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1

Phytotoxic Activity of Ocimum tenuiflorum Extracts on Germination and Seedling Growth of Different Plant Species  

PubMed Central

Phytotoxic activity of Ocimum tenuiflorum (Lamiaceae) plant extracts was investigated against the germination and seedling growth of cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli), and timothy (Phleum pratense) at four different concentrations. The plant extracts at concentrations greater than 30?mg dry weight equivalent extract mL?1 reduced significantly the total germination percent (GP), germination index (GI), germination energy (GE), speed of emergence (SE), seedling vigour index (SVI), and coefficient of the rate of germination (CRG) of all test species except barnyard grass and GP of lettuce. In contrast, time required for 50% germination (T50) and mean germination time (MGT) were increased at the same or higher than this concentration. The increasing trend of T50 and MGT and the decreasing trend of other indices indicated a significant inhibition or delay of germination of the test species by O. tenuiflorum plant extracts and vice versa. In addition, the shoot and root growth of all test species were significantly inhibited by the extracts at concentrations greater than 10?mg dry weight equivalent extract mL?1. The I50 values for shoot and root growth were ranged from 26 to 104?mg dry weight equivalent extract mL?1. Seedling growth was more sensitive to the extracts compared to seed germination. Results of this study suggest that O. tenuiflorum plant extracts have phytotoxic properties and thus contain phytotoxic substances. Isolation and characterization of those substances from this plant may act as a tool for new natural, biodegradable herbicide development to control weeds.

2014-01-01

2

Mycorrhizal fungi of Vanilla: diversity, specificity and effects on seed germination and plant growth.  

PubMed

Mycorrhizal fungi are essential for the germination of orchid seeds. However, the specificity of orchids for their mycorrhizal fungi and the effects of the fungi on orchid growth are controversial. Mycorrhizal fungi have been studied in some temperate and tropical, epiphytic orchids, but the symbionts of tropical, terrestrial orchids are still unknown. Here we study diversity, specificity and function of mycorrhizal fungi in Vanilla, a pantropical genus that is both terrestrial and epiphytic. Mycorrhizal roots were collected from four Vanilla species in Puerto Rico, Costa Rica and Cuba. Cultured and uncultured mycorrhizal fungi were identified by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region of nuclear rDNA (nrITS) and part of the mitochondrial ribosomal large subunit (mtLSU), and by counting number of nuclei in hyphae. Vanilla spp. were associated with a wide range of mycorrhizal fungi: Ceratobasidium, Thanatephorus and Tulasnella. Related fungi were found in different species of Vanilla, although at different relative frequencies. Ceratobasidium was more common in roots in soil and Tulasnella was more common in roots on tree bark, but several clades of fungi included strains from both substrates. Relative frequencies of genera of mycorrhizal fungi differed significantly between cultured fungi and those detected by direct amplification. Ceratobasidium and Tulasnella were tested for effects on seed germination of Vanilla and effects on growth of Vanilla and Dendrobium plants. We found significant differences among fungi in effects on seed germination and plant growth. Effects of mycorrhizal fungi on Vanilla and Dendrobium were similar: a clade of Ceratobasidium had a consistently positive effect on plant growth and seed germination. This clade has potential use in germination and propagation of orchids. Results confirmed that a single orchid species can be associated with several mycorrhizal fungi with different functional consequences for the plant. PMID:18065002

Porras-Alfaro, Andrea; Bayman, Paul

2007-01-01

3

Effects of silver nanoparticle exposure on germination and early growth of eleven wetland plants.  

PubMed

The increasing commercial production of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) has led to concerns over the potential adverse impacts of these ENPs on biota in natural environments. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most widely used ENPs and are expected to enter natural ecosystems. Here we examined the effects of AgNPs on germination and growth of eleven species of common wetland plants. We examined plant responses to AgNP exposure in simple pure culture experiments (direct exposure) and for seeds planted in homogenized field soils in a greenhouse experiment (soil exposure). We compared the effects of two AgNPs-20-nm polyvinylpyrrolidine-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) and 6-nm gum arabic coated silver nanoparticles (GA-AgNPs)-to the effects of AgNO(3) exposure added at equivalent Ag concentrations (1, 10 or 40 mg Ag L(-1)). In the direct exposure experiments, PVP-AgNP had no effect on germination while 40 mg Ag L(-1) GA-AgNP exposure significantly reduced the germination rate of three species and enhanced the germination rate of one species. In contrast, 40 mg Ag L(-1) AgNO(3) enhanced the germination rate of five species. In general root growth was much more affected by Ag exposure than was leaf growth. The magnitude of inhibition was always greater for GA-AgNPs than for AgNO(3) and PVP-AgNPs. In the soil exposure experiment, germination effects were less pronounced. The plant growth response differed by taxa with Lolium multiflorum growing more rapidly under both AgNO(3) and GA-AgNP exposures and all other taxa having significantly reduced growth under GA-AgNP exposure. AgNO(3) did not reduce the growth of any species while PVP-AgNPs significantly inhibited the growth of only one species. Our findings suggest important new avenues of research for understanding the fate and transport of NPs in natural media, the interactions between NPs and plants, and indirect and direct effects of NPs in mixed plant communities. PMID:23091638

Yin, Liyan; Colman, Benjamin P; McGill, Bonnie M; Wright, Justin P; Bernhardt, Emily S

2012-01-01

4

Effects of Silver Nanoparticle Exposure on Germination and Early Growth of Eleven Wetland Plants  

PubMed Central

The increasing commercial production of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) has led to concerns over the potential adverse impacts of these ENPs on biota in natural environments. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most widely used ENPs and are expected to enter natural ecosystems. Here we examined the effects of AgNPs on germination and growth of eleven species of common wetland plants. We examined plant responses to AgNP exposure in simple pure culture experiments (direct exposure) and for seeds planted in homogenized field soils in a greenhouse experiment (soil exposure). We compared the effects of two AgNPs–20-nm polyvinylpyrrolidine-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) and 6-nm gum arabic coated silver nanoparticles (GA-AgNPs)–to the effects of AgNO3 exposure added at equivalent Ag concentrations (1, 10 or 40 mg Ag L?1). In the direct exposure experiments, PVP-AgNP had no effect on germination while 40 mg Ag L?1 GA-AgNP exposure significantly reduced the germination rate of three species and enhanced the germination rate of one species. In contrast, 40 mg Ag L?1 AgNO3 enhanced the germination rate of five species. In general root growth was much more affected by Ag exposure than was leaf growth. The magnitude of inhibition was always greater for GA-AgNPs than for AgNO3 and PVP-AgNPs. In the soil exposure experiment, germination effects were less pronounced. The plant growth response differed by taxa with Lolium multiflorum growing more rapidly under both AgNO3 and GA-AgNP exposures and all other taxa having significantly reduced growth under GA-AgNP exposure. AgNO3 did not reduce the growth of any species while PVP-AgNPs significantly inhibited the growth of only one species. Our findings suggest important new avenues of research for understanding the fate and transport of NPs in natural media, the interactions between NPs and plants, and indirect and direct effects of NPs in mixed plant communities.

Yin, Liyan; Colman, Benjamin P.; McGill, Bonnie M.; Wright, Justin P.; Bernhardt, Emily S.

2012-01-01

5

Elimination of the adverse effects of urea fertilizer on seed germination, seedling growth, and early plant growth in soil  

PubMed Central

The rapidly increasing importance of urea fertilizer in world agriculture has stimulated research to find methods of reducing the problems associated with the use of this fertilizer. One of these problems is that urea has adverse effects on seed germination, seedling growth, and early plant growth in soil. Because there is evidence that these adverse effects are caused largely, if not entirely, by ammonia produced through hydrolysis of urea fertilizer by soil urease, we explored the possibility that they could be reduced or eliminated by amending urea fertilizer with a small amount of a urease inhibitor. Studies with seeds of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), oats (Avena sativa L.), rye (Secale cereale L.), sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) showed that phenylphosphorodiamidate and N-(n-butyl)thiophosphoric triamide were the most effective of 10 urease inhibitors evaluated for reduction of the adverse effect of urea on seed germination. N-(n-butyl)-thiophosphoric triamide was superior to phenylphosphorodiamidate for reducing the adverse effects of urea solutions on seed germination and seedling growth in soil, and it completely eliminated the adverse effect of urea granules on early plant growth in soil. The data reported indicate that the adverse effects of urea fertilizer on seed germination, seedling growth, and early plant growth in soil could be eliminated or markedly reduced by amending the fertilizer with as little as 0.01% (wt/wt) of N-(n-butyl)thiophosphoric triamide. Images

Bremner, John M.; Krogmeier, Michael J.

1988-01-01

6

A Simple and Versatile 2-Dimensional Platform to Study Plant Germination and Growth under Controlled Humidity  

PubMed Central

We describe a simple, inexpensive, but remarkably versatile and controlled growth environment for the observation of plant germination and seedling root growth on a flat, horizontal surface over periods of weeks. The setup provides to each plant a controlled humidity (between 56% and 91% RH), and contact with both nutrients and atmosphere. The flat and horizontal geometry of the surface supporting the roots eliminates the gravitropic bias on their development and facilitates the imaging of the entire root system. Experiments can be setup under sterile conditions and then transferred to a non-sterile environment. The system can be assembled in 1-2 minutes, costs approximately 8.78$ per plant, is almost entirely reusable (0.43$ per experiment in disposables), and is easily scalable to a variety of plants. We demonstrate the performance of the system by germinating, growing, and imaging Wheat (Triticum aestivum), Corn (Zea mays), and Wisconsin Fast Plants (Brassica rapa). Germination rates were close to those expected for optimal conditions.

Sizmur, Tom; Lind, Kara R.; Benomar, Saida; VanEvery, Hannah; Cademartiri, Ludovico

2014-01-01

7

A Simple and Versatile 2-Dimensional Platform to Study Plant Germination and Growth under Controlled Humidity.  

PubMed

We describe a simple, inexpensive, but remarkably versatile and controlled growth environment for the observation of plant germination and seedling root growth on a flat, horizontal surface over periods of weeks. The setup provides to each plant a controlled humidity (between 56% and 91% RH), and contact with both nutrients and atmosphere. The flat and horizontal geometry of the surface supporting the roots eliminates the gravitropic bias on their development and facilitates the imaging of the entire root system. Experiments can be setup under sterile conditions and then transferred to a non-sterile environment. The system can be assembled in 1-2 minutes, costs approximately 8.78$ per plant, is almost entirely reusable (0.43$ per experiment in disposables), and is easily scalable to a variety of plants. We demonstrate the performance of the system by germinating, growing, and imaging Wheat (Triticum aestivum), Corn (Zea mays), and Wisconsin Fast Plants (Brassica rapa). Germination rates were close to those expected for optimal conditions. PMID:24806462

Sizmur, Tom; Lind, Kara R; Benomar, Saida; Vanevery, Hannah; Cademartiri, Ludovico

2014-01-01

8

Morphology, Germination and early Seedling Growth in Phaseolus mungo L. with Reference to the Influence of Various Plant Growth Substances  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents the results of studies on morphological characters, seed germination and the influence of different concentrations of plant growth substances on Phaseolus mungo including the comparative growth patterns of the seedlings. Seeds were pre-soaked for 24h under the various concentrations (0.1, 1.0 and 10 ppm) of GA 3, IBA and NAA. Soaked seeds were arranged in sterilized petriplates

J. S. Chauhan; Anoop Badoni; N. Indrakumar Singh; Seema Ali

2009-01-01

9

Environmental effects of nanosilver: impact on castor seed germination, seedling growth, and plant physiology.  

PubMed

Increasing use of nanoparticles in daily products is of great concern today, especially when their positive and negative impact on environment is not known. Hence, in current research, we have studied the impact of silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) and silver nitrate (AgNO3) application on seed germination, root, and shoot length of castor bean, Ricinus communis L. plant. Silver nanoparticles had no significant effects on seedling growth even at higher concentration of 4,000 mg L(-1), while the silver in bulk form as AgNO3 applied on the castor bean seeds inhibited the seed germination. Silver uptake in seedlings of the castor seeds on treatment with both the forms of silver was confirmed through atomic absorption spectroscopy studies. The silver nanoparticle and silver nitrate application to castor seeds also caused an enhanced enzymatic activity of ROS enzymes and phenolic content in castor seedlings. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of individual phenols indicated enhanced content of parahydroxy benzoic acid. These kinds of studies are of great interest in order to unveil the movement and accumulation of nanoparticles in plant tissues for assessing future applications in the field or laboratory. PMID:23702569

Yasur, Jyothsna; Rani, Pathipati Usha

2013-12-01

10

OP011 Increased growth and germination success in plants following hydrogen sulfide administration.  

PubMed

The biological effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have received increasing attention in recent years, not only as a putative kill mechanism during past mass extinctions, but also as an important signaling molecule in both aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Hydrogen sulfide has recently been added to nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) as a newly categorized group of biologically active gases termed gasotransmitters and gasomediators. The origin of these dual activities remains unknown, but it may be that these varied signaling and biological mediating capabilities are remnants of biological responses by life either evolving or inhabiting highly sulfidic and anoxic environments of earlier times in Earth history. Today, H2S causes a wide variety of vital effects across the "Tree of Life", from metabolic inhibition, to energy source, to coordination of developmental growth programs in yeast and perhaps higher organisms as well. We report [1] that exposing either roots or seeds of multicellular plants to extremely low concentrations of dissolved hydrogen sulfide at any stage of life causes statistically significant increases in biomass including higher fruit yield. Individual cells in treated plants were smaller (?13%) than those of controls. Germination success and seedling size increased in, bean, corn, wheat, and pea seeds while time to germination decreases. Additionally, it was determined that at high concentrations (>10mM) it appears that photosystem (PS) II is inhibited whereas PSI remains active [2]. These findings indicated an important role of H2S as a signaling molecule that can increase the growth rate of all species yet tested. The increased crop yields reported here has the potential to effect the world's agricultural output. PMID:24948249

Dooley, Frederick D; Nair, Suven P; Ward, Peter D

2013-09-01

11

Spent mushroom substrates as component of growing media for germination and growth of horticultural plants.  

PubMed

This research work was conducted in order to investigate the possibility of using spent mushroom substrate (SMS) in the production of horticultural seedlings replacing part of the peat in the growing media. Three vegetable species with different salt sensitivities, the less sensitive being tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum var. Muchamiel), the moderately salt-sensitive being courgette (Cucurbita pepo L. var. Afrodite F1) and the most salt-sensitive being pepper (Capsicum annum L. var. Lamuyo F1) were grown in 12 media containing SMS of two types of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus (SMS-AB) and Pleurotus ostreatus (SMS-PO)) or a mixture of both 50% (v/v) (SMS-50), as well as peat in various ratios. The proportions of each residue in the mixtures elaborated with peat were 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% v/v residue. A substrate of 100% peat was used as control. The experiment was arranged in a completely-randomised design with two replicates per treatment under greenhouse conditions. Prior to sowing, some physical, physico-chemical and chemical properties of the growing media were determined and seed germination and fresh weight of seedling were also measured. In most of the cases, the addition of SMS to the growing media produced an increase in the pH values, salt contents, macro and micronutrient concentrations and a decrease in the water holding capacity contents in comparison to peat, whereas great differences were found in the air capacity values between SMS-based substrates and peat. Up to 75% SMS can be used in mixtures with peat for seed germination of the plant species studied. Regarding the most suitable SMS-based substrates for plant growth, any substrate could be used for tomato seedling production. However, all SMS-AB-based substrates and the media containing low dose of SMS-PO and SMS-50 were adequate for growth of courgette and pepper. PMID:19409775

Medina, E; Paredes, C; Pérez-Murcia, M D; Bustamante, M A; Moral, R

2009-09-01

12

4. The role of plant growth regulators in the germination of forest tree seeds  

Microsoft Academic Search

To establish a role for PGRs in the germination of forest tree seeds, it must be demonstrated that PGRs are involved in the mechanisms that control the induction of and release from dormancy, and also that these mechanisms are operative in the seeds of woody plants. Four currently known concepts of seed dormancy are reviewed, citing the published evidence relating

C. L. Leadem

1987-01-01

13

Effects of lemon balm ( Melissa officinalis L.) extract on germination and seedling growth of six plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

The n-hexane-, acetone- and water-soluble fractions obtained from an aqueous acetone extract of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) shoots inhibited the germination and the growth of roots and shoots of cockscomb (Amaranthus caudatus L.), cress (Lepidium sativum L.), crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis L.), timothy (Phleum pratense L.), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.). The inhibitory activity of the

Hisashi Kato-Noguchi

2001-01-01

14

POLLEN GERMINATION AND TUBE GROWTH  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many aspects of Angiosperm pollen germination and tube growth are discussed including mechanisms of dehydration and rehydration, in vitro germination, pollen coat compounds, the dynamic involvement of cytoskeletal elements (actin, microtubules), calcium ion fluxes, extracellular matrix elements (stylar arabinogalactan proteins), and control mechanisms of gene expression in dehy- drating and germinating pollen. We focus on the recent developments in pollen

Loverine P. Taylor; Peter K. Hepler

1997-01-01

15

Cadmium-induced stress on the seed germination and seedling growth of Brassica napus L., and its alleviation through exogenous plant growth regulators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of its prolific growth, oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) can be grown advantageously for phytoremediation of the lands contaminated by industrial wastes. Therefore, toxic effect\\u000a of cadmium on the germination of oilseed rape, the capability of plants for cadmium phytoextraction, and the effect of exogenous\\u000a application of plant growth regulators to mitigate phytotoxicity of cadmium were investigated. For the

Huabing Meng; Shujin Hua; Imran Haider Shamsi; Ghulam Jilani; Yuanlong Li; Lixi Jiang

2009-01-01

16

Fluazifop-p-butyl herbicide: Implications for germination, emergence and growth of Australian plant species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five experiments were implemented to collect information related to the effects of fluazifop-p-butyl (active chemical in grass selective herbicides, Fusilade® and Fusilade Forte™) on seed germination, seedling emergence, growth and health of species native to southwest Australia (a grass and non-grasses), together with several co-occurring introduced species (grasses and a non-grass). Experiments investigated effects of herbicide concentrations, seed burial depths,

Deanna P. Rokich; Jack Harma; Shane R. Turner; Rohan J. Sadler; Beng H. Tan

2009-01-01

17

Effect of nanosilica and silicon sources on plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, soil nutrients and maize seed germination.  

PubMed

The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of nanosilica and different sources of silicon on soil properties, total bacterial population and maize seed germination. Nanosilica was synthesised using rice husk and characterised. Silica powder was amorphous (50 nm) with >99.9% purity. Sodium silicate treated soil inhibited plant growth promoting rhizobacteria in contrast to nanosilica and other bulk sources. Surface property and effect of soil nutrient content of nanosilica treatment were improved. Colony forming unit (CFU) was doubled in the presence of nanosilica from 4 × 105 CFU (control) to 8 × 105 CFU per gram of soil. The silica and protein content of bacterial biomass clearly showed an increase in uptake of silica with an increase in nanosilica concentration. Nanosilica promoted seed germination percentage (100%) in maize than conventional Si sources. These studies show that nanosilica has favourable effect on beneficial bacterial population and nutrient value of soil. PMID:24028804

Karunakaran, Gopalu; Suriyaprabha, Rangaraj; Manivasakan, Palanisamy; Yuvakkumar, Rathinam; Rajendran, Venkatachalam; Prabu, Periyasamy; Kannan, Narayanasamy

2013-09-01

18

Effects of an industrial effluent on plant colonization and on the germination and post-germinative growth of seeds of terrestrial and aquatic plant species.  

PubMed

Major oil sands industrial companies are located in the Athabasca Oil Sands Deposit in northeastern Alberta, Canada. During the process used to extract light crude oil (via hot water digestion and flotation), gypsum is usually added to produce consolidated tails (CT) and CT release water. The vast volumes of process-treated waters (effluent) are held within large dyked tailings ponds. Toward testing viable options for reclamation, various hummock-wetlands systems have been constructed; in addition, natural wetlands (inhabited by obligate wetland plant species) have become established as a result of seeping of the effluents held within the large dyked ponds. Vegetation surveys conducted on and around the industrial site revealed that the constructed wetlands associated with the dyke drainage (effluent treated with phosphorous) and consolidated tails (CT; effluent treated with gypsum) had low biodiversity and were not invaded by many aquatic plants. Although the natural wetland was also not invaded by many aquatic species, it was found to be as diverse as the reference wetlands (i.e. off-site wetlands not exposed to the effluents). Exposure to oil sands effluents had an inhibitory effect on the germination (percent and/or rate) of several plant species (tomato, clover, wheat, rye, pea, reed canary grass, loblolly pine); clover and tomato seed germination were most affected. Two treatments in particular (effluents from the natural on-site wetland and the CT constructed wetland), delayed germination, and also led to reduced fresh weight of seedlings of tomato, wheat, clover and loblolly pine. The osmolarities of the effluents associated with the natural on-site wetland and CT constructed wetland were 712 and 728 mOs/kg, respectively; substituting these effluents with solutions of polyethylene glycol of the same osmotic potentials had a greater inhibitory effect on germination rate. The negative effects of the effluents on seed germination may account for the paucity of aquatic species that invaded the oil sands impacted wetlands. This factor will also be critical in determining the long-term feasibility of hummock-wetland systems. PMID:11843534

Crowe, A U; Plant, A L; Kermode, A R

2002-01-01

19

EFFECT OF COMPATIBLE OSMOTICA AND PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS IN ALLEVIATING SALINITY STRESS ON THE SEED GERMINATION OF ALLENROLFEA OCCIDENTALIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Allenrolfea occidentalis, a perennial halophytic shrub in the family Chenopodiaceae is widely distributed in the inland salt marshes and salt playas of western United States. Experiments were conducted to determine the influence of compatible osmotica (betaine and proline) and growth regulators (gibberellic acid and kinetin) in alleviating salinity stress on the seed germination of A. occidentalis. Seed germination decreased with

BILQUEES GUL; M. AJMAL KHAN

2008-01-01

20

[Investigations on variability of pollen tube growth in diploid and tetraploid plants of sugar beet : I. Conditions for germination of Beta pollen in vitro].  

PubMed

a) Attempts to germinate freshly harvested pollen of Beta vulgaris L. on semisolid media were carried out in 1966/67. The basic nutrient medium consisted of 5% gelatin, 30% sucrose and 0.03% boric acid (pH 6.4). Very poor germination occurred in aqueous solutions. During the flowering time from August to October the pollen was taken from field grown plants and during the rest of the year from greenhouse plants. b) One of the requirements for satisfactory in vitro germination rates is the optimal degree of ripeness of the pollen grains which is attained immediately after the dehiscence of the anthers. c) From January to March in vitro germination was very poor. Highest germination rates occurred during August and September. d) The germination of Beta pollen is strictly dependent upon the presence of boron in the medium. Optimal concentration of boric acid for pollen germination is 10(-1)% and for pollen tube growth 10(-2)% ; pollen tubes in this case reached a maximum length of 750 ?m, in rare cases even of up to 1200 ?m. Borax and butyl boric acid are less active in promoting germination. Phenyl boric acid has a very slight promoting effect and becomes toxic with concentrations higher than 10(-3)%. e) Highest germination rates (85%) were obtained on the basic medium at pH 5.4 to 5.7 after addition of n/10 HCl. Ca(++)-ions had no positive effect on germination. f) Germination of Beta pollen as compared to other pollen is relatively slow. g) A coating of callose was always observed on the inside of the walls of in vitro grown pollen tubes, less frequently callose plugs were found. Occasionally branching of the tubes occurred. PMID:24435481

Glenk, H O; Blaschke, G; Barocka, K H

1969-01-01

21

Enhancing Effect of Shimizuomyces paradoxus on Seed Germination and Seedling Growth of Canola, Plant Growth of Cucumber, and Harvest of Tomato.  

PubMed

Shimizuomyces paradoxus showed no inhibitory effect against plant pathogen fungi, such as Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and Alternaria solani. The S. paradoxus culture filtrate showed higher seed germination and seedling growth rates in canola than distilled water and potato-dextrose broth. A conidial suspension of 1.0×10(4)/mL resulted in the highest growth stimulating effects on total plant length, and fresh and dry weight of shoots and roots in cucumber, when compared to the highest suspension concentration. Total plant length and shoot weight increased with the foliar spray treatment, and root length and root weight increased by simultaneous treatments of soil drenching and foliar spray in cucumber. Lower concentrations of the S. paradoxus conidial suspension increased the harvest of tomato fruit. PMID:22783066

Sung, Gi-Ho; Shrestha, Bhushan; Park, Ki-Byung; Han, Sang-Kuk; Sung, Jae-Mo

2011-03-01

22

Effects of Posidonia oceanica beach-cast on germination, growth and nutrient uptake of coastal dune plants.  

PubMed

Seagrass meadows play an important role in marine ecosystems. A part of seagrass production is also exported to adjacent coastal terrestrial systems, possibly influencing their functioning. In this work we experimentally analyzed the effect of Posidonia oceanica beach-cast on plant germination, growth, and nutrient uptake of two plant species (Cakile maritima and Elymus farctus) that grow on upper beaches and fore dunes along the Mediterranean coasts. We compared plants growing in simple sand (control) with those growing in a substrate enriched with P. oceanica wrack (treatment) in laboratory. P. oceanica wrack doubled the N substrate pool and kept the substrate humid. Plants growing in the treated substrate grew faster, were twice as large as those growing in the control substrate, while tissues were enriched in N and P (Cakile by the 1.3 fold in N and 2.5 fold in P; Elymus by 1.5 fold in N and 2 fold in P). Our results suggest a positive effect of seagrass litter for the enhancing of dune species, highlighting its role for the conservation of coastal dune ecosystems. PMID:23894678

Del Vecchio, Silvia; Marbà, Núria; Acosta, Alicia; Vignolo, Clara; Traveset, Anna

2013-01-01

23

Effects of Posidonia Oceanica Beach-Cast on Germination, Growth and Nutrient Uptake of Coastal Dune Plants  

PubMed Central

Seagrass meadows play an important role in marine ecosystems. A part of seagrass production is also exported to adjacent coastal terrestrial systems, possibly influencing their functioning. In this work we experimentally analyzed the effect of Posidonia oceanica beach-cast on plant germination, growth, and nutrient uptake of two plant species (Cakile maritima and Elymus farctus) that grow on upper beaches and fore dunes along the Mediterranean coasts. We compared plants growing in simple sand (control) with those growing in a substrate enriched with P. oceanica wrack (treatment) in laboratory. P. oceanica wrack doubled the N substrate pool and kept the substrate humid. Plants growing in the treated substrate grew faster, were twice as large as those growing in the control substrate, while tissues were enriched in N and P (Cakile by the 1.3 fold in N and 2.5 fold in P; Elymus by 1.5 fold in N and 2 fold in P). Our results suggest a positive effect of seagrass litter for the enhancing of dune species, highlighting its role for the conservation of coastal dune ecosystems.

Del Vecchio, Silvia; Marba, Nuria; Acosta, Alicia; Vignolo, Clara; Traveset, Anna

2013-01-01

24

Effects of plant growth promoting bacteria and mycorrhizal on Capsicum annuum L. var. aviculare ([Dierbach] D'Arcy and Eshbaugh) germination under stressing abiotic conditions.  

PubMed

Capsicum annuum var. aviculare to Tarahumara and Papago Indians and farmers of Sonora desert is a promising biological and commercial value as a natural resource from arid and semiarid coastal zones. Traditionally, apply synthetic fertilizers to compensate for soil nitrogen deficiency. However, indiscriminate use of these fertilizers might increase salinity. The inoculation by plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) represents an alternative as potential bio fertilizer resources for salty areas. Seeds ecotypes from four areas of Sonora desert (Mazocahui, Baviacora, Arizpe, La Tortuga), in order to inoculate them with one species of PGPB and AMF. Two germination tests were carried out to study the effect of salinity, temperature regime (night/day) and inoculation with PGPB and AMF growth factors measured on germination (percentage and rate), plant height, root length, and produced biomass (fresh and dry matter). The results indicated that from four studied ecotypes, Mazocahui was the most outstanding of all, showing the highest germination under saline and non-saline conditions. However, the PGPB and AMF influenced the others variables evaluated. This study is the first step to obtain an ideal ecotype of C. a. var. aviculare, which grows in the northwest of México and promoting this type of microorganisms as an efficient and reliable biological product. Studies of the association of PGPB and AMF with the C. a. var. aviculare-Mazocahui ecotype are recommended to determine the extent to which these observations can be reproduced under field conditions. PMID:20447830

Rueda-Puente, Edgar Omar; Murillo-Amador, Bernardo; Castellanos-Cervantes, T; García-Hernández, José Luís; Tarazòn-Herrera, Mario Antonio; Moreno Medina, Salomòn; Gerlach Barrera, Luis Ernesto

2010-08-01

25

Plant growth and cultivation.  

PubMed

There is a variety of methods used for growing plants indoor for laboratory research. In most cases plant research requires germination and growth of plants. Often, people have adapted plant cultivation protocols to the conditions and materials at hand in their own laboratory and growth facilities. Here I will provide a guide for growing some of the most frequently used plant species for research, i.e., Arabidopsis thaliana, barley (Hordeum vulgare) and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the methods presented can be used for other plant species as well, especially if they are related to the above-mentioned species. The presented methods include growing plants in soil, hydroponics, and in vitro on plates. This guide is intended as a starting point for those who are just beginning to work on any of the above-mentioned plant species. Methods presented are to be taken as suggestive and modification can be made according to the conditions existing in the host laboratory. PMID:23073874

Podar, Dorina

2013-01-01

26

A novel method for efficient in vitro germination and tube growth of Arabidopsis thaliana pollen.  

PubMed

In addition to its importance in studies of plant reproduction and fertility, pollen is as widely employed as a model system of cell growth and development. This work demands robust, reproducible methods to induce pollen germination and morphologically normal growth of pollen tubes in vitro. Despite numerous advantages of Arabidopsis thaliana as a model plant, such experiments on pollen germination and pollen tube growth have often proved challenging. Our new method employs a physical cellulosic membrane, overlying an agarose substrate. By modulating the substrate composition, we provide important insights into the mechanisms promoting pollen growth both in vitro and in vivo. This effective new technical approach to A. thaliana pollen germination and tube growth results in swift, consistent and unprecedented levels of germination to over 90%. It can also promote rapid growth of long, morphologically normal pollen tubes. This technical development demonstrates that exogenous spermidine and a cellulosic substrate are key factors in stimulating germination. It has potential to greatly assist the study of reproduction in A. thaliana and its closest relatives, not only for the study of germination levels and pollen tube growth dynamics by microscopy, but also for biochemical and molecular analysis of germinating pollen. PMID:23173941

Rodriguez-Enriquez, M J; Mehdi, S; Dickinson, H G; Grant-Downton, R T

2013-01-01

27

Effects of x-rays and thermal shock on germination, survival, growth and sex ratio of hemp plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seeds of hemp were exposed to x radiation in doses of 5 to 20 kR in December and planted the following April. Some of the seeds were exposed to 80°C for 2 to 6 days prior to sowing. At the end of the vegetation period the height of male and female plants was measured. Tables are presented to show effects

Volkovich

1977-01-01

28

Germination behaviour of seeds of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal: a high value medicinal plant.  

PubMed

In order to evolve a quick method for smooth and optimum germination for Withania somnifera- a medicinally efficacious multipurpose plant, present investigation was carried to study the effect of physico-chemical treatments, storage, temperature, photoperiod and growth regulators (GA3, IAA, IBA, 2-4 D and BA) on germinability. The most effective treatment is GA3 at 150 ?g/ml concentration at 25 °C. The optimal temperature for germination is 25 °C and continuous light favored germination showing that photoperiod has a significant role. The seedlings derived from seeds performed well when grown in a glasshouse. The data have implications for conservation and cultivation of the species studied. PMID:24431513

Khanna, Punit K; Kumar, Arun; Chandra, Ratna; Verma, V

2013-07-01

29

Winery wastewater inhibits seed germination and vegetative growth of common crop species.  

PubMed

The ability to reuse winery wastewater would be of significant benefit to the wine industry, as it could potentially be a cost-effective method of wastewater management, whilst at the same time providing a valuable water resource. This study investigated the effects of different dilutions of a semi-synthetic winery wastewater on the growth and germination of four common crop species in a glasshouse study; barley (Hordeum vulgare), millet (Pennisetum glaucum), lucerne (Medicago sativa) and phalaris (Phalaris aquatica). The wastewater caused a significant delay in the germination of lucerne, millet and phalaris, although overall germination percentage of all species was not affected. Vegetative growth was significantly reduced in all species, with millet being the most severely affected. The germination index of barley correlated very highly (r(2)=0.99) with barley biomass, indicating that barley seed germination bioassays are highly relevant to plant growth, and therefore may be of use as a bioassay for winery wastewater toxicity. PMID:20452120

Mosse, Kim P M; Patti, Antonio F; Christen, Evan W; Cavagnaro, Timothy R

2010-08-15

30

Effect of cadmium on germination, growth and active principle contents of Matricaria recutita L.  

PubMed

The effects on Matricaria recutita L. of an increase of cadmium concentration in soil and in atmosphere were investigated. Data on germination, survival, growth and dry weight were collected and methilenic extracts of the drugs were analyzed. Cd pollution affects Matricaria germination and growth and GLC analysis of extracts shows a significant difference in active principles between the plants subject undergone different treatments. PMID:3247345

De Pasquale, R; Ragusa, S; Iauk, L; Barbera, R; Galati, E M

1988-12-01

31

[Research advance in seed germination of desert woody plants].  

PubMed

This paper reviewed the research methods of desert woody plants seed germination, and the effects of internal and external ecological factors on it. Most researchers use incubator and artificial climate chamber to dispose the seeds, while field investigation was few involved. Seed dormancy is the important physiological factor affecting germination, while seed size, mass and color are closely correlated with its maturity and vigor. The poor permeability of seed capsule is a barrier that restrains the germination, which can be weakened or eliminated by shaving, cutting, treating with low temperature, and dipping in chemical reagent, etc. Seed water content has a close correlation with its storage life and water-absorbing capability. Suitable temperature is the prerequisite of seed germination, while changing temperature can accelerate the germination. Soil moisture content is a limiting factor, while illumination is not so essential to the seed germination of most desert woody plants. Sand-burying plays an important role in the seed germination through regulating illumination, temperature, and soil moisture content. Salinity stress restrains the seed germination of desert woody plants observably. In further studies, the effects of multi-factors and the eco-physiological and molecular biological mechanisms of germination should be more concerned. PMID:17450753

Chang, Wei; Wu, Jian-guo; Liu, Yan-hong

2007-02-01

32

Mechanisms associated with tolerance to flooding during germination and early seedling growth in rice (Oryza sativa)  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Flooding slows seed germination, imposes fatalities and delays seedling establishment in direct-seeded rice. This study describes responses of contrasting rice genotypes subjected to flooding or low oxygen stress during germination and discusses the basis of tolerance shown by certain cultivars. Methods In one set of experiments, dry seeds were sown in soil and either watered normally or flooded with 10 cm of water. Seedling survival and shoot and root growth were assessed and seed portions of germinating seedlings were assayed for soluble sugars and starch concentrations. The whole germinating seedlings were assayed for amylase and peroxidase activities and for ethylene production. Activities of enzymes associated with anaerobic respiration were examined and gene expression was analysed separately with seeds germinating under different amounts of dissolved oxygen in dilute agar. Key Results Flooding during germination reduced survival but to a lesser extent in tolerant genotypes. Starch concentration in germinating seeds decreased while sugar concentration increased under flooding, but more so in tolerant genotypes. Amylase activity correlated positively with elongation (r = 0·85 for shoot and 0·83 for root length) and with plant survival (r = 0·92). Tolerant genotypes had higher amylase activity and higher RAmy3D gene expression. Ethylene was not detected in seeds within 2 d after sowing, but increased thereafter, with a greater increase in tolerant genotypes starting 3 d after sowing. Peroxidase activity was higher in germinating seeds of sensitive genotypes and correlated negatively with survival. Conclusions Under low oxygen stress, tolerant genotypes germinate, grow faster and more seedlings survive. They maintain their ability to use stored starch reserves through higher amylase activity and anaerobic respiration, have higher rates of ethylene production and lower peroxidase activity as germinating seeds and as seedlings. Relevance of these traits to tolerance of flooding during germination and early growth is discussed.

Ismail, Abdelbagi M.; Ella, Evangelina S.; Vergara, Georgina V.; Mackill, David J.

2009-01-01

33

Precocious Germination during In Vitro Growth of Soybean Seeds 1  

PubMed Central

Immature Glycine max (L.) Merrill seeds were grown and matured in liquid medium at 25°C under fluorescent light. In standard medium containing minerals, 146 millimolar sucrose and 62.5 millimolar glutamine (osmolality 0.24), precocious germination seldom occurred with a starting seed size of less than 300 milligrams fresh weight. Frequency of precocious germination increased with increased starting seed size. Sucrose concentration strongly affected precocious germination while glutamine concentration had no effect. Starting with 300 to 350 milligrams fresh weight seeds, treatments which reduced the sucrose concentration or lowered the osmolality of the culture medium stimulated precocious germination, and increased the fresh weight growth but not the dry weight growth of seeds. Increasing the osmolality to 0.38 with sucrose or mannitol prevented precocious germination without reducing dry weight accumulation in seeds. In medium with initially low osmolality, precocious germination was inhibited by addition of 1 to 100 micromolar abscisic acid to the medium without a reduction in seed growth. During growth and maturation of large soybean seeds in vitro, precocious germination and other abnormal tissue growth can be prevented by high sucrose or mannitol concentrations in the medium or by addition of abscisic acid.

Obendorf, Ralph L.; Wettlaufer, Scott H.

1984-01-01

34

Rhizonin A from Burkholderia sp. KCTC11096 and its growth promoting role in lettuce seed germination.  

PubMed

We isolated and identified a gibberellin-producing Burkholderia sp. KCTC 11096 from agricultural field soils. The culture filtrate of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) significantly increased the germination and growth of lettuce and Chinese cabbage seeds. The ethyl acetate extract of the PGPR culture showed significantly higher rate of lettuce seed germination and growth as compared to the distilled water treated control. The ethyl acetate fraction of the Burkholderia sp. was subjected to bioassay-guided isolation and we obtained for the first time from a Burkholderia sp. the plant growth promoting compound rhizonin A (1), which was characterized through NMR and MS techniques. Application of various concentrations of 1 significantly promoted the lettuce seed germination as compared to control. PMID:22759911

Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Abdul Latif; Hussain, Javid; Ali, Liaqat; Kamran, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Lee, In-Jung

2012-01-01

35

How Plants Make Light Work of Growth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is one of a series of articles designed to help science teachers keep current on ideas in specific areas in biology. Contained is information on how plants use light for growth, seed germination, and flowering. (PB)

Kendrick, R. E.

1981-01-01

36

Growth patterns for etiolated soybeans germinated under spaceflight conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the GENEX (GENe EXpression) spaceflight experiment (flown on STS-87), six surface sterilized soybean seeds ( Glycine max cv McCall) were inserted into each of 32 autoclaved plastic seed growth pouches containing an inner germination paper sleeve (for a total of 192 seeds). The pouches were stowed within a mid-deck locker until Mission Flight Day 10, at which time an astronaut added water to initiate the process of seed germination on-orbit and subsequently transferred them to four light-tight aluminum canisters called BRIC-60s (Biological Research In Canisters). We report here on the morphological characteristics of: (1) the recovered flight plants ( N = 177), (2) the corresponding ground control population ( N = 183), plus (3) additional controls grown on the ground under clinostat conditions ( N = 93). No significant morphological differences were found between the flight, ground control and clinorotated treatments for either the cotyledons or hypocotyls. There were, however, significantly longer primary roots produced in the flight population relative to the ground control population, which in turn had significantly longer primary roots than the clinorotated population. This same pattern was observed relative to the production of lateral roots (flight > control > clinorotated). Taken together with previous literature reports, we believe that there is now sufficient evidence to conclude that plants grown under conditions of microgravity will generally exhibit enhanced root production relative to their ground control counterparts. Some causes underlying this phenomenon are speculated on.

Levine, Howard G.; Piastuch, William C.

37

Latrunculin B has different effects on pollen germination and tube growth.  

PubMed Central

The actin cytoskeleton is absolutely required for pollen germination and tube growth, but little is known about the regulation of actin polymer concentrations or dynamics in pollen. Here, we report that latrunculin B (LATB), a potent inhibitor of actin polymerization, had effects on pollen that were distinct from those of cytochalasin D. The equilibrium dissociation constant measured for LATB binding to maize pollen actin was determined to be 74 nM. This high affinity for pollen actin suggested that treatment of pollen with LATB would have marked effects on actin function. Indeed, LATB inhibited maize pollen germination half-maximally at 50 nM, yet it blocked pollen tube growth at one-tenth of that concentration. Low concentrations of LATB also caused partial disruption of the actin cytoskeleton in germinated maize pollen, as visualized by light microscopy and fluorescent-phalloidin staining. The amounts of filamentous actin (F-actin) in pollen were quantified by measuring phalloidin binding sites, a sensitive assay that had not been used previously for plant cells. The amount of F-actin in maize pollen increased slightly upon germination, whereas the total actin protein level did not change. LATB treatment caused a dose-dependent depolymerization of F-actin in populations of maize pollen grains and tubes. Moreover, the same concentrations of LATB caused similar depolymerization in pollen grains before germination and in pollen tubes. These data indicate that the increased sensitivity of pollen tube growth to LATB was not due to general destabilization of the actin cytoskeleton or to decreases in F-actin amounts after germination. We postulate that germination is less sensitive to LATB than tube extension because the presence of a small population of LATB-sensitive actin filaments is critical for maintenance of tip growth but not for germination of pollen, or because germination is less sensitive to partial depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton.

Gibbon, B C; Kovar, D R; Staiger, C J

1999-01-01

38

Strigolactones as Germination Stimulants for Root Parasitic Plants  

PubMed Central

Witchweeds (Striga spp.) and broomrapes (Orobanche and Phelipanche spp.) are the two most devastating root parasitic plants belonging to the family Orobanchaceae and are causing enormous crop losses throughout the world. Seeds of these root parasites will not germinate unless they are exposed to chemical stimuli, ‘germination stimulants’ produced by and released from plant roots. Most of the germination stimulants identified so far are strigolactones (SLs), which also function as host recognition signals for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and a novel class of plant hormones inhibiting shoot branching. In this review, we focus on SLs as germination stimulants for root parasitic plants. In addition, we discuss how quantitative and qualitative differences in SL exudation among sorghum cultivars influence their susceptibility to Striga.

Yoneyama, Koichi; Awad, Ayman A.; Xie, Xiaonan; Yoneyama, Kaori; Takeuchi, Yasutomo

2010-01-01

39

Effects of Orocol TL (a corrosion inhibitor) on germination and growth of bush beans  

SciTech Connect

As part of a continuing series of studies conducted to determine the environmental effects of hexavalent chromium from cooling tower drift on biological systems, the potential for germination and growth effects in bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Bush Blue Lake) from hexavelent chromium in Orocol TL (a proprietary chromated, zinc-phosphate compound added to DOE cooling water systems for corrosion inhibition) was investigated at low and high concentrations in the soil by adjusting soil pH and the percent of organic matter. Germination effects were determined in bean plants grown in soils adjusted to differing pH range (4-4.5, 5-5.5, 6.5-7), levels of organic matter (1.8%, 3%, 5%) and Orocol TL amendments (control of 0 ..mu..g/g, 10 ..mu..g/g chromium). Growth responses (effects) were determined from bush bean plants cultured in the same soil treatment combinations as described for the germination study. Plants were harvested when the plant died or at the end of eight weeks and partitioned into leaves, stems and roots. Following weight determinations, the leaves, stems and roots were analyzed for total chromium content, and the results compared using analysis of variance and multiple comparison procedures. High levels (500 ..mu..g/g) of hexavalent chromium in soil (as Orocol TL) affected germination and growth, while a high level of organic matter significantly reduced chromium toxicity on germination. At lower chromium concentrations there was significant uptake by all plant parts, with a corresponding reduction in biomass of leaves. Consequently, adjustments of soil pH from 4.0 to 7.0 appear to have no significant effect on chromium uptake in plants. Increasing the organic matter level to 5%, while decreasing the toxicity of high chromium levels to germinating seed, did not affect chromium uptake.

Parr, P.D.

1982-04-01

40

Effect of Cd on germination, growth and active principles of Datura metel L  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of Cd concentration increment in soil and\\/or in atmosphere, on germination, growth and alkaloid contents of Datura metel L. were investigated. We observed a significant reduction of growth following addition of Cd in soil. Minor effects on growth were evident when the plants were sprayed with CdCl2 solution (10mgCd\\/l).Scanning electron microscope observation showed stomata widely open and conspicuous

R. de Pasquale; L. Iauk; R. Barbera; A. Saija; E. M. Galati; S. Ragusa

1989-01-01

41

In Vivo Effects of Barbituates on Seed Germination and Seedling Growth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A simple, low-cost experimental system can be used to demonstrate the "in vivo" effects of barbituates on seed germination and seedling growth behavior in different plant species. Lipid solubility and concentration of individual barbituates both affect the response. List of materials needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained are…

Kordan, H. A.

1984-01-01

42

Effects of acidity on tree pollen germination and tube growth  

SciTech Connect

Several studies have indicated that pollen germination and tube growth are adversely affected by air pollutants. Pollutants may inhibit the function of pollen by reducing the number of pollen grains which germinate, by reducing the maximum length to which the pollen tubes grow, or by interfering with the formation of the generative cell. The paper reports on studies that are attempting to determine the effects acid rain may have on these crucial stages in the life histories of northeastern tree species. The first stage of this work assessed the effects of acidity in the growth medium on in vitro pollen germination for four deciduous forest species common to central New York State, Betula lutea (yellow birch), B. lenta (black birch), Acer saccharum (sugar maple), and Cornus florida (flowering dogwood). Measurements were taken at the end of the growth period to determine the percentage of grains which had germinated, and to estimate the average tube length. To determine the effects of pollen on the growth medium, the pH of the germination drop was measured at the end of the growth period.

Jacobson, J.S.; Van Rye, D.M.; Lassoie, J.P.

1985-01-01

43

Effects of plant growth promoting bacteria and mycorrhizal on Capsicum annuum L. var. aviculare ([Dierbach] D’Arcy and Eshbaugh) germination under stressing abiotic conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Capsicum annuum var. aviculare to Tarahumara and Papago Indians and farmers of Sonora desert is a promising biological and commercial value as a natural resource from arid and semiarid coastal zones. Traditionally, apply synthetic fertilizers to compensate for soil nitrogen deficiency. However, indiscriminate use of these fertilizers might increase salinity. The inoculation by plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) and arbuscular

Edgar Omar Rueda-Puente; Bernardo Murillo-Amador; T. Castellanos-Cervantes; José Luís García-Hernández; Mario Antonio Tarazòn-Herrera; Salomòn Moreno Medina; Luis Ernesto Gerlach Barrera

2010-01-01

44

Acceleration of germination and early growth of wheat and bean seedlings grown under various magnetic field and osmotic conditions.  

PubMed

Magnetic field (MF) can have different effects on plant metabolism depending on its application style, intensity, and environmental conditions. This study reports the effects of different intensities of static MF (4 or 7 mT) on seed germination and seedling growth of bean or wheat seeds in different media having 0, 2, 6, and 10 atmosphere (atm) osmotic pressure prepared with sucrose or salt. The germination percentages of the treated seeds were compared with untreated seeds germinated in different osmotic pressure during 7 days of incubation. The application of both MFs promoted the germination ratios of bean and wheat seeds, regardless of increasing osmotic pressure of sucrose or salt. Growth data measured on the 7th day showed that the treated plants grew faster than control. After 7 days of incubation, the mean length of treated seedlings was statistically higher than control plants in all the media. The greatest germination and growth rates in both plants were from the test groups exposed to 7 mT MF. Strikingly, effects of static MF on germination and growth increased positively with increasing osmotic pressure or salt stress compared to their respective controls. On the other hand, MF application caused an increase in dry biomass accumulation of root and shoots of both seedlings; however, this effect was found statistically important in all the conditions for wheat but not for bean, in general. PMID:19681058

Cakmak, Turgay; Dumlupinar, Rahmi; Erdal, Serkan

2010-02-01

45

Nitrogen effects on seed germination and seedling growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent evidence associates the persistence of invasive plant species with disturbance and fluctuations in distinct forms of mineral N in soils. We conducted soil and hydroponic experi- ments to investigate the influence of N form and availability on germination and seedling development of 2 invasive annual grasses, cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) and medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae) and 6 perennial grasses, blue- bunch

THOMAS A. MONACO; CHARLES T. MACKOWN; DOUGLAS A. JOHNSON; THOMAS A. JONES; JEANETTE M. NORTON; JAY B. NORTON; MARGARET G. REDINBAUGH

2003-01-01

46

Parasitic Plants in Agriculture: Chemical Ecology of Germination and Host-Plant Location as Targets for Sustainable Control: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Parasitic plants are among the most problematic pests of agricultural crops worldwide. Effective means of control are generally\\u000a lacking, in part because of the close physiological connection between the established parasite and host plant hindering efficient\\u000a control using traditional methods. Seed germination and host location are critical early-growth stages that occur prior to\\u000a host attachment, and provide promising targets for

Justin B. Runyon; John F. Tooker; Mark C. Mescher; Consuelo M. De Moraes

47

Effect of electroplating factory effluent on the germination and growth of hyacinth bean and mustard.  

PubMed

The effect of electroplating factory effluent in different concentrations (viz., 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 4.0%) on the germination and growth of hyacinth beans (Dolichos lablab) and mustard seeds (Brassica compestris) was studied. The germination of seeds was delayed with the increase of effluent concentration and the germination of mustard seeds was totally inhibited at 1.5% effluent concentration while hyacinth bean seeds tolerated the effluent up to 2.5% concentration. The metal content in the hyacinth bean plants increased with increasing effluent concentration but after 1.0% effluent concentration, the concentration of all the metals (Ca, Mg, Na, K, Cu, Zn, Fe) decreased in the plants except Cr, which increased throughout. Percentage germination, fresh weight, dry weight, root length, and shoot length of the plants were also analyzed. Cd, Ni, Co, Mn, and Pb were not detectable in the hyacinth bean plants. PMID:4065075

Ajmal, M; Khan, A U

1985-12-01

48

Germination and growth inhibitors from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) husks.  

PubMed

On the basis of our findings that the germination of intact wheat seeds (with husks) belonging to dormancy varieties was restrained as compared with that of the dehusked seeds (grains), the germination inhibitors in the husks were explored. The water-soluble extracts from the husks were separated by the aid of inhibition assay experiments, resulting in the characterization of 2-phenylethyl alcohol 1, 4-vinylphenol 2 and its 2-methoxy derivative 3, and dihydroactinidiolide 4, all of which showed clear inhibition of germination at 500 ppm in aqueous solution. The related compounds 1-phenylethyl alcohol 5 and tetrahydroactinidiolide 6 were as active as 1 and 4, while no noticeable difference in activity was detected among both enantiomers and the DL-form of compounds 4-6. Clear synergistic relations were observed between 4 and 1 and also 4 and 3. Since the present inhibitors have been isolated from various kinds of seed plants, they may be responsible for the general germination inhibition in the seed plants. PMID:12381108

Kato, Tadahiro; Saito, Naoko; Kashimura, Kaori; Shinohara, Mariko; Kurahashi, Takuma; Taniguchi, Kohji

2002-10-23

49

Seed Germination and Seedling Growth of Trees in Soil Extracts from Korangi and Landhi Industrial Areas of Karachi, Pakistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of soil extracts from Khan Towel, Tanveer Garment, One Tech Rubber, and One Tech Ply Board factories in the vicinity of Korangi and Landhi industrial areas on seed germination and growth of cultivated plants like Albizia lebbeck, Leucaena leucocephala, Thespesia populnea, and Peltophorum pterocarpum and naturally growing plants such as Prosopis juliflora (Karachi University and Korangi and Landhi

Syed Atiqur Rehman; Muhammad Zafar Iqbal

2007-01-01

50

Germination and Early Seedling Growth of Chaffy-Seeded Grasses at Negative Water Potentials  

Microsoft Academic Search

chaffy-seeded grasses can be debearded, i.e., removal ofthehairsandawn(Ahringet al.,1964)orprocessedto Drought is the most frequent cause of stand establishment failure remove all appendages leaving only caryopses (Beisel, of native grasses. An experiment was conducted to determine the interactions of seed processing and simulated dry conditions on seed 1985). When conditions are favorable, planting caryop- germination and seedling growth of five chaffy-seeded,

T. L. Springer

2005-01-01

51

Germination characteristics of lakeshore plants under an artificially stabilized water regime  

Microsoft Academic Search

To examine the possibility of the failure of lakeshore plants to germinate under an anthropogenically controlled water regime, we investigated physiological germination responses to temperature and inundation among 25 lakeshore plant species from Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. The requirement of low temperature for dormancy breakage, which is common in spring-germinators, was seen in 14 species. Eight species showed sensitivity to temperature

Jun Nishihiro; Sachiko Araki; Nobuo Fujiwara; Izumi Washitani

2004-01-01

52

Coordinated action of ?-galactosidases in the cell wall of embryonic axes during chickpea germination and seedling growth.  

PubMed

The plant cell wall is a dynamic structure whose constant modification is necessary for plant cells to grow and divide. In the cell walls of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) there are at least four ?-galactosidases, whose presence and location in embryonic axes during the first 48 h of seed imbibition are discussed in this paper. We examined their roles as cell wall-modifying enzymes in germinative and/or post-germinative events. At the start of germination, only ?V-Gal, and to a lesser extent ?IV-Gal, appear in the axes before rupture of the testa, suggesting they are related to germination sensu stricto. Once the testa has broken, the four ?-galactosidases are involved in growth and differentiation of the axes. Immunolocation of the different proteins in axes, which in part confirms previous results in seedlings and plants, allows assignment of post-germinative roles to ?I-Gal and ?III-Gal as cell wall modifiers in vascular tissue elements. ?IV-Gal and ?V-Gal participate in the initial events of germination in which cell walls are involved: ?V-Gal in cell proliferation, detachment of root cap cells and initial vascular tissue differentiation; both of them in xylem maturation; and ?IV-Gal in thickening of the primary cell wall. Together with other cell wall-modifying enzymes, such as expansins and XTH, chickpea galactosidases might function in a sequential order in turnover of the primary cell wall, allowing the elongation of embryonic axes during seed germination. PMID:23731125

Hernández-Nistal, J; Martín, I; Dopico, B; Labrador, E

2014-03-01

53

Rice germination and seedling growth in the absence of oxygen  

PubMed Central

Background Higher plants are aerobic organisms which suffer from the oxygen deficiency imposed by partial or total submergence. However, some plant species have developed strategies to avoid or withstand severe oxygen shortage and, in some cases, the complete absence of oxygen (tissue anoxia) for considerable periods of time. Scope Rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the few plant species that can tolerate prolonged soil flooding or complete submergence thanks to an array of adaptive mechanisms. These include an ability to elongate submerged shoot organs at faster than normal rates and to develop aerenchyma, allowing the efficient internal transport of oxygen from the re-emerged elongated shoot to submerged parts. However, rice seeds are able to germinate anaerobically by means of coleoptile elongation. This cannot be explained in terms of oxygen transport through an emerged shoot. This review provides an overview of anoxic rice germination that is mediated through coleoptile rather than root emergence. Conclusions Although there is still much to learn about the biochemical and molecular basis of anaerobic rice germination, the ability of rice to maintain an active fermentative metabolism (i.e. by fuelling the glycolytic pathway with readily fermentable carbohydrates) is certainly crucial. The results obtained through microarray-based transcript profiling confirm most of the previous evidence based on single-gene studies and biochemical analysis, and highlight new aspects of the molecular response of the rice coleoptile to anoxia.

Magneschi, Leonardo; Perata, Pierdomenico

2009-01-01

54

Basal Transcription Factor 3 Plays an Important Role in Seed Germination and Seedling Growth of Rice  

PubMed Central

BTF3 has been recognized to be involved in plant growth and development. But its function remains mostly unknown during seed germination and seedling stage. Here, we have analyzed OsBTF3-related sequences in Oryza sativa L. subspecies, japonica, which resembles with the conserved domain of a nascent polypeptide associated complex (NAC) with different homologs of OsBTF3 and human BTF3. Inhibition of Osj10gBTF3 has led to considerable morphological changes during seed germination and seedling growth. Germination percentage was not influenced by the application of GA3, ABA, and NaCl but all concentrations caused wild-type (WT) seeds to germinate more rapidly than the RNAi (Osj10gBTF3Ri) transgenic lines. Seedling inhibition was more severe in the Osj10gBTF3Ri seedlings compared with their WT especially when treated with 100 or 200??M GA3; 50% reduction in shoots was observed in Osj10gBTF3Ri seedlings. The expression of Osj3g1BTF3, Osj3g2BTF3 and Osj10gBTF3 was primarily constitutive and generally modulated by NaCl, ABA, and GA3 stresses in both Osj10gBTF3Ri lines and WT at the early seedling stage, suggesting that Osj3g1BTF3 and Osj10gBTF3 are much similar but different from Osj3g2BTF3 in biological function. These results show that OsBTF3 plays an important role in seed germination and seedling growth gives a new perception demonstrating that more multifaceted regulatory functions are linked with BTF3 in plants.

Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Mengyun; Wang, Ya

2014-01-01

55

Plant Growth Regulation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Plant growth regulators, including auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, abscisic acid, and ethylene, are investigated in this learning activity to demonstrate how these chemicals (hormones) affect plant growth and development.

This page authored by Jim Bidlack, University of Central Oklahoma, based on original activities by Long Ashton Research Station, KScience, Cynthia Herbrandson, Kellogg Community College, Ross Koning, Eastern Connecticut State University, and A.G. Scientific, Inc.

56

The Pollen Receptor Kinase LePRK2 Mediates Growth-Promoting Signals and Positively Regulates Pollen Germination and Tube Growth1[W][OA  

PubMed Central

In flowering plants, the process of pollen germination and tube growth is required for successful fertilization. A pollen receptor kinase from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), LePRK2, has been implicated in signaling during pollen germination and tube growth as well as in mediating pollen (tube)-pistil communication. Here we show that reduced expression of LePRK2 affects four aspects of pollen germination and tube growth. First, the percentage of pollen that germinates is reduced, and the time window for competence to germinate is also shorter. Second, the pollen tube growth rate is reduced both in vitro and in the pistil. Third, tip-localized superoxide production by pollen tubes cannot be increased by exogenous calcium ions. Fourth, pollen tubes have defects in responses to style extract component (STIL), an extracellular growth-promoting signal from the pistil. Pollen tubes transiently overexpressing LePRK2-fluorescent protein fusions had slightly wider tips, whereas pollen tubes coexpressing LePRK2 and its cytoplasmic partner protein KPP (a Rop-GEF) had much wider tips. Together these results show that LePRK2 positively regulates pollen germination and tube growth and is involved in transducing responses to extracellular growth-promoting signals.

Zhang, Dong; Wengier, Diego; Shuai, Bin; Gui, Cai-Ping; Muschietti, Jorge; McCormick, Sheila; Tang, Wei-Hua

2008-01-01

57

Seed germination and seedling growth of the Mexican sunflower Tithonia diversifolia (Compositae) in Nigeria, Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied seed germination and seedling growth of the Mexican sunflower Tithonia diversifolia in Nigeria. This involved the usage of some dormancy-releasing methods and the effect of some concentrations of three herbicide formulations on the young seedlings. Initial germination tests on fresh and stored seeds revealed a low percentage germination of less than 30%. The seeds of the weed exhibit

D. A. Agboola; W. F. Idowu; M. Kadiri

58

Cadmium Stress Disrupts the Endomembrane Organelles and Endocytosis during Picea wilsonii Pollen Germination and Tube Growth  

PubMed Central

As one of the most severe pollutants, cadmium has been reported to be harmful to plant cells, but the effects of cadmium on gymnosperm pollen germination and tube growth and the mechanism of this involvement are still unclear. Here, we report that cadmium not only strongly inhibited P. wilsonii pollen germination and tube growth, but also significantly altered tube morphology in a dose-dependent manner. Time-lapse images obtained with a laser scanning confocal microscope revealed that endocytosis was dramatically inhibited by cadmium stress. Further investigation with ER-Tracker dye indicated that cadmium stress reduced the number of the Golgi apparatus, and induced dilation of ER. Additionally, Lyso-Tracker staining showed that cadmium distinctly promoted the formation of acidic organelles in pollen tubes, likely derived from the dilated ER. Taken together, our studies indicated that P. wilsonii pollens were highly susceptible to cadmium stress, and that cadmium stress strongly inhibited pollen germination and tube growth by disrupting the endomembrane organelles, inhibiting endo/exocytosis, and forming acidic vacuoles, resulting in swollen tube tips and irregularly broadened tube diameters. These findings provide a new insight into the effects of cadmium toxicity on the tip growth of pollen tubes.

Feng, Yu; Li, Xue; Wei, Qian; Sheng, Xianyong

2014-01-01

59

Muricholic Acids Inhibit Clostridium difficile Spore Germination and Growth  

PubMed Central

Infections caused by Clostridium difficile have increased steadily over the past several years. While studies on C. difficile virulence and physiology have been hindered, in the past, by lack of genetic approaches and suitable animal models, newly developed technologies and animal models allow these processes to be studied in detail. One such advance is the generation of a mouse-model of C. difficile infection. The development of this system is a major step forward in analyzing the genetic requirements for colonization and infection. While important, it is equally as important in understanding what differences exist between mice and humans. One of these differences is the natural bile acid composition. Bile acid-mediated spore germination is an important step in C. difficile colonization. Mice produce several different bile acids that are not found in humans. These muricholic acids have the potential to impact C. difficile spore germination. Here we find that the three muricholic acids (?-muricholic acid, ?-muricholic acid and ?-muricholic acid) inhibit C. difficile spore germination and can impact the growth of vegetative cells. These results highlight an important difference between humans and mice and may have an impact on C. difficile virulence in the mouse-model of C. difficile infection.

Francis, Michael B.; Allen, Charlotte A.; Sorg, Joseph A.

2013-01-01

60

Melatonin promotes seminal root elongation and root growth in transgenic rice after germination.  

PubMed

The effect of melatonin on root growth after germination was examined in transgenic rice seedlings expressing sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT). Enhanced melatonin levels were found in T(3) homozygous seedlings because of the ectopic overexpression of sheep NAT, which is believed to be the rate-limiting enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis in animals. Compared with wild-type rice seeds, the transgenic rice seeds showed enhanced seminal root growth and an analogous number of adventitious roots 4 and 10 days after seeding on half-strength Murashige and Skoog medium. The enhanced initial seminal root growth in the transgenic seedlings matched their increased root biomass well. We also found that treatment with 0.5 and 1 ?M melatonin promoted seminal root growth of the wild type under continuous light. These results indicate that melatonin plays an important role in regulating both seminal root length and root growth after germination in monocotyledonous rice plants. This is the first report on the effects of melatonin on root growth in gain-of-function mutant plants that produce high levels of melatonin. PMID:22640001

Park, Sangkyu; Back, Kyoungwhan

2012-11-01

61

The influence of microbial associations on germination of wheat seeds and growth of seedlings under impact of zinc salts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The life support systems (LSS) for long-term missions are to use cycling-recycling systems, including biological recycling. Higher plants are the traditional regenerator of air and producer of food. They should be used in many successive generations of their reproduction in LSS. Studies of influence of microbial associations on germination of wheat seeds and on growth of seedlings under impact of heavy metals are necessary because of migration of heavy metals in LSS. Microbial associations are able to stimulate growth of plants, to protect them from pathogenic organisms and from toxicity of heavy metal salts. The goal of this work was to investigate effect of microbial associations on the germination of wheat seeds and on the growth of seedlings under impact of different concentrations of ZnSO4. The results of investigations showed that:Zinc salt had an adverse effect on germination of wheat seeds, beginning with concentrations of 8 MPC (Maximum Permissible Concentration) and higher.Microbial associations (concentrations -104 to 107 cells/ml) were able to decrease (partly or completely) the adverse effect of ZnSO4 on germination of wheat seeds.Concentrations (104-107 cells/ml) of microbial associations were able to decrease partly the adverse effect of zinc salts (intervals: from 1 to 32 MP?) on the growth and development of wheat plantlets during heterotrophic phase.The root system of plants was more sensitive to the adverse effect of ZnSO4 than shoots of plants.

Somova, L. A.; Pechurkin, N. S.

2009-04-01

62

Establishment of the male germline and sperm cell movement during pollen germination and tube growth in maize.  

PubMed

Two sperm cells are required to achieve double fertilization in flowering plants (angiosperms). In contrast to animals and lower plants such as mosses and ferns, sperm cells of flowering plants (angiosperms) are immobile and are transported to the female gametes (egg and central cell) via the pollen tube. The two sperm cells arise from the generative pollen cell either within the pollen grain or after germination inside the pollen tube. While pollen tube growth and sperm behaviour has been intensively investigated in model plant species such as tobacco and lily, little is know about sperm dynamics and behaviour during pollen germination, tube growth and sperm release in grasses. In the March issue of Journal of Experimental Botany, we have reported about the sporophytic and gametophytic control of pollen tube germination, growth and guidance in maize.1 Five progamic phases were distinguished involving various prezygotic crossing barriers before sperm cell delivery inside the female gametophyte takes place. Using live cell imaging and a generative cell-specific promoter driving ?-tubulin-YFP expression in the male germline, we report here the formation of the male germline inside the pollen grain and the sperm behaviour during pollen germination and their movement dynamics during tube growth in maize. PMID:20505353

Kliwer, Irina; Dresselhaus, Thomas

2010-07-01

63

Effect of cadmium on pollen germination and tube growth in Lilium longiflorum and Nicotiana tabacum.  

PubMed

Cadmium had a highly toxic effect on pollen germination and tube growth, which were greatly inhibited as metal concentrations increased. Cadmium concentrations up to 10(-2) M completely stopped pollen germination and pollen showed an increasing tendency to burst within 1 h. At low concentrations, the metal caused a slight stimulation of pollen germination, growth rate and tube elongation at the initial stages of tube development. Comparing the two plants studied, cadmium was more toxic for Nicotiana tabacum than for Lilium longiflorum pollen. Pollen tubes showed a range of strong morphological abnormalities, characterized by uneven or aberrant growth, including apical branching or swelling at the tip of the pollen tube. Cell wall intrusions at or near the tip were evident on the inner side, whereas a loose network formed from fibrillar material was observed on the outer layers. After prolonged cadmium exposure, round (ball-like) aggregates were embedded in a fine fibrillar network. Increased cadmium concentrations (10(-3)-10(-2) M) decreased or completely paralyzed cytoplasmic streaming. No typical cytoplasmic zonation existed, while cell organelles (plastids, lipid droplets) were relocated toward the tip. The vesicular apical zone was drastically reduced, with vesicles dispersed into the subapical region. Mitochondria were distributed throughout the subapical region and among the vesicles of the tube apex. Visible ultrastructural changes in cell organelles were not observed. PMID:18709476

Sawidis, T

2008-01-01

64

Responses of germination and radicle growth of two Populus species to water potential and salinity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of water potential, NaCl and Na2SO4 on germination and radicle growth of two riparian tree species, Populus euphratica Oliv. and P. pruinosa Schrenk (Salicaceae), were tested. Growth chamber studies revealed an optimum temperature range for seed germination of both\\u000a species between 15–35°C. The final germination percentage of both species decreases with decreasing water potential in all\\u000a types of

Li Li; Xi-ming Zhang; Runge Michael; Xiao-ming Li; Xing-yuan He

2006-01-01

65

Steroid Hormones Stimulate Germination and Tube Growth of in Vitro Matured Tobacco Pollen.  

PubMed Central

A study of the effects of different steroids on germination and tube growth of tobacco pollen (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Petit Havana SR1) matured in vitro is presented. Application of the mammalian steroid sex hormones (testosterone, progesterone, and estradiol) resulted in a stimulation of pollen germination and tube elongation. The presence of both steroids and flavonols in the germination medium strongly enhanced the growth of tobacco male gametophytes.

Ylstra, B.; Touraev, A.; Brinkmann, A. O.; Heberle-Bors, E.; Tunen, AJV.

1995-01-01

66

Effect of temperature on spore germination and vegetative cell growth of Clostridium botulinum.  

PubMed Central

Spore germination and vegetative growth of Clostridium botulinum type E strain VH at 2 to 50 degrees C were studied. At all of these temperatures, germination began immediately after the addition of the spores to the germination medium. Microscopic observations during germination revealed three types of spores: phase bright (ungerminated), phase variable (partially germinated), and phase dark (fully germinated). At all temperatures except 50 degrees C, there was a pronounced lag between the initial appearance of phase-variable spores and their eventual conversion to phase-dark spores. The number of partially germinated spores increased steadily, reaching 40 to 60% by 18 to 21 h of incubation. During this time, phase-dark, fully germinated spores developed slowly and did not exceed 28% in any of the samples. At 18 to 26 h of incubation, the rate of full germination increased abruptly four-fold. There was extensive and relatively rapid germination at 2 degrees C, the lowest temperature tested, yielding about 60% phase-variable spores by 18 h, which became phase-dark by 26 h of incubation. The optimum temperature for partial and full germination was consistently 9 degrees C. Germination at 50 degrees C was exceptionally rapid and was completed within 1 to 2 h, although 40% remained phase bright. Vegetative cells showed detectable growth at 6 to 41 degrees C, with a distinct optimum at 32.5 degrees C. No growth occurred at 50 degrees C, and only marginal growth was observed at 6 to 14 degrees C. The psychrophilic nature of the germination process coupled with the cold tolerance of vegetative growth appears to give C. botulinum type E an advantage in cold climates as well as in cold-stored foods.

Grecz, N; Arvay, L H

1982-01-01

67

QTL analysis of seed germination and pre-emergence growth at extreme temperatures in Medicago truncatula  

PubMed Central

Enhancing the knowledge on the genetic basis of germination and heterotrophic growth at extreme temperatures is of major importance for improving crop establishment. A quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was carried out at sub- and supra-optimal temperatures at these early stages in the model Legume Medicago truncatula. On the basis of an ecophysiological model framework, two populations of recombinant inbred lines were chosen for the contrasting behaviours of parental lines: LR5 at sub-optimal temperatures (5 or 10°C) and LR4 at a supra-optimal temperature (20°C). Seed masses were measured in all lines. For LR5, germination rates and hypocotyl growth were measured by hand, whereas for LR4, imbibition and germination rates as well as early embryonic axis growth were measured using an automated image capture and analysis device. QTLs were found for all traits. The phenotyping framework we defined for measuring variables, distinguished stages and enabled identification of distinct QTLs for seed mass (chromosomes 1, 5, 7 and 8), imbibition (chromosome 4), germination (chromosomes 3, 5, 7 and 8) and heterotrophic growth (chromosomes 1, 2, 3 and 8). The three QTL identified for hypocotyl length at sub-optimal temperature explained the largest part of the phenotypic variation (60% together). One digenic interaction was found for hypocotyl width at sub-optimal temperature and the loci involved were linked to additive QTLs for hypocotyl elongation at low temperature. Together with working on a model plant, this approach facilitated the identification of genes specific to each stage that could provide reliable markers for assisting selection and improving crop establishment. With this aim in view, an initial set of putative candidate genes was identified in the light of the role of abscissic acid/gibberellin balance in regulating germination at high temperatures (e.g. ABI4, ABI5), the molecular cascade in response to cold stress (e.g. CBF1, ICE1) and hypotheses on changes in cell elongation (e.g. GASA1, AtEXPA11) with changes in temperatures based on studies at the whole plant scale.

Dias, Paula Menna Barreto; Brunel-Muguet, Sophie; Durr, Carolyne; Huguet, Thierry; Demilly, Didier; Wagner, Marie-Helene

2010-01-01

68

Plant Growth Regulators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

Nickell, Louis G.

1978-01-01

69

Germination characteristics of six plant species growing on the Hanford Site. [Disturbed land revegetation feasibility studies  

SciTech Connect

Six plant species (Siberian and thickspike wheatgrass, cheatgrass, sand dropseed, Indian ricegrass, and Russian thistle) found on the Hanford Site were studied as part of an investigation into the revegetation of disturbed areas. Germination response to three environmental parameters (soil moisture, soil temperature, and planting depth) were measured. Results indicated that when a polyethylene glycol solution was used to control the osmotic potential of the imbibition media, no significant decrease in germination rate occurred down to -3.0 bars. However, below -7.0 bars all species experienced a decrease in germination. When germinated in soil, all species except Russian thistle exhibited a significant decrease in germination rate at -0.3 bars. Russian thistle was the only species tested that exhibited germination at a soil temperature of 1/sup 0/C. All species gave optimum germination at temperatures between 10 and 15/sup 0/C. Thickspike wheatgrass was the only species tested which was able to germinate and emerge from a planting depth of greater than 2 inches. If supplemental moisture is provided, a shallow planting would be advisable for those species tested. If not overcome by pretreatment prior to planting, seed dormancy may be a significant factor which will reduce the germination potential of some species tested.

Cox, G.R.; Kirkham, R.R.; Cline, J.F.

1980-03-01

70

[Characteristics of Cannabis sativa L.: seed morphology, germination and growth characteristics, and distinction from Hibiscus cannabinus L].  

PubMed

Illegal cannabis (Cannabis sativa L.) cultivation is still a social problem worldwide. Fifty inquiries on cannabis that Research Center for Medicinal Plant Resources (Tsukuba Division) received between January 1, 2000 and March 31, 2009 were itemized in to 8 categories; 1: seed identification, 2: plant identification, 3: indoor cultivation, 4: outdoor cultivation, 5: germination and growth characteristics, 6: expected amount of cannabis products derived from illegal cannabis plant, 7: non-narcotic cannabis and 8: usage of medicinal cannabis. Top three inquiries were 1: seed identification (16 cases), 3: indoor cultivation (10 cases) and 4: outdoor cultivation (6 cases). Characteristics of cannabis, namely seed morphology, germination and growth characteristics, and distinction from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) that is frequently misjudged as cannabis, were studied to contribute for prevention of illegal cannabis cultivation. PMID:20118648

Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Kitazawa, Takashi; Kawano, Noriaki; Iida, Osamu; Kawahara, Nobuo

2010-02-01

71

On the localisation and transport of ?-amylase during germination and early seedling growth of Hordeum vulgare  

Microsoft Academic Search

A procedure for the isolation of a germination-specific ?-amylase isoenzyme from Hordeum vulgare (cv. Nordal) is described.\\u000a The pure ?-amylase isoenzyme was used to obtain a monospecific anti-?-amylase antibody. The antibody was subsequently used\\u000a to localise ?-amylase in sections of germinating barley seeds (cv. Nordal). Immunohistochemical determination of the pattern\\u000a of enzyme movement during germination and early seedling growth revealed

Gregory C. Gibbons

1979-01-01

72

Factors and mechanisms influencing seed germination in a wetland plant sawgrass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) is the predominant plant and vegetation community in the Florida Everglades. Germination of sawgrass seeds in the laboratory\\u000a or nursery has been difficult and problematic, yet little is known about the physiological mechanistic regulation of the sawgrass\\u000a seed germination process. In the present study, we examined the factors and mechanisms that influence sawgrass seed germination.\\u000a We found

James Webb; ShiLi Miao; Xing-Hai Zhang

2009-01-01

73

Effect of electroplating factory effluent on the germination and growth of hyacinth bean and mustard. [Dolichos lablab; Brassica compestris  

SciTech Connect

The effect of electroplating factory effluent in different concentrations (viz., 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 4.0%) on the germination and growth of hyacinth beans (Dolichos lablab) and mustard seeds (Brassica compestris) was studied. The germination of seeds was delayed with the increase of effluent concentration and the germination of mustard seeds was totally inhibited at 1.5% effluent concentration while hyacinth bean seeds tolerated the effluent up to 2.5% concentration. The metal content in the hyacinth bean plants increased with increasing effluent concentration but after 1.0% effluent concentration, the concentration of all the metals (Ca, Mg, Na, K, Cu, Zn, Fe) decreased in the plants except Cr, which increased throughout. Percentage germination, fresh weight, dry weight, root length, and shoot length of the plants were also analyzed. Cd, Ni, Co, Mn, and Pb were not detectable in the hyacinth bean plants.

Ajmal, M.; Khan, A.U.

1985-12-01

74

Interactive effects of GAs, CKs and growth retardants on the germination of celery seeds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The germination of whole seeds of celery (Apium graveolens L.) was inhibited by paclobutrazol, ancymidol and lower concentrations of uniconazole. The growth retardants daminozide, AMO 1618 and chlormequat chloride inhibited the germination of cut seeds only, indicating that the seed coat prevents the penetration of these compounds at the examined concentrations. Application of a mixture of the gibberellins A4 and

E. Pressman; R. Shaked

1991-01-01

75

Does Germination Success Differ with Respect to Seed Mass and Germination Season? Experimental Testing of Plant Functional Trait Responses to Grassland Management  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Plant functional trait responses to processes such as grassland management have been analysed frequently; however, the scaling-up from individual traits to the outcomes of vegetation dynamics has seldom been tested. In this experiment, germination success was studied with respect to the relationships between grassland management (mowing and grazing), as well as abandonment, and two traits that are relevant for seedling recruitment: seed mass and germination season. On the basis of discussions in the literature and indirect trait analyses in our previous studies, the following hypotheses are proposed: (1) with respect to seed mass, mowing and grazing favour the germination of small seeds, whereas after abandonment the germination success of larger seeds is higher; and (2) with respect to germination season, mowing and grazing favour autumn-germinating seeds, whereas succession promotes spring-germinating seeds. Methods The germination experiment took place in a semi-natural, dry grassland in north-east Germany. Seeds of eight herbaceous species that differ with respect to seed mass and germination season were sown in mown, grazed and abandoned plots. Germination success was documented during the following year. Key Results and Conclusions Contrary to the hypothesis, germination of small seeds was not promoted by mowing or grazing and they germinated relatively more often than expected in the abandoned plots. A relationship between abandonment and gaps of bare soil below the vegetation cover that favour germination of small seeds was likely, but could not be proved statistically. It is possible that the small seeds suffered less from predation. Mowing favoured autumn germination, which could be explained by the removal of biomass in late summer. Contrary to our expectation, there was relatively more spring germination after grazing than after mowing, yet vegetation height was smallest in spring. Generally, germination season was found to be related to the temporal occurrence of favourable light conditions.

Kahmen, S.; Poschlod, P.

2008-01-01

76

Intersection of two signalling pathways: extracellular nucleotides regulate pollen germination and pollen tube growth via nitric oxide  

PubMed Central

Plant and animal cells release or secrete ATP by various mechanisms, and this activity allows extracellular ATP to serve as a signalling molecule. Recent reports suggest that extracellular ATP induces plant responses ranging from increased cytosolic calcium to changes in auxin transport, xenobiotic resistance, pollen germination, and growth. Although calcium has been identified as a secondary messenger for the extracellular ATP signal, other parts of this signal transduction chain remain unknown. Increasing the extracellular concentration of ATP?S, a poorly-hydrolysable ATP analogue, inhibited both pollen germination and pollen tube elongation, while the addition of AMPS had no effect. Because pollen tube elongation is also sensitive to nitric oxide, this raised the possibility that a connection exists between the two pathways. Four approaches were used to test whether the germination and growth effects of extracellular ATP?S were transduced via nitric oxide. The results showed that increases in extracellular ATP?S induced increases in cellular nitric oxide, chemical agonists of the nitric oxide signalling pathway lowered the threshold of extracellular ATP?S that inhibits pollen germination, an antagonist of guanylate cyclase, which can inhibit some nitric oxide signalling pathways, blocked the ATP?S-induced inhibition of both pollen germination and pollen tube elongation, and the effects of applied ATP?S were blocked in nia1nia2 mutants, which have diminished NO production. The concurrence of these four data sets support the conclusion that the suppression of pollen germination and pollen tube elongation by extracellular nucleotides is mediated in part via the nitric oxide signalling pathway.

Reichler, Stuart A.; Torres, Jonathan; Rivera, Amy L.; Cintolesi, Viviana A.; Clark, Greg; Roux, Stanley J.

2009-01-01

77

[Characteristics of seed germination of rare plant species Reaumuria trigyna in west Ordos].  

PubMed

Reaumuria trigyna is a relic species in the desert shrubbery vegetation in arid regions of northwestern China, and plays an important role in the maintenance of the stability of desert vegetation. In this paper, the seed traits and germination strategy of R. trigyna under different environmental conditions, e.g., light, temperature, soil moisture, and sand bury, were investigated. The results showed that R. trigyna seed had high vigor and high germination rate, and endured reserve. The seed could germinate either in light or in darkness, and the optimal temperature for germination was 20 degrees C - 25 degrees C or 15 degrees C/25 degrees C, with the germination rate being 93%. The seed could start to germinate when soil moisture content was 2%, and the germination rate was the highest (89%) when the moisture content was 12%. The optimal sand burial depth of R. trigyna seed was 1 cm, and no seed would germinate when the sand burial depth was >5 cm. Sand burial depth had significant effects on the seedling's emergence percentage and growth height, but lesser effects on seedling' s mass. Soil moisture and sand burial depth were the main environmental factors limiting the seed germination and seedling emergence of R. trigyna. The high seed germination rate of R. trigyna enhanced the survival risk of its seedlings, which was unfavorable to its handling with the extreme changes of desert environment. Such a character of R. trigyna seed was one of the factors causing the species endangered. PMID:19288705

Zhang, Ying-juan; Wang, Yu-shan; Li, Qing-feng

2008-12-01

78

Influences of vermicomposts, produced by earthworms and microorganisms from cattle manure, food waste and paper waste, on the germination, growth and flowering of petunias in the greenhouse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vermicomposts have been shown to promote the germination, growth, and yields of plants. This paper aims to demonstrate the effects of vermicomposts produced from three types of wastes on growth and flowering of petunias which are an important U.S. flowering crop.Vermicomposts, produced commercially from cattle manure, food wastes and paper wastes, were substituted at a range of different concentrations into

Norman Q. Arancon; Clive A. Edwards; Andrei Babenko; John Cannon; Paola Galvis; James D. Metzger

2008-01-01

79

Effect of silver nanoparticles on rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105) seed germination and seedling growth.  

PubMed

With the advances in nanotechnology, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been applied in many industries, increasing their potential exposure level in the environment, yet their environmental safety remains poorly evaluated. The possible effects of different sized AgNPs (20, 30-60, 70-120 and 150nm diameter) on jasmine rice, Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105, were investigated at different concentrations (0.1, 1, 10, 100 and 1000mg/L) upon seed germination and seedling growth. The results revealed that the level of seed germination and subsequent growth of those seedlings that germinated were both decreased with increasing sizes and concentrations of AgNPs. Based on the analysis of AgNPs accumulation in plant tissues, it implied that the higher uptake was found when the seeds were treated with the smaller AgNPs, 20nm diameter AgNPs, but it was trapped in the roots rather than transported to the leaves. These resulted in the less negative effects on seedling growth, when compared to the seed soaking with the larger AgNPs with 150nm diameter. The negative effects of AgNPs were supported by leaf cell deformation when rice seeds were treated with 150-nm-diameter AgNP at the concentration of 10 or 100mg/L during seed germination. These results further strengthen our understanding of environmental safety information with respect to nanomaterials. PMID:24726943

Thuesombat, Pakvirun; Hannongbua, Supot; Akasit, Sanong; Chadchawan, Supachitra

2014-06-01

80

Plant-Growth Inhibitory Activity of Cedrelanolide from Cedrela salvadorensis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of cedrelanolide, the most abundant limonoid isolated from Cedrela salvadorensis (Meliaceae), was assayed as a plant-growth inhibitory compound against monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous seeds. This compound inhibited germination, seed respiration, and seedling dry weights of some plant species (Lolium multiflorum, var. Hercules, Triticum vulgare, var. Salamanca, Physalis ixocarpa, and Trifolium alexandrinum). Our results indicate that cedrelanolide interferes with monocot

Carlos L. Céspedes; José S. Calderón; Juan R. Salazar; Blas Lotina-Hennsen; Rosabel Segura

2001-01-01

81

Effects of Orocol TL (a Corrosion Inhibitor) on Germination and Growth of Bush Beans.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As part of a continuing series of studies conducted to determine the environmental effects of hexavalent chromium from cooling tower drift on biological systems, the potential for germination and growth effects in bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Bus...

P. D. Parr

1982-01-01

82

Phytotoxic Potential of Gambel Oak on Ponderosa Pine Seed Germination and Initial Growth.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water soluble leachates from Gambel Oak leaves reduces speed of germination and initial radical growth of ponderosa pine seeds in laboratory and greenhouse experiments. The combined effects of Gambel oak competition and allelopathy are implicated as contr...

M. G. Harrington

1987-01-01

83

Root exudates of mycorrhizal tomato plants exhibit a different effect on microconidia germination of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici than root exudates from non-mycorrhizal tomato plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of root exudates from mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal tomato plants on microconidia germination of the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici was tested. Microconidia germination was enhanced in the presence of root exudates from mycorrhizal tomato plants. The more tomato plants were colonized by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae, the more microconidia germination was increased, indicating that

S. Scheffknecht; R. Mammerler; S. Steinkellner; H. Vierheilig

2006-01-01

84

Seed germination and seedling growth in the arrow bamboo Fargesia qinlingensis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Improving natural regeneration of bamboos after they die following mass flowering is critical for conservation of giant pandas.\\u000a However, little is known about factors that affect seed germination and seedling growth of bamboos. We studied seed germination\\u000a and seedling growth in Fargesia qinlingensis, which mass flowered in a giant panda habitat in the Qinling Mountains of China in early 2000,

Wei Wang; Scott B. Franklin; Margaret C. Cirtain

2007-01-01

85

Toxic effects of heavy metals (Cd, Cr and Pb) on seed germination and growth and DPPH-scavenging activity in Brassica rapa var. turnip.  

PubMed

Toxicity of heavy metal is a wide spread environmental problem affecting all life forms including plants. In the present study the toxic effects of heavy metals, cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) on seed germination rate (%), germination index (G-index) and growth (mm) of Brassica rapa var. turnip have been investigated. The seeds were soaked either in distilled water (control) or in aqueous solutions of Cd, Cr and Pb (1 g/l, 2.5 g/l and 5 g/l) at 4°C in dark for 24 hours. Prior to inoculation onto MS0 medium, the soaked seeds were either washed with sterile distilled water or inoculated without washing on solidified MS0 medium at 25 ± 2°C with 16/8-hour photoperiod in a growth chamber to germinate in vitro. Such stress conditions revealed that by increasing the concentration of heavy metals, the germination rate (%), G-index value and growth (mm) decreased significantly, suggesting their toxic effect on B. rapa var. turnip. This study further revealed that experiment with seed washing resulted in less toxicity of selected heavy metals on germination and growth of B. rapa var. turnip, as compared to experiment without washing. However, the resulting toxicity order of the selected heavy metals remained the same (Cd > Cr > Pb). Significant decrease has been observed in seed viability and germination potential and finally heavy metals completely ceased further growth and development of plants. The 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-scavenging activity revealed that significantly higher activity was observed in control plants without heavy metals treatment. Furthermore, the Cd-treated plants showed decreased antioxidant activity. Cr and Pb were less toxic as compared to Cd (control > Pb > Cr > Cd). This study revealed that selected heavy metals not only affected plant development but also disturbed plant metabolic pathways. PMID:22872632

Siddiqui, Maryam Mehmood; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Ahmad, Nisar; Ali, Mohammad; Mahmood, Tariq

2014-04-01

86

Bet hedging in desert winter annual plants: optimal germination strategies in a variable environment.  

PubMed

In bet hedging, organisms sacrifice short-term success to reduce the long-term variance in success. Delayed germination is the classic example of bet hedging, in which a fraction of seeds remain dormant as a hedge against the risk of complete reproductive failure. Here, we investigate the adaptive nature of delayed germination as a bet hedging strategy using long-term demographic data on Sonoran Desert winter annual plants. Using stochastic population models, we estimate fitness as a function of delayed germination and identify evolutionarily stable strategies for 12 abundant species in the community. Results indicate that delayed germination meets the criteria as a bet hedging strategy for all species. Density-dependent models, but not density-independent ones, predicted optimal germination strategies that correspond remarkably well with observed patterns. By incorporating naturally occurring variation in seed and seedling dynamics, our results present a rigorous test of bet hedging theory within the relevant environmental context. PMID:24393387

Gremer, Jennifer R; Venable, D Lawrence

2014-03-01

87

The effects of a triazole fungicide, propiconazole, on pollen germination, tube growth and cytoskeletal distribution in Tradescantia virginiana  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of propiconazole on germination and tube growth of Tradescantia virginiana pollen when incorporated in germination media at 0, 102, 136, or 170 l l–1 were evaluated using light microscopy and immunocytochemistry. Propiconazole inhibited pollen germination, cytoplasmic streaming, and tube elongation. Treatments also induced abnormal tube morphology and cytoskeletal distribution. Tubes treated with propiconazole displayed weaker microfilament (Mf) signals

Yi He; Hazel Y. Wetzstein; Barry A. Palevitz

1995-01-01

88

Pollen Germination and Tube Growth in the Snow Buttercup, Ranunculus adoneus  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Pollen germination and tube growth in the snow buttercup, Ranunculus adoneus, photographed under fluorescence microscopy. Snow buttercup flowers exhibit heliotropism, the capacity to track the sun's rays over the course of the day. The adaptive significance of solar tracking in snow buttercups is mediated through the impact of flower heliotropism on paternal and maternal floral environments. In controlled crosses, pollen from solar-tracking flowers has higher germination success than pollen from experimentally restrained flowers. Solar tracking in recipient flowers also enhances pollen germination and increases pollen tube to ovule ratios.

Candace Galen (University of Missouri;Division of Biological Sciences ADR;POSTAL)

2004-03-09

89

Genetic mapping within the wheat D genome reveals QTL for germination, seed vigour and longevity, and early seedling growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling germination, seed vigour and longevity, and early seedling growth were identified\\u000a using a set of common wheat lines carrying known D genome introgression segments. Seed germination (capacity, timing, rate\\u000a and synchronicity) was characterized by a standard germination test, based either on the 1 mm root protrusion (germination\\u000a sensu stricto) or the development of normal seedlings. To

S. Landjeva; U. Lohwasser; A. Börner

2010-01-01

90

Synergistic inhibitory effects of p -coumaric and ferulic acids on germination and growth of grain sorghum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The data support the hypothesis that there is a synergistic phytotoxic effect whenp-coumaric and ferulic acids are found together. Equimolar mixtures of both acids showed greater reduction in sorghum seed germination, shoot elongation, and total seedling growth than either phytotoxin caused when alone. Repeated experiments showed mixtures containing 5×10-3 Mp-coumaric and 5×10-3 M ferulic acids reduced germination to 34% of

James A. Rasmussen; Frank A. Einhellig

1977-01-01

91

Butenolide from plant-derived smoke functions as a strigolactone analogue: Evidence from parasitic weed seed germination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main germination active compound in smoke, 3-methyl-2H-furo[2,3-c]pyran-2-one (butenolide), has structural similarities with strigolactones that function as germination stimulants for root parasitic plants such as Orobanche spp. and Striga spp. (Scrophulariaceae). Consequently, we tested whether butenolide also functions as a germination stimulant for parasitic weeds. Butenolide stimulated germination of both Orobanche minor and Striga hermonthica to similar levels as the

M. I. Daws; H. W. Pritchard; J. Van Staden

2008-01-01

92

Characterization of Roundup Ready Flex Cotton, 'MON 88913', for Use in Ecological Risk Assessment: Evaluation of Seed Germination, Vegetative and Reproductive Growth, and Ecological Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biological and ecological data collected on a genetically modified crop and an appropriate control are useful for assessing potential ecological risk. Specific characteristics studied are selected on the basis of relevance to potential ecological effects, are well known, and are accepted by plant breeders. In these studies, germination, veg- etative and reproductive growth, or ecological characteristics of Roundup Ready Flex

Michael J. Horak; Eric W. Rosenbaum; Carrie L. Woodrum; Amy B. Martens; Ramon F. Mery; J. Tom Cothren; J. Austin Burns; Thomas E. Nickson; Todd A. Pester; Changjian Jiang; Jesse L. Hart; Bernard Sammons

2007-01-01

93

The influence of microbial associations on germination of wheat seeds and on the growth of seedlings under impact of Zink salts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The life support systems LSS for long-term missions are to use cycling-recycling systems including biological recycling Higher plants are the traditional regenerator of air and producer of food They should be used in many successive generations of their reproduction in LSS Development and studies of influence of microbial associations on germination of wheat seeds and on growth of seedlings under impact of heavy metals has good prospects and necessity because of migration of heavy metals in LSS Microbial associations are able to stimulate plants growth to protect them from pathogenic organisms and from toxicity of heavy metals salts The goal of this work was to investigate microbial associations action on the germination of wheat seeds and on the growth of seedlings under impact of different concentrations of ZnSO 4 The results of investigations showed 1 Zink salt had negative action on germination of wheat seeds beginning with concentrations - 8 MPC Maximum Permissible Concentration and higher 2 Microbial associations concentrations -10 4 -- 10 6 cells ml were able to decrease partly or completely the negative action of ZnSO 4 on germination of wheat seeds 3 Concentrations 10 4 -- 10 5 cells ml of microbial associations were able to decrease the negative action of Zink salts intervals from 2 to 32 MPA on the growth and development of wheat plantlets during heterotrophic phase 4 Root system of plants was more sensible to the negative action of ZnSO 4 than shoots of plants

Somova, L. A.; Pechurkin, N. S.; Mikheeva, G. A.

94

The role of avian frugivores in germination of seeds of fleshy-fruited invasive alien plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many highly invasive plant species have fleshy fruits which are eaten by native frugivorous animals. These frugivores play\\u000a an important role in long-distance seed dispersal, and may also affect germination success. The aim of this study was to determine\\u000a whether generalist frugivores enhance or decrease seed germination of invasive alien species through pulp removal or seed\\u000a coat abrasion, besides serving

Lorinda A. Jordaan; Steven D. Johnson; Colleen T. Downs

2011-01-01

95

The effects of triclosan on spore germination and hyphal growth of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices.  

PubMed

The effect of triclosan (5-chloro-2-[2,4-dichlorophenoxy]phenol; TCS), on spore germination, hyphal growth, and hyphal branching of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Glomus intraradices spores was evaluated at exposure concentrations of 0.4 and 4.0 ?g/L in a static renewal exposure system. To determine if potential effects were mycotoxic or a consequence of impaired signaling between a host plant and the fungal symbiont, spores were incubated with and without the addition of a root exudate. Exposed spores were harvested at days 7, 14, and 21. AM spore germination, hyphal growth, and hyphal branching were significantly lower in both TCS concentrations compared to controls in non-root exudate treatments suggesting direct mycotoxic effects of TCS on AM development. Greater hyphal growth and hyphal branching in controls and 0.4?g/L TCS treatments with root exudate compared to non-root exudate treatments demonstrated growth stimulation by signaling chemicals present in the root exudate. This stimulatory effect was absent in the 4.0 ?g/L TCS treatments indicating a direct effect on plant signaling compounds or plant signal response. PMID:23538136

Twanabasu, Bishnu R; Stevens, Kevin J; Venables, Barney J

2013-06-01

96

Analysis of directional root growth patterns from corn and soybean seeds germinated in space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The JOSE (JASON Outreach Seed Experiment) payload was the first plant experiment conducted on the International Space Station (ISS). It consisted of having an on-orbit watering of eight transparent seed pouches each of which contained 6 individual seeds of either soybean (Glycine max cv McCall) or corn ( Zea mays ). The seeds were glued to a germination paper substrate using a 1.2% guar glue solution. The payload was launched on the Orbiter Endeavour (STS-97; ISS Flight 4A) on 11/30/00 and transferred to the ISS on 12/8/00. The eight seed pouches were each watered with 12 mL of distilled water on 1/5/01. Two pouches containing corn plus two pouches containing soybean seeds were maintained in the light after watering. Two additional seed pouches of each species were maintained in the dark after watering. Digital photography was used to document the growth of the germinating seedlings in space. The images were down-linked to a world wide web site for dissemination to students. "Within" species differences (between the light and dark grown seedlings) as well as "between" species differences (comparing corn and soybean) were observed. By day 4 (post-imbibition) there was a clear phototropic effect in the light-grown corn seedlings, each, possessing a green shoot which grew upward towards the light source. In contrast, the dark-grown corn shoots were neither green (since chlorophyll synthesis had not been induced by light) nor were they growing in a uniform direction. For day 4 soybean seedlings, the only difference evident between those germinated under the light vs dark conditions was a slight greening up of the seeds maintained in the presence of light. For both the corn and soybean seedlings, roots grew in a random fashion, with some moving in an upward direction and others progressing downward, reflecting the lack of a gravitropic response which is the primary (earth-based) mechanism controlling the direction of root growth. By day 7 the initial 12 mL of water added to each pouch was greatly diminished, although noticeably less so in the soybean pouches. This was presumably due to the faster and overall greater growth exhibited by the corn seedlings, which resulted in a more rapid utilization of the available water. There was also a more pronounced greening-up of the light-exposed soybean seedlings than was evident at day 4, with both the cotylendons and hypocotyl regions showing signs of chlorophyll synthesis. This work was supported under NASA Contract NAS10-002001.

Levine, H.; Tynes, G.; Norwood, K.

97

Germination behaviour of seeds from herbicide treated plants of Chenopodium album L.  

PubMed

The carry-over effect of sub-lethal herbicides was investigated on the germination of seeds collected from surviving Chenopodium album plants, which had received 1/8, 1/8 twice, 1/8 three times, 1/4, 1/2, 1/1 doses of either pre-emergence ioxynil or post-emergence bentazone in a previous onion (Allium cepa) crop. Seeds were also collected from surviving C. album plants, which had received 1/4, 1/2, 1/1 of either pre-emergence pendimethalin, propachlor and linuron, or 1/8, 1/8 twice, 1/8 three times, 1/4, 1/2, 1/1 of post-emergence ioxynil or linuron in a previous leek (Allium porrum) crop. Seeds of surviving plants were collected and tested for germination at temperature of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 degrees C. The effect of different temperatures on the total number of germinated seeds was significant. Germination was minimum at low temperatures (5 degrees C or 10 degrees C). Herbicides did not show any effect on germination of C. album and resulted in the same final germination percentage as seeds collected from the unsprayed control plots. PMID:19893909

Tanveer, Asif; Nadeem, Muhammad A; Ali, Asghar; Tahir, Muhammad; Zamir, Muhammad S I

2009-12-01

98

Germination and growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) at low atmospheric pressure  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The response of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Waldmann's Green) to low atmospheric pressure was examined during the initial 5 days of germination and emergence, and also during subsequent growth to vegetative maturity at 30 days. Growth took place inside a 66-l-volume low pressure chamber maintained at 70 kPa, and plant response was compared to that of plants in a second, matching chamber that was at ambient pressure (approximately 101 kPa) as a control. In other experiments, to determine short-term effects of low pressure transients, plants were grown at ambient pressure until maturity and then subjected to alternating periods of 24 h of low and ambient atmospheric pressures. In all treatments the partial pressure of O2 was maintained at 21 kPa (approximately the partial pressure in air at normal pressure), and the partial pressure of CO2 was in the range 66.5-73.5 Pa (about twice that in normal air) in both chambers, with the addition of CO2 during the light phase. With continuous exposure to low pressure, shoot and root growth was at least as rapid as at ambient pressure, with an overall trend towards slightly greater performance at the lower pressure. Dark respiration rates were greater at low pressure. Transient periods at low pressure decreased transpiration and increased dark respiration but only during the period of exposure to low pressure. We conclude that long-term or short-term exposure to subambient pressure (70 kPa) was without detectable detriment to vegetative growth and development.

Spanarkel, Robert; Drew, Malcolm C.

2002-01-01

99

THE EFFECT OF SOWING BRUCHID DAMAGED BEAN (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) SEEDS ON GERMINATION, PLANT DEVELOPMENT AND YIELD  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study to investigate the effect of sowing bruchid-damaged bean seeds on germination, plant development and grain yield was conducted at Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA) in Morogoro between November 1999 and April 2000. Undamaged seed and seeds damaged by bruchids with one to four holes were planted in plastic pots and placed in the glasshouse. Germination, plant development, and

M. S. Chipungahelo; R. N. Misangu; S. O. W. M. Reuben

100

Method for Promoting Plant Growth.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This invention relates to a method of promoting plant growth and more particularly to the use of certain synthetic brassinosteroids to promote plant cell elongation and cell division and thereby increase the vegetative growth of plants.

W. J. Meudt M. J. Thompson N. Mandava J. F. Worley

1980-01-01

101

Germination, growth rates, and electron microscope analysis of tomato seeds flown on the LDEF  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The tomato seeds were flown in orbit aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for nearly six years. During this time, the tomato seeds received an abundant exposure to cosmic radiation and solar wind. Upon the return of the LDEF to earth, the seeds were distributed throughout the United States and 30 foreign countries for analysis. The purpose of the experiment was to determine the long term effect of cosmic rays on living tissue. Our university analysis included germination and growth rates as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray analysis of the control as well as Space-exposed tomato seeds. In analyzing the seeds under the Electron Microscope, usual observations were performed on the nutritional and epidermis layer of the seed. These layers appeared to be more porous in the Space-exposed seeds than on the Earth-based control seeds. This unusual characteristic may explain the increases in the space seeds growth pattern. (Several test results show that the Space-exposed seeds germinate sooner than the Earth-Based seeds. Also, the Space-exposed seeds grew at a faster rate). The porous nutritional region may allow the seeds to receive necessary nutrients and liquids more readily, thus enabling the plant to grow at a faster rate. Roots, leaves and stems were cut into small sections and mounted. After sputter coating the specimens with Argon/Gold Palladium Plasma, they were ready to be viewed under the Electron Microscope. Many micrographs were taken. The X-ray analysis displayed possible identifications of calcium, potassium, chlorine, copper, aluminum, silicon, phosphate, carbon, and sometimes sulfur and iron. The highest concentrations were shown in potassium and calcium. The Space-exposed specimens displayed a high concentration of copper and calcium in the two specimens. There was a significantly high concentration of copper in the Earth-based specimens, whereas there was no copper in the Space-exposed specimens.

Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Bridgers, Kevin; Brown, Cecelia Wright

1995-01-01

102

Plant hormone interactions during seed dormancy release and germination  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review focuses mainly on eudicot seeds, and on the interactions between abscisic acid (ABA), gibber- ellins (GA), ethylene, brassinosteroids (BR), auxin and cytokinins in regulating the interconnected molecular processes that control dormancy release and germi- nation. Signal transduction pathways, mediated by environmental and hormonal signals, regulate gene expression in seeds. Seed dormancy release and germination of species with coat

Birgit Kucera; Marc Alan Cohn; Gerhard Leubner-Metzger

2005-01-01

103

Germination of Plasmodiophora brassicae resting spores stimulated by a non-host plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant-induced germination of Plasmodiophora brassicae resting spores was studied in a laboratory experiment. Spore reaction was analysed in nutrient solution with exudates from\\u000a growing roots of different plant species – one host plant (Brassica rapa var. pekinensis) and four non-host plants (Lolium perenne, Allium porrum, Secale cereale and Trifolium pratense) – and in controls with distilled water and nutrient solution.

Hanna Friberg; Jan Lagerlöf; Birgitta Rämert

2005-01-01

104

Germination and root elongation bioassays in six different plant species for testing Ni contamination in soil.  

PubMed

In vitro short-term chronic phytotoxicity germination and root elongation test were applied to test the effects of nickel (Ni) in seed germination and root elongation in six plants species: Cucumis sativus (Cucurbitaceae), Lepidium sativum and Brassica nigra (Brassicaceae), Trifolium alexandrinum and Medicago sativa (Fabaceae), Phacelia tanacetifolia (Boraginaceae). A naturally Ni rich soil was used to compare the results obtained. Unlike root elongation, germination was not affected by Ni in any of the six species tested. EC50 values, calculated on the root elongation, showed that Ni toxicity decreases in the following order: P. tanacetifolia > B. nigra > C. sativus > L. sativum > M. sativa > T. alexandrinum. The test conducted using soil elutriate revealed a significantly lower effect in both seed germination and root elongation when compared to the results obtained using untreated soil. Conversely, the test performed on soil confirmed the high sensitivity of C. sativus, P. tanacetifolia and L. sativum to Ni. PMID:24288040

Visioli, Giovanna; Conti, Federica D; Gardi, Ciro; Menta, Cristina

2014-04-01

105

Influence of pulsed magnetic field on soybean (Glycine max L.) seed germination, seedling growth and soil microbial population.  

PubMed

The effects of pulsed magnetic field (PMF) treatment of soybean (Glycine max L. cv CO3) seeds were investigated on rate of seed germination, seedling growth, physico-chemical properties of seed leachates and soil microbial population under laboratory conditions. Seeds were exposed to PMF of 1500 nT at 0.1, 1.0 10.0 and 100.0 Hz for 5 h per day for 20 days, induced by enclosure coil systems. Non-treated seeds were considered as controls. All PMF treatments significantly increased the rate of seed germination, while 10 and 100 Hz PMFs showed the most effective response. The 1.0 and 10 Hz PMFs remarkably improved the fresh weight of shoots and roots, leaf area and plant height from seedlings from magnetically-exposed seeds compared to the control, while 10 Hz PMF increased the total soluble sugar, total protein and phenol contents. The leaf chlorophyll a, b and total chlorophyll were higher in PMF (10 and 100 Hz) pretreated plants, as compared to other treatments. In addition, activities of alpha-amylase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, nitrate reductase, peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase were increased, while beta-amylase and protease activities were declined in PMF (10 Hz)-exposed soybean plants. Similarly, the capacity of absorbance of water by seeds and electrical conductivity of seed leachates were significantly enhanced by 10 Hz PMF exposure, whereas PMF (10 Hz) pretreated plants did not affect the microbial population in rhizosphere soil. The results suggested the potential of 10 Hz PMF treatment to enhance the germination and seedling growth of soybean. PMID:24772951

Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Kumari, Bollipo Dyana Ranjitha

2013-08-01

106

Effect of some light rare earth elements on seed germination, seedling growth and antioxidant metabolism in Triticum durum.  

PubMed

Rare earth elements (REEs) enriched fertilizers have been commonly used in China since the 1980s, thus inducing a growing concern about their environmental impact in agriculture. In this work, the effect of some light REEs nitrate mixture and La(3+) nitrate on seed germination, seedling growth and antioxidant metabolism in Triticum durum was investigated with the aim of clarifying the potential benefits or damages of REEs on plants. Seed pre-soaking for 8 h with La(3+) and REEs nitrate inhibited seed germination at low concentrations (0.01 mM and 0.1 mM), while pre-soaking for 2 and 4 h already inhibited seed germination when higher concentrations (1 mM and 10 mM) of La(3+) and REEs nitrate were used. La(3+) and REEs nitrate treatment also affected seedling growth. Root growth was enhanced and inhibited at low and high concentrations, respectively. Shoot growth was inhibited by La(3+) and REEs nitrate at all tested concentrations after 12 d of treatments. Enzymatic and non enzymatic antioxidants were differently affected by La(3+) and REEs nitrate and their behaviour changed also depending on the plant organ. In roots La(3+) and REEs nitrate treatments induced an increase in ascorbate (ASC) and glutathione (GSH) contents. In shoots only La(3+) nitrate induced an increase in the ASC content whereas GSH decreased following both La(3+) and REEs nitrate treatments. An increase in ASC peroxidase activity was observed in shoots and roots, while catalase did not change in roots and slightly decreased in shoots. The possible role of the increase in some antioxidants as indicators of stress caused by lanthanide treatments is discussed. PMID:19215958

d'Aquino, Luigi; de Pinto, Maria Concetta; Nardi, Luca; Morgana, Massimo; Tommasi, Franca

2009-05-01

107

Studies on the effects of chromium stress on the germination and growth of Phaseolus mungo: influence of chromium resistant Pseudomonad  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effects of chromium resistant strains of Pseudomonad, Scr 1 and Scr 2 on the germination of seeds and growth of the common blackgram Phaseolus mungo growing under chromium stress have been evaluated. Scr 1 and Scr 2 were isolated from chromium rich wastewaters and rhizosphere of Euphorbia hirta, employing standard methods. Rate of germination and growth of P. mungo exposed

M. Rajkumar; R. Nagendran

2000-01-01

108

Leucanthemum vulgare lam. germination, growth and mycorrhizal symbiosis under crude oil contamination.  

PubMed

Oil contamination of soil limits plants' access to water and nutrients. Leucanthemum vulgare colonized by mycorrhizae could provide an effective tool in remedying oil contamination. Seeds of L. vulgare were planted in pots containing soil mixed with petroleum at 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10% w/w and propagules of mycorrhizal fungi. Plants were grown under ambient conditions for 16 weeks. Seed germination data were collected weekly for three weeks. Mycorrhizal percentage, spore counts, length and weight of roots and shoots were determined after harvesting. Results showed significant differences in seed germination rates between oil-treated, mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants. The overall germination rate was greater at 7.5% w/w crude oil contamination (p = 0.05) in mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal pots with significant differences between their respective Root:Shoot ratios (both length and weight). Results of this research showed L. vulgare could be germinated and grown in crude oil contaminated soils and could be used to augment plant establishment as part of phytoremediation practices. PMID:24933896

Noori, Azam Sadat; Maivan, Hassan Zare; Alaie, Ebrahim

2014-01-01

109

Plant Growth Facility (PGF)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a microgravity environment aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia Life and Microgravity Mission STS-78, compression wood formation and hence altered lignin deposition and cell wall structure, was induced upon mechanically bending the stems of the woody gymnosperms, Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda). Although there was significant degradation of many of the plant specimens in space-flight due to unusually high temperatures experienced during the mission, it seems evident that gravity had little or no effect on compression wood formation upon bending even in microgravity. Instead, it apparently results from alterations in the stress gradient experienced by the plant itself during bending under these conditions. This preliminary study now sets the stage for long-term plant growth experiments to determine whether compression wood formation can be induced in microgravity during phototropic-guided realignment of growing woody plant specimens, in the absence of any externally provided stress and strain.

1998-01-01

110

The Strigolactone Germination Stimulants of the Plant-Parasitic Striga and Orobanche spp. Are Derived from the Carotenoid Pathway1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The seeds of parasitic plants of the genera Striga and Orobanche will only germinate after induction by a chemical signal exuded from the roots of their host. Up to now, several of these germination stimulants have been isolated and identified in the root exudates of a series of host plants of both Orobanche and Striga spp. In most cases, the

Radoslava Matusova; Kumkum Rani; Francel W. A. Verstappen; Maurice C. R. Franssen

2005-01-01

111

The strigolactone germination stimulants of the plant-parasitic Striga and Orobanche spp. are derived from the carotenoid pathway  

Microsoft Academic Search

The seeds of parasitic plants of the genera Striga and Orobanche will only germinate after induction by a chemical signal exuded from the roots of their host. Up to now, several of these germination stimulants have been isolated and identified in the root exudates of a series of host plants of both Orobanche and Striga spp. In most cases, the

R. Matusova; K. Rani; F. W. A. Verstappen; M. C. R. Franssen; M. Beale; H. J. Bouwmeester

2005-01-01

112

Effect of Fungicides and Plant Extracts on the Conidial Germination of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Causing Mango Anthracnose.  

PubMed

In Northern Bangladesh, generally mango trees are planted as agroforest that gives higher Net Present Value (NPV) than traditional agriculture. Mango anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Penz. is seen as a very destructive and widely distributed disease, which results in poor market value. Five fungicides such as Cupravit, Bavistin, Dithane M-45, Thiovit and Redomil were tested against conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides. Dithane M-45 and Redomil were the most effective when the conidia were immersed for 10~20 minutes at 500~1000 ppm concentrations. Antifungal activities of 13 plant extracts were tested against conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides. Conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides was completely inhibited in Curcuma longa (leaf and rhizome), Tagetes erecta (leaf) and Zingiber officinales (rhizome) after 15 minutes of incubation respectively. PMID:24049501

Imtiaj, Ahmed; Rahman, Syed Ajijur; Alam, Shahidul; Parvin, Rehana; Farhana, Khandaker Mursheda; Kim, Sang-Beom; Lee, Tae-Soo

2005-12-01

113

Effect of Fungicides and Plant Extracts on the Conidial Germination of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Causing Mango Anthracnose  

PubMed Central

In Northern Bangladesh, generally mango trees are planted as agroforest that gives higher Net Present Value (NPV) than traditional agriculture. Mango anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Penz. is seen as a very destructive and widely distributed disease, which results in poor market value. Five fungicides such as Cupravit, Bavistin, Dithane M-45, Thiovit and Redomil were tested against conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides. Dithane M-45 and Redomil were the most effective when the conidia were immersed for 10~20 minutes at 500~1000 ppm concentrations. Antifungal activities of 13 plant extracts were tested against conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides. Conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides was completely inhibited in Curcuma longa (leaf and rhizome), Tagetes erecta (leaf) and Zingiber officinales (rhizome) after 15 minutes of incubation respectively.

Imtiaj, Ahmed; Rahman, Syed Ajijur; Alam, Shahidul; Parvin, Rehana; Farhana, Khandaker Mursheda; Kim, Sang-Beom

2005-01-01

114

Effects of radiation, especially ultraviolet B, on conidial germination and mycelial growth of grape powdery mildew  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conidia ofUncinula necator inoculated on vine leaf disks were exposed to different irradiation conditions during various combinations of irradiation periods. In controlled experiments at constant leaf temperature spore germination and mycelial growth were negatively affected by the UV B doses, irrespective of the exposition duration. In semi-controlled condition experiments, conidia were exposed to shaded, sunny and sunny without UV B

L. Willocquet; D. Colombet; M. Rougier; J. Fargues; M. Clerjeau

1996-01-01

115

Effects of Orocol TL (a corrosion inhibitor) on germination and growth of bush beans  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of a continuing series of studies conducted to determine the environmental effects of hexavalent chromium from cooling tower drift on biological systems, the potential for germination and growth effects in bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Bush Blue Lake) from hexavelent chromium in Orocol TL (a proprietary chromated, zinc-phosphate compound added to DOE cooling water systems for corrosion

Parr

1982-01-01

116

Comparative study of seed germination and growth of Kochia prostrata and Kochia scoparia (Chenopodiaceae) under salinity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soils of arid regions of Central Asia contain salts of different types that may differentially affect seed germination and plant development. We studied effect of NaCl, Na2SO4, 2NaCl + KCl + CaCl2 and 2Na2SO4+K2SO4+MgSO4 on germination of Kochia prostrata and Kochia scoparia seeds under a range of concentrations from 0.5 to 5% and at two constant temperature regimes +22 °C and +6 °C. The observed salt

N. S. Orlovsky; U. N. Japakova; I. Shulgina; S. Volis

2011-01-01

117

The Effects of Seed Mass on Germination, Seedling Emergence, and Early Seedling Growth of Eastern White Pine ( Pinus strobus L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Half-sib seed of several eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) families was used to examine seed mass effects on laboratory germination, and seedling emergence and growth under moderate\\u000a and low light (47 and 13% full sunlight) in a greenhouse. Percent germination and speed of germination under laboratory conditions\\u000a were not related to seed mass among half-sib families or multi-family seedlots

William C. Parker; Thomas L. Noland; Andrée E. Morneault

2006-01-01

118

Effect of electroplating factory effluent on the germination and growth of hyacinth bean and mustard. [Dolichos lablab; Brassica compestris  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of electroplating factory effluent in different concentrations (viz., 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 4.0%) on the germination and growth of hyacinth beans (Dolichos lablab) and mustard seeds (Brassica compestris) was studied. The germination of seeds was delayed with the increase of effluent concentration and the germination of mustard seeds was totally inhibited

M. Ajmal; A. U. Khan

1985-01-01

119

INCIPIENT GERMINATION IN HEAVY SUSPENSIONS OF SPORES OF BACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS AT SUBMINIMAL GROWTH TEMPERATURES  

PubMed Central

Curran, Harold R. (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.), and Michael J. Pallansch. Incipient germination in heavy suspensions of spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus at subminimal growth temperatures. J. Bacteriol. 86:911–918. 1963.—By use of spore (plate) counts and permeability to stain, labilization was followed periodically in heavy suspensions of washed Bacillus stearothermophilus 1518 spores incubated at different temperatures. Although vegetative proliferation did not occur below 38 C, incipient germination was rapid down to 20 C and much slower and incomplete at 14 C. Dilution of the suspension materially reduced the degree and rate of labilization. The degree of washing and use of deionized water had no appreciable influence upon early development of the spores. The results are discussed from the point of view of the possible origin and nature of the germination stimulant. Images

Curran, Harold R.; Pallansch, Michael J.

1963-01-01

120

Pump up the volume - a central role for the plasma membrane H(+) pump in pollen germination and tube growth.  

PubMed

The plasma membrane H(+) ATPase is a member of the P-ATPase family transporting H(+) from the cytosol to the extracellular space and thus energizing the plasma membrane for the uptake of ions and nutrients. As a housekeeping gene, this protein can be detected in almost every plant cell including the exclusive expression of specific isoforms in pollen grains and tubes where its activity is a prerequisite for successful germination and growth of pollen tubes. This review summarizes the current knowledge on pollen PM H(+) ATPases and hypothesizes a central role for pollen-specific isoforms of this protein in tube growth. External as well as cytosolic signals from signal transduction and metabolic pathways are integrated by the PM H(+) ATPase and directly translated to tube growth rates, allocating the PM H(+) ATPase to an essential node in the signalling network of pollen tubes in their race to the ovule. PMID:24097309

Lang, Veronika; Pertl-Obermeyer, Heidi; Safiarian, Minou J; Obermeyer, Gerhard

2014-05-01

121

Complete Genome of the Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1  

SciTech Connect

We report the complete sequence of the 5.7-Mbp genome of Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1, a metabolically versatile plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that is highly tolerant to desiccation and capable of solubilizing inorganic phosphate and iron and of synthesizing phytohormones that stimulate seed germination and plant growth.

Matilla, M.A.; van der Lelie, D.; Pizarro-Tobias, P.; Roca, A.; Fernandez, M.; Duque, E.; Molina, L.; Wu, X.; Gomez, M. J.; Segura, A.; Ramos, J.-L.

2011-03-01

122

Roles of brassinosteroids and related mRNAs in pea seed growth and germination.  

PubMed

The levels of endogenous brassinosteroids (BRs) and the expression of the biosynthesis/metabolism/perception genes involved have been investigated during the development and germination of pea (Pisum sativum) seeds. When seeds were rapidly growing, the level of biologically active BRs (brassinolide [BL] and castasterone [CS]) and the transcript levels of two BR C-6 oxidases (CYP85A1 and CYP85A6) reached a maximum, suggesting the significance of BL and CS in seed development. In the early stages of germination, CS, but not BL, appeared and its level increased in the growing tissues in which the transcript level of CYP85A1 and CYP85A6 was high, suggesting the significance of CS in seed germination and early seedling growth of pea. 6-Deoxocathasterone (6-deoxoCT) was the quantitatively major BR in mature seeds. At the early stage of germination, the level of 6-deoxoCT was specifically decreased, whereas the levels of downstream intermediates were increased. It seems that 6-deoxoCT is the major storage BR and is utilized during germination and early growth stages. The level of the mRNAs of BR biosynthesis and perception genes fluctuated during seed development. In mature seeds, most of mRNAs were present, but the level was generally lower compared with immature seeds. However, CYP90A9 mRNA rapidly increased during seed development and reached the maximum in mature seeds. The mRNAs stored in mature pea seeds seem to be utilized when seeds germinate. However, it was found that de novo transcription of mRNAs also starts as early as during seed imbibition. PMID:17322340

Nomura, Takahito; Ueno, Masaaki; Yamada, Yumiko; Takatsuto, Suguru; Takeuchi, Yasutomo; Yokota, Takao

2007-04-01

123

Strigolactones Negatively Regulate Mesocotyl Elongation in Rice during Germination and Growth in Darkness  

PubMed Central

Strigolactones (SLs) are newly discovered plant hormones that regulate plant growth and development including shoot branching. They also stimulate symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Rice has at least three genes that are involved in SL synthesis (D10, D17/HTD1 and D27) and at least two genes that are involved in SL signaling (D3) and SL signaling or downstream metabolism (D14/D88/HTD2). We observed that mesocotyl elongation in darkness was greater in rice mutants defective in these genes than in the wild type. Exogenous application of a synthetic SL analog, GR24, rescued the phenotype of mesocotyl elongation in the SL-deficient mutants, d10-1, d17-1 and d27-1, in a dose-dependent manner, but did not affect mesocotyl lengths of the SL-insensitive mutants, d3-1 and d14-1. No significant differences in cell length were found between the d mutants and the wild type, except for some cells on the lower half of the d3-1 mesocotyl that were shortened. On the other hand, the number of cells in the mesocotyls was 3- to 6-fold greater in the d mutants than in the wild type. Treatment with GR24 reduced the number of cells in the d10-1 mesocotyl to the wild-type level, but did not affect the number of cells in the d3-1 and d14-1 mesocotyls. These findings indicate that SLs negatively regulate cell division, but not cell elongation, in the mesocotyl during germination and growth of rice in darkness.

Hu, Zhongyuan; Yan, Haifang; Yang, Jinghua; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Maekawa, Masahiko; Takamure, Itsuro; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Kyozuka, Junko; Nakazono, Mikio

2010-01-01

124

RRP41L, a Putative Core Subunit of the Exosome, Plays an Important Role in Seed Germination and Early Seedling Growth in Arabidopsis1[C][W  

PubMed Central

In prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, the 3?-5?-exonucleolytic decay and processing of RNAs are essential for RNA metabolism. However, the understanding of the mechanism of 3?-5?-exonucleolytic decay in plants is very limited. Here, we report the characterization of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertional mutant that shows severe growth defects in early seedling growth, including delayed germination and cotyledon expansion, thinner yellow/pale-green leaves, and a slower growth rate. High-efficiency thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the insertional locus was in the sixth exon of AT4G27490, encoding a predicted 3?-5?-exonuclease, that contained a conserved RNase phosphorolytic domain with high similarity to RRP41, designated RRP41L. Interestingly, we detected highly accumulated messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that encode seed storage protein and abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis and signaling pathway-related protein during the early growth stage in rrp41l mutants. The mRNA decay kinetics analysis for seed storage proteins, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenases, and ABA INSENSITIVEs revealed that RRP41L catalyzed the decay of these mRNAs in the cytoplasm. Consistent with these results, the rrp41l mutant was more sensitive to ABA in germination and root growth than wild-type plants, whereas overexpression lines of RRP41L were more resistant to ABA in germination and root growth than wild-type plants. RRP41L was localized to both the cytoplasm and nucleus, and RRP41L was preferentially expressed in seedlings. Altogether, our results showed that RRP41L plays an important role in seed germination and early seedling growth by mediating specific cytoplasmic mRNA decay in Arabidopsis.

Yang, Min; Zhang, Bangyue; Jia, Jianheng; Yan, Chunxia; Habaike, Ayijiang; Han, Yuzhen

2013-01-01

125

Arabidopsis Fatty Acid Desaturase FAD2 Is Required for Salt Tolerance during Seed Germination and Early Seedling Growth  

PubMed Central

Fatty acid desaturases play important role in plant responses to abiotic stresses. However, their exact function in plant resistance to salt stress is unknown. In this work, we provide the evidence that FAD2, an endoplasmic reticulum localized ?-6 desaturase, is required for salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. Using vacuolar and plasma membrane vesicles prepared from the leaves of wild-type (Col-0) and the loss-of-function Arabidopsis mutant, fad2, which lacks the functional FAD2, we examined the fatty acid composition and Na+-dependent H+ movements of the isolated vesicles. We observed that, when compared to Col-0, the level of vacuolar and plasma membrane polyunsaturation was lower, and the Na+/H+ exchange activity was reduced in vacuolar and plasma membrane vesicles isolated from fad2 mutant. Consistent with the reduced Na+/H+ exchange activity, fad2 accumulated more Na+ in the cytoplasm of root cells, and was more sensitive to salt stress during seed germination and early seedling growth, as indicated by CoroNa-Green staining, net Na+ efflux and salt tolerance analyses. Our results suggest that FAD2 mediated high-level vacuolar and plasma membrane fatty acid desaturation is essential for the proper function of membrane attached Na+/H+ exchangers, and thereby to maintain a low cytosolic Na+ concentration for salt tolerance during seed germination and early seedling growth in Arabidopsis.

Sun, Jian; Li, Bei; Zhu, Qiang; Chen, Shaoliang; Zhang, Hongxia

2012-01-01

126

In vitro zygotic embryo culture of wild Musa acuminata ssp. malaccensis and factors affecting germination and seedling growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

In vitro zygotic embryo culture of wild banana significantly increased the germination compared to greenhouse grown seeds. Embryo orientation and BAP concentration significantly affected germination rate. These factors together with gelling agent, dark and light conditions and coconut water, also showed variable effects on the number of roots per plant, root length, shoot length, number of days to root emergence

MJ Asif; C Mak; RY Othman

2001-01-01

127

Phytotoxic effects of sewage sludge extracts on the germination of three plant species  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to evaluate the ability of three types of extracts to explain the ecotoxicological risk of treated municipal sewage\\u000a sludges, the OECD 208A germination test was applied using three plants (Lolium perenne L., Brassica rapa L., and Trifolium pratense L.). Three equivalent batches of sludge, remained as dewatered sludge, composted with plant remains and thermally dried,\\u000a from an anaerobic

Wilson A. Ramírez; Xavier Domene; Pilar Andrés; Josep M. Alcañiz

2008-01-01

128

Growth, Development and Reproduction -- Exploring and explaining germination, growth and development  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A 32-page booklet, containing complete instructions for activities at each life cycle stage. The booklet also includes important background information about plant physiology and how to grow Fast Plants.A Growth, Development and Reproduction kit is available. You can also conduct all the investigations explained in the booklet using seeds from a packet of Standard Wisconsin Fast Plants seeds (or seeds from Fast Plants you grow yourself) and your own potting mix and growing system.Either way, you'll need to plan for providing adequate light. Learn about all these factors in the How to Grow files on this website.

Program, The W.

129

Allelopathic effect of Tithonia diversifolia on the germination, growth and chlorophyll contents of maize (Zea mays L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The allelopathic effects of fresh shoot aqueous extract of Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray was investigated on the germination of seeds and growth of young seedlings of Zea mays L. Although the fresh shoot aqueous extract did not show significant allelopathic effect on the germination of Z. mays, however, the radicle and plumule lengths of the seedlings were significantly inhibited

R. O. Oyerinde; O. O. Otusanya; O. B. Akpor

130

Conserved Features of Germination and Polarized Cell Growth: A Few Insights from a Pollen-Fern Spore Comparison  

PubMed Central

Background The germination of both pollen and fern spores results in the emergence of a cell—pollen tube from pollen, rhizoid from spore—that grows in a polar fashion, primarily at its apical end. In both of these tip-growing cells, the delivery of secretory vesicles to the growing end is guided in part by a calcium gradient, with calcium entering at the tip where it is most highly concentrated. The similarities between the two systems extend beyond tip-focused calcium gradients to encompass signalling pathways and elements including calmodulin, nitric oxide, annexins and Rop-GTPases. Scope and Aims This review is limited to those pathways and elements that function similarly in fern and pollen systems based on currently available evidence. The aim is to illustrate the common mechanisms by which tip growth occurs, facilitate further investigations into this area, and examine the implications for the evolutionarily conserved control of tip growth. Conclusions The interplay of calcium, nitric oxide and other effectors in both pollen and fern spores suggests certain signalling pathways became important regulators of germination and growth early in the evolution of land plants. Both large- and small-scale comparative genomic methods have shown to be promising in their ability to find new and relevant comparisons for further research. Cross-species comparisons may serve to speed up this process by highlighting both basic pathways and system-specific deviations.

Bushart, Thomas J.; Roux, Stanley J.

2007-01-01

131

Effect of three insecticides and two herbicides on rice (Oryza sativa) seedling germination and growth.  

PubMed

Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the most important food crops worldwide. However, it is also a valuable tool in assessing toxicity of organic and inorganic compounds. For more than 20 years, it has been an approved species for standardized phytotoxicity experiments. The objective of this study is to determine germination and radicle (root) and coleoptile (shoot) growth of rice seeds exposed to three insecticides and two herbicides, commonly used in the agricultural production landscape. Although no germination effects of pesticide exposure were observed, significant growth effects were noted between pesticide treatments. Coleoptile growth was significantly (p ? 0.05) lowered in metolachlor/atrazine mixture, diazinon, and lambda-cyhalothrin exposures when compared with controls. Radicles of fipronil-exposed seeds were significantly larger (p ? 0.05) when compared with controls. This research contributes to the phytotoxicity assessment database, in addition to laying the foundation for the use of rice as a phytoremediation tool for agricultural pesticide runoff. PMID:20387062

Moore, M T; Kröger, R

2010-11-01

132

The effect of ethylene, octanoic acid and a plant-derived smoke extract on the germination of light-sensitive lettuce seeds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of an aqueous plant-derived smoke extract, octanoic acid and ethylene on germination of light-sensitive Grand Rapids lettuce seeds were investigated. The smoke extract brought about a concentration dependent increase in germination and a complete inhibition of germination at high concentrations. Octanoic acid could not induce germination. Ethylene at concentrations over 5 µL L-1 increased lettuce seed germination, but

A. K. Jäger; A. Strydom; J. Staden

1996-01-01

133

Nitric Oxide Participates in Cold-Inhibited Camellia sinensis Pollen Germination and Tube Growth Partly via cGMP In Vitro  

PubMed Central

Nitric oxide (NO) plays essential roles in many biotic and abiotic stresses in plant development procedures, including pollen tube growth. Here, effects of NO on cold stress inhibited pollen germination and tube growth in Camellia sinensis were investigated in vitro. The NO production, NO synthase (NOS)-like activity, cGMP content and proline (Pro) accumulation upon treatment with NO scavenger cPTIO, NOS inhibitor L-NNA, NO donor DEA NONOate, guanylate cyclase (GC) inhibitor ODQ or phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor Viagra at 25°C (control) or 4°C were analyzed. Exposure to 4°C for 2 h reduced pollen germination and tube growth along with increase of NOS-like activity, NO production and cGMP content in pollen tubes. DEA NONOate treatment inhibited pollen germination and tube growth in a dose-dependent manner under control and reinforced the inhibition under cold stress, during which NO production and cGMP content promoted in pollen tubes. L-NNA and cPTIO markedly reduced the generation of NO induced by cold or NO donor along with partly reverse of cold- or NO donor-inhibited pollen germination and tube growth. Furthermore, ODQ reduced the cGMP content under cold stress and NO donor treatment in pollen tubes. Meanwhile, ODQ disrupted the reinforcement of NO donor on the inhibition of pollen germination and tube growth under cold condition. Additionally, Pro accumulation of pollen tubes was reduced by ODQ compared with that receiving NO donor under cold or control condition. Effects of cPTIO and L-NNA in improving cold-treated pollen germination and pollen tube growth could be lowered by Viagra. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of cPTIO and L-NNA on Pro accumulation were partly reversed by Viagra. These data suggest that NO production from NOS-like enzyme reaction decreased the cold-responsive pollen germination, inhibited tube growth and reduced Pro accumulation, partly via cGMP signaling pathway in C. sinensis.

Zhu-Ge, Qiang; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Wei-Dong; Fang, Wan-Ping; Chen, Xuan; Li, Xing-Hui

2012-01-01

134

Students' Ideas about Plants and Plant Growth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because the National Science Education Standards (1996) outline specific things K-8 students should know about plants, and previous data indicated that elementary students had difficulty understanding some major ideas about plants and plant growth, the authors of this article thought it appropriate to initiate an investigation to determine the…

Barman, Charles R.; Stein, Mary; McNair, Shannan; Barman, Natalie S.

2006-01-01

135

Influence of Temperature, pH and Selected Growth Media on Germination, Growth and Sporulation of Aschersonia placenta and Hypocrella raciborskii  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tween 70 at 0.1% provided the best conditions for germination of Aschersonia placenta. Optimum germination and growth of the germ tube occurred over a temperature range of 25–30°C and a pH range of 5.0–6.0. A temperature of 30°C resulted in the longest germ tube at 45 ?m. Apparently, temperature and pH did not affect the type of germination, with polar

Y. B. Ibrahim; T. K. Lim; M. K. Tang; H. M. Teng

1993-01-01

136

Growth Protocols for Etiolated Soybeans Germinated within BRIC-60 Canisters Under Spaceflight Conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the GENEX (Gene Expression) spaceflight experiment, protocols were developed to optimize the inflight germination and subsequent growth of 192 soybean (Glycine max cv McCall) seeds during STS-87. We describe a method which provided uniform growth and development of etiolated seedlings while eliminating root and shoot restrictions for short-term (4-7 day) experiments. Final seedling growth morphologies and the gaseous CO2 and ethylene levels present both on the last day in space and at the time of recovery within the spaceflight and ground control BRIC-60 canisters are presented

Levine, H. G.; Sharek, J. A.; Johnson, K. M.; Stryjewski, E. C.; Prima, V. I.; Martynenko, O. I.; Piastuch, W. C.

137

Effect of common food preservatives on mycelial growth and spore germination of Fusarium oxysporum.  

PubMed

The growth and spore germination inhibition of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-cucumerinum by the common food additives: acetic acid, formic acid potassium sorbate, propionic acid, sorbic acid, and the fungistatic agent sec-butylamine was examined in vitro. The inhibitory efficacy of these chemicals decreased in the following order: sorbic acid, potassium sorbate, propionic acid, acetic acid, sec-butylamine and formic acid. At pH 6.4, the ED50 value for mycelium growth was: 976 ppm for sorbic acid, 1292 ppm for potassium sorbate, 2435 ppm for propionic acid, 3805 ppm for acetic acid, 3962 ppm for sec butylamine and 4668 ppm for formic acid. The ED50 value for spore germination was: 225 ppm for potassium sorbate, 1201 ppm for sorbic acid, 1402 ppm for propionic acid, 1600 ppm for sec-butylamine, 1957 ppm for acetic acid and 2485 ppm for formic acid. PMID:10874628

Tzatzarakis, M; Tsatsakis, A M; Liakou, A; Vakalounakis, D J

2000-07-01

138

EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON SEED GERMINATION, GROWTH PATTERN OF STRAITS RHODODENDRON (Melastoma malabathricum L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of media on seed germination and general growth patterns of M. malabathricum under different light and temperature regimes were studied in the laboratory and insect-proof house conditions in University of Malaya. 50 fresh or dried seeds of M. malabathricum were placed in each petri-dish and moistened with water or solutions of the chemical media, KNO3, H2O2 and HNO3

Mahdi Faravani; Baki Bin Bakar

139

Effects of temperature on urediniospore germination, germ tube growth, and initiation of infection in soybean by phakopsora isolates.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT Temperature is a critical factor in plant disease development. As part of a research program to determine how specific environmental variables affect soybean rust, we determined temperature effects on urediniospore germination and germ tube growth of four isolates of Phakopsora pachyrhizi, one each from Brazil, Hawaii, Taiwan, and Zimbabwe, and an isolate of P. meibomiae from Puerto Rico, collected over a 25-year period. Also compared were the effects of temperature during a night dew period on initiation of disease by the P. pachyrhizi isolates. All variables were fit to a nonlinear beta function with temperature as the independent variable. Minimum, maximum, and optimum temperatures, along with shape parameters of the beta function for each variable, were statistically analyzed. All Phakopsora isolates behaved similarly as to how temperature affected urediniospore germination, germ tube growth, and initiation of disease. The results suggest that P. pachyrhizi has changed little in the past few decades with respect to how it responds to temperature and that previously collected research data continues to be valid, simplifying the development of soybean rust disease models. PMID:18943640

Bonde, M R; Berner, D K; Nester, S E; Frederick, R D

2007-08-01

140

Maternal and direct effects of elevated CO 2 on seed provisioning, germination and seedling growth in Bromus erectus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elevated CO2 can affect plant fitness not only through its effects on seed production but also by altering the quality of seeds and therefore\\u000a germination and seedling performance. We collected seeds from mother plants of Bromus erectus grown in field plots at ambient and elevated CO2 (m-CO2, maternal CO2) and germinated them in the greenhouse in a reciprocal design under

Thomas Steinger; Rolf Gall; Bernhard Schmid

2000-01-01

141

Arabidopsis FIMBRIN5, an actin bundling factor, is required for pollen germination and pollen tube growth.  

PubMed

Actin cables in pollen tubes serve as molecular tracks for cytoplasmic streaming and organelle movement and are formed by actin bundling factors like villins and fimbrins. However, the precise mechanisms by which actin cables are generated and maintained remain largely unknown. Fimbrins comprise a family of five members in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we characterized a fimbrin isoform, Arabidopsis FIMBRIN5 (FIM5). Our results show that FIM5 is required for the organization of actin cytoskeleton in pollen grains and pollen tubes, and FIM5 loss-of-function associates with a delay of pollen germination and inhibition of pollen tube growth. FIM5 decorates actin filaments throughout pollen grains and tubes. Actin filaments become redistributed in fim5 pollen grains and disorganized in fim5 pollen tubes. Specifically, actin cables protrude into the extreme tips, and their longitudinal arrangement is disrupted in the shank of fim5 pollen tubes. Consequently, the pattern and velocity of cytoplasmic streaming were altered in fim5 pollen tubes. Additionally, loss of FIM5 function rendered pollen germination and tube growth hypersensitive to the actin-depolymerizing drug latrunculin B. In vitro biochemical analyses indicated that FIM5 exhibits actin bundling activity and stabilizes actin filaments. Thus, we propose that FIM5 regulates actin dynamics and organization during pollen germination and tube growth via stabilizing actin filaments and organizing them into higher-order structures. PMID:21098731

Wu, Youjun; Yan, Jin; Zhang, Ruihui; Qu, Xiaolu; Ren, Sulin; Chen, Naizhi; Huang, Shanjin

2010-11-01

142

The Arabidopsis ZINC FINGER PROTEIN3 Interferes with Abscisic Acid and Light Signaling in Seed Germination and Plant Development1[C][W][OPEN  

PubMed Central

Seed germination is controlled by environmental signals, including light and endogenous phytohormones. Abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits, whereas gibberellin promotes, germination and early seedling development, respectively. Here, we report that ZFP3, a nuclear C2H2 zinc finger protein, acts as a negative regulator of ABA suppression of seed germination in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Accordingly, regulated overexpression of ZFP3 and the closely related ZFP1, ZFP4, ZFP6, and ZFP7 zinc finger factors confers ABA insensitivity to seed germination, while the zfp3 zfp4 double mutant displays enhanced ABA susceptibility. Reduced expression of several ABA-induced genes, such as RESPONSIVE TO ABSCISIC ACID18 and transcription factor ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE4 (ABI4), in ZFP3 overexpression seedlings suggests that ZFP3 negatively regulates ABA signaling. Analysis of ZFP3 overexpression plants revealed multiple phenotypic alterations, such as semidwarf growth habit, defects in fertility, and enhanced sensitivity of hypocotyl elongation to red but not to far-red or blue light. Analysis of genetic interactions with phytochrome and abi mutants indicates that ZFP3 enhances red light signaling by photoreceptors other than phytochrome A and additively increases ABA insensitivity conferred by the abi2, abi4, and abi5 mutations. These data support the conclusion that ZFP3 and the related ZFP subfamily of zinc finger factors regulate light and ABA responses during germination and early seedling development.

Joseph, Mary Prathiba; Papdi, Csaba; Kozma-Bognar, Laszlo; Nagy, Istvan; Lopez-Carbonell, Marta; Rigo, Gabor; Koncz, Csaba; Szabados, Laszlo

2014-01-01

143

Use of Hydrogen Peroxide to Disinfect Hydroponic Plant Growth Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative to conventional bleach and rinsing methods to disinfect hydroponic plant growth systems. A concentration of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide was found to be effective. Residual hydrogen peroxide can be removed from the system by repeated rinsing or by flowing the solution through a platinum on aluminum catalyst. Microbial populations were reduced to near zero immediately after treatment but returned to pre-disinfection levels 2 days after treatment. Treating nutrient solution with hydrogen peroxide and planting directly into trays being watered with the nutrient solution without replenishment, was found to be detrimental to lettuce germination and growth.

Barta, Daniel J.; Henderson, Keith

2000-01-01

144

Root exudates of mycorrhizal tomato plants exhibit a different effect on microconidia germination of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici than root exudates from non-mycorrhizal tomato plants.  

PubMed

The effect of root exudates from mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal tomato plants on microconidia germination of the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici was tested. Microconidia germination was enhanced in the presence of root exudates from mycorrhizal tomato plants. The more tomato plants were colonized by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae, the more microconidia germination was increased, indicating that alterations of the exudation pattern depended on the degree of root AM colonization. Moreover, alterations of the exudation pattern of mycorrhizal plants are not only local, but also systemic. Testing the exudates from plants with a high and a low P level revealed that the alterations of the root exudates from mycorrhizal plants, resulting in a changed effect on microconidia germination, are not due to an improved P status of mycorrhizal plants. PMID:16528569

Scheffknecht, S; Mammerler, R; Steinkellner, S; Vierheilig, H

2006-07-01

145

Assessment of chromium efficacy on germination, root elongation, and coleoptile growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) at different growth periods.  

PubMed

The tannery effluents contain a high concentration of chromium (Cr). It drastically reduces the crop yield when used for irrigation purpose. A huge volume of tannery effluents is available as irrigation for crop production. It is negatively affecting germination as well as yield of the crop. The wheat seeds were exposed to five different concentrations of Cr (0, 20, 40, 80, and 100 ppm). In Petri plates, 100 seeds were placed and the germination percent was recorded after 72 hour (h). Root elongation and coleoptile growth were measured at 72, 120, 168, and 240 h. Results showed that the germination percent of the test crop decreased with increasing Cr levels. It decreased by 6, 14, 30, and 37 % under the Cr concentration of 20, 40, 80, and 100 ppm, respectively. The root elongation was more sensitive than the coleoptile growth. The negative correlation was found between Cr levels and root elongation as well as coleoptile growth. These growth parameters were significantly affected up to 80 ppm of Cr level. The wheat growers using tannery effluent as irrigation should be well treated prior to application. PMID:24415062

Dotaniya, M L; Das, H; Meena, V D

2014-05-01

146

Some chromatographic characteristics of germination stimulants in plant-derived smoke extracts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant-derived smoke extracts stimulate the germination of many different seeds. the present report explains steps to determine some of the chemical characteristics of the compounds concerned. Grand Rapids lettuce seeds were used as a bioassay because smoke-derived extracts overcome their light-sensitivity. The active compounds were partitioned into ethyl acetate, separated by various TLC systems and fractionated by reverse phase HPLC.

J. van Staden; F. E. Drewes; N. A. C. Brown

1995-01-01

147

Germination of Fusarium oxysporum in root exudates from tomato plants challenged with different Fusarium oxysporum strains  

Microsoft Academic Search

The response of microconidia from pathogenic and non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum to root exudates from tomato plants inoculated with different pathogenic and non-pathogenic F. oxysporum strains was studied. Root exudates from non-inoculated tomatoes highly stimulated the microconidial germination of the two\\u000a tomato pathogens, F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici strain Fol 007 and F. oxysporum f.sp. radicis-lycopersici strain Forl 101587. In root exudates

Siegrid Steinkellner; Roswitha Mammerler; Horst Vierheilig

2008-01-01

148

Characterization of Strigolactones, Germination Stimulants for the Root Parasitic Plants Striga and Orobanche , Produced by Maize, Millet and Sorghum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The germination stimulants for root parasitic plants Striga and Orobanche produced by sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench), maize (Zea mays L.), and pearl millet (Pennisetum typhoideum Rich.) were examined. Characterization of strigolactones in the root exudates from the plants grown hydroponically was conducted\\u000a by comparing retention times of germination stimulants on reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with\\u000a those

Ayman A. Awad; Daisuke Sato; Dai Kusumoto; Hiroaki Kamioka; Yasutomo Takeuchi; Koichi Yoneyama

2006-01-01

149

Germination of Phaseolus Vulgaris I. Resumption of Axis Growth 1  

PubMed Central

Growth of the excised axis of Phaseolus vulgaris L. (var. White Marrowfat) begins after a 7-hour incubation in buffer or water at 26°. Growth, as measured by axis elongation or fresh weight increase, is linear for at least 8 hours with a resultant fresh weight increase of approximately 65%. Cell elongation begins 4 or 5 hours prior to cell division and 5 or 6 hours prior to radicle protrusion in the intact seed. The initiation of axis elongation is apparently dependent on synthesis of RNA and protein. Both actinomycin D and puromycin inhibit the initiation of elongation. Actinomycin I) inhibits the incorporation of ATP-8-C14 into axis RNA and C14-leucine into protein, while puromycin inhibits the incorporation of C14-leucine into axis protein. The respiratory rate of the axes increases sharply at about the time of initiation of cell elongation. Dinitrophenol initially increases O2 uptake by the axes, but at the end of 15 hours the rates of O2 uptake by control or dinitrophenol-treated axes are approximately the same.

Walton, D. C.

1966-01-01

150

Gamma radiation effects on seed germination, growth and pigment content, and ESR study of induced free radicals in maize (Zea mays).  

PubMed

The effects of gamma radiation are investigated by studying plant germination, growth and development, and biochemical characteristics of maize. Maize dry seeds are exposed to a gamma source at doses ranging from 0.1 to 1 kGy. Our results show that the germination potential, expressed through the final germination percentage and the germination index, as well as the physiological parameters of maize seedlings (root and shoot lengths) decreased by increasing the irradiation dose. Moreover, plants derived from seeds exposed at higher doses (?0.5 kGy) did not survive more than 10 days. Biochemical differences based on photosynthetic pigment (chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, carotenoids) content revealed an inversely proportional relationship to doses of exposure. Furthermore, the concentration of chlorophyll a was higher than chlorophyll b in both irradiated and non-irradiated seedlings. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy used to evaluate the amount of free radicals induced by gamma ray treatment demonstrates that the relative concentration of radiation-induced free radicals depends linearly on the absorbed doses. PMID:23996407

Marcu, Delia; Damian, Grigore; Cosma, Constantin; Cristea, Victoria

2013-09-01

151

The use of cluster analysis for plant grouping by their tolerance to soil contamination with hydrocarbons at the germination stage.  

PubMed

Clustering was employed for the analysis of obtained experimental data set (42 plants in total) on seed germination in leached chernozem contaminated with kerosene. Among investigated plants were 31 cultivated plants from 11 families (27 species and 20 varieties) and 11 wild plant species from 7 families, 23 annual and 19 perennial/biannual plant species, 11 monocotyledonous and 31 dicotyledonous plants. Two-dimensional (two-parameter) clustering approach, allowing the estimation of tolerance of germinating seeds using a pair of independent parameters (?75%, V7%) was found to be most effective. These parameters characterized the ability of seeds to both withstand high concentrations of contaminants without the significant reduction of the germination, and maintain high germination rate within certain contaminant concentrations. The performed clustering revealed a number of plant features, which define the relation of a particular plant to a particular tolerance cluster; it has also demonstrated the possibility of generalizing the kerosene results for n-tridecane, which is one of the typical kerosene components. In contrast to the "manual" plant ranking based on the assessment of germination at discrete concentrations of the contaminant, the proposed clustering approach allowed a generalized characterization of the seed tolerance/sensitivity to hydrocarbon contaminants. PMID:24704958

Potashev, Konstantin; Sharonova, Natalia; Breus, Irina

2014-07-01

152

Inhibition of Orobanche crenata seed germination and radicle growth by allelochemicals identified in cereals.  

PubMed

Orobanche crenata is a parasitic weed that causes severe yield losses in important grain and forage legume crops. Cereals have been reported to inhibit O. crenata parasitism when grown intercropped with susceptible legumes, but the responsible metabolites have not been identified. A number of metabolites have been reported in cereals that have allelopathic properties against weeds, pests, and pathogens. We tested the effect of several allelochemicals identified in cereals on O. crenata seed germination and radicle development. We found that 2-benzoxazolinone, its derivative 6-chloroacetyl-2-benzoxazolinone, and scopoletin significantly inhibited O. crenata seed germination. Benzoxazolinones, l-tryptophan, and coumalic acid caused the stronger inhibition of radicle growth. Also, other metabolites reduced radicle length, this inhibition being dose-dependent. Only scopoletin caused cell necrotic-like darkening in the young radicles. Prospects for their application to parasitic weed management are discussed. PMID:24044614

Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Antonio; Rubiales, Diego

2013-10-16

153

Chemical Control of Plant Growth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seven experiments are presented in this Science Study Aid to help students investigate the control of plant growth with chemicals. Plant growth regulators, weed control, and chemical pruning are the topics studied in the experiments which are based on investigations that have been and are being conducted at the U. S. Agricultural Research Center,…

Agricultural Research Center (USDA), Beltsville, MD.

154

SUPPRESSOR OF MORE AXILLARY GROWTH2 1 Controls Seed Germination and Seedling Development in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN  

PubMed Central

Abiotic chemical signals discovered in smoke that are known as karrikins (KARs) and the endogenous hormone strigolactone (SL) control plant growth through a shared MORE AXILLARY GROWTH2 (MAX2)-dependent pathway. A SL biosynthetic pathway and candidate KAR/SL receptors have been characterized, but signaling downstream of MAX2 is poorly defined. A screen for genetic suppressors of the enhanced seed dormancy phenotype of max2 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) led to identification of a suppressor of max2 1 (smax1) mutant. smax1 restores the seed germination and seedling photomorphogenesis phenotypes of max2 but does not affect the lateral root formation, axillary shoot growth, or senescence phenotypes of max2. Expression of three transcriptional markers of KAR/SL signaling, D14-LIKE2, KAR-UP F-BOX1, and INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID INDUCIBLE1, is rescued in smax1 max2 seedlings. SMAX1 is a member of an eight-gene family in Arabidopsis that has weak similarity to HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 101, which encodes a caseinolytic peptidase B chaperonin required for thermotolerance. SMAX1 and the SMAX1-like (SMXL) homologs are differentially expressed in Arabidopsis tissues. SMAX1 transcripts are most abundant in dry seed, consistent with its function in seed germination control. Several SMXL genes are up-regulated in seedlings treated with the synthetic SL GR24. SMAX1 and SMXL2 transcripts are reduced in max2 seedlings, which could indicate negative feedback regulation by KAR/SL signaling. smax1 seed and seedling growth mimics the wild type treated with KAR/SL, but smax1 seedlings are still responsive to 2H-furo[2,3-c]pyran-2-one (KAR2) or GR24. We conclude that SMAX1 is an important component of KAR/SL signaling during seed germination and seedling growth but is not necessary for all MAX2-dependent responses. We hypothesize that one or more SMXL proteins may also act downstream of MAX2 to control the diverse developmental responses to KARs and SLs.

Stanga, John P.; Smith, Steven M.; Briggs, Winslow R.; Nelson, David C.

2013-01-01

155

Tolerance of anaerobic conditions caused by flooding during germination and early growth in rice (Oryza sativa L.)  

PubMed Central

Rice is semi-aquatic, adapted to a wide range of hydrologies, from aerobic soils in uplands to anaerobic and flooded fields in waterlogged lowlands, to even deeply submerged soils in flood-prone areas. Considerable diversity is present in native rice landraces selected by farmers over centuries. Our understanding of the adaptive features of these landraces to native ecosystems has improved considerably over the recent past. In some cases, major genes associated with tolerance have been cloned, such as SUB1A that confers tolerance of complete submergence and SNORKEL genes that control plant elongation to escape deepwater. Modern rice varieties are sensitive to flooding during germination and early growth, a problem commonly encountered in rainfed areas, but few landraces capable of germination under these conditions have recently been identified, enabling research into tolerance mechanisms. Major QTLs were also identified, and are being targeted for molecular breeding and for cloning. Nevertheless, limited progress has been made in identifying regulatory processes for traits that are unique to tolerant genotypes, including faster germination and coleoptile elongation, formation of roots and leaves under hypoxia, ability to catabolize starch into simple sugars for subsequent use in glycolysis and fermentative pathways to generate energy. Here we discuss the state of knowledge on the role of the PDC-ALDH-ACS bypass and the ALDH enzyme as the likely candidates effective in tolerant rice genotypes. Potential involvement of factors such as cytoplasmic pH regulation, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species scavenging and other metabolites is also discussed. Further characterization of contrasting genotypes would help in elucidating the genetic and biochemical regulatory and signaling mechanisms associated with tolerance. This could facilitate breeding rice varieties suitable for direct seeding systems and guide efforts for improving waterlogging tolerance in other crops.

Miro, Berta; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

2013-01-01

156

Avenaol, a germination stimulant for root parasitic plants from Avena strigosa.  

PubMed

Root exudates from the allelopathic plant, black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb.), were found to contain at least six different germination stimulants for root parasitic plants, but no known strigolactones (SLs). One of these germination stimulants was purified and named avenaol. Its HR-ESI-TOFMS analysis indicated that the molecular formula of avenaol is C20H24O7, and thus it contains an additional carbon compared with known C19-SLs. Its structure was determined as 5-((E)-(5-(3-hydroxy-1,5,5-trimethyl-2-oxobicyclo[4.1.0]heptan-7-yl)-2-oxodihydrofuran-3(2H)-ylidene)methoxy)-3-methylfuran-2(5H)-one, by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, and ESI- and EI-MS spectrometry. Although avenaol contains the C-D moiety, the common structural feature for all known SLs, it lacks the B ring and has an additional carbon atom between the A and C rings. Avenaol is a potent germination stimulant of Phelipanche ramosa seeds, but only a weak stimulant for seeds of Striga hermonthica and Orobanche minor. PMID:24768285

Kim, Hyun Il; Kisugi, Takaya; Khetkam, Pichit; Xie, Xiaonan; Yoneyama, Kaori; Uchida, Kenichi; Yokota, Takao; Nomura, Takahito; McErlean, Christopher S P; Yoneyama, Koichi

2014-07-01

157

Salinity Eff ects on Seed Germination and Vegetative Growth of Greens-Type Poa annua Relative to Other Cool-Season Turfgrass Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seed germination and vegetative growth stud- ies were conducted to determine relative salinity tolerance of greens-type Poa annua L. com- pared with other cool-season turfgrass spe- cies. Effects of increasing salinity stress on fi nal germination percentage (FGP), germination rate (GR), clipping yield dry weight (CYD), verdure dry weight (VD), root dry weight (RD), and the longest root length (LRL)

Jing Dai; David R. Huff; Maxim J. Schlossberg

2009-01-01

158

Cold Radiofrequency Plasma Treatment Modifies Wettability and Germination Speed of Plant Seeds  

PubMed Central

We report the possibility to modify the wetting properties of the surfaces of a diversity of seeds including: lentils (Lens culinaris), beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and wheat (Triticum, species C9) by cold radiofrequency air plasma treatment. Air plasma treatment leads to the dramatic decrease in the apparent contact angle. Moreover, the speed of germination and yield (germination rate) of seeds can be modified by preliminary plasma treatment. The change in the wetting properties of seeds is at least partially due to oxidation of their surface under plasma treatment. Significant growth of the peaks corresponding to the nitrogen containing groups in the mass spectra of air plasma treated seeds was registered by TOF-SIMS spectroscopy.

Bormashenko, Edward; Grynyov, Roman; Bormashenko, Yelena; Drori, Elyashiv

2012-01-01

159

Antifungal Potential of Crude Plant Extracts on Conidial Germination of Two Isolates of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Penz.) Penz. and Sacc  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crude plant extracts of leaves and stems of 40 different plant species from the state of Morelos, Mexico, were used to compare conidia germination of two isolates of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides obtained from papaya fruit with anthracnose symptoms, collected from the states of Guerrero and Veracruz, Mexico. In general, better antifungal effect was observed with crude plant extract of night-blooming jessamine

Rocío Citlali Hernández-Albíter; Laura Leticia Barrera-Necha; Leticia Bravo-Luna

2007-01-01

160

The involvement of nitric oxide in ultraviolet-B-inhibited pollen germination and tube growth of Paulownia tomentosa in vitro.  

PubMed

The role of nitric oxide (NO) in the ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B)-induced reduction of in vitro pollen germination and tube growth of Paulownia tomentosa Steud. was studied. Results showed that exposure of the pollen to 0.4 and 0.8 W m(-2) UV-B radiation for 2 h resulted in not only the reduction of pollen germination and tube growth but also the enhancement of NO synthase (NOS, EC 1.14.13.39) activity and NO production in pollen grain and tube. Also, exogenous NO donors sodium nitroprusside and S-nitrosoglutathione inhibited both pollen germination and tube growth in a dose-dependence manner. NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-Arg-methyl eater (l-NAME) and NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) not only largely prevented the NO generation but also partly reversed the UV-B-inhibited pollen germination and tube growth. These results indicate that UV-B radiation inhibits pollen germination and tube growth partly via promoting NO production in pollen grain and tube by a NOS-like enzyme. Additionally, a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinequinone (LY-83583) prevented both the UV-B- and NO donors-inhibited pollen germination and tube growth, suggesting that the NO function is mediated by cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate. However, the effects of c-PTIO, l-NAME and LY-83583 on the UV-B-inhibited pollen germination and tube growth were only partial, suggesting that there are NO-independent pathways in UV-B signal networks. PMID:18251898

He, Jun-Min; Bai, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Rui-Bin; Cao, Bing; She, Xiao-Ping

2007-10-01

161

Cadmium stress affects seed germination and seedling growth in Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench by changing the activities of hydrolyzing enzymes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seed germination, one of the most important phases in the life cycle of a plant, is highly responsive to existing environment.\\u000a Hydrolyzing enzymes play a major role in the mobilization of food reserves by hydrolyzing carbohydrates, proteins and fats.\\u000a This paper reports on the effect of Cd toxicity on seed germination and the activities of hydrolyzing enzymes, like acid phosphatases

Saritha V. Kuriakose; M. N. V. Prasad

2008-01-01

162

RNA, Proteins and Polyamines During Tube Growth in Germinating Apple Pollen 1  

PubMed Central

Variations of RNA, protein, and free- and trichloroacetic acid-soluble bound polyamine levels were determined during tube growth in germinating Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Starkrimson pollen. During rehydration of pollen no marked differences were observed, whereas, during germination, RNA, proteins, and polyamines showed parallel decreases. At the same time, there was synthesis of RNA and polyamines as indicated by use of labeled precursors. The data indicate that during germination: (a) the genes for rRNA, tRNA, and probably mRNA are active; (b) the enzymes involved in polyamine biosynthesis are very active. High levels of free arginine during the first 15 minutes were observed, probably in response to a demand for this precursor in polyamine biosynthesis. Moreover, profiles of the variations in the specific activities of RNA and polyamines showed similar patterns. The results indicate that biosynthesis of RNA and polyamines precedes tube emergence. The possible role of these compounds, which are known to be released into the medium in the progamic phase of the fertilization processes, is considered.

Bagni, Nello; Adamo, Patrizia; Serafini-Fracassini, Donatella; Villanueva, Victor R.

1981-01-01

163

Enhanced post-germinative growth of encapsulated somatic embryos of Siberian ginseng by carbohydrate addition to the encapsulation matrix  

Microsoft Academic Search

This experiment was carried out to enhance conversion and ex vitro survival of encapsulated somatic embryos of Siberian ginseng ( Eleutherococcus senticosus). Cotyledonary somatic embryos were encapsulated with 3.0% sodium alginate; 96% of the encapsulated embryos converted to plantlets with well-elongated epicotyls in Perlite containing sucrose as a carbon source. However, although they germinated, post-germinative growth of encapsulated embryos was

S. J. Jung; E. S. Yoon; J. H. Jeong; Y. E. Choi

2004-01-01

164

Common gas phase molecules from fungi affect seed germination and plant health in Arabidopsis thaliana.  

PubMed

Fungal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play important ecophysiological roles in mediating inter-kingdom signaling with arthropods but less is known about their interactions with plants. In this study, Arabidopsis thaliana was used as a model in order to test the physiological effects of 23 common vapor-phase fungal VOCs that included alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, and other chemical classes. After exposure to a shared atmosphere with the 23 individual VOCs for 72 hrs, seeds were assayed for rate of germination and seedling formation; vegetative plants were assayed for fresh weight and chlorophyll concentration. All but five of the VOCs tested (1-decene, 2-n-heptylfuran, nonanal, geosmin and -limonene) had a significant effect in inhibiting either germination, seedling formation or both. Seedling formation was entirely inhibited by exposure to 1-octen-3-one, 2-ethylhexanal, 3-methylbutanal, and butanal. As assayed by a combination of fresh weight and chlorophyll concentration, 2-ethylhexanal had a negative impact on two-week-old vegetative plants. Three other compounds (1-octen-3-ol, 2-ethylhexanal, and 2-heptylfuran) decreased fresh weight alone. Most of the VOCs tested did not change the fresh weight or chlorophyll concentration of vegetative plants. In summary, when tested as single compounds, fungal VOCs affected A. thaliana in positive, negative or neutral ways. PMID:25045602

Hung, Richard; Lee, Samantha; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Bennett, Joan W

2014-01-01

165

Common gas phase molecules from fungi affect seed germination and plant health in Arabidopsis thaliana  

PubMed Central

Fungal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play important ecophysiological roles in mediating inter-kingdom signaling with arthropods but less is known about their interactions with plants. In this study, Arabidopsis thaliana was used as a model in order to test the physiological effects of 23 common vapor-phase fungal VOCs that included alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, and other chemical classes. After exposure to a shared atmosphere with the 23 individual VOCs for 72 hrs, seeds were assayed for rate of germination and seedling formation; vegetative plants were assayed for fresh weight and chlorophyll concentration. All but five of the VOCs tested (1-decene, 2-n-heptylfuran, nonanal, geosmin and -limonene) had a significant effect in inhibiting either germination, seedling formation or both. Seedling formation was entirely inhibited by exposure to 1-octen-3-one, 2-ethylhexanal, 3-methylbutanal, and butanal. As assayed by a combination of fresh weight and chlorophyll concentration, 2-ethylhexanal had a negative impact on two-week-old vegetative plants. Three other compounds (1-octen-3-ol, 2-ethylhexanal, and 2-heptylfuran) decreased fresh weight alone. Most of the VOCs tested did not change the fresh weight or chlorophyll concentration of vegetative plants. In summary, when tested as single compounds, fungal VOCs affected A. thaliana in positive, negative or neutral ways.

2014-01-01

166

Acetylesterase-Mediated Deacetylation of Pectin Impairs Cell Elongation, Pollen Germination, and Plant Reproduction[C][W  

PubMed Central

Pectin is a major component of the primary cell wall of higher plants. Some galacturonyl residues in the backbone of pectinaceous polysaccharides are often O-acetylated at the C-2 or C-3 position, and the resulting acetylesters change dynamically during the growth and development of plants. The processes involve both enzymatic acetylation and deacetylation. Through genomic sequence analysis, we identified a pectin acetylesterase (PAE1) from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa). Recombinant Pt PAE1 exhibited preferential activity in releasing the acetate moiety from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) and potato (Solanum tuberosum) pectin in vitro. Overexpressing Pt PAE1 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) decreased the level of acetyl esters of pectin but not of xylan. Deacetylation engendered differential changes in the composition and/or structure of cell wall polysaccharides that subsequently impaired the cellular elongation of floral styles and filaments, the germination of pollen grains, and the growth of pollen tubes. Consequently, plants overexpressing PAE1 exhibited severe male sterility. Furthermore, in contrast to the conventional view, PAE1-mediated deacetylation substantially lowered the digestibility of pectin. Our data suggest that pectin acetylesterase functions as an important structural regulator in planta by modulating the precise status of pectin acetylation to affect the remodeling and physiochemical properties of the cell wall's polysaccharides, thereby affecting cell extensibility.

Gou, Jin-Ying; Miller, Lisa M.; Hou, Guichuan; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Xiao-Ya; Liu, Chang-Jun

2012-01-01

167

Differential Effects of Four Abiotic Factors on the Germination of Salt Marsh Annuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interspecific differences in responsiveness to temperature, photoperiod, soil salinity, and soil moisture confirm the hypothesis that abiotic factors differentially affect the germination of salt marsh plants. In growth chamber experiments, four of eight annual species responded to small differences in temperature or photoperiod. Increasing soil salinity decreased the final proportion of seeds germinating and slowed germination for each of the

Gregory B. Noe; Joy B. Zedler

2000-01-01

168

?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) homeostasis regulates pollen germination and polarized growth in Picea wilsonii.  

PubMed

?-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a four-carbon non-protein amino acid found in a wide range of organisms. Recently, GABA accumulation has been shown to play a role in the stress response and cell growth in angiosperms. However, the effect of GABA deficiency on pollen tube development remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that specific concentrations of exogenous GABA stimulated pollen tube growth in Picea wilsonii, while an overdose suppressed pollen tube elongation. The germination percentage of pollen grains and morphological variations in pollen tubes responded in a dose-dependent manner to treatment with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MP), a glutamate decarboxylase inhibitor, while the inhibitory effects could be recovered in calcium-containing medium supplemented with GABA. Using immunofluorescence labeling, we found that the actin cables were disorganized in 3-MP treated cells, followed by the transition of endo/exocytosis activating sites from the apex to the whole tube shank. In addition, variations in the deposition of cell wall components were detected upon labeling with JIM5, JIM7, and aniline blue. Our results demonstrated that calcium-dependent GABA signaling regulates pollen germination and polarized tube growth in P. wilsonii by affecting actin filament patterns, vesicle trafficking, and the configuration and distribution of cell wall components. PMID:23900837

Ling, Yu; Chen, Tong; Jing, Yanping; Fan, Lusheng; Wan, Yinglang; Lin, Jinxing

2013-11-01

169

Effect of Temperature, Light and Salinity on Seed Germination and Radicle Growth of the Geographically Widespread Halophyte Shrub Halocnemum strobilaceum  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims The small leafy succulent shrub Halocnemum strobilaceum occurs in saline habitats from northern Africa and Mediterranean Europe to western Asia, and it is a dominant species in salt deserts such as those of north-west China. The effects of temperature, light/darkness and NaCl salinity were tested on seed germination, and the effects of salinity were tested on seed germination recovery, radicle growth and radicle elongation recovery, using seeds from north-west China; the results were compared with those previously reported on this species from ‘salt steppes’ in the Mediterranean region of Spain. Methods Seed germination was tested over a range of temperatures in light and in darkness and over a range of salinities at 25 °C in the light. Seeds that did not germinate in the NaCl solutions were tested for germination in deionized water. Seeds from which radicles had barely emerged in deionized water were transferred to NaCl solutions for 10 d and then back to deionized water for 10 d to test for radicle growth and recovery. Key Results Seeds germinated to higher percentages in light than in darkness and at high than at low temperatures. Germination percentages decreased with an increase in salinity from 0·1 to 0·75 m NaCl. Seeds that did not germinate in NaCl solutions did so after transfer to deionized water. Radicle elongation was increased by low salinity, and then it decreased with an increase in salinity, being completely inhibited by ?2·0 m NaCl. Elongation of radicles from salt solutions <3·0 m resumed after seedlings were transferred to deionized water. Conclusions The seed and early seedling growth stages of the life cycle of H. strobilaceum are very salt tolerant, and their physiological responses differ somewhat between the Mediterranean ‘salt steppe’ of Spain and the inland cold salt desert of north-west China.

Qu, Xiao-Xia; Huang, Zhen-Ying; Baskin, Jerry M.; Baskin, Carol C.

2008-01-01

170

Flooding and Plant Growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Special Issue is based on the 7th Conference of the International Society for Plant Anaerobiosis (ISPA), held in Nijmegen, The Netherlands, 12-16 June 2001. The papers describe and analyse many of the responses that plants display when subjected to waterlogging of the soil or deeper submergence. These responses may be injurious or adaptive, and are discussed at various levels

J. R. Goodin; T. T. Kozlowski

1986-01-01

171

OsAP65, a rice aspartic protease, is essential for male fertility and plays a role in pollen germination and pollen tube growth  

PubMed Central

Aspartic proteases (APs) comprise a large proteolytic enzyme family widely distributed in animals, microbes, viruses, and plants. The rice genome encodes 96 APs, of which only a few have been functionally characterized. Here, the identification and characterization of a novel AP gene, OsAP65, which plays an indispensable role in pollen tube growth in rice, is reported. The T-DNA insertion line of OsAP65 caused severe segregation distortion. In the progeny derived from an individual heterozygous for the T-DNA insertion, the wild type and T-DNA-carrying heterozygote segregated at a ratio close to 1:1, while homozygotes of disrupted OsAP65 (OsAP65–/–) were not recovered. Reciprocal crosses between heterozygotes and wild-type plants demonstrated that the mutant alleles could not be transmitted through the male gamete. Examination of the anthers from heterozygous plants revealed that the mutant pollen matured normally, but did not germinate or elongate. OsAP65 was expressed in various tissues and the transcript level in heterozygous plants was about half of the amount measured in the wild-type plants. The subcellular localization showed that OsAP65 is a pre-vacuolar compartment (PVC) protein. These results indicated that OsAP65 was essential for rice pollen germination and tube growth.

Zhang, Qifa

2013-01-01

172

Density of intraspecific competitors determines the occurrence and benefits of accelerated germination.  

PubMed

Germination is a key process in plant recruitment and population dynamics, and seeds are expected to be under strong selection pressure to germinate under conditions that maximize subsequent plant survival. Increased rates of germination (i.e., accelerated germination) may occur in competitive environments. We examined the effects of conspecific density on the timing of germination of seeds of a bird-dispersed plant, Phytolacca americana (Phytolaccaceae, L.), in three different competitive environments. By comparing germination of seeds sown at the same time at different densities, we quantify the benefits of accelerated germination under conditions in which differences in performance among seedlings are attributable to germination timing only, and not to being sown at different times. We find that although the probability of germination is unchanged, the time to initiation of germination is significantly shorter when competition is greater. We also show that plants that germinate earlier are larger and have higher growth rates because they have more time to grow without competitors. Our work demonstrates that shifts in germination timing in response to competition can yield significant dividends for seeds that germinate earliest, but we caution that the magnitude and consequences of accelerated germination will likely depend on the competitive neighborhood. PMID:21622431

Orrock, John L; Christopher, Cory C

2010-04-01

173

Regulation of carbonic anhydrase gene expression in cotyledons of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) seedlings during post-germinative growth.  

PubMed

Recently, plastidial carbonic anhydrase (CA) cDNA clones encoding functional carbonic anhydrase enzymes were isolated from a 48 h dark-grown cotton seedling (cotyledons) cDNA library (Hoang et al., Plant Cell Physiol. 40: 1999). Here we examined the levels of relative transcript abundance and enzyme activities in cotyledons at different developmental stages and under different environmental conditions (i.e. altering CO2 and light conditions), during post-germinative seedling growth. Relative CA transcript levels and total CA enzyme activity in cotyledons of cotton seedlings increased from 18 h to 72 h of post-germinative growth in the dark, although somewhat later than the glyoxylate cycle enzyme, MS. When 24 h old seedlings were exposed to light for an additional 24 h, CA activity in greening cotyledons increased about 2-fold (compared with controls kept in the dark), whereas relative CA transcript levels were essentially the same. Removal of seed coats from cotyledons of 24 h old seedlings dramatically increased relative CA transcript abundance (measured 24 h later) in the dark, but did not influence CA enzyme activity. Manipulation of external CO2 environments (zero, ambient, or high) modulated coordinately the relative transcript abundance of CA (and rbcS) in cotyledons, but did not affect enzyme activity. On the other hand, regardless of the external CO2 conditions, cotyledons of seedlings exposed to light exhibited increased CA activity, concomitant with increased Rubisco activity and increased chlorophyll content. Collectively, our data suggest that steady-state levels of CA and rbcS transcripts are increased in response to environmental CO2 conditions, while CA (and Rubisco) enzyme activities are likely modulated at the post-transcriptional level following exposure of seedlings to light, and in parallel with development of functional chloroplasts. PMID:12090621

Hoang, Chau V; Chapman, Kent D

2002-07-01

174

A Simple Plant Growth Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the analysis of dandelion peduncle growth based on peduncle length, epidermal cell dimensions, and fresh/dry mass. Methods are simple and require no special apparatus or materials. Suggests that limited practical work in this area may contribute to students' lack of knowledge on plant growth. (Author/DH)

Oxlade, E.

1985-01-01

175

Plant Growth Puzzle  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This minds-on discussion/worksheet activity presents a structured sequence of questions to challenge students to explain why plants that grow in the light weigh more than the seeds they came from, whereas plants that grow in the dark weigh less than the seeds they came from. To maximize student participation and learning, I recommend that you have your students complete the questions individually or in pairs and then have a whole class discussion.

Waldron, Ingrid

176

Effect of light exposure on in vitro germination and germ tube growth of eight species of rust fungi.  

PubMed

The effects of light on urediniospore germination and germ tube elongation was studied with eight species of rust fungi that infect ornamental plants or row crops. Exposure of six species of fungi to cool white fluorescent light at 400 or 600 micromol s(-1) m(-2) for 24 h significantly reduced germination with largest decreases typically observed at 600 micromol s(-1) m(-2). Germination and germ tube elongation did not recover during 24 h dark incubation after 18 h exposure to fluorescent light at 600 micromol s(-1) m(-2), indicating the effects were not reversible. Germ tube elongation of all fungi was negatively affected by increased length of exposure to fluorescent light. Increased exposure to fluorescent light differentially affected germination of the fungi with Puccinia hemerocallidis, Phakopsora pachyrhizi, Pucciniastrum vaccinii and Puccinia menthae negatively affected and Puccinia sorghi, Puccinia triticina, Puccinia pelargonii-zonalis and Puccinia iridis relatively unaffected in 10 h incubation. Exposure of Ph. pachyrhizi and P. triticina urediniospores to sunlight rapidly reduced germination and germ tube elongation with no germination observed for Ph. pachyrhizi after 2.5 h. Germ tube elongation but not germination of hydrated urediniospores of Ph. pachyrhizi and P. triticina was significantly reduced compared to dry urediniospores exposed to 10 h fluorescent light followed by 24 h dark incubation. Exposure to fluorescent light (all fungi) or sunlight (two fungi) negatively affected urediniospore germ tube elongation. Differences observed in urediniospore germination between fungi suggest some species have co-evolved with their host for differing light conditions. Our data suggests exposure of urediniospores to strong light could inactivate rust fungi on plant surfaces or in the atmosphere. PMID:20943512

Buck, James W; Dong, Weibo; Mueller, Daren S

2010-01-01

177

Germination traits explain soil seed persistence across species: the case of Mediterranean annual plants in cereal fields  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Seed persistence in the soil under field conditions is an important issue for the maintenance of local plant populations and the restoration of plant communities, increasingly so in the light of rapidly changing land use and climate change. Whereas processes important for dispersal in space are well known, knowledge of processes governing dispersal in time is still limited. Data for morphological seed traits such as size have given contradictory results for prediction of soil seed persistence or cover only a few species. There have been few experimental studies on the role of germination traits in determining soil seed persistence, while none has studied their predictive value consistently across species. Delayed germination, as well as light requirements for germination, have been suggested to contribute to the formation of persistent seed banks. Moreover, diurnally fluctuating temperatures can influence the timing of germination and are therefore linked to seed bank persistence. Methods The role of germination speed measured by T50 (days to germination of 50 % of all germinated seeds), light requirement and reaction to diurnally fluctuating temperatures in determining seed persistence in the soil was evaluated using an experimental comparative data set of 25 annual cereal weed species. Key Results It is shown that light requirements and slow germination are important features to maintain seeds ungerminated just after entering the soil, and hence influence survival of seeds in the soil. However, the detection of low diurnally fluctuating temperatures enhances soil seed bank persistence by limiting germination. Our data further suggest that the effect of diurnally fluctuating temperatures, as measured on seeds after dispersal and dry storage, is increasingly important to prevent fatal germination after longer burial periods. Conclusions These results underline the functional role of delayed germination and light for survival of seeds in the soil and hence their importance for shaping the first part of the seed decay curve. Our analyses highlight the detection of diurnally fluctuating temperatures as a third mechanism to achieve higher soil seed persistence after burial which interacts strongly with season. We therefore advocate focusing future research on mechanisms that favour soil seed persistence after longer burial times and moving from studies of morphological features to exploration of germination traits such as reaction to diurnally fluctuating temperatures.

Saatkamp, Arne; Affre, Laurence; Dutoit, Thierry; Poschlod, Peter

2011-01-01

178

Increase of seed germination, growth and membrane integrity of wheat seedlings by exposure to static and a 10-KHz electromagnetic field.  

PubMed

There is a large body of experimental data demonstrating various effects of magnetic field (MF) on plants growth and development. Although the mechanism(s) of perception of MF by plants is not yet elucidated, there is a possibility that like other stimuli, MF exerts its effects on plants by changing membrane integrity and conductance of its water channels, thereby influencing growth characteristics. In this study, the seeds of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Kavir) were imbibed in water overnight and then treated with or without a 30-mT static magnetic field (SMF) and a 10-kHz electromagnetic field (EMF) for 4 days, each 5 h. Water uptake of seeds reduced 5 h of the treatment with EMF but did not show changes in SMF treatment. Exposure to both magnetic fields did not affect germination percent of the seeds but increased the speed of germination, compared to the control group. Treatment with EMF significantly reduced seedling length and subsequently vigor index I, while SMF had no effects on these parameters. Both treatments significantly increased vigor index II, compared to the control group. These treatments also remarkably increased catalase activity and proline contents of seedlings but reduced the activity of peroxidase, the rate of lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakages of membranes. The results suggest promotional effects of EMFs on membrane integrity and growth characteristics of wheat seedlings. PMID:23343429

Payez, Atefeh; Ghanati, Faezeh; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Hajnorouzi, Abazar; Rajabbeigi, Elham

2013-12-01

179

Modelling of effects of water activity and temperature on germination and growth of ochratoxigenic isolates of Aspergillus ochraceus on a green coffee-based medium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Influence of water activity (0.75–0.99 aw) and temperature (10, 20 and 30 °C) on germination and mycelial growth on green coffee extract agar medium of three ochratoxigenic isolates of Aspergillus ochraceus was studied. Optimal conditions for germination and growth were observed at 0.95–0.99 aw and 20–30 °C for the three isolates. Minimum aw level for germination was 0.80, and 0.85

E. Pardo; A. J. Ramos; V. Sanchis; S. Mar??n

2005-01-01

180

IAA production during germination of Orobanche spp. seeds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Broomrapes (Orobanche spp.) are parasitic plants, whose growth and development fully depend on the nutritional connection established between the parasite and the roots of the respective host plant. Phytohormones are known to play a role in establishing the specific Orobanche–host plant interaction.The first step in the interaction is seed germination triggered by a germination stimulant secreted by the host-plant roots.

Slavtcho Slavov; Henry van Onckelen; Rossitza Batchvarova; Atanas Atanassov; Els Prinsen

2004-01-01

181

Differential chlorate inhibition of Chaetomium globosum germination, hyphal growth, and perithecia synthesis.  

PubMed

Chaetomium globosum Kunze:Fr is a dermatophytic, dematiaceous fungus that is ubiquitous in soils, grows readily on cellulolytic materials, and is commonly found on water-damaged building materials. Chlorate affects nitrogen metabolism in fungi and is used to study compatibility among anamorphic fungi by inducing nit mutants. The effect of chlorate toxicity on C. globosum was investigated by amending a modified malt extract agar (MEA), oat agar, and carboxymethyl cellulose agar (CMC) with various levels of potassium chlorate (KClO(3)). C. globosum perithecia production was almost completely inhibited (90-100 %) at low levels of KClO(3) (0.1 mM) in amended MEA. Inhibition of perithecia production was also observed on oat agar and CMC at 1 and 10 mM, respectively. However, hyphal growth in MEA was only inhibited 20 % by 0.1-100 mM KClO(3) concentrations. Hyphal growth was never completely inhibited at the highest levels tested (200 mM). Higher levels of KClO(3) were needed on gypsum board to inhibit perithecia synthesis. In additional experiments, KClO(3) did not inhibit C. globosum, Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus niger, Penicillum expansum, and airborne fungal spore germination. The various fungal spores were not inhibited by KClO(3) at 1-100 mM levels. These results suggest that C. globosum perithecia synthesis is more sensitive to chlorate toxicity than are hyphal growth and spore germination. This research provides basic information that furthers our understanding about perithecia formation and may help in developing control methods for fungal growth on building materials. PMID:22903379

Biles, Charles L; Wright, Desiree; Fuego, Marianni; Guinn, Angela; Cluck, Terry; Young, Jennifer; Martin, Markie; Biles, Josiah; Poudyal, Shubhra

2012-12-01

182

Allelopathic Ability of Various Aquatic Plants to Inhibit the Growth of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle and Myriophyllum spicatum L.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The term allelopathy refers to the detrimental effects of higher plants of one species (the donor) on the germination, growth, or development of another species (the recipient) (Putnam 1985). Specifically, allelopathy refers to the biochemical interaction...

H. L. Jones

1995-01-01

183

Seed priming with chitosan improves maize germination and seedling growth in relation to physiological changes under low temperature stress.  

PubMed

Low temperature stress during germination and early seedling growth is an important constraint of global production of maize. The effects of seed priming with 0.25%, 0.50%, and 0.75% (w/v) chitosan solutions at 15 degrees C on the growth and physiological changes were investigated using two maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines, HuangC (chilling-tolerant) and Mo17 (chilling-sensitive). While seed priming with chitosan had no significant effect on germination percentage under low temperature stress, it enhanced germination index, reduced the mean germination time (MGT), and increased shoot height, root length, and shoot and root dry weights in both maize lines. The decline of malondialdehyde (MDA) content and relative permeability of the plasma membrane and the increase of the concentrations of soluble sugars and proline, peroxidase (POD) activity, and catalase (CAT) activity were detected both in the chilling-sensitive and chilling-tolerant maize seedlings after priming with the three concentrations of chitosan. HuangC was less sensitive to responding to different concentrations of chitosan. Priming with 0.50% chitosan for about 60 approximately 64 h seemed to have the best effects. Thus, it suggests that seed priming with chitosan may improve the speed of germination of maize seed and benefit for seedling growth under low temperature stress. PMID:19489108

Guan, Ya-jing; Hu, Jin; Wang, Xian-ju; Shao, Chen-xia

2009-06-01

184

Seed priming with chitosan improves maize germination and seedling growth in relation to physiological changes under low temperature stress*  

PubMed Central

Low temperature stress during germination and early seedling growth is an important constraint of global production of maize. The effects of seed priming with 0.25%, 0.50%, and 0.75% (w/v) chitosan solutions at 15 °C on the growth and physiological changes were investigated using two maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines, HuangC (chilling-tolerant) and Mo17 (chilling-sensitive). While seed priming with chitosan had no significant effect on germination percentage under low temperature stress, it enhanced germination index, reduced the mean germination time (MGT), and increased shoot height, root length, and shoot and root dry weights in both maize lines. The decline of malondialdehyde (MDA) content and relative permeability of the plasma membrane and the increase of the concentrations of soluble sugars and proline, peroxidase (POD) activity, and catalase (CAT) activity were detected both in the chilling-sensitive and chilling-tolerant maize seedlings after priming with the three concentrations of chitosan. HuangC was less sensitive to responding to different concentrations of chitosan. Priming with 0.50% chitosan for about 60~64 h seemed to have the best effects. Thus, it suggests that seed priming with chitosan may improve the speed of germination of maize seed and benefit for seedling growth under low temperature stress.

Guan, Ya-jing; Hu, Jin; Wang, Xian-ju; Shao, Chen-xia

2009-01-01

185

Eupatoriochromene and encecalin, plant growth regulators from yellow starthistle ( Centaurea solstitialis L. )  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two chromenes, eupatoriochromene (1) and encecalin (2), have been isolated from yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis L.). Both chromenes retard seed germination and reduce radicle and hypocotyl growth of weed and crop plant seedlings. In addition,1 increases adventitious root formation of mung bean cuttings.

Glory B. Merrill

1989-01-01

186

Effect of single application of Trichoderma viride and Pseudomonas fluorescens on growth promotion in cotton plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most important and economically cultivated cotton plant was selected to test the growth promotion by Trichoderma viride and Pseudomonas fluroescens with and without pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phaseolina. Of these, T. viride was found to be more effective than P. fluroescens on shoot and root length elongation. Seed germination percentage, root length, shoot length, fresh weight, dry weight

V. Shanmugaiah; N. Balasubramanian; S. Gomathinayagam; P. T. Manoharan

2009-01-01

187

Involvement of reactive oxygen species in endosperm cap weakening and embryo elongation growth during lettuce seed germination  

PubMed Central

Endosperm cap (CAP) weakening and embryo elongation growth are prerequisites for the completion of lettuce seed germination. Although it has been proposed that the cell wall loosening underlying these processes results from an enzymatic mechanism, it is still unclear which enzymes are involved. Here it is shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are non-enzymatic factors, may be involved in the two processes. In Guasihong lettuce seeds imbibed in water, O2·– and H2O2 accumulated and peroxidase activity increased in the CAP, whereas its puncture force decreased. In addition, in the radicle, the increase in embryo growth potential was accompanied by accumulation of O2·– and an increase in peroxidase activity. Imbibing seeds in 0.3% sodium dichloroisocyanurate (SDIC) reduced endosperm viability and the levels of O2·–, H2O2, and peroxidase activity in the CAP, whereas the decrease in its puncture force was inhibited. However, in the embryo, SDIC did not affect the accumulation of O2·–, peroxidase activity, and the embryo growth potential. As a result, SDIC caused atypical germination, in which the endosperm ruptured at the boundary between the CAP and lateral endosperm. ROS scavengers and ROS generation inhibitors inhibited the CAP weakening and also decreased the embryo growth potential, thus decreasing the percentage of seed germination. Exogenous ROS and ROS generation inducers increased the percentage of CAP rupture to some extent, and the addition of H2O2 to 0.3% SDIC enabled some seeds to undergo typical germination.

Zhang, Yu; Chen, Bingxian; Xu, Zhenjiang; Shi, Zhaowan; Chen, Shanli; Huang, Xi; Chen, Jianxun; Wang, Xiaofeng

2014-01-01

188

Involvement of reactive oxygen species in endosperm cap weakening and embryo elongation growth during lettuce seed germination.  

PubMed

Endosperm cap (CAP) weakening and embryo elongation growth are prerequisites for the completion of lettuce seed germination. Although it has been proposed that the cell wall loosening underlying these processes results from an enzymatic mechanism, it is still unclear which enzymes are involved. Here it is shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are non-enzymatic factors, may be involved in the two processes. In Guasihong lettuce seeds imbibed in water, O2·(-) and H2O2 accumulated and peroxidase activity increased in the CAP, whereas its puncture force decreased. In addition, in the radicle, the increase in embryo growth potential was accompanied by accumulation of O2·(-) and an increase in peroxidase activity. Imbibing seeds in 0.3% sodium dichloroisocyanurate (SDIC) reduced endosperm viability and the levels of O2·(-), H2O2, and peroxidase activity in the CAP, whereas the decrease in its puncture force was inhibited. However, in the embryo, SDIC did not affect the accumulation of O2·(-), peroxidase activity, and the embryo growth potential. As a result, SDIC caused atypical germination, in which the endosperm ruptured at the boundary between the CAP and lateral endosperm. ROS scavengers and ROS generation inhibitors inhibited the CAP weakening and also decreased the embryo growth potential, thus decreasing the percentage of seed germination. Exogenous ROS and ROS generation inducers increased the percentage of CAP rupture to some extent, and the addition of H2O2 to 0.3% SDIC enabled some seeds to undergo typical germination. PMID:24744430

Zhang, Yu; Chen, Bingxian; Xu, Zhenjiang; Shi, Zhaowan; Chen, Shanli; Huang, Xi; Chen, Jianxun; Wang, Xiaofeng

2014-07-01

189

Comparisons of germination traits of alpine plants between fellfield and snowbed habitats  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the seed-germination responses of 27 alpine species with reference to habitat type (fellfield and snowbed), temperature (five regimes), and light requirement. About 70% of species showed >40% germination at warm temperatures without cold stratification. However, a moist-chilling treatment markedly improved the germination percentages in most species, especially under cool conditions. Thus, cold stratification effectively reduced the temperature requirement

Yoshiko Shimono; Gaku Kudo

2005-01-01

190

The Window of Desiccation Tolerance Shown by Early-Stage Germinating Seedlings Remains Open in the Resurrection Plant, Xerophyta viscosa  

PubMed Central

Resurrection plants are renowned for their vegetative desiccation tolerance (DT). While DT in vegetative tissues is rare in angiosperms, it is ubiquitous in mature orthodox seeds. During germination, seedlings gradually lose DT until they pass a point of no return, after which they can no longer survive dehydration. Here we investigate whether seedlings of the resurrection plant Xerophyta viscosa ever lose the capacity to establish DT. Seedlings from different stages of germination were dehydrated for 48 hours and assessed for their ability to recover upon rehydration. While a transient decline in the ability of X. viscosa seedlings to survive dehydration was observed, at no point during germination was the ability to re-establish DT completely lost in all seedlings. Pre-treatment of seedlings with PEG or sucrose reduced this transient decline, and improved the survival rate at all stages of germination. Additionally, we observed that the trait of poikilochlorophylly (or loss of chlorophyll) observed in adult X. viscosa leaves can be induced throughout seedling development. These results suggest that the window of DT seen in germinating orthodox seeds remains open in X. viscosa seedlings and that vegetative DT in Xerophyta species may have evolved from the ability to retain this program through to adulthood.

Lyall, Rafe; Ingle, Robert A.; Illing, Nicola

2014-01-01

191

Axon growth and guidance genes identify T-dependent germinal centre B cells.  

PubMed

Selection of B cells subjected to hypermutation in germinal centres (GC) during T cell-dependent (TD) antibody responses yields memory cells and long-lived plasma cells that produce high affinity antibodies biased to foreign antigens rather than self-antigens. GC also form in T-independent (TI) responses to polysaccharide antigens but failed selection results in GC involution and memory cells are not generated. To date there are no markers that allow phenotypic distinction of T-dependent and TI germinal centre B cells. We compared the global gene expression of GC B cells purified from mice immunized with either TD or TI antigens and identified eighty genes that are differentially expressed in TD GC. Significantly, the largest cluster comprises genes involved in growth and guidance of neuron axons such as Plexin B2, Basp1, Nelf, Shh, Sc4mol and Sult4alpha. This is consistent with formation of long neurite (axon and dendrite)-like structures by mouse and human GC B cells, which may facilitate T:B cell interactions within GC, affinity maturation and B cell memory formation. Expression of BASP1 and PLEXIN B2 protein is very low or undetectable in resting and TI GC B cells, but markedly upregulated in GC B cells induced in the presence of T cell help. Finally we show some of the axon growth genes upregulated in TD-GC B cells including Basp1, Shh, Sult4alpha, Sc4mol are also preferentially expressed in post-GC B cell neoplasms. PMID:17938642

Yu, Di; Cook, Matthew C; Shin, Dong-Mi; Silva, Diego G; Marshall, Jennifer; Toellner, Kai-Michael; Havran, Wendy L; Caroni, Pico; Cooke, Michael P; Morse, Herbert C; MacLennan, Ian C M; Goodnow, Christopher C; Vinuesa, Carola G

2008-01-01

192

Overexpression of the vacuolar sugar carrier AtSWEET16 modifies germination, growth, and stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.  

PubMed

Here, we report that SUGARS WILL EVENTUALLY BE EXPORTED TRANSPORTER (SWEET16) from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is a vacuole-located carrier, transporting glucose (Glc), fructose (Fru), and sucrose (Suc) after heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The SWEET16 gene, similar to the homologs gene SWEET17, is mainly expressed in vascular parenchyma cells. Application of Glc, Fru, or Suc, as well as cold, osmotic stress, or low nitrogen, provoke the down-regulation of SWEET16 messenger RNA accumulation. SWEET16 overexpressors (35SPro:SWEET16) showed a number of peculiarities related to differences in sugar accumulation, such as less Glc, Fru, and Suc at the end of the night. Under cold stress, 35SPro:SWEET16 plants are unable to accumulate Fru, while under nitrogen starvation, both Glc and Fru, but not Suc, were less abundant. These changes of individual sugars indicate that the consequences of an increased SWEET16 activity are dependent upon the type of external stimulus. Remarkably, 35SPro:SWEET16 lines showed improved germination and increased freezing tolerance. The latter observation, in combination with the modified sugar levels, points to a superior function of Glc and Suc for frost tolerance. 35SPro:SWEET16 plants exhibited increased growth efficiency when cultivated on soil and showed improved nitrogen use efficiency when nitrate was sufficiently available, while under conditions of limiting nitrogen, wild-type biomasses were higher than those of 35SPro:SWEET16 plants. Our results identify SWEET16 as a vacuolar sugar facilitator, demonstrate the substantial impact of SWEET16 overexpression on various critical plant traits, and imply that SWEET16 activity must be tightly regulated to allow optimal Arabidopsis development under nonfavorable conditions. PMID:24028846

Klemens, Patrick A W; Patzke, Kathrin; Deitmer, Joachim; Spinner, Lara; Le Hir, Rozenn; Bellini, Catherine; Bedu, Magali; Chardon, Fabien; Krapp, Anne; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

2013-11-01

193

Isolation and identification of alectrol as (+)-orobanchyl acetate, a germination stimulant for root parasitic plants.  

PubMed

Alectrol, a germination stimulant for root parasitic plants, was purified from root exudates of red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and identified as a strigolactone, (+)-orobanchyl acetate [(3aS,4S,8bS,E)-8,8-dimethyl-3-(((R)-4-methyl-5-oxo-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-yloxy)methylene)-2-oxo-3,3a,4,5,6,7,8,8b-octahydro-2H-indeno[1,2-b]furan-4-yl acetate], by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and ESI- and EI-MS spectrometry. Orobanchyl acetate afforded an [M-42](+) ion in EI-MS and thus had been recognized as an isomer of strigol. Orobanchyl acetate was detected in root exudates of soybean (Glycine max L.) and cowpea (Vigina unguiculata L.) along with orobanchol. PMID:17822727

Xie, Xiaonan; Yoneyama, Kaori; Kusumoto, Dai; Yamada, Yoichi; Yokota, Takao; Takeuchi, Yasutomo; Yoneyama, Koichi

2008-01-01

194

Isolation and identification of alectrol as (+)-orobanchyl acetate, a germination stimulant for root parasitic plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alectrol, a germination stimulant for root parasitic plants, was purified from root exudates of red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and identified as a strigolactone, (+)-orobanchyl acetate [(3aS,4S,8bS,E)-8,8-dimethyl-3-(((R)-4-methyl-5-oxo-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-yloxy)methylene)-2-oxo-3,3a,4,5,6,7,8,8b-octahydro-2H-indeno[1,2-b]furan-4-yl acetate], by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and ESI- and EI-MS spectrometry. Orobanchyl acetate afforded an [M–42]+ ion in EI-MS and thus had been recognized as an isomer of strigol. Orobanchyl acetate was

Xiaonan Xie; Kaori Yoneyama; Dai Kusumoto; Yoichi Yamada; Takao Yokota; Yasutomo Takeuchi; Koichi Yoneyama

2008-01-01

195

Naringenin inhibits seed germination and seedling root growth through a salicylic acid-independent mechanism in Arabidopsis thaliana.  

PubMed

Flavonoids fulfill an enormous range of biological functions in plants. In seeds, these compounds play several roles; for instance proanthocyanidins protect them from moisture, pathogen attacks, mechanical stress, UV radiation, etc., and flavonols have been suggested to protect the embryo from oxidative stress. The present study aimed at determining the role of flavonoids in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) seed germination, and the involvement of salicylic acid (SA) and auxin (indole-3-acetic acid), two phytohormones with the same biosynthetic origin as flavonoids, the shikimate pathway, in such a putative role. We show that naringenin, a flavanone, strongly inhibits the germination of A. thaliana seeds in a dose-dependent and SA-independent manner. Altered auxin levels do not affect seed germination in Arabidopsis, but impaired auxin transport does, although to a minor extent. Naringenin and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) impair auxin transport through the same mechanisms, so the inhibition of germination by naringenin might involve impaired auxin transport among other mechanisms. From the present study it is concluded that naringenin inhibits the germination of Arabidopsis seeds in a dose-dependent and SA-independent manner, and the results also suggest that such effects are exerted, at least to some extent, through impaired auxin transport, although additional mechanisms seem to operate as well. PMID:23031844

Hernández, Iker; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

2012-12-01

196

Biology of Plants  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Younger students can learn about plant biology. Topics include characteristics of living things, germination and growth, the basic parts of plants, photosynthesis, reproduction, and ecological adaptations of plants. The information presented can also be ordered as a video.

2005-01-01

197

Factors influencing seed germination of medicinal plant Salvia aegyptiaca L. (Lamiaceae)  

PubMed Central

Salvia aegyptiaca is a xerophytic perennial herb belongs to the Lamiaceae family commonly used for medicinal purposes. Laboratory experiments were carried out to assess the effects of temperature and salinity on seed germination and recovery responses after transferring to distilled water. Temperatures between 10 and 40 °C seem to be favourable for the germination of this species. Germination was inhibited by either an increase or decrease in temperature from the optimum (30 °C). The highest germination percentages were obtained at 0 mM NaCl; however, the increase of solution osmolalities progressively inhibited seed germination. The germination rate decreased with an increase in salinity for most of tested temperatures, but comparatively higher rates were obtained at 30 °C. Salt stress decreased both the percentage and the rate of germination. An interaction between salinity and temperature yielded no germination at 300 mM NaCl. By experimental transfer to distilled water, S. aegyptiaca seeds that were exposed to moderately saline conditions recovered and keep their ability to germinate mostly at low temperatures. At 300 mM NaCl, germination recovery decreased with increasing temperature and it was completely inhibited at 40 °C.

Gorai, Mustapha; Gasmi, Hayet; Neffati, Mohamed

2011-01-01

198

Respective roles of the glutamine synthetase\\/glutamate synthase cycle and glutamate dehydrogenase in ammonium and amino acid metabolism during germination and post-germinative growth in the model legume Medicago truncatula  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our objective was to determine the respective roles of the couple glutamine synthetase\\/glutamate synthase (GS\\/GOGAT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) in ammonium and amino acid metabolism during germination and post-germinative growth in the model legume Medicago truncatula Gaertn. For this aim, amino acids were analyzed by HPLC and changes in gene expression of several enzymes involved in N and C metabolism

Gaëlle Glevarec; Sophie Bouton; Emmanuel Jaspard; Marie-Thérèse Riou; Jean-Bernard Cliquet; Akira Suzuki; Anis M. Limami

2004-01-01

199

Deficiency of maize starch-branching enzyme i results in altered starch fine structure, decreased digestibility and reduced coleoptile growth during germination  

PubMed Central

Background Two distinct starch branching enzyme (SBE) isoforms predate the divergence of monocots and dicots and have been conserved in plants since then. This strongly suggests that both SBEI and SBEII provide unique selective advantages to plants. However, no phenotype for the SBEI mutation, sbe1a, had been previously observed. To explore this incongruity the objective of the present work was to characterize functional and molecular phenotypes of both sbe1a and wild-type (Wt) in the W64A maize inbred line. Results Endosperm starch granules from the sbe1a mutant were more resistant to digestion by pancreatic ?-amylase, and the sbe1a mutant starch had an altered branching pattern for amylopectin and amylose. When kernels were germinated, the sbe1a mutant was associated with shorter coleoptile length and higher residual starch content, suggesting that less efficient starch utilization may have impaired growth during germination. Conclusions The present report documents for the first time a molecular phenotype due to the absence of SBEI, and suggests strongly that it is associated with altered physiological function of the starch in vivo. We believe that these results provide a plausible rationale for the conservation of SBEI in plants in both monocots and dicots, as greater seedling vigor would provide an important survival advantage when resources are limited.

2011-01-01

200

Effect of water activity and temperature on the germination and growth of Aspergillus tamarii isolated from "Maldive fish".  

PubMed

Germination times and radial growth rates of cyclopiazonic acid producing strains of Aspergillus tamarii isolated from a smoked dried fish product were studied over water activities (a(w)) ranging from 0.99 to 0.79 at 25°C, 30°C, 35°C and 40°C on two laboratory media. The a(w) of the media was controlled by either NaCl or a mixture of glucose and fructose. The optimum germination and growth were observed at temperatures between 30°C and 35°C. Germination was favored at the highest a(w) of 0.99 under all conditions. Growth however was dependent on the media and temperature with a lower optimum a(w) of 0.95 for NaCl media and 0.95 to 0.92 a(w) on media containing glucose/fructose. The minimum a(w) for growth was often higher than for germination while both parameters were influenced by temperature and media type. Germination on NaCl media was prevented at a(w) values below 0.82 at 25°C and 30°C, 0.85 at 35°C and 40°C. However, growth did not occur at a(w) <0.85 at 25-35°C. At those temperatures on glucose/fructose media, growth was observed at the lowest a(w) tested (0.79). On both media, the restrictive effect of lowered water activity was more pronounced at 40°C than at 25-35°C. Delays in germination increased and growth rates decreased with marginal a(w) and temperature conditions. The fungi displayed better tolerance on glucose/fructose media than on NaCl media on which it was partly inhibited by the NaCl. The information obtained here could be used to develop strategies for the control of this xerophilic fungus on smoked dried fish and other tropical foods on which it predominates. PMID:23177051

Mohamed, Shazla; Mo, Li; Flint, Steve; Palmer, Jon; Fletcher, Graham C

2012-11-15

201

Increased germination of diverse crop-wild hybrid sunflower seeds.  

PubMed

Gene flow from crop fields to wild populations produces hybrids that often differ from their wild counterparts in growth form, phenology, and life history characteristics. Germination and dormancy dynamics have a strong influence on population persistence, competitive dynamics, and ultimately, plant fitness. They may also play a role in modifying crop gene introgression, which has been of primary interest since the release of transgenic crops. We investigated how seed germination and dormancy were affected by sunflower crop wild hybridization in both laboratory and field experiments. Hybridization increased seed germination and decreased dormancy. Of the nine wild populations we assayed, most of their hybrids had higher germination than the wilds of the same population. However, absolute germination levels varied by population and testing environment. Hybrids produced by three different crop lines differed in germination, and their germination rankings shifted across populations. Increased germination in hybrids could accelerate crop gene introgression, provided that hybrids germinate in an appropriate period. Differences in relative germination of wild and hybrid seed indicated that the effect of germination on introgression will likely vary by population due, in part, to initial levels of dormancy in the population. Therefore, the implications of gene flow from crops with novel characteristics or from transgenic crops will also vary by population. PMID:16826985

Mercer, Kristin L; Shaw, Ruth G; Wyse, Donald L

2006-06-01

202

Novel light-activated protein kinases as key regulators of plant growth and development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plants have evolved highly sensitive sensory photoreceptor systems to regulate various aspects of their growth and development.\\u000a Many responses such as seed germination, flowering and dormancy are controlled by red and far-red regions of the solar spectrum\\u000a through the phytochrome family of photoreceptors. However, several other responses such as stem growth inhibition, phototropism\\u000a and opening of stomata are controlled by

S. C. Maheshwari; J. P. Khurana; S. K. Sopory

1999-01-01

203

Inhibition of microbial growth and enrichment of gamma-aminobutyric acid during germination of brown rice by electrolyzed oxidizing water.  

PubMed

Electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) has been regarded as a potential environmentally friendly broad spectrum microbial decontaminant. EOW with a pH of 3.0 and oxidation reduction potential of 1,079.0 mV were generated by the electrolysis of a dilute NaCl solution (20 mM) in an electrochemical cell. The effects of EOW, 1% NaClO solution, and alkaline electrolyzed water on controlling microbial growth, germination ratio, and enrichment of gamma-aminobutyric acid in germinated brown rice (GBR) were evaluated in this study. Results show that EOW was the most effective at inhibiting microbial growth during germination. Rinsing the rice grains with EOW at 12-h intervals resulted in aerobic plate count reductions of 4.82 log CFU/g, while soaking resulted in bacterial count reductions of 5.38 log CFU/g after 72 h of germination. Moreover, EOW significantly enriched gamma-aminobutyric acid content in GBR (P < 0.05); content was increased 1.6 times in grain rinsed with EOW and 1.8 times in grain soaked in EOW. The findings indicate that EOW is a feasible disinfectant for industrial GBR production. PMID:20202333

Lu, Zhan-Hui; Zhang, Yan; Li, Li-Te; Curtis, Rempel B; Kong, Xiao-Lin; Fulcher, R Gary; Zhang, Gong; Cao, Wei

2010-03-01

204

Gene expression and oxalate oxidase activity of two germin isoforms induced by stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wheat germin is a homopentameric 125 kD glycoprotein mainly localized in the cell wall of monocots, and is a specific marker\\u000a of the onset of growth in germinating seeds. The major objective of this study was to examine the expression and oxalate oxidase\\u000a activity of two wheat germin isoforms: gf-2.8 and gf-3.8 in transgenic tobacco plants. The transgenic tobacco plants

Justyna Nowakowska

1998-01-01

205

Oxygen requirement of germinating flax seeds.  

PubMed

Plant experiments in earth orbit are typically prepared on the ground and germinated in orbit to study gravity effects on the developing seedlings. Germination requires the breakdown of storage compounds, and this metabolism depends upon respiration, making oxygen one of the limiting factors in seed germination. In microgravity lack of run-off of excess water requires careful testing of water dispensation and oxygen availability. In preparation for a shuttle experiment (MICRO on STS-107) we studied germination and growth of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seedlings in the developed hardware (Magnetic Field Chamber, MFC). We tested between four to 32 seeds per chamber (air volume=14 mL) and after 36 h measured the root length. At 90 microliters O2 per seed (32 seeds/chamber), the germination decreased from 94 to 69%, and the root length was reduced by 20%, compared to 8 seeds per chamber. Based on the percent germination and root length obtained in controlled gas mixtures between 3.6 and 21.6% O2 we determined the lower limit of reliable germination to be 10 vol. % O2 at atmospheric pressure. Although the oxygen available in the MFC's can support the intended number of seeds, the data show that seed storage and microgravity-related limitations may reduce germination. PMID:14686434

Kuznetsov, Oleg A; Hasenstein, K H

2003-01-01

206

Oxygen requirement of germinating flax seeds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plant experiments in earth orbit are typically prepared on the ground and germinated in orbit to study gravity effects on the developing seedlings. Germination requires the breakdown of storage compounds, and this metabolism depends upon respiration, making oxygen one of the limiting factors in seed germination. In microgravity lack of run-off of excess water requires careful testing of water dispensation and oxygen availability. In preparation for a shuttle experiment (MICRO on STS-107) we studied germination and growth of flax ( Linum usitatissimum L.) seedlings in the developed hardware (Magnetic Field Chamber, MFC). We tested between four to 32 seeds per chamber (air volume = 14 mL) and after 36 h measured the root length. At 90 ?l O 2 per seed (32 seeds/chamber), the germination decreased from 94 to 69%, and the root length was reduced by 20%, compared to 8 seeds per chamber. Based on the percent germination and root length obtained in controlled gas mixtures between 3.6 and 21.6% O 2 we determined the lower limit of reliable germination to be 10 vol. % O 2 at atmospheric pressure. Although the oxygen available in the MFC's can support the intended number of seeds, the data show that seed storage and microgravity-related limitations may reduce germination.

Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Hasenstein, K. H.

2003-05-01

207

Oxygen requirement of germinating flax seeds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plant experiments in earth orbit are typically prepared on the ground and germinated in orbit to study gravity effects on the developing seedlings. Germination requires the breakdown of storage compounds, and this metabolism depends upon respiration, making oxygen one of the limiting factors in seed germination. In microgravity lack of run-off of excess water requires careful testing of water dispensation and oxygen availability. In preparation for a shuttle experiment (MICRO on STS-107) we studied germination and growth of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seedlings in the developed hardware (Magnetic Field Chamber, MFC). We tested between four to 32 seeds per chamber (air volume=14 mL) and after 36 h measured the root length. At 90 microliters O2 per seed (32 seeds/chamber), the germination decreased from 94 to 69%, and the root length was reduced by 20%, compared to 8 seeds per chamber. Based on the percent germination and root length obtained in controlled gas mixtures between 3.6 and 21.6% O2 we determined the lower limit of reliable germination to be 10 vol. % O2 at atmospheric pressure. Although the oxygen available in the MFC's can support the intended number of seeds, the data show that seed storage and microgravity-related limitations may reduce germination. c2003 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Hasentein, K. H. (Principal Investigator)

2003-01-01

208

Simulated flooding and drought effects on germination, growth, and yield parameters of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of drought on germination of sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum L.) also known as benniseed were simulated in the laboratory using varying concentrations of sodium chloride, glucose and polyethylene glycol at 0 - 0.50 MPa water potential. Higher osmotic conditions (0.25 - 0.50 MPa) significantly reduced the percentage germination, radical and shoot development. The ability of the three chemicals

J. K. MENSAH; B. O. OBADONI; P. G. ERUOTOR; F. ONOME-IRIEGUNA

2006-01-01

209

Nickel toxicity on seed germination and growth in radish (Raphanus sativus) and its recovery using copper and boron.  

PubMed

Effect of various concentrations of nickel (100, 200, 500 and 1000 microM) and recovery treatments of boron (50 and 100 microM) and copper (15 and 75 microM) each with 200 microM and 500 microM of nickel on germination, growth, biomass, chlorophyll, carotenoids, pheophytin, amylase, protein, sugar as well as activity of catalase and peroxidase were studied in radish (Raphanus sativus cv. Early menu) seedlings. Nickel treatments caused a considerable reduction in germination percentage, growth and biomass. The different pigments were also decreased with nickel treatments. However boron addition with nickel recovered the negative effect on pigment contents. Among biochemical estimations, amylase activity and total proteins were found to be reduced in nickel treatments. Peroxidase and catalase activity were induced other than higher total sugar with nickel treatments. The combination of nickel with boron resulted into increased protein contents. This combination also reduced the catalase and peroxidase activity. The influence of nickel with copper failed to produce significant recovery except 200 microM nickel in combination with 15 microM copper with regard to catalase and peroxidase activity. The effect of nickel on hydrolyzing enzyme amylase was observed to be inhibitory resulting into poor germination followed by poor seedlings growth. The stress protecting enzymes peroxidase and catalase seem to be induced under the influence of nickel, and providing protection to the seedlings. The application of boron with nickel showed improved germination and growth. The level of catalase and peroxidase were found to be significantly reduced showing normal growth and biomass of seedlings. PMID:20120479

Yadav, Shiv Shankar; Shukla, Rajni; Sharma, Y K

2009-05-01

210

Ammonia Volatilization from Urea-Application Influenced Germination and Early Seedling Growth of Dry Direct-Seeded Rice  

PubMed Central

Poor seed germination and early seedling growth associated with urea-induced soil ammonia volatilization are major constraints in the adoption of dry direct-seeded rice. To directly examine soil ammonia volatilization and its damage to seed germination and early seedling growth of dry direct-seeded rice when urea is applied at seeding, two Petri-dish incubation experiments and a field experiment were conducted. Ammonia volatilization due to urea application significantly reduced seed germination and early seedling growth of dry direct-seedling rice. NBPT significantly reduced ammonia volatilization following urea application. The application of ammonium sulfate, instead of urea at seeding, may mitigate poor crop establishment of dry direct-seeded rice. Root growth of dry direct-seeded rice was more seriously inhibited by soil ammonia volatilization than that of shoot. Results suggest that roots are more sensitive to soil ammonia toxicity than shoots in dry direct-seeded rice system when N is applied as urea at seeding.

Qi, Xiaoli; Wu, Wei; Shah, Farooq; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Liu, Hongyan; Nie, Lixiao

2012-01-01

211

Ammonia volatilization from urea-application influenced germination and early seedling growth of dry direct-seeded rice.  

PubMed

Poor seed germination and early seedling growth associated with urea-induced soil ammonia volatilization are major constraints in the adoption of dry direct-seeded rice. To directly examine soil ammonia volatilization and its damage to seed germination and early seedling growth of dry direct-seeded rice when urea is applied at seeding, two Petri-dish incubation experiments and a field experiment were conducted. Ammonia volatilization due to urea application significantly reduced seed germination and early seedling growth of dry direct-seedling rice. NBPT significantly reduced ammonia volatilization following urea application. The application of ammonium sulfate, instead of urea at seeding, may mitigate poor crop establishment of dry direct-seeded rice. Root growth of dry direct-seeded rice was more seriously inhibited by soil ammonia volatilization than that of shoot. Results suggest that roots are more sensitive to soil ammonia toxicity than shoots in dry direct-seeded rice system when N is applied as urea at seeding. PMID:22454611

Qi, Xiaoli; Wu, Wei; Shah, Farooq; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Liu, Hongyan; Nie, Lixiao

2012-01-01

212

Dynamic adaption of metabolic pathways during germination and growth of lily pollen tubes after inhibition of the electron transport chain.  

PubMed

Investigation of the metabolome and the transcriptome of pollen of lily (Lilium longiflorum) gave a comprehensive overview of metabolic pathways active during pollen germination and tube growth. More than 100 different metabolites were determined simultaneously by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and expressed genes of selected metabolic pathways were identified by next-generation sequencing of lily pollen transcripts. The time-dependent changes in metabolite abundances, as well as the changes after inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, revealed a fast and dynamic adaption of the metabolic pathways in the range of minutes. The metabolic state prior to pollen germination differed clearly from the metabolic state during pollen tube growth, as indicated by principal component analysis of all detected metabolites and by detailed observation of individual metabolites. For instance, the amount of sucrose increased during the first 60 minutes of pollen culture but decreased during tube growth, while glucose and fructose showed the opposite behavior. Glycolysis, tricarbonic acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, starch, and fatty acid degradation were activated, providing energy during pollen germination and tube growth. Inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain by antimycin A resulted in an immediate production of ethanol and a fast rearrangement of metabolic pathways, which correlated with changes in the amounts of the majority of identified metabolites, e.g. a rapid increase in ?-aminobutyric acid indicated the activation of a ?-aminobutyric acid shunt in the tricarbonic acid cycle, while ethanol fermentation compensated the reduced ATP production after inhibition of the oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:23660836

Obermeyer, Gerhard; Fragner, Lena; Lang, Veronika; Weckwerth, Wolfram

2013-08-01

213

Effects of Quality Composts and Other Organic Amendments and Their Humic and Fulvic Acid Fractions on the Germination and Early Growth of Slickspot Peppergrass (Lepidium Papilliferum) and Switchgrass in Various Experimental Conditions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Scientific work done during this reporting period consisted of: 1. preliminary experiments aiming to improve the germination of slickspot peppergrass (Lepidium papilliferum) seeds; 2. Germination and early-growth experiments of slickspot peppergrass seeds...

S. Nicola

2009-01-01

214

Evaluation of Fungicides on Growth and Conidial Germination of Verticillium theobromae Isolated from Plantain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An evaluation of three fungicides, namely, benomyl [methyl l-(butyl-carbamoyl)-2-benzimidazole carbamate], calixin (tridomorph) and dithane M-45 (mancozeb), was carried out for their inhibitory effects on Verticillium theobromae, the causal organism of cigar-end rot disease of plantain (Musa paradisiaca). The LD50 of calixin, benomyl and dithane M-45 in inhibiting mycelial growth, were 0.14, 0.98 and 535.17 µg mL-1, respectively. Calixin was also the most effective in conidial germination inhibition with an LD50 of 21.78 µg mL-1, as compared with dithane M-45 86.39 µg mL-1 and benomyl 275.50 µg mL-1. Germ tubes of the test organism were distorted by the fungicides at varying concentrations. Calixin had greater distortion effect at a lower concentration of 10 µg mL-1, dithane M-45 (100 µg mL-1) and benomyl (1000 µg mL-1). The relevance of these results in relation to the control and management of cigar-end rot disease of plantain is discussed.

Igeleke, C. L.; Ayanru, D. K. G.

215

G Protein Signaling in the Regulation of Arabidopsis Seed Germination  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Seed germination and early seedling growth are regulated by an intricate network of hormonal signaling pathways. The plant hormones gibberellic acid (GA) and brassinosteroids (BRs) are important positive regulators of these processes, whereas the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a potent negative regulator. In Arabidopsis, analysis of mutant plants has implicated heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) components in regulation of seed germination by all three of these hormones.

Sarah M. Assmann (Penn State University;Biology Department REV)

2005-11-01

216

Influences of addition of different krilium in saline-sodic soil on the seed germination and growth of cabbage  

Microsoft Academic Search

China is one of the largest countries with huge amount of saline-sodic soil. How to ameliorate these lands is a hotspot in China. Through measurement of soil salinity, pH value and seed germination and growth status of cabbage seedlings, 17 kinds of krilium were added to experimented soil to evaluate their effects on amelioration of heavy saline-sodic soil. Firstly, among

He Haisheng; Wang Wenjie; Zhu Hong; Zu Yuangang; Zhang Zhonghua; Guan Yu; Xu Huinan; Yu Xingyang

2008-01-01

217

Regulation of Pathogenic Spore Germination by CgRac1 in the Fungal Plant Pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides ? ‡  

PubMed Central

Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is a facultative plant pathogen: it can live as a saprophyte on dead organic matter or as a pathogen on a host plant. Different patterns of conidial germination have been recognized under saprophytic and pathogenic conditions, which also determine later development. Here we describe the role of CgRac1 in regulating pathogenic germination. The hallmark of pathogenic germination is unilateral formation of a single germ tube following the first cell division. However, transgenic strains expressing a constitutively active CgRac1 (CA-CgRac1) displayed simultaneous formation of two germ tubes, with nuclei continuing to divide in both cells after the first cell division. CA-CgRac1 also caused various other abnormalities, including difficulties in establishing and maintaining cell polarity, reduced conidial and hyphal adhesion, and formation of immature appressoria. Consequently, CA-CgRac1 isolates were completely nonpathogenic. Localization studies with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-CgRac1 fusion protein showed that the CgRac1 protein is abundant in conidia and in hyphal tips. Although the CFP signal was equally distributed in both cells of a germinating conidium, reactive oxygen species accumulated only in the cell that produced a germ tube, indicating that CgRac1 was active only in the germinating cell. Collectively, our results show that CgRac1 is a major regulator of asymmetric development and that it is involved in the regulation of both morphogenesis and nuclear division. Modification of CgRac1 activity disrupts the morphogenetic program and prevents fungal infection.

Nesher, Iris; Minz, Anna; Kokkelink, Leonie; Tudzynski, Paul; Sharon, Amir

2011-01-01

218

LED Systems Target Plant Growth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To help develop technologies for growing edible biomass (food crops) in space, Kennedy Space Center partnered with Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC), of Madison, Wisconsin, through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. One result of this research was the High Efficiency Lighting with Integrated Adaptive Control (HELIAC) system, components of which have been incorporated into a variety of agricultural greenhouse and consumer aquarium lighting features. The new lighting systems can be adapted to a specific plant species during a specific growth stage, allowing maximum efficiency in light absorption by all available photosynthetic tissues.

2010-01-01

219

On the Evolutionary Significance of the Morphological Characters of the Germination of Flowering Plants (K Voprosu Ob Evolyutsionnom Znachenii Morfologicheskikh Osobennostei Prorastaniya Tsvetkovykh Rastenii).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

At present a considerable number of facts are known which indicate the great importance of investigations on the morphology of germination of flowering plants to throw light upon the history of their origin and upon their phylogenetic taxonomy. The study ...

I. T. Vasilchenko

1969-01-01

220

(Plant growth with limited water)  

SciTech Connect

The work supported by DOE in the last year built on our earlier findings that stem growth in soybean subjected to limited water is inhibited first by a physical limitation followed in a few hours by metabolic changes that reduce the extensibility of the cell walls. With time, there is modest recovery in extensibility and a 28kD protein accumulates in the walls of the growth-affected cells. A 31kD protein that was 80% similar in amino acid sequence also was present but did not accumulate in the walls of the stem cells. Explorations of the mRNA for these proteins showed that the mRNA for the 28kD protein increased in the shoot in response to water deprivation but the mRNA for the 31kD protein did not accumulate. In contrast, the roots continued to grow and the mRNA for the 31kD protein accumulated but the mRNA for the 28kD protein was undetectable. We also explored how growth occurs in the absence of an external water supply. We found that, under these conditions, internal water is mobilized from surrounding nongrowing or slowly growing tissues and is used by rapidly growing cells. We showed that a low water potential is normally present in the enlarging tissues and is the likely force that extracts water from the surrounding tissues. We found that it involved a gradient in water potential that extended from the xylem to the outlying cells in the enlarging region and was not observed in the slowly growing basal tissue of the stems of the same plant. The gradient was measured directly with single cell determinations of turgor and osmotic potential in intact plants. The gradient may explain instances of growth inhibition with limited water when there is no change in the turgor of the enlarging cells. 17 refs.

Not Available

1991-01-01

221

Evaluation of the effect of clinostat rotation on pollen germination and tube development as a tool for selection of plants in Space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The choice of species and cultivar on which rely to sustain Close Loop Environmental Systems is generally approached by analysing the behaviour of plants in presence of stress (sporophytic selection). In this paper, we investigated the possibility to conduct the selection among genotypes in Space through the male gametophytic selection. Thus, we studied the effect of simulated microgravity on pollen germination and tube development of both woody and herbaceous crop species: Prunus armeniaca (apricot), P. dulcis (almond), Malus domestica (apple) and Vicia faba (broad bean). Pollen collected from just bloomed flowers was assessed for viability and incubated on the optimal growing medium in petri dishes both on a uni-axial clinostat and stationary in 1g. Then, pollen was observed under a light microscope to detect percent germination and growth direction. Histochemical analyses were performed to verify the presence and distribution of storage substances. Moreover, specific stainings and epifluorescent microscopy were applied to count nuclei, follow the migration of sperm cells and investigate the presence, size and morphology of callose plugs. Results showed that simulated microgravity affected pollen tube development. The different response showed by the various species indicates that male-gametophytic selection could be useful for the selection of plants in microgravity.

De Micco, Veronica; Scala, Michele; Aronne, Giovanna

2006-05-01

222

Endophytic bacteria isolated from orchid and their potential to promote plant growth.  

PubMed

Twelve endophytic bacteria were isolated from the meristem of in vitro Cymbidium eburneum orchid, and screened according to indole yield quantified by colorimetric assay, in vitro phosphate solubilization, and potential for plant growth promotion under greenhouse conditions. Eight strains with positive results were classified into the genus Paenibacillus by FAME profile, and evaluated for their ability to increase survival and promote the growth of in vitro germinated Cattleya loddigesii seedlings during the acclimatization process. The obtained results showed that all strains produced detectable indole levels and did not exhibit potential for solubilizing inorganic phosphate. Particularly, an increase of the total biomass and number of leaves was observed. Two strains of Paenibacillus macerans promoted plant growth under greenhouse conditions. None of the treatments had a deleterious effect on growth of inoculated plants. These results suggest that these bacterial effects could be potentially useful to promote plant growth during seedling acclimatization in orchid species other than the species of origin. PMID:23014841

Faria, Deise Cristina; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Melo, Itamar Soares; de Carvalho Costa, Francisco Eduardo

2013-02-01

223

Fabacyl acetate, a germination stimulant for root parasitic plants from Pisum sativum.  

PubMed

A germination stimulant, fabacyl acetate, was purified from root exudates of pea (Pisum sativum L.) and its structure was determined as ent-2'-epi-4a,8a-epoxyorobanchyl acetate [(3aR,4R,4aR,8bS,E)-4a,8a-epoxy-8,8-dimethyl-3-(((R)-4-methyl-5-oxo-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-yloxy)methylene)-2-oxo-3,3a,4,5,6,7,8,8b-decahydro-2H-indeno[1,2-b]furan-4-yl acetate], by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic, ESI- and EI-MS spectrometric, X-ray crystallographic analyses, and by comparing the (1)H NMR spectroscopic data and relative retention times (RR(t)) in LC-MS and GC-MS with those of synthetic standards prepared from (+)-orobanchol and (+)-2'-epiorobanchol. The (1)H NMR spectroscopic data and RR(t) of fabacyl acetate were identical with those of an isomer prepared from (+)-2'-epiorobanchol except for the opposite sign in CD spectra. This is the first natural ent-strigolactone containing an epoxide group. Fabacyl acetate was previously detected in root exudates of other Fabaceae plants including faba bean (Vicia faba L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). PMID:19155028

Xie, Xiaonan; Yoneyama, Kaori; Harada, Yuta; Fusegi, Norio; Yamada, Yoichi; Ito, Satoshi; Yokota, Takao; Takeuchi, Yasutomo; Yoneyama, Koichi

2009-01-01

224

IAA production during germination of Orobanche spp. seeds.  

PubMed

Broomrapes (Orobanche spp.) are parasitic plants, whose growth and development fully depend on the nutritional connection established between the parasite and the roots of the respective host plant. Phytohormones are known to play a role in establishing the specific Orobanche-host plant interaction. The first step in the interaction is seed germination triggered by a germination stimulant secreted by the host-plant roots. We quantified indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) during the seed germination of tobacco broomrape (Orobanche ramosa) and sunflower broomrape (O. cumana). IAA was mainly released from Orobanche seeds in host-parasite interactions as compared to non-host-parasite interactions. Moreover, germinating seeds of O. ramosa released IAA as early as 24 h after the seeds were exposed to the germination stimulant, even before development of the germ tube. ABA levels remained unchanged during the germination of the parasites' seeds. The results presented here show that IAA production is probably part of a mechanism triggering germination upon the induction by the host factor, thus resulting in seed germination. PMID:15310074

Slavov, Slavtcho; van Onckelen, Henry; Batchvarova, Rossitza; Atanassov, Atanas; Prinsen, Els

2004-07-01

225

Gene expression in the soybean seed axis during germination and early seedling growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Copy-DNA clones have been obtained that distinguish eight messenger mRNAs, moderately abundant in the axes of the germinating soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) seedling. These clones have been used to characterize the size of the mRNAs and to anlyze the accumulation of the mRNAs at different time points and in different parts of the axis during germination and early seedling

K. Datta; H. Parker; V. Averyhart-Fullard; A. Schmidt; A. Marcus

1987-01-01

226

Optimization of plant mineral nutrition under growth-limiting conditions in a lunar greenhouse  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It may be assumed that the first plants in a lunar base will play a main role in forming a protosoil of acceptable fertility needed for purposively growing second generation plants like wheat, rice, tulips, etc. The residues of the first-generation plants could be composted and transformed by microorganisms into a soil-like substrate within a loop of regenerative life support system. The lunar regolith may be used as a substrate for plant growth at the very beginning of a mission to reduce its cost. The use of microbial communities for priming plants will allow one to facilitate adaption to stressful conditions and to support the plant development under growth limiting conditions. Well-defined plant-associated bacteria were used for growing three cultivars to colonize French marigold (Tagetes patula L.) in anorthosite, a substrate of low bioavailability, analogous to a lunar rock. The consortium was composed of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and the bacterium Paenibacillus sp. IMBG156 which stimulated seed germination, better plant development, and finally, the flowering of inoculated tagetes. In contrast, control plants grew poorly in the anorthosite and practically did not survive until flowering. Analysis of bacterial community composition showed that all species colonized plant roots, however, the rate of colonization depended on the allelopatic characteristics of marigold varieties. Bacteria of consortium were able to liberate some elements (Ca, Fe, Mn, Si, Ni, Cu, Zn) from substrate anorthosite. Plant colonization by mixed culture of bacterial strains resulted in the increase of accumulation of K, Mg, Mn by the plant and in the lowering of the level of toxic metal accumulation. It was assumed that a rationally assembled consortium of bacterial strains promoted germination of marygold seeds and supported the plant development under growth limiting conditions by means of bioleaching plant essential nutritional elements and by protecting the plant against hyperaccumulation of some toxic metals.

Zaets, I.; Voznyuk, T.; Kovalchuk, M.; Rogutskyy, I.; Lukashov, D.; Mytrokhyn, O.; Mashkovska, S.; Foing, B.; Kozyrovska, N.

227

Determination of plant resistance to carbamate herbicidal compounds inhibiting cell division and early growth by seed and plantlets bioassays.  

PubMed

Herbicide-resistant plants can be generated by either traditional breeding procedures or genetic engineering. Analyses of plant responses to a newly developed herbicide or the tolerance level of a newly developed plant line to a given herbicide are based on various bioassays. Here, we describe several methods for quantitative measurements of plants' responses to propham application, as a model herbicide of the carbamate family. Dose-response assays include seed germination and analyses of shoot and root elongation on paper. To better reflect the natural interaction between the plant, the soil and the herbicide, a protocol for germination and root elongation on sand is described. Finally, a more sensitive bioassay is based on plant growth on agar medium. The described protocols are simple, reproducible and can be easily adopted for a variety of plant species and for various herbicides. Plants' response to a given herbicide can be determined within a few weeks. PMID:17406469

Weiss, Yael; Rubin, Baruch; Shulman, Avidor; Ben Shir, Irina; Keinan, Ehud; Wolf, Shmuel

2006-01-01

228

Smoke as a germination cue: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Slow combustion or burning of dry or green plant material from many sources produces volatile compounds that are water soluble and that stimulate the germination of many seeds with different dormancy strategies. The active principals are apparently produced around 160ndash;200 deg;C and are volatilized at higher temperatures. Once dissolved in water the active compounds also stimulate rooting, seedling growth and

N. A. C. Brown; J. van Staden

1997-01-01

229

The Putative E3 Ubiquitin Ligase ECERIFERUM9 Regulates Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis and Response during Seed Germination and Postgermination Growth in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN  

PubMed Central

The ECERIFERUM9 (CER9) gene encodes a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase that functions in cuticle biosynthesis and the maintenance of plant water status. Here, we found that CER9 is also involved in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in seeds and young seedlings of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The germinated embryos of the mutants exhibited enhanced sensitivity to ABA during the transition from reversible dormancy to determinate seedling growth. Expression of the CER9 gene is closely related to ABA levels and displays a similar pattern to that of ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5), which encodes a positive regulator of ABA responses in seeds. cer9 mutant seeds exhibited delayed germination that is independent of seed coat permeability. Quantitative proteomic analyses showed that cer9 seeds had a protein profile similar to that of the wild type treated with ABA. Transcriptomics analyses revealed that genes involved in ABA biosynthesis or signaling pathways were differentially regulated in cer9 seeds. Consistent with this, high levels of ABA were detected in dry seeds of cer9. Blocking ABA biosynthesis by fluridone treatment or by combining an ABA-deficient mutation with cer9 attenuated the phenotypes of cer9. Whereas introduction of the abi1-1, abi3-1, or abi4-103 mutation could completely eliminate the ABA hypersensitivity of cer9, introduction of abi5 resulted only in partial suppression. These results indicate that CER9 is a novel negative regulator of ABA biosynthesis and the ABA signaling pathway during seed germination.

Zhao, Huayan; Zhang, Huoming; Cui, Peng; Ding, Feng; Wang, Guangchao; Li, Rongjun; Jenks, Matthew A.; Lu, Shiyou; Xiong, Liming

2014-01-01

230

Growth, Development and Flowering in Fast Plants  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This document provides extensive background information about how Fast Plants grow and develop. The distinction between growth and development is explained. Also discussed is how genetics plus interactions with the environment produce variation during growth and development.

Program, The W.

231

Arabidopsis CPR5 Independently Regulates Seed Germination and Postgermination Arrest of Development through LOX Pathway and ABA Signaling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) and the lipoxygenases (LOXs) pathway play important roles in seed germination and seedling growth and development. Here, we reported on the functional characterization of Arabidopsis CPR5 in the ABA signaling and LOX pathways. The cpr5 mutant was hypersensitive to ABA in the seed germination, cotyledon greening and root growth, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing CPR5 were

Guilan Gao; Shengchun Zhang; Chengfeng Wang; Xiang Yang; Yaqin Wang; Xiaojun Su; Jinju Du; Chengwei Yang; Diane Bassham

2011-01-01

232

Enhanced germination and gravitropism of soybean in a hypogeomagnetic field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the future manned space exploration, the duration of the missions would significantly in-crease. Investigating plant growth and development under the space environmental conditions is of essential importance for the food supply projects for the astronauts. Hypogeomagnetic field (HGMF), namely, extremely low magnetic field, is one of the main characters of the space environment. Germination is the first vital step of plant growth and development, which determines the final yield of plants. The effect of HGMF on plant growth, especially early ger-mination, still remains open. In this study, we established a hypogeomagnetic field (HGMF) incubation system, the remnant magnetic field inside no more than 250 nT. Soybean seeds were incubated at 25 in HGMF, and the very beginning of soybean germination, from water ab-sorbance of cotyledon to radicle emergence, was examined within 24 h. Our results showed that the germination ratio and weight ratio of emerged soybean radicles were markedly increased during germination in HGMF. Furthermore, the tropism angle of emerged radicle with gravity in HGMF was statistically smaller than that in GMF when the radicle direction was placed opposite to gravity before germination. These results indicate that the germination and gravit-ropism of soybean is enhanced in a hypogeomagnetic environment, This is a new finding about the early seed germination in such a low environmental magnetic field which is comparable to the magnetic field of Lunar Swirls on the Moon (a few hundred nT), and it might provide new perspectives on the space science researches concerning plant growth and food supply.

Mo, Weichuan

233

Effect of essential oils on Aspergillus spore germination, growth and mycotoxin production: a potential source of botanical food preservative  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate effect of essential oils on Aspergillus spore germination, growth and mycotoxin production. Method In vitro antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic activity of essential oils was carried out using poisoned food techniques, spore germination assay, agar dilution assay, and aflatoxin arresting assay on toxigenic strains of Aspergillus species. Results Cymbopogon martinii, Foeniculum vulgare and Trachyspermum ammi (T. ammi) essential oils were tested against toxicogenic isolates of Aspergillus species. T. ammi oil showed highest antifungal activity. Absolute mycelial inhibition was recorded at 1 µl/mL by essential oils of T. ammi. The oil also showed, complete inhibition of spore germination at a concentration of 2 µl/mL. In addition, T. ammi oil showed significant antiaflatoxigenic potency by totally inhibiting aflatoxin production from Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus at 0.5 and 0.75 µl/mL, respectively. Cymbopogon martinii, Foeniculum vulgare and T. ammi oils as antifungal were found superior over synthetic preservative. Moreover, a concentration of 5?336.297 µl/kg body weight was recorded for LC50 on mice indicating the low mammalian toxicity and strengthening its traditional reputations. Conclusions In conclusion, the essential oils from T. ammi can be a potential source of safe natural food preservative for food commodities contamination by storage fungi.

Gemeda, Negero; Woldeamanuel, Yimtubezinash; Asrat, Daniel; Debella, Asfaw

2014-01-01

234

Seed germination and seedling growth in a wilty mutant of sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.): Effect of abscisic acid and osmotic potential  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of abscisic acid (ABA) on seed germination and seedling growth of w?1, a wilty, ABA-deficient sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) mutant, is described in comparison with the control line (W-1). Exogenous ABA inhibited seed germination in both genotypes; however, for some ABA concentrations, whole achenes of w-1 mutant were slightly more inhibited than the wild type; naked seeds of

Anna Lenzi; Marco Fambrini; Stefano Barotti; Claudio Pugliesi; Paolo Vernieri

1995-01-01

235

The effects of solar radiation on plant growth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This phase of this continuing project was completed in April, 1994, using Dahlgren #855 hybrid sunflower seeds and Park Seeds #0950 non-hybrid sunflower seeds in both the control groups and the tests groups. The control groups (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6) were grown under normal, un-radiated, conditions. The tests groups (1a, 2a, 3a, 4a, 5a, and 6a) were grown onboard the Space Shuttle Discovery on the STS-60 flight in February 1994. All data from this experiment (both control and test groups) will be taken and recorded in a data log and compared against each other to determine the radiation effects of solar radiation on plant germination and growth.

Agard, Joslyn

1995-01-01

236

Effects of calcium on seed germination, seedling growth and photosynthesis of six forest tree species under simulated acid rain.  

PubMed

We selected six tree species, Pinus massoniana Lamb., Cryptomeria fortunei Hooibr. ex Otto et Dietr., Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook., Liquidambar formosana Hance, Pinus armandii Franch. and Castanopsis chinensis Hance, which are widely distributed as dominant species in the forest of southern China where acid deposition is becoming more and more serious in recent years. We investigated the effects and potential interactions between simulated acid rain (SiAR) and three calcium (Ca) levels on seed germination, radicle length, seedling growth, chlorophyll content, photosynthesis and Ca content in leaves of these six species. We found that the six species showed different responses to SiAR and different Ca levels. Pinus armandii and C. chinensis were very tolerant to SiAR, whereas the others were more sensitive. The results of significant SiAR?×?Ca interactions on different physiological parameters of the six species demonstrate that additional Ca had a dramatic rescue effect on the seed germination and seedling growth for the sensitive species under SiAR. Altogether, we conclude that the negative effects of SiAR on seed germination, seedling growth and photosynthesis of the four sensitive species could be ameliorated by Ca addition. In contrast, the physiological processes of the two tolerant species were much less affected by both SiAR and Ca treatments. This conclusion implies that the degree of forest decline caused by long-term acid deposition may be attributed not only to the sensitivity of tree species to acid deposition, but also to the Ca level in the soil. PMID:21470980

Liu, Ting-Wu; Wu, Fei-Hua; Wang, Wen-Hua; Chen, Juan; Li, Zhen-Ji; Dong, Xue-Jun; Patton, Janet; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

2011-04-01

237

Gene expression profiles in promoted-growth rice seedlings that germinated from the seeds implanted by low-energy N+ beam  

PubMed Central

The stimulation effect that some beneficial agronomic qualities have exhibited in present-generation plants have also been observed due to ion implantation on plants. However, there is relatively little knowledge regarding the molecular mechanism of the stimulation effects of ion-beam implantation. In order to extend our current knowledge about the functional genes related to this stimulation effect, we have reported a comprehensive microarray analysis of the transcriptome features of the promoted-growth rice seedlings germinating from seeds implanted by a low-energy N+ beam. The results showed that 351 up-regulated transcripts and 470 down-regulated transcripts, including signaling proteins, kinases, plant hormones, transposable elements, transcription factors, non-coding protein RNA (including miRNA), secondary metabolites, resistance proteins, peroxidase and chromatin modification, are all involved in the stimulating effects of ion-beam implantation. The divergences of the functional catalog between the vacuum and ion implantation suggest that ion implantation is the principle cause of the ion-beam implantation biological effects, and revealed the complex molecular networks required to adapt to ion-beam implantation stress in plants, including enhanced transposition of transposable elements, promoted ABA biosynthesis and changes in chromatin modification. Our data will extend the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms and gene regulation of stimulation effects. Further research on the candidates reported in this study should provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of biological effects induced by ion-beam implantation.

Ya, Huiyuan; Chen, Qiufang; Wang, Weidong; Chen, Wanguang; Qin, Guangyong; Jiao, Zhen

2012-01-01

238

Protocol: optimising hydroponic growth systems for nutritional and physiological analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants  

PubMed Central

Background Hydroponic growth systems are a convenient platform for studying whole plant physiology. However, we found through trialling systems as they are described in the literature that our experiments were frequently confounded by factors that affected plant growth, including algal contamination and hypoxia. We also found the way in which the plants were grown made them poorly amenable to a number of common physiological assays. Results The drivers for the development of this hydroponic system were: 1) the exclusion of light from the growth solution; 2) to simplify the handling of individual plants, and 3) the growth of the plant to allow easy implementation of multiple assays. These aims were all met by the use of pierced lids of black microcentrifuge tubes. Seed was germinated on a lid filled with an agar-containing germination media immersed in the same solution. Following germination, the liquid growth media was exchanged with the experimental solution, and after 14-21 days seedlings were transferred to larger tanks with aerated solution where they remained until experimentation. We provide details of the protocol including composition of the basal growth solution, and separate solutions with altered calcium, magnesium, potassium or sodium supply whilst maintaining the activity of the majority of other ions. We demonstrate the adaptability of this system for: gas exchange measurement on single leaves and whole plants; qRT-PCR to probe the transcriptional response of roots or shoots to altered nutrient composition in the growth solution (we demonstrate this using high and low calcium supply); producing highly competent mesophyll protoplasts; and, accelerating the screening of Arabidopsis transformants. This system is also ideal for manipulating plants for micropipette techniques such as electrophysiology or SiCSA. Conclusions We present an optimised plant hydroponic culture system that can be quickly and cheaply constructed, and produces plants with similar growth kinetics to soil-grown plants, but with the advantage of being a versatile platform for a myriad of physiological and molecular biological measurements on all plant tissues at all developmental stages. We present ‘tips and tricks’ for the easy adoption of this hydroponic culture system.

2013-01-01

239

Spiral Growth in Plants: Models and Simulations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The analysis and simulation of spiral growth in plants integrates algebra and trigonometry in a botanical setting. When the ideas presented here are used in a mathematics classroom/computer lab, students can better understand how basic assumptions about plant growth lead to the golden ratio and how the use of circular functions leads to accurate…

Allen, Bradford D.

2004-01-01

240

Toxic effect of nickel (Ni) on growth and metabolism in germinating seeds of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).  

PubMed

To assess the toxic effect of nickel (Ni) on the growth and some key metabolic processes in sunflower, varying levels of Ni as Ni(NO(3))(2) up to 60 mg L(-1) were applied once to sunflower cultivars SF-187 and Hysun-33 at sowing time in sand culture. An increase in Ni in the growth medium adversely affected growth parameters, sugar concentration (both reducing and non-reducing), as well as the activities of ?-amylase and protease. It also slowed down mobilization of stored proteins and amino acids in the germinating seeds. However, an increase in the activities of ?-amylase and protease was observed over time from 24 to 120 h after sowing. Cultivar Hysun-33 showed better performance than SF-187 in the presence of excess Ni. Overall, Ni-induced reduction in germination of sunflower seed appeared to be due to disturbance in biochemical metabolism as the availability of sugars for the synthesis of metabolic energy as well as necessary amino acids for the synthesis of proteins and enzymes essential for the growing embryo are generally reduced due to suppression in ?-amylase and protease activities. PMID:21240566

Ashraf, Muhammad Yasin; Sadiq, Rumana; Hussain, Mumtaz; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahmad, M Sajid Aqeel

2011-12-01

241

Spaceflight hardware for conducting plant growth experiments in space: the early years 1960-2000  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The best strategy for supporting long-duration space missions is believed to be bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS). An integral part of a BLSS is a chamber supporting the growth of higher plants that would provide food, water, and atmosphere regeneration for the human crew. Such a chamber will have to be a complete plant growth system, capable of providing lighting, water, and nutrients to plants in microgravity. Other capabilities include temperature, humidity, and atmospheric gas composition controls. Many spaceflight experiments to date have utilized incomplete growth systems (typically having a hydration system but lacking lighting) to study tropic and metabolic changes in germinating seedlings and young plants. American, European, and Russian scientists have also developed a number of small complete plant growth systems for use in spaceflight research. Currently we are entering a new era of experimentation and hardware development as a result of long-term spaceflight opportunities available on the International Space Station. This is already impacting development of plant growth hardware. To take full advantage of these new opportunities and construct innovative systems, we must understand the results of past spaceflight experiments and the basic capabilities of the diverse plant growth systems that were used to conduct these experiments. The objective of this paper is to describe the most influential pieces of plant growth hardware that have been used for the purpose of conducting scientific experiments during the first 40 years of research. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Porterfield, D. M.; Neichitailo, G. S.; Mashinski, A. L.; Musgrave, M. E.

2003-01-01

242

Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Response during Arabidopsis Seed Germination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hormone-mediated control of plant growth and development involves both synthesis and response. Previous studies have shown that gibberellin (GA) plays an essential role in Arabidopsis seed germination. To learn how GA stimulates seed germination, we performed comprehensive analyses of GA biosynthesis and response using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray analysis. In addition, spatial correlations between GA biosynthe-

Mikihiro Ogawa; Atsushi Hanada; Yukika Yamauchi; Ayuko Kuwahara; Yuji Kamiya; Shinjiro Yamaguchi

2003-01-01

243

Effects of triclosan on seed germination and seedling development of three wetland plants: Sesbania herbacea, Eclipta prostrata, and Bidens frondosa.  

PubMed

Three wetland macrophytes, Sesbania herbacea, Bidens frondosa, and Eclipta prostrata, were exposed (0.4-1,000-ppb nominal concentrations) to the antimicrobial triclosan for 28 d in a flow-through system. Sesbania herbacea had decreased seed germination at the 100-ppb exposure level at days 7, 14, and 21, and B. frondosa germination was reduced at the 1,000-ppb exposure level at day 7. Eclipta prostrata germination was unaffected. Seedling effects monitored were total fresh weight, shoot and root fresh weights, root length, and root surface area. Root metrics were most affected by exposure. Total root length was diminished at all exposure levels in S. herbacea and B. frondosa and at the 10-ppb and higher concentrations for E. prostrata. Root surface area decreased at all exposure levels in B. frondosa and at the 10-ppb level and above in S. herbacea and E. prostrata. Root and shoot bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were estimated for S. herbacea and B. frondosa. While BCFs were low in shoots of both species and roots of S. herbacea (<10), they were elevated in B. frondosa roots (53-101). Methyl-triclosan was formed in the system and accumulated in shoot and root tissues of S. herbacea to concentrations that exceeded those of the parent compound. However, methyl-triclosan was nontoxic in an Arabidopsis thaliana enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (the putative enzymatic target of triclosan) assay and did not appear to contribute to the effects of exposure. Two of the three plant species assessed exhibited reduced root systems at environmentally relevant concentrations, raising the concern that wetland plant performance could be compromised in constructed wetlands receiving wastewater treatment plant discharges. PMID:19653736

Stevens, Kevin J; Kim, Seon-Young; Adhikari, Sajag; Vadapalli, Vatsala; Venables, Barney J

2009-12-01

244

Controlled-Environment Sunlit Plant Growth Chambers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Controlled environment sunlit plant growth chambers have been built because of a great interest in plant responses to environmental variables under light intensities approaching those of natural sunlight conditions. Individual research projects have designed sunlit chambers that differ in size, structure, material, and environmental control systems dependent on the goals of the projects. Most literature describes plant organism responses to

L. Liu; G. Hoogenboom; K. T. Ingram

2000-01-01

245

Pollution level in distillery effluent and its phytotoxic effect on seed germination and early growth of maize and rice.  

PubMed

The effluent from a Lucknow- based distillery (Mohan Meakin Distillery) was analyzed for physico-chemical and biological parameters of pollution and concentration of potentially toxic heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni and Zn) and the effect of the distillery effluent, as such and on 50% dilution with tap water was studied on seed germination and seedling growth of maize (Zea mays L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.). The effluent was wine red in colour and highly acidic (pH approximately 55) and possessed decaying alcoholic smell. The effluent contained high values of different pollution parameters, particularly total solids, 3450 mgl(-1) (soluble plus suspended solids), alkalinity 1500 mgl(-1), biological oxygen demand (BOD, 1649 mgl(-1)) and chemical oxygen demand (COD, 2036 mgl(-1)). It had very low values of dissolved oxygen (DO, 0.34 mgl(-1)). The heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni and Zn) content, particularly the nickel concentration (0.029 mg l(-1)) was high. Use of the distillery effluent, even on 1:1 dilution with tap water inhibited germination and early seedling growth of maize and rice. In both maize and rice, more so in the former germination % of seeds, length of radicle and plumule and the fresh and dry weight of the seedlings were significantly reduced. The emerging leaves of the seedlings also developed visible effects of toxicity some of which resembled the symptoms of nickel toxicity. Our observations suggest that the effluent, as discharged from the distillery carry a heavy load of pollutants. Its discharge into the river Gomti poses a potential threat to the aquatic life, perticularly during the summer months when the water flow in the river is drastically reduced. The distillery effluentis also harmful for irrigating crops grown along the drain carrying it. PMID:18831388

Pandey, S N; Nautiyal, B D; Sharma, C P

2008-03-01

246

Proteomic analyses of apoplastic proteins from germinating Arabidopsis thaliana pollen  

PubMed Central

Pollen grains play important roles in the reproductive processes of flowering plants. The roles of apoplastic proteins in pollen germination and in pollen tube growth are comparatively less well understood. To investigate the functions of apoplastic proteins in pollen germination, the global apoplastic proteins of mature and germinated Arabidopsis thaliana pollen grains were prepared for differential analyses by using 2-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) saturation labeling techniques. One hundred and three proteins differentially expressed (p value ? 0.01) in pollen germinated for 6h compare with un-germination mature pollen, and 98 spots, which represented 71 proteins, were identified by LC-MS/MS. By bioinformatics analysis, 50 proteins were identified as secreted proteins. These proteins were mainly involved in cell wall modification and remodeling, protein metabolism and signal transduction. Three of the differentially expressed proteins were randomly selected to determine their subcellular localizations by transiently expressing YFP fusion proteins. The results of subcellular localization were identical with the bioinformatics prediction. Based on these data, we proposed a model for apoplastic proteins functioning in pollen germination and pollen tube growth. These results will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of pollen germination and pollen tube growth.

Ge, Weina; Song, Yun; Zhang, Cuijun; Zhang, Yafang; Burlingame, Alma L.; Guo, Yi

2011-01-01

247

Plant photomorphogenesis and canopy growth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An important motivation for studying photomorphogenesis is to understand the relationships among plant photophysiology in canopies, canopy productivity, and agronomic yield. This understanding is essential to optimize lighting systems used for plant farming in controlled environments (CE) and for the design of genetically engineered crop strains with altered photoresponses. This article provides an overview of some basic principles of plant photomorphogenesis in canopies and discusses their implications for (1) scaling up information on plant photophysiology from individual plants in CE to whole canopies in the field, and (2) designing lighting conditions to increase plant productivity in CE used for agronomic purposes (e.g. space farming in CE Life Support Systems). We concentrate on the visible (lambda between 400 and 700 nm) and far-infrared (FR; lambda greater than 700 nm) spectral regions, since the ultraviolet (UV; 280 to 400 nm) is covered by other authors in this volume.

Ballare, Carlos L.; Scopel, Ana L.

1994-01-01

248

Sodium nitrite and sorbic acid effects on Clostridium botulinum spore germination and total microbial growth in chicken frankfurter emulsions during temperature abuse.  

PubMed Central

Samples of (i) a control or of (ii) sodium nitrite-containing or (iii) sorbic acid-containing, mechanically deboned chicken meat frankfurter-type emulsions inoculated with Clostridium botulinum spores, or a combination of ii and iii, were temperature abuse at 27 degrees C. Spore germination and total microbial growth were followed and examined at specified times and until toxic samples were detected. The spores germinated within 3 days in both control and nitrite (20, 40 and 156 micrograms/g) treatments. Sorbic acid (0.2%) alone or in combination with nitrite (20, 40, and 156 micrograms/g) significantly (P less than 0.05) inhibited spore germinations. No significant germination was recorded until toxic samples were detected. A much longer incubation period was necessary for toxin to be formed in nitrite-sorbic acid combination treatments as contrasted with controls or nitrite and sorbic acid used individually. Total growth was not affected by the presence of nitrite, whereas sorbic acid appeared to depress it. Possible mechanisms explaining the effects of nitrite and sorbic acid on spore germination and growth are postulated.

Sofos, J N; Busta, F F; Allen, C E

1979-01-01

249

Effect of Environment on Plant Growth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this plant biotechnology activity is to demonstrate the effect of changes in the environment on the growth and fertility of landscape grasses and crop grasses such as wheat and rice. Plants are placed in environments such as high salinity, cold, heat, or drought and learners observe the different reactions of the plants to these conditions. Learners compare the growth of treated plants to that of the control plants, which are grown under optimal conditions. Learners then discuss the desirability of breeding new types of plants that are better able to withstand these changes if they occur in the general environment. In the original description of the activity, the planting is prepared by the instructor as a demonstration, but learners could be involved in this process. This resource contains background information and questions for learners.

Stephens, Janice; Leach, Jan

2011-01-01

250

A novel role for Arabidopsis CBL1 in affecting plant responses to glucose and gibberellin during germination and seedling development.  

PubMed

Glucose and phytohormones such as abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene, and gibberellin (GA) coordinately regulate germination and seedling development. However, there is still inadequate evidence to link their molecular roles in affecting plant responses. Calcium acts as a second messenger in a diverse range of signal transduction pathways. As calcium sensors unique to plants, calcineurin B-like (CBL) proteins are well known to modulate abiotic stress responses. In this study, it was found that CBL1 was induced by glucose in Arabidopsis. Loss-of-function mutant cbl1 exhibited hypersensitivity to glucose and paclobutrazol, a GA biosynthetic inhibitor. Several sugar-responsive and GA biosynthetic gene expressions were altered in the cbl1 mutant. CBL1 protein physically interacted with AKIN?1, the regulatory ? subunit of the SnRK1 complex which has a central role in sugar signaling. Our results indicate a novel role for CBL1 in modulating responses to glucose and GA signals. PMID:23437128

Li, Zhi-Yong; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Chen, Yang; He, Guang-Yuan; Yang, Guang-Xiao; Chen, Ming; Li, Lian-Cheng; Ma, You-Zhi

2013-01-01

251

Effect of Ultrasonic Vibrations on Plant Growth.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Earlier studies on the effects of ultrasound on plant growth failed to specify the intensities of ultrasonic vibrations in USSR. This study examines the effect of ultrasound with specified intensity, exposure time, and frequency on the seeds of several pl...

R. S. Limar

1973-01-01

252

Functional role of rice germin-like protein1 in regulation of plant height and disease resistance.  

PubMed

The functional role of rice (Oryza sativa) germin-like protein1 (OsGLP1) was elucidated through development of transgenic plants involving endogenous gene silencing in rice and heterologous gene expression in tobacco. Usually, the single copy OsGLP1 gene in rice plant was found to be expressed predominantly in green vegetative tissues. The transgenic rice lines showed significant reduction in endogenous OsGLP1 expression due to 26nt siRNA-mediated gene silencing, displayed semi-dwarfism and were affected seriously by fungal diseases, compared to the untransformed plant. Structural homology modeling predicted a superoxide dismutase (SOD) domain in OsGLP1 protein which upon over-expression in transgenic tobacco plant clearly documented SOD activity. Our observations on the maintenance of cell dimension, cell wall-associated localization particularly in the sub-epidermal tissues and the SOD activity of OsGLP1 could explain its functional role in regulation of plant height and disease resistance in rice plant. PMID:20188068

Banerjee, Joydeep; Maiti, Mrinal K

2010-03-26

253

Embryo growth, testa permeability, and endosperm weakening are major targets for the environmentally regulated inhibition of Lepidium sativum seed germination by myrigalone A  

PubMed Central

Myrigalone A (MyA) is a rare flavonoid in fruit leachates of Myrica gale, a deciduous shrub adapted to flood-prone habitats. As a putative allelochemical it inhibits seed germination and seedling growth. Using Lepidium sativum as a model target species, experiments were conducted to investigate how environmental cues modulate MyA’s interference with key processes of seed germination. Time course analyses of L. sativum testa and endosperm rupture under different light conditions and water potentials were combined with quantifying testa permeability, endosperm weakening, tissue-specific gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) contents, as well as embryo growth and apoplastic superoxide production important for cell expansion growth. Lepidium sativum testa permeability and early water uptake by imbibition is enhanced by MyA. During late germination, MyA inhibits endosperm weakening and embryo growth, both processes required for endosperm rupture. Inhibition of embryo cell expansion by MyA depends on environmental cues, which is evident from the light-modulated severity of the MyA-mediated inhibition of apoplastic superoxide accumulation. Several important key weakening and growth processes during early and late germination are targets for MyA. These effects are modulated by light conditions and ambient water potential. It is speculated that MyA is a soil seed bank-destroying allelochemical that secures the persistence of M. gale in its flood-prone environment.

2012-01-01

254

In Vitro Propagation by Asymbiotic Seed Germination and 1,1Diphenyl2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) Radical Scavenging Activity Studies of Tissue Culture Raised Plants of Three Medicinally Important Species of Dendrobium  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simple and efficient plant propagation system has been developed by asymbiotic germination of seeds in three medicinally important Dendrobium species, namely, Dendrobium tosaense, Dendrobium moniliforme, and Dendrobium linawianum. Plants obtained from natural habitats were grown in the greenhouse. The flowers were hand pollinated. Seeds of the capsules derived after 12 weeks of hand-pollination germinated asymbiotically (50—74%) on half strength

Shu-Fung Lo; Satish Manohar Nalawade; Vanisree Mulabagal; Susan Matthew; Chung-Li Chen; Chao-Lin Kuo; Hsin-Sheng Tsay

2004-01-01

255

Effects of simulated acid rain on germination and early growth of Douglas-fir and ponderosa pine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Germination percentage of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) was reduced by 30% by severe acid-rain treatment (pH 2.0), and seedlings that germinated at pH 2.0 soon died from fungal attack. Less acidic treatments did not affect germination.

John G. McColl; Robert Johnson

1983-01-01

256

Sealed Plant-Growth Chamber For Clinostat  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Laboratory chamber for growing plants used to measure photosynthesis and respiration in simulated microgravity. Holds plant specimens while rotated on clinostat, see article, "Clinostat Delivers Power To Plant-Growth Cabinets" (KSC-11537). Provides way of comparing gas-exchange rates of plants rotated horizontally on clinostat with those of stationary or vertically rotated plants. Gas extracted for analysis without stopping clinostat. Chamber includes potlike base and cylindrical cover, both made of transparent acrylic pipe. Gasket forms seal between cover and bottom plate of base. Cover bolted to pot baseplate, which in turn bolted to clinostat.

Brown, Christopher S.; Dreschel, Thomas W.

1993-01-01

257

The presence of a heterotrimeric G protein and its role in signal transduction of extracellular calmodulin in pollen germination and tube growth  

PubMed Central

The role of heterotrimeric G proteins in pollen germination, tube growth, and signal transduction of extracellular calmodulin (CaM) was examined in lily pollen. Two kinds of antibodies raised against animal Gzalpha, one against an internal sequence and the other against its N terminus, cross-reacted with the same 41-kD protein from lily pollen plasma membrane. This 41-kD protein was also specifically ADP ribosylated by pertussis toxin. Microinjection of the membrane-impermeable G protein agonist GTP-gamma-S into a pollen tube increased its growth rate, whereas microinjection of the membrane-impermeable G protein antagonist GDP-beta-S and the anti-Galpha antibody decreased pollen tube growth. The membrane-permeable G protein agonist cholera toxin stimulated pollen germination and tube growth. Anti-CaM antiserum inhibited pollen germination and tube growth, and this inhibitory effect was completely reversed by cholera toxin. The membrane-permeable heterotrimeric G protein antagonist pertussis toxin completely stopped pollen germination and tube growth. Purified CaM, when added directly to the medium of plasma membrane vesicles, significantly activated GTPase activity in plasma membrane vesicles, and this increase in GTPase activity was completely inhibited by pertussis toxin and the nonhydrolyzable GTP analogs GTP-gamma-S and guanylyl-5'-imidodiphosphate. The GTPase activity in plasma membrane vesicles was also stimulated by cholera toxin. These data suggest that heterotrimeric G proteins may be present in the pollen system where they may be involved in the signal transduction of extracellular CaM and in pollen germination and tube growth.

Ma, L; Xu, X; Cui, S; Sun, D

1999-01-01

258

Vermicompost derived from different feedstocks as a plant growth medium.  

PubMed

This study determined feedstock effects on earthworm populations and the quality of resulting vermicomposts produced from different types of feedstocks using different vermicomposting durations. Feedstock combinations (Kitchen Paper Waste (KPW), Kitchen Yard Waste (KYW), Cattle Manure Yard Waste (CMY)), three durations of vermicomposting (45, 68 or 90 days), and two seed germination methods (with two concentrations of vermicompost) for radish, marigold and upland cress, served as the independent variables. The worms (Eisenia fetida) doubled their weight by day 68 in KPW and CMY vermicomposts and day 90 KPW vermicompost produced the greatest weight of worms. The direct seed germination method (seeding into soil or vermicompost-soil mixtures) indicated that KPW and KYW feedstocks decreased germination compared to the control, even in mature vermicompost. Seed germination was greater in the water extract method; however, most of the vermicompost extracts suppressed germination of the three seed species compared to the water controls. Vermicomposts from all three feedstocks increased leaf area and biomass compared to the control, especially in the 10% vermicompost:soil mix. Thus, seed germination and leaf area or plant biomass for these three species are contrasting vermicompost quality indicators. PMID:20153632

Warman, P R; Anglopez, M J

2010-06-01

259

Instrumentation for plant health and growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comprehensive spectroscopic monitoring of plant health and growth in bioregenerative life support system environments is possible using a variety of spectrometric technologies. Absorption spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry in combination allow for direct, on-line, reagentless monitoring of plant nutrients from nitrate and potassium to micronutrients such as copper and zinc. Fluorometric spectrometry is ideal for the on-line detection, identification and

K. J. Schlager

1994-01-01

260

Dynamical scaling analysis of plant callus growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present experimental results for the dynamical scaling properties of the development of plant calli. We have assayed two different species of plant calli, Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa, under different growth conditions, and show that their dynamical scalings share a universality class. From a theoretical point of view, we introduce a scaling hypothesis for systems whose size evolves in

261

Plant Growth Module (PGM) conceptual design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Plant Growth Module for the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS), designed to answer basic science questions related to growing plants in closed systems, is described functionally with artist's conception drawings. Subsystems are also described, including enclosure and access; data acquisition and control; gas monitor and control; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning; air delivery; nutrient monitor and control; microbial monitoring and control; plant support and nutrient delivery; illumination; and internal operations. The hardware development plan is outlined.

Schwartzkopf, Steven H.; Rasmussen, Daryl

1987-01-01

262

Effect of microgravity on plant growth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The overall goal of this research is to determine the effect of microgravity proper on plant growth (metabolism and cell wall formation). In addressing this goal, the work conducted during this grant period was divided into three components: analyses of various plant tissues previously grown in space aboard MIR Space Station; analyses of wheat tissues grown on Shuttle flight STS-51; and Phenylpropanoid metabolism and plant cell wall synthesis (earth-based investigations).

Lewis, Norman G.

1994-01-01

263

Protein Mobilization in Germinating Mung Bean Seeds Involves Vacuolar Sorting Receptors and Multivesicular Bodies1(W)(OA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plants accumulate and store proteins in protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) during seed development and maturation. Upon seed germination, these storage proteins are mobilized to provide nutrients for seedling growth. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of protein degradation during seed germination. Here we test the hypothesis that vacuolar sorting receptor (VSR) proteins play a role in mediating protein

Junqi Wang; Yubing Li; Sze Wan Lo; Stefan Hillmer; Samuel S. M. Sun; David G. Robinson; Liwen Jiang

264

In vitro propagation by asymbiotic seed germination and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity studies of tissue culture raised plants of three medicinally important species of dendrobium.  

PubMed

A simple and efficient plant propagation system has been developed by asymbiotic germination of seeds in three medicinally important Dendrobium species, namely, Dendrobium tosaense, Dendrobium moniliforme, and Dendrobium linawianum. Plants obtained from natural habitats were grown in the greenhouse. The flowers were hand pollinated. Seeds of the capsules derived after 12 weeks of hand-pollination germinated asymbiotically (50-74%) on half strength Murashige and Skoog's (MS) basal medium with 3% sucrose and solidified with 0.9% Difco agar. Active growth in the germinated seedlings was achieved by re-culturing on full strength MS basal medium supplemented with 8% banana homogenate, 8% potato homogenate, 8% coconut water, 1.5% sucrose and 0.9% Difco agar. Healthy plantlets, transferred to plastic trays containing moss or moss and tree fern, successfully acclimatized (84-100%) in the greenhouse. A marked varied response was observed in the free radical scavenging activity of methanolic extracts of in vitro propagated plants, on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical using a UV spectrophotometer assay. Methanolic extracts were prepared by dissolving the powdered plant material, obtained from six months old in vitro propagated plants, each about 5 g, in boiling methanol. The percentage of scavenging effect of D. tosaense extract was 95.9% at 0.4 mg/ml concentration, whereas D. monoliforme, and D. linawianum extracts scavenged 83.4% and 92.3%, respectively, at a concentration of 0.4 mg/ml. All the extracts scavenged DPPH radical significantly in a concentration dependent manner. PMID:15133256

Lo, Shu-Fung; Nalawade, Satish Manohar; Mulabagal, Vanisree; Matthew, Susan; Chen, Chung-Li; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Tsay, Hsin-Sheng

2004-05-01

265

Plant Growth Modelling and Applications: The Increasing Importance of Plant Architecture in Growth Models  

PubMed Central

Background Modelling plant growth allows us to test hypotheses and carry out virtual experiments concerning plant growth processes that could otherwise take years in field conditions. The visualization of growth simulations allows us to see directly and vividly the outcome of a given model and provides us with an instructive tool useful for agronomists and foresters, as well as for teaching. Functional–structural (FS) plant growth models are nowadays particularly important for integrating biological processes with environmental conditions in 3-D virtual plants, and provide the basis for more advanced research in plant sciences. Scope In this viewpoint paper, we ask the following questions. Are we modelling the correct processes that drive plant growth, and is growth driven mostly by sink or source activity? In current models, is the importance of soil resources (nutrients, water, temperature and their interaction with meristematic activity) considered adequately? Do classic models account for architectural adjustment as well as integrating the fundamental principles of development? Whilst answering these questions with the available data in the literature, we put forward the opinion that plant architecture and sink activity must be pushed to the centre of plant growth models. In natural conditions, sinks will more often drive growth than source activity, because sink activity is often controlled by finite soil resources or developmental constraints. PMA06 This viewpoint paper also serves as an introduction to this Special Issue devoted to plant growth modelling, which includes new research covering areas stretching from cell growth to biomechanics. All papers were presented at the Second International Symposium on Plant Growth Modeling, Simulation, Visualization and Applications (PMA06), held in Beijing, China, from 13–17 November, 2006. Although a large number of papers are devoted to FS models of agricultural and forest crop species, physiological and genetic processes have recently been included and point the way to a new direction in plant modelling research.

Fourcaud, Thierry; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Stokes, Alexia; Lambers, Hans; Korner, Christian

2008-01-01

266

Differential Inactivation of Seed Exudate Stimulation of Pythium ultimum Sporangium Germination by Enterobacter cloacae Influences Biological Control Efficacy on Different Plant Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was initiated to understand whether differential biological control efficacy of Enterobacter cloacae on various plant species is due to differences in the ability of E. cloacae to inactivate the stimulatory activity of seed exudates to Pythium ultimum sporangium germination. In biological control assays, E. cloacae was effective in controlling Pythium damping-off when placed on the seeds of carrot,

Koji Kageyama; Eric B. Nelson

2003-01-01

267

RALFs: peptide regulators of plant growth.  

PubMed

Peptide signaling regulates a variety of developmental processes and environmental responses in plants. For example, the peptide systemin induces the systemic defense response in tomato and defensins are small cysteine-rich proteins that are involved in the innate immune system of plants. The CLAVATA3 peptide regulates meristem size and the SCR peptide is the pollen self-incompatibility recognition factor in the Brassicaceae. LURE peptides produced by synergid cells attract pollen tubes to the embryo sac. RALFs are a recently discovered family of plant peptides that play a role in plant cell growth. PMID:21045555

Bedinger, Patricia A; Pearce, Gregory; Covey, Paul A

2010-11-01

268

[Seed germination and seedling survival and growth in swamps dominated by palms Raphia tae- digera (Arecaceae) in Tortuguero plains, Costa Rica].  

PubMed

In the marshes dominated by palms, seeds face anaerobic substrates and long flooding periods. Some tree species are capable of growing both in flooded swamps and in areas with lower influence of the flood. I studied the potential settlement of various tree species in different macrohabitats in the Tortuguero floodplain using three experiments: (1) Manicaria saccifera and Raphia taedigera seed germination in palm-swamps and forests of slopes; (2) germination of R. taedigera seeds along a microtopographic gradient; and (3) seed germination and seedling height growth of six woody species (Dipteryx oleifera, Pterocarpus officinalis, Prioria copaifera, Pentaclethra macroloba, Carapa guianensis and Crudia acuminata) and two palms (R. taedigera and Manicaria saccifera) under different forest and swamp habitats. In the first experiment, I found that the palms germinated much earlier in the slope forest than in the palm-swamp. In the second experiment, in drier plots (less effect of flooding) germination began earlier than in the more humid plots. In the third experiment, woody species germinated faster than the studied palms, and some species do not tolerate flooded areas (marshes and swamps), so they cannot germinate or survive in them. Other woody species were removed from the slope forest, probably due to seed predators. Based on the presence or absence of these species in the environment of study were divided into: (1) obliged swamp species (R. taedigera and M saccifera), (2) swamp intolerant (D. oleifera), and (3) facultative wetland species (P officinalis, P copaifera, P macroloba, C. guianensis). Crudia acuminata does not seem to follow any of these categories. PMID:24459752

Myers, Ronald L

2013-09-01

269

Irrigation and fertilization effects on seed number, size, germination and seedling growth: implications for desert shrub establishment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plants with limited resources adjust partitioning among growth, survival, and reproduction. We tested the effects of water\\u000a and nutrient amendments on seed production, size, and quality in Sarcobatus vermiculatus (greasewood) to assess the magnitude and importance of changes in reproductive partitioning. In addition, we assessed interactions\\u000a among the environment of seed-producing plants (adult plant scale), seed size, and seedling microenvironment

A. N. Breen; J. H. Richards

2008-01-01

270

Influence of Common Buckwheat on Growth of Other Plant Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

In year 2003 we observed the influence of buckwheat stand on weeds in field conditions, influence of exudates of germinated buckwheat achenes on some crops (oat, annual ryegrass, white mustard and lettuce) and differences among seven varieties of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) in these parameters. The buckwheat stand significant inhibited growth offield pennycress (Thlaspi arvense), gallant soldier (Galinsoga parviflora),

J. Kalinova

2004-01-01

271

A nondestructive method for continuously monitoring plant growth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the past, plant growth generally has been measured using destructive methods. This paper describes a nondestructive technique for continuously monitoring plant growth. The technique provides a means of directly and accurately measuring plant growth over both short and long time intervals. Application of this technique to the direct measurement of plant growth rates is illustrated using corn (Zea mays L.) as an example.

Schwartzkopf, S. H.

1985-01-01

272

Rhizoctonia wilt suppression of brinjal (Solanum melongena L) and plant growth activity by Bacillus BS2.  

PubMed

An antibiotic-producing and hydrogen-cyanide-producing rhizobacteria strain Bacillus BS2 showed a wide range of antifungal activity against many Fusarium sp. and brinjal wilt disease pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Seed bacterization with the strain BS2 promoted seed germination and plant growth in leguminous plants Phaseolus vulgaris and non-leguminous plants Solanum melongena L, Brassica oleracea var. capitata, B. oleraceae var. gongylodes and Lycopersicon esculentum Mill in terms of relative growth rate, shoot height, root length, total biomass production and total chlorophyll content of leaves. Yield of bacterized plants were increased by 10 to 49% compared to uninoculated control plants. Brinjal sapling raised through seed bacterization by the strain BS2 showed a significantly reduced wilt syndrome of brinjal caused by Rhizoctonia solani. Control of wilt disease by the bacterium was clue to the production of antibiotic-like substances, whereas plant growth-promotion was due to the activity of hydrogen cyanide. Root colonization study confirmed that the introduced bacteria colonized the roots and occupied 23-25% of total aerobic bacteria, which was confirmed using dual antibiotic (nalidixic acid and streptomycin sulphate) resistant mutant strain. The results obtained through this investigation suggested the potentiality of the strain BS2 to be used as a plant growth promoter and suppressor of wilt pathogen. PMID:15266911

Boruah, H P Deka; Kumar, B S Dileep

2003-06-01

273

Evaluation of cytological effects of Zn 2+ in relation to germination and root growth of Nigella sativa L. and Triticum aestivum L  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of different treatments with zinc sulfate (Zn2+) on the cytology and growth of Nigella sativa and Triticum aestivum were investigated. Five concentrations of zinc sulfate ranging from 5 to 25mg\\/l were applied for 6, 12, 18, and 24h. The treatments reduced the germination percentages of N. sativa seeds and T. aestivum grains and inhibited the root growth of

A. A El-Ghamery; M. A El-Kholy; M. A Abou El-Yousser

2003-01-01

274

Growth of Plant Tissue Cultures in Simulated Lunar Soil: Implications for a Lunar Base Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). Semiannual Report February 1-July 31, 1987.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Experiments to determine whether plant tissue cultures can be grown in the presence of simulated lunar soil (SLS) and the effect of simulated lunar soil on the growth and morphogenesis of such cultures, as well as the effect upon the germination of seeds ...

S. Venketeswaran

1987-01-01

275

Effect of Nanoencapsulated Vitamin B1 Derivative on Inhibition of Both Mycelial Growth and Spore Germination of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. raphani  

PubMed Central

Nanoencapsulation of thiamine dilauryl sulfate (TDS), a vitamin B1 derivative, was proved to effectively inhibit the spore germination of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. raphani (F. oxysporum), as well as mycelial growth. The average diameter of nanoparticles was measured as 136 nm by being encapsulated with an edible encapsulant, lecithin, whose encapsulation efficiency was about 55% in containing 200 ppm of TDS concentration: the 100 ppm TDS nanoparticle solution showed a mycelial growth inhibition rate of 59%. These results were about similar or even better than the cases of treating 100 ppm of dazomet, a positive antifungal control (64%). Moreover, kinetic analysis of inhibiting spore germination were estimated as 6.6% reduction of spore germination rates after 24 h treatment, which were 3.3% similar to the case of treating 100 ppm of a positive control (dazomet) for the same treatment time. It was also found that TDS itself could work as an antifungal agent by inhibiting both mycelial growth and spore germination, even though its efficacy was lower than those of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles especially played a more efficient role in limiting the spore germination, due to their easy penetration into hard cell membranes and long resident time on the surface of the spore shell walls. In this work, it was first demonstrated that the nanoparticle of TDS not a harmful chemical can control the growth of F. oxysporum by using a lower dosage than commercial herbicides, as well as the inhibiting mechanism of the TDS. However, field trials of the TDS nanoparticles encapsulated with lecithin should be further studied to be effectively used for field applications.

Cho, Jeong Sub; Seo, Yong Chang; Yim, Tae Bin; Lee, Hyeon Yong

2013-01-01

276

Seed reserve composition in 19 tree species of a tropical deciduous forest in Mexico and its relationship to seed germination and seedling growth  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims The size and composition of seed reserves may reflect the ecological strategy and evolutionary history of a species and also temporal variation in resource availability. The seed mass and composition of seed reserves of 19 co-existing tree species were studied, and we examined how they varied among species in relation to germination and seedling growth rates, as well as between two years with contrasting precipitation (652 and 384 mm). Methods Seeds were collected from a tropical deciduous forest in the northwest of Mexico (Chamela Biological Station). The seed dry mass, with and without the seed coat, and the concentrations of lipids, nitrogen and non-structural carbohydrates for the seed minus seed coat were determined. The anatomical localization of these reserves was examined using histochemical analysis. The germination capacity, rate and lag time were determined. The correlations among these variables, and their relationship to previously reported seedling relative growth rates, were evaluated with and without phylogenetic consideration. Key Results There were interannual differences in seed mass and reserve composition. Seed was significantly heavier after the drier year in five species. Nitrogen concentration was positively correlated with seed coat fraction, and was significantly higher after the drier year in 12 species. The rate and lag time of germination were negatively correlated with each other. These trait correlations were also supported for phylogenetic independent contrasts. Principal component analysis supported these correlations, and indicated a negative association of seedling relative growth rate with seed size, and a positive association of germination rate with nitrogen and lipid concentrations. Conclusions Nitrogen concentration tended to be higher after the drier year and, while interannual variations in seed size and reserve composition were not sufficient to affect interspecific correlations among seed and seedling traits, some of the reserves were related to germination variables and seedling relative growth rate.

Soriano, Diana; Orozco-Segovia, Alma; Marquez-Guzman, Judith; Kitajima, Kaoru; Gamboa-de Buen, Alicia; Huante, Pilar

2011-01-01

277

Lunar base agriculture: Soils for plant growth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This work provides information on research and experimentation concerning various aspects of food production in space and particularly on the moon. Options for human settlement of the moon and Mars and strategies for a lunar base are discussed. The lunar environment, including the mineralogical and chemical properties of lunar regolith are investigated and chemical and physical considerations for a lunar-derived soil are considered. It is noted that biological considerations for such a soil include controlled-environment crop production, both hydroponic and lunar regolith-based; microorganisms and the growth of higher plants in lunar-derived soils; and the role of microbes to condition lunar regolith for plant cultivation. Current research in the controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) project is presented in detail and future research areas, such as the growth of higher research plants in CELSS are considered. Optimum plant and microbiological considerations for lunar derived soils are examined.

Ming, Douglas W. (editor); Henninger, Donald L. (editor)

1989-01-01

278

Dynamical scaling analysis of plant callus growth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present experimental results for the dynamical scaling properties of the development of plant calli. We have assayed two different species of plant calli, Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa, under different growth conditions, and show that their dynamical scalings share a universality class. From a theoretical point of view, we introduce a scaling hypothesis for systems whose size evolves in time. We expect our work to be relevant for the understanding and characterization of other systems that undergo growth due to cell division and differentiation, such as, for example, tumor development.

Galeano, J.; Buceta, J.; Juarez, K.; Pumariño, B.; de la Torre, J.; Iriondo, J. M.

2003-07-01

279

Allelopathic effects of microcystin-LR on the germination, growth and metabolism of five charophyte species and a submerged angiosperm.  

PubMed

Microcystins (MCs) are produced by cyanobacteria in aquatic environments and adversely affect macrophytes at very high concentrations. However, the effects of MC on macrophytes at concentrations of environmental relevance are largely unknown. The main objective of this study was to analyze the allelopathic effects of MC-LR at natural concentrations (1, 8 and 16 ?g MC-LR/L) on five charophyte species (Chara aspera, C. baltica, C. hispida, C. vulgaris and Nitella hyalina) and the angiosperm Myriophyllum spicatum. Macrophyte specimens were obtained from a restored area located in Albufera de València Natural Park, a protected coastal Mediterranean wetland. Two different experiments were conducted involving (i) the addition of MC-LR to natural sediment to evaluate its effects on seed germination and (ii) the addition of MC-LR to water cultures of macrophytes to evaluate its effects on growth and metabolic functions. In water, the MC-LR concentration decreased by 84% in two weeks; the loss was not significant in sediment. The first seedlings (all C. hispida) emerged from the wetland sediment following a delay of a few days in the presence of MC-LR. The germination rates in 8 and 16 ?g MC-LR/L treatments were 44% and 11% of that occurring in the absence of MC, but these differences disappeared over time. The final density was 6-7 germlings/dm(3). Final germling length was unaffected by MC-LR. Rotifers (Lecane spp.) emerging from the natural sediment during the experiment were favored by MC-LR; the opposite pattern was observed in the cladoceran Daphnia magna. The growth rates of C. vulgaris, C. baltica and N. hyalina were unaffected by MC exposure, whereas those of C. hispida and C. aspera were reduced in the MC treatments relative to the control treatment. The concentration of chlorophyll-a and the in vivo net photosynthetic rate were lower in the presence of MC-LR, even at the lowest concentration, for all of the characeans tested. M. spicatum was sensitive to the presence of MC-LR in the culture medium; the growth and chlorophyll-a concentrations were reduced. Therefore, environmentally relevant concentrations of MC might induce important changes in macrophyte meadows and the structure of the associated plankton community. Synchrony or delay in the processes evaluated here in response to environmentally relevant concentrations of cyanobacteria MC exudates can enhance understanding of the turning point to alternative states and the point of no return in eutrophicated shallow lakes. PMID:24121158

Rojo, Carmen; Segura, Matilde; Cortés, Francisco; Rodrigo, María A

2013-11-15

280

Lead stress disrupts the cytoskeleton organization and cell wall construction during Picea wilsonii pollen germination and tube growth.  

PubMed

Lead is a widespread pollutant and has been reported to inhibit pollen tube development, but the mechanism of toxicity involved remains unclear. Here, we report that lead stress significantly prevented Picea wilsonii pollen germination and tube growth and also dramatically altered the tube morphology in a concentration-dependent manner. Fluorescence labeling with JIM 5 (anti-acidic pectin antibody) and Calcofluor white revealed the lead-induced decline of acidic pectin and cellulose, especially in the subapical region. Decolorized aniline blue staining showed the marked accumulation of callose in the apical and subapical regions of lead-treated tubes. Fluorescence labeling with Alexa Fluor 568 phalloidin and anti-tubulin antibody revealed that the distribution of the cytoskeleton in P. wilsonii pollen grains and tubes were developmentally regulated and that lead disturbed the cytoskeleton organization, especially in the shank of the pollen tubes. Taken together, our experiments revealed a link between the dynamics of cytoskeleton organization and the process of P. wilsonii pollen tube development and also indicated that lead disturbed the cytoskeleton assembly and, consequently, cell wall construction. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism of lead toxicity in the tip growth of pollen tubes. PMID:21947795

Sheng, Xianyong; Zhang, Shasha; Jiang, Liping; Li, Kai; Gao, Yuan; Li, Xue

2012-04-01

281

Studies on amendment of different biopolymers in sandy loam and their effect on germination, seedling growth of Gossypium herbaceum L.  

PubMed

Different biopolymers, agar, cellulose, alginate, psyllium gaur gum, and bacterial exopolysaccharide (EPS) powders were amended to check their efficacy in enhancing maximum water holding capacity (MWHC), permanent wilting point (PWP), and germination and seedling growth of the Gossypium herbaceum in a laboratory scale. The efficacy of all biopolymers for enhancement of MWHC, PWP, and growth was also analyzed by measuring organic carbon, organic matter, total nitrogen, respiration rate, and microflora in amended and control sandy loams. The range of concentrations (0.2-2%) of all biopolymers was incorporated in sandy loam containing pots. The soil without polymer was considered as control. The psyllium (0.6%) and bacterial EPS (1%) amended soil has 242 and 233% increase in MWHC and thus delaying in the permanent wilting point by 108 and 84 h at 37 °C, respectively, as compared to control. All biopolymers found to increase more or less MWHC, organic matter, total nitrogen, microflora, and PWP as compared to control. The psyllium and bacterial EPS show the highest increase organic matter, biomass, and microflora. The highest reduction in MWHC after 12 weeks were observed in cellulose, gaur gum, and alginate; besides, psyllium, bacterial EPS, and agar showed comparatively less reduction MWHC, i.e., 24% and 14.5%, respectively. The toxicity studies of biopolymer were carried out on earthworm (Eisenia foetida). It revealed their nontoxic nature. The biopolymer amendment in sandy loam can be an effective strategy to improved soil texture, fertility, and thereby crop yield. PMID:20859704

Patil, Satish Vitthalrao; Salunke, B K; Patil, C D; Salunkhe, R B

2011-03-01

282

How do cell walls regulate plant growth?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cell wall of growing plant tissues has frequently been interpreted in terms of inextensible cellulose microfibrils 'tethered' by hemicellulose polymers at- tached to the microfibril surface by hydrogen bonds, with growth occurring when tethers are broken or 'peeled' off the microfibril surface by expansins. This has sometimes been described as the 'sticky network' model. In this paper, a number

David Stuart Thompson

2005-01-01

283

Germination response of MR 219 rice variety to different exposure times and periods of 2450 MHz microwave frequency.  

PubMed

Germination is a key process in plants' phenological cycles. Accelerating this process could lead to improvment of the seedling growth as well as the cultivation efficiency. To achieve this, the effect of microwave frequency on the germination of rice seeds was examined. The physiological feedbacks of the MR 219 rice variety in terms of seed germination rate (GR), germination percentage (GP), and mean germination time (MGT) were analyzed by exposing its seeds to 2450 MHz of microwave frequency for one, four, seven, and ten hours. It was revealed that exposing the seeds to the microwave frequency for 10 hours resulted in the highest GP. This treatment led to 100% of germination after three days with a mean germination time of 2.1 days. Although the other exposure times of microwave frequency caused the moderate effects on germination with a GP(a3) ranged from 93% to 98%, they failed to reduce the MGT(a3). The results showed that ten-hour exposure times of microwave frequency for six days significantly facilitated and improved the germination indices (primary shoot and root length). Therefore, the technique is expected to benefit the improvement of rice seed germination considering its simplicity and efficacy in increasing the germination percentage and rate as well as the primary shoot and root length without causing any environmental toxicity. PMID:24307869

Talei, Daryush; Valdiani, Alireza; Maziah, Mahmood; Mohsenkhah, Mohammad

2013-01-01

284

Seed Dormancy and Germination  

PubMed Central

Seed dormancy allows seeds to overcome periods that are unfavourable for seedling established and is therefore important for plant ecology and agriculture. Several processes are known to be involved in the induction of dormancy and in the switch from the dormant to the germinating state. The role of plant hormones, the different tissues and genes involved, including newly identified genes in dormancy and germination are described in this chapter, as well as the use transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analyses to study these mechanistically not well understood processes.

Bentsink, Leonie; Koornneef, Maarten

2008-01-01

285

Effects of actinobacteria on plant disease suppression and growth promotion.  

PubMed

Biological control and plant growth promotion by plant beneficial microbes has been viewed as an alternative to the use of chemical pesticides and fertilizers. Bacteria and fungi that are naturally associated with plants and have a beneficial effect on plant growth by the alleviation of biotic and abiotic stresses were isolated and developed into biocontrol (BCA) and plant growth-promoting agents (PGPA). Actinobacteria are a group of important plant-associated spore-forming bacteria, which have been studied for their biocontrol, plant growth promotion, and interaction with plants. This review summarizes the effects of actinobacteria as BCA, PGPA, and its beneficial associations with plants. PMID:24092003

Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Yang, Seung Hwan; Zhang, Lixin; Suh, Joo-Won

2013-11-01

286

Water vapor recovery from plant growth chambers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is investigating the use of plant growth chambers (PGCs) for space missions and for bases on the moon and Mars. Key to successful development of PGCs is a system to recover and reuse the water vapor that is transpired from the leaves of the plants. A design is presented for a simple, reliable, membrane-based system that allows the recovery, purification, and reuse of the transpired water vapor through control of temperature and humidity levels in PGCs. The system is based on two membrane technologies: (1) dehumidification membrane modules to remove water vapor from the air, and (2) membrane contactors to return water vapor to the PGC (and, in doing so, to control the humidity and temperature within the PGC). The membrane-based system promises to provide an ideal, stable growth environment for a variety of plants, through a design that minimizes energy usage, volume, and mass, while maximizing simplicity and reliability.

Ray, R. J.; Newbold, D. D.; Colton, R. H.; Mccray, S. B.

1991-01-01

287

Involvement of carboxypeptidase in the degradation of the mung bean ( Vigna radiata ) trypsin inhibitor during germination and early seedling growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examination of the substrate specifity of the carboxypeptidase activity of ungerminated and germinated mung beans (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) reveals the presence of two distinct enzymes. The first of these, carboxypeptidase I, is maximally active against carbobenzyloxy-Ala-Phe. It is present in large amounts in the cotyledons of ungerminated seeds, and declines rapidly during germination. The second, carboxypeptidase II, is most

Karl A. Wilson; Berit R. Rightmire; Anna L. Tan-Wilson

1985-01-01

288

Growth and mitochondrial respiration of mungbeans (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) germinated at low pressure  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mungbean (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) seedlings were grown hypobarically to assess the effects of low pressure (21-24 kilopascals) on growth and mitochondrial respiration. Control seedlings grown at ambient pressure (101 kilopascals) were provided amounts of O2 equivalent to those provided experimental seedlings at reduced pressure to factor out responses to O2 concentration and to total pressure. Respiration was assayed using washed mitochondria, and was found to respond only to O2 concentration. Regardless of total pressure, seedlings grown at 2 millimoles O2 per liter had higher state 3 respiration rates and decreased percentages of alternative respiration compared to ambient (8.4 millimoles O2 per liter) controls. In contrast, seedling growth responded to total pressure but not to O2 concentration. Seedlings were significantly larger when grown under low pressure. While low O2 (2 millimoles O2 per liter) diminished growth at ambient pressure, growth at low pressure in the same oxygen concentration was enhanced. Respiratory development and growth of mungbean seedlings under low pressure is unimpaired whether oxygen or air is used as the chamber gas, and further, low pressure can improve growth under conditions of poor aeration.

Musgrave, M. E.; Gerth, W. A.; Scheld, H. W.; Strain, B. R.

1988-01-01

289

Dynamic Adaption of Metabolic Pathways during Germination and Growth of Lily Pollen Tubes after Inhibition of the Electron Transport Chain1[W][OPEN  

PubMed Central

Investigation of the metabolome and the transcriptome of pollen of lily (Lilium longiflorum) gave a comprehensive overview of metabolic pathways active during pollen germination and tube growth. More than 100 different metabolites were determined simultaneously by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and expressed genes of selected metabolic pathways were identified by next-generation sequencing of lily pollen transcripts. The time-dependent changes in metabolite abundances, as well as the changes after inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, revealed a fast and dynamic adaption of the metabolic pathways in the range of minutes. The metabolic state prior to pollen germination differed clearly from the metabolic state during pollen tube growth, as indicated by principal component analysis of all detected metabolites and by detailed observation of individual metabolites. For instance, the amount of sucrose increased during the first 60 minutes of pollen culture but decreased during tube growth, while glucose and fructose showed the opposite behavior. Glycolysis, tricarbonic acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, starch, and fatty acid degradation were activated, providing energy during pollen germination and tube growth. Inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain by antimycin A resulted in an immediate production of ethanol and a fast rearrangement of metabolic pathways, which correlated with changes in the amounts of the majority of identified metabolites, e.g. a rapid increase in ?-aminobutyric acid indicated the activation of a ?-aminobutyric acid shunt in the tricarbonic acid cycle, while ethanol fermentation compensated the reduced ATP production after inhibition of the oxidative phosphorylation.

Obermeyer, Gerhard; Fragner, Lena; Lang, Veronika; Weckwerth, Wolfram

2013-01-01

290

Growth of plant tissue cultures in simulated lunar soil: Implications for a lunar base CELSS (Controlled Ecological Life Support System)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experiments were carried out on plant tissue cultures, seed germination, seedling development and plants grown on Simulated Lunar Soil to evaluate the potential of future development of lunar based agriculture. The studies done to determine the effect of the placement of SLS on tissue cultures showed no adverse effect of SLS on tissue cultures. Although statistically insignificant, SLS in suspension showed a comparatively higher growth rate. Observations indicate the SLS, itself cannot support calli growth but was able to show a positive effect on growth rate of calli when supplemented with MS salts. This positive effect related to nutritive value of the SLS was found to have improved at high pH levels, than at the recommended low pH levels for standard media. Results from seed germination indicated that there is neither inhibitory, toxicity nor stimulatory effect of SLS, even though SLS contains high amounts of aluminum compounds compared to earth soil. Analysis of seeding development and growth data showed significant reduction in growth rate indicating that, SLS was a poor growth medium for plant life. This was confirmed by the studies done with embryos and direct plant growth on SLS. Further observations attributed this poor quality of SLS is due to it's lack of essential mineral elements needed for plant growth. By changing the pH of the soil, to more basic conditions, the quality of SLS for plant growth could be improved up to a significant level. Also it was found that the quality of SLS could be improved by almost twice, by external supply of major mineral elements, directly to SLS.

Venketeswaran, S.

1988-01-01

291

Plant growth promotion and Penicillium citrinum  

PubMed Central

Background Endophytic fungi are known plant symbionts. They produce a variety of beneficial metabolites for plant growth and survival, as well as defend their hosts from attack of certain pathogens. Coastal dunes are nutrient deficient and offer harsh, saline environment for the existing flora and fauna. Endophytic fungi may play an important role in plant survival by enhancing nutrient uptake and producing growth-promoting metabolites such as gibberellins and auxins. We screened roots of Ixeris repenes (L.) A. Gray, a common dune plant, for the isolation of gibberellin secreting endophytic fungi. Results We isolated 15 endophytic fungi from the roots of Ixeris repenes and screened them for growth promoting secondary metabolites. The fungal isolate IR-3-3 gave maximum plant growth when applied to waito-c rice and Atriplex gemelinii seedlings. Analysis of the culture filtrate of IR-3-3 showed the presence of physiologically active gibberellins, GA1, GA3, GA4 and GA7 (1.95 ng/ml, 3.83 ng/ml, 6.03 ng/ml and 2.35 ng/ml, respectively) along with other physiologically inactive GA5, GA9, GA12, GA15, GA19, GA20 and, GA24. The plant growth promotion and gibberellin producing capacity of IR-3-3 was much higher than the wild type Gibberella fujikuroi, which was taken as control during present study. GA5, a precursor of bioactive GA3 was reported for the first time in fungi. The fungal isolate IR-3-3 was identified as a new strain of Penicillium citrinum (named as P. citrinum KACC43900) through phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA sequence. Conclusion Isolation of new strain of Penicillium citrinum from the sand dune flora is interesting as information on the presence of Pencillium species in coastal sand dunes is limited. The plant growth promoting ability of this fungal strain may help in conservation and revegetation of the rapidly eroding sand dune flora. Penicillium citrinum is already known for producing mycotoxin citrinin and cellulose digesting enzymes like cellulase and endoglucanase, as well as xylulase. Gibberellins producing ability of this fungus and the discovery about the presence of GA5 will open new aspects of research and investigations.

Khan, Sumera Afzal; Hamayun, Muhammad; Yoon, Hyeokjun; Kim, Ho-Youn; Suh, Seok-Jong; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Kim, Jong-Myeong; Lee, In-Jung; Choo, Yeon-Sik; Yoon, Ung-Han; Kong, Won-Sik; Lee, Byung-Moo; Kim, Jong-Guk

2008-01-01

292

Bacillus pumilus ES4: candidate plant growth-promoting bacterium to enhance establishment of plants in mine tailings  

PubMed Central

Three plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB; Bacillus pumilus ES4, B. pumilus RIZO1, and Azospirillum brasilense Cd) were tested for their ability to enhance plant growth and development of the native Sonoran Desert shrub quailbush (Atriplex lentiformis) and for their effect on the native bacterial community in moderately acidic, high-metal content (AHMT) and in neutral, low metal content natural tailings (NLMT) in controlled greenhouse experiments. Inoculation of quailbush with all three PGPB significantly enhanced plant growth parameters, such as germination, root length, dry weight of shoots and roots, and root/shoot ratio in both types of tailings. The effect of inoculation on the indigenous bacterial community by the most successful PGPB Bacillus pumilus ES4 was evaluated by denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprinting and root colonization was followed by specific fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Inoculation with this strain significantly changed the bacterial community over a period of 60 days. FISH analysis showed that the preferred site of colonization was the root tips and root elongation area. This study shows that inoculation of native perennial plants with PGPB can be used for developing technologies for phytostabilizing mine tailings.

de-Bashan, Luz E.; Hernandez, Juan-Pablo; Bashan, Yoav; Maier, Raina

2014-01-01

293

Effects of kaurane diterpene derivatives on germination and growth of Lactuca sativa seedlings.  

PubMed

Kaurenoic and grandiflorenic acid, isolated from Wedelia paludosa (Asteraceae), some derivatives from these acids (alcohols, esters, amides, lactones, oximes) and other naturally occurring kaurane diterpenes were tested for their action on the growth of radical and shoot of Lactuca sativa. Gibberellic acid, GA3, a commercially available phytohormone, belonging to the same class of diterpenes, was also tested. Some of the tested substances showed a remarkable activity either in the inhibition or in stimulation of L. sativa growth. The activity, in some cases, was even higher than that of GA3. PMID:15787248

Vieira, Henriete S; Takahashi, Jacqueline A; Pimenta, Lúcia P S; Boaventura, Maria Amélia D

2005-01-01

294

Project Explorer: Get Away Special #007. [alloy solidification, seed germination, crystal growth, and radio transmission of payload data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tentatively scheduled to fly on STS-17 (41G), this get away special aims to demonstrate amateur radio transmissions to global ground stations in the English language. Experiments No. 1, 2, and 3 use the micro-gravity of space flight to study the solidification of lead-antimony and aluminum-copper alloys, the germination of radish seeds, and the growth of potassium-tetracyanoplatinate hydrate crystals in an aqueous solution. Flight results are to be compared with Earth-based data. Experiment No. 4 (the Marshall Amateur Radio Club Experiment - MARCE) features radio transmissions and also provides timing for the start of all other experiments. A microprocessor obtains real-time data from all experiments as well as temperature and pressure measurements within the GAS canister. These data are to be transmitted on previously announced amateur radio frequencies after they are converted into the English language by a digitalker for general reception. The support structure for the G #007 experiments consists of two primary plates and four bumper assemblies.

Henderson, A. J., Jr.

1984-01-01

295

Effects of simulated acid rain on germination, foliar damage, chlorophyll contents and seedling growth of five hardwood species growing in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seeds and seedlings of five hardwood species were subjected to a simulated acid rain adjusted to pH values of 2.0, 3.5, 5.0, 6.0, and to distilled water (the control). Seed germination was remarkably inhibited by pH 2.0 treatment for three species. Significant foliar damage, decline in chlorophyll contents, and retardation of growth for the seedlings of all the species, were

Hou Bac Fan; Yi Hong Wang

2000-01-01

296

Germination biology and seedling growth of Clusia hilariana Schltdl., a dominant CAM-tree of drought-prone sandy coastal plains  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spatial and temporal fluctuations of water availability can be an obstacle for recruitment of many species in the restinga and might restrict seed germination and seedling growth in specific regeneration safe-sites. Clusia\\u000a hilariana is one of the most dominant species of Restinga de Jurubatiba. This species has a high proportion of seedling establishment\\u000a occurring inside the tanks of soil

Aline Cavalcante; Maria Isabel Guedes Braz; Eduardo Arcoverde de Mattos

2010-01-01

297

Bacterial Ammonia Causes Significant Plant Growth Inhibition  

PubMed Central

Many and complex plant-bacteria inter-relationships are found in the rhizosphere, since plants release a variety of photosynthetic exudates from their roots and rhizobacteria produce multifaceted specialized compounds including rich mixtures of volatiles, e.g., the bouquet of Serratia odorifera 4Rx13 is composed of up to 100 volatile organic and inorganic compounds. Here we show that when growing on peptone-rich nutrient medium S. odorifera 4Rx13 and six other rhizobacteria emit high levels of ammonia, which during co-cultivation in compartmented Petri dishes caused alkalization of the neighboring plant medium and subsequently reduced the growth of A. thaliana. It is argued that in nature high-protein resource degradations (carcasses, whey, manure and compost) are also accompanied by bacterial ammonia emission which alters the pH of the rhizosphere and thereby influences organismal diversity and plant-microbe interactions. Consequently, bacterial ammonia emission may be more relevant for plant colonization and growth development than previously thought.

Weise, Teresa; Kai, Marco; Piechulla, Birgit

2013-01-01

298

Bacterial ammonia causes significant plant growth inhibition.  

PubMed

Many and complex plant-bacteria inter-relationships are found in the rhizosphere, since plants release a variety of photosynthetic exudates from their roots and rhizobacteria produce multifaceted specialized compounds including rich mixtures of volatiles, e.g., the bouquet of Serratia odorifera 4Rx13 is composed of up to 100 volatile organic and inorganic compounds. Here we show that when growing on peptone-rich nutrient medium S. odorifera 4Rx13 and six other rhizobacteria emit high levels of ammonia, which during co-cultivation in compartmented Petri dishes caused alkalization of the neighboring plant medium and subsequently reduced the growth of A. thaliana. It is argued that in nature high-protein resource degradations (carcasses, whey, manure and compost) are also accompanied by bacterial ammonia emission which alters the pH of the rhizosphere and thereby influences organismal diversity and plant-microbe interactions. Consequently, bacterial ammonia emission may be more relevant for plant colonization and growth development than previously thought. PMID:23691060

Weise, Teresa; Kai, Marco; Piechulla, Birgit

2013-01-01

299

EFFECTS OF OZONE ON SPORULATION, SPORE GERMINATION, AND GROWTH OF FOMES ANNOSUS  

EPA Science Inventory

Effects of ozone (O3) on certain cultural characteristics of Fomes annosus were investigated in exposure chamber studies. Growth rates of F. annosus decreased and conidial germ tubes were shorter and had fewer branches as O3 dosages increased. F. annosus conidial production was v...

300

Condensate Recycling in Closed Plant Growth Chambers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Water used in the the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Breadboard Project at the Kennedy Space Center is being recycled. Condensation is collected in the air ducts, filtered and deionized, and resupplied to the system for nutrient solutions, supplemental humidification, solvents and diluents. While the system functions well from a process control standpoint, precise and accurate tracking of water movement through the system to answer plant physiological questions is not consistent. Possible causes include hardware errors, undetected vapor loss from chamber leakage, and unmeasured changes in water volume in the plant growth trays.

Bledsoe, J. O.; Sager, J. C.; Fortson, R. E.

1994-01-01

301

Effects of sheep fleece washings on the germination and growth of Beauveria bassiana.  

PubMed

The development of biopesticides against ectoparasites must take into account the effect that an animal host's secretions and host associated micro-organisms may have on the viability of the applied agent. In this study, the effects of secretions washed from the pelt of sheep on the viability and growth of the fungal pathogen Beauveria bassiana, were assessed. The fungal isolate had been obtained from the parasitic sheep scab mite Psoroptes ovis. It was added to 0.05% Tween 80 in which sheep fleece had been washed up to six times, to ascertain whether successive washings had any effect on the viability of conidia over 6 days. The effects of sterile and non-sterile washings on viability and growth were also investigated. Results indicated that substances in the sheep fleece may cause a significant reduction in the viability of conidia. Viability was linked to the number of times the sheep pelt had been washed in the Tween, with conidia incubated in the first wash from the sheep pelt showing a significantly greater decrease in viability compared to those incubated in the sixth wash. Viability was not linked to the sterility of the washes, although there was a significant difference between length of germ tube growth from viable conidia in sterile and non-sterile washings. PMID:19041656

Taylor, B; Luke, B; Wall, R; Taylor, M; Moore, D

2009-02-01

302

Effects of Neotyphodium Fungi on Lolium multiflorum Seed Germination in Relation to Water Availability  

PubMed Central

• Background and Aims Temperate endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium sp.) grasses have been shown to exhibit an ecological advantage over endophyte-uninfected grasses under abiotic stressful conditions. It is predicted that endophyte-infected plant populations will display higher rates of germination and proportion of germinated seeds under limiting water conditions. • Methods The hydrotime regression model was used to describe the effect of Neotyphodium endophyte on seed germination of Lolium multiflorum at different water potentials. Additionally, seed mortality after water stress exposure was estimated in endophyte-infected and -uninfected seeds. • Key Results Endophyte infection inhibited seed germination at all water potentials. The hydrotime model described satisfactorily the germination responses, and revealed that endophyte-free seeds exhibited higher rates of and final percentage germination, probably due to a lower base water potential compared with endophyte-infected seeds. However, Neotyphodium endophyte conferred a higher rate of survival in those seeds that remained ungerminated when exposed to highly water stress conditions. • Conclusions Changes produced by Neotyphodium endophyte in L. multiflorum seeds might affect fitness in particular ecological scenarios. For example, the presence of the endophyte may curtail seed germination when water is limiting, reducing the risk of seedling death. Conversely, endophyte-free seeds would display an enhanced germination, ensuring a more rapid seedling establishment if later water conditions do not restrict plant growth.

GUNDEL, P. E.; MASEDA, P. H.; VILA-AIUB, M. M.; GHERSA, C. M.; BENECH-ARNOLD, R.

2006-01-01

303

Activated carbon addition affects substrate pH and germination of six plant species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Activated carbon (AC) is widely used in ecological studies for neutralizing allelopathic compounds. However, it has been suggested that AC has direct effects on plants because it alters substrate parameters such as nutrient availability and pH. These side-effects of AC addition may interfere with allelopathic effects. In this study we analyzed three widely used commercial AC brands and analyzed their

P. Kabouw; M. Nab; N. M. van Dam

2010-01-01

304

Seeds Use Temperature Cues to Ensure Germination under Nurse-plant Shade in Xeric Kalahari Savannah  

Microsoft Academic Search

† Background and Aims In arid environments many plant species are found associated with the canopies of woody perennials. Favourable conditions for establishment under canopies are likely to be associated with shade, but under canopies shade is distributed patchily and differs in quality. Diurnal temperature fluctuations and maximum tempera- tures could be reliable indicators of safe sites. Here, an examination

MARTIJN KOS; PETER POSCHLOD

2007-01-01

305

The Growth and Failure of U.S. Manufacturing Plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the patterns of postentry growth and failure for over 200,000 plants that entered the U.S. manufacturing sector in the 1967-77 period. The postentry patterns of growth and failure vary significantly with observable employer characteristics. Plant failure rates decline with size and age as do the growth rates of nonfailing plants. The expected growth rate of a plant,

Timothy Dunne; Mark J. Roberts; Larry Samuelson

1989-01-01

306

Plant growth promotion by phosphate solubilizing bacteria.  

PubMed

Most agronomic soils contain large reserves of total phosphorus [P], but the fixation and precipitation of P cause P deficiency, and in turn, restrict the growth of crops severely. Phosphorus replenishment, especially in sustainable production systems, remains a major challenge as it is mainly fertilizer-dependent. Though the use of chemical P fertilizers is obviously the best means to circumvent P deficiency in different agro-ecosystems, their use is always limited due to its spiralling cost. A greater interest has, therefore, been generated to find an alternative yet inexpensive technology that could provide sufficient P to plants while reducing the dependence on expensive chemical P fertilizers. Among the heterogeneous and naturally abundant microbes inhabiting the rhizosphere, the phosphate solubilizing microorganisms (PSM) including bacteria have provided an alternative biotechnological solution in sustainable agriculture to meet the P demands of plants. These organisms in addition to providing P to plants also facilitate plant growth by other mechanisms. Despite their different ecological niches and multiple functional properties, P-solubilizing bacteria have yet to fulfil their promise as commercial bio-inoculants. Current developments in our understanding of the functional diversity, rhizosphere colonizing ability, mode of actions and judicious application are likely to facilitate their use as reliable components in the management of sustainable agricultural systems. PMID:19789141

Zaidi, A; Khan, M S; Ahemad, M; Oves, M

2009-09-01

307

Development of Biocompatibility Procedures for Assessment of Plant Growth in Ground Test Hardware for the EMCS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) is an European Space Agency-developed facility designed to support plant research in microgravity on the IS NASA is responsible for providing US specific hardware to use within the EMCS. In preparation for flight, research will be developed and tested at Ames Research Center in the EMCS ground test hardware, the Experiment Reference Module (ERM) In order to determine the acceptability of the ERM for such purposes, biocompatibility tests will be performed to determine that the hardware functions as intended and successfully supports the' growth of plants. In this report, we describe the development of procedures and the collection of baseline data against which to compare ERM function, e.g. biocompatibility testing. A simple and robust system was developed to grow whole Arabidopsis thaliana plants within the confined volumes characteristic of spaceflight hardware. Our system for growing plants eliminated the necessity of a water/nutrient delivery system and allowed for quantifiable assessment of individual plants, as well as entire population dynamics. To insure uniform germination, seeds were started in small straw segments and transplanted into modified scintillation vials. Seedlings were selected prior to transplantation to decrease genetic variability. Plants were grown for a total of 24 days in standard laboratory plant growth chambers under controlled conditions. Sequential digital still images were taken on a daily basis. Analysis of these images allowed for the quantification of even minute environmental effect, on growth dynamics whole plants. The data collected provide reliable growth curves against which to compare plants grown in the ERM.

Bowman, R. N.; Steele, M. K.; Sun, S. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

308

[Review on application of plant growth retardants in medicinal plants cultivation].  

PubMed

Plant growth retardants are widely used in cultivation of medicinal plant, but there is still lack of scientific guidance. In order to guide the use of plant growth retardants in medicinal plant cultivation efficiently and reasonably, this paper reviewed the mechanism, function characteristic, plant and soil residue of plant growth retardants, such as chlorocholine chloride, mepiquat chloride, paclobutrazol, unicnazle and succinic acid, and summarized the application of plant growth retardants in medicinal plants cultivation in recent years, with focus on the effect of growth and yield of the officinal organs and secondary metabolites. PMID:24380290

Zhai, Yu-Yao; Guo, Bao-Lin; Cheng, Ming

2013-09-01

309

Differentially expressed myo-inositol monophosphatase gene (CaIMP) in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity and improves seed germination and seedling growth under abiotic stresses.  

PubMed

myo-Inositol monophosphatase (IMP) is an essential enzyme in the myo-inositol metabolic pathway where it primarily dephosphorylates myo-inositol 1-phosphate to maintain the cellular inositol pool which is important for many metabolic and signalling pathways in plants. The stress-induced increased accumulation of inositol has been reported in a few plants including chickpea; however, the role and regulation of IMP is not well defined in response to stress. In this work, it has been shown that IMP activity is distributed in all organs in chickpea and was noticeably enhanced during environmental stresses. Subsequently, using degenerate oligonucleotides and RACE strategy, a full-length IMP cDNA (CaIMP) was cloned and sequenced. Biochemical study revealed that CaIMP encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity, although maximum activity was observed with the myo-inositol 1-phosphate and l-galactose 1-phosphate substrates. Transcript analysis revealed that CaIMP is differentially expressed and regulated in different organs, stresses and phytohormones. Complementation analysis in Arabidopsis further confirmed the role of CaIMP in l-galactose 1-phosphate and myo-inositol 1-phosphate hydrolysis and its participation in myo-inositol and ascorbate biosynthesis. Moreover, Arabidopsis transgenic plants over-expressing CaIMP exhibited improved tolerance to stress during seed germination and seedling growth, while the VTC4/IMP loss-of-function mutants exhibited sensitivity to stress. Collectively, CaIMP links various metabolic pathways and plays an important role in improving seed germination and seedling growth, particularly under stressful environments. PMID:24123252

Saxena, Saurabh C; Salvi, Prafull; Kaur, Harmeet; Verma, Pooja; Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Rao, Venkateswara; Kamble, Nitin; Majee, Manoj

2013-12-01

310

Differentially expressed myo-inositol monophosphatase gene (CaIMP) in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity and improves seed germination and seedling growth under abiotic stresses  

PubMed Central

myo-Inositol monophosphatase (IMP) is an essential enzyme in the myo-inositol metabolic pathway where it primarily dephosphorylates myo-inositol 1-phosphate to maintain the cellular inositol pool which is important for many metabolic and signalling pathways in plants. The stress-induced increased accumulation of inositol has been reported in a few plants including chickpea; however, the role and regulation of IMP is not well defined in response to stress. In this work, it has been shown that IMP activity is distributed in all organs in chickpea and was noticeably enhanced during environmental stresses. Subsequently, using degenerate oligonucleotides and RACE strategy, a full-length IMP cDNA (CaIMP) was cloned and sequenced. Biochemical study revealed that CaIMP encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity, although maximum activity was observed with the myo-inositol 1-phosphate and l-galactose 1-phosphate substrates. Transcript analysis revealed that CaIMP is differentially expressed and regulated in different organs, stresses and phytohormones. Complementation analysis in Arabidopsis further confirmed the role of CaIMP in l-galactose 1-phosphate and myo-inositol 1-phosphate hydrolysis and its participation in myo-inositol and ascorbate biosynthesis. Moreover, Arabidopsis transgenic plants over-expressing CaIMP exhibited improved tolerance to stress during seed germination and seedling growth, while the VTC4/IMP loss-of-function mutants exhibited sensitivity to stress. Collectively, CaIMP links various metabolic pathways and plays an important role in improving seed germination and seedling growth, particularly under stressful environments.

Majee, Manoj

2013-01-01

311

Effects of simulated acid rain on the pollen germination and pollen tube growth of apple (Malus sylvestris Miller cv. Golden).  

PubMed

The pollens of apple flowers have been treated with simulated acid rain solutions in range of pHs 2.9 to 5.0 in order to determine the threshold proportion values that lead the observed symptoms of detriments of acid rain. Compared to controls (pH 6.5), pollen germination decreased by 41.75% at pH 3.3 and pollen tube elongation decreased by 24.3% at pH 3.4. Acid rain threshold proportion value was around pH 3.3 and 3.4 for apple pollen germination and pollen tube elongation, respectively. Furthermore, pollen tube elongation was determined to be more sensitive to acid rain than pollen germination. The pH values below 3.1 resulted in complete destruction of pollen tubes. Pollen germination entirely stopped at around pH 3.0. Finally, it has been shown that the acid rain has a blocking effect on pollen germination and pollen tube elongation in apple. The conclusion is that not only pH value but also the quantity of acid rain is important factor in germination. The results were found statistically significant through the LSD test at levels of p < 0.05 and p < 0.01. PMID:12705325

Munzuroglu, O; Obek, E; Geckil, H

2003-01-01

312

Photoperiod regulates elicitation of growth promotion but not induced resistance by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

For several years, we have noticed that plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), which consistently promote plant growth in greenhouse tests during spring, summer, and fall, fail to elicit plant growth promotion during the mid- winter under ambient light conditions. This report tests the hypothesis that photoperiod regulates elicitation of growth promotion and induced systemic resistance (ISR) by PGPR. A commercially available

J. W. Kloepper; A. Gutiérrez-Estrada; J. A. McInroy

2007-01-01

313

Hesperetin 7-rutinoside (hesperidin) and taxifolin 3-arabinoside as germination and growth inhibitors in soils associated with the weed,Pluchea lanceolata (DC) C.B. Clarke (Asteraceae).  

PubMed

Hesperetin 7-rutinoside (Hesperidin) and taxifolin 3-arabinoside were detected in the soils associated with the rapidly spreading perennial weed,Pluchea lanceolata. In the present investigations, inhibitory potential of the aqueous extracts of the two compounds was established and confirmed through growth experiments pertaining to seed germination and seedling growth of radish, mustard, and tomato, with 10(-4) M solutions of the authentic samples. The significance of the water-soluble compounds present in the rhizosphere zones of the weed and its interference potential is commented upon. PMID:24257882

Inderjit; Dakshini, K M

1991-08-01

314

Clostridium perfringens Spore Germination: Characterization of Germinants and Their Receptors?  

PubMed Central

Clostridium perfringens food poisoning is caused by type A isolates carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (cpe) gene (C-cpe), while C. perfringens-associated non-food-borne gastrointestinal (GI) diseases are caused by isolates carrying a plasmid-borne cpe gene (P-cpe). C. perfringens spores are thought to be the important infectious cell morphotype, and after inoculation into a suitable host, these spores must germinate and return to active growth to cause GI disease. We have found differences in the germination of spores of C-cpe and P-cpe isolates in that (i) while a mixture of l-asparagine and KCl was a good germinant for spores of C-cpe and P-cpe isolates, KCl and, to a lesser extent, l-asparagine triggered spore germination in C-cpe isolates only; and (ii) l-alanine or l-valine induced significant germination of spores of P-cpe but not C-cpe isolates. Spores of a gerK mutant of a C-cpe isolate in which two of the proteins of a spore nutrient germinant receptor were absent germinated slower than wild-type spores with KCl, did not germinate with l-asparagine, and germinated poorly compared to wild-type spores with the nonnutrient germinants dodecylamine and a 1:1 chelate of Ca2+ and dipicolinic acid. In contrast, spores of a gerAA mutant of a C-cpe isolate that lacked another component of a nutrient germinant receptor germinated at the same rate as that of wild-type spores with high concentrations of KCl, although they germinated slightly slower with a lower KCl concentration, suggesting an auxiliary role for GerAA in C. perfringens spore germination. In sum, this study identified nutrient germinants for spores of both C-cpe and P-cpe isolates of C. perfringens and provided evidence that proteins encoded by the gerK operon are required for both nutrient-induced and non-nutrient-induced spore germination.

Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Torres, J. Antonio; Setlow, Peter; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.

2008-01-01

315

Phytotoxical effect of Lepidium draba L. extracts on the germination and growth of monocot (Zea mays L.) and dicot (Amaranthus retroflexus L.) seeds.  

PubMed

Laboratory experiments were performed to determine phytotoxic potentials of white top (Lepidium draba) methanol extracts (root, stem and leaf) on germination and early growth of corn (Zea mays) and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus). Furthermore, the effects of different methanol extracts of L. draba on the phytohormone (indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), gibberellic acid (GA), abscisic acid (ABA) and zeatin) levels of corn and redroot pigweed were investigated. It was observed that all concentrations of methanol extracts of root, stem and leaf of L. draba inhibited germination, radicle and plumule elongation when compared with the respective controls. Besides this, the degree of inhibition was increased in concert with increasing concentrations of extracts used. On the other hand, phytohormone levels changed with the application of different extract concentrations. Comparing with the control, the GA levels significantly decreased while the ABA levels increased in all the application groups. Zeatin and IAA levels showed changes depending upon the applied extracts and concentrations. PMID:23293131

Kaya, Yusuf; Aksakal, Ozkan; Sunar, Serap; Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Bozari, Sedat; Agar, Guleray; Erez, Mehmet Emre; Battal, Peyami

2013-01-01

316

Germination of Dimorphic Seeds of the Desert Annual Halophyte Suaeda aralocaspica (Chenopodiaceae), a C4 Plant without Kranz Anatomy  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Suaeda aralocaspica is a C4 summer annual halophyte without Kranz anatomy that is restricted to the deserts of central Asia. It produces two distinct types of seeds that differ in colour, shape and size. The primary aims of the present study were to compare the dormancy and germination characteristics of dimorphic seeds of S. aralocaspica and to develop a conceptual model of their dynamics. Methods Temperatures simulating those in the natural habitat of S. aralocaspica were used to test for primary dormancy and germination behaviour of fresh brown and black seeds. The effects of cold stratification, gibberellic acid, seed coat scarification, seed coat removal and dry storage on dormancy breaking were tested in black seeds. Germination percentage and recovery responses of brown seeds, non-treated black seeds and 8-week cold-stratified black seeds to salt stress were tested. Key Results Brown seeds were non-dormant, whereas black seeds had non-deep Type 2 physiological dormancy (PD). Germination percentage and rate of germination of brown seeds and of variously pretreated black seeds were significantly higher than those of non-pretreated black seeds. Exposure of seeds to various salinities had significant effects on germination, germination recovery and induction into secondary dormancy. A conceptual model is presented that ties these results together and puts them into an ecological context. Conclusions The two seed morphs of S. aralocaspica exhibit distinct differences in dormancy and germination characteristics. Suaeda aralocaspica is the first cold desert halophyte for which non-deep Type 2 PD has been documented.

Wang, Lei; Huang, Zhenying; Baskin, Carol C.; Baskin, Jerry M.; Dong, Ming

2008-01-01

317

Cytological study on water stress during germination of Zea mays  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kernels of Zea mays were subjected to dehydration treatment at various times during germination. Embryos from kernels dehydrated during the first 36 h of germination are resistant to dehydration and subsequently germinate earlier than controls. Dehydration of kernels germinated during 72h leads to an irreversible arrest of growth of the embryos. However, autoradiographic observations showed that these embryos are still

M. Crèvecoeur; R. Deltour; R. Bronchart

1976-01-01

318

Germination of Medicago sativa is inhibited by soluble compounds in cement dust.  

PubMed

Deposition of cement dust on soils and plant surfaces is known to affect plant growth and the species composition of plant communities, but little is known about its effects (and those of its pH and constituents) on germination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of an aqueous cement extract, constituents of the extract and pH on the germination of seeds of a selected species, Medicago sativa. First, the effects of the extract were tested in assays with concentrations and exposure durations ranging from 0 to 1.0 g/mL and 4 to 96 h, respectively. At 0.8 g/mL, the extract strongly inhibited germination; a 4-h exposure reduced the germination rate, from 77?±?1.8 to 50?±?2.6% (mean ± SE), while 8-h exposure completely inhibited it. Further, treatment at this concentration killed the non-germinating seeds, thus the inhibition was due to toxic effects. Neither the pH of the extract nor the concentration of its main soluble elements separately (K, Ca, S, Na, or Cr) caused the toxicity since germination rates were not significantly reduced when these variables were tested individually. However, a mixture of the elements in solution reduced germination rates, suggesting that they have adverse synergistic effects. PMID:23900953

Lafragüeta, Cristina; García-Criado, Balbino; Arranz, Angel; Vázquez-de-Aldana, Beatriz R

2014-01-01

319

PROMOTION OF PLANT GROWTH BY SOIL BACTERIA THAT REGULATE PLANT ETHYLENE LEVELS  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the central the mechanisms used by many soil bacteria to directly promote plant growth is the production of the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. This enzyme facilitates plant growth as a consequence of the fact that it sequesters and cleaves plant- produced ACC (the immediate precursor of ethylene in plants), thereby lowering the level of ethylene in the plant.

Bernard R. Glick

320

Microbial enrichment of a novel growing substrate and its effect on plant growth.  

PubMed

The quality of torrefied grass fibers (TGF) as a new potting soil ingredient was tested in a greenhouse experiment. TGF was colonized with previously selected microorganisms. Four colonization treatments were compared: (1) no inoculants, (2) the fungus Coniochaeta ligniaria F/TGF15 alone, (3) the fungus followed by inoculation with two selected bacteria, and (4) the fungus with seven selected bacteria. Cultivation-based and DNA-based methods, i.e., PCR-DGGE and BOX-PCR, were applied to assess the bacterial and fungal communities established in the TGF. Although colonization was not performed under sterile conditions, all inoculated strains were recovered from TGF up to 26 days incubation. Stable fungal and bacterial populations of 10(8) and 10(9) CFU/g TGF, respectively, were reached. As a side effect of the torrefaction process that aimed at the chemical stabilization of grass fibers, potentially phytotoxic compounds were generated. These phytotoxic compounds were cold-extracted from the fibers and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Four of 15 target compounds that had previously been found in the extract of TGF were encountered, namely phenol, 2-methoxyphenol, benzopyran-2-one, and tetrahydro-5,6,7,7a-benzofuranone. The concentration of these compounds decreased significantly during incubation. The colonized TGF was mixed with peat (P) in a range of 100%:0%, 50%:50%, 20%:80%, and 0%:100% TGF/P (w/w), respectively, to assess suitability for plant growth. Germination of tomato seeds was assessed three times, i.e., with inoculated TGF that had been incubated for 12, 21, and 26 days. In these tests, 90-100% of the seeds germinated in 50%:50% and 20%:80% TGF/P, whereas on average only 50% of the seeds germinated in pure TGF. Germination was not improved by the microbial inoculants. However, plant fresh weight as well as leaf area of 28-day-old tomato plants were significantly increased in all treatments where C. ligniaria F/TGF15 was inoculated compared to the control treatment without microbial inoculants. Colonization with C. ligniaria also protected the substrate from uncontrolled colonization by other fungi. The excellent colonization of TGF by the selected plant-health promoting bacteria in combination with the fungus C. ligniaria offers the possibility to create disease suppressive substrate, meanwhile replacing 20% to 50% of peat in potting soil by TGF. PMID:19387721

Trifonova, R; Postma, J; Schilder, M T; van Elsas, J D

2009-10-01

321

[Changes in nucleic acid fractions during the germination of seeds of P. pinea. Effect of growth factors].  

PubMed

The application of indolacetic acid, gibberellic acid and kinetin increased the germination pattern of Pinus pinea seeds. Nucleic acid metabolism during germination has been investigated. Seeds grown in the presence of all these substances, contained higher amounts of total nucleic acid than the controls. Kinetin was the most active factor, increasing t-RNA, DNA-RNA and r-RNA levels in embryos and megagametophytes. On the other hand, gibberellic acid showed in the first stages of germination a selective action on the DNA-RNA complex and afterwards on the r-RNA fraction. Indolacetic acid showed mainly a stimulating effect on DNA-RNA and r-RNA fractions embryos; no significant changes were observed in megagametophytes. PMID:6183718

Martínez-Honduvilla, C J; Naddaf, A; Giménez-Solves, A

1982-01-01

322

Germination and Dormancy of Abscisic Acid- and Gibberellin-Deficient Mutant Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Seeds (Sensitivity of Germination to Abscisic Acid, Gibberellin, and Water Potential).  

PubMed Central

Germination responses of wild-type (MM), abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient (sitw), and gibberellin (GA)-deficient (gib-1) mutant tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Moneymaker) seeds to ABA, GA4+7, reduced water potential ([psi]), and their combinations were analyzed using a population-based threshold model (B.R. Ni and K.J. Bradford [1992] Plant Physiol 98: 1057-1068). Among the three genotypes, sitw seeds germinated rapidly and completely in water, MM seeds germinated more slowly and were partially dormant, and gib-1 seeds did not germinate without exogenous GA4+7. Times to germination were inversely proportional to the differences between the external osmoticum, ABA, or GA4+7 concentrations and the corresponding threshold levels that would either prevent ([psi]b, log[ABAb]) or promote (log[GAb]) germination. The sensitivity of germination to ABA, GA4+7, and [psi] varied widely among individual seeds in the population, resulting in a distribution of germination times. The rapid germination rate of sitw seeds was attributable to their low mean [psi]b (-1.17 MPa). Postharvest dormancy in MM seeds was due to a high mean [psi]b (-0.35 MPa) and a distribution of [psi]b among seeds such that some seeds were unable to germinate even on water. GA4+7 (100 [mu]M) stimulated germination of MM and gib-1 seeds by lowering the mean [psi]b to -0.75 MPa, whereas ABA inhibited germination of MM and sitw seeds by increasing the mean [psi]b. The changes in [psi]b were not due to changes in embryo osmotic potential. Rather, hormonal effects on endosperm weakening opposite the radicle tip apparently determine the threshold [psi] for germination. The analysis demonstrates that ABA- and GA-dependent changes in seed dormancy and germination rates, whether due to endogenous or exogenous growth regulators, are based primarily upon corresponding shifts in the [psi] thresholds for radicle emergence. The [psi] thresholds, in turn, determine both the rate and final extent of germination within the seed population.

Ni, B. R.; Bradford, K. J.

1993-01-01

323

[Application of spectroscopy technique to obtain plant growth information].  

PubMed

Detection of plant growth information can predict growth and health status of plant and realize intelligentized management, detection techniques of plant growth information include electrical properties, optical reflectance and machine vision, with the development of spectroscopy technique, near infrared spectroscopy technique, multispectral technique and hyperspectral technique are widely used in plant growth information measurement. Spectroscopy technique is extremely fast, high efficient, cheap to implement and no sample preparation, has been a rapid and non-destructive modern measuring technique. In this paper, the application of spectroscopy technique to measurement of plant growth information was briefly introduced. Some considerable aspects existing in the application were also discussed and it is pointed out that because of real time information obtain and intelligentized management of plant, automation analysis equipment should be developed to improve the speed of plant growth information measurement and cooperating with several other techniques, such as machine vision, thermal imaging technique and spectroscopy technique, is the research trend. PMID:18800709

Jiang, Huan-yu; Ying, Yi-bin; Xie, Li-juan

2008-06-01

324

Effect of new organic supplement (Panchgavya) on seed germination and soil quality.  

PubMed

We studied the suitability of Panchgavya (five products of cow), new organic amendment, application on seed germination, plant growth, and soil health. After characterization, Panchgavya was mixed with water to form different concentration and was tested for seed germination, germination index, and root and shoot growth of different seedlings. Four percent solution of Panchgavya was applied to different plants to test its efficacy. Panchgavya and other two organic amendments were incorporated in soil to test the change of soil chemical and microbiological parameters. Panchgavya contained higher nutrients as compared to farm yard manure (FYM) and vermicompost. Its application on different seeds has positively influenced germination percentage, germination index, root and shoot length, and fresh and dry weight of the seedling. Water-soluble macronutrients including pH and metal were positively and negatively correlated with the growth parameters, respectively. Four percent solution of Panchgavya application on some plants showed superiority in terms of plant height and chlorophyll content. Panchgavya-applied soil had higher values of macro and micronutrients (zinc, copper, and manganese), microbial activity as compared to FYM, and vermicompost applied soils. Application of Panchgavya can be gainfully used as an alternative organic supplement in agriculture. PMID:24234225

Jain, Paras; Sharma, Ravi Chandra; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Banik, Pabitra

2014-04-01

325

Ammonia And Ethylene Optrodes For Research On Plant Growth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fiber-optic sensors developed for use in measuring concentrations of ammonia and ethylene near plants during experiments on growth of plants in enclosed environments. Developmental fiber-optic sensors satisfy need to measure concentrations as low as few parts per billion (ppb) and expected to contribute to research on roles of ethylene and ammonia in growth of plants.

Zhou, Quan; Tabacco, Mary Beth

1995-01-01

326

The role of phytochelates in plant growth and productivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plants require minimal amounts of certain metals (Zn,Fe,Cu,etc) for optimal growth and productivity, but excess of these metals leads to cell death. When growth is limited by metal excess or metal deficiency plants respond by synthesizing nonproteinogenic chelating substances. Phytosiderophores are secreted by roots of iron deficient grasses and are important in providing sufficient Fe for normal growth. In response

A. M. Kinnersley

1993-01-01

327

Germin and Germin-like Proteins: Evolution, Structure, and Function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Germin and germin-like proteins (GLPs) are encoded by a family of genes found in all plants. They are part of the cupin superfamily of biochemically diverse proteins, a superfamily that has a conserved tertiary structure, though with limited similarity in primary sequence. The subgroups of GLPs have different enzyme functions that include the two hydrogen peroxide–generating enzymes, oxalate oxidase (OxO)

Jim M. Dunwell; J. George Gibbings; Tariq Mahmood; S. M. Saqlan Naqvi

2008-01-01

328

Incorporation of Polyamines in the Priming Media Enhances the Germination and Early Seedling Growth in Hybrid Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the benefits (if any) associated with the incorporation of polyamines in the priming media for hybrid sunflower achene priming. Achenes were subjected to hydropriming for 24 h and in the solutions containing 10 mg L -1 spermidine and putrescine for 24 h. All the achene priming treatments resulted in improved germination and early

M. FAROOQ; SHAHZAD M. A. BASRA; M. HUSSAIN; H. REHMAN; B. A. SALEEM

329

Comparative proteomic analysis of genotypic variation in germination and early seedling growth of chickpea under suboptimal soil-water conditions.  

PubMed

Protein expression patterns in imbibed seeds of three cultivars of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) with different rates of germination under limiting water supply in soil (>10% water holding capacity) were compared. A large number of soluble proteins expressed earlier and at higher levels in cv Rupali seeds compared to two other genotypes that germinated less rapidly (KH850) or not at all (KJ850). Among the proteins identified were those with chaperone-like functions, including LEA and HSP proteins and proteins involved in metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Only NAD-malate dehydrogenase was identified as an early, differentially abundant enzyme of the TCA cycle, but in cv Rupali, expression of phospho-enol-pyruvate carboxykinase rose very rapidly to a high level, indicating that an anaplerotic C input to the TCA cycle may have been important. Proteinase inhibitors were more highly expressed in the genotype that did not germinate compared to cv Rupali. Clustering analysis of proteomic data indicated a link between groups of proteins, implying a common regulatory mechanism possibly at the transcriptional level. The chaperone-like proteins and enzymes of ROS homeostasis provide a useful starting point for molecular genetic analysis that may well identify other important genes for the early germination trait. PMID:22765518

Vessal, Saeedreza; Siddique, Kadambot H M; Atkins, Craig A

2012-08-01

330

The proteome of exudates from germinating Lupinus albus seeds is secreted through a selective dual-step process and contains proteins involved in plant defence.  

PubMed

The general knowledge of defence activity during the first steps of seed germination is still largely incomplete. The present study focused on the proteins released in the exudates of germinating white lupin seeds. During the first 24 h, a release of proteins was observed. Initially (i.e. during the first 12 h), the proteins found in exudates reflected the composition of the seed, indicating a passive extrusion of pre-formed proteins. Subsequently, when the rate of protein release was at its highest, the composition of the released proteome changed drastically. This transition occurred in a short time, indicating that more selective and regulated events, such as secretory processes, took place soon after the onset of germination. The present study considered: (a) the characterization of the proteome accumulated in the germinating medium collected after the appearance of the post-extrusion events; (b) the biosynthetic origin and the modalities that are the basis of protein release outside the seeds; and (c) an assessment of antifungal activity of these exudates. The most represented protein in the exudate was chitinase, which was synthesized de novo. The other proteins are involved in the cellular mechanisms responding to stress events, including biotic ones. This exudate was effectively able to inhibit fungal growth. The results of the present study indicate that seed exudation is a dual-step process that leads to the secretion of selected proteins and thus is not a result of passive leakage. The released proteome is involved in protecting the spermosphere environment and thus may act as first defence against pathogens. PMID:23332028

Scarafoni, Alessio; Ronchi, Alessandro; Prinsi, Bhakti; Espen, Luca; Assante, Gemma; Venturini, Giovanni; Duranti, Marcello

2013-03-01

331

Strigolactones as mediators of plant growth responses to environmental conditions  

PubMed Central

Strigolactones (SLs) have been recently identified as a new group of plant hormones or their derivatives thereof, shown to play a role in plant development. Evolutionary forces have driven the development of mechanisms in plants that allow adaptive adjustments to a variety of different habitats by employing plasticity in shoot and root growth and development. The ability of SLs to regulate both shoot and root development suggests a role in the plant's response to its growth environment. To play this role, SL pathways need to be responsive to plant growth conditions, and affect plant growth toward increased adaptive adjustment. Here, the effects of SLs on shoot and root development are presented, and possible feedback loops between SLs and two environmental cues, light and nutrient status, are discussed; these might suggest a role for SLs in plants' adaptive adjustment to growth conditions.

Kapulnik, Yoram

2011-01-01

332

USE OF MARSH PLANTS FOR TOXICITY TESTING OF WATER AND SEDIMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The freshwater wetland plants, Echinochlo crusgalli crusgalli andEchinocloa crusgalli zelayensis, and the saltmarsh plant, Spartina alterniflora, were exposed to the herbicides, metolachlor and norflurazon, in two types of toxicity tests: eed germination and early seedling growth...

333

Demonstrating the Effects of Light Quality on Plant Growth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a lab demonstration that illustrates the effect of different colors or wavelengths of visible light on plant growth and development. This demonstration is appropriate for use in college biology, botany, or plant physiology courses. (HM)

Whitesell, J. H.; Garcia, Maria

1977-01-01

334

Effects of altitude and seed size on germination and seedling survival of heathland plants in north Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of altitude and seed size on germination and seedling survival were studied in Calluna vulgaris, Erica cinerea and Erica vagans. Experiments were carried out in the laboratory over a one year period. Seeds collected from heathlands of different altitudes were divided in two size classes. They were sowed on moist filter paper inside Petri dishes which were placed

M. L. Vera

1997-01-01

335

Exploring Plants  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this media-rich lesson, students observe plant growth by watching a time-lapse video and by growing their own seeds. They identify the conditions seeds need to germinate and consider the role that fruits play in seed dispersal.

2007-08-09

336

Growth-promotion of strawberry plants inoculated with Azospirillum brasilense  

Microsoft Academic Search

Azospirillum brasilense (strains REC3, RLC1, PEC5) were root inoculated in strawberry plants of the cultivars ‘Milsei’, ‘Selva’ and ‘Camarosa’ to\\u000a assess plant growth-promoting effects. The bacteria were able to promote plant growth (expressed as root length, root area,\\u000a and dry weight of root and shoot), depending on the genotypes of plants and bacteria used, whereas the stolon production (3–4)\\u000a depended

Raúl O. Pedraza; Jessica Motok; Sergio M. Salazar; Alicia L. Ragout; María I. Mentel; María L. Tortora; María F. Guerrero-Molina; Beatriz C. Winik; Juan C. Díaz-Ricci

2010-01-01

337

Growth-promotion of strawberry plants inoculated with Azospirillum brasilense  

Microsoft Academic Search

Azospirillum brasilense (strains REC3, RLC1, PEC5) were root inoculated in strawberry plants of the cultivars 'Milsei', 'Selva' and 'Camarosa' to assess plant growth-promoting effects. The bacteria were able to pro- mote plant growth (expressed as root length, root area, and dry weight of root and shoot), depending on the genotypes of plants and bacteria used, whereas the stolon production (3-4)

Raul O. Pedraza; Jessica Motok; Sergio M. Salazar; Alicia L. Ragout; I. Mentel; Marõ ´ a; L. Tortora; F. Guerrero-Molina; Beatriz C. Winik; Juan C. Dõ ´ az-Ricci

2009-01-01

338

Seed germination and seedling establishment of Neotropical dry forest species in response to temperature and light conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was conducted to examine the germination requirements of Cedrela odorata, Guaiacum sanctum and Calycophyllum candidissimum seeds, and the effect of light intensity on survival and growth of C. odorata and G. sanctum seedlings planted on open, partially-open and beneath the canopy of a dry forest in Nicaragua. The results show that germination\\u000a of C. candidissimum seeds was significantly

Benigno González-Rivas; Mulualem Tigabu; Guillermo Castro-Marín; Per Christer Odén

2009-01-01

339

Light Plants and Dark Plants, Wet Plants and Dry Ones  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students plant sunflower seeds in plastic cups, and once germinated, expose them to varying light or soil moisture conditions. They measure growth of the seedlings every few days using non-standard measurement (inch cubes). After a few weeks, they compare the growth of plants exposed to the different conditions and make bar comparative graphs, which they analyze to draw conclusions about the needs of plants.

Engineering K-Ph.d. Program

340

Polyamines, IAA and ABA during germination in two recalcitrant seeds: Araucaria angustifolia (Gymnosperm) and Ocotea odorifera (Angiosperm)  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Plant growth regulators play an important role in seed germination. However, much of the current knowledge about their function during seed germination was obtained using orthodox seeds as model systems, and there is a paucity of information about the role of plant growth regulators during germination of recalcitrant seeds. In the present work, two endangered woody species with recalcitrant seeds, Araucaria angustifolia (Gymnosperm) and Ocotea odorifera (Angiosperm), native to the Atlantic Rain Forest, Brazil, were used to study the mobilization of polyamines (PAs), indole-acetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) during seed germination. Methods Data were sampled from embryos of O. odorifera and embryos and megagametophytes of A. angustifolia throughout the germination process. Biochemical analyses were carried out in HPLC. Key Results During seed germination, an increase in the (Spd + Spm) : Put ratio was recorded in embryos in both species. An increase in IAA and PA levels was also observed during seed germination in both embryos, while ABA levels showed a decrease in O. odorifera and an increase in A. angustifolia embryos throughout the period studied. Conclusions The (Spd + Spm) : Put ratio could be used as a marker for germination completion. The increase in IAA levels, prior to germination, could be associated with variations in PA content. The ABA mobilization observed in the embryos could represent a greater resistance to this hormone in recalcitrant seeds, in comparison to orthodox seeds, opening a new perspective for studies on the effects of this regulator in recalcitrant seeds. The gymnosperm seed, though without a connective tissue between megagametophyte and embryo, seems to be able to maintain communication between the tissues, based on the likely transport of plant growth regulators.

Pieruzzi, Fernanda P.; Dias, Leonardo L. C.; Balbuena, Tiago S.; Santa-Catarina, Claudete; dos Santos, Andre L. W.; Floh, Eny I. S.

2011-01-01

341

Evaluation of nutritional and physical stress conditions during vegetative growth on conidial production and germination in Ophiocordyceps sinensis.  

PubMed

The influence of nutritional and physical stress on sporulation, conidial germination and vegetative biomass of Ophiocordyceps sinensis, one of the most important medicinal fungi in China and now globally, was evaluated using a two-stage culture method. All the treatments, except nutrient deprivation, enhanced conidial production and vegetative biomass to some extent. However, conidia produced under stress showed decreased germination in comparison with those continuously cultured on the enriched potato dextrose agar (PDA; as the control). Among 10 treatments tested, the physical stress of frozen-shock produced the largest number of conidia, 7.5 times higher than that of the control, followed by heat-shock treatment. These results demonstrate that the fungus has strong physiological adaptations to environmental stress that may have evolved because it is endemic to the Tibetan Plateau. This report will be relevant to the study of the pathogenicity and artificial cultivation of this endangered fungus. PMID:23731440

Ren, Shu-Yu; Yao, Yi-Jian

2013-09-01

342

Losses of diesel oil by volatilisation and effects of diesel oil on seed germination and seedling growth.  

PubMed

For phytoremediation to be effective, seeds must germinate and subsequently grow, or seedlings must become established, in contaminated soil. In this study, the effect of diesel oil on the viability of seeds of white clover and ryegrass together with long term abiotic diesel oil loss were investigated. Losses of diesel by volatilisation were found to be as high as 58% over 360 days suggesting that volatilisation (abiotic loss) may be a significant method of contaminant removal that may have been previously underestimated or overlooked in short term studies. White clover and ryegrass seeds were able to germinate in the presence of volatile diesel components and following 24 weeks immersion in diesel oil, which suggested that properties of their seed coats prevented diesel oil causing damage to the seeds. PMID:11816772

Kroening, S J; Leung, D W; Greenfield, L G; Galilee, C

2001-09-01

343

Growth promotion and yield enhancement of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) by application of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria.  

PubMed

Although plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) have been reported to influence plant growth, yield and nutrient uptake by an array of mechanisms, the specific traits by which PGPR promote plant growth, yield and nutrient uptake were limited to the expression of one or more of the traits expressed at a given environment of plant-microbe interaction. We selected nine different isolates of PGPR from a pool of 233 rhizobacterial isolates obtained from the peanut rhizosphere on the basis of ACC-deaminase activity. The nine isolates were selected, initially, on the basis of germinating seed bioassay in which the root length of the seedling was enhanced significantly over the untreated control. All the nine isolates were identified as Pseudomonas spp. Four of these isolates, viz. PGPR1, PGPR2, PGPR4 and PGPR7 (all fluorescent pseudomonads), were the best in producing siderophore and indole acetic acid (IAA). In addition to IAA and siderophore-producing attributes, Pseudomonas fluorescens PGPR1 also possessed the characters like tri-calcium phosphate solubilization, ammonification and inhibited Aspergillus niger and A. flavus in vitro. P. fluorescens PGPR2 differed from PGPR1 in the sense that it did not show ammonification. In addition to the traits exhibited by PGPR1, PGPR4 showed strong in vitro inhibition to Sclerotium rolfsii. The performances of these selected plant growth-promoting rhizobacterial isolates were repeatedly evaluated for 3 years in pot and field trials. Seed inoculation of these three isolates, viz. PGPR1, PGPR2 and PGPR4, resulted in a significantly higher pod yield than the control, in pots, during rainy and post-rainy seasons. The contents of nitrogen and phosphorus in soil, shoot and kernel were also enhanced significantly in treatments inoculated with these rhizobacterial isolates in pots during both the seasons. In the field trials, however, there was wide variation in the performance of the PGPR isolates in enhancing the growth and yield of peanut in different years. Plant growth-promoting fluorescent pseudomonad isolates, viz. PGPR1, PGPR2 and PGPR4, significantly enhanced pod yield (23-26%, 24-28% and 18-24%, respectively), haulm yield and nodule dry weight over the control in 3 years. Other attributes like root length, pod number, 100-kernel mass, shelling out-turn and nodule number were also enhanced. Seed bacterization with plant growth-promoting P. fluorescens isolates, viz. PGPR1, PGPR2 and PGPR4, suppressed the soil-borne fungal diseases like collar rot of peanut caused by A. niger and PGPR4 also suppressed stem rot caused by S. rolfsii. Studies on the growth patterns of PGPR isolates utilizing the seed leachate as the sole source of C and N indicated that PGPR4 isolate was the best in utilizing the seed leachate of peanut, cultivar JL24. Studies on the rhizosphere competence of the PGPR isolates, evaluated on the basis of spontaneous rifampicin resistance, indicated that PGPR7 was the best rhizoplane colonizer and PGPR1 was the best rhizosphere colonizer. Although the presence of growth-promoting traits in vitro does not guarantee that an isolate will be plant growth promoting in nature, results suggested that besides ACC-deaminase activity of the PGPR isolates, expression of one or more of the traits like suppression of phytopathogens, solubilization of tri-calcium phosphate, production of siderophore and/or nodulation promotion might have contributed to the enhancement of growth, yield and nutrient uptake of peanut. PMID:15646384

Dey, R; Pal, K K; Bhatt, D M; Chauhan, S M

2004-01-01

344

Differences in drought tolerance between cultivars of field bean and field pea. Morphological characteristics, germination and seedling growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Different responses among legume species were observed, but the morphological and physiological differences that confer drought\\u000a resistance or susceptibility are not well explained. The objective of this study was the determination of variation of morphological\\u000a characteristics within 7 field bean and 4 field pea cultivars as related to drought tolerance. Also differences in the effect\\u000a of drought on seed germination

Stanis?aw Grzesiak; Morio Iijima; Yasuhiro Kono; Akira Yamauchi

1997-01-01

345

Effect of herbicide Imazethapyr (pursuit™) on chickpea seed germination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Herbicides are the most successful weed control technology ever developed. To assess the effects of herbicides on non-target plants, a study was carried out by using Imazethapyr (IM) on JG-11 cultivar of chickpea germination and early growth. Hydroponic conditions with five concentrations (0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 ppm) of IM were employed along with control. On the termination day

Manijeh Hoseiny-Rad; Shobha Jagannath

2011-01-01

346

Development of the cotyledon cells during olive (Olea europaea L.) in vitro seed germination and seedling growth.  

PubMed

The structural changes occurred in differentiating olive cotyledon cells into mesophyll cells are described. Using histological and immunocytological methods as well as microscopic observations, we showed that in the cells of mature embryo, large electron-dense proteins bodies (PBs) are surrounded by numerous oil bodies (OBs). After 3 days of in vitro germination, the presence of large PBs originated by fusion of smaller PBs was observed. It was also detected a close spatial proximity between PBs and OBs, likely as a reflection of interconnected metabolic pathways. Between the 3rd and the 12th day of germination, the formation of a large vacuolar compartment takes place accompanied by a decrease in the PBs and OBs number. This was coincident with a progressive decrease in the amount of the 11S-type seed storage proteins (SSPs), showed in situ and after Western blot analysis of crude protein extracts. After 26 days germination, the cellular organization became typical for a leaf mesophyll cell, with well-differentiated chloroplasts surrounding a large central vacuole. Our results suggest that the olive cotyledon storage reserves are mobilized gradually until the seedling becomes autotrophic. Moreover, the specific accumulation of storage proteins in the intravacuolar material suggests that these structures may operate as a shuttle for SSPs and/or products of their degradation into the cytoplasm, where finally they supply amino acids for the differentiating mesophyll cells. PMID:21104420

Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Jiménez-López, José Carlos; Zienkiewicz, Krzysztof; de Dios Alché, Juan; Rodríguez-García, María Isabel

2011-10-01

347

The modulating effect of bacterial volatiles on plant growth  

PubMed Central

Bacteria interact with plants in many different ways. In recent years, bacterial production of volatiles has emerged as a novel process by which bacteria modulate plant growth. Exposure to the volatiles produced by certain bacterial strains has been shown to lead to up to 5-fold increased plant biomass or to plant death. Despite these drastic growth alterations, the elucidation of the molecules responsible, of the mechanisms of perception by the plant and of the specific metabolic changes induced in planta is still in its infancy. This review summarizes the current knowledge and highlights future lines of research that should increase our knowledge of the volatile-mediated dialog between bacteria and plants.

Bailly, Aurelien; Weisskopf, Laure

2012-01-01

348

Postponed germination of Puccinia recondita urediospores deposited on wheat seedlings. I. Ripening and longevity of urediospores with postponed germination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Urediospores ofPuccinia recondita f.sp.tritici were applied to wheat seedlings. Inoculated plants were placed in a growth chamber to expose the spores to dry periods from zero to nine days at near-optimal temperatures. The dry period was followed by a wet period varying from 2 to 24 hours for spore germination. Results were subjected to analysis of variance. The effects of

J. C. Zadoks; E. M. Van Hees-Boukema

1986-01-01

349

Rape (Brassica chinensis L.) seed germination, seedling growth, and physiology in soil polluted with di-n-butyl phthalate and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate.  

PubMed

Phthalic acid esters (PAEs) pollution in agricultural soils caused by widely employed plastic products is becoming more and more widespread in China. PAEs polluted soil can lead to phytotoxicity in higher plants and potential health risks to human being. We evaluated the individual toxicity of di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), two representative PAEs, to sown rape (Brassica chinensis L.) seeds within 72 h (as germination stage) and seedlings after germination for 14 days by monitoring responses and trends of different biological parameters. No significant effects of six concentrations of PAE ranging from 0 (not treated/NT) to 500 mg?kg(-1) on germination rate in soil were observed. However, root length, shoot length, and biomass (fresh weight) were inhibited by both pollutants (except root length and biomass under DEHP). Stimulatory effects of both target pollutants on malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxide dismutase (SODase) activity, ascorbate peroxidase (APXase) content, and polyphenoloxidase (PPOase) activity in shoots and roots (SODase activity in shoots excluded) were in the same trend with the promotion of proline (Pro) but differed with acetylcholinesterase activity (except in shoots under DnBP) for analyzed samples treated for 72 h and 14 days. Responses of representative storage compounds free amino acids (FAA) and total soluble sugar (TSS) under both PAEs were raised. Sensitivity of APXase and Pro in roots demonstrates their possibility in estimation of PAE phytotoxicity and the higher toxicity of DnBP, which has also been approved by the morphological photos of seedlings at day 14. Higher sensitivity of the roots was also observed. The recommended soil allowable concentration is 5 mg DnBP?kg(-1) soil for the development of rape. We still need to know the phytotoxicity of DEHP at whole seedling stage for both the growing and development; on the other hand, soil criteria for PAE compounds are urgently required in China. PMID:23389857

Ma, Tingting; Christie, Peter; Teng, Ying; Luo, Yongming

2013-08-01

350

Piriformospora indica, a Cultivable Plant-Growth-Promoting Root Endophyte  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fungi interact with plants as pathogens or benefactors and may influence yields in agroforestry and floriculture. Knowl- edge concerning plant-growth-promoting cultivable root endo- phytes is low (7), and most studies have been conducted with mycorrhizal fungi. These mutualists improve the growth of crops on poor soils with lower inputs of chemical fertilizers and pesticides (2, 9). Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi,

AJIT VARMA; SAVITA VERMA; NIRMAL SAHAY; BRITTA BUTEHORN; PHILIPP FRANKEN

1999-01-01

351

THERMAL RADIATION LOAD ON TEMPERATURE REGIMES IN PLANT GROWTH CHAMBERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

HAMASAKI T. and OKADA M. Thermal radiation load on temperature regimes in plant growth chambers. BIOTRONICS 29, 57-69, 2000. In enclosed environments such as a plant growth chamber, thermal radiation plays an important role in determining heat balance and therefore the resultant temperature regimes. In artificially illuminated chambers, a significant level of thermal radiation is emitted from the lamps and\\/or

T. HAMASAKI; M. OKADA

2000-01-01

352

Plant growth promotion by inoculation with selected bacterial strains versus mineral soil supplements.  

PubMed

In the process of remediation of mine sites, the establishment of a vegetation cover is one of the most important tasks. This study tests two different approaches to manipulate soil properties in order to facilitate plant growth. Mine waste from Ingurtosu, Sardinia, Italy rich in silt, clay, and heavy metals like Cd, Cu, and Zn was used in a series of greenhouse experiments. Bacteria with putative beneficial properties for plant growth were isolated from this substrate, propagated and consortia of ten strains were used to inoculate the substrate. Alternatively, sand and volcanic clay were added. On these treated and untreated soils, seeds of Helianthus annuus, of the native Euphorbia pithyusa, and of the grasses Agrostis capillaris, Deschampsia flexuosa and Festuca rubra were germinated, and the growth of the seedlings was monitored. The added bacteria established well under all experimental conditions and reduced the extractability of most metals. In association with H. annuus, E. pithyusa and D. flexuosa bacteria improved microbial activity and functional diversity of the original soil. Their effect on plant growth, however, was ambiguous and usually negative. The addition of sand and volcanic clay, on the other hand, had a positive effect on all plant species except E. pithyusa. Especially the grasses experienced a significant benefit. The effects of a double treatment with both bacteria and sand and volcanic clay were rather negative. It is concluded that the addition of mechanical support has great potential to boost revegetation of mining sites though it is comparatively expensive. The possibilities offered by the inoculation of bacteria, on the other hand, appear rather limited. PMID:23990253

Wernitznig, S; Adlassnig, W; Sprocati, A R; Turnau, K; Neagoe, A; Alisi, C; Sassmann, S; Nicoara, A; Pinto, V; Cremisini, C; Lichtscheidl, I

2014-06-01

353

Limiting temperatures for urediniospore germination are low in a systemic rust fungus of tallgrass prairie.  

PubMed

Potential responses of plant disease phenology to climate change have been addressed primarily in agricultural systems. As a first step toward understanding the phenology of Uropyxis petalostemonis, a rust fungus commonly infecting the legume Dalea candida in U.S.A. tallgrass prairie, we evaluated the effects of temperature on urediniospore germination. While urediniospore germination for many rust fungi has been reported to decline only when temperatures are well above 25 degrees C, in vitro germination of U. petalostemonis dropped sharply at this temperature. Responses observed on water agar, potato dextrose agar and lima bean agar were similar, although lima bean agar supported a higher percentage germination overall. The low limiting temperatures suggest that most epidemically important new infections by U. petalostemonis occur in spring. High summer temperatures in tallgrass prairie might push infection by this rust fungus species to earlier in the year and select for stronger systemic growth characteristics. PMID:19537211

Worapong, J; Dendy, S P; Tang, Z; Awl, D J; Garrett, K A

2009-01-01

354

Abscisic Acid Represses Growth of the Arabidopsis Embryonic Axis after Germination by Enhancing Auxin Signaling[W  

PubMed Central

Under unfavorable environmental conditions, the stress phytohormone ABA inhibits the developmental transition from an embryo in a dry seed into a young seedling. We developed a genetic screen to isolate Arabidopsis thaliana mutants whose early seedling development is resistant to ABA. Here, we report the identification of a recessive mutation in AUXIN RESISTANT1 (AUX1), encoding a cellular auxin influx carrier. Although auxin is a major morphogenesis hormone in plants, little is known about ABA–auxin interactions during early seedling growth. We show that aux1 and pin2 mutants are insensitive to ABA-dependent repression of embryonic axis (hypocotyl and radicle) elongation. Genetic and physiological experiments show that this involves auxin transport to the embryonic axis elongation zone, where ABA enhances the activity of an auxin-responsive promoter. We propose that ABA represses embryonic axis elongation by potentiating auxin signaling in its elongation zone. This involves repression of the AUXIN INDUCIBLE (Aux/IAA) gene AXR2/IAA7, encoding a key component of ABA- and auxin-dependent responses during postgerminative growth.

Belin, Christophe; Megies, Christian; Hauserova, Eva; Lopez-Molina, Luis

2009-01-01

355

Plant growth promotion in cereal and leguminous agricultural important plants: from microorganism capacities to crop production.  

PubMed

Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are free-living bacteria which actively colonize plant roots, exerting beneficial effects on plant development. The PGPR may (i) promote the plant growth either by using their own metabolism (solubilizing phosphates, producing hormones or fixing nitrogen) or directly affecting the plant metabolism (increasing the uptake of water and minerals), enhancing root development, increasing the enzymatic activity of the plant or "helping" other beneficial microorganisms to enhance their action on the plants; (ii) or may promote the plant growth by suppressing plant pathogens. These abilities are of great agriculture importance in terms of improving soil fertility and crop yield, thus reducing the negative impact of chemical fertilizers on the environment. The progress in the last decade in using PGPR in a variety of plants (maize, rice, wheat, soybean and bean) along with their mechanism of action are summarized and discussed here. PMID:24144612

Pérez-Montaño, F; Alías-Villegas, C; Bellogín, R A; del Cerro, P; Espuny, M R; Jiménez-Guerrero, I; López-Baena, F J; Ollero, F J; Cubo, T

2014-01-01

356

Salinity Effects on Germination and Plant Growth of Prairie Cordgrass and Switchgrass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identifying bioenergy crops that can be produced successfully on marginal lands, such as those affected by salinity, reduces\\u000a the pressure to produce energy crops on land that would otherwise be used to produce food crops. In this paper, the degree\\u000a of salinity tolerance of “Red River” prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata Link) and “Cave-in-Rock” switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) was determined by

Sumin Kim; Thomas Voigt; Allen Parrish; D. K. Lee

357

The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid inhibits growth of Erwinia amylovora and acts as a seed germination-arrest factor.  

PubMed

The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) shares biological activities with 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine, a related molecule produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6. We found that culture filtrates of a P.?aeruginosa strain overproducing AMB weakly interfered with seed germination of the grassy weed Poa annua and strongly inhibited growth of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of the devastating orchard crop disease known as fire blight. AMB was active against a 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine-resistant isolate of E.?amylovora, suggesting that the molecular targets of the two oxyvinylglycines in Erwinia do not, or not entirely, overlap. The AMB biosynthesis and transport genes were shown to be organized in two separate transcriptional units, ambA and ambBCDE, which were successfully expressed from IPTG-inducible tac promoters in the heterologous host P.?fluorescens CHA0. Engineered AMB production enabled this model biocontrol strain to become inhibitory against E.?amylovora and to weakly interfere with the germination of several graminaceous seeds. We conclude that AMB production requires no additional genes besides ambABCDE and we speculate that their expression in marketed fire blight biocontrol strains could potentially contribute to disease control. PMID:23757135

Lee, Xiaoyun; Azevedo, Mark D; Armstrong, Donald J; Banowetz, Gary M; Reimmann, Cornelia

2013-02-01

358

Bioassay of Plant Growth Regulator Activity on Aquatic Plants.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A laboratory bioassay system was developed to determine whether inhibitors of gibberellin synthesis could reduce plant height but maintain physiological competence in two weedy submersed aquatic plants, hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata Royle) and Eurasian ...

C. A. Lembi M. D. Netherland

1990-01-01

359

Plant growth and architectural modelling and its applications  

PubMed Central

Over the last decade, a growing number of scientists around the world have invested in research on plant growth and architectural modelling and applications (often abbreviated to plant modelling and applications, PMA). By combining physical and biological processes, spatially explicit models have shown their ability to help in understanding plant–environment interactions. This Special Issue on plant growth modelling presents new information within this topic, which are summarized in this preface. Research results for a variety of plant species growing in the field, in greenhouses and in natural environments are presented. Various models and simulation platforms are developed in this field of research, opening new features to a wider community of researchers and end users. New modelling technologies relating to the structure and function of plant shoots and root systems are explored from the cellular to the whole-plant and plant-community levels.

Guo, Yan; Fourcaud, Thierry; Jaeger, Marc; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Li, Baoguo

2011-01-01

360

An approach for jatropha improvement using pleiotropic QTLs regulating plant growth and seed yield  

PubMed Central

Background Higher seed yield is one of the objectives of jatropha breeding. However, genetic analysis of the yield traits has not been done in jatropha. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping was conducted to identify genetic factors controlling growth and seed yield in jatropha, a promising biofuel crop. Results A linkage map was constructed consisting of 105 SSR (simple sequence repeat) markers converged into 11 linkage groups. With this map, we identified a total of 28 QTLs for 11 growth and seed traits using a population of 296 backcrossing jatropha trees. Two QTLs qTSW-5 and qTSW-7 controlling seed yield were mapped on LGs 5 and 7 respectively, where two QTL clusters controlling yield related traits were detected harboring five and four QTLs respectively. These two QTL clusters were critical with pleiotropic roles in regulating plant growth and seed yield. Positive additive effects of the two QTLs indicated higher values for the traits conferred by the alleles from J. curcas, while negative additive effects of the five QTLs on LG6, controlling plant height, branch number (in the 4th and 10th months post seed germination), female flower number and fruit number respectively, indicated higher values conferred by the alleles from J. integerrima. Therefore favored alleles from both the parents could be expected to be integrated into elite jatropha plant by further backcrossing and marker assisted selection. Efficient ways to improve the seed yield by applying the two QTL clusters are discussed. Conclusion This study is the first report on genetic analysis of growth and seed traits with molecular markers in jatropha. An approach for jatropha improvement is discussed using pleiotropic QTLs, which will be likely to lead to initiation of molecular breeding in jatropha by integrating more markers in the QTL regions.

2012-01-01

361

????????????????????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????????????? ????????????????? ????????????????????????????????? Zingiberaceous Plant Volatile Extracts Unfavourable towards Postharvest Disease Fungi and the Analysis of Chemical Components of Fingerroot Oil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile extracts obtained from 3 kinds of zingiberaceous plants, Boesenbergia pandurata Alpinia galanga and Zingiber officinal were tested for their unfavourable effects towards radial growth and spore germination of 6 postharvest disease fungi, Colletotrichum capsici (2 isolates), Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (2 isolates), Dothiorella sp., Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Pestalotiopsis sp. and Pythium aphanidermatum. The results demonstrated inhibited growth and spore germination of the

Suputtra Jamkratoke; Chainarong Rattanakreetakul; Chalida Leksomboon; Nuanwan Farungsang; Udom Farungsang

362

Tried and True : Bean plants: A growth experience  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To enhance a seventh-grade life science unit, the author had students grow bean plants in the classroom. Students were then able to observe roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruit up close as they learned about them. Students who held misconceptions prior to the activity had them corrected, learned about plant parts and growth during the plant unit, and observed firsthand how plants change as they grow.

West, Donna

2004-01-01

363

Gravitational stress on germinating Pinus pinea seeds.  

PubMed

In the germination of lipid-rich seeds, the glyoxylate cycle plays a control role in that, bypassing the two decarboxylative steps of the Krebs cycle; it allows the net synthesis of carbohydrates from lipids. The activity of isocitrate lyase, the key enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, is an indicator of the state of seed germination: stage of germination, growth of embryo, activation and progress of protein synthesis, depletion of lipidic supplies. In order to investigate the effects of gravity on seed germination, we carried out a study on the time pattern of germination of Pinus pinea seeds that were subjected to a hypergravitational stress (1000 g for 64 h at 4 degrees C), either in a dry or in a wet environment, before to be placed in germination plates. During the whole time of germination, we monitored the state of embryo growth and the most representative enzymes of the main metabolic pathways. In treated wet seeds, we observed an average germination of only 20% with a slowdown of the enzyme activities assayed and a noticeable degradation of lipidic reserves with respect to the controls. These differences in germination are not found for dry seeds. PMID:14558475

Ranaldi, Francesco; Giachetti, Eugenio; Guerin, Elizabeth; Bacci, Stefano; Paoletti, Elena; Boddi, Vieri; Vanni, Paolo

2003-06-01

364

Signals and Mechanisms in the Control of Plant Growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant growth is mediated by three fundamental processes: cell growth, division, and expansion. The\\u000a mechanistic analysis of their contributions are complicated by the observation that the balance of their\\u000a contributions to organ growth are not hard-wired. Reduced cell proliferation, irrespective of whether this\\u000a is caused by decreased cell growth or diminished cell division, can be, at least partially, compensated\\u000a for

Peter Doerner

365

Effects of an industrial effluent on plant colonization and on the germination and post-germinative growth of seeds of terrestrial and aquatic plant species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Major oil sands industrial companies are located in the Athabasca Oil Sands Deposit in northeastern Alberta, Canada. During the process used to extract light crude oil (via hot water digestion and flotation), gypsum is usually added to produce consolidated tails (CT) and CT release water. The vast volumes of process-treated waters (effluent) are held within large dyked tailings ponds. Toward

A. U. Crowe; A. L. Plant; A. R. Kermode

2002-01-01

366

Identification of growth insensitive to ABA3 (gia3), a recessive mutation affecting ABA Signaling for the control of early post-germination growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.  

PubMed

The stress phytohormone ABA inhibits the developmental transition taking the mature embryo in the dry seed towards a young seedling. ABA also induces the accumulation of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor ABA-insensitive 5 (ABI5) which, apart from blocking endosperm rupture, also protects the embryo by stimulating the expression of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) genes that conferred osmotolerance during seed maturation. It is unknown whether ABA recruits additional embryonic pathways to control early seedling growth and fitness. Here we identify gia3 (growth insensitive to ABA3), a recessive locus in Arabidopsis mediating cotyledon cellular maturation and ABA-dependent repression of cotyledon expansion and greening. Microarray studies showed that expression of the essential mid-embryogenesis gene Maternal Embryo Effect 26 (MEE26) is induced by ABA during early seedling growth in wild-type (WT) or abi5 plants but not in gia3 mutants. However, we also show that the GIA3 locus controls ABA-dependent gene expression responses that partially overlap with those controlled by ABI5. Thus, the gia3 locus identifies an additional arm of ABA signaling, distinct from that controlled by ABI5, which recruits MEE26 expression and maintains cotyledon embryonic identity. Fine mapping localized the gia3 locus within a 1 Mb interval of chromosome 3, containing a large DNA insertion of a duplicated region of chromosome 2. It remains unknown at present whether gia3 phenotypes are the result of single or multiple genetic alterations. PMID:20022976

Kinoshita, Natsuko; Berr, Alexandre; Belin, Christophe; Chappuis, Richard; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Lopez-Molina, Luis

2010-02-01

367

Technological Advancement Conidial germination in the filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ascomycetous fungus Fusarium graminearum is an important plant pathogen causing Fusarium head blight disease of wheat and barley. To understand early developmental stages of this organism, we followed the germination of macroconidia microscopically to understand the timing of key events. These events, recorded after suspension of spores in liquid germination medium, included spore swelling at 2 h, germination tube

Kye-Yong Seong; Xinhua Zhao; Jin-Rong Xu; Ulrich Guldener; H. Corby Kistler

368

Conidial germination in the filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ascomycetous fungus Fusarium graminearum is an important plant pathogen causing Fusarium head blight disease of wheat and barley. To understand early developmental stages of this organism, we followed the germination of macroconidia microscopically to understand the timing of key events. These events, recorded after suspension of spores in liquid germination medium, included spore swelling at 2h, germination tube emergence

Kye-Yong Seong; Xinhua Zhao; Jin-Rong Xu; Ulrich Güldener; H. Corby Kistler

2008-01-01

369

Interplay between cell growth and cell cycle in plants.  

PubMed

The growth of organs and whole plants depends on both cell growth and cell-cycle progression, but the interaction between both processes is poorly understood. In plants, the balance between growth and cell-cycle progression requires coordinated regulation of four different processes: macromolecular synthesis (cytoplasmic growth), turgor-driven cell-wall extension, mitotic cycle, and endocycle. Potential feedbacks between these processes include a cell-size checkpoint operating before DNA synthesis and a link between DNA contents and maximum cell size. In addition, key intercellular signals and growth regulatory genes appear to target at the same time cell-cycle and cell-growth functions. For example, auxin, gibberellin, and brassinosteroid all have parallel links to cell-cycle progression (through S-phase Cyclin D-CDK and the anaphase-promoting complex) and cell-wall functions (through cell-wall extensibility or microtubule dynamics). Another intercellular signal mediated by microtubule dynamics is the mechanical stress caused by growth of interconnected cells. Superimposed on developmental controls, sugar signalling through the TOR pathway has recently emerged as a central control point linking cytoplasmic growth, cell-cycle and cell-wall functions. Recent progress in quantitative imaging and computational modelling will facilitate analysis of the multiple interconnections between plant cell growth and cell cycle and ultimately will be required for the predictive manipulation of plant growth. PMID:24218325

Sablowski, Robert; Carnier Dornelas, Marcelo

2014-06-01

370

Functional approach to high-throughput plant growth analysis  

PubMed Central

Method Taking advantage of the current rapid development in imaging systems and computer vision algorithms, we present HPGA, a high-throughput phenotyping platform for plant growth modeling and functional analysis, which produces better understanding of energy distribution in regards of the balance between growth and defense. HPGA has two components, PAE (Plant Area Estimation) and GMA (Growth Modeling and Analysis). In PAE, by taking the complex leaf overlap problem into consideration, the area of every plant is measured from top-view images in four steps. Given the abundant measurements obtained with PAE, in the second module GMA, a nonlinear growth model is applied to generate growth curves, followed by functional data analysis. Results Experimental results on model plant Arabidopsis thaliana show that, compared to an existing approach, HPGA reduces the error rate of measuring plant area by half. The application of HPGA on the cfq mutant plants under fluctuating light reveals the correlation between low photosynthetic rates and small plant area (compared to wild type), which raises a hypothesis that knocking out cfq changes the sensitivity of the energy distribution under fluctuating light conditions to repress leaf growth. Availability HPGA is available at http://www.msu.edu/~jinchen/HPGA.

2013-01-01

371

Expert System Control of Plant Growth in an Enclosed Space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Expert System is an enclosed, controlled environment for growing plants, which incorporates a computerized, knowledge-based software program that is designed to capture the knowledge, experience, and problem-solving skills of one or more human experts in a particular discipline. The Expert System is trained to analyze crop/plant status, to monitor the condition of the plants and the environment, and to adjust operational parameters to optimize the plant-growth process. This system is intended to provide a way to remotely control plant growth with little or no human intervention. More specifically, the term control implies an autonomous method for detecting plant states such as health (biomass) or stress and then for recommending and implementing cultivation and/or remediation to optimize plant growth and to minimize consumption of energy and nutrients. Because of difficulties associated with delivering energy and nutrients remotely, a key feature of this Expert System is its ability to minimize this effort and to achieve optimum growth while taking into account the diverse range of environmental considerations that exist in an enclosed environment. The plant-growth environment for the Expert System could be made from a variety of structures, including a greenhouse, an underground cavern, or another enclosed chamber. Imaging equipment positioned within or around the chamber provides spatially distributed crop/plant-growth information. Sensors mounted in the chamber provide data and information pertaining to environmental conditions that could affect plant development. Lamps in the growth environment structure supply illumination, and other additional equipment in the chamber supplies essential nutrients and chemicals.

May, George; Lanoue, Mark; Bathel, Matthew; Ryan, Robert E.

2008-01-01

372

Influence of inoculation with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) on tomato plant growth and nematode reproduction under greenhouse conditions  

PubMed Central

Numerous species of soil bacteria which flourish in the rhizosphere of plants or around plant tissues stimulate plant growth and reduce nematode population by antagonistic behavior. These bacteria are collectively known as PGPR (plant growth promoting rhizobacteria). The effects of six isolates of PGPR Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus, were studied on tomato plant growth and root knot nematode reproduction after 45 days from nematode infection. The highest number of shoot dry weight/g (43.00 g) was detected in the plant treated with S. marcescens; then P. putida (34.33 g), B. amyloliquefaciens (31.66 g), P. fluorescens (30.0 g), B. subtilis (29.0 g), B. cereus (27.0 g) and nematode alone (untreated) 20 g/plant. While the highest number of plant height was observed when plant was treated with S. marcescens, P. fluorescens, P. putida, B. amyloliquefaciens and P. putida 52.66, 50.66, 48 and 48 cm respectively. No significant differences were seen between previous treatments but only had significant differences compared with untreated plant. The highest number of fruit/plant was observed when plants were treated with S. marcescens (10.66), then B. amyloliquefaciens (8.66), P. putida (8), P. fluorescens (8) and B. cereus (7.66). No significant differences between the last 4 treatments, but all had significant differences compared with untreated plants. The highest weight of plant yield (g) was observed with S. marcescens (319.6 g/plant) and the lowest weight of plant yield was observed in plants treated with nematode alone (untreated). On the other hand, the lowest numbers of J2/10 g of soil (78), galls/root, (24.33) galls/root, egg masses/root (12.66) and egg/egg masses were observed in the plants treated with S. marcescens.

Almaghrabi, Omar A.; Massoud, Samia I.; Abdelmoneim, Tamer S.

2012-01-01

373

An Exocyst Complex Functions in Plant Cell Growth in Arabidopsis and Tobacco[W  

PubMed Central

The exocyst, an octameric tethering complex and effector of Rho and Rab GTPases, facilitates polarized secretion in yeast and animals. Recent evidence implicates three plant homologs of exocyst subunits (SEC3, SEC8, and EXO70A1) in plant cell morphogenesis. Here, we provide genetic, cell biological, and biochemical evidence that these and other predicted subunits function together in vivo in Arabidopsis thaliana. Double mutants in exocyst subunits (sec5 exo70A1 and sec8 exo70A1) show a synergistic defect in etiolated hypocotyl elongation. Mutants in exocyst subunits SEC5, SEC6, SEC8, and SEC15a show defective pollen germination and pollen tube growth phenotypes. Using antibodies directed against SEC6, SEC8, and EXO70A1, we demonstrate colocalization of these proteins at the apex of growing tobacco pollen tubes. The SEC3, SEC5, SEC6, SEC8, SEC10, SEC15a, and EXO70 subunits copurify in a high molecular mass fraction of 900 kD after chromatographic fractionation of an Arabidopsis cell suspension extract. Blue native electrophoresis confirmed the presence of SEC3, SEC6, SEC8, and EXO70 in high molecular mass complexes. Finally, use of the yeast two-hybrid system revealed interaction of Arabidopsis SEC3a with EXO70A1, SEC10 with SEC15b, and SEC6 with SEC8. We conclude that the exocyst functions as a complex in plant cells, where it plays important roles in morphogenesis.

Hala, Michal; Cole, Rex; Synek, Lukas; Drdova, Edita; Pecenkova, Tamara; Nordheim, Alfred; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Madlung, Johannes; Hochholdinger, Frank; Fowler, John E.; Zarsky, Viktor

2008-01-01

374

Chemical Growth Regulators for Guayule Plants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test Tubes containing Guayule - tissue cultures were used in experiments to test effects of chemical-growth regulators. The shoots grew in response to addition of 2-(3,4-dichlorophenoxy)-triethylamine (triethylamine (TEA) derivative) to agar medium. Preliminary results indicate that a class of compounds that promotes growth in soil may also promote growth in a culture medium. Further experiments are needed to define the effect of the TEA derivative.

Dastoor, M. N.; Schubert, W. W.; Petersen, G. R.

1982-01-01

375

Growth stimulation of ectomycorrhizal fungi by root exudates of Brassicaceae plants: role of degraded compounds of indole glucosinolates.  

PubMed

Brassicaceae plants are nonmycorrhizal. They were found to inhibit VA mycorrhizal infection in their host plants. We tested if they can influence growth of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. When roots and leaves of Brassicaceae plants and ECM fungi were cultured together in the same petri dishes, the root exudates of turnip (Brassica rapa), swede (B. napobrassica), cabbage (B. oleracea, var. capitata), broccoli (B. oleracea, var. italica Plenck), kohlrobi (B. caulorapa Pasq.), mustard (B. juncea), radish (Raphanus sativus), and choy (B. napus) significantly stimulated hyphal growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus. Root exudates of turnip and cabbage stimulated hyphal growth of Pisolithus tinctorius and two isolates of P. involutus. Colony area of P. involutus was increased by 452 and 414%, respectively, in the presence of turnip and cabbage germinants. Root exudates of turnip increased the biomass of P. involutus and P. tinctorius by 256 and 122% and cabbage by 220 and 82%, respectively. The stimulatory effect was not affected by autoclaving the root exudates. Root exudates had chemical reactions with glutathione and lysine, which resulted in a reduction of the growth stimulation of ECM fungi. Myrosinase enhanced further the stimulatory effects of turnip on the ECM colony diameter growth by 23%. Autoclaved roots and leaves of turnip did not stimulate fungal growth, but mechanically ground roots and leaves of turnip stimulated growth of P. involutus by 147 and 135%, respectively. After desulfuration with aryl sulphatuse, the glucosinolates (GLSs) in turnip roots and leaves were identified by HPLC. The major ones were indole GLSs. Prominent compounds identified were 1-methoxy-3-indolymethyl GLS and4-methoxy-3-indolymethyl GLS. The finding provides an opportunity to field test the use of Brassicaceae plants in enhancing ectomycorrhizal formation in conifers by interplanting conifers with Brassicaceae plants in forest tree nursery and agroforestry systems. PMID:12918920

Zeng, Ren Sen; Mallik, Azim U; Setliff, Ed

2003-06-01

376

Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and root system functioning.  

PubMed

The rhizosphere supports the development and activity of a huge and diversified microbial community, including microorganisms capable to promote plant growth. Among the latter, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) colonize roots of monocots and dicots, and enhance plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. Modification of root system architecture by PGPR implicates the production of phytohormones and other signals that lead, mostly, to enhanced lateral root branching and development of root hairs. PGPR also modify root functioning, improve plant nutrition and influence the physiology of the whole plant. Recent results provided first clues as to how PGPR signals could trigger these plant responses. Whether local and/or systemic, the plant molecular pathways involved remain often unknown. From an ecological point of view, it emerged that PGPR form coherent functional groups, whose rhizosphere ecology is influenced by a myriad of abiotic and biotic factors in natural and agricultural soils, and these factors can in turn modulate PGPR effects on roots. In this paper, we address novel knowledge and gaps on PGPR modes of action and signals, and highlight recent progress on the links between plant morphological and physiological effects induced by PGPR. We also show the importance of taking into account the size, diversity, and gene expression patterns of PGPR assemblages in the rhizosphere to better understand their impact on plant growth and functioning. Integrating mechanistic and ecological knowledge on PGPR populations in soil will be a prerequisite to develop novel management strategies for sustainable agriculture. PMID:24062756

Vacheron, Jordan; Desbrosses, Guilhem; Bouffaud, Marie-Lara; Touraine, Bruno; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Muller, Daniel; Legendre, Laurent; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence; Prigent-Combaret, Claire

2013-01-01

377

PROPERTIES AND PLANT GROWTH POTENTIAL OF MINELAND OVERBURDEN  

EPA Science Inventory

Overburden materials from surface coal mines in southwestern Indiana were analyzed for physical and chemical properties. Plant growth potential of selected materials, with and without sewage sludge and fertilizer amendments, was evaluated in greenhouse pot culture and outdoor con...

378

Experiments with Corn To Demonstrate Plant Growth and Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores using corn seeds to demonstrate plant growth and development. This experiment allows students to formulate hypotheses, observe and record information, and practice mathematics. Presents background information, materials, procedures, and observations. (SAH)

Haldeman, Janice H.; Gray, Margarit S.

2000-01-01

379

Tubular Membrane Plant-Growth Unit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hydroponic system controls nutrient solution for growing crops in space. Pump draws nutrient solution along inside of tubular membrane in pipe from reservoir, maintaining negative pressure in pipe. Roots of plants in slot extract nutrient through membrane within pipe. Crop plants such as wheat, rice, lettuce, tomatoes, soybeans, and beans grown successfully with system.

Dreschel, Thomas W.

1992-01-01

380

[Reponses of sugar metabolism in seed germination of three various acid-fast plants to acid rain].  

PubMed

Responses of sugar metabolism during germination of rice (O. sativa ), wheat (T. aestivum) and rape (B. chinensis var. oleifera) seeds to simulated acid rain (pH 2.0, pH 2.5, pH 3.0, pH 3.5, pH 4.0, pH 4.5, pH 5.0) were investigated. The purpose was to clarify the mechanism of acid rain affecting seed germination. The results show that the alpha-amylase activity, contents of soluble sugar and reducing sugar of the rice, wheat and rape seeds decrease with increased stress level (pH 5.0 - 2.0), and are lower than CK. The response order of three indexes to stress level of acid rain is that rice (pH 3.5 - 4.0/53.88% - 77.7%) is smaller than wheat (pH 3.5 - 4.5/58.60% - 89.41%), and rape (pH 4.0 - 5.0/60.14% - 100%) is the smallest, alpha-amylase activity, contents of soluble sugar and reducing sugar of rice increase with prolonged stress time, but the three indexes of wheat and rape increase at first, and then decrease. In the same stress time (3 - 7 d), the three indexes of the three species for all treatment groups are lower than CK, and decrease with increased stress level. The stress time when the maximum damage of a-amylase activity, contents of soluble sugar and reducing sugar appeared is that rice (7 d, 7 d, 7 d) > wheat (7 d, 6 d, 5 d) > rape (3 d, 7 d, 5 d). Responses of three indexes to stress level and stress time of acid rain show that the ability of sugar metabolism resisting acid rain is that rice is stronger than wheat and rape is the worst, and the difference in sugar metabolism of 3 species is one of the internal reasons why the germination indexes behave differently. PMID:18649547

Wang, Li-Hong; Zhou, Qing; Zeng, Qing-Ling

2008-03-01

381

Autotoxicity of chard and its allelopathic potentiality on germination and some metabolic activities associated with growth of wheat seedlings  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the allelopathic effect of aqueous whole mature chard plant extract (Beta vulgaris L. var. Cicla) on wheat (Triticum vulgare L. var. Sides 1) and an associated weed (chard) was investigated. Plants used were sampled in 2006, and then plant extracts were obtained after they were ground and processed with distilled water. Twenty five of wheat grains and

M. M. Hegab; S. E. A. Khodary; Ola Hammouda; H. R. Ghareib

2008-01-01

382

Germination behaviour in populations of Capsella bursa-pastoris ( Cruciferae )  

Microsoft Academic Search

Germination behaviour of variousCapsella bursa-pastoris populations collected from Scandinavia, Middle Europe and the Alps, was tested in unheated, non-illuminated greenhouses (46 populations) and in growth chambers using 5–7 alternating temperature regimes (16 populations). For all populations, the influence of temperature on germination rate is straightforward: the higher the temperature, the greater the germination. Germination capacity, however, may depend on the

Barbara Neuffer; Herbert Hurka

1988-01-01

383

Epidermal Signalling and the Control of Plant Shoot Growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the epidermal cell-layer is of undisputed physiological importance to all angiosperms, its\\u000a potential role in controlling the growth of plant organs has remained a subject of research and contention\\u000a for more than a century. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular control of plant cell\\u000a proliferation, growth and specification, in combination with novel biotechnological techniques, have provided\\u000a new tools for

Gwyneth C. Ingram

384

Plant-growth Lighting for Advanced Life Support: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

35 pages\\u000aProvider Notes:Lighting is a critical concern for plant growth in an Advanced Life-support System (ALS). Electric lighting is energy intensive, but it is necessary when balanced against the hazards and limitations of plant growth under natural sunlight on the surface of the moon or Mars. The characteristics of different electric light types are reviewed, and functionality for an

Gioia Donna Massa; Cary A. Mitchell

2006-01-01

385

BRASSINOSTEROIDS: Essential Regulators of Plant Growth and Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brassinosteroids (BRs) are growth-promoting natural products found at low lev- els in pollen, seeds, and young vegetative tissues throughout the plant kingdom. Detailed studies of BR biosynthesis and metabolism, coupled with the recent identification of BR-insensitive and BR-deficient mutants, has greatly expanded our view of steroids as signals controlling plant growth and development. This review examines the microchemical and molecular

Steven D. Clouse; Jenneth M. Sasse

1998-01-01

386

Plant Hormones Promote Growth in Lichen-Forming Fungi  

PubMed Central

The effect of plant hormones on the growth of lichen-forming fungi (LFF) was evaluated. The use of 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid and indole-3-butyric acid resulted in a 99% and 57% increase in dry weight of the lichen-forming fungus Nephromopsis ornata. The results suggest that some plant hormones can be used as inducers or stimulators of LFF growth for large-scale culture.

Wang, Xin Yu; Wei, Xin Li; Luo, Heng; Kim, Jung A; Jeon, Hae Sook; Koh, Young Jin

2010-01-01

387

The microbiome of medicinal plants: diversity and importance for plant growth, quality and health.  

PubMed

Past medicinal plant research primarily focused on bioactive phytochemicals, however, the focus is currently shifting due to the recognition that a significant number of phytotherapeutic compounds are actually produced by associated microbes or through interaction with their host. Medicinal plants provide an enormous bioresource of potential use in modern medicine and agriculture, yet their microbiome is largely unknown. The objective of this review is (i) to introduce novel insights into the plant microbiome with a focus on medicinal plants, (ii) to provide details about plant- and microbe-derived ingredients of medicinal plants, and (iii) to discuss possibilities for plant growth promotion and plant protection for commercial cultivation of medicinal plants. In addition, we also present a case study performed both to analyse the microbiome of three medicinal plants (Matricaria chamomilla L., Calendula officinalis L., and Solanum distichum Schumach. and Thonn.) cultivated on organically managed Egyptian desert farm and to develop biological control strategies. The soil microbiome of the desert ecosystem was comprised of a high abundance of Gram-positive bacteria of prime importance for pathogen suppression under arid soil conditions. For all three plants, we observed a clearly plant-specific selection of the microbes as well as highly specific diazotrophic communities that overall identify plant species as important drivers in structural and functional diversity. Lastly, native Bacillus spec. div. strains were able to promote plant growth and elevate the plants' flavonoid production. These results underline the numerous links between the plant-associated microbiome and the plant metabolome. PMID:24391634

Köberl, Martina; Schmidt, Ruth; Ramadan, Elshahat M; Bauer, Rudolf; Berg, Gabriele

2013-01-01

388

Plant growth promotion by Bacillus megaterium involves cytokinin signaling  

PubMed Central

Accumulating evidence indicates that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) influence plant growth and development by the production of phytohormones such as auxins, gibberellins, and cytokinins. Little is known on the genetic basis and signal transduction components that mediate the beneficial effects of PGPRs in plants. We recently reported the identification of a Bacillus megaterium strain that promoted growth of A. thaliana and P. vulgaris seedlings. In this addendum, the role of cytokinin signaling in mediating the plant responses to bacterial inoculation was investigated using A. thaliana mutants lacking one, two or three of the putative cytokinin receptors CRE1, AHK2 and AHK3, and RPN12 a gene involved in cytokinin signaling. We show that plant growth promotion by B. megaterium is reduced in AHK2-2 single and double mutant combinations and in RPN12. Furthermore, the triple cytokinin-receptor CRE1-12/AHK2-2/AHK3-3 knockout was insensitive to inoculation in terms of growth promotion and root developmental responses. Our results indicate that cytokinin receptors play a complimentary role in plant growth promotion by B. megaterium.

Ortiz-Castro, Randy; Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo

2008-01-01

389

Plant Growth Regulation: A Viable Concept in Aquatic Plant Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A laboratory bioassay showed that inhibitors of gibberellin synthesis (flurprimidol, paclobutrazol, and uniconazole) reduced plant height but did not affect physiological parameters such as photosynthesis, respiration, and chlorophyll content in two weedy...

C. A. Lembi M. D. Netherland

1992-01-01

390

Natamycin and the germinating spore  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fungi cause enormous food losses worldwide due to crop infection and food spoilage. Contamination by fungi often starts with dispersal vehicles (spores or conidia) that are dispersed either by air and water. A crucial step in fungal contamination is the process of germination, which is followed by mycelial growth throughout the food product. Natamycin is widely used as an anti-fungal

M. R. van Leeuwen

2009-01-01

391

Potassium Uptake Supporting Plant Growth in the Absence of AKT1 Channel Activity  

PubMed Central

A transferred-DNA insertion mutant of Arabidopsis that lacks AKT1 inward-rectifying K+ channel activity in root cells was obtained previously by a reverse-genetic strategy, enabling a dissection of the K+-uptake apparatus of the root into AKT1 and non-AKT1 components. Membrane potential measurements in root cells demonstrated that the AKT1 component of the wild-type K+ permeability was between 55 and 63% when external [K+] was between 10 and 1,000 ?M, and NH4+ was absent. NH4+ specifically inhibited the non-AKT1 component, apparently by competing for K+ binding sites on the transporter(s). This inhibition by NH4+ had significant consequences for akt1 plants: K+ permeability, 86Rb+ fluxes into roots, seed germination, and seedling growth rate of the mutant were each similarly inhibited by NH4+. Wild-type plants were much more resistant to NH4+. Thus, AKT1 channels conduct the K+ influx necessary for the growth of Arabidopsis embryos and seedlings in conditions that block the non-AKT1 mechanism. In contrast to the effects of NH4+, Na+ and H+ significantly stimulated the non-AKT1 portion of the K+ permeability. Stimulation of akt1 growth rate by Na+, a predicted consequence of the previous result, was observed when external [K+] was 10 ?M. Collectively, these results indicate that the AKT1 channel is an important component of the K+ uptake apparatus supporting growth, even in the “high-affinity” range of K+ concentrations. In the absence of AKT1 channel activity, an NH4+-sensitive, Na+/H+-stimulated mechanism can suffice.

Spalding, Edgar P.; Hirsch, Rebecca E.; Lewis, Daniel R.; Qi, Zhi; Sussman, Michael R.; Lewis, Bryan D.

1999-01-01

392

Arabidopsis thaliana DOF6 negatively affects germination in non-after-ripened seeds and interacts with TCP14  

PubMed Central

Seed dormancy prevents seeds from germinating under environmental conditions unfavourable for plant growth and development and constitutes an evolutionary advantage. Dry storage, also known as after-ripening, gradually decreases seed dormancy by mechanisms not well understood. An Arabidopsis thaliana DOF transcription factor gene (DOF6) affecting seed germination has been characterized. The transcript levels of this gene accumulate in dry seeds and decay gradually during after-ripening and also upon seed imbibition. While constitutive over-expression of DOF6 produced aberrant growth and sterility in the plant, its over-expression induced upon seed imbibition triggered delayed germination, abscisic acid (ABA)-hypersensitive phenotypes and increased expression of the ABA biosynthetic gene ABA1 and ABA-related stress genes. Wild-type germination and gene expression were gradually restored during seed after-ripening, despite of DOF6-induced over-expression. DOF6 was found to interact in a yeast two-hybrid system and in planta with TCP14, a previously described positive regulator of seed germination. The expression of ABA1 and ABA-related stress genes was also enhanced in tcp14 knock-out mutants. Taken together, these results indicate that DOF6 negatively affects seed germination and opposes TCP14 function in the regulation of a specific set of ABA-related genes.

Rueda-Romero, Paloma; Barrero-Sicilia, Cristina; Gomez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Carbonero, Pilar; Onate-Sanchez, Luis

2012-01-01

393

Effect of bacterial population density on germination wheat seeds and dynamics of simple artificial ecosystems.  

PubMed

Effect of the size of rhizospheric bacterial populations on germination of seeds and development of simple terrestrial "wheat plants--rhizospheric microorganisms--artificial soil" and "wheat plants-artificial soil" systems has been studied. Experiments demonstrated that within specify ranges in the inoculate, the rhizospheric bacteria are capable of increasing the yield of germinated seeds and stimulate the growth of plantlets. Germination of seeds inoculated with bacteria was either stimulated, or inhibited or remained at control levels depending on the amount of bacteria. Plant biomass growth and total photoassimilation has been found to depend on the amount of bacteria on the plant roots: the higher the amount of bacteria on plant roots, the smaller is the biomass of plants but the total photoassimilation is, higher. Thus, depending on the amount of bacteria on the roots of plants the system either increases the biomass of plants or increases the total photoassimilation, i.e. "pumps" carbon through itself involving bacteria. Grant numbers: N99-04-96017, N15. PMID:11695444

Somova, L A; Pechurkin, N S; Sarangova, A B; Pisman, T I

2001-01-01

394

Plant growth regulatory effect and insecticidal activity of the extracts of the Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima L.)  

PubMed Central

Background There is an urgent need to explore and utilize naturally occurring products for combating harmful agricultural and public health pests. Secondary metabolites in the leaves of the Tree of Heaven, Ailanthus altissima L. have been reported to be herbicidal and insecticidal. The mode of action, however, of the active compounds in A. altissima are not understood. In this paper, we report the chemical characteristics of the herbicidal and insecticidal components in this tree, and will discuss the effect of light on the bioactivity of the active components. Results Extracts from the fresh leaves of A. altissima showed a strong plant germination/growth inhibitory effect in laboratory bioassays against alfalfa (Medicago sativa). The effect was dose-dependent. The growth inhibitory components were in the methylene chloride soluble fraction of the extract. The effect was greater in the light than in the dark. Other fractions had plant growth enhancing effect at lower concentrations. The extract was slightly insecticidal against yellow fever mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti). Conclusions The extract or its semi-purified fractions of A. altissima were strong plant growth inhibitors, therefore good candidates as potential environmentally safe and effective agricultural pest management agents. The finding that light affects the activity will be useful in the application of such natural products.

Tsao, Rong; Romanchuk, Frieda E; Peterson, Chris J; Coats, Joel R

2002-01-01

395

Germination under Extreme Hypobaric and Hypoxic Environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Is the agriculture on Mars without a pressured greenhouse dome possible? In order to inves-tigate a possibility of plant cultivation for the space agriculture on Mars, germination rate for six species of plant, Jute, Chrysanthemum, Komatsuna, Cucumber, Okra, and Eggplant under extreme hypobaric and hypoxic condition was measured. Oxygen partial pressure was 1kPa which was equal to 1/100 of normal earth atmosphere. Seeds of Jute and Cucumber were able to germinate in six species. In the case of Jute, germination rate under the oxygen partial pressure of 1kPa was very high, 70

Hashimoto, Hirofumi

396

Expression of a Polygalacturonase Associated with Tomato Seed Germination1  

PubMed Central

Radicle protrusion from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seeds to complete germination requires weakening of the endosperm tissue opposite the radicle tip. In common with other cell wall disassembly processes in plants, polygalacturonases (PGs) may be involved. Only calcium-dependent exo-PG activity was detected in tomato seed protein extracts. Chromatographic profiles of a partially acid-hydrolyzed fraction of polygalacturonic acid further digested with seed extract were consistent with the presence of only calcium-dependent exo-PG activity. In addition, a transcript encoding a previously unknown PG was detected prior to the completion of germination. The mRNA, produced from a gene (LeXPG1) estimated by Southern analysis to be represented once in the genome, was also present in flowers (anthers) and in lower amounts in roots and stems. LeXPG1 mRNA abundance was low during seed development, increased during imbibition, and was even greater in seeds that had completed germination. Expression of LeXPG1 during germination predominates in the endosperm cap and radicle tip, and in the radicle appears as a distinct band possibly associated with vascular tissue differentiation. We suggest that PG is involved in cell wall loosening of the endosperm necessary for radicle protrusion from tomato seeds and in subsequent embryo and seedling growth.

Sitrit, Yaron; Hadfield, Kristen A.; Bennett, Alan B.; Bradford, Kent J.; Downie, A. Bruce

1999-01-01

397

Factors affecting plant growth in membrane nutrient delivery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of the tubular membrane plant growth unit for the delivery of water and nutrients to roots in microgravity has recently focused on measuring the effects of changes in physical variables controlling solution availability to the plants. Significant effects of membrane pore size and the negative pressure used to contain the solution were demonstrated. Generally, wheat grew better in units with a larger pore size but equal negative pressure and in units with the same pore size but less negative pressure. Lettuce also exhibited better plant growth at less negative pressure.

Dreschel, T. W.; Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.

1990-01-01

398

Toxic Effect of Nickel (Ni) on Growth and Metabolism in Germinating Seeds of Sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess the toxic effect of nickel (Ni) on the growth and some key metabolic processes in sunflower, varying levels of Ni\\u000a as Ni(NO3)2 up to 60 mg L?1 were applied once to sunflower cultivars SF-187 and Hysun-33 at sowing time in sand culture. An increase in Ni in the growth\\u000a medium adversely affected growth parameters, sugar concentration (both reducing and

Muhammad Yasin Ashraf; Rumana Sadiq; Mumtaz Hussain; M. Sajid Aqeel Ahmad

399

Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria for Phytostabilization of Mine Tailings  

SciTech Connect

Eolian dispersion of mine tailings in arid and semiarid environments is an emerging global issue for which economical remediation alternatives are needed. Phytostabilization, the revegetation of these sites with native plants, is one such alternative. Revegetation often requires the addition of bulky amendments such as compost which greatly increases cost. We report the use of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) to enhance the revegetation of mine tailings and minimize the need for compost amendment. Twenty promising PGPB isolates were used as seed inoculants in a series of greenhouse studies to examine revegetation of an extremely acidic, high metal content tailings sample previously shown to require 15% compost amendment for normal plant growth. Several isolates significantly enhanced growth of two native species, quailbush and buffalo grass, in tailings. In this study, PGPB/compost outcomes were plant specific; for quailbush, PGPB were most effective in combination with 10% compost addition while for buffalo grass, PGPB enhanced growth in the complete absence of compost. Results indicate that selected PGPB can improve plant establishment and reduce the need for compost amendment. Further, PGPB activities necessary for aiding plant growth in mine tailings likely include tolerance to acidic pH and metals.

Grandlic, C.J.; Mendez, M.O.; Chorover, J.; Machado, B.; Maier, R.M.

2009-05-19

400

Some soybean cultivars have ability to induce germination of sunflower broomrape.  

PubMed

Sunflower broomrape is a noxious parasitic weed which has caused severe damage to crop ecosystems. Trap crops can release a mixture of allelochemicals to induce the germination of sunflower broomrape. We studied the allelopathic effects of soybean on sunflower broomrape. Fourteen common soybean cultivars were grown in pots. Samples were collected from soybean plants and rhizosphere soil at five growth stages (V1, V3, V5, R2, and R4). The allelopathic effects of soybean reached highest at the V3 stage. Methanolic extracts of soybean roots induced higher broomrape germination than methanolic extracts of stems or leaves. The germination rates induced by root extracts (10-fold dilution) were positively correlated with germination rates induced by stem (10-fold dilution) and leaf extracts (10-fold dilution). The broomrape germination rates induced by root extracts were also positively correlated with soybean nodule diameter and dry weight. The results indicated that soybeans could induce sunflower broomrape germination. We conclude that soybean has the potential to be used as a trap crop for sunflower broomrape. PMID:23544089

Zhang, Wei; Ma, Yongqing; Wang, Zhong; Ye, Xiaoxin; Shui, Junfeng

2013-01-01

401

New insights into the early steps of oil body mobilization during pollen germination  

PubMed Central

In some plants, pollen grains accumulate storage lipids that serve as energy supply during germination. Here, three enzymes involved in early steps of oil body mobilization in the male gametophyte were functionally characterized for the first time. The effect of extracellular sugars on pollen performance and oil body dynamics was also analysed. Olive pollen oil bodies showed phospholipase A, lipase, and lipoxygenase activities on their surface. Enzyme activity levels increased during germination with a maximum after 3h. Removal of extracellular sugars from the germination medium did not affect pollen performance but increased enzyme activity rates and sped up oil body mobilization. Inhibitors seriously hampered pollen germination and pollen tube growth, leading to a characteristic accumulation of oil bodies in the germinative aperture. It can be concluded that storage lipids are sufficient for proper olive pollen germination. A lipase and a lipoxygenase are likely involved in oil body mobilization. Extracellular sugars may modulate their function, while a phospholipase A may promote their access to the storage lipids.

Castro, Antonio Jesus

2013-01-01

402

New insights into the early steps of oil body mobilization during pollen germination.  

PubMed

In some plants, pollen grains accumulate storage lipids that serve as energy supply during germination. Here, three enzymes involved in early steps of oil body mobilization in the male gametophyte were functionally characterized for the first time. The effect of extracellular sugars on pollen performance and oil body dynamics was also analysed. Olive pollen oil bodies showed phospholipase A, lipase, and lipoxygenase activities on their surface. Enzyme activity levels increased during germination with a maximum after 3h. Removal of extracellular sugars from the germination medium did not affect pollen performance but increased enzyme activity rates and sped up oil body mobilization. Inhibitors seriously hampered pollen germination and pollen tube growth, leading to a characteristic accumulation of oil bodies in the germinative aperture. It can be concluded that storage lipids are sufficient for proper olive pollen germination. A lipase and a lipoxygenase are likely involved in oil body mobilization. Extracellular sugars may modulate their function, while a phospholipase A may promote their access to the storage lipids. PMID:23132905

Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Zienkiewicz, Krzysztof; Rejón, Juan David; Rodríguez-García, María Isabel; Castro, Antonio Jesús

2013-01-01

403