs automatically without human interaction, it can be applied to general printer color calibration as well as ICC profile recreation and smart CMM implementation.

  8. Space Weather Nowcasting of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Wilson, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Solomon, Stan C.; Wiltberger, J.; Kunches, Joseph; Kress, Brian T.; Murray, John J.

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing concern for the health and safety of commercial aircrew and passengers due to their exposure to ionizing radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET), particularly at high latitudes. The International Commission of Radiobiological Protection (ICRP), the EPA, and the FAA consider the crews of commercial aircraft as radiation workers. During solar energetic particle (SEP) events, radiation exposure can exceed annual limits, and the number of serious health effects is expected to be quite high if precautions are not taken. There is a need for a capability to monitor the real-time, global background radiations levels, from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), at commercial airline altitudes and to provide analytical input for airline operations decisions for altering flight paths and altitudes for the mitigation and reduction of radiation exposure levels during a SEP event. The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model is new initiative to provide a global, real-time radiation dosimetry package for archiving and assessing the biologically harmful radiation exposure levels at commercial airline altitudes. The NAIRAS model brings to bear the best available suite of Sun-Earth observations and models for simulating the atmospheric ionizing radiation environment. Observations are utilized from ground (neutron monitors), from the atmosphere (the METO analysis), and from space (NASA/ACE and NOAA/GOES). Atmospheric observations provide the overhead shielding information and the ground- and space-based observations provide boundary conditions on the GCR and SEP energy flux distributions for transport and dosimetry simulations. Dose rates are calculated using the parametric AIR (Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation) model and the physics-based HZETRN (High Charge and Energy Transport) code. Empirical models of the near-Earth radiation environment (GCR/SEP energy flux distributions and geomagnetic cut-off rigidity) are benchmarked against the physics-based CMIT (Coupled Magnetosphere- Ionosphere-Thermosphere) and SEP-trajectory models.

  9. High Energy Utilization, Co-Generation Nuclear power Plants With Static Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel P.

    2002-07-01

    In addition to being cost effective, very small nuclear power plants with static energy conversion could meet the needs and the energy mix in underdeveloped countries and remote communities, which may include electricity, residential and industrial space heating, seawater desalination, and/or high temperature process heat or steam for industrial uses. These plants are also an attractive option in naval, marine, and undersea applications, when the absence of a sound signature is highly desirable. An Analysis is performed of Gas Cooled Reactor (CGR) and Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (LMR), very small nuclear power plants with static energy conversion, using a combination of options. These include Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converters (AMTECs) and both single segment and segmented thermoelectric converters. The total energy utilization of these plants exceeds 88%. It includes the fraction of the reactor's thermal power converted into electricity and delivered to the Grid at 6.6 kVA and those used for residential and industrial space heating at {approx}370 K, seawater desalination at 400 K, and/or high temperature process heat or steam at {approx}850 K. In addition to its inherently high reliability, modularity, low maintenance and redundancy, static energy conversion used in the present study could deliver electricity to the Grid at a net efficiency of 29.5%. A LMR plant delivers 2-3 times the fraction of the reactor thermal power converted into electricity in a GCR plant, but could not provide for both seawater desalination and high temperature process heat/steam concurrently, which is possible in GCR plants. The fraction of the reactor's thermal power used for non-electrical power generation in a GCR plant is {approx} 10 - 15% higher than in a LMR plant. (authors)

  10. Probing Our Heliospheric History II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Katherine; Redfield, S.

    2012-05-01

    A physical relationship between our local interstellar medium (ISM), galactic cosmic rays (GCR), and our planetary environment has long been a subject of interest to the astronomical community. Clouds of sufficient density to compress the heliosphere to within 1 AU are commonly seen throughout the galactic environment, including within the Local Bubble (LB). Such a compression would lead to an increase in the GCR flux at 1 AU and would have drastic consequences for many planetary processes such as atmospheric chemistry, lightning production, cloud cover, and DNA mutation rates for surface organisms. Prior to this work, we derived a column density profile of the ISM toward 49 bright stars along a narrow cone centered on the historical solar path. High resolution spectra were taken of NaI and CaII absorption out to a distance of 610 pc, with a median separation distance of 11 pc between adjacent stars. No absorption is seen out to a distance of 120 pc (consistent with the LB), but a complex number of absorbers is seen beyond. We now present the detection of several distinct clouds, their associated column densities, radial velocities, inferred distances, and size constraints. This combination of cloud properties allows us to derive a volume density profile of the ISM in the Sun's “rear-view mirror,” which represents one plausible record of actual ISM encounters for the Sun. We also make use of empirical relations to determine the effect these clouds would have on the historical heliosphere. Our analysis suggests that within the last 10 million years, if the Sun encountered a cloud with the same properties as we have detected along the solar historical trajectory, the Sun's termination shock would have resided inside the orbit of Uranus, with a GCR flux at Earth an order of magnitude greater than it is currently.

  11. Are cosmic rays modulated beyond the heliopause?

    SciTech Connect

    Kóta, J.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2014-02-10

    We discuss the possible spatial variation of Galactic and anomalous cosmic rays (GCRs and ACRs) at and beyond the heliopause (HP). Remaining within the framework of the Parker transport equation and assuming incompressible plasma in the heliosheath, we consider highly idealized simple-flow models and compare our GCR results with recent publications of Scherer et al. and Strauss et al. First, we discuss an order-of-magnitude estimate and a simple spherical model to demonstrate that the modulation of GCRs beyond the HP must be quite small if the diffusion coefficient beyond the HP is greater than ?10{sup 26} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}, a value that is two orders of magnitude smaller than the value of 10{sup 28} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1} determined from observations of GCR composition. Second, we construct a non-spherical model, which allows lateral deflection of the flow and uses different diffusion coefficients parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. We find that modulation of GCRs beyond the HP remains small even if the perpendicular diffusion coefficient beyond the HP is quite small (?10{sup 22} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}) as long as the parallel diffusion is sufficiently fast. We also consider the case when the parallel diffusion beyond the HP is fast, but the perpendicular diffusion is as small as ?10{sup 20} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}; this results in a sharp, almost step-like increase of GCR flux (and decrease of ACRs) at the HP. Possible implications are briefly discussed. We further suggest the possibility that the observed sharp gradient of GCRs at the HP might push the HP closer to the Sun than previously thought.

  12. Radiation Protection Effectiveness of Polymeric Based Shielding Materials at Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Stewart-Sloan, Charlotte R.; Wilson, John W.; Adams, Daniel O.

    2008-01-01

    Correlations of limited ionizing radiation measurements onboard the Space Transportation System (STS; shuttle) and the International Space Station (ISS) with numerical simulations of charged particle transport through spacecraft structure have indicated that usage of hydrogen rich polymeric materials improves the radiation shielding performance of space structures as compared to the traditionally used aluminum alloys. We discuss herein the radiation shielding correlations between measurements on board STS-81 (Atlantis, 1997) using four polyethylene (PE) spheres of varying radii, and STS-89 (Endeavour, 1998) using aluminum alloy spheres; with numerical simulations of charged particle transport using the Langley Research Center (LaRC)-developed High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN) algorithm. In the simulations, the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) component of the ionizing radiation environment at Low Earth Orbit (LEO) covering ions in the 1< or equals Z< or equals 28 range is represented by O'Neill's (2004) model. To compute the transmission coefficient for GCR ions at LEO, O'Neill's model is coupled with the angular dependent LaRC cutoff model. The trapped protons/electrons component of LEO environment is represented by a LaRC-developed time dependent procedure which couples the AP8min/AP8max, Deep River Neutron Monitor (DRNM) and F10.7 solar radio frequency measurements. The albedo neutron environment resulting from interaction of GCR ions with upper atmosphere is modeled through extrapolation of the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurements. With the validity of numerical simulations through correlation with PE and aluminum spheres measurements established, we further present results from the expansion of the simulations through the selection of high hydrogen content commercially available polymeric constituents such as PE foam core and Spectra fiber(Registered TradeMark) composite face sheet to assess their radiation shield properties as compared to generic PE.

  13. Re-calibration of the apparent 25,000 to 35,000 ybp sea level high stand: Just a moment in time some 55,000 to 70,000 years ago

    SciTech Connect

    Dockal, J.A. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Occurrences of shallow marine and strand line sediments at or near the elevation of modern mean sea level with radiocarbon dates in the range of 25,000--35,000 ybp have been reported from the Delmarva Peninsula to the Florida Peninsula. Such dates are in conflict with established sea level curves and have consequently been written off as much older samples contaminated with small amounts of young carbon. An alternate hypothesis is that the assumed near constancy of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux and consequently the C-14 production rate is not totally correct. Be-10 concentrations from ice cores suggests that possibly twice in the last 100,000 years the earth has been briefly subjected to greatly enhanced GCR fluxes. Modeling effects of the increased but brief GCR flux on the total C-14 concentrations in the ocean and biosphere suggests that apparent C-14 dates of 25K to 35K ybp on certain marine deposits may actually reflect deposition during a very brief period of time somewhere between 55K to 70K ybp. Deposits possibly effected include but are not restricted to: an unnamed beach/shore face deposit at Mockhorn Is. Virginia, Diamond City Clay at Cape Lookout NC, Cape Fear Coquina in southeastern NC, Silver Bluff at Sapelo Is. GA, and an unnamed coarse sand at St. George Is., FL. Such deposits are depositionally associated with strand line processes, either near shore, beach, or estuarine. Characteristics of the C-14 dates from such deposits include great variability in age ranges for spatially close samples including association with non-finite samples and apparent violation of the principle of superposition where older material overlies apparently younger. Interpretation of such deposits suggest deposition at or near sea level during a period of falling sea level. Correlation of such deposits north to south along the Atlantic coast suggest continued influence of the glacial forebulge and deposition topographically 5 to 10 meters below modern mean sea level.

  14. Evaluations of Risks from the Lunar and Mars Radiation Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    Protecting astronauts from the space radiation environments requires accurate projections of radiation in future space missions. Characterization of the ionizing radiation environment is challenging because the interplanetary plasma and radiation fields are modulated by solar disturbances and the radiation doses received by astronauts in interplanetary space are likewise influenced. The galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) flux for the next solar cycle was estimated as a function of interplanetary deceleration potential, which has been derived from GCR flux and Climax neutron monitor rate measurements over the last 4 decades. For the chaotic nature of solar particle event (SPE) occurrence, the mean frequency of SPE at any given proton fluence threshold during a defined mission duration was obtained from a Poisson process model using proton fluence measurements of SPEs during the past 5 solar cycles (19-23). Analytic energy spectra of 34 historically large SPEs were constructed over broad energy ranges extending to GeV. Using an integrated space radiation model (which includes the transport codes HZETRN [1] and BRYNTRN [2], and the quantum nuclear interaction model QMSFRG[3]), the propagation and interaction properties of the energetic nucleons through various media were predicted. Risk assessment from GCR and SPE was evaluated at the specific organs inside a typical spacecraft using CAM [4] model. The representative risk level at each event size and their standard deviation were obtained from the analysis of 34 SPEs. Risks from different event sizes and their frequency of occurrences in a specified mission period were evaluated for the concern of acute health effects especially during extra-vehicular activities (EVA). The results will be useful for the development of an integrated strategy of optimizing radiation protection on the lunar and Mars missions. Keywords: Space Radiation Environments; Galactic Cosmic Radiation; Solar Particle Event; Radiation Risk; Risk Analysis; Radiation Protection.

  15. A stochastic simulation of the propagation of Galactic cosmic rays reflecting the discreteness of cosmic ray sources Age and path length distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, S.; Muraishi, H.; Yanagita, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The path length distribution of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) is the fundamental ingredient for modeling the propagation process of GCRs based on the so-called weighted slab method. We try to derive this distribution numerically by taking into account the discreteness in both space and time of occurrences of supernova explosions where GCRs are suspected to be born. The resultant age distribution and ratio of B/C are to be compared with recent observations. Methods: We solve numerically the stochastic differential equations equivalent to the Parker diffusion-convection equation which describes the propagation process of GCR in the Galaxy. We assume the three-dimensional diffusion is an isotropic one without any free escape boundaries. We ignore any energy change of GCRs and the existence of the Galactic wind for simplicity. We also assume axisymmetric configurations for the density distributions of the interstellar matter and for the surface density of supernovae. We have calculated age and path length of GCR protons arriving at the solar system with this stochastic method. The obtained age is not the escape time of GCRs from the Galaxy as usually assumed, but the time spent by GCRs during their journey to the solar system from the supernova remnants where they were born. Results: The derived age and path length show a distribution spread in a wide range even for GCR protons arriving at the solar system with the same energy. The distributions show a cut-off at a lower range in age or path length depending on the energy of GCRs. These cut-offs clearly come from the discreteness of occurrence of supernovae. The mean age of GeV particles obtained from the distributions is consistent with the age obtained by direct observation of radioactive secondary nuclei. The energy dependence of the B/C ratio estimated with the path length distribution reproduces reliably the energy dependence of B/C obtained by recent observations in space.

  16. Solar Drivers of 11-yr and Long-Term Cosmic Ray Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Richardson, I. G.; Ling, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    In the current paradigm for the modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), diffusion is taken to be the dominant process during solar maxima while drift dominates at minima. Observations during the recent solar minimum challenge the pre-eminence of drift: at such times. In 2009, the approx.2 GV GCR intensity measured by the Newark neutron monitor increased by approx.5% relative to its maximum value two cycles earlier even though the average tilt angle in 2009 was slightly larger than that in 1986 (approx.20deg vs. approx.14deg), while solar wind B was significantly lower (approx.3.9 nT vs. approx.5.4 nT). A decomposition of the solar wind into high-speed streams, slow solar wind, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs; including postshock flows) reveals that the Sun transmits its message of changing magnetic field (diffusion coefficient) to the heliosphere primarily through CMEs at solar maximum and high-speed streams at solar minimum. Long-term reconstructions of solar wind B are in general agreement for the approx. 1900-present interval and can be used to reliably estimate GCR intensity over this period. For earlier epochs, however, a recent Be-10-based reconstruction covering the past approx. 10(exp 4) years shows nine abrupt and relatively short-lived drops of B to < or approx.= 0 nT, with the first of these corresponding to the Sporer minimum. Such dips are at variance with the recent suggestion that B has a minimum or floor value of approx.2.8 nT. A floor in solar wind B implies a ceiling in the GCR intensity (a permanent modulation of the local interstellar spectrum) at a given energy/rigidity. The 30-40% increase in the intensity of 2.5 GV electrons observed by Ulysses during the recent solar minimum raises an interesting paradox that will need to be resolved.

  17. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Meier, Matthias M.; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B.; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-10-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis suggests that these single-point differences will be within 30% when a new deterministic pion-initiated electromagnetic cascade code is integrated into NAIRAS, an effort which is currently underway.

  18. Probabilistic Assessment of Cancer Risk from Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    For long duration missions outside of the protection of the Earth s magnetic field, space radiation presents significant health risks including cancer mortality. Space radiation consists of solar particle events (SPEs), comprised largely of medium energy protons (less than several hundred MeV); and galactic cosmic ray (GCR), which include high energy protons and heavy ions. While the frequency distribution of SPEs depends strongly upon the phase within the solar activity cycle, the individual SPE occurrences themselves are random in nature. We estimated the probability of SPE occurrence using a non-homogeneous Poisson model to fit the historical database of proton measurements. Distributions of particle fluences of SPEs for a specified mission period were simulated ranging from its 5 th to 95th percentile to assess the cancer risk distribution. Spectral variability of SPEs was also examined, because the detailed energy spectra of protons are important especially at high energy levels for assessing the cancer risk associated with energetic particles for large events. We estimated the overall cumulative probability of GCR environment for a specified mission period using a solar modulation model for the temporal characterization of the GCR environment represented by the deceleration potential (^). Probabilistic assessment of cancer fatal risk was calculated for various periods of lunar and Mars missions. This probabilistic approach to risk assessment from space radiation is in support of mission design and operational planning for future manned space exploration missions. In future work, this probabilistic approach to the space radiation will be combined with a probabilistic approach to the radiobiological factors that contribute to the uncertainties in projecting cancer risks.

  19. Estimation of Effective Doses for Radiation Cancer Risks on ISS, Lunar, and Mars Missions with Space Radiation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, M.Y.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation protection practices define the effective dose as a weighted sum of equivalent dose over major sites for radiation cancer risks. Since a crew personnel dosimeter does not make direct measurement of effective dose, it has been estimated with skin-dose measurements and radiation transport codes for ISS and STS missions. The Phantom Torso Experiment (PTE) of NASA s Operational Radiation Protection Program has provided the actual flight measurements of active and passive dosimeters which were placed throughout the phantom on STS-91 mission for 10 days and on ISS Increment 2 mission. For the PTE, the variation in organ doses, which is resulted by the absorption and the changes in radiation quality with tissue shielding, was considered by measuring doses at many tissue sites and at several critical body organs including brain, colon, heart, stomach, thyroid, and skins. These measurements have been compared with the organ dose calculations obtained from the transport models. Active TEPC measurements of lineal energy spectra at the surface of the PTE also provided the direct comparison of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) or trapped proton dose and dose equivalent. It is shown that orienting the phantom body as actual in ISS is needed for the direct comparison of the transport models to the ISS data. One of the most important observations for organ dose equivalent of effective dose estimates on ISS is the fractional contribution from trapped protons and GCR. We show that for most organs over 80% is from GCR. The improved estimation of effective doses for radiation cancer risks will be made with the resultant tissue weighting factors and the modified codes.

  20. EXPOSE-R cosmic radiation time profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachev, Tsvetan; Horneck, Gerda; Häder, Donat-Peter; Schuster, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present the time profile of cosmic radiation exposure obtained by the radiation risks radiometer-dosimeter (R3DR) during the ESA exposition facility for EXPOSE-R mission (EXPOSE-R) in the EXPOSE-R facility outside the Russian Zvezda module of the International Space Station (ISS). Another aim is to make the obtained results available to other EXPOSE-R teams for use in their data analysis. R3DR is a low mass and small dimensions automated device, which measures solar radiation in four channels and in addition cosmic ionizing radiation. The main results of cosmic ionizing radiation measurements are: three different radiation sources were detected and quantified: galactic cosmic rays (GCR), energetic protons from the inner radiation belt (IRB) in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly and energetic electrons from the outer radiation belt (ORB). The highest daily averaged absorbed dose rate of 506 ?Gy day-1 came from IRB protons; GCR delivered much smaller daily absorbed dose rates of 81.4 ?Gy day-1 on average, and ORB source delivered on average a dose rate of 89 ?Gy day-1. The IRB and ORB daily averaged absorbed dose rates were higher than those observed during the ESA exposition facility for EXPOSE-E mission (EXPOSE-E), whereas the GCR rate was smaller than that measured during the EXPOSE-E mission. The reason for this difference is much less surrounding constructions shielding of the R3DR instrument in comparison with the R3DE instrument.

  1. Pion and electromagnetic contribution to dose: Comparisons of HZETRN to Monte Carlo results and ISS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Reddell, Brandon; Bahadori, Amir; Norman, Ryan B.; Badavi, Francis F.

    2013-07-01

    Recent work has indicated that pion production and the associated electromagnetic (EM) cascade may be an important contribution to the total astronaut exposure in space. Recent extensions to the deterministic space radiation transport code, HZETRN, allow the production and transport of pions, muons, electrons, positrons, and photons. In this paper, the extended code is compared to the Monte Carlo codes, Geant4, PHITS, and FLUKA, in slab geometries exposed to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) boundary conditions. While improvements in the HZETRN transport formalism for the new particles are needed, it is shown that reasonable agreement on dose is found at larger shielding thicknesses commonly found on the International Space Station (ISS). Finally, the extended code is compared to ISS data on a minute-by-minute basis over a seven day period in 2001. The impact of pion/EM production on exposure estimates and validation results is clearly shown. The Badhwar-O'Neill (BO) 2004 and 2010 models are used to generate the GCR boundary condition at each time-step allowing the impact of environmental model improvements on validation results to be quantified as well. It is found that the updated BO2010 model noticeably reduces overall exposure estimates from the BO2004 model, and the additional production mechanisms in HZETRN provide some compensation. It is shown that the overestimates provided by the BO2004 GCR model in previous validation studies led to deflated uncertainty estimates for environmental, physics, and transport models, and allowed an important physical interaction (?/EM) to be overlooked in model development. Despite the additional ?/EM production mechanisms in HZETRN, a systematic under-prediction of total dose is observed in comparison to Monte Carlo results and measured data.

  2. An Assessment of the Space Radiation Environment in a Near Equatorial Low Earth Orbit Based on Razaksat-1 Satellite

    E-print Network

    Suparta, Wayan

    2015-01-01

    The Malaysian satellite RazakSAT-1 was designed to operate in a near-equatorial orbit (NEqO) and low earth orbit (LEO). However, after one year of operation in 2010, communication to the satellite was lost. This study attempted to identify whether space radiation sources could have caused the communication loss by comparing RazakSAT-1 with two functional satellites. Data on galactic cosmic rays (GCR), trapped protons, trapped electrons, and solar energetic particles (SEPs) obtained from Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) was analyzed.

  3. Models for Examining Impact of Cosmic Rays on Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, William; William J Atkinson Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Soft Error Rate (SER) produced by SEUs in microelectronic devices in near-earth orbits and in the atmosphere has been computed using a common model developed at Boeing, TSAREME. In space, TSAREME models protons, alphas, and heavy ions with atomic numbers up to 26 (iron) for GCR and peak solar flares. In the atmosphere, TSAREME computes the neutron flux fluxes produced by charged particles interacting with air molecules, accounting for magnetosphere variations with latitude. The devices include Complementary Metal on Oxide (CMOS) and Silicon on Insulator (SOI) transistors with feature sizes varying from a micron to 15 nm. Validation of model results to empirical data discussed.

  4. Space Radiation Effects in Inflatable and Composite Habitat Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Rojdev, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    This Year 2 project provides much needed risk reduction data to assess solar particle event (SPE) and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) space radiation damage in existing and emerging materials used in manned low-earth orbit, lunar, interplanetary, and Martian surface missions. More specifically, long duration (up to 50 years) space radiation damage is quantified for materials used in inflatable structures (1st priority), and habitable composite structures and space suits materials (2nd priority). The data collected has relevance for nonmetallic materials (polymers and composites) used in NASA missions where long duration reliability is needed in continuous or intermittent radiation fluxes.

  5. Miniaturized Gas Correlation Radiometer for the Detection of Trace Gases in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melroy, Hilary R.; Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, Elena

    2012-01-01

    We present a miniaturized and simplified version of a gas correlation radiometer (GCR) capable of simultaneously mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR was achieved by implementing compact, light-weight 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fibers (hollow waveguides) as the gas correlation cells. In a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 GCR instrument, exchanging the 10 m multipass cells with hollow waveguide gas correlation cells of equivalent path length reduces the mass from approximately 150 kg to approximately 0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately 1 meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of greater than 99%). A unique feature of this instrument is its stackable module design, with a single module for each trace gas. Each of the modules is self-contained, and fundamentally identical; differing by the bandpass filter wavelength range and gas mixtures inside the hollow-waveguide absorption cells. The current configuration contains four stacked modules for simultaneous measurements of methane (CH4), formaldehyde (H2CO), water vapor (H2O), and deuterated water vapor (HDO) but could easily be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance. Preliminary results indicate that a 1 ppb detection limit is possible for both formaldehyde and methane with one second of averaging. Using non-optimized components, we have demonstrated an instrument sensitivity equivalent to approximately 30 ppb for formaldehyde, and approximately 500 ppb for methane. We expect custom bandpass filters and 6 m long waveguides to significantly improve these promising results. Ongoing testing is being conducted on water vapor and deuterated water vapor.

  6. [Individual characteristics of correction of the cosmonauts' vegetative status with a method of adaptive biofeedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornilova, L. N.; Cowings, P.; Arlashchenko, N. I.; Korneev, D. Iu; Sagalovich, S. V.; Sarantseva, A. V.; Toscano, W.; Kozlovskaia, I. B.

    2003-01-01

    The ability of 4 cosmonauts to voluntarily control their physiological parameters during the standing test was evaluated following a series of the adaptive feedback (AF) training sessions. Vegetative status of the cosmonauts during voluntary "relaxation" and "straining" was different when compared with its indices determined before these sessions. In addition, there was a considerable individual variability in the intensity and direction of the AF effects, and the range of parameters responding to AF. It was GCR which was the easiest one for the AF control.

  7. Biological effectiveness of nuclear fragments produced by high-energy protons interacting in tissues near the bone- soft tissue interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavers, Mark Randall

    1999-12-01

    High-energy protons in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR)-or generated by nuclear interactions of GCR heavy-ions with material-are capable of penetrating great thicknesses of shielding to irradiate humans in spacecraft or in lunar or Martian habitats. As protons interact with the nuclei of the elemental constituents of soft tissue and bone, low energy nuclei-target fragments-are emitted into the cells responsible for bone development and maintenance and for hematopoiesis. Leukemogenesis is the principal endpoint of concern because it is the most likely deleterious effect, and it has a short latency period and comparatively low survival rate, although other myelo- proliferative disorders and osteosarcoma also may be induced. A one-dimensional proton-target fragment transport model was used to calculate the energy spectra of fragments produced in bone and soft tissue, and present in marrow cavities at distances from a bone interface. In terms of dose equivalent, the target fragments are as significant as the incident protons. An average radiation quality factor was found to be between 1.8 and 2.6. Biological response to the highly non- uniform energy deposition of the target fragments is such that an alternative approach to conventional predictive risk assessment is needed. Alternative procedures are presented. In vitro cell response and relative biological effectiveness were calculated from the radial dose distribution of each fragment produced by 1-GeV protons using parameters of a modified Ion-Gamma- Kill (IGK) model of radiation action. The modelled endpoints were survival of C3H10t 1/2 and V79 cells, neoplastic transformation of C3H10t1/2 cells, and mutation of the X-linked hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus in V79 cells. The dose equivalent and cell responses increased by 10% or less near the interface. Since RBE increases with decreasing dose in the IGK model, comparisons with quality factors were made at dose levels 0.01 <= D [Gy] <= 2. Applying average quality factors derived herein to GCR exposures results in a <= 5% increase of in average quality. Calculated RBEs indicate that accepted quality factors for high-energy protons may be too low due to the relatively high effectiveness of the low-charged target fragments. Derived RBEs for target fragments increase the calculated biological effectiveness of GCR by 20% to 180%.

  8. To Cool is to Accrete: Analytic Scalings for Nebular Accretion of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene

    2015-09-01

    Planets acquire atmospheres from their parent circumstellar disks. We derive a general analytic expression for how the atmospheric mass grows with time t as a function of the underlying core mass {M}{core} and nebular conditions, including the gas metallicity Z. Planets accrete as much gas as can cool: an atmosphere's doubling time is given by its Kelvin-Helmholtz time. Dusty atmospheres behave differently from atmospheres made dust-free by grain growth and sedimentation. The gas-to-core mass ratio (GCR) of a dusty atmosphere scales as GCR \\propto {t}0.4{M}{core}1.7{Z}-0.4{? }{rcb}3.4, where {? }{rcb}\\propto 1/(1-Z) (for Z not too close to 1) is the mean molecular weight at the innermost radiative-convective boundary. This scaling applies across all orbital distances and nebular conditions for dusty atmospheres; their radiative-convective boundaries, which regulate cooling, are not set by the external environment, but rather by the internal microphysics of dust sublimation, H2 dissociation, and the formation of H-. By contrast, dust-free atmospheres have their radiative boundaries at temperatures {T}{rcb} close to nebular temperatures {T}{out}, and grow faster at larger orbital distances where cooler temperatures, and by extension lower opacities, prevail. At 0.1 AU in a gas-poor nebula, GCR \\propto {t}0.4{T}{rcb}-1.9{M}{core}1.6{Z}-0.4{? }{rcb}3.3, while beyond 1 AU in a gas-rich nebula, GCR \\propto {t}0.4{T}{rcb}-1.5{M}{core}1{Z}-0.4{? }{rcb}2.2. We confirm our analytic scalings against detailed numerical models for objects ranging in mass from Mars (0.1{M}\\oplus ) to the most extreme super-Earths (10-20{M}\\oplus ), and explain why heating from planetesimal accretion cannot prevent the latter from undergoing runaway gas accretion.

  9. Cosmogenic neon from precompaction irradiation of Kapoeta and Murchison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Swindle, T. D.; Goswami, J. N.

    1983-01-01

    Neon from hand-picked Murchison and Kapoeta grains, selected on the basis of the presence or absence of solar flare particle tracks, was analyzed in order to delineate the precompaction history of this material. The irradiated grains showed large enrichments of cosmogenic neon relative to the unirradiated grains. Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure ages for the unirradiated grains yield the nominal values reported for the recent exposure history of these meteorites. Apparent minimum precompaction galactic exposure ages of 28 m.y. and 56 m.y. would have been obtained for Murchison and Kapoeta, respectively, if the cosmogenic effects in the irradiated grains were due to GCR irradiation. Since this seems unreasonably long, the cosmogenic neon in the irradiated grains may be due to spallation by solar cosmic rays. This, however, would require a more active early sun. The isotopic composition of the cosmogenic neon in these grains suggests a harder energy spectrum than is characteristic of present solar flares. Lack of apparent solar wind effects may require some kind of shielding, such as nebular gas.

  10. Low dose radiation hypersensitivity and clustered DNA damages in human fibroblasts exposed to low dose and dose rate protons or 137CS y-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett P. V.; Bennett, P.V.; Keszenman, D.J.; Johnson, A.M.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

    2013-05-14

    Effective radioprotection for human space travelers hinges upon understanding the individual properties of charged particles. A significant fraction of particle radiation astronauts will encounter in space exploratory missions will come from high energy protons in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and/or possible exposures to lower energy proton flux from solar particle events (SPEs). These potential exposures present major concerns for NASA and others, in planning and executing long term space exploratory missions. We recently reported cell survival and transformation (acquisition of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar) frequencies in apparently normal NFF-28 primary human fibroblasts exposed to 0-30 cGy of 50MeV, 100MeV (SPE-like), or 1000 MeV (GCR-like) monoenergetic protons. These were modeled after 1989 SPE energies at an SPE-like low dose-rate (LDR) of 1.65 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) of 33.3 cGy/min delivered at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL.

  11. Forbush decreases associated to Stealth Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, B.; Wallmann, C.; Galsdorf, D.; Herbst K.; Kühl, P.; Dumbovic, M.; Vršnak, B.; Veronig, A.; Temmer, M.; Möstl, C.; Dalla, S.

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are structures in the solar wind that are the counterparts of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the Sun. It is commonly believed that enhanced magnetic fields in interplanetary shocks and solar ejecta as well as the increased turbulence in the solar wind sheath region are the cause of Forbush decreases (FDs) representing decreases of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities. Recently, stealth CMEs i.e.~CMEs with no apparent solar surface association have become a subject in recent studies of solar activity. Whether all of such stealth CMEs can drive a FD is difficult to investigate on the basis of neutron monitor NM measurements because these measurements not only reflect the GCR intensity variation in interplanetary space but also the variation of the geomagnetic field as well as the conditions in the Earth atmosphere. Single detector counter from spacecraft instrumentation, here SOHO and Chandra EPHIN, exceed counting statistic of NMs allowing to determine intensity variation of less than 1 permil in interplanetary space on the basis of 30 minute count rate averages. Here we present the ongoing analysis of eleven stealth CMEs.

  12. Statistical Characteristics of Elemental Abundance Ratios: Observations from the ACE Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.-L.; Zhang, H.

    2015-05-01

    We statistically analyze the elemental galactic cosmic ray (GCR) composition measurements of elements 5 ? Z ? 28 within the energy range 30-500 MeV/nucleon from the CRIS instrument on board the ACE spacecraft in orbit about the L1 Lagrange point during the period from 1997 to 2014. Similarly to the last unusual solar minimum, the elevated elemental intensities of all heavy nuclei during the current weak solar maximum in 2014 are ˜40% higher than that of the previous solar maximum in 2002, which has been attributed to the weak modulation associated with low solar activity levels during the ongoing weakest solar maximum since the dawn of space age. In addition, the abundance ratios of heavy nuclei with respect to elemental oxygen are generally independent of kinetic energy per nucleon in the energy region 60-200 MeV/nuc, in good agreement with previous experiments. Furthermore, the abundance ratios of most relatively abundant species, except carbon, exhibit considerable solar-cycle variation, which are obviously positively correlated with the sunspot numbers with about one-year time lag. We also find that the percentage variation of abundance ratios for most elements are approximately identical. These preliminary results provide valuable insights into the characteristics of elemental heavy nuclei composition and place new and significant constraints on future GCR heavy nuclei propagation and modulation models.

  13. Space Radiation Risk Assessment for Future Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ponomarev, Artem; Atwell, Bill; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    For lunar exploration mission design, radiation risk assessments require the understanding of future space radiation environments in support of resource management decisions, operational planning, and a go/no-go decision. The future GCR flux was estimated as a function of interplanetary deceleration potential, which was coupled with the estimated neutron monitor rate from the Climax monitor using a statistical model. A probability distribution function for solar particle event (SPE) occurrence was formed from proton fluence measurements of SPEs occurred during the past 5 solar cycles (19-23). Large proton SPEs identified from impulsive nitrate enhancements in polar ice for which the fluences are greater than 2 10(exp 9) protons/sq cm for energies greater than 30 MeV, were also combined to extend the probability calculation for high level of proton fluences. The probability with which any given proton fluence level of a SPE will be exceeded during a space mission of defined duration was then calculated. Analytic energy spectra of SPEs at different ranks of the integral fluences were constructed over broad energy ranges extending out to GeV, and representative exposure levels were analyzed at those fluences. For the development of an integrated strategy for radiation protection on lunar exploration missions, effective doses at various points inside a spacecraft were calculated with detailed geometry models representing proposed transfer vehicle and habitat concepts. Preliminary radiation risk assessments from SPE and GCR were compared for various configuration concepts of radiation shelter in exploratory-class spacecrafts.

  14. A comparative study of space radiation organ doses and associated cancer risks using PHITS and HZETRN.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Amir A; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Slaba, Tony C; Shavers, Mark R; Semones, Edward J; Van Baalen, Mary; Bolch, Wesley E

    2013-10-21

    NASA currently uses one-dimensional deterministic transport to generate values of the organ dose equivalent needed to calculate stochastic radiation risk following crew space exposures. In this study, organ absorbed doses and dose equivalents are calculated for 50th percentile male and female astronaut phantoms using both the NASA High Charge and Energy Transport Code to perform one-dimensional deterministic transport and the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System to perform three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Two measures of radiation risk, effective dose and risk of exposure-induced death (REID) are calculated using the organ dose equivalents resulting from the two methods of radiation transport. For the space radiation environments and simplified shielding configurations considered, small differences (<8%) in the effective dose and REID are found. However, for the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) boundary condition, compensating errors are observed, indicating that comparisons between the integral measurements of complex radiation environments and code calculations can be misleading. Code-to-code benchmarks allow for the comparison of differential quantities, such as secondary particle differential fluence, to provide insight into differences observed in integral quantities for particular components of the GCR spectrum. PMID:24061091

  15. Galactic cosmic ray modulation at high rigidities: cycles 20 - 22 and the ascending phase of cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Wilson, Margaret D.

    We have followed the long term, steady state, 11 year modulation of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity for several solar cycles, using the dataset obtained with a variety of detectors on Earth (neutron monitors and ion chambers, at different global sites) as well as at the balloon altitudes. The median rigidity of response (Rm) for these detectors, to GCR spectrum, lies in the range: 3 GV < Rm < 67 GV. The onset of modulation for cycle 23 occurred at Earth following a number of coronal mass ejections in the April-May 1998 period, as an active region moved across the solar disk from the east to the west limb. We have examined the characteristics of the observed modulation at Earth so far and compared it with those observed previously at the relatively comparable stages of development. Although the modulation pattern is the same for all the cycles studied, the contributions to the amplitude of modulation as a function of the phase of solar activity vary greatly from one cycle to another.

  16. A comparison of depth dependence of dose and linear energy transfer spectra in aluminum and polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    A set of four tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs), with their detector heads at the centers of 0 (bare), 3, 7 and 9-inch-diameter aluminum spheres, were flown on Shuttle flight STS-89. Five such detectors at the centers of polyethylene spheres were flown 1 year earlier on STS-81. The results of dose-depth dependence for the two materials convincingly show the merits of using material rich in hydrogen to decrease the radiation exposure to the crew. A comparison of the calculated galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) absorbed dose and dose-equivalent rates using the radiation transport code HZETRN with nuclear fragmentation model NUCFRG2 and the measured GCR absorbed dose rates and dose-equivalent rates shows that they agree within root mean square (rms) error of 12.5 and 8.2%, respectively. However, there are significant depth-dependent differences in the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra. A comparison for trapped protons using the proton transport code BRYNTRN and the AP-8 MIN trapped-proton model shows a systematic bias, with the model underpredicting dose and dose-equivalent rates. These results show the need for improvements in the radiation transport and/or fragmentation models.

  17. Comparisons Between Model Predictions and Spectral Measurements of Charged and Neutral Particles on the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald M.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Boettcher, Stephan; Boehm, Eckart; Guo, Jingnan; Koehler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Posner, Arik

    2914-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars have been made by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Curiosity rover since August 2012. RAD is a particle detector that measures the energy spectrum of charged particles (10 to approx. 200 MeV/u) and high energy neutrons (approx 8 to 200 MeV). The data obtained on the surface of Mars for 300 sols are compared to the simulation results using the Badhwar-O'Neill galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment model and the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code. For the nuclear interactions of primary GCR through Mars atmosphere and Curiosity rover, the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used. For describing the daily column depth of atmosphere, daily atmospheric pressure measurements at Gale Crater by the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) are implemented into transport calculations. Particle flux at RAD after traversing varying depths of atmosphere depends on the slant angles, and the model accounts for shielding of the RAD "E" dosimetry detector by the rest of the instrument. Detailed comparisons between model predictions and spectral data of various particle types provide the validation of radiation transport models, and suggest that future radiation environments on Mars can be predicted accurately. These contributions lend support to the understanding of radiation health risks to astronauts for the planning of various mission scenarios

  18. Biomarker Response to Galactic Cosmic Ray-Induced NOx and the Methane Greenhouse Effect in the Atmosphere of an Earthlike Planet Orbiting an M-Dwarf Star

    E-print Network

    Grenfell, J L; Patzer, B; Rauer, H; Segura, A; Stadelmann, A; Stracke, B; Titz, R; Von Paris, P; Grenfell, John Lee; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Patzer, Beate; Rauer, Heike; Segura, Antigona; Stadelmann, Anja; Stracke, Barbara; Titz, Ruth; Paris, Philip von

    2007-01-01

    Planets orbiting in the habitable zone (HZ) of M-Dwarf stars are subject to high levels of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) which produce nitrogen oxides in earthlike atmospheres. We investigate to what extent this NOx may modify biomarker compounds such as ozone (O3) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as well as related compounds such as water (H2O) (essential for life) and methane (CH4) (which has both abiotic and biotic sources) . Our model results suggest that such signals are robust, changing in the M-star world atmospheric column by up to 20% due to the GCR NOx effects compared to an M-star run without GCR effects and can therefore survive at least the effects of galactic cosmic rays. We have not however investigated stellar cosmic rays here. CH4 levels are about 10 times higher than on the Earth related to a lowering in hydroxyl (OH) in response to changes in UV. The increase is less than reported in previous studies. This difference arose partly because we used different biogenic input. For example, we employed 23% ...

  19. Implication of the sidereal anisotropy of ~5 TeV cosmic ray intensity observed with the Tibet III air shower array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibet As ? Collaboration

    This paper presents the sidereal anisotropy of ~10 TeV galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity observed by the Tibet Air Shower experiment. The observed sky- map of the directional anisotropy clearly shows the large-scale feature consisting of excess and deficit of the relative intensity. We note that the observed angular separation between the excess and the deficit is ~120 deg, which is much smaller than 180 deg expected from the uni-directional flow but significantly larger than 90 deg expected from the bi-directional counter streaming. According to our preliminary least-square analysis, the large-scale feature can be reproduced by a combination of the uni-directional and bi- directional flows with reference axes perpendicular to each other. We suggest that such two streams can be expected if the GCR population is lower at the location of the heliosphere in the local interstellar cloud (LIC) than that outside LIC. If this is the case, the orientation of the local interstellar magnetic field can be inferred from the reference axis of the bi-directional streaming.

  20. Predictors of satisfaction in geographically close and long-distance relationships.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-yeon; Pistole, M Carole

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the authors examined geographically close (GCRs) and long-distance (LDRs) romantic relationship satisfaction as explained by insecure attachment, self-disclosure, gossip, and idealization. After college student participants (N = 536) completed a Web survey, structural equation modeling (SEM) multigroup analysis revealed that the GCR and LDR models were nonequivalent, as expected. Self-disclosure mediated the insecure attachment-idealization path differently in GCRs and in LDRs. Self-disclosure was positively associated with idealization in GCRs and negatively associated with idealization in LDRs, with the insecure attachment-idealization and the insecure attachment-satisfaction paths negative for both GCRs and LDRs. Furthermore, the insecure attachment-idealization path was stronger than the mediated path, especially for LDRs; the insecure attachment-satisfaction path was stronger than the mediation model for GCRs and LDRs. In other words, the GCR and LDR models differed despite some similarities. For both, with higher insecure (i.e., anxious and avoidant) attachment, the person discloses less to the partner, idealizes the partner less, and is less satisfied with the relationship. Also, people who idealize are more satisfied. In contrast, in LDRs only, with higher insecure attachment, the people tend to gossip more. With higher insecure attachment and with higher self-disclosure, people idealize more in GCRs but idealize less in LDRs. Overall, attachment insecurity explained more idealization and satisfaction in LDRs than in GCRs. Implications are discussed. PMID:22506910

  1. Dose and dose equivalent and related risk during a cruise to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Günther; Matthiae, Daniel; Berger, Thomas; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Don; Rafkin, Scott; Ehresmann, Bent; Cucinotta, Francis; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Boehm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Koehler, jan; Martin, Cesar; Boettcher, Stephan; Brinza, David; Posner, Arik

    2014-05-01

    The radiation exposure in space can be estimated with numerical simulations applying different models for the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) irradiating a defined shielding geometry or by in situ measurements. A comparison of commonly used GCR models, Badhwar-O'Neill2010, Burger-Usoskin, CREME2009/CREME96, and the recently released Badhwar-O'Neill 2011 with the newly developed DLR model show considerable differences in particle fluences. The differences arising in the calculated radiation exposure by applying these models were quantified in terms of absorbed dose and dose equivalent rates using the GEANT4 Monte-Carlo framework for different shielding thicknesses and the cumulative shielding distribution of the MSL transfer vehicle. The calculations are compared with actual measurement of the Radiation Assessment detector (RAD) of the Mars Science Lab (MSL) on its cruise towards Mars and on the surface of Mars. From the dose equivalents measured and calculated estimates of the upper and lower limits for the risks for a human flight to Mars assuming the radiation environment experienced by MSL-RAD are given using the NASA risk model.

  2. North-south excess of hemispheric sunspot numbers and cosmic ray asymmetric solar modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Timeline of solar activity is reviewed for 1945-2013 with data for yearly north-south excess (NSE) of hemispheric sunspot numbers (SSNs) for six cycles (18-23) and rising phase of cycle 24. There are more sunspots in north hemisphere for 1950-1970 (cycles 18-20) and excess in south hemisphere for 1980-2010 (cycles 21-23). To the best of our knowledge, the physical cause(es) for NSE and change of its sign are not known, highlighting the fact that we do not yet understand how the solar Dynamo works. Others have analyzed NSE data for shorter periods. We study the relationship between NSE and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) asymmetric solar modulation for the space age with high latitude neutron monitor data located in USA and Europe; space age began in October 1963 with in situ measurements of the solar wind parameters at 1 AU. We infer an asymmetric GCR particle density gradient normal to the ecliptic plane exists for 1963-2013 and undergoes significant temporal variations unrelated to Schwabe or Hale cycle. Furthermore, it has no physical relationship with NSE for the period of our analysis, contrary to the result of a prior study for a shorter period.

  3. Space Radiation: The Number One Risk to Astronaut Health beyond Low Earth Orbit

    PubMed Central

    Chancellor, Jeffery C.; Scott, Graham B. I.; Sutton, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Projecting a vision for space radiobiological research necessitates understanding the nature of the space radiation environment and how radiation risks influence mission planning, timelines and operational decisions. Exposure to space radiation increases the risks of astronauts developing cancer, experiencing central nervous system (CNS) decrements, exhibiting degenerative tissue effects or developing acute radiation syndrome. One or more of these deleterious health effects could develop during future multi-year space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Shielding is an effective countermeasure against solar particle events (SPEs), but is ineffective in protecting crew members from the biological impacts of fast moving, highly-charged galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) nuclei. Astronauts traveling on a protracted voyage to Mars may be exposed to SPE radiation events, overlaid on a more predictable flux of GCR. Therefore, ground-based research studies employing model organisms seeking to accurately mimic the biological effects of the space radiation environment must concatenate exposures to both proton and heavy ion sources. New techniques in genomics, proteomics, metabolomics and other “omics” areas should also be intelligently employed and correlated with phenotypic observations. This approach will more precisely elucidate the effects of space radiation on human physiology and aid in developing personalized radiological countermeasures for astronauts. PMID:25370382

  4. Yeast Assay Highlights the Intrinsic Genomic Instability of Human PML Intron 6 over Intron 3 and the Role of Replication Fork Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chanet, Roland; Kienda, Guy; Heneman-Masurel, Amélie; Vernis, Laurence; Cassinat, Bruno; Guardiola, Philippe; Fenaux, Pierre; Chomienne, Christine; Huang, Meng-Er

    2015-01-01

    Human acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by a specific balanced translocation t(15;17)(q22;q21) involving the PML and RARA genes. In both de novo and therapy-related APL, the most frequent PML breakpoints are located within intron 6, and less frequently in intron 3; the precise mechanisms by which these breakpoints arise and preferentially in PML intron 6 remain unsolved. To investigate the intrinsic properties of the PML intron sequences in vivo, we designed Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains containing human PML intron 6 or intron 3 sequences inserted in yeast chromosome V and measured gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCR). This approach provided evidence that intron 6 had a superior instability over intron 3 due to an intrinsic property of the sequence and identified the 3’ end of intron 6 as the most susceptible to break. Using yeast strains invalidated for genes that control DNA replication, we show that this differential instability depended at least upon Rrm3, a DNA helicase, and Mrc1, the human claspin homolog. GCR induction by hydrogen peroxide, a general genotoxic agent, was also dependent on genetic context. We conclude that: 1) this yeast system provides an alternative approach to study in detail the properties of human sequences in a genetically controlled situation and 2) the different susceptibility to produce DNA breaks in intron 6 versus intron 3 of the human PML gene is likely due to an intrinsic property of the sequence and is under replication fork genetic control. PMID:26053431

  5. LET spectra measurements of charged particles in the P0006 experiment on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Csige, I.; Oda, K.; Henke, R. P.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Frigo, L. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Derrickson, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements are under way of the charged particle radiation environment of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite using stacks of plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's) placed in different locations of the satellite. In the initial work the charge, energy, and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of charged particles were measured with CR-39 double layer PNTD's located on the west side of the satellite (Experiment P0006). Primary and secondary stopping heavy ions were measured separately from the more energetic particles. Both trapped and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles are included, with the latter component being dominated by relativistic iron particles. The results from the P0006 experiment will be compared with similar measurements in other locations on LDEF with different orientation and shielding conditions. The remarkably detailed investigation of the charged particle radiation environment of the LDEF satellite will lead to a better understanding of the radiation environment of the Space Station Freedom. It will enable more accurate prediction of single event upsets (SEU's) in microelectronics and, especially, more accurate assessment of the risk - contributed by different components of the radiation field (GCR's, trapped protons, secondaries and heavy recoils, etc.) - to the health and safety of crew members.

  6. Ecosystem level assessment of the Grand Calumet Lagoons, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.M.

    1995-12-31

    The Grand Calumet Lagoons make up the eastern section of the Grand Calumet River (GCR), Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal and nearshore Lake Michigan Area of Concern (AOC). The GCR AOC is the only one of the 42 Great Lakes Areas of Concern identified by the International Joint Commission with all 14 designated uses classified as impaired. Included within the boundaries of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (INDU), is the central section of the Grand Calumet Lagoons. A number of biotic and abiotic factors were tested to determine the effects of an industrial landfill that borders the lagoons to assess the potential impact on park resources. Analysis included water quality testing, assessments of macroinvertebrate, fish, algae and aquatic plant communities and contaminant concentrations in water, sediment and plant and fish tissue. Surface water testing found very few contaminants, but significantly higher nutrient levels were found in the water column closest to the landfill. Macroinvertebrate, aquatic plant and fish communities all showed significant impairment in relationship to their proximity to the landfill. Aquatic plant growth habit became limited next to the landfill with certain growth habits disappearing entirely. Aquatic plants collected close to the landfill had high concentrations of several heavy metals in their stems and shoots. Using the index of biotic integrity (IBI), fish community assessment indicated impairment in the areas adjacent to the landfill. Sediments tested at one site had over 12% polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and carp (Cyprinus carpio) collected from this site had whole fish tissue concentrations over 1 mg/kg PAH.

  7. IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY PROGRAM TO OBTAIN BENCHMARK DATA ON THE FLOW PHENOMENA IN A SCALED MODEL OF A PRISMATIC GAS-COOLED REACTOR LOWER PLENUM FOR THE VALIDATION OF CFD CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-09-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a typical prismatic gas-cooled (GCR) reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A detailed description of the model, scaling, the experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that are presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic GCR design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements reveal undeveloped, non-uniform flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and charts that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet flow is also presented.

  8. Reply to comment by Peters et al. (2015) on "Cosmogenic 180W variations in meteorites and re-assessment of a possible 184Os-180W decay system"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David L.; Kruijer, Thomas S.; Leya, Ingo; Kleine, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    Peters et al. (2014) argued that ?180W excesses in iron meteorites originated as the decay product of 184Os. They also suggested that compositional heterogeneities, leading to variable Os/W ratios within a single iron, was the most likely explanation for discrepant ?180W values measured in different studies of the same meteorites. In Cook et al. (2014), we showed that irradiation by galactic cosmic rays (GCR) can induce large variations in ?180W. These effects provide at least a partial explanation for the observed ?180W excesses. Additionally, they can explain why ?180W values may vary both among members of a particular iron meteorite group (e.g., IVB irons), as well as between different specimens of a single iron meteorite (e.g., Weaver Mountains). We used GCR-corrected ?180W data to re-estimate the possible role of 184Os decay in generating ?180W excesses and found that any radiogenic production of 180W was much smaller than suggested by Peters et al. (2014). The preceding comment by Peters et al. (2015) on our 2014 paper contains criticisms that focus mainly on the following topics: the influence of an s-process deficit in W isotopes on ?180W in some iron meteorites, our sample selection for the construction of our isochron, and the potential effect of sample compositional heterogeneity on Os/W ratios and how this may impact our isochron slope. We address each of these in turn below.

  9. Time Profile of Cosmic Radiation Exposure During the EXPOSE-E Mission: The R3DE Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Horneck, Gerda; Häder, Donat-Peter; Schuster, Martin; Richter, Peter; Lebert, Michael; Demets, Rene

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this paper is to present the time profile of cosmic radiation exposure obtained by the Radiation Risk Radiometer-Dosimeter during the EXPOSE-E mission in the European Technology Exposure Facility on the International Space Station's Columbus module. Another aim is to make the obtained results available to other EXPOSE-E teams for use in their data analysis. Radiation Risk Radiometer-Dosimeter is a low-mass and small-dimension automatic device that measures solar radiation in four channels and cosmic ionizing radiation as well. The main results of the present study include the following: (1) three different radiation sources were detected and quantified—galactic cosmic rays (GCR), energetic protons from the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region of the inner radiation belt, and energetic electrons from the outer radiation belt (ORB); (2) the highest daily averaged absorbed dose rate of 426 ?Gy d?1 came from SAA protons; (3) GCR delivered a much smaller daily absorbed dose rate of 91.1 ?Gy d?1, and the ORB source delivered only 8.6 ?Gy d?1. The analysis of the UV and temperature data is a subject of another article (Schuster et al., 2012). Key Words: Ionizing radiation—R3D—ISS. Astrobiology 12, 403–411. PMID:22680687

  10. Fragmentation cross sections of 28Si at beam energies from 290AMeV to 1200A MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, C.; Fukumura, A.; Guetersloh, S.B.; Heilbronn, L.H; Iwata, Y.; Miller, J.; Murukami, T.

    2006-08-25

    In planning for long-duration spaceflight, it will beimportant to accurately model the exposure of astronauts to heavy ions inthe Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). As part of an ongoing effort to improveheavy-ion transport codes that will be used in designing futurespacecraft and habitats, fragmentation cross sections of 28Si have beenmeasured using beams with extracted energies from 290A MeV to 1200A MeV,spanning most of the peak region of the energy distribution of siliconions in the GCR. Results were obtained for six elemental targets:hydrogen, carbon, aluminum, copper, tin, and lead. The charge-changingcross sections are found to be energy-independent within the experimentaluncertainties, except for those on the hydrogen target. Cross sectionsfor the heaviest fragments are found to decrease slightly with increasingenergy for lighter targets, but increase with energy for tin and leadtargets. The cross sections are compared to previous measurements atsimilar energies, and to predictions of the NUCFRG2 model used by NASA toevaluate radiation exposures in flight. For charge-changing crosssections, reasonable agreement is found between the present experimentand those of Webber, et al. and Flesch, et al., and NUCFRG2 agrees withthe data to within 3 percent in most cases. Fragment cross sections showless agreement between experiments, and there are substantial differencesbetween NUCFRG2 predictions andthe data.

  11. An assessment of galactic cosmic radiation quality considering heavy ion track structures within the cellular environment.

    PubMed

    Craven, P A; Rycroft, M J

    1996-01-01

    Beyond the magnetic influence of the Earth, the flux of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) represents a radiological concern for long-term manned space missions. Current concepts of radiation quality and equivalent dose are inadequate for accurately specifying the relative biological "efficiency" of low doses of such heavily ionising radiations, based as they are on the single parameter of Linear Energy Transfer (LET). Such methods take no account of the mechanisms, nor of the highly inhomogeneous spatial structure, of energy deposition in radiation tracks. DNA damage in the cell nucleus, which ultimately leads to the death or transformation of the cell, is usually initiated by electrons liberated from surrounding molecules by the incident projectile ion. The characteristics of these emitted "delta-rays", dependent primarily upon the charge and velocity of the ion, are considered in relation to an idealised representation of the cellular environment. Theoretically calculated delta-ray energy spectra are multiplied by a series of weighting algorithms designed to represent the potential for DNA insult in this environment, both in terms of the quantity and quality of damage. By evaluating the resulting curves, and taking into account the energy spectra of heavy ions in space, a relative measure of the biological relevance of the most abundant GCR species is obtained, behind several shielding configurations. It is hoped that this method of assessing the radiation quality of galactic cosmic rays will be of value when considering the safety of long-term manned space missions. PMID:11538985

  12. The Earth climate and life evolution response to cosmic radiation enhancement arising from reversals and excursions of geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, N.

    Climate abrupt warming as well as biologic evolutionary events in respect to fauna and human evolution are shown to originate during reversals and excursions of geomagnetic field when the geomagnetic field loses a lot in its module value and consequently in its protective characteristics making galactic cosmic rays GCR and solar protons penetration into the Earth atmosphere possible Usually preceded by climate cooling and populations reduction reversals and excursions stimulate evolutionary genetic mutations generated by intense radiation and climate abrupt warming resulted from destruction of stratospheric aerosols by GCR Favorable environment conditions on new features and species origin For example it was Gauss-Matuyama reversal 2 3 Myr to make for Hominid evolutionary mutations and for distinctly new species Homo erectus origin The evolutionary events and climate shifts appear explicable on the context of the fundamentally new model of the geomagnetic field generation based on hypothesis of the hot Earth and the theory of the Earth magnetic poles drift throughout reversals and excursions theory

  13. Modeling the variations of Dose Rate measured by RAD during the first MSL Martian year: 2012-2014

    E-print Network

    Jingnan Guo; Cary Zeitlin; Robert F. Wimmer-Schweingruber; Scot Rafkin; Donald M. Hassler; Arik Posner; Bernd Heber; Jan Koehler; Bent Ehresmann; Jan K. Appel; Eckart Boehm; Stephan Boettcher; Soenke Burmeister; David E. Brinza; Henning Lohf; Cesar Martin; H. Kahanpaeae; Guenther Reitz

    2015-09-21

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), on board Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures the {energy spectra} of both energetic charged and neutral particles along with the radiation dose rate at the surface of Mars. With these first-ever measurements on the Martian surface, RAD observed several effects influencing the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) induced surface radiation dose concurrently: [a] short-term diurnal variations of the Martian atmospheric pressure caused by daily thermal tides, [b] long-term seasonal pressure changes in the Martian atmosphere, and [c] the modulation of the primary GCR flux by the heliospheric magnetic field, which correlates with long-term solar activity and the rotation of the Sun. The RAD surface dose measurements, along with the surface pressure data and the solar modulation factor, are analysed and fitted to empirical models which quantitatively demonstrate} how the long-term influences ([b] and [c]) are related to the measured dose rates. {Correspondingly we can estimate dose rate and dose equivalents under different solar modulations and different atmospheric conditions, thus allowing empirical predictions of the Martian surface radiation environment.

  14. Shielding experiments with high-energy heavy ions for spaceflight applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Guetersloh, S.; Heilbronn, L.; Miller, J.; Elkhayari, N.; Empl, A.; LeBourgeois, M.; Mayes, B. W.; Pinsky, L.; Christl, M.; Kuznetsov, E.

    2008-07-01

    Mitigation of radiation exposures received by astronauts on deep-space missions must be considered in the design of future spacecraft. The galactic cosmic rays (GCR) include high-energy heavy ions, many of which have ranges that exceed the depth of shielding that can be launched in realistic scenarios. Some of these ions are highly ionizing (producing a high dose per particle) and for some biological endpoints are more damaging per unit dose than sparsely ionizing radiation. The principal physical mechanism by which the dose and dose equivalent delivered by these particles can be reduced is nuclear fragmentation, the result of inelastic collisions between nuclei in the hull of the spacecraft and/or other materials. These interactions break the incident ions into lighter, less ionizing and less biologically effective particles. We have previously reported the tests of shielding effectiveness using many materials in a 1 GeV nucleon-1 56Fe beam, and also reported results using a single polyethylene (CH2) target in a variety of beam ions and energies up to 1 GeV nucleon-1. An important, but tentative, conclusion of those studies was that the average behavior of heavy ions in the GCR would be better simulated by heavy beams at energies above 1 GeV nucleon-1. Following up on that work, we report new results using beams of 12C, 28Si and 56Fe, each at three energies, 3, 5 and 10 GeV nucleon-1, on carbon, polyethylene, aluminium and iron targets.

  15. A comparison of two different types of geosynchronous satellite measurements during the 1989 solar proton events.

    PubMed

    Normand, E

    1994-10-01

    The proton telescope aboard the GOES-7 satellite continuously records the proton flux at geosynchronous orbit, and therefore provides a direct measurement of the energetic protons arriving during solar energetic particle (SEP) events. Microelectronic devices are susceptible to single event upset (SEU) caused by both energetic protons and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) ions. Some devices are so sensitive that their upsets can be used as a dosimetric indicator of a high fluence of particles. The 93L422 1K SRAM is one such device. Eight of them are on the TDRS-1 satellite in geosynchronous orbit, and collectively they had been experiencing 1-2 upset/day due to the GCR background. During the large SEP events of 1989 the upset rate increased dramatically, up to about 250 for the week of 19 Oct, due to the arrival of the SEP protons. Using the GOES proton spectra, the proton-induced SEU cross section curve for the 93L422 and the shielding distribution around the 93L422, the calculated upsets based on the GOES satellite data compared well against the log of measured upsets on TDRS-1. PMID:11540009

  16. Monte Carlo Analysis of Pion Contribution to Absorbed Dose from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aghara, S.K.; Battnig, S.R.; Norbury, J.W.; Singleterry, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction, particle production and transport is necessary to estimate the radiation damage to equipment used on spacecraft and the biological effects of space radiation. For long duration astronaut missions, both on the International Space Station and the planned manned missions to Moon and Mars, the shielding strategy must include a comprehensive knowledge of the secondary radiation environment. The distribution of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is a function of the type, energy and population of these secondary products. Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) comprised of protons and heavier nuclei have energies from a few MeV per nucleon to the ZeV region, with the spectra reaching flux maxima in the hundreds of MeV range. Therefore, the MeV - GeV region is most important for space radiation. Coincidentally, the pion production energy threshold is about 280 MeV. The question naturally arises as to how important these particles are with respect to space radiation problems. The space radiation transport code, HZETRN (High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport), currently used by NASA, performs neutron, proton and heavy ion transport explicitly, but it does not take into account the production and transport of mesons, photons and leptons. In this paper, we present results from the Monte Carlo code MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended), showing the effect of leptons and mesons when they are produced and transported in a GCR environment.

  17. Long-term variation of the solar diurnal anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays observed with the Nagoya multi-directional muon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Munakata, K.; Kozai, M.; Kato, C.; Kóta, J.

    2014-08-10

    We analyze the three-dimensional anisotropy of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities observed independently with a muon detector at Nagoya in Japan and neutron monitors over four solar activity cycles. We clearly see the phase of the free-space diurnal anisotropy shifting toward earlier hours around solar activity minima in A > 0 epochs, due to the reduced anisotropy component parallel to the mean magnetic field. This component is consistent with a rigidity-independent spectrum, while the perpendicular anisotropy component increases with GCR rigidity. We suggest that this harder spectrum of the perpendicular component is due to contribution from the drift streaming. We find that the bi-directional latitudinal density gradient is positive in the A > 0 epoch, while it is negative in the A < 0 epoch, in agreement with the drift model prediction. The radial density gradient of GCRs, on the other hand, varies with a ?11 yr cycle with maxima (minima) in solar maximum (minimum) periods, but we find no significant difference between the radial gradients in the A > 0 and A < 0 epochs. The corresponding parallel mean free path is larger in A < 0 than in A > 0. We also find, however, that the parallel mean free path (radial gradient) appears to persistently increase (decrease) in the last three cycles of weakening solar activity. We suggest that simple differences between these parameters in A > 0 and A < 0 epochs are seriously biased by these long-term trends.

  18. The response of a spherical tissue-equivalent proportional counter to 56-Fe particles from 200-1000 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Gersey, Bradford B.; Borak, Thomas B.; Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Zeitlin, Cary J.; Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Murakami, T.; Iwata, Y.

    2001-09-04

    The radiation environment aboard the space shuttle and the International Space Station includes high-Z and high-energy (HZE) particles that are part of the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) spectrum. Iron-56 is considered to be one of the most biologically important parts of the GCR spectrum. Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are used as active dosimeters on manned space flights. These TEPC's are further used to determine average quality factor for each space mission. A TEPC simulating a 1 micron diameter sphere of tissue was exposed as part of a particle spectrometer to iron-56 at energies from 200-1000 MeV/nucleon. The response of TEPC in terms of frequency-averaged lineal energy, dose-averaged lineal energy, as well as energy deposited at different impact parameters through detector was determined for six different incident energies of iron-56 in this energy range. Calculations determined that charged particle equilibrium was achieved for each of the six experiments. Energy depositions at different impact parameters were calculated using a radial dose distribution model and the results compared to experimental data.

  19. Benchmark Analysis of Pion Contribution from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aghara, Sukesh K.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norbury, John W.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Shielding strategies for extended stays in space must include a comprehensive resolution of the secondary radiation environment inside the spacecraft induced by the primary, external radiation. The distribution of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is a function of the type, energy and population of these secondary products. A systematic verification and validation effort is underway for HZETRN, which is a space radiation transport code currently used by NASA. It performs neutron, proton and heavy ion transport explicitly, but it does not take into account the production and transport of mesons, photons and leptons. The question naturally arises as to what is the contribution of these particles to space radiation. The pion has a production kinetic energy threshold of about 280 MeV. The Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) spectra, coincidentally, reaches flux maxima in the hundreds of MeV range, corresponding to the pion production threshold. We present results from the Monte Carlo code MCNPX, showing the effect of lepton and meson physics when produced and transported explicitly in a GCR environment.

  20. Summary of Atmospheric Ionizing AIR Research: SST-Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Rafnsson, V.; deAngelis, G.; Friedberg, W.; Clem, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    The Supersonic Transport (SST) program, proposed in 1961, first raised concern for the exposure of pregnant occupants by solar energetic particles (SEP), and neutrons were suspected to have a main role in particle propagation deep into the atmosphere. An eight-year flight program confirmed the role of SEP as a significant hazard and of the neutrons as contributing over half of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures, with the largest contribution from neutrons above 10 MeV. The FAA Advisory Committee on the Radiobiological Aspects of the SST provided operational requirements. The more recent lowering of the radiation exposure limits by the International Commission on Radiological Protection with the classification of aircrew as radiation workers renewed interest in GCR background exposures at commercial flight altitudes and stimulated epidemiological studies in Europe, Japan, Canada and the USA. The proposed development of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) required validation of the role of high-energy neutrons, and this resulted in ER-2 flights at solar minimum (June 1997) and studies on effects of aircraft materials on interior exposures. Recent evaluation of health outcomes of DOE nuclear workers resulted in legislation for health compensation in year 2000 and recent European aircrew epidemiological studies of health outcomes bring renewed interest in aircraft radiation exposures. As improved radiation models become available, it is imperative that a corresponding epidemiological program of US aircrew be implemented.

  1. Overview of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) Research: SST - Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Rafnsson, V.; Clem, J. M.; DeAngelis, G.; Friedberg, W.

    2002-01-01

    The Supersonic Transport (SST) program, proposed in 1961, first raised concern for the exposure of pregnant occupants by solar energetic particles (SEP), and neutrons were suspected to have a main role in particle propagation deep into the atmosphere. An eight-year flight program confirmed the role of SEP as a significant hazard and of the neutrons as contributing over half of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures, with the largest contribution from neutrons above 10 MeV. The FAA Advisory Committee on the Radiobiological Aspects of the SST provided operational requirements. The more recent (1990) lowering of recommended exposure limits by the International Commission on Radiological Protection with the classification of aircrew as "radiation workers" renewed interest in GCR background exposures at commercial flight altitudes and stimulated epidemiological studies in Europe, Japan, Canada and the USA. The proposed development of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) required validation of the role of high-energy neutrons, and this resulted in ER-2 flights at solar minimum (June 1997) and studies on effects of aircraft materials on interior exposures. Recent evaluation of health outcomes of DOE nuclear workers resulted in legislation for health compensation in year 2000 and recent European aircrew epidemiological studies of health outcomes bring renewed interest in aircraft radiation exposures. As improved radiation models become available, it is imperative that a corresponding epidemiological program of US aircrew be implemented.

  2. 11 - Year Variations of Atmospheric Conductivity and Electric Currents from Thunderstorms to Ionosphere during Solar Cycle - Quasi-Static Modeling of the Coupling Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velinov, P.; Tonev, P.

    Possible ways by which solar activity can influence the elements of the global atmospheric electric circuit are studied Thunderstorms at the Earth act as tropospheric electric generators in the global electric circuit since they create currents which flow into the ionosphere A key factor for these currents is the atmospheric conductivity The conductivity in lower stratosphere is provided by galactic cosmic rays GCR which produce maximal ionization at Pfotzer maximum at about 12-18 km as dependent of the latitude Since the GCR flux is modulated by solar activity the conductivity can suffer long-term variations with 11- and 22-year solar cycle so that it is expected to be higher in the lower stratosphere during solar minimums and vice versa This suggestion is supported by observation that the current Ionosphere-Earth varies by a factor of about twice at middle latitudes in a good correlation with solar activity In respect to this our goal is to study the possible impact of the solar activity to the thunderstorm-ionosphere currents through presumable 11-year variations of the stratospheric conductivity In order to estimate this possible influence two cases are considered respectively of solar maximum and of solar minimum We propose an analytical model based on the Maxwell equations under quasi-static conditions by which the temporal and spatial behavior of both the conduction and the Maxwell currents over a single thundercloud cell are computed This model takes into account the capacitive properties of the atmosphere and thus it describes the

  3. ACCELERATION OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, L. A.; Gloeckler, G.

    2012-01-10

    Challenges have arisen to diffusive shock acceleration as the primary means to accelerate galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) in the interstellar medium. Diffusive shock acceleration is also under challenge in the heliosphere, where at least the simple application of diffusive shock acceleration cannot account for observations. In the heliosphere, a new acceleration mechanism has been invented-a pump mechanism, driven by ambient turbulence, in which particles are pumped up in energy out of a low-energy core particle population through a series of adiabatic compressions and expansions-that can account for observations not only at shocks but in quiet conditions in the solar wind and throughout the heliosheath. In this paper, the pump mechanism is applied to the acceleration of GCRs in the interstellar medium. With relatively straightforward assumptions about the magnetic field in the interstellar medium, and how GCRs propagate in this field, the pump mechanism yields (1) the overall shape of the GCR spectrum, a power law in particle kinetic energy, with a break at the so-called knee in the GCR spectrum to a slightly steeper power-law spectrum. (2) The rigidity dependence of the H/He ratio observed from the PAMELA satellite instrument.

  4. Space Radiation: The Number One Risk to Astronaut Health beyond Low Earth Orbit.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, Jeffery C; Scott, Graham B I; Sutton, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Projecting a vision for space radiobiological research necessitates understanding the nature of the space radiation environment and how radiation risks influence mission planning, timelines and operational decisions. Exposure to space radiation increases the risks of astronauts developing cancer, experiencing central nervous system (CNS) decrements, exhibiting degenerative tissue effects or developing acute radiation syndrome. One or more of these deleterious health effects could develop during future multi-year space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Shielding is an effective countermeasure against solar particle events (SPEs), but is ineffective in protecting crew members from the biological impacts of fast moving, highly-charged galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) nuclei. Astronauts traveling on a protracted voyage to Mars may be exposed to SPE radiation events, overlaid on a more predictable flux of GCR. Therefore, ground-based research studies employing model organisms seeking to accurately mimic the biological effects of the space radiation environment must concatenate exposures to both proton and heavy ion sources. New techniques in genomics, proteomics, metabolomics and other "omics" areas should also be intelligently employed and correlated with phenotypic observations. This approach will more precisely elucidate the effects of space radiation on human physiology and aid in developing personalized radiological countermeasures for astronauts. PMID:25370382

  5. Getting ready for the manned mission to Mars: the astronauts' risk from space radiation.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Christine E; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2007-07-01

    Space programmes are shifting towards planetary exploration and, in particular, towards missions by human beings to the Moon and to Mars. Radiation is considered to be one of the major hazards for personnel in space and has emerged as the most critical issue to be resolved for long-term missions both orbital and interplanetary. The two cosmic sources of radiation that could impact a mission outside the Earth's magnetic field are solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Exposure to the types of ionizing radiation encountered during space travel may cause a number of health-related problems, but the primary concern is related to the increased risk of cancer induction in astronauts. Predictions of cancer risk and acceptable radiation exposure in space are extrapolated from minimal data and are subject to many uncertainties. The paper describes present-day estimates of equivalent doses from GCR and solar cosmic radiation behind various shields and radiation risks for astronauts on a mission to Mars. PMID:17235598

  6. Analysis of MIR-18 results for physical and biological dosimetry: radiation shielding effectiveness in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Williams, J. R.; Dicello, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    We compare models of radiation transport and biological response to physical and biological dosimetry results from astronauts on the Mir space station. Transport models are shown to be in good agreement with physical measurements and indicate that the ratio of equivalent dose from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) to protons is about 3/2:1 and that this ratio will increase for exposures to internal organs. Two biological response models are used to compare to the Mir biodosimetry for chromosome aberration in lymphocyte cells; a track-structure model and the linear-quadratic model with linear energy transfer (LET) dependent weighting coefficients. These models are fit to in vitro data for aberration formation in human lymphocytes by photons and charged particles. Both models are found to be in reasonable agreement with data for aberrations in lymphocytes of Mir crew members: however there are differences between the use of LET dependent weighting factors and track structure models for assigning radiation quality factors. The major difference in the models is the increased effectiveness predicted by the track model for low charge and energy ions with LET near 10 keV/micrometers. The results of our calculations indicate that aluminum shielding, although providing important mitigation of the effects of trapped radiation, provides no protective effect from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in low-earth orbit (LEO) using either equivalent dose or the number of chromosome aberrations as a measure until about 100 g/cm 2 of material is used.

  7. Space Radiation Cancer Risks and Uncertainties for Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Peterson, L. E.; Badhwar, G. D.; Saganti, P. B.; Dicello, J. F.

    2001-01-01

    Projecting cancer risks from exposure to space radiation is highly uncertain because of the absence of data for humans and because of the limited radiobiology data available for estimating late effects from the high-energy and charge (HZE) ions present in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Cancer risk projections involve many biological and physical factors, each of which has a differential range of uncertainty due to the lack of data and knowledge. We discuss an uncertainty assessment within the linear-additivity model using the approach of Monte Carlo sampling from subjective error distributions that represent the lack of knowledge in each factor to quantify the overall uncertainty in risk projections. Calculations are performed using the space radiation environment and transport codes for several Mars mission scenarios. This approach leads to estimates of the uncertainties in cancer risk projections of 400-600% for a Mars mission. The uncertainties in the quality factors are dominant. Using safety standards developed for low-Earth orbit, long-term space missions (>90 days) outside the Earth's magnetic field are currently unacceptable if the confidence levels in risk projections are considered. Because GCR exposures involve multiple particle or delta-ray tracks per cellular array, our results suggest that the shape of the dose response at low dose rates may be an additional uncertainty for estimating space radiation risks.

  8. Variations of dose rate observed by MSL/RAD in transit to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jingnan; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Hassler, Donald M.; Posner, Arik; Heber, Bernd; Köhler, Jan; Rafkin, Scot; Ehresmann, Bent; Appel, Jan K.; Böhm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Brinza, David E.; Lohf, Henning; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Günther

    2015-05-01

    Aims: To predict the cruise radiation environment related to future human missions to Mars, the correlation between solar modulation potential and the dose rate measured by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) has been analyzed and empirical models have been employed to quantify this correlation. Methods: The instrument RAD, onboard Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures a broad spectrum of energetic particles along with the radiation dose rate during the 253-day cruise phase as well as on the surface of Mars. With these first ever measurements inside a spacecraft from Earth to Mars, RAD observed the impulsive enhancement of dose rate during solar particle events as well as a gradual evolution of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) induced radiation dose rate due to the modulation of the primary GCR flux by the solar magnetic field, which correlates with long-term solar activities and heliospheric rotation. Results: We analyzed the dependence of the dose rate measured by RAD on solar modulation potentials and estimated the dose rate and dose equivalent under different solar modulation conditions. These estimations help us to have approximate predictions of the cruise radiation environment, such as the accumulated dose equivalent associated with future human missions to Mars. Conclusions: The predicted dose equivalent rate during solar maximum conditions could be as low as one-fourth of the current RAD cruise measurement. However, future measurements during solar maximum and minimum periods are essential to validate our estimations.

  9. Modeling the Variations of Dose Rate Measured by RAD during the First MSL Martian Year: 2012-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jingnan; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Rafkin, Scot; Hassler, Donald M.; Posner, Arik; Heber, Bernd; Köhler, Jan; Ehresmann, Bent; Appel, Jan K.; Böhm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Brinza, David E.; Lohf, Henning; Martin, Cesar; Kahanpää, H.; Reitz, Günther

    2015-09-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), on board Mars Science Laboratory’s (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures the energy spectra of both energetic charged and neutral particles along with the radiation dose rate at the surface of Mars. With these first-ever measurements on the Martian surface, RAD observed several effects influencing the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) induced surface radiation dose concurrently: (a) short-term diurnal variations of the Martian atmospheric pressure caused by daily thermal tides, (b) long-term seasonal pressure changes in the Martian atmosphere, and (c) the modulation of the primary GCR flux by the heliospheric magnetic field, which correlates with long-term solar activity and the rotation of the Sun. The RAD surface dose measurements, along with the surface pressure data and the solar modulation factor, are analyzed and fitted to empirical models that quantitatively demonstrate how the long-term influences ((b) and (c)) are related to the measured dose rates. Correspondingly, we can estimate dose rate and dose equivalents under different solar modulations and different atmospheric conditions, thus allowing empirical predictions of the Martian surface radiation environment.

  10. Energetic Particle Radiation in Transit to and on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Guenther

    The radiation exposure in space and on planetary surfaces can be calculated with numerical simulations applying different models for the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and a code that combines radiation transport into the spacecraft or through the atmosphere and finally in the human body. The Mars Science Lab Radiation assessment detector (MSL-RAD) has provided, for the first time, measurements from inside a spacecraft on its way to Mars and, since the landing of the curiosity rover in August 2012, from the surface of Mars. Through MSL-RAD, a unique data set has become available which allows us validating model calculations with respect to their applicability in future mission planning. Commonly used GCR models, such as Badhwar-O'Neill2010, Burger-Usoskin, CREME2009/CREME96, Badhwar-O’Neill 2011 and a model developed by DLR already show considerable differences in calculated particle fluences. The differences arising in the calculated radiation exposure by applying these models were quantified in terms of particle fluence, absorbed dose and dose equivalent rate using different codes for different shielding thicknesses and the cumulative shielding distribution of the MSL transfer vehicle. The calculations are compared with measurement of the Radiation Assessment detector (RAD) of the Mars Science Lab (MSL) on its cruise towards Mars and on the surface. From the dose equivalents measured and calculated estimates of the upper and lower limits for the risks for a human flight to Mars assuming the radiation environment experienced by MSL-RAD are given and discussed.

  11. Synchronized Northern Hemisphere climate change and solar magnetic cycles during the Maunder Minimum

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiko T.; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Miyahara, Hiroko; Sho, Kenjiro; Nakatsuka, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    The Maunder Minimum (A.D. 1645–1715) is a useful period to investigate possible sun–climate linkages as sunspots became exceedingly rare and the characteristics of solar cycles were different from those of today. Here, we report annual variations in the oxygen isotopic composition (?18O) of tree-ring cellulose in central Japan during the Maunder Minimum. We were able to explore possible sun–climate connections through high-temporal resolution solar activity (radiocarbon contents; ?14C) and climate (?18O) isotope records derived from annual tree rings. The tree-ring ?18O record in Japan shows distinct negative ?18O spikes (wetter rainy seasons) coinciding with rapid cooling in Greenland and with decreases in Northern Hemisphere mean temperature at around minima of decadal solar cycles. We have determined that the climate signals in all three records strongly correlate with changes in the polarity of solar dipole magnetic field, suggesting a causal link to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). These findings are further supported by a comparison between the interannual patterns of tree-ring ?18O record and the GCR flux reconstructed by an ice-core 10Be record. Therefore, the variation of GCR flux associated with the multidecadal cycles of solar magnetic field seem to be causally related to the significant and widespread climate changes at least during the Maunder Minimum. PMID:21076031

  12. Design of Two RadWorks Storm Shelters for Solar Particle Event Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Matthew; Cerro, Jeffery; Latorella, Kara; Clowdsley, Martha; Watson, Judith; Albertson, Cindy; Norman, Ryan; Le Boffe, Vincent; Walker, Steven

    2014-01-01

    In order to enable long-duration human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit, the risks associated with exposure of astronaut crews to space radiation must be mitigated with practical and affordable solutions. The space radiation environment beyond the magnetosphere is primarily a combination of two types of radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). While mitigating GCR exposure remains an open issue, reducing astronaut exposure to SPEs is achievable through material shielding because they are made up primarily of medium-energy protons. In order to ensure astronaut safety for long durations beyond low-Earth orbit, SPE radiation exposure must be mitigated. However, the increasingly demanding spacecraft propulsive performance for these ambitious missions requires minimal mass and volume radiation shielding solutions which leverage available multi-functional habitat structures and logistics as much as possible. This paper describes the efforts of NASA's RadWorks Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Project to design two minimal mass SPE radiation shelter concepts leveraging available resources: one based upon reconfiguring habitat interiors to create a centralized protection area and one based upon augmenting individual crew quarters with waterwalls and logistics. Discussion items include the design features of the concepts, a radiation analysis of their implementations, an assessment of the parasitic mass of each concept, and the result of a human in the loop evaluation performed to drive out design and operational issues.

  13. EVALUATION OF ZERO-POWER, ELEVATED-TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS AT JAPAN’S HIGH TEMPERATURE ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Nozomu Fujimoto; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Atsushi Zukeran

    2011-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The experimental benchmark performed and currently evaluated in this report pertains to the data available for two zero-power, warm-critical measurements with the fully-loaded HTTR core. Six isothermal temperature coefficients for the fully-loaded core from approximately 340 to 740 K have also been evaluated. These experiments were performed as part of the power-up tests (References 1 and 2). Evaluation of the start-up core physics tests specific to the fully-loaded core (HTTR-GCR-RESR-001) and annular start-up core loadings (HTTR-GCR-RESR-002) have been previously evaluated.

  14. CRaTER: The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation Experiment on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Heine, T.; Larsen, B. A.; Blake, J. B.; Caranza, P.; Crain, W. R.; George, J.; Lalic, M.; Lin, A.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Salvaggio, D.; Kasper, J. C.; Stubbs, T. J.; Doucette, M.; Ford, P.; Foster, R.; Goeke, R.; Gordon, D.; Klatt, B.; O'Connor, J.; Smith, M.; Onsager, T.; Zeitlin, C.; Townsend, L. W.; Charara, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) characterizes the radiation environment to be experienced by humans during future lunar missions. CRaTER measures the effects of ionizing energy loss in matter due to penetrating solar energetic protons (SEP) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR), specifically in silicon solid-state detectors and after interactions with tissue-equivalent plastic (TEP), a synthetic analog of human tissue. The CRaTER investigation quantifies the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum in these materials through direct measurements with the lunar space radiation environment, particularly the interactions of ions with energies above 10 MeV, which penetrate and are detected by CRaTER. Combined with models of radiation transport through materials, CRaTER LET measurements constrain models of the biological effects of ionizing radiation in the lunar environment as well as provide valuable information on radiation effects on electronic systems in deep space. In addition to these human exploration goals, CRaTER measurements also provide new insights on the spatial and temporal variability of the SEP and GCR populations and their interactions with the lunar surface. We present here an overview of the CRaTER science goals and investigation, including: an instrument description; observation strategies; instrument testing, characterization, and calibration; and data analysis, interpretation, and modeling plans.

  15. Simulation of Earth-Moon-Mars Environments for the Assessment of Organ Doses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Schwadron, Nathan; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Space radiation environments for historically large solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) at solar minimum and solar maximum are simulated in order to characterize exposures to radio-sensitive organs for missions to low-Earth orbit (LEO), moon, and Mars. Primary and secondary particles for SPE and GCR are transported through the respective atmosphere of Earth or Mars, space vehicle, and astronaut s body tissues using the HZETRN/QMSFRG computer code. In LEO, exposures are reduced compared to deep space because particles are deflected by the Earth s magnetic field and absorbed by the solid body of the Earth. Geomagnetic transmission function as a function of altitude was applied for the particle flux of charged particles, and the shift or the organ exposures to higher velocity or lower stopping powers compared to those in deep space were analyzed. In the transport through Mars atmosphere, a vertical distribution of atmospheric thickness was calculated from the temperature and pressure data of Mars Global Surveyor, and the directional cosine distribution was implemented to describe the spherically distributed atmospheric distance along the slant path at each altitude. The resultant directional shielding by Mars atmosphere at solar minimum and solar maximum was used for the particle flux simulation at various altitudes on the Martian surface. Finally, atmospheric shielding was coupled with vehicle and body shielding for organ dose estimates. We made predictions of radiation dose equivalents and evaluated acute symptoms at LEO, moon, and Mars at solar minimum and solar maximum.

  16. Solar-flare implanted He-4/He-3 and solar-proton-produced Ne and Ar concentration profiles preserved in lunar rock 61016

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Garrison, D. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Reedy, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    Depth profiles for Ne-21, Ne-22, and Ar-38 isotopes from oriented lunar rock 61016 are reported. Concentration profiles of cosmogenic GCR+SCR (Galactic cosmic ray and solar cosmic ray-produced) isotopes are determined, quantitatively resolving neon and argon produced by energetic solar flares from that produced by Galactic cosmic rays. The SCR component is resolved from the GCR component as a function of shielding, and excellent agreement is found between experimental SCR production profiles for the isotopes and theoretically calculated values. A characteristic SW He-4/He-3 ratio of 3450 +/- 81, representing energies down to as few keV/amu. In slightly deeper samples an SRF He-4/He-3 ratio of 3450 +/- 725 is found for He particles with E larger than about 1 MeV/amu. These results indicate that the isotopic composition of SF He, averaged over the long term, is energy-dependent. An implanted Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio of 12.4 is measured in unetched samples, representing E greater than 1 MeV/amu, and a ratio of 11.6 is inferred in the samples, representing E larger than about 5 MeV/amu.

  17. Prospective Memory Development Through Childhood into Adolescence 

    E-print Network

    Bialek, Anna Katarzyna

    2009-07-03

    memory development in childhood and adolescence, and accentuated the importance of not using prospective memory as an umbrella term for event-based and time-based memory as well as the importance of controlling time delay and motivation....

  18. AN EXTENSIBLE PARAMETER VIEWER FOR CUMULVS Dan Bennett, Paul Farrell, and Arden Ruttan

    E-print Network

    Farrell, Paul A.

    have created an extensible viewer. This viewer is built upon a utility library which supplies python bindings to CUMULVS. The viewer is event based and can be easily employed to produce both text and GUI

  19. Event-by-event Simulation of Quantum Cryptography Protocols

    E-print Network

    Shuang Zhao; Hans De Raedt

    2007-08-13

    We present a new approach to simulate quantum cryptography protocols using event-based processes. The method is validated by simulating the BB84 protocol and the Ekert protocol, both without and with the presence of an eavesdropper.

  20. LEARNING TEMPORAL RELATIONS IN SMART HOME DATA Vikramaditya R. Jakkula and Diane J. Cook.

    E-print Network

    Cook, Diane J.

    of this work is to identify interesting temporal patterns in order to improve prediction of events based. For example, consider three events A (turn on range top), B (turn on oven), and C (turn on toaster). Figure 1

  1. Cosmic ray heliospheric transport study with neutron monitor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Ygbuhay, R. C.; Modzelewska, R.; Dorman, L. I.; Alania, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    Determining transport coefficients for galactic cosmic ray (GCR) propagation in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) poses a fundamental challenge in modeling cosmic ray modulation processes. GCR scattering in the solar wind involves wave-particle interaction, the waves being Alfven waves which propagate along the ambient field (B). Empirical values at 1 AU are determined for the components of the diffusion tensor for GCR propagation in the heliosphere using neutron monitor (NM) data. At high rigidities, particle density gradients and mean free paths at 1 AU in B can only be computed from the solar diurnal anisotropy (SDA) represented by a vector A (components Ar, A?, and A?) in a heliospherical polar coordinate system. Long-term changes in SDA components of NMs (with long track record and the median rigidity of response Rm ~ 20 GV) are used to compute yearly values of the transport coefficients for 1963-2013. We confirm the previously reported result that the product of the parallel (to B) mean free path (?||) and radial density gradient (Gr) computed from NM data exhibits a weak Schwabe cycle (11y) but strong Hale magnetic cycle (22y) dependence. Its value is most depressed in solar activity minima for positive (p) polarity intervals (solar magnetic field in the Northern Hemisphere points outward from the Sun) when GCRs drift from the polar regions toward the helioequatorial plane and out along the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), setting up a symmetric gradient G?s pointing away from HCS. Gr drives all SDA components and ?|| Gr contributes to the diffusive component (Ad) of the ecliptic plane anisotropy (A). GCR transport is commonly discussed in terms of an isotropic hard sphere scattering (also known as billiard-ball scattering) in the solar wind plasma. We use it with a flat HCS model and the Ahluwalia-Dorman master equations to compute the coefficients ? (=??/??) and ?? (a measure of turbulence in the solar wind) and transport parameters ?||, ??, Gr, G?s, and an asymmetric gradient G?a normal to the ecliptic plane. We study their dependence on rigidity (R), p/n intervals, sunspot numbers (SSNs), and solar wind parameters at 1 AU. ?|| exhibits a strong 22y dependence but Gr does not, explaining solar polarity dependence of ?|| Gr. The computed Gr values are an order of magnitude greater than those reported by our colleagues making an ad hoc assumption that ? is low (0.01). At high rigidities, the drift contribution at 1 AU is small and unsteady. A new methodology is outlined to compute yearly GCR north-south anisotropy (A?) from the data for a single detector sorted for p/n intervals. We show that G?a is the main contributor to A? in the steady state, and G?a is shown not correlated with the north-south excess SSNs.

  2. A Physical Model of Cosmogenic Nuclide Production in Stony and Iron Meteoroids on the Basis of Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, I.; Lange, H.-J.; Michel, R.; Meltzow, B.; Herpers, U.; Busemann, H.; Wieler, R.; Dittrich-Hannen, B.; Suter, M.; Kubik, P. W.

    1995-09-01

    By extending and improving earlier model calculations [1-4] of cosmogenic nuclide production by GCR particles in extraterrestrial matter, we can now present a physical model without free parameters for a consistent description of GCR production rates in stony and iron meteoroids. The model takes explicitely into account p and n-induced reactions. GCR 4He particles are considered only approximately. It is based on depth-size and bulk-chemistry-dependent spectra of primary and secondary protons and of secondary neutrons calculated by HET and MORSE codes within the HERMES code system [5] and on the cross sections of the underlying reactions. Comprehensive and reliable sets of proton cross sections from thresholds up to 2.6 GeV exist now for many cosmogenic nuclides (see [6] for a review). For n-induced reactions the situation is not so good. Only a few data at low energies and practically no data at higher energies exist. GCR production of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteoroids is already dominated by neutron-induced reactions for most meteoroid radii. In iron meteoroids neutrons are even more important because of the high mass numbers of the bulk and of consequently higher multiplicities for production of secondary neutrons. In order to overcome this problem, the necessary excitation functions of neutron-induced reactions were determined from experimental thick-target production rates by least-squares unfolding procedures using the code STAYS'L [7]. The data were produced in laboratory experiments under completely controlled conditions [8-11]. The unfolding procedure starts from guess functions (from threshold up to 900 MeV) based on all available experimental neutron cross sections and on theoretical ones calculated by the AREL [12] code which is a relativistic version of the hybrid model of pre-equilibrium reactions [13]. With the new neutron cross sections it is possible to describe simultanously all data from the simulation experiments with an accuracy of better than 10 % and to calculate consistent cosmogenic nuclide production rates in stony and iron meteoroids. The new model calculations are so far valid for 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 53Mn as well as He, Ne and Ar isotopes. The new theoretical production rates are compared with measured depth profiles in stony and iron meteorites and will be discussed with respect to primary GCR spectra and preatmospheric radii and exposure histories of stony and iron meteoroids. Acknowledgement: This work was partially supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Swiss National Science Foundation. References: [1] Michel R. et al. (1991) Meteoritics, 26, 221-242. [2] Michel R. et al. (1995) Planet. Space Sci., in press. [3] Bhandari N. et al. (1993) GCA, 57, 2361-2375. [4] Herpers U. et al. (1995) Planet. Space Sci., in press. [5] Cloth P. et al. (1988) JUEL-2203. [6] Michel R. (1994) in Nuclear Data for Science and Technology (J. K. Dickens, ed.), 337-343, Am. Nucl. Soc., La Grange Park. [7] Perrey F. G. (1977) Code STAYS'L, NEA Data Bank, OECD Paris. [8] Michel R. et al. (1986) Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res., B16, 61-82. [9] Michel R. et al. (1989) Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res., B42, 76-100. [10] Michel R. et al. (1993) J. Radioanal. Nucl. Chem., 169, 13-25. [11] Michel R. et al. (1994) in Nuclear Data for Science and Technology (J. K. Dickens, ed.), 377-379, Am. Nucl. Soc., La Grange Park. [12] Blann M. (1994) Code AREL, personal communication to R. Michel. [13] Blann M. (1972) Phys. Rev. Lett., 27, 337-340.

  3. Predictions for Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) is a serious hazard to humans and electronic instruments during space travel, particularly on prolonged missions outside the Earth s magnetic fields. Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is composed of approx. 98% nucleons and approx. 2% electrons and positrons. Although cosmic ray heavy ions are 1-2% of the fluence, these energetic heavy nuclei (HZE) contribute 50% of the long-term dose. These unusually high specific ionizations pose a significant health hazard acting as carcinogens and also causing microelectronics damage inside spacecraft and high-flying aircraft. These HZE ions are of concern for radiation protection and radiation shielding technology, because gross rearrangements and mutations and deletions in DNA are expected. Calculations have shown that HZE particles have a strong preference for interaction with light nuclei. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is totally impractical. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Shielding is required during missions in Earth orbit and possibly for frequent flying at high altitude because of the broad GCR spectrum and during a passage into deep space and LunarMars habitation because of the protracted exposure encountered on a long space mission. An additional hazard comes from solar particle events (SPEs) which are mostly energetic protons that can produce heavy ion secondaries as well as neutrons in materials. These events occur at unpredictable times and can deliver a potentially lethal dose within several hours to an unshielded human. Radiation protection for humans requires safety in short-term missions and maintaining career exposure limits within acceptable levels on future long-term exploration missions. The selection of shield materials can alter the protection of humans by an order of magnitude. If improperly selected, shielding materials can actually increase radiation damage due to penetration properties and nuclear fragmentation. Protecting space-borne microelectronics from single event upsets (SEUs) by transmitted radiation will benefit system reliability and system design cost by using optimal shield materials. Long-term missions on the surface of the Moon or Mars will require the construction of habitats to protect humans during their stay. One approach to the construction is to make structural materials from lunar or Martian regolith using a polymeric material as a binder. The hydrogen-containing polymers are considerably more effective for radiation protection than the regolith, but the combination minimizes the amount of polymer to be transported. We have made composites of simulated lunar regolith with two different polymers, LaRC-SI, a high-performance polyimide thermoset, and polyethylene, a thermoplastic.

  4. The effect of irradiation on the magnetic properties of rock and synthetic samples with implications to irradiation of extraterrestrial materials in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezaeva, N. S.; Gattacceca, J.; Rochette, P.; Duprat, J.; Rizza, G.; Vernazza, P.; Trukhin, V. I.

    2013-05-01

    Before reaching the Earth through meteorite falls or sample return, most extraterrestrial materials have been exposed to space radiations at different stages in their history. In the Solar System there are three main types of particle radiation: large fluxes of low-energy solar wind (SW) particles, smaller fluxes of high-energy galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles, and intermittent intense fluxes of solar-flare-associated particles, also called solar cosmic rays or solar energetic particles (SEP). We report here the results of laboratory analog experiments to consider the potential effects of SEP and GCR on the magnetic properties of extraterrestrial materials. We carried out proton bombardment experiments (with irradiation energies E1=400 keV and E2=850 keV and three irradiation fluences in 1014-1016 p/cm2 range) and lead-ion bombardment experiments (E=1 GeV) on (previously demagnetized by 120 mT alternating magnetic field) rock and synthetic samples with the following magnetic carriers: metallic iron and nickel iron, Ti-rich and Ti-free magnetite, pyrrhotite. Irradiation experiments resulted in either further demagnetization or magnetization of irradiated samples depending on the type of magnetic mineralogy and type of ionizing radiation involved. Apart for the formation of radiation-induced remanent magnetization (RIRM), we observed major changes in bulk magnetic properties, i.e., a moderate to dramatic decrease (up to 93%) in the coercivity of remanence Bcr for all iron-bearing phases (iron-in-epoxy and Bensour meteorite samples). Contrary to iron-bearing samples, several magnetite-bearing samples experienced a radiation-induced magnetic hardening (increase in Bcr). Magnetic hardening was also observed for Ar2+ ion-irradiated nickel iron-bearing HED meteorites, measured for comparison with the previously stated results. Therefore, the combined effect of SEP with GCR may magnetically soften iron-bearing materials and harden magnetite-bearing materials. In order to answer the question weather RIRM may account for natural remanent magnetization of meteorites and lunar samples, physical mechanism of RIRM formation and potential dependence of RIRM intensity on the background magnetic field present during irradiation event should be investigated.

  5. Modelling human exposure to space radiation with different shielding: the FLUKA code coupled with anthropomorphic phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Alloni, D.; Battistoni, G.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Gadioli, E.; Garzelli, M. V.; Liotta, M.; Mairani, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Paretzke, H. G.; Parini, V.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinsky, L.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.; Trovati, S.; Zankl, M.

    2006-05-01

    Astronauts' exposure to the various components of the space radiation field is of great concern for long-term missions, especially for those in deep space such as a possible travel to Mars. Simulations based on radiation transport/interaction codes coupled with anthropomorphic model phantoms can be of great help in view of risk evaluation and shielding optimisation, which is therefore a crucial issue. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code can be coupled with two types of anthropomorphic phantom (a mathematical model and a ''voxel'' model) to calculate organ-averaged absorbed dose, dose equivalent and ''biological'' dose under different shielding conditions. Herein the ''biological dose'' is represented by the average number of ''Complex Lesions'' (CLs) per cell in a given organ. CLs are clustered DNA breaks previously calculated by means of event-by-event track structure simulations at the nm level and integrated on-line into FLUKA, which adopts a condensed-history approach; such lesions have been shown to play a fundamental role in chromosome aberration induction, which in turn can be correlated with carcinogenesis. Examples of calculation results will be presented relative to Galactic Cosmic Rays, as well as to the August 1972 Solar Particle Event. The contributions from primary ions and secondary particles will be shown separately, thus allowing quantification of the role played by nuclear reactions occurring in the shield and in the human body itself. As expected, the SPE doses decrease dramatically with increasing the Al shielding thickness; nuclear reaction products, essentially due to target fragmentation, are of minor importance. A 10 g/cm2 Al shelter resulted to be sufficient to respect the 30-day limits for deterministic effects recommended for missions in Low Earth Orbit. In contrast with the results obtained for SPEs, the calculated GCR doses are almost independent of the Al shield thickness, and the GCR doses to internal organs are not significantly lower than the skin doses. Furthermore, nuclear interactions play a much larger role for GCR than for SPE doses.

  6. Third generation cephalosporin resistant Enterobacteriaceae and multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria causing bacteremia in febrile neutropenia adult cancer patients in Lebanon, broad spectrum antibiotics use as a major risk factor, and correlation with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Moghnieh, Rima; Estaitieh, Nour; Mugharbil, Anas; Jisr, Tamima; Abdallah, Dania I.; Ziade, Fouad; Sinno, Loubna; Ibrahim, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complications in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. The spectrum and susceptibility profiles of causative microorganisms differ with time and place. Data from Lebanon are scarce. We aim at evaluating the epidemiology of bacteremia in cancer patients in a university hospital in Lebanon, emphasizing antibiotic resistance and risk factors of multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO)-associated bacteremia. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 75 episodes of bacteremia occurring in febrile neutropenic patients admitted to the hematology-oncology unit at Makassed General Hospital, Lebanon, from October 2009-January 2012. It corresponds to epidemiological data on bacteremia episodes in febrile neutropenic cancer patients including antimicrobial resistance and identification of risk factors associated with third generation cephalosporin resistance (3GCR) and MDRO-associated bacteremia. Results: Out of 75 bacteremias, 42.7% were gram-positive (GP), and 57.3% were gram-negative (GN). GP bacteremias were mostly due to methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (28% of total bacteremias and 66% of GP bacteremias). Among the GN bacteremias, Escherichia coli (22.7% of total, 39.5% of GN organisms) and Klebsiella pneumoniae(13.3% of total, 23.3% of GN organisms) were the most important causative agents. GN bacteremia due to 3GC sensitive (3GCS) bacteria represented 28% of total bacteremias, while 29% were due to 3GCR bacteria and 9% were due to carbapenem-resistant organisms. There was a significant correlation between bacteremia with MDRO and subsequent intubation, sepsis and mortality. Among potential risk factors, only broad spectrum antibiotic intake >4 days before bacteremia was found to be statistically significant for acquisition of 3GCR bacteria. Using carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam>4 days before bacteremia was significantly associated with the emergence of MDRO (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings have major implications for the management of febrile neutropenia, especially in breakthrough bacteremia and fever when patients are already on broadspectrum antibiotics. Emergence of resistance to 3GCs and, to a lesser extent, to carbapenems in GN isolates has to be considered seriously in our local guidelines for empiric treatment of febrile neutropenia, especially given that their occurrence was proven to be associated with poorer outcomes. PMID:25729741

  7. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Christopher J; Meier, Matthias M; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-01-01

    [1] The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis suggests that these single-point differences will be within 30% when a new deterministic pion-initiated electromagnetic cascade code is integrated into NAIRAS, an effort which is currently underway. PMID:26213513

  8. Impact of Track Structure Effects on Shielding and Dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Schimmerling, W.; Kim, M. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) consisting of nuclei of all the known elements with kinetic energies extending from tens to millions of MeV pose a significant health hazard to future deep space operations. Even half of the radiation exposures expected in ISS will result from GCR components. The biological actions of these radiations are known to depend on the details of the energy deposition (not just linear energy transfer, LET, but the lateral dispersion of energy deposition about the particle track). Energy deposits in tissues are dominated by the transfer of tens to hundreds of eV to the tissue's atomic electrons. In the case of low LET radiations, the collisions are separated by large dimensions compared to the size of important biomolecular structures. If such events are also separated in time, then the radiation adds little to the background of radicals occurring from ordinary metabolic processes and causes little or no biological injury. Hence, dose rate is a strong determinant of the action of low LET exposures. The GCR exposures are dominated by ions of high charge and energy (HZE) characterized by many collisions with atomic electrons over biomolecular dimensions, resulting in high radical- density events associated with a few isolated ion paths through the cell and minimal dose rate dependence at ordinary exposure levels. The HZE energy deposit declines quickly laterally and merges with the background radical density in the track periphery for which the exact lateral distribution of the energy deposit is the determinant of the biological injury. Although little data exists on human exposures from HZE radiations, limited studies in mice and mammalian cell cultures allow evaluation of the effects of track structure on shield attenuation properties and evaluation of implications for dosimetry. The most complete mammalian cell HZE exposure data sets have been modeled including the C3H10T1/2 survival and transformation data of Yang et al., the V79 survival and mutation data of various groups, and the Harderian gland tumor data of Alpen et al. Model results for the Harderian gland tumor data in comparison with data from Alpen et al. The Harderian target cell initiation cross section compares closely with the transformation cross section found for the C3H10T1/2 cell transformation data of Yang et al. The most notable feature of the cross sections are the multivalued cross sections for a given LET which implies the corresponding relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is dependent not only on the LET but also the ion type. This fact is at variance with the latest ICRP recommended quality factor which is a defined function of only the LET.

  9. Comparison of Organ Dosimetry for Astronaut Phantoms: Earth-Based vs. Microgravity-Based Anthropometry and Body Positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanBaalen, Mary; Bahadon, Amir; Shavers, Mark; Semones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use NASA radiation transport codes to compare astronaut organ dose equivalents resulting from solar particle events (SPE), geomagnetically trapped protons, and free-space galactic cosmic rays (GCR) using phantom models representing Earth-based and microgravity-based anthropometry and positioning. Methods: The Univer sity of Florida hybrid adult phantoms were scaled to represent male and female astronauts with 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile heights and weights as measured on Earth. Another set of scaled phantoms, incorporating microgravity-induced changes, such as spinal lengthening, leg volume loss, and the assumption of the neutral body position, was also created. A ray-tracer was created and used to generate body self-shielding distributions for dose points within a voxelized phantom under isotropic irradiation conditions, which closely approximates the free-space radiation environment. Simplified external shielding consisting of an aluminum spherical shell was used to consider the influence of a spacesuit or shielding of a hull. These distributions were combined with depth dose distributions generated from the NASA radiation transport codes BRYNTRN (SPE and trapped protons) and HZETRN (GCR) to yield dose equivalent. Many points were sampled per organ. Results: The organ dos e equivalent rates were on the order of 1.5-2.5 mSv per day for GCR (1977 solar minimum) and 0.4-0.8 mSv per day for trapped proton irradiation with shielding of 2 g cm-2 aluminum equivalent. The organ dose equivalents for SPE irradiation varied considerably, with the skin and eye lens having the highest organ dose equivalents and deep-seated organs, such as the bladder, liver, and stomach having the lowest. Conclus ions: The greatest differences between the Earth-based and microgravity-based phantoms are observed for smaller ray thicknesses, since the most drastic changes involved limb repositioning and not overall phantom size. Improved self-shielding models reduce the overall uncertainty in organ dosimetry for mission-risk projections and assessments for astronauts

  10. Measurement of Charged Particle Interactions in Spacecraft and Planetary Habitat Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Miller, Jack W.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Wilson, John W.

    2001-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Program, through its 98-HEDS-04 Research Announcement, has called for research to support 'enhanced human radiation protection through the development of light weight soft goods with high radiation protection characteristics.' Given the nature of the particle flux from the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR), and the many constraints on the depth and type of shielding in spacecraft and planetary habitats, it is clear that the health risks these particles present to astronauts in deep space cannot be entirely eliminated. It is the objective of this project to develop a highly accurate model of GCR transport so that NASA can develop and validate the properties of protective shielding materials with the best available information. The validity of the GCR transport model depends in large part on having accurate and precise input data in the form of the charge-changing and fragment production cross sections for the heavy ions of greatest biological significance. The accuracy of the transport model can be evaluated and enhanced by employing the following a three-step strategy: (1) New cross section data will be made available to the NASA-Langley scientists responsible for the transport codes, and will be used as inputs to the codes; (2) The codes will be used to predict additional cross sections and/or details of the radiation field behind realistic shielding arrangements, where the materials and configurations may be quite complex. Mock-ups of the shielding configurations suitable for use in accelerator experiments will obtained by the NASA-Langley co-investigators; and (3) The transport model predictions will be tested in accelerator-based experiments. The time scale for one pass through these steps is well-suited to a four-year schedule. Over a longer term, these steps may be repeated, leading to still further refinements of the transport code, new predictions, and an additional round of measurements, until the desired predictive accuracy is achieved. The focus of this work is primarily on the first of these steps, the determination of fragmentation cross sections, which will be the main task in years one and two. The detailed strategy for carrying out the remainder of the program is more difficult to specify, as it depends on unpredictable factors such as the extent to which the transport model must be modified, schedules for accelerator time, target fabrication, etc.

  11. A radiation spectrometer for planetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashoka, B. N.; Abraham, Lalitha; Verma, Smrati; Ramakrishna Sharma, M.; Bug, Monoj; Paavan Tadepalli, Srikar; Kumar

    This is an instrument designed to monitor the radiation environment in space by measuring the energy, flux and dose of the incident charged particles, besides carrying out particle identification by the well established ``E-? E technique". The radiation environment in space is mainly made up of background Galactic Cosmic Radiations (GCR) punctuated by brief but intense Solar Particle Events (SPEs). Information about this radiation environment is an important input to plan, design long duration satellite and execute human exploration missions. We are in the process of building a compact radiation spectrometer. The lab model development for this instrument is under progress. Here we present the performance of the lab model detector and electronics which is validated through GEANT simulations. This instrument can be flown on future inter-planetary missions for carrying out radiation environment related studies.

  12. Parallelizable restarted iterative methods for nonsymmetric linear systems. Part 1: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, W.D.; Carey, G.F.

    1991-05-01

    Large sparse nonsymmetric problems of the form Au = b are frequently solved using restarted conjugate gradient-type algorithms such as the popular GCR and GMRES algorithms. In this study the authors define a new class of algorithms which generate the same iterates as the standard GMRES algorithm but require as little as half of the computational expense. This performance improvement is obtained by using short economical three-term recurrences to replace the long recurrence used by GMRES. The new algorithms are shown to have good numerical properties in typical cases, and the new algorithms may be easily modified to be as numerically safe as standard GMRES. Numerical experiments with these algorithms are given in Part 2, in which they demonstrate the improved performance of the new schemes on different computer architectures.

  13. Cosmic ray neon, Wolf-Rayet stars, and the superbubble origin of galactic cosmic rays

    E-print Network

    W. R. Binns; M. E. Wiedenbeck; M. Arnould; A. C. Cummings; J. S. George; S. Goriely; M. H. Israel; R. A. Leske; R. A. Mewaldt; G. Meynet; L. M. Scott; E. C. Stone; T. T. von Rosenvinge

    2005-08-18

    The abundances of neon isotopes in the galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are reported using data from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). We compare our ACE-CRIS data for neon and refractory isotope ratios, and data from other experiments, with recent results from two-component Wolf-Rayet (WR) models. The three largest deviations of GCR isotope ratios from solar-system ratios predicted by these models are indeed present in the GCRs. Since WR stars are evolutionary products of OB stars, and most OB stars exist in OB associations that form superbubbles, the good agreement of these data with WR models suggests that superbubbles are the likely source of at least a substantial fraction of GCRs.

  14. Economic impact and effectiveness of radiation protection measures in aviation during a ground level enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthiä, Daniel; Schaefer, Martin; Meier, Matthias M.

    2015-06-01

    In addition to the omnipresent irradiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and their secondary products, passengers and aircraft crew may be exposed to radiation from solar cosmic rays during ground level enhancements (GLE). In general, lowering the flight altitude and changing the flight route to lower latitudes are procedures applicable to immediately reduce the radiation exposure at aviation altitudes. In practice, however, taking such action necessarily leads to modifications in the flight plan and the consequential, additional fuel consumption constrains the mitigating measures. In this work we investigate in a case study of the ground level event of December 13th 2006 how potential mitigation procedures affect the total radiation exposure during a transatlantic flight from Seattle to Cologne taking into account constraints concerning fuel consumption and range.

  15. Martian Radiation Environment: Model Calculations and Recent Measurements with "MARIE"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saganti, P. B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; zeitlin, C. J.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Galactic Cosmic Ray spectra in Mars orbit were generated with the recently expanded HZETRN (High Z and Energy Transport) and QMSFRG (Quantum Multiple-Scattering theory of nuclear Fragmentation) model calculations. These model calculations are compared with the first eighteen months of measured data from the MARIE (Martian Radiation Environment Experiment) instrument onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft that is currently in Martian orbit. The dose rates observed by the MARIE instrument are within 10% of the model calculated predictions. Model calculations are compared with the MARIE measurements of dose, dose-equivalent values, along with the available particle flux distribution. Model calculated particle flux includes GCR elemental composition of atomic number, Z = 1-28 and mass number, A = 1-58. Particle flux calculations specific for the current MARIE mapping period are reviewed and presented.

  16. PREFACE: 24th European Cosmic Ray Symposium (ECRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-08-01

    The 24th European Cosmic Ray Symposium (ECRS) took place in Kiel, Germany, at the Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel from September 1 - 5, 2014, The first symposium was held in 1968 in Lodz, Poland (high energy, extensive air showers and astrophysical aspects) and in Bern (solar and heliospheric phenomena) and the two "strands" joined together in 1976 with the meeting in Leeds. The 24th ECRS covered a wide range of scientific issues divided into the following topics: HECR-I Primary cosmic rays I (experiments) HECR-II Primary cosmic rays II (theory) MN Cosmic ray muons and neutrinos GR GeV and TeV gamma astronomy SH Energetic particles in the heliosphere (solar and anomalous CRs and GCR modulation) GEO Cosmic rays and geophysics (energetic particles in the atmosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth) INS Future Instrumentation DM Dark Matter The organizers are very grateful to the Deutsche Forschungs Gemeinschaft for supporting the symposium.

  17. Radiation Effects In Space

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Ram K.

    2011-06-01

    Protecting space missions from severe exposures from radiation, in general, and long duration/deep space human missions, in particular, is a critical design driver, and could be a limiting factor. The space radiation environment consists of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar particle events (SPE), trapped radiation, and includes ions of all the known elements over a very broad energy range. These ions penetrate spacecraft materials producing nuclear fragments and secondary particles that damage biological tissues and microelectronic devices. One is required to know how every element (and all isotopes of each element) in the periodic table interacts and fragments on every other element in the same table as a function of kinetic energy ranging over many decades. In addition, the accuracy of the input information and database, in general and nuclear data in particular, impacts radiation exposure health assessments and payload penalty. After a brief review of effects of space radiation on materials and electronics, human space missions to Mars is discussed.

  18. Updates from the MSL-RAD Experiment on the Mars Curiosity Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Cary

    2015-01-01

    The MSL-RAD instrument continues to operate flawlessly on Mars. As of this writing, some 1040 sols (Martian days) of data have been successfully acquired. Several improvements have been made to the instrument's configuration, particularly aimed at enabling the analysis of neutral-particle data. The dose rate since MSL's landing in August 2012 has remained remarkably stable, reflecting the unusual and very weak solar maximum of Cycle 24. Only a few small SEP events have been observed by RAD, which is shielded by the Martian atmosphere. Gale Crater, where Curiosity landed, is 4.4 km below the mean surface of Mars, and the column depth of atmosphere above is approximately 20 g/sq cm, which provides significant attenuation of GCR heavy ions and SEPs. Recent analysis results will be presented, including updated estimates of the neutron contributions to dose and dose equivalent in cruise and on the surface of Mars.

  19. Low concentration ratio solar array for low Earth orbit multi-100kW application. Volume 2: Drawings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalbandian, S. J.; French, E. P.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary design effort directed toward a low concentration ratio photovoltaic array system based on 1984 technology and capable of delivering multi-hundred kilowatts (300 kW to 100 kW range) in low Earth orbit. The array system consists of two or more array modules each capable of delivering between 113 kW to 175 kW using silicon solar cells or gallium arsenide solar cells, respectively. The array module deployed area is 1320 square meters and consists of 4356 pyramidal concentrator elements. The module, when stowed in the Space Shuttle's payload bay, has a stowage volume of a cube with 3.24 meters on a side. The concentrator elements are sized for a geometric concentration ratio (GCR) of six with an aperture area of 0.5 meters x 0.5 meters. Drawings for the preliminary design configuration and for the test hardware that was fabricated for design evaluation and test are provided.

  20. Simulation of Spatial and Temporal Radiation Exposures for ISS in the South Atlantic Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brooke M.; Nealy, John E.; Luetke, Nathan J.; Sandridge, Christopher A.; Qualls, Garry D.

    2004-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) living areas receive the preponderance of ionizing radiation exposure from Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and geomagnetically trapped protons. Practically all trapped proton exposure occurs when the ISS passes through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region. The fact that this region is in proximity to a trapping mirror point indicates that the proton flux is highly directional. The inherent shielding provided by the ISS structure is represented by a recently-developed CAD model of the current 11-A configuration. Using modeled environment and configuration, trapped proton exposures have been analytically estimated at selected target points within the Service and Lab Modules. The results indicate that the directional flux may lead to substantially different exposure characteristics than the more common analyses that assume an isotropic environment. Additionally, predictive capability of the computational procedure should allow sensitive validation with corresponding on-board directional dosimeters.